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Sample records for incisors canines premolars

  1. Orthodontic management of bilateral maxillary canine-first premolar transposition and bilateral agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors: a case report

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    Elena Di Palma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Maxillary canine-first premolar transposition (Mx.C.P1 is an uncommon dental positional anomaly that may create many orthodontic problems from both esthetic and functional points of view. OBJECTIVE: In this report we show the orthodontic management of a case of Mx.C.P1 associated with bilateral maxillary lateral incisor agenesis and unilateral mandibular second premolar agenesis METHODS: The patient was treated with a multibracket appliance and the extraction of the lower premolar. RESULTS: treatment was completed without the need for any prosthetic replacement.

  2. Prediction of Mesiodistal Width of Unerupted Lateral Incisors, Canines and Premolars in Orthodontic Patients in Early Mixed Dentition Period.

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    Toodehzaeim, Mohammad Hossein; Haerian, Alireza; Alesaeidi, Ali

    2016-11-01

    Proper diagnosis and prevention of malocclusion are superior to treatment. Discrepancy between arch length and tooth size in mixed dentition period is a condition requiring timely diagnosis. Estimating the mesiodistal width of unerupted teeth according to the size of erupted ones can lead to earlier diagnosis of malocclusion. On the other hand, the best timing for serial extractions is before the eruption of lateral incisors. The aim of this study was to present prediction formulas for mesiodistal width of unerupted lateral incisors, canines and premolars in an Iranian population based on the width of erupted permanent mandibular central incisors and maxillary first molars. A total of 120 dental models (60 males, 60 females) of orthodontic patients between 11-25 years were evaluated in Yazd city. The measurements were made by a digital caliper on the widest mesiodistal width of teeth at the interproximal contacts. Data were analyzed to calculate the prediction equation. The prediction equation in the upper jaw was y=0.57x+10.82 for males, y=0.7x+6.37 for females and y=0.64x+8.46 for both sexes. The equation for the lower jaw was y=0.76x+2.86 for males, y=0.74x+3.53 for females and y=0.77x+2.7 for both sexes. The prediction equations suggested in this study can predict the mesiodistal width of unerupted lateral incisors, canines and premolars in an Iranian population in early mixed dentition period without taking radiographs.

  3. Prediction of Mesiodistal Width of Unerupted Lateral Incisors, Canines and Premolars in Orthodontic Patients in Early Mixed Dentition Period

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    Mohammad Hossein Toodehzaeim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Proper diagnosis and prevention of malocclusion are superior to treatment. Discrepancy between arch length and tooth size in mixed dentition period is a condition requiring timely diagnosis. Estimating the mesiodistal width of unerupted teeth according to the size of erupted ones can lead to earlier diagnosis of malocclusion. On the other hand, the best timing for serial extractions is before the eruption of lateral incisors. The aim of this study was to present prediction formulas for mesiodistal width of unerupted lateral incisors, canines and premolars in an Iranian population based on the width of erupted permanent mandibular central incisors and maxillary first molars.Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dental models (60 males, 60 females of orthodontic patients between 11-25 years were evaluated in Yazd city. The measurements were made by a digital caliper on the widest mesiodistal width of teeth at the interproximal contacts. Data were analyzed to calculate the prediction equation.Results: The prediction equation in the upper jaw was y=0.57x+10.82 for males, y=0.7x+6.37 for females and y=0.64x+8.46 for both sexes. The equation for the lower jaw was y=0.76x+2.86 for males, y=0.74x+3.53 for females and y=0.77x+2.7 for both sexes.Conclusions: The prediction equations suggested in this study can predict the mesiodistal width of unerupted lateral incisors, canines and premolars in an Iranian population in early mixed dentition period without taking radiographs.Keywords: Dentition, Mixed; Dentition, Permanent; Tooth, Unerupted

  4. Prediction of width of un-erupted incisors, canines and premolars in a Ugandan population: A cross sectional study

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    Buwembo William

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate prediction of the space forms an important part of an orthodontic assessment in the mixed dentition. However the most commonly used methods of space analysis are based on data developed on Caucasian populations. In order to provide more accurate local data we set out to develop a formula for predicting the widths of un-erupted canines and premolars for a Ugandan population and to compare the predicted widths of the teeth from this formula with those obtained from Moyers’ tables, and Tanaka and Johnston’s equations. Methods Dental casts were prepared using mandibular and maxillary arch impressions of 220 children (85 boys/135 girls aged 12–17 years recruited from schools in Kampala, Uganda. The mesio-distal width of the mandibular incisors, mandibular and maxillary canines and premolars were measured with a pair of digital calipers. Based on regression analysis, predictive equations were derived and the findings were compared with those presented in Moyers’ probability tables, and Tanaka and Johnston’s equations. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the tooth widths predicted by our equations and those from Moyers’ probability tables at the 65th and 75th percentile probabilities for the girls and at 75th level in boys in the mandibular arch. While in the maxillary arch no statistically significant differences at the 75th and 95th levels were noted in girls. There were statistically significant differences between predicted tooth sizes using equations from the present study and those predicted from the Tanaka and Johnston regression equations. Conclusions In this Ugandan population, Moyers’ probability tables could be used to predict tooth widths at specific percentile probabilities, but generally, Tanaka and Johnston technique tends to overestimate the tooth widths.

  5. Reliability of permanent mandibular first molars and incisors widths as predictor for the width of permanent mandibular and maxillary canines and premolars

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    Madhulika Mittar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Preventive measures are necessary to prevent a potential irregularity from progressing into a more severe malocclusion. The determination of the tooth size-arch length discrepancy in mixed dentition requires an accurate prediction of the mesiodistal widths of the unerupted permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: For the study, 200 subjects in the age group of 16-25 years were selected from various colleges of M. M. University. The mesiodistal width of permanent mandibular incisors, first molars, canines and premolars of both arches were measured on the subject cast using an electronic digital caliper. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference between mesiodistal tooth widths of males and females. Linear regression equation was determined to predict the sum of mandibular and maxillary permanent canines and premolars using mandibular first molars plus the four mandibular incisors as predictors. Results: There was no significant difference between the actual and predicted width of sum of permanent canines and premolars using regression equations. The predicted widths of both arches using Tanaka and Johnston equations showed significant differences. Determined regression equations for males were accurate in male samples and determined regression equation for females were accurate in female samples for both arches.

  6. [Congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors: long-term periodontal and functional evaluation after orthodontic space closure with first premolar intrusion and canine extrusion].

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    Rosa, Marco; Lucchi, Patrizia; Ferrari, Simona; Zachrisson, Bjørn U; Caprioglio, Alberto

    2017-12-01

    The aims of this investigation were to evaluate associations between orthodontic space closure (including first premolar intrusion and canine extrusion for esthetic reasons) and periodontal tissue deterioration over a 10-year period in subjects with one or both missing maxillary lateral incisors and to investigate the occurrence of signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD). This was a retrospective cohort study comprising patients treated by the same orthodontist. The agenesis group included 26 consecutive adolescent and young adult patients (9 male, 17 female) treated with space closure. The control group consisted of 32 orthodontic patients (12 male, 20 female) with no missing teeth and no need for extractions. In the agenesis group, full-mouth probing pocket depths and bleeding on probing were recorded at six locations for each of 657 teeth (3942 periodontal sites). In the control group, comparative data were collected for the maxillary first molars, premolars, canines, and lateral incisors, a total of 264 teeth (1584 periodontal sites). Mobility and gingival recession were also evaluated. Patients in both groups completed questionnaires concerning symptoms related to TMD. The full-mouth assessments in the agenesis group generally demonstrated periodontally healthy conditions, with probing depths below 4 mm and few bleeding sites. Some slight recessions were found, mostly on molars and second premolars, and there was normal mobility of first premolars that substituted for canines. Comparisons between the agenesis and control groups showed no statistically significant differences for the maxillary teeth regarding increased pocket depth (≥ 4 mm) or increased mobility. Interproximal sites in the agenesis group showed less bleeding on probing than in the control group; this was statistically significant. Anterior teeth in the agenesis group did not show any more recession than in the controls. In addition, we observed no

  7. Congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors: Long-term periodontal and functional evaluation after orthodontic space closure with first premolar intrusion and canine extrusion.

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    Rosa, Marco; Lucchi, Patrizia; Ferrari, Simona; Zachrisson, Bjørn U; Caprioglio, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    The aims of this investigation were to evaluate associations between orthodontic space closure (including first premolar intrusion and canine extrusion for esthetic reasons) and periodontal tissue deterioration over a 10-year period in subjects with one or both missing maxillary lateral incisors and to investigate the occurrence of signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD). This was a retrospective cohort study comprising patients treated by the same orthodontist. The agenesis group included 26 consecutive adolescent and young adult patients (9 male, 17 female) treated with space closure. The control group consisted of 32 orthodontic patients (12 male, 20 female) with no missing teeth and no need for extractions. In the agenesis group, full-mouth probing pocket depths and bleeding on probing were recorded at 6 locations for each of 657 teeth (3942 periodontal sites). In the control group, comparative data were collected for the maxillary first molars, premolars, canines, and lateral incisors, a total of 264 teeth (1584 periodontal sites). Mobility and gingival recession were also evaluated. Patients in both groups completed questionnaires concerning symptoms related to TMD. The full-mouth assessments in the agenesis group generally demonstrated periodontally healthy conditions, with probing depths below 4 mm and few bleeding sites. Some slight recessions were found, mostly on molars and second premolars, and there was normal mobility of first premolars that substituted for canines. Comparisons between the agenesis and control groups showed no statistically significant differences for the maxillary teeth regarding increased pocket depth (≥4 mm) or increased mobility. Interproximal sites in the agenesis group showed less bleeding on probing than in the control group; this was statistically significant. Anterior teeth in the agenesis group did not show any more recession than in the controls. In addition, we observed no difference in signs or symptoms

  8. Prediction of Mesiodistal Width of Unerupted Lateral Incisors, Canines and Premolars in Orthodontic Patients in Early Mixed Dentition Period

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    Mohammad Hossein Toodehzaeim; Alireza Haerian; Ali Alesaeidi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Proper diagnosis and prevention of malocclusion are superior to treatment. Discrepancy between arch length and tooth size in mixed dentition period is a condition requiring timely diagnosis. Estimating the mesiodistal width of unerupted teeth according to the size of erupted ones can lead to earlier diagnosis of malocclusion. On the other hand, the best timing for serial extractions is before the eruption of lateral incisors. The aim of this study was to present prediction formula...

  9. Patterns of incisor-premolar agenesis combinations: A retrospective study.

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    Demiriz, Levent; Bodrumlu, Ebru Hazar; Kokturk, Furuzan

    2017-01-01

    Tooth agenesis is the most common dental anomaly which causes serious problems in humans. Many theories were asserted to explain the main etiologic factor of this anomaly, and genetic factors were considered as primary reasons. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between incisor and premolar tooth agenesis and to reveal a considerable data about combinations of incisor-premolar agenesis and their frequency. According to inclusion and exclusion criterion, archived panoramic radiographs of nonsyndromic 6535 patients (4077 females and 2058 males) ranging in age from 7 to 18 years old were retrospectively examined to find the presence of tooth agenesis. Panoramic radiographs showing at least one tooth agenesis were recorded, and the missing tooth or teeth excluding third molars were noted. Combinations of incisor-premolar tooth agenesis were listed, and the most affected teeth groups were noted. Collected data were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test or Fisher exact's Chi-square test. Three hundred and eight patients (4.7%) who had at least one tooth agenesis and 648 missing permanent tooth, excluding third molars, were detected. Although the sample size of females was bigger than males in all examined patients, tooth agenesis was detected significantly more in males than females (P = 0.021). Thirty-two patients (10.4%) had both incisor and premolar agenesis, and of all patients, twenty patients (6, 5%) were found to have both maxillary lateral incisor and mandibular second premolar agenesis. Combinations of tooth agenesis are an issue which has begun to take attention recently. The results of the present study may provide empirical data for further genetic studies.

  10. Patterns of incisor-premolar agenesis combinations: A retrospective study

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    Levent Demiriz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tooth agenesis is the most common dental anomaly which causes serious problems in humans. Many theories were asserted to explain the main etiologic factor of this anomaly, and genetic factors were considered as primary reasons. Aims: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between incisor and premolar tooth agenesis and to reveal a considerable data about combinations of incisor-premolar agenesis and their frequency. Settings and Design: According to inclusion and exclusion criterion, archived panoramic radiographs of nonsyndromic 6535 patients (4077 females and 2058 males ranging in age from 7 to 18 years old were retrospectively examined to find the presence of tooth agenesis. Panoramic radiographs showing at least one tooth agenesis were recorded, and the missing tooth or teeth excluding third molars were noted. Methods: Combinations of incisor-premolar tooth agenesis were listed, and the most affected teeth groups were noted. Statistical Analysis Used: Collected data were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test or Fisher exact's Chi-square test. Results: Three hundred and eight patients (4.7% who had at least one tooth agenesis and 648 missing permanent tooth, excluding third molars, were detected. Although the sample size of females was bigger than males in all examined patients, tooth agenesis was detected significantly more in males than females (P = 0.021. Thirty-two patients (10.4% had both incisor and premolar agenesis, and of all patients, twenty patients (6, 5% were found to have both maxillary lateral incisor and mandibular second premolar agenesis. Conclusions: Combinations of tooth agenesis are an issue which has begun to take attention recently. The results of the present study may provide empirical data for further genetic studies.

  11. A new understanding of oral and dental disorders of the equine incisor and canine teeth.

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    Earley, Edward; Rawlinson, Jennifer T

    2013-08-01

    This article discusses the classification systems for dental fractures and how the assessment affects treatment options. Diagonal incisor malocclusion is discussed in relation to skull asymmetry and how this commonly relates to premolar and molar occlusion. Oral and radiographic assessment of incisive bone fracture and incisor avulsion is reviewed for determining treatment options. A summary of incisor and canine resorption and hypercementosis is presented. Clinical presentations, staging, and classifications of tooth resorption as well as canine odontoplasty are discussed. Excessive plaque and calculus formation on lower canines leading to periodontal disease and abscess is examined. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Distal movement of maxillary canines and premolars with sectional mechanics following Distal Jet application to molars.

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    Bolla, E; Doldo, T; Giorgetti, R

    2004-01-01

    to assess the effectiveness of Distal Jet without simultaneous fixed appliance treatment. twenty subjects with Class II malocclusion who received the Distal Jet appliance to move maxillary molars distally. Subsequently, the canine and premolar distal movements were achieved by the use of.017 x.025 Ni-Ti sectional wires and memory power chain. revealed that Distal Jet is more effective with less anchorage loss when this appliance is used independent of multibracket appliances. this study showed that Distal Jet is an effective and predictable appliance. The distal movements of upper premolars, canines and incisors with sectional wires fabricated from.017 x.025 Ni-Ti were biomechanically very effective, simple in clinical application, and did not require any patient compliance.

  13. Bilateral Maxillary Central Incisor Impaction associated with Developing Supernumerary Premolars in the Mandibular Arch

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    Mitali Mishra

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of 15-year-old girl with bilaterally impacted supernumeraries in the premaxilla region associated with asymptomatic impacted developing supernumerary premolars in the mandibular arch. The supernumeraries of premaxilla region impeded the eruption of the permanent maxillary central incisors. The impacted supernumerary tooth was surgically removed and brackets bonded to the central incisors to apply orthodontic extrusive force which brought the central incisors down to their proper position in the dental arch.

  14. Bilateral Second Premolars Agenesia Together with a Unilateral Canine Radiculomegaly.

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    Kemoli, Arthur Musakulu; Junior, Thomas Munyao

    2017-01-01

    Congenitally missing teeth is a common feature for the third molars. However, missing teeth, macrodontia and radiculomegaly occurring in a single patient is very rare. This article describes a case of agenesis of mandibular second premolars, radiculomegaly with dilacerations of a canine tooth together with elongated roots of other canines. All these features had been discerned through diagnostic radiographs taken during a routine treatment planning.

  15. Bilateral second premolars agenesia together with a unilateral canine radiculomegaly

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    Arthur Musakulu Kemoli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenitally missing teeth is a common feature for the third molars. However, missing teeth, macrodontia and radiculomegaly occurring in a single patient is very rare. This article describes a case of agenesis of mandibular second premolars, radiculomegaly with dilacerations of a canine tooth together with elongated roots of other canines. All these features had been discerned through diagnostic radiographs taken during a routine treatment planning.

  16. Distally displaced premolars: A dental anomaly associated with palatally displaced canines.

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    Baccetti, Tiziano; Leonardi, Maria; Giuntini, Veronica

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of association between distally displaced premolars (DDP) and palatally displaced canines (PDC) in the pattern of associated phenotypes of dental developmental disturbance. A sample of 2811 subjects (mean age, 9 years 7 months +/- 1 year 3 months) was divided randomly into 2 groups. The first group of 500 subjects was the control group. The reference prevalence rates for the examined parameters were calculated for this group: DDP (measured with the distal angle theta and the premolar-molar angle gamma); PDC; and other dental anomalies, specifically, aplasia of the third molars, aplasia of the contralateral mandibular second premolar, aplasia of the maxillary lateral incisors, and small maxillary lateral incisors. Of the remaining 2311 subjects, the first 100 with a diagnosis of DDP of at least 1 mandibular second premolar comprised experimental group 1 (DDP group). In addition to sex distribution, the same variables that were examined in the control group were analyzed. In the subgroup with the concurrent DDP and PDC (experimental group 2, or DDP-PDC group), the presence of other dental anomalies was investigated. The prevalence rate for PDC in experimental group 1 was compared with that in the control group. The same was done for the prevalence rates for the 4 other dental anomalies in the PDC-DDP group (experimental group 2) vs the prevalence rates for these anomalies in the control group. All comparisons were performed with chi-square tests with the Yates correction (P <0.05), as were the comparisons between the sexes in experimental groups 1 and 2. The values for theta and gamma angles in experimental group 1 were compared with the values for these angles in experimental group 2, as well as with those in the control group. These statistical comparisons were made with analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the Bonferroni post-hoc test (P <0.05). The prevalence rate for PDC in experimental group 1 (28%) was

  17. Postretention mandibular incisor stability after premolar serial extractions.

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    Woodside, D G; Rossouw, P E; Shearer, D

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mandibular incisor alignment in serial extraction cases, using the longitudinal dental cast records of the Burlington Growth Center as a control sample. Various parameters were investigated and the statistical differences determined between the treated and untreated groups. The results were also compared with data from serial extraction groups that subsequently had orthodontic treatment. Untreated subjects and subjects treated only with serial extractions showed similar longitudinal changes. However, the extraction group that also received orthodontic treatment appeared to show more lower incisor crowding long-term. No predictors for stability of clinical significance could be determined. Mechanotherapy influences the craniofacial and dentoalveolar dimensions, which appear to cause more long-term lower incisor crowding.

  18. Prediction of the size of unerupted canines and premolars in an Iranian population

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    Mashaallah Khanehmasjedi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: One of the important aspects of diagnosis and treatment planning in the mixed dentition is estimation of the size of unerupted permanent canines and premolars. One of the most commonly used the prediction methods are Tanaka and Johnston, which are based on data from a sample of Northern European descent children. The accuracy of this method when applied to a different ethnic population is questionable. The aim of this study was to determine the modified equations from Tanaka and Johnston for Iranian population. Materials and Methods: This study was an analytic and cross-sectional investigation with the randomized cluster sampling in Ahwaz. Fifty four students of 14-18 years age (32 girls, 22 boys were selected between 320 students and plaster models of their maxillary and mandibular arches were prepared. Subjects had fully erupted teeth, class I canine and molar relationship and presented no proximal caries or fillings, morphological anomalies, missing teeth or occlusal abrasion, and bruxism. The mesiodistal crown diameters of the permanent teeth were measured with using the sharpened boley gauge (accuracy 0.01 mm. The data were analyzed by using the regression correlation analyses and t-test. Results: The size of permanent canines and premolars were larger in maxilla than mandible and males than females. These values in Iran were different from other countries. Conclusion: In this study to predict the space (in mm required for alignment of unerupted canine and premolars in Iranian children, halve the sum of mesiodistal dimension of the four mandibular incisors and add the respective constants 10.5 for upper jaw and 10 for lower jaw.

  19. Prediction of Un-erupted Canine and Premolar Tooth Size in Mixed Dentition among Bangladeshi Population.

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    Chokrobrty, R; Rafique, T; Ghosh, R; Biswas, A K; Sajedeen, M; Hassan, G S

    2017-10-01

    Accurate prediction of the space available to accommodate the size of the un-erupted canines and premolars plays an important role in mixed dentition in Orthodontics. This Descriptive cross sectional study was carried out in the Department of Orthodontics of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University from July 2014 to June 2015. Dental study models of 140 patients were taken as sample. The sample was consisted of 54 Bangladeshi males and 86 females aged between 12 to 17 years and without any previous orthodontic treatment fully erupted permanent teeth and with no dental anomalies were recruited. The study was done by measuring the mesio-distal dimensions of teeth over the dental cast. A pre-structured data collection form which includes the particulars of the patient and data was filled. All patients were having a serial number to maintain their confidentiality. The study protocol was approved by "Institutional Review Board" of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Un-paired t test were used to examine differences between genders, correlation coefficients and linear regression equations were used to carry out the analysis. Descriptive statistics including means, standard deviations, and minimum-maximum values were calculated. Unpaired sample 't' tests were carried out to compare tooth size between the sexes. Logistic regression for development of new prediction formula on the basis of study sample of our population. Pearson correlation coefficient test for found the correlation between mandibular incisors and mandibular and maxillary canine and premolars in each quadrant. The difference between the present study with that of Moyers and Tanaka and Johnston were statistically significant (p<0.001). The values from Moyers and Tanaka and Johnston methods exceed while comparing to Bangladeshi population. Therefore, Moyers and Tanaka and Johnston method of prediction are not applicable for our population.

  20. Forces and moments generated by removable thermoplastic aligners: incisor torque, premolar derotation, and molar distalization.

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    Simon, Mareike; Keilig, Ludger; Schwarze, Jörg; Jung, Britta A; Bourauel, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    The exact force systems as well as their progressions generated by removable thermoplastic appliances have not been investigated. Thus, the purposes of this experimental study were to quantify the forces and moments delivered by a single aligner and a series of aligners (Invisalign; Align Technology, Santa Clara, Calif) and to investigate the influence of attachments and power ridges on the force transfer. We studied 970 aligners of the Invisalign system (60 series of aligners). The aligners came from 30 consecutive patients, of which 3 tooth movements (incisor torque, premolar derotation, molar distalization) with 20 movements each were analyzed. The 3 movement groups were subdivided so that 10 movements were supported with an attachment and 10 were not. The patients' ClinCheck (Align Technology, Santa Clara, Calif) was planned so that the movements to be investigated were performed in isolation in the respective quadrant. Resin replicas of the patients' intraoral situation before the start of the investigated movement were taken and mounted in a biomechanical measurement system. An aligner was put on the model, the force systems were measured, and the calculated movements were experimentally performed until no further forces or moments were generated. Subsequently, the next aligners were installed, and the measurements were repeated. The initial mean moments were about 7.3 N·mm for maxillary incisor torque and about 1.0 N for distalization. Significant differences in the generated moments were measured in the premolar derotation group, whether they were supported with an attachment (8.8 N·mm) or not (1.2 N·mm). All measurements showed an exponential force change. Apart from a few maximal initial force systems, the forces and moments generated by aligners of the Invisalign system are within the range of orthodontic forces. The force change is exponential while a patient is wearing removable thermoplastic appliances. Copyright © 2014 American Association of

  1. Multidisciplinary Treatment of Severe Upper Incisor Root Resorption Secondary to Transposed Canine.

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    Korkmaz, Yasemin Nur; Yagci, Filiz

    2017-02-01

    Tooth transposition is a rare dental anomaly that could lead to undesirable side effects on other teeth. This case report aims to describe the multidisciplinary treatment of a patient with a severely resorbed permanent maxillary central incisor due to transposition with the permanent canine. A girl aged 13 years and 7 months with a chief complaint of a pink spot on her maxillary left incisor with a slightly erupted tooth above it was referred to our clinic. Her left maxillary canine was transposed to her left central incisor site. The left canine was impacted and had caused severe resorption of the left central incisor root. Her maxillary left canine was substituted for the central incisor after the compulsory extraction of her left central incisor. The canine was prosthetically restored after orthodontic treatment. The results were stable 1 year after treatment had been completed. Orthodontic treatment in coordination with other dental specialties like prosthodontics, periodontology and oral and maxillofacial surgery can provide functional and esthetic outcome in cases of severely transposed canines. This is a rare case of transposition that shows the significant root resorption on the maxillary central incisor due to the ectopic eruption of the canine. Canine substitution for the central incisor was chosen as a treatment plan instead of placing an implant. An esthetic smile and a functional occlusion were established at the end of the treatment. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:5-12, 2017). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The timing of tooth eruption and root development of permanent canine and premolars in Korean children

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    Cheong, Chang Shin; Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hae [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the timing and sequence of eruption of permanent canine and premolars, and to evaluate tooth calcification stage on emergence in Korean children. The sample was comprised of 1,266 children (male 720, female 546) aged from 7-13 years. Tooth eruption and calcification stages were determined through oral and panoramic radiographic examination, respectively. Probit analysis was used to calculate the timing of tooth eruption and tooth calcification stage from these cross-sectional data. In both males and females, eruption occurred around the time when one third of tooth root or more was formed. The sequence was as follows: first premolar, canine, and second premolar in maxilla, and canine, first premolar and second premolar in mandible. Tooth eruption occurred earlier in girls compared with boys, averaging 0.63 years. Eruption sequence is identical in males and females with a trend for females to erupt earlier than males. Tooth eruption becomes earlier over the past decades in Korean children.

  3. Treatment outcome and efficacy of an aligner technique – regarding incisor torque, premolar derotation and molar distalization

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Mareike; Keilig, Ludger; Schwarze, Jörg; Jung, Britta A; Bourauel, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of orthodontic treatment using the Invisalign® system. Particularly, we analyzed the influence of auxiliaries (Attachment/Power Ridge) as well as the staging (movement per aligner) on treatment efficacy. Methods We reviewed the tooth movements of 30 consecutive patients who required orthodontic treatment with Invisalign®. In all patients, one of the following tooth movements was performed: (1) Incisor Torque >10°, (2) Premolar d...

  4. A CLINICAL CASE OF LOSS OF THE UPPER LATERAL INCISORS AS A RESULT OF CANINES IMPACTION.

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    Hristina Arnautska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The resorption of the lateral incisors after ectopic eruption of the permanent canines is one of the most common complications and may be detected in all cases of seriously altered route of eruption. The case presented is of a 10-year old boy with permanent dentition and extracted upper lateral incisors as a result of a severe degree of resorption of their roots due to improper eruption of the canines. This article aims at establishing that early detection and prompt preventive measures will lead to avoiding the critical complications arising out of the impacted canines and will preserve the morphological and functional integrity of the incisors and the dentition.

  5. Treatment outcome and efficacy of an aligner technique – regarding incisor torque, premolar derotation and molar distalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of orthodontic treatment using the Invisalign® system. Particularly, we analyzed the influence of auxiliaries (Attachment/Power Ridge) as well as the staging (movement per aligner) on treatment efficacy. Methods We reviewed the tooth movements of 30 consecutive patients who required orthodontic treatment with Invisalign®. In all patients, one of the following tooth movements was performed: (1) Incisor Torque >10°, (2) Premolar derotation >10° (3) Molar distalization >1.5 mm. The groups (1)-(3) were subdivided: in the first subgroup (a) the movements were supported with the use of an attachment, while in the subgroup (b) no auxiliaries were used (except incisor torque, in which Power Ridges were used). All tooth movements were performed in a split-mouth design. To analyze the clinical efficacy, pre-treatment and final plaster cast models were laser-scanned and the achieved tooth movement was determined by way of a surface/surface matching algorithm. The results were compared with the amount of tooth movement predicted by ClinCheck®. Results The overall mean efficacy was 59% (SD = 0.2). The mean accuracy for upper incisor torque was 42% (SD = 0.2). Premolar derotation showed the lowest accuracy with approximately 40% (SD = 0.3). Distalization of an upper molar was the most effective movement, with efficacy approximately 87% (SD = 0.2). Conclusion Incisor torque, premolar derotation and molar distalization can be performed using Invisalign® aligners. The staging (movement/aligner) and the total amount of planned movement have an significant impact on treatment efficacy. PMID:24923279

  6. Treatment outcome and efficacy of an aligner technique--regarding incisor torque, premolar derotation and molar distalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Mareike; Keilig, Ludger; Schwarze, Jörg; Jung, Britta A; Bourauel, Christoph

    2014-06-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of orthodontic treatment using the Invisalign® system. Particularly, we analyzed the influence of auxiliaries (Attachment/Power Ridge) as well as the staging (movement per aligner) on treatment efficacy. We reviewed the tooth movements of 30 consecutive patients who required orthodontic treatment with Invisalign®. In all patients, one of the following tooth movements was performed: (1) Incisor Torque >10°, (2) Premolar derotation >10° (3) Molar distalization >1.5 mm. The groups (1)-(3) were subdivided: in the first subgroup (a) the movements were supported with the use of an attachment, while in the subgroup (b) no auxiliaries were used (except incisor torque, in which Power Ridges were used). All tooth movements were performed in a split-mouth design. To analyze the clinical efficacy, pre-treatment and final plaster cast models were laser-scanned and the achieved tooth movement was determined by way of a surface/surface matching algorithm. The results were compared with the amount of tooth movement predicted by ClinCheck®. The overall mean efficacy was 59% (SD = 0.2). The mean accuracy for upper incisor torque was 42% (SD = 0.2). Premolar derotation showed the lowest accuracy with approximately 40% (SD = 0.3). Distalization of an upper molar was the most effective movement, with efficacy approximately 87% (SD = 0.2). Incisor torque, premolar derotation and molar distalization can be performed using Invisalign® aligners. The staging (movement/aligner) and the total amount of planned movement have an significant impact on treatment efficacy.

  7. Advances in the treatment of diseased equine incisor and canine teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlinson, Jennifer T; Earley, Edward

    2013-08-01

    Dental therapies for equid incisor and canine teeth have modernized significantly over the last 2 decades. Basic principles in incisor reduction have become more conservative, and extraction procedures more exacting. Periodontal and endodontic treatments are described to save teeth that would have succumbed to extraction in the past. Pathologic impacts on treatment decisions for equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis are significant, and veterinarians and owners need to be aware of treatment options and outcomes. Easy access to equid incisor and canine teeth offers a variety of therapeutic options, and this article reviews some of the practical procedures available. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mandibular Symmetrical Bilateral Canine-Lateral Incisors Transposition: Its Early Diagnosis and Treatment Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehoshua Shapira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral mandibular tooth transposition is a relatively rare dental anomaly caused by distal migration of the mandibular lateral incisors and can be detected in the early mixed dentition by radiographic examination. Early diagnosis and interceptive intervention may reduce the risk of possible transposition between the mandibular canine and lateral incisor. This report illustrates the orthodontic management of bilateral mandibular canine-lateral incisor transposition. Correct positioning of the affected teeth was achieved on the left side while teeth on the right side were aligned in their transposed position. It demonstrates the outcome of good alignment of the teeth in the dental arch.

  9. Maxillary canine-first premolar transposition in the permanent dentition: treatment considerations and a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Synodinos, Philippos N

    2010-12-01

    Transposition is defined as the interchange of position between two adjacent teeth within the same quadrant of the dental arch. Permanent maxillary canine-premolar transposition is the most commonly observed transposition in the human dentition. Its prevalence is relatively low and its aetiology remains unclear, although it has been associated with genetic factors. It may also be related to a combination of localised factors such as malformation of adjacent teeth, tooth agenesis, retention of the deciduous canine and a history of local trauma. Treatment is selected on an individual case basis after thoroughly considering the overall facial and dental characteristics, duration of treatment, cost, patient preference and the orthodontist\\'s experience. This article provides a case report of maxillary canine transposition in the permanent dentition, successfully managed with orthodontic treatment.

  10. In Vivo Color Relationships Between the Maxillary Central Incisors and Canines as a Function of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Marie Elena; Kelly, J Robert; Rungruanganut, Patchanee

    2016-01-01

    It has long been taught that the hue of a patient can be taken from the canine and applied to other anterior teeth at a lower chroma. This concept does not appear to derive from published work. This study examined color relationships between in vivo maxillary central incisors and canines as a function of age. The L*a*b* values and VITA Classical shades of the maxillary central incisor and canine of 62 subjects were determined using a handheld spectrophotometer. Linear regression analysis and t tests were used to describe the relationships of the L*a*b* values of these teeth within each patient and as a function of age. Linear regression demonstrated a significant decrease in ΔE with age (P = .056). Patient age was greater when ΔE (central-canine) > 3.3 (average age = 38.8 years) than when ΔE < 3.3 (average age = 58.8 years) (t test; P = .19). ΔC decreases significantly with age (P < .001). ΔH demonstrated a trend to decrease as a function of age (P = .2). ΔL remained the same over time (P = .21). Changes with age were due to central incisor differences, while the canine remained constant. ΔE (incisor-canine) significantly decreases with age; mostly due to ΔC. The majority of changes for all three color coordinates are due to alterations in the central incisor. The majority of the patients in this study were found to have a different shade family (VITA Classical) for the central incisor and canine.

  11. Treatment of an avulsed maxillary permanent central incisor by autotransplantation of a primary canine tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, D; Dalci, K; Tunç, E Sen

    2008-07-01

    To present a case in which an avulsed permanent maxillary central incisor was replaced by autotransplantation of a primary canine tooth. The present case describes transplantation of a primary canine tooth into the space left by an avulsed permanent maxillary central incisor after a delay of several days. After root canal treatment, the primary canine tooth was extracted and placed into the prepared socket. To provide better adaptation of the donor tooth, the recipient alveolar site was remodeled using surgical burs. Semi-rigid splinting was maintained for 15 days. The crown of the primary canine was reshaped with composite resin and with an interim prosthesis, preventing movement of the lateral incisor tooth into the space of the transplanted canine. After 24-month follow-up the autotransplanted primary canine showed ankylosis but the tooth was in an acceptable state. The use of permanent tooth autotransplantation has been well documented. However a literature search revealed only one case report on the autotransplantation of primary teeth. Long term results of primary tooth autotransplantation are scarce but the procedure in this case report could be considered as a temporary space maintainer for the treatment of a patient with a lost permanent incisor under 10 years of age. Success of primary tooth autotransplantation may be affected by several factors, such as case selection, extra oral time, surgical and endodontic procedures.

  12. Prediction of canine and premolar size using the widths of various permanent teeth combinations: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalasandhya Vanjari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To suggest the best predictor/s for determining the mesio-distal widths (MDWs of canines (C and premolars (Ps, and propose regression equation/s for hitherto unreported population. Methods: Impressions of maxillary and mandibular arches were made for 201 children (100 boys and 101 girls; age range: 11–15 years who met the inclusion criteria and poured with dental stone. The maximum MDWs of all the permanent teeth were measured using digital vernier caliper. Thirty-three possible combinations (patterns of permanent maxillary and mandibular first molars, central and lateral incisors were framed and correlated with MDWs of C and Ps using Pearson correlation test. Results: There were significant correlations between the considered patterns and MDWs of C and Ps, with difference noted between girls (range of r: 0.34–0.66 and boys (range of r: 0.28–0.77. Simple linear and multiple regression equations for boys, girls, and combined sample were determined to predict MDW of C and Ps in both the arches. Conclusions: The accuracy of prediction improved considerably with the inclusion of as many teeth as possible in the regression equations. The newly proposed equations based on the erupted teeth may be considered clinically useful for space analysis in the considered population.

  13. Differences between dentitions with palatally and labially located maxillary canines observed in incisor width, dental morphology and space conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, L; Larsen, H J; Sørensen, H B

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the interrelationship between incisor width, deviations in the dentition and available space in the dental arch in palatally and labially located maxillary ectopic canine cases.......To analyze the interrelationship between incisor width, deviations in the dentition and available space in the dental arch in palatally and labially located maxillary ectopic canine cases....

  14. Lateral incisor agenesis, canine impaction and characteristics of supernumerary teeth in a South European male population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delli, Konstantina; Livas, Christos; Bornstein, Michael M

    2013-07-01

    To assess the prevalence of lateral incisor agenesis impacted canines and supernumerary teeth in a young adult male population. The panoramic radiographs of 1745 military students (mean age: 18.6 ± 0.52 years) who attended the Center of Aviation Medicine of the Armed Forces of Greece during the period 1997-2011 were initially analyzed for lateral incisor agenesis by two observers. After exclusion of the known orthodontic cases, a subgroup of 1636 examinees (mean age: 18.6 ± 0.44 years) was evaluated for canine impaction and supernumerary teeth. Twenty-eight missing lateral incisors were observed in 22 military students, indicating an incidence of 1.3% in the investigated population. No lateral incisor agenesis was detected in the mandibular arch. A prevalence rate of 0.8% was determined for canine impaction in the sample of young adults. The majority of impacted teeth (86.7%) were diagnosed in the maxillary arch. Thirty-five supernumerary teeth were observed in 24 examinees (prevalence rate: 1.5%). The ratio of supernumerary teeth located in the maxilla versus the mandible was 2.2:1. The most common type of supernumerary tooth was the upper distomolar. The prevalence of lateral incisor agenesis, canine impaction, and supernumerary teeth ranged from 0.8 to 1.5% in the sample of male Greek military students.

  15. The alveolar process following single-tooth extraction: a study of maxillary incisor and premolar sites in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Mônica; Lindhe, Jan; Araújo, Mauricio G

    2016-07-01

    The present investigation was performed to determine some dimensional alterations that occur in the alveolar process of the incisor and premolar sites of the maxilla following tooth removal. Computer-assisted cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were obtained from the maxilla using an iCAT unit, and involved edentulous and contralateral tooth sites. For each site included in the study, parasagittal and axial reconstructions, 1 mm apart, were made and measurements of different variables (cross-sectional area, height, and width) performed. The study involved 69 subjects and disclosed that the cross-sectional area and the height and width of the alveolar process of the lateral incisor site were the smallest and those of the second premolar the largest. All parameters had been significantly reduced after the completion of the ≥1 year of healing. Thus, the overall (i) cross-sectional area was reduced from 99.1 to 65.0 mm(2) , (ii) the height from 11.5 to 9.5 mm, and (iii) the width from 8.5 to 3.2 mm (marginal 1/3(rd) ), 8.9 to 4.8 mm (middle portion), and 9.0 to 5.7 mm (apical portion). The removal of single tooth caused marked hard tissue diminution. The loss of hard tissue was most pronounced in the buccal and marginal portions of the edentulous ridge that in most sites had acquired a triangular shape. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Mesiodistal inclination of the unerupted second premolar in the mandible of Japanese orthodontic patients with incisor agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kure, Kenichi; Arai, Kazuhito

    2015-11-01

    To elucidate the mesiodistal inclination of the unerupted mandibular second premolar (MnP2) in cases of mandibular incisor (MnIc) agenesis and unilateral MnP2 agenesis. Twenty-two cases of unilateral MnP2 agenesis (MnP2 agenesis group) and a control group (control group A) of 22 cases without permanent tooth agenesis excluding third molars were selected. Thirty-six cases of MnIc agenesis (MnIc agenesis group) and another control group (control group B) of 36 subjects were also selected. Mesiodistal inclination of the unerupted MnP2 on the panoramic X-rays was measured according to the distal angle and premolar-molar angle using the methods of Shalish et al. and Baccetti et al., respectively. Differences in mean values of the angular measurements between agenesis groups and corresponding controls were investigated (unpaired t-test). In the MnP2 agenesis group, the mean distal angle decreased 12.3° and the mean premolar-molar angle increased 13.3° for the MnP2 compared with control group A (both P agenesis group, no significant differences in the means of those angles for the MnP2 were found when compared with control group B. In Japanese orthodontic patients, there is a relationship between unilateral MnP2 agenesis and the mesiodistal angulation of the unerupted MnP2. However, no significant relationship was observed between MnIc agenesis (which relationship is often seen in Asian populations) and the position of the unerupted MnP2. These results suggest that different genetic factors are involved in MnP2 agenesis and MnIc agenesis.

  17. Fusion of a primary mandibular lateral incisor and canine: A rarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treville Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusion is a developmental anomaly of dental hard tissues characterized by the union of two adjacent teeth. It may be complete with the formation of an abnormally large tooth or incomplete with the union of crowns or roots only. The exact cause is still unknown. This report describes a case of unilateral fusion of the primary lateral incisor and canine in a 6-year-old female patient who accompanied her parents for dental treatment and later had a checkup herself during one of the visits to the dental clinic. Medical history was noncontributory while there was no family history of dental anomalies. An intraoral examination revealed that mandibular right primary lateral incisor was fused to the primary canine. The permanent central incisors were erupting lingually. The intraoral periapical radiograph showed a bifid pulp chamber with a normal-sized root canal. Since the tooth was noncarious, a preventive approach with a periodic follow-up was planned.

  18. Canine and incisor microwear in pitheciids and Ateles reflects documented patterns of tooth use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delezene, Lucas K; Teaford, Mark F; Ungar, Peter S

    2016-09-01

    Platyrrhine species differ in the extent to and the manner in which they use their incisors and canines during food ingestion. For example, Ateles uses its anterior teeth to process mechanically nondemanding soft fruits, while the sclerocarp-harvesting pitheciids rely extensively on these teeth to acquire and process more demanding foods. Pitheciids themselves vary in anterior tooth use, with the pitheciines (Cacajao, Chiropotes, and Pithecia) noted to use their robust canines in a variety of ways to predate seeds, while Callicebus, which rarely predates seeds, uses its incisors and exceptionally short canines to scrape tough mesocarp from fruits. To investigate the relationship between tooth use and dental wear, microwear textures were investigated for the anterior teeth of these five genera of platyrrhine primates. Using a white light confocal microscope, 12 microwear texture attributes that reflect feature size, anisotropy, density, and complexity were recorded from high-resolution epoxy casts of the incisors and canines of adult wild-collected Brazilian specimens of Ateles, Callicebus, Cacajao, Chiropotes, and Pithecia. Pitheciine canines tend to have deep microwear features and complex, anisotropic microwear textures, while Ateles anterior teeth tend to have very small features, low feature density, and less complex and anisotropic surfaces. Callicebus incisor and canine microwear is generally intermediate in size and complexity between those extremes. These findings align with expectations from reported field observations of tooth use and illustrate the potential for using microwear texture analysis to infer patterns of anterior tooth use in extinct primates. Am J Phys Anthropol 161:6-25, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Relation between agenesis and shape anomaly of maxillary lateral incisors and canine impaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anísio Bueno de Carvalho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose was to obtain information about the relation between agenesis and shape anomaly of maxillary lateral incisors and canine impaction. METHODS: Seventy-three patients with canine impaction and 73 control patients, without canine impaction, were evaluated. The mesiodistal distances of the maxillary lateral incisors adjacent to the impacted canines and the correspondent mandibular lateral incisors were measured. The adjacent lateral incisors were classified in: 1 - absent, 2 - small, 3 - peg-shaped, 4 - standard. RESULTS: The results showed that among the patients with impacted canines, there were 21 anomalous teeth (small and peg-shaped and among the control patients there were only three small and peg-shaped teeth, with a statistically significant difference (p = 0.001. No patients were found with impacted canines and absent lateral incisors. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that in patients with anomalous lateral incisors (small and peg-shaped there is a probability to present impacted canines and this must be considered.OBJETIVO: o objetivo foi obter informação sobre a relação existente entre a agenesia e/ou anomalia de forma de incisivos laterais superiores e impacção de caninos. MÉTODOS: foram avaliados 73 pacientes com impacção de caninos e 73 pacientes controle, sem impacção de caninos. Foram medidas as distâncias mesiodistais dos incisivos laterais superiores adjacentes aos caninos impactados e os incisivos laterais correspondentes inferiores. Os incisivos laterais adjacentes foram classificados em: 1 - ausentes; 2 - pequenos; 3 - conoides; 4 - normais. RESULTADOS: os resultados mostraram que no grupo de pacientes com caninos impactados foram encontrados 22 dentes anômalos (pequenos e conoides, e no grupo controle apenas três dentes pequenos e conoides, sendo uma diferença estatisticamente significativa (p=0,001. Não foram encontrados pacientes com canino impactado e incisivo lateral ausente. CONCLUS

  20. Odontometric Data and New Regression Equations for Predicting the Size of Unerupted Permanent Canine and Premolars for Chennai Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S V Soumya

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The observations obtained from our study would not only pave the way in predicting the mesiodistal width of unerupted canine and premolar in Chennai population but also give normative odontometric data which can be used for anthropological use and for diagnosis and treatment planning

  1. Orthodontic correction of a transposed maxillary canine and first premolar in the permanent dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kazuaki; Nakao, Kimihisa; Aoki, Taijyu; Fuyamada, Mariko; Saito, Keisuke; Goto, Shigemi

    2012-10-01

    The patient was a 16-year-old Japanese girl whose chief complaints were crowding and transposition of the maxillary canine and first premolar. A setup model was used to preoperatively align the teeth in their transposed positions. The amount of postoperative reshaping was estimated for the occlusal surfaces of the teeth. However, the patient did not wish to have her teeth reduced by reshaping or to have composite materials for restorative camouflage. Because she strongly expected alignment of her teeth in the correct intra-arch position, her transposed teeth were corrected without extraction of the transposed teeth. Cone-beam computed tomography was used to obtain more detailed information about the transposition, and the direction of tooth movement was examined. Although the duration of the treatment was long, both the crowns and the roots of the transposed teeth were aligned correctly. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of the physiological properties of human periodontal-masseteric reflex evoked by incisor and canine stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko eOhmori

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study was designed to clarify whether the bilateral cooperation in the human periodontal-masseteric reflex (PMR differs between central incisors and canines. Methods: Surface array electrodes were placed on the bilateral masseter muscles to simultaneously record the firing activities of single motor units from both sides in 7 healthy adults. During light clenching, mechanical stimulation was applied to the right maxillary central incisor and canine to evoke the PMR. Unitary activity was plotted with respect to the background activity and firing frequency. The slope of the regression line (sRL and the correlation coefficient (CC between the central incisor and canine and the lateral differences between these values were compared. Results: There were significant differences in the sRL and CC, as well as lateral differences, between the central incisor- and canine-driven PMR. Discussion: These results suggest that the PMR differs depending on both the tooth position and laterality.

  3. Gender determination from the mesiodistal dimension of permanent maxillary incisors and canines: An odontometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gender determination is crucial for identification, as the number of possible matches is reduced by 50%. The inert, mineralized structures of teeth resist post-mortem degradation and survive deliberate, accidental or natural change, better than any other skeletal structure. Tooth size measurements based on odontometric investigations in a specific population can be used in gender determination. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate and estimate the accuracy of using permanent maxillary incisors and canines for gender determination. Settings and Design: The undergraduate students of a dental college, meeting the inclusion criteria, were selected. After short listing the undergraduate students through the convenience sampling technique, a total of 300 subjects were purposively selected. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 300 subjects (150 males and 150 females, the mesiodistal dimensions of the maxillary anterior teeth were taken with the help of a digital vernier calliper and manual divider, with a sharp fine tip. Statistical Analysis: The collected data was subjected to statistical analysis. The data was subsequently processed and analyzed using the SPSS software package version 17. Results: The mesiodistal dimensions of the right and left maxillary canines and central incisors were significantly different (i.e., greater in males as compared to females. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the maxillary central incisors and canines revealed a statistically highly significant sexual dimorphism and could be used as an adjunct for the determination of gender in individuals, as well as in groups, such as, in mass disasters or archaeological sites.

  4. Are Hypomineralized Primary Molars and Canines Associated with Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Figueiredo Sé, Maria Jose; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; Dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes Aparecida Martins; de Cassia Loiola Cordeiro, Rita; Cabral, Renata Nunes; Leal, Soraya Coelho

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of and relationship between hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPM) and hypomineralized primary canines (HPC) with molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH) in 1,963 schoolchildren. The European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) criterion was used for scoring HSPM/HPC and MIH. Only children with four permanent first molars and eight incisors were considered in calculating MIH prevalence (n equals 858); for HSPM/HPC prevalence, only children with four primary second molars (n equals 1,590) and four primary canines (n equals 1,442) were considered. To evaluate the relationship between MIH/HSPM, only children meeting both criteria cited were considered (n equals 534), as was true of MIH/HPC (n equals 408) and HSPM/HPC (n equals 360; chi-square test and logistic regression). The prevalence of MIH was 14.69 percent (126 of 858 children). For HSPM and HPC, the prevalence was 6.48 percent (103 of 1,592) and 2.22 percent (32 of 1,442), respectively. A significant relationship was observed between MIH and both HSPM/HPC (Phypomineralized second primary molars and hypomineralized primary canines are associated with molar-incisor hypomineralization, because children with HSPM/HPC are six times more likely to develop MIH.

  5. Unusual Case of Extraction of Maxillary Lateral Incisors and Mandibular Central Incisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa-María Yañez-Vico

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This article’s purpose is to report a case where maxillary lateral incisors and mandibular central incisors are extracted and a canine substitution was performed as the best therapeutic option in order to obtain symmetry in a malocclusion with an upper lateral incisor with poor prognostic, solve moderate crowding, get enough space for the permanent dentition, and provide stability to the results. Case Report. An 11-year-old boy with straight profile with acute-to-normal nasolabial angle and protruded lips, mixed dentition, lower and upper severe crowding, and a bilateral molar angle Class I. The left maxillary lateral incisor failed endodontic treatment secondary to an intrusive traumatic lesion in the primary and permanent dentition. The treatment of choice was the extraction of both upper lateral incisors and both central lower incisors. The patient finished with molar and canine angle Class I and coincident midlines and was functionally stable; both lateral and protrusive jaw movements were effectively made by the first premolars and central incisors and canines without improper contacts of the rest of the teeth. Overbite of one-third and correct overjet were also achieved, and the esthetic outcome was satisfactory due to the composed material restorations of both the central and lateral incisors, as well as recontouring of the first maxillary premolars.

  6. Orthodontic Treatment of Maxillary Incisors with Severe Root Resorption Caused by Bilateral Canine Impaction in a Class II Division 1 Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Na-Young; Park, Jae Hyun; Lee, Mi-Young; Cho, Jin-Woo; Cho, Jin-Hyoung; An, Ki-Yong; Chae, Jong-Moon

    2016-01-01

    This case report shows the successful alignment of bilateral impacted maxillary canines. A 12-year-old male with the chief complaint of the protrusion of his maxillary anterior teeth happened to have bilateral maxillary canine impaction on the labial side of his maxillary incisors. Four maxillary incisors showed severe root resorption because of the impacted canines. The patient was diagnosed as skeletal Class II malocclusion with proclined maxillary incisors. The impacted canine was carefully retracted using sectional buccal arch wires to avoid further root resorption of the maxillary incisors. To distalize the maxillary dentition, two palatal miniscrews were used. After 25 months of treatment, the maxillary canines were well aligned without any additional root resorption of the maxillary incisors.

  7. Bilaterally impacted mandibular supernumerary premolars associated with unusual clinical complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zameer Pasha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Supernumerary teeth are extra teeth in comparison to the normal dentition. Their prevalence varies between 0.1% and 3.8%. Supernumeraries are more common in permanent dentition and its incidence is higher in maxillary incisor region, followed by maxillary third molar and mandibular molar, premolar, canine, and lateral incisor. The prevalence of supernumerary premolars is between 0.075-0.26%, and they may occur in single or multiple numbers Bilateral occurrence is uncommon and large percentage of supernumerary premolars remains impacted, unerupted, and usually asymptomatic; radiograph plays an important role in diagnosis of these. The present paper reports a case of bilaterally impacted completely developed supernumerary premolars associated with common clinical complication in unusual manner along with taurodontism of the upper and lower molars.

  8. Esthetic perception of maxillary lateral incisor agenesis treatment by canine mesialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Antonino; Pinho, Teresa

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate perception of the smile in maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (MLIA) cases treated by mesialization of a canine. Nine images were digitally modified from the same frontal intraoral photograph to simulate various treatment options for space closure in MLIA. A questionnaire was submitted to laypersons (303), general dentists (215), prosthodontists (55) and orthodontists (81). Statistical tests with a significance level of Pdental and gingival reshaping. All study groups considered the simple dental reshaping of the mesial edge of the canine to be attractive. In the analysis of the images grouped together for both unilateral and bilateral MLIA, the view showing dental and gingival reshaping was considered the most attractive whereas unmodified mesialization was considered the least attractive. Regarding the space closure treatments, although all groups regarded simple dental reshaping of the canine to be attractive, the dental professionals considered gingival and crown reshaping to be more esthetic. In contrast, laypersons were not significantly responsive to this dental and gingival modification as compared to only slight reshaping of the mesial edge of the cusp of the mesialized canine in MLIA. Copyright © 2015 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Retrospective Study of Association between Displacement of Maxillary Canine and Tooth Agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, E; Lee, K; An, S; Song, J; Ra, J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the interrelationships between displacement of maxillary canine and tooth agenesis in age from 10 to 19 years. The panoramic radiographs of 128 subjects with displacement of maxillary canine and 600 subjects without displacement of maxillary canine were examined. The panoramic radiographs taken between 2003 and 2013 were used for diagnosis other related dental anomalies, including permanent tooth agenesis and small maxillary lateral incisor. Patients with maxillary canine displacement had a significantly higher prevalence rate of permanent tooth agenesis excluding of third molars (p agenesis of maxillary lateral incisor (p 0.05). This study indicates that there is positive relationship between displacement of maxillary canine, small maxillary lateral incisor and permanent tooth agenesis. Especially, maxillary lateral incisor and maxillary second premolar have strong association with maxillary canine displacement. Consequently, permanent tooth agenesis and small maxillary lateral incisor can be a predictor of maxillary canine displacement.

  10. A comparison of various removable partial denture clasp materials and fabrication procedure for placing clasps on canine and premolar teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandenBrink, J P; Wolfaardt, J F; Faulkner, M G

    1993-08-01

    There is no established protocol for selection among the different retentive material-attachment combinations for clasps other than tradition or laboratory preference. Various wrought-wire, cast-metal, and thermoplastic materials were subjected to several fabrication procedures and tested in a custom-designed force displacement apparatus. The wrought wires included ADA Spec. No. 7 type I and type II alloys and other precious and nonprecious alloys. A graphic means was devised to allow the rational selection of wrought-wire clasp-arm combinations for placing clasps on canine and premolar teeth. Guidelines for using straight wire data for curved wire applications are indicated.

  11. Tooth fractures in canine clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capik, I.; Ledecky, V.; Sevcik, A.

    2001-01-01

    Tooth fractures constitute a considerable fraction of all tooth diseases. Out of the 5,370 dogs treated during four years, 492 were presented with dental problems and 28.3 % of the latter were treated for tooth fractures. Canines were the most frequently affected teeth (38.8 %), followed by premolars (33.1 %), incisors (25.9 %), and molars (2.2 %), 55.4 % of the patients with canine and incisor fractures being large breed dogs. Fractures of premolars (mostly of 108, 208) were divided evenly irrespective of breed or body size. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment yielded good therapeutic results in most cases, but repeated treatment was necessary in some patients

  12. Prediction of agenesis of the mandibular second premolar using the developmental stages of the mandibular canine, first premolar, and second molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji-Soo; Shin, Teo Jeon; Kim, Young-Jae; Kim, Jung-Wook; Jang, Ki-Taeg; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Hyun, Hong-Keun

    2018-03-01

    The aim in this study was to suggest a standard for early diagnosis of agenesis of the mandibular second premolars (L5) by estimating the developmental stages of the mandibular canines (L3), first premolars (L4), and second molars (L7). Among all 5136 pediatric patients aged 5-11 years who received panoramic radiographs between June 2008 and December 2009 at Seoul National University Dental Hospital, 215 control patients and 74 agenesis patients who met inclusion criteria were analyzed. The developmental stages of all L3, L4, L5, and L7 of control and agenesis patients were estimated using the method proposed by Demirjian. To identify the tooth (L3, L4, L7) with the developmental pattern most similar to that of L5, Kendall rank correlation coefficients and Bootstrap method were used. To verify that patients with agenesis of L5 show delayed development, Wilcoxon rank sum test was used. To identify the stages in which to diagnose agenesis of L5, we performed survival analysis. There was a significant correlation between the developmental stages of L3, L4, L7 and L5. The developmental stages of those three teeth in the agenesis group were delayed compared with those in the control group at certain ages. If the developmental stages of at least two of those three teeth reach Demirjian stage D without the calcification of L5, agenesis of L5 can be confirmed. Agenesis of L5 can be confirmed when two of the three teeth (L3, L4, L7) reach Demirjian stage D. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mandibular changes secondary to serial extractions compared with late premolar extractions and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Esther; Kennedy, David B; Aleksejuniene, Jolanta; Hannam, Alan G; Yen, Edwin H

    2015-10-01

    Variations in treatment times for serial extraction and late premolar extraction patients may be due to differences in the time needed to flatten the occlusal curves. In this study, we compared tooth tipping and occlusal curves in patients treated by serial extractions or late premolar extractions with untreated controls. Mandibular dental casts and cephalometric radiographs were collected from 90 subjects (30 Class I control subjects, 30 patients with serial extractions, and 30 with late premolar extractions) at 3 time points: T0, baseline for the controls and serial extraction patients; T1, after natural drift and preorthodontics for the controls and the serial extraction patients, and pretreatment for the late premolar extraction patients; and T2, after comprehensive orthodontic treatment for the serial extraction and the late premolar extraction groups. The long axes of the central incisor, canine, and first molar to the palatal plane were measured on digitized headfilms to determine the direction and the amount of tipping between the time points. Three occlusal curves were measured by sphere fitting cusp-tip landmarks on digitized mandibular casts. From T0 to T1, incisors and canines in the patients with serial extractions tipped distally. Molars at T1 in the patients with serial extractions were tipped forward more than in the late premolar extraction patients and the controls. From T1 to T2, canines and molars in the patients with serial extractions were uprighted. Serial extractions produce steeper occlusal curves and distal tipping of the incisors and canines after drift (T1). Posttreatment (T2) occlusal curves in the patients with serial extractions are steeper than in the late premolar extraction patients and controls (except for the curve of Spee). After the serial extractions, orthodontic treatment included incisor and canine proclination, with molar uprighting and occlusal curve flattening. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists

  14. Orthopantomographic evaluation of canine and first premolar using Demirjian's stages in central India: new approach to forensic age estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Hrishikesh V; Dixit, Pradeep; Shrigiriwar, Manish; Bardale, Rajesh

    2012-07-01

    Teeth development is widely used for age estimation in forensic science. The aims of this study were as follows: first, to establish Indian data on canine and first premolar development for age estimation and second, to investigate population differences in teeth development. Orthopantomograms of 340 Indian children aged between 5 and 14 years were analyzed. Demirjian's stages were recorded for the developmental evaluation of canine and first premolar and for further descriptive statistical analysis. A two-way ANOVA was performed to test the significance of difference in teeth development by sex and stage. A one-way ANOVA was performed to investigate population differences in teeth development. Results showed statistically significant differences in teeth development by sex and stage. Accordingly, teeth development was earlier in girls. No statistically significant differences were observed in timings of Demirjian's stages among different populations. In conclusion, the findings of this study could be used for age estimation of Indian children. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. Where to position osteotomies in genioglossal advancement surgery based on locations of the mental foramen, canine, lateral incisor, central incisor, and genial tubercle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joshua S; Lee, Christopher; Rogers, Jason M; Sun, Ho-Hyun; Liu, Yuan F; Elo, Jeffrey A; Inman, Jared C

    2017-09-01

    The study aimed to provide precise measurements of anterior mandibular structural anatomy and to explore potential osteotomies for genioglossal advancement. Cone beam computed tomography was used to analyze 33 randomly selected patients undergoing surgery for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) between 2014 and 2016 at an academic surgical hospital. The locations of relevant mandibular structures were measured and statistical modeling was performed. Mean horizontal distances from midline to the mental foramina and the roots of the canine, lateral incisor, and central incisor were 22.11 ± 1.92, 13.56 ± 3.01, 6.19 ± 1.58, and 2.04 ± 0.87 mm, respectively. Mean vertical distances from the inferior border of the mandible were 15.15 ± 1.77, 17.11 ± 3.28, 20.48 ± 3.10, and 21.81 ± 3.49 mm, respectively. The superior border of the genial tubercle was 15.63 ± 2.75 mm, and the inferior border was 6.87 ± 3.29, from the inferior border of the mandible. The angle of decline of the best-fit line through the important structures was about 18° from the occlusion plane at the midline. A straight line estimating the mental foramen, canine, lateral incisor, and central incisor tooth roots crosses at a mean of 22.3-22.6 mm above the inferior border of the mandible at the midline and has an angle of decline of about 18°. Potential osteotomies made parallel to and below this line result in tradeoffs between maximizing capture of the genioglossus muscle attachment and risk of dental/neurovascular injury.

