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Sample records for incidentally-identified nsclc brain

  1. Brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Prognostic importance of the number of involved extracranial organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerdan, L. [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); University of Luebeck, Section of Nuclear Medicine, Luebeck (Germany); Segedin, B. [Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Nagy, V. [Oncology Institute Ion Ciricuta, Department of Radiotherapy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Khoa, M.T. [Hanoi Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Bach Mai Hospital, Nuclear Medicine and Oncology Center, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Trang, N.T. [Bach Mai Hospital, Nuclear Medicine and Oncology Center, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Schild, S.E. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Department of Radiation Oncology, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Rades, D. [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    This study investigated the potential prognostic value of the number of involved extracranial organs in patients with brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 472 patients who received whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone with 5 x 4 Gy or 10 x 3 Gy for brain metastasis from NSCLC were included in this retrospective study. In addition to the number of involved extracranial organs, 6 further potential prognostic factors were investigated including WBRT regimen, age, gender, Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), number of brain metastases, and the interval from cancer diagnosis to WBRT. Subgroup analyses were performed for patients with metastatic involvement of one (lung vs. bone vs. other metastasis) and two (lung+bone vs. lung+lymph nodes vs. other combinations) extracranial organs. The survival rates at 6 months of the patients with involvement of 0, 1, 2, 3, and ≥4 extracranial organs were 52, 27, 17, 4, and 14%, respectively (p<0.001). On multivariate analysis, the number of involved extracranial organs remained significant (risk ratio 1.32; 95% confidence interval 1.19-1.46; p<0.001). Age <65 years (p=0.004), KPS ≥70 (p<0.001), and only 1-3 brain metastases (p=0.022) were also significantly associated with survival in the multivariate analysis. In the separate analyses of patients with involvement of one and two extracranial organs, survival was not significantly different based on the pattern of extracranial organ involvement. The number of involved extracranial organs is an independent prognostic factor of survival in patients with brain metastasis from NSCLC, irrespective of the pattern of extracranial organ involvement. (orig.)

  2. Angiogenesis Inhibitors in NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Manzo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a complex biological process that plays a relevant role in sustaining the microenvironment, growth, and metastatic potential of several tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Bevacizumab was the first angiogenesis inhibitor approved for the treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC in combination with chemotherapy; however, it was limited to patients with non-squamous histology and first-line setting. Approval was based on the results of two phase III trials (ECOG4599 and AVAIL that demonstrated an improvement of about two months in progression-free survival (PFS in both trials, and in the ECOG4599 trial, an improvement in overall survival (OS also. Afterwards, other antiangiogenic agents, including sunitinib, sorafenib, and vandetanib have been unsuccessfully tested in first and successive lines. Recently, two new antiangiogenic agents (ramucirumab and nintedanib produced a significant survival benefit in second-line setting. In the REVEL study, ramucirumab plus docetaxel prolonged the median OS of patients with any histology NSCLC when compared with docetaxel alone (10.4 versus 9.1 months, hazard ratio (HR 0.857, p = 0.0235. In the LUME-Lung 1 study, nintedanib plus docetaxel prolonged the median PFS of patients with any tumor histology (p = 0.0019, and improved OS (12.6 versus 10.3 months in patients with adenocarcinoma. As a result, it became a new option for the second-line treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC and adenocarcinoma histology. Identifying predictive biomarkers to optimize the benefit of antiangiogenic drugs remains an ongoing challenge.

  3. Sulforaphane attenuates EGFR signaling in NSCLC cells.

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    Chen, Chi-Yuan; Yu, Zhu-Yun; Chuang, Yen-Shu; Huang, Rui-Mei; Wang, Tzu-Chien V

    2015-06-03

    EGFR, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), is frequently overexpressed and mutated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been widely used in the treatment of many cancers, including NSCLC. However, intrinsic and acquired resistance to TKI remains a common obstacle. One strategy that may help overcome EGFR-TKI resistance is to target EGFR for degradation. As EGFR is a client protein of heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) and sulforaphane is known to functionally regulate HSP90, we hypothesized that sulforaphane could attenuate EGFR-related signaling and potentially be used to treat NSCLC. Our study revealed that sulforaphane displayed antitumor activity against NSCLC cells both in vitro and in vivo. The sensitivity of NSCLC cells to sulforaphane appeared to positively correlate with the inhibition of EGFR-related signaling, which was attributed to the increased proteasomal degradation of EGFR. Combined treatment of NSCLC cells with sulforaphane plus another HSP90 inhibitor (17-AAG) enhanced the inhibition of EGFR-related signaling both in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that sulforaphane is a novel inhibitory modulator of EGFR expression and is effective in inhibiting the tumor growth of EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLC cells. Our findings suggest that sulforaphane should be further explored for its potential clinical applications against NSCLC.

