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Sample records for include acid neutralization

  1. Large neutral amino acids in daily practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Kirsten Kiær

    2010-01-01

    At the Kennedy Centre for Phenylketonuria, Denmark, large neutral amino acids (LNAAs) are being used to treat adult and adolescent patients who are nonadherent to dietary treatment for phenylketonuria (PKU). At the start of treatment, a patient must undergo dietary analysis and regular blood...

  2. Large neutral amino acids in daily practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahring, Kirsten Kiær

    2010-12-01

    At the Kennedy Centre for Phenylketonuria, Denmark, large neutral amino acids (LNAAs) are being used to treat adult and adolescent patients who are nonadherent to dietary treatment for phenylketonuria (PKU). At the start of treatment, a patient must undergo dietary analysis and regular blood sampling to measure plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations. The aim of this analysis and treatment is that the patient receives 25-30% of the daily protein requirement from LNAA supplementation and the remaining 70-75% from natural, low-phenylalanine proteins (although some patients have difficulties in maintaining this level of protein intake). Patients are therefore able to follow a more "normal" diet than those adhering to a PKU diet with AA supplementation (in which only 20% of the daily protein requirement is provided from the diet and 80% from AA supplementation). LNAAs have also been used to treat older patients with untreated/late-diagnosed PKU who show profound intellectual, psychological, and behavioral impairments. Treatment with LNAAs has been shown to improve measures of concentration and awareness of external stimuli in some of these patients and thus enhance their socialization, emotionality, frustration tolerance, and mood.

  3. Studies of Latent Acidity and Neutral Buffered Chloroaluminate Ionic Liquids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osteryoung, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Studies on ionic liquids composed of aluminum chloride and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride were carried out, with emphasis on understanding and explaining acidity and latent acidity in "neutral buffered" melts...

  4. A computational study of ultrafast acid dissociation and acid-base neutralization reactions. I. The model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Patrick; Thomas, Vibin; Rivard, Ugo; Iftimie, Radu

    2010-07-28

    Ultrafast, time-resolved investigations of acid-base neutralization reactions have recently been performed using systems containing the photoacid 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS) and various Bronsted bases. Two conflicting neutralization mechanisms have been formulated by Mohammed et al. [Science 310, 83 (2005)] and Siwick et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 13412 (2007)] for the same acid-base system. Herein an ab initio molecular dynamics based computational model is formulated, which is able to investigate the validity of the proposed mechanisms in the general context of ground-state acid-base neutralization reactions. Our approach consists of using 2,4,6-tricyanophenol (exp. pKa congruent with 1) as a model for excited-state HPTS( *) (pKa congruent with 1.4) and carboxylate ions for the accepting base. We employ our recently proposed dipole-field/quantum mechanics (QM) treatment [P. Maurer and R. Iftimie, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074112 (2010)] of the proton donor and acceptor molecules. This approach allows one to tune the free energy of neutralization to any desired value as well as model initial nonequilibrium hydration effects caused by a sudden increase in acidity, making it possible to achieve a more realistic comparison with experimental data than could be obtained via a full-QM treatment of the entire system. It is demonstrated that the dipole-field/QM model reproduces correctly key properties of the 2,4,6-tricyanophenol acid molecule including gas-phase proton dissociation energies and dipole moments, and condensed-phase hydration structure and pKa values.

  5. 40 CFR 417.140 - Applicability; description of the neutralization of sulfuric acid esters and sulfonic acids...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... neutralization of sulfuric acid esters and sulfonic acids subcategory. 417.140 Section 417.140 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Neutralization of Sulfuric Acid Esters and Sulfonic Acids Subcategory § 417.140 Applicability; description of the neutralization of sulfuric acid esters and sulfonic acids...

  6. STATINS AND URSODEOXYCHOLIC ACID: COOPERATION OR NEUTRALITY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Grigorieva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of combined therapy of gallstone disease (GSD, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and hypercholesterolemia (HCE with statins and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA are analyzed. In GSD statin therapy was often accompanied with reduction of bile lithogenicity but did not always accelerate stone litholysis under their combination with UDCA. Statin induced liver injuries are often observed in NAFLD and NASH, adjuvant UDCA therapy shown positive effect on inflammatory and histological liver parameters in these diseases. Serum lipid levels in patients with HCE were reduced most effectively with statin combined with UDCA. Combined therapy with statin and UDCA is recommended in patient with HCE and chronic liver diseases.

  7. Neutralization of acid-mine water with calcium-carbonate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maree, JP

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, Lime is used for the neutralization of acidic effluents. Calcium carbonate should be considered as an alternative because of considerations such as lower cost, low solubility at pH values greater than 7 and simple dosing system...

  8. Evidence for biofilm acid neutralization by baking soda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zero, Domenick T

    2017-11-01

    The generating of acids from the microbial metabolism of dietary sugars and the subsequent decrease in biofilm pH below the pH at which tooth mineral begins to demineralize (critical pH) are the key elements of the dental caries process. Caries preventive strategies that rapidly neutralize biofilm acids can prevent demineralization and favor remineralization and may help prevent the development of sugar-induced dysbiosis that shifts the biofilm toward increased cariogenic potential. Although the neutralizing ability of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) has been known for many years, its anticaries potential as an additive to fluoride dentifrice has received only limited investigation. There is evidence that baking soda rapidly can reverse the biofilm pH decrease after a sugar challenge; however, the timing of when it is used in relation to a dietary sugar exposure is critical in that the sooner its used the greater the benefit in preventing a sustained biofilm pH decrease and subsequent demineralization. Furthermore, the effectiveness of baking soda in elevating biofilm pH appears to depend on concentration. Thus, the concentration of baking soda in marketed dentifrice products, which ranges from 10% to 65%, may affect their biofilm pH neutralizing performance. People with hyposalivation particularly may benefit from using fluoride dentifrice containing baking soda because of their diminished ability to clear dietary sugars and buffer biofilm acids. Although promising, there is the need for more evidence that strategies that modify the oral ecology, such as baking soda, can alter the cariogenic (acidogenic and aciduric) properties of biofilm microorganisms. The acid neutralization of dental biofilm by using fluoride dentifrice that contains baking soda has potential for helping counteract modern high-sugar diets by rapidly neutralizing biofilm-generated acid, especially in people with hyposalivation. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by

  9. Neutralization of the Tamagawa thermal acid water with crushed limestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umetsu, Yoshio (Iwate Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Iwate, (Japan))

    1989-06-30

    The Tamagawa hot spring, Akita Prefecture, is a hidrochloric and n sulfuric acid hot spring with 98{sup 0}C in water temperature, 9m{sup 3}/min in artesian flow rate and 1.2 in pH. In order to cope with projected dam construction downstream, an in situ test was carried out for the water neutralization with crushed limestone, in which test was used a plastic cylinder cone type reactor, 60{sup 0}C in angle of repose, reinforced with glass fiber. Hot spring water was introduced into the reactor from its bottom and ran as countercurrent through the reactor. In a neutralization test with a use of crushed limestone, 5 to 25mm in grain size, the neutralization rate attained to 80.5%, when acid water containing 1300mgl/sup -1/ So{sub 4}/sup 2-/ was treated at 50{sup 0}C with the residence time of five minutes. If water of the Tamagawa hot spring is 95% neutralized to 75% in neutralization rate, the dam body point 22km downstream is expectable to rise from 3 to over 4.3 in pH. 7 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Measurement of neutral sulfuric acid-dimethylamine clusters using CI-APi-TOF-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Mario; Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Sipilä, Mikko; Rondo, Linda; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Junninen, Heikki; Hutterli, Manuel; Kirkby, Jasper; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Curtius, Joachim; Cloud Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that dimethylamine could be a key ternary species in the formation and early growth of atmospheric aerosol particles. We report on nucleation studies for the ternary system of sulfuric acid, water and dimethylamine which have been performed at the CERN CLOUD chamber. These studies were conducted at atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulfuric acid and dimethylamine at 278 K and 38% RH. Two newly developed Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometers (CIAPi-TOF-MS) were used to measure the time-resolved concentration of neutral clusters containing sulfuric acid and dimethylamine. Results from other instrumental techniques are included in the analysis as well to obtain a deeper insight into the occurring mechanisms. It is the first time that the neutral nucleation pathway has been studied in such detail from the early generation of sulfuric acid monomers up to particle sizes reaching several nanometers.

  11. Rheological evaluation of simulated neutralized current acid waste - transuranics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fow, C.L.; McCarthy, D.; Thornton, G.T.; Scott, P.A.; Bray, L.A.

    1986-09-01

    At the Hanford Plutonium and Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX), in Richland, Washington, plutonium and uranium products are recovered from irradiated fuel by a solvent extraction process. A byproduct of this process is an aqueous waste stream that contains fission products. This waste stream, called current acid waste (CAW), is chemically neutralized and stored in double shell tanks (DSTs) on the Hanford Site. This neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) will be transported by pipe to B-Plant, a processing plant located nearby. In B-Plant, the transuranic (TRU) elements in NCAW are separated from the non-TRU elements. The majority of the TRU elements in NCAW are in the solids. Therefore, the primary processing operation is to separate the NCAW solids (NCAW-TRU) from the NCAW liquid. These two waste streams will be pumped to suitable holding tanks before being further processed for permanent disposal. To ensure that the retrieval and transportation of NCAW and NCAW-TRU are successful, researchers at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated the rheological and transport properties of the slurries. This evaluation had two phases. First, researchers conducted laboratory rheological evaluations of simulated NCAW and NCAW-TRU. The results of these evaluations were then correlated with classical rheological models and scaled up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. This scale-up procedure has already been successfully used to predict the critical transport properties of a slurry (Neutralized Cladding Removal Waste) with rheological properties similar to those displayed by NCAW and NCAW-TRU

  12. Lead acid batteries simulation including experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achaibou, N.; Malek, A. [Division Energie Solaire Photovoltaique, Centre de Developpement des Energies Renouvelables, B.P. 62, Route de l' Observatoire, Bouzareah, Alger (Algeria); Haddadi, M. [Laboratoire de Dispositif de Communication et de Conversion Photovoltaique Ecole Nationale Polytechnique, Rue Hassen Badi, El Harrach, Alger (Algeria)

    2008-12-01

    The storage of energy in batteries is a cause of the failure and loss of reliability in PV systems. The battery behavior has been largely described in the literature by many authors; the selected models are of Monegon and CIEMAT. This paper reviews the two general lead acid battery models and their agreement with experimental data. In order to validate these models, the behavior of different battery cycling currents has been simulated. Results obtained have been compared to real data. The CIEMAT model presents a good performance compared to Monegon's model. (author)

  13. Partitioning of acidic, basic and neutral amino acids into imidazolium-based ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absalan, Ghodratollah; Akhond, Morteza; Sheikhian, Leila

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, partitioning behaviors of typical neutral (Alanine), acidic (Glutamic acid) and basic (Lysine) amino acids into imidazolium-based ionic liquids [C(4)mim][PF(6)], [C(6)mim][PF(6)], [C(8)mim][PF(6)], [C(6)mim][BF(4)] and [C(8)mim][BF(4)] as extracting solvents were examined. [C(6)mim][BF(4)] showed the best efficiency for partitioning of amino acids. The partition coefficients of amino acids in ionic liquids were found to depend strongly on pH of the aqueous solution, amino acid and ionic liquid chemical structures. Different chemical forms of amino acids in aqueous solutions were pH dependent, so the pH value of the aqueous phase was a determining factor for extraction of amino acids into ionic liquid phase. Both water content of ionic liquids and charge densities of their anionic and cationic parts were important factors for partitioning of cationic and anionic forms of amino acids into ionic liquid phase. Extracted amino acids were back extracted into phosphate buffer solutions adjusted on appropriate pH values. The results showed that ionic liquids could be used as suitable modifiers on the stationary phase of an HPLC column for efficient separation of acidic, basic, and neutral amino acids.

  14. Not All Children with Cystic Fibrosis Have Abnormal Esophageal Neutralization during Chemical Clearance of Acid Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Frederick W; Moore-Clingenpeel, Melissa; Machado, Rodrigo Strehl; Nemastil, Christopher J; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R; Hayes, Don; Kopp, Benjamin T; Kaul, Ajay; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Mousa, Hayat

    2017-09-01

    Acid neutralization during chemical clearance is significantly prolonged in children with cystic fibrosis, compared to symptomatic children without cystic fibrosis. The absence of available reference values impeded identification of abnormal findings within individual patients with and without cystic fibrosis. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that significantly more children with cystic fibrosis have acid neutralization durations during chemical clearance that fall outside the physiological range. Published reference value for acid neutralization duration during chemical clearance (determined using combined impedance/pH monitoring) was used to assess esophageal acid neutralization efficiency during chemical clearance in 16 children with cystic fibrosis (3 to cystic fibrosis. Duration of acid neutralization during chemical clearance exceeded the upper end of the physiological range in 9 of 16 (56.3%) children with and in 3 of 16 (18.8%) children without cystic fibrosis ( p =0.0412). The likelihood ratio for duration indicated that children with cystic fibrosis are 2.1-times more likely to have abnormal acid neutralization during chemical clearance, and children with abnormal acid neutralization during chemical clearance are 1.5-times more likely to have cystic fibrosis. Significantly more (but not all) children with cystic fibrosis have abnormally prolonged esophageal clearance of acid. Children with cystic fibrosis are more likely to have abnormal acid neutralization during chemical clearance. Additional studies involving larger sample sizes are needed to address the importance of genotype, esophageal motility, composition and volume of saliva, and gastric acidity on acid neutralization efficiency in cystic fibrosis children.

  15. Uptake of neutral alpha- and beta-amino acids by human proximal tubular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, H; Røigaard, H; Jacobsen, Christian

    1996-01-01

    experiments revealed that all the neutral amino acids tested reduced the uptake of AIB, whereas there was no effect of taurine, L-aspartic acid, and L-arginine. By contrast, the influx of beta-alanine was only drastically reduced by beta-amino acids, whereas the inhibition by neutral alpha-amino acids...... was relatively low. Nor did L-arginine and L-aspartic acid affect the uptake of beta-alanine into AHKE cells. Comparison with the results obtained for normal (NHKE) and immortalized (IHKE) embryonic cells suggested an unaltered expression of the types of transport carriers for neutral alpha- and beta-amino acids...

  16. In silico classification of proteins from acidic and neutral cytoplasms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaping Fang

    Full Text Available Protein acidostability is a common problem in biopharmaceutical and other industries. However, it remains a great challenge to engineer proteins for enhanced acidostability because our knowledge of protein acidostabilization is still very limited. In this paper, we present a comparative study of proteins from bacteria with acidic (AP and neutral cytoplasms (NP using an integrated statistical and machine learning approach. We construct a set of 393 non-redundant AP-NP ortholog pairs and calculate a total of 889 sequence based features for these proteins. The pairwise alignments of these ortholog pairs are used to build a residue substitution propensity matrix between APs and NPs. We use Gini importance provided by the Random Forest algorithm to rank the relative importance of these features. A scoring function using the 10 most significant features is developed and optimized using a hill climbing algorithm. The accuracy of the score function is 86.01% in predicting AP-NP ortholog pairs and is 76.65% in predicting non-ortholog AP-NP pairs, suggesting that there are significant differences between APs and NPs which can be used to predict relative acidostability of proteins. The overall trends uncovered in the study can be used as general guidelines for designing acidostable proteins. To best of our knowledge, this work represents the first systematic comparative study of the acidostable proteins and their non-acidostable orthologs.

  17. Acid Water Neutralization Using Microbial Fuel Cells: An Alternative for Acid Mine Drainage Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Leiva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD is a complex environmental problem, which has adverse effects on surface and ground waters due to low pH, high toxic metals, and dissolved salts. New bioremediation approach based on microbial fuel cells (MFC can be a novel and sustainable alternative for AMD treatment. We studied the potential of MFC for acidic synthetic water treatment through pH neutralization in batch-mode and continuous-flow operation. We observed a marked pH increase, from ~3.7 to ~7.9 under batch conditions and to ~5.8 under continuous-flow operation. Likewise, batch reactors (non-MFC inoculated with different MFC-enriched biofilms showed a very similar pH increase, suggesting that the neutralization observed for batch operation was due to a synergistic influence of these communities. These preliminary results support the idea of using MFC technologies for AMD remediation, which could help to reduce costs associated with conventional technologies. Advances in this configuration could even be extrapolated to the recovery of heavy metals by precipitation or adsorption processes due to the acid neutralization.

  18. The effects of formic and nitric acids on simulated Hanford neutralized current acid waste rheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.A.; Langowski, M.H.; O'Rourke, S.M.; McDonald, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    The rheology of simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) was examined as a function of solids loading and pH. The pH was varied between 10 and 5 in separate experiments by nitric and formic acid titrations. In addition, NCAW simulant rheology and attainable solids loading were evaluated by anion and cation solubilities for both titration series. Suspension dispersability was examined by acoustophoresis. Results from the acoustophoresis experiments showed dispersability was not dependent on pH. However, the rheology results showed that viscosity and yield stress decreased as pH was lowered

  19. Passive neutralization of acid mine drainage using basic oxygen furnace slag as neutralization material: experimental and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvimba, John N; Siyakatshana, Njabulo; Mathye, Matlhodi

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated passive neutralization of acid mine drainage using basic oxygen furnace slag as neutralization material over 90 days, with monitoring of the parameters' quality and assessment of their removal kinetics. The quality was observed to significantly improve over time with most parameters removed from the influent during the first 10 days. In this regard, removal of acidity, Fe(II), Mn, Co, Ni and Zn was characterized by fast kinetics while removal kinetics for Mg and SO 4 2- were observed to proceed slowly. The fast removal kinetics of acidity was attributed to fast release of alkalinity from slag minerals under mildly acidic conditions of the influent water. The removal of acidity through generation of alkalinity from the passive treatment system was also observed to generally govern the removal of metallic parameters through hydroxide formation, with overall percentage removals of 88-100% achieved. The removal kinetics for SO 4 2- was modelled using two approaches, yielding rate constant values of 1.56 and 1.53 L/(day mol) respectively, thereby confirming authenticity of SO 4 2- removal kinetics experimental data. The study findings provide insights into better understanding of the potential use of slags and their limitations, particularly in mine closure, as part of addressing this challenge in South Africa.

  20. The effect of copper and zinc at neutral and acidic pH on the general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of sublethal copper and zinc concentrations at a neutral and an acidic pH, on selected haematological parameters as well as on the total osmolality and electrolyte concentrations of Oreochromis mossambicus. In general, at neutral pH copper and zinc caused blood ...

  1. A reassessment of the blood-brain barrier transport of large neutral amino acids during acute systemic inflammation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Rasmus H; Berg, Ronan M G; Taudorf, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    We reassessed data from a previous study on the transcerebral net exchange of large neutral amino acids (LNAAs) using a novel mathematical model of blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport. The study included twelve healthy volunteers who received a 4-h intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion (t...

  2. Trend of acid rain and neutralization by yellow sand in east Asia—a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Hiroaki; Ueda, Hiromasa; Wang, Zifa

    Acid rain and its neutralization by yellow sand in East Asia were investigated numerically by an Air Quality Prediction Modeling System (AQPMS). AQPMS consists of advection, diffusion, dry and wet deposition, gas-phase chemistry and the liquid-phase chemistry. A new deflation module of the yellow sand (Asian soil dust) was designed to provide explicit information on the dust loading. Different from the previous ones for Sahara and Australian deserts, this new one includes three major predictors, i.e., the friction velocity, the surface humidity and the predominant weather system, while this module was linked to the AQPMS. For model validation, the predicted pH values and sulfate- and nitrate-ion levels of precipitation, together with the surface concentrations of gaseous pollutants, were compared with the measured values at atmospheric monitoring stations, and a reasonable agreement was obtained. Firstly, the trend of the acid rain in East Asia due to the rapid increase of Chinese pollutants emission was investigated, and a remarkably rapid increase of acid rain area was predicted in the period from 1985 to 1995, the monthly mean pH values showing the decrease of 0.3-0.8 in the area from the center to northeast in China, and 0.1-0.2 even in Japan and Korea. Secondly, the simulation results of April 1995 exhibited a strong neutralization of the precipitation by the yellow sand. The monthly mean pH values in the northern China showed a remarkable increase of 0.6-1.8 by neutralization effect of the yellow sand, while the increases in the southern China were less than 0.1. Even in Korea and Japan the yellow sand caused the increase of the pH value of rain by 0.1-0.2.

  3. Trend of acid rain and neutralization by yellow sand in east Asia - a numerical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terada, Hiroaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Ueda, Hiromasa [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Disaster Prevention Research Inst.; Wang, Z. [Institute for Global Change Research, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Acid rain and its neutralization by yellow sand in East Asia were investigated numerically by an Air Quality Prediction Modeling System (AQPMS). AQPMS consists of advection, diffusion, dry and wet deposition, gas-phase chemistry and the liquid-phase chemistry. A new deflation module of the yellow sand (Asian soil dust) was designed to provide explicit information on the dust loading. Different from the previous ones for Sahara and Australian deserts, this new one includes three major predictors, i.e., the friction velocity, the surface humidity and the predominant weather system, while this module was linked to the AQPMS. For model validation, the predicted pH values and sulfate- and nitrate-ion levels of precipitation, together with the surface concentrations of gaseous pollutants, were compared with the measured values at atmospheric monitoring stations, and a reasonable agreement was obtained. Firstly, the trend of the acid rain in East Asia due to the rapid increase of Chinese pollutants emission was investigated, and a remarkably rapid increase of acid rain area was predicted in the period from 1985 to 1995, the monthly mean pH values showing the decrease of 0.3-0.8 in the area from the center to northeast in China, and 0.1-0.2 even in Japan and Korea. Secondly, the simulation results of April 1995 exhibited a strong neutralization of the precipitation by the yellow sand. The monthly mean pH values in northern China showed a remarkable increase of 0.6-1.8 by neutralization effect of the yellow sand, while the increases in southern China were less than 0.1. Even in Korea and Japan the yellow sand caused the increase of the pH value of rain by 0.1-0.2. (author)

  4. Chemistry of neutral and acid production fluids from the Onikobe geothermal field, Miyagi prefecture, Honshu, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truesdell, A.H.; Nakanishi, S.

    2005-01-01

    This investigation has shown that production fluids at Onikobe vary widely in chemical composition and concentration but have certain characteristics in common. These characteristics include a rather narrow range of reservoir temperatures from 230 to 255 deg. C measured temperatures; 225 to 280 deg. C calculated from enthalpy assuming no excess steam; 241 to 270 deg. C calculated from the quartz saturation geothermometer and 253 to 280 deg. C calculated from the most reasonable Na/K geothermometer. The agreement between enthalpy derived and other temperatures suggests that there is little excess steam as does inlet vapour fraction (IVF) values, which are less than 0.1 for almost all samples. The largest variations in concentration are in pH and acid sensitive constituents including Fe, Mg, Ca which are dissolved from reservoir rocks and casings by low pH waters and other constituents with volatility depending on pH (NH 4 , HBO 3 ). The pH varies from 2.8 to 8 and Fe varies from 0.01 to 371 ppm. The variation of other acid sensitive constituents, although not as large, is also significant. The source of the acid is not yet understood. The large 'chloride excess' and the strong correlation of low pH with high chloride indicate that the acid enters the water as HCl, but some SO 4 acidity could have been removed by reaction with plagioclase to form anhydrite. There is a consistent increase in salinity with time along with indications that the waters are gas depleted. These observations are interpreted as showing that injected waters enriched in salts and depleted in gases are contributing to production waters. The acid reservoir seems to be limited to moderate depths in the middle of the drilled area. Drilling either to the NW where wells 134, 135 and 128 (before its casing leak) produced neutral waters or to the S where well 129 produces neutral waters would seem to be the best strategy. The relative homogeneity of the neutral waters suggests that there is a large

  5. Effects of running the Bostom Marathon on plasma concentrations of large neutral amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlay, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.; Lopez G-Coviella, I.; Blusztajn, J. K.; Vacanti, C. A.; Logue, M.; During, M.; Caballero, B.; Maher, T. J.; Evoniuk, G.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma large neutral amino acid concentrations were measured in thirty-seven subjects before and after completing the Boston Marathon. Concentrations of tyrosine, phenylalanine, and methionine increased, as did their 'plasma ratios' (i.e., the ratio of each amino acid's concentration to the summed plasma concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids which compete with it for brain uptake). No changes were noted in the plasma concentrations of tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, nor valine; however, the 'plasma ratios' of valine, leucine, and isoleucine all decreased. These changes in plasma amino acid patterns may influence neurotransmitter synthesis.

  6. Content and vacuole extravacuole distribution of neutral sugars, free amino acids, and anthocyanin in protoplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, G.J.

    1979-07-01

    Neutral sugar, free amino acid, and anthocyanin levels and vacuole/extravacuole distribution were determined for Hippeastrum and Tulipa petal and Tulipa leaf protoplasts. Glucose and fructose, the predominant neutral monosaccharides observed, were primarily vacuolar in location. Glutamine, the predominant free amino acid found, was primarily extravacuolar. ..gamma..-methyleneglutamate was identified as a major constituent of Tulipa protoplasts. Qualitative characterization of Hippeastrum petal and vacuole organic acids indicated the presence of oxalic, malic, citric, and isocitric acids. Data are presented which indicate that vacuoles obtained by gentle osmotic shock of protoplasts in dibasic phosphate have good purity and retain their contents.

  7. ACIDIC AND NEUTRAL LIQUID INGESTION IN PATIENTS WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafne Calsoni GOMES

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Sour acidic liquid has a slower distal esophageal transit than a neutral liquid. Our hypothesis was that an acidic sour bolus has a different ingestion dynamic than a neutral bolus. Method In 50 healthy volunteers and 29 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, we evaluated the ingestion dynamics of 100 mL of acidic sour liquid (concentrated lemon juice, pH: 3.0 and 100 mL of water (pH: 6.8. The time to ingest the total volume, the number of swallows to ingest the volume, the interval between swallows, the flux of ingestion and the volume ingested in each swallow was measured. Results In both groups, healthy volunteers and patients in treatment for GERD, the acidic liquid took longer to be ingested, a higher number of swallows, a slower flux of ingestion and a smaller volume in each swallow than the neutral bolus. There was no difference between healthy volunteers and patients with GERD. The ingestion in women was longer than in men for acidic and neutral liquids. Conclusion Acidic liquid has a different dynamic of ingestion than the neutral liquid, which may be consequence of the slower transit through the distal esophageal body or an anticipation to drink a sour bolus. Patients with GERD have the same prolonged ingestion of the acidic liquid bolus as seen in healthy volunteers.

  8. Acidic and neutral liquid ingestion in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Dafne Calsoni; Dantas, Roberto Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Sour acidic liquid has a slower distal esophageal transit than a neutral liquid. Our hypothesis was that an acidic sour bolus has a different ingestion dynamic than a neutral bolus. In 50 healthy volunteers and 29 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), we evaluated the ingestion dynamics of 100 mL of acidic sour liquid (concentrated lemon juice, pH: 3.0) and 100 mL of water (pH: 6.8). The time to ingest the total volume, the number of swallows to ingest the volume, the interval between swallows, the flux of ingestion and the volume ingested in each swallow was measured. In both groups, healthy volunteers and patients in treatment for GERD, the acidic liquid took longer to be ingested, a higher number of swallows, a slower flux of ingestion and a smaller volume in each swallow than the neutral bolus. There was no difference between healthy volunteers and patients with GERD. The ingestion in women was longer than in men for acidic and neutral liquids. Acidic liquid has a different dynamic of ingestion than the neutral liquid, which may be consequence of the slower transit through the distal esophageal body or an anticipation to drink a sour bolus. Patients with GERD have the same prolonged ingestion of the acidic liquid bolus as seen in healthy volunteers.

  9. Evaluation of acid neutralizing capacity data for solutions containing natural organic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, K.J.; Serkiz, S.M.; Perdue, E.M. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta (USA))

    1990-05-01

    When the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of an aqueous solution is measured by an acidimetric titration, the measured parameter (ANC{sub t}) is generally assumed to correspond to the ANC of the sample (ANC{sub i}). This paper demonstrates that ANC{sub t} actually corresponds to ANC{sub i} - ANC{sub e}, where ANC{sub e} is the ANC of the sample at the titration endpoint. This relationship applies whether the endpoint occurs at a fixed pH or is determined by a Gran plot. When the sample contains organic acids, ANC{sub e} is generally non-zero and its neglect can introduce serious errors into the interpretation of ANC titration data. This paper presents computer simulations of ANC titrations in systems containing both carbonate and organic alkalinity, using a realistic thermodynamic model of the acidities of natural organic acids. The necessity of considering ANC{sub e} is demonstrated both computationally and by analysis of published results in which discrepancies between Gran ANC values and anion deficits could not previously be explained.

  10. Hydrothermal liquefaction of cellulose to bio-oil under acidic, neutral and alkaline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Sudong; Tan, Zhongchao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) at acidic, neutral and alkaline conditions. ► Bio-oil compositions varied with acidic, neutral and alkaline conditions. ► Reaction mechanisms varied with acidic, neutral and alkaline conditions. ► HTL should be classified to acidic, neutral and alkaline processes. -- Abstract: Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of biomass to bio-oil under alkaline or neutral conditions has been widely reported in literature. However, there has been limited data available in literature on comparing HTL of biomass to bio-oil under acidic, neutral, and alkaline in terms of chemical compositions and yields by using the same reaction conditions and reactor. Using cellulose as a feedstock we conducted the comparative studies for pH = 3, 7 and 14 at temperatures of 275–320 °C with reaction residence times of 0–30 min. Results showed that the chemical compositions of the bio-oils were different for acidic, neutral and alkaline conditions. Under acidic and neutral conditions, the main composition of HTL bio-oil was 5-(Hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF). Under alkaline conditions, the main compounds became C 2–5 carboxylic acids. For bio-oil yields, it was observed that high temperatures and long residence times had negative effects, regardless of the pH levels. However, the corresponding reaction mechanisms are different. Under acidic conditions, the decrease in the bio-oil yields was mainly caused by polymerization of 5-HMF to solids. Under neutral conditions, the bio-oil yields decreased because 5-HMF was converted to both solid and gaseous products. Under alkaline conditions, the bio-oil decomposed to gases through the formation of short chain acids and aldehydes. Therefore, although they were all referred to as HTL bio-oil in literature, they were formed by different reaction pathways and had different properties due to their different chemical compositions. Given these differences, different strategies are recommended in this study to

  11. Cerebral net exchange of large neutral amino acids after lipopolysaccharide infusion in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan Mg; Taudorf, Sarah; Bailey, Damian M

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in circulating large neutral amino acids (LNAAs), leading to a decrease in the plasma ratio between branched-chain and aromatic amino acids (BCAA/AAA ratio), may be involved in sepsis-associated encephalopathy. We hypothesised that a decrease in the BCAA/AAA ratio occurs along with a ...

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some neutral and acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The effect of solvent composition indicate that the rate of reaction increases with increase in the po- larity of the medium. Addition of ... oxidation of several neutral and acidic α-amino ac- ids by TBATB in aqueous acetic acid solution, and the mechanistic aspects are discussed in this paper. 2. Experimental. 2.1 Materials.

  13. Cerebral net exchange of large neutral amino acids after lipopolysaccharide infusion in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan Mg; Taudorf, Sarah; Bailey, Damian M

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in circulating large neutral amino acids (LNAAs), leading to a decrease in the plasma ratio between branched-chain and aromatic amino acids (BCAA/AAA ratio), may be involved in sepsis-associated encephalopathy. We hypothesised that a decrease in the BCAA/AAA ratio occurs along...

  14. Hydrobiogeochemical interactions in 'anoxic' limestone drains for neutralization of acidic mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, E.I.; Cravotta, C.A.; Savela, C.E.; Nord, G.L.

    1999-01-01

    Processes affecting neutralization of acidic coal mine drainage were evaluated within 'anoxic' limestone drains (ALDs). Influents had pH???3.5 and dissolved oxygen treatment step is indicated to promote Al removal before diverting acidic mine water into alkalinity-producing materials. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. Mathematical modeling of the lithium, thionyl chloride static cell. I. Neutral electrolyte. II - Acid electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsaur, K.C.; Pollard, R.

    1984-05-01

    Mathematical models are presented for a Li-LiAlCl4/SOCl2-C static cell with neutral electrolyte and a Li/SOCl2-C static cell with acid electrolyte. The model for the Li-LiAlCl4/SOCl2-C cell with neutral solution predicts that high internal resistance can develop in the positive electrode as a result of low local porosities which are, in turn, caused by large-volume, solid reaction products. Consequently, the maximum usable cell capacity is dictated by the nonuniformity of the reaction distribution at the front of the positive electrode. In many respects, a cell with acid electrolyte can be regarded as a combination of an equivalent neutral electrolyte system and an acid reservoir. The model for the Li/SOCl2 cell suggests that the cell life depends primarily on the quantity of acid added to the electrolyte. 58 references.

  16. Mathematical modeling of the lithium, thionyl chloride static cell. I - Neutral electrolyte. II - Acid electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaur, K.-C.; Pollard, R.

    1984-05-01

    Mathematical models are presented for a Li-LiAlCl4/SOCl2-C static cell with neutral electrolyte and a Li/SOCl2-C static cell with acid electrolyte. The model for the Li-LiAlCl4/SOCl2-C cell with neutral solution predicts that high internal resistance can develop in the positive electrode as a result of low local porosities which are, in turn, caused by large-volume, solid reaction products. Consequently, the maximum usable cell capacity is dictated by the nonuniformity of the reaction distribution at the front of the positive electrode. In many respects, a cell with acid electrolyte can be regarded as a combination of an equivalent neutral electrolyte system and an acid reservoir. The model for the Li/SOCl2 cell suggests that the cell life depends primarily on the quantity of acid added to the electrolyte.

  17. Production and transformation of dissolved neutral sugars and amino acids by bacteria in seawater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Linda; Lechtenfeld, O.J.; Benner, R.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean consists of a heterogeneous mixture of molecules, most of which are of unknown origin. Neutral sugars and amino acids are among the few recognizable biomolecules in DOM, and the molecular composition of these biomolecules is shaped primarily by biological...... production and degradation processes. This study provides insight into the bioavailability of biomolecules as well as the chemical composition of DOM produced by bacteria. The molecular compositions of combined neutral sugars and amino acids were investigated in DOM produced by bacteria and in DOM remaining...... degradation are not strongly influenced by the initial substrate or bacterial community. The molecular composition of neutral sugars released by bacteria was characterized by a high glucose content (47 mol %) and heterogeneous contributions from other neutral sugars (3–14 mol %). DOM remaining after bacterial...

  18. Green biorefinery: separation of lactic acid from grass silage juice by chromatography using neutral polymeric resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Vu Hong; Novalin, Senad

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work was to recover lactic acid in undissociated form from grass silage juice. For this aim, chromatographic separation using neutral polymeric resin Amberlite XAD1600 was investigated. Up to now, there is no hint in the literatures about using neutral polymeric resin for lactic acid separation from a mixture. Important factors (flow-rate, concentration of feed and loaded volume) that affect separation performance were firstly investigated with model solutions. The obtained results showed that lactic acid solutions with the purity varying from 93.2% to 99.9% could be obtained at the recovery yields over 99.4%. After that, trials with silage juice were carried out. Due to the complex composition of the feed, the purity of products decreased to 94% at a recovery yield of 97%. Although 99% of inorganic salts and sugars were separated from lactic acid organic acids in general and acetic acid in particular caused a purity problem. It seems that organic acids could not be separated from lactic acid by neutral resin Amberlite XAD1600. Besides the organic acid problem, some amino acids were remained in the products as impurities.

  19. Big, strong, neutral, twisted, and chiral π acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingjie; Huang, Guangxi; Besnard, Celine; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2015-04-13

    General synthetic access to expanded π-acidic surfaces of variable size, topology, chirality, and π acidity is reported. The availability of π surfaces with these characteristics is essential to develop the functional relevance of anion-π interactions with regard to molecular recognition, translocation, and transformation. The problem is that, with expanded π surfaces, the impact of electron-withdrawing substituents decreases and the high π acidity needed for strong anion-π interactions can be more difficult to obtain. To overcome this problem, it is herein proposed to build large surfaces from smaller fragments and connect these fragments with bridges that are composed only of single atoms. Two central surfaces for powerful anion-π interactions, namely, perfluoroarenes and naphthalenediimides (NDIs), were selected as fragments and coupled with through sulfide bridges. Their oxidation to sulfoxides and sulfones, as well as fluorine substitution in the peripheral rings, provides access to the full chemical space of relevant π acidities. According to cyclic voltammetry, LUMO levels range from -3.96 to -4.72 eV. With sulfoxide bridges, stereogenic centers are introduced to further enrich the intrinsic planar chirality of the expanded surfaces. The stereoisomers were separated by chiral HPLC and characterized by X-ray crystallography. Their topologies range from chairs to π boats, and the latter are reminiscent of the cation-π boxes in operational neuronal receptors. With pentafluorophenyl acceptors, the π acidity of NDIs with two sulfoxide groups in the core reaches -4.45 eV, whereas two sulfone moieties give a value of -4.72 eV, which is as low as with four ethyl sulfone groups, that is, a π superacid near the limit of existence. Beyond anion-π interactions, these conceptually innovative π-acidic surfaces are also of interest as electron transporters in conductive materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Amino Acid Changes in the HIV-1 gp41 Membrane Proximal Region Control Virus Neutralization Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Todd; Trama, Ashley; Tumba, Nancy; Gray, Elin; Lu, Xiaozhi; Madani, Navid; Jahanbakhsh, Fatemeh; Eaton, Amanda; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Sutherland, Laura L; Scearce, Richard M; Bowman, Cindy M; Barnett, Susan; Abdool-Karim, Salim S; Boyd, Scott D; Melillo, Bruno; Smith, Amos B; Sodroski, Joseph; Kepler, Thomas B; Alam, S Munir; Gao, Feng; Bonsignori, Mattia; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M Anthony; Montefiori, David; Santra, Sampa; Morris, Lynn; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-10-01

    Most HIV-1 vaccines elicit neutralizing antibodies that are active against highly sensitive (tier-1) viruses or rare cases of vaccine-matched neutralization-resistant (tier-2) viruses, but no vaccine has induced antibodies that can broadly neutralize heterologous tier-2 viruses. In this study, we isolated antibodies from an HIV-1-infected individual that targeted the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) that may have selected single-residue changes in viral variants in the MPER that resulted in neutralization sensitivity to antibodies targeting distal epitopes on the HIV-1 Env. Similarly, a single change in the MPER in a second virus from another infected-individual also conferred enhanced neutralization sensitivity. These gp41 single-residue changes thus transformed tier-2 viruses into tier-1 viruses that were sensitive to vaccine-elicited tier-1 neutralizing antibodies. These data demonstrate that Env amino acid changes within the MPER bnAb epitope of naturally-selected escape viruses can increase neutralization sensitivity to multiple types of neutralizing antibodies, and underscore the critical importance of the MPER for maintaining the integrity of the tier-2 HIV-1 trimer. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The neutralization of acidic coal mine lakes by additions of natural organic matter: a mesocosm test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugam, R.B.; Gastineau, J.; Ratcliff, E.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical polyethylene enclosures 3 m in length and 1 m in diameter reaching from the surface to the bottom were constructed in an acid (pH=3.1) lake on a coal surface mine in southern Illinois. Wheat straw was added to the enclosures to test the effects of dissimilatory sulfate reduction on water chemistry. Added straw increased sulfide concentrations, raised pH to 6.5, reduced O 2 and increased acid neutralizing capacity of the enclosed water columns when compared with a control enclosure and with the open lake. Generation of acid neutralizing capacity exceeded the standing stock of sulfide indicating that sulfide was removed either by precipitation of FeS or outgassing of H 2 S. The pH and acid neutralizing capacity within the enclosures eventually returned to the level of the surrounding lake because of water exchange around the enclosure walls. Our results show that additions of organic matter to acid surface mine lakes result in the generation of acid neutralizing capacity

  2. The effect of electro-activation and eggshell powder on the neutralization of acid mine drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kastyuchik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD production by sulfide mine tailing (SMT is a major environmental preoccupation because it can degrade water surface quality on account of its strong acidity and advanced content of sulfide, iron (Fe and other metals and metalloids. Acid neutralization and the precipitation of metals present in AMD were carried out by electro-activation with ion-exchange membranes, which is based on the self-generation of necessary conditions for acid neutralization and metal precipitation. The treatment of SMT was carried out by using an electro-activation cell generated alkaline solution in the cathode compartment. After 60 min of electro-activation, a pHcatholyte of 7.9–9.6, depending on the experimental conditions, was obtained. The absence of Fe and other trace metal ions in the catholyte provide evidence that the electro-activation of SMT promotes the precipitation of insoluble trace metals in the cathode compartment. This approach can be applied to real conditions in combination with a pretreatment of SMT neutralization, in which biological calcareous amendments are available. Finally, the electro-activation technology of acid mine drainage may be a feasible, cost-effective approach for SMT neutralization because it focuses on sustainable development.

  3. The glutamate/neutral amino acid transporter family SLC1: molecular, physiological and pharmacological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Hediger, Matthias A

    2004-02-01

    The solute carrier family 1 (SLC1) includes five high-affinity glutamate transporters, EAAC1, GLT-1, GLAST, EAAT4 and EAAT5 (SLC1A1, SLC1A2, SLC1A3, SLC1A6, and SLC1A7, respectively) as well as the two neutral amino acid transporters, ASCT1 and ASCT2 (SLC1A4 and ALC1A5, respectively). Although each of these transporters have similar predicted structures, they exhibit distinct functional properties which are variations of a common transport mechanism. The high-affinity glutamate transporters mediate transport of l-Glu, l-Asp and d-Asp, accompanied by the cotransport of 3 Na(+) and 1 H(+), and the countertransport of 1 K(+), whereas ASC transporters mediate Na(+)-dependent exchange of small neutral amino acids such as Ala, Ser, Cys and Thr. The unique coupling of the glutamate transporters allows uphill transport of glutamate into cells against a concentration gradient. This feature plays a crucial role in protecting neurons against glutamate excitotoxicity in the central nervous system. During pathological conditions, such as brain ischemia (e.g. after a stroke), however, glutamate exit can occur due to "reversed glutamate transport", which is caused by a reversal of the electrochemical gradients of the coupling ions. Selective inhibition of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 (SLC1A1) may be of therapeutic interest to block glutamate release from neurons during ischemia. On the other hand, upregulation of the glial glutamate transporter GLT1 (SLC1A2) may help protect motor neurons in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), since loss of function of GLT1 has been associated with the pathogenesis of certain forms of ALS.

  4. Efficacy of tannins from Mimosa pudica and tannic acid in neutralizing cobra (Naja kaouthia venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FY Sia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effectiveness of Mimosa pudica tannins (MPT in neutralizing the lethality of Naja kaouthia venom was compared with commercially derived tannins. Preincubation of MPT with N. kaouthia venom maintained 100% survival of mice after 24 hours. The mouse group in which there was no preincubation, no protection against the effects of the venom was observed. M. pudica tannin was found to be more effective in neutralizing the lethality of N. kaouthia venom when compared to commercial tannic acid. Two protein spots were missing in the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE of the MPT treated mouse indicating the down-regulation of venom proteins. The results from this study indicated that tannins obtained from M. pudica are better than tannic acid in neutralizing the lethality of N. kaouthia venom in vitro. However, further investigations are required to establish that M. pudica has potential for treating N. kaouthia snakebites.

  5. Photophysical properties of neutral and dissociated forms of rosmarinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danaf, Nader Al [Department of Chemistry, American University of Beirut, Beirut (Lebanon); Department of Life Sciences and Chemistry, Jacobs University Bremen, Bremen (Germany); Melhem, Racha Abi [Department of Chemistry, American University of Beirut, Beirut (Lebanon); Assaf, Khaleel I.; Nau, Werner M. [Department of Life Sciences and Chemistry, Jacobs University Bremen, Bremen (Germany); Patra, Digambara, E-mail: dp03@aub.edu.lb [Department of Chemistry, American University of Beirut, Beirut (Lebanon)

    2016-07-15

    Polyphenols are bioactive components that have attracted attention by chemists over many years. Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a polyphenol that is widely investigated for its broad range of potential applications as an anti-carcinogenic agent, an anti-inflammatory drug, and antioxidant. The spectroscopic properties of this molecule are addressed in details in this study. The absorption and fluorescence of RA are investigated at different pH values, characterizing the dissociated forms of RA. In a similar manner, RA was characterized in a set of different solvents. The spectral shifts of RA in the different solvents were addressed by using the Lippert–Mataga and the Stokes' shift vs. E{sub T}30 plots, which revealed two sets of linearity for the behavior of RA in polar protic and aprotic solvents. The lifetime decay profile of the dissociated forms of RA and those of RA in different solvents are characterized by bi-exponential lifetime decay functions. A theoretical study on the molecular structure of the different dissociated forms of RA is also reported. The simulated UV–vis spectra of the dissociated forms of RA were studied and compared to the experimental spectra by performing TDDFT calculations. Besides the UV-simulated spectra, the frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) of the different RA dissociated forms were also calculated.

  6. PcMtr, an aromatic and neutral aliphatic amino acid permease of Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, H; Evers, ME; Driessen, AJM

    2004-01-01

    The gene encoding an aromatic and neutral aliphatic amino acid permease of Penicillium chrysogenum was cloned, functionally expressed and characterized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae M4276. The permease, designated PcMtr, is structurally and functionally homologous to Mtr of Neurospora crassa, and

  7. Analysis of fecal bile acids and neutral steroids using gas-liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Srikumar, T.S.; Wezendonk, B.; Dokkum, W. van

    1998-01-01

    In the present pilot study, for investigating the physiological effects of different types of nondigestible oligosaccharides, we have validated the application of methodologies for the analysis of bile acids and neutral steroids in feces of human subjects. The accuracy of the extraction and

  8. Neutralization and Acid Dissociation of Hydrogen Carbonate Ion: A Thermochemical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Nobuyoshi; Shigedomi, Kana; Kimura, Tomoyasu; Tatsuoka, Tomoyuki; Mishima, Saki

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory inquiry into the thermochemical relationships in the reaction between aqueous solutions of NaHCO[subscript 3] and NaOH is described. The enthalpy change for this reaction, delta[subscript r]H, and that for neutralization of strong acid and NaOH(aq), delta[subscript n]H, are determined calorimetrically; the explanation for the…

  9. 40 CFR 417.30 - Applicability; description of the soap manufacturing by fatty acid neutralization subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the soap... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Soap Manufacturing by Fatty Acid Neutralization Subcategory § 417.30 Applicability...

  10. Simultaneous Hydrogen Generation and Waste Acid Neutralization in a Reverse Electrodialysis System

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-09-02

    Waste acid streams produced at industrial sites are often co-located with large sources of waste heat (e.g., industrial exhaust gases, cooling water, and heated equipment). Reverse electrodialysis (RED) systems can be used to generate electrical power and hydrogen gas using waste heat-derived solutions, but high electrode overpotentials limit system performance. We show here that an ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) RED system can achieve simultaneous waste acid neutralization and in situ hydrogen production, while capturing energy from excess waste heat. The rate of acid neutralization was dependent on stack flow rate and increased 50× (from 0.06 ± 0.04 to 3.0 ± 0.32 pH units min -1 m-2 membrane), as the flow rate increased 6× (from 100 to 600 mL min-1). Acid neutralization primarily took place due to ammonium electromigration (37 ± 4%) and proton diffusion (60 ± 5%). The use of a synthetic waste acid stream as a catholyte (pH ≈ 2) also increased hydrogen production rates by 65% (from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 8.7 ± 0.1 m3 H2 m-3 catholyte day -1) compared to an AmB electrolyte (pH ≈ 8.5). These findings highlight the potential use of dissimilar electrolytes (e.g., basic anolyte and acidic catholyte) for enhanced power and hydrogen production in RED stacks. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  11. Process for production of electrical energy from the neutralization of acid and base in a bipolar membrane cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walther, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical energy is generated from acid-base neutralization reactions in electrodialytic cells. Permselective bipolar membranes in these cells are contacted on their cation selective faces by aqueous acid streams and on their anion-selective faces by aqueous base streams. Spontaneous neutralization reactions between the basic anions and acidic cations through the bipolar membranes produce electrical potential differences between the acid and base streams. These potential differences are transmitted to electrodes to produce electrical energy which is withdrawn from the cell

  12. Beta-galactosidase and selective neutrality. [amino acid composition of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, R.

    1979-01-01

    Three hypotheses to explain the amino acid composition of proteins are inconsistent (about 10 to the minus 9th) with the experimental data for beta-galactosidase from Escherichia coli. The exceptional length of this protein, 1021 residues, permits rigorous tests of these hypotheses without complication from statistical artifacts. Either this protein is not at compositional equilibrium, which is unlikely from knowledge about other proteins, or the evolution of this protein and its coding gene have not been selectively neutral. However, the composition of approximately 60% of the molecule is consistent with either a selectively neutral or nonneutral evolutionary process.

  13. Column leaching test to evaluate the use of alkaline industrial wastes to neutralize acid mine tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doye, I.; Duchesne, J. [University of Laval, Quebec City, PQ (Canada)

    2005-08-01

    Acid mine drainage is a serious environmental problem caused by the oxidation of sulfide minerals that releases highly acidic, sulfate, and metals-rich drainage. In this study, alkaline industrial wastes were mixed with acid mine tailings in order to obtain neutral conditions. A series of column leaching tests were performed to evaluate the behavior of reactive mine tailings amended with alkaline-additions under dynamic conditions. Column tests were conducted of oxidized mine tailings combined with cement kiln dust, red mud bauxite, and mixtures of cement kiln dust with red mud bauxite. The pH results show the addition of 10% of alkaline materials permits the maintenance of near neutral conditions. In the presence of 10% alkaline material, the concentration of toxic metals such as Al, Cu, Fe, Zn are significantly reduced as well as the number of viable cells (Thiobacillus ferrooxidans) compared to control samples.

  14. Boronic acids facilitate rapid oxime condensations at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Pascal; Stress, Cedric; Gillingham, Dennis

    2015-06-01

    We report here the discovery and development of boron-assisted oxime formation as a powerful connective reaction for chemical biology. Oximes proximal to boronic acids form in neutral aqueous buffer with rate constants of more than 10 4 M -1 s -1 , the largest to date for any oxime condensation. Boron's dynamic coordination chemistry confers an adaptability that seems to aid a number of elementary steps in the oxime condensation. In addition to applications in bioconjugation, the emerging importance of boronic acids in chemical biology as carbohydrate receptors or peroxide probes, and the growing list of drugs and drug candidates containing boronic acids suggest many potential applications.

  15. The SLC1 high-affinity glutamate and neutral amino acid transporter family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Clémençon, Benjamin; Simonin, Alexandre; Leuenberger, Michele; Lochner, Martin; Weisstanner, Martin; Hediger, Matthias A

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate transporters play important roles in the termination of excitatory neurotransmission and in providing cells throughout the body with glutamate for metabolic purposes. The high-affinity glutamate transporters EAAC1 (SLC1A1), GLT1 (SLC1A2), GLAST (SLC1A3), EAAT4 (SLC1A6), and EAAT5 (SLC1A7) mediate the cellular uptake of glutamate by the co-transport of three sodium ions (Na(+)) and one proton (H(+)), with the counter-transport of one potassium ion (K(+)). Thereby, they protect the CNS from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Loss of function of glutamate transporters has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. In addition, glutamate transporters play a role in glutamate excitotoxicity following an ischemic stroke, due to reversed glutamate transport. Besides glutamate transporters, the SLC1 family encompasses two transporters of neutral amino acids, ASCT1 (SLC1A4) and ASCT2 (SLC1A5). Both transporters facilitate electroneutral exchange of amino acids in neurons and/or cells of the peripheral tissues. Some years ago, a high resolution structure of an archaeal homologue of the SLC1 family was determined, followed by the elucidation of its structure in the presence of the substrate aspartate and the inhibitor d,l-threo-benzyloxy aspartate (d,l-TBOA). Historically, the first few known inhibitors of SLC1 transporters were based on constrained glutamate analogs which were active in the high micromolar range but often also showed off-target activity at glutamate receptors. Further development led to the discovery of l-threo-β-hydroxyaspartate derivatives, some of which effectively inhibited SLC1 transporters at nanomolar concentrations. More recently, small molecule inhibitors have been identified whose structures are not based on amino acids. Activators of SLC1 family members have also been discovered but there are only a few examples known. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  16. Magnesium hydroxide as the neutralizing agent for radioactive hydrochloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, M.J.; Fife, K.W.

    1995-10-01

    The current technology at Los Alamos for removing actinides from acidic chloride waste streams is precipitation with approximately 10 M potassium hydroxide. Although successful, there are many inherent drawbacks to this precipitation technique which will be detailed in this paper. Magnesium hydroxide (K sp = 1.3 x 10 -11 ) has limited solubility in water and as a result of the common ion effect, cannot generate a filtrate with a pH greater than 9. At a pH of 9, calcium (K sp = 5.5 x 10 -6 ) will not coprecipitate as the hydroxide. This is an important factor since many acidic chloride feeds to hydroxide precipitation contain significant amounts of calcium. In addition, neutralization with Mg(OH) 2 produces a more filterable precipitate because neutralization occurs as the Mg(OH) 2 is dissolved by the acid rather than as a result of the much faster liquid/liquid reaction of KOH with the waste acid. This slower solid/liquid reaction allows time for crystal growth to occur and produces more easily filterable precipitates. On the other hand, neutralization of spent acid with strong KOH that yields numerous hydroxide ions in solution almost instantaneously forming a much larger volume of small crystallites that result in gelatinous, slow-filtering precipitates. Magnesium hydroxide also offers a safety advantage. Although mildly irritating, it is a weak base and safe and easy to handle. From a waste minimization perspective, Mg(OH) 2 offers many advantages. First, the magnesium hydroxide is added as a solid. This step eliminates the diluent water used in KOH neutralizations. Secondly, because the particle size of the precipitate is larger, more actinides are caught on the filter paper resulting in a smaller amount of actinide being transferred to the TA-50 Liquid Waste Treatment Facility. Third, the amount of solids that must be reprocessed is significantly smaller resulting in less waste generation from the downstream processes

  17. Predicted effects of mineral neutralization and bisulfate formation on hydrogen ion concentration for dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Todd A; Wyman, Charles E

    2004-01-01

    Dilute acid and water-only hemicellulose hydrolysis are being examined as part of a multiinstitutional cooperative effort to evaluate the performance of leading cellulosic biomass pretreatment technologies on a common basis. Cellulosic biomass, such as agricultural residues and forest wastes, can have a significant mineral content. It has been shown that these minerals neutralize some of the acid during dilute acid pretreatment, reducing its effectiveness, and the higher solids loadings desired to minimize costs will require increased acid use to compensate. However, for sulfuric acid in particular, an equilibrium shift to formation of bisulfate during neutralization can further reduce hydrogen ion concentrations and compound the effect of neutralization. Because the equilibrium shift has a more pronounced effect at lower acid concentrations, additional acid is needed to compensate. Coupled with the effect of temperature on acid dissociation, these effects increase acid requirements to achieve a particular reaction rate unless minerals are removed prior to hydrolysis.

  18. Incorporation of alpha-Ketoglutaric Acid as a Fixed Bed Scrubber Media for the Neutralization of Hydrazine Family Hypergolic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVor, R. W.; Santiago-Maldonado, E.; Parkerson, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    A candidate scrubber media, alpha-ketoglutaric acid (aKGA) adsorbed onto a silica-based substrate was examined as a potential alternative to the hydrazine-family hypergolic fuel neutralization techniques currently utilized at NASA/Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Helvenson et. al. has indicated that aKGA will react with hydrazines to produce non-hazardous, possibly biodegradable products. Furthermore, the authors have previously tested and demonstrated the use of aKGA aqueous solutions as a replacement neutralizing agent for citric acid, which is currently used as a scrubbing agent in liquid scrubbers at KSC. Specific properties examined include reaction efficiency, the loading capacity of aKGA onto various silica substrates, and the comparison of aKGA media performance to that of the citric acid vapor scrubber systems at KSC and a commercial vapor scrubber media. Preliminary investigations showed hydrophobic aerogel particles to be an ideal substrate for the deposition of the aKGA. Current studies have shown that the laboratory produced aKGA-Aerogel absorbent media are more efficient and cost effective than a commercially available fixed bed scrubber media, although much less cost effective than liquid-based citric acid scrubbers (although possibly safer and less labor intensive). A comparison of all three alternative scrubber technologies (liquid aKGA, solid-phase aKGA, and commercially available sorbent materials) is given considering both hypergolic neutralization capabilities and relative costs (as compared to the current citric acid scrubbing technology in use at NASA/KSC).

  19. Isolation of aquatic yeasts with the ability to neutralize acidic media, from an extremely acidic river near Japan's Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuya, Daisuke; Hayashi, Takuya; Wang, Yu; Tanaka, Mami; Okai, Masahiko; Ishida, Masami; Urano, Naoto

    2017-07-01

    The Yukawa River is an extremely acidic river whose waters on the east foot of the Kusatu-Shirane Volcano (in Gunma Prefecture, Japan) contain sulfate ions. Here we isolated many acid-tolerant yeasts from the Yukawa River, and some of them neutralized an acidic R2A medium containing casamino acid. Candida fluviatilis strain CeA16 had the strongest acid tolerance and neutralizing activity against the acidic medium. To clarify these phenomena, we performed neutralization tests with strain CeA16 using casamino acid, a mixture of amino acids, and 17 single amino acid solutions adjusted to pH 3.0, respectively. Strain CeA16 neutralized not only acidic casamino acid and the mixture of amino acids but also some of the acidic single amino acid solutions. Seven amino acids were strongly decomposed by strain CeA16 and simultaneously released ammonium ions. These results suggest strain CeA16 is a potential yeast as a new tool to neutralize acidic environments. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Usefulness of Organic Acid Produced by Exiguobacterium sp. 12/1 on Neutralization of Alkaline Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niha Mohan Kulshreshtha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the role of organic acids produced by Exiguobacterium sp. strain 12/1 (DSM 21148 in neutralization of alkaline wastewater emanated from beverage industry. This bacterium is known to be able to grow in medium of pH as high as pH 12.0 and to neutralize alkaline industrial wastewater from pH 12.0 to pH 7.5. The initial investigation on the type of functional groups present in medium, carried out using FT-IR spectroscopy, revealed the presence of peaks corresponding to carbonyl group and hydroxyl group, suggesting the release of carboxylic acid or related metabolic product(s. The identification of specific carboxylic group, carried out using RP-HPLC, revealed the presence of a single peak in the culture supernatant with retention time most similar to formic acid. The concentration of acid produced on different carbon sources was studied as a function of time. Although acid was present in same final concentration, the rate of acid production was highest in case of medium supplemented with sucrose followed by fructose and glucose. The knowledge of metabolic products of the bacterium can be considered as a first step towards realization of its potential for large-scale bioremediation of alkaline wastewater from beverage industry.

  1. Stemflow acid neutralization capacity in a broadleaved deciduous forest: the role of edge effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiklomanov, Alexey N; Levia, Delphis F

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric deposition is an important pathway for moisture, nutrient, and pollutant exchange among the atmosphere, forest, and soils. Previous work has shown the importance of proximity to the forest edge to chemical fluxes in throughfall, but far less research has considered stemflow. This study examined the difference in acid neutralization capacity (ANC) of stemflow of nineteen Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar) trees between the forest edge and interior in a rural area of northeastern Maryland. We measured ANC directly via potentiometric titration. Stemflow from trees at the forest edge was found to have significantly higher and more variable pH and ANC than in the forest interior (p edge was observed, indicating the importance of individual tree characteristics in stemflow production and chemistry. These results reaffirm the importance of stemflow for acid neutralization by deciduous tree species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Acceptor extraction of uranyl salts with mixtures of organophosphoric acids with neutral additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgov, V.G.; Us, T.V.; Mikhajlov, V.A.; Stoyanov, Ye.S.; Drozdova, M.K.; Bogdanova, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium solvent extraction by mixtures of organophosphoric acids (HX) with neutral additives (L) (phosphine oxides, sulfoxides, tbp) excibits, along with the widely known synergic effect at low HX saturation with uranium, a new synergic effect occurring after complete HX saturation. Three types of isotherms of uranyl salt extraction by benzene solutions of HX and mixtures of HX with L were revealed. Their forms depend on superposition of cation-exchange and noncation-exchange synergic effects. Similarity of synergic effect of acid and neutral mixture components during solvent extraction from diluted and concentrated solutions of uranyl salts testified to the same nature of these two effects; both of them are determined by acceptor properties of uranium atom in monomeric UO 2 (HX 2 ) 2 and polymeric (UO 2 X 2 ) p complexes. The established reqularities were confirmed, when studying uranyl sulfate extraction by UO 2 X 2 mixture with L

  3. Boronic acids facilitate rapid oxime condensations at neutral pH

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Pascal; Stress, Cedric; Gillingham, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    We report here the discovery and development of boron-assisted oxime formation as a powerful connective reaction for chemical biology. Oximes proximal to boronic acids form in neutral aqueous buffer with rate constants of more than 104 M−1 s−1, the largest to date for any oxime condensation. Boron's dynamic coordination chemistry confers an adaptability that seems to aid a number of elementary steps in the oxime condensation. In addition to applications in bioconjugation, the emerging importa...

  4. Neutralization of acid mine drainage using the final product from CO2 emissions capture with alkaline paper mill waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-López, Rafael; Castillo, Julio; Quispe, Dino; Nieto, José Miguel

    2010-05-15

    In this study, experiments were conducted to investigate the applicability of low-cost alkaline paper mill wastes as acidity neutralizing agents for treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD). Paper wastes include a calcium mud by-product from kraft pulping, and a calcite powder from a previous study focused on sequestering CO(2) by carbonation of calcium mud. The neutralization process consisted of increase of pH by alkaline additive dissolution, decrease of metals solubility and precipitation of gypsum and poorly crystallized Fe-Al oxy-hydroxides/oxy-hydroxysulphates, which acted as a sink for trace elements to that extent that solutions reached the pre-potability requirements of water for human consumption. This improvement was supported by geochemical modelling of solutions using PHREEQC software, and observations by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction of reaction products. According to PHREEQC simulations, the annual amount of alkaline additive is able to treat AMD (pH 3.63, sulphate 3800 mg L(-1), iron 348 mg L(-1)) with an average discharge of about 114 and 40 Ls(-1) for calcium mud and calcite powder, respectively. Likewise, given the high potential of calcium mud to sequester CO(2) and of resulting calcite powder to neutralize AMD, paper wastes could be a promising solution for facing this double environmental problem. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Neutralization of acid mine drainage using the final product from CO2 emissions capture with alkaline paper mill waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Lopez, Rafael; Castillo, Julio; Quispe, Dino; Nieto, Jose Miguel

    2010-01-01

    In this study, experiments were conducted to investigate the applicability of low-cost alkaline paper mill wastes as acidity neutralizing agents for treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD). Paper wastes include a calcium mud by-product from kraft pulping, and a calcite powder from a previous study focused on sequestering CO 2 by carbonation of calcium mud. The neutralization process consisted of increase of pH by alkaline additive dissolution, decrease of metals solubility and precipitation of gypsum and poorly crystallized Fe-Al oxy-hydroxides/oxy-hydroxysulphates, which acted as a sink for trace elements to that extent that solutions reached the pre-potability requirements of water for human consumption. This improvement was supported by geochemical modelling of solutions using PHREEQC software, and observations by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction of reaction products. According to PHREEQC simulations, the annual amount of alkaline additive is able to treat AMD (pH 3.63, sulphate 3800 mg L -1 , iron 348 mg L -1 ) with an average discharge of about 114 and 40 L s -1 for calcium mud and calcite powder, respectively. Likewise, given the high potential of calcium mud to sequester CO 2 and of resulting calcite powder to neutralize AMD, paper wastes could be a promising solution for facing this double environmental problem.