  16. Localization of Impacted Maxillary Canines and Root Resorption of Neighbouring Lateral Incisor Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Farokh-Gisour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Canine impaction is one of the most prevalent impactions and it affects aesthetic and function of the oral cavity. Recent advances in 3D imaging has provided new facilities for precise localization of the impacted teeth and their effect on adjacent roots. The aim of this study was to assess the location of impacted canine and adjacent root resorption by CBCT in an Iranian adolescent population. In this retrospective, descriptive-analytic study, CBCT images of 25 orthodontic patients (seven had bilateral canine impaction and the bucco-lingual and vertical position of teeth and tooth location to the adjacent teeth were evaluated using CBCT. A total of 32 impacted canines were examined (24 females,8 males. Of these, 11 (34.4% were located buccally, 11 (34.4% mid-alveolar and 10 (31.1% palatally .in vertical position, 7 of the impacted canines (21.9% were coronal and 16 (50% in the cervical 2/3 and 8 teeth (25% were positioned in cervical one third and one of them (3.1% was positioned apically. Among 32 studied teeth, 6 (%8.8 of them did not cause incisor degeneration and 8 (%25 teeth cause mild degeneration and none of them caused intense incisor resorption. The average size of follicle was 3.6mm. According to the results, CBCT is a good tool for evaluation of impacted canine location and its effect on adjacent roots. Another important finding was the high prevalence of root resorption (90%, which implies immediate treatment of impacted canines.

  17. Extraction of Maxillary Central Incisors: An Orthodontic-Restorative Treatment

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    Zohreh Hedayati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malformed central incisors with poor prognosis could be candidates for extraction especially in crowded dental arches. This case report refers to a 12-year-old boy who suffered from malformed upper central incisors associated with severe attrition. Upper lateral incisors were positioned palatally and canines were rotated and positioned in the high buccal area. The patient had class II malocclusion and space deficiency in both dental arches. Due to incisal wear and malformed short maxillary central incisors and the need for root canal therapy with a major crown build-up, these teeth were extracted. The maxillary lateral incisors were substituted. Thus the maxillary canines were substituted for lateral incisors and the first premolars were substituted for canines. In the lower dental arch the first bicuspids were extracted. Composite resin build-up was performed on the maxillary lateral incisors and canines. This allowed for the crowding and the malocclusion to be corrected. Subsequent gingivectomy improved the patient's gingival margins and smile esthetics one month after orthodontic therapy.

  18. Agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors and associated dental anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garib, Daniela Gamba; Alencar, Bárbara Maria; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of dental anomalies in patients with agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors and to compare the findings with the prevalence of these anomalies in the general population. A sample of 126 patients, aged 7 to 35 years, with agenesis of at least 1 maxillary lateral incisor was selected. Panoramic and periapical radiographs and dental casts were used to analyze other associated dental anomalies, including agenesis of other permanent teeth, ectopia of unerupted permanent teeth, microdontia of maxillary lateral incisors, and supernumerary teeth. The occurrence of these anomalies was compared with prevalence data previously reported for the general population. Statistical testing was performed with the chi-square test (P <0.05) and the odds ratio. Patients with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis had a significantly increased prevalence rate of permanent tooth agenesis (18.2%), excluding the third molars. The occurrence of third-molar agenesis in a subgroup aged 14 years or older (n = 76) was 35.5%. The frequencies of maxillary second premolar agenesis (10.3%), mandibular second premolar agenesis (7.9%), microdontia of maxillary lateral incisors (38.8%), and distoangulation of mandibular second premolars (3.9%) were significantly increased in our sample compared with the general population. In a subgroup of patients aged 10 years or older (n = 115), the prevalence of palatally displaced canines was elevated (5.2%). The prevalences of mesioangulation of mandibular second molars and supernumerary teeth were not higher in the sample. Permanent tooth agenesis, maxillary lateral incisor microdontia, palatally displaced canines, and distoangulation of mandibular second premolars are frequently associated with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis, providing additional evidence of a genetic interrelationship in the causes of these dental anomalies. 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  19. Prediction of the mesiodistal size of unerupted canines and premolars for a group of Romanian children: a comparative study

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    Cornel Gheorghe BOITOR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of the present study was to develop an optimization method of multiple linear regression equation (MLRE, using a genetic algorithm to determine a set of coefficients that minimize the prediction error for the sum of permanent premolars and canine dimensions in a group of young people from a central area of Romania represented by a city called Sibiu. Material and Methods To test the proposed method, we used a multiple linear regression equation derived from the estimation method proposed by Mojers, to which we adjusted regression coefficients using the Breeder genetic algorithm. A total of 92 children were selected with complete permanent teeth with no clinically visible dental caries, proximal restorations or orthodontic treatment. A hard dental stone was made for each of these models, which was then measured with a digital calliper. The Dahlberg analyses of variance had been performed to determine the error of method, then the Correlation t Test was applied, and finally the MLRE equations were obtained using the version 16 for Windows of the SPSS program. Results The correlation coefficient of MLRE was between 51-67% and the significance level was set at α=0.05. Comparing predictions provided by the new and respectively old method, we can conclude that the Breeder genetic algorithm is capable of providing the best values for parameters of multiple linear regression equations, and thus our equations are optimized for the best performance. Conclusion The prediction error rates of the optimized equations using the Breeder genetic algorithm are smaller than those provided by the multiple linear regression equations proposed in the recent study.

  20. Dental development of Didelphis albiventris (Marsupialia: I - incisors and canines Desenvolvimento dental de Didelphis albiventris (Marsupialia: I. incisivos e caninos

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    C. T. Fonseca

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of incisors and canines in marsupials of D. albiventris was studied at various stages of development. Seventy-six specimens, with ages varying from 0 to 100 days, were used in this investigation. Serial sections of the maxilla were obtained in the transverse plane and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Histological analyses were made to verify the pattern of teeth development, as well as their chronology of eruption. The period of time from birth to 100 days comprised the entire process of teeth development, from epithelial bud formation to early eruption of the teeth. Oral epithelium thickening gave rise to the functional incisors and canines. In addition, a secondary dental lamina emerged in different phases of development in the outer epithelium of incisors and canines, which degenerated when it reached the bud stage. No evidence of deciduous dentition was observed. The results of this investigation suggest that secondary dental lamina represents remnants of a primitive condition in which secondary dentition used to be present.Estudou-se o desenvolvimento dos dentes incisivos e caninos em 76 amostras de Didelphis albiventris com idade entre 0 e 100 dias. Cortes transversais, seriados de 6 µm de espessura foram obtidos da região da maxila, corados com Hematoxilina e Eosina e analisados ao microscópio de luz. Verificou-se que o período estudado abrange todo o desenvolvimento dental, desde a fase de iniciação da interação epitélio/mesenquima até a completa formação e erupção dos incisivos e caninos. O espessamento do epitélio oral dá origem aos incisivos e caninos funcionais, enquanto o epitélio dental externo do órgão dental origina uma lâmina dental secundária, a qual sofre degeneração, quando o dente alcança o estágio de botão. Não há vestígios de dentição decídua. Sugere-se que a lâmina dental secundária é remanescente de uma condição primitiva na qual ocorria dentição secundária.

  1. Patologías dentales en incisivos, caninos y primer premolar en caballos chilenos adultos Dental pathologies in incisors, canines and first premolar in adult Chilean horses

    OpenAIRE

    L Muñoz; F Vidal; O Sepúlveda; O Ortiz; C Rehhof

    2010-01-01

    Las patologías dentales han ido tomando mayor relevancia clínico veterinaria, aumentando el número de consultas, tratamientos y procedimientos preventivos. En caballos chilenos, la información existente de patologías dentales es nula, por lo que se hace primordial la investigación y recolección de datos en esta raza. Se analizaron 100 caballos pertenecientes a la Asociación de Rodeo Concepción, entre los meses de junio y septiembre del año 2007. Los materiales que se utilizaron fueron puro, l...

  2. The difference of canine, first and second premolar tooth size resulted from cone beam computed tomography imaging with Moyers Prediction Table on the working study model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julies Hariani Sugiaman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Model study is one of the standard orthodontic components which is important for diagnosis and treatment plan, but in some patients with the high gag reflex, it will be difficult to get this kind of study models. The existence of a new device which is able to show the condition of patients' mouth in three space areas (axial, sagittal, and coronal is expected to be an alternative when a study model is difficult to get. The purpose of this study is to find out whether or not there are any differences on the size of canine's mesiodistal, first and second premolar resulted from CBCT imaging with Moyers analysis on the study models. The method of the research is comparative descriptive. Measurements are made on 10 CBCT imaging results and 10 study models. The mesiodistal size, the result of CBCT imaging is measured by the available computer program and also the mesiodistal size of the study models is measured using a sliding compass, and then the size of canines, first and second premolar teeth resulted from CBCT imaging are compared to the result of Moyers method analysis on the study models. The t-test is used to find out if there is a difference between teeth size value between the CBCT imaging with the study models. The significance is determined based on the p-value t table.

  3. Influence of deciduous canine extractions on incisor alignment, dental arch dimensions and dental fear

    OpenAIRE

    Sjögren, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Interception of crowding, by extraction of deciduous and permanent teeth, to eliminate or at least facilitate orthodontic treatment has a long tradition. This treatment procedure, know as “guided eruption” or “serial extraction” was re-introduced by Robert Hotz and Birger Kjellgren in 1947-48. The sequential extraction procedure begins with the removal of the deciduous canines in the early mixed dentition and additional extractions of deciduous first molars and permanent bicusp...

  4. On the Etiology of Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Kup, Elaine

    Molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a condition that is defined based on its peculiar clinical presentation. Reports on the etiology of the condition and possible risk factors are inconclusive and the original suggestion that MIH is an idiopathic condition is often cited. Our group was the first to suggest MIH has a genetic component that involves genetic variation in genes expressed during dental enamel formation. In this report, we provide a rationale to explain the preferential affection of molars and incisors. We suggest that MIH is a genetic condition based on its prevalence, which varies depending on the geographic location, and the evidence that on occasion second primary molars, permanent canines, and premolars can show signs of hypomineralization of enamel when molars and incisors are affected. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Penatalaksanaan Kasus Maloklusi dengan Agenesis Insisif Lateral Atas dan Premolar Dua Bawah pada Periode Gigi Bercampur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratri Anandita

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In orthodontic practice, orthodontist frequently face the patients with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors and mandibular second premolar. There are some treatment options for patients with congenitally missing second premolar such as keeping the deciduous second molar, extracting the molars and allowing space to close spontaneously, prosthetic replacement, autotransplantation and orthodontic space closure. Instead of treatment option for congenitally maxillary lateral incisor are orthodontic space opening for future restoration or orthodontic space closure using canines to replace missing maxillary lateral incisors. There are some factors must be consider before making a decision, such as the facial profile, dentoalveolar protrusion, the tooth size-arch length discrepancy, inclination and position of canine, dental esthetic of canines, occlusion, the dental relationship, patient’s age, the stage of development of the adjacent teeth and the condition of the deciduous predecessors with regard to root resorption and infracclusion. In this paper it will be discussed about the indications, advantages and disadvantages of both treatment modalities to help clinicians to cope with the malocclusion cases with congenital missing teeth. In this regard it needed teamwork among the orthodontist, prosthodontist, dental surgeon and restorative dentist to analyzing some factors related to individual patients and establishing overall treatment plans.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v16i1.18

  6. Surgical-orthodontic treatment of Class III malocclusion with agenesis of lateral incisor and unerupted canine

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    Bruno Boaventura Vieira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Orthodontic-surgical treatment was performed in patient with skeletal Class III malocclusion due to exceeding mandibular growth. Patient also presented upper and lower dental protrusion, overjet of -3.0 mm, overbite of -1.0 mm, congenital absence of tooth #22, teeth #13 and supernumerary impaction, tooth #12 with conoid shape and partly erupted in supraversion, prolonged retention of tooth #53, tendency to vertical growth of the face and facial asymmetry. The discrepancy on the upper arch was -2.0 mm and -5.0 mm on the lower arch. METHODS: The pre-surgical orthodontic treatment was performed with extractions of the teeth #35 and #45. On the upper arch, teeth #53, #12 and supernumerary were extracted to accomplish the traction of the impacted canine. The spaces of the lower extractions were closed with mesialization of posterior segment. After aligning and leveling the teeth, extractions spaces closure and correct positioning of teeth on the bone bases, the correct intercuspation of the dental arch, with molars and canines in Angle's Class I, coincident midline, normal overjet and overbite and ideal torques, were evaluated through study models. The patient was submitted to orthognathic surgery and then the post-surgical orthodontic treatment was finished. RESULTS: The Class III malocclusion was treated establishing occlusal and facial normal standards.

  7. Increased occurrence of dental anomalies associated with second-premolar agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garib, Daniela G; Peck, Sheldon; Gomes, Simone Carinhena

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of dental anomalies in patients with agenesis of second premolars and compare the findings with the prevalence of these anomalies in the general population. A Brazilian sample of 203 patients aged 8 to 22 years was selected. All patients presented agenesis of at least one second premolar. Panoramic and periapical radiographs and dental casts were used to analyze the presence of other associated dental anomalies, including agenesis of other permanent teeth, ectopia of unerupted permanent teeth, infraocclusion of deciduous molars, microdontia of maxillary lateral incisors, and supernumerary teeth. The occurrence of these anomalies was compared with occurrence data previously reported for the general population. Statistical testing was performed using the chi-square test (P agenesis of at least one second premolar presented a significantly increased prevalence rate of permanent tooth agenesis (21%), excluding third molars. Among the sample segment aged 14 years or greater (N = 77), occurrence of third-molar agenesis (48%) exceeded twice its normal frequency. Significant increases in occurrence of microdontia of maxillary lateral incisors (20.6%), infraocclusion of deciduous molars (24.6%), and distoangulation of mandibular second premolars (7.8%) were observed. Palatally displaced canine anomaly was also significantly elevated (8.1%). The results provide evidence that agenesis of other permanent teeth, microdontia, deciduous molar infraocclusion, and certain dental ectopias are the products of the same genetic mechanisms that cause second-premolar agenesis.

  8. Root development of permanent lateral incisor in cleft lip and palate children: A radiographic study

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    Amarlal Deepti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the root development of lateral incisor on the cleft side with the root development of its contralateral tooth in cleft lip and palate children. Setting: Cleft lip and palate wing, Meenakshi Ammal Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: A sample of 96 orthopantamograms of patients with unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and/or cleft palate was selected, regardless of sex and race. Main Outcome Measure: Orthopantamograms were analyzed for root development of lateral incisor on the cleft and noncleft side. Associated anomalies like hypodontia, supernumerary teeth, malformed lateral incisors and root development of canine, if present, were recorded. Findings and Conclusions: Root development of permanent lateral incisor was delayed on the cleft side compared to the noncleft side. There was a statistically significant relationship between levels of root development of lateral incisors on the cleft side within the different study groups ( P < 0.05. Incidence of hypodontia increased in proportion to cleft severity. Frequency of missing second premolars, supernumerary teeth and malformed lateral incisors increased in cleft lip and palate patients. Root development of canine showed a slight delay on the cleft side when compared to the canine on the noncleft side.

  9. Transmigration of mandibular canine – case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruszka, Katarzyna; Różyło, T. Katarzyna; Różyło-Kalinowska, Ingrid; Denkiewicz, Katarzyna; Masłowska, Klaudia

    2014-01-01

    Transmigration is a phenomenon of movement of an unerupted tooth in the bone across the midline. This anomaly is not often found. Transmigration is more prevalent in females than in males, and more often encountered in the mandible than maxilla, it affects mostly canines. The aim of this study was to present a case report of a mandibular canine transmigration in a patient aged 12. Intraoral examination determined hypodontia of right second premolar and delayed eruption of left second premolar in maxilla, as well as persistent deciduous teeth: right second molar, left canine and second molar. The patient was referred for a Cone-Beam CT examination, which allowed precise visualization of the transmigrating canine as well as ruled out resorption of roots of mandibular incisors. The treatment with a maxillary fixed orthodontic appliance was finished after obtaining a satisfactory result. Proper alignment of the incisors in the anterior-posterior plane and correct midline position were accepted by the patient. Transmigrating canine after consultation with the surgeon was designed to further radiological observation

  10. Intrusion of Lower Incisors in Deep Overbite Cases with Mini-screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaa-Eldin, Ahmed M; Salem, Ahmed S; Fouda, Maher A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the dentoskeletal effects of intrusion of the lower incisor teeth by mini-screws. Ten patients were selected from the outpatient clinic of the Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Mansoura University with Angle's Class II division I malocclusions. Age ranged from 15 to 18 years (15.4 year mean) with deep overbite (more than 1/3 the crown height of the lower incisors covered) requiring intrusion of the lower incisors. After alignment of the first molars, the second premolars ,and canines without inclusion of the lower four incisors, the cuspids were retracted on 16x22 inch stainless steel wire. For each patient, two mini-screws were inserted for anchorage for the lower incisors segment intrusion between the lateral incisor and the cuspid--one in each side and connected to a utility arch wire. The mean of overbite correction was 4.2 mm (p<. 05, and lower incisors were intruded significantly by a mean of 3.55 mm (p<.05). The mandibular incisors were effectively intruded by using mini-screws as orthodontic anchorage with no significant counteractive movements in the molars.

  11. Impacted maxillary central incisor: surgical exposure and orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Teresa; Neves, Manuel; Alves, Célia

    2011-08-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a patient with a horizontally impacted maxillary central incisor, a canine in the same quadrant, and an inclusion tendency. Due to severe crowing in the maxilla and the Class II molar relationship on the impaction side, a 2-stage treatment plan was developed. In the first stage, the right first premolar and deciduous canine were extracted; this allowed enough space for the eruption of the maxillary right permanent canine. The second stage included surgical exposure and traction of the impacted central incisor with a fixed orthodontic appliance. An excisional uncovering technique was needed to expose the impacted incisor. After it erupted, an apically positioned partial-thickness flap was used to add keratinized attached gingiva in the area surrounding the crown, initially located in an area of unattached gingiva. The patient finished treatment with a normal and stable occlusion between the maxillary and mandibular arches and an adequate width of attached gingiva. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Why segment the maxilla between laterals and canines?

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    Lucas Senhorinho Esteves

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Maxillary surgery on a bone segment enables movement in the sagittal and vertical planes. When performed on multiple segments, it further provides movement in the transverse plane. Typical sites for interdental osteotomies are between laterals and canines, premolars and canines, or between incisors. Additionally, osteotomies can be bilateral, unilateral or asymmetric. The ability to control intercanine width, buccolingual angulation of incisors, and correct Bolton discrepancy are some of the advantages of maxillary segmentation between laterals and canines. Objective: This article describes important features to be considered in making a clinical decision to segment the maxilla between laterals and canines when treating a dentoskeletal deformity. It further discusses the history of this surgical approach, the indications for its clinical use, the technique used to implement it, as well as its advantages, disadvantages, complications and stability. It is therefore hoped that this paper will contribute to disseminate information on this topic, which will inform the decision-making process of those professionals who wish to make use of this procedure in their clinical practice. Conclusions: Segmental maxillary osteotomy between laterals and canines is a versatile technique with several indications. Furthermore, it offers a host of advantages compared with single-piece osteotomy, or between canines and premolars.

  13. Class I malocclusion with severe double rotrusion treated with first premolars extraction

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    Ricardo Moresca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Angle Class I malocclusion with bimaxillary protrusion is characterized by severe buccal tipping of incisors, which causes upper and lower lip protrusion. First premolars extraction is recommended to reduce facial convexity as a result of anterior teeth retraction, which keeps canines and first molars in key to occlusion. In order to yield orthodontic results that are compatible with ideal esthetic and cephalometric outcomes, the space closure phase needs to be carried out with overbite and incisors torque control. The majority of cases also requires maximum anchorage of posterior teeth. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO.

  14. Class I malocclusion with severe double rotrusion treated with first premolars extraction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresca, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Angle Class I malocclusion with bimaxillary protrusion is characterized by severe buccal tipping of incisors, which causes upper and lower lip protrusion. First premolars extraction is recommended to reduce facial convexity as a result of anterior teeth retraction, which keeps canines and first molars in key to occlusion. In order to yield orthodontic results that are compatible with ideal esthetic and cephalometric outcomes, the space closure phase needs to be carried out with overbite and incisors torque control. The majority of cases also requires maximum anchorage of posterior teeth. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO) as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO. PMID:25162577

  15. A rare case of dens invaginatus in a mandibular canine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Roy; Moule, Alexander J; Walsh, Laurence J

    2010-08-01

    Dens invaginatus (dens in dente) is a common dental anomaly with a reported prevalence of between 0.04% and 10%. It typically affects permanent maxillary lateral incisors, central incisors and premolars. These developmental lesions are less common in mandibular teeth and are extremely rare in canines and molars. This report describes a rare case of dens invaginatus (Oehlers type II) in a permanent mandibular canine. The tooth was mature with a closed apex and showed apical pathosis. The tooth was treated endodontically using a non-surgical technique with hand endodontic files, and then followed up after a period of 8 months. A follow-up radiograph showed some healing of the lesion.

  16. Orthodontic tooth movement after extraction of previously autotransplanted maxillary canines and ridge augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, A R; Fletcher, B

    2000-12-01

    A case report is detailed in which autotransplanted maxillary canines were removed and the spaces closed. Substantial surrounding bone loss was associated with the upper right canine, and a bone graft was needed to reestablish normal dentoalveolar ridge morphology. Bone was taken from the maxillary tuberosity and placed in the canine extraction site, fixed with a bone screw, and covered with GoreTex. Seven months after placement of the bone graft, the GoreTex and stabilizing screw were removed to allow for consolidation of the bone. The upper left canine and lower second premolars were extracted, and fixed appliances were placed in both arches to align the teeth and close the spaces. Protraction of the upper right first premolar and retraction of the lateral incisor into the graft site were kept slow and constant with continued periodontal assessment. During the space closure, there was some concern that the bone in the graft site might resorb, leaving the teeth with compromised periodontal support. However, no significant periodontal attachment loss occurred despite ongoing concern about the amount of keratinized tissue. Perhaps the relatively slow rate of tooth movement provided for bone to be maintained and recreated ahead of the tooth. Almost complete closure of the upper canine extraction spaces was achieved. The upper premolars were substituted for the maxillary canines, and unfavorable prosthetic options were thus avoided. The lower arch was aligned, and the extraction spaces completely closed.

  17. Pleistocene vertebrates from Celebes. VIII. Dentition and skeleton of Celebochoerus heekereni Hooijer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijer, D.A.

    1954-01-01

    CONTENTS Introduction............... 1 Celebochoerus heekereni Hooijer........... 2 Lower premolars............. 4 Upper premolars............. 9 Lower canines.............. 13 Upper canines.............. 15 Lower incisors.............. 23 Upper incisors.............. 24 Lower molars..............

  18. Frequency of impacted teeth and categorization of impacted canines: A retrospective radiographic study using orthopantomograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoubi, Hassan; Alharbi, Abdulgader Abdullatif; Ferguson, Donald J; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the frequency of impacted maxillary canines using seven subtype classification system. For this purpose, impacted maxillary canines have been divided into seven various subtypes. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional, and retrospective study conducted using radiographic data of residents of Madinah, Al Munawwarah. Radiographic data of 14,000 patients, who attended College of Dentistry, Taibah University, from January 2011 to February 2015, were screened against the selection criteria for the presence of impacted teeth. The individuals with maxillary impacted canines were matched to maxillary canine impaction. The occurrence of each subtype of impacted canines was calculated. Impacted teeth are more common in the maxilla compared to mandible. The impacted canine represented the highest proportion of all impacted maxillary teeth followed by the second premolars and the central incisors. According to the classification system represented, Type II of canine impaction comprised the highest proportion (51%) while Type IV (0.5%) comprised the lowest frequency. The maxillary canine is the most frequently impacted tooth followed by mandibular canines. Although there are many variations, the majority of impacted canines fall into Type II of the classification of impacted canines.

  19. Delayed dental maturity in dentitions with agenesis of mandibular second premolars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, S; Christensen, I J; Kjaer, I

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate dental maturity in the mandibular canine/premolar and molar innervation fields in children with agenesis of the 2nd mandibular premolar and to associate these findings with normal control material.......To evaluate dental maturity in the mandibular canine/premolar and molar innervation fields in children with agenesis of the 2nd mandibular premolar and to associate these findings with normal control material....

  20. Root Length and Anatomy of Impacted Maxillary Canines in Patients with Unilateral Maxillary Canine Impaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostfa Shahabi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Canine impaction is a common occurrence. In this study, we sought to investigate the root anatomy and length of impacted canines and lateral incisor adjacent to impacted maxillary canine. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, three-dimensional tomographic imaging was performed on 26 patients with unilateral maxillary canine impaction. In this study, we evaluated root length and anatomy of impacted canines, in terms of resorption intensity and curvature, with Planmeca Romexis Viewer 4.0. Furthermore, crown shape as well as root length and anatomy of the lateral incisors adjacent to impacted canines were investigated and compared with the other side on the dental arch, where canine eruption was normal. Results: Root length of impacted canines was significantly lower than that of normal canines (P=0.011. There were no significant differences between root length of lateral incisors adjacent to impacted canines and root length of lateral incisors adjacent to normal canines (P=0.221. Moreover, the resorption intensity of the adjacent lateral incisors was higher than that of the impacted canines. No significant differences were noted in root resorption intensity between the lateral incisors adjacent to the imacted canines and the lateral incisors adjacent to normal canines (P=0.36. In addition, resorption intensity was significantly higher in impacted canines than in normal canines (P=0.024. Root anatomy of impacted canines was not significantly different from that of normal canines (P=0.055. The crown shape of the lateral incisors adjacent to impacted canines was not significantly different from that of the lateral incisors adjacent to normal canines (P=0.052. Conclusion: Impaction can probably affect root length and canine resorption severity. However, root and crown shape of lateral incisors cannot always be associated with canine impaction.

  1. Permanent Maxillary Canine Agenesis: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambalimath, Halaswamy V; Jain, Somya; Patil, Raju Umaji; Asokan, Alexander; Kambalimath, Deepashri

    2015-01-01

    Congenitally missing teeth (CMT) are among one of the commonly known dental anomalies. The most frequently missing teeth in the permanent dentition, excluding the third molars, are mandibular second premolars and maxillary lateral incisors. Exclusive agenesis of both maxillary canines is an extremely rare occurrence and only a few cases have been reported. Previous studies showed that the prevalence of maxillary canine agenesis varies between 0.07 and 0.13%. In recent studies on Indian population, no cases of maxillary canine agenesis have been documented. This paper reports a case of non-syndromic bilateral agenesis of permanent maxillary canines, along with agenesis of both mandibular central incisors in a healthy 13-year-old Indian female patient; and a brief literature review on prevalence, etiology and treatment modalities of the condition. How to cite this article: Kambalimath HV, Jain S, Patil RU, Asokan A, Kambalimath D. Permanent Maxillary Canine Agenesis: A Rare Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015; 8(3):242-246.

  2. Perawatan maloklusi Angle kelas II divisi 2 pasien dewasa dengan pencabutan dua premolar atas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tita Ratya Utari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of maloclussion angle class II division 2 in adult patient with two maxillary premolar extractions. Angle Malocclusion class II division 2 had a characteristic of central incisor retroclination, lateral incisor proclination, added by severe deep overbite that caused aesthetic disturbance to the patient. In adult patient this type of case usually is treated with rst premolar extraction. This case report aimed to describe orthodontic treatment in maloclussion Angle class II division 2 to correct anterior crowding deep overbite which nally improve the aesthetics. A 19-year old female patient with overjet 0.5 mm, step bite (overbite 7.8mm and ANB 10° (SNA 92°, SNB 82°. An 18 year old male patient with overjet 0.5 mm step bite (overbite 9mm and ANB 10,5° (SNA 87,5°, SNB 77°. Both patients were diagnosed with malocclusion Angle class II division 2 with the palatoversi of central incisor, labioversi of lateral incisor and anterior crowding with trapezoid shape of the jaw. Patient was given orthodontic treatment using xed appliance with straight wire system and extraction of upper rst premolar. The treatments began by correcting the inclination of central incisor that allowed braces installation in lower anterior teeth. Canine was distalized then anterior retraction, it followed by intrusion of anterior maxilla using U loop. Treatment for malocclusion Angle Class II division 2 with the extraction of upper rst premolar feasible for correcting its anterior relation. Deep overbite and anterior crowding in both patients were corrected for better face aesthetics.   ABSTRAK Maloklusi Angle kelas II divisi 2 dengan karakteristik retroklinasi insisivus sentral, proklinasi insisivus lateral disertai deep overbite yang parah menyebabkan gangguan estetik bagi pasien. pencabutan gigi premolar atas umumnya dilakukan untuk memperbaiki maloklusi pada pasien dewasa. Laporan kasus ini bertujuan memaparkan perawatan ortodontik dengan

  3. Clinical management of a fused upper premolar with supernumerary tooth: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Min Cho

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available n dentistry, the term 'fusion' is used to describe a developmental disorder of dental hard tissues. In the permanent dentition, fusion of a normal tooth and a supernumerary tooth usually involves the incisors or canines. However, a few cases of fusion involving premolars have also been reported to date. We present a rare case in which fusion of the maxillary left second premolar and a supernumerary tooth in a 13-year-old girl was diagnosed using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, Alphard-3030, Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd.. The tooth was bicuspidized after routine nonsurgical root canal treatment, and the separated teeth underwent appropriate restoration procedures. The second premolar and supernumerary tooth remained asymptomatic without any signs of inflammation after a follow-up period of 9 years. Identification of anatomical anomalies is important for treatment in cases involving fusion with supernumerary tooth, and therefore the microscopic examinations and CBCT are essential for the diagnosis. Fused teeth can be effectively managed by the comprehensive treatment which includes both endodontic and periodontal procedures.

  4. Measurement of forces and moments around the maxillary arch for treatment of a simulated lingual incisor and high canine malocclusion using straight and mushroom archwires in fixed lingual appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Brandon; Gullion, Geoffry; Heo, Giseon; Carey, Jason P; Major, Paul W; Romanyk, Dan L

    2017-11-30

    An Orthodontic SIMulator (OSIM) was used to investigate the propagation of forces and moments around a simulated archform for a gingival displaced canine and lingual displaced lateral incisor using fixed lingual orthodontic appliances. In-Ovation L self-ligating lingual brackets were bonded to anatomically shaped teeth on the OSIM, and the teeth were positioned such that a G4 NiTi 0.016" large maxillary mushroom archwire could be ligated in passive position. Each trial consisted of two movements: a 3mm lingual displacement of the 1-2 lateral incisor at 0.2 mm increments, and a 1.5 mm gingival displacement of the 2-3 canine at 0.15 mm increments (n = 50). Anterior brackets were repositioned to accommodate G4 NiTi 0.016" universal straight archwires (n = 50). Tests were completed at 37°C, and force and moment data in all directions was collected for each tooth around the arch at all increments. In general, the straight archwire produced significantly larger forces and moments at the centre of resistance for teeth of interest than did mushroom archwires. Specifically, the straight archwire produced 2.62 N and 3.81 N more force in the direction of tooth movement on the tooth being moved for a gingival displaced canine and lingual displaced lateral incisor, respectively, as compared to mushroom archwires. Results from this study suggest that mushroom archwires may provide better mechanics for movement of teeth in the anterior segment when using a round archwire; however, only biomechanical data was considered in this study and there are many factors that need to be considered in treatment planning. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Combined use of miniscrews and continuous arch for intrusive root movement of incisors in Class II division 2 with gummy smile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Wook; Choi, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Kee-Joon

    2014-09-01

    Adequate intrusion and torque control of the retroclined maxillary incisors are critical for the treatment of Class II division 2 (div2) malocclusion. In addition, anterior retraction via lingual root movement can be challenging. This case report demonstrates a combined use of miniscrews and continuous arch with additional torque for intrusion, retraction, and torque control of maxillary incisors in the Class II div2 with gummy smile. A 20-year-old woman presented with multiple issues, including impacted canine, lip protrusion, prolonged retained mandibular primary molar, and two missing maxillary premolars. In order to improve her facial profile and eliminate the need for prosthetic work, the mandibular primary molar and contralateral premolar were extracted. Two miniscrews were placed at the maxillary buccal alveolar bone to apply the posterosuperior force for retraction of anterior teeth, with additional labial crown torque on the arch wire. The results were the intrusion (4 mm) and lingual root movement (17°) of the maxillary incisors without anchorage loss of maxillary molars, flattening of the Curve of Spee, and Class I molar relation that were maintained after 50 months of retention period. The combined use of miniscrews and continuous arch could be a reliable and effective treatment modality for torque control and intrusion of retroclined maxillary incisors in the Class II div2 patient.

  6. Phenotypes of Enamel Hypomineralization and Molar Incisor Hypomineralization in Permanent Dentition: Identification, Quantification and Proposal for Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Neeti

    To report the extent, pattern, clinical presentation and phenotypes of enamel hypomineralization in permanent dentition Study Design: This cross sectional observational study recruited a random sample of 1726, 12-16 year olds. Enamel hypomineralization was scored on all teeth by a calibrated examiner using the EAPD 2003 criteria. Proportions of affected subjects (prevalence) with a minimum of one hypomineralization and Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) were calculated. Proportions of following phenotypes were quantified i.e. MH (only FPM hypomineralization), M+IH (concomitantly affected FPMs and permanent incisors without affecting any other tooth in the arch), MIHO (hypomineralization affecting at least one of the canines, premolars or 2(nd) molars and simultaneously including at least one FPM), IH (only permanent incisor's hypomineralization) and NoFPM (hypomineralization affecting at least one of the canines, premolars and 2(nd) molars but not FPM; incisors can be affected concomitantly). A comparative evaluation of extent and severity of enamel hypomineralization was performed amongst various phenotypes. Statistical measures employed t-test, chi square tests and ANOVA. Overall prevalence of affected subjects was 13.21% (228/1726) and 9.79% (169/1726) for enamel hypomineralization and MIH respectively. A total of 4.36±3.45 teeth/subject and 6.01±5.20 surfaces/subject were found to be affected with enamel hypomineralization. Most prevalent phenotype was M+IH while the least prevalent was IH. Maximum severity i.e. number of affected surfaces and surfaces with PEB were reported for MIHO (p<0.001). Enamel hypomineralization can manifest in any tooth in five phenotypic variations in permanent dentition with varying extent and severity.

  7. Impacted maxillary canines and root resorptions of neighbouring teeth: a radiographic analysis using cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Caroline S; Bornstein, Michael M; Mock, Lothar; Heuberger, Benjamin M; Dietrich, Thomas; Katsaros, Christos

    2013-08-01

    The study analyses the location of impacted maxillary canines and factors influencing root resorptions of adjacent teeth using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In addition, the interrater reliability between observers of two different dental specialties for radiographic parameters will be evaluated. CBCT images of patients who were referred for radiographic localization of impacted maxillary canines and/or suspicion of root resorptions of adjacent teeth were included. The study analysed the exact three-dimensional location of the impacted canines in the anterior maxilla, frequency and extent of root resorptions, and potential influencing factors. To assess interrater agreement, Cohen's correlation parameters were calculated. This study comprises 113 patients with CBCT scans, and 134 impacted canines were analysed retrospectively. In the patients evaluated, 69 impacted canines were located palatally (51.49 per cent), 41 labially (30.60 per cent), and 24 (17.91 per cent) in the middle of the alveolar process. Root resorptions were found in 34 lateral incisors (25.37 per cent), 7 central incisors (5.22 per cent), 6 first premolars (4.48 per cent), and 1 second premolar (0.75 per cent). There was a significant correlation between root resorptions on adjacent teeth and localization of the impacted canine in relation to the bone, as well as vertical localization of the canine. Interrater agreement showed values of 0.546-0.877. CBCT provides accurate information about location of the impacted canine and prevalence and degree of root resorption of neighbouring teeth with high interrater correlation. This information is of great importance for surgeons and orthodontists for accurate diagnostics and interdisciplinary treatment planning.

  8. Six upper incisors: what's next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berneburg, Mirjam; Meller, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes our therapeutic approach taken in a girl with eruption disturbance of the upper anterior teeth. Two supernumerary teeth were involved, which required a combination of orthodontic and surgical treatment. The initial situation in the upper anterior segment was characterized by two supernumerary mesial incisors, ectopic eruption of the distally located lateral incisors, and crowded tooth buds in the canine areas. Key decisions had to be made as to whether any teeth needed to be extracted and, if so, regarding the timing and sites of extraction. Removing teeth too early would have preempted a complete assessment of tooth quality, whereas late extraction would have carried a risk of eruption disturbance. Once the distal lateral incisors had erupted, the supernumerary mesial incisors were extracted and the central incisors (initially located in between) mesialized with a bracket appliance. Following space closure and mesialization of the lateral incisors, a functional appliance was used. Tooth 13 was erupting, while tooth 23 was displaced and subsequently aligned as part of the final bracket treatment. To successfully treat eruption disturbances, a careful diagnostic workup is essential, including informative radiographs, personalized treatment planning, and correct decision-making as to whether teeth need to be extracted and regarding the timing and sites of extraction. Finally, the eruption of the canines should be monitored.

  9. Bilateral dens invaginatus in the mandibular premolars - Diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharangate, Nupur; Figueiredo, Nigel R; Fernandes, Marina; Lambor, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    Dens invaginatus (DI) is a developmental anomaly that results from an infolding of the dental papilla during tooth development and simulates the appearance of a tooth within another tooth. It shows a wide spectrum of variations in morphology and usually affects the maxillary lateral incisors. This study presents an unusual case of an Oehlers' Type I DI involving the bilateral mandibular first and second premolars, which presented as an incidental radiographic finding in the first premolars and was associated with a periapical lesion in the second premolars which was successfully treated using nonsurgical endodontics.

  10. Bilateral dens invaginatus in the mandibular premolars - Diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupur kharangate

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dens invaginatus (DI is a developmental anomaly that results from an infolding of the dental papilla during tooth development and simulates the appearance of a tooth within another tooth. It shows a wide spectrum of variations in morphology and usually affects the maxillary lateral incisors. This study presents an unusual case of an Oehlers′ Type I DI involving the bilateral mandibular first and second premolars, which presented as an incidental radiographic finding in the first premolars and was associated with a periapical lesion in the second premolars which was successfully treated using nonsurgical endodontics.

  11. Dental and craniofacial findings in 91 individuals with agenesis of permanent maxillary canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvedsen, K P; Kjær, I

    2017-08-01

    Agenesis of maxillary permanent canines is a rare form of agenesis (prevalence 0.07-0.13%). The aetiology is still unknown. The purpose was to focus on dentitions and craniofacial profiles in individuals with maxillary canine agenesis. From 91 individuals (10-18 years of age) 91 Orthopantomograms and 77 profile radiographs were divided accordingly: Group I: agenesis of 1 or 2 maxillary canines. Group II: several ageneses including the maxillary canines. Dentition analysis included crown/root shape, invaginations, eruption disturbances and resorption patterns. Cephalometric angular measurements and mutual comparisons between the groups were performed. Agenesis pattern in Group II was compared to agenesis pattern in a population of children and young adults not characterized by maxillary canine agenesis. Cephalometric values from both groups were compared to normal values from individuals without agenesis. Findings were statistically evaluated. Dentition: Group I: only the missing maxillary canines were deemed to be in an abnormal dental deviation. Group II: abnormal dental development regarding morphology, resorption of primary teeth and also agenesis of the first maxillary premolar. Comparison of the groups showed a difference in the pattern of malformation. Profile: Group I: anterior inclination of the maxilla and increased cranial base angle were significant findings. Group II: diminished incisor slope in the maxilla and enlarged cranial base angle were significant findings. A comparison showed a difference in maxillary inclinations of the teeth. Group I dentitions are normally developed with only minor dental malformations. Group II dentitions had several dental malformations and often agenesis of the first maxillary premolar. Significant findings: first maxillary premolar agenesis in Group II and enlarged cranial base angle in both groups.

  12. Premolarized double dens in dente in albinism - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprabha B

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Dens in dente are known to be associated with many dental abnormalities such as taurodontism microdontia, gemination, and dens evaginatus. This paper describes a rare case of double dens in dente in a lateral incisor with crown morphology similar to a premolar present in a patient with features of albinism. Problems associated with this condition and their management is discussed.

  13. Effect of Incisor Angulation on Overjet and Overbite in Class II Camouflage Treatment. A typodont study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangcharearn, Yasinee; Ho, Christopher

    2007-11-01

    To determine the amount of variation in overjet and overbite that may result from changes in upper and lower incisor angulations following upper first premolar extraction treatment in Class II malocclusions. Typodonts were set up to simulate a skeletal Class II occlusion treated with upper first premolar extractions. The upper incisor angulation was altered through a range from 100 degrees to 120 degrees to the palatal plane by 2 degrees increments. The overjet and overbite were measured with every 2 degrees of upper incisor angulation change. A regression analysis was performed on the experimental data, and the regression coefficients, slope, and intercept were estimated. Excessive proclination of the lower incisors will result in an abnormal overjet and overbite relationship for any magnitude of upper incisor angulation. A normal lower incisor angulation facilitates the attainment of an optimal occlusion. Excessive palatal root torque of the upper incisors will result in an increase in overjet and a consequent decrease in overbite. If the upper incisors are excessively retroclined, an edge-to-edge incisor relationship will result. Class II camouflage treatment with upper first premolar extractions requires correctly angulated incisors to achieve optimal buccal segment interdigitation and incisor relationship. Labial root torque and interproximal reduction of the lower anterior teeth should be considered when the lower incisors are excessively proclined.

  14. Avaliação da efetividade do método de Tanaka-Johnston para predição do diâmetro mésio-distal de caninos e pré-molares não-irrompidos Evaluation of the effectiveness of the Tanaka-Johnston method for prediction of the mesiodistal diameter of unerupted canines and premolars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Maria Teixeira MARCHIONNI

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo, os autores avaliaram o método de predição de Tanaka-Johnston com o objetivo de verificar sua efetividade para os lados direito e esquerdo, para ambos os sexos e para as raças branca, mulato claro, mulato médio, mulato escuro e negra, na cidade de Salvador - Bahia. Com o auxílio de um paquímetro digital, mediu-se o diâmetro mésio-distal dos incisivos inferiores permanentes, caninos e pré-molares, já irrompidos na cavidade bucal, de 98 indivíduos (45 do sexo masculino e 53 do sexo feminino, com idade variando entre 13 e 29 anos. Através de testes estatísticos, compararam-se os resultados obtidos a partir da aplicação das fórmulas de Tanaka-Johnston com os valores reais. Após análise dos resultados, observou-se que a correlação entre os valores estimados pela técnica de Tanaka-Johnston e os valores reais foram maiores para o sexo feminino que para o sexo masculino. Em relação à raça, os coeficientes de correlação foram satisfatórios para todas, sendo maior no arco dentário superior para a raça mulato escuro (0,67 e no arco dentário inferior para a raça mulato claro (0,74. Considerando-se os lados, os achados revelaram um maior coeficiente de correlação para o arco dentário inferior do lado esquerdo (0,61. Pôde-se concluir, neste trabalho, que o método de Tanaka-Johnston, apesar de ter sido preconizado a partir de uma amostra de descendentes europeus, é indicado para predição do diâmetro mésio-distal de caninos e pré-molares não-irrompidos para diferentes raças, sexos e lados dos arcos dentários na amostra estudada.In the present study, the authors evaluated the Tanaka-Johnston method of prediction, with the objective of verifying its effectiveness for the right and left sides, for both genders and for the white, light mulatto, medium mulatto, dark mulatto and black races in the city of Salvador, Bahia. The mesiodistal diameter of the inferior permanent incisors, canines and

  15. Biomechanical considerations in mandibular incisor extraction cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachala, Madhukar Reddy; Aileni, Kaladhar Reddy; Dasari, Arun Kumar; Sinojiya, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular incisor extraction can be regarded as a valuable treatment option in certain malocclusions to obtain excellence in orthodontic results in terms of function, aesthetics and stability. This treatment alternative is indicated in clinical situations like mild to moderate class III malocclusion, mild anterior mandibular tooth size excess, periodontally compromised teeth, ectopic eruption of mandibular incisor and minimal openbite tendencies. Unlike in premolar extraction cases, space closure in mandibular incisor extraction cases is unique in which the extraction space will be in the middle of the arch. The end result of space closure in these cases should be well aligned, upright, anterior teeth with parallel roots and the goal can be achieved with the bodily tooth movement through proper application of biomechanics. The purpose of this article is to explain the biomechanics of space closure in mandibular incisor extraction cases.

  16. Canine retraction: A systematic review of different methods used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshrestha, Rohit S; Tandon, Ragni; Chandra, Pratik

    2015-01-01

    Canine retraction is a very important step in treatment of patients with crowding, or first premolar extraction cases. In severe crowding cases until, the canines have been distilized to relive the crowding, space to correctly align the incisors will not be available. Correct positioning of the canines after retraction is of great importance for the function, stability, and esthetics. The aim of this systematic review was to examine, in an evidence-based way, which kinds of canine retraction methods/techniques are most effective and which have the least side effects. A literature survey was performed by applying the Medline Database (Entrez PubMed) and Science Direct database covering the period from 1985 to 2014, to find out efficient ways to accomplish canine retraction. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), prospective and retrospective controlled studies, and clinical trials were included. Two reviewers selected and extracted the data independently and assessed the quality of the retrieved studies. The search strategy resulted in 324 articles, of which 22 met the inclusion criteria. Due to the vast heterogeneity in study methods, the scientific evidence was too weak to evaluate retraction efficiency during space closure. The data so far reviewed proved that elastomeric power chains, elastic threads, magnets, NiTi coil springs, corticotomies, distraction osteogenesis, and laser therapy, all are able to provide optimum rate of tooth movements. All the methods were nearly similar to each other for retraction of canines Most of the techniques lead to anchorage loss in various amounts depending on the methods used. Most of the studies had serious problems with small sample size, confounding factors, lack of method error analysis, and no blinding in measurements. To obtain reliable scientific evidence, controlled RCT's with sufficient sample sizes are needed to determine which method/technique is the most effective in the respective retraction situation. Further

  17. Delayed dental maturity in dentitions with agenesis of mandibular second premolars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugaard, S; Christensen, I J; Kjaer, I

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate dental maturity in the mandibular canine/premolar and molar innervation fields in children with agenesis of the 2nd mandibular premolar and to associate these findings with normal control material. Department of Orthodontics, Institute of Odontology, University of Copenhagen. Eighty-three panoramic radiographs (27 girls and 31 boys with agenesis of one mandibular 2nd premolar and 17 girls and eight boys with agenesis of both mandibular 2nd premolars) represented all mandibular second premolar agenesis cases from a material of 2847 radiographs. On each radiograph, dental maturity of all available mandibular premolars, canines and 2nd molars was evaluated and categorized in maturity stages according to Haavikko whose material served as control material. Descriptive statistics given by sample mean, standard deviation and range for each tooth stratified by gender and agenesis. Ninety-five percentage confidence limits and T-statistics were used. p-values agenesis, the canines are specifically delayed in both girls and boys, with a larger delay in girls (p=0.009). The second molar is not delayed in boys (p=0.98) but is in girls (p=0.04). The differences in delay for the canine compared to the second molar are significant for both girls and boys. The results show a considerable delay in tooth maturation within the canine/premolar innervation field predominantly in girls. The 2nd molar is delayed in girls but not in boys. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Molar-incisor hypomineralization: Prevalence, severity and clinical characteristics in 8- to 13-year-old children of Udaipur, India

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    Shubha Arehalli Bhaskar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The last couple of decades has seen an increasing interest in molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH. Although the reported prevalence of MIH ranges from 2.4% to 40.2% worldwide, very little data is available from India. Objective: To assess the prevalence, clinical characteristics, distribution, severity and association with caries of MIH defects in children aged 8-13 years of Udaipur, Rajasthan. Study design: This cross-sectional descriptive study consisted of 1173 children aged 8-13 years selected by random sampling procedure. The European Academy of Pediatric Dentistry criteria were followed for MIH diagnosis. The presence of dental caries and treatment need for MIH-affected teeth were recorded as per the WHO criteria. Results: The prevalence of MIH in the children examined was 9.46%. Severity of the defects increased with the age of the children. Involvement of incisors increased when more First permanent molars (FPMs were affected. An average of 3.65 teeth was involved per MIH-affected individual. Significantly larger numbers of mandibular FPMs and maxillary central incisors were diagnosed with MIH. The association of dental caries was significantly higher with MIH-affected FPMs. Primary molars and permanent canines and premolars were also showed MIH like lesions in some of the MIH-affected children. Conclusion: MIH was observed in about 10% of the children examined. MIH-affected FPMs appear to be more vulnerable to early caries and subsequent pulp involvement with need for extensive dental treatment.

  19. Molar-incisor hypomineralization: prevalence, severity and clinical characteristics in 8- to 13-year-old children of Udaipur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Shubha Arehalli; Hegde, Sapna

    2014-01-01

    The last couple of decades has seen an increasing interest in molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH). Although the reported prevalence of MIH ranges from 2.4% to 40.2% worldwide, very little data is available from India. To assess the prevalence, clinical characteristics, distribution, severity and association with caries of MIH defects in children aged 8-13 years of Udaipur, Rajasthan. This cross-sectional descriptive study consisted of 1173 children aged 8-13 years selected by random sampling procedure. The European Academy of Pediatric Dentistry criteria were followed for MIH diagnosis. The presence of dental caries and treatment need for MIH-affected teeth were recorded as per the WHO criteria. The prevalence of MIH in the children examined was 9.46%. Severity of the defects increased with the age of the children. Involvement of incisors increased when more First permanent molars (FPMs) were affected. An average of 3.65 teeth was involved per MIH-affected individual. Significantly larger numbers of mandibular FPMs and maxillary central incisors were diagnosed with MIH. The association of dental caries was significantly higher with MIH-affected FPMs. Primary molars and permanent canines and premolars were also showed MIH like lesions in some of the MIH-affected children. MIH was observed in about 10% of the children examined. MIH-affected FPMs appear to be more vulnerable to early caries and subsequent pulp involvement with need for extensive dental treatment.

  20. Masculinization of the eruption pattern of permanent mandibular canines in opposite sex twin girls.

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    Heikkinen, Tuomo; Harila, Virpi; Tapanainen, Juha S; Alvesalo, Lassi

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effect of prenatal androgenization on the clinical eruption of permanent teeth expressing dimorphism and bimaturism. The eruption curves of permanent teeth (except third molars), including those that make up the canine complex (permanent canines, lower first premolars), are compared among opposite sex twins (OS twins) relative to single-born boys and girls. The comparisons are made with regard to three phases of eruption (pierced mucosa, half- erupted, and completely erupted) from a cross-sectional sample of dental casts, using Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression analyzes. The casts were collected from 2159 school children from the US Collaborative Perinatal Project, including 39 pairs of OS-twins, of which 12 pairs (30.8%) were Euro-Americans and 27 pairs (69.2%) were of African-American ancestry. The eruption patterns of the incisors, upper first molars, and lower canines were found to be significantly masculinized (delayed) among OS twin girls. The differences in most other teeth were either not significant, or the number of observations of active eruption phases were too few, such as in the upper first molars and incisors, to yield strong evidence and meaningful results. The masculinization of the tooth eruption pattern in OS twin girls is intriguing because of the lower canine responses during puberty, as well as canine primordial formation during early fetal androgenization of their co-twin during the 8th to 14th gestational weeks. The present results offer a challenge for future research exploring tooth eruption mechanisms, and may also highlight some cases of delayed or ectopic canines, which are biased toward females. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Optimal parameters for final position of teeth in space closure in case of a missing upper lateral incisor.

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    Lombardo, Luca; D'Ercole, Antonio; Latini, Michele Carmelo; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2014-11-27

    The aim of this study was to provide clinical indications for the correct management of appliances in space closure treatment of patients with agenesis of the upper lateral incisors. Virtual setup for space closure was performed in 30 patients with upper lateral incisor agenesis. Tip, torque and in-out values were measured and compared with those of previous authors. In the upper dentition, the tip values were comparable to those described by Andrews (Am J Orthod 62(3):296-309, 1972), except for at the first premolars, which require a greater tip, and the first molars, a lesser tip. The torque values showed no differences except for at the canines, where it was greater, and the in-out values were between those reported by Andrews and those by Watanabe et al. (The Shikwa Gakuho 96:209-222, 1996) (except for U3 and U4). The following prescriptions are advisable: tip 5°, torque 8° and in-out 2.5 for U1; tip 9°, torque 3° and in-out 3.25 for U3; tip 10°, torque -8° and in-out 3.75 for U4; and tip 5°, torque -8° and in-out 4 for U5. Andrews' prescription is suitable for the lower jaw, except for at L6. It is also advisable to execute selective grinding (1.33±0.5 mm) and extrusion (0.68±0.23 mm) on the upper canine during treatment, and the first premolar requires some intrusion (0.56±0.30 mm).

  2. Root Length and Anatomy of Impacted Maxillary Canines in Patients with Unilateral Maxillary Canine Impaction

    OpenAIRE

    Mostfa Shahabi; Maryam Omidkhoda; Seyedeh Haniyeh Omidi; Seyed Hosein Hoseini Zarch

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Canine impaction is a common occurrence. In this study, we sought to investigate the root anatomy and length of impacted canines and lateral incisor adjacent to impacted maxillary canine. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, three-dimensional tomographic imaging was performed on 26 patients with unilateral maxillary canine impaction. In this study, we evaluated root length and anatomy of impacted canines, in terms of resorption intensity and curvature, with Planme...

  3. Lateral incisor root resorption and active orthodontic treatment in the early mixed dentition.

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    Amlani, M S; Inocencio, F; Hatibovic-Kofman, S

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the presence of root resorption in the lateral incisor after active orthodontic treatment in the early mixed dentition. Twenty-six children treated at the Children's Clinic of the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Western Ontario were examined radiographically for lateral incisors root resorption before and after early active treatment to align upper incisors (2 x 4 appliance). In addition, canine inclinations to the midline and to the long axis of the lateral incisor as well as the most medial position of the canine crown were measured as potential risk factors for root resorption. 8% (4) of the lateral incisors exhibited root resorption and the mean crown-to-root ratio of these teeth was significantly higher than that for lateral incisors not exhibiting root resorption. Similarly, mean canine inclinations to the midline and to the long axis of the lateral incisor were also significantly higher for the root resorption group. No association could be found between the most medial position of the canine crown and root resorption in the lateral incisor. This study showed that active orthodontic treatment in the early mixed dentition does not increase the risk for root resorption in the lateral incisors as long as the clinician takes into consideration canine inclinations and their potential effect on root resorption. Limitations inherent to radiographic assessment are acknowledged.

  4. Management of an impacted and transposed maxillary canine

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    Deepti A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Maxillary canine-lateral incisor transposition is a relatively rare anomaly, with both dental and facial esthetic implications. This is a case report of a maxillary canine-lateral incisor transposition that was successfully treated by surgical-orthodontic treatment followed by esthetic reshaping of the involved teeth.

  5. Upper Incisor Changes Due to Modifying the Point of Application of Forces during Space Closure in MBT Technique

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    H. Ravanmehr

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: A recent technique (MBT has been introduced for easy and efficient orthodontic treatment by means of straight wire fixed appliances. Although this technique has many advantages, in space closure stage causes up righting problem in upper incisors, which should be adjusted by applying additional torque in anterior region.Purpose: The purpose of this clinical trial was to determine whether there is a significant difference in final incisor inclination (torque of two groups one treated with MBT technique and the other by changing the point of application of the closing force (in anterior region.Materials and Methods: Twelve patients (8 girls, 4 boys with Cl I malocclusion and crowding, whom were candidate for first premolars extraction, were selected.For space closure, 6 anterior teeth (canine to canine in upper and lower jaws ligated and the applied force was from the hooks on canines to hooks on the first molars.After space closure the results compared with the results of a previous study which treatment plan was according to original MBT technique (anterior hooks soldered to arch wire. Forces applied randomly among quadrants by NiTi coil spring (American Orthodontics Co. or active tie backs with elastic modules (Dentaurum Co.Results: The results showed a statistically significant difference between final torques of two techniques (P=0.0001. Also, the rate of space closure with NiTi coils was significantly greater than active tie back (P=0.0001.Conclusion: Anchorage loss in two groups compared and the results indicated significantly lower anchorage loss in NiTi coil spring group (P=0.035.

  6. Bilateral supernumerary primary maxillary canines

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    Santanu Mukhopadhyay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Supernumerary teeth are more common in the permanent than in primary dentition. In the primary dentition, the anomaly is most frequently observed in the maxillary lateral incisor region, followed by the maxillary midline where they are termed as mesiodens. Supernumerary teeth in the primary canine region are rare. This paper describes a rare case of nonsyndromic supernumerary primary maxillary canine distributed bilaterally in a 4-year-old boy. Both the supernumeraries resembled size and shape of normal primary canine. The right supplemental canine is high labially placed, whereas the left one is seen normally aligned in the dental arch distal to lateral incisor. One of the most significant sequelae of primary supernumerary teeth is their duplication in the permanent series. Radiographic examination of supernumerary primary canine did not indicate any such anomaly in the permanent dentition. The patient was kept under observation.

  7. A premolar extraction case using the Invisalign system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönn, Mirjam; Göz, Gernot

    2006-09-01

    Invisalign therapy is an orthodontic treatment method using removable transparent polyurethane splints. Its applicability in extraction cases is limited. This case report documents the treatment with Invisalign of a patient in whom four premolars had to be extracted due to dental crowding. The patient's primary objective was to undergo treatment to resolve her anterior crowding as esthetically inconspicuously as possible. Diagnostic findings were: constriction of the maxillary and mandibular arch with anterior dental crowding; proclination and anteposition of the anteriors; neutroclusion with an overjet of 6 mm and an overbite of 1 mm. The radiographs showed a mesial tilt of the lower canines and premolars and a mild skeletal Class II relationship with a vertical craniofacial configuration. Treatment was initiated by extracting the four first premolars and placing the attachments (Tetric Ceram composite). After the Invisalign aligners had been worn, the anterior segment was uprighted and retracted, the crowding resolved, and the arches well-aligned. The patient's neutroclusion was maintained, physiological anterior relations in the sagittal and vertical planes were achieved, and the lower canines and premolars were uprighted. Active treatment lasted 1 year and 8 1/2 months and involved 43 maxillary and 28 mandibular aligners. Particularly in cases with an extended indication for this new treatment modality, due consideration must be given to the importance of comprehensive and meticulous diagnostics and treatment planning, and a solid grasp of the biological and mechanical fundamentals.

  8. Managing the severely proclined maxillary anteriors by extracting traumatized right maxillary central incisor

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    Mahesh Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old girl reported with severely proclined maxillary anterior teeth with fractured and discolored right maxillary central incisor with questionable prognosis. Autotransplantation of premolar to replace central incisor was considered a risky option as patient was 14-year-old with presence of advanced root development of premolar. The immediate placement of the prosthetic implant was also not possible because of patient′s age. Therefore, it was decided to use the space obtained by extracting questionable maxillary right central incisor for orthodontic purpose and also sacrificing the healthy premolar is invariably an excessive biological cost for a modest functional and aesthetic gain. Hence, the treatment plan for this case includes extraction of right maxillary central incisor and left maxillary first premolar, movement of right maxillary lateral incisor mesially, achieving normal axial inclination of maxillary anteriors with normal overjet and overbite. Mandibular arch was treated nonextraction due to congenitally missing central incisors with presence of normally inclined lower anteriors thereby maintaining Angles class I occlusion. Tipping, usually, seen in Begg mechanotherapy was used for our advantage to correct severely proclined maxillary anteriors with simultaneous bite opening mechanics. Case was completed in 19 months and posttreatment records including photographs, radiographs and study models were made. Begg wrap around the retainer was placed in the maxillary arch allowing natural settling of occlusion.

  9. Three-dimensional analysis of the tooth movement and arch dimension changes in Class I malocclusions treated with first premolar extractions: a guideline for virtual treatment planning.