  4. Bevacizumab in the treatment of NSCLC: patient selection and perspectives

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    Russo AE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Alessia E Russo,1 Domenico Priolo,1 Giovanna Antonelli,1 Massimo Libra,2 James A McCubrey,3 Francesco Ferraù1 1Medical Oncology Department, San Vincenzo Hospital, Taormina (Messina, Italy; 2Laboratory of Translational Oncology & Functional Genomics, Department of Biomedical and Biotechnological Sciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy; 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA Abstract: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents about 85% of all lung cancers, and more than half of NSCLCs are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Chemotherapy has reached a plateau in the overall survival curve of about 10 months. Therefore, in last decade novel targeted approaches have been developed to extend survival of these patients, including antiangiogenic treatment. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF signaling pathway plays a dominant role in stimulating angiogenesis, which is the main process promoting tumor growth and metastasis. Bevacizumab (bev; Avastin® is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that neutralizes VEGF’s biologic activity through a steric blocking of its binding with VEGF receptor. Currently, bev is the only antiangiogenic agent approved for the first-line treatment of advanced or recurrent nonsquamous NSCLC in “bev-eligible” patients. The ineligibility to receive bev is related to its toxicity. In the pivotal trials of bev in NSCLC, fatal bleeding events including pulmonary hemorrhage were observed with rates higher in the chemotherapy-plus-bev group. Therefore, in order to reduce the incidence of severe pulmonary hemorrhage, numerous exclusion criteria have been characteristically applied for bev such as central tumor localization or tumor cavitation, use of anticoagulant therapy, presence of brain metastases, age of patients (elderly. Subsequent studies designed to evaluate the safety of bev have demonstrated that this agent is safe and

  5. Knockdown of OCT4 may sensitize NSCLC cells to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Ma, M; Duan, X; Zhang, H; Yang, M

    2017-05-01

    Cisplatin is commonly used in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) chemotherapy; however, chemoresistance to cisplatin remains a great clinical challenge. Octamer-binding protein 4 (OCT4) has been reported to be overexpressed in NSCLC. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential role of OCT4 in NSCLC with chemoresistance to cisplatin. Expressions of OCT4 was detected in NSCLC tissues and cell lines. We utilized siRNA to knock down OCT4 expression in human NSCLC cells and analyzed their phenotypic changes. We found that the difference of OCT4 expression between NSCLC and the adjacent non-tumourous tissues was statistically significant. Knockdown of OCT4 in NSCLC cells could decrease cell proliferation, and potentiate apoptosis induced by cisplatin, suggesting OCT4 may contribute to cisplatin resistance in NSCLC. Our findings indicate that targeting OCT4 could improve cisplatin effect in NSCLC, confirming their role in modulating cisplatin sensitivity.

  6. Spotlight on ceritinib in the treatment of ALK+ NSCLC: design, development and place in therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Daffinà, Maria Grazia; D’Aveni, Alessandro; Marabello, Grazia; Liguori, Alessia; Giovannetti, Elisa; Karachaliou, Niki; Gonzalez Cao, Maria; Rosell, Rafael; Altavilla, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    The identification of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has radically changed the treatment of a subset of patients harboring this oncogenic driver. Crizotinib was the first ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor to receive fast approval and is currently indicated as the first-line therapy for advanced, ALK-positive NSCLC patients. However, despite crizotinib’s efficacy, patients almost invariably progress, with the central nervous system being one of the most common sites of relapse. Different mechanisms of acquired resistance have been identified, including secondary ALK mutations, ALK copy number alterations and activation of bypass tracks. Different highly potent and brain-penetrant next-generation ALK inhibitors have been developed and tested in NSCLC patients with ALK rearrangements. Ceritinib, a structurally distinct and selective ALK inhibitor, showed 20 times higher potency than crizotinib in inhibiting ALK and had activity against the most common crizotinib-resistant mutations, including L1196M and G1269A, in preclinical models. In Phase I and II studies, ceritinib demonstrated pronounced activity in both crizotinib-naïve and crizotinib-refractory patients, with responses observed regardless of the presence of ALK resistance mutations. Ceritinib was the first ALK inhibitor to be approved for the treatment of crizotinib-refractory, ALK-rearranged NSCLC, and recent results from a Phase III study have demonstrated superior efficacy compared to standard chemotherapy in the first- and second-line setting. We provide an extensive overview of ceritinib from the design of the compound through preclinical data until efficacy and toxicity results from Phase I–III clinical studies. We review the molecular alterations associated with resistance to ceritinib and highlight the importance of obtaining tumor biopsy at progression to tailor therapy based upon the