  6. Classification of illicit heroin by UPLC-Q-TOF analysis of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuimei; Hua, Zhendong; Bai, Yanping

    2015-12-01

    The illicit manufacture of heroin results in the formation of trace levels of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities that provide valuable information about the manufacturing process used. In this work, a new ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF) method; that features high resolution, mass accuracy and sensitivity for profiling neutral and acidic heroin manufacturing impurities was developed. After the UPLC-Q-TOF analysis, the retention times and m/z data pairs of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities were detected, and 19 peaks were found to be evidently different between heroin samples from "Golden Triangle" and "Golden Crescent". Based on the data set of these 19 impurities in 150 authentic heroin samples, classification of heroin geographic origins was successfully achieved utilizing partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). By analyzing another data set of 267 authentic heroin samples, the developed discrimiant model was validated and proved to be accurate and reliable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Distributions of 12 elements on 64 absorbers from simulated Hanford Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Marsh, S.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated 64 commercially available or experimental absorber materials for their ability to remove hazardous components from high-level waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. We tested these absorbers with a solution that simulates Hanford neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) (pH 14.2). To this simulant solution we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y) and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, and Zr). For each of 768 element/absorber combinations, we measured distribution coefficients for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of these 2304 measured distribution coefficients, we determined that many of the tested absorbers may be suitable for processing NCAW solutions.

  8. New Parameterizations for Neutral and Ion-Induced Sulfuric Acid-Water Particle Formation in Nucleation and Kinetic Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttänen, Anni; Merikanto, Joonas; Henschel, Henning; Duplissy, Jonathan; Makkonen, Risto; Ortega, Ismael K.; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2018-01-01

    We have developed new parameterizations of electrically neutral homogeneous and ion-induced sulfuric acid-water particle formation for large ranges of environmental conditions, based on an improved model that has been validated against a particle formation rate data set produced by Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) experiments at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The model uses a thermodynamically consistent version of the Classical Nucleation Theory normalized using quantum chemical data. Unlike the earlier parameterizations for H2SO4-H2O nucleation, the model is applicable to extreme dry conditions where the one-component sulfuric acid limit is approached. Parameterizations are presented for the critical cluster sulfuric acid mole fraction, the critical cluster radius, the total number of molecules in the critical cluster, and the particle formation rate. If the critical cluster contains only one sulfuric acid molecule, a simple formula for kinetic particle formation can be used: this threshold has also been parameterized. The parameterization for electrically neutral particle formation is valid for the following ranges: temperatures 165-400 K, sulfuric acid concentrations 104-1013 cm-3, and relative humidities 0.001-100%. The ion-induced particle formation parameterization is valid for temperatures 195-400 K, sulfuric acid concentrations 104-1016 cm-3, and relative humidities 10-5-100%. The new parameterizations are thus applicable for the full range of conditions in the Earth's atmosphere relevant for binary sulfuric acid-water particle formation, including both tropospheric and stratospheric conditions. They are also suitable for describing particle formation in the atmosphere of Venus.

  9. Enantioselective analysis of chiral anteiso fatty acids in the polar and neutral lipids of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauff, Simone; Hottinger, Georg; Vetter, Walter

    2010-04-01

    Anteiso fatty acids (aFA) are substituted with a methyl group on the antepenultimate carbon of the straight acyl chain. This feature leads to a stereogenic center. The 12-methyltetradecanoic acid (a15:0) and the 14-methylhexadecanoic acid (a17:0) are the most common aFA found in food, although they occur only in very small quantities. In this study we used gas chromatography in combination with a chiral stationary phase to determine the enantiomeric distribution of both a15:0 and a17:0 in the neutral and polar lipids of aquatic food samples and cheese. The best suited column was selected out of four custom-made combinations of heptakis(6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2,3-di-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin (beta-TBDM) with different amount and polarity of an achiral polysiloxane. After separation of polar and neutral lipids of the food samples by solid phase extraction, fatty acid methyl esters were prepared and the fatty acid methyl esters were fractionated by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. Measurements of fractions high in aFA by enantioselective GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring mode verified the dominance of the (S)-enantiomers of a15:0 and a17:0 in both lipid fractions. However (R)-enantiomers were detectable in all samples. The relative proportion of the (R)-enantiomers was up to fivefold higher in the polar lipids than in the neutral lipids. The higher proportions in the polar lipids indicate that microorganisms might be involved in the formation of (R)-aFA.

  10. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Ureilites Including Almahata Sitta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Callahan, M. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Ureilites are a class of meteorites that lack chondrules (achondrites) but have relatively high carbon abundances, averaging approx.3 wt %. Using highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS), it was recently determined that there are amino acids in. fragment 94 of the Almahata Sitta ureilite[l]. Based on the presence of amino acids that are rare in the Earth's biosphere, as well as the near-racemic enantiomeric ratios of marry of the more common amino acids, it was concluded that most of the detected amino acids were indigenous to the meteorite. Although the composition of the Almahata Sitta ureilite appears to be unlike other recovered ureilites, the discovery of amino acids in this meteorite raises the question of whether other ureilites rnav also contain amino acids. Herein we present the results of LC-FDlTo.F-MS analyses of: a sand sample from the Almahata Sitta strewn held, Almahata Sitta fragments 425 (an ordinary H5 chondrite) and 427 (ureilite), as well as an Antarctic ureilite (Allan lulls, ALHA 77257).

  11. Acid mine drainage neutralization in a pilot sequencing batch reactor using limestone from a paper and pulp industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadapalli, V R K; Zvimba, J N; Mathye, M; Fischer, H; Bologo, L

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the implications of using two grades of limestone from a paper and pulp industry for neutralization of acid mine drainage (AMD) in a pilot sequencing batch reactor (SBR). In this regard, two grades of calcium carbonate were used to neutralize AMD in a SBR with a hydraulic retention time (including settling) of 100 min and a sludge retention time of 360 min, by simultaneously monitoring the Fe(II) removal kinetics and overall assessment of the AMD after treatment. The Fe(II) kinetics removal and overall AMD treatment were observed to be highly dependent on the limestone grade used, with Fe(II) completely removed to levels lower than 50 mg/L in cycle 1 after 30 min using high quality or pure paper and pulp limestone. On the contrary, the other grade limestone, namely waste limestone, could only achieve a similar Fe(II) removal efficiency after four cycles. It was also noticed that suspended solids concentration plays a significant role in Fe(II) removal kinetics. In this regard, using pure limestone from the paper and pulp industry will have advantages compared with waste limestone for AMD neutralization. It has significant process impacts for the SBR configuration as it allows one cycle treatment resulting in a significant reduction of the feed stock, with subsequent generation of less sludge during AMD neutralization. However, the use of waste calcium carbonate from the paper and pulp industry as a feed stock during AMD neutralization can achieve significant cost savings as it is cheaper than the pure limestone and can achieve the same removal efficiency after four cycles.

  12. Stream chemistry in the eastern United States. 2. Current sources of acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing-capacity streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlihy, A.T.; Kaufmann, P.R.; Mitch, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors examined anion composition in National Stream Survey (NSS) data in order to evaluate the most probable sources of current acidity in acidic and low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) streams in the eastern United States. Acidic streams that had almost no organic influence (less than 10% of total anions) and sulfate and nitrate concentrations indicative of evaporative concentration of atmospheric deposition were classified as acidic due to acidic deposition. These acidic streams were located in small forested watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands (an estimated 1950 km of stream length) and in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (1250 km). Acidic streams affected primarily by acidic deposition but also influenced by naturally occurring organic anions accounted for another 1180 km of acidic stream length and were located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, plateau tops in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands, and the Florida Panhandle. The total length of streams acidic due to acid mine drainage in the NSS (4590 km) was about the same as the total length of acidic streams likely affected by acidic deposition (4380 km). Acidic streams whose acid anion composition was dominated by organics were located in Florida and the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. In Florida, most of the acidic streams were organic dominated, whereas about half of the streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain were organic dominated. Organic-dominated acidic streams were not observed in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands

  13. Inflammatory responses to neutral fat and fatty acids in multiple organs in a rat model of fat embolism syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Meri; Chiba, Shoetsu; Nagai, Tomonori; Takeshita, Hiroshi; Kanno, Sanae; Ikawa, Toru; Sakamoto, Kana; Sagi, Morihisa; Ichiba, Kazue; Mukai, Toshiji

    2015-09-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a common complication of long bone fractures. FES is rare but with significant morbidity and occasional fatalities. Studies of animal models of FES are numerous; however, few studies compare inflammatory reactions in multiple organs. The present study investigated the effect of neutral fat and fatty acids, which cause changes in multiple organs and induce FES. Using rats we evaluated the ratio of lung-to-body weight and conducted histological analyses and quantitative analysis of inflammatory cytokine mRNAs in the lungs following intravenous administration of neutral fat or fatty acids. Neutral fat increased the ratio of lung-to-body weight, and neutral fat formed emboli in lung capillaries. The levels of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the lungs increased after injection of neutral fat and oleic acid. Analysis of the histologic changes revealed that the highest numbers of fat droplets, occluding the capillaries of the lungs, kidney, heart, and brain formed 12h after the injection of neutral fat and fat droplets gradually diminished 48h later. Fat droplets were not detected in any organs after the injection of oleic acid. IL-1β and TNF-α levels in the lungs were elevated 9-24h after the injection of neutral fat, although IL-6 levels peaked at 6h. After injection of oleic acid, peak levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were detected at 6h, and IL-6 again increased in all organs and plasma at 15h. Neutral fat, but not fatty acids, formed emboli in the capillaries of multiple organs. These findings suggest that neutral fat increased inflammatory cytokine levels by forming emboli in organ capillaries, particularly in the lungs, while oleic acid augmented inflammatory cytokine levels by stimulating endothelial cells of multiple organs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effects of Various Amendments on Trace Element Stabilization in Acidic, Neutral, and Alkali Soil with Similar Pollution Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Suk; Min, Hyun-Gi; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Jeong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have examined the application of soil amendments, including pH change-induced immobilizers, adsorbents, and organic materials, for soil remediation. This study evaluated the effects of various amendments on trace element stabilization and phytotoxicity, depending on the initial soil pH in acid, neutral, and alkali conditions. As in all types of soils, Fe and Ca were well stabilized on adsorption sites. There was an effect from pH control or adsorption mechanisms on the stabilization of cationic trace elements from inorganic amendments in acidic and neutral soil. Furthermore, acid mine drainage sludge has shown great potential for stabilizing most trace elements. In a phytotoxicity test, the ratio of the bioavailable fraction to the pseudo-total fraction significantly affected the uptake of trace elements by bok choy. While inorganic amendments efficiently decreased the bioavailability of trace elements, significant effects from organic amendments were not noticeable due to the short-term cultivation period. Therefore, the application of organic amendments for stabilizing trace elements in agricultural soil requires further study.

  15. The Effects of Various Amendments on Trace Element Stabilization in Acidic, Neutral, and Alkali Soil with Similar Pollution Index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Suk Kim

    Full Text Available Many studies have examined the application of soil amendments, including pH change-induced immobilizers, adsorbents, and organic materials, for soil remediation. This study evaluated the effects of various amendments on trace element stabilization and phytotoxicity, depending on the initial soil pH in acid, neutral, and alkali conditions. As in all types of soils, Fe and Ca were well stabilized on adsorption sites. There was an effect from pH control or adsorption mechanisms on the stabilization of cationic trace elements from inorganic amendments in acidic and neutral soil. Furthermore, acid mine drainage sludge has shown great potential for stabilizing most trace elements. In a phytotoxicity test, the ratio of the bioavailable fraction to the pseudo-total fraction significantly affected the uptake of trace elements by bok choy. While inorganic amendments efficiently decreased the bioavailability of trace elements, significant effects from organic amendments were not noticeable due to the short-term cultivation period. Therefore, the application of organic amendments for stabilizing trace elements in agricultural soil requires further study.

  16. Fatty acid composition including trans isomers of Serbian biscuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravić Snežana Ž.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was carried out with the aim of evaluating the quality of the lipid fraction of Serbian biscuits. Total fat contents of the biscuit samples ranged between 10.2% and 24.5%. The saturated, cis-monounsaturated and cis-polyunsaturated fatty acid contents were within the ranges of 18.585.6%, 10.649.9% and 2.713.3% of total fatty acids, respectively. The content of trans fatty acids (TFA ranged from 0.0% to 42.5% and the mean was 10.2%. In a total of 34 investigated samples, 10 of them were found to be trans - free, 8 contained low level of TFA (under 2%, 4 samples contained between 2 and 10% of TFA, while 12 samples contained very high amounts of TFA (12.042.5%. The results obtained showed a considerable variability in fatty acid composition of biscuits which indicated that different types of fats and oils were used for production of biscuits in Serbia.

  17. Therapeutic brain modulation with targeted large neutral amino acid supplements in the Pah-enu2 phenylketonuria mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Danique; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M; Mazzola, Priscila N; van Faassen, Martijn H.J.R.; de Blaauw, Pim; Pascucci, Tiziana; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Kema, Ido P; Heiner-Fokkema, Rebecca; Zee, van der Eddy; Spronsen, van FrancJan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phenylketonuria treatment consists mainly of a Phe-restricted diet, which leads to suboptimal neurocognitive and psychosocial outcomes. Supplementation of large neutral amino acids (LNAAs) has been suggested as an alternative dietary treatment strategy to optimize neurocognitive outcome

  18. The evolution of a mining lake - From acidity to natural neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sienkiewicz, Elwira, E-mail: esienkie@twarda.pan.pl; Gąsiorowski, Michał, E-mail: mgasior@twarda.pan.pl

    2016-07-01

    Along the border of Poland and Germany (central Europe), many of the post-mining lakes have formed “an anthropogenic lake district”. This study presents the evolution of a mining lake ecosystem (TR-33) based on subfossil phyto- and zooplankton, isotopic data (δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N), elemental analyses of organic carbon and nitrogen (C/N ratio and TOC) and sedimentological analyses. Recently, lake TR-33 became completely neutralized from acidification and an increase in eutrophication began a few years ago. However, the lake has never been neutralized by humans; only natural processes have influenced the present water quality. From the beginning of the existence of the lake (1920s) to the present, we can distinguish four stages of lake development: 1) very shallow reservoir without typical lake sediments but with a sand layer containing fine lignite particles and very poor diatom and cladoceran communities; 2) very acidic, deeper water body with increasing frequencies of phyto- and zooplankton; 3) transitional period (rebuilding communities of diatoms and Cladocera), meaning a deep lake with benthic and planktonic fauna and flora with wide ecological tolerances; and 4) a shift to circumneutral conditions with an essential increase in planktonic taxa that prefer more fertile waters (eutrophication). In the case of lake TR-33, this process of natural neutralization lasted approximately 23 years. - Highlights: • Originally acid water lake had poor phyto- and zooplankton populations. • Process of natural neutralization lasted approximately 23 years. • Presently, lake's ecosystem is similar to other shallow lakes in the region. • Changes in the lake are representative for other mine lakes.

  19. Lipase catalyzed synthesis of neutral glycerides rich in micronutrients from rice bran oil fatty acid distillate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sumit; Gangopadhyay, Sarbani; Ghosh, Santinath

    2008-01-01

    Neutral glycerides with micronutrients like sterols, tocopherols and squalene may be prepared from cheap raw material like rice bran oil fatty acid distillate (RBO FAD). RBO FAD is an important byproduct of vegetable oil refining industries in the physical refining process. Glycerides like triacylglycerols (TAG), diacylglycerols (DAG) and monoacylglycerols (MAG) containing significant amounts of unsaponifiable matter like sterols, tocopherols and hydrocarbons (mainly squalene) may certainly be considered as novel functional food ingredients. Fatty acids present in RBO FAD were esterified with glycerol of varying amount (1:0.33, 1:0.5, 1:1 and 1:1.5 of FAD : glycerol ratio) for 8 h using non-specific enzyme NS 40013 (Candida antartica). After esterification the product mixture containing mono, di- and triglycerides was purified by molecular distillation to remove excess free fatty acids and also other volatile undesirable components. The purified product containing sterols, tocopherols and squalene can be utilized in various food formulations.

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies Follow Distinct Aggregation Pathways During Production-Relevant Acidic Incubation and Neutralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Skamris; Tian, Xinsheng; Thorolfsson, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Aggregation aspects of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of common concern to the pharmaceutical industry. Low pH treatment is applied during affinity purification and to inactivate endogenous retroviruses, directing interest to the mechanisms of acid-induced antibody aggregat......PURPOSE: Aggregation aspects of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of common concern to the pharmaceutical industry. Low pH treatment is applied during affinity purification and to inactivate endogenous retroviruses, directing interest to the mechanisms of acid-induced antibody...... identified, which may lead to two distinct pathways of reversible and irreversible aggregation, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that subtle variations in mAb sequence greatly affect responses towards low-pH incubation and subsequent neutralization, and demonstrate how orthogonal biophysical methods...... distinguish between reversible and irreversible mAb aggregation pathways at early stages of acidic treatment....

  1. Passive neutralization of acid mine drainage using basic oxygen furnace slag as neutralization material: experimental and modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zvimba, JN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available .00 <5.00 After neutral. (mg/L) <5.00 167 <1.00 7.96 88.3 58.1 73.2 162 28.9 6.5 29.6 <5.00 <5.00 Sn Sr Ta Te Th Tl U V W Y Yb Zn Zr Before neutral. (mg/L) 11.2 124 6.62 <5.00 20.5 <5.00 <5.00 470 24 <5.00 <5.00 101 19.7 After neutral. (mg...) Ltd for providing analytical data, Phumulani Msomi for assisting with 397 sample analysis. 398 399 References 400 Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, 1992 19th edition, 401 American Public Health Association...

  2. Screening and quantitative determination of twelve acidic and neutral pharmaceuticals in whole blood by liquid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Steentoft, Anni; Buck, Maike

    2010-01-01

    . The method was fully validated for salicylic acid, paracetamol, phenobarbital, carisoprodol, meprobamate, topiramate, etodolac, chlorzoxazone, furosemide, ibuprofen, warfarin, and salicylamide. The method also tentatively includes thiopental, theophylline, piroxicam, naproxen, diclophenac, and modafinil......We describe a multi-method for simultaneous identification and quantification of 12 acidic and neutral compounds in whole blood. The method involves a simple liquid-liquid extraction, and the identification and quantification are performed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry...

  3. Equivalence-point electromigration acid-base titration via moving neutralization boundary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Fan, Liu-Yin; Huang, Shan-Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we developed a novel method of acid-base titration, viz. the electromigration acid-base titration (EABT), via a moving neutralization boundary (MNR). With HCl and NaOH as the model strong acid and base, respectively, we conducted the experiments on the EABT via the method of moving neutralization boundary for the first time. The experiments revealed that (i) the concentration of agarose gel, the voltage used and the content of background electrolyte (KCl) had evident influence on the boundary movement; (ii) the movement length was a function of the running time under the constant acid and base concentrations; and (iii) there was a good linearity between the length and natural logarithmic concentration of HCl under the optimized conditions, and the linearity could be used to detect the concentration of acid. The experiments further manifested that (i) the RSD values of intra-day and inter-day runs were less than 1.59 and 3.76%, respectively, indicating similar precision and stability in capillary electrophoresis or HPLC; (ii) the indicators with different pK(a) values had no obvious effect on EABT, distinguishing strong influence on the judgment of equivalence-point titration in the classic one; and (iii) the constant equivalence-point titration always existed in the EABT, rather than the classic volumetric analysis. Additionally, the EABT could be put to good use for the determination of actual acid concentrations. The experimental results achieved herein showed a new general guidance for the development of classic volumetric analysis and element (e.g. nitrogen) content analysis in protein chemistry. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Spectral investigation and theoretical study of zwitterionic and neutral forms of quinolinic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabacak, M.; Sinha, L.; Prasad, O.; Bilgili, S.; Sachan, Alok K.; Asiri, A. M.; Atac, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, molecular structure and vibrational analysis of quinolinic acid (2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid), in zwitterionic and neutral forms, were presented using FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR, UV experimental techniques and quantum chemical calculations. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (2,3-PDCA) in the solid phase were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and 3500-0 cm-1, respectively. The geometrical parameters and energies were obtained for zwitter and neutral forms by using density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. 3D potential energy scan was performed by varying the selected dihedral angles using M06-2X and B3LYP functionals at 6-31G(d) level of theory and thus the most stable conformer of the title compound was determined. The most stable conformer was further optimized at higher level and vibrational wavenumbers were calculated. Theoretical vibrational assignment of 2,3-PDCA, using percentage potential energy distribution (PED) was done with MOLVIB program. 13C and 1H NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO. Chemical shifts were calculated at the same level of theory. The UV absorption spectra of the studied compound in ethanol and water were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm. The optimized geometric parameters were compared with experimental data.

  5. Acid mine drainage treatment using by-products from quicklime manufacturing as neutralization chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Sarpola, Arja; Hu, Tao; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate whether by-products from quicklime manufacturing could be used instead of commercial quicklime (CaO) or hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2), which are traditionally used as neutralization chemicals in acid mine drainage treatment. Four by-products were studied and the results were compared with quicklime and hydrated lime. The studied by-products were partly burnt lime stored outdoors, partly burnt lime stored in a silo, kiln dust and a mixture of partly burnt lime stored outdoors and dolomite. Present application options for these by-products are limited and they are largely considered waste. Chemical precipitation experiments were performed with the jar test. All the studied by-products removed over 99% of Al, As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Zn and approximately 60% of sulphate from acid mine drainage. However, the neutralization capacity of the by-products and thus the amount of by-product needed as well as the amount of sludge produced varied. The results indicated that two out of the four studied by-products could be used as an alternative to quicklime or hydrated lime for acid mine drainage treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. FibreBags vs. FibreCaps for acid and neutral detergent fibre analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Koivisto , Jason

    2003-01-01

    International audience; A new procedure for determining acid detergent fibre and neutral detergent fibre (ADF and NDF) was developed to reduce the need for filtration and to allow for batch processing of forage samples. The FibreBag system is an economically necessary evolution of the earlier FibreCap system. The purpose of this enquiry was to determine if the FibreBag is a suitable replacement for the FibreCap. The FibreBag method produced very similar results to the FibreCap system of analy...

  7. Fast targeted analysis of 132 acidic and neutral drugs and poisons in whole blood using LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rago, Matthew; Saar, Eva; Rodda, Luke N; Turfus, Sophie; Kotsos, Alex; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri; Drummer, Olaf H

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an LC-MS/MS based screening technique that covers a broad range of acidic and neutral drugs and poisons by combining a small sample volume and efficient extraction technique with simple automated data processing. After protein precipitation of 100μL of whole blood, 132 common acidic and neutral drugs and poisons including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, barbiturates, anticonvulsants, antidiabetics, muscle relaxants, diuretics and superwarfarin rodenticides (47 quantitated, 85 reported as detected) were separated using a Shimadzu Prominence HPLC system with a C18 separation column (Kinetex XB-C18, 4.6mm×150mm, 5μm), using gradient elution with a mobile phase of 25mM ammonium acetate buffer (pH 7.5)/acetonitrile. The drugs were detected using an ABSciex(®) API 2000 LC-MS/MS system (ESI+ and -, MRM mode, two transitions per analyte). The method was fully validated in accordance with international guidelines. Quantification data obtained using one-point calibration compared favorably to that using multiple calibrants. The presented LC-MS/MS assay has proven to be applicable for determination of the analytes in blood. The fast and reliable extraction method combined with automated processing gives the opportunity for high throughput and fast turnaround times for forensic and clinical toxicology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Alteration of the phospho- or neutral lipid content and fatty acid composition in Listeria monocytogenes due to acid adaptation mechanisms for hydrochloric, acetic and lactic acids at pH 5.5 or benzoic acid at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastronicolis, Sofia K; Berberi, Anita; Diakogiannis, Ioannis; Petrova, Evanthia; Kiaki, Irene; Baltzi, Triantafillia; Xenikakis, Polydoros

    2010-10-01

    This study provides a first approach to observe the effects on Listeria monocytogenes of cellular exposure to acid stress at low or neutral pH, notably how phospho- or neutral lipids are involved in this mechanism, besides the fatty acid profile alteration. A thorough investigation of the composition of polar and neutral lipids from L. monocytogenes grown at pH 5.5 in presence of hydrochloric, acetic and lactic acids, or at neutral pH 7.3 in presence of benzoic acid, is described relative to cells grown in acid-free medium. The results showed that only low pH values enhance the antimicrobial activity of an acid. We suggest that, irrespective of pH, the acid adaptation response will lead to a similar alteration in fatty acid composition [decreasing the ratio of branched chain/saturated straight fatty acids of total lipids], mainly originating from the neutral lipid class of adapted cultures. Acid adaptation in L. monocytogenes was correlated with a decrease in total lipid phosphorus and, with the exception of cells adapted to benzoic acid, this change in the amount of phosphorus reflected a higher content of the neutral lipid class. Upon acetic or benzoic acid stress the lipid phosphorus proportion was analysed in the main phospholipids present: cardiolipin, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphoaminolipid and phosphatidylinositol. Interestingly only benzoic acid had a dramatic effect on the relative quantities of these four phospholipids.

  9. Long-term treatment of phenylketonuria with a new medical food containing large neutral amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concolino, D; Mascaro, I; Moricca, M T; Bonapace, G; Matalon, K; Trapasso, J; Radhakrishnan, G; Ferrara, C; Matalon, R; Strisciuglio, P

    2017-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by deficient activity of phenylalanine hydroxylase. A low phenylalanine (Phe) diet is used to treat PKU. The diet is very restrictive, and dietary adherence tends to decrease as patients get older. Methods to improve dietary adherence and blood Phe control are continuously under investigation. A new formula Phe-neutral amino acid (PheLNAA) has been tested in this study with the purpose of improving the compliance and lowering blood phenylalanine. The formula has been tested for nitrogen balance, and it is nutritionally complete. It is fortified with more nutritional additives that can be deficient in the PKU diet, such as B12, Biotin, DHA, Lutein and increased levels of large neutral amino acids to help lower blood Phe. The new formula has been tested on 12 patients with a loading test of 4 weeks. Fifty-eight percent of patients had a significant decline in blood Phe concentration from baseline throughout the study. The PheLNAA was well tolerated with excellent compliance and without illnesses during the study. In conclusion, the new formula is suitable for life-long treatment of PKU, and it offers the PKU clinic a new choice for treatment.

  10. In-stream chemical neutralization: A whole watershed approach to mitigating acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britt, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    The North Branch of the Potomac River is adversely affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) throughout its entire length. As an alternative to mine-mouth treatment methods an in-stream AMD-neutralization demonstration program for an approximately 25-mile segment of the North Branch of the Potomac River was designed and implemented. This river segment was ranked as the highest priority site in Maryland for a demonstration project owing to its combination of very poor water quality and excellent potential for supporting a recreational sport fishery in the absence of toxic metal and acid loadings. A whole-watershed approach employing Scandinavian doser technologies and calcium carbonate neutralizing agents is the basis for the North Branch Potomac River demonstration project. The project involves four phases: feasibility (1), design (2), implementation (3), and monitoring (4). This watershed approach to mitigating AMD is expected to restore circumneutrial water quality and to promote desirable fishery resources throughout the mainstem and selected tributaries of the North Branch of the Potomac River Upstream of Jennings Randolph Dam. This paper summarizes Phases 1--3 of the demonstration project

  11. Machine learning and hurdle models for improving regional predictions of stream water acid neutralizing capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povak, Nicholas A.; Hessburg, Paul F.; Reynolds, Keith M.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; McDonnell, Todd C.; Salter, R. Brion

    2013-06-01

    In many industrialized regions of the world, atmospherically deposited sulfur derived from industrial, nonpoint air pollution sources reduces stream water quality and results in acidic conditions that threaten aquatic resources. Accurate maps of predicted stream water acidity are an essential aid to managers who must identify acid-sensitive streams, potentially affected biota, and create resource protection strategies. In this study, we developed correlative models to predict the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of streams across the southern Appalachian Mountain region, USA. Models were developed using stream water chemistry data from 933 sampled locations and continuous maps of pertinent environmental and climatic predictors. Environmental predictors were averaged across the upslope contributing area for each sampled stream location and submitted to both statistical and machine-learning regression models. Predictor variables represented key aspects of the contributing geology, soils, climate, topography, and acidic deposition. To reduce model error rates, we employed hurdle modeling to screen out well-buffered sites and predict continuous ANC for the remainder of the stream network. Models predicted acid-sensitive streams in forested watersheds with small contributing areas, siliceous lithologies, cool and moist environments, low clay content soils, and moderate or higher dry sulfur deposition. Our results confirmed findings from other studies and further identified several influential climatic variables and variable interactions. Model predictions indicated that one quarter of the total stream network was sensitive to additional sulfur inputs (i.e., ANC < 100 µeq L-1), while <10% displayed much lower ANC (<50 µeq L-1). These methods may be readily adapted in other regions to assess stream water quality and potential biotic sensitivity to acidic inputs.

  12. Theoretical models of mercury dissolution from dental amalgams in neutral and acidic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keanini, Russell G.; Ferracane, Jack L.; Okabe, Toru

    2001-06-01

    This article reports an experimental and theoretical investigation of mercury dissolution from dental amalgams immersed in neutral (noncorrosive) and acidic (corrosive) flows. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric measurements of Hg loss indicate that in neutral flow, surface oxide films formed in air prior to immersion persist and effectively suppress significant mercury release. In acidic (pH 1) flows, by contrast, oxide films are unstable and dissolve; depending on the amalgam’s material composition, particularly its copper content, two distinct mercury release mechanisms are initiated. In low copper amalgam, high initial mercury release rates are observed and appear to reflect preferential mercury dissolution from unstable Sn8Hg ( γ 2) grains within the amalgam matrix. In high copper amalgam, mercury release rates are initially low, but increase with time. Microscopic examination suggests that this feature reflects corrosion of copper from grains of Cu6Sn5 ( η') and consequent exposure of Ag2Hg3 ( γ 1) grains; the latter serve as internal mercury release sites and become more numerous as corrosion proceeds. Three theoretical models are proposed in order to explain observed dissolution characteristics. Model I, applicable to high and low copper amalgams in neutral flow, assumes that mercury dissolution is mediated by solid diffusion within the amalgam, and that a thin oxide film persists on the amalgam’s surface and lumps diffusive in-film transport into an effective convective boundary condition. Model II, applicable to low copper amalgam in acidic flow, assumes that the amalgam’s external oxide film dissolves on a short time scale relative to the experimental observation period; it neglects corrosive suppression of mercury transport. Model III, applicable to high copper amalgam in acidic flow, assumes that internal mercury release sites are created by corrosion of copper in η' grains and that corrosion proceeds via an oxidation-reduction reaction

  13. Neutral sphingomyelinase-2, acid sphingomyelinase, and ceramide levels in COPD patients compared to controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea SR

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Simon R Lea,1,* Hannah J Metcalfe,1,* Jonathan Plumb,1 Christian Beerli,2 Chris Poll,3 Dave Singh,1 Katharine H Abbott-Banner3 1Centre for Respiratory Medicine and Allergy, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The University of Manchester and University Hospital of South Manchester, NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK; 2Novartis Pharma AG, Postfach, Basel, Switzerland; 3Respiratory Diseases, Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research, Horsham, West Sussex, UK *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Increased pulmonary ceramide levels are suggested to play a causative role in lung diseases including COPD. Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (nSMase-2 and acid SMase (aSMase, which hydrolyze sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, are activated by a range of cellular stresses, including inflammatory cytokines and pathogens, but notably cigarette smoke appears to only activate nSMase-2. Our primary objective was to investigate nSMase-2 and aSMase protein localization and quantification in lung tissue from nonsmokers (NS, smokers (S, and COPD patients. In addition, various ceramide species (C16, C18, and C20 were measured in alveolar macrophages from COPD patients versus controls. Materials and methods: Patients undergoing surgical resection for suspected or confirmed lung cancer were recruited, and nSMase-2 and aSMase protein was investigated in different areas of lung tissue (small airways, alveolar walls, subepithelium, and alveolar macrophages by immunohistochemistry. Ceramide species were measured in alveolar macrophages from COPD patients and controls by mass spectrometry. Results: nSMase-2 and aSMase were detected in the majority of small airways. There was a significant increase in nSMase-2 immunoreactivity in alveolar macrophages from COPD patients (54% compared with NS (31.7% (P<0.05, and in aSMase immunoreactivity in COPD (68.2% and S (69.5% alveolar macrophages compared with NS (52.4% (P

  14. Magnetic properties, acid neutralization capacity, and net acid production of rocks in the Animas River Watershed Silverton, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCafferty, Anne E.; Yager, Douglas B.; Horton, Radley M.; Diehl, Sharon F.

    2006-01-01

    Federal land managers along with local stakeholders in the Upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colorado are actively designing and implementing mine waste remediation projects to mitigate the effects of acid mine drainage from several abandoned hard rock metal mines and mills. Local source rocks with high acid neutralization capacity (ANC) within the watershed are of interest to land managers for use in these remediation projects. A suite of representative samples was collected from propylitic to weakly sericitic-altered volcanic and plutonic rocks exposed in outcrops throughout the watershed. Acid-base accounting laboratory methods coupled with mineralogic and geochemical characterization provide insight into lithologies that have a range of ANC and net acid production (NAP). Petrophysical lab determinations of magnetic susceptibility converted to estimates for percent magnetite show correlation with the environmental properties of ANC and NAP for many of the lithologies. A goal of our study is to interpret watershed-scale airborne magnetic data for regional mapping of rocks that have varying degrees of ANC and NAP. Results of our preliminary work are presented here.

  15. Study of aniline polymerization reactions through the particle size formation in acidic and neutral medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aribowo, Slamet; Hafizah, Mas Ayu Elita; Manaf, Azwar; Andreas

    2018-04-01

    In the present paper, we reported particle size kinetic studies on the conducting polyaniline (PANI) which synthesized through a chemical oxidative polymerization technique from aniline monomer. PANI was prepared using ammonium persulfate (APS) as oxidizing agent which carried out in acidic and neutral medium at various batch temperatures of respectively 20, 30 and 50 °C. From the studies, it was noticed that the complete polymerization reaction progressed within 480 minutes duration time. The pH of the solution during reaction kinetic reached values 0.8 - to 1.2 in acidic media, while in the neutral media the pH value reached values 3.8 - 4.9. The batch temperature controlled the polymerization reaction in which the reaction progressing, which followed by the temperature rise of solution above the batch temperature before settled down to the initial temperature. An increment in the batch temperature gave highest rise in the solution temperature for the two media which cannot be more than 50 °C. The final product of polymerization reaction was PANI confirmed by Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectrophotometer for molecule structure identification. The averages particle size of PANI which carried out in the two different media is evidently similar in the range 30 - 40 μm and insensitive to the batch temperature. However, the particle size of PANI which obtained from the polymerization reaction at a batch temperature of 50 °C under acidic condition reached ˜53.1 μm at the tip of the propagation stage which started in the first 5 minutes. The size is obviously being the largest among the batch temperatures. Whereas, under neutral condition the particle size is much larger which reached the size 135 μm at the batch temperature of 20 °C. It is concluded that the particle size formation during the polymerization reaction being one of the important parameter to determine particle growing of polymer which indicated the reaction kinetics mechanism of synthesize

  16. Acidic, neutral and alkaline forest ponds as a landscape element affecting the biodiversity of freshwater snails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyra, Aneta

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, the number of areas remaining under the influence of acidity has increased. At all levels of ecosystems, biodiversity decreases with acidification, due to the elimination of species that are most sensitive to low pH. Forest ponds belong to a specific group that varied in location, a huge amount of leaf litter, and isolation from other aquatic environments. They are crucial in the industrial landscape with well-developed industry and human activity. The aim was to investigate the relative importance of water chemistry in explaining snail assemblage compositions and species richness in forest ponds of contrasting pH. Patterns in gastropod communities were determined from an analysis in 26 forest ponds with multivariate gradient analysis. Ponds ranged in a base mean pH from 3.0 to 9.0. pH has been found to be an important factor influencing gastropod fauna. Neutral ponds support diverse communities, typical of small water bodies. In two acidic pond types, snail fauna was different. Among the species characteristic for acidic ponds (pH pH. Current knowledge of pH-associated changes in aquatic ecosystems is still incomplete because anthropogenic acidification is a recent phenomenon. It is extremely important in forest habitats, since they react more intensively to climatic factors and are often used in landscape management and planning.

  17. A comparative study of the neutral and acidic polysaccharides from Allium macrostemon Bunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhanjun; Wang, Fuhua; Wang, Mingchun; Ma, Liping; Ye, Hong; Zeng, Xiaoxiong

    2015-03-06

    Neutral and acidic polysaccharides, named AMP40N and AMP40S respectively, were isolated and purified from the dried bulbs of Allium macrostemon Bunge. Both of them showed a single and symmetrically sharp peak, indicating they were homogeneous polysaccharides. Molecular weights of AMP40N and AMP40S were determined to be 18.2 and 105.1 kDa, respectively. AMP40N was composed of arabinose and glucose, while AMP40S was composed of rhamnose, arabinose, glucose and galactose and a certain amount of uronic acid. FT-IR, periodic acid oxidation, Smith degradation, methylation and GC-MS analysis revealed that non-reducing terminal and →2,6)-Glc-(1→ existed in AMP40N and AMP40S. The glycosidic linkage of arabinose in AMP40N was →2)-Ara-(1→, whereas it was Ara-(1→ in AMP40S. AMP40S had (1→2)-linked l-rhamnose residue. Both AMP40N and AMP40S exhibited strong anti-tumor potential against human gastric carcinoma cells BGC-823, in particular, AMP40S presented significantly higher inhibitory rate of 85.94% than AMP40N of 52.63%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Insight into acid-base nucleation experiments by comparison of the chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud P; Sarnela, Nina; Dommen, Josef; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Jokinen, Tuija; Sipilä, Mikko; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Almeida, Joao; Breitenlechner, Martin; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Tomé, António; Virtanen, Annele; Viisanen, Yrjö; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Curtius, Joachim; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-12-02

    We investigated the nucleation of sulfuric acid together with two bases (ammonia and dimethylamine), at the CLOUD chamber at CERN. The chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters was studied using three Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometers: two were operated in positive and negative mode to detect the chamber ions, while the third was equipped with a nitrate ion chemical ionization source allowing detection of neutral clusters. Taking into account the possible fragmentation that can happen during the charging of the ions or within the first stage of the mass spectrometer, the cluster formation proceeded via essentially one-to-one acid-base addition for all of the clusters, independent of the type of the base. For the positive clusters, the charge is carried by one excess protonated base, while for the negative clusters it is carried by a deprotonated acid; the same is true for the neutral clusters after these have been ionized. During the experiments involving sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, it was possible to study the appearance time for all the clusters (positive, negative, and neutral). It appeared that, after the formation of the clusters containing three molecules of sulfuric acid, the clusters grow at a similar speed, independent of their charge. The growth rate is then probably limited by the arrival rate of sulfuric acid or cluster-cluster collision.

  19. Brain large neutral amino acids and catecholamines in parenterally nourished preterm rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, S M; Rassin, D K

    1995-10-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) has been adapted as a standard for providing nutrition to ill term and preterm infants. The availability of tyrosine in amino acid preparations utilized for TPN is limited and may potentiate a tyrosine-deficient state. Phenlyalanine hydroxylase activity, responsible for catalyzing tyrosine synthesis, has been suggested to be decreased in fetal and neonatal animals. Parenterally nourished premature rabbits (n = 16) and suckled rabbits (n = 19) were studied in order to compare growth parameters and amino acids in the plasma and brain, as well as whole brain catecholamine concentrations. Influx velocities into the brain of amino acids were also determined in these two groups. The preterm rabbit's average birth weight (42.6 +/- 6.0) was less than that of term rabbits (56.7 +/- 8.7, P < 0.005). Significantly lower concentrations of the catecholamine precursor tyrosine were found in both the plasma and brain of the parenterally nourished animals compared to the suckled animals. Tyrosine is reduced in the brain in TPN-supported animals reflecting both low tyrosine intake and increased plasma concentrations of large neutral amino acids that compete for uptake at the blood-brain barrier. However, no difference was observed between the two groups in their brain catecholamine concentrations. The seven-day parenterally nourished rabbit appears to be tyrosine-deficient but no evident effects on brain catecholamine concentrations were seen. The effects and impact of a tyrosine-deficient state might better be evaluated by regional evaluation of catecholaminergic areas of the brain or over a longer period of parenteral nutrition.

  20. Effect of acidity and elevated PCO2 on acid. Neutralization within pulsed limestone bed reactors receiving coal mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watten, B.J.; Sibrell, P.L.; Schwartz, M.F.

    2004-01-01

    Limestone has potential for reducing reagent costs and sludge volume associated with the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD), but its use has been restricted by slow dissolution rates and sensitivity to scale forming reactions that retard transport of H+ at the solid-liquid interface. We evaluated a pulsed limestone bed (PLB) remediation process designed to circumvent these problems through use of intermittently fluidized beds of granular limestone and elevated carbon dioxide pressure. PLB limestone dissolution (LD, mg/L), and effluent alkalinity (Alk, mg/L) were correlated with reactor pressure (PCO2, kPa), influent acidity (Acy, mg/L) and reactor bed height (H, cm) using a prototype capable of processing 10 L/min. The PLB process effectively neutralized sulfuric acid acidity over the range of 6-1033 mg/L (as CaCO3) while generating high concentrations of alkalinity (36-1086 mg/L) despite a hydraulic residence time of just 4.2-5.0 min. Alk and LD (mg/L CaCO3) rose with increases in influent acidity and PCO2 (p < 0.001) according to the models: Alk = 58 + 38.4 (PCO2)0.5 + 0.080 (Acy) - 0.0059(PCO2) 0.5 (Acy); LD = 55 + 38.3 (PCO2)0.5 + 1.08 (Acy) - 0.0059 (PCO2)0.5 (Acy). Alkalinity decreased at an increasing rate with reductions in H over the range of 27.3-77.5 cm (p < 0.001). Carbon dioxide requirements (Q(avg)CO2, L/min) increased with PCO2 (p < 0.001) following the model Q(avg)CO2 = 0.858 (PCO2)0.620, resulting in a greater degree of pH buffering (depression) within the reactors, a rise in limestone solubility and an increase in limestone dissolution related to carbonic acid attack. Corresponding elevated concentrations of effluent alkalinity allow for sidestream treatment with blending. Numerical modeling demonstrated that carbon dioxide requirements are reduced as influent acidity rises and when carbon dioxide is recovered from system effluent and recycled. Field trials demonstrated that the PLB process is capable of raising the pH of AMD above that

  1. Catalysis of the Carbonylation of Alcohols to Carboxylic Acids Including Acetic Acid Synthesis from Methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Denis; DeKleva, Thomas W.

    1986-01-01

    Monsanto's highly successful synthesis of acetic acid from methanol and carbon monoxide illustrates use of new starting materials to replace pretroleum-derived ethylene. Outlines the fundamental aspects of the acetic acid process and suggests ways of extending the synthesis to higher carboxylic acids. (JN)

  2. Carboxylic acid functional group analysis using constant neutral loss scanning-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dron, Julien [Laboratoire de Chimie et Environnement, Marseille Universites (case 29), 3 place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France)], E-mail: julien.dron@up.univ-mrs.fr; Eyglunent, Gregory; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Wortham, Henri [Laboratoire de Chimie et Environnement, Marseille Universites (case 29), 3 place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France)

    2007-12-12

    The present study describes the development of a new analytical technique for the functional group determination of the carboxylic moiety using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) operated in the constant neutral loss scanning (CNLS) mode. Carboxylic groups were first derivatized into their corresponding methyl esters by reacting with BF{sub 3}/methanol mix and the reaction mixture was then directly injected into the APCI chamber. The loss of methanol (m/z = 32 amu) resulting from the fragmentation of the protonated methyl esters was then monitored. Applying this method together with a statistical approach to reference mixtures containing 31 different carboxylic acids at randomly calculated concentrations demonstrated its suitability for quantitative functional group measurements with relative standard deviations below 15% and a detection limit of 0.005 mmol L{sup -1}. Its applicability to environmental matrices was also shown through the determination of carboxylic acid concentrations inside atmospheric aerosol samples. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that the tandem mass spectrometry was successfully applied to functional group analysis, offering great perspectives in the characterization of complex mixtures which are prevailing in the field of environmental analysis as well as in the understanding of the chemical processes occurring in these matrices.

  3. Degradation of unglazed rough graphite-aluminium solar absorber surfaces in simulated acid and neutral rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konttinen, P.; Lund, P.D.; Salo, T.

    2005-01-01

    Degradation mechanisms of unglazed solar absorber surfaces based on aluminium substrate were studied. Rough graphite-aluminium surfaces were total-immersion subjected to aerated and de-aerated simulated neutral and acid rain. Test conditions were based on calculated absorber stagnation temperature and global rain acidity measurements. Changes in optical properties, elemental composition and sample mass were examined by spectrometry, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and thermogravimetry, respectively. The absorbers exhibited almost no degradation at pH value of 3.5. At pH 5.5 alumina on the surface hydrated significantly degrading the optical properties of the surfaces severely in most cases. Therefore these absorber surfaces can not be recommended to be used in non-glazed applications if they are exposed to rain with pH exceeding ∼ 3.5-4.5. The total-immersion test needs to be developed further as the test results exhibited poor temperature and time dependency thus preventing accurate service lifetime estimates. Still, these tests were useful in determining favourable and non-favourable operating conditions for the absorber surfaces based on aluminium substrate. (author)

  4. Carboxylic acid functional group analysis using constant neutral loss scanning-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dron, Julien; Eyglunent, Gregory; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Wortham, Henri

    2007-01-01

    The present study describes the development of a new analytical technique for the functional group determination of the carboxylic moiety using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) operated in the constant neutral loss scanning (CNLS) mode. Carboxylic groups were first derivatized into their corresponding methyl esters by reacting with BF 3 /methanol mix and the reaction mixture was then directly injected into the APCI chamber. The loss of methanol (m/z = 32 amu) resulting from the fragmentation of the protonated methyl esters was then monitored. Applying this method together with a statistical approach to reference mixtures containing 31 different carboxylic acids at randomly calculated concentrations demonstrated its suitability for quantitative functional group measurements with relative standard deviations below 15% and a detection limit of 0.005 mmol L -1 . Its applicability to environmental matrices was also shown through the determination of carboxylic acid concentrations inside atmospheric aerosol samples. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that the tandem mass spectrometry was successfully applied to functional group analysis, offering great perspectives in the characterization of complex mixtures which are prevailing in the field of environmental analysis as well as in the understanding of the chemical processes occurring in these matrices

  5. Acidic Microenvironments in Waste Rock Characterized by Neutral Drainage: Bacteria–Mineral Interactions at Sulfide Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Dockrey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial populations and microbe-mineral interactions were examined in waste rock characterized by neutral rock drainage (NRD. Samples of three primary sulfide-bearing waste rock types (i.e., marble-hornfels, intrusive, exoskarn were collected from field-scale experiments at the Antamina Cu–Zn–Mo mine, Peru. Microbial communities within all samples were dominated by neutrophilic thiosulfate oxidizing bacteria. However, acidophilic iron and sulfur oxidizers were present within intrusive waste rock characterized by bulk circumneutral pH drainage. The extensive development of microbially colonized porous Fe(III (oxyhydroxide and Fe(III (oxyhydroxysulfate precipitates was observed at sulfide-mineral surfaces during examination by field emission-scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FE-SEM-EDS. Linear combination fitting of bulk extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS spectra for these precipitates indicated they were composed of schwertmannite [Fe8O8(OH6–4.5(SO41–1.75], lepidocrocite [γ-FeO(OH] and K-jarosite [KFe3(OH6(SO42]. The presence of schwertmannite and K-jarosite is indicative of the development of localized acidic microenvironments at sulfide-mineral surfaces. Extensive bacterial colonization of this porous layer and pitting of underlying sulfide-mineral surfaces suggests that acidic microenvironments can play an important role in sulfide-mineral oxidation under bulk circumneutral pH conditions. These findings have important implications for water quality management in NRD settings.

  6. A laboratory method to estimate the efficiency of plant extract to neutralize soil acidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo E. Cassiolato

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble plant organic compounds have been proposed to be efficient in alleviating soil acidity. Laboratory methods were evaluated to estimate the efficiency of plant extracts to neutralize soil acidity. Plant samples were dried at 65ºC for 48 h and ground to pass 1 mm sieve. Plant extraction procedure was: transfer 3.0 g of plant sample to a becker, add 150 ml of deionized water, shake for 8 h at 175 rpm and filter. Three laboratory methods were evaluated: sigma (Ca+Mg+K of the plant extracts; electrical conductivity of the plant extracts and titration of plant extracts with NaOH solution between pH 3 to 7. These methods were compared with the effect of the plant extracts on acid soil chemistry. All laboratory methods were related with soil reaction. Increasing sigma (Ca+Mg+K, electrical conductivity and the volume of NaOH solution spent to neutralize H+ ion of the plant extracts were correlated with the effect of plant extract on increasing soil pH and exchangeable Ca and decreasing exchangeable Al. It is proposed the electrical conductivity method for estimating the efficiency of plant extract to neutralize soil acidity because it is easily adapted for routine analysis and uses simple instrumentations and materials.Tem sido proposto que os compostos orgânicos de plantas solúveis em água são eficientes na amenização da acidez do solo. Foram avaliados métodos de laboratório para estimar a eficiência dos extratos de plantas na neutralização da acidez do solo. Os materiais de plantas foram secos a 65º C por 48 horas, moídos e passados em peneira de 1mm. Utilizou-se o seguinte procedimento para obtenção do extrato de plantas: transferir 3.0 g da amostra de planta para um becker, adicionar 150 ml de água deionizada, agitar por 8h a 175 rpm e filtrar. Avaliaram-se três métodos de laboratório: sigma (Ca + Mg + K do extrato de planta, condutividade elétrica (CE do extrato de planta e titulação do extrato de planta com solu

  7. Net Acid Production, Acid Neutralizing Capacity, and Associated Mineralogical and Geochemical Characteristics of Animas River Watershed Igneous Rocks Near Silverton, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Douglas B.; Choate, LaDonna; Stanton, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents results from laboratory and field studies involving the net acid production (NAP), acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), and magnetic mineralogy of 27 samples collected in altered volcanic terrain in the upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colo., during the summer of 2005. Sampling focused mainly on the volumetrically important, Tertiary-age volcanic and plutonic rocks that host base- and precious-metal mineralization in the study area. These rocks were analyzed to determine their potential for neutralization of acid-rock drainage. Rocks in the study area have been subjected to a regional propylitic alteration event, which introduced calcite, chlorite (clinochlore), and epidote that have varying amounts and rates of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC). Locally, hydrothermal alteration has consumed any ANC and introduced minerals, mainly pyrite, that have a high net acid production (NAP). Laboratory studies included hydrogen pyroxide (H2O2) acid digestion and subsequent sodium hydroxide (NaOH) titration to determine NAP, and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) acid titration experiments to determine ANC. In addition to these environmental rock-property determinations, mineralogical, chemical, and petrographic characteristics of each sample were determined through semiquantitative X-ray diffractometry (Rietveld method), optical mineralogy, wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence, total carbon-carbonate, and inductively coupled plasma?mass spectrometric analysis. An ANC ranking was assigned to rock samples based on calculated ANC quantity in kilograms/ton (kg/t) calcium carbonate equivalent and ratios of ANC to NAP. Results show that talus near the southeast Silverton caldera margin, composed of andesite clasts of the Burns Member of the Silverton Volcanics, has the highest ANC (>100 kg/t calcium carbonate equivalent) with little to no NAP. The other units found to have moderate to high ANC include (a) andesite lavas and volcaniclastic rocks of the San Juan

  8. A single amino acid substitution in the S1 and S2 Spike protein domains determines the neutralization escape phenotype of SARS-CoV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuki, Yu-ya; Ohnishi, Kazuo; Takagi, Hirotaka; Oshima, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Mizukoshi, Fuminori; Terahara, Kazutaka; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamaoka, Shoji; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2008-07-01

    In response to SARS-CoV infection, neutralizing antibodies are generated against the Spike (S) protein. Determination of the active regions that allow viral escape from neutralization would enable the use of these antibodies for future passive immunotherapy. We immunized mice with UV-inactivated SARS-CoV to generate three anti-S monoclonal antibodies, and established several neutralization escape mutants with S protein. We identified several amino acid substitutions, including Y442F and V601G in the S1 domain and D757N and A834V in the S2 region. In the presence of each neutralizing antibody, double mutants with substitutions in both domains exhibited a greater growth advantage than those with only one substitution. Importantly, combining two monoclonal antibodies that target different epitopes effected almost complete suppression of wild type virus replication. Thus, for effective passive immunotherapy, it is important to use neutralizing antibodies that recognize both the S1 and S2 regions.

  9. Fatty acid profiles of polar and neutral lipids of ten species of higher basidiomycetes indigenous to eastern Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedneault, Karine; Angers, Paul; Gosselin, André; Tweddell, Russell J

    2008-12-01

    Neutral and polar lipid contents of ten species of edible mushrooms indigenous to Eastern Canada belonging to the families Agaricaceae, Amanitaceae, Boletaceae, Coprinaceae, Ganodermataceae, and Lycoperdaceae were analysed. The total lipid content of the species analysed ranged from 3.1% (Ganoderma applanatum) to 16% (w/w) d.w. (Amanita vaginata) and averaged 8.6% (w/w) d.w. Polar lipids accounted for more than 50% of the total lipids in most species and differences were observed between neutral and polar lipid contents according to the species analysed. In both lipid fractions, high proportions of unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) ranging from 62.7 to 82.3% (polar lipids) and 59.8 to 82.5% (neutral lipids) of the total FAs were observed. Analysis of FA profiles showed that both neutral and polar lipids were mainly composed of linoleic (18:2 Delta9c,12c), oleic (18:1 Delta9c), and palmitic (16:0) acids. Significant differences (P<0.05) in the contents of specific FAs were observed between mushroom species. Among the 44 FAs detected in the species analysed, the occurrence of cis-11-heptadecenoic (17:1 Delta11c) acid is reported for the first time in basidiomycetes, while elaidic acid (18:1 Delta9t) is reported for the first time in fungi.

  10. Acid mine drainage neutralization in a pilot sequencing batch reactor using limestone from a paper and pulp industry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vadapalli, VRK

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Technology Acid mine drainage neutralization in a pilot sequencing batch reactor using limestone from a paper and pulp industry V.R.K. Vadapallia∗, J.N. Zvimbab, M. Mathyeb, H. Fischerc and L. Bologoc aSustainable Resources and Environment...

  11. Development and Implementation of a Simple, Engaging Acid Rain Neutralization Experiment and Corresponding Animated Instructional Video for Introductory Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Danielle; Yennie, Craig J.; Lynch, Patrick; Lowry, Gregory; Budarz, James; Zhu, Wenlei; Wang, Li-Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe an acid rain neutralization laboratory experiment and its corresponding instructional video. This experiment has been developed and implemented for use in the teaching laboratory of a large introductory chemistry course at Brown University. It provides a contextually relevant example to introduce beginner-level students with…

  12. Treatment of acidic mine water at uranium mine No. 711 by barium chloride-sludge recycle-fractional neutralization process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chaowen; Wang Benyi; Ding Tongsen; Zhong Pingru; Liao Yongbing; Li Xiaochu; Lu Guohua

    1994-01-01

    The barium chloride-sludge recycle-fractional neutralization process for disposal of acidic mine water at Uranium Mine No. 711 was checked through laboratory and enlarged tests and one-year industrial trial-run. The results showed that the presented technology can meet the requirements of production and environmental protection

  13. Distinct Plasma Profile of Polar Neutral Amino Acids, Leucine, and Glutamate in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Obukhanych, Tetyana V.; Laval, Julie; Aronov, Pavel A.; Libove, Robin; Banerjee, Arpita Goswami; Parker, Karen J.; O'Hara, Ruth; Herzenberg, Leonard A.; Herzenberg, Leonore A.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to examine plasma amino acid (AA) levels in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD, N = 27) and neuro-typically developing controls (N = 20). We observed reduced plasma levels of most polar neutral AA and leucine in children with ASD. This AA profile conferred significant post hoc power for discriminating…

  14. Differential effects of 17α-ethinylestradiol on the neutral and acidic pathways of bile salt synthesis in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopen, N.R.; Post, S.M.; Wolters, H.; Havinga, R.; Stellaard, F.; Boverhof, R.; Kuipers, F.; Princen, H.M.G.

    1999-01-01

    Effects of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE) on the neutral and acidic biosynthetic pathways of bile salt (BS) synthesis were evaluated in rats with an intact enterohepatic circulation and in rats with long-term bile diversion to induce BS synthesis. For this purpose, bile salt pool composition, synthesis

  15. Reactivity of glycyl-amino acids toward hydroxyl radical in neutral aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Takahiro; Iwashita, Naomi; Shinohara, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Masaharu

    1978-01-01

    Rate constants for reactions of hydroxyl radicals with several glycyl-amino acids were determined by a competition method using p-nitrosodimethylailine as a reference compound. For glycyl-aliphatic amino acids, the enhancement of reactivity was observed as compared with the corresponding free amino acids. The reactivity was explained qualitatively in terms of partial reactivities assigned to each C-H bond of the dipeptides. For glycyl-aromatic amino acids, the rate constants were found to be almost equal to those of the corresponding free amino acids. The reactivity of a protein toward hydroxyl radical was well understood by summation of the rate constants, corrected by steric factors, of amino acid residues located on surface of the protein. The enhanced reactivity of the aliphatic peptides was interpreted in terms of the difference in interaction energy between NH 2 - and NH 3 + -forms of an aliphatic amino acid, which was calculated for the system including glycine and hydroxyl radical according to CNDO/2 method. (auth.)

  16. Specificity of neutral amino acid uptake at the basolateral side of the epithelium in the cat salivary gland in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, J C; Mann, G E; Yudilevich, D L

    1981-01-01

    1. Amino acid uptake was measured in resting cat submandibular glands with either a natural blood supply or perfused at constant flow with a Krebs-albumin solution. Following a bolus arterial injection of a 3H-labelled amino acid and D-[14C]mannitol (extracellular reference tracer), the venous effluent was immediately sampled sequentially. The maximal uptake, Umax, from the blood or perfusate was determined from the paired-tracer dilution curves using the expression: uptake % = (1 -- (3H/14C) X 100). 2. In glands with a natural blood supply, Umax values up to 46% were measured for short-chain (serine and alanine) and long-chain (valine, methionine, leucine, isoleucine, 1-amino-cyclopentane cyclopentane carboxylic acid, phenylalanine, tryptophan, tyrosine, histidine and glutamine) neutral amino acids. In contrast, Umax was negligible for amino acids of the imino-glycine group (proline and glycine) and the nonmetabolized amino acids, 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB). 3. In glands with a natural blood supply addition of an unlabelled amino acid to the tracer injectate reduced Umax for the test acid by up to 80%. The pattern of these interactions suggested the presence of two transport systems for neutral amino acids, one preferring short-chain and the other long-chain amino acids. 4. In glands perfused at constant flow rates with an amino acid-free Krebs-albumin solution high Umax values were measured: L-serine (66%), L-alanine (54%), L-leucine (43%), L-phenylalanine (42%) and L-tyrosine (51%). Only a low uptake was observed for L-proline (8%) and glycine (14%). There was no uptake of methylaminoisobutyric acid which confirms the result obtained in glands with an intact circulation. 5. Saturation of L-phenylalanine influx was observed in perfused glands as the perfusate concentration of unlabelled L-phenylalanine was increased from 0.5 to 20 mmol . 1-1. A Michaelis--Menten analysis based on a single entry system indicated an apparent

  17. The role of chemical weathering in the neutralization of acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asolekar, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical weathering of soils/minerals is an important process which controls the long-term neutralization of acid rain as well as the quality of surface water, ground water, and oceans. Few laboratory studies have been conducted to evaluate the response of real whole soils or soil fractions to acidification. In this research experiments were performed in a laboratory semi-continuous pH-stat reactor over the pH range 2.7 to 4.7 using Band C-horizon soil fractions from the Bear Brook Watershed, Maine, and in presence/absence of 1 to 20 mmol/L oxalate ligand in the bulk solution. Acid consumption rate and the corresponding release rates of sodium, calcium, magnesium, aluminum, iron, and silica were monitored in the laboratory reactor. Both H + -ion and oxalate promoted weathering rates were fractional order based on the concentration in bulk solution. The mixed kinetic model for the soils is: WR T = WR H + WR ox = K H (H + ) m + K ox [OX TD ] p , where m and p are fractional orders. The hydrogen ion consumption rates were approximately equal to cation release rates on an equivalent basis for hydrogen ion promoted weathering situations where secondary precipitation was unlikely (pH < 4.7) as well as for weathering of C-horizon light fraction at pH 4.0 and oxalate concentration 1 and 5 mmol/L. The relative proportions of released species were in the neighborhood of stoichiometric ratios of bulk soil chemistry for weatherable minerals in Band C-horizon soil fractions. The experimental ratios of H/Si, Al/Si, Fe/Si, Ca/Si, Na/Si, and Mg/Si for linear weathering rates of Band C-horizon soil fractions were fairly constant in the presence and absence of oxalate ligand and strongly suggested that silica may be used as a tracer for primary mineral weathering assuming quartz is inert

  18. The chemistry of conventional and alternative treatment systems for the neutralization of acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, Margarete; Fyson, Andrew; Wheeler, William N.

    2006-01-01

    The oxidation of pyritic mining waste is a self-perpetuating corrosive process which generates acid mine drainage (AMD) effluent for centuries or longer. The chemical neutralization of these complex, buffered effluents result in unstable, metal-laden sludges, which require disposal to minimize long-term environmental consequences. A variety of passive treatment systems for AMD, developed in the past two decades, combine limestone and organic substrates in constructed wetlands. These systems work well initially but over the longer term fail due to clogging with and the depletion of available organic carbon. However, some ecologically engineered systems, which exploit the activities of acid reducing microbes in the sediment, rely on photosynthesis in the water column as a source of organic matter. The primary productivity in the water column, which also generates some alkalinity, provides electron donors for the microbial reduction processes in the sediment. In its consideration of 'passive' systems, the literature has placed undue emphasis on sulphate reduction; thermodynamical iron reduction is equally important as is the need to prevent iron oxidation. Secondary precipitates of iron play a significant role in sediment-driven biomineralization processes, which affect the anaerobic degradation of organic matter and the stability of the resulting metal sulfides. One such passive system, which utilized a floating root mass as a source of organic carbon, is described. An extensive review of the literature and the chemical and biogeochemical reactions of AMD treatment systems, lead to the conclusion, that sediment based ecological systems offer the greatest potential for the sustainable treatment of AMD

  19. The chemistry of conventional and alternative treatment systems for the neutralization of acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalin, Margarete; Fyson, Andrew; Wheeler, William N

    2006-08-01

    The oxidation of pyritic mining waste is a self-perpetuating corrosive process which generates acid mine drainage (AMD) effluent for centuries or longer. The chemical neutralization of these complex, buffered effluents result in unstable, metal-laden sludges, which require disposal to minimize long-term environmental consequences. A variety of passive treatment systems for AMD, developed in the past two decades, combine limestone and organic substrates in constructed wetlands. These systems work well initially but over the longer term fail due to clogging with and the depletion of available organic carbon. However, some ecologically engineered systems, which exploit the activities of acid reducing microbes in the sediment, rely on photosynthesis in the water column as a source of organic matter. The primary productivity in the water column, which also generates some alkalinity, provides electron donors for the microbial reduction processes in the sediment. In its consideration of 'passive' systems, the literature has placed undue emphasis on sulphate reduction; thermodynamical iron reduction is equally important as is the need to prevent iron oxidation. Secondary precipitates of iron play a significant role in sediment-driven biomineralization processes, which affect the anaerobic degradation of organic matter and the stability of the resulting metal sulfides. One such passive system, which utilized a floating root mass as a source of organic carbon, is described. An extensive review of the literature and the chemical and biogeochemical reactions of AMD treatment systems, lead to the conclusion, that sediment based ecological systems offer the greatest potential for the sustainable treatment of AMD.