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    Cho, Min-Young; Choi, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2010-12-01

    Our objective was to analyze patterns of tooth movement and changes of arch dimension by superimposing 3-dimensional (3D) virtual models. The sample consisted of 24 Korean adults with Class I malocclusion and minimal crowding, treated by first premolar extractions, sliding mechanics (0.022-in MBT brackets [3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif] with 0.019 × 0.025-in stainless steel wire) and moderate anchorage. The 3D virtual maxillary casts at pretreatment and posttreatment were superimposed with the best-fit method. Linear and angular variables were measured with 3Txer program (Orapix, Seoul, Korea). Wilcoxon signed rank and Mann-Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. There was no significant difference in the individual tooth movement between the right and left sides (P > 0.05). For the movement of each tooth, the maxillary central incisors (U1), lateral incisors (U2), and canines (U3) were significantly inclined lingually, extruded, and moved posteriorly and laterally. The maxillary second premolar (U5), first molar (U6), and second molar (U7) had significant mesial inward rotation, anterior movement, and contracted toward the midsagittal plane. The ratio of anteroposterior movement between the maxillary anterior and posterior teeth was 5:1. The amounts of contraction in U5, U6, and U7 were 1.4, 1.3, and 1.2 mm, respectively. When the amount of change between the adjacent teeth were compared, the linguoversion in U1 was significantly greater than that of U2. U3 and U5 showed significant opposite movements in all variables. There were differences only in angulation and vertical displacement between U6 and U7. Superimposition of 3D virtual models could be a guideline for precise virtual treatment planning. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Análise da correlação entre a angulação (mesiodistal dos caninos e a inclinação (vestibulolingual dos incisivos Analysis of the correlation between mesiodistal angulation of canines and labiolingual inclination of incisors

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    Amanda Sayuri Cardoso Ohashi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o nível de correlação entre a angulação dos caninos e a inclinação dos incisivos. MÉTODOS: a angulação mesiodistal dos caninos e a inclinação vestibulolingual dos incisivos foram obtidas em um programa digital gráfico (Imagetool®, a partir de fotografias padronizadas dos modelos de 60 pacientes. A inclinação dos incisivos foi, ainda, avaliada pela cefalometria lateral. RESULTADOS: o erro casual mostrou uma variação em torno de 2° nas medidas feitas nos modelos (1,8-2,5º, enquanto o erro sistemático, avaliado pela teste de correlação intraclasse, revelou uma excelente reprodutibilidade para ambos os métodos empregados (p0,05 e variou bastante na arcada inferior (r=0,14-0,50, dependendo da grandeza correlacionada. CONCLUSÃO: ratifica-se a introdução de mudanças na angulação dos caninos com o intuito de acompanhar as compensações observadas na inclinação dos incisivos, principalmente na arcada inferior.OBJECTIVE: To assess the degree of correlation between canine angulation and incisor inclination. METHODS: Mesiodistal angulation of canines and labiolingual inclination of incisors were obtained by means of digital graphics software (ImageTool® from standardized photographs of the casts of 60 patients. Incisor inclination was also assessed by lateral cephalometric radiographs. RESULTS: Random error showed a variation of around 2° in measurements made on the casts (1.8-2.5, while systematic error, measured by the intraclass correlation test, displayed excellent reproducibility for both methods used in this study (p0.05 and varied widely in the mandibular arch (r=0.14 to 0.50. CONCLUSIONS: The introduction of changes in the angulation of canines with the aim of monitoring compensations observed in incisor inclination is warranted, especially in the lower arch.

  11. Avaliação ortopantomográfica das angulações mesiodistais de caninos, pré-molares e molares inferiores com e sem a presença dos terceiros molares Panoramic evaluation of the mesiodistal angulations of canine teeth, premolar and inferior molars with and without the presence of the third molars

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    Rodrigo Castellazzi Sella

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: comparar os valores médios normais das angulações mesiodistais dentárias, propostos por Ursi, em 1989, com as angulações mesiodistais de caninos, pré-molares e molares inferiores em indivíduos com e sem a presença dos terceiros molares inferiores e idades entre 18 e 25 anos. Além disso, foram comparados os valores das angulações mesiodistais desses dentes nessas duas situações. MÉTODOS: foram utilizadas 40 radiografias ortopantomográficas de indivíduos, de ambos os gêneros, que não receberam tratamento ortodôntico, divididos em dois grupos: Grupo I, constituído por 20 radiografias que não apresentavam os terceiros molares inferiores; e Grupo II, formado por 20 radiografias com os terceiros molares inferiores presentes. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: a análise dos resultados e a análise estatística permitiram concluir que ambos os grupos exibiram pré-molares e molares inferiores mais angulados em sentido mesial, quando comparados à oclusão normal. Por outro lado, a angulação mesiodistal de caninos inferiores mostrou-se semelhante àquela apresentada em casos de oclusão normal. Os dois grupos, quando comparados entre si, exibiram semelhantes valores angulares dos caninos, pré-molares e molares inferiores, de modo que a presença dos terceiros molares não exerceu influência sobre essas angulações mesiodistais dentárias.AIM: To compare the normal mean values of the mesiodistal axial angulation, proposed by Ursi in 1989, with the mesiodistal axial angulation of canine teeth, premolar and inferior molars in individuals with and without the presence of the third inferior molars and ages between 18 and 25 years. Besides, the values of the mesiodistal axial angulation of these teeth were compared in these two situations. METHODS: Forty panoramic x-rays were used from individuals of both genders that didn't receive orthodontic treatment, divided in two groups: Group I, constituted by 20 x-rays that didn't present

  12. Overjet and overbite analysis during the eruption of the upper permanent incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuoghi, Osmar A; Sella, Rodrigo C; Mamede, Igo; de Macedo, Fernanda A; Miranda-Zamalloa, Yésselin M; de Mendonça, Marcos R

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to analyze the overjet and overbite behavior during eruption of the upper permanent incisors. Fourth-eight plaster casts of 16 patients from ages 6-13 years were appraised longitudinally. It was found that the overjet remains constant, starting at the eruption of the upper permanent central incisors until eruption of the upper permanent canine teeth, while the overbite increases after eruption of the upper permanent lateral incisors and remains constant with the eruption of the canine teeth.

  13. Atypical presentation of bilateral supplemental maxillary central incisors with unusual talon cusp

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    Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed eruption of maxillary permanent central incisors in a child poses a distressing esthetic quandary to parents, by virtue of its location in the dental architecture. Well-aligned anterior teeth add confidence to smile and have enhanced self-esteem, which is critical even in early life. Impaction of the maxillary central incisors compared to third molars or the canines is less reported; bilateral supplemental maxillary central incisors related to impacted permanent maxillary central incisors are rare and one of the supplemental central incisors showing unusual talon is still infrequent. A case of impacted maxillary permanent central incisors related to supplemental maxillary central incisors, with one of them showing an unusual talon cusp, is presented.

  14. [Intruding upper incisors using mini-screw anchorage in patients with gummy smile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Yi; Zhou, Yan-Heng; Lin, Jiu-Xiang

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of mini-screw anchorage on intruding upper incisors in patients with gummy smile. Sixteen female patients (mean age: 23.8 years) were involved in this study. The mini-screws were placed between upper lateral incisors and canines on both sides for intruding upper incisors together with fixed appliance. The cephalometric analysis was carried out. Totally 63 teeth in 16 patients were intruded successfully and the deep overbite was decreased by (2.74 +/- 2.00) mm (P gummy smile by intruding upper incisors with mini-screw implant.

  15. Endodontic Treatment of Type II Dens Invaginatus in a Maxillary Lateral Incisor: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvacioglu-Yigit, Dilek; Aydemir, Seda

    2012-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a developmental anomaly that results in an enamel-lined cavity intruding into the crown or root before the mineralization phase. It typically affects permanent maxillary lateral incisors, central incisors, and premolars. This paper describes the root canal treatment of Oehlers' type II dens invaginatus in maxillary left lateral incisors. A 16-year-old boy presented to the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Kocaeli, to receive his dental treatments. During the caries removal, the pulp was exposed then anendodontic treatment was initiated. Two canals, one of which represented the invagination, were instrumented, irrigated, and then obturated with a lateral condensation technique. PMID:23213576

  16. Endodontic Treatment of Type II Dens Invaginatus in a Maxillary Lateral Incisor: A Case Report

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    Dilek Helvacioglu-Yigit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dens invaginatus is a developmental anomaly that results in an enamel-lined cavity intruding into the crown or root before the mineralization phase. It typically affects permanent maxillary lateral incisors, central incisors, and premolars. This paper describes the root canal treatment of Oehlers’ type II dens invaginatus in maxillary left lateral incisors. A 16-year-old boy presented to the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Kocaeli, to receive his dental treatments. During the caries removal, the pulp was exposed then anendodontic treatment was initiated. Two canals, one of which represented the invagination, were instrumented, irrigated, and then obturated with a lateral condensation technique.

  17. Bilateral Intraosseous Migration of Mandibular Second Premolars in a Patient with Nine Missing Teeth

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    H. Shahoon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Intraosseous migration is an unusual developmental dental anomaly, which demonstrates horizontal movement of unerupted teeth only affecting the permanent dentition of the lower jaw. Mandibular second premolar is the most common impacted tooth after the thirdmolars and maxillary canines. Distal migration of the second premolar is rare and early loss of the permanent first molar is one of the most important predisposing factors of intrabony migration of this tooth. Bilateral migration of the mandibular premolars is veryrare compared to unilateral migration. Hereby, we present an 18-year-old man with bilateral intrabony migration of the mandibular second premolars to the mandibular angle (at the inferior and buccal side of the mandibular canal in the presence of first molars. Thepatient also had nine congenitally missing teeth without any systemic complication or abnormality in the skeleton. The teeth were surgically extracted. The clinical and diagnostic features and treatment of this case are discussed.

  18. Posttreatment stability in Class II nonextraction and maxillary premolar extraction protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Guilherme; Araki, Janine; Camardella, Leonardo Tavares

    2012-01-01

    To cephalometrically compare the overjet, overbite, and molar and canine relationship stability of Class II malocclusion treatment with and without maxillary premolar extractions. Two groups of 30 patients each with pre- and posttreatment matching characteristics and satisfactory finishing were used. Group 1 consisted of 30 patients treated with nonextraction at a mean pretreatment age of 12.14 years, while group 2 consisted of 30 patients treated with maxillary first premolar extractions at a mean pretreatment age of 12.87 years. Lateral cephalograms obtained before and after treatment and at a mean of 8.2 years after the end of treatment were compared. Student t tests were used to compare the initial and final dental relationships of the groups and the amount of treatment and long-term posttreatment changes. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to investigate correlations between treatment and long-term posttreatment dental relationship changes. In groups with matching canine relationship treatment changes, long-term stability of the overjet, overbite, and molar and canine relationships were similar in the groups. There were significant but weak correlations between treatment changes in overjet, overbite, and canine relationships with their long-term posttreatment changes. Nonextraction and maxillary premolar extraction treatment of complete Class II malocclusion have similar long-term posttreatment stability in terms of overjet, overbite, and canine and molar relationships.

  19. Cephalometric changes in Class II division 1 patients treated with two maxillary premolars extraction

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    Marisana Piano Seben

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cephalometric alterations in patients with Angle Class II division 1 malocclusion, orthodontically treated with extraction of two maxillary premolars. METHODS: The sample comprised 68 initial and final lateral cephalograms of 34 patients of both gender (mean initial age of 14.03 years and mean final age of 17.25 years, treated with full fixed appliances and extraction of the first maxillary premolars. In order to evaluate the alterations due the treatment between initial and final phases, the dependent t test was applied to the studied cephalometric variables. RESULTS: The dentoskeletal alterations due to extraction of two maxillary premolars in the Class II division 1 malocclusion were: maxillary retrusion, improvement of the maxillomandibular relation, increase of lower anterior face height, retrusion of the maxillary incisors, buccal inclination, protrusion and extrusion of the mandibular incisors, besides the reduction of overjet and overbite. The tissue alterations showed decrease of the facial convexity and retrusion of the upper lip. CONCLUSIONS: The extraction of two maxillary premolars in Class II division 1 malocclusion promotes dentoskeletal and tissue alterations that contribute to an improvement of the relation between the bone bases and the soft tissue profile.

  20. Second premolar agenesis as a subclinical phenotype of isolated cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, J P; Lauris, R C M C; Dalbén, G; Garib, D G

    2017-02-01

    To compare the prevalence of dental anomalies in patients with isolated cleft palate with or without hypodontia of the second premolar. A total of 653 patients with isolated cleft palate aged 8-12 years were divided into two groups: G1-subjects without hypodontia of second premolar (n = 546) and G2-subjects with hypodontia of at least one-second premolar (n = 107). The control group consisted of 107 non-cleft orthodontic patients. Panoramic and periapical radiographs and dental casts were used to analyze the presence of dental anomalies. Intergroup comparisons were performed using the chi-square test complemented by Proportion test and Bonferroni test. G2 presented higher prevalence of hypodontia of other permanent teeth compared to G1 and control. Ectopic eruption of the maxillary canine and tooth transposition were more frequent in patients with a cleft compared to patients without a cleft, without statistical differences. Deciduous molar infra-occlusion and second premolar disto-angulation were less prevalent in G1 and G2 compared to the control group. G2 showed a higher prevalence of complete cleft palate than G1. Patients with cleft palate and second premolar agenesis showed increased prevalence of tooth agenesis and palatally displaced canines. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Eleven-Year Follow-Up of a Prospective Study of Zirconia Implant Abutments Supporting Single All-Ceramic Crowns in Anterior and Premolar Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembic, Anja; Philipp, Alexander Otto Hermann; Hämmerle, Christoph Hans Franz; Wohlwend, Arnold; Sailer, Irena

    2015-10-01

    Clinical studies on zirconia abutments report very good survival rates and biological and technical results, but few have an observation period of more than 5 years. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term performance of customized zirconia implant abutments supporting all-ceramic crowns. Twenty-seven patients receiving 54 single implants were included (25 incisors, 14 canines, 15 premolars in both jaws). Yttria-stabilized zirconia abutments were screwed to the implants with a defined torque. All-ceramic crowns were adhesively cemented onto the abutments. The implants, abutments, and crowns were clinically and radiographically examined after 11 years of use. Modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria were used to assess technical outcomes: fracture of abutment/crown framework/veneering ceramic, loosening of abutment screw/crown, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, occlusal wear, and abutment fit. The biological parameters were pocket probing depth, plaque control record, bleeding on probing, papilla index, and gingival/mucosal recession at implants and neighboring natural teeth. The cumulative success rate of abutments and crowns was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The results of the USPHS criteria were analyzed descriptively. Sixteen patients with 31 zirconia abutments were examined at 11.3 (±0.9) years after implantation. No abutment or crown was lost. The cumulative success rate was 96.3% for abutments and 90.7% for crowns. Two abutment screws loosened, and three crowns exhibited minor chipping. There were no biological complications. Customized zirconia single implant abutments exhibited excellent long-term outcomes in anterior and premolar regions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Morphological variation of the maxillary lateral incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Kondo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The maxillary lateral incisor is a variable tooth morphologically. This tooth frequently shows reduction in size, and also various alterations in shape, for example, peg-shaped, cone-shaped, barrel-shaped and canine-shaped. The lateral incisor variant can be analyzed by family studies and using twin models, and these approaches have shown that genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors can all contribute to variation in the trait. Discordance of the phenotype in monozygotic twin pairs could be explained by the following two hypotheses: (1 the embryological environment of monochorionic twin pairs who share the same placenta and chorionic membrane during the prenatal period may differ, (2 phenotypic variation may be caused by epigenetic influences. Possible developmental factors are discussed in this review. Recent studies suggest that Msx1, Pax9 and Axin2 genes predispose to lateral incisor agenesis. Tooth reduction and agenesis seem to represent inter-related complex multifactorial traits, influenced by a combination of gene expression and function, environmental interaction and developing timing. Thus, accumulation of large data banks of morphological data is needed to support and clarify ongoing molecular genetic studies of dental development.

  3. NEED OF PREVENTION STEPS AGAINST IMPACTION OF MANDIBULAR AND MAXILLARY PREMOLARS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristina Arnautska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lower second premolars, closely followed by upper premolars, are regarded as the third most common teeth prone to impaction, after wisdom teeth and upper canines. Objective of this article is to show the possibility for spontaneous eruption of impacted premolars upon extraction of deciduous molars and removal of the follicular cyst as described in several clinical cases. The present paper reports four clinical cases supporting the thesis that regardless of the reason behind impacted premolars, undertaking preventive measures significantly improves the position of the germ of those teeth. Conclusions: The early extraction of the deciduous molar, monitoring the patient and reserving the space for the succeeding impacted premolar can lead to non-invasive or relatively short orthodontic treatment (secondary prevention.If root development is incomplete yet there is a good growth potential which could lead to spontaneous eruption (primary prevention. Age specifics particular to children such as the great regenerative abilities of the bone, provide a good prognosis for spontaneous eruption or significant improvement in the position of impacted premolars and facilitate the orthodontic treatment.

  4. Orthodontic management of a patient with impacted and transposed mandibular canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Rhita C; Carvalho, Felipe A R; Almeida, Marco A O; Capelli, Jonas

    2009-01-01

    This patient report describes the treatment of a 10-year-old female with complete transposition of her impacted mandibular canines and lateral incisors. The patient had a Class I occlusion, and her mandibular lateral incisors were in crossbite with the maxillary central incisors. The treatment objectives were to create space for the impacted canines and align them with the incisors, one of which was extracted. After treatment, the appearance of the patient's teeth was improved, the occlusion was preserved, and overjet and overbite were corrected. © 2009 BY QUINTESSENCE PUBLISHING CO, INC.

  5. Controlled canine retraction using orthodontic mini-implants coupled with bondable powerarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Many patients present with a substantial amount of anterior dental crowding, necessitating canine retraction prior to incisor alignment. Conventional biomechanics typically requires anchorage reinforcement and risks distal tipping of the canine crown and a delay before incisor alignment. However, it is now possible to produce controlled canine retraction without anchorage loss, even with narrow, flexible archwires in situ. This enables simultaneous alignment of displaced incisors. This technique involves a combination of orthodontic mini-implants (OMIs) and a powerarm bonded directly on either the labial or palatal surface of the target tooth, as described in this paper.

  6. Dental fast track: prenatal enamel growth, incisor eruption, and weaning in human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Correlation between the timing of permanent first molar eruption and weaning age in extant primates has provided a way to infer a life history event in fossil species, but recent debate has questioned whether the same link is present in human infants. Deciduous incisors erupt at an age when breast milk can be supplemented with additional foods (mixed feeding), and weaning is typically complete before permanent first molars erupt. Here, I use histological methods to calculate the prenatal rate by which enamel increases in thickness and height on human deciduous incisors, canines, and molars (n = 125). Growth trajectories for each tooth type are related to the trimesters and assessed against the eruption sequence and final crown height. Analyses show that central incisors initiate early in the second trimester with significantly faster secretion rates relative to canines and second molars, which initiate closer to birth. Even though initial extension rates were correlated with crown height and scaled with positive allometry within each tooth class, the relatively short incisors still increased in height at a significantly faster rate than the taller canines and molars. The incisor prenatal "fast track" produces a greater proportion of the crown before birth than all other tooth types. This growth mechanism likely facilitates early incisor eruption at a time when the mixed feeding of infants can be initiated as part of the weaning process. Findings provide a basis from which to explore new links between developmental trends along the tooth row and mixed feeding age in other primates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. “Maxillary lateral incisor partial anodontia sequence”: a clinical entity with epigenetic origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolaro, Alberto; Cardoso, Maurício Almeida; Consolaro, Renata Bianco

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The relationship between maxillary lateral incisor anodontia and the palatal displacement of unerupted maxillary canines cannot be considered as a multiple tooth abnormality with defined genetic etiology in order to be regarded as a “syndrome”. Neither were the involved genes identified and located in the human genome, nor was it presumed on which chromosome the responsible gene would be located. The palatal maxillary canine displacement in cases of partial anodontia of the maxillary lateral incisor is potentially associated with environmental changes caused by its absence in its place of formation and eruption, which would characterize an epigenetic etiology. The lack of the maxillary lateral incisor in the canine region means removing one of the reference guides for the eruptive trajectory of the maxillary canine, which would therefore, not erupt and /or impact on the palate. Consequently, and in sequence, it would lead to malocclusion, maxillary atresia, transposition, prolonged retention of the deciduous canine and resorption in the neighboring teeth. Thus, we can say that we are dealing with a set of anomalies and multiple sequential changes known as sequential development anomalies or, simply, sequence. Once the epigenetics and sequential condition is accepted for this clinical picture, it could be called “Maxillary Lateral Incisor Partial Anodontia Sequence.” PMID:29364376

  8. Enamel thickness in Asian human canines and premolars

    OpenAIRE

    Feeney, Robin N. M.; Zermeno, John P.; Reid, Donald J.; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Dental enamel thickness continues to feature prominently in anthropological studies of ape and human evolution, as well as studies of preventative oral care and treatment. Traditional studies of enamel thickness require physical sectioning of teeth for linear and scaled measurements. Recent applications of microtomographic imaging allow scientists to employ larger and more diverse samples, including global samples of recent humans as well as fossil hominin teeth. Unfortunately, little is know...

  9. Evolution of the mandibular third premolar crown in early Australopithecus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delezene, Lucas K; Kimbel, William H

    2011-06-01

    The Pliocene hominins Australopithecus anamensis and Australopithecus afarensis likely represent ancestor-descendent taxa--possibly an anagenetic lineage--and capture significant change in the morphology of the canine and mandibular third premolar (P(3)) crowns, dental elements that form the canine honing complex in nonhuman catarrhines. This study focuses on the P(3) crown, highlighting plesiomorphic features in A. anamensis. The A. afarensis P(3) crown, in contrast, is variable in its expression of apomorphic features that are characteristic of geologically younger hominins. Temporal variation characterizes each taxon as well. The A. anamensis P(3) from Allia Bay, Kenya expresses apomorphic character states, shared with A. afarensis, which are not seen in the older sample of A. anamensis P(3)s from Kanapoi, Kenya, while spatiotemporal differences in shape exist within the A. afarensis hypodigm. The accumulation of derived features in A. afarensis results in an increased level of P(3) molarisation. P(3) molarisation did not evolve concurrent with postcanine megadontia and neither did the appearance of derived aspects of P(3) occlusal form coincide with the loss of canine honing in hominins, which is apparent prior to the origin of the genus Australopithecus. A. afarensis P(3) variation reveals the independence of shape, size, and occlusal form. The evolution of the P(3) crown in early Australopithecus bridges the wide morphological gap that exists between geologically younger hominins on the one hand and extant apes and Ardipithecus on the other. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Case of Maxillary Protrusion with Congenitally Missing Canine Teeth in the Mandible

    OpenAIRE

    松井, 啓至; 酒徳, 明彦

    1996-01-01

    A patient that had a maxillary protrusion with congenitally missing canine teeth in the mandible was successfully treated with the extraction of the maxillary first premolars. The patient's cooperation in wearing headgear appliance was highly favorable. Her profile changes were pronounced and esthetically pleasing. A review of her post-treatment records revealed an excellent esthetic and occlusal result even though the first premolars were aligned instead of the canine teeth in the mandible. ...

  11. Localization of impacted maxillary canines using panoramic radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Archna; Pai, Keerthilatha M; Setty, Suhas; Sharma, Gaurav

    2009-03-01

    We aimed to establish a reliable method of localizing an impacted maxillary canine on the sole basis of assessment of a single panoramic radiograph, and to determine the validity and reproducibility of the method. Panoramic radiographs of 50 subjects with a total of 68 impacted canines were analysed. The Canine Incisor Index (CII), Canine Canine Index (CCI), control Canine Incisor Index (c-CII), Zone (apical, middle, coronal) and Sector (I, II, III, IV) were determined on digitized panoramic radiographs. Comparison of the CII and CCI values of labially or palatally impacted canines revealed a statistically significant difference (P 0.05). There was a significant difference between palatal and central canine impactions in relation to CII (P 0.05). Correct prediction of palatal canine impactions by differential magnification on a panoramic radiograph is possible in 77% of cases. Vertical and horizontal restrictions have no value in recognition of labiolingual position of impacted maxillary canines. The panoramic radiograph cannot be used as a sole radiograph for reliable localization of impacted maxillary canines.

  12. Association of agenesis of mandibular lateral incisors with other dental anomalies in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Saori; Sanpei, Sugako; Takakuwa, Akiko; Takahashi, Keiko; Endo, Toshiya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the association of mandibular incisor agenesis with other dental anomalies in Japanese orthodontic patients. A total of 52 subjects with 1 or 2 congenitally missing permanent mandibular lateral incisors (group A) were selected and divided into group 1a (26 subjects with 1 lateral incisor missing) and group 2a (26 subjects with 2 lateral incisors missing). Fifty two sex-matched subjects without agenesis of the mandibular lateral incisor served as controls (group C). Radiographs, study models, and medical and dental records were used to identify anomalies of teeth. The prevalence rate of agenesis of teeth other than the mandibular lateral incisors and third molars was significantly increased in group A. Agenesis of the maxillary second premolars was significantly increased in groups 2a and A. Significantly increased prevalence rates of symmetrical tooth agenesis, with third molars excluded, and third molar agenesis were observed in group 1a and A. Japanese subjects with agenesis of 1 or 2 permanent mandibular lateral incisors have significantly increased prevalence rates of other permanent tooth agenesis and symmetrical tooth agenesis.

  13. Sagittal, vertical and transversal dimensions of the maxillary complex in patients with ectopic maxillary canines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, H J; Sørensen, H B; Artmann, L

    2010-01-01

    To analyse the craniofacial maxillary complex in cases with labially and palatally located ectopic canines, subgrouped accordingly: Group I: no deviations in the dentition; Group IIa: deviations in the maxillary incisors only; Group IIb: deviations in the dentition in general....

  14. Assessment of facial profile changes in Class I biprotrusion adolescent subjects submitted to orthodontic treatment with extractions of four premolars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trindade Mattos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cephalometric changes in tooth and profile position in young adolescent individuals with Class I biprotrusion submitted to orthodontic treatment with extractions of four first premolars. METHODS: Pre and posttreatment lateral cephalometric radiographs from 20 patients with Class I biprotrusion malocclusion were used to evaluate the following measurements: nasolabial angle, distance from lips to E line, distance from lips, incisors, tip of the nose and soft tissue pogonion to Sy line. RESULTS: All measurements showed significant changes after treatment (p<0.05, except the distance from lips and soft tissue pogonion to Sy line. There was a positive correlation between the retraction of incisors and the change of upper and lower lips (0.803/0.925; p<0.001. CONCLUSION: The profile retrusion observed occurred more due to nose growth than to lips retraction. The response from soft tissues to incisors retraction showed a great variability.

  15. Canine Distemper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although this brochure provides basic information about canine distemper, your veterinarian is always your best source of ... Consult your veterinarian for more information about canine distemper and its prevention. And Now A Note On ...

  16. Upper incisors' positions after extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneck, Eduardo César; Mattos, Fernanda Silva; Cotrim-Ferreira, Flávio Augusto; Prado, Renata Falchete; Silva, Márcio Garcia; Araújo, Adriano Marotta

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to verify the amount of horizontal and vertical movement and incisor inclination of upper incisors and correlate these with Edgewise and Alexander brackets use and the presence of overbite during anterior retraction in sliding mechanics. The sample was composed of 40 adult patients divided into 2 groups, treated with Edgewise and Alexander brackets (20 each) subdivided in 2 groups (10 each), according to the presence or absence of deep bite. Treatment consisted of 4 extraction cases with sliding mechanics with the 2 different brackets. Pre- and post-treatment cephalograms were measured and the values of interest submitted to descriptive statistical analysis, ANOVA at 5%, the Tukey test and Pearson's correlation. Upper incisor retraction was not related to the brackets used nor to the presence of deep bite, though lingual tipping was greater when Edgewise brackets were used and deep bite was absent. No statistically significant differences in upper incisor vertical movements were observed and no correlation was determined between upper incisor intrusion and lower incisor labial tipping in overbite correction or in upper incisor retraction and lower incisor labial tipping for overjet correction. Bracket prescription and its interaction with deep bite were significant and Edgewise brackets without deep bite showed the worst inclination control. It was concluded that bracket prescriptions are important to increase control of sliding mechanics.

  17. A multidisciplinary treatment of congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors: a 14-year follow-up case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Rodrigues de ALMEIDA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Absence of the maxillary lateral incisor creates an aesthetic problem which can be managed in various ways. The condition requires careful treatment planning and consideration of the options and outcomes following either space closure or prosthetic replacement. Recent developments in restorative dentistry have warranted a re-evaluation of the approach to this clinical situation. Factors relating both to the patient and the teeth, including the presentation of malocclusion and the effect on the occlusion must be considered. The objective of this study was to describe the etiology, prevalence and alternative treatment modalities for dental agenesis and to present a clinical case of agenesis of the maxillary lateral incisors treated by the closure of excessive spaces and canine re-anatomization. A clinical case is presented to illustrate the interdisciplinary approach between orthodontics and restorative dentistry for improved esthetic results. In this report, the treatment of a girl with a Class II malocclusion of molars and canines with missing maxillary lateral incisors and convex facial profile is shown. Treatment was successfully achieved and included the space closure of the areas corresponding to the missing upper lateral incisors, through movement of the canines and the posterior teeth to mesial by fixed appliances as well as the canines transformation in the maxillary lateral incisors. This is a 14-year follow-up case report involving orthodontics and restorative dentistry in which pretreatment, posttreatment, and long-term follow-up records for the patient are presented.

  18. A multidisciplinary treatment of congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors: a 14-year follow-up case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    de ALMEIDA, Renato Rodrigues; MORANDINI, Ana Carolina Faria; de ALMEIDA-PEDRIN, Renata Rodrigues; de ALMEIDA, Marcio Rodrigues; CASTRO, Renata Cristina Faria Ribeiro; INSABRALDE, Natalia Martins

    2014-01-01

    Absence of the maxillary lateral incisor creates an aesthetic problem which can be managed in various ways. The condition requires careful treatment planning and consideration of the options and outcomes following either space closure or prosthetic replacement. Recent developments in restorative dentistry have warranted a re-evaluation of the approach to this clinical situation. Factors relating both to the patient and the teeth, including the presentation of malocclusion and the effect on the occlusion must be considered. The objective of this study was to describe the etiology, prevalence and alternative treatment modalities for dental agenesis and to present a clinical case of agenesis of the maxillary lateral incisors treated by the closure of excessive spaces and canine re-anatomization. A clinical case is presented to illustrate the interdisciplinary approach between orthodontics and restorative dentistry for improved esthetic results. In this report, the treatment of a girl with a Class II malocclusion of molars and canines with missing maxillary lateral incisors and convex facial profile is shown. Treatment was successfully achieved and included the space closure of the areas corresponding to the missing upper lateral incisors, through movement of the canines and the posterior teeth to mesial by fixed appliances as well as the canines transformation in the maxillary lateral incisors. This is a 14-year follow-up case report involving orthodontics and restorative dentistry in which pretreatment, post-treatment, and long-term follow-up records for the patient are presented. PMID:25466480

  19. The assessment of impacted maxillary canine position with panoramic radiography and cone beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Y H; Liang, H; Benson, B W; Flint, D J; Cho, B H

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the position of impacted maxillary canines on panoramic radiography with cone beam CT (CBCT) and analyse the labiopalatal position of canines and root resorption of permanent incisors in CBCT according to the mesiodistal position of canines on panoramic radiographs. This study was a retrospective radiographic review of 63 patients with 73 impacted maxillary canines. The mesiodistal position of the canine cusp tip was classified by sector location and analysed on 73 impacted canines from 63 panoramic radiographs. The labiopalatal position of the impacted canines and root resorption of permanent incisors were evaluated with CBCT. The sector location on panoramic radiographs was compared with the labiopalatal position of impacted maxillary canines on CBCT. The statistical correlation between panoramic and CBCT findings was examined using the χ(2) test and the Fisher's exact test. Labially impacted canines in CBCT were more frequent in Panoramic Sectors 1, 2 and 3, mid-alveolus impacted canines were more frequent in Sector 4 and palatally impacted canines were more frequent in Sector 5. There was a statistically significant association between the panoramic sectors of the impacted canines and the labiopalatal position of the canines (p panoramic radiography.

  20. Deepbite correction with incisor intrusion in adults: a long-term cephalometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale Varlık, Selin; Onur Alpakan, Ödül; Türköz, Çağrı

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term stability of deep overbite correction with mandibular incisor intrusion with utility arches in adult patients. Pretreatment, posttreatment, and 5-years postretention lateral cephalograms of 31 patients (mean age, 26.8 years; range, 24.1-30.9 years) with Class II Division 1 malocclusion and deepbite, treated by maxillary first premolar extraction and mandibular incisor intrusion, were traced and measured. Significant decreases in overjet and overbite (6.4 ± 1.2 and 3.9 ± 0.7 mm, respectively), significant retroclination (17° ± 1.9°) and retraction (3.8 ± 1.1 mm) of the maxillary incisors, and significant increases in protrusion (0.8 ± 1.5 mm), proclination (0.6° ± 0.9°), and intrusion (2.6 ± 1.4 mm) of the mandibular incisors were observed at posttreatment. At postretention, there were statistically significant but clinically unimportant increases in overjet and overbite (0.4 ± 0.2 and 0.8 ± 0.4 mm, respectively) and extrusion of the mandibular incisors (0.8 ± 1.1 mm). Correction of deepbite in nongrowing patients by mandibular incisor intrusion with a utility arch can be considered effective and stable. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Rare Bilateral Presentation of Multiple Dens Invaginatus, Shovel-Shaped Incisor and Talon Cusp With Mesiodens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, S; Jain, M; Shubha, A B

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a unique and unusual case of concomitant appearance of morphological dental anomalies in the maxillary anterior region, along with its management in a patient with no systemic abnormality. This case report describes the clinical and radiographic features of talon cusp, dens invaginatus, shovel-shaped incisors and a supernumerary tooth occurring in a single patient, which is a rare presentation. All 4 permanent maxillary incisors had dens invaginatus, the permanent maxillary canines showed the presence of talon cusps, the permanent maxillary central incisors were shovel-shaped and an erupted mesiodens was also observed. Treatment included restorative, surgical and orthodontic approaches.

  2. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Murali H; Aluru, Srikanth C; Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Bandlapalli, Anila; Patel, Nikunj

    2016-07-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect affecting teeth. High prevalence rates of MIH and its clinical implications are significant for both the patients and clinicians. A wide variation in defect prevalence (2.4-40.2%) is reported. It seems to differ with regions and various birth cohorts. Some of the recent prevalence studies are tabulated. Patient implications include hypersensitive teeth, rapid progression of caries, mastication impairment due to rapid attrition, and esthetic repercussions. Implications for clinicians include complexity in treatment planning and treatment implementation, poor prognosis of the restorations, difficulty in achieving pain control during treatment, and behavior management problems. Intention of this paper is to review the etio-pathogenesis, prevalence, clinical features, diagnostic features, and eventually present a sequential treatment approach, i.e., in accordance with current clinical practice guidelines.

  3. ["Molar-incisor hypomineralization"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerhoff, Nadja-Marina; Lussi, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    Hypocalcification of the enamel is the most common developmental disorder observed in teeth. The prevalence of this kind of hypomineralisation is about 10-19%. These molars are often referred to as cheese molars, because the lesions clinically resemble cheese in color and consistency. Other descriptions are: idiopathic enamel hypomineralisation in the permanent first molars, idiopathic enamel opacities in the permanent first molars, non fluoride enamel hypomineralisation in the permanent first molars, non-endemic mottling of enamel in the permanent first molars. Molar-Incisor Hypomineralisation is today the proposed expression for this disease. Occlusal surfaces of the first permanent molar are most commonly affected. The lesions are more frequent in the upper jaw than in the lower jaw. The incisors are affected to a lesser degree than the molars. Several aetiological factors can cause these defects. Some studies show a relation between intake of dioxins via mother's milk after prolonged breast feeding and developmental defects of the child's teeth. Because the ameloblasts are very sensitive to oxygen supply, complications involving oxygen shortages during birth or respiratory diseases such as asthma or bronchitis and pneumonia are discussed as further aetiological factors. Renal insufficiency, hypoparothyroidism, diarrhoea, malabsorption and malnutrition and high-fever diseases can be other reasons for the occurrence of these defects. Defective enamel can be a locus of lowered resistance for caries. Histologically there are areas of porosity of varying degrees. The affected teeth can be very sensitive to air, cold, warm and mechanical stimuli. Toothbrushing may create toothache in these teeth. We therefore suggest that these patients receive intensified prevention with fluoride varnish, a fissure sealing, GIZ, composits, stainless steel crowns or implants. In some cases an interdisciplinary approach with an orthodontist can result in the extraction of the molars

  4. Orthodontic space closure without contralateral extraction through mesial movement of lower molars in patients with aplastic lower second premolars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, B; Guitard, Y

    2001-09-01

    A method is presented that allows unilateral space closure in patients with aplastic lower second premolars. Based on a straight-wire appliance, space closure was achieved with a combination of "push mechanics" using the second molar as an anchorage unit and Class II "pull mechanics", thus avoiding the application of any distalizing force on the lower incisors. The results from 13 consecutively treated subjects (five boys, eight girls, mean age 12 years and 6 months) were analyzed. Complete bodily space closure was achieved in all 13 cases within a mean treatment time of 2 years and 7 months. The desired Angle Class III molar relationship of one premolar width (+/- 1/4 premolar width) on the aplastic side was successful in eleven patients, an additional 4.7 mm of space being created for the third molar on the aplastic side compared with the contralateral side (p orthodontic space closure in cases of unilateral aplastic lower second premolars can be performed successfully with the presented treatment method without the need for additional premolar extractions, prosthodontic treatment or implants. Furthermore, the prognosis for the lower wisdom tooth on the aplastic side is improved.

  5. Orthodontic management of unfavorably impacted maxillary central incisor (sickle incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisek Ghosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaction is an eruptive disturbance characterized by the inability of the teeth to reach from its place of formation to the place of its function. Maxillary central incisor impactions are usually rare as it is one of the first permanent teeth to erupt in the oral cavity. The etiologic factors include the presence of mesiodens, dilacerations of roots, odontomas, fibrous gingiva etc. Impaction of central incisor usually poses a functional as well as an esthetic problem. Treatment options might include surgical intervention or prosthetic rehabilitation, but the best modality would be its orthodontic management. Orthodontic disimpaction in such situations provides a solution to an otherwise long-term esthetic and functional problem. This case report provides a detailed descriptive overview on the orthodontic management of an unfavorably impacted maxillary central incisor (sickle incisor.

  6. The rat incisor in toxicologic pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, M.H.M.; Kooij, A.J. van de; Slootweg, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Microscopic examination of the incisors of rats and mice may reveal toxicologically significant changes. First, the incisor morphology reflects the nutritional status of the animal: fluctuations of mineral metabolism and vitamin availability are disclosed by the rodent incisors, because the incisors

  7. Indirect usage of miniscrew anchorage to intrude overerupted mandibular incisors in a Class II patient with a deep overbite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Yoshihito; Kuroda, Shingo; Sugawara, Yasuyo; Balam, Tarek A; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    Vertical dentoalveolar discrepancies are a common problem in orthodontic patients but are often difficult to treat with traditional mechanics. This case report illustrates the successful treatment of overerupted mandibular incisors via the indirect use of miniscrew anchorage. A woman (age, 22 years 9 months) had chief complaints of maxillary incisor protrusion and crooked teeth. An excessive curve of Spee caused by elongation of the mandibular incisors was also found. The patient was diagnosed with a severe Class II Division 1 malocclusion and a deep overbite. After extraction of the mandibular first premolars and the subsequent leveling phase, the elongated incisors were intruded with a novel method, which involved the combined use of sectional archwires and miniscrews placed in the premolar areas. After the procedure, the mandibular incisors had been intruded by 6.5 mm with no undesirable side effects. The total active treatment period was 42 months. The resultant occlusion and satisfactory facial profile were maintained after 30 months of retention. Our novel intrusion approach shows potential for correcting a deep overbite. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Indirect usage of miniscrew anchorage to intrude overerupted mandibular incisors in a Class II patient with a deep overbite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Yoshihito; Kuroda, Shingo; Sugawara, Yasuyo; Balam, Tarek A; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Vertical dentoalveolar discrepancies are a common problem in orthodontic patients but are often difficult to treat with traditional mechanics. This case report illustrates the successful treatment of overerupted mandibular incisors via the indirect use of miniscrew anchorage. A woman (age, 22 years 9 months) had chief complaints of maxillary incisor protrusion and crooked teeth. An excessive curve of Spee caused by elongation of the mandibular incisors was also found. The patient was diagnosed with a severe Class II Division 1 malocclusion and a deep overbite. After extraction of the mandibular first premolars and the subsequent leveling phase, the elongated incisors were intruded with a novel method, which involved the combined use of sectional archwires and miniscrews placed in the premolar areas. After the procedure, the mandibular incisors had been intruded by 6.5 mm with no undesirable side effects. The total active treatment period was 42 months. The resultant occlusion and satisfactory facial profile were maintained after 30 months of retention. Our novel intrusion approach shows potential for correcting a deep overbite. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2016.

  9. Dens invaginatus (dilated odontome) in mandibular canine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawar, Sangamesh S; Satyakiran, Gvv; Krishnanand, Ps; Prashanth, R

    2014-09-01

    Dens invaginatus is a developmental malformation of teeth related to shape of the teeth. Affected teeth show a deep infolding of enamel and dentin starting from the tip of the cusps and may extend deep into the root. It results from the invagination of the enamel organ into the dental papilla before calcification has occurred. Teeth most affected are maxillary lateral incisors. The presence of dens invaginatus in mandibular canine is extremely rare. The tooth was symptomatic in that it was mobile and was oriented horizontally. This article presents a case of symptomatic dens invaginatus in mandibular canine.

  10. Dentigerous cyst associated with a maxillary permanent lateral incisor: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B K Ramnarayan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma to deciduous teeth can have severe consequences. Dentigerous cysts are common developmental odontogenic cysts of the jaws. They are associated with the crown of an unerupted/impacted or developing tooth. Reported cases most commonly involve mandibular third molars and maxillary canines. They rarely involve the incisors. The condition occurs predominantly in the second and third decades of life. We report a case of dentigerous cyst involving the permanent maxillary lateral incisor, which developed as a consequence to trauma to the deciduous predecessor. The pathogenesis and clinical and radiologic features are discussed.

  11. Mandibular incisor position changes do not explain increase in keratinized gingiva height after periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald J Ferguson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to reexamine the relationship between mandibular incisor inclination, prominence and vertical changes in position, and keratinized gingival tissue (KT height changes labial to the mandibular incisors after orthodontic treatment with and without augmented corticotomy (Cort. Materials and Methods: Two orthodontically treated groups of 35 individuals each, with (Cort and without (conventional [Conv] alveolar decortication and augmentation bone grafting (periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics [PAOO], were matched for sample size, gender, mandibular premolar extractions, pretreatment age, posttreatment observation period, and pretreatment KT height in this case–controlled retrospective study. Pre- and post-treatment lateral cephalometric radiographs were evaluated for mandibular incisor vertical, inclination, and prominence changes. Results: As reported previously (Wilcko 2015, KT height had significantly increased by 0.78 mm (P = 0.001 in the Cort group and decreased by 0.38 mm (P = 0.002 in Conv on an average of 1.5 years after completion of active orthodontic therapy. In this study, Cort mandibular incisors proclined and protruded significantly during therapy while Conv incisors did not. Changes in mandibular incisor inclination and prominence explained neither the decrease in keratinized gingiva height in Conv nor the KT height gain in Cort. Conclusions: In spite of mandibular incisor proclination and protrusion, orthodontic therapy combined with alveolar decortication and augmentation bone grafting resulted in a clinically significant increase in keratinized gingiva height 1.5 years' posttreatment.

  12. Congenitally missing mandibular second premolars: clinical options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokich, Vincent G; Kokich, Vincent O

    2006-10-01

    Congenital absence of mandibular second premolars affects many orthodontic patients. The orthodontist must make the proper decision at the appropriate time regarding management of the edentulous space. These spaces can be closed or left open. If the space will be left open for an eventual restoration, the keys during orthodontic treatment are to create the correct amount of space and to leave the alveolar ridge in an ideal condition for a future restoration. If the space will be closed, the clinician must avoid any detrimental alterations to the occlusion and the facial profile. Some early decisions that the orthodontist makes for a patient whose mandibular second premolars are congenitally missing will affect his or her dental health for a lifetime. Therefore, the correct decision must be made at the appropriate time. In this article, we present and discuss various treatment alternatives for managing orthodontic patients with at least 1 congenitally missing mandibular second premolar.

  13. [Gummy smile correction by intruding upper incisors with mini-screw implant: an esthetic evaluation by the golden facial mask].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da-Wei; Zhou, Yan-Heng; Li, Yun-Yi

    2010-09-01

    to use a golden facial mask to classify the gummy smile and then to evaluate the effectiveness of correction gummy smile by intruding upper incisors and canines with mini-screw implants. sixteen female and 1 male gummy smile patients with an age range of 16 - 40 years, 26.2 years on average, were involved in the study. The mini-screw implants were inserted buccally between upper lateral incisors and canines on both sides for intruding upper incisors together with fixed appliance. The golden facial mask was introduced to analyze the frontal view of smile pre- and post-treatment. gummy smile of all patients involved in the study was reduced by intruding upper incisors and canines, and the average period for intruding about 9.8 months. According to the analysis of the golden facial mask, the reasons of gummy smile in different patients were different before treatment. However, the lips, teeth and gingiva were almost coincident with the golden facial mask after treatment. analyzing the relationship among lip, teeth and gingiva by the golden facial mask, the inprovement of gummy smile by using mini-screw implants to intrude the upper incisors can be evaluated.

  14. Mandibular Second Premolar with Four Canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Ghiasi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A mandibular second premolar with four canals is an interesting example of anatomic variations. This report describes a case of a mandibular second premolar with three roots and four canals (one mesiobuccal, two distobuccal and one lingual. The canals were prepared using K-files and irrigated with NaOCl (5.25% and normal saline as the final irrigant. The canals were filled laterally with gutta percha and AH26 sealer (De Trey, Dentsply, Switzerland. This case shows a rare anatomic configuration and points out the importance of looking for additional canals.

  15. Radiographic evaluation in clinical practice of the types and stage of incisor tooth resorption and hypercementosis in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, T J; Puchalski, S M; Arzi, B; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2017-07-01

    There are several reports of incisor tooth resorption and hypercementosis in horses but, to date, studies have been limited in case numbers and to advanced lesions. Tooth resorption in other species is a radiographic diagnosis of types of resorption that are often identified before clinical signs. Our goal was to evaluate radiographically incisor tooth resorption in a large population of horses, utilising interpretation criteria from canine and human dentistry. To document and classify incisor tooth resorption and hypercementosis. Retrospective descriptive case series. Horses presented for routine dental care >5 years old were included only if owners were unaware of incisor pathology. Radiographs (three views) were obtained of the incisor teeth and incisor teeth resorption was classified according to the radiographic criteria described for man and dogs. Hypercementosis and its location were recorded. Tooth resorption was detected in 149 of 169 (88.2%) horses and 951 of 1952 (48.7%) of incisor teeth. The classification system used was applicable in 926 (97.2%) of 951 affected teeth. Hypercementosis was detected in 34 (20.1%) horses and 148 (7.6%) teeth. As horses increased in age, resorption and hypercementosis was more frequent; no significant differences were found among sex or breed categories. All horses with hypercementosis had resorption, but only 23.4% of horses with resorption had hypercementosis. Advanced (stage ≥3) resorption was detected in 159 (8.1%) teeth and 54 (32.0%) horses in an otherwise clinically healthy population. Certain horses' anatomy precluded isolation of the mandibular third incisor teeth from the canine teeth due to superimposition. Incisor tooth resorption, in particular external replacement resorption and external inflammatory resorption, is common in horses. Hypercementosis is consistently associated with resorption, but the inverse association is inconsistent. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  16. Novel treatment of equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis of incisor teeth in a 22-year-old Arabian mare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier-Lowe, Candace K; Anthony, James

    2015-08-01

    Equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis is a rarely reported condition in the incisor and canine teeth of older horses. Histologically, there is internal and external resorption of the tooth with formation of excessive cementum. Once lesions become infected or supragingival this condition is very painful. The clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of hypercementosis in an Arabian mare are described.

  17. Novel treatment of equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis of incisor teeth in a 22-year-old Arabian mare

    OpenAIRE

    Grier-Lowe, Candace K.; Anthony, James

    2015-01-01

    Equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis is a rarely reported condition in the incisor and canine teeth of older horses. Histologically, there is internal and external resorption of the tooth with formation of excessive cementum. Once lesions become infected or supragingival this condition is very painful. The clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of hypercementosis in an Arabian mare are described.

  18. Esthetics with prosthetics in case of maxillary canine transposition: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These are mainly genetically governed and are treated orthodontically if complete segment of tooth is present; in case of missing teeth, participation of cosmetic dentist is must. The present case report describes a situation where left canine to lateral incisor complete transposition was present along with a missing left central ...

  19. Dental repercussions of maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Teresa; Lemos, Carolina

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (MLIA) on the position of other teeth in the dental arch. The sample consisted of 147 individuals (66 males and 81 females) divided into two age groups: a growth phase group (A) comprising 43 individuals (18 males and 25 females, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years) and an adult group (B) (with females older than 14 and males older than 18 years) comprising 104 individuals (48 males and 56 females, ages ranging from 15 to 45 years). Within these groups, the individuals were then divided into three subsets: group 1 with MLIA, group 2 relatives of group 1 but without MLIA, and group 3 individuals from the general population (without agenesis and unrelated). Clinical evaluation of the maxillary dental midline and of the antero-posterior relationship between the upper and lower arches at the first permanent molars and canines was performed. Variables were compared by a chi-square test. There was a significant (P dental midline. MLIA was associated with a Class II malocclusion; this was more frequent on the same side as the agenesis.

  20. An impacted supplemental premolar in the mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koul M

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Supernumerary teeth are rare anomalies of the maxillofacial complex that are more common in the maxilla than in the mandible. This article reports a case of an impacted supplemental type of supernumerary tooth in the mandibular arch, in the left premolar region. The etiology, types and treatment alternatives are discussed.

  1. Nonsurgical treatment with rapid mandibular canine retraction via periodontal ligament distraction in an adult with a Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, John E

    2005-09-01

    A woman with a Class III malocclusion was a poor candidate for orthognathic surgery. An orthodontic treatment plan was developed that incorporated a relatively new and rapid process of canine distraction. The mandibular first premolars were extracted, correcting the anterior crossbite, the Class III canine relationship, and the Class III facial appearance. The canines were distracted, through the periodontal ligament, into the extraction sites. Dental distraction is a breakthrough for orthodontics, especially for adults with critical anchorage requirements.

  2. Maxillary canine displacement and genetically determined predisposition to disturbed development of the dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Franka; Grabowski, Rosemarie

    2003-05-01

    The relationship between maxillary canine displacement and the simultaneous occurrence of "genetically determined predisposition to disturbed development of the dentition" as defined by Hoffmeister was investigated in 675 patients. Panoramic radiographs taken of each patient during the first and the second mixed dentition periods were evaluated. Canine inclination and the distance between the tip of the canine and a line connecting the cusps of the molars were computed in five different age groups according to Dausch-Neumann. Statistical analysis revealed 34 patients with "potential canine displacement", who exhibited further symptoms of "genetically determined predisposition to disturbed development of the dentition" significantly more frequently than the total group. The symptoms concerned were agenesia, displaced tooth buds, rotated or tilted incisors, aplasia and microdontia of lateral incisors. Careful follow-ups in patients with a predisposition to disturbed dental development enables risks to be anticipated and canine displacement to be detected at an early stage.

  3. A new method for rapid Canine retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Khavari A

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis method (Do in bone lengthening and rapid midpalatal expansion have shown the great ability of osteognic tissues for rapid bone formation under distraction force and special protocol with optimum rate of one millimeter per day. Periodontal membrane of teeth (PDM is the extension of periostium in the alveolar socked. Orthodontic force distracts PDM fibers in the tension side and then bone formation will begin.Objects: Rapid retraction of canine tooth into extraction space of first premolar by DO protocol in order to show the ability of the PDM in rapid bone formation. The other objective was reducing total orthodontic treatment time of extraction cases.Patients and Methods: Tweleve maxillary canines in six patients were retracted rapidly in three weeks by a custom-made tooth-born appliance. Radiographic records were taken to evaluate the effects of heavy applied force on canine and anchorage teeth.Results: Average retraction was 7.05 mm in three weeks (2.35 mm/week. Canines rotated distal- in by mean 3.5 degrees.Anchorage loss was from 0 to 0.8 mm with average of 0.3 mm.Root resorption of canines was negligible, and was not significant clinically. Periodontium was normal after rapid retraction. No hazard for pulp vitality was observed.Discussion: PDM responded well to heavy distraction force by Do protocol. Rapid canine retraction seems to be a safe method and can considerabely reduce orthodontic time.

  4. Dental anomalies in an orthodontic patient population with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citak, Mehmet; Cakici, Elif Bahar; Benkli, Yasin Atakan; Cakici, Fatih; Bektas, Bircan; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmış

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of dental anomalies in a subpopulation of orthodontic patients with agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors (MLI). The material of the present study included the records of the 1964 orthodontic patients. Panoramic radiographs and dental casts were used to analyze other associated eight dental anomalies, including agenesis of other teeth, dens invaginatus, dens evaginatus, peg shaped MLI, taurodontism, pulp stone, root dilaceration and maxillary canine impaction. Out of the 1964 patients examined, 90 were found to have agenesis of MLI, representing a prevalence of 4.6%. The most commonly found associated-anomalies were agenesis of other teeth (23.3%), peg-shaped MLIs (15.6%), taurodontism (42.2%), and dilacerated teeth (18.9%). Permanent tooth agenesis, taurodontism, peg-shaped maxillary lateral incisor, and root dilacerations are frequently associated with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

  5. Dental anomalies in an orthodontic patient population with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Citak

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of dental anomalies in a subpopulation of orthodontic patients with agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors (MLI. Methods: The material of the present study included the records of the 1964 orthodontic patients. Panoramic radiographs and dental casts were used to analyze other associated eight dental anomalies, including agenesis of other teeth, dens invaginatus, dens evaginatus, peg shaped MLI, taurodontism, pulp stone, root dilaceration and maxillary canine impaction. Results: Out of the 1964 patients examined, 90 were found to have agenesis of MLI, representing a prevalence of 4.6%. The most commonly found associated-anomalies were agenesis of other teeth (23.3%, peg-shaped MLIs (15.6%, taurodontism (42.2%, and dilacerated teeth (18.9%. Conclusion: Permanent tooth agenesis, taurodontism, peg-shaped maxillary lateral incisor, and root dilacerations are frequently associated with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

  6. Early treatment of an ectopic premolar to prevent molar-premolar transposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavale, Rosangela; Matarese, Giovanni; Isola, Gaetano; Grassia, Vincenzo; Perillo, Letizia

    2013-04-01

    Orthodontic treatment is planned on an individual, case-by-case basis after thoroughly considering the patient's overall facial and dental characteristics, the expected duration of treatment, costs, patient preferences, and the orthodontist's experience. This article reports the treatment of a patient with a maxillary premolar-molar transposition in the permanent dentition that was successfully managed with orthodontic treatment. A girl, aged 10 years 2 months, came for treatment with an ectopic maxillary left premolar. Radiographic analysis indicated a developing complete transposition of the maxillary left premolar. The patient was treated with extraction of the deciduous molar and surgical exposure and ligation of the premolar. Eruption was properly guided, and the correct order of the 2 teeth was restored in the arch. This challenging treatment approach is described in detail, including the mechanics used to align the ectopic premolar. Early treatment can, in many cases, prevent a molar-premolar transposition. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The primary Maxillary Central Incisor in the Solitary Median Maxillary Central Incisor syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, I; Balslev-Olesen, M

    2012-01-01

    of the cranium and face. It is not known whether the centrally located permanent incisor is always preceded by a centrally located primary incisor. The aim was to analyse whether a permanent single central incisor in SMMCI is always preceded by a primary single central incisor and to study extra- and intraoral...

  8. Bilateral protostylids and parastyles associated with hypodontia of maxillary lateral incisor: Report of two rare clinical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulabha A Narsapur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molars and premolars of maxilla and mandible infrequently exhibit a supernumerary inclusion or an anomalous cusp on their buccal surfaces which is known as a paramolar tubercle. When supernumerary cusps are associated with maxillary molars and premolars, they are termed as parastyle, and when associated with mandibular molars and premolars they are known as protostylid. This rare entity occurs singly in permanent dentition and is seen on the mesial half of the molars. The present paper reports two rare cases of bilateral paramolar tubercle in mandibular first molars and maxillary second molars associated with hypodontia of maxillary lateral incisor in both the cases. One paramolar tubercle in the mandibular molar was associated with accessory separate root on the distal aspect.

  9. Rethinking incisor size and diet in anthropoids: diet, incisor wear and incisor breadth in the African apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Melanie A

    2007-07-01

    In a seminal study Hylander (1975) concluded that the length of the incisor row in catarrhines considered frugivores is longer relative to body mass than in those classified as folivores. Assuming that large fruits require greater incisal processing than do leaves, stems, berries, and seeds, he argued that the larger incisors of frugivores increased their resistance to wear. The present analysis examines diet, incisor wear, and incisor crown breadth in cranial samples of western lowland gorillas and chimpanzees. Incisor wear rate was assessed on the basis of the extent of incisor crown reduction observed at sequential stages of first molar wear. Incisor metrics were obtained from the unworn teeth of juveniles. Results suggest that incisor wear is greater in the more folivorous western lowland gorillas than in more frugivorous chimpanzees. Moreover, incisor crown dimensions do not differ appreciably among African apes. These findings fail to support the hypothesis that slower wear rates are associated with broader incisor crowns, and raise new questions regarding the significance of incisor row length in anthropoids. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Dens evaginatus and dens invaginatus in all maxillary incisors: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardhan, Talla Harsha; Shanmugam, Subramanyam

    2010-02-01

    Dens evaginatus is a developmental malformation characterized by the presence of an extra cusp that takes the form of a tubercle arising from the occlusal or the lingual surface of the tooth. It is also referred to as talon cusp in the anterior teeth and Leong premolar in the premolars. Dens invaginatus is a deep surface invagination of the crown or the root lined by enamel, dentin, and pulp. Though many case reports of dens evaginatus and dens invaginatus have been found in the literature, an association of both is a rare anomaly. Only two cases of concomitance of dens invaginatus and dens evaginatus have been reported. This article is a case report of dens evaginatus and dens invaginatus involving all four maxillary incisors in a 25-year-old patient.

  11. The effect of buccal corticotomy on accelerating orthodontic tooth movement of maxillary canine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbakhshi, Mohammad Reza; Motamedi, Ali Mohammad Kalantar; Feizbakhsh, Masoud; Mogharehabed, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Selective alveolar corticotomy is defined as an intentional injury to cortical bone. This technique is an effective means of accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of buccal corticotomy in accelerating maxillary canine retraction. The sample in this clinical trial study consisted of 15 adult female patients with therapeutic need for extraction of maxillary first premolars and maximum canine retraction. By use of split-mouth design, at the time of premolars extraction, buccal corticotomy was performed around the maxillary first premolar, randomly on one side of maxilla, and the other side was reserved as the control side. Canine retraction was performed by use of friction - less mechanic with simple vertical loop. Every 2 weeks, distance between canines and second premolars was measured until complete space closure. The velocity of space closure was calculated to evaluate the effect of this technique in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. The obtained data were statistically analyzed using independent t-test, and the significance was set at 0.05. The rate of canine retraction was significantly higher on the corticotomy side than the control side by an average of 1.8 mm/month versus 1.1 mm/month in the corticotomy side and control side, respectively (P orthodontic tooth movement about two times faster than conventional orthodontics and it is significant in early stages after surgical porsedure. Therefore Buccal corticotomy is a useful adjunct technique for accelerating orthodontic tooth movement.

  12. The effect of buccal corticotomy on accelerating orthodontic tooth movement of maxillary canine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbakhshi, Mohammad Reza; Motamedi, Ali Mohammad Kalantar; Feizbakhsh, Masoud; Mogharehabed, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Selective alveolar corticotomy is defined as an intentional injury to cortical bone. This technique is an effective means of accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of buccal corticotomy in accelerating maxillary canine retraction. Materials and Methods: The sample in this clinical trial study consisted of 15 adult female patients with therapeutic need for extraction of maxillary first premolars and maximum canine retraction. By use of split-mouth design, at the time of premolars extraction, buccal corticotomy was performed around the maxillary first premolar, randomly on one side of maxilla, and the other side was reserved as the control side. Canine retraction was performed by use of friction – less mechanic with simple vertical loop. Every 2 weeks, distance between canines and second premolars was measured until complete space closure. The velocity of space closure was calculated to evaluate the effect of this technique in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. The obtained data were statistically analyzed using independent t-test, and the significance was set at 0.05. Results: The rate of canine retraction was significantly higher on the corticotomy side than the control side by an average of 1.8 mm/month versus 1.1 mm/month in the corticotomy side and control side, respectively (P orthodontic tooth movement about two times faster than conventional orthodontics and it is significant in early stages after surgical porsedure. Therefore Buccal corticotomy is a useful adjunct technique for accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. PMID:27605986

  13. Mandibular incisor apicoectomy in a Canadian Beaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Gerhard; Venter, Leon; Crossley, David; Buss, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A 52-month-old Canadian beaver was presented for treatment of lip trauma resulting from overgrowth of the right mandibular incisor tooth following earlier loss of the right maxillary incisor tooth. Extraction of the affected tooth was considered, but rejected due to the length of the embedded portion of rodent mandibular incisor teeth. The lip injury was managed by crown reduction (odontoplasty) of the overgrowing incisor tooth pending a more permanent treatment plan. A 2-cm apicoectomy of the right mandibular incisor tooth was performed to arrest growth of the tooth when the beaver was 82-months-old. The remainder of the tooth continued to erupt and was completely expelled during a 9-month period with one additional odontoplasty being required. The beaver continued to feed normally with just the left maxillary and mandibular incisor teeth until its death at 118-months, with odontoplasty performed twice on the remaining incisor teeth during the 30-months following exfoliation.