  7. Exploration of Postoperative Follow-up Strategies for Early Staged NSCLC Patients on the Basis of Follow-up Result of 416 Stage I NSCLC Patients after Lobectomy

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    Liang DAI

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Currently, there is no consensus on the follow-up strategy (follow-up time interval and content of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in the world, and the relevant clinical evidence is also very limited. In this study, we aimed to summarize the recurrence/metastasis sites and timings of stage I NSCLC patients based on their follow-up data, aiming to provide a basis of follow-up time interval and content for this group of patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the 416 stage I NSCLC patients that underwent continuous anatomic lobectomy between Jan. 2000 to Oct. 2013 in our prospective lung cancer database. According to the recurrence/metastasis sites and timings, the long term follow-up time interval and content were explored. Results The 5-yr disease free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS in the whole group were 82.4% and 85.4%, respectively. There were 76 cases (18.3% had recurrence/metastasis during follow-up, among which the most frequent site was pulmonary metastasis (21 cases, 5.0%, followed by brain metastasis (20 cases, 4.8%, bone metastasis (12 cases, 2.9%, and mediastinal lymph node metastasis (12 cases, 2.9%. Among the factors that could influence recurrence/metastasis, patients with pT2a suffered from a higher recurrence/metastasis rate compared to patients with pT1 (P=0.006, with 5-yr DFS being 73.8% and 87.3%, respectively (P=0.002, and the 5-yr OS being 77.7% and 90.3%, respectively (P=0.011. Conclusion The commonest recurrence/metastasis sites of stage I NSCLC after anatomic lobectomy are lung, brain and mediastinal lymph nodes, the risk of recurrence/metastasis within 2 years were equal to that between 3 years and 5 years. The follow-up frequencies and content within 2 years could be adjusted according to T stages.

  8. [Exploration of Postoperative Follow-up Strategies for Early Staged NSCLC Patients on the Basis of Follow-up Result of 416 Stage I NSCLC Patients after Lobectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Liang; Yan, Wanpu; Kang, Xiaozheng; Fu, Hao; Yang, Yongbo; Zhou, Haitao; Liang, Zhen; Xiong, Hongchao; Lin, Yao; Chen, Keneng

    2018-03-20

    Currently, there is no consensus on the follow-up strategy (follow-up time interval and content) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the world, and the relevant clinical evidence is also very limited. In this study, we aimed to summarize the recurrence/metastasis sites and timings of stage I NSCLC patients based on their follow-up data, aiming to provide a basis of follow-up time interval and content for this group of patients. We retrospectively analyzed the 416 stage I NSCLC patients that underwent continuous anatomic lobectomy between Jan. 2000 to Oct. 2013 in our prospective lung cancer database. According to the recurrence/metastasis sites and timings, the long term follow-up time interval and content were explored. The 5-yr disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in the whole group were 82.4% and 85.4%, respectively. There were 76 cases (18.3%) had recurrence/metastasis during follow-up, among which the most frequent site was pulmonary metastasis (21 cases, 5.0%), followed by brain metastasis (20 cases, 4.8%), bone metastasis (12 cases, 2.9%), and mediastinal lymph node metastasis (12 cases, 2.9%). Among the factors that could influence recurrence/metastasis, patients with pT2a suffered from a higher recurrence/metastasis rate compared to patients with pT1 (P=0.006), with 5-yr DFS being 73.8% and 87.3%, respectively (P=0.002), and the 5-yr OS being 77.7% and 90.3%, respectively (P=0.011). The commonest recurrence/metastasis sites of stage I NSCLC after anatomic lobectomy are lung, brain and mediastinal lymph nodes, the risk of recurrence/metastasis within 2 years were equal to that between 3 years and 5 years. The follow-up frequencies and content within 2 years could be adjusted according to T stages.

  9. Cost-effective analysis of PET application in NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Aichun; Liu Jianjun; Sun Xiaoguang; Shi Yiping; Huang Gang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of PET and CT application for diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in China. Methods: Using decision analysis method the diagnostic efficiency of PET and CT for diagnosis of NSCLC in china was analysed. And also the value of cost for accurate diagnosis (CAD), cost for accurate staging (CAS) and cost for effective therapy (CAT) was calculated. Results: (1) For the accurate diagnosis, CT was much more cost-effective than PET. (2) For the accurate staging, CT was still more cost-effective than PET. (3) For the all over diagnostic and therapeutic cost, PET was more cost-effective than CT. (4) The priority of PET to CT was for the diagnosis of stage I NSCLC. Conclusion: For the management of NSCLC patient in China, CT is more cost-effective for screening, whereas PET for clinical staging and monitoring therapeutic effect. (authors)