  20. Evaluation of alternative tissues and equipment for the analysis of neutral and acid detergente fiber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Santos Farias

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare alternative devices and tissues for the determination of neutral detergent fiber (NDF and acid detergent fiber (ADF with the conventional method. Two tissues, nylon (50 μm and TNT (100 g/m², and two devices (fiber digester and autoclave were used for the determination of NDF and ADF content compared to the conventional method. A completely randomized experimental design, which consisted of five treatments and 10 repetitions, was used. The NDF content obtained with TNT in the two devices differed from that obtained with the conventional method (P<0.01. However, the use of nylon in the autoclave and fiber digester provided similar values (P>0.01, indicating this combination as a possible alternative to the conventional method. There was no difference (P>0.01 between the alternative methods for the analysis of NDF. The content of ADF differed between the devices and tissues evaluated (P<0.01. However, the use of nylon tissue in the fiber digester provided values similar to the conventional method (P>0.01 and may be indicated as a practical alternative for the analysis of ADF. The NDF content obtained with nylon tissue, irrespective of the equipment used, and the ADF content obtained with nylon tissue in the fiber digester were similar to the conventional method.

  1. Comparison of Different Methods of Denim Stone Washing by Pumice Stone, Acid Cellulases and Neutral Cellulases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Montazer

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Denim is a casual garment normally used by young people and extremely influential in shaping the fashion industry. Among various garments, these garments are subjected to innovations. This work is an attempt to compare the different methods of stone washing using pumice stones, acid cellulases and neutral cellulases or in combination of these methods. The effects of different processing conditions on the garment are compared and reported. Color differences of samples are probed by reflective colorimeter on the front side as well as the backside and also the white pocket of the garment.The abrasion resistance, tensile strength and crease recovery angle of samples are also reported. The XRD spectra are used to calculate the crystalline degrees of the selected samples. Moreover, fiber surfaces of some treated samples have been observed by SEM. The results indicate that treatment of denim with pumice stone with equal weight of garment causes a small color differences. The addition of cellulases to the washing, however, accelerates the color fading. Also, lower staining observed on the white pocket when the garment was treated with cellulases. However, the neutralcellulases increase the garment fading and decrease the staining on the white pocket. It is also observed that pumice stone with cellulases damages the fabric surface, although it is of a minimal damage.

  2. Investigation of metal ion extraction and aggregate formation combining acidic and neutral organophosphorous reagents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braatz, A.D.; Nilsson, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, 916 Engineering Tower, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2575 (United States); Ellis, R.; Antonio, M. [Chemical Science and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200 9700 South Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439-4831 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, we investigate how varying mixtures of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and dibutyl phosphate (HDBP) results in enhanced extraction of lanthanum(III), La{sup 3+}, and dysprosium(III), Dy{sup 3+}. Water and metal ion extraction were carefully monitored as a function of TBP:HDBP mole ratio.In addition to these techniques, EXAFS was used to determine the coordination environment of the metal ion in this system. To produce the necessary signal, a concentration of 1.25*10{sup -3} M La{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+} was used. Although previous studies of synergistic extraction of metal cations using combinations of neutral and acidic reagents explain the enhanced extraction by increased dehydration of the metal ion and the formation of mixed extractant complexes, our evidence for the increased water extraction coupled with the aggregate formation suggests a reverse micellar aspect to synergism in the system containing TBP and HDBP. It is quite possible that both of these phenomena contribute to our system behavior. The EXAFS data shows that, based on coordination numbers alone, several possible structures may exist. From this study, we cannot provide a definitive answer as to the nature of extraction in this system or the exact complex formed during extraction.

  3. Bacterial glycerol oxidation coupled to sulfate reduction at neutral and acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sidnei C; Liebensteiner, Martin G; van Gelder, Antonie H; Dimitrov, Mauricio R; Almeida, Paulo F; Quintella, Cristina M; Stams, Alfons J M; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

    2018-03-27

    Glycerol is a main co-product of biodiesel production. Crude glycerol may serve as a cheap and attractive substrate in biotechnological applications, e.g. for the production of valuable chemicals or as an electron donor for reduction processes. In this work, sulfate reduction with glycerol was studied at neutral and acidic pH using bioreactor sludge samples and Tinto River sediments as a source of inoculum, respectively. Communities of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and fermentative bacteria were co-enriched at both pH values. Molecular analyses revealed that sequences belonging to Desulfomicrobium genus were dominant in the cultures enriched at pH 7, while Desulfosporosinus sequences dominated in the culture enriched at pH 4. Glycerol conversion was coupled to sulfate reduction, but the substrate was incompletely oxidized to acetate in the neutrophilic enrichments, and acetate, lactate, and 1,3-propanediol under low pH conditions. Two strains belonging to Desulfomicrobium and Proteiniphilum genera were isolated from the neutrophilic enrichments, but the first isolate was not able to use glycerol, which suggests a syntrophic relationship between glycerol-degrading fermentative bacteria and SRB. A Clostridium strain able to grow with glycerol was isolated from the low pH enrichment. Our data indicate that glycerol promotes the growth of sulfate-reducing communities to form sulfide, which can be used to precipitate and recover heavy metals.

  4. Neutral and acidic milk oligosaccharides of the striped skunk (Mephitidae: Mephitis mephitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufik, Epi; Sekii, Nobuhiro; Senda, Akitsugu; Fukuda, Kenji; Saito, Tadao; Eisert, Regina; Oftedal, Olav T; Urashima, Tadasu

    2013-07-01

    The biological significance of the tremendous variation in proportions of oligosaccharides and lactose among mammalian milks is poorly understood. We investigated milk oligosaccharides of the striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) and compared these results to other species of the clade Mustelida. Individual oligosaccharides were identified by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In the striped skunk, six oligosaccharides were identified: isoglobotriose, 2'-fucosyllactose, A-tetrasaccharide, Galili pentasaccharide, 3'-sialyllactose and monosialyl monogalactosyl lacto-N-neohexaose. Four of these have been found in related Mustelida and the other two in more distantly related carnivorans. The neutral and acidic oligosaccharides derive from three core structures: lactose (Gal(β1-4)Glc), lacto-N-neotetraose (Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc) and lacto-N-neohexaose (Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc). © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  5. Synergistic extraction of Eu(III) with mixture of picrolonic acid and neutral organophosphorous extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib-ur-Rehman; Farhat Waqar; Akbar Ali

    2015-01-01

    Synergistic extraction of Eu(III) has been studied with a mixture of picrolonic acid (HPA) and neutral organophosphorous extractants; trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) and tributylphosphate (TBP) in chloroform separately, from aqueous solution of pH 1-2, having ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm -3 (K + /H + , Cl - ). Highest extraction (≥99 %) was achieved at pH 2 within five minutes using all the three mixtures. Composition of the extracted adduct has been determined as Eu(PA) 3 ·2TOPO, Eu(PA) 3 ·2TPPO and Eu(PA) 3 ·TBP. The equilibrium constants (logK Mix ) for Eu(III) were calculated to be 4.54 ± 0.03, 5.69 ± 0.06 and 6.17 ± 0.04 using 0.01 mol dm -1 mixture of HPA and TBP, TPPO and TOPO respectively. Highest extraction was observed with HPA-TOPO, followed by HPA-TPPO and least with HPA-TBP mixture. Order of extraction becomes TOPO > TPPO > TBP. Separation factors for various metal ions have also been calculated and it is found that Eu(III) can be separated quantitatively from divalent metal ions. Pronounced synergism was observed in the range of 10 3 -10 4 when the europium was extracted with the mixture of these extractants. (author)

  6. Fe(II) oxidation during acid mine drainage neutralization in a pilot-scale sequencing batch reactor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zvimba, JN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available @csir.co.za; MMathye@csir.co.za; VVadapalli@geoscience.org.za; LBologo@csir.co.za; HSwanepoel@csir.co.za ABSTRACT This study investigated Fe(II) oxidation during acid mine drainage (AMD) neutralization using CaCO3 in a pilot scale Sequencing Batch... decanting from the Witwatersrand’s Western Basin. Treatment of AMD using CaCO3 and Ca(OH)2 is a widely used approach in South Africa (Vadapalli et al 2008). Moreover, the CSIR has developed an integrated CaCO3/Ca(OH)2 neutralization process capable...

  7. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz [Livermore, CA

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  8. Protonation of D-gluconate and its complexation with Np(V) in acidic to nearly neutral solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Clark, S.B.; Tian, G.; Rao, L.; Zanonato, P.L.

    2006-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of the protonation of D-gluconic acid (HGH 4 (aq)) and its complexation with Np(V) have been studied in acidic to nearly neutral solutions at t = 25 C and I = 1 M NaClO 4 by potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry. The protonation constant (log K H ) and enthalpy (ΔH H ) of the carboxylate group are determined to be (3.30 ± 0.10) and -(4.03 ± 0.07) kJ mol -1 , respectively. Gluconate forms two Np(V) complexes in nearly neutral solutions. The formation constants and enthalpies of complexation are: log β 1 = (1.48 ± 0.03) and ΔH 1 = -(7.42 ± 0.13) kJ mol -1 for NpO 2 (GH 4 )(aq), log β = (2.14 ± 0.09) and ΔH 2 = -(12.08 ± 0.45) kJ mol -1 for NpO 2 (GH 4 ) 2 - . The thermodynamic parameters indicate that gluconic acid, like isosaccharinic acid and other α-hydroxycarboxylic acids, is a slightly stronger acid and forms stronger complexes with Np(V) than simple monocarboxylic acids. (orig.)

  9. Therapeutic brain modulation with targeted large neutral amino acid supplements in the Pah-enu2 phenylketonuria mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Danique; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M; Mazzola, Priscila N; van Faassen, Martijn Hjr; de Blaauw, Pim; Pascucci, Tiziana; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Kema, Ido P; Heiner-Fokkema, M Rebecca; van der Zee, Eddy A; van Spronsen, Francjan J

    2016-11-01

    Phenylketonuria treatment consists mainly of a Phe-restricted diet, which leads to suboptimal neurocognitive and psychosocial outcomes. Supplementation of large neutral amino acids (LNAAs) has been suggested as an alternative dietary treatment strategy to optimize neurocognitive outcome in phenylketonuria and has been shown to influence 3 brain pathobiochemical mechanisms in phenylketonuria, but its optimal composition has not been established. In order to provide additional pathobiochemical insight and develop optimal LNAA treatment, several targeted LNAA supplements were investigated with respect to all 3 biochemical disturbances underlying brain dysfunction in phenylketonuria. Pah-enu2 (PKU) mice received 1 of 5 different LNAA-supplemented diets beginning at postnatal day 45. Control groups included phenylketonuria mice receiving an isonitrogenic and isocaloric high-protein diet or the AIN-93M diet, and wild-type mice receiving the AIN-93M diet. After 6 wk, brain and plasma amino acid profiles and brain monoaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations were measured. Brain Phe concentrations were most effectively reduced by supplementation of LNAAs, such as Leu and Ile, with a strong affinity for the LNAA transporter type 1. Brain non-Phe LNAAs could be restored on supplementation, but unbalanced LNAA supplementation further reduced brain concentrations of those LNAAs that were not (sufficiently) included in the LNAA supplement. To optimally ameliorate brain monoaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations, LNAA supplementation should include Tyr and Trp together with LNAAs that effectively reduce brain Phe concentrations. The requirement for Tyr supplementation is higher than it is for Trp, and the relative effect of brain Phe reduction is higher for serotonin than it is for dopamine and norepinephrine. The study shows that all 3 biochemical disturbances underlying brain dysfunction in phenylketonuria can be targeted by specific LNAA supplements. The study thus

  10. Acid neutralizing, mechanical and physical properties of pit and fissure sealants containing melt-derived 45S5 bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Song-Yi; Piao, Yin-Zhu; Kim, Sung-Min; Lee, Yong-Keun; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of 45S5 bioactive glass (BAG) on the acid neutralizing, mechanical and physical properties of pit and fissure sealants. 45S5BAG (glass (180 ± 30 nm) and added into a resin matrix [Bis-GMA/TEGDMA 50/50 (wt%) containing 1% of DMAEMA/CQ 2:1 (wt%)] with varying filler proportions; 0% 45S5BAG+50% glass (BAG0); 12.5% 45S5BAG+37.5% glass (BAG12.5); 25% 45S5BAG+25% glass (BAG25); 37.5% 45S5BAG+12.5% glass (BAG37.5); and 50% 45S5BAG+0% glass (BAG50). To evaluate the acid neutralizing properties, specimens were immersed in lactic acid solution (pH 4.0). Then, the change in pH and the time required to raise the pH from 4.0 to 5.5 were measured. In addition, flexural strength, water sorption and solubility were analyzed. The acid neutralizing properties of each group exhibited increasing pH values as more 45S5BAG was added, and the time required to raise the pH from 4.0 to 5.5 became shorter as the proportion of 45S5BAG increased (P0.05), except for BAG50. The novel pit and fissure sealants neutralized the acid solution (pH 4.0) and exhibited appropriate mechanical and physical properties. Therefore, these compounds are suitable candidates for caries-inhibiting dental materials. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The crystallinity of calcium phosphate powders influenced by the conditions of neutralized procedure with citric acid additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chengfeng

    2009-01-01

    Calcium phosphate powders with nano-sized crystallinity were synthesized by neutralization using calcium hydroxide and orthophosphoric acid with the assistance of citric acid. The influence of processing parameters, such as free or additive citric acid, synthetic temperature and ripening time, on the crystallinity of hydroxyapatite were investigated. The results of X-ray diffraction and microstructure observations showed that the crystallinity and morphology of nano-sized hydroxyapatite particles were influenced by the presence or absence of citric acid. It was found that the crystallinities and crystallite sizes of hydroxyapatite powders prepared with the additive citric acid increased with increasing synthetic temperature and ripening time. Especially, the crystallinities of (h k 0) planes were raised and more homogeneously grown particles were obtained with increasing synthetic temperature

  12. Comparative study of cadmium and lead accumulations in Cambarus bartoni (Fab. ) (Decapoda, Crustacea) from an acidic and a neutral lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keenan, S.; Alikhan, M.A. (Laurentian Univ., Sudbury, Ontario (Canada))

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to compare concentrations of lead and cadmium in the sediment and water, as well as in the crayfish, Cambarus Bartoni (Fab.) (Decapoda - Crustacea) trapped from an acidic and a neutral lake in the Sudbury district of Northeastern Ontario. Hepatopancreatic, alimentary canal, tail muscles and exoskeletal concentrations in the crayfish are also examined to determine specific tissue sites for these accumulations.

  13. The Effect of Acid Neutralization on Analytical Results Produced from SW846 Method 8330 after the Alkaline Hydrolysis of Explosives in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Hydrochloric acid H3PO Phosphoric acid H2SO4 Sulfuric acic NaOH Sodium hydroxide NaH2PO4 Mono...basic form of phosphoric acid or sodium phosphate NO2- Nitrite OH- Hydroxide ion ERDC/EL TR-12-14 1 1 Introduction Alkaline hydrolysis has... sodium hydroxide pellets visible after mixing. Neutralization of Soil pH Neutralization of soil pH prior to extraction was accomplished by

  14. Studies on triazole derivatives as inhibitors for the corrosion of muntz metal in acidic and neutral solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berchmans, L. John; Sivan, V.; Iyer, S. Venkata Krishna

    2006-01-01

    The influence of few triazole derivatives namely, 4-amino-5-mercapto-3-methyl 1,2,4 triazole (AMMT), 4-amino-5-mercapto-3-methyl 1,2,4 triazole (AMET) and 4-amino-5-mercapto-3-propyl 1,2,4 triazole (AMPT) on the corrosion behavior of muntz metal (60Cu-40Zn) in acidic and neutral solutions has been studied using weight loss measurements and potentiodynamic polarization methods. Surface morphological examinations such as UV spectral analysis, XRD and SEM have also been carried out to understand the mechanism of inhibition of corrosion. All the triazoles derivatives are found to inhibit the corrosion of muntz metal very effectively in both the acidic and neutral solutions. Polarization measurements clearly show that the inhibitors behave as mixed type in neutral medium and are predominantly cathodic nature in acidic solutions. UV spectra, XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopic studies clearly reveal the formation of a strongly adsorbed film on the metal surface, which is responsible for the inhibition of corrosion in both the media. From the above studies, it can be concluded that the inhibition of corrosion by these compounds is due to a chmisorption process. Among these compounds, AMPT is found to offer better corrosion inhibition than the other compounds

  15. A mathematical approach for assessing the transport of large neutral amino acids across the blood-brain barrier in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Rasmus Holmboe; Berg, Ronan M G

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the large neutral amino acid (LNAA) transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is thought to contribute to brain dysfunction in a number of clinical conditions, including phenylketonuria, acute liver failure, and sepsis. Here, we present a novel approach for estimating BBB permeability and the LNAA concentrations in brain extracellular fluid, by demonstrating that they can be mathematically derived on the basis of kinetic constants of the BBB available from the literature, if cerebral blood flow and the arterial and jugular venous LNAA concentrations are known. While it is well known that the permeability surface area product of the BBB to a LNAA from blood to brain (PS1) can be calculated from the arterial LNAA concentrations and kinetic constants of the BBB, we demonstrate that the permeability surface area product from brain to blood (PS2) can be calculated by deriving the substrate activity of the saturable transporter from the kinetic constants and arterial and jugular venous LNAA concentrations, and that the concentration of the LNAA in brain extracellular fluid can then be determined. This approach is methodically simple, and may be useful for assessing the transcerebral exchange kinetics of LNAAs in future human-experimental and clinical studies.

  16. Use of steel slag to neutralize acid mine drainage (AMD in sulfidic material from a uranium mine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Marcon de Carvalho Leite

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Acid Mine Drainage (AMD is one of the main environmental impacts caused by mining. Thus, innovative mitigation strategies should be exploited, to neutralize acidity and prevent mobilization of trace elements in AMD. The use of industrial byproducts has been considered an economically and environmentally effective alternative to remediate acid mine drainage. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the use of steel slag to mitigate acid mine drainage in a sulfidic material from a uranium mine, as an alternative to the use of limestone. Thus, increasing doses of two neutralizing agents were applied to a sulfidic material from the uranium mine Osamu Utsumi in Caldas, Minas Gerais State. A steel slag from the company ArcelorMittal Tubarão and a commercial limestone were used as neutralizing agents. The experiment was conducted in leaching columns, arranged in a completely randomized, [(2 x 3 + 1] factorial design, consisting of two neutralizing agents, three doses and one control, in three replications, totaling 21 experimental units. Electrical conductivity (EC, pH and the concentrations of Al, As, Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, S, Se, and Zn were evaluated in the leached solutions. The trace element concentration was evaluated by ICP-OES. Furthermore, the CO2 emission was measured at the top of the leaching columns by capturing in NaOH solution and titration with HCl, in the presence of BaCl2. An increase in the pH of the leachate was observed for both neutralizing agents, with slightly higher values for steel slag. The EC was lower at the higher lime dose at an early stage of the experiment, and CO2 emission was greater with the use of limestone compared to steel slag. A decrease in trace element mobilization in the presence of both neutralizing agents was also observed. Therefore, the results showed that the use of steel slag is a suitable alternative to mitigate AMD, with the advantage of reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere

  17. Effect of ferrous sulfate and nitrohumic acid neutralization on the leaching of metals from a combined bauxite residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jie; Liu, Jidong; Chen, Juan; Liu, Xiaolian; Li, Fasheng; Du, Ping

    2017-04-01

    Bauxite residue neutralization is intended to open opportunities for revegetation and reuse of the residue. Ferrous sulfate (FS) and nitrohumic acid (NA) were two kinds of materials studied for pH reduction of the residue from 10.6 to 8.3 and 8.1, respectively. The effects of FS and NA on the leaching of metals from a combined bauxite residue were investigated by using sequential and multiple extraction procedures. Neutralization with FS and NA restricted the leaching of Al, V, and Pb from the residue but promoted the leaching of Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni, consistent with the changes in the potentially mobile fractions. With the exceptions of Pb and Ni, leaching of metals increased during a 10-day extraction period. However, the maximum leaching of Al, V, Pb, Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni from neutralized bauxite residue were 0.46 mg/L, 59.3, 12.9, 167, 95.3, 15.5, and 14.5 μg/L, respectively, which were under the corresponding limits in the National Standard (GB/T 14848-93). Although it is necessary to consider the continued leaching of metals during neutralization, both maximum and accumulation leaching concentrations of metals from a combined bauxite residue were too low to pose a potential environmental risk.

  18. Identification of water-soluble heavy crude oil organic-acids, bases, and neutrals by electrospray ionization and field desorption ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Lateefah A; Kim, Sunghwan; Klein, Geoffrey C; Smith, Donald F; Rodgers, Ryan P; Marshall, Alan G

    2007-04-15

    We identify water-soluble (23 degrees C) crude oil NSO nonvolatile acidic, basic, and neutral crude oil hydrocarbons by negative-ion ESI and continuous flow FD FT-ICR MS at an average mass resolving power, m/deltam50% = 550,000. Of the 7000+ singly charged acidic species identified in South American crude oil, surprisingly, many are water-soluble, and much more so in pure water than in seawater. The truncated m/z distributions for water-soluble components exhibit preferential molecular weight, size, and heteroatom class influences on hydrocarbon solubility. Acidic water-soluble heteroatomic classes detected at >1% relative abundance include O, O2, O3, O4, OS, O2S, O3S, O4S, NO2, NO3, and NO4. Parent oil class abundance does not directly relate to abundance in the water-soluble fraction. Acidic oxygen-containing classes are most prevalent in the water-solubles, whereas acidic nitrogen-containing species are least soluble. In contrast to acidic nitrogen-containing heteroatomic classes, basic nitrogen classes are water-soluble. Water-soluble heteroatomic basic classes detected at >1% relative abundance include N, NO, NO2, NS, NS2, NOS, NO2S, N2, N2O, N2O2, OS, O2S, and O2S2.

  19. The Adsorption Study of Aflatoxin B1 by Nanocellulose Conjugated with Aptamer in acidic, alkali, and Neutral Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Mirdehghan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aflatoxin leads to liver cancer, its removal in the foodstuff is very important. The aim of this study is to investigate the adsorption of aflatoxin B1 by nanocellulose conjugated with aptamer in acidic, alkali, and neutral conditions. Methods: First, nanocellulose was synthesized by acid hydrolysis and then conjugated with aptamer by cross-linker. Then, serial concentrations of conjugated nanocellulose (0.6, 1.25, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/mL were separately mixed with aflatoxin solution (1000µg/mL, and incubated at  37 °C for 0.5 h at pH of 1, 7, and 13. Then, the percentage of aflatoxin adsorption was measured at 340 nm.   Results: The decrease of pH led to increase of adsorption up to 40%. Statistically, there was significant difference between the quantity of adsorption at acidic condition and the quantity of adsorption at alkali and neutral conditions (P<0.05. Conclusion: Aflatoxin could be adsorbed by conjugated nanocellulose, and this power of adsorption is increased at acidic condition.

  20. Synthesis and HNO Donating Properties of the Piloty's Acid Analogue Trifluoromethanesulphonylhydroxamic acid: Evidence for Quantitative Release of HNO at Neutral pH Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adas, Sonya K; Bharadwaj, Vinay; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Jiuhong; Seed, Alexander J; Brasch, Nicola Elizabeth; Sampson, Paul

    2018-03-11

    Trifluoromethanesulphonylhydroxamic acid, CF3SO2NHOH, is shown to release HNO under physiological pH conditions. A two-step synthesis is presented with the first complete characterization of CF3SO2NHOH. This molecule rapidly decomposes in neutral aqueous solution to cleanly release HNO and CF3SO2-, demonstrated using the HNO traps TXPTS and HOCbl, and by 19F NMR spectroscopy. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Acid Neutralizing Ability and Shear Bond Strength Using Orthodontic Adhesives Containing Three Different Types of Bioactive Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Yi Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare the acid neutralizing ability and shear bond strength (SBS of three different types of orthodontic adhesives containing bioactive glasses (BAGs. 45S5, 45S5F and S53P4 BAGs were prepared using the melting technique and ground to fine particles. Orthodontic adhesives containing three types of BAGs were prepared as follows: 52.5% 45S5 BAG + 17.5% glass (45S5_A; 61.25% 45S5 BAG + 8.75% glass (45S5_B; 52.5% 45S5F BAG + 17.5% glass (45S5F_A; 61.25% 45S5F BAG + 8.75% glass (45S5F_B; 52.5% S53P4 BAG + 17.5% glass (S53P4_A; 61.25% S53P4 BAG + 8.75% glass (S53P4_B; and 70.0% glass (BAG_0. To evaluate the acid neutralizing properties, specimens were immersed in lactic acid solution, and pH changes were measured. SBS was measured with a universal testing machine. For all of the BAG-containing adhesives, the one with 61.25% of BAG showed a significantly greater increase of pH than the one with 52.5% of BAG (p < 0.05. Groups with 61.25% of BAG showed lower SBS than samples with 52.5% of BAG. 45S5F_A showed no significant difference of SBS compared to BAG_0 (p > 0.05. The adhesive containing 61.25% of 45S5F BAG exhibited clinically acceptable SBS and acid neutralizing properties. Therefore, this composition is a suitable candidate to prevent white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment.

  2. Acid-neutralizing potential of minerals in intrusive rocks of the Boulder batholith in northern Jefferson County, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desborough, George A.; Briggs, Paul H.; Mazza, Nilah; Driscoll, Rhonda

    1998-01-01

    Experimental studies show that fresh granitic rocks of the Boulder batholith in the Boulder River headwaters near Basin, Montana have significant acid-neutralizing potential and are capable of neutralizing acidic water derived from metal-mining related wastes or mine workings. Laboratory studies show that in addition to the acidneutralizing potential (ANP) of minor amounts of calcite in these rocks, biotite, tremolite, and feldspars will contribute significantly to long-term ANP. We produced 0.45 micrometer-filtered acidic (pH = 2.95) leachate for use in these ANP experiments by exposing metal-mining related wastes to deionized water in a waste:leachate ratio of 1:20. We then exposed these leachates to finely-ground and sized fractions of batholith rocks, and some of their mineral fractions for extended and repeated periods, for which results are reported here. The intent was to understand what reactions of metal-rich acidic water and fresh igneous rocks would produce. The reactions between the acidic leachates and the bulk rocks and mineral fractions are complex. Factors such as precipitation of phases like Fe-hydroxides and Alhydroxides and the balance between dissolved cations and anions that are sulfate dominated complicate analysis of the results. Research by others of acid neutralization by biotite and tremolite attributed a rise in pH to proton (H+) adsorption in sites vacated by K, Mg, and Ca. Destruction of the silicate framework and liberation of associated structural hydroxyl ions may contribute to ANP. Studies by others have indicated that the conversion of biotite to a vermiculite-type structure by removal of K at a pH of 4 consumes about six protons for every mole of biotite, but at a pH of 3 there is pronounced dissolution of the tetrahedral lattice. The ANP of fresh granitic rocks is much higher than anticipated. The three bulk Boulder igneous rock samples studied have minimum ANP equivalent to about 10-14 weight percent calcite. This ANP is in

  3. Select nutrients in the ovine uterine lumen. IV. Expression of neutral and acidic amino acid transporters in ovine uteri and peri-implantation conceptuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haijun; Wu, Guoyao; Spencer, Thomas E; Johnson, Gregory A; Bazer, Fuller W

    2009-06-01

    The availability of specific neutral and acidic amino acids in the uterine lumen of ewes increased significantly during the peri-implantation period, but mechanisms for their transport into the uterine lumen and uptake by conceptuses are not established in any species. In this study, effects of pregnancy, progesterone (P4), and interferon tau (IFNT) on expression of neutral and acidic amino acid transporters in uteri of cyclic and pregnant ewes and conceptuses were studied. SLC1A2, SLC1A3, SLC3A1, SLC6A14, SLC6A19, SLC7A6, SLC38A3, and SLC38A6 mRNAs were only weakly expressed in the ovine endometrium. However, SLC1A4, SLC1A5, SLC7A8, and SLC43A2 mRNAs were detectable in uterine luminal epithelia (LE), superficial glandular epithelia (sGE), and/or glandular epithelia (GE). SLC1A1 and SLC7A5 mRNAs were most abundant in LE/sGE and GE. SLC1A3 and SLC38A4 mRNAs were most abundant in uterine stroma. SLC38A6 mRNA was detected only in cells with a stromal distribution suggesting immune lineage. SLC1A5 mRNA was expressed primarily in LE/sGE and stromal cells, and it was more abundant in uteri of pregnant ewes (day x status interaction; P SLC1A4, SLC1A5, SLC6A19, SLC7A5, SLC7A6, SLC7A8, and SLC43A2) of conceptuses. These results document coordinate changes in expression of transporters that are likely responsible for increases in amounts of neutral and acidic amino acids in the uterine lumen to support conceptus growth, development, and survival.

  4. Validation of molecular force field parameters for peptides including isomerized amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Akifumi; Nakayoshi, Tomoki; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi; Kurimoto, Eiji; Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Hirono, Shuichi; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2018-04-01

    Recently, stereoinversions and isomerizations of amino acid residues in the proteins of living beings have been observed. Because isomerized amino acids cause structural changes and denaturation of proteins, isomerizations of amino acid residues are suspected to cause age-related diseases. In this study, AMBER molecular force field parameters were tested by using computationally generated nonapeptides and tripeptides including stereoinverted and/or isomerized amino acid residues. Energy calculations by using density functional theory were also performed for comparison. Although the force field parameters were developed by parameter fitting for l-α-amino acids, the accuracy of the computational results for d-amino acids and β-amino acids was comparable to those for l-α-amino acids. The conformational energies for tripeptides calculated by using density functional theory were reproduced more accurately than those for nonapeptides calculated by using the molecular mechanical force field. The evaluations were performed for the ff99SB, ff03, ff12SB, and the latest ff14SB force field parameters. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some neutral and acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The oxidation of eleven amino acids by tetrabutylammonium tribromide (TBATB) in aqueous acetic acid results in the formation of the corresponding carbonyl compounds and ammonia. The reaction is first order with respect to TBATB. Michaelis-Menten type kinetics is observed with some of the amino acids while others ...

  6. Machine learning and hurdle models for improving regional predictions of stream water acid neutralizing capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas A. Povak; Paul F. Hessburg; Keith M. Reynolds; Timothy J. Sullivan; Todd C. McDonnell; R. Brion Salter

    2013-01-01

    In many industrialized regions of the world, atmospherically deposited sulfur derived from industrial, nonpoint air pollution sources reduces stream water quality and results in acidic conditions that threaten aquatic resources. Accurate maps of predicted stream water acidity are an essential aid to managers who must identify acid-sensitive streams, potentially...

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some neutral and acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    recrystallization. Stoichiometry, with an excess of amino acid could not be studied because of the difficulty in determin- ing the concentration of amino acids. Stoichiometric determination with an excess of TBATB showed that two moles of TBATB were consumed per mole of the amino acid. This is because aldehydes, the.

  8. Actions of four organic acids in radix isatidis on endotoxin-neutralization investigated by kinetic turbidimetric assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; He, Ying-jun; Li, You; Gong, Mu-xin

    2012-06-01

    To investigate anti-endotoxin action of four OAs reacted with endotoxin by the LAL assay with KTA. Using a incubating kinetic tube reader and kinetic turbidimetric assay (KTA), the concentration-response time curve of endotoxin reacted with limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) at 37 degrees C were obtained and the action of four organic acids (OAs) on it were investigated. The four OAs were benzoic acid, salicylic acid, syringic acid and 2-amino-benzoic acid from Radix isatidis. Meanwhile, the temperature variation caused by endotoxin with the four OAs was studied by the rabbit pyrogen test (RPT). It was showed that a low concentration (1 mg/mL) of the four OAs had a little effect of anti-endotoxin, and when the concentrations of the four OAs were 30 mg/mL, the endotoxin was neutralized completely. The relationships between the concentrations of endotoxin and the OAs were all linear with correlation coefficients of greater than 0.9995, indicating that the four OAs all had strong anti-endotoxin action, while syringic acid had the strongest action among the four OAs with IC50 of 12.84 mg/mL. The investigations of KTA agreed well with the results obtained by means of RPT.

  9. Neutralization of soil aerosol and its impact on the distribution of acid rain over east Asia: Observations and model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zifa; Akimoto, Hajime; Uno, Itsushi

    2002-10-01

    A comprehensive Air Quality Prediction Modeling System is applied to simulate the pH values in precipitation and to investigate neutralization by soil aerosols and their influence on the distribution of acid rain over east Asia. A modified deflation module is designed to provide explicit information on the soil aerosol loading. Numerical simulation was performed for 1 year, from 15 December 1998 to 31 December 1999. Wet deposition monitoring data at 17 sites of the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in east Asia in addition to State Environmental Protection Agency data were used to evaluate the model, and a reasonable agreement was obtained. Observed evidence clearly shows that in northern China acid deposition is heavily influenced and buffered by natural soil dust from desert and semiarid areas. The observed mean rainwater pH value in northern China is the highest, between 6.0 and 7.2, while in southern China, where many areas severely impacted by acid precipitation are located, the pH value is much lower, between 3.5 and 5. In Japan the mean pH value is 4.7, significantly higher than that in southern China, while in South Korea the pH value is intermediate between those in northern China and Japan. The model is capable of reproducing this geographical distribution of rainwater pH over east Asia. The simulation results for 1999 demonstrated strong neutralization of precipitation by soil aerosols over northeast Asia, and the distribution pattern of acid rain was also altered. The annual mean pH values in northern China and Korea show a remarkable increase of 0.8-2.5, while the increase in mean pH values over southern China and Japan are less than 0.1. The neutralization effects vary by season, with the greatest influence in spring, when pH values increased by 0.1-0.4 in Japan, 0.5-1.5 in Korea, and more than 2 in northern China.

  10. Breakfast meal composition influences plasma tryptophan to large neutral amino acid ratios of healthy lean young men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, D.V.M.; Liardon, R.; Leathwood, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of a carbohydrate, a 20% protein, or a carbohydrate +0.3% tryptophan TRP breakfast on plasma large neutral amino acid ratio was studied in 6 healthy men. The carbohydrate-rich meal produced shifts in plasma amino acid concentrations such that plasma TRP/LNAA ratios increased from 0.13 to 0.15 (p<0.04) and the protein meal decreased the ratio from 0.14 to 0.11 (p<0.04) after 1 hour. Addition of 0.3% TRP to the carbohydrate-rich meal increased plasma TRP/LNAA ratios more than 2-fold. The TRP containing meal was thus the only one likely to influence brain 5-HT synthesis, although the difference between the plasma TRP/LNAA ratios after carbohydrate and protein breakfasts suggests that the brain may distinguish, by synthesizing more or less 5-HT, the composition of breakfast meals. (Author)

  11. Neutral detergent fiber increases endogenous ileal losses but has no effect on ileal digestibility of amino acids in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal-Landín, Gerardo; Reis de Souza, Tércia Cesária; Bayardo Uribe, Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effect of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) on endogenous amino acids and protein ileal losses; and also apparent ileal digestibility (AID), and standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of amino acids and crude protein. Sixteen barrows were fed four protein-free diets containing graded NDF levels in Experiment 1. NDF was a mixture of sugarcane bagasse and corn leaves (SBCL). Twenty-four barrows were fed diets with soybean protein concentrate (SPC) or casein as protein sources and SBCL or corncobs (CC) as NDF sources in Experiment 2. In Experiment 1, a linear increase (P protein ileal losses was observed with increased NDF levels, except for arginine, histidine, methionine and proline. In Experiment 2, protein (P Protein and NDF sources significantly affected (P protein, which was higher in casein diets (92.8%) and CC diets (92.7%). NDF source had no effect (P > 0.05) on SID of amino acids. Overall, this study showed that NDF increased endogenous amino acid and protein ileal losses, but did not affect ileal digestibility of amino acids. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Evaluation of selected static methods used to estimate element mobility, acid-generating and acid-neutralizing potentials associated with geologically diverse mining wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Philip L.; Seal, Robert R.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Lowers, Heather

    2015-01-01

    A comparison study of selected static leaching and acid–base accounting (ABA) methods using a mineralogically diverse set of 12 modern-style, metal mine waste samples was undertaken to understand the relative performance of the various tests. To complement this study, in-depth mineralogical studies were conducted in order to elucidate the relationships between sample mineralogy, weathering features, and leachate and ABA characteristics. In part one of the study, splits of the samples were leached using six commonly used leaching tests including paste pH, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Field Leach Test (FLT) (both 5-min and 18-h agitation), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Method 1312 SPLP (both leachate pH 4.2 and leachate pH 5.0), and the USEPA Method 1311 TCLP (leachate pH 4.9). Leachate geochemical trends were compared in order to assess differences, if any, produced by the various leaching procedures. Results showed that the FLT (5-min agitation) was just as effective as the 18-h leaching tests in revealing the leachate geochemical characteristics of the samples. Leaching results also showed that the TCLP leaching test produces inconsistent results when compared to results produced from the other leaching tests. In part two of the study, the ABA was determined on splits of the samples using both well-established traditional static testing methods and a relatively quick, simplified net acid–base accounting (NABA) procedure. Results showed that the traditional methods, while time consuming, provide the most in-depth data on both the acid generating, and acid neutralizing tendencies of the samples. However, the simplified NABA method provided a relatively fast, effective estimation of the net acid–base account of the samples. Overall, this study showed that while most of the well-established methods are useful and effective, the use of a simplified leaching test and the NABA acid–base accounting method provide investigators fast

  13. Permeation of membranes by the neutral form of amino acids and peptides: relevance to the origin of peptide translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The flux of amino acids and other nutrient solutes such as phosphate across lipid bilayers (liposomes) is 10(5) slower than facilitated inward transport across biological membranes. This suggest that primitive cells lacking highly evolved transport systems would have difficulty transporting sufficient nutrients for cell growth to occur. There are two possible ways by which early life may have overcome this difficulty: (1) The membranes of the earliest cellular life-forms may have been intrinsically more permeable to solutes; or (2) some transport mechanism may have been available to facilitate transbilayer movement of solutes essential for cell survival and growth prior to the evolution of membrane transport proteins. Translocation of neutral species represents one such mechanism. The neutral forms of amino acids modified by methylation (creating protonated weak bases) permeate membranes up to 10(10) times faster than charged forms. This increased permeability when coupled to a transmembrane pH gradient can result in significantly increased rates of net unidirectional transport. Such pH gradients can be generated in vesicles used to model protocells that preceded and were presumably ancestral to early forms of life. This transport mechanism may still play a role in some protein translocation processes (e.g. for certain signal sequences, toxins and thylakoid proteins) in vivo.

  14. Canine distemper virus neutralization activity is low in human serum and it is sensitive to an amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia L.; Domi, Arban; Wright, Kevin J.; Driscoll, Jonathan; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J.; Kamali, Anatoli; Karita, Etienne; Allen, Susan; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A.; Parks, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Serum was analyzed from 146 healthy adult volunteers in eastern Africa to evaluate measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb) prevalence and potency. MV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) results indicated that all sera were positive for MV nAbs. Furthermore, the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) for the majority of sera corresponded to antibody titers induced by MV vaccination. CDV nAbs titers were low and generally were detected in sera with high MV nAb titers. A mutant CDV was generated that was less sensitive to neutralization by human serum. The mutant virus genome had 10 nucleotide substitutions, which coded for single amino acid substitutions in the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) glycoproteins and two substitutions in the large polymerase (L) protein. The H substitution occurred in a conserved region involved in receptor interactions among morbilliviruses, implying that this region is a target for cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. - Highlights: • Screened 146 serum samples for measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb). • MV nAb is prevalent in the sera. • CDV neutralizing activity is generally low or absent and when detected it is present in sera with high MV nAb titers. • A neutralization-resistant CDV mutant was isolated using human serum selection. • A mutation was identified in the receptor-binding region of CDV hemagglutinin protein that confers the neutralization resistance

  15. Canine distemper virus neutralization activity is low in human serum and it is sensitive to an amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xinsheng, E-mail: xzhang@iavi.org [AIDS Vaccine Design and Development Laboratory, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI), Brooklyn, NY (United States); Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, State University of New York, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Wallace, Olivia L.; Domi, Arban; Wright, Kevin J.; Driscoll, Jonathan [AIDS Vaccine Design and Development Laboratory, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI), Brooklyn, NY (United States); Anzala, Omu [Kenya AIDS Vaccine Initiative (KAVI)-Institute of Clinical Research, Nairobi (Kenya); Sanders, Eduard J. [Centre for Geographic Medicine Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), Kilifi, Kenya & Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, Headington (United Kingdom); Kamali, Anatoli [MRC/UVRI Uganda Virus Research Unit on AIDS, Masaka and Entebbe (Uganda); Karita, Etienne [Projet San Francisco, Kigali (Rwanda); Allen, Susan [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Fast, Pat [Department of Medical Affairs, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, NY, NY (United States); Gilmour, Jill [Human Immunology Laboratory, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, London (United Kingdom); Price, Matt A. [Department of Medical Affairs, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, NY, NY (United States); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Parks, Christopher L. [AIDS Vaccine Design and Development Laboratory, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI), Brooklyn, NY (United States); Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, State University of New York, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Serum was analyzed from 146 healthy adult volunteers in eastern Africa to evaluate measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb) prevalence and potency. MV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) results indicated that all sera were positive for MV nAbs. Furthermore, the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) for the majority of sera corresponded to antibody titers induced by MV vaccination. CDV nAbs titers were low and generally were detected in sera with high MV nAb titers. A mutant CDV was generated that was less sensitive to neutralization by human serum. The mutant virus genome had 10 nucleotide substitutions, which coded for single amino acid substitutions in the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) glycoproteins and two substitutions in the large polymerase (L) protein. The H substitution occurred in a conserved region involved in receptor interactions among morbilliviruses, implying that this region is a target for cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. - Highlights: • Screened 146 serum samples for measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb). • MV nAb is prevalent in the sera. • CDV neutralizing activity is generally low or absent and when detected it is present in sera with high MV nAb titers. • A neutralization-resistant CDV mutant was isolated using human serum selection. • A mutation was identified in the receptor-binding region of CDV hemagglutinin protein that confers the neutralization resistance.

  16. Recovery of young brown trout (Salmo trutta) in acidified streams: What are the critical values for acid-neutralizing capacity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesthagen, T.; Fiske, P.; Saksgård, R.

    2016-12-01

    The recovery of young allopatric brown trout (Salmo trutta) grouped into YoY (age 0+) and older parr (age ≥1+) fish, was studied in acid-sensitive streams in a Norwegian watershed during a 24-year-period (1987-2010). Their abundance was assessed by electrofishing. Most sites typically had 5.0-5.5 in pH, 0.4-0.7 mg L-1 Ca, 10-20 μg L-1 inorganic toxic aluminum (Ali) and acid-neutralizing capacity adjusted for organic acids (ANCOAA) of - 15 to +25 μeq L-1. Densities of both YoY and older parr increased significantly during the study period. Water quality also improved in recent years with respect to pH (5.8-6.0), Ali (5-15 μg L-1) and ANCOAA (10-20 μeq L-1). However, some negative trends in both fish density and water chemistry were found during both the first (1987-1993) and last years (2004-2008) of the study. Initially, YoY densities remained at about 16-20 specimens 100 m-2 (1987-1990), declined to 10-15 specimens 100 m-2 in the early/mid 1990s, and rosed to 30-50 specimens 100 m-2 in recent years (1997-2010). Their densities correlated significantly with ANCOAA, and at least three stages in the recovery process were recognised: (i) Low density with 10-20 specimens 100 m-2 at -18 to -5 μeq L-1, (ii) medium and unstable density with 20-30 specimens 100 m-2 at -5 to 10 μeq L-1, and (iii) increasing density to 40-50 specimens 100 m-2 at 10-25 μeq L-1. The decline in brown trout density in the early-mid 1990s coincided with high sea salt depositions, which caused increased acidification. Component 1 in a PCA explained 51% of the variation in fish densities, including conductivity, Mg, Ca, Na, alkalinity and TOC. Component 2 explained an additional 31% of the variation, including pH, Ali and ANCOAA. Multiple regression analysis coefficients showed that the two components explained 41% of the variance in total fish density. Young brown trout suffered a high mortality during the initial phase of the study in spite of relative low levels of Ali. This is

  17. Cooperation of Antiporter LAT2/CD98hc with Uniporter TAT1 for Renal Reabsorption of Neutral Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilches, Clara; Boiadjieva-Knöpfel, Emilia; Bodoy, Susanna; Camargo, Simone; López de Heredia, Miguel; Prat, Esther; Ormazabal, Aida; Artuch, Rafael; Zorzano, Antonio; Verrey, François; Nunes, Virginia; Palacín, Manuel

    2018-04-02

    Background Reabsorption of amino acids (AAs) across the renal proximal tubule is crucial for intracellular and whole organism AA homeostasis. Although the luminal transport step is well understood, with several diseases caused by dysregulation of this process, the basolateral transport step is not understood. In humans, only cationic aminoaciduria due to malfunction of the basolateral transporter y + LAT1/CD98hc (SLC7A7/SLC3A2), which mediates the export of cationic AAs, has been described. Thus, the physiologic roles of basolateral transporters of neutral AAs, such as the antiporter LAT2/CD98hc (SLC7A8/SLC3A2), a heterodimer that exports most neutral AAs, and the uniporter TAT1 (SLC16A10), which exports only aromatic AAs, remain unclear. Functional cooperation between TAT1 and LAT2/CD98hc has been suggested by in vitro studies but has not been evaluated in vivo Methods To study the functional relationship of TAT1 and LAT2/CD98hc in vivo , we generated a double-knockout mouse model lacking TAT1 and LAT2, the catalytic subunit of LAT2/CD98hc (dKO LAT2-TAT1 mice). Results Compared with mice lacking only TAT1 or LAT2, dKO LAT2-TAT1 mice lost larger amounts of aromatic and other neutral AAs in their urine due to a tubular reabsorption defect. Notably, dKO mice also displayed decreased tubular reabsorption of cationic AAs and increased expression of y + LAT1/CD98hc. Conclusions The LAT2/CD98hc and TAT1 transporters functionally cooperate in vivo , and y + LAT1/CD98hc may compensate for the loss of LAT2/CD98hc and TAT1, functioning as a neutral AA exporter at the expense of some urinary loss of cationic AAs. Cooperative and compensatory mechanisms of AA transporters may explain the lack of basolateral neutral aminoacidurias in humans. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  18. Fatty Acid Diversity is Not Associated with Neutral Genetic Diversity in Native Populations of the Biodiesel Plant Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Díaz, Yesenia; González-Rodríguez, Antonio; Rico-Ponce, Héctor Rómulo; Rocha-Ramírez, Víctor; Ovando-Medina, Isidro; Espinosa-García, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) is a shrub native to Mexico and Central America, which produces seeds with a high oil content that can be converted to biodiesel. The genetic diversity of this plant has been widely studied, but it is not known whether the diversity of the seed oil chemical composition correlates with neutral genetic diversity. The total seed oil content, the diversity of profiles of fatty acids and phorbol esters were quantified, also, the genetic diversity obtained from simple sequence repeats was analyzed in native populations of J. curcas in Mexico. Using the fatty acids profiles, a discriminant analysis recognized three groups of individuals according to geographical origin. Bayesian assignment analysis revealed two genetic groups, while the genetic structure of the populations could not be explained by isolation-by-distance. Genetic and fatty acid profile data were not correlated based on Mantel test. Also, phorbol ester content and genetic diversity were not associated. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that total oil content was associated with altitude and seasonality of temperature. The content of unsaturated fatty acids was associated with altitude. Therefore, the cultivation planning of J. curcas should take into account chemical variation related to environmental factors. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  19. Neutral lipid biosynthesis in engineered Escherichia coli: jojoba oil-like wax esters and fatty acid butyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Stöveken, Tim; Luftmann, Heinrich; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2006-02-01

    Wax esters are esters of long-chain fatty acids and long-chain fatty alcohols which are of considerable commercial importance and are produced on a scale of 3 million tons per year. The oil from the jojoba plant (Simmondsia chinensis) is the main biological source of wax esters. Although it has a multitude of potential applications, the use of jojoba oil is restricted, due to its high price. In this study, we describe the establishment of heterologous wax ester biosynthesis in a recombinant Escherichia coli strain by coexpression of a fatty alcohol-producing bifunctional acyl-coenzyme A reductase from the jojoba plant and a bacterial wax ester synthase from Acinetobacter baylyi strain ADP1, catalyzing the esterification of fatty alcohols and coenzyme A thioesters of fatty acids. In the presence of oleate, jojoba oil-like wax esters such as palmityl oleate, palmityl palmitoleate, and oleyl oleate were produced, amounting to up to ca. 1% of the cellular dry weight. In addition to wax esters, fatty acid butyl esters were unexpectedly observed in the presence of oleate. The latter could be attributed to solvent residues of 1-butanol present in the medium component, Bacto tryptone. Neutral lipids produced in recombinant E. coli were accumulated as intracytoplasmic inclusions, demonstrating that the formation and structural integrity of bacterial lipid bodies do not require specific structural proteins. This is the first report on substantial biosynthesis and accumulation of neutral lipids in E. coli, which might open new perspectives for the biotechnological production of cheap jojoba oil equivalents from inexpensive resources employing recombinant microorganisms.

  20. Neutralization of sulfuric acid solutions by calcite dissolution and the application to anoxic limestone drain design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huminicki, Danielle M.C.; Rimstidt, J. Donald

    2008-01-01

    Batch reactor (BR) experiments were conducted to measure the effect of hydrodynamics and gypsum coatings on calcite neutralization rates. A factorial array of BR experiments measured the H + concentration change by calcite dissolution over a pH range of 1.5-3.5 and Na 2 SO 4 concentrations of 0-1 M. The rate of H + concentration change with time was determined by numerical differentiation of H + concentration versus time. Regression modeling showed that for uncoated calcite, rates are only significantly affected by pH, r=-10 -2.32 a H + 0.76 . Whereas, for calcite coated with gypsum only time had a significant effect on calcite dissolution rates, r = -10 -1.96 t -0.53 . Because transport-limited dissolution rates for uncoated calcite are a function of the pH and Reynolds number, a model was developed to express the effects of these two variables on the rate of H + consumption for a solution with a Darcy velocity, q, through a porous medium with a particle radius, r p , such that r ' =1.08x10 -3 q 0.31 r p -0.69 m H + 0.87 . This equation was integrated via a numerical model to simulate the performance of an idealized anoxic limestone drain (ALD). This model predicts the pH and alkalinity change along the length of an ALD. The model shows that the efficiency of an ALD is greater when the Darcy velocity is low and the particle radius is small. In addition, the growth of gypsum coatings causes the rate of H + neutralization to decline as the square root of time as they form and block the H + transport to the calcite surface. Supersaturation with respect to gypsum, leading to coating formation, can be avoided by diluting the ALD feed solution or by replacing limestone with dolomite

  1. Observation of neutral, ionic and intermediate states in lamotrigine-acid complexes- inference from crystallographic bond geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu; Ravikumar, Krishnan

    2014-09-01

    The anticonvulsant and antiepileptic drug lamotrigine was crystallized with three aromatic acids viz., 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (I), para-toluenesulfonic acid (II) and 4-bromobenzoic acid (III), with the objective of understanding the formation of a salt or co-crystal in the solid state. Single crystal X-ray diffraction and FT-infrared spectroscopic measurements were carried out for all of them. The asymmetric units of I and II contain two lamotriginium cations and two anions (2,5-dihydroxybenzoate in I and para-toluenesulfonate in II), respectively, and additionally II contains one water molecule. The asymmetric unit of III comprises one lamotriginium cation, one 4-bromobenzoate anion and one dimethylformamide (DMF) solvate. In all three complexes the protonation occurs at the N2 atom of the triazine ring. In I and II, the complete proton transfer is observed. However in III, only partial proton transfer is inferred from O to N because of the acidic H atom disorder. The protonation of lamotrigine is also confirmed by the unambiguous location of H atom from the difference Fourier map and as well as from the geometrical bond analysis. Further, various lamotrigine-acid complexes from the CSD were analyzed to establish a correlation between different ionization states (neutral, intermediate and ionic) and changes in the geometrical parameters. The bond angles of triazine ring in lamotrigine and bond distances of carboxylic acid are found to be the best descriptors for distinguishing all three ionization states, whereas, the bond angles of carboxylic acid have to failed to distinguish intermediate state from ionic. From hydrogen bonding point of view, only the lamotrigine-acid heterosynthon is observed in I and II, whereas in III, both lamotrigine-lamotrigine homosynthon and lamotrigine-acid heterosynthon are observed. In I, the cation-anion and anion-anion interactions form a supramolecular two-dimension hydrogen-bonded square grid network, while the water molecule

  2. Heavy Metals and Radioactivity Reduction from Acid Mine Drainage Lime Neutralized Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashifana, T.; Sithole, N.

    2018-03-01

    The worldwide known treatment processes of acid mine drainage result into the formation of hydrous ferric oxides that is amorphous, poorly crystalline and into the generation of hazardous voluminous sludge posing threat to the environment. Applicable treatment technologies to treat hazardous solid material and produce useful products are limited and in most cases nonexistence. A chemical treatment process utilizing different reagents was developed to treat hazardous acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge with the objectives to conduct radioactivity assessment of the sludge generated from lime treatment process and determine the reagent that provides the best results. Leaching with 0.5 M citric acid, 0.4 M oxalic acid, 0.5 M sodium carbonate and 0.5 M sodium bicarbonate was investigated. The leaching time applied was 24 hours at 25 °C. The characterization of the raw AMD revealed that the AMD sludge from lime treatment process is radioactive. The sludge was laden with radioactive elements namely, 238U, 214Pb, 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 214Bi. 0.5 M citric acid provided the best results and the hazardous contaminants were significantly reduced. The constituents in the sludge after treatment revealed that there is a great potential for the sludge to be used for other applications such as building and construction.

  3. Fatty Acid Composition of Egg Yolk from Chickens Fed a Diet including Marigold (Tagetes erecta L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Altuntaş

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effects of diet supplemented with marigold on egg yolk fatty acid composition and egg quality parameters. Sixty hens were assigned into three groups and fed diets supplemented with 0 (control, 10 g kg−1, or 20 g kg−1 marigold for 42 days. Eggs collected at the 6th week of the study were analyzed for fatty acid analysis. Laying performance, egg quality parameters, and feed intake were also evaluated. Yolk color scores in the group fed the 20 g kg−1 marigold-supplemented diet were found greater than control (10.77 versus 9.77. Inclusion of 20 g kg−1 marigold in diet influenced egg weights adversely compared to the control. Diet supplemented with 10 g kg−1 or 20 g kg−1 marigold increased the levels of C16:0 and C18:0 and decreased levels of C16:1 (n-7 and C18:1 (n-9 in the egg yolk. Also, diet including marigold increased total saturated fatty acids (SFA and decreased monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA in the egg yolk.

  4. The impacts of neutralized acid mine drainage contaminated water on the expression of selected endocrine-linked genes in juvenile Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus exposed in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truter, Johannes Christoff; va Wyk, Johannes Hendrik; Oberholster, Paul Johan; Botha, Anna-Maria

    2014-02-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a global environmental concern due to detrimental impacts on river ecosystems. Little is however known regarding the biological impacts of neutralized AMD on aquatic vertebrates despite excessive discharge into watercourses. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the endocrine modulatory potential of neutralized AMD, using molecular biomarkers in the teleost fish Oreochromis mossambicus in exposure studies. Surface water was collected from six locations downstream of a high density sludge (HDS) AMD treatment plant and a reference site unimpacted by AMD. The concentrations of 28 elements, including 22 metals, were quantified in the exposure water in order to identify potential links to altered gene expression. Relatively high concentrations of manganese (~ 10mg/l), nickel (~ 0.1mg/l) and cobalt (~ 0.03 mg/l) were detected downstream of the HDS plant. The expression of thyroid receptor-α (trα), trβ, androgen receptor-1 (ar1), ar2, glucocorticoid receptor-1 (gr1), gr2, mineralocorticoid receptor (mr) and aromatase (cyp19a1b) was quantified in juvenile fish after 48 h exposure. Slight but significant changes were observed in the expression of gr1 and mr in fish exposed to water collected directly downstream of the HDS plant, consisting of approximately 95 percent neutralized AMD. The most pronounced alterations in gene expression (i.e. trα, trβ, gr1, gr2, ar1 and mr) was associated with water collected further downstream at a location with no other apparent contamination vectors apart from the neutralized AMD. The altered gene expression associated with the "downstream" locality coincided with higher concentrations of certain metals relative to the locality adjacent to the HDS plant which may indicate a causative link. The current study provides evidence of endocrine disruptive activity associated with neutralized AMD contamination in regard to alterations in the expression of key genes linked to the thyroid, interrenal and

  5. Kinetics of Antibody Aggregation at Neutral pH and Ambient Temperatures Triggered by Temporal Exposure to Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Hiroshi; Honda, Shinya

    2016-09-15

    The purification process of an antibody in manufacturing involves temporal exposure of the molecules to low pH followed by neutralization-pH-shift stress-which causes aggregation. It remains unclear how aggregation triggered by pH-shift stress grows at neutral pH and how it depends on the temperature in an ambient range. We used static and dynamic light scattering to monitor the time-dependent evolution of the aggregate size of the pH-shift stressed antibody between 4.0 and 40.0 °C. A power-law relationship between the effective molecular weight and the effective hydrodynamic radius was found, indicating that the aggregates were fractal with a dimension of 1.98. We found that the aggregation kinetics in the lower-temperature range, 4.0-25.0 °C, were well described by the Smoluchowski aggregation equation. The temperature dependence of the effective aggregation rate constant gave 13 ± 1 kcal/mol of endothermic activation energy. Temporal acid exposure creates an enriched population of unfolded protein molecules that are competent of aggregating. Therefore, the energetically unfavorable unfolding step is not required and the aggregation proceeds faster. These findings provide a basis for predicting the growth of aggregates during storage under practical, ambient conditions.

  6. Calculation of the free energy of solvation for neutral analogs of amino acid side chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa, Alessandra; Mark, AE

    2002-01-01

    The ability of the GROMOS96 force field to reproduce partition constants between water and two less polar solvents (cyclohexane and chloroform) for analogs of 18 of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids has been investigated. The estimations of the solvation free energies in water, in cyclohexane

  7. The effect of copper and zinc at neutral and acidic pH on the blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of copper and zinc on fish blood coagulation under alkaline and acidic conditions and the possible occurrence of disseminated intravascular clotting under these conditions have been poorly studied to date. It was found that the blood coagulation system of adult O. mossambicus exposed to copper and zinc at ...

  8. General Chemistry Students' Conceptual Understanding and Language Fluency: Acid-Base Neutralization and Conductometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyachwaya, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine college general chemistry students' conceptual understanding and language fluency in the context of the topic of acids and bases. 115 students worked in groups of 2-4 to complete an activity on conductometry, where they were given a scenario in which a titration of sodium hydroxide solution and dilute…

  9. Small Neutral Amino Acid Ester Prodrugs of Acyclovir Targeting Amino Acid Transporters on the Cornea: Possible Antiviral Agents against Ocular HSV-1 Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katragadda Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the affinity and permeability patterns of the amino acid ester prodrugs of acyclovir (ACV, L-alanine-ACV (AACV, L-serine-ACV (SACV, L-serine-succinate-ACV (SSACV and L-cysteine-ACV (CACV on rabbit primary corneal epithelial cell culture (rPCEC and on rabbit cornea. Amino acid prodrugs of acyclovir, AACV, SACV, SSACV and CACV were synthesized in our laboratory. Chemical hydrolysis in aqueous buffer, enzymatic hydrolysis in corneal homogenates and transport across freshly excised rabbit cornea of these prodrugs were studied. SSACV inhibited the uptake of [ 3 H] L-alanine on rPCEC and across the intact rabbit cornea. Lineweaver-Burk plot transformation revealed competitive inhibition between L-alanine and SSACV. In corneal tissue homogenate, the half lives of SSACV, SACV and CACV (t 1/2 were observed to be 3.5 ± 0.4, 9.2 ± 0.6 and 1.8 ± 0.1 hr respectively, whereas AACV was readily converted to the active parent drug acyclovir exhibiting complete degradation before 5 min. Interestingly translocation of SACV across cornea was inhibited in the presence of 5 mM arginine (~51%, a specific substrate for cationic transport system and in presence of BCH (~38%, a substrate specific for large neutral amino acid transport system (LAT or cationic and neutral amino acid transport system (B 0,+ . SACV exhibited higher permeability across cornea along with excellent antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 and varicella-zoster virus (VZV in comparison to ACV. Recognition by multiple transporters, stability in corneal homogenate and changes in physico-chemical properties contributed to the increased permeability of SACV across cornea.

  10. Crystal structure of a 2:1 piroxicam–gentisic acid co-crystal featuring neutral and zwitterionic piroxicam molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horstman, Elizabeth M.; Bertke, Jeffery A.; Woods, Toby J.; Kenis, Paul J. A.

    2016-11-04

    A new 2:1 co-crystal of piroxicam and gentisic acid [systematic name: 4-hydroxy-1,1-dioxo-N-(pyridin-2-yl)-2H-1λ6,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide–2-(4-oxido-1,1-dioxo-2H-1λ6,2-benzothiazine-3-amido)pyridin-1-ium–2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2C15H13N3O4S·C7H6O4] has been synthesized using a microfluidic platform and initially identified using Raman spectroscopy. In the co-crystal, one piroxicam molecule is in its neutral form and an intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond is observed. The other piroxicam molecule is zwitterionic (proton transfer from the OH group to the pyridine N atom) and two intramolecular N—H...O hydrogen bonds occur. The gentisic acid molecule shows whole-molecule disorder over two sets of sites in a 0.809(2):0.191(2) ratio. In the crystal, extensive hydrogen bonding between the components forms layers propagating in theabplane.

  11. Crystal structure of a 2:1 piroxicam–gentisic acid co-crystal featuring neutral and zwitterionic piroxicam molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Horstman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new 2:1 co-crystal of piroxicam and gentisic acid [systematic name: 4-hydroxy-1,1-dioxo-N-(pyridin-2-yl-2H-1λ6,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide–2-(4-oxido-1,1-dioxo-2H-1λ6,2-benzothiazine-3-amidopyridin-1-ium–2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2C15H13N3O4S·C7H6O4] has been synthesized using a microfluidic platform and initially identified using Raman spectroscopy. In the co-crystal, one piroxicam molecule is in its neutral form and an intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond is observed. The other piroxicam molecule is zwitterionic (proton transfer from the OH group to the pyridine N atom and two intramolecular N—H...O hydrogen bonds occur. The gentisic acid molecule shows whole-molecule disorder over two sets of sites in a 0.809 (2:0.191 (2 ratio. In the crystal, extensive hydrogen bonding between the components forms layers propagating in the ab plane.

  12. Determination of the acidity constants of neutral red and bromocresol green by solution scanometric method and comparison with spectrophotometric results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardeshir Shokrollahi

    2016-03-01

    The method is based on scanning cells containing the indicator solution with a scanner, and analyzing the color of each cell with a software written in visual basic (VB 6 media to red, green and blue values. The cells were made by making holes in the Plexiglas® sheet. Also, the acidity constants of the neutral red and bromocresol green indicators were studied with spectrophotometrically. HypSpec program has been applied for the estimation of pKa values based on spectrophotometric data. The agreement between obtained pKa values by solution scanometric, spectrophotometric method and values reported in the literature demonstrates the utility of the method here used. Also the HySS 2009 program was applied for drawing of the corresponding distribution diagrams.

  13. Neutralization/prevention of acid rock drainage using mixtures of alkaline by-products and sulfidic mine wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakangas, Lena; Andersson, Elin; Mueller, Seth

    2013-11-01

    Backfilling of open pit with sulfidic waste rock followed by inundation is a common method for reducing sulfide oxidation after mine closure. This approach can be complemented by mixing the waste rock with alkaline materials from pulp and steel mills to increase the system's neutralization potential. Leachates from 1 m3 tanks containing sulfide-rich (ca.30 wt %) waste rock formed under dry and water saturated conditions under laboratory conditions were characterized and compared to those formed from mixtures. The waste rock leachate produced an acidic leachate (pH9). The decrease of elemental concentration in the leachate was most pronounced for Pb and Zn, while Al and S were relatively high. Overall, the results obtained were promising and suggest that alkaline by-products could be useful additives for minimizing ARD formation.