  14. Effect of incisor inclination changes on cephalometric points a and b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, S.; Shaikh, A.; Fida, M.

    2015-01-01

    The position of cephalometric points A and B are liable to be affected by alveolar remodelling caused by orthodontic tooth movement during incisor retraction. This study was conducted to evaluate the change in positions of cephalometric points A and B in sagittal and vertical dimensions due to change in incisor inclinations. Methods: Total sample of 31 subjects were recruited into the study. The inclusion criteria were extraction of premolars in upper and lower arches, completion of growth and orthodontic treatment. The exclusion criteria were patients with craniofacial anomalies and history of orthodontic treatment. By superimposition of pre and post treatment tracings, various linear and angular parameters were measured. Various tests and multiple linear regression analysis were performed to determine changes in outcome variables. Statistically significant p-value was <0.05. Results:One-sample t-test showed that change in position of only point A was statistically significant which was 1.61mm (p<0.01) in sagittal direction and 1.49mm (p<0.01) in vertical direction. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that if we retrocline upper incisor by 100, the point A will move superiorly by 0.6mm. Conclusions: Total change in the position of point A is in a downward and forward direction. Total Change in upper incisors inclinations causes change in position of point A only in vertical direction. (author)

  15. Distribution of permanent canine agenesis in Down syndrome: 15 cases from a Centre for Special Care Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuland-Bosma, Wimke; Reuland, Merijn C; Bronkhorst, Ewald

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution of permanent canine agenesis in subjects with Down syndrome (DS). Subjects with canine agenesis were determined by means of panoramic radiographs from 150 DS subjects attending a center for special care dentistry. Our results confirm the high prevalence of agenetic canines in DS (21 canines, 14%). We found specific effects on the distribution both of phenotype and of location (jaw). In subjects with a mild expression of hypodontia (phenotype nonoligodontia) agenetic canines primarily occurred in the mandibula, whereas in subjects with severe hypodontia (phenotype oligodontia) agenetic canines virtually only occurred in the maxilla. In both phenotypes cooccurrence of an agenetic lateral incisor with an agenetic canine was observed in the maxilla. It was striking that canine agenesis in the mandibula did not cooccur with agenesis of other teeth. These results can be important for treatment planning. © 2014 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Impacted maxillary canines and root resorption of adjacent teeth: A retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, R; Cavallini, C; Vernucci, R; Vichi, M; Leonardi, R; Barbato, E

    2016-11-01

    The prevalence of impacted maxillary canine is reported to be between 1% and 3%. The lack of monitoring and the delay in the treatment of the impacted canine can cause different complications such as: displacement of adjacent teeth, loss of vitality of neighbouring teeth, shortening of the dental arch, follicular cysts, canine ankylosis, recurrent infections, recurrent pain, internal resorption of the canine and the adjacent teeth, external resorption of the canine and the adjacent teeth, combination of these factors. An appropriate diagnosis, accurate predictive analysis and early intervention are likely to prevent such undesirable effects. The objective is to evaluate, by means of a retrospective observational study, the possibility of carrying out a predictive analysis of root resorption adjacent to the impacted canines by means of orthopantomographs, so as to limit the prescription of additional 3D radiography. 120 subjects with unilateral or bilateral maxillary impacted canine were examined and 50 patients with 69 impacted maxillary canine (22 male, 28 female; mean age: 11.7 years) satisfied the inclusion criteria of the study. These patients were subjected to a basic clinical and radiographic investigation (orthopantomographs and computerized tomography). All panoramic films were viewed under standardized conditions for the evaluation of two main variables: maxillary canine angulations (a, b, g angles) and the overlapping between the impacted teeth and the lateral incisor (Analysis of Lindauer). Binary logistic regression was used to estimate the likelihood of resorbed lateral incisors depending on sector location and angle measurements. Results indicated that b angle has the greatest influence on the prediction of root resorption (predictive value of b angle = 76%). If β angle <18° and Lindauer = I, the probability of resorption is 0.06. Evaluation of b angle and superimposition lateral incisor/impacted canine analysed on orthopantomographs could be one of

  17. A study to evaluate the changes in 3rd molar angulation with extraction of four premolars in class II malocclusion therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özge Uslu-Akçam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objectives of the study are to evaluate the changes in third molar angulation during orthodontic treatment with extraction of premolars in Class II malocclusions, and to evaluate the relationship between the angulation of third molars and positional changes of incisors and molars. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on lateral cephalograms and dental panoramic tomograms of 30 patients (mean age 13.48 years with skeletodental Class II malocclusion treated with four first premolar extractions. Twenty-four cases were treated with edgewise, and six were treated with Begg technique. The changes in the eruption pattern of the third molars were observed at the beginning of the treatment (T1 and at the end of the treatment (T2. The changes in the anteroposterior position of the incisors and molars, original molar space, and mesiodistal third molar angulation were tested by paired t-test. Results: The positional changes of the upper/lower incisors and first molars and original molar space were found similar in edgewise and Begg technique. Original molar space was increased in both jaws during orthodontic treatment. Long axis angle of the upper right third molar due to occlusal plane was increased nonsignificantly. Lower right third molars uprighted significantly. A positive correlation was found between the inclination of the lower right third molars and position of lower incisors and first molars. Conclusion: Treatment with extraction of premolars result in a greater space in the third molar region as a result of the mesial movement of the molars during space closure.

  18. Premolar root changes following treatment with the banded herbst appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiopoulos, Athanasios T; Athanasiou, Athanasios E; Papadopoulos, Moschos A; Kolokithas, George; Ioannidou, Ioulia

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to radiographically assess root morphology changes in maxillary and mandibular premolars following Herbst appliance treatment. Twenty-five consecutive adolescents (19 boys and six girls, mean age 13.08 years) with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion were treated with the banded Herbst appliance for a mean period of 13.16 months. Periapical radiographs of the upper and lower premolars were obtained before appliance insertion and immediately after appliance removal using the parallel technique. All radiographs were scanned, digitized and analyzed using appropriately adjusted cephalometric software. The pre- and post-treatment length and area of the first and second maxillary and mandibular premolar roots were calculated. Statistical analysis included paired t-tests to evaluate pre- and posttreatment changes, and independent t-tests to compare the pre and post-treatment differences between the first and the second premolars, which served as controls. The level of significance was set at p premolar root lengths or areas was noted following removal of the Herbst appliance. We observed a statistically-significant decrease in the root area of the first mandibular premolars compared to that of the second mandibular premolars. Although we observed no statistically-significant root morphology changes in the first and second premolars following Herbst appliance treatment, the mandibular first premolars revealed significantly more root resorption than did the mandibular second premolars.

  19. Study cast measurements in the assessment of incisor crowding among patients attending dental clinics in Abha city, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Al-Shahrani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Demand for orthodontic treatment is increasing in Saudi Arabia. An observational study was planned to assess the incisor crowding in maxillary and mandibular arch among Saudi males and females reporting to different dental clinics in Abha city, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted. Five hundred and thirty-two study casts of males and females aged between 16 and 35 years without a previous history of extraction of permanent teeth were included in the study. Labiolingual linear displacement of anatomic contact points of each maxillary and mandibular incisor from the adjacent tooth was measured. Right canine mesial aspect to the left canine mesial aspect was examined for five displacements. Results: There was a high prevalence of incisor crowding observed in the study population. Sixty-four percent (342 out of 532 casts showed bi-maxillary crowding, 14% (75 out of 352 showed mandibular, and 8.1% (43 out of 532 showed maxillary crowding. About 13.6% (72 out of 532 of the study population had well-aligned maxillary and mandibular incisors while 86.4% (460 out of 532 had some degree of incisor crowding. Females had more incisor crowding (48.5%-258 out of 532 than males (37.9%-202 out of 532. Conclusion: High prevalence of incisor crowding in Abha region reported in this study necessitates long-term planning and preventive measures for the adolescent population and treatment of the adult population of the Abha city, KSA.

  20. Comparative evaluation of pentraxin 3 levels in GCF during canine retraction with active tieback and NiTi coil spring: An in vivo study

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Pratik; Shanthraj, Ravi; Bhagyalakshmi, A; Garg, Nekta; Vallakati, Anisha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the levels of pentraxin 3 (PTX-3) in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in patients undergoing orthodontic canine retraction with active tieback and nickel titanium (NiTi) coil spring. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients of the age group 15?25 years with first premolar extraction undergoing canine retraction were selected. One month after placement of 0.019? ? 0.025? stainless steel wire, canine retraction was started with active tieback (150 g force) on upper right qu...

  1. The management of premolar supernumeraries in three orthodontic cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, C M

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the incidence, etiology and location of supernumerary teeth with emphasis on premolar supernumeraries and examines the management of supernumerary premolars of three patients undergoing orthodontics. These cases demonstrate that the management of premolars is assessed individually and treatments based on potential complications, which may occur during the orthodontic and surgical management of the dentition. Progress and posttreatment radiographs are recommended for the assessment of late forming supernumerary teeth.

  2. Canine Parvovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finally, do not let your puppy or adult dog to come into contact with the fecal waste of other dogs while walking or playing outdoors. Prompt and proper ... advisable as a way to limit spread of canine parvovirus infection as well as other diseases that ...

  3. Management of an Unusual Ectopic Eruption of Maxillary Canine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aileni, Kaladhar Reddy; Rachala, Madhukar Reddy; Prathima, Chintakunta Reddy; Naveen, Pitalla Kumar; Soujanya, Donthula

    2017-05-01

    Transposition of teeth is a rare condition, with a prevalence of 0.3-0.4% in general population. They are more commonly observed in females, and may occur unilaterally/bilaterally with greater frequency of left side occurrence in unilateral transposition cases. A 17-year-old female patient reported with the chief complaint of unaesthetic smile. On clinical examination the patient was diagnosed with Angle's class I malocclusion with an ectopically erupted maxillary left canine labial to the left central incisor with retained deciduous canine. The treatment plan decided was to extract the retained deciduous canine, level and align the ectopic canine using an R-loop. The treatment for the patient was finished in 14 months and was retained using a fixed lingual retainer in the upper and lower arches.

  4. [Incisor repositioning: a new approach in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallel, Ines; Khemiri, Mourad; Fathallah, Safa; Ben Rejeb, Salwa; Tobji, Samir; Ben Amor, Adel

    2015-12-01

    Lower incisors axis has a "key" position in different cephalometric analysis. However, several critics are directed towards the cephalometric profile and cephalometric landmarks (point, line and angle). The published norms and the cephalometric standards recommended for the optimal positioning of incisors could only be used as general clinical guidelines. Incisor repositioning to achieve optimal facial aesthetics requires taking into consideration the hard and soft tissues of the face, the profile, the muscular dynamics as well as the facial growth. In this work, we propose a new approach of incisor repositioning taking into account the variability of periodontal, functional and aesthetic factors. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2015.

  5. Perbandingan Tinggi Tulang Maksila dan Mandibula di Regio Interisisivi Sentral antara Pra dan Pasca Perawatan Ortodontik dengan Pencabutan ke Empat Gigi Premolar Pertama (Kajian pada Foto Panoramik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayan Ardhana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Latar belakang. Perawatan ortodontik pada kasus-kasus gigi berjejal dan protusif sering membutuhkan pencabutan gigi premolar untuk penyediaan ruang agar gigi berjejal dapat dirapikan dan gigi depan yang protusif dapat diundurkan. Gigi insisivus sentral merupakan salah satu gigi yang paling banyak mengalami pergerakan selama proses retrusi. Pergerakan gigi insisivus mengakibatkan terjadinya perubahan pada puncak tulang alveolar selama perawatan yang mungkin akan mempengaruhi tinggi tulang maksila dan mandibula pasca perawatan. Tujuan penelitian. Membandingkan tinggi tulang maksila dan mandibula di daerah interdental gigi insisivi sentral pada foto panoramic antara pra dan pasca perawatan maloklusi dengan pencabutan ke empat gigi premolar pertama. Metode penelitian. Digunakan 30 pasang foto panoramic pra dan pasca perawatan yang dipilih sesuai dengan kriteria penelitian dari pasien-pasien peneliti yang telah selesai mendapat perawatan aktif dengan teknik edgewise. Analisis Kolmogorov-Smirnov dan Shaviro-Wilk digunakan untuk uji normalitas dan Student t-test data berpasangan digunakan untuk menguji perbedaan tinggi tulang maksila dan mandibula antara pra dan pasca perawatan. Hasil Penelitian. Tidak didapatkan perbedaan (p>0,05 tinggi tulang maksila dan amndibula antara pra dan pasca perawatan ortodontik dengan pencabutan keempat gigi premolar pertama.   Background. In orthodontic treatment, premolar extractions are often needed in crowding and prostrusive cases to provide space for the teeth can be aligned and retracted to their desire position. Central incisor teeth are the teeth that mostly undergone more movement during retrusion. The change of the alveolar bone crest in this incisors might affect the maxillary and mandibular bone height post-treatment. Research objectives. The present study aimed to compare the bone height in the interdental maxillary and mandibular central incisors regions before and after orthodontic treatment with four

  6. Comparison of canine retraction using single and Siamese edgewise brackets: An in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Iqbal Bhat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to check the rate of canine retraction with bodily mechanics using two different pre-adjusted edgewise bracket Systems. Materials and Methods: A split mouth study with twenty patients who were randomly selected and allotted to a single operator. Duration of canine retraction, angulation of canine during its retraction, degree of Rotation, anchorage Loss, distance between canine and premolar at different time intervals were then evaluated, pre- (To, 3 months- (T1 and canine tip touches the second premolar- (T2. Descriptive statistics including mean values and standard deviations were calculated. Paired and unpaired t-test was performed to evaluate the differences between the groups. Results: Rotation and angulation of the canines did not show significant difference in both the systems. There was statistically significant difference (P<0.01 in anchorage loss between single wing and Siamese bracket being 2.65 ±1.41 mm and 1.31 ± 0.93 respectively. There was statistically significant intergroup difference (P<0.01 in canine movement i.e distance between canine and premolar was recorded as 4.72mm (15.06 ± 1.69 to 10.34 ± 1.68mm in single wing bracket and 6.25mm in Siamese (15.52 ± 1.41 to 9.27 ± 1.94. Conclusion: In cases where high anchorage is required and the rate of canine retraction is a concern, Siamese brackets pose a definite advantage over Single wing brackets.

  7. New hominin fossils from Kanapoi, Kenya, and the mosaic evolution of canine teeth in early hominins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael Plavcan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Whilst reduced size, altered shape and diminished sexual dimorphism of the canine–premolar complex are diagnostic features of the hominin clade, little is known about the rate and timing of changes in canine size and shape in early hominins. The earliest Australopithecus, Australopithecus anamensis, had canine crowns similar in size to those of its descendant Australopithecus afarensis, but a single large root alveolus has suggested that this species may have had larger and more dimorphic canines than previously recognised. Here we present three new associated dentitions attributed to A. anamensis, recently recovered from the type site of Kanapoi, Kenya, that provide evidence of canine evolution in early Australopithecus. These fossils include the largest mandibular canine root in the hominin fossil record. We demonstrate that, although canine crown height did not differ between these species, A. anamensis had larger and more dimorphic roots, more like those of extant great apes and Ardipithecus ramidus, than those of A. afarensis. The canine and premolar occlusal shapes of A. anamensis also resemble those of Ar. ramidus, and are intermediary between extant great apes and A. afarensis. A. afarensis achieved Homo-like maxillary crown basal proportions without a reduction in crown height. Thus, canine crown size and dimorphism remained stable during the early evolution of Australopithecus, but mandibular root dimensions changed only later within the A. anamensis–afarensis lineage, coincident with morphological changes in the canine–premolar complex. These observations suggest that selection on canine tooth crown height, shape and root dimensions was not coupled in early hominin evolution, and was not part of an integrated adaptive package.

  8. Dental size reduction in Indonesian Homo erectus: Implications for the PU-198 premolar and the appearance of Homo sapiens on Java.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanski, Joshua M; Marsh, Hannah E; Maddux, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    The recent recovery of a hominin maxillary third premolar, PU-198, within the faunal collections from Punung Cave (East Java) has led to assertions that Homo sapiens appeared on Java between 143,000 and 115,000 years ago. The taxonomic assignment of PU-198 to H. sapiens was based predominantly on the small size of the specimen, following an analysis which found little to no overlap in premolar size between Homo erectus and terminal Pleistocene/Holocene H. sapiens. Here, we re-evaluate the use of size in the taxonomic assignment of PU-198 in light of 1) new buccolingual and mesiodistal measurements taken on the fossil, 2) comparisons to a larger sample of H. erectus and H. sapiens maxillary third premolars, and 3) evidence of a diachronic trend in post-canine dental size reduction among Javan H. erectus. Our results demonstrate PU-198 to be slightly larger than previously suggested, reveal substantial overlap in premolar size between H. erectus and H. sapiens, and indicate a statistically significant reduction in premolar size between early and late Javan H. erectus. Our findings cast doubt on the assignment of PU-198 to H. sapiens, and accordingly, question the appearance of H. sapiens on Java between 143,000 and 115,000 years ago. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Incisors with a mind of their own

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heumen, C.C.M. van; Termeer, D.; Oosterkamp, B.C.; Meijer, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old man, known to have hypodontia, was bothered by his over-erupted central incisors. After the placement of implants and the accompanying crown- and bridgework, the central incisors appear to be increasingly over-erupted. The history shows that this phenomenon has already been seen in the

  10. Determining the localization of premolar zenith positions according ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determining the localization of premolar zenith positions according to the gingival line. ... Conclusions: The present study results showed that GZs of FPM and SPM teeth for both left and right sight was coronally located according to ZL. Key words: Gingival aesthetics, gingival localization, maxillary premolars ...

  11. Morphology of root canals in lower human premolars | Baroudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The knowledge of the root canal morphology and the possible anatomical variations of mandibular premolars are important for the successful endodontic treatment of such cases. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of two or three root canals in extracted first and second mandibular premolars ...

  12. Bilateral mandibular second premolars with three separate roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Hakam Mukhaimer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mandibular second premolar is usually described as a single-rooted tooth with a single root canal. However, three root canals may be found but the occurrence of three separate roots is extremely rare. This report describes the case of a patient with bilateral mandibular second premolar with three roots and three root canals. The pre-operative radiograph of the right premolar revealed the presence of three roots, while the radiograph of the left premolar looked unusual and showed two roots. The access cavity preparation was extended and three orifices leading to three roots were found. All root canals were cleaned, shaped, and obturated. The post-operative radiograph showed a satisfactory root canal filling. Clinicians should always consider the presence of anatomical variations in the teeth during endodontic treatments. Despite the low prevalence, variations may occur in the number of roots and root canals of mandibular second premolars, as demonstrated in this case report.

  13. Agenesis of premolar associated with submerged primary molar and a supernumerary premolar: An unusual case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. S. G. Nirmala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of submerged primary molar, agenesis of permanent successor with a supernumerary in the same place is very rare. The purpose of this article is to report a case of submerged mandibular left second primary molar with supernumerary tooth in the same region along with agenesis of second premolar in an 11-year-old girl, its possible etiological factors, and a brief discussion on treatment options.

  14. Over-bite and vertical changes following first premolar extraction in high angle cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, G C; Pradeep, M C; Kumar, G Arun; Girish, K S; Suresh, B S

    2012-11-01

    Orthodontists generally agree that nonextraction treatment is associated with downward and backward rotation of the mandible and an increase in the lower anterior face height (LAFH). They also agree that extraction line of treatment is associated with upward and forward rotation of the mandible and decrease in the LAFH. The intent of this cephalometric investigation was to examine the wedge hypothesis, that the vertical dimension collapses after first bicuspid extraction. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the cephalometric overbite and vertical changes following first premolar extraction in high angle cases. Forty-five adult patients having high mandibular plane angle, i.e. Gogn--SN more than or equal to 32° having class I molar and canine relation were included. Pre and post-treatment lateral cephalograms were measured and compared to analyze the cephalometric changes. There was no decrease in the overbite and vertical changes following first premolar extraction in high angle cases. The facial complex does increase in size with growth, but mandibular plane while moving inferiorly, remain essentially parallel to its pretreatment position due to residual growth and treatment mechanics. The study concluded that, There was no decrease in the vertical facial dimension, overbite and mandibular plane angle. However, it should be interpreted with caution, given the small sample size.

  15. Cone beam computed tomography findings of impacted upper canines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva Santos, Ludmilla Mota [Dept. of Endodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Paulista State University, Aracatuba(Brazil); Bastos, Luana Costa; Da Silva, Silvio Jose Albergaria; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores [School of Dentistry, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador (Brazil); Oliveira Santos, Christiano [Dept. of Stomatology, Oral Public Health, and Forensic Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Neves, Frederico Sampaio [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Piracicaba (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    To describe the features of impacted upper canines and their relationship with adjacent structures through three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Using the CBCT scans of 79 upper impacted canines, we evaluated the following parameters: gender, unilateral/bilateral occurrence, location, presence and degree of root resorption of adjacent teeth (mild, moderate, or severe), root dilaceration, dental follicle width, and presence of other associated local conditions. Most of the impacted canines were observed in females (56 cases), unilaterally (51 cases), and at a palatine location (53 cases). Root resorption in adjacent teeth and root dilaceration were observed in 55 and 47 impacted canines, respectively. In most of the cases, the width of the dental follicle of the canine was normal; it was abnormally wide in 20 cases. A statistically significant association was observed for all variables, except for root dilaceration (p=0.115) and the side of impaction (p=0.260). Root resorption of adjacent teeth was present in most cases of canine impaction, mostly affecting adjacent lateral incisors to a mild degree. A wide dental follicle of impacted canines was not associated with a higher incidence of external root resorption of adjacent teeth.

  16. Cone beam computed tomography findings of impacted upper canines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva Santos, Ludmilla Mota; Bastos, Luana Costa; Da Silva, Silvio Jose Albergaria; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores; Oliveira Santos, Christiano; Neves, Frederico Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    To describe the features of impacted upper canines and their relationship with adjacent structures through three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Using the CBCT scans of 79 upper impacted canines, we evaluated the following parameters: gender, unilateral/bilateral occurrence, location, presence and degree of root resorption of adjacent teeth (mild, moderate, or severe), root dilaceration, dental follicle width, and presence of other associated local conditions. Most of the impacted canines were observed in females (56 cases), unilaterally (51 cases), and at a palatine location (53 cases). Root resorption in adjacent teeth and root dilaceration were observed in 55 and 47 impacted canines, respectively. In most of the cases, the width of the dental follicle of the canine was normal; it was abnormally wide in 20 cases. A statistically significant association was observed for all variables, except for root dilaceration (p=0.115) and the side of impaction (p=0.260). Root resorption of adjacent teeth was present in most cases of canine impaction, mostly affecting adjacent lateral incisors to a mild degree. A wide dental follicle of impacted canines was not associated with a higher incidence of external root resorption of adjacent teeth.

  17. Influence of the vertical position of maxillary central incisors on the perception of smile esthetics among orthodontists and laypersons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Andre Wilson; McComb, Ryan W; Moon, Won; Gandini, Luiz Gonzaga

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perception of smile esthetics among orthodontists and laypeople with respect to different upper central incisor vertical positions in a frontal smile analysis. A frontal close-up smile photo of an adult Caucasian woman was selected. The patient had healthy upper anterior dentition and had no history of orthodontic treatment. Images were altered in order to create six different central incisor vertical positions in 0.5-mm increments. All images were assessed in three different views: full smile, gingival close-up excluding incisal edges, and incisal close-up excluding gingival margins. Images were randomly assembled in an album, which was given to 120 judges: 60 orthodontists and 60 laypersons. Each rater was asked to evaluate the attractiveness of the images using the visual analog scale. The data collected were then statistically analyzed. The highest rated smiles showed two notable characteristics: the central-to-lateral incisal step was 1.5 mm; and the central incisor gingival margins matched the laterals, and both were 0.5 mm below the line of the canine gingival margins. The least attractive smile was the one with no step between the centrals and laterals, and with the central incisor gingival margins 1.0 mm above the canine gingival margins. The results of this study indicate that slightly extruded upper central incisors are more esthetically preferred than intruded. The upper central incisors are the key determinant in evaluating smile esthetics, and thus, the assessment of their ideal vertical positioning is an aspect of paramount importance. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Short-term effects of systematic premolar extraction on lip profile, vertical dimension and cephalometric parameters in borderline patients for extraction therapy--a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschneck, Christian; Proff, Peter; Reicheneder, Claudia; Lippold, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    The belief of many orthodontists that premolar extraction therapy leads to a loss of vertical dimension and an aggravated facial profile often predetermines a non-extraction approach. We investigated the short-term effects of systematic premolar extraction in borderline cases for extraction therapy on dentofacial parameters, especially vertical dimension and facial profile. Of 50 juvenile borderline cases for extraction treatment with a distinct sagittal overjet of 6-9 mm and dental crowding of >6 mm, 25 had all first premolars extracted, whereas the 25 control patients received non-extraction orthodontic treatment with corresponding fixed and removable appliances. Patient selection by multivariate cluster analysis ensured homogeneity at baseline regarding dentoskeletal parameters. Parameter changes were determined with radiographic cephalograms and compared between the extraction and non-extraction group. The systematic extraction of premolars in borderline patients with a distinct sagittal overjet and crowding did not significantly influence sagittal or vertical skeletal dimension, while leading to a slightly more concave lip profile due to incisor retraction compared to the non-extraction control group. The influence of premolar extractions on facial profile is often overestimated, since only slight changes in lip profile are to be expected. In integrated treatment planning, the extraction decision should not be primarily based on concerns about the aggravation of facial profile and loss of vertical dimension. The decision, whether to extract healthy premolars in borderline patients for extraction therapy, is difficult to make. Our study clarifies the repercussions on cephalometric dentofacial parameters, facilitating future orthodontic extraction decisions.

  19. Root canal morphology of South asian Indian mandibular premolar teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shishir; Pawar, Mansing

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the root canal morphology of South Asian Indian mandibular premolars using a tooth clearing technique. Two hundred mandibular premolar teeth were collected from different dental schools and clinics in India. After pulp tissue removal and root canal staining with Indian ink, the specimens were decalcified with 5% nitric acid, dehydrated in ethyl alcohol, and subsequently cleared in methyl salicylate. Of the 200 mandibular premolars, 100 were first premolars and 100 were second premolars. Of the first premolars, 94% had a single root, whereas 6% were 2 rooted. Seventy-six percent had a single canal, 22% had 2 canals, and 2% had 3 canals. Eighty-two percent had a single apical foramen, 16% had 2 foramens, and 2% teeth had 3 apical foramens. Eighty percent of teeth had type I, 6% had type II, 10% had type IV, 2% had type V, and 2% teeth had type IX root canal anatomy. Of the 100 second premolars, 92% had a single root, whereas 8% teeth were 2 rooted and fused. Fifty-eight percent of teeth had a single canal, and 42% had two canals. Eighty-eight percent had a single apical foramen, and 12% had 2 foramens. Sixty-six percent had type I, 30% had type II, and 4% had type V root canal anatomy. A high prevalence of 2 canals was noted in the first and second premolars. Also, 20% of first premolars and 34% of second premolars had a root canal anatomy other than type I. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dento-skeletal characteristics of subjects with impacted mandibular canine(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A cross-sectional clinical study was designed to analyze selected dento-skeletal characteristics of the patients with impacted permanent mandibular canine (s (PMC[s]. Materials and Methods: Pretreatment lateral cephalograms of 39 subjects diagnosed with mandibular canine (s impaction (impaction group, "IG" and 78 subjects of the control reference sample (control group, "CG" were used to analyze selected dento-skeletal characteristics. Comparisons were made between the groups using independent ′t′-tests and Chi-square tests. Odds of specific diagnostic sub-categories between "IG" and "CG" were evaluated in terms of odds ratios. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Both the statistical tests gave similar results. The odds ratio of 8.99 (P < 0.0001 and 3.05 (P = 0.005 at 95% confidence interval indicated significantly strong connection of mandibular canine impaction with skeletal Class II and retroclined maxillary incisors, respectively. Conclusions: When compared with controls, cases exhibiting PMC (s impaction revealed a trend toward retrognathic mandible, skeletal Class II, retroclined incisors.

  1. The effectiveness and long-term stability of overbite correction with incisor intrusion mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Buraiki, Huda; Sadowsky, Cyril; Schneider, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Correction of deep overbite with subsequent achievement of long-term stability is difficult. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and long-term stability of overbite correction with incisor intrusion mechanics. The treated group consisted of 25 subjects (13 female, 12 male) with deep overbite of at least 4 mm (mean overbite, 5.9 mm). The orthodontic treatment was initiated in the late mixed or early permanent dentition, and all patients were treated nonextraction. All patients had lateral cephalometric radiographs taken at pretreatment (T1), posttreatment (T2), and postretention (T3). The treatment included cervical headgear and lever arches to intrude mainly the maxillary incisors and occasionally the mandibular incisors. Premolars were not included in the fixed appliances during the treatment. The untreated group consisted of 25 age- and sex-matched subjects from the Bolton Growth Study. The mechanics used were effective in overbite correction. During the posttreatment period, overbite increased by 0.7 mm. Although this change was statistically significant, the amount was small and is considered clinically insignificant, given the severity of the overbite pretreatment. Furthermore, a net overbite correction (T3-T1) of 3.3 mm and postretention overbite on 2.6 mm is an excellent clinical outcome.

  2. Unilateral failure of development of mandibular premolars and molars in an Eastern Grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) and its effects on molar progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, D; Campbell, J; Davey, J; Luke, T; Agren, E; Beveridge, I

    2008-01-01

    An adult male Eastern Grey kangaroo from a wildlife reserve near Melbourne was submitted for necropsy examination and was discovered to have abnormal dentition. There was no evidence that any premolars or molars had ever been present on the right mandible, whilst the incisors were normal. The age of the kangaroo was estimated to be 1 year 9 months using the right maxillary molars and 2 years 4 months old using the contralateral side, presumably due to the asymmetry of the dental arcades. 'Lumpy jaw', a common periodontal disease of kangaroos, from which Bacteroides sp was cultured, was present on the base of the vertical ramus of the left mandible. Complete unilateral absence of premolar and molar teeth in the mandible of a kangaroo has not been described. This condition affected molar progression in both sets of maxillary molars.

  3. Radiographic assessment of dental anomalies in patients with ectopic maxillary canines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Helle Budtz; Artmann, Lone; Larsen, Helle Juul

    2008-01-01

    month, were analysed. Dental deviations registered were crown and root malformations, agenesis, and eruption deviations. Registrations were performed in the maxillary incisor field and in the dentition in general. Results. The study documented that palatally as well as labially located ectopic canines...

  4. Ectopic eruption: Management of a partial mandibular lateral incisor transposition in a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhossein Mirhashemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: tooth transposition is a rare condition especially in the mandibular arch. Management of this condition is so hard, complicated and unknown for most of the clinicians. Case report: In this report we describe a case of orthodontic management of a partial mandibular left lateral incisor and canine transposition. We used a modified lingual arch appliance for initial correction of tooth transposition, more detailing was achieved by fix treatment. Discussion: Early detection of this anomaly is very important. Providing panoramic radiography to assess the developing dentition during the age of 6 to 8 years is an apropos forethought.

  5. Macrodontic maxillary incisor in alagille syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Cozzani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the surgical-orthodontic guided-eruption of a deeply impacted macrodontic maxillary central incisor in a 10-year-old patient with Alagille syndrome (ALGS. In the first stage, orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance on deciduous teeth allowed to create enough space for the eruption of the maxillary right central incisor. The second stage included closed surgical exposure and vertical traction. After impacted tooth erupted in the proper position, accessory periodontal treatment and dental reshaping procedures may be indicated to camouflage macrodontic incisor with the adjacent teeth. This is the first report that presents a patient with ALGS undergoing orthodontic and surgical treatment.

  6. A Mandibular Second Premolar with Three Canals and Atypical Orifices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mandibular second premolars with three canals (Type V, Vertucci and separate foramina are very rare. The anatomy of the pulp chamber floor in these premolars usually reveals one lingual and two buccal orifices at the same level. This case report describes a second premolar with three canals and an unusual pulpal floor anatomy with one mesiobuccal and one distobuccal orifice at the same level and an orifice on the distolingual wall. Very careful examination of the pulpal space with an optical device and preoperative spiral computed tomography is recommended to locate any unusual orifices.

  7. Premolar Cystic Ameloblastoma in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Sanyog; Sonalika, Wanjari Ghate; Hs, Vanishree; Tegginammani, Anand S

    2017-01-01

    Mandibular swellings may occur as a result of many benign lesions of odontogenic or non-odontogenic origin. Ameloblastomas are benign tumours of odontogenic origin, whose importance lies in its potential to grow into enormous size with resulting bone deformity, it is a slow-growing, persistent, and locally aggressive neoplasm. The unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) represents an ameloblastoma variant, presenting as a cyst clinically and radiographically, but showing typical ameloblastomatous epithelium lining histologically. It commonly occurs in second and third decades of life and is rare in children under 12 years of age, and better response to conservative treatment. It shares many clinical and radiographic features with odontogenic cysts/tumours and/or periapical disease of endodontic origin. Reported here is an unusual case of unicystic ameloblastoma involving the crown of an unerupted mandibular first premolar in a 9-year boy in an uncommon location, which was misdiagnosed as periapical lesion of inflammatory origin clinically, and as a dentigerous cyst radiographically. This highlights the importance to routinely submit the removed surgical specimen for histopathological examination.

  8. CANINE ECTOPIC TREATMENT WITH FIRST MOLAR EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Margo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Decision to extract or not and the type of tooth must be analyzed carefully in orthodontic treatment. Preferable tooth to be extracted was the tooth with large caries or restoration. Usually the type of tooth to be extracted was second molar (if the third molar appears, incisor, first molar, and combination of several teeth. Orthodontic treatment with molar extraction is more difficult to treat and the result is usually compromise. There are several considerations in extracting first molar such as tooth with large caries or restoration, hypoplasia, periapical disease, large discrepancy, high maxilla-mandibular plane angle, and cases with anterior open bite. Nowadays, orthodontic cases with molar extraction do not prolong the treatment time compared to premolar extraction case, but the anchorage system must be considered carefully. The present case was treated with extraction of first molar to solve anterior crowding with maximum anchorage at the upper jaw and using Nance Holding Appliance.

  9. Risk of developing palatally displaced canines in patients with early detectable dental anomalies: a retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    GARIB, Daniela Gamba; LANCIA, Melissa; KATO, Renata Mayumi; OLIVEIRA, Thais Marchini; NEVES, Lucimara Teixeira das

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The early recognition of risk factors for the occurrence of palatally displaced canines (PDC) can increase the possibility of impaction prevention. Objective To estimate the risk of PDC occurrence in children with dental anomalies identified early during mixed dentition. Material and Methods The sample comprised 730 longitudinal orthodontic records from children (448 females and 282 males) with an initial mean age of 8.3 years (SD=1.36). The dental anomaly group (DA) included 263 records of patients with at least one dental anomaly identified in the initial or middle mixed dentition. The non-dental anomaly group (NDA) was composed of 467 records of patients with no dental anomalies. The occurrence of PDC in both groups was diagnosed using panoramic and periapical radiographs taken in the late mixed dentition or early permanent dentition. The prevalence of PDC in patients with and without early diagnosed dental anomalies was compared using the chi-square test (p<0.01), relative risk assessments (RR), and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV). Results PDC frequency was 16.35% and 6.2% in DA and NDA groups, respectively. A statistically significant difference was observed between groups (p<0.01), with greater risk of PDC development in the DA group (RR=2.63). The PPV and NPV was 16% and 93%, respectively. Small maxillary lateral incisors, deciduous molar infraocclusion, and mandibular second premolar distoangulation were associated with PDC. Conclusion Children with dental anomalies diagnosed during early mixed dentition have an approximately two and a half fold increased risk of developing PDC during late mixed dentition compared with children without dental anomalies. PMID:28076458

  10. Risk of developing palatally displaced canines in patients with early detectable dental anomalies: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gamba GARIB

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The early recognition of risk factors for the occurrence of palatally displaced canines (PDC can increase the possibility of impaction prevention. Objective To estimate the risk of PDC occurrence in children with dental anomalies identified early during mixed dentition. Material and Methods The sample comprised 730 longitudinal orthodontic records from children (448 females and 282 males with an initial mean age of 8.3 years (SD=1.36. The dental anomaly group (DA included 263 records of patients with at least one dental anomaly identified in the initial or middle mixed dentition. The non-dental anomaly group (NDA was composed of 467 records of patients with no dental anomalies. The occurrence of PDC in both groups was diagnosed using panoramic and periapical radiographs taken in the late mixed dentition or early permanent dentition. The prevalence of PDC in patients with and without early diagnosed dental anomalies was compared using the chi-square test (p<0.01, relative risk assessments (RR, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV. Results PDC frequency was 16.35% and 6.2% in DA and NDA groups, respectively. A statistically significant difference was observed between groups (p<0.01, with greater risk of PDC development in the DA group (RR=2.63. The PPV and NPV was 16% and 93%, respectively. Small maxillary lateral incisors, deciduous molar infraocclusion, and mandibular second premolar distoangulation were associated with PDC. Conclusion Children with dental anomalies diagnosed during early mixed dentition have an approximately two and a half fold increased risk of developing PDC during late mixed dentition compared with children without dental anomalies.

  11. Compound odontome with unerupted permanent incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfujul Haq Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are mixed odontogenic tumors composed of both epithelial and mesenchymal dental hard tissues. They are usually asymptomatic and are often discovered during routine radiography. A case of odontoma in a 21 year old man is described who presented with delayed eruption of upper central and lateral incisor teeth. The odontome was surgically removed followed by re-implantation of preserved extracted lateral incisor and a porcelain crown. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2011; 5(1: 29-31

  12. Molar incisor hypomineralization: current research evidences

    OpenAIRE

    Manikandan Ekambaram

    2016-01-01

    Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is a condition of systemic origin that involves one to four first permanent molar teeth and often associated with affected incisors. Although several associations to prenatal/perinatal childhood medical conditions have been reported, the etiology of MIH still remains unclear. The degree of enamel hypomineralization in the affected teeth can vary and the clinical problems associated with the teeth include increased susceptibility to caries, rapid wear, an...

  13. Maxillary incisor retraction: evaluation of different mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos de Oliveira Ruellas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To mechanically evaluate different systems used for incisors retraction. METHODS: Three different methods for incisors retraction using 0.019 x 0.025-in stainless steel wire were evaluated. The samples were divided into three groups: Group A (retraction arch with 7-mm high vertical hooks; Group G3 (elastic chain attached to the miniimplant and to the 3-mm stainless steel hook soldered to the retraction arch; Group G6 (elastic chain attached to the mini-implant and to the 6-mm stainless steel hook soldered to the retraction arch. A dental mannequin was used for evaluation in order to simulate the desired movements when the device was exposed to a heat source. The analysis of variance (ANOVA and the Tukey test were used (p < 0.05. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that Groups G3 and G6 exhibited less extrusion and less incisor inclination during the retraction phase (p < 0.05. With regard to incisor extrusion, statistically significant differences were observed between Groups A and G3, and between Groups A and G6 (p < 0.05. Regarding incisor inclination, statistically significant differences were observed between the three systems evaluated (p < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Arches with 6-mm vertical hooks allow the force to be applied on the center of resistance of the incisors, thus improving mechanical control when compared with the other two systems.

  14. How to predict timing of eruption of inferior second premolars

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Eduardo Martinelli Santayana de; Schmidt, Caroline Bom; Araujo, Laura Lütz; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon; Lima, Fernando Martinelli de

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between the stages of dental formation and the timing of eruption of mandibular second premolars. Materials and Methods: The sample comprised panoramic radiographs of 25 children, 7 to 12 years old, observed by space supervision during development of dentition. The initial radiograph (T1) was taken in the mixed dentition period and the progress radiograph (T2) close to the eruption of mandibular second premolars. The stages of dental formation were dete...

  15. Extraction of maxillary canines: Esthetic perceptions of patient smiles among dental professionals and laypeople.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruvenkatachari, Badri; Javidi, Hanieh; Griffiths, Sarah Elizabeth; Shah, Anwar A; Sandler, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    Maxillary canines are generally considered important both cosmetically and functionally. Most claims on the importance of maxillary canines, however, have been based on expert opinions and clinician-based studies. There are no scientific studies in the literature reporting on their cosmetic importance or how laypeople perceive a smile treated by maxillary canine extractions. Our objective was to investigate whether there is any difference in the perceptions of patients' smiles treated by extracting either maxillary canines or first premolars, as judged by orthodontists, dentists, and laypeople. This retrospective study included 24 participants who had unilateral or bilateral extraction of maxillary permanent canines and fixed appliances in the maxillary and mandibular arches to comprehensively correct the malocclusion, selected from orthodontic patients treated at Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS trust in the United Kingdom over the last 20 years. The control group of patients had extraction of maxillary first premolars followed by fixed appliances and finished to an extremely high standard judged by the requirement that they had been submitted for the Membership in Orthodontics examination. The finished Peer Assessment Rating scores for this group were less than 5. The end-of-treatment frontal extraoral smiling and frontal intraoral views were presented for both groups. The photographs were blinded for extraction choice and standardized for size and brightness using computer software (Adobe Photoshop CC version 14.0; Adobe Systems, San Jose, Calif). The work file was converted to an editable pdf file and e-mailed to the assessors. The assessor panel consisted of 30 members (10 orthodontists, 10 dentists, and 10 laypeople), who were purposely selected. The measures were rated on a 10-point Likert scale. The attractiveness ratings were not statistically significantly different between the canine extraction and premolar extraction groups, with a mean difference of 0

  16. The primary Maxillary Central Incisor in the Solitary Median Maxillary Central Incisor syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, I; Balslev-Olesen, M

    2012-01-01

    Solitary Median Maxillary Central Incisor (SMMCI) is a developmental anomaly in the permanent dentition with one single central incisor in the maxilla, positioned exactly in the midline. This condition has been associated with extra- and intraoral malformations in the frontonasal segment of the c...

  17. How far is the root apex of a unilateral impacted canine from the root apices' arch form?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hun; Kim, You-Min; Oh, Sewoong; Kim, Seong-Sik; Park, Soo-Byung; Son, Woo-Sung; Kim, Yong-Il

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the arch form of the root apices of normally erupting teeth and then determine the differences in the location of the apex of impacted canines relative to normally erupting canines. In addition, we sought to determine whether the labiopalatal position of the impacted canines influences the position of the apices. The study included 21 patients with unerupted canines that subsequently had a normal eruption, 21 patients with palatally impacted canines, 27 patients with labially impacted canines, and 17 patients with midalveolus impacted canines. Images were obtained using cone beam computed tomography, and the x, y, and z coordinates of the root apices were determined using Ondemand3D software (Cybermed Co., Seoul, Korea). Two-dimensional coordinates were converted from acquired 3-dimensional coordinates via projection on a palatal plane, and the Procrustes method was used to process the converted 2-dimensional coordinates and to draw the arch forms of the root apices. Finally, we measured the extent of root apex deviation from the arch forms of the root apices. Normally erupting canines showed that even though calcifications may be immature, their positions were aligned with a normal arch form. The root apices of the impacted canines were an average of 6.572 mm away from the root apices' arch form, whereas those of the contralateral nonimpacted canines were an average distance of 2.221 mm away, a statistically significant difference. The palatally impacted canines' root apices distribution tended toward the first premolar root apices. Incompletely calcified, unerupted teeth with a subsequent normal eruption showed a normal arch form of the root apices. The root apices of impacted canines were farther from the arch forms than were the nonimpacted canines. Also, the root apices of impacted canines in the palatal area showed distributions different from those of the other impacted canine groups. Copyright © 2017 American

  18. Incisor inclination and perceived tooth colour changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciucchi, Philip; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2017-10-01

    Social attractiveness is influenced by a variety of different smile-related factors. We evaluated whether the degree of upper central incisor proclination can result in tooth colour change. Forty young adult subjects (20-25 years) in good health with a complete sound dentition were selected. The subjects were seated in standardized light conditions with an above-directed light source. Their natural head position was stated as 0 degrees. To mimic the range of possible anterior torque movements they were asked to tilt their heads upward +15 degrees (upward tilting) and downward -15 degrees (downward tilting). Frontal macro photographs, parallel to the Frankfort plane of the patient's natural head position were taken at the three head angulations (+15, 0, and -15 degrees ). Photographs were analysed for colour differences at the centre of the incisor clinical crowns with a CIE L*a*b* colour model based software. A paired t-test was used to test for significance between each value for each inclination. Differences were found between the CIE L*a*b* colour values for: upward tilting, downward tilting, and -15 to +15 degrees (total tilting) except for b* values for downward tilting. As the inclination of the subject's head changed downward, the upper incisors were retroclined and the CIE L*a*b* values indicated a darker and less green but redder colour component. As the inclination of the subject's head changed upwards the upper incisors were proclined and the L*a*b* values indicated a lighter and less green and yellow but redder and bluer colour component. Proclination of upper incisors caused lighter tooth colour parameters compared to retroclined incisors and colour changes. Orthodontic change of upper incisor inclination may induce alterations on how tooth colour is perceived.

  19. Immediate placement and functional loading of implants on canine with fixed partial denture for a patient having canine protected occlusion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jun-Won; Ahn, Seung-Geun; Leem, Dae-Ho; Seo, Jae-Min

    2012-02-01

    Conventional implant protocols required a load-free healing period of three to six months between placement and functional loading of the implants. Many efforts have been made to minimize the duration of treatment time. Several literatures have documented immediate function with provisional or definitive prosthesis within a week of the placement in response to these demands. In addition, immediate implant placement has advantages such as shortened treatment time and preservation of soft tissue architectures. This article presents immediate implant placement into fresh extraction sockets followed by functional immediate loading with provisional prosthesis on canine and premolars for a patient having canine protected occlusion.

  20. Immediate placement and functional loading of implants on canine with fixed partial denture for a patient having canine protected occlusion: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jun-Won; Ahn, Seung-Geun; Leem, Dae-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Conventional implant protocols required a load-free healing period of three to six months between placement and functional loading of the implants. Many efforts have been made to minimize the duration of treatment time. Several literatures have documented immediate function with provisional or definitive prosthesis within a week of the placement in response to these demands. In addition, immediate implant placement has advantages such as shortened treatment time and preservation of soft tissue architectures. This article presents immediate implant placement into fresh extraction sockets followed by functional immediate loading with provisional prosthesis on canine and premolars for a patient having canine protected occlusion. PMID:22439101

  1. Investigation of the maxillary lateral incisor agenesis and associated dental anomalies in an orthodontic patient population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamak, Hasan; Yildirim, Hanifi; Ceylan, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of maxillary lateral incisor (MLI) agenesis and associated dental anomalies as well as skeletal patterns in an orthodontic population, and then to compare it with the prevalence of these anomalies in the general population. Study Design: The material of the present study included the records of the 3872 orthodontic patients. The followings were recorded for each subject with the agenesis of MLI: Age, sex, unilateral or bilateral absence, anterior-posterior skeletal relationship of the maxilla and mandible, and presence of associated dental anomalies. The occurrence of these anomalies was compared with data previously reported for the general populations. Results: Of the 3872 patients examined, 94 were found to have agenesis of the MLI, representing a prevalence of 2.4 per cent, with females being more frequently observed. The most commonly found associated anomalies were ectopic eruption of maxillary canines and reduced or peg- shaped contralateral incisor with the frequencies of 21.3 per cent and 20.2 per cent respectively. Conclusions: Patients with agenesis of MLI showed a significantly higher prevalence of skeletal Class III malocclusion compared with the general population. The prevalence of ectopic eruption, transposition, and transmigration of the maxillary canine and reduced or peg- shaped MLIs were significantly increased. Key words:Hypodontia, missing laterals, associated dental anomalies. PMID:22549676

  2. Investigation of the maxillary lateral incisor agenesis and associated dental anomalies in an orthodontic patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikoglu, Mevlut; Kamak, Hasan; Yildirim, Hanifi; Ceylan, Ismail

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of maxillary lateral incisor (MLI) agenesis and associated dental anomalies as well as skeletal patterns in an orthodontic population, and then to compare it with the prevalence of these anomalies in the general population. The material of the present study included the records of the 3872 orthodontic patients. The followings were recorded for each subject with the agenesis of MLI: Age, sex, unilateral or bilateral absence, anterior-posterior skeletal relationship of the maxilla and mandible, and presence of associated dental anomalies. The occurrence of these anomalies was compared with data previously reported for the general populations. Of the 3872 patients examined, 94 were found to have agenesis of the MLI, representing a prevalence of 2.4 per cent, with females being more frequently observed. The most commonly found associated anomalies were ectopic eruption of maxillary canines and reduced or peg- shaped contralateral incisor with the frequencies of 21.3 per cent and 20.2 per cent respectively. Patients with agenesis of MLI showed a significantly higher prevalence of skeletal Class III malocclusion compared with the general population. The prevalence of ectopic eruption, transposition, and transmigration of the maxillary canine and reduced or peg- shaped MLIs were significantly increased.

  3. Three-dimensional localization of impacted canines and root resorption assessment using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuhtaseb, Eyad; Mao, Jing; Mahony, Derek; Bader, Rawan; Zhang, Zhi-xing

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new way to localize the impacted canines from three dimensions and to investigate the root resorption of the adjacent teeth by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Forty-six patients undergoing orthodontic treatments and having impacted canines in Tongji Hospital were examined. The images of CBCT scans were obtained from KaVo 3D exam vision. Angular and linear measurements of the cusp tip and root apex according to the three planes (mid-sagittal, occlusal and frontal) have been taken using the cephalometric tool of the InVivo Dental Anatomage Version 5.1.10. The measurements of the angular and linear coordinates of the maxillary and mandibular canines were obtained. Using this technique the operators could envision the location of the impacted canine according to the three clinical planes. Adjacent teeth root resorption of 28.26 % was in the upper lateral incisors while 17.39% in upper central incisors, but no lower root resorption was found in our samples. Accurate and reliable localization of the impacted canines could be obtained from the novel analysis system, which offers a better surgical and orthodontic treatment for the patients with impacted canines.

  4. Comparison of soft tissue profile changes in serial extraction and late premolar extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J R; Little, R M; Joondeph, D R; Doppel, D M

    1999-04-01

    To assess soft tissue profile changes through time, a comparison was made of patients treated by serial extraction without subsequent orthodontic treatment (n=28), patients treated with serial extraction and orthodontic treatment (n=30), and patients treated orthodontically with late extraction (n=30). Cephalometric radiographs were traced and digitized; linear and angular measurements were made with a custom computer program that allowed digitization of specific soft tissue points. Maxillary, mandibular, and overall cephalometric superimpositions and linear measurements of change from the superimpositions were done by hand. Statistical analyses were made to determine if significant differences existed within each group at each time period and between groups at each time period, as well as between males and females at each time period. Data were also analyzed to determine if significant correlations existed between any hard tissue variable and any soft tissue variable, or between any soft tissue variable and any other soft tissue variable. It was found that in those patients treated with late premolar extraction, the most labial point of the mandibular incisor was more posterior from pretreatment to posttreatment than in the serial extraction group. While a great number of associations existed between variables, no significant differences were found between the soft tissue profiles of these three groups of patients. The gender differences that were found to exist were most likely due to normal maturational changes, not the treatment itself.

  5. A jig for measuring incisor inclination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N; Spary, D J; Rock, W P

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to design and construct a jig for measuring the inclination of the upper incisors to the maxillary plane and of the lower incisors to the mandibular plane. After several prototypes had been tested, the required properties for a successful jig were identified and a simple inexpensive device was produced. Measurements obtained when using the jig on 51 subjects were compared with cephalometric values by means of regression analysis. This revealed that measurements obtained using the jig against the upper and then the lower incisor crowns could be converted to cephalometric incisor angulations with 96 per cent accuracy to 10 degrees, by adding 23 and 3 degrees, respectively. The jig was accurate to 5 degrees on 69 per cent of occasions for the upper teeth. The 5 degrees accuracy with the lower incisors was only 27 per cent, although over a 6 degree range it improved to 78 per cent. For upper and lower tooth measurements combined, the jig was accurate to within 6 degrees on 75 per cent of occasions.

  6. A patient with mandibular deviation and 3 mandibular incisors treated with asymmetrically bent improved superelastic nickel-titanium alloy wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yuhei; Kokai, Satoshi; Ono, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Skeletal and dental discrepancies cause asymmetric malocclusions in orthodontic patients. It is difficult to achieve adequate functional occlusion and guidance in patients with congenital absence of a mandibular incisor due to the tooth-size discrepancy. Here, we describe the orthodontic treatment of a 22-year-old woman with an asymmetric Angle Class II malocclusion, mandibular deviation to the left, and 3 mandibular incisors. The anterior teeth and maxillary canines were crowded. We used an improved superelastic nickel-titanium alloy wire (Tomy International, Tokyo, Japan) to compensate for the asymmetric mandibular arch and an asymmetrically bent archwire to move the maxillary molars distally. A skeletal anchorage system provided traction for intermaxillary elastics, and extractions were not needed. We alleviated the crowding and created an ideal occlusion with proper overjet, overbite, and anterior guidance with Class I canine and molar relationships. This method of treatment with an asymmetrically bent nickel-titanium alloy wire provided proper Class I occlusion and anterior guidance despite the mandibular deviation to the left and 3 mandibular incisors, without the need for extractions. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Canine thymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronsohn, M.

    1985-01-01

    Thymoma is an uncommon canine neoplasm of thymic epithelial cells. It is seen in various breeds but may occur more frequently in German Shepherd Dogs. Middle-aged or older dogs can be affected and no sex predilection exists. A paraneoplastic syndrome of myasthenia gravis, nonthymic malignant tumors, and/or polymyositis occurs in a significant number of dogs with thymoma. Clinical signs are variable and are related to a space-occupying cranial mediastinal mass and/or manifestations of the paraneo-plastic syndrome. Dyspnea is the most common presenting clinical sign. Thoracic radiographs usually show a cranial mediastinal mass. Lymphoma is the main differential diagnosis. A definitive diagnosis may be made by closed biopsy but is more likely to be confirmed by thoracotomy. Thymomas may be completely contained within the thymic capsule or may spread by local invasion or metastasis. A staging system allows for an accurate prognosis and a therapeutic plan. Surgical removal of encapsulated thymomas may result in long-term survival or cure. Invasive or metastatic thymomas carry a guarded prognosis. Manifestations of the paraneoplastic syndrome complicate treatment. Adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy may be of value for advanced cases; however, adequate clinical trials have not been done in the dog

  8. Cephalometric changes in overbite and vertical facial height after removal of 4 first molars or first premolars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Mark G; Groisser, Gordon; Damon, Clay; Amberman, Douglas; Nelson, Suchitra; Palomo, J Martin

    2006-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of standard edgewise orthodontic treatment with extraction of 4 first molars (6xT group) or Tweed edgewise treatment with extraction of 4 first premolars (4xT group). A cephalometric analysis that isolated tipping and bodily tooth movements of the maxillary and mandibular incisors and measured vertical skeletal changes in the anterior region of the maxilla and mandible was used. Thirty subjects treated by 10 practitioners comprised the 6xT group, whereas 31 subjects treated in the Case Western Reserve University orthodontic clinic were used in the 4xT group. Control groups (6xC and 4xC) were selected from untreated subjects enrolled in the Bolton-Brush Growth Study and were matched on age and gender. Data were collected before (T1) and after (T2) treatment. Analysis of the data showed no statistically significant changes between 6xT and 6xC for any of the variables studied. An increase in overbite of 2.1 mm in the 6xT group was the result of small but clinically significant changes in both tipping and extrusion of maxillary and mandibular incisors. In the 4xT group, statistically and clinically significant changes were observed for intrusion of the maxillary and mandibular incisors, resulting in a 4.1-mm decrease in overbite. Importantly, both the 6xT and the 4xT groups showed no increase in mandibular vertical height during treatment. Both treatment strategies showed good control of vertical mandibular growth. Bodily intrusion of anterior teeth was the main contributor to correction of deep overbite in the Tweed edgewise sample.

  9. Molar incisor hypomineralisation in 7-to-14-year old children in Plovdiv, Bulgaria--an epidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukleva, Maria P; Petrova, Svetla G; Kondeva, Vesselina K; Nihtyanova, Tanya I

    2008-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental disturbance of enamel affecting the first permanent molars and permanent incisors. The epidemiological evidence on MIH prevalence shows it to be in the range of 3.6 to 25%. The prevalence of MIH has not been documented in Bulgaria which warranted the conduction of the present study. To find the prevalence of molar incisor hypomineralisation in Bulgarian children. The study included randomly selected 2960 children aged 7 to 14 years from Plovdiv and born between 1992 and 1999. The children were allocated to age groups which were matched in number--each of them included 370 children and consisted of approximately equal number of girls and boys. The defect was assessed by visual and tactile inspection using directed light without the enamel surface being preliminary dried. The prevalence of MIH was determined totally and for each age group; also we determined the degree of damage by type of teeth, and the average number of affected teeth of one person with MIH. The results were analysed using alternative analysis at a level of significance P prevalence of MIH of the studied populations was 3.58%. The prevalence of MIH for the different age groups was within the range of 2.43-7.84%. The highest prevalence was found for the children born in 1999 (7.84%). It was significantly higher in comparing all age groups (P 0.05). The mean number of affected teeth per person with MIH was 3.99 of which 2.08 were first permanent molars, 1.86--incisors and 0.5--canines. The incisors and the first permanent molars were approximately equally affected (P > 0.05). The results of the study suggest that molar incisor hypomineralization can be found in Bulgarian children too. The prevalence of MIH and the mean number of affected teeth of one individual are lower than the data reported in similar studies in other countries.

  10. Interdisciplinary approach for bilateral maxillary canine: First premolar transposition with complex problems in an adult patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhivakar Selvaraj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult patients seeking orthodontic care were increased nowadays not only on esthetic need but also on functional demand. But problems with adult patients were not only malocclusions but also dental caries, pulpal pathology, missing teeth, muco-gingival problems and loss of supporting structures. We report here a case of 35-year-old female with complete transposition referred as a positional interchange of two permanent teeth within the same quadrant of the dental arch along with gingival recession of the lower anteriors and missing molars. Gingival health was improved by free gingival graft in lower anteriors followed by fixed orthodontic procedure to correct transposition. Based on transposition crown recontouring and restoration was done along with replacement of missing molars with fixed prosthesis. Thus, proper treatment planning with interdisciplinary management improves not only the esthetics and occlusal relationship but also with stable results.

  11. A Three-rooted Mandibular Second Premolar: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Fathi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Presence of extra roots and canals should be considered before initiation of root canal treatment for the success of endodontic treatment. A mandibular second premolar with three separate roots is very rare and its prevalence has been reported to be around 0.1%. This case report explains non-surgical endodontic treatment of a mandibular second premolar with three separate roots and three separate mesiobuccal, midbuccal, and lingual canal orifices. Close attention to anatomic variations, thorough radiographic examinations, thorough evaluation of the pulp chamber floor, and use of magnifying and optical devices have been recommended for the success of endodontic treatment of mandibular second premolars with complicated root canal system anatomy.

  12. Incisor ablation among the late upper paleolithic people of Tam Hang (Northern Laos): Social identity, mortuary practice, and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willman, John C; Shackelford, Laura; Demeter, Fabrice

    2016-07-01

    A detailed assessment of intentional incisor ablation among the Late Upper Paleolithic people of Tam Hang (northern Laos) was undertaken to understand how this cultural practice, in addition to age and sex, influenced an individual's inclusion in the mortuary context. The covariation of ablation status with occlusal variation and anterior dental pathology was addressed to study the implications of this cultural practice on oral health. Sex, age, caries, antemortem tooth loss, and occlusal variation were assessed through standard osteological methods for 12 individuals. An observational protocol to identify intentional ablation was developed specifically for this sample. Four ablation states were identified that range from no ablation to the removal of two, three, or four lateral (I2) incisors. The timing of ablation was attributed to ritual extractions during early adolescence. Adult age-at-death was the strongest indicator of inclusion in the main burial context and a child burial was isolated from those of adults. Ablation status does not strongly influence inclusion in the mortuary context. Individuals lacking ablation tended to have a higher incidence of anterior caries, pathological tooth loss, incisor crowding, and canine rotation. This study identifies the oldest case of intentional incisor ablation in Late Pleistocene Mainland Southeast Asia. We conclude that ablation does not always "compromise" the dentition; instead, it may have unintentional oral health benefits in some contexts. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:519-528, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Late-Developing Supernumerary Premolars: Analysis of Different Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Paduano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case series describes the different potential approaches to late-developing supernumerary premolars (LDSP. LDSP are supernumerary teeth (ST formed after the eruption of the permanent dentition; usually they develop in the premolar region of the upper and lower jaw. The choice to extract or to monitor the LDSP depends on many factors and has to be carefully planned due to the several risks that either the monitoring or the extraction could provoke. These four cases of LDSP showed different treatment plan alternatives derived from a scrupulous assessment of the clinical and radiographic information.