  10. Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytte, Tine; Hansen, Olfred; Stohlberg-Rohr, Thomine

    2010-01-01

        Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC Tine Schytte, Olfred Hansen, Thomine Stolberg-Rohr* and Carsten Brink*. Dept. Oncology and Radiophysic Lab.* Odense University Hospital, Denmark   Keyword: Radiotherapy, Locally advanced NSCLC, Cardiac toxicity   Backgro......    Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC Tine Schytte, Olfred Hansen, Thomine Stolberg-Rohr* and Carsten Brink*. Dept. Oncology and Radiophysic Lab.* Odense University Hospital, Denmark   Keyword: Radiotherapy, Locally advanced NSCLC, Cardiac toxicity......   Background: Lung and oesophageal toxicity have been regarded as main toxicity in definitive radiotherapy (RT) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), whereas cardiac toxicity has not been offered much concern. This is probably due to the poor prognosis for patients with unresectable NSCLC. In this study we...... year was 64%, 35% and 14%, respectively. In a Cox regression analyses of time to CE, age > 65 year, + induction chemotherapy, smoking, high mean dose to left + right ventricles or whole heart was not a statistically significant factor, whereas low FEV-1, large GTV, low Hb, poor PS, high V20 to lunge...

  11. Identification of Reprogrammed Myeloid Cell Transcriptomes in NSCLC.

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    Anna Durrans

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related mortality worldwide, with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC as the most prevalent form. Despite advances in treatment options including minimally invasive surgery, CT-guided radiation, novel chemotherapeutic regimens, and targeted therapeutics, prognosis remains dismal. Therefore, further molecular analysis of NSCLC is necessary to identify novel molecular targets that impact prognosis and the design of new-targeted therapies. In recent years, tumor "activated/reprogrammed" stromal cells that promote carcinogenesis have emerged as potential therapeutic targets. However, the contribution of stromal cells to NSCLC is poorly understood. Here, we show increased numbers of bone marrow (BM-derived hematopoietic cells in the tumor parenchyma of NSCLC patients compared with matched adjacent non-neoplastic lung tissue. By sorting specific cellular fractions from lung cancer patients, we compared the transcriptomes of intratumoral myeloid compartments within the tumor bed with their counterparts within adjacent non-neoplastic tissue from NSCLC patients. The RNA sequencing of specific myeloid compartments (immature monocytic myeloid cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils identified differentially regulated genes and mRNA isoforms, which were inconspicuous in whole tumor analysis. Genes encoding secreted factors, including osteopontin (OPN, chemokine (C-C motif ligand 7 (CCL7 and thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 were identified, which enhanced tumorigenic properties of lung cancer cells indicative of their potential as targets for therapy. This study demonstrates that analysis of homogeneous stromal populations isolated directly from fresh clinical specimens can detect important stromal genes of therapeutic value.

  12. Emerging treatments and combinations in the management of NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Martin; Mellemgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    There remains an unmet need for effective, well-tolerated treatment options in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to alleviate the disease burden for a broad selection of patients. Nintedanib is a potent, oral, triple angiokinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast...... investigated extensively in preclinical research and in a number of clinical studies, the most important of which was the Phase III LUME-Lung 1 study, which investigated nintedanib in combination with docetaxel in patients with advanced NSCLC after failure of first-line chemotherapy. In this study, which led...... to the approval of nintedanib, addition of nintedanib to docetaxel significantly improved overall survival in patients with adenocarcinoma histology. Nintedanib demonstrated a manageable safety profile in combination with docetaxel. This review focuses on the clinical experience with nintedanib in NSCLC...

  13. Targeting Redox Homeostasis in LKB1-deficient NSCLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    profiling to identify critical nodes that regulate energy metabolism and antioxidant functions in LKB1-deficient NSCLC cells. LKB1 is a tumor suppressive...of exogenous EGF (Fig. 5B). EGF treatment stimulated phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt in both control and shLKB1 cells. EGFR phosphorylation was