  14. A novel technology for neutralizing acidity and attenuating toxic chemical species from acid mine drainage using cryptocrystalline magnesite tailings

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was developed with the aim of beneficiating two waste materials by converting them into a resource. Magnesite tailings, which is the by-product of magnesite mining, was used to remediate acid mine drainage (AMD) which is the by...

  15. Neutral molecular markers support common origin of aluminium tolerance in three congeneric grass species growing in acidic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Roberto; Figueiras, Ana M; Gallego, F Javier; Benavente, Elena; Manzaneda, Antonio J; Benito, César

    2017-11-01

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity is the main abiotic stress limiting plant productivity in acidic soils that are widely distributed among arable lands. Plant species differ in the level of Al resistance showing intraspecific and interspecific variation in many crop species. However, the origin of Al-tolerance is not well known. Three annual species, difficult to distinguish phenotypically and that were until recently misinterpreted as a single complex species under Brachypodium distachyon , have been recently separated into three distinct species: the diploids B. distachyon (2 n = 10) and B. stacei (2 n = 20), and B. hybridum (2 n = 30), the allotetraploid derived from the two diploid species. The aims of this work were to know the origin of Al-tolerance in acidic soil conditions within these three Brachypodium species and to develop new DNA markers for species discrimination. Two multiplex SSR-PCRs allowed to genotype a group of 94 accessions for 17 pentanucleotide microsatellite (SSRs) loci. The variability for 139 inter-microsatellite (ISSRs) markers was also examined. The genetic relationships obtained using those neutral molecular markers (SSRs and ISSRs) support that all Al-tolerant allotetraploid accessions of B. hybridum have a common origin that is related with both geographic location and acidic soils. The possibility that the adaptation to acidic soils caused the isolation of the tolerant B. hybridum populations from the others is discussed. We finally describe a new, easy, DNA barcoding method based in the upstream-intron 1 region of the ALMT1 gene, a tool that is 100 % effective to distinguish among these three Brachypodium species.

  16. A facile nanoaggregation strategy for oral delivery of hydrophobic drugs by utilizing acid-base neutralization reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huabing; Wan Jiangling; Wang Yirui; Mou Dongsheng; Liu Hongbin; Xu Huibi; Yang Xiangliang

    2008-01-01

    Nanonization strategies have been used to enhance the oral availability of numerous drugs that are poorly soluble in water. Exploring a facile nanonization strategy with highly practical potential is an attractive focus. Here, we report a novel facile nanoaggregation strategy for constructing drug nanoparticles of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility by utilizing acid-base neutralization in aqueous solution, thus facilitating the exploration of nanonization in oral delivery for general applicability. We demonstrate that hydrophobic itraconazole dissolved in acid solution formed a growing core and aggregated into nanoparticles in the presence of stabilizers. The nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 279.3 nm and polydispersity index of 0.116, showed a higher dissolution rate when compared with the marketed formulation; the average dissolution was about 91.3%. The in vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the nanoparticles had a rapid absorption and enhanced oral availability. The diet state also showed insignificant impact on the absorption of itraconazole from nanoparticles. This nanoaggregation strategy is a promising nanonization method with a facile process and avoidance of toxic organic solvents for oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility and reveals a highly practical potential in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries

  17. Characterization of neutral and acidic glycosphingolipids in brains of two patients with GM1 gangliosidosis type 1 and type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Y; Makita, A; Minami, R

    1985-04-01

    Brains of two patients with GM1 gangliosidosis type 1 and type 2, together with the age-matched control brains, were analyzed for glycosphingolipids. Six species of neutral glycolipids, eight species of gangliosides, and sulfatide were isolated from the diseased brains and identified. In addition to GM1 ganglioside and its asialo derivative, the diseased brains accumulated considerable amounts of gangliotriaosylceramide and glycolipids belonging to the globo series, the accumulation of which cannot be explained by deficient beta-galactosidase activity in this disease. GM4 ganglioside was detected in the type 2 brain, but not in type 1. As to fatty acid composition of monohexosylceramides and sulfatide in the two diseased brains, stearic acid was more predominant in the type 1 brain than in the type 2 brain. In light of our previous observations on a Tay-Sachs brain and present results, it appears that metabolism of the globo series glycolipids, which is active in normal brain at early infancy but inactive thereafter, remains in brains with GM1 gangliosidosis (types 1 and 2) and Tay-Sachs disease, reflecting a disturbance in development of the brain.

  18. Trophic niches of sympatric tropical tuna in the Western Indian Ocean inferred by stable isotopes and neutral fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardenne, Fany; Bodin, Nathalie; Chassot, Emmanuel; Amiel, Aurélien; Fouché, Edwin; Degroote, Maxime; Hollanda, Stéphanie; Pethybridge, Heidi; Lebreton, Benoit; Guillou, Gaël; Ménard, Frédéric

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the trophic ecology of three sympatric tropical tuna species (bigeye BET, skipjack SKJ, and yellowfin YFT) sampled in the Western Indian Ocean throughout 2013. Specifically we explored inter-specific resource partitioning and ontogenetic variability using neutral fatty acids and stable isotope analysis of liver and muscle from small (⩽100 cm fork length, FL) and large (>100 cm FL) tuna collected in mixed schools at the surface by purse-seine. Both biochemical tracers were used to calculate trophic niche indices that collectively revealed high potential for resource overlap, especially among small tuna. Resource overlap appeared strongest between BET and YFT, with SKJ tissues having high carbon isotope (δ13C) values (-17 ± 0.3‰), lower nitrogen isotope (δ15N) values (11.4 ± 0.6‰), and higher relative proportion of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) than the two other species, indicating a different diet. Size was found to be a strong predictor for most biochemical tracers in the three species with δ13C, δ15N and total lipid content in the liver. In the larger species (YFT and BET), proportions of mono-unsaturated fatty acids typically increased with size, while quantities of PUFA decreased. In addition to ontogenetic variability, trophic markers were shown to vary between sampling area and season: higher lipid reserves and δ15N values, and lower δ13C values occurred during monsoon periods around Seychelles than in the Mozambique Channel (parted from about 1500 km). Our multi-tracer approach reveals the magnitude of potential competitive interactions in mixed tropical tuna schools at both small and large sizes and demonstrates that ontogenetic niche differentiation acts as a major factor of coexistence in tropical tuna.

  19. Effect of temperature, hydraulic residence time and elevated PCO2 on acid neutralization within a pulsed limestone bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watten, B.J.; Lee, P.C.; Sibrell, P.L.; Timmons, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    Limestone has potential for reducing reagent costs and sludge volume associated with treatment of acid mine drainage, but its use is restricted by slow dissolution rates and the deposition of Fe, Al and Mn-based hydrolysis products on reactive surfaces. We evaluated a pulsed limestone bed (PLB) reactor (15 L/min capacity) that uses a CO2 pretreatment step to accelerate dissolution and hydraulic shearing forces provided by intermittent fluidization to abrade and carry away surface scales. We established the effects of hydraulic residence time (HRT, 5.1-15.9 min), temperature (T, 12-22 ??C) and CO2 tension (PCO2, 34.5-206.8 kPa) on effluent quality when inlet acidity (Acy) was fixed at 440 mg/L (pH=2.48) with H2SO4. The PLB reactor neutralized all H+ acidity (N=80) while concurrently providing unusually high levels of effluent alkalinity (247-1028 mg/L as CaCO3) that allow for side-stream treatment with blending. Alkalinity (Alk) yields rose with increases in PCO2, HRT and settled bed height (BH, cm) and decreased with T following the relationship (R2=0.926; p<0.001): (Alk)non-filtered=-548.726+33.571??(PCO2)0.5+33.671??(HRT)+7.734??(BH)-5.197??(T). Numerical modeling showed CO2 feed requirements for a target Alk yield decrease with increases in HRT, T and the efficiency of off-gas (CO2) recycling. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The orphan transporter v7-3 (slc6a15) is a Na+-dependent neutral amino acid transporter (B0AT2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bröer, Angelika; Tietze, Nadine; Kowalczuk, Sonja

    2006-01-01

    Transporters of the SLC6 (solute carrier 6) family play an important role in the removal of neurotransmitters in brain tissue and in amino acid transport in epithelial cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that mouse v7-3 (slc6a15) encodes a transporter for neutral amino acids. The transpor...... and cultured neurons. A potential role of B(0)AT2 in transporting neurotransmitter precursors and neuromodulators is proposed....

  1. Magnetic ZIC-HILIC Beads Enrichment for Neutral and Acidic Glycopeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Andrecht, S.; Schneider, A.; Schweiger-Hufnagel, U.; Suckau, D.; Resemann, A.

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylation is the most abundant protein posttranslational modification and is involved in many relevant biological processes and crucial to the understanding of many diseases. In depth analysis of glycosylation sites is difficult, however, as glycopeptides exhibit a significant micro heterogeneity at glycosylation sites. In addition, ion suppression effects require selective methods for glycopeptide enrichment. Mass spectrometric analysis of glycopeptides is challenging because both the peptide as well as the glycan moiety have to be elucidated for a full structural understanding. We used Fetuin, Asialo-Fetuin and Alpha-1-Acidglycoprotein to equally representing sialylated and non-sialylated glycosylic structures. In addition, monoclonal antibodies were analyzed as a dedicated example for pharmaceutical QC. Proteins were digested with trypsin and glycopeptides were enriched using a dedicated ZICHILIC glycocapture beads in combination with an optimized buffer system (EMD Chemicals Inc.). The glycopeptides were analyzed using ESI ion trap MS for glycoprofiling and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS for in depth characterization of the glycopeptides. For database searches, an integrated software approach was used: protein searches of the glycopeptide MS/MS spectra were performed for obtaining the amino acid sequence of the glycopeptide, and searches in glycan databases based on the same glycopeptide MS/MS spectra were carried out to complete the characterization of N-linked glycopeptides. In the current study, two important features of glycoprotein analysis are shown: (1) The employed integrated software approach allowed the glycan identification in a similar way as peptide identification. The important step of interactive result validation was facilitated by a suite of dedicated data and result viewers. (2) Compared to MS analysis of native glycoprotein digests, the enriched samples allowed to detect more glycopeptides and permitted the acquisition of higher quality MS/MS spectra

  2. Identification of a disulfide bridge important for transport function of SNAT4 neutral amino acid transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rugmani Padmanabhan Iyer

    Full Text Available SNAT4 is a member of system N/A amino acid transport family that primarily expresses in liver and muscles and mediates the transport of L-alanine. However, little is known about the structure and function of the SNAT family of transporters. In this study, we showed a dose-dependent inhibition in transporter activity of SNAT4 with the treatment of reducing agents, dithiothreitol (DTT and Tris(2-carboxyethylphosphine (TCEP, indicating the possible involvement of disulfide bridge(s. Mutation of residue Cys-232, and the two highly conserved residues Cys-249 and Cys-321, compromised the transport function of SNAT4. However, this reduction was not caused by the decrease of SNAT4 on the cell surface since the cysteine-null mutant generated by replacing all five cysteines with alanine was equally capable of being expressed on the cell surface as wild-type SNAT4. Interestingly, by retaining two cysteine residues, 249 and 321, a significant level of L-alanine uptake was restored, indicating the possible formation of disulfide bond between these two conserved residues. Biotinylation crosslinking of free thiol groups with MTSEA-biotin provided direct evidence for the existence of a disulfide bridge between Cys-249 and Cys-321. Moreover, in the presence of DTT or TCEP, transport activity of the mutant retaining Cys-249 and Cys-321 was reduced in a dose-dependent manner and this reduction is gradually recovered with increased concentration of H2O2. Disruption of the disulfide bridge also decreased the transport of L-arginine, but to a lesser degree than that of L-alanine. Together, these results suggest that cysteine residues 249 and 321 form a disulfide bridge, which plays an important role in substrate transport but has no effect on trafficking of SNAT4 to the cell surface.

  3. Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A

    2014-06-03

    Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicated that "autunite-type" sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to "phosphuranylite-type" sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases.

  4. Chemical characterization of the inorganic fraction of aerosols and mechanisms of the neutralization of atmospheric acidity in Athens, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgos, E. T.; Rapsomanikis, S.

    2007-06-01

    with inter-ionic correlations suggested that atmospheric ammonia is the major neutralizing agent of sulfate, while being insufficient to neutralize it to full extend. The formation of NH4NO3 is therefore not favored and additional contribution to the neutralization of acidity has been shown to be provided by Ca2+ and Mg2+. In the coarse particle fraction, the predominantly abundant Ca2+ has been found to correlate well with NO3- and SO42-, indicating its role as important neutralizing agent in this particle size range. The proximity of the location under study to the sea explains the important concentrations of salts with marine origin like NaCl and MgCl2 that were found in the coarse fraction, while chloride depletion in the gaseous phase was found to be limited to the fine particulate fraction. Total analyzed inorganic mass (elemental+ionic) was found to be ranging between approximately 25-33% of the total coarse particle mass and 35-42% of the total fine particle mass.

  5. Geochemical characterisation of seepage and drainage water quality from two sulphide mine tailings impoundments: Acid mine drainage versus neutral mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, P.M.; Raisanen, M.L.; Johnson, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    Seepage water and drainage water geochemistry (pH, EC, O2, redox, alkalinity, dissolved cations and trace metals, major anions, total element concentrations) were studied at two active sulphide mine tailings impoundments in Finland (the Hitura Ni mine and Luikonlahti Cu mine/talc processing plant). The data were used to assess the factors influencing tailings seepage quality and to identify constraints for water treatment. Changes in seepage water quality after equilibration with atmospheric conditions were evaluated based on geochemical modelling. At Luikonlahti, annual and seasonal changes were also studied. Seepage quality was largely influenced by the tailings mineralogy, and the serpentine-rich, low sulphide Hitura tailings produced neutral mine drainage with high Ni. In contrast, drainage from the high sulphide, multi-metal tailings of Luikonlahti represented typical acid mine drainage with elevated contents of Zn, Ni, Cu, and Co. Other factors affecting the seepage quality included weathering of the tailings along the seepage flow path, process water input, local hydrological settings, and structural changes in the tailings impoundment. Geochemical modelling showed that pH increased and some heavy metals were adsorbed to Fe precipitates after net alkaline waters equilibrated with the atmosphere. In the net acidic waters, pH decreased and no adsorption occurred. A combination of aerobic and anaerobic treatments is proposed for Hitura seepages to decrease the sulphate and metal loading. For Luikonlahti, prolonged monitoring of the seepage quality is suggested instead of treatment, since the water quality is still adjusting to recent modifications to the tailings impoundment.

  6. Large Neutral Amino Acid Supplementation Exerts Its Effect through Three Synergistic Mechanisms: Proof of Principle in Phenylketonuria Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danique van Vliet

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU was the first disorder in which severe neurocognitive dysfunction could be prevented by dietary treatment. However, despite this effect, neuropsychological outcome in PKU still remains suboptimal and the phenylalanine-restricted diet is very demanding. To improve neuropsychological outcome and relieve the dietary restrictions for PKU patients, supplementation of large neutral amino acids (LNAA is suggested as alternative treatment strategy that might correct all brain biochemical disturbances caused by high blood phenylalanine, and thereby improve neurocognitive functioning.As a proof-of-principle, this study aimed to investigate all hypothesized biochemical treatment objectives of LNAA supplementation (normalizing brain phenylalanine, non-phenylalanine LNAA, and monoaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in PKU mice.C57Bl/6 Pah-enu2 (PKU mice and wild-type mice received a LNAA supplemented diet, an isonitrogenic/isocaloric high-protein control diet, or normal chow. After six weeks of dietary treatment, blood and brain amino acid and monoaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations were assessed.In PKU mice, the investigated LNAA supplementation regimen significantly reduced blood and brain phenylalanine concentrations by 33% and 26%, respectively, compared to normal chow (p<0.01, while alleviating brain deficiencies of some but not all supplemented LNAA. Moreover, LNAA supplementation in PKU mice significantly increased brain serotonin and norepinephrine concentrations from 35% to 71% and from 57% to 86% of wild-type concentrations (p<0.01, respectively, but not brain dopamine concentrations (p = 0.307.This study shows that LNAA supplementation without dietary phenylalanine restriction in PKU mice improves brain biochemistry through all three hypothesized biochemical mechanisms. Thereby, these data provide proof-of-concept for LNAA supplementation as a valuable alternative dietary treatment strategy in PKU. Based on these

  7. Presumptive brain influx of large neutral amino acids and the effect of phenylalanine supplementation in patients with Tyrosinemia type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, Willem G; van Vliet, Danique; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; de Blaauw, Pim; Rubio Gozalbo, M Estela; Heiner-Fokkema, M Rebecca; van Spronsen, Francjan J

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary Tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a rare metabolic disease caused by a defect in the tyrosine degradation pathway. Current treatment consists of 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC) and a tyrosine and phenylalanine restricted diet. Recently, neuropsychological deficits have been seen in HT1 patients. These deficits are possibly associated with low blood phenylalanine concentrations and/or high blood tyrosine concentrations. Therefore, the aim of the present study was threefold. Firstly, we aimed to calculate how the plasma amino acid profile in HT1 patients may influence the presumptive brain influx of all large neutral amino acids (LNAA). Secondly, we aimed to investigate the effect of phenylalanine supplementation on presumptive brain phenylalanine and tyrosine influx. Thirdly, we aimed to theoretically determine minimal target plasma phenylalanine concentrations in HT1 patient to ensure adequate presumptive brain phenylalanine influx. Data of plasma LNAA concentrations were obtained. In total, 239 samples of 9 HT1 children, treated with NTBC, diet, and partly with phenylalanine supplementation were collected together with 596 samples of independent control children. Presumptive brain influx of all LNAA was calculated, using Michaelis-Menten parameters (Km) and Vmax-values obtained from earlier articles. In HT1 patients, plasma concentrations and presumptive brain influx of tyrosine were higher. However, plasma and especially brain influx of phenylalanine were lower in HT1 patients. Phenylalanine supplementation did not only tend to increase plasma phenylalanine concentrations, but also presumptive brain phenylalanine influx, despite increased plasma tyrosine concentrations. However, to ensure sufficient brain phenylalanine influx in HT1 patients, minimal plasma phenylalanine concentrations may need to be higher than considered thus far. This study clearly suggests a role for disturbed brain LNAA biochemistry, which is not well

  8. Enhanced dissolution and oral bioavailability of aripiprazole nanosuspensions prepared by nanoprecipitation/homogenization based on acid-base neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Liu, Xiaoyi; Lian, Ruyue; Zheng, Siji; Yin, Zongning; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wei

    2012-11-15

    In this study, aripiprazole (APZ), a weak alkaline drug with pH-dependent solubility, was selected as model drug to examine the feasibility of preparing nanosuspensions using nanoprecipitation/homogenization technique based on acid-base neutralization. The related substances in nanosuspensions prepared under optimal conditions were slightly increased as compared with APZ raw material. The resultant APZ nanosuspensions showed a mean particle size of 350 nm with polydispersion index (PI) value of 0.20. Good physical stability was kept for over 40 days. SEM observation showed the morphology of oval crystals with rough surface. Nanosuspensions significantly increased the solubility as well as the dissolution of APZ due to the decreased particle size. Differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffractometry confirmed the crystallinity of APZ in nanosuspensions. APZ nanosuspensions got maximum absorption rate and extent comparing with APZ commercial tablet and suspensions with relative bioavailability of 123.43 ± 12.98% and 171.41 ± 14.62%, respectively. This technique has the potential to prepare nanosuspensions of insoluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Neutral and anionic duality of 1,2,4-triazole α-amino acid scaffold in 1D coordination polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, Anil D.; Dîrtu, Marinela M.; Garcia, Yann

    2012-01-01

    A tiny supramolecular synthon, 4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl acetic acid (HGlytrz) which is bifunctional by design having an electronic asymmetry and conformational flexibility has been introduced to synthesize iron(II) complexes. Having 1,2,4-triazole or carboxylic extremities on the same framework HGlytrz could display dual functionality by acting as a neutral as well as anionic ligand based on the possibility of deprotonation of carboxylic group. Four new iron(II) HGlytrz complexes with ClO 4 - (1), NO 3 -bar (2), BF 4 - (3) and CF 3 SO 3b ar (4) anions were prepared. Formulation of their composition which is complicated due to ligand deprotonation is discussed. Unlike its ester protected counterpart ethyl-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl-acetate (αGlytrz) which show hysteretic room temperature spin crossover, 1–4 remain in the high-spin state as revealed by 57 Mössbauer spectroscopy. Prospects of such 1D coordination polymers with dangling unbounded carboxylic entities in the realm of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) are discussed.

  10. Neutral and anionic duality of 1,2,4-triazole {alpha}-amino acid scaffold in 1D coordination polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, Anil D.; Dirtu, Marinela M.; Garcia, Yann, E-mail: yann.garcia@uclouvain.be [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, MOST - Inorganic Chemistry (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    A tiny supramolecular synthon, 4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl acetic acid (HGlytrz) which is bifunctional by design having an electronic asymmetry and conformational flexibility has been introduced to synthesize iron(II) complexes. Having 1,2,4-triazole or carboxylic extremities on the same framework HGlytrz could display dual functionality by acting as a neutral as well as anionic ligand based on the possibility of deprotonation of carboxylic group. Four new iron(II) HGlytrz complexes with ClO{sub 4{sup -}} (1), NO{sub 3}-bar (2), BF{sub 4{sup -}} (3) and CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3b}ar (4) anions were prepared. Formulation of their composition which is complicated due to ligand deprotonation is discussed. Unlike its ester protected counterpart ethyl-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl-acetate ({alpha}Glytrz) which show hysteretic room temperature spin crossover, 1-4 remain in the high-spin state as revealed by {sup 57}Moessbauer spectroscopy. Prospects of such 1D coordination polymers with dangling unbounded carboxylic entities in the realm of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) are discussed.

  11. Preservation of glutamic acid-iron chelate into montmorillonite to efficiently degrade Reactive Blue 19 in a Fenton system under sunlight irradiation at neutral pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhujian [College of Natural Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Wu, Pingxiao, E-mail: pppxwu@scut.edu.cn [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Centre, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Gong, Beini; Yang, Shanshan; Li, Hailing [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Centre, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhu, Ziao; Cui, Lihua [College of Natural Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China)

    2016-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • G–Fe chelate molecules were well preserved into montmorillonite. • The product shows an excellent catalytic activity under sunlight at neutral pH value. • G–Fe–Mt is a promising catalyst for advanced oxidation processes. - Abstract: To further enhance the visible light responsive property and the chemical stability of Fe/clay mineral catalysts, glutamic acid-iron chelate intercalated montmorillonite (G–Fe–Mt) was developed. The physiochemical properties of G–Fe–Mt were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), etc. The results showed that glutamic acid-iron chelates were successfully intercalated into the gallery of montmorillonite and the intercalated glutamic acid-iron chelate molecules were well preserved. The product G–Fe–Mt displayed excellent catalytic performance in heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction under sunlight irradiation at acidic and neutral pH values. The chelation and the visible light responsiveness of glutamic acid produce a synergistic effect leading to greatly enhanced sunlight-Fenton reaction catalyzed by the heterogeneous G–Fe–Mt under neutral pH. G–Fe–Mt is a promising catalyst for advanced oxidation processes.

  12. Stochastic multicomponent reactive transport analysis of low quality drainage release from waste rock piles: Controls of the spatial distribution of acid generating and neutralizing minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedretti, Daniele; Mayer, K Ulrich; Beckie, Roger D

    2017-06-01

    In mining environmental applications, it is important to assess water quality from waste rock piles (WRPs) and estimate the likelihood of acid rock drainage (ARD) over time. The mineralogical heterogeneity of WRPs is a source of uncertainty in this assessment, undermining the reliability of traditional bulk indicators used in the industry. We focused in this work on the bulk neutralizing potential ratio (NPR), which is defined as the ratio of the content of non-acid-generating minerals (typically reactive carbonates such as calcite) to the content of potentially acid-generating minerals (typically sulfides such as pyrite). We used a streamtube-based Monte-Carlo method to show why and to what extent bulk NPR can be a poor indicator of ARD occurrence. We simulated ensembles of WRPs identical in their geometry and bulk NPR, which only differed in their initial distribution of the acid generating and acid neutralizing minerals that control NPR. All models simulated the same principal acid-producing, acid-neutralizing and secondary mineral forming processes. We show that small differences in the distribution of local NPR values or the number of flow paths that generate acidity strongly influence drainage pH. The results indicate that the likelihood of ARD (epitomized by the probability of occurrence of pH<4 in a mixing boundary) within the first 100years can be as high as 75% for a NPR=2 and 40% for NPR=4. The latter is traditionally considered as a "universally safe" threshold to ensure non-acidic waters in practical applications. Our results suggest that new methods that explicitly account for mineralogical heterogeneity must be sought when computing effective (upscaled) NPR values at the scale of the piles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of fatty acid precursors, including food preservatives, on the growth and fatty acid composition of Listeria monocytogenes at 37 and 10degreesC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julotok, Mudcharee; Singh, Atul K; Gatto, Craig; Wilkinson, Brian J

    2010-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that grows at refrigeration temperatures and increases its content of anteiso-C(15:0) fatty acid, which is believed to be a homeoviscous adaptation to ensure membrane fluidity, at these temperatures. As a possible novel approach for control of the growth of the organism, the influences of various fatty acid precursors, including branched-chain amino acids and branched- and straight-chain carboxylic acids, some of which are also well-established food preservatives, on the growth and fatty acid composition of the organism at 37 degrees C and 10 degrees C were studied in order to investigate whether the organism could be made to synthesize fatty acids that would result in impaired growth at low temperatures. The results indicate that the fatty acid composition of L. monocytogenes could be modulated by the feeding of branched-chain amino acid, C(4), C(5), and C(6) branched-chain carboxylic acid, and C(3) and C(4) straight-chain carboxylic acid fatty acid precursors, but the growth-inhibitory effects of several preservatives were independent of effects on fatty acid composition, which were minor in the case of preservatives metabolized via acetyl coenzyme A. The ability of a precursor to modify fatty acid composition was probably a reflection of the substrate specificities of the first enzyme, FabH, in the condensation of primers of fatty acid biosynthesis with malonyl acyl carrier protein.

  14. Digital Genome-Wide ncRNA Expression, Including SnoRNAs, across 11 Human Tissues Using PolyA-Neutral Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, John C.; Armour, Christopher D.; Löwer, Martin; Haynor, David; Biery, Matthew; Bouzek, Heather; Chen, Ronghua; Jackson, Stuart; Johnson, Jason M.; Rohl, Carol A.; Raymond, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are an essential class of molecular species that have been difficult to monitor on high throughput platforms due to frequent lack of polyadenylation. Using a polyadenylation-neutral amplification protocol and next-generation sequencing, we explore ncRNA expression in eleven human tissues. ncRNAs 7SL, U2, 7SK, and HBII-52 are expressed at levels far exceeding mRNAs. C/D and H/ACA box snoRNAs are associated with rRNA methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively: spleen expresses both, hypothalamus expresses mainly C/D box snoRNAs, and testes show enriched expression of both H/ACA box snoRNAs and RNA telomerase TERC. Within the snoRNA 14q cluster, 14q(I-6) is expressed at much higher levels than other cluster members. More reads align to mitochondrial than nuclear tRNAs. Many lincRNAs are actively transcribed, particularly those overlapping known ncRNAs. Within the Prader-Willi syndrome loci, the snoRNA HBII-85 (group I) cluster is highly expressed in hypothalamus, greater than in other tissues and greater than group II or III. Additionally, within the disease locus we find novel transcription across a 400,000 nt span in ovaries. This genome-wide polyA-neutral expression compendium demonstrates the richness of ncRNA expression, their high expression patterns, their function-specific expression patterns, and is publicly available. PMID:20668672

  15. Digital genome-wide ncRNA expression, including SnoRNAs, across 11 human tissues using polyA-neutral amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Castle

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are an essential class of molecular species that have been difficult to monitor on high throughput platforms due to frequent lack of polyadenylation. Using a polyadenylation-neutral amplification protocol and next-generation sequencing, we explore ncRNA expression in eleven human tissues. ncRNAs 7SL, U2, 7SK, and HBII-52 are expressed at levels far exceeding mRNAs. C/D and H/ACA box snoRNAs are associated with rRNA methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively: spleen expresses both, hypothalamus expresses mainly C/D box snoRNAs, and testes show enriched expression of both H/ACA box snoRNAs and RNA telomerase TERC. Within the snoRNA 14q cluster, 14q(I-6 is expressed at much higher levels than other cluster members. More reads align to mitochondrial than nuclear tRNAs. Many lincRNAs are actively transcribed, particularly those overlapping known ncRNAs. Within the Prader-Willi syndrome loci, the snoRNA HBII-85 (group I cluster is highly expressed in hypothalamus, greater than in other tissues and greater than group II or III. Additionally, within the disease locus we find novel transcription across a 400,000 nt span in ovaries. This genome-wide polyA-neutral expression compendium demonstrates the richness of ncRNA expression, their high expression patterns, their function-specific expression patterns, and is publicly available.

  16. Effect of Extraction Conditions on the Saccharide (Neutral and Acidic) Composition of the Crude Pectic Extract from Various Agro-Industrial Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbar, Neha; Roy, Sandra Van; Wijnants, Marc; Dejonghe, Winnie; Caligiani, Augusta; Sforza, Stefano; Elst, Kathy

    2016-01-13

    The influence of different extraction methodologies was assessed on the composition of both neutral (arabinose, rhamnose, galactose) and acidic (galacturonic acid) pectic polysaccharides obtained from four agro-industrial residues, namely, berry pomace (BP), onion hulls (OH), pressed pumpkin (PP), and sugar beet pulp (SBP). For acidic pectic polysaccharides, the extraction efficiency was obtained as BP (nitric acid-assisted extraction, 2 h, 62.9%), PP (enzymatic-assisted extraction, 12 h, 75.0%), SBP (enzymatic-assisted extraction, 48 h, 89.8%; and nitric acid-assisted extraction, 4 h, 76.5%), and OH (sodium hexametaphosphate-assisted extraction, 0.5 h, 100%; and ammonium oxalate-assisted extraction, 0.5 h, 100%). For neutral pectic polysaccharides, the following results were achieved: BP (enzymatic-assisted extraction, 24 h, 85.9%), PP (nitric acid-assisted extraction, 6 h, 82.2%), and SBP (enzymatic assisted extraction, 48 h, 97.5%; and nitric acid-assisted extraction, 4 h, 83.2%). On the basis of the high recovery of pectic sugars, SBP and OH are interesting candidates for the further purification of pectin and production of pectin-derived products.

  17. Using self-consistent Gibbs free energy surfaces to calculate size distributions of neutral and charged clusters for the sulfuric acid-water binary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Froyd, K. D.; Toon, O. B.

    2012-12-01

    We construct tables of reaction enthalpies and entropies for the association reactions involving sulfuric acid vapor, water vapor, and the bisulfate ion. These tables are created from experimental measurements and quantum chemical calculations for molecular clusters and a classical thermodynamic model for larger clusters. These initial tables are not thermodynamically consistent. For example, the Gibbs free energy of associating a cluster consisting of one acid molecule and two water molecules depends on the order in which the cluster was assembled: add two waters and then the acid or add an acid and a water and then the second water. We adjust the values within the tables using the method of Lagrange multipliers to minimize the adjustments and produce self-consistent Gibbs free energy surfaces for the neutral clusters and the charged clusters. With the self-consistent Gibbs free energy surfaces, we calculate size distributions of neutral and charged clusters for a variety of atmospheric conditions. Depending on the conditions, nucleation can be dominated by growth along the neutral channel or growth along the ion channel followed by ion-ion recombination.

  18. Sodium ions activated phosphofructokinase leading to enhanced D-lactic acid production by Sporolactobacillus inulinus using sodium hydroxide as a neutralizing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lu; Liu, Mingqing; Sun, Jiaduo; Wu, Bin; He, Bingfang

    2017-05-01

    Sporolactobacillus inulinus is a superior D-lactic acid-producing bacterium and proposed species for industrial production. The major pathway for D-lactic acid biosynthesis, glycolysis, is mainly regulated via the two irreversible steps catalyzed by the allosteric enzymes, phosphofructokinase (PFK) and pyruvate kinase. The activity level of PFK was significantly consistent with the cell growth and D-lactic acid production, indicating its vital role in control and regulation of glycolysis. In this study, the ATP-dependent PFK from S. inulinus was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The PFK was allosterically activated by both GDP and ADP and inhibited by phosphoenolpyruvate; the addition of activators could partly relieve the inhibition by phosphoenolpyruvate. Furthermore, monovalent cations could enhance the activity, and Na + was the most efficient one. Considering this kind activation, NaOH was investigated as the neutralizer instead of the traditional neutralizer CaCO 3 . In the early growth stage, the significant accelerated glucose consumption was achieved in the NaOH case probably for the enhanced activity of Na + -activated PFK. Using NaOH as the neutralizer at pH 6.5, the fermentation time was greatly shortened about 22 h; simultaneously, the glucose consumption rate and the D-lactic acid productivity were increased by 34 and 17%, respectively. This probably contributed to the increased pH and Na + -promoted activity of PFK. Thus, fermentations by S. inulinus using the NaOH neutralizer provide a green and highly efficient D-lactic acid production with easy subsequent purification.

  19. Canine distemper virus neutralization activity is low in human serum and it is sensitive to an amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia L; Domi, Arban; Wright, Kevin J; Driscoll, Jonathan; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J; Kamali, Anatoli; Karita, Etienne; Allen, Susan; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A; Parks, Christopher L

    2015-08-01

    Serum was analyzed from 146 healthy adult volunteers in eastern Africa to evaluate measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb) prevalence and potency. MV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) results indicated that all sera were positive for MV nAbs. Furthermore, the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) for the majority of sera corresponded to antibody titers induced by MV vaccination. CDV nAbs titers were low and generally were detected in sera with high MV nAb titers. A mutant CDV was generated that was less sensitive to neutralization by human serum. The mutant virus genome had 10 nucleotide substitutions, which coded for single amino acid substitutions in the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) glycoproteins and two substitutions in the large polymerase (L) protein. The H substitution occurred in a conserved region involved in receptor interactions among morbilliviruses, implying that this region is a target for cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemical characterization of the inorganic fraction of aerosols and mechanisms of the neutralization of atmospheric acidity in Athens, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. Karageorgos

    2007-06-01

    + and Cl, while SO42−, Ca2+ and NH4+ were the major ionic components of the fine fraction. In the fine particles, a low molar ratio of NH4+/SO42− indicated an ammonium-poor ambient air, and together with inter-ionic correlations suggested that atmospheric ammonia is the major neutralizing agent of sulfate, while being insufficient to neutralize it to full extend. The formation of NH4NO3 is therefore not favored and additional contribution to the neutralization of acidity has been shown to be provided by Ca2+ and Mg2+. In the coarse particle fraction, the predominantly abundant Ca2+ has been found to correlate well with NO3 and SO42−, indicating its role as important neutralizing agent in this particle size range. The proximity of the location under study to the sea explains the important concentrations of salts with marine origin like NaCl and MgCl2 that were found in the coarse fraction, while chloride depletion in the gaseous phase was found to be limited to the fine particulate fraction. Total analyzed inorganic mass (elemental+ionic was found to be ranging between approximately 25–33% of the total coarse particle mass and 35–42% of the total fine particle mass.

  1. Mathematical modeling of cadmium(II) solvent extraction from neutral and acidic chloride media using Cyanex 923 extractant as a metal carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, A A; Coll, M T; Fortuny, A; Rathore, N S; Sastre, A M

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes experimental work and the mathematical modeling of solvent extraction of cadmium(II) from neutral and acidic aqueous chloride media with a Cyanex 923 extractant in Exxol D-100. Solvent extraction experiments were carried out to analyze the influence of variations in the composition of the aqueous and organic phases on the efficiency of cadmium(II) extraction. In neutral and acidic chloride conditions, the extraction of cadmium(II) by the organophosphorous extractant Cyanex 923 (L) is based on the solvation mechanism of neutral H(n)CdCl((2+n)) species and the formation of H(n)CdCl((2+n))L(q) complexes in the organic phase, where n=0, 1, 2 and q=1, 2. The mathematical model of cadmium(II) extraction was derived from the mass balances and chemical equilibria involved in the separation system. The model was computed with the Matlab software. The equilibrium parameters for metal extraction, i.e. the stability constants of the aqueous Cd-Cl complexes, the formation constants of the acidic Cd-Cl species and the metal equilibrium extraction constants, were proposed. The optimized constants were appropriate, as there was good agreement when the model was fitted to the experimental data for each of the experiments. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  3. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: Process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.

    1996-04-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs have been established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste is being performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  4. Comparison of the fatty acid profile of muscle neutral lipids and phospholipids of up-river anadromous sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus L. from three Portuguese river basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pinela

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Composition of fatty acid profile of muscle neutral lipids (NL and phospholipids (PL of sea lamprey that enter the Portuguese rivers Minho, Tagus and Guadiana during their non-trophic spawning migration was analysed. The fatty acid profile exhibited differences in the percentage among NL and PL and between river basins. Similarities were found in the fatty acid profile of NL. Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA were the most representative, followed by saturated fatty acids (SFA and finally by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA. Monoenic 16:1 and 18:1ω9 formed a considerable percentage of total fatty acids, followed by SFA 14:0 and 16:0. EPA and DHA were the dominant PUFA fatty acids. In terms of NL, the fatty acid that contributed for the discrimination between the three river basins was 18:1ω7. Individuals from the Minho river basin exhibited a different fatty acid profile of PL characterised by a low PUFA percentage when compared with lampreys from the Tagus and Guadiana river basins. Muscle PL fraction showed that the two monoenes, 16:1 and 18:1ω9, occurred at high percentage, followed by 16:0 and 14:0 (SFA. Among PUFA, DHA was the most representative fatty acid. The fatty acids that contributed to the separation between the three river basins were 16:0, 18:4ω3 and 24:1ω9. Although the results point in the direction of a possible difference between the fatty acid composition of the NL and PL fractions in the muscle samples from the three river basins, further studies, especially in tissues where fatty acid composition will be less sensitive to diet and environmental factors, are necessary to confirm this hypothesis.

  5. Case Studies in Systems Chemistry. Final Report. [Includes Complete Case Study, Carboxylic Acid Equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, George

    This publication was produced as a teaching tool for college chemistry. The book is a text for a computer-based unit on the chemistry of acid-base titrations, and is designed for use with FORTRAN or BASIC computer systems, and with a programmable electronic calculator, in a variety of educational settings. The text attempts to present computer…

  6. Preservation of glutamic acid-iron chelate into montmorillonite to efficiently degrade Reactive Blue 19 in a Fenton system under sunlight irradiation at neutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhujian; Wu, Pingxiao; Gong, Beini; Yang, Shanshan; Li, Hailing; Zhu, Ziao; Cui, Lihua

    2016-05-01

    To further enhance the visible light responsive property and the chemical stability of Fe/clay mineral catalysts, glutamic acid-iron chelate intercalated montmorillonite (G-Fe-Mt) was developed. The physiochemical properties of G-Fe-Mt were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), etc. The results showed that glutamic acid-iron chelates were successfully intercalated into the gallery of montmorillonite and the intercalated glutamic acid-iron chelate molecules were well preserved. The product G-Fe-Mt displayed excellent catalytic performance in heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction under sunlight irradiation at acidic and neutral pH values. The chelation and the visible light responsiveness of glutamic acid produce a synergistic effect leading to greatly enhanced sunlight-Fenton reaction catalyzed by the heterogeneous G-Fe-Mt under neutral pH. G-Fe-Mt is a promising catalyst for advanced oxidation processes.

  7. Phenylglycine analogs are inhibitors of the neutral amino acid transporters ASCT1 and ASCT2 and enhance NMDA receptor-mediated LTP in rat visual cortex slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Alan C; Rangel-Diaz, Natalie; Staubli, Ursula; Yang, Jia-Ying; Penjwini, Mahmud; Viswanath, Veena; Li, Yong-Xin

    2017-11-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) co-agonist d-serine is a substrate for the neutral amino acid transporters ASCT1 (SLC1A4) and ASCT2 (SLC1A5). We identified l-phenylglycine (PG) and its analogs as inhibitors of ASCT1 and ASCT2. PG analogs were shown to be non-substrate inhibitors of ASCT1 and ASCT2 with a range of activities relative to other amino acid transport systems, including sodium-dependent glutamate transporters, the sodium-independent d-serine transporter asc-1 and system L. L-4-chloroPG was the most potent and selective ASCT1/2 inhibitor identified. The PG analogs facilitated theta-burst induced long-term potentiation in rat visual cortex slices in a manner that was dependent on extracellular d-serine. For structurally-related PG analogs, there was an excellent correlation between ASCT1/2 transport inhibition and enhancement of LTP which was not the case for inhibition of asc-1 or system L. The ability of PG analogs to enhance LTP is likely due to inhibition of d-serine transport by ASCT1/2, leading to elevated extracellular levels of d-serine and increased NMDA receptor activity. These results suggest that ASCT1/2 may play an important role in regulating extracellular d-serine and NMDA receptor-mediated physiological effects and that ASCT1/2 inhibitors have the potential for therapeutic benefit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. pH-Free Measurement of Relative Acidities, Including Isotope Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Charles L

    2017-01-01

    A powerful pH-free multicomponent NMR titration method can measure relative acidities, even of closely related compounds, with excellent accuracy. The history of the method is presented, along with details of its implementation and a comparison with earlier NMR titrations using a pH electrode. Many of its areas of applicability are described, especially equilibrium isotope effects. The advantages of the method, some practical considerations, and potential pitfalls are considered. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Liver protective effect of ursodeoxycholic acid includes regulation of ADAM17 activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buryová, Halka; Chalupský, Karel; Žbodáková, Olga; Kanchev, Ivan; Jiroušková, Markéta; Gregor, Martin; Sedláček, Radislav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, 30.10.2013 (2013), s. 155-155 ISSN 1471-230X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/2143; GA ČR GAP303/10/2044; GA AV ČR IAA500520812; GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : ursodeoxycholic acid * ADAM17 * shedding * cholestasis * liver Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.113, year: 2013

  10. Effect of humic acid on water chemistry, bioavailability and toxicity of aluminium in the freshwater snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, at neutral pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobranskyte, A. [Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Jugdaohsingh, R. [Gastrointestinal Laboratory, Rayne Institute, St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); McCrohan, C.R. [Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Stuchlik, E. [Hydrobiological Station, Institute for Environmental Studies, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Powell, J.J. [MRC Human Nutrition Research, Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, Fulbourn Road, Cambridge CB1 9NL (United Kingdom); White, K.N. [Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: keith.white@manchester.ac.uk

    2006-03-15

    The influence of humic acid on the water chemistry of environmentally relevant concentrations of Al at neutral pH was studied, together with its effect on the bioavailability and toxicity of Al in Lymnaea stagnalis. Humic acid significantly reduced the loss of Al from the water and increased the fraction of filterable Al, although this was a relatively small fraction of total Al. Filterable Al concentration in the presence or absence of humic acid was independent of initial Al concentration. Humic acid only partly reduced toxicity, as observed by a reduction in behavioural suppression, and had no effect on the level of Al accumulated in tissues. These results suggest that humic acid maintains Al in a colloidal form that is bioavailable to L. stagnalis. However, these colloidal Al-humic acid species were less toxic since behavioural toxicity was reduced. Humic acid may play an important role in limiting the toxicity of Al to freshwater organisms. - Humic acid reduces aluminium toxicity in freshwater snails.

  11. Targeted toxicological screening for acidic, neutral and basic substances in postmortem and antemortem whole blood using simple protein precipitation and UPLC-HR-TOF-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telving, Rasmus; Hasselstrøm, Jørgen Bo; Andreasen, Mette Findal

    2016-01-01

    -HR-TOF-MS was achieved in one injection. This method covered basic substances, substances traditionally analyzed in negative ESI (e.g., salicylic acid), small highly polar substances such as beta- and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (BHB and GHB, respectively) and highly non-polar substances such as amiodarone. The new method......A broad targeted screening method based on broadband collision-induced dissociation (bbCID) ultra-performance liquid chromatography high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-HR-TOF-MS) was developed and evaluated for toxicological screening of whole blood samples. The acidic, neutral...... was performed on spiked whole blood samples and authentic postmortem and antemortem whole blood samples. For most of the basic drugs, the established cut-off limits were very low, ranging from 0.25ng/g to 50ng/g. The established cut-off limits for most neutral and acidic drugs, were in the range from 50ng...

  12. Comparison of acidic and neutral PH root conditioners prior to a coronally positioned flap to treat gingival recession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Shariatmadar Ahmadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Localized gingival recession can be treated successfully via coronally positioned flap (CPF and additional use of root surface demineralization agents. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of additional use of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA and citric acid as a root conditioner in association with CPF to cover localized buccal gingival recessions. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with 66 Miller class I buccal gingival recession ≥ 2 mm on single-rooted teeth were studied. Patients were randomly assigned: CPF with EDTA gel (test 1 and CPF with saturated citric acid (test 2 or CPF alone (control. Clinical parameters were measured at baseline and 1, 2, 3 and 6 months after surgery; assessment included recession depth (RD, clinical attachment level (CAL, probing depth (PD and height of keratinized gingiva (HKG. SPSS version-20 was used to perform all statistical analyses. Data was reported as Mean ± SD. Age, RD, CAL, PD, and HKG before treatment and after 6 months among study groups were compared by one-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey test. The level of significance was considered to be less than 0.05. Results: At 6 months, all treatment modalities showed significant root coverage and gain in CAL. RD was reduced from 2.86 ± 0.76 mm to 0.55±0.53 mm in the EDTA group and from 2.37±0.57 mm to 1.03±0.43 mm in the acid group and from 2.37±0.54 mm to 0.85±0.49 mm in the control group. The average percentage of root coverage for the EDTA, acid, and control groups were 80.73%, 52.16%, and 64.50%, respectively. At 6 months, there was a significant difference (P < 0.05 in all parameters for the EDTA group (except HKG that did not vary among the groups. Conclusion: Root preparation with EDTA was an effective procedure to cover localized gingival recessions and significantly improved the amount of root coverage obtained.

  13. Multifunctional colloidal nanofiber composites including dextran and folic acid as electro-active platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzayev, Zakir M O; Bunyatova, Ulviye; Şimșek, Murat

    2017-06-15

    This work presents the fabrication and characterization of novel colloidal multifunctional polymer nanofiber composites (NFCs) from water dispersion blends of intercalated silicate layered nanocomposites of poly (2-vinyl-N-pyrrolidone)/octadecyl amine-montmorillonite (ODA-MMT) and dextran/ODA-MMT as matrix and partner polymer intercalated nanocomposites in the presence of NaOH and folic acid (FA) as doping agents by green reactive electrospinning. Chemical and physical structures, surface morphology and electrical properties were investigated. Effects of matrix/partner polymer ratios, doping agents, absorption time of NaOH, and temperature on electrical parameters of NFCs were evaluated. The presence of FA and increasing dextran fraction in NFCs resulted in reducing fiber diameter and improving diameter distribution. High complexing behaviors of matrix/partner polymer chains, organoclay, FA, and NaOH significantly improved conductivity parameters, especially 5-min of absorption time (≈10 -2 -10 - 3 Sm -1 ). The conductivity of the samples decreased with increasing temperature. NFCs fabricated for the first time are promising candidates for various biomedical, electrochemical and electronic applications as electro-active platforms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis and application of carbonated fatty acid esters from carbon dioxide including a life cycle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäffner, Benjamin; Blug, Matthias; Kruse, Daniela; Polyakov, Mykola; Köckritz, Angela; Martin, Andreas; Rajagopalan, Prasanna; Bentrup, Ursula; Brückner, Angelika; Jung, Sebastian; Agar, David; Rüngeler, Bettina; Pfennig, Andreas; Müller, Karsten; Arlt, Wolfgang; Woldt, Benjamin; Grass, Michael; Buchholz, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    Carbon dioxide can be used in various ways as a cheap C1 source. However, the utilization of CO2 requires energy or energy-rich reagents, which leads to further emissions, and therefore, diminishes the CO2-saving potential. Therefore, life cycle assessment (LCA) is required for each process that uses CO2 to provide valid data for CO2 savings. Carbon dioxide can be incorporated into epoxidized fatty acid esters to provide the corresponding carbonates. A robust catalytic process was developed based on simple halide salts in combination with a phase-transfer catalyst. The CO2-saving potential was determined by comparing the carbonates as a plasticizer with an established phthalate-based plasticizer. Although CO2 savings of up to 80 % were achieved, most of the savings arose from indirect effects and not from CO2 utilization. Furthermore, other categories have been analyzed in the LCA. The use of biobased material has a variety of impacts on categories such as eutrophication and marine toxicity. Therefore, the benefits of biobased materials have to be evaluated carefully for each case. Finally, interesting properties as plasticizers were obtained with the carbonates. The volatility and water extraction could be improved relative to the epoxidized system. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Profile of trans fatty acids (FAs) including trans polyunsaturated FAs in representative fast food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyburczy, Cynthia; Delmonte, Pierluigi; Fardin-Kia, Ali Reza; Mossoba, Magdi M; Kramer, John K G; Rader, Jeanne I

    2012-05-09

    The content of trans fat in foods is most commonly determined by summing the levels of individual trans fatty acids (FAs), analyzed as FA methyl esters (FAME) by gas chromatography. Current Official Methods of the American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS) enable quantitation of total trans fat in foods but were not designed for the determination of transFA isomeric compositions. In the present study, the content of trans fat in 32 representative fast food samples ranged from 0.1 to 3.1 g per serving, as determined according to AOCS Official Method Ce 1j-07. Further analysis of FAME using the 200 m SLB-IL111 ionic liquid column yielded quantitative results of total, trans, saturated, and cis unsaturated fat that were comparable to those of Method Ce 1j-07 and also allowed for the complementary determination of individual trans 18:1, trans 18:2, and trans 18:3 FA isomeric compositions under conditions suitable for routine sample analysis.

  16. Dose-response relationship of tryptophan with large neutral amino acids, and its impact on physiological responses in the chick model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Alhassan Usman; Idrus, Zulkifli; Meng, Goh Yong; Narayan, Edward J; Farjam, Abdoreza Soleimani

    2018-05-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) has been associated with the regulation of several behavioral and physiological processes, through stimulation of serotonergic activity. Tryptophan utilization at the metabolic level is influenced by the competitive carrier system it shares with large neutral amino acids (LNAA). This study was carried out using meat-type chicken as a model, to investigate the dose response effects of Trp/LNAA on fear response (tonic immobility; TI) and hormonal responses, including corticosterone (CORT), serotonin (5-HT), triiodothyronine (T 3 ) and thyroxine (T 4 ). A total of 12 cages (48 birds) were assigned to each of the six experimental groups at 29-42 days of age. Experimental diets were formulated to have incremental levels of Trp/LNAA (0.025, 0.030, 0.035, 0.040, 0.045, and 0.050). The results revealed that, Trp/NAA had no significant effect on growth performance and TI of the birds. However, elevation of Trp/LNAA was concurred with a linear reduction in CORT (P < .0001, r 2  = 0.819) and linear increases in 5-HT (P < .0001, r 2  = 0.945), T 3 (P = .0003, r 2  = 0.403) and T 4 (P < .0001, r 2  = 0.937) levels. In conclusion, the results from the current study demonstrated that, although incremental levels of Trp/LNAA did not affect bird growth performance or fearfulness, it increased 5-HT, T 3 and T 4, and decreased CORT levels in a linear dose-dependent manner. Manipulation of Trp feeding levels could be applied to manage stressful conditions in birds. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Amine Chemistry at Aqueous Interfaces: The Study of Organic Amines in Neutralizing Acidic Gases at an Air/Water Surface Using Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, L.; Wren, S. N.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Small organic bases have been measured in atmospheric samples, with their sources ranging from industrial processing to animal husbandry. These small organic amines are often highly soluble, being found in atmospheric condensed phases such as fogwater and rainwater. Additionally, they display acid-neutralization ability often greater than ammonia, yet little is known regarding their kinetic and thermodynamic properties. This presentation will describe the molecular level details of a model amine system at the vapor/liquid interface in the presence of acidic gas. We find that this amine system shows very unique properties in terms of its bonding, structure, and orientation at aqueous surfaces. The results of our studies using a combination of computation, vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy, and surface tension will report the properties inherent to these atmospherically relevant species at aqueous surfaces.

  18. Improvement of Neutral Lipid and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthesis by Overexpressing a Type 2 Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase in Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Fang Niu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae have been emerging as an important source for the production of bioactive compounds. Marine diatoms can store high amounts of lipid and grow quite quickly. However, the genetic and biochemical characteristics of fatty acid biosynthesis in diatoms remain unclear. Glycerophospholipids are integral as structural and functional components of cellular membranes, as well as precursors of various lipid mediators. In addition, diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT is a key enzyme that catalyzes the last step of triacylglyceride (TAG biosynthesis. However, a comprehensive sequence-structure and functional analysis of DGAT in diatoms is lacking. In this study, an isoform of diacylglycerol acyltransferase type 2 of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was characterized. Surprisingly, DGAT2 overexpression in P. tricornutum stimulated more oil bodies, and the neutral lipid content increased by 35%. The fatty acid composition showed a significant increase in the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids; in particular, EPA was increased by 76.2%. Moreover, the growth rate of transgenic microalgae remained similar, thereby maintaining a high biomass. Our results suggest that increased DGAT2 expression could alter fatty acid profile in the diatom, and the results thus represent a valuable strategy for polyunsaturated fatty acid production by genetic manipulation.

  19. A Strategy Combining Higher Energy C-Trap Dissociation with Neutral Loss- and Product Ion-Based MSn Acquisition for Global Profiling and Structure Annotation of Fatty Acids Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Qi-Rui; Hou, Jin-Jun; Yang, Min; Shen, Yao; Qi, Peng; Feng, Rui-Hong; Dai, Zhuo; Yan, Bing-Peng; Wang, Jian-Wei; Shi, Xiao-Jian; Wu, Wan-Ying; Guo, De-An

    2017-03-01

    Fatty acids conjugates (FACs) are ubiquitous but found in trace amounts in the natural world. They are composed of multiple unknown substructures and side chains. Thus, FACs are difficult to be analyzed by traditional mass spectrometric methods. In this study, an integrated strategy was developed to global profiling and targeted structure annotation of FACs in complex matrix by LTQ Orbitrap. Dicarboxylic acid conjugated bufotoxins (DACBs) in Venenum bufonis (VB) were used as model compounds. The new strategy (abbreviated as HPNA) combined higher-energy C-trap dissociation (HCD) with product ion- (PI), neutral loss- (NL) based MS n (n ≥ 3) acquisition in both positive-ion mode and negative-ion mode. Several advantages are presented. First, various side chains were found under HCD in negative-ion mode, which included both known and unknown side chains. Second, DACBs with multiple side chains were simultaneously detected in one run. Compared with traditional quadrupole-based mass method, it greatly increased analysis throughput. Third, the fragment ions of side chain and steroids substructure could be obtained by PI- and NL-based MS n acquisition, respectively, which greatly increased the accuracy of the structure annotation of DACBs. In all, 78 DACBs have been discovered, of which 68 were new compounds; 25 types of substructure formulas and seven dicarboxylic acid side chains were found, especially five new side chains, including two saturated dicarboxylic acids [(azelaic acid (C 9 ) and sebacic acid (C 10 )] and three unsaturated dicarboxylic acids (u-C 8 , u-C 9 , and u-C 10 ). All these results greatly enriched the structures of DACBs in VB. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. Acid neutralizing capacity and leachate results for igneous rocks, with associated carbon contents of derived soils, Animas River AML site, Silverton, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Douglas B.; Stanton, Mark R.; Choate, LaDonna M.; Burchell,

    2009-01-01

    Mine planning efforts have historically overlooked the possible acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) that local igneous rocks can provide to help neutralize acidmine drainage. As a result, limestone has been traditionally hauled to mine sites for use in neutralizing acid drainage. Local igneous rocks, when used as part of mine life-cycle planning and acid mitigation strategy, may reduce the need to transport limestone to mine sites because these rocks can contain acid neutralizing minerals. Igneous hydrothermal events often introduce moderately altered mineral assemblages peripheral to more intensely altered rocks that host metal-bearing veins and ore bodies. These less altered rocks can contain ANC minerals (calcite-chlorite-epidote) and are referred to as a propylitic assemblage. In addition, the carbon contents of soils in areas of new mining or those areas undergoing restoration have been historically unknown. Soil organic carbon is an important constituent to characterize as a soil recovery benchmark that can be referred to during mine cycle planning and restoration. This study addresses the mineralogy, ANC, and leachate chemistry of propylitic volcanic rocks that host polymetallic mineralization in the Animas River watershed near the historical Silverton, Colorado, mining area. Acid titration tests on volcanic rocks containing calcite (2 – 20 wt %) and chlorite (6 – 25 wt %), have ANC ranging from 4 – 146 kg/ton CaCO3 equivalence. Results from a 6-month duration, kinetic reaction vessel test containing layered pyritic mine waste and underlying ANC volcanic rock (saturated with deionized water) indicate that acid generating mine waste (pH 2.4) has not overwhelmed the ANC of propylitic volcanic rocks (pH 5.8). Sequential leachate laboratory experiments evaluated the concentration of metals liberated during leaching. Leachate concentrations of Cu-Zn-As-Pb for ANC volcanic rock are one-to-three orders of magnitude lower when compared to leached solution from

  1. An optimized method for fatty acid analysis, including quantification of trans fatty acids, in human adipose tissue by gas-liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bysted, Anette; Cold, S; Hølmer, Gunhild Kofoed

    1999-01-01

    for 25 min, and finally raised at 25 degrees C/min to 225 degrees C. The trans and cis isomers of18:1 were well separated from each other, as shown by silver-ion thin-layer chromatography. Verification by standardsshowed that the trans 18:1 isomers with a double bond in position 12 or lower were......Considering the need for a quick direct method for measurement of the fatty acid composition including trans isomers ofhuman adipose tissue we have developed a procedure using gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) alone, which is thussuitable for validation of fatty acid status in epidemiological studies...

  2. Improved volatile fatty acids anaerobic production from waste activated sludge by pH regulation: Alkaline or neutral pH?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huijun; Chen, Xingchun; Liu, He; Liu, Hongbo; Fu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the anaerobic fermentation was carried out for volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production at different pH (between 7.0 and 10.0) conditions with untreated sludge and heat-alkaline pretreated waste activated sludge. In the fermentation with untreated sludge, the extent of hydrolysis of organic matters and extent of acidification at alkaline pH are 54.37% and 30.37%, respectively, resulting in the highest VFAs yield at 235.46mg COD/gVS of three pH conditions. In the fermentation with heat-alkaline pretreated sludge, the acidification rate and VFAs yield at neutral pH are 30.98% and 240.14mg COD/gVS, respectively, which are higher than that at other pH conditions. With the glucose or bovine serum albumin as substrate for VFAs production, the neutral pH showed a higher VFAs concentration than the alkaline pH condition. The results of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that the alkaline pH caused low microbial richness. Based on the results in this study, we demonstrated that the alkaline pH is favor of hydrolysis of organic matter in sludge while neutral pH improved the acidogenesis for the VFAs production from sludge. Our finding is obvious different to the previous research and helpful for the understanding of how heat-alkaline pretreatment and alkaline fermentation influence the VFAs production, and beneficial to the development of VFAs production process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of the synergic effect of some neutral organophosphoric compounds on the extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid solutions by D1-(2-Ethyl Hexyl) phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stas, J.; Khorfan, S.; Koudsi, Y.

    1998-05-01

    The extraction of uranium (VI) from pure phosphoric acid media by D2EHPA/Kerosene has been studied. The mechanism of the extraction was found as follows: The logarithm of the equilibrium constant of the extraction (LogKex) was found (3.06), (3.32), (3.24), (3.3) for the following phosphoric acid concentrations respectively (1), (2), (3), (4) Mol/1, and the enthalpy change DELTA H was found (-100.68 kj/mol). (-76 kj/mol) for (1), (2) mol/1 phosphoric acid concentrations. The synergic effect of TOPO, TBP, and TBPI with DEHPA have been studied during the extraction of uranium from pure phosphoric acid and Syrian commercial phosphoric acid. The synergic effect increases as follows: TBP< TBPI<< TOPO (In pure phosphoric acid), TBPI approx TBP<< TOPO (In Syrian commercial phosphoric acid). The difficulty of extracting uranium (VI) from Syrian commercial phosphoric acid in comparison with pure phosphoric acid is due to the presence of several impurities capable of complexing uranium, and a small amounts of solid and organic matters, all these are factors which reduce the distribution coefficient of uranium. (Author)

  4. Results of test of acid fluids neutralization in the well H-43, Los Humeros geothermal field, Puebla; Resultados de la prueba de neutralizacion de fluidos acidos en el pozo H-43, campo geotermico de Los Humeros, Puebla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Armenta, Magaly del Carmen; Ramirez Montes, Miguel; Sandoval Medina, Fernando; Rosales Lopez, Cesar [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)]. E-mail: magaly.flores@cfe.gob.mx

    2011-07-15

    The well H-43 was drilled in Los Humeros Geothermal Field, Pue., in 2007 and 2008. When well production was measured, it was found the well produced acid fluids with high corrosion potential. Then it was decided to try to neutralize the acidity of the H-43 fluids by adding a solution of sodium hydroxide. This is a basic substance used to neutralize mainly the acid groups H+, and the goal was to raise the pH of the fluids to minimize its corrosive features. First sodium hydroxide was injected into the well to protect the casing of 244.4 mm (9 5/8 in) against corrosion and then all the surface installations. It was possible to increase the pH of the well fluid from 5.2 up to 6.8 without altering the steam production, thus demonstrating the neutralization procedure is feasible. The approximate costs of the neutralization tests performed, including equipment for the proposed neutralization system, the neutralizer (NaOH), and drilling the well are about 71.4 million pesos (around 5.5 million USD). We estimate a benefit/cost ratio of 1.5 and a return on investment in five years, considering the income from energy sales at present value. [Spanish] El pozo H-43 fue perforado en el campo de Los Humeros, Pue., en 2007-2008, y al evaluar su produccion se encontro que producia fluidos acidos de alto potencial corrosivo. Se decidio por tanto realizar una prueba para neutralizar la acidez de los fluidos de este pozo, que consistio en agregarle una solucion de hidroxido de sodio. Esta es una sustancia basica que neutraliza principalmente los grupos acidos H+, con lo que se buscaba aumentar el pH del fluido lo necesario para reducir al maximo su caracter corrosivo. La inyeccion del hidroxido de sodio se realizo dentro del pozo a fin de proteger de la corrosion a la tuberia de revestimiento de 244.4 mm (9 5/8 pulgadas), y posteriormente a todos los equipos superficiales. Como resultado de la prueba, se logro aumentar el pH del fluido producido por el pozo de 5.2 a un maximo de 6

  5. Elevated acetyl-CoA by amino acid recycling fuels microalgal neutral lipid accumulation in exponential growth phase for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lina; Shen, Hui; Wang, Nan; Tatlay, Jaspaul; Li, Liang; Tan, Tin Wee; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2017-04-01

    Microalgal neutral lipids [mainly in the form of triacylglycerols (TAGs)], feasible substrates for biofuel, are typically accumulated during the stationary growth phase. To make microalgal biofuels economically competitive with fossil fuels, generating strains that trigger TAG accumulation from the exponential growth phase is a promising biological approach. The regulatory mechanisms to trigger TAG accumulation from the exponential growth phase (TAEP) are important to be uncovered for advancing economic feasibility. Through the inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase by sodium dichloroacetate, acetyl-CoA level increased, resulting in TAEP in microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta. We further reported refilling of acetyl-CoA pool through branched-chain amino acid catabolism contributed to an overall sixfold TAEP with marginal compromise (4%) on growth in a TAG-rich D. tertiolecta mutant from targeted screening. Herein, a three-step α loop-integrated metabolic model is introduced to shed lights on the neutral lipid regulatory mechanism. This article provides novel approaches to compress lipid production phase and heightens lipid productivity and photosynthetic carbon capture via enhancing acetyl-CoA level, which would optimize renewable microalgal biofuel to fulfil the demanding fuel market. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The structure and diffusion behaviour of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in neutral aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo, M.M.; Esteso, M.A.; Barros, M.F.; Verissimo, L.M.P.; Romero, C.M.; Suarez, A.F.; Ramos, M.L.; Valente, A.J.M.; Burrows, H.D.; Ribeiro, A.C.F.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Diffusion coefficients and densities of binary aqueous solutions of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). • Dependence on both shape and size of GABA on its diffusion. • Interactions intramolecular and the solute-water interactions in these systems. - Abstract: GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a non-protein amino acid with important physiological properties, and with considerable relevance to the food and pharmaceutical industries. Particular interest has focused on its role as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian cerebral cortex. In this paper, we report density and mutual diffusion coefficients of GABA in non-buffered aqueous solutions (0.001–0.100) mol·dm −3 at 298.15 K. Under these conditions, 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy and pH measurements show that it is present predominantly as a monomeric zwitterionic species. Diffusion coefficients have been computed assuming that this behaves as the binary system GABA/water. From density and intermolecular diffusion coefficients measurements, the molar volume, hydrodynamic radii, R h , diffusion coefficients at infinitesimal concentration, D 0 , activity coefficients and the thermodynamic factors, F T , have been estimated. Within experimental error, the hydrodynamic volume calculated from this is identical to the molar volume obtained from density measurements. From the NMR spectra and literature data, it is suggested that this amino acid diffuses in aqueous solution as a curved, coil-like hydrated zwitterionic entity.