  14. Endodontic and periodontal treatments of a geminated mandibular first premolar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpour, S; Bercy, P; Van Nieuwenhuysen, J-P

    2002-02-01

    To describe a rare case of gemination involving a mandibular first premolar. The complex morphology of geminated teeth renders their endodontic and periodontal management difficult. Root canal and periodontal treatments were performed on a geminated mandibular first premolar with three canals. Clinical examination showed two separated crowns with united roots. Radiographically, two distinct pulp chambers with two joined and a third independent canal were seen. Conventional root canal treatment resulted in complete healing of the apical lesion. However, the occurrence of a vertical fracture led to the extraction of the mesial segment. At the follow-up visit, the distal segment was clinically healthy and continued to satisfy functional demands.

  15. Mandibular meslodens with agenesis of central incisors - A rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mesiodens is commonly located in maxillary central incisor region and rarely in the mandible. Congenital absence of mandibular central incisor is uncommon. This is a report of a rare association of mandibular mesiodens with congenitally absent permanent central incisors. This is the first case report of such an association.

  16. External apical root resorption in maxillary incisors in orthodontic patients: associated factors and radiographic evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanekrungsan, Kamonporn [Dept. of Dentistry, Overbrook Hospital, Chiang Rai (Thailand); Patanaporn, Virush; Janhom, Apirum; Korwanich, Narumanus [Dept. of Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2012-09-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the incidence and degree of external apical root resorption of maxillary incisors after orthodontic treatment and to evaluate particular associated factors related to external apical root resorption. The records and maxillary incisor periapical radiographs of 181 patients were investigated. Crown and root lengths were measured and compared on the pre- and post-treatment periapical radiographs. Crown length was measured from the center of the incisal edge to the midpoint of the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). Root length was measured from the CEJ midpoint to the root apex. A correction factor for the enlargement difference was used to calculate root resorption. The periapical radiographs of 564 teeth showed that the average root resorption was 1.39{+-}1.27 (8.24{+-}7.22%) and 1.69{+-}1.14 mm (10.16{+-}6.78%) for the maxillary central and lateral incisors, respectively. The results showed that the dilacerated or pointed roots, maxillary premolar extraction cases, and treatment duration were highly significant factors for root resorption (p<0.001). Allergic condition was a significant factor at p<0.01. Age at the start of treatment, large overjet, and history of facial trauma were also factors significantly associated with root resorption (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in root resorption among the factors of gender, overbite, tongue-thrusting habit, types of malocclusion, and types of bracket. These results suggested that orthodontic treatment should be carefully performed in pre-treatment extraction patients who have pointed or dilacerated roots and need long treatment duration.

  17. External apical root resorption in maxillary incisors in orthodontic patients: associated factors and radiographic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanekrungsan, Kamonporn; Patanaporn, Virush; Janhom, Apirum; Korwanich, Narumanus

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the incidence and degree of external apical root resorption of maxillary incisors after orthodontic treatment and to evaluate particular associated factors related to external apical root resorption. The records and maxillary incisor periapical radiographs of 181 patients were investigated. Crown and root lengths were measured and compared on the pre- and post-treatment periapical radiographs. Crown length was measured from the center of the incisal edge to the midpoint of the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). Root length was measured from the CEJ midpoint to the root apex. A correction factor for the enlargement difference was used to calculate root resorption. The periapical radiographs of 564 teeth showed that the average root resorption was 1.39±1.27 (8.24±7.22%) and 1.69±1.14 mm (10.16±6.78%) for the maxillary central and lateral incisors, respectively. The results showed that the dilacerated or pointed roots, maxillary premolar extraction cases, and treatment duration were highly significant factors for root resorption (p<0.001). Allergic condition was a significant factor at p<0.01. Age at the start of treatment, large overjet, and history of facial trauma were also factors significantly associated with root resorption (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in root resorption among the factors of gender, overbite, tongue-thrusting habit, types of malocclusion, and types of bracket. These results suggested that orthodontic treatment should be carefully performed in pre-treatment extraction patients who have pointed or dilacerated roots and need long treatment duration.

  18. Canine Eruption After Secondary Alveolar Bone Graft in Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellone, Valentino; Cirignaco, Giulio; Cavarretta, Bruno; Cascone, Piero

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze dental abnormalities in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients by focusing on the role of the secondary alveolar bone graft (SABG) surgery and its outcomes on canine eruption/inclusion. A sample of 24 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate were selected.Dental anomalies, canine eruption based on the existence of supernumeraries, agenesis elements, inclination of the major canine axis before and after surgery, distance from the occlusal plane before and after surgery, and sector classification were analyzed. Out of the 24 patients, 87.5% presented a canine spontaneously erupted in the dental arch while 12.5% needed surgical-orthodontic traction.There is also no proof that inclination of the canine significantly influenced the eruption before (P = 0.5889) and after (P = 0.4029) surgery. Also, there is no any correlation between the 2 sides (P = 0.1257).The SABG surgery showed a significant correlation with canine eruption (P = 0.009242); moreover, SABG shows a positive relationship with the radicular development of the canine (P = 0.005163).Lateral incisive (P = 0.8493) and second premolar agenesis (P = 1) are not statistically correlated with the eruption of the canine. This does not happen with supernumerary elements that are correlated with the surgical-orthodontic traction (P = 0.0004464). Agenesis does not play any role in the process of canine eruption while supernumeraries do. There is no relationship between the inclination and eruption of the canine.The SABG surgery has a key role because it contributes to create an appropriate support for the erupting canine, the nasal base and the anterior maxilla.

  19. Incisors as digging tools in molerats (Bathyergidae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1998-03-26

    Xa and Vb) at which the upper and lower incisors (lines a- ..... JARVIS. JU.M., BENNETT. N.C. 1991. Introducing the Alriean mole-rats (family Bathyergidae). In: The biology of the naked mole-rat: 66 - 96. (Eds) Sherman. R. W ..

  20. Deciduous molar hypomineralization and molar incisor hypomineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elfrink, M.E.C.; ten Cate, J.M.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Hofman, A.; Moll, H.A.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2012-01-01

    This study was embedded in the Generation R Study, a population-based prospective cohort study from fetal life until young adulthood. This study focused on the relationship between Deciduous Molar Hypomineralization (DMH) and Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH). First permanent molars develop

  1. Molar incisor hypomineralization, prevalence, and etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allazzam, Sulaiman Mohammed; Alaki, Sumer Madani; El Meligy, Omar Abdel Sadek

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the prevalence and possible etiological factors associated with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) among a group of children in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods. A group of 8-12-year-old children were recruited (n = 267) from the Pediatric Dental Clinics at the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University. Children had at least one first permanent molar (FPM), erupted or partially erupted. Demographic information, children's medical history, and pregnancy-related data were obtained. The crowns of the FPM and permanent incisors were examined for demarcated opacities, posteruptive breakdown (PEB), atypical restorations, and extracted FPMs. Children were considered to have MIH if one or more FPM with or without involvement of incisors met the diagnostic criteria. Results. MIH showed a prevalence of 8.6%. Demarcated opacities were the most common form. Maxillary central incisors were more affected than mandibular (P = 0.01). The condition was more prevalent in children with history of illnesses during the first four years of life including tonsillitis (P = 0.001), adenoiditis (P = 0.001), asthma (P = 0.001), fever (P = 0.014), and antibiotics intake (P = 0.001). Conclusions. The prevalence of MIH is significantly associated with childhood illnesses during the first four years of life including asthma, adenoid infections, tonsillitis, fever, and antibiotics intake.

  2. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization, Prevalence, and Etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Mohammed Allazzam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the prevalence and possible etiological factors associated with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH among a group of children in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods. A group of 8-12-year-old children were recruited (n=267  from the Pediatric Dental Clinics at the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University. Children had at least one first permanent molar (FPM, erupted or partially erupted. Demographic information, children’s medical history, and pregnancy-related data were obtained. The crowns of the FPM and permanent incisors were examined for demarcated opacities, posteruptive breakdown (PEB, atypical restorations, and extracted FPMs. Children were considered to have MIH if one or more FPM with or without involvement of incisors met the diagnostic criteria. Results. MIH showed a prevalence of 8.6%. Demarcated opacities were the most common form. Maxillary central incisors were more affected than mandibular (P=0.01. The condition was more prevalent in children with history of illnesses during the first four years of life including tonsillitis (P=0.001, adenoiditis (P=0.001, asthma (P=0.001, fever (P=0.014, and antibiotics intake (P=0.001. Conclusions. The prevalence of MIH is significantly associated with childhood illnesses during the first four years of life including asthma, adenoid infections, tonsillitis, fever, and antibiotics intake.

  3. [Upper lateral incisor with 2 canals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabra Campos, H

    1991-01-01

    Clinical case summary of the patient with an upper lateral incisor with two root canals. The suspicion that there might be an anatomic anomaly in the root that includes a complex root canal system was made when an advanced radicular groove was detected in the lingual surface or an excessively enlarged cingulum.

  4. Agenesis of second premolars and delayed dental maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbrich, Bianca; Hirsch, Alexander; Dannhauer, Karl-Heinz; Gelbrich, Götz

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to examine the relationship between second-premolar agenesis and how rapidly permanent dentition develops. Panoramic radiographs of 678 girls and boys aged 6-14 years were evaluated. Subjects with syndromes or history of tooth extraction were excluded. The permanent dentition's stages of mineralization (scale 1-10) and eruption (1-7), and the resorption (1-5) of deciduous teeth were assessed. Adjusted for age and sex, subjects with one or more missing second premolars revealed earlier developmental stages (mineralization: average -0.37 stages per tooth, 95% CI -0.23 to -0.50; eruption: -0.42, 95% CI -0.60 to -0.24; resorption: -0.36, 95% CI -0.49 to -0.24; all p dental development was delayed by 8.6 months (95% CI 5.4-11.8) in subjects with missing second premolars. These results have implications for several areas of medicine. Joint biological etiology for the agenesis and late maturation of permanent teeth should be considered in developmental research. Orthodontists should be aware of the delay associated with missing second premolars when timing interventions. Forensic age assessment based on tooth development should adjust for missing teeth to avoid underestimating the subject's age.

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Three-Rooted Maxillary Premolars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisu, Hacer Deniz; Alacam, Tayfun

    2009-01-01

    Anatomical variations must be considered in clinical and radiographical evaluations during endodontic treatment. Access cavity modifications may be required for stress free entry to complex anatomy. Higher magnification and illumination can be useful for access cavity preparation and to recognize and locate additional canals. This article describes the diagnosis and clinical management of two clinical cases of three rooted maxillary premolars. PMID:19262733

  6. Transplantation of premolars as an approach for replacing avulsed teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Schwartz, Ole; Kofoed, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Autotransplantation of premolars to the anterior region subsequent to tooth loss represent a unique treatment method that has a number of advantages in comparison with other tooth substitution methods. A tooth transplant has a bone inducing capacity implying that lost labial bone is regenerated. ...

  7. Maxillary First Premolar with Three Root Canals: A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus meticulous knowledge of tooth morphology, careful interpretation of angled radiographs, proper access cavity preparation and a detailed exploration of the interior of the tooth is needed to ensure a proper endodontic treatment. This article reports a rare finding of three canals in a maxillary first premolar with non well ...

  8. Bilateral dens invaginatus in the mandibular premolar region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canger Emin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dens invaginatus (dens in dente, DI is a rare developmental anomaly resulting from invagination of a portion of the crown rare. It is an important dental anomaly due to the possible pulpal involvement. DI can be detected clinically in a tooth presenting unusual crown morphology or having deep foramen coaceum. Also, clinically, non-suspected affected teeth are commonly diagnosed as an incidental radiographic finding. Presence of DI in the mandibular premolar teeth is unusual. Aims is to introduce a case of bilateral occurrence of DI in mandibular first premolar teeth. A 33- year-old man was referred to our clinic with a chief complaint of severe pain in his lower third molar tooth. Radiographic examination revealed bilateral DI (single at the left, double at the right in mandibular first premolar teeth. The teeth were restored with fissure sealant. Although bilateral appearance of DI is a frequent situation, mandibular occurrence is very rare. Our review of the literature reveals just nine cases of DI, and only one of them is in a premolar tooth.

  9. Effects of the pendulum appliance, cervical headgear, and 2 premolar extractions followed by fixed appliances in patients with Class II malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida-Pedrin, Renata Rodrigues; Henriques, José Fernando Castanha; de Almeida, Renato Rodrigues; de Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues; McNamara, James A

    2009-12-01

    In this retrospective study, we compared the cephalometric effects, the dental-arch changes, and the efficiency of Class II treatment with the pendulum appliance, cervical headgear, or extraction of 2 maxillary premolars, all associated with fixed appliance therapy. The sample of 82 patients with Class II malocclusion was divided into 3 groups: group 1 patients (n = 22; treatment time, 3.8 years) were treated with the pendulum appliance and fixed orthodontic appliances. Group 2 patients (n = 30; treatment time, 3.2 years) were treated with cervical headgear followed by fixed appliances; group 3 patients (n = 30; treatment time, 2.1 years) were treated with 2 maxillary premolar extractions and fixed appliances. The average starting ages of the groups ranged from 13.2 to 13.8 years. Data were obtained from serial cephalometric measurements and dental casts. The dental casts were analyzed with the treatment priority index. The treatment efficiency index was also used. The 3 treatment protocols produced similar cephalometric effects, especially skeletally. Comparisons among the 2 distalizing appliances (pendulum and cervical headgear) and extraction of 2 maxillary premolars for Class II treatment showed changes primarily in the maxillary dentoalveolar component and dental relationships. The facial profile was similar after treatment, except for slightly more retrusion of the upper lip in the extraction patients. The treatment priority index demonstrated that occlusal outcomes also were similar among the groups. The treatment efficiency index had higher values for the extraction group. The effects of treatment with the pendulum appliance or cervical headgear and extraction of 2 maxillary premolars associated with fixed appliances were similar from both occlusal and cephalometric standpoints. Class II treatment with extraction of maxillary teeth was more efficient because of the shorter treatment time. Differences in maxillary incisor retraction should be noted, but

  10. Canine adenoviruses and herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, Nicola; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2008-07-01

    Canine adenoviruses (CAVs) and canine herpesvirus (CHV) are pathogens of dogs that have been known for several decades. The two distinct types of CAVs, type 1 and type 2, are responsible for infectious canine hepatitis and infectious tracheobronchitis, respectively. In the present article, the currently available literature on CAVs and CHV is reviewed, providing a meaningful update on the epidemiologic, pathogenetic, clinical, diagnostic, and prophylactic aspects of the infections caused by these important pathogens.

  11. Canine respiratory viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Buonavoglia , Canio; Martella , Vito

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Acute contagious respiratory disease (kennel cough) is commonly described in dogs worldwide. The disease appears to be multifactorial and a number of viral and bacterial pathogens have been reported as potential aetiological agents, including canine parainfluenza virus, canine adenovirus and Bordetella bronchiseptica, as well as mycoplasmas, Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, canine herpesvirus and reovirus-1,-2 and -3. Enhancement of pathogenicity by multiple in...

  12. Finite element analysis of equine incisor teeth. Part 2: investigation of stresses and strain energy densities in the periodontal ligament and surrounding bone during tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, P; Lüpke, M; Seifert, H; Staszyk, C

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the hypothetical contribution of biomechanical loading to the onset of equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis (EOTRH) and to elucidate the physiological age-related positional changes of the equine incisors. Based on high resolution micro-computed tomography (μCT) datasets, 3-dimensional models of entire incisor arcades and the canine teeth were constructed representing a young and an old incisor dentition. Special attention was paid to constructing an anatomically correct model of the periodontal ligament (PDL). Using previously determined Young's moduli for the equine incisor PDL, finite element (FE) analysis was performed. Resulting strains, stresses and strain energy densities (SEDs), as well as the resulting regions of tension and compression within the PDL and the surrounding bone were investigated during occlusion. The results showed a distinct distribution pattern of high stresses and corresponding SEDs in the PDL and bone. Due to the tooth movement, peaks of SEDs were obtained in the PDL as well as in the bone on the labial and palatal/lingual sides of the alveolar crest. At the root, highest SEDs were detected in the PDL on the palatal/lingual side slightly occlusal of the root tip. This distribution pattern of high SEDs within the PDL coincides with the position of initial resorptive lesions in EOTRH affected teeth. The position of high SEDs in the bone can explain the typical age-related alteration of shape and angulation of equine incisors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The unerupted maxillary canine - a post-surgical review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dowling, Ian

    2009-10-01

    The orthodontic records of 685 patients referred for surgical exposure of an unerupted impacted maxillary canine tooth were examined. The condition was more common among females than males, slightly less than 2:1. The impacted teeth had a palatal-labial ratio of 3:1. All of the teeth were exposed using the open surgical technique and in 98% of cases the tooth erupted and was orthodontically aligned. In 2% of cases ankylosis occurred and the teeth were subsequently extracted. The presence of peg-shaped lateral incisors associated with the impacted maxillary canine tooth was 3.4% of the total number of impacted teeth and congenital absence was found in 1.7% of impacted teeth.

  14. The unerupted maxillary canine--a post-surgical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dowling, Ian

    2009-01-01

    The orthodontic records of 685 patients referred for surgical exposure of an unerupted impacted maxillary canine tooth were examined. The condition was more common among females than males, slightly less than 2:1. The impacted teeth had a palatal-labial ratio of 3:1. All of the teeth were exposed using the open surgical technique and in 98% of cases the tooth erupted and was orthodontically aligned. In 2% of cases ankylosis occurred and the teeth were subsequently extracted. The presence of peg-shaped lateral incisors associated with the impacted maxillary canine tooth was 3.4% of the total number of impacted teeth and congenital absence was found in 1.7% of impacted teeth.

  15. Assessment of radiographic factors affecting surgical exposure and orthodontic alignment of impacted canines of the palate: a 15-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein Kalantar; Tabatabaie, Fataneh Alavi; Navi, Fina; Shafeie, Hasan Ali; Fard, Behnam Khosravani; Hayati, Zahra

    2009-06-01

    Impacted canines require a combination of both surgical and orthodontic management. In this study, patients treated for bone-impacted canines of the hard palatal were evaluated to assess which radiographic factors influenced the feasibility to move impacted maxillary permanent canines from the hard palate into the alveolar arch. Eighty patients aged 12 to 24 (average 16 years) were treated surgically and orthodontically to align 146 bone-impacted canines of the hard palate (from 1994 to 2008). Factors such as age, sex, angulation of the canine to the midline (CAM), anomaly of the canine root (RA), overlap of the adjacent lateral incisor root (OALIR), and ratio of root formation (RRF) upon treatment were documented. Radiographic records and demographic data were assessed. The following radiographic measurements of canine position were made from the orthopantomogram (OPG): (1) angulation to the midline, (2) anteroposterior position of the root, (3) overlap of the adjacent incisor. RA or dilaceration was assessed from the OPG, maxillary occlusal (MO), and periapical (PA) radiographs. Whether the impacted canine had responded to surgical exposure and was orthodontically aligned, or surgically removed and discarded was also recorded. The data were analyzed to assess and correlate significance. Eighty patients aged 12 to 24 (19 males and 61 females) with 146 bone-impacted permanent canines of the hard palatal were treated. One hundred and three teeth (70.54%) had responded to surgical exposure and orthodontic alignment within 9 to 12 months. Forty-three impacted canine teeth (29.46%) had to be surgically removed because of ankylosis and no movement after 8 to 9 months using 50 to 60 g of traction force via elastic chains. Data analysis via chi-square and Pearson correlation tests showed that as the CAM increased (> 45 degrees), the canine was more likely to be unresponsive to treatment (P half the root) of the adjacent lateral incisor root (OALIR) via the canine crown

  16. Molar incisor hypomineralization: current research evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manikandan Ekambaram

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH is a condition of systemic origin that involves one to four first permanent molar teeth and often associated with affected incisors. Although several associations to prenatal/perinatal childhood medical conditions have been reported, the etiology of MIH still remains unclear. The degree of enamel hypomineralization in the affected teeth can vary and the clinical problems associated with the teeth include increased susceptibility to caries, rapid wear, and post-eruptive enamel breakdown. Affected teeth are extremely challenging to treat as the enamel is porous, sensitive and treating clinicians might encounter great difficulty in achieving profound anaesthesia. The first part of thispresentation will give an update on prevalence, potential etiological factors, and management strategies of this condition. The second part of the presentation will cover a systematic review results on bonding strategies to hypomineralized enamel.

  17. Bilateral fusion of permanent maxillary incisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Hans

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental fusion is a rare developmental anomaly, which is included in the anomalies of tooth morphology or shape. Fusion can occur at the level of enamel or enamel and dentin, which results in the formation of a single tooth with enlarged clinical crown. Fusion is more common in deciduous dentition. Incisors are reported to be fused in primary and permanent dentition, but bilateral fusion is a rare occurrence. The prevalence of bilateral fusion in the permanent dentition is less frequent than unilateral fusion and is reported to be around 0.05%. The authors report a case of a 20-year-old male with bilateral fusion of maxillary central and lateral incisors. Multi-disciplinary treatment approach is essential to get the desired esthetic result. The best way to manage these difficult cases depends on a number of factors including the knowledge and technical skills of the practitioner.

  18. The essential role of cone beam computed tomography to diagnose the localization of impacted maxillary canine and to detect the austerity of the adjacent root resorption in the Romanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oana, Lăduncă; Zetu, Irina; Petcu, Ana; Nemtoi, A; Dragan, Eliza; Haba, Danisia

    2013-01-01

    The impaction phenomenon is a pathological condition which is defined as the lack of eruption of a permanent tooth in the oral cavity. After third molar, the first permanent tooth impacted in the alveolar bone is the permanent maxillary canine, with varies from 1% to 3%. The aim of this study was to use the most recently imaging technique--CBCT, to evaluate the position of the impacted maxillary canine and to determinate the severity of root resorption of the adjacent teeth. The all 230 patients of this study were referred to a CBCT scanning with Scanora machine and only the region of clinical interest was irradiated. The age of the subjects was distributed between the ages of 11 and 42 years. From a total of 364 impacted canine teeth, 92 were side impacted canines, 97 right impacted canines and 87 were left impacted canines. We report a lateral incisors root resorption present in 54.37% and 24.29% the resorption of central incisors. The use of CBCT in patients with impacted canines has potential diagnostic and may influence the planning of treatment. Also the CBCT can be a genuine method used to rectify, to diagnose and to make a suggestive treatment for the resorption of the root of incisors.

  19. Management of Congenitally Missing Lateral Incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Kedia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple treatment options are available to patients who have congenitally missing teeth. Management options for the treatment of missing teeth can include the following: (1 Orthodontic space closure and adjacent tooth substitution, (2 autotransplantation, (3 prosthetic replacement with resin-bonded fixed partial dentures, conventional fixed partial dentures and single-tooth implants. In this case report, treatment of a patient with congenitally missing maxillary right lateral incisor will be presented.

  20. Bilateral fusion of permanent maxillary incisors

    OpenAIRE

    Manoj Kumar Hans; Shashit Shetty; Hitesh Chopra

    2011-01-01

    Dental fusion is a rare developmental anomaly, which is included in the anomalies of tooth morphology or shape. Fusion can occur at the level of enamel or enamel and dentin, which results in the formation of a single tooth with enlarged clinical crown. Fusion is more common in deciduous dentition. Incisors are reported to be fused in primary and permanent dentition, but bilateral fusion is a rare occurrence. The prevalence of bilateral fusion in the permanent dentition is less frequent than u...

  1. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization, Prevalence, and Etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Allazzam, Sulaiman Mohammed; Alaki, Sumer Madani; El Meligy, Omar Abdel Sadek

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the prevalence and possible etiological factors associated with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) among a group of children in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods. A group of 8-12-year-old children were recruited (n = 267) from the Pediatric Dental Clinics at the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University. Children had at least one first permanent molar (FPM), erupted or partially erupted. Demographic information, children's medical history, and pregnancy-related data wer...

  2. Compensatory canine angulation in angle Class II and III patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carlos Agner Busato

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurence of compensation in mesiodistal axial inclinations of canines in skeletal malocclusions patients. The sample consisted of 25 Angle Class II, division 1 malocclusion (group 1 and 19 Angle Class III malocclusion patients (group 2. After measurement of dental angulations through a method that associates plaster model photography and AutoCad software, comparisons between the groups were performed by T-test for independent samples. Results showed that there was no statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 between groups, when maxillary canine angulations were compared. Regarding the mandibular canines, there was a statistically significant difference in dental angulation, expressed by 3.2° for group 1 and 0.15° for group 2. An upright position tendency for mandibular canines was observed in the Angle Class III sample. This configures a pattern of compensatory coronary positioning, since the angulation of these teeth makes them occupy less space in the dental arch and consequently mandibular incisors can be in a more retracted position in the sagittal plane.

  3. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment of a Maxillary Mature Premolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingan Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative endodontic treatment was performed on a mature maxillary premolar diagnosed as chronic pulpitis. The root canals were chemomechanically prepared and placed intracanal medicaments at the first appointment. Then 2 weeks later, a blood clot was created in the canals, over which mineral trioxide aggregate was placed. At 6-month follow-up, cementum-like tissue seemed to be formed in the root canal along with nearly recovered pulp vitality. At 12-month recall, the radiographic results revealed evidence of root wall thickening. At 30-month recall, no periapical lesion was found. This case report indicates that regenerative endodontic treatment for the mature premolar is feasible. More cases are needed for further validation.

  4. Impacted maxillary second premolars: a report of four cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Chikkaramaiah, Shivashankar; Panja, Pritam; Koratagere, Nagesh

    2014-01-01

    Impacted teeth are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Apart from their symptomatic nature and the probable functional disruption they can cause, impacted teeth have the potential to cause more severe and serious problems such as development of dentigerous cysts and other complications due to their proximity to the nasal and oral cavity. In this report, we highlight a series of four cases involving maxillary second premolars, teeth that are not often impacted. PMID:25320255

  5. Resistencia a la fractura de premolares superiores reconstruidos

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Osorio, Javier; Arroyo Bote, Sebastiana; Juvany Blanch, Albert; Canalda Sahli, Carlos; Brau Aguadé, Esteban

    2000-01-01

    Resistencia a la fractura experimental de premolares superiores tratados endodóncicamente y restau­rados, utilizando tres métodos diferentes de reconstrucción. Los dientes fueron agrupados según el método de reconstrucción, montados en una prensa hidráulica y las cúspides sometidas a una fuerza compresiva, hasta el momento de la fractura. Se comparan las fuerzas de fractura de los diferentes grupos.

  6. Predicting Agenesis of the Mandibular Second Premolar from Adjacent Teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Sharma

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of agenesis of the mandibular second premolar (P2 enhances management of the dental arch in the growing child. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship in the development of the mandibular first molar (M1 and first premolar (P1 at early stages of P2 (second premolar. Specifically, we ask if the likelihood of P2 agenesis can be predicted from adjacent developing teeth. We selected archived dental panoramic radiographs with P2 at crown formation stages (N = 212 and calculated the likelihood of P2 at initial mineralisation stage 'Ci' given the tooth stage of adjacent teeth. Our results show that the probability of observing mandibular P2 at initial mineralisation stage 'Ci' decreased as both the adjacent P1 and M1 matured. The modal stage at P2 'Ci' was P1 'Coc' (cusp outline complete and M1 'Crc' (crown complete. Initial mineralisation of P2 was observed up to P1 'Crc' and M1 stage 'R½' (root half. The chance of observing P2 at least 'Coc' (coalescence of cusps was considerably greater prior to these threshold stages compared to later stages of P1 and M1. These findings suggest that P2 is highly unlikely to develop if P1 is beyond 'Crc' and M1 is beyond 'R½'.

  7. Predicting Agenesis of the Mandibular Second Premolar from Adjacent Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Geetanjali; Johal, Ama S; Liversidge, Helen M

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis of agenesis of the mandibular second premolar (P2) enhances management of the dental arch in the growing child. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship in the development of the mandibular first molar (M1) and first premolar (P1) at early stages of P2 (second premolar). Specifically, we ask if the likelihood of P2 agenesis can be predicted from adjacent developing teeth. We selected archived dental panoramic radiographs with P2 at crown formation stages (N = 212) and calculated the likelihood of P2 at initial mineralisation stage 'Ci' given the tooth stage of adjacent teeth. Our results show that the probability of observing mandibular P2 at initial mineralisation stage 'Ci' decreased as both the adjacent P1 and M1 matured. The modal stage at P2 'Ci' was P1 'Coc' (cusp outline complete) and M1 'Crc' (crown complete). Initial mineralisation of P2 was observed up to P1 'Crc' and M1 stage 'R½' (root half). The chance of observing P2 at least 'Coc' (coalescence of cusps) was considerably greater prior to these threshold stages compared to later stages of P1 and M1. These findings suggest that P2 is highly unlikely to develop if P1 is beyond 'Crc' and M1 is beyond 'R½'.

  8. Early Miocene catarrhine dietary behaviour: the influence of the Red Queen Effect on incisor shape and curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Andrew S

    2009-03-01

    The early Miocene catarrhine fossil record of East Africa represents a diverse and extensive adaptive radiation. It is well accepted that these taxa encompass a dietary range similar to extant hominoids, in addition to some potentially novel dietary behaviour. There have been numerous attempts to infer diet for these taxa from patterns of dental allometry and incisor and molar microwear, however, morphometric analyses until now have been restricted to the post-canine dentition. It has already been demonstrated that given the key functional role of the incisors in pre-processing food items prior to mastication, there is a positive correlation between diet and incisal curvature (Deane, A.S., Kremer, E.P., Begun, D.R., 2005. A new approach to quantifying anatomical curvatures using High Resolution Polynomial Curve Fitting (HR-PCF). Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 128(3), 630-638.; Deane, A.S., 2007. Inferring dietary behaviour for Miocene hominoids: A high-resolution morphometric approach to incisal crown curvature. Ph.D. Dissertation. The University of Toronto.). This study seeks to re-examine existing dietary hypotheses for large-bodied early Miocene fossil catarrhines by contrasting the incisal curvature for these taxa with comparative models derived from prior studies of the correlation between extant hominoid incisor curvature and feeding behaviour. Incisor curvature was quantified for 78 fossil incisors representing seven genera, and the results confirm that early Miocene fossil catarrhines represent a dietary continuum ranging from more folivorous (i.e., Rangwapithecus) to more frugivorous (i.e., Proconsul) diets, as well as novel dietary behaviours that are potentially similar to extant ceboids (i.e., Afropithecus). Additionally, early Miocene fossil catarrhine incisors are less curved than extant hominoid incisors, indicating a general pattern of increasing mesio-distal and labial curvature through time. This pattern of morphological shifting is consistent with the

  9. Digital analysis of anterior dental esthetic parameters in patients with bilateral maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Núbia Pavesi; De-Marchi, Luciana Manzotti; Gribel, Bruno Frazão; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2013-06-01

    To analyze anterior dental esthetic parameters-width/height ratio (WHR), gingival zenith (GZ), and apparent contact dimension (ACD)-in patients with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (MLIA) bilaterally treated with space closure and recontouring of the canines, or with implant-supported prostheses. Fifty-two participants were allocated into three groups as follows: MLIA patients (N = 18) treated with teeth recontouring (RG); MLIA patients (N = 10) treated with implants (IG); and volunteers without agenesis (N = 24), who served as controls (CG). Dental casts of all patients were obtained and electronically scanned. Digital images were analyzed with 3Shape A/S OrthoAnalyser software (Copenhagen, Denmark). Shapiro-Wilk test, Spearman correlation, and Kruskal-Wallis statistical tests (p  0.05). Concerning GZ, RG presented more discrepancies than IG and CG, with statistically significant differences (p = 0.0165). IG presented statistically significant differences for the ACD in comparison with RG and CG (p agenesis (CG) in relation to the anterior dental esthetic parameters evaluated. The digital analysis of esthetic principles, such as those investigated in this study involving maxillary incisor agenesis, is paramount to successful esthetic treatment planning. The results of the present study, as well as those found in the literature, indicate that clinicians should use esthetic parameters, such as those investigated herein, when treatment planning extensive oral rehabilitation cases. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Prosthetic replacement vs space closure for maxillary lateral incisor agenesis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Giordani Santos; de Almeida, Natália Valli; Pereira, Daniele Masterson Tavares; Mattos, Cláudia Trindade; Mucha, José Nelson

    2016-08-01

    Defining the best treatment for maxillary lateral incisor agenesis is a challenge. Our aim in this study was to determine, with the evidence available in the literature, the best treatment for maxillary lateral incisor agenesis in the permanent dentition, evaluating the esthetic, occlusal (functional), and periodontal results between prosthetic replacement and orthodontic space closure. Electronic databases (CENTRAL, PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and LILACS) were searched in September 2014 and updated in January 2015, with no restriction on language or initial date. A manual search of the reference lists of the potential studies was performed. Risk of bias was assessed by the Newcastle Ottawa Scale. The search identified 2174 articles, of which 1196 were excluded because they were duplicates. Titles and abstracts of 978 articles were accessed, and 957 were excluded. In total, 21 articles were read in full, and 9 case-control studies were included after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were extracted from the articles selected, and a table was compiled for comparison and analysis of the results. There were no randomization and blinding, and the risk of bias evaluation found gaps in compatibility and outcome domains in almost all selected studies. Tooth-supported dental prostheses of maxillary lateral incisor agenesis had worse scores in the periodontal indexes than did orthodontic space closure. Space closure is evaluated better esthetically than prosthetic replacements, and the presence or absence of a Class I relationship of the canines showed no relationship with occlusal function or with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Retention of permanent incisors by mesiodens: a family affair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallas, M M; García, A

    2000-01-22

    The term mesiodens refers to a supernumerary tooth that is present in the midline of the maxilla between the two central incisors. One or two mesiodentes may be present. We present a rare case of two sisters, in both of whom a pair of mesiodentes caused the retention of permanent incisors. They were referred to our hospital with asymptomatic delayed eruption of upper incisors. This article is written to point out genetic factors as the possible origin of supernumerary teeth.

  12. Fused upper central incisors: management of two clinical cases

    OpenAIRE

    Sfasciotti, Gian Luca; Marini, Roberta; Bossù, Maurizio; Ierardo, Gaetano; Annibali, Susanna

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the management of two clinical cases, in which the upper right central incisor was fused with a supernumerary tooth and the upper left central incisor was macrodontic. A radiographic examination revealed that the fused teeth had two separate roots. Hemisectioning of the fused teeth was performed, the supernumerary portion was extracted and the remaining part was reshaped to remove any sharp margins and to achieve a normal morphology. The macrodontic central incisors were no...

  13. Molar-incisor hypomineralization: Therapeutic challenge to paediatric dentistry practice

    OpenAIRE

    Stojković Branislava; Kostadinović Ljiljana; Igić Marija; Tričković-Janjić Olivera; Stojanović Simona; Janošević Predrag

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Molar incisor hypomineralization indicates the appearance of enamel hypomineralization of systemic origin which occurs in 1-4 first permanent molars, which is often accompanied by changes on permanent incisors. Variations in clinical manifestation, together with commonly present asymmetry, are the reason for large variations in the needs for therapeutic treatment of these structural enamel defects. Case study: Two patients with diagnosed molar incisor hypomineralization are show...

  14. [Tooth shape and color as criteria for or against orthodontic space closure in case of a missing lateral incisor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wriedt, Susanne; Werner, Patrick; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the esthetic parameters that are applied, more or less unconsciously, in deciding for or against orthodontic space closure in the case of aplasia or traumatic loss of lateral incisors. The width-height index for teeth 13 to 23 was measured on 200 dental students. The VITA Easyshade system was used to determine the components of the tooth color (L, C, h) and to identify differences between each tooth. Eight investigators subjectively assessed digital photographs of the subjects, opting for or against space closure. The Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated for the parameters measured. A comparison of the parameters showed that not one factor alone was responsible for the decision for or against space closure for esthetic reasons. Orthodontists were more likely to favor space closure when the canine was slightly wider and had a less pointed shape and the differences were very small between canine and central incisor in terms of hue, chroma, and lightness. We observed that the subjective decision on the esthetic aspects of space closure correlates closely with the objective criteria.

  15. Management of Traumatized Permanent Incisors. Revascularization and Delayed Replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharechahi, Maryam; Shojaeian, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a clinical case of a 9-year-old boy with a traumatic injury to the maxillary central incisors 24 hours after a fall in his schoolyard. The upper left central incisor was avulsed and was kept in saliva for four hours from the moment of trauma until its replantation. The right one was necrotized after one month. We describe successful revascularization treatment of right necrotic immature upper incisor and delayed replantation of left one. After 18 months, radiolucent lesions in the periapical areas of both maxillary central incisors had healed, and root apex development was noted with thickening of the walls in tooth #8.

  16. Comparison of canine retraction by in vivo method using four brands of elastomeric power chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanuru, Ravi Krishna; Azaneen, Mustafa; Narayana, Veera; Kolasani, Balaram; Indukuri, Ravikishore Reddy; Babu, P Firoz

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the amount of space closure by movement of canines into the extraction spaces using four brands of elastomeric power chains (EPCs) by intraoral application with pre-adjusted appliance for 6 weeks. The sample size calculation was based on the studies of Boester and Johnston and also with repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) continuous data for force degradation, standard deviation of 24.9 g, and also from a pilot study, which totaled to around 17 patients with a mean age of 20 ± 2 years and receiving fixed orthodontic treatment that required retraction of canines into the premolar extraction spaces in all four dental arch quadrants. Four brands of EPCs, namely the Ormco, 3M Unitek, Rocky Mountain, and Highland, which were closed-link with five loops delivering less than or equal to 250 g were used. The rates of canine retraction were measured between the attachment points on the canine bracket hook and first molar hook using a Mitutoyo Digital Vernier Caliper at the time of first application, after 3 weeks of use, and at the end of 6 weeks of use, and were subjected to statistical calculations. The distances recorded from canine retraction were similar with slight differences noticed in the four brands of EPCs. However, no statistically significant difference was observed in relation to the EPCs. Although all brands of the EPCs produced space closure of canines, it was observed that not much of a significant difference existed among the products tested.

  17. Altered anatomy in a case with a buccally impacted maxillary canine tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, M C; Comes, C A; Stanciu, D; Ciuluvică, R C; Motoc, A; Niculescu, M C; Jianu, Adelina Maria

    2010-01-01

    Bilateral dissections of maxilla were performed in a human adult cadaver head, male, aged 53 years. After the en block removal of the soft tissues in the oral and infraorbital regions, the antero-lateral surface of maxilla was exposed and also the vestibular aspect of the upper alveolar process. An oblique labially impacted right upper canine was evidenced, completely submucosal: its apex was tangent to the maxillary sinus floor, while the superior side of the apical part of the root was in close relation with the floor of the laterally expanded inferior nasal meatus. Superior and adjacent to the neck of that impacted canine a follicular cyst was evidenced and the antral wall presented distally to the apex of the impacted canine a dehiscent area, where the antral mucosa was only covered by an incomplete thin bony lamella. The incisors on that side were present but no resorption was identified at their level. Within the anterior border of the wall separating the maxillary sinus, small, and the inferior nasal meatus, the nerve for that impacted canine was coursing; the nerves for the upper incisors were initially located within the antero-lateral wall of the inferior nasal meatus. Although small, the maxillary sinus presented a supero-medial recess above the enlarged inferior nasal meatus and lateral to the normally-sized middle nasal meatus.

  18. Canine pulmonary angiostrongylosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Jørgen; Willesen, Jakob Lundgren

    2009-01-01

    Canine pulmonary angiostrongylosis is an emerging snail-borne disease causing verminous pnemonia and coagulopathy in dogs. The parasite is fund in Europe, North and South America and Africa, covering tropical, subtropical and temperate regions. Its distribution has been characterised by isolated...... larvae may not reflect what happens under field conditions. There is insufficient understanding of the spread of infection and the dynamic consequences of this parasite in the canine population. This review discusses the biology, epidemiology, clinical aspects and management of canine pulmonary...

  19. Predictive factors for resorption of teeth adjacent to impacted maxillary canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuminetti, Fany; Boutin, François; Frapier, Laure

    2017-03-01

    conclusion that the risk of resorption of the lateral incisor is not linked to the buccal or palatal situation of the canine. The risk is greater when the canine is vertically above the lateral incisor root and close to the median palatine suture, suggesting a mechanical blockage by the apex of the lateral incisor. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Clinical evaluation of desensitizing treatment for incisor teeth affected by molar-incisor hypomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgül, Betül Memiş; Saat, Sinem; Sönmez, Hayriye; Oz, Firdevs Tulga

    2013-01-01

    Sensitivity complaints are commonly observed in teeth affected by MIH (molar incisor hypomineralization). This study aimed to evaluate the hypersensitivity observed in MIH-affected teeth and the effect of desensitizing agents applied with and without ozone to incisors affected by MIH. The first part of the study included 120 teeth from 42 patients with MIH. These 42 patients included 33 children with 92 incisor teeth with a Vas score of > or = 30, and these 92 incisors were included in the second part of the study. The patients included in the second part were divided into three main groups and six subgroups. The main groups included the following: fluoride, CPP-ACP and CPP-ACP with fluoride. Each main group was divided into two subgroups: one with ozone use and one without ozone use. Girls exhibited significantly more sensitivity compared with boys (p 0.05). The results of this study revealed that gender is an important factor in the sensitivity of teeth with MLH. Desensitizing agents effectively reduced the hypersensitivity of teeth with MIH. CPP-ACP paste was found to be more effective, and ozone therapy prolonged the effect of CPP-ACP paste.

  1. Compound odontoma associated with impacted maxillary incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharan, S; Krishnan, I S

    2012-01-01

    Odontomas are considered to be the most common odontogenic tumors of the oral cavity. Some authors consider it as malformations rather than true neoplasms. The exact etiology of odontomes is still not known. Most odontomes are asymptomatic and are discovered during routine radiographic investigations. Odontomes generally cause disturbances in the eruption of the teeth, most commonly delayed eruption or deflection. The present report describes the surgical management of a case of compound odontoma in a 10-year-old boy who presented with a complaint of swelling in the maxillary right anterior region and retained deciduous incisors. The related literature is also being reviewed in this article.

  2. Compound odontoma associated with impacted maxillary incisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sreedharan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are considered to be the most common odontogenic tumors of the oral cavity. Some authors consider it as malformations rather than true neoplasms. The exact etiology of odontomes is still not known. Most odontomes are asymptomatic and are discovered during routine radiographic investigations. Odontomes generally cause disturbances in the eruption of the teeth, most commonly delayed eruption or deflection. The present report describes the surgical management of a case of compound odontoma in a 10-year-old boy who presented with a complaint of swelling in the maxillary right anterior region and retained deciduous incisors. The related literature is also being reviewed in this article.

  3. Dental anomalies associated with buccally- and palatally-impacted maxillary canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajnani, Anand K; King, Nigel M

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the association of both buccally- and palatally-impacted canines with other dental anomalies. This retrospective study was conducted on a population of 533 southern Chinese children and adolescents who had impacted maxillary canines that had been treated in the Paediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics Clinic, Prince Philip Dental Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. Descriptions of the impacted canine and other associated anomalies were obtained from the case notes and radiographs. Clinical photographs and study casts were used, where available. A total of 253 (47.5%) patients with impacted maxillary canines were diagnosed with other dental anomalies. Microdontia was the most frequently-occurring anomaly reported in these patients, with the maxillary lateral incisor the most commonly affected tooth. Other odontogenic anomalies that were associated with both buccally- and palatally-impacted canines included hypodontia, supernumerary teeth, transposition of other teeth, enamel hypoplasia, other impacted teeth, and dens invaginatus. Both buccally- and palatally-impacted canines were found to be associated with other odontogenic anomalies. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Morphology of the occlusal surfaces of premolar and molar teeth as an indicator of age in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmalt, J L; Allen, A L

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of cheek tooth occlusal surface morphology as an indicator of age in the horse using a blinded cross-sectional design. Twenty horses of varying age, breed and sex were used. Horses of known age (foaling date) were euthanized for reasons other than dental disease. Following disarticulation of the head and sectioning of the mandibles, cheek teeth were cleaned using running water and photographs were taken of each arcade. Using a computer-based program, the total surface area of each premolar and molar, the outer enamel ridge perimeter distance, infundibular surface areas and perimeter distances were measured. Further anatomical data were calculated from these measurements and a statistical analysis of the relationship between horse age and cheek tooth occlusal morphology was performed. Results indicated that multiple anatomical regions within the occlusal surface of the equine cheek tooth can be used as an indicator of age. There are important differences between mandibular and maxillary teeth as well as between teeth in the same dental arcade. Horse size is also of significance. The mesial infundibular surface area as a percentage of the total surface area of tooth 111, and the mesiodistal length of 1/2/3/4 09 teeth, most closely approximates age within our mathematical model. Cheek tooth morphological data can be used to predict age in horses that possess all their permanent dentition. In cases in which the age of horses cannot be accurately determined from incisor examination, cheek teeth may be used.

  5. Transplantation of premolars as an approach for replacing avulsed teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Schwartz, Ole; Kofoed, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    . Secondly the tooth precipitates growth of the alveolar procces and allows treatment to be performed at an early age (10-12 years) where the trauma incidence is at its maximum. Finally transplanted teeth can be moved orthodontically. These characteristics make implant solutions appealing in a number...... of situations. The procedure consist in selecting a premolar in a optimal root development stage which is approximately three fourths root formation where optimal pulp and periodontal ligament healing can be achieved in more than 90 percent of the cases. The tooth is later after slight crown remodeling restored...

  6. Biomechanical Effects of Bonding Pericervical Dentin in Maxillary Premolars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Nghia; Li, Fang-Chi; Friedman, Shimon; Kishen, Anil

    2018-02-16

    Pericervical dentin (PCD) loss may increase root fracture propensity in root-filled teeth. This study evaluated the impacts of bonding PCD with composite resin (CR) on radicular microstrain distribution and load at failure of root-filled maxillary premolars. Ten single-canal maxillary premolars decoronated 2 mm coronal to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) had canals enlarged with ProTaper Universal instruments (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK) to F3. They were root filled with gutta-percha (GP) to the CEJ and restored with Cavit (3M Deutschland GmbH, Neuss, Germany) (GP group, n = 5) or 6 mm apical to the CEJ and restored with bonded CR to simulate bonding of PCD (bonded PCD group, n = 5). Digital moiré interferometry was used to evaluate pre- and postoperative whole-field microstrain distribution in the root dentin under physiologically relevant loads (10-50 N). Another 30 premolars, similarly treated as groups 1 and 2 or left untreated as controls (n = 10/group), were subjected to cyclic loads (1.2 million cycles, 45 N, 4 Hz) followed by uniaxial compressive load to failure. Mechanical data were analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey test at a 5% level of significance. Microstrain distribution showed bending and compressive patterns at the coronal and apical root dentin, respectively. In the GP group, microstrain distribution was unaltered. In the bonded-PCD group, different microstrain distribution suggested stiffening at the PCD. The load at failure did not differ significantly for the GP, bonded PCD, and control groups (P > .05). CR bonding of PCD might impact the biomechanical responses in maxillary premolar roots at low-level continuous loads. The effect of this impact on root fracture loads when subjected to cyclic load warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Irregular periapical radiopacity in mandibular premolars and molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, S Aravind; Vinayachandran, Divya

    2014-01-01

    Increased deposition of cementum is observed in a wide number of both benign and malignant conditions. Many cases are often diagnosed during routine examination as an incidental finding. Diagnosing correctly without confusing it with other similarly appearing lesions, thus avoiding subjecting the patient to unnecessary investigations and stress, is of prime importance. We report one such case, where the patient presented with the routine complaint of a painful tooth, during the investigation of which he was also diagnosed with hypercementosis affecting the mandibular second premolars and molars bilaterally. The literature review reveals that not many cases of hypercementosis are frequently reported.

  8. Irregular Periapical Radiopacity in Mandibular Premolars and Molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Aravind Warrier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased deposition of cementum is observed in a wide number of both benign and malignant conditions. Many cases are often diagnosed during routine examination as an incidental finding. Diagnosing correctly without confusing it with other similarly appearing lesions, thus avoiding subjecting the patient to unnecessary investigations and stress, is of prime importance. We report one such case, where the patient presented with the routine complaint of a painful tooth, during the investigation of which he was also diagnosed with hypercementosis affecting the mandibular second premolars and molars bilaterally. The literature review reveals that not many cases of hypercementosis are frequently reported.

  9. The effects of impacted premaxillary supernumerary teeth on permanent incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yun-Hoa; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Cho, Bong-Hae

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the radiographic features associated with impacted premaxillary supernumerary teeth, to determine the relationship between their characteristics and their effects on permanent incisors, and to investigate the types of orthodontic treatment that patients received after the extraction of impacted supernumerary teeth. The clinical records and radiographs of 193 patients whose impacted premaxillary supernumerary teeth were removed were retrospectively reviewed, and 241 impacted supernumerary teeth were examined. Cone-beam computed tomographic images and panoramic radiographs were examined to determine the number, location, sagittal position, orientation, and morphology of the supernumerary teeth. Their effects on permanent incisors and the orthodontic treatment received by patients after the extraction of the supernumeraries were also investigated. Supernumerary teeth were most frequently observed in the central incisor region, in the palatal position, in the inverted orientation, and were most commonly conical in shape. The most common complication was median diastema, followed by displacement and delayed eruption of the adjacent incisors. Ten (71.4%) of the 14 odontomas showed delayed eruption of the adjacent incisors. Displacement of the incisors was more frequently observed in association with supernumerary teeth with tuberculate or supplemental shapes. Orthodontic traction was most frequently performed after the removal of odontomas. In 32 cases (13.3%), permanent incisors erupted after the orthodontic creation of sufficient space. Median diastema was most common complication. The delayed eruption of incisors was common in supernumerary teeth with a vertical orientation and an odontoma shape.

  10. The effects of impacted premaxillary supernumerary teeth on permanent incisors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Kim, Ji Yeon; Cho, Bong Hae [School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the radiographic features associated with impacted premaxillary supernumerary teeth, to determine the relationship between their characteristics and their effects on permanent incisors, and to investigate the types of orthodontic treatment that patients received after the extraction of impacted supernumerary teeth. The clinical records and radiographs of 193 patients whose impacted premaxillary supernumerary teeth were removed were retrospectively reviewed, and 241 impacted supernumerary teeth were examined. Cone-beam computed tomographic images and panoramic radiographs were examined to determine the number, location, sagittal position, orientation, and morphology of the supernumerary teeth. Their effects on permanent incisors and the orthodontic treatment received by patients after the extraction of the supernumeraries were also investigated. Supernumerary teeth were most frequently observed in the central incisor region, in the palatal position, in the inverted orientation, and were most commonly conical in shape. The most common complication was median diastema, followed by displacement and delayed eruption of the adjacent incisors. Ten (71.4%) of the 14 odontomas showed delayed eruption of the adjacent incisors. Displacement of the incisors was more frequently observed in association with supernumerary teeth with tuberculate or supplemental shapes. Orthodontic traction was most frequently performed after the removal of odontomas. In 32 cases (13.3%), permanent incisors erupted after the orthodontic creation of sufficient space. Median diastema was most common complication. The delayed eruption of incisors was common in supernumerary teeth with a vertical orientation and an odontoma shape.

  11. The effects of impacted premaxillary supernumerary teeth on permanent incisors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Kim, Ji Yeon; Cho, Bong Hae

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the radiographic features associated with impacted premaxillary supernumerary teeth, to determine the relationship between their characteristics and their effects on permanent incisors, and to investigate the types of orthodontic treatment that patients received after the extraction of impacted supernumerary teeth. The clinical records and radiographs of 193 patients whose impacted premaxillary supernumerary teeth were removed were retrospectively reviewed, and 241 impacted supernumerary teeth were examined. Cone-beam computed tomographic images and panoramic radiographs were examined to determine the number, location, sagittal position, orientation, and morphology of the supernumerary teeth. Their effects on permanent incisors and the orthodontic treatment received by patients after the extraction of the supernumeraries were also investigated. Supernumerary teeth were most frequently observed in the central incisor region, in the palatal position, in the inverted orientation, and were most commonly conical in shape. The most common complication was median diastema, followed by displacement and delayed eruption of the adjacent incisors. Ten (71.4%) of the 14 odontomas showed delayed eruption of the adjacent incisors. Displacement of the incisors was more frequently observed in association with supernumerary teeth with tuberculate or supplemental shapes. Orthodontic traction was most frequently performed after the removal of odontomas. In 32 cases (13.3%), permanent incisors erupted after the orthodontic creation of sufficient space. Median diastema was most common complication. The delayed eruption of incisors was common in supernumerary teeth with a vertical orientation and an odontoma shape

  12. Brain malformation in single median maxillary central incisor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, I; Wagner, Aa; Thomsen, L L

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and radiographic examinations and MR scan of a 12-year-old girl with SMMCI (single median maxillary central incisor) showed impaired growth and a midline defect involving the central incisor, cranium and the midline structures in the brain, falx cerebri and pituitary gland. She had a sev...

  13. Maxillary incisor root forms in orthodontic patients in Nairobi, Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective:To evaluate, radiographically, the root forms of maxillary incisors in a sample of patients seeking orthodontic treatment in Nairobi, Kenya. Design:A retrospective study of maxillary incisor root forms based on periapical radiographs. Setting: A private dental clinic in Nairobi, Kenya. Materials and Methods:The study ...

  14. Orthodontic intervention of an impacted upper left central incisor due ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fixed orthodontic appliance was used to facilitate traction and correction of malalignement of the impacted upper left central incisor.Treatment outcome: Successful removal of the odontoma, full exposure of the crown of upper left central incisor and good alignment on the arch were achieved. Crowding on the upper and ...

  15. Molar incisor hypomineralisation: clinical management of the young patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daly, Dympna

    2009-04-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralisation (MIH) is a common developmental condition resulting in enamel defects in first permanent molars and permanent incisors. It presents at eruption of these teeth. Early diagnosis is essential since rapid breakdown of tooth structure may occur, giving rise to acute symptoms and complicated treatment. The purpose of this article is to review MIH and illustrate its clinical management in young children.

  16. Serum Antibody Responses to Oral Microorganisms in Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    dentition. Nonhuman primates have a primary and permanent dentition which includes molars, premolars , canines and incisors. As has been described above, the...the last immunization. Silk sutures were ligated at the cementoenamel junction of all mandibular left second premolars and second molars to convert

  17. Weighing Evidence: The Design and Comparison of Probability Thought Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    show wide-fanning cheekbones, very large molar and premolar teeth and smaller incisor and canines. The brain case has an average capacity of about 500...cheekbones of A but has similar cranial capacity and only slightly less massive molar and premolar teeth. (Ill) A large-brained (c. 850 cubic centimeters

  18. Endodontic management of mandibular second premolar with three roots and three root canals: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Shrivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High level of success in endodontic treatment requires an understanding of root canal anatomy and morphology. The clinician must be prepared to identify those teeth that tend to vary generally from norm. Thorough debridement and obturation of such teeth can be challenging and failing to do so can lead to treatment failure. Mandibular premolars have earned the reputation for having aberrant anatomy. However, the occurrence of three separate canals with three separate foramina in mandibular premolars is very rare. The incidence of three canals is as high as 23% in mandibular first premolars, whereas in second premolars incidence is as low as 0.4%. Three rooted mandibular second premolar is reported to be 0.2%. This case report describes endodontic management of one such tooth with unusual morphological variations in canal anatomy of mandibular second premolar.

  19. Stability of class II subdivision malocclusion treatment with 3 and 4 premolar extractions

    OpenAIRE

    Janson, Guilherme; Araki, Janine; Estelita, S?rgio; Camardella, Leonardo T

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the occlusal stability of class II subdivision malocclusion treatment with 3 and 4 first premolar extractions. A sample of 156 dental casts from 52 patients with class II subdivision malocclusion was divided into two groups according to the extraction protocol. Group 1 comprised 24 patients treated with 3 premolar extractions and group 2 included 28 patients treated with 4 premolar extractions. Methods Peer assessment rating (PAR) indexes we...

  20. Morphology of the cemento-enamel junction in premolar teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arambawatta, Kapila; Peiris, Roshan; Nanayakkara, Deepthi

    2009-12-01

    The present study attempted to describe the distribution of the mineralized tissues that compose the cemento-enamel junction, with respect to both the different types of permanent premolars of males and females and the various surfaces of individual teeth. The cervical region of ground sections of 67 premolars that had been extracted for orthodontic reasons were analyzed using transmitted light microscopy to identify which of the following tissue interrelationships was present at the cemento-enamel junction: cementum overlapping enamel; enamel overlapping cementum; edge-to-edge relationship between cementum and enamel; or the presence of gaps between the enamel and cementum with exposed dentin. An edge-to-edge interrelation between root cementum and enamel was predominant (55.1%). In approximately one-third of the sample, gaps between cementum and enamel with exposed dentin were observed. Cementum overlapping enamel was less prevalent than previously reported, and enamel overlapping cementum was seen in a very small proportion of the sample. In any one tooth, the distribution of mineralized tissues at the cemento-enamel junction was irregular and unpredictable. The frequency of gaps between enamel and cementum with exposure of dentin was higher than previously reported, which suggests that this region is fragile and strongly predisposed to pathological changes. Hence, this region should be protected and carefully managed during routine clinical procedures such as dental bleaching, orthodontic treatment, and placement of restorative materials.

  1. Comparison of the changes of alveolar bone thickness in maxillary incisor area in extraction and non-extraction cases: computerized tomography evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Barroso Picanço

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare, through computed tomography, alveolar bone thickness changes at the maxillary incisors area during orthodontic treatment with and without tooth extraction. METHODS: Twelve patients were evaluated. They were divided into 2 groups: G1 - 6 patients treated with extraction of right and left maxillary first premolars, with mean initial age of 15.83 years and mean treatment length of 2.53 years; G2 - 6 patients treated without extraction, with mean initial age of 18.26 years and mean treatment length of 2.39 years. Computed tomographies, lateral cephalograms and periapical radiographs were used at the beginning of the treatment (T1 and 18 months after the treatment had started (T2. Extraction space closure occurred in the extraction cases. Intragroup and intergroup comparisons were performed by dependent and independent t test, respectively. RESULTS: In G1, the central incisor was retracted and uprighted, while in G2 this tooth showed vestibularization. Additionally, G1 presented a higher increase of labial alveolar bone thickness at the cervical third in comparison with G2. The incidence of root resorption did not present significant differences between groups. CONCLUSION: There were no changes in alveolar bone thickness when extraction and nonextraction cases were compared, except for the labial alveolar bone thickness at the cervical third of maxillary incisors.

  2. [Unerupted first deciduous molar located higher to the first premolar: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Y; Liu, H

    2017-02-18

    Tooth eruption is defined as the movement of a tooth from its site of development within the alveolar process to its functional position in the oral cavity. The process of tooth eruption can be divided into different phases: pre-eruptive bone stage, alveolar bone stage, mucosal stage, preocclusal stage, occlusal stage and maturation stage. Any disturbance in these phases can lead to eruptive anomalies. The incidence of unerupted teeth is usually higher among permanent teeth than among deciduous ones. Of the primary teeth reported as unerupted, second deciduous molars are the teeth most frequently involved, followed by primary central incisors. At present almost no coverage is seen about the impaction of the first deciduous molar. In this case, a 4-year-old boy who presented with an impacted left maxillary first deciduous molar came to the Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology. This tooth, located higher to the left maxillary first premolar, was well near to the maxillary sinus. The family and medical histories were noncontributory and his physical findings were within normal limits. The mother was reported as having experienced no illness or other complications and taken no medications during pregnancy. His clinical extraoral examination was noncontributory. His clinical intra-oral examination revealed that the maxillary left first primary molar was not present. No enlargement of the area was apparent visually or on palpation. The remaining primary dentition was well aligned and in good condition. His oral hygiene was good, although there were incipient occlusal carious lesions in the mandibular second primary molars. There was no history or evidence of dental trauma. A diagnosis of a left maxillary first deciduous molar was made on the basis of the clinical and radiographic evidence. Numerous local etiologic factors have been described for impacted teeth. These include anomalous teeth, malposition, fusion with

  3. Impacted permanent incisors associated with compound odontoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Cintia de Vasconcellos; Knop, Luégya Amorin Henriques; da Rocha, Maria Celina Barreiros Siquara; Telles, Paloma Dias da Silva

    2015-01-12

    Odontomas are the most common odontogenic tumours of the maxillary bones, characterised by a slow growth and benign behaviour. They are usually small, asymptomatic and diagnosed after routine radiographic examination. The aim of this study was to report a case of a compound odontoma in the anterior maxilla of a 7-year-old girl, which was causing the impaction of the maxillary right central and lateral incisors, as well as the prolonged retention of the corresponding primary teeth. We also aimed to review the literature about these tumours, since they are not part of the dentist's day-to-day clinical practice. The clinical and radiographic features, the diagnosis and treatment of the case were discussed in this work. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Pulpal reactions in rat incisors to Caridex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedenberg, C; Bornstein, R

    1990-12-01

    This study examined the in vivo effects of Caridex, a chemomechanical caries removal system, on rat pulpal tissue. Rat incisors were opened and the pulps exposed to Caridex or physiological saline and sealed with calcium hydroxide. After various time periods, teeth were extracted and examined by light microscopy. Histological evaluation revealed an almost identical response in both test and control teeth which consisted of a transient inflammatory reaction and a limited necrosis in adjacent pulp tissue. Within seven days, formation of hard tissue matrix was seen below the necrotic area and on pulpal walls. It was suggested that the high pH of Caridex may have contributed to the necrotizing effect of calcium hydroxide in adjacent pulp tissue and the formation of hard tissue matrix. Additionally, the solution is most probably bactericidal. The results suggest that the system can be used as a caries removal agent on humans without unfavourable side effects on the dental pulp.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of molar incisor hypomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathu-Muju, Kavita; Wright, J Timothy

    2006-11-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a relatively common condition that varies in clinical severity and can result in early loss of the permanent 6-year molars. The etiology of MIH remains unclear, and the diagnosis can be confused with more generalized enamel defects such as those that occur in amelogenesis imperfecta. The management of MIH depends largely on the severity of the enamel defect. Degrees of hypomineralization can range from mild enamel opacities to enamel that readily abrades from the tooth as it emerges into the oral cavity. Usually, severely affected molars are extremely hypersensitive, prone to rapid caries development, and can be difficult to manage in young patients. The purpose of this article is to review approaches to diagnosing and treating MIH.