  14. P13.10 Intracranial response to nivolumab in NSCLC patients with untreated or progressing CNS metastases

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    Yust-Katz, S.; Dudnik, E.; Perlov, E.; Zer, A.; Flex, D.; Peled, N.; Siegal, T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Central nervous system (CNS) metastases occur in about 30% of patients (pts) with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Local treatment strategies (e.g., radiotherapy or surgery) result in delays in systemic therapy administration and are frequently associated with neurocognitive impairment. Nivolumab is an anti-PD1 immune check-point inhibitor which has been recently approved by the FDA as a second line treatment of NSCLC. Data regarding its intracranial activity is lacking. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed efficacy and safety of nivolumab administered intravenously at a dose of 3mg/kg q2 weeks in five pts with advanced NSCLC and new or progressing intracranial metastases which were diagnosed before or within 1 month after starting the treatment. Results: Pt baseline characteristics were as follows: median age 78y (range, 52–84); 2 males; 4 smokers; ECOG PS 0/1/2 - 2 pts/1 pt/2 pts; histological subtype: adenocarcinoma/ squamous-cell carcinoma/NSCLC NOS 3 pts /1 pt/1 pt; EGFR WT/ALK neg/KRAS M all/all/2 pts. Four pts had parenchymal brain metastases, three pts had leptomeningeal disease. All pts were asymptomatic and did not require corticosteroids or immediate brain irradiation. Dramatic response in the brain was observed in two pts (including 1 pt with leptomeningeal spread demonstrating a complete response in the CNS); time-to-response comprised 5 weeks and 9 weeks; all responses are still ongoing at the time of the report (18+ weeks, 19+ weeks). In one pt stabilization of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis for 10 weeks was achieved. Systemic responses and intracranial responses were largely concordant. No treatment-related or CNS-metastases related grade ≥ 3 adverse events were observed. Conclusions: Nivolumab has a promising intracranial activity and favorable safety profile in pts with NSCLC and untreated/progressing CNS metastases. Nivolumab CNS activity warrants further evaluation.

  15. NSCLC molecular testing in Central and Eastern European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryska, Ales; Berzinec, Peter; Brcic, Luka; Cufer, Tanja; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Gottfried, Maya; Kovalszky, Ilona; Olszewski, Włodzimierz; Oz, Buge; Plank, Lukas; Timar, Jozsef

    2018-03-09

    The introduction of targeted treatments for subsets of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has highlighted the importance of accurate molecular diagnosis to determine if an actionable genetic alteration is present. Few data are available for Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) on mutation rates, testing rates, and compliance with testing guidelines. A questionnaire about molecular testing and NSCLC management was distributed to relevant specialists in nine CEE countries, and pathologists were asked to provide the results of EGFR and ALK testing over a 1-year period. A very high proportion of lung cancer cases are confirmed histologically/cytologically (75-100%), and molecular testing of NSCLC samples has been established in all evaluated CEE countries in 2014. Most countries follow national or international guidelines on which patients to test for EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements. In most centers at that time, testing was undertaken on request of the clinician rather than on the preferred reflex basis. Immunohistochemistry, followed by fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmation of positive cases, has been widely adopted for ALK testing in the region. Limited reimbursement is a significant barrier to molecular testing in the region and a disincentive to reflex testing. Multidisciplinary tumor boards are established in most of the countries and centers, with 75-100% of cases being discussed at a multidisciplinary tumor board at specialized centers. Molecular testing is established throughout the CEE region, but improved and unbiased reimbursement remains a major challenge for the future. Increasing the number of patients reviewed by multidisciplinary boards outside of major centers and access to targeted therapy based on the result of molecular testing are other major challenges.

  16. Focus on Nintedanib in NSCLC and other tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Manzo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nintedanib is a new triple angiokinase inhibitor that potently blocks the proangiogenic pathways mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptors, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF receptors and fibroblast growth factor (FGF receptors. Evidence about its efficacy in addition to second-line chemotherapy in non-small-cell-lung-cancer (NSCLC has been produced by two large randomized phase III clinical trials (LUME-Lung-1 and LUME-Lung-2, conducted in patients with pretreated NSCLC, without major risk factors for bleeding. In the LUME-Lung-1, the addition of nintedanib to docetaxel significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS, that was the primary endpoint of the trial (3.4 vs 2.7 months, HR 0.79; p=0.0019. Furthermore, a significant improvement in median overall survival (OS (from 10.3 to 12.6 months was observed in patients with adenocarcinoma histology, with a greater advantage in patients with adenocarcinoma who progressed within 9 months after start of first line treatment (from 7.9 to 10.9 months, and in patients with adenocarcinoma most refractory to first line chemotherapy (from 6.3 to 9.8 months. Adverse events were more common in the docetaxel plus nintedanib group and they included diarrhea and increased liver enzymes, while no statistically significant increase in the incidence of bleeding and hypertension events by the addition of nintedanib was observed. On these bases, the combination of docetaxel and nintedanib can be considered a new option for the second-line treatment for patients with advanced NSCLC with adenocarcinoma histology. Future challenges are the identification of predictive factors to help the decision of using nintedanib in eligible patients.