  7. Crop rotation and seasonal effects on fatty acid profiles of neutral and phospholipids extracted from no-till agricultural soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, Alejandro E.; Ravnskov, Sabine; Larsen, John

    2015-01-01

    to winter differentially according to soil treatment being the smallest decrease inHR management 35%. Both PLFA and NLFA profiles showed strong potential to discriminatebetween different land uses. In winter samples, some rare or unknown fatty acids were relevant forthe discrimination of agricultural...

  8. Neutralization and attenuation of metal species in acid mine drainage and mine leachates using magnesite: a batch experimental approach

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the potential application of amorphous magnesite for remediation of Acid Mine Drainage (AMD). Magnesite was mixed with simulated AMD at specific S/L ratios and agitated in an orbital shaker and its capacity to remove metals...

  9. Lactic acid production from lime-treated wheat straw by Bacillus coagulans: neutralization of acid by fed-batch addition of alkaline substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, R.H.W.; Bakker, R.R.; Jansen, M.L.A.; Visser, D.; Jong, de E.; Eggink, G.; Weusthuis, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional processes for lignocellulose-to-organic acid conversion requires pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and microbial fermentation. In this study, lime-treated wheat straw was hydrolyzed and fermented simultaneously to lactic acid by an enzyme preparation and Bacillus coagulans DSM 2314.

  10. In situ monitoring the effects of a magnetic field on the open-circuit corrosion states of iron in acidic and neutral solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Zhanpeng; Yang Wu

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a 0.4 T horizontal magnetic field (HMF) on the open-circuit corrosion states of iron in static aqueous solutions are studied by in situ monitoring the responses of two electrochemical parameters to the applied magnetic field, i.e. the open-circuit potential (OCP) and the current under potentiostatic polarization. The applied magnetic field makes the OCP shift in the noble direction. Withdrawing the magnetic field causes a negative shift of the OCP in acidic solutions, but it does not cause any significant change of OCP in neutral solutions. Imposing a magnetic field induces a cathodic current for iron that was previously potentiostatically polarized at the OCP without magnetic field. Withdrawing the magnetic field induces an anodic current for iron that was previously potentiostatically polarized at the OCP with the magnetic field. The magnetic field effect is more significant in the acid solutions than in the salt solutions. The magnetic field effects on the oxygen reduction and on the activation-controlled iron dissolution reaction are found to be insignificant. The magnetic field effect on the hydrogen reduction reaction on iron in acidic solutions is demonstrated. Results show the possibility that a magnetic field would affect the hydrogen evolution by enhancing the electron-transfer process that has been categorized in the classical electrochemistry kinetics to be the rate-determining process. The memory effect of the magnetic field on the electrochemical reaction is identified and discussed

  11. Crystal structure of a 2:1 piroxicam-gentisic acid co-crystal featuring neutral and zwitterionic piroxicam mol-ecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Elizabeth M; Bertke, Jeffery A; Woods, Toby J; Kenis, Paul J A

    2016-12-01

    A new 2:1 co-crystal of piroxicam and gentisic acid [systematic name: 4-hy-droxy-1,1-dioxo- N -(pyridin-2-yl)-2 H -1λ 6 ,2-benzo-thia-zine-3-carboxamide-2-(4-oxido-1,1-dioxo-2 H -1λ 6 ,2-benzo-thia-zine-3-amido)-pyridin-1-ium-2,5-di-hydroxy-benzoic acid, 2C 15 H 13 N 3 O 4 S·C 7 H 6 O 4 ] has been synthesized using a microfluidic platform and initially identified using Raman spectroscopy. In the co-crystal, one piroxicam mol-ecule is in its neutral form and an intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed. The other piroxicam mol-ecule is zwitterionic (proton transfer from the OH group to the pyridine N atom) and two intra-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds occur. The gentisic acid mol-ecule shows whole-mol-ecule disorder over two sets of sites in a 0.809 (2):0.191 (2) ratio. In the crystal, extensive hydrogen bonding between the components forms layers propagating in the ab plane.

  12. The thermodynamics of extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) from nitric acid by neutral phosphorus-based organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalina, D.G.; Mason, G.W.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    The extraction of Th(IV) and U(VI) from dilute nitric acid solution by several neutral phosphorus-based extractants has been studied as a function of temperature in the range of 0 to 50 0 C. From the variation of the distribution ratio (Ksub(d)) with temperature the thermodynamic quantities ΔG, ΔH and ΔS have been calculated for these extractions. The results of this study indicate that the steric bulk of the extractant plays a major role in determining how well Th(IV) is extracted. The size of the extractant appears to be of little or no importance in the extraction of U(VI). Similarly, the basicity of the extractant is of lesser importance in the extraction of uranyl ion relative to thorium ion. (author)

  13. Binding of Gallic Acid and Epigallocatechin Gallate to Heat-Unfolded Whey Proteins at Neutral pH Alters Radical Scavenging Activity of in Vitro Protein Digests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanyun; Xiong, Youling L

    2017-09-27

    Preheated (80 °C for 9 min) whey protein isolate (HWPI) was reacted with 20, 120, and 240 μmol/g (protein basis) gallic acid (GA) or epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) at neutral pH and 25 °C. Isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorometry showed a similar trend that GA binding to HWPI was moderate but weaker than EGCG binding. However, the shift of maximal fluorescence emission wavelength in opposite directions in response to GA (blue) and EGCG (red) suggests discrepant binding patterns. Electrophoresis results showed that EGCG induced formation of HWPI complexes while GA only had a marginal effect. Both free and phenolic-bound HWPI exhibited mild antiradical activity. However, when subjected to in vitro digestion, synergistic radical-scavenging activity was produced between the phenolics and peptides with the highest synergism being observed on 120 μmol/g phenolics.

  14. Application of neutral electrolyzed water to disinfection of alginate impression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, Yuki; Chen, Ker-Kong; Nagamatsu, Hiroshi; Kozono, Yoshio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Neutral electrolyzed water was developed with new concepts of long-term good durability and minimum corrosiveness to metal in addition to its excellent bactericidal activities similar to acid type of electrolyzed waters. The present study examined the bactericidal effects of the neutral electrolyzed water on disinfection of the alginate impression of a dental arch model contaminated by bacteria. Only 1-min immersion in neutral electrolyzed water could sufficiently disinfect the alginate impression including the metallic tray under ultrasonic with no significant differences from acid electrolyzed waters. No bactericidal effects were found in any electrolyzed water when used as mixing water. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of each electrolyzed water in a comprehensive way, it was suggested that neutral electrolyzed water may be the most appropriate for the disinfection of alginate impression.

  15. Neutral Lipid Biosynthesis in Engineered Escherichia coli: Jojoba Oil-Like Wax Esters and Fatty Acid Butyl Esters

    OpenAIRE

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Stöveken, Tim; Luftmann, Heinrich; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Wax esters are esters of long-chain fatty acids and long-chain fatty alcohols which are of considerable commercial importance and are produced on a scale of 3 million tons per year. The oil from the jojoba plant (Simmondsia chinensis) is the main biological source of wax esters. Although it has a multitude of potential applications, the use of jojoba oil is restricted, due to its high price. In this study, we describe the establishment of heterologous wax ester biosynthesis in a recombinant E...

  16. FT-midIR determination of fatty acid profiles, including trans fatty acids, in bakery products after focused microwave-assisted Soxhlet extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Jiménez, J; Priego-Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2006-08-01

    A study of the feasibility of Fourier transform medium infrared spectroscopy (FT-midIR) for analytical determination of fatty acid profiles, including trans fatty acids, is presented. The training and validation sets-75% (102 samples) and 25% (36 samples) of the samples once the spectral outliers have been removed-to develop FT-midIR general equations, were built with samples from 140 commercial and home-made bakery products. The concentration of the analytes in the samples used for this study is within the typical range found in these kinds of products. Both sets were independent; thus, the validation set was only used for testing the equations. The criterion used for the selection of the validation set was samples with the highest number of neighbours and the most separation between them (H/=0.90, SEP=1-1.5 SEL and R (2)=0.70-0.89, SEP=2-3 SEL, respectively. The results obtained with the proposed method were compared with those provided by the conventional method based on GC-MS. At 95% significance level, the differences between the values obtained for the different fatty acids were within the experimental error.

  17. Substrate selection for fundamental studies of electrocatalysts and photoelectrodes: inert potential windows in acidic, neutral, and basic electrolyte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse D Benck

    Full Text Available The selection of an appropriate substrate is an important initial step for many studies of electrochemically active materials. In order to help researchers with the substrate selection process, we employ a consistent experimental methodology to evaluate the electrochemical reactivity and stability of seven potential substrate materials for electrocatalyst and photoelectrode evaluation. Using cyclic voltammetry with a progressively increased scan range, we characterize three transparent conducting oxides (indium tin oxide, fluorine-doped tin oxide, and aluminum-doped zinc oxide and four opaque conductors (gold, stainless steel 304, glassy carbon, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in three different electrolytes (sulfuric acid, sodium acetate, and sodium hydroxide. We determine the inert potential window for each substrate/electrolyte combination and make recommendations about which materials may be most suitable for application under different experimental conditions. Furthermore, the testing methodology provides a framework for other researchers to evaluate and report the baseline activity of other substrates of interest to the broader community.

  18. The role of calcium ions in the photocatalytic oxidation of humic acid at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariquit, Eden G; Salim, Chris; Hinode, Hirofumi

    2008-10-01

    Humic acids (HAs) are natural organic matter derived from the decomposition of plant, algal, and microbial materials. They belong to the group of the most predominant type of natural organic matter present in ground and surface waters. HAs affect the mobility and bioavailability of aquatic contaminants. However, if they are left unremoved from the water before water treatment processes, they can form carcinogenic disinfection by-products, such as trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, and other halogenated disinfection by-products, that can pose a threat to human beings. An advanced oxidation process using UV light and a commercially available titanium dioxide was used to oxidize HA at a pH that is similar to that of natural water. The effect of adding calcium ions to the adsorption and the photocatalytic oxidation of HAs was studied. The effect of varying the TiO(2) load was also investigated. The experiment was done using a photochemical batch reactor equipped with a mercury lamp emitting light with wavelengths of 310-580 nm. The absorbances by the samples were determined at wavelengths of 254 nm and 436 nm, which represent the aromatic-compound content of and the color of the solution, respectively. Results indicated calcium ions have an effect on both the adsorption and the photocatalytic oxidation of HA at a pH within 8.0 +/- 0.5. Calcium ions facilitated adsorption of HA onto the surface of TiO(2) and resulted to faster photocatalytic oxidation. The data were plotted with respect to the normalized absorbances and irradiation time.

  19. Amines are likely to enhance neutral and ion-induced sulfuric acid-water nucleation in the atmosphere more effectively than ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kurtén

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the structure and formation thermodynamics of dimer clusters containing H2SO4 or HSO4 together with ammonia and seven different amines possibly present in the atmosphere, using the high-level ab initio methods RI-MP2 and RI-CC2. As expected from e.g. proton affinity data, the binding of all studied amine-H2SO4 complexes is significantly stronger than that of NH3•H2SO4, while most amine-HSO4 complexes are only somewhat more strongly bound than NH3•HSO4. Further calculations on larger cluster structures containing dimethylamine or ammonia together with two H2SO4 molecules or one H2SO4 molecule and one HSO4 ion demonstrate that amines, unlike ammonia, significantly assist the growth of not only neutral but also ionic clusters along the H2SO4 co-ordinate. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the difference in complexation free energies for amine- and ammonia-containing clusters is large enough to overcome the mass-balance effect caused by the fact that the concentration of amines in the atmosphere is probably 2 or 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of ammonia. This implies that amines might be more important than ammonia in enhancing neutral and especially ion-induced sulfuric acid-water nucleation in the atmosphere.

  20. Human neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1: Structure of the gene (SLC1A4) and localization to chromosome 2p13-p15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, K.; Dueker, M.; Stoffel, W. [Universitaet Koeln (Germany)] [and others

    1994-11-01

    Screening for cDNAs encoding proteins similar to the sodium-coupled glutamate transporter GLAST1 led to the isolation of a cDNA clone coding for a protein that turned out to be identical to the recently described neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1. The new member of the GLAST-related transporter family does not transport glutamate or aspartate but alanine, serine, cysteine, and threonine instead. The expressed sequence tag EST02446, a short cDNA sequence found in the course of a large-scale sequencing project of human brain-derived cDNA, showed significant similarity to the eukaryotic glutamate transporter GLAST1 and was therefore used as probe in the search for further glutamate transporter cDNAs. Fragments of the cDNA were used for the isolation and characterization of human ASCT1 genomic clones. The ORF of 1572 bp encoding 524 amino acid residues is distributed over 8 exons, which span at least 40 kb of human chromosomal DNA. The ASCT1 gene locus was assigned to chromosome 2p13-p15 by chromosomal in situ suppression (CISS) studies. The gene structure is not related to any other previously characterized transporter gene. In contrast to the genes of the sodium-coupled nonglutamate neurotransmitter transporters, it shows no obvious correspondence between intron/exon structure and transmembrane organization. The transcription start site in human liver tissue was determined by primer extension analysis to be located 291 bp upstream of the initiating ATG codon. The DNA region immediately upstream of the transcription start lacks any TATA or CAAT boxes but contains several bindings sites for the transcription factors Sp1 and Egr-1. The ASCT1 gene (SLC1A4) structure reported here will facilitate the characterization of the genes of the other members of the GLAST-related transporter family and might be useful in the elucidation of amino acid transport-related defects. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Evaluation of Tetrahydrobiopterin Therapy with Large Neutral Amino Acid Supplementation in Phenylketonuria: Effects on Potential Peripheral Biomarkers, Melatonin and Dopamine, for Brain Monoamine Neurotransmitters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Yano

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU is due to a defective hepatic enzyme, phenylalanine (Phe hydroxylase. Transport of the precursor amino acids from blood into the brain for serotonin and dopamine synthesis is reported to be inhibited by high blood Phe concentrations. Deficiencies of serotonin and dopamine are involved in neurocognitive dysfunction in PKU.(1 To evaluate the effects of sapropterin (BH4 and concurrent use of large neutral amino acids (LNAA on the peripheral biomarkers, melatonin and dopamine with the hypothesis they reflect brain serotonin and dopamine metabolism. (2 To evaluate synergistic effects with BH4 and LNAA. (3 To determine the effects of blood Phe concentrations on the peripheral biomarkers concentrations.Nine adults with PKU completed our study consisting of four 4-week phases: (1 LNAA supplementation, (2 Washout, (3 BH4 therapy, and (4 LNAA with BH4 therapy. An overnight protocol measured plasma amino acids, serum melatonin, and 6-sulfatoxymelatonin and dopamine in first void urine after each phase.(1 Three out of nine subjects responded to BH4. A significant increase of serum melatonin levels was observed in BH4 responders with decreased blood Phe concentration. No significant change in melatonin, dopamine or Phe levels was observed with BH4 in the subjects as a whole. (2 Synergistic effects with BH4 and LNAA were observed in serum melatonin in BH4 responders. (3 The relationship between serum melatonin and Phe showed a significant negative slope (p = 0.0005 with a trend toward differing slopes among individual subjects (p = 0.066. There was also a negative association overall between blood Phe and urine 6-sulfatoxymelatonin and dopamine (P = 0.040 and 0.047.Blood Phe concentrations affected peripheral monoamine neurotransmitter biomarker concentrations differently in each individual with PKU. Melatonin levels increased with BH4 therapy only when blood Phe decreased. Monitoring peripheral neurotransmitter metabolites may assist in

  2. Electromagnetic radiation optimum neutralizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Igor

    2002-01-01

    This particular article relates to subtle electrical effects, and provides some evidence of a fundamental nature on how subtle low frequency electromagnetic fields might be utilized to protect human body against harmful effects of high frequencies electromagnetic radiation. I have focused my efforts on definite polar polymer compound named EMRON which is patented in the USA. This polar polymer compound can be excited by external high frequencies electromagnetic fields to generate subtle low frequency oscillations that are beneficial for cellular life structures. This concept is based on the possibility of existence of resonance phenomenon between polar polymers and biopolymers such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, etc. Low frequency patterns generated by defined polar polymer compound can interact with biostructures and transmit the signals that support and improve cellular functions in the body. The mechanism of this process was confirmed by number of studies. The animal (including human) brain is affected by electromagnetic waves to the extent that production of Alpha or Theta waves can be directly induced into brain by carrying an ELF (extremely low frequency, 5-12 Hz) signal on a microwave carrier frequency. EMRON does not reduce the power of electromagnetic fields. It 'shields' the cellular structures of the body against the harmful effects of EMR. The radiation is still entering the body but the neutralizing effect of EMRON renders the radiation harmless

  3. A METHOD FOR AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF 10 ML WATER SAMPLES CONTAINING ACIDIC, BASIC, AND NEUTRAL SEMIVOLATILE COMPOUNDS LISTED IN USEPA METHOD 8270 BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION COUPLED IN-LINE TO LARGE VOLUME INJECTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data is presented showing the progress made towards the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the single run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of acid, base and neutral compounds...

  4. Effects of forage neutral detergent fibre and time after feeding on medial and ventral rumen pH and volatile fatty acids concentration in heifers fed highly digestible grass/clover silages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, A.K.S.; Storm, Adam Christian; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    2016-01-01

    The major microbial fermentation of forages and production of volatile fatty acids (VFA) takes place in the medial part of the rumen, whereas the absorption of VFA occurs through the rumen epithelium, for example the ventral sac. The objective was to study effects of forage neutral detergent fibre...

  5. Effects of forage neutral detergent fibre and time after feeding on medial and ventral rumen pH and volatile fatty acids concentration in heifers fed highly digestible grass/clover silages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, A. K. S.; Storm, A. C.; Weisbjerg, M. R.

    2017-01-01

    The major microbial fermentation of forages and production of volatile fatty acids (VFA) takes place in the medial part of the rumen, whereas the absorption of VFA occurs through the rumen epithelium, for example the ventral sac. The objective was to study effects of forage neutral detergent fibre...

  6. Partitioning of uranyl between ferrihydrite and humic substances at acidic and circum-neutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dublet, Gabrielle; Lezama Pacheco, Juan; Bargar, John R.; Fendorf, Scott; Kumar, Naresh; Lowry, Gregory V.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2017-10-01

    As part of a larger study of the reactivity and mobility of uranyl (U(VI)O22+) cations in subsurface environments containing natural organic matter (NOM) and hydrous ferric oxides, we have examined the effect of reference humic and fulvic substances on the sorption of uranyl on 2-line ferrihydrite (Fh), a common, naturally occurring nano-Fe(III)-hydroxide. Uranyl was reacted with Fh at pH 4.6 and 7.0 in the presence and absence of Elliott Soil Humic Acid (ESHA) (0-835 ppm) or Suwanee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) (0-955 ppm). No evidence was found for reduction of uranyl by either form of NOM after 24 h of exposure. The following three size fractions were considered in this study: (1) ≥0.2 μm (Fh-NOM aggregates), (2) 0.02-0.2 μm (dispersed Fh nanoparticles and NOM macro-molecules), and (3) <0.02 μm (dissolved). The extent to which U(VI) is sorbed in aggregates or dispersed as colloids was assessed by comparing U, Fe, and NOM concentrations in these three size fractions. Partitioning of uranyl between Fh and NOM was determined in size fraction (1) using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Uranyl sorption on Fh-NOM aggregates was affected by the presence of NOM in different ways depending on pH and type of NOM (ESHA vs. SRFA). The presence of ESHA in the uranyl-Fh-NOM ternary system at pH 4.6 enhanced uranyl uptake more than the presence of SRFA. In contrast, neither form of NOM affected uranyl sorption at pH 7.0 over most of the NOM concentration range examined (0-500 ppm); at the highest NOM concentrations (500-955 ppm) uranyl uptake in the aggregates was slightly inhibited at pH 7.0, which is interpreted as being due to the dispersion of Fh aggregates. XAS at the U LIII-edge was used to characterize molecular-level changes in uranyl complexation as a result of sorption to the Fh-NOM aggregates. In the absence of NOM, uranyl formed dominantly inner-sphere, mononuclear, bidentate sorption complexes on Fh. However, when NOM concentration was increased at pH 4.6, the

  7. Evasin-displaying lactic acid bacteria bind different chemokines and neutralize CXCL8 production in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrlec, Katja; Pucer Janež, Anja; Rogelj, Boris; Štrukelj, Borut; Berlec, Aleš

    2017-11-01

    Chemokines are key signals in the immune system and play an important role as proinflammatory mediators in the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer, making them an important target for therapy. Recombinant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were engineered to bind CC and CXC chemokines by displaying chemokine-binding proteins evasin-1, evasin-3 and evasin-4 on their surface. Evasin genes were cloned into lactococcal surface display vector and overexpressed in L. lactis NZ9000 and NZ9000ΔhtrA in fusion with secretion signal and surface anchor. Evasin-displaying bacteria removed from 15% to 90% of 11 different chemokines from the solution as determined with ELISA and Luminex multiplexing assays, whereby L. lactis NZ9000ΔhtrA proved more efficient. Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 was coated with L. . lactis-expressed evasin fusion protein, and its ability to bind chemokines was also confirmed. Evasin-3-displaying L. lactis removed 76.0% of IL-1β-induced CXCL8 from the supernatant of Caco-2 epithelial cells. It also prevented secretion of CXCL8 from Caco-2 cells in a time-dependent manner when added before induction with IL-1β. Evasin-displaying LAB have the ability to bind multiple chemokines simultaneously and exert synergistic activity. This innovative treatment approach therefore has the potential for mucosal therapy of inflammatory bowel disease or colorectal cancer. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Human neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1: structure of the gene (SLC1A4) and localization to chromosome 2p13-p15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, K; Düker, M; Fink, T; Lichter, P; Stoffel, W

    1994-11-01

    Screening for cDNAs encoding proteins similar to the sodium-coupled glutamate transporter GLAST1 led to the isolation of a cDNA clone coding for a protein that turned out to be identical to the recently described neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1. The new member of the GLAST-related transporter family does not transport glutamate or aspartate but alanine, serine, cysteine, and threonine instead. The expressed sequence tag EST02446, a short cDNA sequence found in the course of a large-scale sequencing project of human brain-derived cDNAs, showed significant similarity to the eukaryotic glutamate transporter GLAST1 and was therefore used as probe in the search for further glutamate transporter cDNAs. Fragments of the cDNA were used for the isolation and characterization of human ASCT1 genomic clones. The ORF of 1572 bp encoding 524 amino acid residues is distributed over 8 exons, which span at least 40 kb of human chromosomal DNA. The ASCT1 gene locus was assigned to chromosome 2p13-p15 by chromosomal in situ suppression (CISS) studies. The gene structure is not related to any other previously characterized transporter gene. In contrast to the genes of the sodium-coupled nonglutamate neurotransmitter transporters, it shows no obvious correspondence between intron/exon structure and transmembrane organization. The transcription start site in human liver tissue was determined by primer extension analysis to be located 291 bp upstream of the initiating ATG codon. The DNA region immediately upstream of the transcription start lacks any TATA or CAAT boxes but contains several binding sites for the transcription factors Sp1 and Egr-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Molecular structure investigation of neutral, dimer and anion forms of 3,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Bilgili, Sibel; Atac, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the structural and vibrational analysis of 3,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (3,4-PDCA) are presented using experimental techniques as FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR, UV and quantum chemical calculations. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 3,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid in the solid phase are recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1, respectively. The geometrical parameters and energies of all different and possible monomer, dimer, anion-1 and anion-2 conformers of 3,4-PDCA are obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) with B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. There are sixteen conformers (C1sbnd C16) for this molecule (neutral form). The most stable conformer of 3,4-PDCA is the C1 conformer. The complete assignments are performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. 1H and 13C NMR spectra are recorded and the chemical shifts are calculated by using DFT/B3LYP methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The UV absorption spectrum of the studied compound is recorded in the range of 200-400 nm by dissolved in ethanol. The optimized geometric parameters were compared with experimental data via the X-ray results derived from complexes of this molecule. In addition these, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), thermodynamic and electronic properties, HOMO-LUMO energies and Mulliken atomic charges, are performed.

  10. Methods development for separation of inorganic anions, organic acids and bases, and neutral organic compounds by ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-04-01

    A novel anion-exchange resin containing three amine groups was prepared by reaction of a chloromethylated polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) resin with diethylenetriamine. After being protonated by contact with an aqueous acid, this resin can be used for ion chromatographic separation of anions. The charge on the resins can be varied from +1 to +3 by changing the mobile phase pH. The selectivity of the new ion exchangers for various inorganic anions was quite different from that of conventional anion exchangers. The performance of this new anion exchanger was studied by changing the pH and the concentration of the eluent, and several different eluents were used with some common anions as testing analytes. Conductivity detection and UV-visible detection were applied to detect the anions after separation. The new resin can also be used for HPLC separation of neutral organic compounds. Alkylphenols and alkylbenzenes were separated with this new polymeric resin, and excellent separations were obtained under simple conditions. This report contains Chapter 1: General introduction and Chapter 6: General conclusions.

  11. Three-Dimensional Printed Shape Memory Objects Based on an Olefin Ionomer of Zinc-Neutralized Poly(ethylene-co-methacrylic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiyang; Peng, Fang; Cavicchi, Kevin A; Cakmak, Mukerrem; Weiss, R A; Vogt, Bryan D

    2017-08-16

    Three-dimensional printing enables the net shape manufacturing of objects with minimal material waste and low tooling costs, but the functionality is generally limited by available materials, especially for extrusion-based printing, such as fused deposition modeling (FDM). Here, we demonstrate shape memory behavior of 3D printed objects with FDM using a commercially available olefin ionomer, Surlyn 9520, which is zinc-neutralized poly(ethylene-co-methacrylic acid). The initial fixity for 3D printed and compression-molded samples was similar, but the initial recovery was much lower for the 3D printed sample (R = 58%) than that for the compression-molded sample (R = 83%). The poor recovery in the first cycle is attributed to polyethylene crystals formed during programming that act to resist the permanent network recovery. This effect is magnified in the 3D printed part due to the higher strain (lower modulus in the 3D printed part) at a fixed programming stress. The fixity and recovery in subsequent shape memory cycles are greater for the 3D printed part than for the compression-molded part. Moreover, the programmed strain can be systematically modulated by inclusion of porosity in the printed part without adversely impacting the fixity or recovery. These characteristics enable the direct formation of complex shapes of thermoplastic shape memory polymers that can be recovered in three dimensions with the appropriate trigger, such as heat, through the use of FDM as a 3D printing technology.

  12. Chemical Cues which Include Amino Acids Mediate Species-Specific Feeding Behavior in Invasive Filter-Feeding Bigheaded Carps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Aaron W; Sorensen, Peter W

    2017-04-01

    This study tested whether and how dissolved chemicals might assist food recognition in two filter-feeding fishes, the silver (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and the bighead carp (H. nobilis). These species evolved in Asia, are now invasive in the Mississippi River, and feed voraciously on microparticles including plankton. The food habits and biology of these carps are broadly similar to many filter-feeding fish, none of whose chemical ecology has been examined. We conducted five experiments. First, we demonstrated that buccal-pharngeal pumping (BPP), a behavior in which fish pump water into their buccal cavities, is responsible for sampling food: BPP activity in both silver and bighead carps was low and increased nearly 25-fold after exposure to a filtrate of a planktonic food mixture (P amino acids could explain about half of the activity of food filtrate, other unknown chemical stimuli were also implicated. Finally, occlusion experiments showed the olfactory sense has a very important, but not exclusive, role in bigheaded carp feeding behaviors and this might be exploited in both their control and culture.

  13. Cooperativity Enables Non-neutralizing Antibodies to Neutralize Ebolavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie A. Howell

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Drug combinations are synergistic when their combined efficacy exceeds the sum of the individual actions, but they rarely include ineffective drugs that become effective only in combination. We identified several “enabling pairs” of neutralizing and non-neutralizing anti-ebolavirus monoclonal antibodies, whose combination exhibited new functional profiles, including transforming a non-neutralizing antibody to a neutralizer. Sub-neutralizing concentrations of antibodies 2G4 or m8C4 enabled non-neutralizing antibody FVM09 (IC50 >1 μM to exhibit potent neutralization (IC50 1–10 nM. While FVM09 or m8C4 alone failed to protect Ebola-virus-infected mice, a combination of the two antibodies provided 100% protection. Furthermore, non-neutralizers FVM09 and FVM02 exponentially enhanced the potency of two neutralizing antibodies against both Ebola and Sudan viruses. We identified a hotspot for the binding of these enabling antibody pairs near the interface of the glycan cap and GP2. Enabling cooperativity may be an underappreciated phenomenon for viruses, with implications for the design and development of immunotherapeutics and vaccines.

  14. A 2-4-Amino Acid Deletion in the V5 Region of HIV-1 Env gp120 Confers Viral Resistance to the Broadly Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody, VRC01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Shingo; Sasaki, Maho; Tanaka, Takako; Inoue, Mari; Ophinni, Youdiil; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Kameoka, Masanori

    2017-12-01

    The envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) plays a critical role in viral entry into host cells. The broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody VRC01, which recognizes the CD4 binding site on gp120, neutralizes more than 90% of HIV-1 isolates. However, some of the CRF01_AE viruses prevalent in Southeast Asia are resistant to VRC01-mediated neutralization. We previously reported that 3 amino acid residues at positions 185, 186, and 197 of gp120 played an important role in the VRC01 resistance of CRF01_AE Env (AE-Env) clones isolated from HIV-infected Thai individuals. However, the VRC01 susceptibility of AE-Env clones was not fully explained by mutations at these 3 residues. In the present study, we examined other factors involved in the acquisition of viral VRC01 resistance. Neutralization tests using lentiviral vectors expressing a series of mutant AE-Env clones revealed that the deletion of 2-4 amino acid residues on the loop structure in the V5 region of gp120 conferred VRC01 resistance to several AE-Env clones. Our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying viral VRC01 resistance.

  15. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 1 (SNAT1 modulates L-citrulline transport and nitric oxide (NO signaling in piglet pulmonary arterial endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dikalova

    Full Text Available There is evidence that impairments in nitric oxide (NO signaling contribute to chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. The L-arginine-NO precursor, L-citrulline, has been shown to ameliorate pulmonary hypertension. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporters (SNATs are involved in the transport of L-citrulline into pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs. The functional link between the SNATs, L-citrulline, and NO signaling has not yet been explored.We tested the hypothesis that changes in SNAT1 expression and transport function regulate NO production by modulating eNOS coupling in newborn piglet PAECs.A silencing RNA (siRNA technique was used to assess the contribution of SNAT1 to NO production and eNOS coupling (eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratios in PAECs from newborn piglets cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in the presence and absence of L-citrulline. SNAT1 siRNA reduced basal NO production in normoxic PAECs and prevented L-citrulline-induced elevations in NO production in both normoxic and hypoxic PAECs. SNAT1 siRNA reduced basal eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratios in normoxic PAECs and prevented L-citrulline-induced increases in eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratios in hypoxic PAECs.SNAT1 mediated L-citrulline transport modulates eNOS coupling and thus regulates NO production in hypoxic PAECs from newborn piglets. Strategies that increase SNAT1-mediated transport and supply of L-citrulline may serve as novel therapeutic approaches to enhance NO production in patients with pulmonary vascular disease.

  16. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 1 (SNAT1) modulates L-citrulline transport and nitric oxide (NO) signaling in piglet pulmonary arterial endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikalova, Anna; Fagiana, Angela; Aschner, Judy L; Aschner, Michael; Summar, Marshall; Fike, Candice D

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that impairments in nitric oxide (NO) signaling contribute to chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. The L-arginine-NO precursor, L-citrulline, has been shown to ameliorate pulmonary hypertension. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporters (SNATs) are involved in the transport of L-citrulline into pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs). The functional link between the SNATs, L-citrulline, and NO signaling has not yet been explored. We tested the hypothesis that changes in SNAT1 expression and transport function regulate NO production by modulating eNOS coupling in newborn piglet PAECs. A silencing RNA (siRNA) technique was used to assess the contribution of SNAT1 to NO production and eNOS coupling (eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratios) in PAECs from newborn piglets cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in the presence and absence of L-citrulline. SNAT1 siRNA reduced basal NO production in normoxic PAECs and prevented L-citrulline-induced elevations in NO production in both normoxic and hypoxic PAECs. SNAT1 siRNA reduced basal eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratios in normoxic PAECs and prevented L-citrulline-induced increases in eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratios in hypoxic PAECs. SNAT1 mediated L-citrulline transport modulates eNOS coupling and thus regulates NO production in hypoxic PAECs from newborn piglets. Strategies that increase SNAT1-mediated transport and supply of L-citrulline may serve as novel therapeutic approaches to enhance NO production in patients with pulmonary vascular disease.

  17. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K.; Ho, J. X.; Keeling, K.; Gilliland, G. L.; Ji, X.; Ruker, F.; Carter, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Muster T et al., 1993, J Virol 67:6642-6647) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class (Ji X, Zhang P, Armstrong RN, Gilliland GL, 1992, Biochemistry 31:10169-10184) was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(3)2(1)2, with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  18. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for fats, including saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, trans fatty acids, and cholesterol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    This Opinion of the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA) deals with the setting of Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for fats. A lower bound of the reference intake range for total fat of 20 energy % (E%) and an upper bound of 35 E% are proposed. Fat intake in infants can......-linolenic acid (ALA) of 0.5 E%; not to set an UL for ALA; to set an AI of 250 mg for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) for adults; to set an AI of 100 mg DHA for infants (>6 months) and young children...... gradually be reduced from 40 E% in the 6-12 month period to 35-40 E% in the 2nd and 3rd year of life. For specific fatty acids the following is proposed: saturated fatty acid (SFA) and trans fatty acid intake should be as low as possible; not to set any DRV for cis-monounsaturated fatty acids......; not to formulate a DRV for the intake of total cis-polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA); not to set specific values for the n-3/n-6 ratio; to set an Adequate Intake (AI) of 4 E% for linoleic acid (LA); not to set any DRV for arachidonic acid; not to set an UL for total or any of the n-6 PUFA; to set an AI for alpha...

  19. An ion-neutral model to investigate chemical ionization mass spectrometry analysis of atmospheric molecules - application to a mixed reagent ion system for hydroperoxides and organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikes, Brian G.; Treadaway, Victoria; McNeill, Ashley S.; Silwal, Indira K. C.; O'Sullivan, Daniel W.

    2018-04-01

    An ion-neutral chemical kinetic model is described and used to simulate the negative ion chemistry occurring within a mixed-reagent ion chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). The model objective was the establishment of a theoretical basis to understand ambient pressure (variable sample flow and reagent ion carrier gas flow rates), water vapor, ozone and oxides of nitrogen effects on ion cluster sensitivities for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), methyl peroxide (CH3OOH), formic acid (HFo) and acetic acid (HAc). The model development started with established atmospheric ion chemistry mechanisms, thermodynamic data and reaction rate coefficients. The chemical mechanism was augmented with additional reactions and their reaction rate coefficients specific to the analytes. Some existing reaction rate coefficients were modified to enable the model to match laboratory and field campaign determinations of ion cluster sensitivities as functions of CIMS sample flow rate and ambient humidity. Relative trends in predicted and observed sensitivities are compared as instrument specific factors preclude a direct calculation of instrument sensitivity as a function of sample pressure and humidity. Predicted sensitivity trends and experimental sensitivity trends suggested the model captured the reagent ion and cluster chemistry and reproduced trends in ion cluster sensitivity with sample flow and humidity observed with a CIMS instrument developed for atmospheric peroxide measurements (PCIMSs). The model was further used to investigate the potential for isobaric compounds as interferences in the measurement of the above species. For ambient O3 mixing ratios more than 50 times those of H2O2, O3-(H2O) was predicted to be a significant isobaric interference to the measurement of H2O2 using O2-(H2O2) at m/z 66. O3 and NO give rise to species and cluster ions, CO3-(H2O) and NO3-(H2O), respectively, which interfere in the measurement of CH3OOH using O2-(CH3OOH) at m/z 80. The CO3-(H2O

  20. Broadly Neutralizing Activity of Zika Virus-Immune Sera Identifies a Single Viral Serotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Dowd

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemics of Zika virus (ZIKV have been associated with congenital malformation during pregnancy and Guillain-Barré syndrome. There are two ZIKV lineages (African and Asian that share >95% amino acid identity. Little is known regarding the ability of neutralizing antibodies elicited against one lineage to protect against the other. We investigated the breadth of the neutralizing antibody response following ZIKV infection by measuring the sensitivity of six ZIKV strains to neutralization by ZIKV-confirmed convalescent human serum or plasma samples. Contemporary Asian and early African ZIKV strains were similarly sensitive to neutralization regardless of the cellular source of virus. Furthermore, mouse immune serum generated after infection with African or Asian ZIKV strains was capable of neutralizing homologous and heterologous ZIKV strains equivalently. Because our study only defines a single ZIKV serotype, vaccine candidates eliciting robust neutralizing antibody responses should inhibit infection of both ZIKV lineages, including strains circulating in the Americas.

  1. Health information impact on the relative importance of beef attributes including its enrichment with polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and conjugated linoleic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallas, Zein; Realini, Carolina E; Gil, José Maria

    2014-08-01

    This paper uses Choice Experiments (CE) to investigate Spanish consumers' preferences towards beef meat enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and conjugated linoleic acid). Data were gathered from self-completed questionnaires in a controlled environment with two different samples (320 and 322 consumers) differentiated by the information received. The surveys were carried out in three main Spanish cities (Barcelona, Zaragoza and Pamplona), representing the average consumer. A variation of the "Dual Response Choice Experiments" (DRCE) design was used due to its ability to emphasize the purchase context. Results showed that consumers who received information attach higher preference for enriched meat with polyunsaturated fatty acids. The utility associated with the higher content of fat increase for informed consumers, showing a substitute effect. Informed consumers are willing to accept meat with a higher amount of visible fat if it is enriched with beneficial fatty acids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Health information impact on the relative importance of beef attributes including its enrichment with polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and conjugated linoleic acid)

    OpenAIRE

    Kallas, Zein; Realini Cujó, Carolina; Gil Roig, José María

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses Choice Experiments (CE) to investigate Spanish consumers' preferences towards beef meat enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and conjugated linoleic acid). Data were gathered from self-completed questionnaires in a controlled environment with two different samples (320 and 322 consumers) differentiated by the information received. The surveys were carried out in three main Spanish cities (Barcelona, Zaragoza and Pamplona), representing the average consumer. A var...

  3. Large neutral amino acid supplementation as an alternative to the phenylalanine-restricted diet in adults with phenylketonuria : evidence from adult Pah-enu2 mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Danique; van der Goot, Els; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M.; van Faassen, Martijn; de Blaauw, Pim; Kema, Ido P.; Heiner-Fokkema, M. Rebecca; van der Zee, Eddy A.; van Spronsen, Francjan J.

    Phenylketonuria treatment mainly consists of a phenylalanine-restricted diet but still results in suboptimal neuropsychological outcome, which is at least partly based on cerebral monoamine deficiencies, while, after childhood, treatment compliance decreases. Supplementation of large neutral amino

  4. The impacts of neutralized acid mine drainage contaminated water on the expression of selected endocrine-linked genes in juvenile Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus exposed in vivo

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Truter, JC

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available into watercourses. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the endocrine modulatory potential of neutralized AMD, using molecular biomarkers in the teleost fish Oreochromis mossambicus in exposure studies. Surface water was collected from six locations...

  5. Synthesis of cryptocrystalline magnesite–bentonite clay composite and its application for neutralization and attenuation of inorganic contaminants in acidic and metalliferous mine drainage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of this study was to synthesize cryptocrystalline magnesite–bentonite clay composite by mechanochemical activation and evaluate its usability as low cost adsorbent for neutralization and attenuation of inorganic contaminants...

  6. Amino acid-mediated impacts of elevated carbon dioxide and simulated root herbivory on aphids are neutralized by increased air temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryalls, James M W; Moore, Ben D; Riegler, Markus; Gherlenda, Andrew N; Johnson, Scott N

    2015-02-01

    Changes in host plant quality, including foliar amino acid concentrations, resulting from global climate change and attack from multiple herbivores, have the potential to modify the pest status of insect herbivores. This study investigated how mechanically simulated root herbivory of lucerne (Medicago sativa) before and after aphid infestation affected the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) under elevated temperature (eT) and carbon dioxide concentrations (eCO2). eT increased plant height and biomass, and eCO2 decreased root C:N. Foliar amino acid concentrations and aphid numbers increased in response to eCO2, but only at ambient temperatures, demonstrating the ability of eT to negate the effects of eCO2. Root damage reduced aboveground biomass, height, and root %N, and increased root %C and C:N, most probably via decreased biological nitrogen fixation. Total foliar amino acid concentrations and aphid colonization success were higher in plants with roots cut early (before aphid arrival) than those with roots cut late (after aphid arrival); however, this effect was counteracted by eT. These results demonstrate the importance of amino acid concentrations for aphids and identify individual amino acids as being potential factors underpinning aphid responses to eT, eCO2, and root damage in lucerne. Incorporating trophic complexity and multiple climatic factors into plant-herbivore studies enables greater insight into how plants and insects will interact in the future, with implications for sustainable pest control and future crop security. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  7. Quantitative Determination of Δ9-THC, CBG, CBD, Their Acid Precursors and Five Other Neutral Cannabinoids by UHPLC-UV-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Avula, Bharathi; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Radwan, Mohamed M; Wang, Mei; Wanas, Amira S; Mehmedic, Zlatko; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2018-03-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of terpenophenolic compounds in the medicinal plant Cannabis sativa (Cannabaceae family). Cannabigerolic acid, Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A, cannabidiolic acid, Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabigerol, cannabidiol, cannabichromene, and tetrahydrocannabivarin are major metabolites in the classification of different strains of C. sativa . Degradation or artifact cannabinoids cannabinol, cannabicyclol, and Δ 8 -tetrahydrocannabinol are formed under the influence of heat and light during processing and storage of the plant sample. An ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatographic method coupled with photodiode array and single quadruple mass spectrometry detectors was developed and validated for quantitative determination of 11 cannabinoids in different C. sativa samples. Compounds 1:  - 11: were baseline separated with an acetonitrile (with 0.05% formic acid) and water (with 0.05% formic acid) gradient at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min on a Waters Cortec UPLC C18 column (100 mm × 2.1 mm I. D., 1.6 µm). The limits of detection and limits of quantitation of the 11 cannabinoids were below 0.2 and 0.5 µg/mL, respectively. The relative standard deviation for the precision test was below 2.4%. A mixture of acetonitrile and methanol (80 : 20, v / v ) was proven to be the best solvent system for the sample preparation. The recovery of all analytes was in the range of 97 - 105%. A total of 32 Cannabis samples including hashish, leaves, and flower buds were analyzed. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Contribution to the study of the electrochemical behaviour of titanium and of its industrial shores in sulphuric environment. Characteristics of their resistance to pitting corrosion in neutral and acid halogenous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Jacques-Alain

    1975-01-01

    After a presentation of the general metallurgical, physical, and corrosion resistance characteristics of titanium and of its alloys, this research thesis presents the experimental means, discusses the influence of experimental conditions on the assessment of the electrochemical behaviour of titanium and of its alloys. It reports an investigation of the cathodic behaviour of non-alloyed titanium and notably the hydrogen release kinetics in a concentrated acid environment. It discusses the influence of alloy composition on their cathodic behaviour, addresses the anodic behaviour of titanium and of its alloys in sulphuric environment, and the pitting corrosion of titanium and of its alloys in an acid and neutral halogenous environment [fr

  9. What is Neutrality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, R.; van der Burg, W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reinvestigates the question of liberal neutrality. We contend that current liberal discussions have been dominated - if not hijacked - by one particular interpretation of what neutrality could imply, namely, exclusive neutrality, that aims to exclude religious and cultural expressions

  10. Fatty acid composition of ruminal digesta and longissimus muscle from lambs fed silage mixtures including red clover, sainfoin, and timothy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campidonico, L; Toral, P G; Priolo, A; Luciano, G; Valenti, B; Hervás, G; Frutos, P; Copani, G; Ginane, C; Niderkorn, V

    2016-04-01

    This work investigated the effects of feeding silage mixtures of a plant containing polyphenol oxidase (PPO; red clover [; RC]), a plant containing tannins (sainfoin [; SF]), and a grass species not containing these compounds (timothy [; T]) on ruminal and intramuscular (i.m.) fatty acids of lambs. Forty 4-mo-old castrated male Romane lambs, divided into 5 groups, received 1 of the following silages: 1) T (100%), 2) a binary mixture of timothy and tannin-containing sainfoin ( cv. Perly; 50:50 [T-SF]), 3) a binary mixture of timothy and PPO-containing red clover ( cv. Mervius; 50:50 [T-RC]), 4) a ternary mixture of timothy, sainfoin, and red clover containing both tannins and PPO (50:25:25, respectively [T-SF-RC]), and 5) a binary mixture of tannin-containing sainfoin and PPO-containing red clover (50:50 [SF-RC]). In the rumen digesta, the partial or total replacement of T with forage legumes was associated with greater concentrations of PUFA ( < 0.001) and 1esser concentrations of MUFA ( < 0.001). The inclusion of forage legumes in the silage favored the accumulation of 18:3 -3 ( < 0.001), with the greatest concentrations being observed in SF-RC. This latter diet also led to the greatest percentage of 18:2 -6 ( < 0.001). Forage legumes decreased the -11 18:1 to 30% of T in rumen digesta ( < 0.001). Forage legumes decreased the total concentration of branched-chain fatty acids in the rumen digesta (on average, -28%; < 0.001), this effect being less marked (-17%; = 0.014) in T-RC in comparison with T. The dietary treatment tended to affect the proportion of MUFA ( = 0.081) and of PUFA ( = 0.079) in the i.m. fat of the LM, respectively, at the highest and lowest numerical value in the T group. The sum of -3 fatty acids was less in the T and T-SF groups compared with the mixture of legumes without T (SF-RC; < 0.001 and < 0.008, respectively). The latter group had also a lesser -6-to--3 ratio than the T-SF group ( = 0.01). -11 18:1 was greater ( < 0.03) in lambs given T

  11. 1-(2-aminophenyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carboxylic acid: activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens including Vibrio cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Krishnendu; Haldar, Debasish

    2017-10-01

    We report a new synthetic aromatic ε-amino acid containing a triazole moiety with antimicrobial potential against Gram-positive, Gram-negative and pathogenic bacteria including Vibrio cholerae. Structure-property relationship studies revealed that all the functional groups are essential to enhance the antimicrobial activity. The 1-(2-aminophenyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carboxylic acid was synthesized by click chemistry. From X-ray crystallography, the amino acid adopts a kink-like structure where the phenyl and triazole rings are perpendicular to each other and the amine and acid groups maintain an angle of 60°. The agar diffusion test shows that the amino acid has significant antibacterial activity. The liquid culture test exhibits that the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value for Bacillus subtilis and Vibrio cholerae is 59.5 µg ml-1. FE-SEM experiments were performed to study the morphological changes of bacterial shape after treatment with compound 1. The antimicrobial activity of the amino acid was further studied by DNA binding and degradation study, protein binding, dye-binding assay and morphological analysis. Moreover, the amino acid does not have any harmful effect on eukaryotes.

  12. Energy densification of biomass-derived organic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, M. Clayton; van Walsum, G. Peter; Schwartz, Thomas J.; van Heiningen, Adriaan

    2013-01-29

    A process for upgrading an organic acid includes neutralizing the organic acid to form a salt and thermally decomposing the resulting salt to form an energy densified product. In certain embodiments, the organic acid is levulinic acid. The process may further include upgrading the energy densified product by conversion to alcohol and subsequent dehydration.

  13. Neutralization of wastewater from nitrite passivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlowski, L.; Mientki, B.; Wasag, H.

    1982-01-01

    A method for neutralization of wastewater formed in nitrite passivation has been presented. The method consists of introducing urea into wastewater and acidifying it with sulphuric acid. Wastewater is neutralized with lime. After clarification, wastewater can be drained outside the plant

  14. N-linked glycosylation and sequence changes in a critical negative control region of the ASCT1 and ASCT2 neutral amino acid transporters determine their retroviral receptor functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Mariana; Lavillette, Dimitri; Kelly, Sean M; Kabat, David

    2003-03-01

    A widely dispersed interference group of retroviruses that includes the feline endogenous virus (RD114), baboon endogenous virus (BaEV), human endogenous virus type W (HERV-W), and type D primate retroviruses uses the human Na(+)-dependent neutral amino acid transporter type 2 (hASCT2; gene name, SLC1A5) as a common cell surface receptor. Although hamster cells are fully resistant to these viruses and murine cells are susceptible only to BaEV and HERV-W pseudotype viruses, these rodent cells both become highly susceptible to all of the viruses after treatment with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of protein N-linked glycosylation. A partial explanation for these results was recently provided by findings that the orthologous murine transporter mASCT2 is inactive as a viral receptor, that a related (ca. 55% identity) murine paralog (mASCT1; gene name, SLC1A4) mediates infections specifically of BaEV and HERV-W, and that N-deglycosylation of mASCT1 activates it as a receptor for all viruses of this interference group. Because the only two N-linked oligosaccharides in mASCT1 occur in the carboxyl-terminal region of extracellular loop 2 (ECL2), it was inferred that this region contributes in an inhibitory manner to infections by RD114 and type D primate viruses. To directly and more thoroughly investigate the receptor active sites, we constructed and analyzed a series of hASCT2/mASCT2 chimeras and site-directed mutants. Our results suggest that a hypervariable sequence of 21 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminal portion of ECL2 plays a critical role in determining the receptor properties of ASCT2 proteins for all viruses in this interference group. In addition, we analyzed the tunicamycin-dependent viral susceptibility of hamster cells. In contrast to mASCT1, which contains two N-linked oligosaccharides that partially restrict viral infections, hamster ASCT1 contains an additional N-linked oligosaccharide clustered close to the others in the carboxyl-terminal region of ECL2

  15. Sugar-based gemini surfactant with a vesicle-to-micelle transition at acidic pH and a reversible vesicle flocculation near neutral pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnsson, M; Wagenaar, A; Engberts, JBFN

    2003-01-01

    A sugar-based (reduced glucose) gemini surfactant forms vesicles in dilute aqueous solution near neutral pH. At lower pH, there is a vesicle-to-micelle transition within a narrow pH region (pH 6.0-5.6). The vesicles are transformed into large cylindrical micelles that in turn are transformed into

  16. Simultaneous optimization of monolayer formation factors, including temperature, to significantly improve nucleic acid hybridization efficiency on gold substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pris, Andrew D; Ostrowski, Sara G; Garaas, Sarah D

    2010-04-20

    Past literature investigations have optimized various single factors used in the formation of thiolated, single stranded DNA (ss-DNA) monolayers on gold. In this study a more comprehensive approach is taken, where a design of experiment (DOE) is employed to simultaneously optimize all of the factors involved in construction of the capture monolayer used in a fluorescence-based hybridization assay. Statistical analysis of the fluorescent intensities resulting from the DOE provides empirical evidence for the importance and the optimal levels of traditional and novel factors included in this investigation. We report on the statistical importance of a novel factor, temperature of the system during monolayer formation of the capture molecule and lateral spacer molecule, and how proper usage of this temperature factor increased the hybridization signal 50%. An initial theory of how the physical factor of heat is mechanistically supplementing the function of the lateral spacer molecule is provided.

  17. Remediation of grey forest soils heavily polluted with heavy metals by means of their leaching at acidic pH followed by the soil reclamation by means of neutralization and bacterial manure addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan; Spasova, Irena; Nicolova, Marina

    2014-05-01

    Some grey forest soils in Western Bulgaria are heavily polluted with heavy metals (copper, lead, and zinc), arsenic, and uranium due to the infiltration of acid mine drainage generated at the abandoned uranium mine Curilo. This paper presents some results from a study about soil remediation based on the contaminants leaching from the topsoil by means of irrigation with solutions containing sulphuric acid or its in situ generation by means of sulphur-oxidizing chemolithotrophic bacteria in or without the presence of finely cut straw. These methods were tested in large scale zero suction lysimeters. The approaches based on S° and finely cut straw addition was the most efficient amongst the tested methods and for seven months of soil remediation the concentration of all soil contaminants were decreased below the relevant Maximum Admissible Concentration (MAC). Neutralization of the soil acidity was applied as a next stage of soil reclamation by adding CaCO3 and cow manure. As a result, soil pH increased from strongly acidic (2.36) to slightly acidic (6.15) which allowed subsequent addition of humic acids and bacterial manure to the topsoil. The soil habitat changed in this way facilitated the growth of microorganisms which restored the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and carbon to the levels typical for non-polluted grey forest soil.

  18. Extruded linseed and rapeseed both influenced fatty acid composition of total lipids and their polar and neutral fractions in longissimus thoracis and semitendinosus muscles of finishing Normand cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeanu, Mihaela; Thomas, Agnès; Bispo, Esperanza; Gobert, Mylène; Gruffat, Dominique; Durand, Denys; Bauchart, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    The effects of extruded linseed and rapeseed on lipids and FA composition of total, polar and neutral lipids of longissimus thoracis (LT) and semitendinosus (ST) muscles were investigated in 21 Normand cull cows. Animals were assigned in a 100 d finishing period to straw (30%) and concentrate (70%) based (C) or the same diet supplemented with linseed (L) or with rapeseed (66%) plus linseed (33%) (RL). Beef polar and neutral lipids were purified by liquid chromatography and their FA analysed by GLC. Trans and cis 18:1, purified by HPLC from total FA methyl esters, were analysed by GLC-MS. L and LR diets did not increase beef lipid deposition, but had modified FA composition of both LT and ST muscles in favouring deposition of 18:3n-3 and 9cis,11tr 18:2 (CLA), mainly to the detriment of 18:1∆9 cis (neutral lipids) and 18:2n-6 (polar lipids). However, they did not favour deposition of LC n-3 PUFA in the two muscles, but had increased deposition of trans 18:1 significantly, especially of ∆13tr to ∆16tr isoforms to the detriment of ∆10tr 18:1 (L diet) and of ∆11tr 18:1 (RL diet). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 3-(1H-Indol-3-yl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulfonamidopropanoic acid including an unknown solvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Ullah Khan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C17H15N3O6S, which crystallized with highly disordered methanol and/or water solvent molecules, the dihedral angle between the the indole and benzene ring systems is 5.3 (2°, which allows for the formation of intramolecular π–π stacking interactions [centroid–centroid separations = 3.641 (3 and 3.694 (3 Å] and an approximate overall U-shape for the molecule. In the crystal, dimers linked by pairs of Ns—H...Oc (s = sulfonamide and c = carboxylate hydrogen bonds generate R22(10 loops, whereas Ni—H...π (i = indole interactions lead to chains propagating in [100] or [010]. Together, these lead to a three-dimensional network in which the solvent voids are present as intersecting (two-dimensional systems of [100] and [010] channels. The title compound was found to contain a heavily disordered solvent molecule, which could be methanol or water or a mixture of the two. Due to its uncertain nature and the unresolvable disorder, the data were processed with the SQUEEZE option in PLATON [Spek (2009. Acta Cryst. D65, 148–155], which revealed 877.8 Å3 of solvent-accessible volume per unit cell and 126 electron-units of scattering density or 109.7 Å3 (16 electron units per organic molecule.. This was not included in the calculations of overall formula weight, density and absorption coefficient.

  20. New CE-ESI-MS analytical method for the separation, identification and quantification of seven phenolic acids including three isomer compounds in virgin olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevado, Juan José Berzas; Peñalvo, Gregorio Castañeda; Robledo, Virginia Rodríguez; Martínez, Gabriela Vargas

    2009-10-15

    A sensitive and expeditious CE-ESI-MS analytical method for the separation, identification and determination of seven selected antioxidants (cinnamic and benzoic acids), including three isomers of coumaric acid (ortho-, meta- and para-) has been developed. In order to obtain the analytical separation, capillary electrophoresis and CE-MS interface parameters (e.g., buffer pH and composition, sheath liquid and gas flow rates, sheath liquid composition, electrospray voltage, etc.) were carefully optimized. The polar fraction containing the selected phenolic acids was obtained using a previously optimized SPE pretreatment. An MS detector in order to extract structural information about the target compounds and facilitate their qualitative analysis was used in the negative ion mode. The proposed off-line SPE CE-ESI-MS method was validated by assessing its precision, LODs and LOQs, linearity range and accuracy. The optimized and validated method was used in order to quantify the selected antioxidants in various samples of virgin olive oil and extra-virgin olive oil obtained from the main olive varieties cropped in Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. Salicylic acid was used as internal standard throughout in order to ensure reproducibility in the quantitative analysis of the oil samples. The results confirmed the presence of hydroxyphenyl acetic, p-coumaric, ferulic and vanillic acids in substantial amounts (microg g(-1) level) in all samples.

  1. Ultracold neutral plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, M.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-01-01

    By photoionizing samples of laser-cooled atoms with laser light tuned just above the ionization limit, plasmas can be created with electron and ion temperatures below 10 K. These ultracold neutral plasmas have extended the temperature bounds of plasma physics by two orders of magnitude. Table-top experiments, using many of the tools from atomic physics, allow for the study of plasma phenomena in this new regime with independent control over the density and temperature of the plasma through the excitation process. Characteristic of these systems is an inhomogeneous density profile, inherited from the density distribution of the laser-cooled neutral atom sample. Most work has dealt with unconfined plasmas in vacuum, which expand outward at velocities of order 100 m/s, governed by electron pressure, and with lifetimes of order 100 μs, limited by stray electric fields. Using detection of charged particles and optical detection techniques, a wide variety of properties and phenomena have been observed, including expansion dynamics, collective excitations in both the electrons and ions, and collisional properties. Through three-body recombination collisions, the plasmas rapidly form Rydberg atoms, and clouds of cold Rydberg atoms have been observed to spontaneously avalanche ionize to form plasmas. Of particular interest is the possibility of the formation of strongly coupled plasmas, where Coulomb forces dominate thermal motion and correlations become important. The strongest impediment to strong coupling is disorder-induced heating, a process in which Coulomb energy from an initially disordered sample is converted into thermal energy. This restricts electrons to a weakly coupled regime and leaves the ions barely within the strongly coupled regime. This review will give an overview of the field of ultracold neutral plasmas, from its inception in 1999 to current work, including efforts to increase strong coupling and effects on plasma properties due to strong coupling.

  2. Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) is an astronaut training facility and neutral buoyancy pool operated by NASA and located at the Sonny Carter Training Facility,...

  3. Extension of a PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid to include the competitive formation and clearance of metabolites associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corley, R.A.; Saghir, S.A.; Bartels, M.J.; Hansen, S.C.; Creim, J.; McMartin, K.E.; Snellings, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    A previously developed PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid was extended to include glyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, and the precipitation of calcium oxalate that is associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans. The development and evaluation of the PBPK model was based upon previously published pharmacokinetic studies coupled with measured blood and tissue partition coefficients and rates of in vitro metabolism of glyoxylic acid to oxalic acid, glycine and other metabolites using primary hepatocytes isolated from male Wistar rats and humans. Precipitation of oxalic acid with calcium in the kidneys was assumed to occur only at concentrations exceeding the thermodynamic solubility product for calcium oxalate. This solubility product can be affected by local concentrations of calcium and other ions that are expressed in the model using an ion activity product estimated from toxicity studies such that calcium oxalate precipitation would be minimal at dietary exposures below the NOAEL for kidney toxicity in the sensitive male Wistar rat. The resulting integrated PBPK predicts that bolus oral or dietary exposures to ethylene glycol would result in typically 1.4-1.6-fold higher peak oxalate levels and 1.6-2-fold higher AUC's for calcium oxalate in kidneys of humans as compared with comparably exposed male Wistar rats over a dose range of 1-1000 mg/kg. The converse (male Wistar rats predicted to have greater oxalate levels in the kidneys than humans) was found for inhalation exposures although no accumulation of calcium oxalate is predicted to occur until exposures are well in excess of the theoretical saturated vapor concentration of 200 mg/m 3 . While the current model is capable of such cross-species, dose, and route-of-exposure comparisons, it also highlights several areas of potential research that will improve confidence in such predictions, especially at low doses relevant for most human exposures.

  4. Vendor neutral archive in PACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Tapesh Kumar; Sanjeev

    2012-10-01

    An archive is a location containing a collection of records, documents, or other materials of historical importance. An integral part of Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) is archiving. When a hospital needs to migrate a PACS vendor, the complete earlier data need to be migrated in the format of the newly procured PACS. It is both time and money consuming. To address this issue, the new concept of vendor neutral archive (VNA) has emerged. A VNA simply decouples the PACS and workstations at the archival layer. This is achieved by developing an application engine that receives, integrates, and transmits the data using the different syntax of a Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) format. Transferring the data belonging to the old PACS to a new one is performed by a process called migration of data. In VNA, a number of different data migration techniques are available to facilitate transfer from the old PACS to the new one, the choice depending on the speed of migration and the importance of data. The techniques include simple DICOM migration, prefetch-based DICOM migration, medium migration, and the expensive non-DICOM migration. "Vendor neutral" may not be a suitable term, and "architecture neutral," "PACS neutral," "content neutral," or "third-party neutral" are probably better and preferred terms. Notwithstanding this, the VNA acronym has come to stay in both the medical IT user terminology and in vendor nomenclature, and radiologists need to be aware of its impact in PACS across the globe.

  5. Vendor neutral archive in PACS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapesh Kumar Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An archive is a location containing a collection of records, documents, or other materials of historical importance. An integral part of Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS is archiving. When a hospital needs to migrate a PACS vendor, the complete earlier data need to be migrated in the format of the newly procured PACS. It is both time and money consuming. To address this issue, the new concept of vendor neutral archive (VNA has emerged. A VNA simply decouples the PACS and workstations at the archival layer. This is achieved by developing an application engine that receives, integrates, and transmits the data using the different syntax of a Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM format. Transferring the data belonging to the old PACS to a new one is performed by a process called migration of data. In VNA, a number of different data migration techniques are available to facilitate transfer from the old PACS to the new one, the choice depending on the speed of migration and the importance of data. The techniques include simple DICOM migration, prefetch-based DICOM migration, medium migration, and the expensive non-DICOM migration. "Vendor neutral" may not be a suitable term, and "architecture neutral," "PACS neutral," "content neutral," or "third-party neutral" are probably better and preferred terms. Notwithstanding this, the VNA acronym has come to stay in both the medical IT user terminology and in vendor nomenclature, and radiologists need to be aware of its impact in PACS across the globe.