  6. Amoxicillin may cause molar incisor hypomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laisi, S; Ess, A; Sahlberg, C; Arvio, P; Lukinmaa, P-L; Alaluusua, S

    2009-02-01

    The etiology of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is unclear. Our hypothesis was that certain antibiotics cause MIH. We examined 141 schoolchildren for MIH and, from their medical files, recorded the use of antibiotics under the age of 4 yrs. MIH was found in 16.3% of children. MIH was more common among those children who had taken, during the first year of life, amoxicillin (OR=2.06; 95% CI, 1.01-4.17) or the rarely prescribed erythromycin (OR=4.14; 95% CI, 1.05-16.4), compared with children who had not received treatment. Mouse E18 teeth were cultured for 10 days with/without amoxicillin at concentrations of 100 microg/mL-4 mg/mL. Amoxicillin increased enamel but not dentin thickness. An altered pattern of amelogenesis may have interfered with mineralization. We conclude that the early use of amoxicillin is among the causative factors of MIH.

  7. Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Roger K

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI is a complex disorder consisting of multiple, mainly midline defects of development resulting from unknown factor(s operating in utero about the 35th–38th day(s from conception. It is estimated to occur in 1:50,000 live births. Aetiology is uncertain. Missense mutation in the SHH gene (I111F at 7q36 may be associated with SMMCI. The SMMCI tooth differs from the normal central incisor, in that the crown form is symmetric; it develops and erupts precisely in the midline of the maxillary dental arch in both primary and permanent dentitions. Congenital nasal malformation (choanal atresia, midnasal stenosis or congenital pyriform aperture stenosis is positively associated with SMMCI. The presence of an SMMCI tooth can predict associated anomalies and in particular the serious anomaly holoprosencephaly. Common congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI are: severe to mild intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, cleft lip and/or palate and less frequently, microcephaly, hypopituitarism, hypotelorism, convergent strabismus, oesophageal and duodenal atresia, cervical hemivertebrae, cervical dermoid, hypothyroidism, scoliosis, absent kidney, micropenis and ambiguous genitalia. Short stature is present in half the children. Diagnosis should be made by eight months of age, but can be made at birth and even prenatally at 18–22 weeks from the routine mid-trimester ultrasound scan. Management depends upon the individual anomalies present. Choanal stenosis requires emergency surgical treatment. Short stature may require growth hormone therapy. SMMCI tooth itself is mainly an aesthetic problem, which is ideally managed by combined orthodontic, prosthodontic and oral surgical treatment; alternatively, it can be left untreated.

  8. STRATIFICATION TECHNIQUE IN MAXILLARY ANTERIOR INCISORS RESTORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Kirilova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Because of their main characteristics: transparency, opalescence and color density, the tooth structures are extremely difficult to restore by means of completely inconspicuous restorations of the natural tooth tissue characteristics. The aim is to show successful aesthetic restoration of III Class dental lesions in upper incisors by means of high quality composites. Materials and method: A female patient visited the clinic being not satisfied with the esthetics of her front teeth. The intraoral examination showed previous restorations and carious lesions in 12, 11, 21, 22. After defining the tooth color a silicone key was made. The treatment was performed under anesthesia, the existing restorations were removed and the carious lesions in teeth 11, 12, 21, 22 were treated with restorations using Vanini edge preparation. The teeth were restored by means of stratification technique. After etching and rinsing, bonding was applied for 20 sec. and then polymerized. After fixing the silicone key enamel shade was applied and then dentine shades UD2, UD3, UD4 of 0.5mm thickness each. The polymerization was done layer by layer. Applied were 10 to 15 layers in total. The composite material was preheated in oven up to 55. Teeth 21 and 22 are restored with Enamel Plus HRi (Micerium. Results and Discussion: Excellent aesthetics is achieved with composite material. They have enamel and dentine shades and allow high quality aesthetics. The polishing is excellent in Enamel Plus HRi (Micerium which is typical for this type of composite. The result of the carious lesion treatment in this patient is real improvement of the dental appearance of her anterior incisors. Conclusion: Materials show excellent aesthetic results due to their characteristics and the stratification technique used.

  9. Maxillary lateral incisor agenesis; a retrospective cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naji Ziad Arandi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to estimate the prevalence of congenitally missing lateral incisors in a sample of 2662 dental patients in Palestine. Methods: A total of 2662 digital panoramic radiographs were retrospectively examined for the presence of congenitally missing permanent lateral incisors. The radiographs were obtained from the archival records of patients attending a local dental center at the city of Nablus in Palestine. Results: The prevalence of missing lateral incisors among the examined population (n = 2662 was found to be 1.91%. Unilateral agenesis accounted for 66.6% of the total cases that showed at least one missing lateral incisor. Around 79% of the unilateral cases were on the left side while 21% were on the right side. Bilateral agenesis accounted for 33.3% of 34 cases that had at least one congenitally missing permanent maxillary lateral incisor. Conclusion: The prevalence of missing maxillary lateral incisors in this study population was 1.91% which was within the range reported in different populations. Keywords: Tooth agenesis, Permanent maxillary lateral incisors, Retrospective, Prevalence

  10. Assessment of periodontal status following the alignment of impacted permanent maxillary canine teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarmach, I J; Szarmach, J; Waszkiel, D; Paniczko, A

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of orthodontic movement of the impacted canines after surgical exposure and alignment on the periodontal status of the transpositioned and adjacent teeth as well as to compare certain parameters with those of spontaneously erupted teeth. Twenty-four patients (mean age 18.4 +/- 3.66) with unilaterally impacted 24 canines were enrolled in the study. The following parameters were assessed: pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), platelet index (PI) of Silness and Löe, and modified sulcus bleeding index (SBI). Optic density of the alveolar bone along the root surface of the aligned canine was analysed based on digital radiological images made with the right angle technique. Control group consisted of spontaneously erupted teeth. In comparison to the control group, in the orthodonticaly treated group PD was found to increase on the mesial buccal and palatal surfaces of the first premolar (p aligned canine (p aligned tooth were statistically significant (p alignment zone and the control, and there was no link between the method of treatment and periodontal status, either. The alignment of the impacted permanent maxillary canines poses a risk of periodontal deterioration. Patients subjected to surgical-orthodontic treatment require periodic periodontal follow-ups.

  11. Foreign body in a deciduous incisor: A radiological revelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehl G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A 6-year-old boy was brought to the dental department with a history of toothache in the anterior maxillary region. Intraoral examination revealed caries in the deciduous upper central and lateral incisor teeth. Radiological evaluation revealed the silhouette of a metallic paper clip in the pulp chamber of the deciduous right maxillary central incisor. The tooth was extracted as the permanent incisor was erupting below. Children often avoid informing their parents regarding such incidents due to fear of punishment.

  12. Fused upper central incisors: management of two clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfasciotti, Gian Luca; Marini, Roberta; Bossù, Maurizio; Ierardo, Gaetano; Annibali, Susanna

    2011-03-01

    This paper reports the management of two clinical cases, in which the upper right central incisor was fused with a supernumerary tooth and the upper left central incisor was macrodontic. A radiographic examination revealed that the fused teeth had two separate roots. Hemisectioning of the fused teeth was performed, the supernumerary portion was extracted and the remaining part was reshaped to remove any sharp margins and to achieve a normal morphology. The macrodontic central incisors were not treated. At 12-months post-surgery there were no periodontal problems and no hypersensitivity. Orthodontic treatment was performed to appropriately align the maxillary teeth and to correct the malocclusion.

  13. A tall rostral hook in a medieval horse premolar tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viranta, Suvi; Mannermaa, Kristiina

    2017-06-01

    Development of dental abnormalities due to improper occlusal wear is common among modern domestic horses. This phenomenon often is attributed to jaw conformation. Rostral mandibular hooks may develop in horses with underjet or mandibular prognathism, a condition where the lower jaw protrudes forward, beyond the upper jaw. Less abrasive diet, free of phytoliths and matrix-like plant fibers, also may promote enamel and focal overgrowths of equine dentition. Here we report a rostral mandibular hook in a lower premolar tooth of a medieval horse, found in a spring deposit in Levänluhta, Osthrobothnia, Finland. To our knowledge, this is the first such report from a medieval horse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fracture resistance of premolars with bonded class II amalgams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias de Souza, Grace Mendonça; Pereira, Gisele Damiana Silveira; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Santos; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars with MOD cavity preparation and simulated periodontal ligament. The teeth were restored with silver amalgam (G1), Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and silver amalgam (G2) and Panavia F and silver amalgam (G3). After restorations were made, the specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 24 hours at 100% humidity and submitted to the compression test in the Universal Testing Machine (Instron). The statistical analysis of the results (ANOVA and Tukey Test) revealed that the fracture resistance of group 2 (G2=105.720 kgF) was superior to those of groups 1 (G1=72.433 kgF) and 3 (G3=80.505 kgF) that did not differ between them.

  15. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faeze Foroughi-Parvar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania infantum is the obligatory intracellular parasite of mammalian macrophages and causes zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL. The presence of infected dogs as the main reservoir host of ZVL is regarded as the most important potential risk for human infection. Thus the prevention of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL is essential to stop the current increase of the Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis. Recently considerable advances in achieving protective immunization of dogs and several important attempts for achieving an effective vaccine against CVL lead to attracting the scientists trust in its important role for eradication of ZVL. This paper highlights the recent advances in vaccination against canine visceral leishmaniasis from 2007 until now.

  16. Gender differences in patterns of second premolar agenesis observed in 4,756 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenrad, Jacob Breum; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Kjær, Inger

    2013-12-01

    To elucidate intra- and inter-maxillary patterns of second premolar agenesis in the mandible and maxilla-including unilateral and/or bilateral occurrence and gender differences. The study comprised panoramic radiographs from 4,756 children with and without orthodontic treatment needs. All radiographs were screened twice. 251 individuals had agenesis of one or more mandibular and/or maxillary second premolars; 37 had agenesis of both mandibular and maxillary second premolars. Gender differences were analysed using χ² and Fisher's exact test. 193 individuals had agenesis of one or both mandibular second premolars, while 95 had agenesis of one or both maxillary second premolars. In females, agenesis of left and right second premolars was significantly associated in both the mandible and in maxilla (p agenesis occurred almost twice as frequently in females. Unilateral agenesis in the maxilla occurred almost twice as frequently in females. The probability of finding second premolar agenesis in the maxilla was significantly greater in females than in males (p = 0.03). A significant association was seen between agenesis of tooth 25 and 35 in females and males combined (p = 0.03) and in males alone (p = 0.01). No significance was found between agenesis of tooth 15 and 45 in either females or males. The study confirms some previous findings of second premolar agenesis and presents new observations on gender differences, especially concerning associations in agenesis occurrence within and between the jaws.

  17. Endodontic Treatment of a Mandibular Second Premolar with Three Roots and Three Canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonny Paul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex root canal system with atypical variations is a common finding among mandibular premolars. Endodontic treatment in these teeth may not be successful due to the failure to recognise and treat multiple canals. This paper presents endodontic treatment of a mandibular second premolar with three roots and three canals.

  18. A geometric morphometric analysis of hominin upper premolars. Shape variation and morphological integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Robles, Aida; Martinón-Torres, María; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Prado-Simón, Leyre; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2011-12-01

    This paper continues the series of articles initiated in 2006 that analyse hominin dental crown morphology by means of geometric morphometric techniques. The detailed study of both upper premolar occlusal morphologies in a comprehensive sample of hominin fossils, including those coming from the Gran Dolina-TD6 and Sima de los Huesos sites from Atapuerca, Spain, complement previous works on lower first and second premolars and upper first molars. A morphological gradient consisting of the change from asymmetric to symmetric upper premolars and a marked reduction of the lingual cusp in recent Homo species has been observed in both premolars. Although percentages of correct classification based on upper premolar morphologies are not very high, significant morphological differences between Neanderthals (and European middle Pleistocene fossils) and modern humans have been identified, especially in upper second premolars. The study of morphological integration between premolar morphologies reveals significant correlations that are weaker between upper premolars than between lower ones and significant correlations between antagonists. These results have important implications for understanding the genetic and functional factors underlying dental phenotypic variation and covariation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence of isolated maxillary lateral incisor agenesis in Syrian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbani, Tamouh; Abdullah, Nagham; Rsheadat, Yasser; Hassan, Mohamed Ibrahim Abu

    2017-01-01

    This research is designed to obtain a better understanding and provide more insight of this phenomenon through evaluating the prevalence of congenital absence of maxillary lateral incisors in a Syrian population. The method involved clinical examination of 8000 school children with an equal number of males and females (age range 12-15 years) to identify students only affected by bilateral or unilateral congenital absence of maxillary lateral incisors. Agenesis was determined based on radiological evidence. The results of this study showed that the prevalence of isolated maxillary lateral incisors agenesis was 1.15%. In the sample studied, 66.3% of the patients were female and 33.7% were male (p agenesis in a Syrian population is within the average range with regard to other populations. A significant familial component to the etiology of maxillary lateral incisors agenesis was found.

  20. [Indirect bonded prosthesis. Use of an impacted central incisor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaia, A M; Manfio, A P; Moraes, C J; Dutra, D A; Isaia, V G; Moncada, A C

    1990-01-01

    The authors presents a case about right central superior incisor impacted. After surgical remotion of the retain tooth, this was utilized like pontic in the confeccion of the indirect adhesive prosthesis for the patient.

  1. Post-traumatic impaction of maxillary incisors: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoloni, Valeria; Pavoni, Chiara; Mucedero, Manuela; Bollero, Patrizio; Laganà, Giuseppina; Cozza, Paola

    2013-01-01

    To provide clinicians with useful information for immediate diagnosis and management of impacted maxillary incisors due to trauma. We present a case of post-traumatic impaction of a central right maxillary incisor in a young patient. The treatment plan consisted in the interceptive management (surgical and orthodontic), the valuation of the necessary space to move the impacted tooth in the normal position and the biomechanical approach for anchorage, avoiding prosthetic/implants replacement. THE THERAPY OF AN IMPACTED MAXILLARY INCISOR DUE TO TRAUMA REQUIRES A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH: orthodontic, surgical, endodontic and periodontal considerations are essential for successful treatment. SURGICAL EXPOSURE AND ORTHODONTIC TRACTION IS THE TREATMENT MOST OFTEN USED IN CASE OF POSTTRAUMATIC IMPACTED INCISOR: this technique in fact can lead to suitable results at the periodontal, occlusal and esthetics levels at an early stage and more definitively than with other treatment options.

  2. Unusual anatomy of maxillary central incisor with two roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Ashwini Shivakumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Knowledge of root canal morphology is essential for successful endodontic therapy. Failure to recognize unusual root canal anatomy may lead to unsuccessful endodontic treatment. Case Report: This case report describes the successful endodontic treatment of the maxillary central incisor with unusual anatomy of two roots and two root canals. A 23-year-old male patient was referred for dental consultation with discoloration of the maxillary right central incisor with periapical lesion, which revealed unusual anatomy of root on radiographic examination, and was confirmed upon exploration. Discussion: As described by Vertucci, the maxillary central incisor presents a single root and single root canal in 100% of the cases. However, few cases of maxillary central incisors with two canals were reported in the literature, most of which were associated with developmental anomalies like fusion, germination or dens invaginatus. Clinician should be aware of the unusual anatomical variations that should be detected by the different diagnostic resources available.

  3. Comparative photoelastic study of dental and skeletal anchorages in the canine retraction

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    Cristiane Aparecida de Assis Claro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare dental and skeletal anchorages in mandibular canine retraction by means of a stress distribution analysis. METHODS: A photoelastic model was produced from second molar to canine, without the first premolar, and mandibular canine retraction was simulated by a rubber band tied to two types of anchorage: dental anchorage, in the first molar attached to adjacent teeth, and skeletal anchorage with a hook simulating the mini-implant. The forces were applied 10 times and observed in a circular polariscope. The stresses located in the mandibular canine were recorded in 7 regions. The Mann-Whitney test was employed to compare the stress in each region and between both anchorage systems. The stresses in the mandibular canine periradicular regions were compared by the Kruskal-Wallis test. RESULTS: Stresses were similar in the cervical region and the middle third. In the apical third, the stresses associated with skeletal anchorage were higher than the stresses associated with dental anchorage. The results of the Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the highest stresses were identified in the cervical-distal, apical-distal, and apex regions with the use of dental anchorage, and in the apical-distal, apical-mesial, cervical-distal, and apex regions with the use of skeletal anchorage. CONCLUSIONS: The use of skeletal anchorage in canine retraction caused greater stress in the apical third than the use of dental anchorage, which indicates an intrusive component resulting from the direction of the force due to the position of the mini-implant and the bracket hook of the canine.

  4. Comparative photoelastic study of dental and skeletal anchorages in the canine retraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claro, Cristiane Aparecida de Assis; Chagas, Rosana Villela; Neves, Ana Christina Elias Claro; da Silva-Concílio, Laís Regiane

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare dental and skeletal anchorages in mandibular canine retraction by means of a stress distribution analysis. Methods A photoelastic model was produced from second molar to canine, without the first premolar, and mandibular canine retraction was simulated by a rubber band tied to two types of anchorage: dental anchorage, in the first molar attached to adjacent teeth, and skeletal anchorage with a hook simulating the mini-implant. The forces were applied 10 times and observed in a circular polariscope. The stresses located in the mandibular canine were recorded in 7 regions. The Mann-Whitney test was employed to compare the stress in each region and between both anchorage systems. The stresses in the mandibular canine periradicular regions were compared by the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results Stresses were similar in the cervical region and the middle third. In the apical third, the stresses associated with skeletal anchorage were higher than the stresses associated with dental anchorage. The results of the Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the highest stresses were identified in the cervical-distal, apical-distal, and apex regions with the use of dental anchorage, and in the apical-distal, apical-mesial, cervical-distal, and apex regions with the use of skeletal anchorage. Conclusions The use of skeletal anchorage in canine retraction caused greater stress in the apical third than the use of dental anchorage, which indicates an intrusive component resulting from the direction of the force due to the position of the mini-implant and the bracket hook of the canine. PMID:24713566

  5. Diagnostic performance of increased overjet in Class II division 1 malocclusion and incisor trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Giuntini, Veronica; Vangelisti, Andrea; Darendeliler, M Ali; Franchi, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to evaluate the associations between an increased overjet (IO) and other dentoskeletal characteristics of Class II division 1 malocclusions in the mixed dentition; 2) to assess whether Class II division 1 malocclusions or rather an increased overjet per se is a risk factor for upper incisor trauma (UIT). A sample of 900 mixed dentition subjects, was observed by clinical inspection, analysis of dental casts, and lateral cephalograms. The diagnostic performance of IO (overjet ≥ 7 mm) was evaluated in relation to other Class II dentoskeletal features (Class II molar and canine relationships, and skeletal Class II relationships). Secondly, the diagnostic performance of IO and of the other Class II dentoskeletal components was tested with regard to the prevalence of UIT. Diagnostic performance was assessed by odds ratio and positive likelihood ratio. The diagnostic performance of IO with regard to the other dentoskeletal components of Class II malocclusions was not significant. The only Class II features associated significantly with an increased risk of UIT was IO. When used as an isolated occlusal feature, IO is not a valid diagnostic indicator for Class II division 1 malocclusions. An increased overjet per se, and not Class II malocclusions, appears to be a significant risk factor for UIT. These findings recommend discrimination between clinical conditions showing an isolated IO from comprehensive Class II malocclusions during diagnosis, analysis of treatment outcomes, and evaluation of the risk of upper incisor trauma. Copyright © 2010 Società Italiana di Ortodonzia SIDO. Published by Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  6. Orthodontic correction of severely rotated maxillary central incisor in a diabetic adult

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    Rajesh Gyawali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orthodontics has recently seen an increase in the number of adult population seeking treatment. Financial dependency, increasing awareness and availability of service can be the reasons behind this rise. Though, clinical myths regarding duration, effectiveness of treatment, associated systemic conditions still exist, these should be of no concern and with adequate monitoring and procedural modifications, conventional orthodontic treatment is possible.Case description: A 58 year old Type II diabetic male presented to orthodontic clinic with unesthetic gap between upper front teeth. The history revealed extraction of painful mesiodens. On examination, the patient had Class I molar, canine and incisor relationship. 21 was rotated with 5mm of space between central incisors. Fixed orthodontic treatment was planned after physician consultation regarding his diabetic condition. Bondable buccal tubes instead of bands were used in first molars, 0.022” Roth brackets were bonded on other maxillary teeth. The wire gradually progressed from 0.014”NiTi, 0.016”NiTi to 0.018”SS. Lingual button was attached on the labial and lingual surface of 21 to apply couple. After the correction of rotation of 21, remaining space closure with esthetic contouring of 21 was done. Maintenance of adequate oral hygiene was reinforced throughout the treatment period. Fixed lingual retainer was bonded and pericision performed to retain the achieved result.Conclusion: Orthodontic treatment can be carried out in diabetic adults with good glycemic control to achieve esthetic results; however, measures for maintenance of adequate oral hygiene should be undertaken. Interdisciplinary approach involving restorative procedures can enhance the esthetics achieved.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(3:30-34

  7. Hypomineralized Second Primary Molars as Predictor of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization

    OpenAIRE

    Negre-Barber, A.; Montiel-Company, J. M.; Boronat-Catal?, M.; Catal?-Pizarro, M.; Almerich-Silla, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect of dental enamel that shares features with hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPM). Prior to permanent tooth eruption, second primary molars could have predictive value for permanent molar and incisor hypomineralization. To assess this possible relationship, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 8 and 9 years from the INMA cohort in Valencia (Spain). A calibrated examiner (linear-weighted Ka...

  8. Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Sasani, F.; Javanbakht, J.; Samani, R.; Shirani, D.

    2014-01-01

    Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis (CCL) is a significant veterinary problem. Infected dogs also serve as parasite reservoirs and contribute to human transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Histologically, the lesions were nodular to diffuse interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with histiocytic pseudorosettes together with numerous amastigotes within macrophages and occasionally within the interstitium. Organisms were often contained within clear and intracellular vacuoles. The other inflammato...

  9. The incidence of the dens invaginatus in the maxillary incisors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hae Yun; Lee, Sang Rae

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to reveal a incidence of dens invaginatus in the maxillary incisor region. The material was 1671 sets of full mouth intraoral standard films, which was taken from the patients visiting for the routine check at the Infirmary of College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University. The following results were obtained; 1. The incidence of dens invaginatus was 14.90 and that of slightly dilated dens invaginatus was 9.46%. 2. The incidence of dens invaginatus showed no difference between male and female. 3. Most of the dens invaginatus occurred in the maxillary lateral incisors (93.53%) and a few in the maxillary central incisors (6.46%) showed slight invagination. 4. Among the cases with dens invaginatus, over a half (53.41%) showed bilateral occurrence. 5. Comparatively rate cases, i. e. bilateral dens invaginatus of the maxillary central incisors, unilateral double dens invaginatus of the maxillary lateral incisor, and bilateral dens invaginatus of the maxillary lateral incisors, one side double and one side single, were reported.

  10. The incidence of the dens invaginatus in the maxillary incisors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hae Yun; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Dental Radiology, Division of Dentistry, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-11-15

    The purpose of this survey was to reveal a incidence of dens invaginatus in the maxillary incisor region. The material was 1671 sets of full mouth intraoral standard films, which was taken from the patients visiting for the routine check at the Infirmary of College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University. The following results were obtained; 1. The incidence of dens invaginatus was 14.90 and that of slightly dilated dens invaginatus was 9.46%. 2. The incidence of dens invaginatus showed no difference between male and female. 3. Most of the dens invaginatus occurred in the maxillary lateral incisors (93.53%) and a few in the maxillary central incisors (6.46%) showed slight invagination. 4. Among the cases with dens invaginatus, over a half (53.41%) showed bilateral occurrence. 5. Comparatively rate cases, i. e. bilateral dens invaginatus of the maxillary central incisors, unilateral double dens invaginatus of the maxillary lateral incisor, and bilateral dens invaginatus of the maxillary lateral incisors, one side double and one side single, were reported.

  11. Root canal morphology and variations of mandibular premolars by clearing technique: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Vaishali; Shah, Nimisha; Joshi, Hardik

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare internal anatomy between first and second mandibular premolars and to study different percentage variations of root canal morphology of mandibular premolars in Gujarat population based on Vertucci's classification by clearing technique. A total of 80 extracted intact permanent mandibular premolars (40 each mandibular first premolar and mandibular second premolar) with fully formed apices were collected. Access cavity was prepared with endo access kit, all samples were placed in 2.5% sodium hypochlorite for 48 hours, after that all samples were washed in running water for 2 hours. After washing, all samples were transferred to 5% nitric acid, for decalcification, for 72 hours, with the acid being changed every 24 hours and stirred once every 8 hours. All samples were washed in running water and dehydrated using ascending grades (70%, 80%, 90% and 100%) of isopropyl alcohol for 2 days. Finally, they were rendered transparent by immersion in methyl salicylate for 15 minutes and then India ink dye was injected into the access cavity. The anatomy of the root canal was observed and classified based on the Vertucci's classification. Parametric Z-test was used to compare the variation between mandibular first and second premolars. In mandibular first premolar, type 1 was found in 20%, type 2 was 5%, type 3 was 5%, type 4 was 25%, type 5 was 12.5% and type 6 was 2.5% of total samples. Whereas, in mandibular second premolar, type 1 was found in 80% out of all samples, type 4 was 2.5%, type 5 was 17.5%. Type 2, type 3, type 6, type 7 and type 8 were not found in this study. Mandibular first premolar showed higher variation (75%) compared to mandibular second premolar (37.5%). The knowledge of variations in the root canal morphology of the mandibular premolars can enhance the level of endodontic treatment of mandibular premolars. Root canal morphology, Vertucci's classification, Clearing technique. How to cite this article: Parekh V, Shah N

  12. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global warming, coinfection with immunosuppressive diseases, and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL) in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China, and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases, and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost–effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine VL. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans and dogs against VL. PMID:22566950

  13. Vaccines for canine leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global warming, coinfection with immunosuppressive diseases, and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL) in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China, and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases, and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost-effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine VL. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans and dogs against VL.

  14. Vaccines for canine leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarisa B. Palatnik-De-Sousa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global-warming, co-infection with immunosuppressive diseases and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost-effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine visceral leishmaniasis. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans

  15. Deciduous molar hypomineralization and molar incisor hypomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfrink, M E C; ten Cate, J M; Jaddoe, V W V; Hofman, A; Moll, H A; Veerkamp, J S J

    2012-06-01

    This study was embedded in the Generation R Study, a population-based prospective cohort study from fetal life until young adulthood. This study focused on the relationship between Deciduous Molar Hypomineralization (DMH) and Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH). First permanent molars develop during a period similar to that of second primary molars, with possible comparable risk factors for hypomineralization. Children with DMH have a greater risk of developing MIH. Clinical photographs of clean, moist teeth were taken with an intra-oral camera in 6,161 children (49.8% girls; mean age 74.3 mos, SD ± 5.8). First permanent molars and second primary molars were scored with respect to DMH or MIH. The prevalence of DMH and MIH was 9.0% and 8.7% at child level, and 4.0% and 5.4% at tooth level. The Odds Ratio for MIH based on DMH was 4.4 (95% CI, 3.1-6.4). The relationship between the occurrence of DMH and MIH suggests a shared cause and indicates that, clinically, DMH can be used as a predictor for MIH.

  16. Onset of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagrell, Tobias G; Salmon, Phil; Melin, Lisa; Norén, Jörgen G

    2013-01-01

    The etiological factors and timing of the onset of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) are still not clear. The aim of this study was to examine ground radial and sagittal sections from teeth diagnosed with MIH using light microscopy, polarized light microscopy and X-ray micro-computed tomography (XMCT) and to estimate the onset and timing of the MIH and to relate the hypomineralized enamel to the incremental lines. Thirteen extracted permanent first molars diagnosed MIH, were analyzed with light microscopy and XMCT. The hypomineralized areas were mainly located in the mesio-buccal cusps, starting at the enamel-dentin-junction and continuing towards the enamel surface. In a relative gray scale analysis the values decreased from the EDJ towards the enamel surface. The findings indicate that the ameloblasts in the hypomineralized enamel are capable of forming an enamel of normal thickness, but with a substantial reduction of their capacity for maturation of enamel. Chronologically, it is estimated that the timing of the disturbance is at a period during the first 6-7 months of age.

  17. Mandibular premolars with unusual root canal configuration: A report of two cases

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    Sarah Abdulla Essa Al-Mahroos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the normal root canal morphology and its variation is essential to ensure a successful root canal therapy. The aim of this report is to describe the endodontic treatment of two mandibular premolars with aberrant root canal morphology with the aid of dental operating microscope. A 29-year-old Saudi male with three mandibular left premolars was referred by the Prosthodontic Department for endodontic evaluation prior to placement of final coronal restorations. The first premolar was diagnosed as having necrotic pulp while the third premolar was previously treated. Root canal treatment and nonsurgical root canal retreatment were performed for the first and third premolars, respectively. The first premolar had a C-shaped configuration and Vertucci′s Type V (1-2 canal system while the third premolar had Type III configuration (1-2-1. One year later, the teeth were asymptomatic with normal periapical tissues radiographically. Root canal aberrations may occur in any tooth type, and the clinicians should always assume the presence of these aberrations and use all the available tools to detect and manage them.

  18. Root Anatomy and Root Canal Configuration of Human Permanent Mandibular Premolars: A Systematic Review

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    Jojo Kottoor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mandibular premolars have been reported with complex anatomical aberrations, making them one of the most difficult teeth to manage endodontically. Methodology. An exhaustive search was undertaken to identify associated anatomic studies of mandibular premolars through MEDLINE/PubMed database using keywords, and a systematic review of the relevant articles was performed. Chi-square test with Yates correction was performed to assess the statistical significance of any anatomic variations between ethnicities and within populations of the same ethnicity. Documented case reports of variations in mandibular premolar anatomy were also identified and reviewed. Results. Thirty-six anatomic studies were analyzed which included 12,752 first premolars and nineteen studies assessing 6646 second premolars. A significant variation in the number of roots, root canals, and apical foramen was observed between Caucasian, Indian, Mongoloid, and Middle Eastern ethnicities.The most common anatomic variation was C-shaped canals in mandibular first premolars with highest incidence in Mongoloid populations (upto 24% while dens invaginatus was the most common developmental anomaly. Conclusions. A systematic review of mandibular premolars based on ethnicity and geographic clusters offered enhanced analysis of the prevalence of number of roots and canals, their canal configuration, and other related anatomy.

  19. Analysis of the golden proportion and width/height ratios of maxillary anterior dentition in patients with lateral incisor agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Núbia Pavesi; de-Marchi, Luciana Manzotti; Gribel, Bruno Frazão; Ubaldini, Adriana Lemos Mori; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-12-01

      The purpose of this study was to assess the presence of the golden proportion (GP) in the facial view tooth-to-tooth width proportion of the six maxillary anterior teeth and to evaluate the width/height (W/H) ratios of the incisors of patients with maxillary lateral incisor (LI) agenesis treated either with implants or orthodontically (by moving canines into the position of the laterals, recontouring them, and placing composite restorations over the repositioned teeth).   Forty-eight patients with LI agenesis were divided into four experimental groups: unilateral recontouring group (N = 10), bilateral recontouring group (BRG, N = 18), unilateral implant group (UIG, N = 10), bilateral implant group (N = 10), and a control group (CG, N = 25) of patients without agenesis. GP ratios were determined on patients' dental casts placed over Levin's grids, whereas W/H ratios were measured directly on the casts and a millimeter ruler to determine these distances. Statistical analysis was performed with Shapiro-Wilk, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, Friedman, and Wilcoxon tests (p agenesis, regardless of the method of treatment. The mean W/H ratios of the laterals ranged between 0.75 and 0.90.   Although the GP may be a useful diagnostic guide, it was not observed in the majority of esthetic outcomes of patients treated with maxillary LI agenesis in this study. The assessment of the golden proportion and width/height ratio of upper anterior teeth in patients with upper lateral incisor agenesis treated with either implants or tooth re-contouring may assist dentists and patients in deciding the best treatment option based on the peculiarities of each case. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Morfología de los conductos radiculares de premolares superiores e inferiores

    OpenAIRE

    Greco Machado, Y.; García Molina, J. A.; Lozano de Luaces, Vicente; Manzanares Céspedes, María Cristina

    2009-01-01

    El propósito de este estudio fue caracterizar la anatomía de los conductos radiculares de dientes premolares superiores e inferiores provenientes de pacientes españoles. Fueron seleccionados 200 dientes premolares permanentes sometidos a diafanización. Para el estudio de los conductos radiculares se empleó la clasificación de Vertucci. La incidencia de conducto tipo I (un conducto) para los primeros premolares superiores fue de 5.88%, mientras que un 88.22% presentó dos conductos (de tipo II ...

  1. Cone-beam computed tomography of bilateral radiculous maxillary first premolars

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ahmad Alenezi; Mohammad Abdullah Tarish; Saad Al-Nazhan

    2016-01-01

    A deep knowledge of the internal and external anatomy of various human teeth is a backbone for a successful outcome of endodontic therapy. Usually, maxillary first premolar tooth has two roots, buccal and palatal. Three-rooted maxillary first premolar is scarce. The clinician has to expect any variation in root canal system and use the best diagnostic tools to manage the cases. The aim of this case report was to illustrate bilateral three-rooted maxillary first premolars and to describe the e...

  2. Cone-beam computed tomography of bilateral radiculous maxillary first premolars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ahmad Alenezi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A deep knowledge of the internal and external anatomy of various human teeth is a backbone for a successful outcome of endodontic therapy. Usually, maxillary first premolar tooth has two roots, buccal and palatal. Three-rooted maxillary first premolar is scarce. The clinician has to expect any variation in root canal system and use the best diagnostic tools to manage the cases. The aim of this case report was to illustrate bilateral three-rooted maxillary first premolars and to describe the endodontic implication in preoperative assessment and during operative procedures.

  3. A complex odontoma of the anterior maxilla associated with an erupting canine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Ajay; Moghe, Swapnil; Gupta, Mithilesh K; Pathak, Abhishek

    2013-11-12

    Many developmental anomalies of the jaw are accidentally diagnosed during radiographic investigations for other symptoms. Complex odontomas are odontogenic tumours, relatively rare in the anterior maxilla and generally asymptomatic. Frequently the odontoma may interfere with the eruption of teeth. This paper describes a case of complex odontoma in an 8-year-old girl, which resulted in the palatal displacement of the lateral incisor and an erupting permanent canine. A calcified mass was seen on the radiograph and was provisionally diagnosed as an odontoma which was surgically enucleated. Routine follow-up was carried out for more than 1 year and no recurrence was seen.

  4. Apexification of nonvital immature mandibular premolars using two different techniques

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    Ping-Han Wen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this report was to present two cases of mandibular premolars with necrotic pulp and open apices treated with two different techniques. The first case was a 20-year-old female whose teeth 35 and 45 were diagnosed with pulpal necrosis and chronic apical periodontitis, possibly resulting from dens evaginatus. Traditional apexification with Ca(OH2 was chosen; however, teeth 35 and 45 fractured after 2 and 9 months, respectively. The second case was an 11-year-old boy whose tooth 45 was diagnosed with necrotic pulp and a chronic apical abscess, possibly resulting from dens evaginatus. The mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA barrier technique was performed after short-term Ca(OH2 dressing, and the remaining space of the canal was filled with light-cured composite resin. The tooth remained healthy and functional at 1-year follow-up. The apical barrier technique using MTA has the advantages of a reduced treatment time, lower chance of tooth fracture, and fewer visits to the dental office. This report demonstrates that the MTA barrier technique followed by light-cured composite resin filling can be a good alternative treatment to traditional apexification.

  5. Evaluating the Amount of Tooth Movement and Root Resorption during Canine Retraction with Friction versus Frictionless Mechanics Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhlouf, Mohamed; Aboul-Ezz, Amr; Fayed, Mona Salah; Hafez, Hend

    2018-02-15

    The current study was carried out to compare the amount of tooth movement during canine retraction comparing two different retraction mechanics; friction mechanics represented by a NiTi closed coil spring versus frictionless mechanics represented by T - loop, and their effect on root resorption using Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). Ten patients were selected in a split-mouth study design that had a malocclusion that necessitates the extraction of maxillary first premolars and retraction of maxillary canines. The right maxillary canines were retracted using T - loops fabricated from 0.017 X 0.025 TMA wires. The left maxillary canines received NiTi coil spring with 150 gm of retraction force. Pre retraction and post retraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography were taken to evaluate the amount of tooth movement and root resorption using three-dimensional planes. T - loop side showed statistically significant higher mean anteroposterior measurement than NiTi coil spring side, indicating a lower amount of canine movement pre and post a canine retraction. Concerning the root resorption, there was no statistically significant change in the mean measurements of canine root length post retraction. The NiTi coil spring side showed more distal movement more than the T-loop side. Both retraction mechanics with controlled retraction force, do not cause root resorption.

  6. Evaluating the Amount of Tooth Movement and Root Resorption during Canine Retraction with Friction versus Frictionless Mechanics Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhlouf, Mohamed; Aboul–Ezz, Amr; Fayed, Mona Salah; Hafez, Hend

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current study was carried out to compare the amount of tooth movement during canine retraction comparing two different retraction mechanics; friction mechanics represented by a NiTi closed coil spring versus frictionless mechanics represented by T - loop, and their effect on root resorption using Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). METHOD: Ten patients were selected in a split-mouth study design that had a malocclusion that necessitates the extraction of maxillary first premolars and retraction of maxillary canines. The right maxillary canines were retracted using T - loops fabricated from 0.017 X 0.025 TMA wires. The left maxillary canines received NiTi coil spring with 150 gm of retraction force. Pre retraction and post retraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography were taken to evaluate the amount of tooth movement and root resorption using three-dimensional planes. RESULTS: T - loop side showed statistically significant higher mean anteroposterior measurement than NiTi coil spring side, indicating a lower amount of canine movement pre and post a canine retraction. Concerning the root resorption, there was no statistically significant change in the mean measurements of canine root length post retraction. CONCLUSION: The NiTi coil spring side showed more distal movement more than the T-loop side. Both retraction mechanics with controlled retraction force, do not cause root resorption. PMID:29531610

  7. Global burden of molar incisor hypomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendicke, Falk; Elhennawy, Karim; Reda, Seif; Bekes, Katrin; Manton, David J; Krois, Joachim

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to systematically review and meta-analyze the global, super-regional, regional and national prevalence of molar-incisor-hypomineralization (MIH) and to determine the numbers of prevalent and incident cases on different spatial scales. The review was registered (PROSPERO CRD42017063842). Five electronic databases (Medline, EMBASE, LILACS, Web of Science, Google Scholar) were searched systematically. Observational studies on the prevalence of MIH were included and the prevalence on different spatial scales (global, super-regional, regional, national) synthesized using random-effects meta-analyses. The prevalence was then regressed on a large set of methodological, socioeconomic and environmental variables to estimate the global burden (incident and prevalent cases) of MIH. Of 2239 identified studies, 99 studies on 113,144 participants from 43 countries were included. The meta-analysis yielded a mean (95% CI) prevalence of 13.1% (11.8-14.5%), with significant differences between super-regions, regions and countries. The number of prevalent cases in 2015 was estimated at 878 (791-971) million people, while the number of incident cases in 2016 was 17.5 (15.8-19.4) million. Of these, 27.4% (23.5-31.7%) (in mean, 240 million prevalent and 4.8 million incident cases, respectively) were or will be in need of therapy due to pain, hypersensitivity or posteruptive breakdown. Heavily populated countries contribute significantly to the burden of prevalent cases, while growing countries like India, but also Pakistan or Indonesia rank first with respect to the number of incident cases. MIH is highly prevalent across the globe. Certain (mainly low- and middle income) countries shoulder the majority of this burden. Clinical significance The consistently high prevalence and the large proportion of cases in need of care should be considered by both clinicians in their daily practice and healthcare planners and policy makers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. American canine hepatozoonosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panciera, R J; Ewing, S A

    2003-06-01

    American canine hepatozoonosis is an emerging, tick-transmitted infection of domestic dogs caused by a recently recognized species of apicomplexan parasite, Hepatozoon americanum. The known definitive host of the protozoan is the Gulf Coast tick, Amblyomma maculatum. Presently recognized intermediate hosts include the domestic dog and the coyote, Canis latrans. Laboratory-reared larval or nymphal A. maculatum can be infected readily by feeding to repletion on a parasitemic intermediate host; sporogony requires 35-40 days. Transmission of infection to the dog has been produced experimentally by oral administration of mature oocysts or oocyst-containing ticks. Canine disease follows experimental exposure in 4-6 weeks and is characterized by systemic illness, extreme neutrophilic leukocytosis, muscle and bone pain, and proliferation of periosteal bone. Histopathological findings include multifocal skeletal and cardiac myositis associated with escape of mature merozoites from within the host-cell environment. There is also rapid onset of periosteal activation and osteogenesis and, less frequently, glomerulopathy and amyloidosis. Sequential stages of development of H. americanum in both the dog and the tick have been elucidated. Gamonts potentially infectious to ticks have been observed in peripheral blood leukocytes of the dog in as few as 28 days after exposure to oocysts. Young coyotes experimentally exposed to a canine strain of H. americanum acquired disease indistinguishable from that of similarly exposed young dogs.

  9. The radiographic localization of unerupted maxillary incisors and supernumeraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Duk; Lee, Chang Yul; You, Choong Hyun

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the use of the vertical tube shift from a panoramic film and a periapical film to localize unerupted maxillary incisors and supernumeraries. The total of 103 displaced maxillary incisors or embedded supernumeraries were examined in this study. The vertical tube shift technique with panoramic and periapical radiography by normal projection taken and compared to localize the position of the embedded maxillary incisors or supernumeraries by a radiologist and 5 general dentists. The gold standard used for the radiographic comparisons was the true position of the embedded tooth as confirmed by horizontal tube shift technique using three periapical radiographs. The general dentist examiners were instructed on the use of the modified acronym 'SLDOBU' by the radiologist as it pertains to panoramic radiographs as the principle of vertical tube shift. All of the embedded maxillary incisors and supernumeraries were successfully located using the vertical tube shift from a panoramic and a maxillary anterior periapical radiograph by the radiologist and 5 general dentists. The use of a panoramic film with a periapical film combination for a vertical tube shift can be useful to localize unerupted maxillary incisors and supernumeraries.

  10. The radiographic localization of unerupted maxillary incisors and supernumeraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Duk; Lee, Chang Yul; You, Choong Hyun [Chosun University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    To evaluate the use of the vertical tube shift from a panoramic film and a periapical film to localize unerupted maxillary incisors and supernumeraries. The total of 103 displaced maxillary incisors or embedded supernumeraries were examined in this study. The vertical tube shift technique with panoramic and periapical radiography by normal projection taken and compared to localize the position of the embedded maxillary incisors or supernumeraries by a radiologist and 5 general dentists. The gold standard used for the radiographic comparisons was the true position of the embedded tooth as confirmed by horizontal tube shift technique using three periapical radiographs. The general dentist examiners were instructed on the use of the modified acronym 'SLDOBU' by the radiologist as it pertains to panoramic radiographs as the principle of vertical tube shift. All of the embedded maxillary incisors and supernumeraries were successfully located using the vertical tube shift from a panoramic and a maxillary anterior periapical radiograph by the radiologist and 5 general dentists. The use of a panoramic film with a periapical film combination for a vertical tube shift can be useful to localize unerupted maxillary incisors and supernumeraries.

  11. Molar-incisor hypomineralization: Therapeutic challenge to paediatric dentistry practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojković Branislava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Molar incisor hypomineralization indicates the appearance of enamel hypomineralization of systemic origin which occurs in 1-4 first permanent molars, which is often accompanied by changes on permanent incisors. Variations in clinical manifestation, together with commonly present asymmetry, are the reason for large variations in the needs for therapeutic treatment of these structural enamel defects. Case study: Two patients with diagnosed molar incisor hypomineralization are shown. The first patient, a six-year-old girl, with diagnosed mild clinical form, visited the dentist immediately after the eruption of the first permanent molars. Early diagnosis and timely application of preventive-profilactic measures, together with mild clinical form, are the reason for prevention of dental caries and further spreading of posteruptive enamel breakdown on affected first molars. Unlike the first one, the second patient, a 7,5-year-old girl had the diagnosis of moderate molar incisor hypomineralization. She developed dental caries on tooth 46 as well as complication in dental caries on tooth 36 which was extracted soon after the eruption. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and the severity of clinical appearance are the most important factors which determine therapeutic outcome of the treatment of molar incisor hypomineralization.

  12. Increased Occurrence of Dental Anomalies Associated with Second-Premolar Agenesis

    OpenAIRE

    GARIB, Daniela G.; PECK, Sheldon; GOMES, Simone Carinhena

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of dental anomalies in patients with agenesis of second premolars and compare the findings with the prevalence of these anomalies in the general population. Materials and Methods: A Brazilian sample of 203 patients aged 8 to 22 years was selected. All patients presented agenesis of at least one second premolar. Panoramic and periapical radiographs and dental casts were used to analyze the presence of other associated dental anomalies, including agenesis o...

  13. An Unusual Case of Bilateral Maxillary and Mandibular Para Premolar: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar VC

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of supernumerary teeth is not uncommon in the general population. They occur more frequently in patients with a family history of such teeth but it is rare to find multiple supernumeraries in individuals with no other associated disease or syndrome. There have been very few documented cases of bilateral maxillary and mandibular supernumeraries in premolar region. A 35 year-old male with unusually six Para premolars and complete dentition is presented.

  14. Root canal treatment of three-rooted mandibular second premolar using cone-beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ahmad Alenezi; Mohammad Abdullah Tarish; Deena J Alenezi

    2015-01-01

    A careful knowledge of root canals anatomy of different teeth is a corner stone for a successful outcome of root canal therapy. This reported case illustrates root canal therapy of a mandibular second premolar with three separated roots and root canals. An 18-year-old Saudi male presented for non-surgical endodontic treatment of mandibular right second premolar. Radiographic and clinical examinations revealed the presence of three roots and three root canals. The case was successfully managed...

  15. Frequency of two canals in maxillary second premolar tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Khurram P; Khokhar, Nadeem H; Siddiqui, M Irfanullah

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency of two canals in relation to age and gender as well as role of shift cone angle radiographic technique in maxillary second premolar tooth. A cross-sectional study. The study was conducted in Operative Department (Endodontic Department), Hamdard University Dental Hospital, Karachi, from January 2004 to February 2005. One hundred and twenty patients were selected for the study, based on non-probability purposive sampling technique. Twenty patients were dropped out of the study and the data was analyzed for 100 patients. All patients were examined clinically as well as radiographically. Then the canals were opened to further confirm and treat the tooth. The findings were noted on a performa and then cross-tabbed for the significant difference. One hundred patients {43 males (43%) and 57 females (57%)} whose mean age was 36.2 (SD +/- 7.3} were treated. Forty (40) years was the age limit for dividing the patients into two groups. Out of 43 males, 27 (63%) were below 40 years and out of 57 females, 38 (67%) were below 40 years. Statistical analysis with Chi-square revealed no significant difference. Out of 43 males, 27 (63%) had two canals and out of 57 females, 30 (53%) had two canals with no significant difference between the two groups. Results of parallel X-ray were cross tabbed with shift cone angle technique and the difference was highly significant (Chi-square value 9.61 and p-value 0.002). Frequency of two canals was high is not age or gender dependant. Shift cone angle technique should be used as radiographic support for the clinical examination to identify the number of canals. The second canal became apparent with shift cone technique in 78% cases where additional periapical radiographs with shift cone angle technique were taken.

  16. Root canal treatment of mandibular second premolar tooth with taurodontism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujašković Mirjana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Taurodontism is a morphoanatomical change in the shape of a tooth. An enlarged body of a tooth with smaller than usual roots is a characteristic feature. Internal tooth anatomy correlates with this appearance, which means that a taurodontal tooth has a large pulp chamber and apically positioned furcations. This dental anomaly may be associated with different syndromes and congenital discoders. CASE OUTLINE The case report presents the patient of a rare case of taurodontism in the mandibular second premolar with chronic periodontitis. Endodontic treatment was performed after dental history and clinical examination. Special care is required in all segments of endodontic treatment of a taurodontal tooth from the identification orifice, canal exploration, determining working length, cleaning and shaping and obturation of the root canal. Precurved K-file was used for canal exploration and location of the furcation. One mesial and one distal canal with the buccal position were identified in the apical third of the root canal. The working lengths of two canals were determined by radiographic interpretation with two K-files in each canal and verified with the apex locator. During canal instrumentation, the third canal was located in the disto-lingual position. The working length of the third canal was established using the apex locator. CONCLUSION Thorough knowledge of tooth anatomy and its variations can lead to lower percentage of endodontic failure. Each clinical case involving these teeth should be investigated carefully, clinically and radiographically to detect additional root canals. High quality radiographs from different angles and proper instrumentarium improve the quality of endodontic procedure.

  17. Orthodontic Treatment of a Mandibular Incisor Extraction Case with Invisalign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid H. Zawawi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular incisor extraction for orthodontic treatment is considered an unusual treatment option because of the limited number of patients that meet the criteria for such treatment. Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning is essential to achieve the desired results. Adult orthodontic patients are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations and reject the idea of conventional fixed appliances. In recent years, Invisalign appliances have gained tremendous attention for orthodontic treatment of adult patients to meet their esthetic demands. In this case report, a case of Class I malocclusion was treated with mandibular incisor extraction using the Invisalign appliance system. Successful tooth alignment of both arches was achieved. The use of Invisalign appliance is an effective treatment option in adult patients with Class I malocclusion that requires incisor extraction due to moderate to severe mandibular anterior crowding.

  18. Orthodontic treatment of a mandibular incisor extraction case with invisalign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, Khalid H

    2014-01-01

    Mandibular incisor extraction for orthodontic treatment is considered an unusual treatment option because of the limited number of patients that meet the criteria for such treatment. Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning is essential to achieve the desired results. Adult orthodontic patients are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations and reject the idea of conventional fixed appliances. In recent years, Invisalign appliances have gained tremendous attention for orthodontic treatment of adult patients to meet their esthetic demands. In this case report, a case of Class I malocclusion was treated with mandibular incisor extraction using the Invisalign appliance system. Successful tooth alignment of both arches was achieved. The use of Invisalign appliance is an effective treatment option in adult patients with Class I malocclusion that requires incisor extraction due to moderate to severe mandibular anterior crowding.

  19. Orthodontic management of impacted central incisor: A clinical challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Khera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple treatment options are available for patients who have impacted incisor. This paper shows a case in which orthodontic as well as surgical considerations in 10-year-old female child were presented in the management of impacted central incisor. The orthodontic treatment plan included three steps – creation of space, exposure of crown, and forced eruption. A unique and innovative technique for orthodontic traction (0.017 × 0.025 TMA wire with palatal extension was employed to move the maxillary incisor into arch, with minimum injury to neighboring soft tissue. After the successful management of impacted teeth, it is very important to periodically review the periodontal condition and stability.

  20. Esthetic periodontal surgery for impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Ju; Lin, Yi-Chun; Kaung, Shou-Shin; Yang, Shue-Fen; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin

    2012-10-01

    Clinicians do not frequently see impacted dilacerated maxillary incisors in their patients. When they do, there are several diagnostic and management challenges for correcting root dilacerations. An unfavorable esthetic outcome might occur as a result of soft-tissue complications during surgical eruption procedures. We present 2 patients with an impacted and dilacerated maxillary central incisor. Computed tomography scans with 3-dimensional reformation were used to accurately assess the positions of the dilacerated teeth, the degree of dilaceration, and the stage of root formation. The therapy primarily involved 2-stage crown exposure surgery combined with orthodontic traction. An apicoectomy was performed on 1 dilacerated tooth; the other exhibited pulp vitality. This article highlights the periodontal surgical strategies for the esthetic management of inverted crowns. Through periodontal plastic surgery and interdisciplinary cooperation, the impacted dilacerated central incisors were properly aligned, and successful esthetic results were achieved. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Multidisciplinary treatment of a fractured maxillary central incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kumar Neela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subgingivally fractured incisors are still a challenge to treat. Restoration of severely damaged teeth requires careful attention and comprehensive preplanned treatment. Here, a patient who had traumatic injury to the upper left central incisor which led to an oblique fracture involving enamel, dental and extending into the root below the gingival margin was saved from extraction by accelerated forced eruption of a root portion, allowing placement of crown, and eliminating the need for a fixed partial denture. A tooth otherwise would have gone for extraction routinely was thus saved and restored through a multidisciplinary approach by a combined orthodontic, periodontal and endodontic treatment.

  2. A new approach to incisor retention--the lingual spur retainer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, T G

    1996-08-01

    Late lower incisor crowding and incisor rotations remain a problem in orthodontics. We describe a new fixed retainer which is simple to use, allows physiological tooth movement, but prevents rotational and labio-lingual relapse.

  3. Comparison of the dental anomaly frequency in patients with and without mandibular second premolar agenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Cantekin

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Tooth agenesis, microdontia of maxillary lateral incisor, and taurodontism are frequently associated with agenesis of MP2 as compared with a well matched control group and different populations.

  4. Shovel-shaped incisors in the Black Sea region population of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Murat Canger

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The incidence of shovel-shaped incisors was 10.1% in our study group; SSI affected lateral incisors more than central incisors; the number of women reflecting SSI was higher than men; and the majority of individuals had Type II (semi-shovel severity.

  5. Concomitant hypohyperdontia: simultaneous occurrence of a mesiodens and agenesis of a maxillary lateral incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, J J; Jiménez-Rubio, A

    1998-10-01

    A 13-year-old boy appeared for evaluation with a missing maxillary left lateral incisor. He also had an abnormally shaped tooth in the midline between his maxillary central incisors. This mesiodens had an incompletely developed root. The unusual association of these 2 anomalies is discussed as a possible transposition of the lateral incisor to the mesiodens position.

  6. Mini-screw implant or transpalatal arch-mediated anchorage reinforcement during canine retraction: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mohit; Sharma, Vineet; Khanna, Bharat

    2012-06-01

    To compare mesial movement of upper first molars during maxillary canine retraction using a pre-adjusted edgewise appliance provided by anchorage reinforcement and a transpalatal arch or mini-screw implant. Randomized clinical trial. Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune, India. From a cohort of subjects requiring the extraction of both upper first premolars and pre-adjusted edgewise appliances to correct their malocclusion, a total of 30 were randomly allocated to receive two different forms of anchorage reinforcement: group A--receiving mini-screw implant and group B--receiving a transpalatal arch Group A subjects received titanium mini-screw implants placed at the start of treatment between the maxillary second premolar and maxillary first molar. Maxillary second premolars were secured to the mini-screw implants using of 0.010-inch stainless steel ligature wire. Group B subjects received a custom-made transpalatal arch which was soldered to maxillary first molar bands. Active canine retraction was initiated in both groups on placement of a 0.019×0.025-inch stainless steel archwire using nickel titanium closed coil springs. Mesial movement of the upper first molars as measured on pre- (T1) and post-treatment (T2) lateral skull radiographs. The results showed that in group A the mean mesial movement of the first molars between T1 and T2 was 0.0 mm (SD 0.02; P = 0.90), whereas in Group B there was a mean forward movement of the first maolars of 2.48 mm (SD 0.71; Pimplants placed prior to levelling and aligning were able to provide absolute anchorage during maxillary canine retraction, in contrast to a transpalatal arch.

  7. Surgical orthodontic treatment of an impacted canine in the presence of dens invaginatus and follicular cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallarossa, Marialuce; Canevello, Carola; Silvestrini Biavati, Francesca; Laffi, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. "Dens invaginatus" is a dental anomaly which originates from the invagination of the ameloblastic epithelium into the lingual surface of the dental crown during the odontogenesis. It can cause early pulpal necrosis, abscesses, retention or dislocation of contiguous elements, cysts, and internal resorptions. It normally affects the upper lateral incisors. In the following study the authors will discuss the etiology, the physiopathology, and the surgical-orthodontic management of a rare case of impacted canine associated with dens invaginatus and follicular cyst, with the aim of highlighting the importance of taking any therapeutic decision based on the data available in the literature. Case Report. The present study describes a combined surgical-orthodontic treatment of an impacted canine associated with a lateral incisor (2.2) suffering from type III dens invaginatus with radicular cyst, in a 15-year-old patient. Discussion. When treating a dens invaginatus there are different therapeutic solutions: they depend on the gravity of the anomaly and on the association with the retention of a permanent tooth. The aesthetic and functional restoration becomes extremely important when performing a surgical-orthodontic repositioning.

  8. Elastic Band Causing Exfoliation of the Upper Permanent Central Incisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Ghislaine Oliveira Alves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study reports a case in which elastic band use culminated in the loss of the incisors. Case Report. An 11-year-old white girl was seen complaining of pain, with purulent discharge and severe tooth mobility. The bone destruction detected radiographically in the region, despite its single location and absence in posterior quadrants of the maxilla and/or mandible, was similar to that observed in Langerhans cell disease. To our surprise, an elastic band involving the midportion of the roots of the two upper central incisors was found during biopsy. The debris was removed and a metal wire was placed in permanent maxillary right and left incisors. The patient was followed up, but no improvement in tooth mobility was observed. Bone loss increased, and internal resorption and root exposure occurred, which culminated in the extraction of permanent maxillary right and left incisors. Conclusion. The present case highlights the fact that professionals sometimes are confronted by anamnestic reports never seen before.

  9. Maxillary arch and combined incisor dimensions of Urhobos in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The combined mesiodistal crown widths of the four maxillary permanent incisors, interpremolar and intermolar arch widths of the maxillary arch of one hundred study models (50 males and 50 females) were measured with digital Vernier Caliper. There were statistically significant gender differences in the combined ...

  10. Treatment of unerupted maxillary incisors — a case report | Umweni ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of unerupted maxillary left central incisor due to impedance from an odontome is presented. The problems associated with various modalities of management are highlighted in the light of current practical possibilities to achieve good aesthetics. Surgical removal of the impeding pathologic agent and orthodontic ...

  11. Factors associated with molar incisor hypomineralization in Thai children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitiphat, Waranuch; Luangchaichaweng, Sarunporn; Pungchanchaikul, Patimaporn; Angwaravong, Onauma; Chansamak, Nusara

    2014-08-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a qualitative developmental enamel defect that affects one to four permanent first molars, with or without involvement of permanent incisors. Its etiology is of systemic origin, but is not well understood. Therefore, we conducted this cross-sectional study to examine pre-, peri-, and postnatal risk factors for MIH among children, 7-8 yr of age, in urban areas of Khon Kaen, Thailand. Molar incisor hypomineralization defects were diagnosed using the European Academy of Pediatric Dentistry criteria. Mothers or primary caregivers were interviewed on maternal medical history and habits during pregnancy, pregnancy and delivery complications, and the child's medical history. Molar incisor hypomineralization defects were observed in 78 (27.7%) of 282 children. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed a statistically significant association between the development of MIH and Cesarean section (adjusted OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.1-3.7), complications during vaginal delivery (adjusted OR = 4.5, 95% CI = 1.9-11.0), and severe/chronic illness when under 3 yr of age (adjusted OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.6-5.0). There was no association of preterm birth and low birth weight with MIH. The results suggest that Cesarean section, complications during vaginal delivery, and poor health during the first 3 yr of life are independent risk factors for MIH. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  12. Prevalence Of Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation In Six To Eight Year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) and any associated causes of MIH in children from two rural divisions in Kenya. Design: Prospective cross-sectional study. Setting: Seventeen primary schools in Matungulu and Kangundo divisions of Machakos district in Kenya. Subjects: All ...