  17. Changes in pulmonary function after definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Søren M; Brink, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    a negative impact on FVC. Long-term FEV1 and FVC were analyzed using linear regression. Treatment year and V60 had a significant impact on loss of FEV1. V60 had a significant impact on FVC changes. CONCLUSION: In this study, early PF change reached a plateau at 6months after the start of radiotherapy......INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with early and long-term pulmonary function (PF) changes after definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC patients. PF was measured by spirometry i.e. forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1), and forced vital capacity (FVC...

  18. Chemotherapy and quality of life in NSCLC PS 2 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbekkmo, Nina; Strøm, Hans H; Sundstrøm, Stein H

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Nearly 40% of patients with advanced NSCLC are in performance status (PS) 2. These patients have a shorter life expectancy than PS 0/1 patients and they are underrepresented in clinical trials. Data on how platinum-based combination chemotherapy affects Health Related Quality of Life......, the development of HRQOL during the first nine weeks were compared between PS 2 and PS 0/1 patients. We used the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-LC13 questionnaires. Standardized area under the curve for all HRQOL items, and HRQOL responses classified as better, stable or worse, were compared between the groups. RESULTS...

  19. KLF4 promotes c-Met amplification-mediated gefitinib resistance in NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Xie, Qianyi; Liu, Suo; Ji, Ying; Li, Chunyun; Wang, Chunle; Jin, Longyu

    2018-04-06

    Gefitinib have been widely used in the first-line treatment of advanced EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many NSCLC patients will acquire resistance to gefitinib after 9-14 months of treatment. This study revealed that Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) contributes to the formation of gefitinib resistance in c-Met overexpressing NSCLC cells. We observed that KLF4 was overexpressed in c-Met overexpressing NSCLC cells and tissues. Knockdown of KLF4 increased tumorigenic properties in gefitinib-resistant NSCLC cell lines without c-Met overexpression, but it reduced tumorigenic properties and increased gefitinib sensitivity in gefitinib-resistant NSCLC cells with c-Met overexpression, whereas overexpression of KLF4 reduced gefitinib sensitivity in gefitinib-sensitive NSCLC cells. Furthermore, Western blot analysis revealed that KLF4 contributed to the formation of gefitinib resistance in c-Met overexpressing NSCLC cells by inhibiting the expression of apoptosis-related proteins under gefitinib treatment and activating the c-Met/Akt signaling pathway by decreasing the inhibition of β-Catenin on phosphorylation of c-Met to prevent blockade by gefitinib. In summary, this study's results suggest that KLF4 is a promising candidate molecular target for both prevention and therapy of NSCLC with c-Met overexpression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Spotlight on ceritinib in the treatment of ALK+ NSCLC: design, development and place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santarpia M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mariacarmela Santarpia,1 Maria Grazia Daffinà,1 Alessandro D’Aveni,1 Grazia Marabello,1 Alessia Liguori,1 Elisa Giovannetti,2–4 Niki Karachaliou,5 Maria Gonzalez Cao,6 Rafael Rosell,7,8 Giuseppe Altavilla1 1Medical Oncology Unit, Department of Human Pathology “G. Barresi”, University of Messina, Messina, Italy; 2Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 3Department of Nanoscience and Nanotechnologies, CNR-Nano, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, 4Cancer Pharmacology Lab, AIRC Start-Up Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 5Institute of Oncology Rosell (IOR, University Hospital Sagrat Cor, 6Oncology Department, Institute of Oncology Rosell (IOR, Quirón-Dexeus University Institute, Barcelona, 7Cancer Biology and Precision Medicine Program, Germans Trias i Pujol Research Institute, 8Catalan Institute of Oncology, Germans Trias i Pujol University Hospital, Badalona, Spain Abstract: The identification of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK fusion gene in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has radically changed the treatment of a subset of patients harboring this oncogenic driver. Crizotinib was the first ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor to receive fast approval and is currently indicated as the first-line therapy for advanced, ALK-positive NSCLC patients. However, despite crizotinib’s efficacy, patients almost invariably progress, with the central nervous system being one of the most common sites of relapse. Different mechanisms of acquired resistance have been identified, including secondary ALK mutations, ALK copy number alterations and activation of bypass tracks. Different highly potent and brain-penetrant next-generation ALK inhibitors have been developed and tested in NSCLC patients with ALK rearrangements. Ceritinib, a structurally distinct and selective ALK inhibitor, showed 20 times higher potency than crizotinib in

  1. Efficacy of EGFR-TKI therapy in patients with brain metastases from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Among the patients with BM from NSCLC, EGFR-TKIs exhibit a therapeutic advantage over chemotherapy or radiotherapy, which is reflected in the elevation of ORR and improvement in OS and LPFS. Keywords: Brain metastasis, Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), Protein kinase Inhibitors, Epidermal.