  6. Vacuolar proteases from Candida glabrata: Acid aspartic protease PrA, neutral serine protease PrB and serine carboxypeptidase CpY. The nitrogen source influences their level of expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda-González, M Eugenia; Parra-Ortega, Berenice; Betancourt-Cervantes, Yuliana; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuole is actively involved in the mechanism of autophagy and is important in homeostasis, degradation, turnover, detoxification and protection under stressful conditions. In contrast, vacuolar proteases have not been fully studied in phylogenetically related Candida glabrata. The present paper is the first report on proteolytic activity in the C. glabrata vacuole. Biochemical studies in C. glabrata have highlighted the presence of different kinds of intracellular proteolytic activity: acid aspartyl proteinase (PrA) acts on substrates such as albumin and denatured acid hemoglobin, neutral serine protease (PrB) on collagen-type hide powder azure, and serine carboxypeptidase (CpY) on N-benzoyl-tyr-pNA. Our results showed a subcellular fraction with highly specific enzymatic activity for these three proteases, which allowed to confirm its vacuolar location. Expression analyses were performed in the genes CgPEP4 (CgAPR1), CgPRB1 and CgCPY1 (CgPRC), coding for vacuolar aspartic protease A, neutral protease B and carboxypeptidase Y, respectively. The results show a differential regulation of protease expression depending on the nitrogen source. The proteases encoded by genes CgPEP4, CgPRB1 and CgCPY1 from C. glabrata could participate in the process of autophagy and survival of this opportunistic pathogen. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. In Vitro Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities of Chlorogenic Acid against Clinical Isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia including the Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole Resistant Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunanidhi, Arunkumar; Thomas, Renjan; van Belkum, Alex; Neela, Vasanthakumari

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm activity of chlorogenic acid against clinical isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was investigated through disk diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), time-kill and biofilm assays. A total of 9 clinical S. maltophilia isolates including one isolate resistant to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) were tested. The inhibition zone sizes for the isolates ranged from 17 to 29 mm, while the MIC and MBC values ranged from 8 to 16 μg mL−1 and 16 to 32 μg mL−1. Chlorogenic acid appeared to be strongly bactericidal at 4x MIC, with a 2-log reduction in viable bacteria at 10 h. In vitro antibiofilm testing showed a 4-fold reduction in biofilm viability at 4x MIC compared to 1x MIC values (0.085 chlorogenic acid. The data from this study support the notion that the chlorogenic acid has promising in vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm activities against S. maltophilia. PMID:23509719

  8. Study of neutral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, W.; Bulos, F.; Eisner, A.

    1975-01-01

    The range of physics problems for which a detector emphasizing neutrals is most suitable is discussed. The primary goals are the all neutrals cross section, sigma/sub o/ (e + e - → neutrals), the characterization of the neutral energy in multi-hadronic events, the search for monoenergetic photons, and good sensitivity in the difficult region of low energy photons. Those features of multi-hadronic events which are most relevant to a neutral detector were calculated using a jet model with parameters extrapolated from SPEAR energies. These distributions are presented and discussed

  9. A computational study of ultrafast acid dissociation and acid-base neutralization reactions. II. The relationship between the coordination state of solvent molecules and concerted versus sequential acid dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Patrick; Thomas, Vibin; Iftimie, Radu

    2011-03-07

    We investigate the role played by the coordination state of pre-existing water wires during the dissociation of moderately strong acids by means of first-principles molecular dynamics calculations. By preparing 2,4,6-tricyanophenol (calc. pKa∼0.5) in two different initial states, we are able to observe sequential as well as concerted trajectories of dissociation: On one hand, equilibrium dissociation takes place on a ∼50 ps timescale; proton conduction occurs through three-coordinated water wires in this case, by means of sequential Grotthus hopping. On the other hand, by preparing 2,4,6-tricyanophenol in a hydration state inherited from that of equilibrated phenol (calc. pKa=7.6), the moderately strong acid finds itself in a presolvated state from which dissociation can take place on a ∼1 ps timescale. In this case, concerted dissociation trajectories are observed, which consist of proton translocation through two intervening, four-coordinated, water molecules in 0.1-1.0 ps. The present results suggest that, in general, the mechanism of proton translocation depends on how the excess proton is injected into a hydrogen bond network. In particular, if the initial conditions favour proton release to a fourfold H-bonded water molecule, proton translocation by as much as 6-8 Å can take place on a sub-picosecond timescale. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Targeted mutation of Δ12 and Δ15 desaturase genes in hemp produce major alterations in seed fatty acid composition including a high oleic hemp oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecka, Monika; Kaminski, Filip; Adams, Ian; Poulson, Helen; Sloan, Raymond; Li, Yi; Larson, Tony R; Winzer, Thilo; Graham, Ian A

    2014-06-01

    We used expressed sequence tag library and whole genome sequence mining to identify a suite of putative desaturase genes representing the four main activities required for production of polyunsaturated fatty acids in hemp seed oil. Phylogenetic-based classification and developing seed transcriptome analysis informed selection for further analysis of one of seven Δ12 desaturases and one of three Δ15 desaturases that we designate CSFAD2A and CSFAD3A, respectively. Heterologous expression of corresponding cDNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed CSFAD2A to have Δx+3 activity, while CSFAD3A activity was exclusively at the Δ15 position. TILLING of an ethyl methane sulphonate mutagenized population identified multiple alleles including non-sense mutations in both genes and fatty acid composition of seed oil confirmed these to be the major Δ12 and Δ15 desaturases in developing hemp seed. Following four backcrosses and sibling crosses to achieve homozygosity, csfad2a-1 was grown in the field and found to produce a 70 molar per cent high oleic acid (18:1(Δ9) ) oil at yields similar to wild type. Cold-pressed high oleic oil produced fewer volatiles and had a sevenfold increase in shelf life compared to wild type. Two low abundance octadecadienoic acids, 18:2(Δ6,9) and 18:2(Δ9,15), were identified in the high oleic oil, and their presence suggests remaining endogenous desaturase activities utilize the increased levels of oleic acid as substrate. Consistent with this, CSFAD3A produces 18:2(Δ9,15) from endogenous 18:1(Δ9) when expressed in S. cerevisiae. This work lays the foundation for the development of additional novel oil varieties in this multipurpose low input crop. © 2014 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Seq2Logo: a method for construction and visualization of amino acid binding motifs and sequence profiles including sequence weighting, pseudo counts and two-sided representation of amino acid enrichment and depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    valuable information related to amino acid depletion. Seq2logo aims at resolving these issues allowing the user to include sequence weighting to correct for data redundancy, pseudo counts to correct for low number of observations and different logotype representations each capturing different aspects...

  12. Purification of Peptide Components including Melittin from Bee Venom using gel filtration chromatography and propionic acid/urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Chon Choi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This study was conducted to carry out Purification of Melittin and other peptide components from Bee Venom using gel filtration chromatography and propionic acid/urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis Methods : Melittin and other peptide components were separated from bee venom by using gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-50 column in 0.05M ammonium acetate buffer. Results : Melittin and other peptide components were separated from bee venom by using gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-50 column in 0.05M ammonium acetate buffer. The fractions obtained from gel filtration chromatography was analyzed by using SDS-PAGE and propionic acid/urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The melittin obtained from the gel filtration contained residual amount of phospholipase A2 and a protein with molecular weight of 6,000. The contaminating proteins were removed by the second gel filtration chromatography. Conclusion : Gel filtration chromatography and propionic acid/urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are useful to separate peptide components including melittin from bee venom.

  13. Tailings neutralization and other alternatives for immobilizing toxic materials in tailings. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opitz, B.E.; Sherwood, D.R.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1985-09-01

    This document, ''Tailing Neutralization and Other Alternatives for Immobilizing Toxic Materials in Tailings,'' is the final report in a series of six. It summarizes research completed since the beginning of the project. Three subtasks are included: Subtask A - Neutralization Methods Selection; Subtask B - Laboratory Analysis; and Subtask C - Field Testing. Subtask A reviews treatment processes from other industries to evaluate whether current waste technology from other fields is applicable to the uranium industry. This task also identifies several reagents that were tested for their effectiveness in treating acidic tailings and tailings solution in order to immobilize the contaminants associated with the acid waste. Subtask B describes the laboratory batch and column treatment studies performed on solid waste tailings and tailings solutions over the course of the project. The evaluation of several reagents identified in Subtask A was based on three criteria: (1) treated effluent water quality; (2) neutralized sludge handling and hydraulic properties; and (3) reagent costs and acid neutralizing efficiency. Subtask C presents a field demonstration plan that will evaluate the effectiveness, costs, and benefits of neutralizing acidic uranium mill tailings solution to reduce the potential leaching of toxic trace metals, radionuclides, and macro ions from a tailings impoundment. Details of the related research can be found in the documents listed in the ''Previous Documents in Series.'' 43 refs., 9 figs., 46 tabs

  14. Mod en neutral seksualitet!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Jonatan

    2013-01-01

    Towards a Neutral Sexuality! or Roland Barthes as a Queer Thinker? This article argues that the work of Roland Barthes has interesting perspectives in common with the queer theory. This argument will be put forward by using his concept of ‘the neutral’ that Barthes defines as “that which outplays...... the paradigm”. This notion was presented at a series of lectures at Collège de France in 1977. Through a reading of Barthes’s autobiography, Roland Barthes par Roland Barthes (1975), the article demonstrates how Barthes in this text tries to outplay the paradigms that rules over the hegemonic understanding...... theory” in the late 1970’s that beside Barthes includes Jean Baudrillard....

  15. PLT neutral beam injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.; Barber, G.C.; Blue, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) neutral beam injection system is given and its performance characteristics are outlined. A detailed operational procedure is included, as are some tips on troubleshooting. Proper operation of the source is shown to be a crucial factor in system performance

  16. Seq2Logo: a method for construction and visualization of amino acid binding motifs and sequence profiles including sequence weighting, pseudo counts and two-sided representation of amino acid enrichment and depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-07-01

    Seq2Logo is a web-based sequence logo generator. Sequence logos are a graphical representation of the information content stored in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and provide a compact and highly intuitive representation of the position-specific amino acid composition of binding motifs, active sites, etc. in biological sequences. Accurate generation of sequence logos is often compromised by sequence redundancy and low number of observations. Moreover, most methods available for sequence logo generation focus on displaying the position-specific enrichment of amino acids, discarding the equally valuable information related to amino acid depletion. Seq2logo aims at resolving these issues allowing the user to include sequence weighting to correct for data redundancy, pseudo counts to correct for low number of observations and different logotype representations each capturing different aspects related to amino acid enrichment and depletion. Besides allowing input in the format of peptides and MSA, Seq2Logo accepts input as Blast sequence profiles, providing easy access for non-expert end-users to characterize and identify functionally conserved/variable amino acids in any given protein of interest. The output from the server is a sequence logo and a PSSM. Seq2Logo is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/biotools/Seq2Logo (14 May 2012, date last accessed).

  17. Proposal to neutralize acid fluids from wells in the Los Humeros, Pue., geothermal field; Propuesta para la neutralizacion de fluidos acidos provenientes de pozos del campo geotermico de Los Humeros, Pue.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Armenta, Magaly del Carmen; Ramirez Montes, Miguel; Garcia Cuevas, Juan Manuel [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)]. E-mail: magaly.flores@cfe.gob.mx

    2009-07-15

    Neutralizing an acidic fluid consists of adding a sodium hydroxide solution to neutralize the H group of acids, therefore increasing the pH. The injection of sodium hydroxide has to be continuous and at a proper depth inside the well to protect against the corrosion of casing and surface equipment. Neutralization is a common practice used in geothermal fields, such as at The Geysers in the US and Miravalles in Costa Rica-places where aggressive fluids cause problems for extracting and using geothermal fluids commercially. A zone surrounding wells H-4, H-16 and H-29 in the northern section of the Los Humeros, Pue., geothermal field, known as the Colapso Central, has shown evidence of aggressively acidic fluids. Several wells drilled in the area had to be repaired, thus plugging and isolating the deepest production zones. Well H-43 was drilled two years ago in the northern zone of the field, and even though it is not located in the aggressive-fluid zone, the well presents mineralogical features possibly indicating the presence of acidic fluids. Therefore, before producing this well it has been proposed we install a neutralization system with general characteristics presented in this paper. The system will prevent corrosion that up to now has prevented exploitation of the deep portion of Colapso Central, helping to develop the field in a more profitable way. [Spanish] Neutralizar un fluido acido consiste en agregarle una solucion de hidroxido de sodio. Esto neutraliza el grupo de acidos H y en consecuencia aumenta el pH. La inyeccion de hidroxido de sodio se realiza de manera continua y a una profundidad adecuada dentro del pozo para proteger a la tuberia y a todo el equipo superficial contra la corrosion. La neutralizacion es una practica comun que se viene realizando en campos como Los Geysers en Estados Unidos y en Miravalles, Costa Rica, donde la presencia de fluidos agresivos causa problemas en la extraccion y aprovechamiento del fluido geotermico con fines

  18. Prediction of oxidation parameters of purified Kilka fish oil including gallic acid and methyl gallate by adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnaashari, Maryam; Farhoosh, Reza; Farahmandfar, Reza

    2016-10-01

    As a result of concerns regarding possible health hazards of synthetic antioxidants, gallic acid and methyl gallate may be introduced as natural antioxidants to improve oxidative stability of marine oil. Since conventional modelling could not predict the oxidative parameters precisely, artificial neural network (ANN) and neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) modelling with three inputs, including type of antioxidant (gallic acid and methyl gallate), temperature (35, 45 and 55 °C) and concentration (0, 200, 400, 800 and 1600 mg L(-1) ) and four outputs containing induction period (IP), slope of initial stage of oxidation curve (k1 ) and slope of propagation stage of oxidation curve (k2 ) and peroxide value at the IP (PVIP ) were performed to predict the oxidation parameters of Kilka oil triacylglycerols and were compared to multiple linear regression (MLR). The results showed ANFIS was the best model with high coefficient of determination (R(2)  = 0.99, 0.99, 0.92 and 0.77 for IP, k1 , k2 and PVIP , respectively). So, the RMSE and MAE values for IP were 7.49 and 4.92 in ANFIS model. However, they were to be 15.95 and 10.88 and 34.14 and 3.60 for the best MLP structure and MLR, respectively. So, MLR showed the minimum accuracy among the constructed models. Sensitivity analysis based on the ANFIS model suggested a high sensitivity of oxidation parameters, particularly the induction period on concentrations of gallic acid and methyl gallate due to their high antioxidant activity to retard oil oxidation and enhanced Kilka oil shelf life. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Enteric bacterial metabolites propionic and butyric acid modulate gene expression, including CREB-dependent catecholaminergic neurotransmission, in PC12 cells--possible relevance to autism spectrum disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bistra B Nankova

    Full Text Available Alterations in gut microbiome composition have an emerging role in health and disease including brain function and behavior. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA like propionic (PPA, and butyric acid (BA, which are present in diet and are fermentation products of many gastrointestinal bacteria, are showing increasing importance in host health, but also may be environmental contributors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Further to this we have shown SCFA administration to rodents over a variety of routes (intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal or developmental time periods can elicit behavioral, electrophysiological, neuropathological and biochemical effects consistent with findings in ASD patients. SCFA are capable of altering host gene expression, partly due to their histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. We have previously shown BA can regulate tyrosine hydroxylase (TH mRNA levels in a PC12 cell model. Since monoamine concentration is known to be elevated in the brain and blood of ASD patients and in many ASD animal models, we hypothesized that SCFA may directly influence brain monoaminergic pathways. When PC12 cells were transiently transfected with plasmids having a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the TH promoter, PPA was found to induce reporter gene activity over a wide concentration range. CREB transcription factor(s was necessary for the transcriptional activation of TH gene by PPA. At lower concentrations PPA also caused accumulation of TH mRNA and protein, indicative of increased cell capacity to produce catecholamines. PPA and BA induced broad alterations in gene expression including neurotransmitter systems, neuronal cell adhesion molecules, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function, all of which have been implicated in ASD. In conclusion, our data are consistent with a molecular mechanism through which gut related environmental signals

  20. An update on potato crisps contents of moisture, fat, salt and fatty acids (including trans-fatty acids) with special emphasis on new oils/fats used for frying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves Albuquerque, Tânia; Sanches-Silva, Ana; Santos, Lèlita; Costa, Helena S

    2012-09-01

    Eighteen brands of potato crisps, frequently consumed, were analyzed to establish their nutritional value in relation to salt, fat and fatty acid (FA) composition. The purpose of the present study was to determine moisture, total fat, salt contents and FA profiles (including trans-FAs), and to identify the oil/fat used for frying of the 18 brands of potato crisps. Our results show that salt content ranged from 0.127 to 2.77 g/100 g and total fat content of potato crisps varied between 20.0 and 42.8 g/100 g. With respect to FAs analysis, palmitic acid (C16:0), oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) were the major FAs found in the analyzed potato crisps. It is clear from our work that nowadays most potato crisps are currently produced using oils with high contents in unsaturated FAs, which can be considered as healthier from a nutritional point of view. Nevertheless, some brands of potato crisps still use palm oil or a blend of palm oil and other fats/oils, which are very rich in saturated FAs.

  1. Utilization of sodium bicarbonate for the neutralization of acid components in exhaust gases; Verwendung von Natriumbicarbonat zur Neutralisation saurer Bestandteile in Abgasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Thomas [Solvay Chemicals GmbH, Rheinberg (Germany). Technisches Marketing

    2013-03-01

    The SOLVAIR dry process using sodium bicarbonate as absorbent facilitates an uncomplicated and efficient purification of exhaust gases from different processes. The products from exhaust gas purification can be used either directly in a producing process or subsequently to a treatment process in the chemical process. The author of this contribution reports on the utilization of sodium bicarbonate in the neutralisation of pour components in exhaust gases such as hydrochloric acid, sulphur dioxide and nitrous dioxides. Further aspects of this contribution are the energy efficiency and the recycling of reaction products.

  2. Neutral surfaces in neutral four-spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Jensen

    1990-11-01

    Full Text Available Properties of the Gauss map of neutral surfaces are studied. Special attention is given to surfaces of parallel, or zero, mean curvature. Bilagrangian structures are defined and used in ways analogous to the use of complex structures in the Riemannian case. The nonsimplicity of the structure group SO(2,2 is used to factor the Gauss map and to construct analogs of the twistor space, called in this context reflector space.

  3. Evaluation of passive samplers with neutral or ion-exchange polymer coatings to determine freely dissolved concentrations of the basic surfactant lauryl diethanolamine: Measurements of acid dissociation constant and organic carbon-water sorption coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Chen, Yi; Hermens, Joop L M; Droge, Steven T J

    2013-11-08

    A passive sampler tool (solid-phase microextraction, SPME) was optimized to measure freely dissolved concentrations (Cw,free) of lauryl diethanolamine (C12-DEA). C12-DEA can be protonated and act as a cationic surfactant. From the pH-dependent sorption to neutral SPME coatings (polyacrylate and PDMS), a pKa of 8.7 was calculated, which differs more than two units from the value of 6.4 reported elsewhere. Polyacrylate coated SPME could not adequately sample largely protonated C12-DEA in humic acid solutions of pH 6. A new hydrophobic SPME coating with cation-exchange properties (C18/SCX) sorbed C12-DEA 100 fold stronger than polyacrylate, because it specifically sorbs protonated C12-DEA species. The C18/SCX-SPME fiber showed linear calibration isotherms in a concentration range of acid at pH 6 (ionic strength 0.015 M) were measured over a broad concentration range with a sorption coefficient of 10(5.3). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. CO2-neutral fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  5. CO2-neutral fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goede A. P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for storage of renewable energy (RE generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel

  6. Comparison of Glycomacropeptide with Phenylalanine Free-Synthetic Amino Acids in Test Meals to PKU Patients: No Significant Differences in Biomarkers, Including Plasma Phe Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahring, Kirsten K; Lund, Allan M; Jensen, Erik; Jensen, Thomas G; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Pedersen, Michael; Bardow, Allan; Holst, Jens Juul; Rehfeld, Jens F; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2018-01-01

    Management of phenylketonuria (PKU) is achieved through low-phenylalanine (Phe) diet, supplemented with low-protein food and mixture of free-synthetic (FS) amino acid (AA). Casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP) is a natural peptide released in whey during cheese-making and does not contain Phe. Lacprodan® CGMP-20 used in this study contained a small amount of Phe due to minor presence of other proteins/peptides. The purpose of this study was to compare absorption of CGMP-20 to FSAA with the aim of evaluating short-term effects on plasma AAs as well as biomarkers related to food intake. This study included 8 patients, who had four visits and tested four drink mixtures (DM1-4), consisting of CGMP, FSAA, or a combination. Plasma blood samples were collected at baseline, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 240 minutes (min) after the meal. AA profiles and ghrelin were determined 6 times, while surrogate biomarkers were determined at baseline and 240 min. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used for evaluation of taste and satiety. The surrogate biomarker concentrations and VAS scores for satiety and taste were nonsignificant between the four DMs, and there were only few significant results for AA profiles (not Phe). CGMP and FSAA had the overall same nonsignificant short-term effect on biomarkers, including Phe. This combination of FSAA and CGMP is a suitable supplement for PKU patients.

  7. Comparison of Glycomacropeptide with Phenylalanine Free-Synthetic Amino Acids in Test Meals to PKU Patients: No Significant Differences in Biomarkers, Including Plasma Phe Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten K. Ahring

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Management of phenylketonuria (PKU is achieved through low-phenylalanine (Phe diet, supplemented with low-protein food and mixture of free-synthetic (FS amino acid (AA. Casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP is a natural peptide released in whey during cheese-making and does not contain Phe. Lacprodan® CGMP-20 used in this study contained a small amount of Phe due to minor presence of other proteins/peptides. Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare absorption of CGMP-20 to FSAA with the aim of evaluating short-term effects on plasma AAs as well as biomarkers related to food intake. Methods. This study included 8 patients, who had four visits and tested four drink mixtures (DM1–4, consisting of CGMP, FSAA, or a combination. Plasma blood samples were collected at baseline, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 240 minutes (min after the meal. AA profiles and ghrelin were determined 6 times, while surrogate biomarkers were determined at baseline and 240 min. A visual analogue scale (VAS was used for evaluation of taste and satiety. Results. The surrogate biomarker concentrations and VAS scores for satiety and taste were nonsignificant between the four DMs, and there were only few significant results for AA profiles (not Phe. Conclusion. CGMP and FSAA had the overall same nonsignificant short-term effect on biomarkers, including Phe. This combination of FSAA and CGMP is a suitable supplement for PKU patients.

  8. Reliable detection of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis by using multiplex qPCR including internal controls for nucleic acid extraction and amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rotterdam Bart J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several pathogens could seriously affect public health if not recognized timely. To reduce the impact of such highly pathogenic micro-organisms, rapid and accurate diagnostic tools are needed for their detection in various samples, including environmental samples. Results Multiplex real-time PCRs were designed for rapid and reliable detection of three major pathogens that have the potential to cause high morbidity and mortality in humans: B. anthracis, F. tularensis and Y. pestis. The developed assays detect three pathogen-specific targets, including at least one chromosomal target, and one target from B. thuringiensis which is used as an internal control for nucleic acid extraction from refractory spores as well as successful DNA amplification. Validation of the PCRs showed a high analytical sensitivity, specificity and coverage of diverse pathogen strains. Conclusions The multiplex qPCR assays that were developed allow the rapid detection of 3 pathogen-specific targets simultaneously, without compromising sensitivity. The application of B. thuringiensis spores as internal controls further reduces false negative results. This ensures highly reliable detection, while template consumption and laboratory effort are kept at a minimum

  9. Diverse Cone-Snail Species Harbor Closely Related Streptomyces Species with Conserved Chemical and Genetic Profiles, Including Polycyclic Tetramic Acid Macrolactams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Quezada

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces are Gram-positive bacteria that occupy diverse ecological niches including host-associations with animals and plants. Members of this genus are known for their overwhelming repertoire of natural products, which has been exploited for almost a century as a source of medicines and agrochemicals. Notwithstanding intense scientific and commercial interest in Streptomyces natural products, surprisingly little is known of the intra- and/or inter-species ecological roles played by these metabolites. In this report we describe the chemical structures, biological properties, and biosynthetic relationships between natural products produced by Streptomyces isolated from internal tissues of predatory Conus snails, collected from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Using chromatographic, spectroscopic and bioassays methodology, we demonstrate that Streptomyces isolated from five different Conus species produce identical chemical and antifungal profiles – comprising a suite of polycyclic tetramic acid macrolactams (PTMs. To investigate possible ecological (and evolutionary relationships we used genome analyses to reveal a close taxonomic relationship with other sponge-derived and free-living PTM producing Streptomyces (i.e., Streptomyces albus. In-depth phylogenomic analysis of PTM biosynthetic gene clusters indicated PTM structure diversity was governed by a small repertoire of genetic elements, including discrete gene acquisition events involving dehydrogenases. Overall, our study shows a Streptomyces-Conus ecological relationship that is concomitant with specific PTM chemical profiles. We provide an evolutionary framework to explain this relationship, driven by anti-fungal properties that protect Conus snails from fungal pathogens.

  10. Achieving Airport Carbon Neutrality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report is a guide for airports that wish to reduce or eliminate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from existing buildings and operations. Reaching carbon neutrality typically requires the use of multiple mechanisms to first minimize energy consumpt...

  11. Neutral losses of sodium benzoate and benzoic acid in the fragmentation of the [M + Na]+ ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide via intramolecular rearrangement in electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yunfeng; Gao, Guanwei; Shen, Shanshan; Liu, Xin; Lu, Chengyin

    2017-02-15

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry can be applied to determine structural information about organic compounds. The [M + Na] + ion is one of the major precursor ions in ESI mass spectrometry, but its fragmentation mechanism study is still insufficient. This study reveals the interesting fragmentation reactions of the [M + Na] + ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide. The fragmentations of the [M + Na] + , [M + Li] + , and [M + H] + ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide were studied using a hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer and an ion trap mass spectrometer. A hydrogen/deuterium (H/D)-exchange experiment in the amide group of methoxyfenozide allowed for the confirmation of the fragmentation mechanism. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed for a further understanding of the fragmentation mechanism of the [M + Na] + ion of methoxyfenozide. Neutral losses of sodium benzoate and benzoic acid in the fragmentation of the [M + Na] + ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide were observed as the major fragmentation pathways. In contrast, similar fragmentations were not observed or minor pathways in the fragmentation of the [M + Li] + and [M + H] + ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide. In addition, a minor product ion resulting from loss of NaOH was identified, which was the first reported example in the fragmentation of sodiated compounds in mass spectrometry. Losses of sodium benzoate and benzoic acid in the fragmentation of the [M + Na] + ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide are proposed to be formed through an intramolecular rearrangement reaction, which is supported by DFT calculations. An H/D-exchange experiment confirms that the carboxyl hydrogen of benzoic acid and the hydrogen of NaOH exclusively derive from the amide hydrogen of the precursor ion. This study enriches our knowledge on the Na + -induced fragmentation reactions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright

  12. Tandem mass spectrometry of isomeric aniline-labeled N-glycans separated on porous graphitic carbon: Revealing the attachment position of terminal sialic acids and structures of neutral glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Claudia; Rizzi, Andreas M

    2015-07-15

    Quantitative monitoring of changes in the N-glycome upon disease has gained significance in the context of biomarker discovery. Separation and quantification of isobaric glycan isomers can be attained by using high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS). Collision-induced dissociation (CID)-based fragmentation of separated isobaric glycans is evaluated in respect to its potential of providing fragment ions specific for the linkage positions of terminal sialic acids and the presence of intersecting GlcNAc moieties, respectively. N-Glycans were labeled via reductive amination using (12)C6-aniline and (13)C6-aniline as isotope-coded labeling reagents. The differently labeled glycans were merged and separated into various species using a porous graphitic carbon (PGC) stationary phase. Identification of structural features of separated isobaric isomers was performed by CID-based tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) carried out in a quadrupole time-of-flight (QqTOF) or a quadrupole ion-trap (IT) mass spectrometer. Working in the negative ion mode, new diagnostic CID fragment ions could be found that are indicative for the α2,6-type linkage of sialic acids. Other diagnostic ions, identified before as being indicative for the substitution of the 6-antenna, could be confirmed as being of relevance also in the case of aniline labeling. In the positive ion mode, CID fragment ions indicative for the structure of short neutral N-glycans were identified. One new diagnostic ion specific for the linkage position of the terminal sialic acids and one for the presence of bisecting GlcNAc in N-glycans were identified. The aniline label introduced for improved relative quantitation in MS(1) was found not to significantly alter the CID fragmentation patterns that were reported previously by other authors for unlabeled/reduced glycans or for glycans with more polar labels. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Functional properties of a newly cloned fish ortholog of the neutral amino acid transporter B0AT1 (SLC6A19).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margheritis, Eleonora; Terova, Genciana; Cinquetti, Raffaella; Peres, Antonio; Bossi, Elena

    2013-10-01

    The functional properties of an ortholog of the B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) amino acid transporter, cloned from the intestine of the sea bass Dicentrachus labrax, were investigated. The two-electrode voltage-clamp technique was applied to Xenopus laevis oocytes heterologously expressing the transporter in order to measure the currents associated with the transport process in different conditions. In particular the substrate specificity, the ionic requirements, and possible effects of pH were examined. Among the organic substrates, leucine, glycine, serine and valine generated the largest transport currents with apparent affinities in the lower millimolar range. The importance of Na(+) as the driver ion in the transport process is confirmed, although Li(+) is also capable to sustain transport, while K(+) is not. No evidence of a relevant role of Cl(-) in the transport activity was found. Concerning the other two kinds of currents commonly found in electrogenic transporters, very fast pre-steady-state currents were detected in the absence of organic substrate, while lithium-specific leak currents were not observed. The comparison of these properties with those of the mammalian and insect orthologs may give interesting indication for future structure-function studies in this transporter subfamily. © 2013.

  14. Expression of apical Na(+)-L-glutamine co-transport activity, B(0)-system neutral amino acid co-transporter (B(0)AT1) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 along the jejunal crypt-villus axis in young pigs fed a liquid formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut apical amino acid (AA) transport activity is high at birth and during suckling, thus being essential to maintain luminal nutrient-dependent mucosal growth through providing AA as essential metabolic fuel, substrates and nutrient stimuli for cellular growth. Because system-B(0) Na(+)-neutral AA c...

  15. Metabolic evidence of vitamin B-12 deficiency, including high homocysteine and methylmalonic acid and low holotranscobalamin, is more pronounced in older adults with elevated plasma folate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: An analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey indicated that in older adults exposed to folic acid fortification, the combination of low serum vitamin B-12 and elevated folate is associated with higher concentrations of homocysteine and methylmalonic acid ...

  16. Negative ion formation and neutralization processes, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Toshio

    1982-01-01

    This review has been made preliminary for the purpose of contribute to the plasma heating by ''negative ion based neutral beam injection'' in the magnetic confinement fusion reactor. A compilation includes the survey of the general processes of negative ion formation, the data of the cross section of H - ion formation and the neutralization of H - ion, and some of new processes of H - ion formation. The data of cross section are mainly experimental, but partly include the results of theoretical calculation. (author)

  17. Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma upregulates markers associated with high-grade serous carcinomas including Rsf-1 (HBXAP), cyclin E and fatty acid synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehdev, Ann Smith; Kurman, Robert J; Kuhn, Elisabetta; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2010-06-01

    Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) has been proposed as a precursor for many pelvic high-grade serous carcinomas. Our previous analysis of the ovarian cancer genome identified several genes with oncogenic potential that are amplified and/or overexpressed in the majority of high-grade serous carcinomas. Determining whether these genes are upregulated in STICs is important in further elucidating the relationship of STICs to high-grade serous carcinomas and is fundamental in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of high-grade serous carcinomas. In this study, 37 morphologically defined STICs were obtained from 23 patients with stage IIIC/IV high-grade serous carcinomas. Both STICs and the high-grade serous carcinomas were analyzed for expression of Rsf-1 (HBXAP), cyclin E, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and mucin-4. In addition, they were examined for expression of established markers including p53, Ki-67 and p16. We found that diffuse nuclear p53 and p16 immunoreactivity was observed in 27 (75%) of 36 and 18 (55%) of 33 STICs, respectively, whereas an elevated Ki-67 labeling index (>or=10%) was detected in 29 (78%) of 37 STICs. Cyclin E nuclear staining was seen in 24 (77%) of 35 STICs, whereas normal tubal epithelial cells were all negative. Increased Rsf-1 and FASN immunoreactivity occurred in 63%, and 62% of STICs, respectively, compared with adjacent normal-appearing tubal epithelium. Interestingly, only one STIC showed increased mucin-4 immunoreactivity. Carcinomas, when compared with STICs, overexpressed p16, Rsf-1, cyclin E and FASN in a higher proportion of cases. In conclusion, STICs express several markers including Rsf-1, cyclin E and FASN in high-grade serous carcinomas. In contrast, mucin-4 immunoreactivity either did not change or was reduced in most STICs. These results suggest that overexpression of Rsf-1, cyclin E and FASN occurs early in tumor progression.

  18. Radiative lifetimes of neutral gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, E A; Bilty, K A; Lawler, J E

    2011-01-01

    The current work is part of an ongoing study of radiative properties of rare earth neutral atoms motivated by research needs in several disparate fields including astrophysics, laser chemistry and lighting technology. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic beam has been used to measure radiative lifetimes, accurate to ±5%, for 136 levels of neutral gadolinium. Of the 136 levels, 6 are odd parity ranging in energy from 32 929 to 36 654 cm -1 , and the remaining 130 are even parity ranging from 17 750 to 34 175 cm -1 . This set of Gd i lifetimes represents a significant extension to the available published data, with 93 of the 136 level lifetimes measured for the first time. These lifetimes will provide the absolute normalization for a large set of measured Gd i transition probabilities.

  19. Radiative lifetimes of neutral neodymium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, E A; Fittante, A J; Lawler, J E

    2011-01-01

    This work is part of an on-going study of radiative properties of rare earth neutral atoms. This work is motivated by research needs in several disparate fields including astrophysics and lighting technology. Radiative lifetimes of 100 levels of neutral neodymium are measured using the technique of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic beam. Of the 100 levels, 3 are even parity ranging in energy from 25 746 to 26 835 cm -1 , and the remaining 97 are odd parity ranging from 17 787 to 27 786 cm -1 . This set of Nd i lifetimes represents a significant extension to the available published data, with 51 of the 100 level lifetimes measured for the first time. These data, which are accurate to ±5%, provide the absolute normalization for a large set of measured Nd i transition probabilities.

  20. Neutral-beam development plan, FY 1982-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The following chapters are included: (1) status of BNL negative ion source development, (2) source development program plan, (3) status of beam transport and acceleration, (4) accelerator development program plan, (5) neutralizer concepts, (6) neutralization program plan, (7) neutral beam systems, (8) test facilities, (9) program milestones and time schedules, (10) organization and Grumman participation, and (11) funding tables

  1. Flaxseed meal and oat hulls supplementation modulates growth performance, blood lipids, intestinal fermentation, bile acids, and neutral sterols in growing pigs fed corn-soybean meal-based diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndou, S P; Kiarie, E; Thandapilly, S J; Walsh, M C; Ames, N; Nyachoti, C M

    2017-07-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of flaxseed meal and oat hulls supplementation on growth performance, apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of fat, serum lipids, and concentrations of VFA, bile acids (BA), and neutral sterols (NS) in digesta and feces in growing pigs. Forty-eight Genesus [(Duroc boar × Yorkshire-Landrace sows] barrows (25.0 ± 0.32 kg initial BW) were housed in pairs. Pigs were assigned to 1 of the 3 corn-soybean meal-based diets-a basal corn-soybean meal-containing diet (control), a flaxseed meal-containing diet (FM), or an oat hulls-containing diet (OH)-in a completely randomized design. All diets were formulated to be isoenergetic and to contain similar standardized ileal digestible AA contents and meet other nutrient requirements for growing pigs. The experiment lasted for 28 d. Average daily feed intake; ADG; G:F; ATTD of fat, serum lipids, and digesta; and fecal VFA, BA, and NS concentrations were determined. Pigs fed the control or OH had greater final BW ( < 0.001), ADFI ( = 0.005), and ADG ( < 0.001) than FM-fed pigs. The ATTD of fat in the FM was lowest at 70.1% followed by 79.2% in OH and was greatest at 92.4% in the control ( = 0.020). Total serum cholesterol content was 2.25 and 1.99 mmol/L and lower ( < 0.001) in pigs fed FM and OH, respectively, than the 2.36 mmol/L in pigs fed the control. Pigs fed the FM and OH had greater ileal and cecal total VFA ( < 0.001), ileal deoxycholic acid ( < 0.01), and cecal ( < 0.001) and fecal cholesterol ( = 0.002) concentrations than those fed the control. Pigs fed the FM excreted more fecal lithocholic acid ( = 0.002) and ursodeoxycholic acid ( = 0.001) compared with those that consumed the control and OH. The concentrations of coprostanol in cecal digesta ( < 0.001) and feces ( = 0.011) were higher in pigs fed the FM and OH than in pigs fed the control. In conclusion, feeding flaxseed meal and oat hulls induced intestinal fermentation; however, the former depressed

  2. Biodiesel production by two-stage transesterification with ethanol by washing with neutral water and water saturated with carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendow, G; Veizaga, N S; Sánchez, B S; Querini, C A

    2012-08-01

    Industrial production of ethyl esters is impeded by difficulties in purifying the product due to high amounts of soap formed during transesterification. A simple biodiesel wash process was developed that allows successful purification of samples containing high amounts of soap. The key step was a first washing with neutral water, which removed the soaps without increasing the acidity or affecting the process yield. Afterward, the biodiesel was washed with water saturated with CO(2), a mild acid that neutralized the remaining soaps and extracted impurities. The acidity, free-glycerine, methanol and soaps concentrations were reduced to very low levels with high efficiency, and using non-corrosive acids. Independently of the initial acidity, it was possible to obtain biodiesel within EN14214 specifications. The process included the recovery of soaps by hydrolysis and esterification, making it possible to obtain the theoretical maximum amount of biodiesel. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Two types of antibodies are induced by vaccination with A/California/2009 pdm virus: binding near the sialic acid-binding pocket and neutralizing both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuko Ohshima

    Full Text Available Many people have a history of catching the flu several times during childhood but no additional flu in adulthood, even without vaccination. We analyzed the total repertoire of antibodies (Abs against influenza A group 1 viruses induced in such a flu-resistant person after vaccination with 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus. They were classified into two types, with no exceptions. The first type, the products of B cells newly induced through vaccination, binds near the sialic acid-binding pocket. The second type, the products of long-lived memory B cells established before vaccination, utilizes the 1-69 VH gene, binds to the stem of HA, and neutralizes both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses with few exceptions. These observations indicate that the sialic acid-binding pocket and its surrounding region are immunogenically very potent and majority of the B cells whose growth is newly induced by vaccination produce Abs that recognize these regions. However, they play a role in protection against influenza virus infection for a short period since variant viruses that have acquired resistance to these Abs become dominant. On the other hand, although the stem of HA is immunogenically not potent, the second type of B cells eventually becomes dominant. Thus, a selection system should function in forming the repertoire of long-lived memory B cells and the stability of the epitope would greatly affect the fate of the memory cells. Acquisition of the ability to produce Abs that bind to the stable epitope could be a major factor of flu resistance.

  4. Two types of antibodies are induced by vaccination with A/California/2009 pdm virus: binding near the sialic acid-binding pocket and neutralizing both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Nobuko; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Iba, Yoshitaka; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Many people have a history of catching the flu several times during childhood but no additional flu in adulthood, even without vaccination. We analyzed the total repertoire of antibodies (Abs) against influenza A group 1 viruses induced in such a flu-resistant person after vaccination with 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus. They were classified into two types, with no exceptions. The first type, the products of B cells newly induced through vaccination, binds near the sialic acid-binding pocket. The second type, the products of long-lived memory B cells established before vaccination, utilizes the 1-69 VH gene, binds to the stem of HA, and neutralizes both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses with few exceptions. These observations indicate that the sialic acid-binding pocket and its surrounding region are immunogenically very potent and majority of the B cells whose growth is newly induced by vaccination produce Abs that recognize these regions. However, they play a role in protection against influenza virus infection for a short period since variant viruses that have acquired resistance to these Abs become dominant. On the other hand, although the stem of HA is immunogenically not potent, the second type of B cells eventually becomes dominant. Thus, a selection system should function in forming the repertoire of long-lived memory B cells and the stability of the epitope would greatly affect the fate of the memory cells. Acquisition of the ability to produce Abs that bind to the stable epitope could be a major factor of flu resistance.

  5. Neutral currents, supernovae neutrinos, and nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    The inelastic interactions of neutrinos during stellar collapse and neutron star cooling are discussed. The primary mechanism for dissipative neutrino reactions is nuclear excitation by neutral current scattering, a process not included in standard descriptions of supernovae. Charge-current and neutral current ''preheating'' of iron lying outside the shock front appears to be significant in the few milliseconds near shock breakout. This could help produce a more energetic shock. During the cooling phase, the neutral current interactions of muon and taon neutrinos appear to be responsible for some interesting nucleosynthesis. I discuss two examples the production of fluorine and neutrino-induced r-process nucleosynthesis. 26 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  6. Water absorption in neutralized Nafion membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodmacq, B.; Roche, E.; Pineri, M.; Escoubez, M.; Duplessix, R.; Eisenberg, A.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper some results are reported about the interactions between water and Nafion neutralized with different cations. The energy of water absorption have been measured in the whole range of relative humidity pressures. Moessbauer spectra permit to get information about the change of environment of the iron atoms during the hydration. Small angle neutron and X ray scattering experiments have then been performed to define a possible phase segregation. From these results a model of clustering in the Nafion membranes is proposed. The neutralized Nafion samples have been obtained by soaking the acid samples in solutions containing the different salts

  7. Boronic acids facilitate rapid oxime condensations at neutral pH† †Dedicated to Andreas Pfaltz on the occasion of his retirement. ‡ ‡Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed kinetic data, HPLC assays, and characterization data for all new compounds are provided. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sc00921a Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Pascal; Stress, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    We report here the discovery and development of boron-assisted oxime formation as a powerful connective reaction for chemical biology. Oximes proximal to boronic acids form in neutral aqueous buffer with rate constants of more than 104 M–1 s–1, the largest to date for any oxime condensation. Boron's dynamic coordination chemistry confers an adaptability that seems to aid a number of elementary steps in the oxime condensation. In addition to applications in bioconjugation, the emerging importance of boronic acids in chemical biology as carbohydrate receptors or peroxide probes, and the growing list of drugs and drug candidates containing boronic acids suggest many potential applications. PMID:29142692

  8. Inactivation of Biological Agents Using Neutral Oxone-Chloride Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delcomyn, Carrie A; Bushway, Karen E; Henley, Michael V

    2006-01-01

    ... to contaminated equipment or terrain. A neutral, bicarbonate-buffered aqueous solution of Oxone and sodium chloride that rapidly generates hypochlorite and hypochlorous acid in situ was evaluated as a new alternative to bleach...

  9. Vendor neutral archive in PACS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Tapesh Kumar; Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    An archive is a location containing a collection of records, documents, or other materials of historical importance. An integral part of Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) is archiving. When a hospital needs to migrate a PACS vendor, the complete earlier data need to be migrated in the format of the newly procured PACS. It is both time and money consuming. To address this issue, the new concept of vendor neutral archive (VNA) has emerged. A VNA simply decouples the PACS and workstations at the archival layer. This is achieved by developing an application engine that receives, integrates, and transmits the data using the different syntax of a Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) format. Transferring the data belonging to the old PACS to a new one is performed by a process called migration of data. In VNA, a number of different data migration techniques are available to facilitate transfer from the old PACS to the new one, the choice depending on the speed of migration and the importance of data. The techniques include simple DICOM migration, prefetch-based DICOM migration, medium migration, and the expensive non-DICOM migration. “Vendor neutral” may not be a suitable term, and “architecture neutral,” “PACS neutral,” “content neutral,” or “third-party neutral” are probably better and preferred terms. Notwithstanding this, the VNA acronym has come to stay in both the medical IT user terminology and in vendor nomenclature, and radiologists need to be aware of its impact in PACS across the globe

  10. Natural strain variation and antibody neutralization of dengue serotype 3 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahala M P B Wahala

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENVs are emerging, mosquito-borne flaviviruses which cause dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. The DENV complex consists of 4 serotypes designated DENV1-DENV4. Following natural infection with DENV, individuals develop serotype specific, neutralizing antibody responses. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have been used to map neutralizing epitopes on dengue and other flaviviruses. Most serotype-specific, neutralizing MAbs bind to the lateral ridge of domain III of E protein (EDIII. It has been widely assumed that the EDIII lateral ridge epitope is conserved within each DENV serotype and a good target for vaccines. Using phylogenetic methods, we compared the amino acid sequence of 175 E proteins representing the different genotypes of DENV3 and identified a panel of surface exposed amino acids, including residues in EDIII, that are highly variant across the four DENV3 genotypes. The variable amino acids include six residues at the lateral ridge of EDIII. We used a panel of DENV3 mouse MAbs to assess the functional significance of naturally occurring amino acid variation. From the panel of antibodies, we identified three neutralizing MAbs that bound to EDIII of DENV3. Recombinant proteins and naturally occurring variant viruses were used to map the binding sites of the three MAbs. The three MAbs bound to overlapping but distinct epitopes on EDIII. Our empirical studies clearly demonstrate that the antibody binding and neutralization capacity of two MAbs was strongly influenced by naturally occurring mutations in DENV3. Our data demonstrate that the lateral ridge "type specific" epitope is not conserved between strains of DENV3. This variability should be considered when designing and evaluating DENV vaccines, especially those targeting EDIII.

  11. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) neutralization: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosie, Margaret J; Pajek, Daniela; Samman, Ayman; Willett, Brian J

    2011-10-01

    One of the major obstacles that must be overcome in the design of effective lentiviral vaccines is the ability of lentiviruses to evolve in order to escape from neutralizing antibodies. The primary target for neutralizing antibodies is the highly variable viral envelope glycoprotein (Env), a glycoprotein that is essential for viral entry and comprises both variable and conserved regions. As a result of the complex trimeric nature of Env, there is steric hindrance of conserved epitopes required for receptor binding so that these are not accessible to antibodies. Instead, the humoral response is targeted towards decoy immunodominant epitopes on variable domains such as the third hypervariable loop (V3) of Env. For feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), as well as the related human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), little is known about the factors that lead to the development of broadly neutralizing antibodies. In cats infected with FIV and patients infected with HIV-1, only rarely are plasma samples found that contain antibodies capable of neutralizing isolates from other clades. In this review we examine the neutralizing response to FIV, comparing and contrasting with the response to HIV. We ask whether broadly neutralizing antibodies are induced by FIV infection and discuss the comparative value of studies of neutralizing antibodies in FIV infection for the development of more effective vaccine strategies against lentiviral infections in general, including HIV-1.

  12. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV Neutralization: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret J. Hosie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the major obstacles that must be overcome in the design of effective lentiviral vaccines is the ability of lentiviruses to evolve in order to escape from neutralizing antibodies. The primary target for neutralizing antibodies is the highly variable viral envelope glycoprotein (Env, a glycoprotein that is essential for viral entry and comprises both variable and conserved regions. As a result of the complex trimeric nature of Env, there is steric hindrance of conserved epitopes required for receptor binding so that these are not accessible to antibodies. Instead, the humoral response is targeted towards decoy immunodominant epitopes on variable domains such as the third hypervariable loop (V3 of Env. For feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, as well as the related human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1, little is known about the factors that lead to the development of broadly neutralizing antibodies. In cats infected with FIV and patients infected with HIV-1, only rarely are plasma samples found that contain antibodies capable of neutralizing isolates from other clades. In this review we examine the neutralizing response to FIV, comparing and contrasting with the response to HIV. We ask whether broadly neutralizing antibodies are induced by FIV infection and discuss the comparative value of studies of neutralizing antibodies in FIV infection for the development of more effective vaccine strategies against lentiviral infections in general, including HIV-1.

  13. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy

  14. Issues in neutral currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental results on low energy confirming the structure of the effective Lagrangian of the weak neutral current processes as predicted by the Salam-Weinberg model are reviewed. Some possible modifications of the effective Lagrangian and the feasibility of their experimental verification are also considered. (P.L.)

  15. Impact of Biological Feedback and Incentives on Blood Fatty Acid Concentrations, Including Omega-3 Index, in an Employer-Based Wellness Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBurney, Michael I; Bird, Julia K

    2017-08-05

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) are important fatty acids for the retina and brain. More than 95% of Americans have suboptimal EPA + DHA blood concentrations. This cross-sectional employer-based study assessed whole blood fatty acid levels of volunteers participating in an onsite wellness biometric screening program and was designed to determine if an incentive, a $5 coupon for a 90-day supply of fish oil supplement typically costing $18-30, stimulated incremental dietary behavior change relative to nutritional status assessment alone to increase EPA + DHA concentrations. Volunteers completed a dietary survey and finger stick blood samples were collected to be analyzed for fatty acid composition. In addition, 636 individuals participated in the initial onsite biometric screening. Three months later, and without prior knowledge, all employees were invited to a second screening. At the second screening, 198 employees volunteered for the first time and 149 employees had a second test (17.9%). At baseline, the average age ( n = 834) was 45 year and omega-3 index was 5.0% with 41% female. EPA + DHA concentration, i.e., omega-3 index, was significantly lower in men (4.8%) than women (5.2%), as were DHA and linoleic acid (LA) concentrations ( p omega-3 index was positively and linearly associated with omega-3 intake. Only 4% of volunteers had an omega-3 index >8% on initial screening. Among the 149 individuals with two measurements, omega-3 intake from supplements, but not food, increased significantly from 258 to 445 mg/d ( p omega-3 index (+0.21, p omega-3 supplement.

  16. Stereochemistry of C18 monounsaturated cork suberin acids determined by spectroscopic techniques including (1) H-NMR multiplet analysis of olefinic protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sara; Graça, José

    2014-01-01

    Suberin is a biopolyester responsible for the protection of secondary plant tissues, and yet its molecular structure remains unknown. The C18:1 ω-hydroxyacid and the C18:1 α,ω-diacid are major monomers in the suberin structure, but the configuration of the double bond remains to be elucidated. To unequivocally define the configuration of the C18:1 suberin acids. Pure C18:1 ω-hydroxyacid and C18:1 α,ω-diacid, isolated from cork suberin, and two structurally very close C18:1 model compounds of known stereochemistry, methyl oleate and methyl elaidate, were analysed by NMR spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, and GC-MS. The GC-MS analysis showed that both acids were present in cork suberin as only one geometric isomer. The analysis of dimethyloxazoline (DMOX) and picolinyl derivatives proved the double bond position to be at C-9. The FTIR spectra were concordant with a cis-configuration for both suberin acids, but their unambiguous stereochemical assignment came from the NMR analysis: (i) the chemical shifts of the allylic (13) C carbons were shielded comparatively to the trans model compound, and (ii) the complex multiplets of the olefinic protons could be simulated only with (3) JHH and long-range (4) JHH coupling constants typical of a cis geometry. The two C18:1 suberin acids in cork are (Z)-18-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid and (Z)-octadec-9-enedoic acid. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Arsenic Metabolites, Including N-Acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic Acid, in Chicken Litter from a Roxarsone-Feeding Study Involving 1600 Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zonglin; Peng, Hanyong; Lu, Xiufen; Liu, Qingqing; Huang, Rongfu; Hu, Bin; Kachanoski, Gary; Zuidhof, Martin J; Le, X Chris

    2016-07-05

    The poultry industry has used organoarsenicals, such as 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (Roxarsone, ROX), to prevent disease and to promote growth. Although previous studies have analyzed arsenic species in chicken litter after composting or after application to agricultural lands, it is not clear what arsenic species were excreted by chickens before biotransformation of arsenic species during composting. We describe here the identification and quantitation of arsenic species in chicken litter repeatedly collected on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 of a Roxarsone-feeding study involving 1600 chickens of two strains. High performance liquid chromatography separation with simultaneous detection by both inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry provided complementary information necessary for the identification and quantitation of arsenic species. A new metabolite, N-acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic acid (N-AHAA), was identified, and it accounted for 3-12% of total arsenic. Speciation analyses of litter samples collected from ROX-fed chickens on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 showed the presence of N-AHAA, 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (3-AHPAA), inorganic arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), and ROX. 3-AHPAA accounted for 3-19% of the total arsenic. Inorganic arsenicals (the sum of As(III) and As(V)) comprised 2-6% (mean 3.5%) of total arsenic. Our results on the detection of inorganic arsenicals, methylarsenicals, 3-AHPAA, and N-AHAA in the chicken litter support recent findings that ROX is actually metabolized by the chicken or its gut microbiome. The presence of the toxic metabolites in chicken litter is environmentally relevant as chicken litter is commonly used as fertilizer.

  18. Association study of polymorphisms in the neutral amino acid transporter genes SLC1A4, SLC1A5 and the glycine transporter genes SLC6A5, SLC6A9 with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibata Hiroki

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the glutamatergic dysfunction hypothesis for schizophrenia pathogenesis, we have been performing systematic association studies of schizophrenia with the genes involved in glutametergic transmission. We report here association studies of schizophrenia with SLC1A4, SLC1A5 encoding neutral amino acid transporters ASCT1, ASCT2, and SLC6A5, SLC6A9 encoding glycine transporters GLYT2, GLYT1, respectively. Methods We initially tested the association of 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs distributed in the four gene regions with schizophrenia using 100 Japanese cases-control pairs and examined allele, genotype and haplotype association with schizophrenia. The observed nominal significance were examined in the full-size samples (400 cases and 420 controls. Results We observed nominally significant single-marker associations with schizophrenia in SNP2 (P = 0.021 and SNP3 (P = 0.029 of SLC1A4, SNP1 (P = 0.009 and SNP2 (P = 0.022 of SLC6A5. We also observed nominally significant haplotype associations with schizophrenia in the combinations of SNP2-SNP7 (P = 0.037 of SLC1A4 and SNP1-SNP4 (P = 0.043 of SLC6A5. We examined all of the nominal significance in the Full-size Sample Set, except one haplotype with insufficient LD. The significant association of SNP1 of SLC6A5 with schizophrenia was confirmed in the Full-size Sample Set (P = 0.018. Conclusion We concluded that at least one susceptibility locus for schizophrenia may be located within or nearby SLC6A5, whereas SLC1A4, SLC1A5 and SLC6A9 are unlikely to be major susceptibility genes for schizophrenia in the Japanese population.

  19. Association study of polymorphisms in the neutral amino acid transporter genes SLC1A4, SLC1A5 and the glycine transporter genes SLC6A5, SLC6A9 with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiangdong; Sagata, Noriaki; Takeuchi, Naoko; Tanaka, Masami; Ninomiya, Hideaki; Iwata, Nakao; Ozaki, Norio; Shibata, Hiroki; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki

    2008-07-18

    Based on the glutamatergic dysfunction hypothesis for schizophrenia pathogenesis, we have been performing systematic association studies of schizophrenia with the genes involved in glutametergic transmission. We report here association studies of schizophrenia with SLC1A4, SLC1A5 encoding neutral amino acid transporters ASCT1, ASCT2, and SLC6A5, SLC6A9 encoding glycine transporters GLYT2, GLYT1, respectively. We initially tested the association of 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed in the four gene regions with schizophrenia using 100 Japanese cases-control pairs and examined allele, genotype and haplotype association with schizophrenia. The observed nominal significance were examined in the full-size samples (400 cases and 420 controls). We observed nominally significant single-marker associations with schizophrenia in SNP2 (P = 0.021) and SNP3 (P = 0.029) of SLC1A4, SNP1 (P = 0.009) and SNP2 (P = 0.022) of SLC6A5. We also observed nominally significant haplotype associations with schizophrenia in the combinations of SNP2-SNP7 (P = 0.037) of SLC1A4 and SNP1-SNP4 (P = 0.043) of SLC6A5. We examined all of the nominal significance in the Full-size Sample Set, except one haplotype with insufficient LD. The significant association of SNP1 of SLC6A5 with schizophrenia was confirmed in the Full-size Sample Set (P = 0.018). We concluded that at least one susceptibility locus for schizophrenia may be located within or nearby SLC6A5, whereas SLC1A4, SLC1A5 and SLC6A9 are unlikely to be major susceptibility genes for schizophrenia in the Japanese population.

  20. Serial mixed-mode cation- and anion-exchange solid-phase extraction for separation of basic, neutral and acidic pharmaceuticals in wastewater and analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavén, Martin; Alsberg, Tomas; Yu, Yong; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Sun, Hongwen

    2009-01-02

    A novel solid-phase extraction (SPE) method is presented whereby 15 basic, neutral and acidic pharmaceuticals in wastewater were simultaneously extracted and subsequently separated into different fractions. This was achieved using mixed-mode cation- and anion-exchange SPE (Oasis MCX and MAX) in series. Analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC/QTOF-MS). A fast separation was achieved, with all compounds eluting within 6min, narrow chromatographic peaks, with a peak base width of 6s on average, and a high mass accuracy of quantified wastewater sample ions, with average mass errors in absolute value of 0.7mDa or 2.7ppm. The recovery of the SPE method in the analysis of sewage treatment plant (STP) influent and effluent wastewater was on average 80% and the ion suppression 30%. For less demanding samples Oasis MCX used alone may be an alternative method, although for STP influent waters containing high loads of organic compounds the clean-up achieved using only Oasis MCX was insufficient, leading to unreliable quantitation. Furthermore, serial SPE separation according to molecular charge added an additional degree of analyte confirmation. For quantitation, an approach combining external standard calibration curves, isotopically labelled surrogate standards and single-point standard addition was used. The applicability of the method was demonstrated in the analysis of influent and effluent wastewater from an STP, using small sample volumes (25-50mL). The effluent wastewater had been subjected to three different treatments; activated sludge, activated sludge followed by ozonation, and a membrane bioreactor (MBR). Ozone treatment proved superior in removal of the analysed pharmaceuticals, while the MBR provided higher removal efficiencies than the activated sludge process.

  1. Design of a negative ion neutral beam system for TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easoz, J.R.

    1978-05-01

    A conceptual design of a neutral beam line based on the neutralization of negative deuterium ions is presented. This work is a detailed design of a complete neutral beam line based on using negative ions from a direct extraction source. Anticipating major technological advancements, beam line components have been scaled including the negative ion sources and components for the direct energy recovery of charged beams and high speed cryogenic pumping. With application to the next step in experimental fusion reactors (TNS), the neutral beam injector system that has been designed provides 10 MW of 200 keV neutral deuterium atoms. Several arms are required for plasma ignition

  2. Impact of neutral density fluctuations on gas puff imaging diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wersal, C.; Ricci, P.

    2017-11-01

    A three-dimensional turbulence simulation of the SOL and edge regions of a toroidally limited tokamak is carried out. The simulation couples self-consistently the drift-reduced two-fluid Braginskii equations to a kinetic equation for neutral atoms. A diagnostic neutral gas puff on the low-field side midplane is included and the impact of neutral density fluctuations on D_α light emission investigated. We find that neutral density fluctuations affect the D_α emission. In particular, at a radial distance from the gas puff smaller than the neutral mean free path, neutral density fluctuations are anti-correlated with plasma density, electron temperature, and D_α fluctuations. It follows that the neutral fluctuations reduce the D_α emission in most of the observed region and, therefore, have to be taken into account when interpreting the amplitude of the D_α emission. On the other hand, higher order statistical moments (skewness, kurtosis) and turbulence characteristics (such as correlation length, or the autocorrelation time) are not significantly affected by the neutral fluctuations. At distances from the gas puff larger than the neutral mean free path, a non-local shadowing effect influences the neutral density fluctuations. There, the D_α fluctuations are correlated with the neutral density fluctuations, and the high-order statistical moments and measurements of other turbulence properties are strongly affected by the neutral density fluctuations.

  3. Neutral atom traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  4. Ion-Ion Neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-31

    of Birmingam, P 0 Box 363, 2310/A2 Birmingham B15 2TT, England. 2303/GlAC II. Controlling Office Name and Address 12. Report Date Air Force Geophysics...source. Thus unwanted molecular excitation and dissociation can be avoided and greater control can be exercised in the creation of suitable plasma...The Fall fractigRal ionization density in these afterglow plagas (%-10 -𔃺) ensures that electron- neutral collisions are the most effective. This

  5. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  6. Gargamelle: neutral current event

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This event shows real tracks of particles from the 1200 litre Gargamelle bubble chamber that ran on the PS from 1970 to 1976 and on the SPS from 1976 to 1979. In this image a neutrino passes close to a nucleon and reemerges as a neutrino. Such events are called neutral curent, as they are mediated by the Z0 boson which has no electric charge.

  7. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, F.L.; Blank, M.L.

    1984-10-26

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated either-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood presure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  8. Parenteral nutrition including an omega-3 fatty-acid-containing lipid emulsion for intensive care patients in China: a pharmacoeconomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Y

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Yufei Feng,1 Chao Li,1 Tian Zhang,1 Lorenzo Pradelli2 1Department of Pharmacy, Beijing Hospital, National Center of Gerontology, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2AdRes Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Piazza Carlo Emanuele II, Torino, Italy Background/objectives: Parenteral nutrition (PN incorporating omega-3 fatty-acid-enriched lipid emulsions has been shown to be cost effective in Western populations. A pharmacoeconomic evaluation was performed within the Chinese intensive care unit (ICU setting. This assessed whether the additional acquisition cost of PN with omega-3 fatty-acid-enriched lipid emulsion (SMOFlipid vs standard PN was offset by improved clinical outcomes that can reduce subsequent costs. Materials and methods: A pharmacoeconomic discrete event simulation model was developed, based on an update to efficacy data from a previous international meta-analysis, with China-specific clinical and economic input parameters. Sensitivity analyses were undertaken to assess the effects of uncertainty around input parameters. Results: The model predicted that PN with an omega-3 fatty-acid-enriched lipid emulsion was more effective and less costly than PN with standard lipid emulsions for Chinese ICU patients, as follows: reduced length of overall hospital length of stay (19.48 vs 21.35 days, respectively, reduced length of ICU stay (5.03 vs 6.18 days, respectively, and prevention of 35.6% of nosocomial infections leading to a lower total cost per patient (¥47 189 [US $6937] vs ¥54 783 [US $8053], respectively. Additional treatment costs were offset by savings in overall hospital and ICU stay cost, and antibiotic cost, resulting in a mean cost saving of ¥7594 (US $1116 per patient. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of these findings. Conclusions: PN enriched with an omega-3 fatty-acid-containing lipid emulsion vs standard PN may be effective in reducing length of hospital and ICU stay and infectious complications in

  9. Extraction of tetravalent berkelium by neutral organophosphoric compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malikov, D.A.; Milyukova, M.S.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Kuzovkina, E.V.

    1983-01-01

    Extraction of tetravalent berkelium by neutral organophosphoric compounds from solutions of nitric-, hydrochloric- and sulfuric acids has been studied. Effect of the acid concentration, extracting agents, solvent nature and other factors on the berkelium (4) distribution coefficients is investigated. It is shown that TBP, TOPO and TPPO extract berkelium (4) quantitatively under certain conditions. Nitric acid solutions are an optimum medium for efffective extraction of berkelium (4) by neutral organophosphoric compounds. Trioctylphosphinooxide is the best of all the extractants studied. The acid concentration range in which berkelium quantitative extraction is observed, is higher for TOPO in all the organic solvents than for TBP and TPPO. Mechanism of berkelium (4) extraction by neutral organophosphoric compounds from nitric acid solutions is studied. It is established that tetravalent berkelium is extracted by TBP, TOPO and TPPO in the form of berkelium tetranitrate dissolvate Bk(NO 3 ) 4 x2S, where S=TBP, TOPO, TPPO

  10. Association study of polymorphisms in the neutral amino acid transporter genes SLC1A4, SLC1A5 and the glycine transporter genes SLC6A5, SLC6A9 with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Shibata Hiroki; Ozaki Norio; Ninomiya Hideaki; Iwata Nakao; Tanaka Masami; Takeuchi Naoko; Sagata Noriaki; Deng Xiangdong; Fukumaki Yasuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Based on the glutamatergic dysfunction hypothesis for schizophrenia pathogenesis, we have been performing systematic association studies of schizophrenia with the genes involved in glutametergic transmission. We report here association studies of schizophrenia with SLC1A4, SLC1A5 encoding neutral amino acid transporters ASCT1, ASCT2, and SLC6A5, SLC6A9 encoding glycine transporters GLYT2, GLYT1, respectively. Methods We initially tested the association of 21 single nucleot...