  13. Orthodontic management of an impacted maxillary central incisor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The orthodontic management of an impacted maxillary central incisor with a talon cusp and dilacerated root in a 23-year-old female is reported. The patient presented complaining of an inability to smile because of the irregular arrangement of her front teeth. An oral examination revealed absence of the maxillary right ...

  14. Immediate maxillary lateral incisor implants with nonocclusal loading provisional crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñarrocha, Miguel; Lamas, Joana; Peñarrocha, Maria; Garcia, Berta

    2008-01-01

    This clinical report series describes a treatment modality involving immediately placed dental implants in maxillary lateral incisor sites using noncemented immediate provisional crowns retained with calcinable copings (prosthetic complement used in preparing the metal for the definitive prosthesis). Ten implants were placed in eight patients for the replacement of maxillary lateral incisors: two immediate and eight corresponding to cases of agenesis. All were subjected to immediate rehabilitation with provisional acrylic resin crowns in nonocclusal loading. One implant failed 3 weeks after placement due to acute local trauma. The other nine remained functional within the mouth, with normal clinical and radiological characteristics after a minimum of 12-month follow-up. Immediate placement of implant fixed provisional restorations retained by friction in maxillary lateral incisors offers an esthetic solution, eliminates the need for a removable provisional restoration, and avoids implant failures associated with excess cement or screw loosening. Moreover, in the case of extractions, immediate placement and provisionalization of implants in maxillary lateral incisors can effectively optimize the peri-implant esthetic results by maintaining the existing hard and soft tissue architecture of the replaced tooth. As no cement or screws are required, and the provisional crowns are placed in nonocclusal loading, the risk of complications is minimized.

  15. Eruption of primary Incisors: prevalence of sequence reversal and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result: Nine (3.1 %) out of the 290 children assessed erupted the maxillary Incisors ahead of the mandibular counterparts and their mothers allowed the teeth to erupt normally. One hundred and fifty-seven (54.1 %) of the mothers agreed that the tooth should be allowed to grow normally as part of the series of the primary ...

  16. A Review Of 39 Cases Of Unerupted Maxillary Incisors | Sanu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of isolated odontomes was the most common cause of lack of eruption of the maxillary incisors with a prevalence of 20.5%. Other factors causing delayed eruption were odontomes with retained primary tooth (15.4%), presence of supernumerary teeth of especially the mesiodens type (15.4%), retained primary ...

  17. Lower molar and incisor displacement associated with mandibular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Bravo, L A; Ben-Bassat, Y; Curry, S; Korn, E L

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the amount of alveolar modeling at the apices of the mandibular incisor and first molar specifically associated with appositional and resorptive changes on the lower border of the mandible during growth and treatment. Cephalometric data from superimpositions on anterior cranial base, mandibular implants of the Björk type, and anatomical "best fit" of mandibular border structures were integrated using a recently developed strategy, which is described. Data were available at annual intervals between 8.5 and 15.5 years for a previously described sample of approximately 30 children with implants. The average magnitudes of the changes at the root apices of the mandibular first molar and central incisor associated with modeling/remodeling of the mandibular border and symphysis were unexpectedly small. At the molar apex, mean values approximated zero in both anteroposterior and vertical directions. At the incisor apex, mean values approximated zero in the anteroposterior direction and averaged less than 0.15 mm/year in the vertical direction. Standard deviations were roughly equal for the molar and the incisor in both the anteroposterior and vertical directions. Dental displacement associated with surface modeling plays a smaller role in final tooth position in the mandible than in the maxilla. It may also be reasonably inferred that anatomical best-fit superimpositions made in the absence of implants give a more complete picture of hard tissue turnover in the mandible than they do in the maxilla.

  18. Dentoskeletal features associated with unilateral or bilateral palatal displacement of maxillary canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacerdoti, Raffaele; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2004-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the prevalence and distribution of palatally displaced maxillary canines (PDC) in a large orthodontic population, and to investigate the associations between PDC, craniofacial features, and other dental anomalies such as aplasia or small-sized upper lateral incisors. An initial sample of 5000 subjects was evaluated. The reference values were calculated in a control group of 1000 subjects that was extracted from the initial sample. Chi-squared tests were used for statistical comparisons. The prevalence rate of PDC was 2.4%, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:3. PDC subjects with low angle vertical relationships showed a significantly high prevalence rate (60.2%). Unilateral PDC was significantly associated with aplasia of upper lateral incisors, whereas bilateral PDC was associated with aplasia of third molars. PDC showed reciprocal significant associations with bilateral small-sized upper lateral incisors. None of the three hypotheses offered in support of the "guidance theory" in the etiology of PDC were corroborated by the findings of the present study. The occurrence of other dental anomalies concurrent with PDC, sex differences, and the bilateral expression of PDC, all confirm the genetic component in the etiology of this tooth disturbance.

  19. Managing molar-incisor hypomineralization: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhennawy, Karim; Schwendicke, Falk

    2016-12-01

    We systematically reviewed treatment modalities for MIH-affected molars and incisors. Trials on humans with ≥1 MIH molar/incisor reporting on various treatments were included. Two authors independently searched and extracted records. Sample-size-weighted annual failure rates were estimated where appropriate. The risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, Google Scholar) were screened, and hand searches and cross-referencing performed. Fourteen (mainly observational) studies were included. Ten trials (381 participants) investigated MIH-molars, four (139) MIH-incisors. For molars, remineralization, restorative or extraction therapies had been assessed. For restorative approaches, mean (SD) annual failure rates were highest for fissure sealants (12[6]%) and glass-ionomer restorations (12[2]%), and lowest for indirect restorations (1[3]%), preformed metal crowns (1.3 [2.1]%) and composite restorations (4[3]%). Ony study assessed extraction of molars in young patients (median age 8.2 years), the majority of them without malocclusions, but third molars in development. Spontaneous alignment of second molars was more frequent in the maxilla (55%) than the mandible (47%). For incisors, desensitizing agents successfully managed hypersensitivity. Micro-abrasion and composite veneers improved aesthetics. Few, mainly moderate to high-risk-studies investigated treatment of MIH. Remineralization or sealants seem suitable for MIH-molars with limited severity and/or hypersensitivity. For severe cases, restorations with composites or indirect restorations or preformed metal crowns seem suitable. Prior to tooth extraction as last resort factors like the presence of a general malocclusion, patients' age and the status of neighboring teeth should be considered. No recommendations can be given for MIH-incisors. Dentists need to consider the specific condition of each tooth and the needs and expectations of

  20. [Radiographic study of the canal anatomy of mandibular premolars in a Senegalese population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, M; Touré, B; Kane, A W; Leye, F; Bane, K; Boucher, Y

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the canal anatomy of mandiblar premolars in Senegalese population. Retroalveolar radiographs of mandibular premolars of 208 patients in Senegal were obtained. Two experienced practitioners using a long cone tube and the parallel plane technique with angulators took the radiographs. The canal morphology of each tooth was determined in terms of the number of canals radiologically visible to the apex. Any anatomic structure emanating from the pulp chamber or the principal canal to the apex and measuring more than 3 millimetres was considered to be a supplementary canal. For the 208 patients studied, 412 first premolars were present and 4 were absent.Among the 412 teeth, 335 (81.3%) had a single canal, 62 (15.1%) 2 canals, and 17 (3.6%) 3 canals. For the second premolars 408 were present. Of the 408 teeth, 352 (86%) had one canal, 49 (12%) 2 canals, and 8 (2%) 3 canals. The prevalence of two or more canals in premolar mandibular from Senegalese patients was similar to that found in the others ethnic population.

  1. The Dance of Tusks: Rediscovery of Lower Incisors in the Pan-American Proboscidean Cuvieronius hyodon Revises Incisor Evolution in Elephantimorpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The incisors of proboscideans (tusks and tushes) are one of the most important feature in conservation, ecology and evolutionary history of these mammals. Although the absence of upper incisors is rare in proboscideans (occurring only in deinotheres), the independent losses of lower incisors are recognized for most of its lineages (dibelodont condition). The presence of lower incisors in the Pan-American gomphothere Cuvieronius hyodon was reported a few times in literature, but it was neglected in systematic studies. We analyzed several specimens of Cuvieronius hyodon from the Americas and recognized that immature individuals had lower incisors during very early post-natal developmental stages. Subsequently, these are lost and lower incisors alveoli close during later developmental stages, before maturity. Moreover, for the first time in a formal cladistic analysis of non-amebelodontine trilophodont gomphotheres, Rhynchotherium and Cuvieronius were recovered as sister-taxa. Among several non-ambiguous synapomorphies, the presence of lower incisors diagnoses this clade. We recognize that the presence of lower incisors in Cuvieronius and Rhynchotherium is an unique case of taxic atavism among the Elephantimorpha, since these structures are lost at the origin of the ingroup. The rediscovery of the lower incisors in Cuvieronius hyodon, their ontogenetic interpretation and the inclusion of this feature in a revised phylogenetic analysis of trilophodont gomphotheres brought a better understanding for the evolutionary history of these proboscideans. PMID:26756209

  2. Change in the mesiodistal axial inclination of the maxillary lateral teeth during the mixed dentition stage: Morphometric analysis of panoramic radiographs from two cases of mild crowding with a high canine

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    Morio Masunaga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of the mesiodistal axial inclination of the maxillary lateral teeth relative to the functional occlusal plane (FOP on panoramic radiographs in patients with Angle Class I maxillary anterior crowding with high canines during the mixed dentition stage. Materials and Methods: Panoramic radiographs were used to measure the mesiodistal axial inclination of the teeth before orthodontic treatment in Cases 1 and 2. The long axes of the teeth were determined according to the previous study by Ursi et al. Finally, the angles between the long axes of teeth and the FOP were measured. Results: The first premolar and canine showed mesial tipping in the alveolar bone during eruption. The crown of the second premolar was located close to the apex of the first molar and showed excessive mesial inclination relative to the long axis of the second deciduous molar. Before orthodontic treatment, considerable autonomous changes in the mesiodistal inclination were found in the canine and the second premolar in the maxillary alveolar bone during eruption. With respect to the first molar, the mesiodistal inclination was invariable, or the angle was almost 90° without any significant change during the observation period. Conclusions: Based on the results of this study, two new findings are described. Autonomous changes in the inclination of the mesiodistal maxillary teeth were observed during exfoliation, particularly in the canine and second premolars. In addition, the eruption of the maxillary lateral teeth influenced the neighboring teeth, whereas the first molar maintained an environmentally defined position.

  3. ANATOMÍA DE LA PRIMERA PREMOLAR MANDIBULAR OBSERVADA MEDIANTE TOMOGRAFÍA CONE BEAM. ESTUDIO IN VITRO

    OpenAIRE

    Falla Coronel, Maricarmen; Universidad Señor de Sipán; Ibáñez Sevilla, Carmen Teresa; Universidad Nacional de Trujillo

    2016-01-01

    Objetivo: Determinar la anatomía de la primera premolar mandibular observada mediante tomografía Cone Beam mediante el estudio in vitro Material y métodos: Investigación cuantitativa, diseño transversal, se empleó 62 primeras premolares mandibulares extraídos por indicación de ortodoncia, enfermedad periodontal y caries dental. Se determinó la morfología externa de la raíz del primer premolar mandibular, el número de conductos de la primera premolar mandibular observadas mediante la tomografí...

  4. The effect of low-level laser therapy on tooth movement during canine distalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üretürk, Sevin Erol; Saraç, Müyesser; Fıratlı, Sönmez; Can, Şule Batu; Güven, Yegane; Fıratlı, Erhan

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the effects of low level laser therapy on tooth movement during canine distalization by evaluating IL-1β, TGF-β1 levels in gingival crevicular fluid. Maxillary first premolars of the 15 Angle Class II division I patients (12-19 years old) were extracted. Right maxillary canines were distalized by standard protocol as control group whereas the left maxillary canines distalized by laser application. A gallium-aluminum-arsenide diode laser with an output power of 20 mW was applied as five doses from the buccal and the palatal side on the day 0, and the 3rd, 7th, 14th, 21th 30th, 33st, 37th, 60th, 63th, and 67th days. Gingival crevicular fluid samples were obtained with filtration paper at the initial, 7th, 14th, and 21th days, and the IL-1ß and TGF-ß1 cytokine levels were analyzed. Orthodontic models and periodontal indices were taken initially and on the days 30th, 60th, and 90th of canine distalization period. Tooth movement was assessed by scanning models (3Shape). The amount of tooth movement in the laser group was 40% more than the control group. First day IL-1ß levels were statistically higher than initial and 21st day levels (P= 0.003, P = 0.012). The rise in IL-1ß levels caused the negative correlations between 7th day IL-1β and 21st day TGF-β1 levels describes the tissue effects of laser application. Periodontal indices showed no sign of gingival inflammation during canine distalization period. As conclusion, laser does accelerate tooth movement and could shorten the whole treatment duration.

  5. Modified serial extraction treatment in a patient with congenitally missing lower second premolars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hummayani, Fadia Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Serial extraction is a sequential plan of premature removal of one or more deciduous teeth in order to improve the alignment of permanent teeth and then removal of permanent teeth to maintain the proper ratio between tooth size and arch size. The aim of this case report was to present a case treated successfully with a modified serial extraction protocol in the lower arch because the patient had congenitally missing lower second premolars with severe crowding. The treatment consisted of selective removal of the deciduous mandibular teeth only (C, D, and E) and no permanent premolar removal. However, the space of the missing second premolars was utilized to resolve the anterior crowding along with the spontaneous closure of the extra spaces by physiologic movement of the permanent mandibular teeth. Whereas in the upper arch conventional serial extraction was performed.

  6. Non-syndromic multiple supernumerary premolars: Clinicoradiographic report of five cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Tanwar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperdontia or supernumerary teeth in both arches without any syndromic manifestation are extremely rare. Supernumerary teeth are commonly associated with Gardner’s syndrome, cleft lip and palate, cleidocranial dysplasia and trichorhinopha-langeal syndrome. Five cases of non-syndromic multiple premolars of maxillary and mandibular arches in Indian patients are presented here. This case series reports three cases with multiple (9 in maximum, bilaterally impacted and erupted supernumerary teeth and two cases with supernumerary premolars in non-syndromic cases from Indian patients. Supernumerary teeth can be present in any region of the oral cavity. Although the occurrence of maxillary para-premolars is rare, radio-logical investigations play a major and decisive role in determining the management of such cases.

  7. Non-syndromic multiple supernumerary premolars: Clinicoradiographic report of five cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanwar, Renu; Jaitly, Vipul; Sharma, Aadya; Heralgi, Rashmi; Ghangas, Munish; Bhagat, Ankur

    2017-01-01

    Hyperdontia or supernumerary teeth in both arches without any syndromic manifestation are extremely rare. Supernumerary teeth are commonly associated with Gardner’s syndrome, cleft lip and palate, cleidocranial dysplasia and trichorhinopha-langeal syndrome. Five cases of non-syndromic multiple premolars of maxillary and mandibular arches in Indian patients are presented here. This case series reports three cases with multiple (9 in maximum), bilaterally impacted and erupted supernumerary teeth and two cases with supernumerary premolars in non-syndromic cases from Indian patients. Supernumerary teeth can be present in any region of the oral cavity. Although the occurrence of maxillary para-premolars is rare, radio-logical investigations play a major and decisive role in determining the management of such cases. PMID:28413596

  8. Podoplanin Expression in Canine Melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Honma, Ryusuke; Kaneko, Mika K.; Fujii, Yuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru; Kato, Yukinari

    2016-01-01

    A type I transmembrane protein, podoplanin (PDPN), is expressed in several normal cells such as lymphatic endothelial cells or pulmonary type I alveolar cells. We recently demonstrated that anticanine PDPN monoclonal antibody (mAb), PMab-38, recognizes canine PDPN of squamous cell carcinomas, but does not react with lymphatic endothelial cells. Herein, we investigated whether PMab-38 reacts with canine melanoma. PMab-38 reacted with 90% of melanoma cells (9/10 cases) using immunohistochemistr...

  9. ANÁLISIS COMPUTACIONAL DE LESIONES CERVICALES NO CARIOSAS EN UN PREMOLAR SUPERIOR COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF NON-CAVITY CERVICAL LESIONS IN AN UPPER PREMOLAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Cendoya

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un modelo tridimensional de elementos finitos para investigar el efecto producido por las fuerzas de oclusión en la distribución y magnitud del campo tensional sobre un premolar superior. De esta forma, se busca definir cuál es la situación de carga de oclusión más crítica desde el punto de vista tensional sobre el esmalte dental en la zona cervical que pudiese dar origen a una lesión del tipo no cariosa. Utilizando elementos finitos hexaédricos lineales y procesando el modelo con el programa SAMCEF se realiza un análisis numérico estático lineal considerando que el premolar es isótropo y homogéneo. Se definen siete estados de carga asociados a una fuerza de oclusión de 170 N para las cuales se investiga la distribución y magnitud de los campos tensionales sobre el premolar. Los resultados numéricos permiten concluir que las tensiones máximas sobre el premolar tienden a concentrarse en la zona cervical alcanzando sus valores máximos cuando la carga de 170 N actúa de forma inclinada a 45º con respecto a la vertical. La relevancia de la presente investigación radica en el hecho que numéricamente se demuestra que la distribución y zona en donde los campos tensionales tienden a concentrase y alcanzar sus valores máximos son coincidentes con las zonas del diente en donde clínicamente se observan lesiones no cariosas.A three-dimensional model of finite elements in order to investigate the effect produced by occlusion forces on both distribution and magnitude of the tensional field on an upper premolar is hereby presented. Thus, defining from a tensional point of view, which is the situation of the most critical occlusion loading on dental enamel capable to produce a non-cavity lesion is intended. By using finite linear hexahedral elements and processing the models through SAMCEF software, a static linear numerical analysis is performed, considering that premolar is isotropic and homogeneous. Seven load states

  10. Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasani, F; Javanbakht, J; Samani, R; Shirani, D

    2016-03-01

    Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis (CCL) is a significant veterinary problem. Infected dogs also serve as parasite reservoirs and contribute to human transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Histologically, the lesions were nodular to diffuse interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with histiocytic pseudorosettes together with numerous amastigotes within macrophages and occasionally within the interstitium. Organisms were often contained within clear and intracellular vacuoles. The other inflammatory cells, which were present in the biopsies of the Leishmania-infected dog, were lymphocytes and plasma cells. The histopathology results emphasized the role of dog, particularly asymptomatic dog, as reservoirs for CCL because of the high cutaneous parasite loads. These results may help to explain the maintenance of high transmission rates and numbers of CCL cases in endemic urban regions.

  11. Evaluation of canine retraction following periodontal distraction using NiTi coil spring and implants – A clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Rohit; Tikku, Tripti; Sachan, Kiran; Maurya, R.P.; Verma, Geeta; Ojha, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the amount of canine retraction with periodontal distraction using miniscrew implants and NiTi coil spring. Material and method Sample comprised of 25 patients who were scheduled for all 1st premolar extraction (13 males and 12 females), in the age range of 16–22 years with mean age 18.8 ± 2.7 years. For each patient left side served as control side (Group I) and right side as experimental side (Group II). At the time of first premolar extraction, periodontal distraction was performed only on the experimental side, followed by retraction of canine from mini-implant by closed NiTi coil spring on both the sides. “Nemotech” software was used to evaluate the amount of canine retraction for a period of 3 months. Results Significantly higher amount of tooth movement was seen from T0–T1 and from T1–T2 in Group II for the maxillary parameters 3C-5C, 6CF-3C, 3C-I/3C-J and for the mandibular parameter 6CF″-3C″. Whereas no significant amount of tooth movement was observed for maxillary and mandibular parameters between T2-T3 except for 6CF″-3C″ (p ≤ 0.01) which was significantly higher for the Group II. Conclusion There was accelerated canine retraction on the periodontal distraction side as compared to the control side, with negligible anchorage loss. PMID:25737943

  12. Multiple Non-Syndromic Bilaterally Erupted Para Premolars in the Mandibular Arch: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Mehra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Supernumerary teeth are the teeth present in addition to the normal set of teeth and are not uncommon in the general population. Presence of supernumerary teeth may affect the aesthetics of an individual and hence need appropriate management. It is however rare to find multiple supernumerary teeth which are not associated with any syndromes. Non-syndromic multiple supernumerary teeth have a predilection to occur in the mandibular premolar region. This paper reports an unusual case of an 18 year old boy with two completely erupted additional premolars on either side of the mandibular arch.

  13. Unerupted Primary Molar Teeth Positioned Inferior to the Permanent Premolar: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bagheri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary tooth impaction is a rare finding during the development of primary dentition. Several factors contribute to the impaction of a deciduous tooth. This report describes the diagnosis and treatment of a 10-year-old boy who presented an impacted second primary mandibular molar. This tooth, located inferior to the second premolar together with an odontoma, was positioned superior to the premolar teeth. Treatment consisted of surgical removal of the impacted deciduoustooth and odontoma and placement of a passive lower lingual holdingarch. Periodic examination was indicated for follow- up. Early intervention was recommended to manage orofacial disfigurement and to avoid consequent problems.

  14. Upper First Premolar Positioning Evaluation for the Stability of the Dental Occlusion: Anatomical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambataro, Sergio; Cervino, Gabriele; Fiorillo, Luca; Cicciù, Marco

    2018-03-08

    The present study aimed to find the proper distorotation of the upper first premolar to achieve the therapeutic ideal advocated for the stability of the human occlusion. Normal teeth were analyzed and occlusal photocopies of upper arch were made to perform the 2 measurements. The first parameter was the angle formed by the perpendicular to the wire through the buccal cusp and a line connecting the buccal and the lingual cusps of the upper first premolar. The second one was the angle from the buccal line and the sagittal plane of the model. The amount of distorotation was calculated and a method to bond the bracket was suggested.

  15. Cone beam computed tomography analysis of root and canal morphology of mandibular premolars in a Spanish population

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    Llena, Carmen; Ortolani, Pablo Sebastian; Forner, Leopoldo [Dept. of of Stomatology, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Fernandez, Jaime [Ferneandez Ugedo y Chaves Clinic, Alicante (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical anatomy of lower premolar roots in a Spanish population by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), correlating findings with patient gender and tooth type. Using 70 CBCT images, we evaluated 126 healthy, untreated, well-developed lower premolars. The number and morphology of roots and root canals, and the foramina number were assessed. Results for gender and tooth type were compared using the chi-squared and ANOVA tests. The average length of teeth and roots was significantly higher in men (p=0.00). All 126 premolars had a single root. One canal was found in 83.3% of the premolars, with no gender or tooth type differences; Vertucci configuration types I and V were the most prevalent. The first premolars showed significantly greater variability than the second premolars (p=0.03). A single apical foramen was found in 89.7% of the premolars, with no differences by tooth type. Women had a significantly higher prevalence of two apical foramina than men (p=0.04). Some degree of curvature was observed in 65% of the premolars, with no differences by gender or tooth type. A root angle of more than 20 degrees was found in 12.98% of the premolars, without any differences by gender or tooth. All premolars were single-rooted. One canal had the most prevalent morphology. More variability in canal anatomy was found in the first premolars. Curvatures greater than 20 degrees were found at less than 5 mm from the apex.

  16. Long-term effectiveness of canine-to-canine bonded flexible spiral wire lingual retainers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, A.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Katsaros, C.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The flexible spiral wire (FSW) canine-to-canine lingual retainer bonded to all 6 anterior teeth is a frequently used type of mandibular fixed retainer. This study aimed to assess the long-term effectiveness of FSW canine-to-canine lingual retainers in maintaining the alignment of the

  17. Long-term effectiveness of canine-to-canine bonded flexible spiral wire lingual retainers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, Anne-Marie; Renkema, Alianne; Bronkhorst, Ewald; Katsaros, Christos

    Introduction: The flexible spiral wire (FSW) canine-to-canine lingual retainer bonded to all 6 anterior teeth is a frequently used type of mandibular fixed retainer. This study aimed to assess the long-term effectiveness of FSW canine-to-canine lingual retainers in maintaining the alignment of the

  18. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell...

  19. Management of avulsed permanent maxillary central incisors during endotracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh R Kalaskar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Avulsion is serious injury that may encounter during endotracheal intubation and its management often presents a challenge. Replantation of the avulsed tooth can restore esthetic appearance and occlusal function shortly after the injury. The present article describes the management of air-dried maxillary permanent incisors that have been avulsed due to direct laryngoscopy during the induction of general anesthesia for tonsillectomy procedure. The replanted maxillary central incisors had maintained its function and esthetic for 1 year after replantation. Children in a mixed dentition phase are high-risk group children for traumatic dental injury during laryngoscopy; therefore, Anesthetic Departments should have local protocols to refer patients for dental treatment postoperatively in the event of trauma.

  20. Orthodontic management of an impacted maxillary incisor due to odontoma

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    Rahul S Baldawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are a heterogeneous group of jaw bone lesions, classified as odontogenic tumors which usually include well-diversified dental tissues. Odontomas are the most common type of odontogenic tumors and generally they are asymptomatic. Two types of odontomas are described: compound and complex based on either the appearance of well-organized tooth-like structures (compound odontomas or on a mass of disorganized odontogenic tissues (complex odontomas. Compound odontomas have a predilection for the anterior maxilla, whereas complex odontomas have a predilection for the posterior mandible. Odontomas frequently interfere with eruption of teeth leading to their impaction. This is a case report of a 14-year-old girl with an unerupted maxillary right central incisor due to a complex composite odontoma a rare occurrence in anterior maxilla. Surgical excision of the odontoma and orthodontic treatment to get the impacted maxillary right central incisor into alignment is discussed.

  1. Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH): clinical presentation, aetiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerheijm, K L

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the current knowledge about Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is presented. MIH is defined as hypomineralization of systemic origin of one to four permanent first molars frequently associated with affected incisors and these molars are related to major clinical problems in severe cases. At the moment, only limited data are available to describe the magnitude of the phenomenon. The prevalence of MIH in the different studies ranges from 3.6-25% and seems to differ in certain regions and birth cohorts. Several aetiological factors (for example, frequent childhood diseases) are mentioned as the cause of the defect. Children at risk should be monitored very carefully during the period of eruption of their first permanent molars. Treatment planning should consider the long-term prognosis of these teeth.

  2. Orthodontic Treatment of a Mandibular Incisor Extraction Case with Invisalign

    OpenAIRE

    Zawawi, Khalid H.

    2014-01-01

    Mandibular incisor extraction for orthodontic treatment is considered an unusual treatment option because of the limited number of patients that meet the criteria for such treatment. Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning is essential to achieve the desired results. Adult orthodontic patients are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations and reject the idea of conventional fixed appliances. In recent years, Invisalign appliances have gained tremendous attention for orthodontic trea...

  3. Talon cusps in mandibular incisors: Report of eight rare cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-yin Cho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Talon cusps in mandibular anterior teeth are very rare. Talon cusps in mandibular anterior teeth associated with other anomalies are even rarer and that a bilateral case in the mandible has not been reported before. In this report, eight such rare cases of talon cusps in permanent mandibular incisors are presented. It includes a bilateral case that in the author′s knowledge is the first case reported in the English literatures.

  4. Dual embryonic origin of maxillary lateral incisors: clinical implications in patients with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gamba Garib

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Cleft lip and palate are craniofacial anomalies highly prevalent in the overall population. In oral clefts involving the alveolar ridge, variations of number, shape, size and position are observed in maxillary lateral incisors. The objective of this manuscript is to elucidate the embryonic origin of maxillary lateral incisors in order to understand the etiology of these variations.Contextualization: The hypothesis that orofacial clefts would split maxillary lateral incisor buds has been previously reported. However, recent studies showed that maxillary lateral incisors have dual embryonic origin, being partially formed by both the medial nasal process and the maxillary process. In other words, the mesial half of the lateral incisor seems to come from the medial nasal process while the distal half of the lateral incisor originates from the maxillary process. In cleft patients, these processes do not fuse, which results in different numerical and positional patterns for lateral incisors relating to the alveolar cleft. In addition to these considerations, this study proposes a nomenclature for maxillary lateral incisors in patients with cleft lip and palate, based on embryology and lateral incisors position in relation to the alveolar cleft.Conclusion:Embryological knowledge on the dual origin of maxillary lateral incisors and the use of a proper nomenclature for their numerical and positional variations renders appropriate communication among professionals and treatment planning easier, in addition to standardizing research analysis.

  5. Molar incisor hypomineralization: review and recommendations for clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, Vanessa; Messer, Louise B; Burrow, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) describes the clinical picture of hypomineralization of systemic origin affecting one or more first permanent molars (FPMs) that are associated frequently with affected incisors. Etiological associations with systemic conditions or environmental insults during the child's first 3 years have been implicated. The complex care involved in treating affected children must address their behavior and anxiety, aiming to provide a durable restoration under pain-free conditions. The challenges include adequate anaesthesia, suitable cavity design, and choice of restorative materials. Restorations in hypomineralized molars appear to fail frequently; there is little evidence-based literature to facilitate clinical decisions on cavity design and material choice. A 6-step approach to management is described: (1) risk identification; (2) early diagnosis; (3) remineralization and desensitization; (4) prevention of caries and posteruption breakdown; (5) restorations and extractions; and (6) maintenance. The high prevalence of MIH indicates the need for research to clarify etiological factors and improve the durability of restorations in affected teeth. The purpose of this paper was to describe the diagnosis, prevalence, putative etiological factors, and features of hypomineralized enamel in molar incisor hypomineralization and to present a sequential approach to management.

  6. Replantation of permanent incisors in children using Emdogain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Edward J; Kenny, David J; Tenenbaum, Howard C; Sigal, Michael J; Johnston, Douglas H

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether application of an enamel matrix protein derivative, Emdogain (Biora AB Malmo, Sweden) to the root surface of avulsed permanent incisors would improve postreplantation outcomes in a pediatric population. Between June 1999 and May 2002, 25 avulsed permanent maxillary incisors (22 centrals and three laterals) were treated with Emdogain and followed for up to 32 months, mean duration 20.6 months (range: 6.9-32.5 months). Mean patient age at the time of treatment was 12.0 years (range: 7.7-17.6 years) and mean extra-alveolar duration was 185 min (range: 100-300 min). At the end of their follow-up each of the replanted incisors demonstrated radiographic evidence of replacement root resorption and clinical evidence of ankylosis. None of the replanted teeth were affected by inflammatory root resorption and there was no evidence of infection. When compared with the control samples from Barrett and Kenny (Endod Dent Traumatol 1997;15:269-72.) and Andersson et al. (Endod Dent Traumatol 1989;5:38-47.) this sample treated with the Emdogain protocol demonstrated significantly less root resorption than either of the control samples (anova, P Emdogain protocol did not produce periodontal regeneration, it did eliminate inflammatory resorption and infection and led to significantly less root resorption compared with the two historical controls.

  7. In vitro fracture behavior of maxillary premolars with metal crowns and several post-and-core systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Kreulen, C.M.; Bell-Ronnlof, A.M. Le; Lassila, L.V.; Vallittu, P.K.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    The in vitro fracture behavior of severely damaged premolars, restored with metal crowns with limited ferrule and several post-and-core systems, was investigated. Crowns of maxillary premolars were removed and canals were prepared with Gates Glidden drills and with Parapost drills. Groups of 11

  8. Ex vivo fracture resistance of direct resin composite complete crowns with and without posts on maxillary premolars.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Bell, A.M. Le; Kreulen, C.M.; Lassila, L.V.; Vallittu, P.K.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate ex vivo the fracture resistance and failure mode of direct resin composite complete crowns with and without various root canal posts made on maxillary premolars. METHODOLOGY: The clinical crowns of 40 human extracted single-rooted maxillary premolars were sectioned at the

  9. The Ultrasonographic Determination of the Position of the Mental Foramen and its Relation to the Mandibular Premolar Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laher, Abdullah Ebrahim; Motara, Feroza; Moolla, Muhammed

    2016-06-01

    The position of the mental foramen has been well researched in cadaver specimens, radiographically as well as intraoperatively. To our knowledge, this landmark study is the first to make use of ultrasonography in a study population to determine the position of the mental foramen in relation to the mandibular premolar teeth. Ultrasonography has great potential to further revolutionize the practice of medicine and dento-maxillofacial surgery. To make use of ultrasound to determine the position of the mental foramen and its relation to the mandibular premolar teeth. One hundred Black and Caucasian subjects were enrolled. A high frequency (8MHz) transducer (PLF.805ST) of a diagnostic ultrasound system (model SSA-510A) was applied above the inferior border of the mandible, just lateral to the mentum. With the marker of the transducer pointing cranially, the position of the mental foramen in relation to the closest mandibular premolar tooth was determined. The position was compared across race, sex and age groups. All mental foramina (100%) were visualised. Overall the most frequent position of the mental foramen was in line with the long axis of the second premolar on the right (44%) and between the first and second premolars on the left (44%). There were no statistical differences (p >0.05) between race groups, sex and age groups with regard to the position of the mental foramen in relation to the mandibular premolars. However, in Blacks, the most frequent position of the mental foramen was in line with the long axis of the second premolar and in Caucasians the most common position was between the first and second premolars. The most frequent position of the mental foramen in females was in line with the long axis of the second premolar on the right and between the first and second premolars on the left. In males, the most frequent position of the mental foramen was in line with the long axis of the second premolar bilaterally. The most common position of the mental

  10. Long-term periodontal response to orthodontic treatment of palatally impacted maxillary canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioglio, Alberto; Vanni, Arianna; Bolamperti, Laura

    2013-06-01

    One of the most important aspects to take into consideration when evaluating the outcome of treatment of impacted maxillary canines is the final periodontal status. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term periodontal response of palatally impacted maxillary canines aligned using a codified procedure and the 'Easy Cuspid' compared with contralateral spontaneously erupted teeth. The periodontal conditions of the adjacent teeth were also considered. From an initial sample of 124 patients, 33 patients (24 females and 9 males) were selected. All patients who had undergone surgical orthodontic treatment conducted in accordance with a standardized protocol were recalled for follow-up at an average of 4.6 years after the end of treatment. The average treatment time was 29 months and the mean eruption time of the previously impacted tooth was 3.1 months. The average probing depth values showed no significant clinical differences. Probing depths recorded at the vestibular surface of the lateral incisor (P alignment of palatally impacted canines without damage to the periodontium.

  11. Premolar Axial Wall Height Effect on CAD/CAM Crown Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    Postgraduate Dental School 3 rhe author hereby certifies that the use of any copyrighted material in the thesis manuscript entitled: Premolar...surface area was determined using a digital measuring microscope (Hirox). Scanned preparations (CEREC) were fitted with e.max CAD crowns and cemented ...Figure 10. Before and after Crysta ll/Glaze ....................................... . Figure 11. Dental Laboratory Ceramic Furnace (Programat P700

  12. Congenitally missing mandibular second premolar: treatment outcome with orthodontic space closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fines, Casey D; Rebellato, Joe; Saiar, Maryam

    2003-06-01

    Orthodontic treatment for patients with congenitally missing mandibular second premolars can be challenging. Treatment options include keeping the deciduous second molar, extracting the molars and allowing the space to close spontaneously, autotransplantation, prosthetic replacement, and orthodontic space closure. Space closure with orthodontic appliances is demonstrated in this case report.

  13. Occurrence of the Uto-Aztecan premolar trait in a contemporary Colombian Amerindian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Flórez, C D

    2012-10-01

    In 2009, in the Indian Kamëntša community in southern Colombia an oral inspection was conducted on 61 young people. Using the methods of Arizona State University's Dental Anthropology System (ASUDAS) the presence of unilateral Uto-Aztecan premolar (UAP) is reported here. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Autotransplantation of two maxillary premolars in a free vascularized fibula reconstructed mandible

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink, G.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Strackee, S.D.; van Teeseling, R.A.; Smeele, L.E.; Becking, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    A 10-year-old female patient with a fibula transplant in her left hemimandible due to ameloblastoma treatment was referred for combined orthodontic and surgical planning and treatment to observe and prevent expected asymmetric facial development and malocclusion, because the premolars and molars on

  15. Determination of permanent premolars eruption ages among public school children in Lahore, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokhio, A.L.; Soomro, S.H.; Khuhawar, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine mean eruption age, range and sequence of permanent maxillary and mandibular premolars in public schools of Lahore, Pakistan so as to provide a reference for planning orthodontic treatment and in pediatric dentistry. Methodology: This is a cross sectional study consisting of multistage random sampling and included 4000 children, with ages in between 9-14 years of different public schools in Lahore. Participants were examined and tooth numbering was noted by two-digit system of FDI (Federation Dentaire Internationale). Emergence was divided into three stages depending on eruption level. SPSS version 18 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Out of 4000 children, 1960 were boys and 2031 were girls. In both genders maxillary premolars erupted before mandibular counterparts. All premolars erupted earlier in females than the males. The sequence of emergence for both genders was P1, P2 in upper as well as in lower arch. Conclusion: Eruption of premolar in females was earlier than males but delayed in both genders while compared with Western standard. (author)

  16. Stability of class II subdivision malocclusion treatment with 3 and 4 premolar extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Guilherme; Araki, Janine; Estelita, Sérgio; Camardella, Leonardo T

    2014-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to compare the occlusal stability of class II subdivision malocclusion treatment with 3 and 4 first premolar extractions. A sample of 156 dental casts from 52 patients with class II subdivision malocclusion was divided into two groups according to the extraction protocol. Group 1 comprised 24 patients treated with 3 premolar extractions and group 2 included 28 patients treated with 4 premolar extractions. Peer assessment rating (PAR) indexes were measured on the dental casts obtained before (T1) and after treatment (T2) and at a mean of 6.9 years after the end of treatment (T3). The groups were matching regarding sex distribution, pretreatment, posttreatment and long-term posttreatment ages, and treatment and long-term posttreatment times. They were also comparable concerning the initial malocclusion severity and the occlusal results at the end of treatment. Stability evaluation was calculated by subtracting the posttreatment from the long-term posttreatment index values (T3 - T2). T tests were used to compare the amount and percentage of long-term posttreatment changes. There were no intergroup differences regarding the amount and percentage of long-term posttreatment changes. Treatment of class II subdivision malocclusion with 3 and 4 premolar extractions have a similar long-term posttreatment occlusal stability.

  17. Canine oral melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Philip J

    2007-05-01

    Melanoma is the most common oral malignancy in the dog. Oral and/or mucosal melanoma has been routinely considered an extremely malignant tumor with a high degree of local invasiveness and high metastatic propensity. Primary tumor size has been found to be extremely prognostic. The World Health Organization staging scheme for dogs with oral melanoma is based on size, with stage I = or = 4cm tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, and stage IV = distant metastasis. Median survival times for dogs with oral melanoma treated with surgery are approximately 17 to 18, 5 to 6, and 3 months with stage I, II, and III disease, respectively. Significant negative prognostic factors include stage, size, evidence of metastasis, and a variety of histologic criteria. Standardized treatments such as surgery, coarse-fractionation radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have afforded minimal to modest stage-dependent clinical benefits and death is usually due to systemic metastasis. Numerous immunotherapeutic strategies have been employed to date with limited clinical efficacy; however, the use of xenogeneic DNA vaccines may represent a leap forward in clinical efficacy. Oral melanoma is a spontaneous syngeneic cancer occurring in outbred, immunocompetent dogs and appears to be a more clinically faithful therapeutic model for human melanoma; further use of canine melanoma as a therapeutic model for human melanoma is strongly encouraged. In addition, the development of an expanded but clinically relevant staging system incorporating the aforementioned prognostic factors is also strongly encouraged.

  18. Premolar root and canal variation in extant non-human hominoidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, N Collin; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Skinner, Matthew M

    2015-08-11

    The premolar sub-cervical region in four non-human extant ape genera are examined to: 1) define a classification scheme for the premolar root system in order to rigorously characterize, quantify and document variation in root and canal, form, number and configuration; 2) compare this variation within and between genera; and 3) test the hypotheses that sex and size (i.e., the "size/number continuum," Shields, ) of the premolar are determinants of root/canal form and/or number. Microtomography and 3D visualization software are utilized to examine a large sample of Hylobates, Pan, Gorilla, and Pongo (n = 951 teeth). Each premolar root system is examined to ascertain the expected level of variability for each taxon. Cervical surface area (mm 2 ) serves as a metric proxy for tooth size. A Chi-square test of independence is used to assess for variability differences between and within each taxon, and Mann-Whitney U tests are employed to assess the predicted relationship between tooth size and variation within each taxon. Our findings indicate that root and canal configurations, non-metric root traits and tooth size can distinguish between extant ape genera. Within the four ape taxa, premolar size variation is generally, but not always, correlated with canal/root number. Our results indicate that males and females within genera differ in tooth size but not in canal/root form and number. We report previously undocumented variation in the study taxa. Our results are discussed within the context of Miocene Apes as well as the developmental and systematic implications. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fatigue resistance and failure mode of adhesively restored custom metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boff, Luís Leonildo; Oderich, Elisa; Cardoso, Antônio Carlos; Magne, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the fatigue resistance and failure mode of composite resin and porcelain onlays and crowns bonded to premolar custom metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments. Sixty composite resin mesostructures were fabricated with computer assistance with two preparation designs (crown vs onlay) and bonded to a metal implant abutment. Following insertion into an implant with a tapered abutment interface (Titamax CM), each metal-composite resin abutment was restored with either composite resin (Paradigm MZ100) or ceramic (Paradigm C) (n = 15) and attached with adhesive resin (Optibond FL) and a preheated light-curing composite resin (Filtek Z100). Cyclic isometric chewing (5 Hz) was then simulated, starting with 5,000 cycles at a load of 50 N, followed by stages of 200, 400, 600, 800, 1,000, 1,200, and 1,400 N (25,000 cycles each). Samples were loaded until fracture or to a maximum of 180,000 cycles. The four groups were compared using life table survival analysis (log-rank test). Previously published data using zirconia abutments of the same design were included for comparison. Paradigm C and MZ100 specimens fractured at average loads of 1,133 N and 1,266 N, respectively. Survival rates ranged from 20% to 33.3% (ceramic crowns and onlays) to 60% (composite resin crowns and onlays) and were significantly different (pooled data for restorative material). There were no restoration failures, but there were adhesive failures at the connection between the abutment and the mesostructure. The survival of the metal-composite resin premolar abutments was inferior to that of identical zirconia abutments from a previous study (pooled data for abutment material). Composite resin onlays/crowns bonded to metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments presented higher survival rates than comparable ceramic onlays/crowns. Zirconia abutments outperformed the metal-composite resin premolar abutments.

  20. Stress Distribution Evaluation of the Periodontal Ligament in the Maxillary Canine for Retraction by Different Alveolar Corticotomy Techniques: A Three-dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Ariel Adriano Reyes; Saga, Armando Yukio; de Lima, Key Fonseca; Paese, Victor Nissen; Tanaka, Orlando M

    2016-01-01

    By using the finite element method (FEM), this study aimed to evaluate the effect of different corticotomy formats on the distribution and magnitude of stress on the periodontal ligament (PDL) during retraction of the maxillary canine. A geometric model of the left hemi-jaw was created from computed tomography scan images of a dry human skull and loads were administered during distalization movement of the canine. Three trials were performed: (1) without corticotomy, (2) box-shaped corticotomy and perforations in the cortical bone of the canine (CVC) and (3) CVC and circular-shaped corticotomy in the cortical bone of the edentulous space of the first premolar. There was no difference in stress distribution among the different corticotomy formats. Different corticotomy formats used to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement did not affect stress distribution in the PDL during canine retraction. From a mechanical perspective, the present study showed that the stress distribution on the PDL during canine retraction was similar in all the corticotomy formats. When using the Andrews T2 bracket, the PDL presented the highest levels of stress in the middle third of the PDL, suggesting that the force was near the center of resistance. Also, as bone weakening by corticotomies did not influence stress distribution, the surgical procedure could be simplified to a less aggressive one, focusing more on inflammatory cellular stimulation than on bone resistance. A simpler surgical act could also be performed by most orthodontists in their practices, enhancing postoperative response and reducing patient costs.

  1. Congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors: update on the functional and esthetic parameters of patients treated with implants or space closure and teeth recontouring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Marchi, Luciana Manzotti De; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (MLIA) is a condition that affects both dental esthetics and function in young patients, and represents an important challenge for clinicians. Although several treatment options are available, the mesial repositioning of the canines followed by teeth recontouring into lateral incisors; or space opening/maintenance followed by implant placement have recently emerged as two important treatment approaches. In this article, the current and latest literature has been reviewed in order to summarize the functional and esthetic outcomes obtained with these two forms of treatment of MLIA patients in recent years. Indications, clinical limitations and the most important parameters to achieve the best possible results with each treatment modality are also discussed. Within the limitations of this review, it is not possible to assert at this point in time that one treatment approach is more advantageous than the other. Long-term followup studies comparing the existing treatment options are still lacking in the literature, and they are necessary to shed some light on the issue. It is possible, however, to state that adequate multidisciplinary diagnosis and planning are imperative to define the treatment option that will provide the best individual results for patients with MLIA.

  2. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF INCISOR PSEUDO-ODONTOMAS IN PRAIRIE DOGS (CYNOMYS LUDOVICIANUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizzone, Igor; Di Ianni, Francesco; Volta, Antonella; Gnudi, Giacomo; Manfredi, Sabrina; Bertocchi, Mara; Parmigiani, Enrico

    2017-05-01

    Maxillary incisor pseudo-odontomas are common in pet prairie dogs and can cause progressive respiratory obstruction, while mandibular pseudo-odontomas are rarely clinically significant. The aim of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to describe CT features of maxillary and mandibular incisor pseudo-odontomas vs. normal incisors in a group of pet prairie dogs. All pet prairie dogs with head CT scans acquired during the period of 2013-2015 were included. A veterinary radiologist who was aware of final diagnosis reviewed CT scans and recorded qualitative features of affected and normal incisors. Mean density values for the pulp cavity and palatal and buccal dentin were also recorded. A total of 16 prairie dogs were sampled (12 normal maxillary incisors, 20 confirmed maxillary incisor pseudo-odontomas, 20 normal mandibular incisors, 12 presumed mandibular incisor pseudo-odontomas). Maxillary incisors with confirmed pseudo-odontomas had a significantly hyperattenuating pulp and dentin in the reserve crown and apical zone, when compared to normal maxillary incisors. Pseudo-odontomas appeared as enlargements of the apical zone with a globular/multilobular hyperattenuating mass formation haphazardly arranged, encroaching on midline and growing caudally and ventrally. Presumed mandibular incisor pseudo-odontomas had similar CT characteristics. In 60% of prairie dogs with maxillary incisor pseudo-odontomas, the hard palate was deformed and the mass bulged into the oral cavity causing loss of the palatine bone. The common nasal meatus was partially or totally obliterated in 81.8% of prairie dogs with maxillary pseudo-odontomas. Findings supported the use of CT for characterizing extent of involvement and surgical planning in prairie dogs with pseudo-odontomas. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  3. Degree of severity of molar incisor hypomineralization and its relation to dental caries

    OpenAIRE

    Negre-Barber, A.; Montiel-Company, J. M.; Catalá-Pizarro, M.; Almerich-Silla, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization is a developmental defect of dental enamel associated with rapid caries progression. In order to discover whether molar incisor hypomineralization predisposes to dental caries, a cross-sectional cohort study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged between eight and nine years. It was found that 24.2% of the children presented molar incisor hypomineralization. Of these, 72% had a mild form and 28% a severe form. Caries prevalence was greater among the ch...

  4. Dual embryonic origin of maxillary lateral incisors: clinical implications in patients with cleft lip and palate

    OpenAIRE

    Garib, Daniela Gamba; Rosar, Julia Petruccelli; Sathler, Renata; Ozawa, Terumi Okada

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:Cleft lip and palate are craniofacial anomalies highly prevalent in the overall population. In oral clefts involving the alveolar ridge, variations of number, shape, size and position are observed in maxillary lateral incisors. The objective of this manuscript is to elucidate the embryonic origin of maxillary lateral incisors in order to understand the etiology of these variations.Contextualization: The hypothesis that orofacial clefts would split maxillary lateral incisor buds h...

  5. Treatment strategies for missing maxillary central incisor--an orthodontist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Rajaganesh; Nene, Purvaja; Mehta, Kunal; Nene, Salil; Hegde, Ashwith; Jaju, Rajbala

    2014-08-01

    The loss of maxillary central incisors at an early age has psychological, esthetic, and functional implications. Multiple treatment options are available for replacing missing central incisors. The management demands a multidisciplinary approach involving the orthodontist, prosthodontist, and periodontist. Treatment planning requires consideration of a variety of clinical and nonclinical factors. This clinical report attempts to demonstrate different strategies for the management of unilaterally and bilaterally missing central incisors. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Podoplanin Expression in Canine Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Honma, Ryusuke; Kaneko, Mika K; Fujii, Yuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru; Kato, Yukinari

    2016-12-01

    A type I transmembrane protein, podoplanin (PDPN), is expressed in several normal cells such as lymphatic endothelial cells or pulmonary type I alveolar cells. We recently demonstrated that anticanine PDPN monoclonal antibody (mAb), PMab-38, recognizes canine PDPN of squamous cell carcinomas, but does not react with lymphatic endothelial cells. Herein, we investigated whether PMab-38 reacts with canine melanoma. PMab-38 reacted with 90% of melanoma cells (9/10 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Of interest, PMab-38 stained the lymphatic endothelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts in melanoma tissues, although it did not stain any lymphatic endothelial cells in normal tissues. PMab-38 could be useful for uncovering the function of PDPN in canine melanomas.

  7. Approaches to canine health surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Dan G; Church, David B; McGreevy, Paul D; Thomson, Peter C; Brodbelt, Dave C

    2014-01-01

    Effective canine health surveillance systems can be used to monitor disease in the general population, prioritise disorders for strategic control and focus clinical research, and to evaluate the success of these measures. The key attributes for optimal data collection systems that support canine disease surveillance are representativeness of the general population, validity of disorder data and sustainability. Limitations in these areas present as selection bias, misclassification bias and discontinuation of the system respectively. Canine health data sources are reviewed to identify their strengths and weaknesses for supporting effective canine health surveillance. Insurance data benefit from large and well-defined denominator populations but are limited by selection bias relating to the clinical events claimed and animals covered. Veterinary referral clinical data offer good reliability for diagnoses but are limited by referral bias for the disorders and animals included. Primary-care practice data have the advantage of excellent representation of the general dog population and recording at the point of care by veterinary professionals but may encounter misclassification problems and technical difficulties related to management and analysis of large datasets. Questionnaire surveys offer speed and low cost but may suffer from low response rates, poor data validation, recall bias and ill-defined denominator population information. Canine health scheme data benefit from well-characterised disorder and animal data but reflect selection bias during the voluntary submissions process. Formal UK passive surveillance systems are limited by chronic under-reporting and selection bias. It is concluded that active collection systems using secondary health data provide the optimal resource for canine health surveillance.

  8. Canine and feline parasitic zoonoses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Xu, Min-Jun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Song, Hui-Qun; Wang, Chun-Ren; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-07-28

    Canine and feline parasitic zoonoses have not been given high priority in China, although the role of companion animals as reservoirs for zoonotic parasitic diseases has been recognized worldwide. With an increasing number of dogs and cats under unregulated conditions in China, the canine and feline parasitic zoonoses are showing a trend towards being gradually uncontrolled. Currently, canine and feline parasitic zoonoses threaten human health, and cause death and serious diseases in China. This article comprehensively reviews the current status of major canine and feline parasitic zoonoses in mainland China, discusses the risks dogs and cats pose with regard to zoonotic transmission of canine and feline parasites, and proposes control strategies and measures.

  9. ERUPTION PATTERN OF PERMANENT TEETH -IN TANZANIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was visible in the oral vacity. Generally permanent teeth erupted earlier in girls than in boys. The differences were 0.1 - 0.2 years for incisors and first molars, 0.2 - 0.4 years for canines and premolars and 0.3 - 0.5 years for second molars. Except for the second premolars, mandibular teeth erupted earlier than the maxillary in ...

  10. Canine and feline colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastant-Maillard, S; Aggouni, C; Albaret, A; Fournier, A; Mila, H

    2017-04-01

    Puppy and kitten survival over the first weeks is particularly dependent on colostrum, a specific secretion of the mammary gland produced during the first 2 days post-partum. Colostrum is a source of nutrients and immunoglobulins. It also contributes to the digestive tract maturation. Colostrum differentiates from milk mainly based on its concentration in immunoglobulins G: 20-30 g/L in dog colostrum, 40-50 g/L in cats' vs <1 g/L in milk. IgG concentration rapidly drops after parturition (-50% in 24 hr). Immune quality of colostrum is highly variable between bitches, with no relationship with maternal blood IgG level, dam's age, breed size or litter size. In addition to systemic immune protection, colostrum also plays a major role for local digestive protection, due to IgA, lysozyme, lactoferrin, white blood cells and various cytokines. Energetic concentration of canine and feline colostrum is not superior to that of mature milk. It depends on colostrum fat concentration and is affected by breed size (higher in breeds <10 kg adult body weight). As puppies and kittens are almost agammaglobulinemic at birth, transfer of IgG from their digestive tract into their bloodstream is crucial for their survival, IgG absorption ending at 12-16 hr after birth. Energetic supply over the two first days of life, as evidenced by growth rate over the two first days of life, also affects risk of neonatal mortality. Early and sufficient suckling of colostrum is thus the very first care to be provided to newborns for their later health and survival. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Endodontic therapy of a mandibular canine tooth with irreversible pulpitis secondary to dentigerous cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGee, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Dentigerous cysts are uncommon, yet are being reported with increasing frequency in the veterinary literature. Dentigerous cysts are a type of benign odontogenic cyst associated with impacted teeth, most commonly the mandibular first premolar tooth. Significant bone destruction can occur secondary to the expansion of a dentigerous cyst. The expanding cyst can lead to pathology of neighboring teeth, which can include external root resorption or pulpitis. Intraoral dental radiographs are imperative to properly assess the presence and extent of a dentigerous cyst, as well as the status of the neighboring teeth. This case report describes treatment for dentigerous cyst including cyst lining curettage, mandibular bone regeneration, and endodontic therapy for a canine tooth with irreversible pulpitis.

  12. Orthodontic management of class I crowding malocclusion with palatal canine impaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisek Ghosh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient named A. A, age 16 years reported with a chief complaint of crowding in the upper front tooth region. After clinical and radiographic evaluation, the patient was diagnosed as a case of Angles Class I malocclusion overlying a Class I skeletal base with crowding of 16 mm in the upper arch and 11 mm in the lower arch with multiple impacted teeth. The treatment objective was to de-crowd the upper and lower dentition while restoring their alignment and attend to the impacted teeth. The treatment plan was to create adequate space by extraction of the upper and lower first premolars and use of contemporary orthodontic mechanics with the pre adjusted edgewise appliance to de-crowd and de-impact the displaced teeth. The case was finished with Class I molar and canine relation with normal overjet, overbite, and good overall facial esthetics.

  13. Comparison of two cone beam computed tomographic systems versus panoramic imaging for localization of impacted maxillary canines and detection of root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqerban, Ali; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Fieuws, Steffen; Willems, Guy

    2011-02-01

    The diagnostic accuracy for the localization of impacted canines and the detection of canine-induced root resorption of maxillary incisors were compared between conventional radiographic procedures using one two-dimensional (2D) panoramic radiograph with that of two three-dimensional (3D) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The clinical records of 60 consecutive patients who had impacted or ectopically erupting maxillary canines were identified from those seeking orthodontic treatment. For each case, two sets of radiographic information were obtained. The study sample was divided into two groups: group A (n = 30) included those for whom a dental pantomograph (DPT) and CBCT obtained with a 3D Accuitomo-XYZ Slice View Tomograph were available and group B (n = 30) who had a DPT and CBCT obtained with a Scanora. The DPT and CBCT images were subsequently analysed by 11 examiners. Statistical analysis included an evaluation of the agreement between observers based on the standard error of the measurement, kappa statistics and coefficient of concordance, as well as an assessment of the differences between 2D and 3D imaging employing Wilcoxon signed rank and McNemar tests. There was a highly significant difference between the 2D and 3D images in the width of the canine crown (P radiography for both canine localization and identification of root resorption of adjacent teeth.

  14. Does midline coincidence of upper and lower teeth affect smile aesthetics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Jajoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of single mandibular incisor has always led to debate regarding midline and smile esthetics. The current case report describes the effect of mesiodens in worsening the Class II Division 1 malocclusion and its correction by extraction of mesiodens, upper first premolars, and single mandibular incisor. Satisfactory functional and esthetic results were achieved with well-settled Class II molar, Class I canine relationship, ideal overjet, and overbite. Two years postretention records show stable results.

  15. Prevalence of Impacted Pre-Molar Teeth in College of Dentistry, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, A B

    2015-06-01

    An impacted tooth is one which fails to reach the occlusal plane even after two-third's of its root completion. Though the etiology is multi-factorial, most common reason is crowding of teeth with lack of space for eruption. Mandibular third molars are the most commonly impacted teeth. Very few studies have been done to assess the prevalence of impacted premolar teeth. This study had been undertaken at College of Dentistry, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to report the prevalence of impacted premolar teeth and its relation to age group and gender. This retrospective study involved 3800 panoramic radiographs of subjects aged 18-45 years who had presented to the College of Dentistry, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, for oral care during the period from February 2009 to February 2011. All panoramic radiographs were taken with standardized equipment and specifications. The study sample comprised of 3800 panoramic radiographs. A total of 45 impacted premolar teeth were identified (1.2%) (P = 0.89). The male to female ratio with impacted premolars was 35:10 (3.5:1). Age Group 1 (i.e., 20-25 years) had the highest prevalence of premolar tooth impaction (75.5%) and this decreased with increasing age. Of the 45 impacted premolars, mandibular premolars were most commonly encountered (75.6%), followed by impacted teeth in the mandibular arch (24.4%). The ratio of mandibular to maxillary third molar impaction was 3:1. (1) The prevalence of impacted premolar teeth is more in mandibular arch than in the maxillary arch, (2) females had higher prevalence of impacted teeth than men, (3) age group 25-30 years had high rate of prevalence of impacted premolars.

  16. Distribution and characteristics of molar-incisor hypomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Svjetlana; Ivanović, Mirjana; Davidović, Bojana; Lecić, Jelena

    2014-08-01

    Developmental disorders of teeth are the problems that are becoming more present in pediatric dentistry, especially on first permanent molars and incisors. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is proposed term for this phenomenon. The aim of this study was to establish the MIH prevalence in children living in the Foca municipality (Bosnia and Herzegovina) as well as to assess characteristics and expression of hypomineralization within the tested population. A total of 141 children from the Foca municipality, 8 years of age, were included in this study. Criteria according to Weerhejm have been used for diagnosis of hypomineralization: demarcated opacity (DO), post-eruptive breakdown (PEB), atypical restoration (AR), extracted molars due to MIH (E-MIH) and unerupted tooth (UT). Level and the prominence of color changes have been determined for patients with DO, PEB and AR. MIH in this area was present in 12.8% of children. The prevalence of MIH changes expressed in percentages was as follows: DO was at 9.2%, PEB in 3.5%, AR in 5.6%, while E-MIH was 5.6%. A total of 9.9% of the examinees had mild, 5.6% moderate, and 7.8% severe form of MIH. White form of MIH defects was found in 9.9% of the examinees, white-yellow one in 5.6% and yellow-brown color in 3.5% of the examined children. These changes were more often present in the lower jaw (60.3%). In total, 6.4% of children had these changes present only on molars, while 6.4% of them both on molars and incisors simultaneously. A total of 12.8% of the examinees with MIH is not to be disregarded. With timely diagnosis, prevention and therapy complications could be avoided or mitigated.

  17. Distribution and characteristics of molar-incisor hypomineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Svjetlana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Developmental disorders of teeth are the problems that are becoming more present in pediatric dentistry, especially on first permanent molars and incisors. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH is proposed term for this phenomenon. The aim of this study was to establish the MIH prevalence in children living in the Foča municipality (Bosnia and Herzegovina as well as to assess characteristics and expression of hypomineralization within the tested population. Methods. A total of 141 children from the Foča municipality, 8 years of age, were included in this study. Criteria according to Weerhejm have been used for diagnosis of hypomineralization: demarcated opacity (DO, post-eruptive breakdown (PEB, atypical restoration (AR, extracted molars due to MIH (E-MIH and unerupted tooth (UT. Level and the prominence of color changes have been determined for patients with DO, PEB and AR. Results. MIH in this area was present in 12.8% of children. The prevalence of MIH changes expressed in percentages was as follows: DO was at 9.2%, PEB in 3.5%, AR in 5.6%, while E-MIH was 5.6%. A total of 9.9% of the examinees had mild, 5.6% moderate, and 7.8% severe form of MIH. White form of MIH defects was found in 9.9% of the examinees, white-yellow one in 5.6% and yellow-brown color in 3.5% of the examined children. These changes were more often present in the lower jaw (60.3%. In total, 6.4% of children had these changes present only on molars, while 6.4% of them both on molars and incisors simultaneously. Conclusion. A total of 12.8% of the examinees with MIH is not to be disregarded. With timely diagnosis, prevention and therapy complications could be avoided or mitigated.