  2. The clinical characteristics and prognostic analysis of Chinese advanced NSCLC patients based on circulating tumor DNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao C

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chuangzhou Rao,1 Liangqin Nie,1 Xiaobo Miao,1 Yunbao Xu,1 Bing Li,2 Tengfei Zhang2 1Radiotherapy & Chemotherapy Dept 2, Ningbo No. 2 Hospital, Zhejiang, 2Burning Rock Biotech, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA is a noninvasive and real-time marker for tumor diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction. However, further investigations about ctDNA prognostic and predictive value are still needed, and conclusions from several studies were inconsistent.Experimental design: We performed capture-based targeted ultradeep sequencing on liquid biopsies from a cohort of 34 advanced Chinese non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and analyzed the clinical use of ctDNA in this study.Results: On the basis of clinical characteristics of the 34 NSCLC patients, we found that brain metastasis correlated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS and is more prone to happen in younger patients. After ctDNA sequencing, we analyzed the prognostic value of baseline ctDNA. In osimertinib-treated group, high max allelic fraction (maxAF correlated with shorter PFS. But for the cohort of 34 patients, no correlation can be observed between maxAF and PFS. We also presented two cases to demonstrate the value of disease progression prediction by ctDNA, which can be detected earlier than clinical response.Conclusion: In this study, we demonstrated that ctDNA is a prognostic marker for evaluating treatment response and predicting recurrence in advanced NSCLC. Further investigations with larger cohort and uniformed patient background are still needed to validate our findings. Keywords: circulating tumor DNA, non-small-cell lung cancer, prognosis 

  3. Time and dose-related changes in lung perfusion after definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina P; Khalil, Azza A; Møller, Ditte S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To examine radiation-induced changes in regional lung perfusion per dose level in 58 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: NSCLC patients receiving chemo-radiotherapy (RT) of minimum 60 Gy we...

  4. The Predictive Value of Germline Polymorphisms in Patients with NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Anneli Dowler; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund

    2010-01-01

    urgently needed. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are stable markers of potential clinical value and the study aimed at evaluating their use in lung cancer patients given standard chemotherapy. Genomic DNA was extracted from a pre-treatment blood sample drawn from patients with advanced Non....... Haplotypes were estimated and analyzed when relevant. There were no significant associations between SNPs in the EGF system or the DNA-repair system and RR, PFS or OS. In contrast, the VEGF+405, VEGF-460 and VEGF-2579, heterozygous patients had a higher response rate and longer PFS than homozygous patients....... Haplotype analysis of the VEGF+405 and VEGF- 460 supported our findings. These results were, however, not confirmed in the validation cohort. Although significant results regarding VEGF related SNPs, in the primary analysis, no predictive value of a broad panel of SNPs in NSCLC was found in the validation...

  5. XL-184, a MET, VEGFR-2 and RET kinase inhibitor for the treatment of thyroid cancer, glioblastoma multiforme and NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Guessous, Fadila; Kofman, Alex; Schiff, David; Abounader, Roger

    2010-02-01

    XL-184 (BMS-907351), under development by Exelixis Inc and Bristol-Myers Squibb Co, is a pan-tyrosine kinase inhibitor for the potential oral treatment of medullary thyroid cancer, glioblastoma multiforme and NSCLC. The prinicipal targets of XL-184 are MET, VEGFR-2 and RET, but the drug is also reported to display inhibitory activity against KIT, FLT3 and TEK. Preclinical studies demonstrated that XL-184 potently inhibited multiple receptor tyrosine kinases in various cancer cell lines and animal xenograft models, and that the drug exhibited significant oral bioavailability and blood-brain barrier penetration. A phase I clinical trial in patients with advanced solid malignancies indicated that XL-184 accumulated dose-dependently in the plasma and had a long terminal half-life. A phase II trial in patients with progressive or recurrent glioblastoma revealed modest but promising median progression-free survival. Toxicity and side effects for the drug have generally been of low-to-moderate severity. At the time of publication, three additional trials of XL-184 were recruiting patients, including a phase I trial in combination with standard of care in patients with glioblastoma, a phase I/II trial in combination with erlotinib in patients with NSCLC, and a phase III trial in patients with medullary thyroid cancer.