  11. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  12. Nitrogen-neutrality: a step towards sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leip, Adrian; Leach, Allison; Musinguzi, Patrick; Tumwesigye, Trust; Olupot, Giregon; Tenywa, John Stephen; Mudiope, Joseph; Hutton, Olivia; Cordovil, Claudia M. d. S.; Bekunda, Mateete; Galloway, James

    2014-11-01

    We propose a novel indicator measuring one dimension of the sustainability of an entity in modern societies: Nitrogen-neutrality. N-neutrality strives to offset Nr releases an entity exerts on the environment from the release of reactive nitrogen (Nr) to the environment by reducing it and by offsetting the Nr releases elsewhere. N-neutrality also aims to increase awareness about the consequences of unintentional releases of nitrogen to the environment. N-neutrality is composed of two quantified elements: Nr released by an entity (e.g. on the basis of the N footprint) and Nr reduction from management and offset projects (N offset). It includes management strategies to reduce nitrogen losses before they occur (e.g., through energy conservation). Each of those elements faces specific challenges with regard to data availability and conceptual development. Impacts of Nr releases to the environment are manifold, and the impact profile of one unit of Nr release depends strongly on the compound released and the local susceptibility to Nr. As such, N-neutrality is more difficult to conceptualize and calculate than C-neutrality. We developed a workable conceptual framework for N-neutrality which was adapted for the 6th International Nitrogen Conference (N2013, Kampala, November 2013). Total N footprint of the surveyed meals at N2013 was 66 kg N. A total of US 3050 was collected from the participants and used to offset the conference’s N footprint by supporting the UN Millennium Village cluster Ruhiira in South-Western Uganda. The concept needs further development in particular to better incorporate the spatio-temporal variability of impacts and to standardize the methods to quantify the required N offset to neutralize the Nr releases impact. Criteria for compensation projects need to be sharply defined to allow the development of a market for N offset certificates.

  13. Nitrogen-neutrality: a step towards sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leip, Adrian; Leach, Allison; Hutton, Olivia; Galloway, James; Musinguzi, Patrick; Tumwesigye, Trust; Olupot, Giregon; Stephen Tenywa, John; Mudiope, Joseph; Cordovil, Claudia M d S; Bekunda, Mateete

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel indicator measuring one dimension of the sustainability of an entity in modern societies: Nitrogen-neutrality. N-neutrality strives to offset Nr releases an entity exerts on the environment from the release of reactive nitrogen (Nr) to the environment by reducing it and by offsetting the Nr releases elsewhere. N-neutrality also aims to increase awareness about the consequences of unintentional releases of nitrogen to the environment. N-neutrality is composed of two quantified elements: Nr released by an entity (e.g. on the basis of the N footprint) and Nr reduction from management and offset projects (N offset). It includes management strategies to reduce nitrogen losses before they occur (e.g., through energy conservation). Each of those elements faces specific challenges with regard to data availability and conceptual development. Impacts of Nr releases to the environment are manifold, and the impact profile of one unit of Nr release depends strongly on the compound released and the local susceptibility to Nr. As such, N-neutrality is more difficult to conceptualize and calculate than C-neutrality. We developed a workable conceptual framework for N-neutrality which was adapted for the 6th International Nitrogen Conference (N2013, Kampala, November 2013). Total N footprint of the surveyed meals at N2013 was 66 kg N. A total of US$ 3050 was collected from the participants and used to offset the conference’s N footprint by supporting the UN Millennium Village cluster Ruhiira in South-Western Uganda. The concept needs further development in particular to better incorporate the spatio-temporal variability of impacts and to standardize the methods to quantify the required N offset to neutralize the Nr releases impact. Criteria for compensation projects need to be sharply defined to allow the development of a market for N offset certificates. (paper)

  14. Deciphering the mechanisms involved in Portulaca oleracea (C4) response to drought: metabolic changes including crassulacean acid-like metabolism induction and reversal upon re-watering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Rodrigo Matías; Andreo, Carlos Santiago; Lara, María Valeria

    2014-11-01

    Portulaca oleracea is a C(4) plant; however, under drought it can change its carbon fixation metabolism into a crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM)-like one. While the C(3) -CAM shift is well known, the C(4) -CAM transition has only been described in Portulaca. Here, a CAM-like metabolism was induced in P. oleracea by drought and then reversed by re-watering. Physiological and biochemical approaches were undertaken to evaluate the drought and recovery responses. In CAM-like plants, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters were transitory affected and non-radiative energy dissipation mechanisms were induced. Induction of flavonoids, betalains and antioxidant machinery may be involved in photosynthetic machinery protection. Metabolic analysis highlights a clear metabolic shift, when a CAM-like metabolism is induced and then reversed. Increases in nitrogenous compounds like free amino acids and urea, and of pinitol could contribute to withstand drought. Reciprocal variations in arginase and urease in drought-stressed and in re-watered plants suggest urea synthesis is strictly regulated. Recovery of C(4) metabolism was accounted by CO(2) assimilation pattern and malate levels. Increases in glycerol and in polyamines would be of importance of re-watered plants. Collectively, in P. oleracea multiple strategies, from induction of several metabolites to the transitory development of a CAM-like metabolism, participate to enhance its adaptation to drought. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  15. Dietary flax oil rich in α-linolenic acid reduces renal disease and oxylipin abnormalities, including formation of docosahexaenoic acid derived oxylipins in the CD1-pcy/pcy mouse model of nephronophthisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tamio; Devassy, Jessay G; Gabbs, Melissa; Ravandi, Amir; Nagao, Shizuko; Aukema, Harold M

    2015-03-01

    The CD1-pcy/pcy mouse model of nephronophthisis displays reduced renal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels and alterations in renal cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase oxylipins derived from n-6 fatty acids. Since dietary flax oil ameliorates disease progression, its effect on renal fatty acids and oxylipins was examined. Sixteen weeks of feeding resulted in reduced disease progression and enrichment of renal phospholipid α-linolenic acid (ALA) and eicosapentaenoic acid, reduction in arachidonic acid (AA), but no change in linoleic acid (LA) or DHA. In diseased kidneys, flax oil feeding mitigated the elevated levels of renal cyclooxygenase derived oxylipins formed from AA and the lowered lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 derived oxylipins formed from ALA and DHA. Increased DHA oxylipins occurred with flax feeding despite not altering DHA levels. Dietary flax oil may therefore reduce disease progression via mitigation of oxylipin abnormalities. This study also provides evidence of in vivo ALA conversion to DHA in amounts necessary to restore DHA oxylipin levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Discrete symmetries with neutral mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabéu, José

    2018-01-01

    Symmetries, and Symmetry Breakings, in the Laws of Physics play a crucial role in Fundamental Science. Parity and Charge Conjugation Violations prompted the consideration of Chiral Fields in the construction of the Standard Model, whereas CP-Violation needed at least three families of Quarks leading to Flavour Physics. In this Lecture I discuss the Conceptual Basis and the present experimental results for a Direct Evidence of Separate Reversal-in-Time T, CP and CPT Genuine Asymmetries in Decaying Particles like Neutral Meson Transitions, using Quantum Entanglement and the Decay as a Filtering Measurement. The eight transitions associated to the Flavour-CP eigenstate decay products of entangled neutral mesons have demonstrated with impressive significance a separate evidence of TRV and CPV in Bd-physics, whereas a CPTV asymmetry shows a 2σ effect interpreted as an upper limit. Novel CPTV observables are discussed for K physics at KLOE-2, including the difference between the semileptonic asymmetries from KL and KS, the ratios of double decay rate Intensities to Flavour-CP eigenstate decay products and the ω-effect. Their observation would lead to a change of paradigm beyond Quantum Field Theory, however there is nothing in Quantum Mechanics forbidding CPTV.

  17. Proteolytische activiteit bij neutrale pH in rundermilt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, Jan

    1969-01-01

    Intracellular enzymes, hydrolysing proteins optimally at acid pH values (acid proteases), have been studied in detail by several investigators. The existence of proteolytic activity at neutral pH in animal tissue extracts, on the other hand, has often been mentioned, but with few reports on the

  18. Amino acid profiles of rumen undegradable protein: a comparison between forages including cereal straws and alfalfa and their respective total mixed rations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B; Jiang, L S; Liu, J X

    2017-10-06

    Optimizing the amino acid (AA) profile of rumen undegradable protein (RUP) can positively affect the amount of milk protein. This study was conducted to improve knowledge regarding the AA profile of rumen undegradable protein from corn stover, rice straw and alfalfa hay as well as the total mixed ratio diets (TMR) based on one of them as forage source [forage-to-concentrate ratio of 45:55 (30% of corn stover (CS), 30% of rice straw (RS), 23% of alfalfa hay (AH) and dry matter basis)]. The other ingredients in the three TMR diets were similar. The RUP of all the forages and diets was estimated by incubation for 16 hr in the rumen of three ruminally cannulated lactating cows. All residues were corrected for microbial colonization, which was necessary in determining the AA composition of RUP from feed samples using in situ method. Compared with their original AA composition, the AA pattern of forages and forage-based diets changed drastically after rumen exposure. In addition, the extent of ruminal degradation of analysed AA was not constant among the forages. The greatest individual AA degradability of alfalfa hay and corn stover was Pro, but was His of rice straw. A remarkable difference was observed between microbial attachment corrected and uncorrected AA profiles of RUP, except for alfalfa hay and His in the three forages and TMR diets. The ruminal AA degradability of cereal straws was altered compared with alfalfa hay but not for the TMR diets. In summary, the AA composition of forages and TMR-based diets changed significantly after ruminal exposure, indicating that the original AA profiles of the feed cannot represent its AA composition of RUP. The AA profile of RUP and ruminal AA degradability for corn stover and rice straw contributed to missing information in the field. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Neutral polypropylene laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolfino, Chiara; Lertora, Enrico; Gambaro, Carla

    2016-10-01

    The joining of polymeric materials is a technology used in many industrial applications, from transport to telecommunications and the medical sector. A new technology for the joining of polymers is the laser welding process. In particular, fibre laser welding is a flexible technology which allows high process speed and the realization of good quality joints. Despite its application becoming more widespread in the production of assemblies of high precision, the application of laser technology for the welding of polymers has not been the subject of many studies up to now. This study focused on the welding of neutral polypropylene. The window process parameter was identified, without the use of additives to increase radiation absorption, and a mechanical characterization was conducted in order to evaluate the quality of the joints realized.

  20. Neutral Kaon Spectrometer 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneta, M.; Beckford, B.; Fujii, T.; Fujii, Y.; Futatsukawa, K.; Han, Y. C.; Hashimoto, O.; Hirose, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Kanda, H.; Kimura, C.; Maeda, K.; Nakamura, S. N.; Suzuki, K.; Tsukada, K.; Yamamoto, F.; Yamazaki, H.

    2018-04-01

    A large-acceptance spectrometer, Neutral Kaon Spectrometer 2 (NKS2), was newly constructed to explore various photoproduction reactions in the gigaelectronvolt region at the Laboratory of Nuclear Science (LNS, currently ELPH), Tohoku University. The spectrometer consisted of a dipole magnet, drift chambers, and plastic scintillation counters. NKS2 was designed to separate pions and protons in a momentum range of less than 1 GeV/ c, and was placed in a tagged photon beamline. A cryogenic H2/D2 target fitted to the spectrometer were designed. The design and performance of the detectors are described. The results of the NKS2 experiment on analyzing strangeness photoproduction data using a 0.8-1.1 GeV tagged photon beam are also presented.

  1. Spectroscopy of neutral radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Aran; De, Subhadeep; Jungmann, Klaus; Wilschut, Hans; Willmann, Lorenz [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth atoms radium is uniquely sensitive towards parity and time reversal symmetry violations due to a large enhancement of an intrinsic permanent electric dipole moment of the nucleous or the electron. Furthermore, radium is sensitive to atomic parity violation and the nuclear anapole moment. To prepare such experiments spectroscopy of relevant atomic states need to be done. At a later stage we will build a neutral atom trap for radium. We have built an atomic beam of the short lived isotope {sup 225}Ra with a flux of several 10{sup 4} atoms/sec. We are preparing the laser spectroscopy using this beam setup. In the preparation for efficient laser cooling and trapping we have successfully trapped barium, which is similar in it's requirements for laser cooling. The techniques which we have developed with barium can be used to trap rare radium isotopes. We report on the progress of the experiments.

  2. Manufacturing of neutral beam sources at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, E.D.; Duffy, T.J.; Harter, G.A.; Holland, E.D.; Kloos, W.A.; Pastrone, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Over 50 neutral beam sources (NBS) of the joint Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL)/Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) design have been manufactured, since 1973, in the LLL Neutral Beam Source Facility. These sources have been used to provide start-up and sustaining neutral beams for LLL mirror fusion experiments, including 2XIIB, TMX, and Beta II. Experimental prototype 20-kV and 80-kV NBS have also been designed, built, and tested for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF)

  3. Design, Synthesis, and in Vitro Pharmacology of New Radiolabeled γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid Analogues Including Photolabile Analogues with Irreversible Binding to the High-Affinity γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabbatini, Paola; Wellendorph, Petrine; Høg, Signe

    2010-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a psychotropic compound endogenous to the brain. Despite its potential physiological significance, the complete molecular mechanisms of action remain unexplained. To facilitate the isolation and identification of the high-affinity GHB binding site, we herein report...

  4. PDX neutral-beam reionization losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Dylla, H.F.; Eubank, H.P.; Kozub, T.A.; Moore, R.; Schilling, G.; Stewart, L.D.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1982-02-01

    Reionization losses for 1.5 MW H 0 and 2 MW D 0 neutral beams injected into the PDX tokamak were studied using pressure gauges, photo-transistors, thermocouples, surface shielding, and surface sample analysis. Considerable outgassing of conventionally prepared 304SS ducts occurred during initial injections and gradually decreased with the cumulative absorption of beam power. Reionization power losses are presently about 5% in the ducts and about 12% total for a beamline including the duct. Present duct pressures are attributed primarily to gas from the ion source and neutralizer with much smaller contributions from residual wall desorption. Physical mechanisms for the observed duct outgassing are discussed

  5. Simplified Stability Criteria for Delayed Neutral Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghua Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For a class of linear time-invariant neutral systems with neutral and discrete constant delays, several existing asymptotic stability criteria in the form of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs are simplified by using matrix analysis techniques. Compared with the original stability criteria, the simplified ones include fewer LMI variables, which can obviously reduce computational complexity. Simultaneously, it is theoretically shown that the simplified stability criteria and original ones are equivalent; that is, they have the same conservativeness. Finally, a numerical example is employed to verify the theoretic results investigated in this paper.

  6. Greenhouse gas neutral Germany in 2050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benndorf, Rosemarie; Bernicke, Maja; Bertram, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    In order to answer the question how a greenhouse gas neutral Germany would look like an interdisciplinary process was started by the Federal Environmental Agency. It was clear from the beginning of this work that a sustainable regenerative energy supply could not be sufficient. Therefore all relevant emission sources were included into the studies: traffic, industry, waste and waste water, agriculture, land usage, land usage changes and forestry. The necessary transformation paths to reach the aim of a greenhouse gas neutral Germany in 2050, economic considerations and political instruments were not part of this study.

  7. Neutral beam injection in 2XIIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibbs, S.M.

    1975-01-01

    Integrated into the operation of the 2XIIB controlled fusion experiment is a 600-A, 20-keV neutral injection system: the highest neutral-beam current capacity of any existing fusion machine. This paper outlines the requirements of the injection system and the design features to which they led. Both mechanical and electrical aspects are discussed. Also included is a brief description of some operational aspects of the system and some of the things we have learned along the way, as well as a short history of the most significant developments

  8. LADEE Neutral Mass Spectrometer Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This bundle contains the data collected by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) instrument aboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE)...

  9. Neutral pion production measurements at SciBooNE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catala-Perez, J.

    2011-01-01

    Neutrino-induced neutral pion production is an important measurement for next generation neutrino oscillation experiments. Neutral current (NC) neutral pion production is a direct background for electron neutrino appearance experiments, while charged current (CC) neutral pion production affects experiments looking for muon neutrino disappearance. Located in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab, SciBooNE is a neutrino scattering experiment designed to accurately measure muon neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections on carbon near 1 GeV neutrino energy. In this talk I will present recent SciBooNE results on neutral pion production, including the total cross section measurement for both channels relative to the CC inclusive cross section, the separation of the coherent and incoherent contributions to the NC channel, and details on neutral pion production kinematics.

  10. Carbon-neutral energy cycles using alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Takashi; Kitano, Sho; Hata, Shinichi; Yamauchi, Miho

    2018-01-01

    Abstract We demonstrated carbon-neutral (CN) energy circulation using glycolic acid (GC)/oxalic acid (OX) redox couple. Here, we report fundamental studies on both catalyst search for power generation process, i.e. GC oxidation, and elemental steps for fuel generation process, i.e. OX reduction, in CN cycle. The catalytic activity test on various transition metals revealed that Rh, Pd, Ir, and Pt have preferable features as a catalyst for electrochemical oxidation of GC. A carbon-supported Pt catalyst in alkaline conditions exhibited higher activity, durability, and product selectivity for electrooxidation of GC rather than those in acidic media. The kinetic study on OX reduction clearly indicated that OX reduction undergoes successive two-electron reductions to form GC. Furthermore, application of TiO2 catalysts with large specific area for electrochemical reduction of OX facilitates the selective formation of GC. PMID:29511392

  11. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-04

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  12. Gas–liquid chromatographic method for analysing complex mixtures of fatty acids including conjugated linoleic acids (cis9trans11 and trans10cis12 isomers) and long-chain (n-3 or n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids: Application to the intramuscular fat of beef meat

    OpenAIRE

    Aldai, Noelia; Osoro, Koldo; Barrón, L.J. (L.); Nájera, A.I. (A.)

    2012-01-01

    The optimisation and validation of a gas–liquid chromatographic (GLC) method using direct saponification with KOH/methanol followed by a derivatization with (trimethylsilyl)diazomethane was carried out trying to overcome all the difficulties posed by the analysis of complex mixtures of fatty acids (FAs) in animal fat tissues. The presented method allowed sensitive, selective and simultaneous determination of a wide range of different FAs, including short-chain FAs, branched-chain FAs and conj...

  13. Genetic signatures in the envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1 that associate with broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gnanakaran

    Full Text Available A steady increase in knowledge of the molecular and antigenic structure of the gp120 and gp41 HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env is yielding important new insights for vaccine design, but it has been difficult to translate this information to an immunogen that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies. To help bridge this gap, we used phylogenetically corrected statistical methods to identify amino acid signature patterns in Envs derived from people who have made potently neutralizing antibodies, with the hypothesis that these Envs may share common features that would be useful for incorporation in a vaccine immunogen. Before attempting this, essentially as a control, we explored the utility of our computational methods for defining signatures of complex neutralization phenotypes by analyzing Env sequences from 251 clonal viruses that were differentially sensitive to neutralization by the well-characterized gp120-specific monoclonal antibody, b12. We identified ten b12-neutralization signatures, including seven either in the b12-binding surface of gp120 or in the V2 region of gp120 that have been previously shown to impact b12 sensitivity. A simple algorithm based on the b12 signature pattern was predictive of b12 sensitivity/resistance in an additional blinded panel of 57 viruses. Upon obtaining these reassuring outcomes, we went on to apply these same computational methods to define signature patterns in Env from HIV-1 infected individuals who had potent, broadly neutralizing responses. We analyzed a checkerboard-style neutralization dataset with sera from 69 HIV-1-infected individuals tested against a panel of 25 different Envs. Distinct clusters of sera with high and low neutralization potencies were identified. Six signature positions in Env sequences obtained from the 69 samples were found to be strongly associated with either the high or low potency responses. Five sites were in the CD4-induced coreceptor binding site of gp120, suggesting an

  14. Mild Solutions of Neutral Stochastic Partial Functional Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Govindan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the existence and uniqueness of a mild solution for a neutral stochastic partial functional differential equation using a local Lipschitz condition. When the neutral term is zero and even in the deterministic special case, the result obtained here appears to be new. An example is included to illustrate the theory.

  15. Beam heating of the neutralizer gas of neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, W.

    1989-02-01

    It was shown by Pamela that the target thickness of the neutralizer gas in neutral beam injectors is smaller than to be expected from gas flow calculations. He explained his findings by direct and indirect beam heating of the gas and a consequent flow acceleration. The role of the neutralizer plasma electrons in the gas heating scenario is reconsidered here. To this end the particle and energy balances of the electrons are solved with allowance for ionization and dissociation of the gas by the electrons. It is shown that the direct contribution of the electrons to heating is not dominant. Their indirect contribution via ion acceleration in the space charge sheath in front of the walls is usually stronger. Methods to increase the neutralizer target thickness are investigated. They are essentially (1) structuring the neutralizer surface in order to reduce the reflection of medium energy particles and to increase the gas accommodation, (2) cooling down the neutralizer to LN 2 -temperature. The scaling of the target thickness with various parameters is investigated and compared with 'cold' flow. Initially it was assumed that the neutralizer plasma electrons are hot and able to excite Balmer alpha radiation in collisions with H 2 molecules. The investigation shows that the electrons must be cold instead (T e + 2 and H + 3 ions leading to excited hydrogen atoms. (orig.)

  16. Broeset - carbon neutral settlements in the making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gansmo, Helen Joesok

    2010-07-01

    Full text: In order to achieve the Norwegian Government's goal of making Norway a carbon neutral nation within 2030 we must be able to construct local carbon neutral settlements within a few years. In Trondheim the local authorities selected the area Broeset to be developed as 'a sustainable neighbourhood'. 'Sustainable' is defined in a holistic way, including low energy demand and healthy materials as well as social and economic issues such as low cost housing for vulnerable groups. The municipality is in charge of the planning process of Broeset in cooperation with governmental institutions and an interdisciplinary group of researchers at NTNU and SINTEF. Planning and designing a carbon neutral settlement is not only a matter of innovative technology and material and energy development and use, but includes for instance lifestyle, housing patterns, transportation and leisure-related travel for the residents. The aim is to make Broeset a neighbourhood where residents can live, work, shop, go to school and find meaningful leisure activities in settlements which enable people to lower their 'carbon footprint'. This paper will address how the planners try to meet the desires of diverse future residents as well as getting renewable energy and sustainable solutions integrated into the area. What socio-technical actors and solutions are regarded as (un)controversial in the process? And what mediating actors do/could contribute in building alliances towards planning, building and living in carbon neutral settlements? (Author)

  17. Remarkable Impact of Acidic Ginsenosides and Organic Acids on Ginsenoside Transformation from Fresh Ginseng to Red Ginseng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Xia, Juan; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Zhang, Jin-Qiu; Ruan, Chang-Chun; Sun, Guang-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2016-07-06

    Panax ginseng contains many chemical components, including acidic ginsenosides and organic acids. However, whether these acidic substances play a role in ginsenoside transformation during steaming treatment has not yet been explored. In this paper, the content of neutral ginsenosides, acidic ginsenosides, and their degradation products in unsteamed and steamed P. ginseng were simultaneously quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. We observed that neutral ginsenosides were converted to rare ginsenosides during the root steaming but not during the individual ginsenoside steaming. In contrast, acidic malonyl ginsenosides released malonic acid and acetic acid through demalonylation, decarboxylation, deacetylation reactions during the steaming at 120 °C. These malonyl ginsenosides not only were converted to rare ginsenosides but also promoted the degradation of neutral ginsenosides. Further studies indicated that a low concentration of organic acid was the determining factor for the ginsenoside conversion. The related mechanisms were deduced to be mainly acidic hydrolysis and dehydration. In summary, acidic ginsenosides and organic acids remarkably affected ginsenoside transformation during the steaming process. Our results provide useful information for precisely understanding the ginsenoside conversion pathways and mechanisms underlying the steaming process.

  18. Characterization of the neutralization determinants of equine arteritis virus using recombinant chimeric viruses and site-specific mutagenesis of an infectious cDNA clone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasuriya, Udeni B.R.; Dobbe, Jessika C.; Heidner, Hans W.; Smalley, Victoria L.; Navarrette, Andrea; Snijder, Eric J.; MacLachlan, N. James

    2004-01-01

    We have used an infectious cDNA clone of equine arteritis virus (EAV) and reverse genetics technology to further characterize the neutralization determinants in the GP5 envelope glycoprotein of the virus. We generated a panel of 20 recombinant viruses, including 10 chimeric viruses that each contained the ORF5 (which encodes GP5) of different laboratory, field, and vaccine strains of EAV, a chimeric virus containing the N-terminal ectodomain of GP5 of a European strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and 9 mutant viruses with site-specific substitutions in their GP5 proteins. The neutralization phenotype of each recombinant chimeric/mutant strain of EAV was determined with EAV-specific monoclonal antibodies and EAV strain-specific polyclonal equine antisera and compared to that of their parental viruses from which the substituted ORF5 was derived. The data unequivocally confirm that the GP5 ectodomain contains critical determinants of EAV neutralization. Furthermore, individual neutralization sites are conformationally interactive, and the interaction of GP5 with the unglycosylated membrane protein M is likely critical to expression of individual epitopes in neutralizing conformation. Substitution of individual amino acids within the GP5 ectodomain usually resulted in differences in neutralization phenotype of the recombinant viruses, analogous to differences in the neutralization phenotype of field strains of EAV and variants generated during persistent infection of EAV carrier stallions

  19. In vitro neutralization of the scorpion, Buthus tamulus venom toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswarlu, Y; Janakiram, B; Reddy, G R

    1988-01-01

    Scorpion (Buthus tamulus) venom was subjected to neutralization by treating the venom with various chemicals such as hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide, thiourea, formaldehyde, zinc sulphate, acetic acid and trichloroacetic acid. The venom was also subjected to heat treatment. The levels of total protein, free amino acids and protease activity in neutralized venom decreased significantly. The decrease in venom protein and free amino acids was in proportion to the duration of the heat treatment and the concentration of chemicals used except zinc sulphate, sodium hydroxide and thiourea. Protease activity of neutralized venom samples also showed a decrease except with zinc sulphate which enhanced the enzyme activity. Intramuscular injection of formaldehyde, trichlcroacetic acid and heat treated venoms into albino rats produced low mortality while thiourea and zinc sulphate were not effective in reducing the mortality. Hydrochloric acid and acetic acid treated venoms reduced the mortality by 50% with a decrease in the symptoms of envenomation. The changes were attributed to the denaturing of venom protein by chemical and heat treatments.

  20. Non-random escape pathways from a broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody map to a highly conserved region on the hepatitis C virus E2 glycoprotein encompassing amino acids 412-423.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-yong Keck

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A challenge for hepatitis C virus (HCV vaccine development is to define epitopes that are able to elicit protective antibodies against this highly diverse virus. The E2 glycoprotein region located at residues 412-423 is conserved and antibodies to 412-423 have broadly neutralizing activities. However, an adaptive mutation, N417S, is associated with a glycan shift in a variant that cannot be neutralized by a murine but by human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs against 412-423. To determine whether HCV escapes from these antibodies, we analyzed variants that emerged when cell culture infectious HCV virions (HCVcc were passaged under increasing concentrations of a specific HMAb, HC33.1. Multiple nonrandom escape pathways were identified. Two pathways occurred in the context of an N-glycan shift mutation at N417T. At low antibody concentrations, substitutions of two residues outside of the epitope, N434D and K610R, led to variants having improved in vitro viral fitness and reduced sensitivity to HC33.1 binding and neutralization. At moderate concentrations, a S419N mutation occurred within 412-423 in escape variants that have greatly reduced sensitivity to HC33.1 but compromised viral fitness. Importantly, the variants generated from these pathways differed in their stability. N434D and K610R-associated variants were stable and became dominant as the virions were passaged. The S419N mutation reverted back to N419S when immune pressure was reduced by removing HC33.1. At high antibody concentrations, a mutation at L413I was observed in variants that were resistant to HC33.1 neutralization. Collectively, the combination of multiple escape pathways enabled the virus to persist under a wide range of antibody concentrations. Moreover, these findings pose a different challenge to vaccine development beyond the identification of highly conserved epitopes. It will be necessary for a vaccine to induce high potency antibodies that prevent the formation of escape

  1. PVO VENUS ONMS BROWSE NEUTRAL DENSITY 12 SECOND V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set was designed to determine the composition of the neutral thermosphere/exosphere of Venus. The term composition includes both the type of neutral gases...

  2. TPX Neutral Beam Injection System design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Halle, A.; Bowen, O.N.; Edwards, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    The existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Neutral Beam system is proposed to be modified for long pulse operation on the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Day one of TPX will call for one TFTR beamline modified for 1000 second pulse lengths oriented co-directional to the plasma current. The system design will be capable of accommodating an additional co-directional and a single counter directional beamline. For the TPX conceptual design, every attempt was made to use existing Neutral Beam hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary systems, service infrastructure, and control systems. This paper describes the moderate modifications required to the power systems, the ion sources, and the beam impinged surfaces of the ion dumps, the calorimeters, the various beam scrapers, and the neutralizers. Also described are the minimal modifications required to the vacuum, cryogenic, and gas systems and the major modification of replacing the beamline-torus duct in its entirety. Operational considerations for Neutral Beam subsystems over 1000 second pulse lengths will be explored including proposed operating scenarios for full steady state operation

  3. Effects of dietary neutral detergent fiber and starch ratio on rumen epithelial cell morphological structure and gene expression in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L; Zhao, M; Zhao, L S; Xu, J C; Loor, J J; Bu, D P

    2017-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of dietary neutral detergent fiber to starch ratio on rumen epithelial morphological structure and gene expression. Eight primiparous dairy cows including 4 ruminally fistulated cows were assigned to 4 total mixed rations with neutral detergent fiber to starch ratios of 0.86, 1.18, 1.63, and 2.34 in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. The duration of each period was 21 d including 14 d for adaptation and 7 d for sampling. Rumen epithelial papillae were collected from the ruminally fistulated cows for morphological structure examination and mRNA expression analysis using quantitative real-time PCR of several genes related to volatile fatty acid absorption and metabolism, and cellular growth. Increasing dietary neutral detergent fiber to starch ratio resulted in a linear increase in the thickness of the stratum spinosum and basale. In contrast, expression of HMGCS2 (encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of ketone bodies) decreased linearly, whereas the expression of MCT2 (encoding a transporter of volatile fatty acid) increased linearly with increasing dietary neutral detergent fiber to starch ratio. As dietary neutral detergent fiber to starch ratio increased, expression of IGFBP5 (a gene related to the growth of rumen epithelial papillae) decreased, whereas IGFBP6 expression increased. Both of these IGFBP genes are regulated by short-chain fatty acids. Overall, the data indicate that dietary neutral detergent fiber to starch ratio can alter the thickness of the rumen epithelial papillae partly through changes in expression of genes associated with regulating volatile fatty acid absorption, metabolism, and cell growth. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular clock in neutral protein evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke Claus O

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A frequent observation in molecular evolution is that amino-acid substitution rates show an index of dispersion (that is, ratio of variance to mean substantially larger than one. This observation has been termed the overdispersed molecular clock. On the basis of in silico protein-evolution experiments, Bastolla and coworkers recently proposed an explanation for this observation: Proteins drift in neutral space, and can temporarily get trapped in regions of substantially reduced neutrality. In these regions, substitution rates are suppressed, which results in an overall substitution process that is not Poissonian. However, the simulation method of Bastolla et al. is representative only for cases in which the product of mutation rate μ and population size Ne is small. How the substitution process behaves when μNe is large is not known. Results Here, I study the behavior of the molecular clock in in silico protein evolution as a function of mutation rate and population size. I find that the index of dispersion decays with increasing μNe, and approaches 1 for large μNe . This observation can be explained with the selective pressure for mutational robustness, which is effective when μNe is large. This pressure keeps the population out of low-neutrality traps, and thus steadies the ticking of the molecular clock. Conclusions The molecular clock in neutral protein evolution can fall into two distinct regimes, a strongly overdispersed one for small μNe, and a mostly Poissonian one for large μNe. The former is relevant for the majority of organisms in the plant and animal kingdom, and the latter may be relevant for RNA viruses.

  5. Neutrality Versus Materiality: A Thermodynamic Theory of Neutral Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Tailleux

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a theory for constructing quasi-neutral density variables γ directly in thermodynamic space is formulated, which is based on minimising the absolute value of a purely thermodynamic quantity J n . Physically, J n has a dual dynamic/thermodynamic interpretation as the quantity controlling the energy cost of adiabatic and isohaline parcel exchanges on material surfaces, as well as the dependence of in-situ density on spiciness, in a description of water masses based on γ, spiciness and pressure. Mathematically, minimising | J n | in thermodynamic space is showed to be equivalent to maximising neutrality in physical space. The physics of epineutral dispersion is also reviewed and discussed. It is argued, in particular, that epineutral dispersion is best understood as the aggregate effect of many individual non-neutral stirring events (being understood here as adiabatic and isohaline events with non-zero buoyancy, so that it is only the net displacement aggregated over many events that is approximately neutral. This new view resolves an apparent paradox between the focus in neutral density theory on zero-buoyancy motions and the overwhelming evidence that lateral dispersion in the ocean is primarily caused by non-zero buoyancy processes such as tides, residual currents and sheared internal waves. The efficiency by which a physical process contributes to lateral dispersion can be characterised by its energy signature, with those processes releasing available potential energy (negative energy cost being more efficient than purely neutral processes with zero energy cost. The latter mechanism occurs in the wedge of instability, and its source of energy is the coupling between baroclinicity, thermobaricity, and density compensated temperature/salinity anomalies. Such a mechanism, which can only exist in a salty ocean, is speculated to be important for dissipating spiciness anomalies and neutral helicity. The paper also discusses potential

  6. Weak neutral-current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.M.

    1978-08-01

    The roles of each type of experiment in establishing uniquely the values of the the neutral-current couplings of u and d quarks are analyzed together with their implications for gauge models of the weak and electromagnetic interactions. An analysis of the neutral-current couplings of electrons and of the data based on the assumption that only one Z 0 boson exists is given. Also a model-independent analysis of parity violation experiments is discussed. 85 references

  7. Weak neutral-current interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, R.M.

    1978-08-01

    The roles of each type of experiment in establishing uniquely the values of the the neutral-current couplings of u and d quarks are analyzed together with their implications for gauge models of the weak and electromagnetic interactions. An analysis of the neutral-current couplings of electrons and of the data based on the assumption that only one Z/sup 0/ boson exists is given. Also a model-independent analysis of parity violation experiments is discussed. 85 references. (JFP)

  8. An Introductory Laboratory Exercise for Acids and Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard; Silberman, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Discusses an acid-base neutralization exercise requiring groups of students to determine: (1) combinations of solutions giving neutralization; (2) grouping solutions as acids or bases; and (3) ranking groups in order of concentration. (JM)

  9. Inhibition of Neutral Red Photolysis with Different Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatan Rimpapa

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Neutral red is a dye the azine structure which has been used as an acido-base indicator and a dye in histochemistry. In 1960 Goldhaber introduced Neutral red into the medium of resorbing bone cultures to localize the osteoclast in the living cultures. Using time-lapse microcinematography in order to follow the osteoclasts, he reported excellent contrast could be obtained with Neutral red due to the avidity of osteoclasts for this dye. Unfortunately, however, the photodynamic effect resulting from subsequent exposure of these cultures to light precluded this approach, and again in 1963. it was observed that the death of the osteoclasts was probably due to a photodynamic effect related to the dye in the cell, the presence of oxygen and the frequent exposure of light by our time-lapse photography. VIS and UV irradiation induced photolysis of Neutral red, and from Neutral red cation produced with photons a Neutral red radical. This Neutral red radical can be inhibited with action of an antioxidant, such as melatonin, glutathione, ascorbic acid, E vitamin, etc. We developed an assay with Neutral redphotolysis which utilizes a VIS and UV irradiation technique for quantification the inhibition of photolysis with action of an antioxidant. In this method Neutral red acts double, as a free radical generator and as a photosensitizer.

  10. Results from neutral kaon regeneration at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hladky, J.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental neutral kaon regeneration results at Serpukhov energies up to 50 GeV are presented, including the coherent regeneration on hydrogen, deuterium and carbon regenerators and elastic regeneration on deuterium and carbon regenerators. (author)

  11. Evaluation of Neutralizing Capacity of Different Commercial Brands ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2015-10-31

    Oct 31, 2015 ... ABSTRACT. This study is based on the evaluation of acid neutralizing capacity of five different commercial brands of antacid tablets. Five different but widely used commercial antacid tablets were selected for the purpose of this study. Each of the sample tablets was purchased, crushed, weighed and kept at ...

  12. Statistical theory of neutral protein evolution by random site mutations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alternatively, a self-consistent mean-field based theory is developed to evaluate the protein neutrality through random single-point and multiple-point mutations by calculating the pair-wise probability profile of the amino acid residues in a library of sequences, consistent with a particular foldability criterion. The theory ...

  13. The Relationship between Neutralization Techniques and Induced Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalateh Sadati, Ahmad; Tabei, Seyed Ziaaddin; Salehzadeh, Hamzeh; Rahnavard, Farnaz; Namavar Jahromi, Bahia; Hemmati, Soroor

    2014-04-01

    Induced abortion is not only a serious threat for women's health, but also a controversial topic for its ethical and moral problems. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between neutralization techniques and attempting to commit abortion in married women with unintended pregnancy. After in-depth interviews with some women who had attempted abortion, neutralization themes were gathered. Next, to analyze the data quantitatively, a questionnaire was created including demographic and psychosocial variables specifically related to neutralization. The participants were divided into two groups (abortion and control) of unintended pregnancy and were then compared. Analysis of psychosocial variables revealed a significant difference in the two groups at neutralization, showing that neutralization in the control group (56.97±10.24) was higher than that in the abortion group (44.19±12.44). To evaluate the findings more accurately, we examined the causal factors behind the behaviors of the abortion group. Binary logistic regression showed that among psychosocial factors, neutralization significantly affected abortion (95% CI=1.07-1.35). Despite the network of many factors affecting induced abortion, neutralization plays an important role in reinforcing the tendency to attempt abortion. Furthermore, the decline of religious beliefs, as a result of the secular context of the modern world, seems to have an important role in neutralizing induced abortion.

  14. Protein structure and neutral theory of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptitsyn, O B; Volkenstein, M V

    1986-08-01

    The neutral theory of evolution is extended to the origin of protein molecules. Arguments are presented which suggest that the amino acid sequences of many globular proteins mainly represent "memorized" random sequences while biological evolution reduces to the "editing" these random sequences. Physical requirements for a functional globular protein are formulated and it is shown that many of these requirement do not involve strategical selection of amino acid sequences during biological evolution but are inherent also for typical random sequences. In particular, it is shown that random sequences of polar and amino acid residues can form alpha-helices and beta-strand with lengths and arrangement along the chain similar to those in real globular proteins. These alpha- and beta-regions in random sequences can form three-dimensional folding patterns also similar to those in proteins. The arguments are presented suggesting that even the tight packing of side groups inside protein core do not require very strong biological selection of amino acid sequences either. Thus many structural features of real proteins can exist also in random sequences and the biological selection is needed mainly for the creation of active site of protein and for their stability under physiological conditions.

  15. Effects of Neutralization and Crosslinking Agents on the Morphology of Chitosan Electrospun Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mashayekhi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan, a natural polymer derived from chitin by deacetylation process of chitin, has gained an enormous interest in tissue engineering due to its unique features such as antibacterial activity and wound healing properties. Electrospinning of acidified chitosan solution is one of the most widely-used approaches in fabrication of 3D scaffolds. Although there are some reports addressing morphology tailoring of the chitosan nanofibers through solution electrospinning, there is no comparative report concerning the neutralization and stabilization conditions of chitosan electrospun fibers. Therefore, this article compares the effects of different neutralizing agents such as aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3 and potassium carbonate (K2CO3, and crosslinking reagents including glutaraldehyde (GA and genipin on morphology of electrospun chitosan fibers. After neutralization and stabilization processes, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR was employed to investigate the morphology of fibers. Furthermore, the influence of the aforementioned parameters on stability of fibers was probed using scanning electron microscopy. SEM images illustrated that the scaffold resulting from electrospinning of 4 wt% chitosan solution in a mixture of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA and dichloromethane (DCM possessed a well-formed nanofibrous structure. Afterwards, different methods for neutralization and stabilization of the electrospun chitosan nanofiber mats were performed. In this respect, aqueous solutions of both Na2CO3 and K2CO3 salts (1M were employed as neutralization agents and GA and genipin were used as two different crosslinking agents. Based on SEM analysis, the chitosan fibers, crosslinked with genipin, showed better morphology than a scaffold which was crosslinked with glutaraldehyde

  16. Neutralization of feline immunodeficiency virus by polyclonal cat antibody: Simultaneous involvement of hypervariable regions 4 and 5 of the surface glycoprotein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); W. Huisman (Willem); J.A. Karlas (Jos); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); M.L. Bosch (Marnix); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSites involved in antibody-mediated neutralization of feline immunodeficiency virus were mapped by reciprocal exchange of envelope fragments or amino acids between molecular clones of feline immunodeficiency virus with different susceptibilities to neutralization by a polyclonal cat

  17. Electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Cooling and trapping of neutral atoms is a new branch of applied physics that has potential for application in many areas. The authors present an introduction to laser cooling and magnetic trapping. Some basic ideas and fundamental limitations are discussed, and the first successful experiments are reviewed. Trapping a neutral object depends on the interaction between an inhomogeneous electromagnetic field and a multiple moment that results in the exchange of kinetic for potential energy. In neutral atom traps, the potential energy must be stored as internal atomic energy, resulting in two immediate and extremely important consequences. First, the atomic energy levels will necessarily shift as the atoms move in the trap, and, second, practical traps for ground state neutral atoms atr necessarily very shallow compared to thermal energy. This small depth also dictates stringent vacuum requirements because a trapped atom cannot survive a single collision with a thermal energy background gas molecule. Neutral trapping, therefore, depends on substantial cooling of a thermal atomic sample and is inextricably connected with the cooling process

  18. Quasi-Neutral Theory of Epidemic Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Oscar A.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Some epidemics have been empirically observed to exhibit outbreaks of all possible sizes, i.e., to be scale-free or scale-invariant. Different explanations for this finding have been put forward; among them there is a model for “accidental pathogens” which leads to power-law distributed outbreaks without apparent need of parameter fine tuning. This model has been claimed to be related to self-organized criticality, and its critical properties have been conjectured to be related to directed percolation. Instead, we show that this is a (quasi) neutral model, analogous to those used in Population Genetics and Ecology, with the same critical behavior as the voter-model, i.e. the theory of accidental pathogens is a (quasi)-neutral theory. This analogy allows us to explain all the system phenomenology, including generic scale invariance and the associated scaling exponents, in a parsimonious and simple way. PMID:21760930

  19. Distribution and mobility of omega 3 fatty acids in rainbow trout fed varying levels and types of dietary lipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castledine, A J; Buckley, J T

    1980-04-01

    The availability of essential fatty acids in fish neutral lipid to tissue phospholipids was determined under conditions of adequate and inadequate essential fatty acid intake as well as during fasting. Juvenile rainbow trout were fed a semi-purified diet containing varying levels of cod liver oil, with or without supplementary olein. Fatty acid analysis indicated that in all treatments the neutral lipid pool was not turned over during feeding but was enhanced by exogenous or endogenously synthesized fatty acids. Fish that received diets devoid of essential fatty acids maintained virtually all of the docosahexenoic acid originally present in each lipid pool. Fish fed diets containing essential fatty acids deposited them in proportion to the dietary levels. After a 4-week fast, no change was noted in the relative levels of fatty acids in neutral lipid indicating that all fatty acids in neutral lipid were catabolized equally--including essential fatty acids. During fasting there was a selective retention of docosahexenoic and linoleic acids in the phospholipid pool.

  20. Neutral B meson flavor tagging

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, R J

    2001-01-01

    We present an investigation of the use of net charge and kaon identification to tag the flavor of neutral B mesons. The net charge of the neutral B meson decay products is zero if all charged particles are used and slightly non-zero if only undiscriminated hadronic final states are used. The net charge of the kaons alone correctly tags the identity of the neutral meson in at least a third of all decays. We have parametrized the particle identification capability of several techniques, such as dE/dx in time projection chambers, LEP/SLC ring-imaging chambers and an enhanced BaBar DIRC. Using these parametrisations we compare the relative tagging power of each technique to that of an ideal detector. (8 refs).

  1. The Acid Rain Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  2. Hydrofluoric acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mouth (intubation), and breathing machine (ventilator) Blood and urine tests Camera down the throat to see burns in the esophagus and the stomach (endoscopy) Fluids through a vein (IV) Magnesium and calcium solutions to neutralize the acid Medicines ...

  3. Neutral currents in semileptonic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschos, E.A.

    1975-05-01

    The evidence for weak neutral currents is analyzed in semileptonic reactions with special emphasis on their Lorentz and internal symmetry structure. It is found that present observations are consistent with the expectations of gauge theories, but other possibilities can not be ruled out. Of particular interest in this respect is the presence of a large isoscalar component. The excitation of the Δ-resonance by neutral currents is analyzed, and pion-nucleon mass distributions are presented. Charge asymmetries sensitive to isoscalar-isovector interferences are discussed. (U.S.)

  4. An ultrasensitive universal detector based on neutralizer displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jagotamoy; Cederquist, Kristin B.; Zaragoza, Alexandre A.; Lee, Paul E.; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2012-08-01

    Diagnostic technologies that can provide the simultaneous detection of nucleic acids for gene expression, proteins for host response and small molecules for profiling the human metabolome will have a significant advantage in providing comprehensive patient monitoring. Molecular sensors that report changes in the electrostatics of a sensor's surface on analyte binding have shown unprecedented sensitivity in the detection of charged biomolecules, but do not lend themselves to the detection of small molecules, which do not carry significant charge. Here, we introduce the neutralizer displacement assay that allows charge-based sensing to be applied to any class of molecule irrespective of the analyte charge. The neutralizer displacement assay starts with an aptamer probe bound to a neutralizer. When analyte binding occurs the neutralizer is displaced, which results in a dramatic change in the surface charge for all types of analytes. We have tested the sensitivity, speed and specificity of this system in the detection of a panel of molecules: (deoxy)ribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, cocaine, adenosine triphosphate and thrombin.

  5. Broader HIV-1 neutralizing antibody responses induced by envelope glycoprotein mutants based on the EIAV attenuated vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lianxing

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to induce a potent and cross-reactive neutralizing antibody (nAb, an effective envelope immunogen is crucial for many viral vaccines, including the vaccine for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The Chinese equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV attenuated vaccine has controlled the epidemic of this virus after its vaccination in over 70 million equine animals during the last 3 decades in China. Data from our past studies demonstrate that the Env protein of this vaccine plays a pivotal role in protecting horses from both homologous and heterogeneous EIAV challenges. Therefore, the amino acid sequence information from the Chinese EIAV attenuated vaccine, in comparison with the parental wild-type EIAV strains, was applied to modify the corresponding region of the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 CN54. The direction of the mutations was made towards the amino acids conserved in the two EIAV vaccine strains, distinguishing them from the two wild-type strains. The purpose of the modification was to enhance the immunogenicity of the HIV Env. Results The induced nAb by the modified HIV Env neutralized HIV-1 B and B'/C viruses at the highest titer of 1:270. Further studies showed that a single amino acid change in the C1 region accounts for the substantial enhancement in induction of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions This study shows that an HIV envelope modified by the information of another lentivirus vaccine induces effective broadly neutralizing antibodies. A single amino acid mutation was found to increase the immunogenicity of the HIV Env.

  6. Are neutral loss and internal product ions useful for top-down protein identification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Kaijie; Yu, Fan; Fang, Houqin; Xue, Bingbing; Liu, Yan; Li, Yunhui; Tian, Zhixin

    2017-05-08

    Neutral loss and internal product ions have been found to be significant in both peptide and protein tandem mass spectra and they have been proposed to be included in database search and for protein identification. In addition to common canonical b/y ions in collision-based dissociation or c/z ions in electron-based dissociation, inclusion of neutral loss and internal product ions would certainly make better use of tandem mass spectra data; however, their ultimate utility for protein identification with false discovery rate control remains unclear. Here we report our proteome-level utility benchmarking of neutral loss and internal product ions with tandem mass spectra of intact E. coli proteome. Utility of internal product ions was further evaluated at the protein level using selected tandem mass spectra of individual E. coli proteins. We found that both neutral loss and internal products ions do not have direct utility for protein identification when they were used for scoring of P Score; but they do have indirect utility for provision of more canonical b/y ions when they are included in the database search and overlapping ions between different ion types are resolved. Tandem mass spectrometry has evolved to be a state-of-the-art method for characterization of protein primary structures (including amino acid sequence, post-translational modifications (PTMs) as well as their site location), where full study and utilization tandem mass spectra and product ions are indispensable. This primary structure information is essential for higher order structure and eventual function study of proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Initiatives towards Carbon Neutrality in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area

    OpenAIRE

    Dahal, Karna Prasad; Niemelä, Jari Kalevi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon neutrality represents one climate strategy adopted by many cities, including the city of Helsinki and the Helsinki metropolitan area in Finland. This study examines initiatives adopted by the Helsinki metropolitan area aimed at reducing energy-related carbon emissions and achieving carbon neutrality through future actions. Various sectorial energy consumption rates per year and carbon emissions from various sectors within the city of Helsinki and the metropolitan area were extracted fr...

  8. ITER Neutral Beam Injection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Shigeru; Akiba, Masato

    1991-03-01

    A Japanese design proposal of the ITER Neutral Beam Injection System (NBS) which is consistent with the ITER common design requirements is described. The injection system is required to deliver a neutral deuterium beam of 75MW at 1.3MeV to the reactor plasma and utilized not only for plasma heating but also for current drive and current profile control. The injection system is composed of 9 modules, each of which is designed so as to inject a 1.3MeV, 10MW neutral beam. The most important point in the design is that the injection system is based on the utilization of a cesium-seeded volume negative ion source which can produce an intense negative ion beam with high current density at a low source operating pressure. The design value of the source is based on the experimental values achieved at JAERI. The utilization of the cesium-seeded volume source is essential to the design of an efficient and compact neutral beam injection system which satisfies the ITER common design requirements. The critical components to realize this design are the 1.3MeV, 17A electrostatic accelerator and the high voltage DC acceleration power supply, whose performances must be demonstrated prior to the construction of ITER NBI system. (author)

  9. Net Neutrality in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.

    2014-01-01

    The Netherlands is among the first countries that have put specific net neutrality standards in place. The decision to implement specific regulation was influenced by at least three factors. The first was the prevailing social and academic debate, partly due to developments in the United States. The

  10. Money neutrality: Rethinking the myth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issaoui Fakhri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considered as an axiomatic basis of classical, neoclassical, and monetarist theories, the long-run money neutrality assumption does not always seem to be verified. Indeed, in our view, the money, in the sense of M2, can constitute a long-run channel of growth transmission. Thus, this paper examines the long-term relationship among money supply (M2, income (GDP, and prices (CPI. The subprime crisis in 2007 has shown that the demand for money does not only meet motives of transaction, precaution, and speculation but also of fictional or quasi-fictional future demands due to the fact that they are created without real counterparts. The capacity of production systems in developed countries to respond to increases in money supply by creating more wealth, involves the assumption of money neutrality in the long-run. However, in developing countries, the excess of money supply may lead to inflation trends. The present study has confirmed the long-term non-neutrality of money supply in the USA, and its neutrality in Gabon and Morocco.

  11. Laser cooling of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A qualitative description of laser cooling of neutral atoms is given. Two of the most important mechanisms utilized in laser cooling, the so-called Doppler Cooling and Sisyphus Cooling, are reviewed. The minimum temperature reached by the atoms is derived using simple arguments. (Author) 7 refs

  12. RE: Pedagogy--After Neutrality

    Science.gov (United States)

    I'Anson, John

    2010-01-01

    Within the UK and in many parts of the world, official accounts of what it is to make sense of religion are framed within a rhetorics of neutrality in which such study is premised upon the possibility of dispassionate engagement and analysis. This paper, which is largely theoretical in scope, explores both the affordances and the costs of such an…

  13. A catalog of neutral and deleterious polymorphism in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W Doniger

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The abundance and identity of functional variation segregating in natural populations is paramount to dissecting the molecular basis of quantitative traits as well as human genetic diseases. Genome sequencing of multiple organisms of the same species provides an efficient means of cataloging rearrangements, insertion, or deletion polymorphisms (InDels and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. While inbreeding depression and heterosis imply that a substantial amount of polymorphism is deleterious, distinguishing deleterious from neutral polymorphism remains a significant challenge. To identify deleterious and neutral DNA sequence variation within Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we sequenced the genome of a vineyard and oak tree strain and compared them to a reference genome. Among these three strains, 6% of the genome is variable, mostly attributable to variation in genome content that results from large InDels. Out of the 88,000 polymorphisms identified, 93% are SNPs and a small but significant fraction can be attributed to recent interspecific introgression and ectopic gene conversion. In comparison to the reference genome, there is substantial evidence for functional variation in gene content and structure that results from large InDels, frame-shifts, and polymorphic start and stop codons. Comparison of polymorphism to divergence reveals scant evidence for positive selection but an abundance of evidence for deleterious SNPs. We estimate that 12% of coding and 7% of noncoding SNPs are deleterious. Based on divergence among 11 yeast species, we identified 1,666 nonsynonymous SNPs that disrupt conserved amino acids and 1,863 noncoding SNPs that disrupt conserved noncoding motifs. The deleterious coding SNPs include those known to affect quantitative traits, and a subset of the deleterious noncoding SNPs occurs in the promoters of genes that show allele-specific expression, implying that some cis-regulatory SNPs are deleterious. Our results show that

  14. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of primary aliphatic saturated or unsaturated alcohols/aldehydes/acids/acetals/esters with a second primary, secondary or tertiary oxygenated functional group including aliphatic lactones (chemical group 9) when used as flavourings for all animal species

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP)

    2012-01-01

    Chemical group 9 consists of primary aliphatic saturated or unsaturated alcohols/aldehydes/acids/acetals/esters with a second primary, secondary or tertiary oxygenated functional group including aliphatic lactones, of which 30 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The FEEDAP Panel was unable to perform an assessment of 2-oxopropanal because of issues related to the purity of the compound. The FEEDAP Panel concludes that lactic acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, 4-oxov...

  15. Heterogeneous Coordination Environments in Lithium-Neutralized Ionomers Identified Using 1H and 7Li MAS NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Todd M.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Stevens, Mark J.; Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Buitrago, C. Francisco; Winey, Karen I.; Opper, Kathleen L.; Wagener, Kenneth B.

    2012-01-01

    The carboxylic acid proton and the lithium coordination environments for precise and random Li-neutralized polyethylene acrylic acid P(E-AA) ionomers were explored using high speed solid-state 1H and 7Li MAS NMR. While the 7Li NMR revealed only a single Li coordination environment, the chemical shift temperature variation was dependent on the precise or random nature of the P(E-AA) ionomer. The 1H MAS NMR revealed two different carboxylic acid proton environments in these materials. By utilizing 1H-7Li rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) MAS NMR experiments, it was demonstrated that the proton environments correspond to different average 1H-7Li distances, with the majority of the protonated carboxylic acids having a close through space contact with the Li. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the shortest 1H-7Li distance corresponds to un-neutralized carboxylic acids directly involved in the coordination environment of Li clusters. These solid-state NMR results show that heterogeneous structural motifs need to be included when developing descriptions of these ionomer materials.

  16. Direct analysis of sialylated or sulfated glycosphingolipids and other polar and neutral lipids using TLC-MS interfaces[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejung; Zhou, Ying; Costello, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Gangliosides and sulfatides (STs) are acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) that have one or more sialic acids or sulfate substituents, in addition to neutral sugars, attached to the C-1 hydroxyl group of the ceramide long chain base. TLC is a widely employed and convenient technique for separation and characterization of GSLs. When TLC is directly coupled to MS, it provides both the molecular mass and structural information without further purification. Here, after development of the TLC plates, the structural analyses of acidic GSLs, including gangliosides and STs, were investigated using the liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA™) and CAMAG TLC-MS interfaces coupled to an ESI QSTAR Pulsar i quadrupole orthogonal TOF mass spectrometer. Coupling TLC with ESI-MS allowed the acquisition of high resolution mass spectra of the acidic GSLs with high sensitivity and mass accuracy, without the loss of sialic acid residues that frequently occurs during low-pressure MALDI MS. These systems were then applied to the analysis of total lipid extracts from bovine brain. This allowed profiling of many different lipid classes, not only gangliosides and STs, but also SMs, neutral GSLs, and phospholipids. PMID:24482490

  17. Direct analysis of sialylated or sulfated glycosphingolipids and other polar and neutral lipids using TLC-MS interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejung; Zhou, Ying; Costello, Catherine E

    2014-04-01

    Gangliosides and sulfatides (STs) are acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) that have one or more sialic acids or sulfate substituents, in addition to neutral sugars, attached to the C-1 hydroxyl group of the ceramide long chain base. TLC is a widely employed and convenient technique for separation and characterization of GSLs. When TLC is directly coupled to MS, it provides both the molecular mass and structural information without further purification. Here, after development of the TLC plates, the structural analyses of acidic GSLs, including gangliosides and STs, were investigated using the liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA™) and CAMAG TLC-MS interfaces coupled to an ESI QSTAR Pulsar i quadrupole orthogonal TOF mass spectrometer. Coupling TLC with ESI-MS allowed the acquisition of high resolution mass spectra of the acidic GSLs with high sensitivity and mass accuracy, without the loss of sialic acid residues that frequently occurs during low-pressure MALDI MS. These systems were then applied to the analysis of total lipid extracts from bovine brain. This allowed profiling of many different lipid classes, not only gangliosides and STs, but also SMs, neutral GSLs, and phospholipids.

  18. Nutritional quality in terms of lipid content and fatty acid composition of neutral and polar lipids in the adductor muscle of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1794 farmed in the Bizert lagoon (Tunisia in relation with sexual cycle and environmental settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa Dridi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Monthly variations of fatty acid composition of the two fractions polar lipids (PL and neutral lipids (NL in the adductor muscle of cupped oyster Crassostrea gigas, were studied from May 2005 until June 2006 in the Bizert lagoon, related to environmental parameters and reproductive events. C. gigas showed a clear cycle of energy storage and utilization in the site of study. Total PL and NL content varied significantly during the year and showed a negative and significant correlation with the gametogenic condition index which can be explained by transfer of fatty acids from the adductor muscle to gonads to support the gametogenic cycle. Nevertheless, PL and NL have no significant correlations either with temperature or chlorophyll a registered in the site of study. The adductor muscle proved to be less influenced by chlorophyll a richness of the farming environment. The dominance of total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs over the saturated fatty acids (SFAs and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs in both PL and NL fractions was established throughout the period of study. Oysters analyzed were characterized by high levels of PUFAs n−3 and high n−3/n−6 PUFAs ratio in both PL and NL fractions. PUFAs n−3 and SFAs of PL and PUFAs and SFAs of NL, showed a negative and significant correlation between them. In fact, low temperature values produce generally an increase in the PUFAs percentages in order to maintain the fluidity of cell membranes. We deduce that annual variations of fatty acids content in PL and NL fractions of the adductor muscle of C. gigas seem to be in relation with the reproductive events. According to our results, the adductor muscle tissues were relatively poor in fatty acids (maximum values (% of dry weight of PL and NL respectively were 2.04 ± 0.33 and 1.75 ± 0.9. Lipids fluctuations were not pronounced all over the period of study in the site of sampling due to low effects of the environment richness and phases of

  19. Neutral and alkaline cellulases: Production, engineering, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hmad, Ines; Gargouri, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Neutral and alkaline cellulases from microorganisms constitute a major group of the industrial enzymes and find applications in various industries. Screening is the important ways to get novel cellulases. Most fungal cellulases have acidic pH optima, except some fungi like Humicola insolens species. However, new applications require the use of neutral and alkaline cellulases in food, brewery and wine, animal feed, textile and laundry, pulp and paper industries, agriculture as well in scientific research purposes. Indeed, the demand for these enzymes is growing more rapidly than ever before, and becomes the driving force for research on engineering the cellulolytic enzymes. Here, we present an overview of the biotechnological research for neutral and alkaline cellulases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Neutral Supersymmetric Higgs Boson Searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Stephen Luke [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    In some Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, including the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the coupling of Higgs bosons to b-quarks is enhanced. This enhancement makes the associated production of the Higgs with b-quarks an interesting search channel for the Higgs and Supersymmetry at D0. The identification of b-quarks, both online and offline, is essential to this search effort. This thesis describes the author's involvement in the development of both types of b-tagging and in the application of these techniques to the MSSM Higgs search. Work was carried out on the Level-3 trigger b-tagging algorithms. The impact parameter (IP) b-tagger was retuned and the effects of increased instantaneous luminosity on the tagger were studied. An extension of the IP-tagger to use the z-tracking information was developed. A new b-tagger using secondary vertices was developed and commissioned. A tool was developed to allow the use of large multi-run samples for trigger studies involving b-quarks. Offline, a neural network (NN) b-tagger was trained combining the existing offline lifetime based b-tagging tools. The efficiency and fake rate of the NN b-tagger were measured in data and MC. This b-tagger was internally reviewed and certified by the Collaboration and now provides the official b-tagging for all analyses using the Run IIa dataset at D0. A search was performed for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a b{bar b} pair and produced in association with one or more b-quarks. Limits are set on the cross-section times the branching ratio for such a process. The limits were interpreted in various MSSM scenarios. This analysis uses the NN b-tagger and was the first to use this tool. The analysis also relies on triggers using the Level-3 IP b-tagging tool described previously. A likelihood discriminant was used to improve the analysis and a neural network was developed to cross-check this technique. The result of the analysis has been submitted to PRL

  1. Mechanisms of equine infectious anemia virus escape from neutralizing antibody responses define epitope specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponseller, Brett A; Clark, Sandra K; Friedrich, Rachel A

    2012-08-01

    Determining mechanisms of viral escape to particular epitopes recognized by virus-neutralizing antibody can facilitate characterization of host-neutralizing antibody responses as type- versus group-specific, and provides necessary information for vaccine development. Our study reveals that a single N-glycan located in the 5' region of the Wyoming wild-type equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) principal neutralizing domain (PND) accounts for the differences in neutralization phenotype observed between PND variants, while variations in charged amino acids within the PND do not appear to play a key role in viral escape. Site-directed mutagenesis and peptide mapping of a conserved epitope to neutralizing antibody in the 3' region of the PND showed rapid selective pressure for acquisition of a 5' PND N-glycan responsible for defining the specificity of the neutralizing-antibody response.

  2. D-Serine Is a Substrate for Neutral Amino Acid Transporters ASCT1/SLC1A4 and ASCT2/SLC1A5, and Is Transported by Both Subtypes in Rat Hippocampal Astrocyte Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Alan C.; Farnsworth, Jill; Lind, Genevieve E.; Li, Yong-Xin; Yang, Jia-Ying; Dang, Van; Penjwini, Mahmud; Viswanath, Veena; Staubli, Ursula; Kavanaugh, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play critical roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Activation of NMDA receptors by synaptically released L-glutamate also requires occupancy of co-agonist binding sites in the tetrameric receptor by either glycine or D-serine. Although D-serine appears to be the predominant co-agonist at synaptic NMDA receptors, the transport mechanisms involved in D-serine homeostasis in brain are poorly understood. In this work we show that the SLC1 amino acid...