  18. Alveolar bone width preservation after decoronation of ankylosed anterior incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaul; Schwarz-Arad, Dvorah; Ashkenazi, Malka

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the alteration of alveolar ridge dimensions after decoronation procedures in children and adolescents at least 1 year after surgery. Twelve children who underwent decoronation of ankylosed maxillary anterior incisors with at least 1 year after surgery follow-up were recalled for reevaluation. All decoronations were performed when the ankylosed teeth were submerged 1-1.5 mm. During the recall appointment, impressions of the upper arch were obtained. The bucco-palatal alveolar dimensions of the decoronated teeth were measured on the cast at the mid-mesiodistal distance from the missing tooth and were compared with the distance from the contralateral healthy incisor. Overall, 12 children (9 male and 3 female) were reevaluated up to 82 months after decoronation (mean, 49.58 ± 24 months). The mean age of the patients at the time of trauma was 9.83 ± 2.8 years. The average bucco-palatal dimension of the alveolar ridge at the mid-decoronation area was 9 ± 1 mm compared with 10.17 ± 0.9 mm at the contralateral homologous tooth (difference of 1.67 ± 1.12, P = .004). The findings show a positive statistical correlation between the duration of the follow-up period and the bucco-palatal dimension of the alveolar ridge (P = .027). Although decoronation of ankylosed young permanent incisors resulted in a decrease in the bucco-palatal dimension with time, it did not prevent additional alveolar growth that occurs with age in a developing child and thus may help maintain the alveolar bone ridge width, height, and continuity and assist in future rehabilitation with less invasive ridge augmentation procedures required for implant placement. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dental caries pattern of first and second permanent molars and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only 421(2.5%) teeth were carious in 143(23.8%) subjects. First permanent molars had the highest caries prevalence rate (9.3%), followed by second permanent molars (7.8%), while premolars (0.13%), incisors (0.08%) and canines (0%) had the lowest rates. Pit and fissure caries on occlusal surfaces was the most ...

  20. Gingival recession following apical surgery in the esthetic zone: a clinical study with 70 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Salvi, Giovanni E; Janner, Simone

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated gingival recession 1 year following apical surgery of 70 maxillary anterior teeth (central and lateral incisors, canines, and first premolars). A visual assessment of the mid-facial aspect of the gingival level and of papillary heights of treated teeth was carried out...

  1. Non-Syndromic Oligodontia in permanent dentition: A case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of a syndrome. The present case report highlights a unique case of non syndromic oligodontia, with agenesis of four permanent incisors, left permanent canine and right second premolar in the mandibular arch and its management with a novel fixed functional prosthetic appliance. Prosthetic rehabilitation is an urgent need ...

  2. Buccal bone thickness at dental implants in the aesthetic zone : A 1-year follow-up cone beam computed tomography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, Kirsten W.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    Sufficient buccal bone thickness (BBT) is important for an optimal aesthetic outcome of implant treatment in the aesthetic zone. The aim of the study was to assess BBT at dental implants placed in the aesthetic zone (incisor, canine or first premolar in the maxilla) (immediate or delayed, with or

  3. Bilateral Complete and Incomplete Fusion of Incisors and its Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Godwin Clovis; Chalakkal, Paul; De Souza, Neil; Gavhane, Sanket

    2017-01-01

    This case report highlights the management of a case of bilateral complete and incomplete fusion of maxillary incisors in a 10-year-old child. A mock-up was done on the diagnostic cast. Pretreatment esthetic evaluation was done using bis-acryl composite temporaries which were transferred intraorally from the diagnostic cast using a putty index. An incisal overlap veneer preparation was done, following which, an IPS e-max veneer was cemented. A digital mock-up was carried out using the Adobe Photoshop and Corel Draw softwares to aid in laboratorial fabrication of the veneer.

  4. Bilateral complete and incomplete fusion of incisors and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godwin Clovis Da Costa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report highlights the management of a case of bilateral complete and incomplete fusion of maxillary incisors in a 10-year-old child. A mock-up was done on the diagnostic cast. Pretreatment esthetic evaluation was done using bis-acryl composite temporaries which were transferred intraorally from the diagnostic cast using a putty index. An incisal overlap veneer preparation was done, following which, an IPS e-max veneer was cemented. A digital mock-up was carried out using the Adobe Photoshop and Corel Draw softwares to aid in laboratorial fabrication of the veneer.

  5. Surgical innovations in canine gonadectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Goethem, Bart

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis some recent technological developments in human surgery are evaluated for their potential use in veterinary medicine by introducing them as surgical innovations for canine gonadectomy. Barbed sutures achieve wound apposition without surgical knot tying and thus avoid knot-associated

  6. Prognostic markers of canine pyometra

    OpenAIRE

    M.C. Sant'Anna; L.G.P. Giordano; K.K.M.C. Flaiban; E.E. Muller; M.I.M. Martins

    2014-01-01

    The pyometra is a disease that affects middle age and elderly female dogs during diestrus. Hormonal, microbiological, biochemical and hematological aspects are well described. However, few studies have evaluated the role of each in the prognosis of canine pyometra. The aim of this study was to identify markers associated with clinical worsening of dogs with pyometra. We prospectively evaluated 80 dogs with pyometra tre...

  7. Immunohistochemical Characterization of Canine Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana CORA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lymphomas occur by clonal expansion of lymphoid cells and have distinctive morphological and immunophenotypic features. Determination of canine lymphoma immunophenotype is useful for accurate prognosis and further therapy. In the suggested study, we performed an immunohistochemical evaluation of some cases with canine lymphoma diagnosed in the Department of Pathology (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, in order to characterize them. The investigation included 39 dogs diagnosed with different anatomical forms of lymphoma, following necropsy analysis or assessment of biopsies. The diagnosis of lymphoma was confirmed by necropsy and histopathology (Hematoxylin-eosin stain examinations. The collected specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry technique (automatic method using the following antibodies: CD3, CD20, CD21 and CD79a. The analyzed neoplasms were characterized as follows: about 64.10% of cases were diagnosed as B-cell lymphomas, 33.34% of cases as T-cell lymphomas, whereas 2.56% of cases were null cell type lymphomas (neither B nor T. Most of multicentric (80%, mediastinal (60% and primary central nervous system lymphomas (100% had B immunophenotype, while the majority of cutaneous (80% and digestive (100% lymphomas had T immunophenotype. Immunohistochemical description of canine lymphomas can deliver some major details concerning their behavior and malignancy. Additionally, vital prognosis and efficacy of some therapeutic protocols are relying on the immunohistochemical features of canine lymphoma.

  8. The Late Neandertal permanent lower left third premolar from Walou Cave (Trooz, Belgium) and its context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Michel; Verna, Christine; Le Cabec, Adeline; Gómez-Robles, Aida; Draily, Christelle; Richards, Michael P; Pirson, Stéphane

    2017-09-01

    We describe a hominin permanent lower left third premolar unearthed in 1997 at Walou Cave (Belgium), found in direct association with a Mousterian lithic industry, in a layer directly dated to 40-38,000 years BP. The taxonomical attribution of the tooth is addressed through comparative morphometric analyses, and stable isotope analyses aimed at determining the diet of the individual. The Walou P 3 plots within the Neandertal range of variation and is significantly different from recent modern humans in all morphometric assessments. The isotope data showed that like other Neandertals, the Walou individual acquired its dietary proteins primarily from terrestrial food sources. We discuss the implications of the existence of a clearly Neandertal premolar dating to the period of the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition in the Meuse river basin. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Root canal treatment of three-rooted mandibular second premolar using cone-beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ahmad Alenezi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A careful knowledge of root canals anatomy of different teeth is a corner stone for a successful outcome of root canal therapy. This reported case illustrates root canal therapy of a mandibular second premolar with three separated roots and root canals. An 18-year-old Saudi male presented for non-surgical endodontic treatment of mandibular right second premolar. Radiographic and clinical examinations revealed the presence of three roots and three root canals. The case was successfully managed with the help of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. In conclusion, the clinicians should always suspect the event of anatomical varieties and use all the available tools to diagnose and manage their cases.

  10. Fracture Resistance and Failure Mode of Endodontically Treated Premolars Restored with Different Adhesive Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Sarabi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The restoration of endodontically treated teeth is a topic that has been studied extensively but it is still a challenge for dental practitioners. The aim of this study was to evaluate fracture resistance, fracture patterns and fracture location of endodontically treated human maxillary premolars restored with direct and indirect composite resin and ceramic restoration. Methods: Eighty non-carious maxillary premolars were selected and divided into four groups (n=20. Endodontic treatment and mesio-occluso-distal preparations were carried out in all the groups except for the control group (group I. Subsequently, the prepared teeth were restored as follows: group II: indirect composite restoration; group III: ceramic restoration; group IV: direct composite restoration. The specimens were subjected to compressive axial loading until fracture occurred. The mode of failure was also recorded. Results: Group I had higher fracture resistance (1196.82±241.74 than the other groups (P

  11. Comparison of the dental anomaly frequency in patients with and without mandibular second premolar agenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Cantekin, Kenan; Celikoglu, Mevlut

    2015-01-01

    Background/purpose: There is remarkably little information in the literature comparing the prevalence of dental anomalies associated with mandibular second premolar (MP2) agenesis with control groups. The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency of dental anomalies associated with agenesis of the MP2, and to compare the results with control groups. Materials and methods: A total of 4812 panoramic radiographs (also called orthopantograms, OPGs) and dental casts were used to...

  12. Cuspal Fracture Resistance of Maxillary Premolar Teeth Restored With 5 Different Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Daneshkazemi

    2015-07-01

    Results:There was a high significant difference among all the groups. The average fracture resistance values were as follows: group A 236.19 N, group B 289.81 N, group C 333.07 N, group D 459.31 N and group E 165.04 N. Conclusion: Regarding the higher cuspal fracture resistance in group D, it can be definitely possible to apply this method to restore destructed and carious maxillary premolar teeth with more reliability.

  13. Endodontic retreatment - unusual anatomy of a maxillary second and mandibular first premolar: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarnath Shenoy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An accurate diagnosis of the morphology of the root canal system is a prerequisite for successful root canal treatment. A major cause of endodontic treatment failure in missed (or untreated root canals is that they still harbor infection. Careful radiographic interpretation and examination of pulp chamber floors are helpful in locating root canal entrances. These case reports present anatomical variations in upper and lower premolars.

  14. Tooth loss treatment in the anterior region: Autotransplantation of premolars and cryopreservation

    OpenAIRE

    Hans Ulrik Paulsen; Jens Ove Andreasen; Ole Schwartz

    2016-01-01

    Avulsed and lost anterior teeth are common in young people. Using autotransplantation, it is possible to move problems in dental arches to regions where they are easier to solve orthodontically. Transplantation of premolars with three-quarter root formation or full root formation with wide open apical foramina provides the best prognosis for long-term survival. This article describes the use of autotransplantation and orthodontic treatment, together with cryopreservation, in connection with c...

  15. Root canal morphology of mandibular first premolar in a Gujarati population - An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge about root canal morphology and its frequent variations can exert considerable influence on the success of endodontic treatment. The aim of this study was to survey the root canal morphology of mandibular first premolar teeth in a Gujarati population by decalcification and clearing technique. Methods : One hundred thirty eight extracted mandibular first premolar teeth were collected from a Gujarati population. After decalcifying and clearing, the teeth were examined for tooth length, number of cusps and roots, number and shape of canal orifices and canal types. Results: The average length of mandibular first premolar teeth was 21.2 mm. All the teeth had 2 cusps. One hundred thirty four teeth (97.1% had one root, and just 4 teeth (2.89% had two roots. Mesial invagination of root was found in 21 teeth (15.21%. One canal orifice was found in 122 teeth (88.4% and two canal orifices in 16 teeth (11.59%. Shape of orifices was found to be round in 46 teeth (33.33%, oval in 72 teeth (52.17% and flattened ribbion in 20 teeth (14.49%. According to Vertucci′s classification, Type I canal system was found in 93 teeth (67.39%, Types II,III,IV,V,and VI in 11 teeth (7.97%, 5 teeth (3.62%, 4 teeth (2.89%, 24 teeth (17.39%, and 1 tooth (0.72% respectively. Conclusion: Mandibular first premolar teeth were mostly found to have one root and Type I canal system.

  16. Regenerative endodontic treatment for necrotic immature permanent premolar: A report of case

    OpenAIRE

    Sheetal B Ghivari; Deepti Khanchandani; Asim Jamadar

    2017-01-01

    Regenerative endodontic procedures provide new hope of converting nonvital tooth into vital once again. These potential regenerative approaches include root canal revascularization, postnatal stem-cell therapy, pulp implant, scaffold implant, three-dimensional cell printing, injectable scaffolds, and gene therapy. In this article, we describe successful revascularization treatment of necrotic permanent premolar tooth. Clinical and radiographic examination showed pulp involvement due to deep p...

  17. Modified serial extraction treatment in a patient with congenitally missing lower second premolars

    OpenAIRE

    Al Hummayani, Fadia Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Serial extraction is a sequential plan of premature removal of one or more deciduous teeth in order to improve the alignment of permanent teeth and then removal of permanent teeth to maintain the proper ratio between tooth size and arch size. The aim of this case report was to present a case treated successfully with a modified serial extraction protocol in the lower arch because the patient had congenitally missing lower second premolars with severe crowding. The treatment consisted of selec...

  18. Severe Impaction of the Primary Mandibular Second Molar Accompanied by Displacement of the Permanent Second Premolar

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuyama, Junko; Kinoshita-Kawano, Shoko; Hayashi-Sakai, Sachiko; Mitomi, Tomoe; Sano-Asahito, Tomiko

    2015-01-01

    Tooth impaction is defined as any tooth that fails to erupt into a normal functional position and remains unerupted beyond the time at which it should normally erupt. Reports of impaction and eruption failure in primary teeth are relatively rare compared to permanent teeth. We report 2 rare cases where the second premolar was located on the occlusal side of the impacted mandibular second primary molar. In the first case, the succedaneous permanent tooth erupted after extraction of the primary...

  19. Ontogeny of canine dimorphism in extant hominoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, G T; Dean, C

    2001-07-01

    Many behavioral and ecological factors influence the degree of expression of canine dimorphism for different reasons. Regardless of its socioecological importance, we know virtually nothing about the processes responsible for the development of canine dimorphism. Our aim here is to describe the developmental process(es) regulating canine dimorphism in extant hominoids, using histological markers of tooth growth. Teeth preserve a permanent record of their ontogeny in the form of short- and long-period incremental markings in both enamel and dentine. We selected 52 histological sections of sexed hominoid canine teeth from a total sample of 115, from which we calculated the time and rate of cuspal enamel formation and the rate at which ameloblasts differentiate along the future enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) to the end of crown formation. Thus, we were able to reconstruct longitudinal growth curves for height attainment in male and female hominoid canines. Male hominoids consistently take longer to form canine crowns than do females (although not significantly so for our sample of Homo). Male orangutans and gorillas occasionally take up to twice as long as females to complete enamel formation. The mean ranges of female canine crown formation times are similar in Pan, Gorilla, and Pongo. Interspecific differences between female Pan canine crown heights and those of Gorilla and Pongo, which are taller, result from differences in rates of growth. Differences in canine crown heights between male Pan and the taller, more dimorphic male Gorilla and Pongo canines result both from differences in total time taken to form enamel and from faster rates of growth in Gorilla and Pongo. Although modern human canines do not emerge as significantly dimorphic in this study, it is well-known that sexual dimorphism in canine crown height exists. Larger samples of sexed modern human canines are therefore needed to identify clearly what underlies this. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. [Sequence orthodontic treatment of impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Pang, Xuannai; Nan, Lan; Mo, Shuixue

    2012-06-01

    To explore an effective orthodontic method for treating impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors. 12 impacted teeth of 11 cases were chosen. The position of the impacted teeth and the relations with neighbour tissues were assessed by X-ray images, oral examination and plaster model, etc. The impacted teeth were induced to erupt with the closed-eruption technique and fixed orthodontic appliances, root canal therapy, apicoectomy and prosthetic treatment. 12 impacted teeth were moved into arches, and the occlusal relationship was normal. There were no root resorption or conglutination in those impacted teeth. The labial impacted teeth of nine cases had bigger labial crown torsion. The root apexes of four impacted teeth were palpable under mucosa of the labial sulcus and operated by root canal therapy and apicoectomy. One of them received prosthetic treatment. Others (five cases) hadn't accepted root canal therapy, and were observed temporarily. The effects of two palatal impacted teeth was stable. It was a good method to expand indication with sequence orthodontic treatment. The impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors could be aligned with good esthetical and functional effect.

  1. Hypomineralized Second Primary Molars as Predictor of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negre-Barber, A; Montiel-Company, J M; Boronat-Catalá, M; Catalá-Pizarro, M; Almerich-Silla, J M

    2016-08-25

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect of dental enamel that shares features with hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPM). Prior to permanent tooth eruption, second primary molars could have predictive value for permanent molar and incisor hypomineralization. To assess this possible relationship, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 8 and 9 years from the INMA cohort in Valencia (Spain). A calibrated examiner (linear-weighted Kappa 0.83) performed the intraoral examinations at the University of Valencia between November 2013 and 2014, applying the diagnostic criteria for MIH and HSPM adopted by the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry. 100 children (24.2%) presented MIH and 60 (14.5%) presented HSPM. Co-occurrence of the two defects was observed in 11.1% of the children examined. The positive predictive value was 76.7% (63.9-86.6) and the negative predictive value 84.7% (80.6-88.3). The positive likelihood ratio (S/1-E) was 10.3 (5.9-17.9) and the negative likelihood ratio (1-S/E) 0.57 (0.47-0.68). The odds ratio was 18.2 (9.39-35.48). It was concluded that while the presence of HSPM can be considered a predictor of MIH, indicating the need for monitoring and control, the absence of this defect in primary dentition does not rule out the appearance of MIH.

  2. [Eccentric projection for the observation of the root canals of the upper premolars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimano, T; Hirota, S; Omochi, M; Daibo, M

    1990-11-01

    Information on the length and the shape of the root canals is necessary in dental care. They are obtained from X-ray examination of teeth. However, it is useful to apply eccentric projection for optimization in dental radiography. We observed 135 teeth and 355 films of extracted upper premolars, and tried to establish the standard of eccentric projection for the observation of root canals of the upper premolars, on the basis of the calculations and the experiments. 1. Shapes of root canals in the upper premolars are classified into 3 types with 3 subtypes. The rate of teeth with one root was 69.6%, but the rate of teeth with two root canals was 43%. These indicate the necessity of the eccentric projection in dental radiography, although there is a limit to the ability of X-ray film for confirmation of real condition of the root canals. 2. Optimal eccentric projection angle was 20 degrees-25 degrees. There is no significant difference between the paralleling technique and bisecting technique. There is no significant difference between the mesial and distal eccentric projection. But, the mesial eccentric projection is more effective for the observation of whole root and the ease of radiographic technique than the distal eccentric projection.

  3. Sexual dimorphism, pattern of third molar and mandibular second premolar agenesis in Indian paediatric orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Apurva; Pandey, Ramesh K

    2017-04-01

    To determine and compare the prevalence and pattern of agenesis of third molar and mandibular second premolar in paediatric orthodontic patients of age group 9-15 for sexual dimorphism. The digital orthopantograph was obtained from the archive record of patients of age group 9-15 year. Radiographs of 301 patients were evaluated after taking exclusion criteria into account and were assessed for the presence/absence of third molars and mandibular second premolar. Tooth development evaluation followed the method of Demirjian et al., based on eight stages of tooth formation. The agenesis of third molar in maxilla and mandible between age groups and gender was compared using Chi-squared test. The rate of agenesis of third molars was observed 36.8% in the present study. Twenty-four (24.3%) percentage of the study population showed agenesis of all the four third molars. The agenesis of third molars was found to be higher among males than females ( p  > 0.05). Prevalence of agenesis of mandibular second premolar was 4.7-5%. Agenesis of third molars was more commonly seen in the maxilla, having male predilection. Maxillary right third molar was the most commonly missing tooth irrespective of gender.

  4. Arrested root formation of 4 second premolars: report of a patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Maria L; Gong, Siew-Ging

    2012-05-01

    The shape and size of tooth roots are genetically and phylogenetically predetermined. Clinical defects in root formation can manifest in the form of shortened roots caused by either root agenesis or root resorption. We report on a patient who came at age 7 years for space management. In the 2-year period after the initial visit, maxillary arch expansion was performed, followed by serial extractions of all 4 first premolars. A radiograph taken about 18 months after the serial extraction showed that although the crowns of all 4 second premolars had erupted fully into the arch, the roots were only about half of their normal length. With a family history of 1 sibling with a missing second premolar and the symmetrical distribution and pattern of the teeth in the 4 dental quadrants, we speculated that the arrested root development was due most likely to a genetic predisposition. Arrested root development is difficult to predict, but a potential warning sign is a family history of malformed or missing teeth. Proper, adequate, and accurate records continue to remain critical for both medical and legal purposes in the treatment of patients with potential problems in root agenesis. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Immediate loading of subcrestally placed dental implants in anterior and premolar sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Anders; Smeets, Ralf; Köppen, Kai; Sehner, Susanne; Kornmann, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Gerlach, Till

    2017-11-01

    Immediate loading of dental implants has been evolving into an appropriate procedure for the treatment of partially edentulous jaws. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical success and radiological outcome of immediately and delayed loaded dental implants in anterior and premolar sites. In this retrospective study, data of 163 individuals requiring tooth removal with subsequent implant placement in anterior and premolar sites were analyzed. Implants were immediately loaded by provisional acrylic resin bridges or loaded with delay. Implants were followed up annually for up to 9 years including intraoral radiographs. A total of 285 implants in 163 patients were placed. 218 implants were immediately loaded and 67 implants with delay. Fifteen implants failed during the follow-up period resulting in survival rates of 94.5% for immediate loading and 95.5% for delayed loading. After an initial decrease of 0.3 mm in the first 12 months the marginal bone level remained stable. No statistically significant differences were found in marginal bone loss between immediately and delayed loaded implants (P = 0.518, 95% CI). Within the limits of this study, immediate loading of immediately subcrestally placed dental implants in anterior and premolar sites is a reliable treatment option for dental rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxygen Saturation in the Dental Pulp of Maxillary Premolars in Different Age Groups - Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Carlos; Serpa, Giuliano C; Alencar, Ana Helena G; Bruno, Kely F; Barletta, Fernando B; Felippe, Wilson T; Estrela, Cyntia R A; Souza, João B

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine oxygen saturation levels in the dental pulp of maxillary premolars in different age groups. A total of 120 human maxillary premolars with normal dental pulps were selected covering the following age groups: 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39 and 40-44 years (n=24 each group). Oxygen saturation was assessed using pulse oximetry. Analysis of variance was used to assess differences in oxygen saturation levels and Tukey's test was used to identify the age groups that differed from each other. Significance was set at 0.05. Mean oxygen saturation of 120 premolars was 86.20% considering all age groups. Significantly reduced levels were found in the oldest group compared to the other groups: 40 to 44 years - 80.00% vs. 89.71, 87.67, 88.71, and 84.80% for age groups 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39 years, respectively. The mean oxygen saturation levels were similar between 20 and 39 years of age (86.20%) in the whole sample, but reduced significantly in the 40-44-year age group, suggesting that older patients present lower oxygen saturation results even in the absence of pulp tissue injury.

  7. Diagnosis and root canal treatment in a mandibular premolar with three canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Lanuce Rosa; Arruda, Marcos; de Arruda, Marcos Pôrto; Rangel, Andréa Leão; Takano, Edson; de Carvalho Júnior, Jacy Ribeiro; Saquy, Paulo Cesar

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a case report of a left mandibular second premolar with three canals and three different apical foramina. A 39-year-old male patient presented to our clinic with pain in the mandibular left second premolar. Initially, pain was caused by cold stimulus and later was spontaneously. The intraoral clinical examination revealed a fractured amalgam restoration with occlusal caries. Percussion and cold (Endo-Frost) tests were positive. The radiographic examination showed the presence of two roots. The probable diagnosis was an acute pulpitis. After access cavity, it was observed remaining roof of the pulp chamber and mild bleeding in the tooth lingual area, indicating the possible presence of a third canal. The endodontic treatment was completed in a single session using Root ZX apex locator and K3 NiTi rotary system with surgical diameter corresponding to a .02/45 file in the three canals and irrigation with 1% sodium hypochlorite. The canals were obtured with gutta-percha cones and Sealer 26 using the lateral condensation technique. After 1 year of follow-up, the tooth was asymptomatic and periapical repair was observed radiographically. Internal alterations should be considered during the endodontic treatment of mandibular second premolars. The correct diagnosis of these alterations by the analysis of preoperative radiographs can help the location of two or more canals, thereby avoiding root therapy failure.

  8. Evaluation of the maxillary premolar roots dissociation using radiographic holders with conventional and digital radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Regina Ramalho da Silva Bardauil

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This in vivo study evaluated the dissociation quality of maxillary premolar roots combining variations of vertical and horizontal angulations by using X-ray holders (Rinn -XCP, and made a comparison between two types of intraoral radiography systems - conventional film (Kodak Insight, Rochester, USA and digital radiography (Kodak RVG 6100, Kodak, Rochester, USA. The study sample was comprised of 20 patients with a total of 20 maxillary premolars that were radiographed, using the paralleling angle technique (GP, with a 20º variation of the horizontal angle (GM and 25º variation of the horizontal angle combined with 15º vertical angle (GMV. Each image was independently analyzed by two experienced examiners. These examiners assigned a score to the diagnostic capability of root dissociation and the measurement of the distance between the apexes. Statistical data was derived using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, Friedman and T test. The means of the measured distances between buccal and lingual root apexes were greater for the GMV, which ranged from 2.3 mm to 3.3 mm. A statistically significant difference was found between GM and GMV when compared to GP with p < 0.01. An established best diagnostic dissociation roots image was found in the GMV. These results support the use of the anterior X-ray holders which offer a better combined deviation (GMV to dissociate maxillary premolar roots in both radiography systems.

  9. How to predict the timing of eruption of mandibular second premolars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Eduardo Martinelli; Schmidt, Caroline Bom; de Araujo, Laura Lütz; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon; Martinelli, Fernando Lima

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the relationship between the stages of dental formation and the timing of eruption of mandibular second premolars. The sample comprised panoramic radiographs of 25 children, 7 to 12 years old, observed by space supervision during development of dentition. The initial radiograph (T1) was taken in the mixed dentition period and the progress radiograph (T2) close to the eruption of mandibular second premolars. The stages of dental formation were determined by the proportion between crown length and total length (CL/TL) as well by the Simpson and Kunos index. Average values between right and left sides (35, 45) were correlated to the time elapsed until dental eruption (T2-T1). Statistical analysis was performed by Pearson correlation analysis. The proportion CL/TL presented higher correlation index with time to eruption than the Simpson and Kunos index. The linear regression equation for prediction of timing of eruption showed high coefficient of determination, low deviation, and good accuracy. According to survival analysis, mean deviation at 95% confidence level was between 3.6 and 6.4 months. There was no difference in contralateral measurements, with high intraclass correlation coefficient for both CL/TL proportion and Simpson and Kunos index. More advanced stages of dental formation indicate less time until dental eruption. The strong correlation with crown length/total length proportion (CL/TL) provides a linear regression equation for prediction of the timing of eruption of mandibular second premolars.

  10. Fracture Resistance of Premolars Restored by Various Types and Placement Techniques of Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horieh Moosavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To verify the fracture resistance of premolars with mesioocclusodistal preparations restored by different resin composites and placement techniques. Sixty premolars were randomly divided into two groups based on type of composite resin: Filtek P60 or Nulite F, and then each group was separated into three subgroups: bulk, centripetal, and fiber insert according to the type of placement method (n=10. Single-bond adhesive system was used as composite bonding according to the manufacturer's instructions. Specimens were restored in Groups 1, 2, and 3 with Filtek P60 and in Groups 4, 5, and 6 with Nulite F. After being stored 24 hours at 37∘C, a 4 mm diameter steel sphere in a universal testing machine was applied on tooth buccal and lingual cusps at a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min until fracture occurred. Groups 3 and 6 showed higher fracture resistance than Groups 1, 2, 4, and 5. Among the placement techniques, the fiber insert method had a significant effect, but the type of composite was ineffective. The insertion technique in contrast to the type of material had a significant influence on the fracture resistance of premolar teeth.

  11. Numerical fatigue analysis of premolars restored by CAD/CAM ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homaei, Ehsan; Jin, Xiao-Zhuang; Pow, Edmond Ho Nang; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Farhangdoost, Khalil

    2018-04-10

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the fatigue life of premolars restored with two dental ceramics, lithium disilicate (LD) and polymer infiltrated ceramic (PIC) using the numerical method and compare it with the published in vitro data. A premolar restored with full-coverage crown was digitized. The volumetric shape of tooth tissues and crowns were created in Mimics ® . They were transferred to IA-FEMesh for mesh generation and the model was analyzed with Abaqus. By combining the stress distribution results with fatigue stress-life (S-N) approach, the lifetime of restored premolars was predicted. The predicted lifetime was 1,231,318 cycles for LD with fatigue load of 1400N, while the one for PIC was 475,063 cycles with the load of 870N. The peak value of maximum principal stress occurred at the contact area (LD: 172MPa and PIC: 96MPa) and central fossa (LD: 100MPa and PIC: 64MPa) for both ceramics which were the most seen failure areas in the experiment. In the adhesive layer, the maximum shear stress was observed at the shoulder area (LD: 53.6MPa and PIC: 29MPa). The fatigue life and failure modes of all-ceramic crown determined by the numerical method seem to correlate well with the previous experimental study. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical recommendations for management of mesiodens and unerupted permanent maxillary central incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, E; Kennedy, D; Wiebe, C

    2014-12-01

    Un-erupted maxillary incisors may result secondary to supernumerary teeth. Despite the removal of such mesiodentes, orthodontic traction of a permanent un-erupted maxillary incisor may be required. The literature regarding the impacted maxillary central incisor(s) was reviewed and all pertinent publications on the subject assessed. The review specifically relative to mesiodentes, surgical exposure and orthodontic management was interpreted together with the clinical experience of a number of the authors' cases. From this analysis a set of recommendations was developed. (1) A sufficient arch space has to be ensured or orthodontically created for permanent maxillary central incisor(s). (2) Early surgical extraction of a mesiodens or mesiodentes (ideally before 7 years of age), with simultaneous closed surgical exposure of the permanent impacted maxillary incisor with bonding of an attachment with gold chain. (3) Re-evaluation after 2-3 months to assess for any natural eruption of the maxillary central incisor. (4) Application of orthodontic traction in the event of non-eruption. Early diagnosis of the presence of mesiodentes is imperative. Appropriate surgical and/or orthodontic traction is often indicated with regular post-surgical follow-up assessments.

  13. Orthodontic Management of Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Paduano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a woman, aged 15 years, with permanent dentition, brachyfacial typology, with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors. Multibracket straightwire fixed appliance was used to open the space for dental implant placement, and treat the impaired occlusion. The missing lateral incisors were substituted with oral implants.

  14. Preplanning contemporary incisor positioning using inclinometer: A clinical and cephalometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Birla

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Third-order measurements using inclinometer device can offer a simple way to get an objective and rapid vision of the incisors inclination and might be a helpful guideline to the choice of low or high torque brackets. Incisor inclination is strongly correlated with skeletal-sagittal data, but little with skeletal-vertical findings.

  15. Management of Traumatic Injury to Maxillary Central Incisors associated with Inverted Mesiodens: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuluri, Chaitanya; Nuvvula, Sivakumar

    2013-01-01

    Maxillary incisors are the most frequently injured teeth in the primary and permanent dentition. Stage of adolescence show a significant number of dental injuries as they engage in contact sports. Children with accident prone profile, i.e. class II division I or class I type II malocclusion are more prone for injuries because of the proclined maxillary incisors. Supernumerary teeth are those that are additional to the normal complement. They occur in single or multiple, unilateral or bilateral in either of the jaws. This paper reports the presence of an inverted supernumerary tooth in the right maxillary central incisor region with trauma involving both maxillary central incisors and also the management of the supernumerary tooth and traumatized teeth in a 14-year-old boy. How to cite this article: Pavuluri C, Nuvvula S. Management of Traumatic Injury to Maxillary Central Incisors associated with Inverted Mesiodens: A Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(1):30-32.

  16. Management of a Permanent Maxillary Lateral Incisor with Vital Pulp and Necrotic Dens Invaginatus Type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Thais Rodrigues Campos; Silva, Luciana Pereira da; Andrade Risso, Patrícia de; Maia, Lucianne Cople; Primo, Laura Guimarães

    2017-09-15

    This is a case report on the management of a vital lateral incisor with a radiolucent cervical area associated with the presence of necrotic pulp due to a dens invaginatus (DI) type III. A nine-year-old boy presented to a university pediatric dental clinic with dental trauma. The examination showed poor oral hygiene, an uncomplicated fracture in the permanent maxillary left central incisor, and a fistula near the permanent maxillary right lateral incisor. A radiograph showed that the right lateral incisor had incomplete root development and a type III DI. Although sensitive to thermal pulp testing, tracing of the fistula indicated that the radiolucent area was associated with the DI, extending laterally to the periodontal ligament. Endodontic treatment was performed only in the invagination, keeping the root canal of the lateral incisor vital. After two years of follow-up, complete root formation and injury repair associated with invagination were observed.

  17. One-step triplex PCR/RT-PCR to detect canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus, and canine kobuvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dafei; Liu, Fei; Guo, Dongchun; Hu, Xiaoliang; Li, Zhijie; Li, Zhigang; Ma, Jianzhang; Liu, Chunguo

    2018-01-23

    To rapidly distinguish Canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), and canine kobuvirus (CaKoV) in practice, a one-step multiplex PCR/RT-PCR assay was developed, with detection limits of 10 2.1 TCID 50 for CDV, 10 1.9 TCID 50 for CPV and 10 3 copies for CaKoV. This method did not amplify nonspecific DNA or RNA from other canine viruses. Therefore, the assay provides a sensitive tool for the rapid clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance of CDV, CPV and CaKoV in dogs.

  18. [Canine teeth impacted in the palate--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovcencu, Loredana; Costan, V V

    2011-01-01

    Maxillary canines have the longest period of development, the deepest area of formation and the most difficult path of all teeth. The maxillary canines are the most likely to remain unerupted or impacted. The maxillary permanent canine is considered important by virtue of its place in the scheme of functional occlusion and its contribution to facial appearance. We successfully orthodontically treated two cases with palatally impacted canines. Although both cases had palatally impacted canines, they were different due to canine position and angulation.

  19. Effect of composite/amalgam thickness on fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth, restored with combined amalgam-composite restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Firouzmandi, Maryam; Doozandeh, Maryam; Jowkar, Zahra; Abbasi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Combined amalgam-composite restorations have been used through many years to benefit from the advantages of both dental amalgam and composite resin. Two variations have been mentioned for this technique, this study investigated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth with extended mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities, restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restorations. Material and Methods Sixty intact extracted premolar teeth were randomly divid...

  20. Cuspal Deflection of Premolars Restored with Bulk-Fill Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behery, Haytham; El-Mowafy, Omar; El-Badrawy, Wafa; Saleh, Belal; Nabih, Sameh

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro study compared cuspal deflection of premolars restored with three bulk-fill composite resins to that of incrementally-restored ones with a low-shrinkage silorane-based restorative material. Forty freshly-extracted intact human upper premolars were used. Reference points at buccal and palatal cusp tips were acid-etched and composite rods were horizontally bonded to them (TPH-Spectra-HV, Dentsply). Two acrylic resin guiding paths were made for each premolar to guide beaks of a digital micrometer used for cuspal deflection measurements. Standardized MOD cavities, 3 mm wide bucco-lingually and 3.5 mm deep, were prepared on each premolar. Prepared teeth were then equally divided into four groups (n = 10) and each group was assigned to one of four composite resin (QuiXX, Dentsply; X-tra fil, Voco; Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, Ivoclar Vivadent; low-shrinkage Filtek LS, 3M/ESPE). Adper Single Bond-Plus, 3M/ESPE was used with all bulk-fill restoratives. LS-System Adhesive, 3M/ESPE was used with Filtek LS. For each prepared premolar, cuspal deflection was measured in microns as the difference between two readings between reference points before and after restoration completion. Means and SDs were calculated and data statistically-analyzed using One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Filtek LS showed the lowest mean cuspal deflection value 6.4(0.84)μm followed by Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill 10.1(1.2) μm and X-tra fil 12.4(1.35)μm, while QuiXX showed the highest mean 13(1.05)μm. ANOVA indicated significant difference among mean values of groups (p composite resins tested. Filtek LS had the lowest significant mean cuspal deflection in comparison to all tested bulk-fill restoratives. The use of Tetric EvoCeram Bulk fill composite resin restorative for class II MOD cavities resulted in reduced cuspal deflection in comparison to the two other bulk-fill composite resins tested. The silorane-based Filtek LS restorative resulted in the least cuspal deflection in

  1. Anatomical landmarks of maxillary bifurcated first premolars and their influence on periodontal diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dababneh, Reem; Rodan, Rania

    2013-01-01

    To assess the anatomical landmarks of the roots of bifurcated maxillary first premolars and study their effect on the diagnosis and management of periodontal disease. One hundred sixty-five maxillary first premolars were selected. The frequency of single-, two-rooted, and three-rooted premolars was assessed, but only the dual-rooted were used for the purpose of this study. For each tooth, the following measurements were obtained using a micrometer caliper: buccal and palatal root length, mesial and distal root trunk length, crown length, and width of the furcation entrance. The types of root trunk were classified according to the ratio of root trunk height to root length into types A, B and C. Root trunk types A, B and C are defined as root trunks involving the cervical third or less, up to half of the length of the root, or greater than the apical half of the root, respectively. The presence of any root grooves and concavities, as well as bifurational ridges, was assessed. The crown to root ratio was calculated. Of the 165 maxillary first premolar teeth retrieved, 100 (60.6%) were two-rooted, 62 (37.57%) were single-rooted, and three (1.81%) were triple-rooted. Type A root trunks comprised only 7% of the examined teeth, while types B and C had more or less comparable results (46% and 47% respectively). Type B was more common in distal root trunks while type C was dominant in mesial root trunks. Bifurcation ridges were observed in 37% of the teeth; the mean root trunk length was greater in teeth with bifurcation ridges than in teeth without (7.41 mm vs. 5.96 mm). Root grooves and concavities were found in 96% of the mesial aspects of the root, and in 57% of the palatal aspect of the buccal root. The mean width of the furcation entrance was 0.89 +/- 0.19 mm (range 0.39-1.28). The average crown to root ratio was 0.69:1. Awareness of root surface anatomical variations may help the practitioner when assessing the diagnosis, treatment plan and prognosis of periodontally

  2. Resorption of lateral incisors during canine eruption: two clinical cases with focus on root length and heredity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zargham, Mostafa; Kjær, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is well-known that pressure from orthodontic appliance can provoke root resorption in dentitions with short roots. The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate two clinical cases with focus on root length in dentitions exposed due to pressure from erupting teeth...

  3. Pentraxin-3 Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid during Canine Retraction with Nickel-Titanium Coil Spring and Active Tieback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thukral, Rakesh; Mangat, Sukhpreet; Ganguly, Anvesha; Agarkar, Sanket S; Bali, Harleen; Grover, Shekhar

    2017-08-01

    Orthodontic treatment is routinely carried out in patients with the purpose of correcting various forms of dental malocclusions. Retraction of the canines can be achieved either individually or along with incisor. Pentraxin-3 (PTX-3) is regarded as the true independent indicator of disease activity. Hence, we undertook the present study to assess and compare the level of PTX-3 in patients undergoing canine retraction with active tieback and Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) coil spring. The present study included assessment of 25 patients that underwent canine retraction as a part of fixed orthodontic treatment. In the maxillary right and left quadrant, active tieback and NiTi coil spring were used respectively. Gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected 1 hour prior to the commencement of orthodontic canine retraction procedure followed by collection at following time intervals: 1 hour, 1, 7, and 14 days after the start of canine retraction procedure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit was used for analysis of the samples as per manufacturer's instructions. All the data were recorded and compiled. All the results were analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Nonsignificant difference was observed in the values of PTX-3 at baseline and 1 hour. While comparing the mean PTX-3 values between different time intervals in both the study groups, significant difference was observed. In comparison to the active tieback, NiTi coil exhibited faster space closure rate. In patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, PTX-3 is associated with periodontal remodeling under the effect of orthodontic forces.

  4. Agenesis of permanent canines: Rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Kumar Yadav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Agenesis of permanent canines is a rare condition, and that of both maxillary and mandibular permanent canines is extremely rare. It may occur either isolated or in association with other dental anomalies. Reports of such cases are very scarce in the literature. Need for early diagnosis of such conditions should be emphasized because of functional, esthetic, and psychological problems which should be evaluated and treated appropriately. The present paper presents a report of bilaterally missing permanent maxillary and mandibular canines. This case might contribute in the future studies of incidence of agenesis of permanent canines.

  5. Agenesis of permanent canines: Rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sumit Kumar; Yadav, Achla Bharti; Kedia, Neal Bharat; Singh, Abhinav Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Agenesis of permanent canines is a rare condition, and that of both maxillary and mandibular permanent canines is extremely rare. It may occur either isolated or in association with other dental anomalies. Reports of such cases are very scarce in the literature. Need for early diagnosis of such conditions should be emphasized because of functional, esthetic, and psychological problems which should be evaluated and treated appropriately. The present paper presents a report of bilaterally missing permanent maxillary and mandibular canines. This case might contribute in the future studies of incidence of agenesis of permanent canines.

  6. Cryopreservation of microencapsulated canine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shambhu; Otsuki, Tsubasa; Fujimura, Chika; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamashita, Yasuhisa; Higaki, Shogo; Hishinuma, Mitsugu

    2011-03-01

    The objective was to develop a method for cryopreserving microencapsulated canine sperm. Pooled ejaculates from three beagle dogs were extended in egg yolk tris extender and encapsulated using alginate and poly-L-lysine at room temperature. The microcapsules were cooled at 4 °C, immersed in pre-cooled extender (equivalent in volume to the microcapsules) to reach final concentration of 7% (v/v) glycerol and 0.75% (v/v) Equex STM paste, and equilibrated for 5, 30 and 60 min at 4 °C. Thereafter, microcapsules were loaded into 0.5 mL plastic straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen. In Experiment 1, characteristics of microencapsulated canine sperm were evaluated after glycerol addition at 4 °C. Glycerol exposure for 5, 30 and 60 min did not significantly affect progressive motility, viability, or acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm compared with pre-cooled unencapsulated sperm (control). In Experiment 2, characteristics of frozen-thawed canine microencapsulated sperm were evaluated at 0, 3, 6, and 9 h of culture at 38.5 °C. Pre-freeze glycerol exposure for 5, 30, and 60 min at 4 °C did not influence post-thaw quality in unencapsulated sperm. Post-thaw motility and acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm decreased more than those of unencapsulated sperm (P < 0.05) following glycerol exposure for 5 min. However, motility, viability and acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm after 30 and 60 min glycerol exposure were higher than unencapsulated sperm cultured for 6 or 9 h (P < 0.05). In conclusion, since microencapsulated canine sperm were successfully cryopreserved, this could be a viable alternative to convention sperm cryopreservation in this species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fractal pattern of canine trichoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vico, Gionata; Cataldi, Marielda; Maiolino, Paola; Carella, Francesca; Beltraminelli, Stefano; Losa, Gabriele A

    2011-06-01

    To assess by fractal analysis the specific architecture, growth pattern, and tissue distribution that characterize subtypes of canine trichoblastoma, a benign tumor derived from or reduplicating the primitive hair germ of embryonic follicular development. Tumor masks and outlines obtained from immunohistologic images by gray threshold segmentation of epithelial components were analyzed by fractal and conventional morphometry. The fractal dimension [FD] of each investigated case was determined from the slope of the regression line describing the fractal region within a bi-asymptotic curve experimentally established. All tumor masks and outlines obtained by gray threshold segmentation of epithelial components showed fractal self-similar properties that were evaluated by peculiar FDs. However, only masks revealed significantly different FD values, ranging from 1.75 to 1.85, enabling the discrimination of canine trichoblastoma subtypes. The FD data suggest that an iterative morphogenetic process, involving both the air germ and associated dermal papilla, may be responsible of the peculiar tissue architecture of trichoblastoma. The present study emphasized the reliability of fractal analysis in achieving the objective characterization of canine trichoblastoma.

  8. Dilaceration of Mandibular Central Incisor: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senem Yigit Ozer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilaceration of teeth can ocur as a result of trauma to its primary predecessors. Crown dilaceration is more rare than root dilacerations. This report describes a rare case of crown dilaceration of the mandibular central incisor caused by trauma. Periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography scans revealed a severe crown dilaceration in the labial direction. After conventional root canal treatment, a glass fiber-reinforced post was placed and the tooth was restored using the original crown which was removed from the root before root canal obturation. One year after the treatment, the tooth was clinically intact without mobility and there was no sensitivity during percussion. Radiographic examination revealed that the periodontal tissues were healthy and there was no sign of root resorption. It was concluded that correct diagnosis and prompt treatment help to achieve desirable esthetics and function for crown dilecaration.

  9. Dens invaginatus in a geminated maxillary lateral incisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallivathukal, Renjith George; Misra, Alok; Nagraj, Sumanth Kumbargere; Donald, Preethy Mary

    2015-01-01

    Dens invaginatus (DI) and gemination are two developmental abnormalities that are well reported in the dental literature, but their coexistence in a single tooth is rare. Such situations worsen the risk factors associated with these anomalies, and the treatment plan should be customised as they possess altered morphology and anatomy. A 19-year-old girl came for evaluation of a cracked tooth in the front region of the upper jaw. The tooth showed clinical features of gemination and radiographic features of DI, and was diagnosed as DI in geminated maxillary lateral incisor. The differential diagnoses based on clinical appearance without radiographic investigation may warrant the treatment approach if these two abnormalities coexist in a single tooth. The report also highlights the importance of three-dimensional imaging in diagnosis and treatment planning of teeth with altered pulp canal anatomy. There are few reported cases in the literature detailing the treatment options for these two anomalies occurring in the same tooth. PMID:26002668

  10. [Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH)--a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotler, M; Ratson, T

    2010-04-01

    MIH was defined by Weerheijm (2001) as "hypomineralisation of systemic origin of 1-4 permanent first molars, frequently associated with affected incisors". The prevalence of MIH varies between 2.8% and 25%, dependent upon the study. At their sixth congress in 2003, The European Association of pediatric dentistry defined criteria for diagnosis of the phenomena. It included the presence of demarcated opacity, posteruptive enamel breakdown, atypical restoration, extracted molar due to MIH and unerupted teeth. According to the teeth involved and to the time of the crown formation, researches focused on environmental and systemic conditions as possible reasons for MIH.The etiologies were divided into five groups: Exposure to environmental contaminants, pre/peri and neonatal problems, exposure to fluoride, common childhood illnesses and medically compromised children. The clinical implications include highly sensitive teeth, difficulty to achieve adequate anesthesia, behavioral problems and anxiety, rapid progression of caries and the esthetic implications. A six step approach to management was described suggested: risk identification, early diagnosis, remineralization and desensitization, prevention of caries and posteruption breakdown, restorations and extractions and finally maintenance. Restoring an affected molar can vary from adhesive intra coronal restorations (resin composite is the material of choice) to extra coronal restorations (e.g. preformed metal crown). Esthetic solutions to affected incisors may include microabrasion (that shows little improvement) and resin composite or porcelain veneer. The key for a successful treatment is early diagnosis, intense follow up and usage of remineralizating agents as soon as the teeth erupt. There is still need for further research to clarify the etiological factors and improve the durability of restoration in affected teeth.

  11. Molar incisor hypomineralization in Hong Kong Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Shiu-Yin; Ki, Yung; Chu, Vanessa

    2008-09-01

    Most prevalence studies on molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) were carried out in European countries, and data from the East-Asian populations were lacking. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of MIH in Hong Kong Chinese children. Since 2006, charting of teeth with MIH was included into the routine dental examination in a school dental clinic. The dental records of grade 6 primary school children who attended annual check-up in this clinic in 2006 were subsequently reviewed retrospectively. The records were selected for this study if the charting indicated that the children were affected by MIH. A total of 2635 records were reviewed and 73 cases of MIH were identified. The prevalence of MIH in this group of children was 2.8%. Their mean age was 12, and the male-to-female ratio was 1 : 1.2. The mean decayed, missing, or filled permanent teeth value of those affected was 1.5, which was higher than that of the general Hong Kong Chinese children aged 12 years old (0.8). A total of 192 teeth were affected. The most commonly affected teeth were permanent maxillary first molars, followed by mandibular first molars and maxillary central incisors. Dental fillings and fissure sealants were found in 52 (38%) and 65 (47%) permanent first molars with hypomineralization, respectively. Medical histories were unremarkable in 60 children, whereas early childhood diseases were reported in 13 cases. The prevalence of MIH in the permanent dentition of Hong Kong Chinese children was 2.8%. Children with MIH showed higher caries experience in the permanent dentition than the general population of similar age.

  12. Management of impacted incisors following surgery to remove obstacles to eruption: a prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavoni, Chiara; Franchi, Lorenzo; Laganà, Giuseppina; Baccetti, Tiziano; Cozza, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of rapid maxillary expansion (RME) vs simply monitoring the eruption of permanent maxillary incisors following the surgical removal of obstacles to their eruption (supernumerary teeth, odontomas). Following surgical removal of the obstacles to incisor eruption (T1), 62 patients were randomly assigned to either the group to undergo RME (34 subjects; mean age 8 years, 11 months ± 11 months) or the group that was monitored without further treatment (28 subjects; mean age=9 years, 1 month ± 1 year). At T2 (1 year after T1), the prevalence rate of erupted incisors was recorded. Also, the time of eruption of the incisors and the amount of space loss were analyzed. At T2, eruption of impacted incisors occurred in approximately 82 percent of the RME group cases vs approximately 39 percent of the monitored group cases (chi-square=10.43, P<.001). Time of eruption was significantly faster in the RME group, and anterior space loss significantly smaller. Rapid maxillary expansion treatment following surgical removal of the obstacles to the eruption of permanent maxillary incisors appears to be an efficient interceptive approach leading to eruption of the incisors in four out of five cases within seven months.

  13. Lower incisor intrusion with intraoral transosseous stainless steel wire anchorage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-chao; Huang, Ji-na; Lin, Xin-ping

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the potential use of intraoral transosseous stainless steel wires as anchorage for intrusion of the lower incisors using a rabbit model. Placement of intraoral transosseous stainless steel wires around incisors is similar to that of intraoral transosseous wiring of edentulous mandibular fractures. Ten male New Zealand rabbits, 9 +/- 1.5 months of age, average weight 1.8 +/- 0.3 kg, were used in this study. One lower incisor was intruded with a 50 g bilateral force using a coil spring for 10 weeks, while the other incisor served as the control. Clinical measurements of the distances between the occlusal edges of the incisors (EE) were performed weekly with a calliper. In addition to standard descriptive statistical calculations, a paired Student's t-test was used for comparison of the two groups. All surgical sites healed uneventfully after insertion of the wires. Significant differences were found in the change of EE between the experimental and control sides from 4 weeks onwards. Intrusion of the incisor, 4 +/- 0.58 mm, was seen on the test side, while EE on the control side remained unchanged. Within the limits of this animal study, it is concluded that the intraoral transosseous stainless steel wire anchorage system is a cost-effective method for intrusion of lower incisors when the use of other anchorage system is not possible.

  14. Degree of severity of molar incisor hypomineralization and its relation to dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negre-Barber, A; Montiel-Company, J M; Catalá-Pizarro, M; Almerich-Silla, J M

    2018-01-19

    Molar incisor hypomineralization is a developmental defect of dental enamel associated with rapid caries progression. In order to discover whether molar incisor hypomineralization predisposes to dental caries, a cross-sectional cohort study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged between eight and nine years. It was found that 24.2% of the children presented molar incisor hypomineralization. Of these, 72% had a mild form and 28% a severe form. Caries prevalence was greater among the children with severe form (60.7%) than in those with mild form (43.1%) or no molar incisor hypomineralization (45.5%). The caries indices were higher in out molar incisor hypomineralization (1.18) or with mild form (1.08). The tooth-surface caries ratio was significantly higher in surfaces with severe hypomineralization than in those with no hypomineralization or mild hypomineralization. A linear regression model showed that cariogenic food intake and the presence of severe molar incisor hypomineralization were significantly associated with DMFS. Consequently, an association was found to exist between dental caries and the presence of surfaces affected by severe molar incisor hypomineralization, which should be considered a risk factor within the multifactorial etiology of caries.

  15. Outcome of orthodontic space closure with a missing maxillary central incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czochrowska, Ewa M; Skaare, Anne B; Stenvik, Arild; Zachrisson, Björn U

    2003-06-01

    Orthodontic space closure is one of the treatment alternatives when a maxillary central incisor is missing. Because no systematic analysis of such treatment results is available, a sample of 20 consecutively treated patients was examined in a follow-up study. All patients had received orthodontic treatment with the objective of closing the space for the missing central incisor. Biologic features and the clinical appearance of the recontoured lateral incisor (test tooth) replacing the missing tooth were compared with the neighboring intact central incisor, which served as control tooth. The patients' opinions regarding the treatment and the result were recorded in a questionnaire. The position of the examined teeth and the appearance of the surrounding soft tissues were similar in the test and control teeth. However, in some patients (25%), certain aspects of the recontoured incisor crown (such as the width at the gingival margin) mismatched the appearance of the controls. A somewhat increased mobility and probing pocket depth on the mesial aspect was recorded for some test teeth. No obvious detrimental effects were observed on the radiographs. Most patients expressed satisfaction with the treatment result. It is concluded that orthodontic mesialization of the lateral incisor to replace a missing central incisor is a valid treatment modality, if the indications for such treatment are present and careful attention to detail in orthodontic and restorative treatment is exercised.

  16. A randomized clinical trial comparing mandibular incisor proclination produced by fixed labial appliances and clear aligners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Joe; Garvey, Thérèse; Al-Awadhi, Ebrahim A

    2016-09-01

    To compare the mandibular incisor proclination produced by fixed labial appliances and third generation clear aligners. Patients underwent a course of orthodontic treatment using either fixed labial appliances or clear aligners (Invisalign). Mandibular incisor proclination was measured by comparing pretreatment and near-end treatment lateral cephalograms. Eligibility criteria included adult patients with mild mandibular incisor crowding (clear aligner group. Baseline characteristics were similar for both groups: Fixed appliance mean crowding was 2.1 ± 1.3 mm vs clear aligner mean crowding, 2.5 ± 1.3 mm; pretreatment mean mandibular incisor inclination for the fixed appliance group was 90.8 ± 5.4° vs 91.6 ± 6.4° for the clear aligner group. Fixed appliances produced 5.3 ± 4.3° of mandibular incisor proclination. Clear aligners proclined the mandibular incisors by 3.4 ± 3.2°. The difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (P > .05). There was no difference in the amount of mandibular incisor proclination produced by clear aligners and fixed labial appliances in mild crowding cases.

  17. Association between maxillary anterior supernumerary teeth and impacted incisors in mixed dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dongmei; Mei, Li; Wang, Yan; Li, Jialing; Li, Huang

    2017-08-01

    Few researchers have investigated the relationship between supernumerary teeth (ST) and impacted incisors. The authors investigated the relationship between ST and impacted incisors in the maxillary anterior area in the mixed dentition. Using cone-beam computed tomography, the authors diagnosed 417 ST among 294 patients (age range, 6-12 years; 220 boys and 74 girls). The number, morphology, growth orientation, and position of ST were recorded along with the presence of impacted incisors. The authors reported that 23.1% of patients having ST (n = 68; mean [standard deviation] age 8.5 [1.6] years) also had impacted incisors. Morphology (molariform and odontomelike), growth orientation (normal and no orientation), and position (coronal) of the ST were significantly associated with impacted incisors (P < .05 for all). An increase of 1 year in age was associated with a decreased risk of having ST accompanied by impacted incisors (odds ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.63 to 0.92). An increase of 1 ST more than doubled the risk of having an impacted incisor (odds ratio, 2.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.44 to 3.96). In this population, the number, morphology, growth orientation, and position of ST as well as the patient's age were associated with impacted incisors in the maxillary anterior area during the mixed dentition. The presence and morphology of ST should alert the clinician to the increased likelihood of having impacted incisors and the need for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Retração rápida de caninos Rapid canine retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Renato Carvalho Ribeiro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: a retração rápida de caninos por distração do ligamento periodontal é uma técnica de movimentação dentária que permite o fechamento de espaço da extração de primeiros pré-molares em um intervalo de duas ou três semanas, proporcionando uma redução significativa no tempo do tratamento ortodôntico. OBJETIVO: apresentar modificações propostas na técnica cirúrgica original e no posicionamento dos distratores. CONCLUSÕES: a retração rápida de caninos é uma técnica que proporciona uma redução significativa no tempo de tratamento ortodôntico. A modificação na técnica cirúrgica proporcionou maior velocidade e segurança ao ato cirúrgico. O distrator posicionado por palatina, no mínimo, proporcionou a preservação da tábua óssea vestibular e evitou a vestibularização dos caninos.INTRODUCTION: Rapid canine retraction through distraction of the periodontal ligament is a tooth movement technique that allows the closure of first premolar extraction space within a period of two to three weeks while providing significant reduction in orthodontic treatment time. OBJECTIVE: To propose changes in the original surgical technique and in the placement of distractors. CONCLUSIONS: Rapid canine retraction is a technique that provides significant reduction in orthodontic treatment time. Changes in the surgical technique provided greater speed and safety in surgery. As a minimum benefit, when positioned palatally, distractors helped to preserve the buccal bone plate and prevented canine proclination.

  19. Root and Root Canal Morphology of Maxillary First Premolars: A Literature Review and Clinical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ibrahim Ali; Alenezi, Mohammad Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Sound knowledge of the external and internal morphology of the different teeth groups is essential to ensure a successful outcome of root canal treatment. The aims of this study were to review the available literature with respect to the root and root canal morphology of maxillary first premolars and discuss the clinical considerations of this morphology on the various dental procedures. The MEDLINE/PubMed and Scopus databases were searched for relevant literature. The identified publications were classified into anatomic studies and clinical case reports. The data extracted from anatomic studies were tabulated, and weighted averages for certain internal and external morphologic features were calculated. The anatomic and developmental variations in the clinical case reports were summarized. A total of 92 studies (45 anatomic studies and 47 case reports) including a total of 11,299 teeth were identified. The majority of maxillary first premolars had 1 root (41.7%) or 2 roots (56.6%). Regardless of the number of roots, the vast majority (86.6%) had 2 root canals, with type IV (2-2) being the most common canal configuration (64.8%). The majority of the apical foramina (66.6%) did not coincide with the apical root tip. About 38% of the teeth had lateral canals, 12.3% had apical deltas, and 16.0% had isthmi. The clinical case reports showed that the 3-rooted variant was the most common anatomic variation, and developmental anomalies were rarely reported. The maxillary first premolars are predominantly 2-rooted teeth with 2 root canals. However, the clinician should be aware about the possible anatomic variations of these teeth and their relationship with the adjacent anatomic structures while planning and performing endodontic, restorative, periodontal, and surgical procedures. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical evaluation of bonded amalgam restorations in endodontically treated premolar teeth: a one-year evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrari, Farzaneh; Nojoomian, Mahsima; Moosavi, Horieh

    2010-10-14

    The aim of this clinical study was to compare the fracture resistance, marginal adaptation, and rate of recurrent caries of bonded and nonbonded amalgam restorations in endodontically treated premolar teeth. A total of 36 patients with endodontically treated maxillary first or second premolars were selected and divided into three groups. The treatments in all groups consisted of lingual cusp coverage and cementation of a prefabricated intracanal post (No. 2 long, Dentatus USA, New York, NY, USA). One type of cavity liner was used for each group as follows: copal varnish (Group A), Amalgambond Plus (Group B), and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (Group C). The teeth were then restored with Cinalux high-copper spherical amalgam (Cinalux, Sh. Dr Faghihi Dental Co., Tehran, Iran). After one year, fracture resistance, marginal adaptation, and secondary caries were evaluated. Fischer's exact test was used for statistical analysis using a 0.05 percent significance level. There was no significant difference among groups with respect to fracture resistance (p=0.49). However, significant differences in marginal adaptation existed among the three groups (p=0.02) and no recurrent caries were found in any of the restored teeth. Bonding amalgam restorations using Amalgambond Plus and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus did not improve the fracture resistance or affect the resistance to secondary caries in endodontically treated premolar teeth. However, the teeth in both these bonded groups showed significant improvement in marginal adaptation compared with restorations placed with copal varnish (p=0.02). Amalgambond Plus or Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive resins significantly improved marginal adaptation of amalgam compared with copal varnish, but did not enhance fracture resistance or affect the prevention of secondary caries.