  3. A composite model including visfatin, tissue polypeptide-specific antigen, hyaluronic acid, and hematological variables for the diagnosis of moderate-to-severe fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwist, Alina; Hartleb, Marek; Lekstan, Andrzej; Kukla, Michał; Gutkowski, Krzysztof; Kajor, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Histopathological risk factors for end-stage liver failure in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) include nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and advanced liver fibrosis. There is a need for noninvasive diagnostic methods for these 2 conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate new laboratory variables with a predictive potential to detect advanced fibrosis (stages 2 and 3) in NAFLD. The study involved 70 patients with histologically proven NAFLD of varied severity. Additional laboratory variables included zonulin, haptoglobin, visfatin, adiponectin, leptin, tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPSA), hyaluronic acid, and interleukin 6. Patients with NASH (NAFLD activity score of ≥5) had significantly higher HOMA-IR values and serum levels of visfatin, haptoglobin, and zonulin as compared with those without NASH on histological examination. Advanced fibrosis was found in 16 patients (22.9%) and the risk factors associated with its prevalence were age, the ratio of erythrocyte count to red blood cell distribution width, platelet count, and serum levels of visfatin and TPSA. Based on these variables, we constructed a scoring system that differentiated between NAFLD patients with and without advanced fibrosis with a sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 100% (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.93). The scoring system based on the above variables allows to predict advanced fibrosis with high sensitivity and specificity. However, its clinical utility should be verified in further studies involving a larger number of patients.

  4. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear β decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left up to other presenters

  5. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, J A

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear beta decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left...

  6. Radiative lifetimes of neutral samarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, E A; Lawler, J E

    2013-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 120 odd-parity levels of neutral samarium, ranging in energy from 17 190 to 33 507 cm −1 , are measured using the technique of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic beam. This work is part of an ongoing study of radiative properties of rare earth neutral atoms, and is motivated by research needs in astrophysics and lighting technology. This set of Sm i lifetimes substantially increases the available published lifetime data, with 49 of the 120 level lifetimes measured for the first time. These data, most of which are accurate to ±5%, will be combined with branching fractions determined from Fourier transform spectroscopy to produce a large set of measured Sm i transition probabilities. (paper)

  7. Lanthanoid abundance of some neutral hot spring waters in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikawada, Yoshikazu; Oi, Takao; Honda, Teruyuki

    1999-01-01

    Contents of lanthanoids (Ln's) in some neutral hot spring waters as well as in acidic hot spring waters were determined by neutron activation analysis. It was found that a higher pH resulted in lower concentrations of Ln's; the value of correlation coefficient (r) between the logarithm of the concentration of Sm ([Sm]), chosen as the representative of Ln's, and the logarithm of pH was -0.90. The sum of [Al] and [Fe] was strongly correlated with [Ln]'s in the pH range of 1.3 and 8.8; the correlation was expressed as log[Sm] = 0.893 log([Al] + [Fe]) - 5.45 with the r value of 0.98. The sum of [Al] and [Fe] was thus a good measure of the Ln contents in acidic and neutral hot spring waters. The Ln abundance patterns of neutral hot spring waters with normal CO 2 concentrations had concave shapes with relative depletion in the middle-heavy Ln's and seemed to reflect the solubility of Ln carbonates. The neutral hot spring water with a high CO 2 content of 1,800 ppm showed a Ln pattern with a relative enrichment in the heavy Ln's and seemed to reflect the solubility of Ln's observed for CO 2 -rich solutions. (author)

  8. Proton electroinsertion in self-assembled materials for neutralization pseudocapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facci, Tiago; Gomes, Wellington J A S; Bravin, Bruno; Araújo, Diógenes M; Huguenin, Fritz

    2014-01-14

    We propose novel pseudocapacitors that can store energy related to the partial entropy change associated with proton concentration variations following neutralization reactions. In this situation, it is possible to obtain electrochemical energy after the complete charge/discharge cycle conducted in electrolytic solutions with different proton concentrations. To this end, we prepared modified electrodes from phosphomolybdic acid (PMA), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS), and polyallylamine (PAH) by the layer-by-layer (LbL) method and investigated their electrochemical behavior, aiming to use them in these neutralization pseudocapacitors. We analyzed the potentiodynamic profile of the current density at several scan rates, to evaluate the reversibility of the proton electroinsertion process, which is crucial to maximum energy storage efficiency. On the basis of the proposed reaction mechanism and by using frequency-domain measurements and models, we determined rate constants at different potentials. Our results demonstrated that the conducting polymer affects the self-assembled matrixes, ensuring that energy storage is high (22.5 kJ mol(-1)). The process involved neutralization of a hydrochloric acid solution from pH = 1 to pH = 6, which corresponds to 40% of the neutralization enthalpy.

  9. Neutral Pion Photoproduction on Neutron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulychev, S. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. E.; Kulikov, V. V.; Martem'yanov, M. A.; Tarasov, V. E.; Briscoe, W. J.; Strakovsky, I. I.

    2017-12-01

    The reaction γ n → π0 n is investigated both theoretically and experimentally as an important step toward determining the electromagnetic coupling constants of the N* and Δ* resonances [1]. We analyze the data on the collisions of γ quanta with energies between 200 and 800 MeV with a deuterium target collected by the A2 experiment in Mainz, Germany. These complement the data for neutral-pion photoproduction on protons obtained by the same experiment [2].

  10. Money neutrality: Rethinking the myth

    OpenAIRE

    Issaoui Fakhri; Boufateh Talel; Guesmi Mourad

    2015-01-01

    Considered as an axiomatic basis of classical, neoclassical, and monetarist theories, the long-run money neutrality assumption does not always seem to be verified. Indeed, in our view, the money, in the sense of M2, can constitute a long-run channel of growth transmission. Thus, this paper examines the long-term relationship among money supply (M2), income (GDP), and prices (CPI). The subprime crisis in 2007 has shown that the demand for money does not only...

  11. Neutral beams for magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, B.

    1977-01-01

    Significant advances in forming energetic beams of neutral hydrogen and deuterium atoms have led to a breakthrough in magnetic fusion: neutral beams are now heating plasmas to thermonuclear temperatures, here at LLL and at other laboratories. For example, in our 2XIIB experiment we have injected a 500-A-equivalent current of neutral deuterium atoms at an average energy of 18 keV, producing a dense plasma (10 14 particles/cm 3 ) at thermonuclear energy (14 keV or 160 million kelvins). Currently, LLL and LBL are developing beam energies in the 80- to 120-keV range for our upcoming MFTF experiment, for the TFTR tokamak experiment at Princeton, and for the Doublet III tokamak experiment at General Atomic. These results increase our long-range prospects of producing high-intensity beams of energies in the hundreds or even thousands of kilo-electron-volts, providing us with optimistic extrapolations for realizing power-producing fusion reactors

  12. A Neutral Beam Injector Upgrade for NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, T.; McCormack, B.; Loesser, G.D.; Kalish, M.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Grisham, L.; Edwards, J.; Cropper, M.; Rossi, G.; Halle, A. von; Williams, M.

    2002-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) capability with a Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) capable of 80 kiloelectronvolt (keV), 5 Megawatt (MW), 5 second operation. This 5.95 million dollar upgrade reused a previous generation injector and equipment for technical, cost, and schedule reasons to obtain these specifications while retaining a legacy capability of 120 keV neutral particle beam delivery for shorter pulse lengths for possible future NSTX experiments. Concerns with NBI injection included power deposition in the plasma, aiming angles from the fixed NBI fan array, density profiles and beam shine through, orbit losses of beam particles, and protection of the vacuum vessel wall against beam impingement. The upgrade made use of the beamline and cryo panels from the Neutral Beam Test Stand facility, existing power supplies and controls, beamline components and equipment not contaminated by tritium during DT [deuterium-tritium] experiments, and a liquid Helium refrigerator plant to power and cryogenically pump a beamline and three ion sources. All of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) ion sources had been contaminated with tritium, so a refurbishment effort was undertaken on selected TFTR sources to rid the three sources destined for the NSTX NBI of as much tritium as possible. An interconnecting duct was fabricated using some spare and some new components to attach the beamline to the NSTX vacuum vessel. Internal vacuum vessel armor using carbon tiles was added to protect the stainless steel vacuum vessel from beam impingement in the absence of plasma and interlock failure. To date, the NBI has operated to 80 keV and 5 MW and has injected requested power levels into NSTX plasmas with good initial results, including high beta and strong heating characteristics at full rated plasma current

  13. The RNA-Binding Chaperone Hfq Is an Important Global Regulator of Gene Expression in Pasteurella multocida and Plays a Crucial Role in Production of a Number of Virulence Factors, Including Hyaluronic Acid Capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégroz, Marianne; Kleifeld, Oded; Wright, Amy; Powell, David; Harrison, Paul; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D

    2016-05-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of a number of economically important animal diseases, including avian fowl cholera. Numerous P. multocida virulence factors have been identified, including capsule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and filamentous hemagglutinin, but little is known about how the expression of these virulence factors is regulated. Hfq is an RNA-binding protein that facilitates riboregulation via interaction with small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules and their mRNA targets. Here, we show that a P. multocida hfq mutant produces significantly less hyaluronic acid capsule during all growth phases and displays reduced in vivo fitness. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during mid-exponential-phase growth revealed altered transcript levels for 128 genes and altered protein levels for 78 proteins. Further proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during the early exponential growth phase identified 106 proteins that were produced at altered levels. Both the transcript and protein levels for genes/proteins involved in capsule biosynthesis were reduced in the hfq mutant, as were the levels of the filamentous hemagglutinin protein PfhB2 and its secretion partner LspB2. In contrast, there were increased expression levels of three LPS biosynthesis genes, encoding proteins involved in phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine addition to LPS, suggesting that these genes are negatively regulated by Hfq-dependent mechanisms. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that Hfq plays a crucial role in regulating the global expression of P. multocida genes, including the regulation of key P. multocida virulence factors, capsule, LPS, and filamentous hemagglutinin. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xudong; de Soet, Johannes Jacob; Tong, Huichun; Gao, Xuejun; He, Libang; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP). Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0) for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period) produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries.

  15. Wide prevalence of heterosubtypic broadly neutralizing human anti-influenza A antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jianhua; Sheehan, Jared; Hwang, William C; Bankston, Laurie A; Burchett, Sandra K; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Liddington, Robert C; Beigel, John H; Marasco, Wayne A

    2011-04-15

    Lack of life-long immunity against influenza viruses represents a major global health care problem with profound medical and economic consequences. A greater understanding of the broad-spectrum "heterosubtypic" neutralizing human antibody (BnAb) response to influenza should bring us closer toward a universal influenza vaccine. Serum samples obtained from 77 volunteers in an H5N1 vaccine study were analyzed for cross-reactive antibodies (Abs) against both subtype hemagglutinins (HAs) and a highly conserved pocket on the HA stem of Group 1 viruses. Cross-reactive Abs in commercial intravenous immunoglobulin were affinity purified using H5-coupled beads followed by step-wise monoclonal antibody competition or acid elution. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to quantify cross-binding, and neutralization activity was determined with HA-pseudotyped viruses. Prevaccination serum samples have detectable levels of heterosubtypic HA binding activity to both Group 1 and 2 influenza A viruses, including subtypes H5 and H7, respectively, to which study subjects had not been vaccinated. Two different populations of Broadly neutralizing Abs (BnAbs) were purified from intravenous immunoglobulin by H5 beads: ~0.01% of total immunoglobulin G can bind to HAs from both Group 1 and 2 and neutralize H1N1 and H5N1 viruses; ~0.001% is F10-like Abs directed against the HA stem pocket on Group 1 viruses. These data--to our knowledge, for the first time--quantitatively show the presence, albeit at low levels, of two populations of heterosubtypic BnAbs against influenza A in human serum. These observations warrant further investigation to determine their origin, host polymorphism(s) that may affect their expression levels and how to boost these BnAb responses by vaccination to reach sustainable protective levels.

  16. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  17. Neutral particle dynamics in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemczewski, Artur P. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This thesis presents an experimental study of neutral particle dynamics in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The primary diagnostic used is a set of six neutral pressure gauges, including special-purpose gauges built for in situ tokamak operation. While a low main chamber neutral pressure coincides with high plasma confinement regimes, high divertor pressure is required for heat and particle flux dispersion in future devices such as ITER. Thus we examine conditions that optimize divertor compression, defined here as a divertor-to-midplane pressure ratio. We find both pressures depend primarily on the edge plasma regimes defined by the scrape-off-layer heat transport. While the maximum divertor pressure is achieved at high core plasma densities corresponding to the detached divertor state, the maximum compression is achieved in the high-recycling regime. Variations in the divertor geometry have a weaker effect on the neutral pressures. For otherwise similar plasmas the divertor pressure and compression are maximum when the strike point is at the bottom of the vertical target plate. We introduce a simple flux balance model, which allows us to explain the divertor neutral pressure across a wide range of plasma densities. In particular, high pressure sustained in the detached divertor (despite a considerable drop in the recycling source) can be explained by scattering of neutrals off the cold plasma plugging the divertor throat. Because neutrals are confined in the divertor through scattering and ionization processes (provided the mean-free-paths are much shorter than a typical escape distance) tight mechanical baffling is unnecessary. The analysis suggests that two simple structural modifications may increase the divertor compression in Alcator C-Mod by a factor of about 5. Widening the divertor throat would increase the divertor recycling source, while closing leaks in the divertor structure would eliminate a significant neutral loss mechanism.

  18. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-09

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

  19. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinchoon

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline employing direct energy recovery of unneutralized residual ions is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell, and thus improves the overall neutral beamline efficiency. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beam direction in the neutral izer exit region. The ions which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be loosely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell are reflected onto and collected at an interior wall of the neutralizer formed by the modified end geometry, and thus do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell. Electrons within the neutralizer are prevented from exiting the neutralizer end opening by the action of crossed fields drift (ExB) and are terminated to a collector collar around the downstream opening of the neutralizer. The correct combination of the extended neutralizer end structure and the magnet region is designed so as to maximize the exit of full energy ions and to contain the fractional energy ions.

  20. Public Schools and the Road to Religious Neutrality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, Daniel A.

    1989-01-01

    Separatists and Fundamentalists share common goals: to establish true religious neutrality in the schools and to eliminate the stranglehold of the American Civil Religion. Since schools cannot separate themselves entirely from religious issues, the solution may be to include more courses in comparative religion and philosophy. Includes 13…

  1. D-Serine Is a Substrate for Neutral Amino Acid Transporters ASCT1/SLC1A4 and ASCT2/SLC1A5, and Is Transported by Both Subtypes in Rat Hippocampal Astrocyte Cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan C Foster

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors play critical roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Activation of NMDA receptors by synaptically released L-glutamate also requires occupancy of co-agonist binding sites in the tetrameric receptor by either glycine or D-serine. Although D-serine appears to be the predominant co-agonist at synaptic NMDA receptors, the transport mechanisms involved in D-serine homeostasis in brain are poorly understood. In this work we show that the SLC1 amino acid transporter family members SLC1A4 (ASCT1 and SLC1A5 (ASCT2 mediate homo- and hetero-exchange of D-serine with physiologically relevant kinetic parameters. In addition, the selectivity profile of D-serine uptake in cultured rat hippocampal astrocytes is consistent with uptake mediated by both ASCT1 and ASCT2. Together these data suggest that SLC1A4 (ASCT1 may represent an important route of Na-dependent D-serine flux in the brain that has the ability to regulate extracellular D-serine and thereby NMDA receptor activity.

  2. D-Serine Is a Substrate for Neutral Amino Acid Transporters ASCT1/SLC1A4 and ASCT2/SLC1A5, and Is Transported by Both Subtypes in Rat Hippocampal Astrocyte Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Alan C; Farnsworth, Jill; Lind, Genevieve E; Li, Yong-Xin; Yang, Jia-Ying; Dang, Van; Penjwini, Mahmud; Viswanath, Veena; Staubli, Ursula; Kavanaugh, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play critical roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Activation of NMDA receptors by synaptically released L-glutamate also requires occupancy of co-agonist binding sites in the tetrameric receptor by either glycine or D-serine. Although D-serine appears to be the predominant co-agonist at synaptic NMDA receptors, the transport mechanisms involved in D-serine homeostasis in brain are poorly understood. In this work we show that the SLC1 amino acid transporter family members SLC1A4 (ASCT1) and SLC1A5 (ASCT2) mediate homo- and hetero-exchange of D-serine with physiologically relevant kinetic parameters. In addition, the selectivity profile of D-serine uptake in cultured rat hippocampal astrocytes is consistent with uptake mediated by both ASCT1 and ASCT2. Together these data suggest that SLC1A4 (ASCT1) may represent an important route of Na-dependent D-serine flux in the brain that has the ability to regulate extracellular D-serine and thereby NMDA receptor activity.

  3. Space station neutral external environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, H.; Leger, L.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular contamination levels arising from the external induced neutral environment of the Space Station (Phase 1 configuration) were calculated using the MOLFLUX model. Predicted molecular column densities and deposition rates generally meet the Space Station contamination requirements. In the doubtful cases of deposition due to materials outgassing, proper material selection, generally excluding organic products exposed to the external environment, must be considered to meet contamination requirements. It is important that the Space Station configuration, once defined, is not significantly modified to avoid introducing new unacceptable contamination sources.

  4. Curious behavior of optically trapped neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieman, C.; Walker, T.; Sesko, D.; Monroe, C.

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the behavior of clouds of neutral atoms contained in a spontaneous force optical trap. Because of the low temperatures of the atoms ( 5 atoms. These include the expansion of the cloud as the number is increased and dramatic changes in the distribution of the atoms at higher numbers. We can explain much of the collective behavior using a simple model that includes a 1/r 2 force between the atoms arising from the multiple scattering of photons. Finally, we discuss the optical trapping of atoms directly from a low pressure vapor in a small glass cell. We have used these optically trapped atoms to load a magnetostatic trap in the same cell. This provided a high density sample of atoms with a temperature of less than 2 μK

  5. Atmospheric Neutral Density Experiment Mission Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, A.; Bruninga, B.; Picone, J.; Emmert, J.; Gilbreath, G.; Healy, L.; Wasiczko, L.

    The Atmospheric Neutral Density Experiment (ANDE) Risk Reduction flight was launched on Dec 9, 2006 and deployed into orbit by the Space Shuttle Discovery on December 21, 2006. The primary mission objective is to test the deployment mechanism from the Shuttle for the ANDE flight in mid 2009. Scientific objectives of the ANDE risk reduction flight include; monitor total neutral density along the orbit for improved orbit determination of resident space objects, monitor the spin rate and orientation of the spacecraft, provide a test object for polarimetry studies using the HI-CLASS system. Each of the two ANDE missions consists of two spherical spacecraft fitted with retro-reflectors for satellite laser ranging (SLR). The ANDE risk reduction mission spacecraft each contain a small lightweight payload designed to determine the spin rate and orientation of the spacecraft from on-orbit measurements and from ground based observations. The follow-on ANDE mission scheduled for launch in 2009 will consist of two spherical spacecraft also fitted with retro-reflectors for SLR. One of these spacecraft will also carry instrumentation to measure the in-situ atmospheric density, composition and winds. This paper presents a mission overview and emphasis will be placed on the scientific results from the risk reduction mission and a brief overview of the follow-on mission.

  6. Application of the Akinfiev-Diamond equation of state to neutral hydroxides of metalloids (B(OH)3, Si(OH)4, As(OH)3) at infinite dilution in water over a wide range of the state parameters, including steam conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinfiev, Nikolay N.; Plyasunov, Andrey V.

    2014-02-01

    The Akinfiev and Diamond (2003) equation of state (EoS) for aqueous nonelectrolytes was employed to describe hydroxides of metalloids (B(OH)3, Si(OH)4, As(OH)3) over a wide temperature and pressure ranges, including steam conditions. The EoS is based on the accurate knowledge of solvent (H2O) properties and requires only three empirical parameters to be fitted to experimental data, and these are independent of temperature and pressure. For nonvolatile components thermodynamic properties of species in the ideal gas state were evaluated using quantum chemical computations. The proposed approach has been tested to predict the whole set of thermodynamic properties of solutes (the chemical potential, entropy, molar volume, and molar heat capacity) over a wide range of temperatures (273-1200 K) and pressures (0.1-1000 MPa), including the near-critical region and both low and high density regions of the solvent. Thus it can be used for modeling various geochemical processes over a whole range of solvent densities, including processes in boiling fluids and a vapor phase as well. solubility data in a low density aqueous fluid (ρ1∗ 1 mol kg-1) where polymerization effects may take place (Newton and Manning, 2003); the rest of data, containing the majority of quartz solubility points at 293-1273 K, 0.1-1000 MPa. Only the 3rd part of experimental quartz solubility data has been used in the fitting procedure. Thermodynamic properties of Si(OH)4 in the ideal gas state were recently determined by the analysis of the relevant experimental data in Plyasunov (2011b). The temperature dependence of heat capacity of the molecule was adopted from comprehensive study of Rutz and Bockhorn (2005)where DFT calculations at different levels of theory including CBS-QBS and G3MP2 methods, as well as corrections for hindered rotations and scaling for vibration frequencies were employed. The adopted Cpo (T = 300-1500 K) values for gaseous Si(OH)4 were approximated by a function and used in the

  7. Neutral and plasma shielding model for pellet ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1987-10-01

    The neutral gas shielding model for ablation of frozen hydrogenic pellets is extended to include the effects of an initial Maxwelliam distribution of incident electron energies; a cold plasma shield outside the neutral shield and extended along the magnetic field; energetic neutral beam ions and alpha particles; and self-limiting electron ablation in the collisionless plasma limit. Including the full electron distribution increases ablation, but adding the cold ionized shield reduces ablation; the net effect is a modest reduction in pellet penetration compared with the monoenergetic electron neutral shielding model with no plasma shield. Unlike electrons, fast ions can enter the neutral shield directly without passing through the cold ionized shield because their gyro-orbits are typically larger than the diameter of the cold plasma tube. Fast alpha particles should not enhance the ablation rate unless their population exceeds that expected from local classical thermalization. Fast beam ions, however, may enhance ablation in the plasma periphery if their population is high enough. Self-limiting ablation in the collisionless limit leads to a temporary distortion of the original plasma electron Maxwellian distribution function through preferential depopulation of the higher-energy electrons. 23 refs., 9 figs

  8. Fatty Acid Profiles of Stipe and Blade from the Norwegian Brown Macroalgae Laminaria hyperborea with Special Reference to Acyl Glycerides, Polar Lipids, and Free Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Foseid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A thorough analysis of the fatty acid profiles of stipe and blade from the kelp species Laminaria hyperborea is presented. Lipid extracts were fractionated into neutral lipids, free fatty acids, and polar lipids, prior to derivatization and GC-MS analysis. A total of 42 fatty acids were identified and quantified, including the n-3 fatty acids α-linolenic acid, stearidonic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid. The fatty acid amounts are higher in blade than in stipe (7.42 mg/g dry weight and 2.57 mg/g dry weight, resp.. The highest amounts of n-3 fatty acids are found within the neutral lipid fractions with 590.6 ug/g dry weight and 100.9 ug/g dry weight for blade and stipe, respectively. The amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids are 3.4 times higher in blade than stipe. The blade had the highest PUFA/SFA ratio compared to stipe (1.02 versus 0.76 and the lowest n-6/n-3 ratio (0.8 versus 3.5. This study highlights the compositional differences between the lipid fractions of stipe and blade from L. hyperborea. The amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids compared to saturated- and monounsaturated fatty acids is known to influence human health. In the pharmaceutical, food, and feed industries, this can be of importance for production of different health products.

  9. Biomass and Neutral Lipid Production in Geothermal Microalgal Consortia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Faye Bywaters

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, technologies have been developed that offer the possibility of using algal biomass as feedstocks to energy producing systems- in addition to oil-derived fuels (Bird et al., 2011;Bird et al., 2012. Growing native mixed microalgal consortia for biomass in association with geothermal resources has the potential to mitigate negative impacts of seasonally low temperatures on biomass production systems as well as mitigate some of the challenges associated with growing unialgal strains. We assessed community composition, growth rates, biomass and neutral lipid production of microalgal consortia obtained from geothermal hot springs in the Great Basin/Nevada area that were cultured under different thermal and light conditions. Biomass production rates ranged from 368 to 3246 mg C L-1 d-1. The neutral lipid production in these consortia with and without shifts to lower temperatures and additions of bicarbonate (both environmental parameters that have been shown to enhance neutral lipid production ranged from zero to 38.74 mg free fatty acids and triacylglycerols L-1 d-1, the upper value was approximately 6% of the biomass produced. The higher lipid values were most likely due to the presence of Achnanthidium sp. Palmitic and stearic acids were the dominant free fatty acids. The S/U ratio (the saturated to unsaturated FA ratio decreased for cultures shifted from their original temperature to 15°C. Biomass production was within the upper limits of those reported for individual strains, and production of neutral lipids was increased with secondary treatment – all results demonstrate a potential of culturing and manipulating resultant microalgal consortia for biomass-based energy production and perhaps even for biofuels.

  10. Biomass and Neutral Lipid Production in Geothermal Microalgal Consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywaters, Kathryn F.; Fritsen, Christian H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, technologies have been developed that offer the possibility of using algal biomass as feedstocks to energy producing systems – in addition to oil-derived fuels (Bird et al., 2011, 2012). Growing native mixed microalgal consortia for biomass in association with geothermal resources has the potential to mitigate negative impacts of seasonally low temperatures on biomass production systems as well as mitigate some of the challenges associated with growing unialgal strains. We assessed community composition, growth rates, biomass, and neutral lipid production of microalgal consortia obtained from geothermal hot springs in the Great Basin/Nevada area that were cultured under different thermal and light conditions. Biomass production rates ranged from 39.0 to 344.1 mg C L−1 day−1. The neutral lipid production in these consortia with and without shifts to lower temperatures and additions of bicarbonate (both environmental parameters that have been shown to enhance neutral lipid production) ranged from 0 to 38.74 mg free fatty acids (FFA) and triacylglycerols (TAG) L−1 day−1; the upper value was approximately 6% of the biomass produced. The higher lipid values were most likely due to the presence of Achnanthidium sp. Palmitic and stearic acids were the dominant free fatty acids. The S/U ratio (the saturated to unsaturated FA ratio) decreased for cultures shifted from their original temperature to 15°C. Biomass production was within the upper limits of those reported for individual strains, and production of neutral lipids was increased with secondary treatment. All results demonstrate a potential of culturing and manipulating resultant microalgal consortia for biomass-based energy production and perhaps even for biofuels. PMID:25763368

  11. Mefenamic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  12. Evaluation of selected neutralizing agents for the treatment of uranium tailings leachates. Laboratory progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.R.; Serne, R.J.

    1983-02-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of selected neutralizing agents for the treatment of uranium tailings solutions. Highly acidic tailings solutions (pH 3 ) reagent grade; Calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH) 2 ] reagent grade; Magnesium oxide (MgO) reagent grade; Sodium carbonate (Na 2 CO 3 ) reagent grade; and Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) reagent grade. Evaluation of the effectiveness for the treatment of uranium tailings solutions for the selected neutralizing agents under controlled laboratory conditions was based on three criteria. The criteria are: (1) treated effluent water quality, (2) neutralized sludge handling and hydraulic properties, and (3) reagent costs and acid neutralizing efficiency. On the basis of these limited laboratory results calcium hydroxide or its dehydrated form CaO (lime) appears to be the most effective option for treatment of uranium tailings solutions

  13. Gargamelle and the neutral currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, A.

    1996-06-01

    In order to simplify the description of forces, the physicists want to reduce the number of four interactions to a smaller one. They want to unify them. Einstein tried to unify the electromagnetic interaction and the gravitation interaction but it was probably the most difficult to unify. during the sixties, the American physicists Sheldon Glashow and Steven Weinberg and the Pakistani Abdus Salam ( each rewarded by the Nobel price of 1979) propose to unify the weak and electromagnetic interactions interactions under the form of an only interaction, the electro-weak interaction. To check the validity of this theory exist the demonstration by the weak neutral currents. In 1973, European physicians which analyzed photos taken in the bubble chamber called Gargamelle brought the experimental proof. This book tells the story of this discovery. (N.C.)

  14. Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B.V.; Clarke, M.; Hu, H.; Betz [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (LSNMS) is an emerging technique for highly sensitive surface analysis. In this technique a target is bombarded with a pulsed beam of keV ions. The sputtered particles are intercepted by a high intensity pulsed laser beam above the surface and ionised with almost 100% efficiency. The photions may then be mass analysed using a quadrupole or, more commonly, using time of flight (TOF) techniques. In this method photoions are extracted from the ionisation region, accelerated to a known energy E{sub o} and strike a channelplate detector a distance `d` away. The flight time `t` of the photoions is then related to their mass by `d` {radical}m / {radical} 2E{sub o} so measurement of `t` allows mass spectra to be obtained. It is found that LSNMS is an emerging technique of great sensitivity and flexibility, useful for both applied analysis and to investigate basic sputtering processes. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  15. TFTR neutral beam power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitz, A.; Murray, H.; Winje, R.

    1977-01-01

    The TFTR NB System will be composed of four beam lines, each containing three ion sources presently being developed for TFTR by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL). The Neutral Beam Power System (NBPS) will provide the necessary power required to operate these Ion Sources in both an experimental or operational mode as well as test mode. This paper describes the technical as well as the administrative/management aspects involved in the development and building of this system. The NBPS will combine the aspects of HV pulse (120 kV) and long pulse width (0.5 sec) together to produce a high power system that is unique in the Electrical Engineering field

  16. Autologous HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies: emergence of neutralization-resistant escape virus and subsequent development of escape virus neutralizing antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Nielsen, C; Hansen, J E

    1992-01-01

    The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development...... escape virus may be part of the explanation of the apparent failure of the immune system to control HIV infection....... of neutralizing antibodies to the primary virus isolates was detected 13-45 weeks after seroconversion. Emergence of escape virus with reduced sensitivity to neutralization by autologous sera was demonstrated. The patients subsequently developed neutralizing antibodies against the escape virus but after a delay...

  17. Neutral dipole-dipole dimers: A new field in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosower, Edward M.; Borz, Galina

    2018-03-01

    Dimer formation with dipole neutralization produces species such as low polarity water (LPW) compatible with hydrophobic surfaces (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2015, 17, 24895-24900) Dimerization and dipole neutralization occurs for N-methylacetamide on polyethylene, a behavior drastically different from its contortions in acetonitrile on AgBr:AgCl planar crystals (AgX) (ChemPhysChem 2014, 15, 3598-3607). The weak infrared absorption of the amide dimer on polyethylene is shown experimentally. Dimerization of palmitic acid is shown along with some of the many ramifications for intracellular systems. Polyoligomers of water are present on polyethylene surfaces. Some high resolution spectra of three of the polyoligomers of water are shown along with a mechanistic scheme for polyoligomer formation and dissolution. The structures of some of the oligomers are known from spectroscopic studies of water on AgX. The scope of the article begins with PE, generally accepted as hydrophobic. The IR of PE revealed not only that water was present but that it appeared in two forms, oligomers (O) and polyoligomers (PO). How did we recognize what they were? These species had been observed as especially strong "marker" peaks in the spectra1 of water placed on planar AgX, a platform developed by Katzir and his coworkers [6]. But there was a problem: the proximity to PE of oligomers with substantial (calculated) dipole moments and thus polarity, including cyclic hexamers of water (chair and boat forms), the cyclic pentamer, the books I and II, and the cyclic trimer [7a]. Another link was needed, a role perfectly fit by the already cited low polarity water (LPW). The choice was experimentally supported by the detection of low intensity absorption in the bending region.Some important generalities flow from these results. What other dimers might be present in the biological or chemical world? Palmitic acid dimer (PAD) would be a candidate for decreasing the polarity of the acid (PA). Another

  18. Fate of oral neutralizing antacid and its effect on postprandial gastric secretion and emptying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering, T B; Carlson, G L; Malagelada, J R; Duenes, J A; McCall, J T

    1979-11-01

    The fate and neutralizing efficiency of oral antacids (aluminum and magnesium hydroxides) as well as their effect on postprandial gastric function were quantified in 6 patients with duodenal ulcer disease. We employed a double-marker technique for measurement of gastric secretion and emptying and combined this with back-titration of the gastric samples and analysis of aluminum to trace the fate of antacid in the stomach and duodenum. These studies show that: (a) antacid therapy with aluminum and magnesium hydroxides significantly increases gastric secretion; (b) intragastric neutralization of gastric acid produces a significant and substantial decrease in net acid output (acid secreted minus acid neutralized), but the beneficial effects of neutralization are partially offset by incomplete intragastric formation of aluminum trichloride; (c) most but not all of the ingested antacid is utilized in acid neutralization in the stomach (average 78.6% in our 6 patients); and (d) antacid therapy does not modify the absolute rate of postprandial gastric emptying, but increases dilution of gastric contents, expanding the intragastric volume. Thus, the fractional gastric emptying rate declines, and this, in turn, should enhance antacid utilization by delaying its emptying.

  19. Uranium mill tailings neutralization: contaminant complexation and tailings leaching studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opitz, B.E.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1985-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to compare the effectiveness of limestone (CaCO 3 ) and hydrated lime [Ca(OH) 2 ] for improving waste water quality through the neutralization of acidic uranium mill tailings liquor. The experiments were designed to also assess the effects of three proposed mechanisms - carbonate complexation, elevated pH, and colloidal particle adsorption - on the solubility of toxic contaminants found in a typical uranium mill waste solution. Of special interest were the effects each of these possible mechanisms had on the solution concentrations of trace metals such as Cd, Co, Mo, Zn, and U after neutralization. Results indicated that the neutralization of acidic tailings to a pH of 7.3 using hydrated lime provided the highest overall waste water quality. Both the presence of a carbonate source or elevating solution pH beyond pH = 7.3 resulted in a lowering of previously achieved water quality, while adsorption of contaminants onto colloidal particles was not found to affect the solution concentration of any constituent investigated. 24 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs

  20. Modeling Secondary Neutral Helium in the Heliosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Hans-Reinhard; Möbius, Eberhard; Wood, Brian E.

    2016-01-01

    An accurate, analytic heliospheric neutral test-particle code for helium atoms from the interstellar medium (ISM) is coupled to global heliospheric models dominated by hydrogen and protons from the solar wind and the ISM. This coupling enables the forward-calculation of secondary helium neutrals from first principles. Secondaries are produced predominantly in the outer heliosheath, upwind of the heliopause, by charge exchange of helium ions with neutral atoms. The forward model integrates the secondary production terms along neutral trajectories and calculates the combined neutral helium phase space density in the innermost heliosphere where it can be related to in-situ observations. The phase space density of the secondary component is lower than that of primary neutral helium, but its presence can change the analysis of primaries and the ISM, and can yield valuable insight into the characteristics of the plasma in the outer heliosheath. (paper)

  1. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  2. Doublet III neutral beam multi-stream command language system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, L.; Garcia, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A multi-stream command language system was developed to provide control of the dual source neutral beam injectors on the Doublet III experiment at GA Technologies Inc. The Neutral Beam command language system consists of three parts: compiler, sequencer, and interactive task. The command language, which was derived from the Doublet III tokamak command language, POPS, is compiled, using a recursive descent compiler, into reverse polish notation instructions which then can be executed by the sequencer task. The interactive task accepts operator commands via a keyboard. The interactive task directs the operation of three input streams, creating commands which are then executed by the sequencer. The streams correspond to the two sources within a Doublet III neutral beam, plus an interactive stream. The sequencer multiplexes the execution of instructions from these three streams. The instructions include reads and writes to an operator terminal, arithmetic computations, intrinsic functions such as CAMAC input and output, and logical instructions. The neutral beam command language system was implemented using Modular Computer Systems (ModComp) Pascal and consists of two tasks running on a ModComp Classic IV computer. The two tasks, the interactive and the sequencer, run independently and communicate using shared memory regions. The compiler runs as an overlay to the interactive task when so directed by operator commands. The system is succesfully being used to operate the three neutral beams on Doublet III

  3. Artificial electromagnetism for neutral atoms: Escher staircase and Laughlin liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Erich J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for creating fields that couple to neutral atoms in the same way that electromagnetic fields couple to charged particles. We show that this technique opens the door for a range of neutral atom experiments, including probing the interplay between periodic potentials and quantum Hall effects. Furthermore, we propose, and analyze, seemingly paradoxical geometries which can be engineered through these techniques. For example, we show how to create a ring of sites where an atom continuously reduces its potential energy by moving in a clockwise direction

  4. New results from PETRA on fragmentation and neutral particles production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Daniel.

    1981-10-01

    New results on the neutral component of jets are presented, including first measurements of π 0 production. Then a short review is made of the description of multihadronic events by first order QCD and fragmentation models, and some differences between the Lund and Feynman-Field models are analyzed

  5. National negative-ion-based neutral-beam development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.S.; Pyle, R.V.

    1983-08-01

    The plan covers facilities required, program milestones, and decision points. It includes identification of applications, experiments, theoretical research areas, development of specific technologies and reactor development and demonstration facilities required to bring about the successful application of negative-ion-based neutral beams. Particular emphasis is placed on those activities leading to use on existing plasma confinement experiments or their upgrades

  6. On implicit abstract neutral nonlinear differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, Eduardo, E-mail: lalohm@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Computação e Matemática, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto (Brazil); O’Regan, Donal, E-mail: donal.oregan@nuigalway.ie [National University of Ireland, School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics (Ireland)

    2016-04-15

    In this paper we continue our developments in Hernández and O’Regan (J Funct Anal 261:3457–3481, 2011) on the existence of solutions for abstract neutral differential equations. In particular we extend the results in Hernández and O’Regan (J Funct Anal 261:3457–3481, 2011) for the case of implicit nonlinear neutral equations and we focus on applications to partial “nonlinear” neutral differential equations. Some applications involving partial neutral differential equations are presented.

  7. Morphological characteristics in peritoneum in patients with neutral peritoneal dialysis solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Chieko; Honda, Kazuho; Kawanishi, Kunio; Nakamoto, Hirotaka; Ito, Yasuhiko; Sakurada, Tsutomu; Tanno, Yudo; Mizumasa, Toru; Miyazaki, Masanobu; Moriishi, Misaki; Nakayama, Masaaki

    2015-09-01

    Peritoneal dialysis solution (PDS) plays a role in functional and morphological damage to the peritoneum. This study aimed to clarify the effect of neutral PDS in preventing morphological changes by assessing peritoneal damage and comparing morphological alterations between PD patients treated with neutral PDS and acidic PDS. Sixty-one patients participated from seven hospitals. All patients were treated with neutral PDS excluding icodextrin, during their entire PD treatment, and experienced no episode of peritonitis. The thickness of submesothelial compact (SMC) zone and the presence of vasculopathy in the anterior parietal abdominal peritoneum were assessed. The impact of icodextrin, hybrid therapy, and peritoneal rest and lavage in morphological alterations were determined. There was no significant difference in the average SMC thickness between neutral and acidic PDS. The vessel patency in patients using neutral PDS was significantly higher compared to that in acidic PDS at any time during PD. There were no significant suppressive effects from interventions or use of icodextrin with respect to peritoneal morphological injury. A monolayer of mesothelial cell was observed in approximately half the patients, especially in their receiving lavage patients. Neutral PDS, accompanied by other preventive approaches against peritoneal injury, might suppress the development of peritoneal morphological alterations.

  8. Ion-to-Neutral Ratios and Thermal Proton Transfer in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, I.-Chung; Chu, Kuan Yu; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Wu, Shang-Yun; Dyakov, Yuri A.; Chen, Jien-Lian; Gray-Weale, Angus; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2015-07-01

    The ion-to-neutral ratios of four commonly used solid matrices, α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB), sinapinic acid (SA), and ferulic acid (FA) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) at 355 nm are reported. Ions are measured using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with a time-sliced ion imaging detector. Neutrals are measured using a rotatable quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion-to-neutral ratios of CHCA are three orders of magnitude larger than those of the other matrices at the same laser fluence. The ion-to-neutral ratios predicted using the thermal proton transfer model are similar to the experimental measurements, indicating that thermal proton transfer reactions play a major role in generating ions in ultraviolet-MALDI.

  9. Thermodynamic Mechanism for the Evasion of Antibody Neutralization in Flaviviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the epitopes of antigenic proteins can confer viral resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. However, the fundamental properties that characterize epitope residues and how mutations affect antibody binding to alter virus susceptibility to neutralization remain largely unknown. To address these questions, we used an ensemble-based algorithm to characterize the effects of mutations on the thermodynamics of protein conformational fluctuations. We applied this method to the envelope protein domain III (ED3) of two medically important flaviviruses: West Nile and dengue 2. We determined an intimate relationship between the susceptibility of a residue to thermodynamic perturbations and epitope location. This relationship allows the successful identification of the primary epitopes in each ED3, despite their high sequence and structural similarity. Mutations that allow the ED3 to evade detection by the antibody either increase or decrease conformational fluctuations of the epitopes through local effects or long-range interactions. Spatially distant interactions originate in the redistribution of conformations of the ED3 ensembles, not through a mechanically connected array of contiguous amino acids. These results reconcile previous observations of evasion of neutralization by mutations at a distance from the epitopes. Finally, we established a quantitative correlation between subtle changes in the conformational fluctuations of the epitope and large defects in antibody binding affinity. This correlation suggests that mutations that allow viral growth, while reducing neutralization, do not generate significant structural changes and underscores the importance of protein fluctuations and long-range interactions in the mechanism of antibody-mediated neutralization resistance. PMID:24950171

  10. A New Method to Monitor the Primary Neutral Integrity in Multi-Grounded Neutral Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangmin Xie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the three-phase four-wire system, there are usually multiple grounding points in the primary neutral line due to safety and economic considerations. The rising “neutral to earth voltage (NEV” caused by a broken primary neutral can threaten the safety of nearby facilities and humans; therefore, the integrity of the primary neutral conductor is of vital importance for the multi-grounded neutral (MGN system. In this paper, a new passive method is proposed to monitor the integrity of the primary neutral line in the MGN system. The method is based on the measured voltage and current data at the service transformer, and there is no need to install any signal generators. Therefore, it causes no disturbance to the utility and customer. In the paper, the equivalent analysis circuit is established and a new parameter is proposed to reflect the neutral condition. The value of the parameter is estimated based on the measured data, and then, the equivalent impedance of the primary neutral groundings can be obtained. On the other hand, the impedance value for the primary neutral under normal operating conditions can be estimated based on the derived analytical formulas. By comparing the monitored primary neutral impedance with its normal value, the broken neutral condition in the primary system can be detected. Different primary neutral broken cases are analyzed in the paper based on the Monte Carlo simulation. The results indicate that the integrity condition in the primary neutral can be accurately monitored by the proposed method.

  11. Liberal Neutrality : Constructivist, not foundationalist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lendell Horne

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In defending the principle of neutrality, liberals have often appealed to a more general moral principle that forbids coercing persons in the name of reasons those persons themselves cannot reasonably be expected to share. Yet liberals have struggled to articulate a non-arbitrary, non-dogmatic distinction between the reasons that persons can reasonably be expected to share and those they cannot. The reason for this, I argue, is that what it means to “share a reason” is itself obscure. In this paper I articulate two different conceptions of what it is to share a reason; I call these conceptions “foundationalist” and “constructivist.” On the foundationalist view, two people “share” a reason just in the sense that the same reason applies to each of them independently. On this view, I argue, debates about the reasons we share collapse into debates about the reasons we have, moving us no closer to an adequate defense of neutrality. On the constructivist view, by contrast, “sharing reasons” is understood as a kind of activity, and the reasons we must share are just those reasons that make this activity possible. I argue that the constructivist conception of sharing reasons yields a better defense of the principle of neutrality. À travers leur défense du principe de neutralité, les libéraux ont souvent interpellé un principe moral plus général qui interdit de contraindre des personnes pour des raisons dont on ne peut raisonnablement attendre que ces personnes elles-mêmes les partagent. Les libéraux éprouvent cependant de la difficulté à articuler une distinction non-arbitraire et non-dogmatique entre les raisons dont on peut raisonnablement attendre que les personnes les partagent et celles dont on ne le peut pas. Je soutiens dans cet article que cette difficulté provient du fait que «partager une raison » est une notion obscure. Pour illustrer cela, je me pencherai sur deux conceptions distinctes de ce que veut dire

  12. On the relation between plasma and neutral gas profiles in a cold gas-blanket system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bures, M.

    1981-01-01

    A solution for the neutral density profile using the measured plasma density and temperature gradients is presented. The fluid model is used. It is found that the penetration length for neutrals is underestimated in the situation where the integrated profiles are used. The ionization rate need not be inferred in the present calculation, because the ionization of neutrals diffusing into the plasma is implicitly included in measured profiles. This calculation is advantageous in the low temperature range where the ionization rate is a strongly varying function of temperature. Finally the presented solution indicates that the temperature gradient plays the essential role in the determination of the neutral density profile. (Auth.)

  13. Autologous HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies: emergence of neutralization-resistant escape virus and subsequent development of escape virus neutralizing antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Nielsen, C; Hansen, J E

    1992-01-01

    The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development of ...... escape virus may be part of the explanation of the apparent failure of the immune system to control HIV infection.......The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development...... of neutralizing antibodies to the primary virus isolates was detected 13-45 weeks after seroconversion. Emergence of escape virus with reduced sensitivity to neutralization by autologous sera was demonstrated. The patients subsequently developed neutralizing antibodies against the escape virus but after a delay...

  14. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  15. Evaluation of neutralization treatment processes and their use for uranium tailings solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.R.; Opitz, B.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The potential for groundwater contamination from the typically acidic mill wastes that are disposed of in tailings impoundments is of primary concern at uranium mill sites in the US. Solution-treatment processes provide a system for limiting the environmental impact from acidic seepage. Treatment of uranium tailings solutions from evaporation ponds, underdrains, and surface seeps could aid in decommissioning active sites or be used as an emergency measure to avert possible uncontrolled discharges. At present, neutralization processes appear to be best suited for treating uranium mill tailings solution because they can, at a reasonable cost, limit the solution concentration of many contaminants and thus reduce the potential for groundwater contamination. However, the effectiveness of the neutralization process depends on the reagent used as well as the chemistry of the waste stream. This article provides a description of neutralization processes, an assessment of their performance on acidic uranium tailings leachates, and recommendations for their use at US uranium mill sites

  16. Dust in the Diffuse Neutral Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofia, Ulysses J.

    2008-05-01

    Studies of interstellar dust have always relied heavily upon Laboratory Astrophysics for interpretation. Laboratory values, in the broad sense that includes theory, are needed for the most basic act of measuring interstellar abundances, to the more complex determination of what grains are responsible for particular extinction. The symbiotic relationship between astronomical observations and Laboratory Astrophysics has prompted both fields to move forward, especially in the era of high-resolution ultraviolet spectroscopy when new elemental species could be interpreted and observations were able to show the limits of laboratory determinations. Thanks to this synergy, we currently have a good idea of the quantity of the most abundant elements incorporated into dust in diffuse neutral interstellar clouds: carbon, oxygen, iron, silicon and magnesium. Now the task is to figure out how, chemically and physically, those elements are integrated into interstellar grains. We can do this by comparing extinction curves to grain populations in radiative transfer models. The limitation at the present time is the availability of optical constants in the infrared through ultraviolet for species that are likely to exist in dust, i.e., those that are easy to form in the physical environments around stars and in molecular clouds. Extinction in some lines of sight can be fit within current abundance limits and with the optical constants that are available. However the inability to reproduce other extinction curves suggests that optical constants can be improved, either in quality for compounds that have been measured, or quantity in the sense of providing data for more materials. This talk will address the current state and the future of dust studies in the diffuse neutral interstellar medium. This work is supported by the grant HST-AR-10979.01-A from the Space Telescope Science Institute to Whitman College.

  17. TORE SUPRA neutral injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayetti, P.; Becherer, R.; Bottiglioni, F.; Jacquot, C.; Jequier, F.; Fumelli, M.; Lotte, P.; Pamela, J.; Sledziewski, Z.

    1989-01-01

    The Neutral Beam Injection on TS consists of three boxes, each housing two injectors. Each of them is designed to accelerate 40 A at 100 kV in D 2 ar 40A at 80 kV in H 2 , in shots of 30 s. The power on the plasma is expected to be 7.5 MW (full energy) and 9 MW (total) for the D-beams; 2.5 MW and 3.8 MW for H-beams. This for a species mix of 0.85 19 m -2 and a transmission efficiency of 0.7. Four injectors are in co and two through another one, and they are tilted of 20 deg from the radial direction. Injectors are designed for the energy recovery of the full energy ions. A prototype line, operated in 1987-88, has given the imput for the demensioning of the present system.First injectors are expected to be operational by the end of 1988. The present contribution describes the injection boxes, injection line, magnetic shielding, electrical circuity and power supplies, control and data acquisition systems, and the Fast Interlock Safety System (FISS). 7 refs.; 6 figs

  18. Breakdown studies for neutral injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottiglioni, F.; Bussac, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Reliable operation of high energy neutral injectors is challenged by the voltage hold-off capability of the extraction systems. The high voltage behavior of a gap depends not only on a large number of macroscopic parameters, e.g. the electrodes material, geometry, separation, and residual gas pressure, but also upon dimly defined and badly controlled microscopic electric properties such as electrodes surface conditions, which are in turn affected by the conditioning procedures and by the operational history of the gap. In fact, it is merely due to the microscopic surface conditions of electrodes, especially cathodes, that for most favorable regimes, macroscopic breakdown fields are two orders of magnitude lower than what can be expected from the field emission theory (E greater than or equal to 3 10 9 V/m). At FAR, experimental data on the voltage hold-off problems are obtained in a large injector (Megawatt Beam Line - MWBL) and in L.E.O., a smaller but more flexible facility where single beam studies will be made, up to 160 keV. Some results are described

  19. Simulations of Atmospheric Neutral Wave Coupling to the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefring, C. L.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    The densities in the E- and F-layer plasmas are much less than the density of background neutral atmosphere. Atmospheric neutral waves are primary sources of plasma density fluctuations and are the sources for triggering plasma instabilities. The neutral atmosphere supports acoustic waves, acoustic gravity waves, and Kelvin Helmholtz waves from wind shears. These waves help determine the structure of the ionosphere by changes in neutral density that affect ion-electron recombination and by neutral velocities that couple to the plasma via ion-neutral collisions. Neutral acoustic disturbances can arise from thunderstorms, chemical factory explosions and intentional high-explosive tests. Based on conservation of energy, acoustic waves grow in amplitude as they propagate upwards to lower atmospheric densities. Shock waves can form in an acoustic pulse that is eventually damped by viscosity. Ionospheric effects from acoustic waves include transient perturbations of E- and F-Regions and triggering of E-Region instabilities. Acoustic-gravity waves affect the ionosphere over large distances. Gravity wave sources include thunderstorms, auroral region disturbances, Space Shuttle launches and possibly solar eclipses. Low frequency acoustic-gravity waves propagate to yield traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID's), triggering of Equatorial bubbles, and possible periodic structuring of the E-Region. Gravity wave triggering of equatorial bubbles is studied numerically by solving the equations for plasma continuity and ion velocity along with Ohms law to provide an equation for the induced electric potential. Slow moving gravity waves provide density depressions on bottom of ionosphere and a gravitational Rayleigh-Taylor instability is initiated. Radar scatter detects field aligned irregularities in the resulting plasma bubble. Neutral Kelvin-Helmholtz waves are produced by strong mesospheric wind shears that are also coincident with the formation of intense E-layers. An

  20. Optical modulator including grapene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  1. Dietary echium oil increases long-chain n-3 PUFAs, including docosapentaenoic acid, in blood fractions and alters biochemical markers for cardiovascular disease independently of age, sex, and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnt, Katrin; Fuhrmann, Claudia; Köhler, Melanie; Kiehntopf, Michael; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    Dietary supplementation with echium oil (EO) containing stearidonic acid (SDA) is a plant-based strategy to improve long-chain (LC) n-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status in humans. We investigated the effect of EO on LC n-3 PUFA accumulation in blood and biochemical markers with respect to age, sex, and metabolic syndrome. This double-blind, parallel-arm, randomized controlled study started with a 2-wk run-in period, during which participants (n = 80) were administered 17 g/d run-in oil. Normal-weight individuals from 2 age groups (20-35 and 49-69 y) were allotted to EO or fish oil (FO; control) groups. During the 8-wk intervention, participants were administered either 17 g/d EO (2 g SDA; n = 59) or FO [1.9 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA); n = 19]. Overweight individuals with metabolic syndrome (n = 19) were recruited for EO treatment only. During the 10-wk study, the participants followed a dietary n-3 PUFA restriction, e.g., no fish. After the 8-wk EO treatment, increases in the LC n-3 metabolites EPA (168% and 79%) and docosapentaenoic acid [DPA (68% and 39%)] were observed, whereas docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) decreased (-5% and -23%) in plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, respectively. Compared with FO, the efficacy of EO to increase EPA and DPA in blood was significantly lower (∼25% and ∼50%, respectively). A higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with lower relative and net increases in EPA and DPA. Compared with baseline, EO significantly reduced serum cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, oxidized LDL, and triglyceride (TG), but also HDL cholesterol, regardless of age and BMI. In the FO group, only TG decreased. Overall, daily intake of 15-20 g EO increased EPA and DPA in blood but had no influence on DHA. EO lowered cardiovascular risk markers, e.g., serum TG, which is particularly relevant for individuals with metabolic syndrome. Natural EO could be a noteworthy source of n-3 PUFA in human nutrition.

  2. Revised neutral gas shielding model for pellet ablation - combined neutral and plasma shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Schuresko, D.D.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    The ablation and penetration of pellets in early ORMAK and ISX-A experiments were reliably predicted by the neutral gas shielding model of Milora and Foster. These experiments demonstrated that the principle components of the model - a self-generated shield which reduces the heat flux at the plasma surface - were correct. In more recent experiments with higher temperature plasmas, this model consistently predicts greater penetration than observed in the experiments. Upgarding known limitations of the original model brings the predicted and observed penetration values into agreement. These improvements include: (1) treating the incident electrons as having distribution in energy rather than being monoenergetic; (2) including the shielding effects of cold, dense plasma extending along the magnetic field outside the neutral shield; and (3) modifying the finite plasma, self-limiting incident heat flux so that it represents a collisionless plasma limit rather than a collisional limit. Comparisons are made between the models for a selection of ISX-B Alcator-C, and TFTR shots. The net effect of the changes in the model is an increase in pellet ablation rates and decrease in penetration for current and future experiments

  3. Photoproduction of neutral pions off protons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crede, V.; Sparks, N.; Wilson, A.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bantes, R.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Castelijns, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Frommberger, F.; Funke, Chr; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, P.; Jaegle, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kammer, S.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Löhner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.; Mertens, T.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nikonov, V. A.; Novinski, D.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Schadmand, S.; Schmidt, C.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S.; Sokhoyan, V.; Suele, A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch

    2011-01-01

    Photoproduction of neutral pions has been studied with the CBELSA/TAPS detector in the reaction gamma p -> p pi(0) for photon energies between 0.85 and 2.50 GeV. The pi(0) mesons are observed in their dominant neutral decay mode: pi(0) -> gamma gamma. For the first time, the differential cross

  4. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their related...

  5. Targets for high power neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.

    1980-01-01

    Stopping high-power, long-pulse beams is fast becoming an engineering challenge, particularly in neutral beam injectors for heating magnetically confined plasmas. A brief review of neutral beam target technology is presented along with heat transfer calculations for some selected target designs

  6. Auditors' Professional Skepticism: Neutrality versus Presumptive Doubt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, T.L.C.M.; Quadackers, L.M.; Wright, A.

    2014-01-01

    Although skepticism is widely viewed as essential to audit quality, there is a debate about what form is optimal. The two prevailing perspectives that have surfaced are "neutrality" and "presumptive doubt." With neutrality, auditors neither believe nor disbelieve client management. With presumptive

  7. The Framing of Network Neutrality Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, James

    The neutrality of the internet with regard to applications (e.g. search, social networking, email, to mention only three) has been central to innovation and growth in the knowledge-economy over the past two decades. Until recently, neutrality was built into the internet's design via its core stan...

  8. The case for ecological neutral theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosindell, James; Hubbell, Stephen P.; He, Fangliang; Harmon, Luke J.; Etienne, Rampal S.

    Ecological neutral theory has elicited strong opinions in recent years. Here, we review these opinions and strip away some unfortunate problems with semantics to reveal three major underlying questions. Only one of these relates to neutral theory and the importance of ecological drift, whereas the

  9. Neutrality as Realism in the New Global Order: A Treatise | Osai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In contemporary foreign policy analysis, with special reference to the study of neutrality, the intellectual polemic between the Hobbesian and Lockean schools of ... including public opinion, and the output of institutionalism within the domestic political system provide an explanation for the continuing stance of neutrality.

  10. Potential Effects of Permanent Neutrality on Mongolia’s Defense Foreign Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    and provided broad intelligence for the Allies, and Sweden provided arms and military equipment for Norway to fight alongside the Soviet Union.36...more duties for the neutral states to affirm the safety of war victims such as prisoners of war, escaped prisoners of war, and internees, including...of war to protect military prisoners , 71 Karsh, Neutrality and Small States, 38. 72 Karsh

  11. Age structure in neutral theory resolves inconsistencies related to reproductive-size threshold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosindell, James; Jansen, Patrick A.; Etienne, Rampal S.

    Neutral theory consists of a suite of models that assume ecological equivalence among individual organisms. They have been most commonly applied to tropical forest tree communities either as null models or as approximations. Neutral models typically only include reproductive adults; therefore,

  12. Age structure in neutral theory resolves inconsistencies related to reproductive size threshold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosindell, J.; Jansen, P.A.; Etienne, R.S.

    2012-01-01

    Neutral theory consists of a suite of models that assume ecological equivalence among individual organisms. They have been most commonly applied to tropical forest tree communities either as null models or as approximations. Neutral models typically only include reproductive adults; therefore,

  13. A neutral sampling formula for multiple samples and an `exact' test of neutrality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    As the utility of the neutral theory of biodiversity is increasingly being recognized, there is also an increasing need for proper tools to evaluate the relative importance of neutral processes (dispersal limitation and stochasticity). One of the key features of neutral theory is its close link to

  14. A neutral sampling formula for multiple samples and an 'exact' test of neutrality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, Rampal S.

    As the utility of the neutral theory of biodiversity is increasingly being recognized, there is also an increasing need for proper tools to evaluate the relative importance of neutral processes (dispersal limitation and stochasticity). One of the key features of neutral theory is its close link to

  15. Mechanistic insights into the neutralization of cytotoxic abrin by the monoclonal antibody D6F10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shradha Bagaria

    Full Text Available Abrin, an A/B toxin obtained from the Abrus precatorius plant is extremely toxic and a potential bio-warfare agent. Till date there is no antidote or vaccine available against this toxin. The only known neutralizing monoclonal antibody against abrin, namely D6F10, has been shown to rescue the toxicity of abrin in cells as well as in mice. The present study focuses on mapping the epitopic region to understand the mechanism of neutralization of abrin by the antibody D6F10. Truncation and mutational analysis of abrin A chain revealed that the amino acids 74-123 of abrin A chain contain the core epitope and the residues Thr112, Gly114 and Arg118 are crucial for binding of the antibody. In silico analysis of the position of the mapped epitope indicated that it is present close to the active site cleft of abrin A chain. Thus, binding of the antibody near the active site blocks the enzymatic activity of abrin A chain, thereby rescuing inhibition of protein synthesis by the toxin in vitro. At 1∶10 molar concentration of abrin:antibody, the antibody D6F10 rescued cells from abrin-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis but did not prevent cell attachment of abrin. Further, internalization of the antibody bound to abrin was observed in cells by confocal microscopy. This is a novel finding which suggests that the antibody might function intracellularly and possibly explains the rescue of abrin's toxicity by the antibody in whole cells and animals. To our knowledge, this study is the first report on a neutralizing epitope for abrin and provides mechanistic insights into the poorly understood mode of action of anti-A chain antibodies against several toxins including ricin.

  16. Life History Traits, Protein Evolution, and the Nearly Neutral Theory in Amniotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuet, Emeric; Nabholz, Benoît; Bonneau, Manon; Mas Carrio, Eduard; Nadachowska-Brzyska, Krystyna; Ellegren, Hans; Galtier, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    The nearly neutral theory of molecular evolution predicts that small populations should accumulate deleterious mutations at a faster rate than large populations. The analysis of nonsynonymous (dN) versus synonymous (dS) substitution rates in birds versus mammals, however, has provided contradictory results, questioning the generality of the nearly neutral theory. Here we analyzed the impact of life history traits, taken as proxies of the effective population size, on molecular evolutionary and population genetic processes in amniotes, including the so far neglected reptiles. We report a strong effect of species body mass, longevity, and age of sexual maturity on genome-wide patterns of polymorphism and divergence across the major groups of amniotes, in agreement with the nearly neutral theory. Our results indicate that the rate of protein evolution in amniotes is determined in the first place by the efficiency of purifying selection against deleterious mutations-and this is true of both radical and conservative amino acid changes. Interestingly, the among-species distribution of dN/dS in birds did not follow this general trend: dN/dS was not higher in large, long-lived than in small, short-lived species of birds. We show that this unexpected pattern is not due to a more narrow range of life history traits, a lack of correlation between traits and Ne, or a peculiar distribution of fitness effects of mutations in birds. Our analysis therefore highlights the bird dN/dS ratio as a molecular evolutionary paradox and a challenge for future research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Purification of Sardine Fish Oil Through Degumming and Neutralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Bija

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The quality of sardine fish oil can be improved by purification method through the step of degumming and neutralization. The aimed of this this study was analysis characteristic of crude sardin fish oil and determined the best method of purification. Degumming was carried out using 30% water and salt at concentration 5%, 8%, 10% b/v. Neutralization process using  NaOH with 16°Be and bleaching using 5% Magnesol XL. All step of refining was done at 50°C, 60°C, 70°C, and 80°C. The result of analysis showed that sardine crude fish oil had 24.86% of palmitic acid as the highest fatty acid, heavy metal was not detected,dencity was 0.92 g/cm3 and viscocity was 51 cPs. The best treatment of purification method was degumming using 5% NaCl at 50°C with rendement 65.37±0.72%; free fatty acid (FFA 0.38±0.03%; peroxide (PV 1.07±0.12 mEq/kg; anisidine (p-AnV 15.18±0.16 mEq/kg; total oxidation value (TOTOX 17.31±0.39 mEq/kg; and clarity was 75.09± 1.20%.

  18. Neutral-beam-heating applications and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    The technique of heating the plasma in magnetically confined fusion devices by the injection of intense beams of neutral atoms is described. The basic principles governing the physics of neutral beam heating and considerations involved in determining the injection energy, power, and pulse length required for a fusion reactor are discussed. The pertinent experimental results from various fusion devices are surveyed to illustrate the efficacy of this technique. The second part of the paper is devoted to the technology of producing the neutral beams. A state-of-the-art account o the development of neutral injectors is presented, and the prospects for utilizing neutral injection to heat the plasma in a fusion reactor are examined

  19. Tax Neutrality on International Capital Investments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizem KAPUCU

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The tax policies which states follow with regard to developing technology and capital investments with raising mobility due to globalism are need to be discussed in its legal basis. The principle of tax neutrality has the aim of being legal foundation for these policies. According to this, the neutrality principle in taxation of international capital investments is provided with two measures, namely; not effecting the investment decision and not discriminate between investments. In this paper, initially focused on the conceptual framework and the foundations of the tax neutrality principle and later capital export neutrality and capital import neutrality are considered and explained with regard to international capital movements. Moreover, conformity and diversion to the principle of the current situation and regulations in OECD, EU and Turkey are examined.

  20. A two-reagent neutralization scheme for controlling the migration of contaminants from a uranium mill tailing disposal pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodson, M.E.; Opitz, B.E.; Sherwood, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques for reducing contaminant migration from tailings liquor impoundments and evaporation ponds are being investigated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Uranium Research and Recovery Program. Building upon previous studies investigating single-reagent neutralization, laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of a two-reagent neutralization scheme for the treatment of acidic uranium mill tailings liquors. Acidic tailings liquor, pH 3 neutralization to pH 4.0 followed by continued neutralization with lime to pH 7.3, resulted in the highest solution quality with respect to the Environmental Protection Agency's water quality guidelines. Furthermore, the two-reagent neutralization scheme is the most cost-effective treatment procedure tested to date