  6. Prognostic significance of CDH13 hypermethylation and mRNA in NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue R

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ruilin Xue,1 Cuili Yang,1 Fang Zhao,2 Dejia Li1 1Global Health Institute, School of Public Health, 2Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Aberrant methylation of CpG dinucleotides is a commonly observed epigenetic modification in human cancer. Thus, detection of aberrant gene promoter methylation as a tool for diagnosis of tumors or as a prognostic marker has been widely described for many types of cancers, including nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Emerging evidence indicates that CDH13 is a candidate tumor suppressor in several types of human tumors, including NSCLC. However, the correlation between CDH13 hypermethylation and clinicopathological characteristics of NSCLC remains unclear. In the current study, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate the effects of CDH13 hypermethylation on the incidence of NSCLC and clinicopathological characteristics. Final analysis of 803 NSCLC patients from eleven eligible studies was performed. CDH13 hypermethylation was observed to be significantly higher in NSCLC than in normal lung tissue, with the pooled odds ratio (OR from seven studies including 448 NSCLC and 345 normal lung tissue (OR, 7.85; 95% confidence interval, 5.12–12.03; P<0.00001. CDH13 hypermethylation was also associated with pathological types. The pooled OR was obtained from four studies, including 111 squamous cell carcinoma and 106 adenocarcinoma (OR, 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.19–0.66; P=0.001, which indicated that CDH13 hypermethylation plays a more important role in the pathogenesis of adenocarcinoma. NSCLC with CDH13 hypermethylation was found more frequently in poorly differentiated NSCLC patients. NSCLC patients with CDH13 hypermethylation had a lower survival rate than those without CDH13 hypermethylation. In addition, CDH13 mRNA high expression was found to correlate with better overall survival for all NSCLC patients followed for 20 years

  7. Intravenous or oral administration of vinorelbine in adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and vinorelbine for resected NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Steffen Filskov; Carus, Andreas; Meldgaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cisplatin and vinorelbine given intravenously is a well-established adjuvant chemotherapy regimen after surgery for early-stage NSCLC. Vinorelbine can also be administered orally. However, the efficacy of orally administrated vinorelbine in adjuvant treatment of NSCLC is unknown. We...... University Hospital (Denmark) from 2005 to 2012 for adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery for NSCLC. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Of the 265 patients included in this study, 126 patients received i.v. and 139 received p.o. vinorelbine/cisplatin. The two groups were comparable with respect to important baseline....... In conclusion we observed that intravenous or oral administration of vinorelbine in combination with cisplatin after surgery for NSCLC appear equally effective in terms of overall and disease-free survival....

  8. Inhibitory effect and molecular mechanism of mesenchymal stem cells on NSCLC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Mengwu; Hou, Lingling; Zhang, Jingsi; Zhao, Diandian; Hua, Jilei; Wang, Ziling; He, Jinsheng; Jiang, Hong; Hu, Honggang; Zhang, Lishu

    2018-04-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still the main threat of cancer-associated death. Current treatment of NSCLC has limited effectiveness, and unfortunately, the prognosis of NSCLC remains poor. Therefore, a novel strategy for cancer therapy is urgently needed. Stem cell therapy has significant potential for cancer treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with capacity for self-renewal and differentiation into various cells types exhibit the feature of homing to tumor site and immunosuppression, have been explored as a new treatment for various cancers. Studies revealed that the broad repertoire of trophic factors secreted by MSCs extensively involved in the interplay between MSCs and tumor cells. In this study, we confirmed that MSCs do have the paracrine effect on proliferation and migration of NSCLC cells (A549, NCI-H460, and SK-MES-1). Co-culture system and conditioned medium experiments results showed that soluble factors secreted by MSCs inhibited the proliferation of NSCLC cells in vitro. The scratch assay showed that conditioned medium of MSCs could suppress the migration of NSCLC cells in vitro. Western blot results showed that the expression of proteins relevant to cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis, and migration was remarkably decreased via MAPK/eIF4E signaling pathway. We speculated that soluble factors secreted by MSCs might be responsible for inhibitory mechanism of NSCLC cells. By Human Gene Expression Microarray Assay and recombinant Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor 165 (VEGF165) neutralizing experiment, we verified that VEGF might be responsible for the down-regulation of proteins related to cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis, and migration by suppressing translation initiation factor eIF4E via MAPK signaling pathway. Taken together, our study demonstrated that a possible trophic factor secreted by MSCs could manipulate translation initiation of NSCLC cells via MAPK signaling pathway, and significantly affect the fate of tumor cells, which

  9. Association of BIM Deletion Polymorphism and BIM-γ RNA Expression in NSCLC with EGFR Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    ISOBE, KAZUTOSHI; KAKIMOTO, ATSUSHI; MIKAMI, TETSUO; KABURAKI, KYOHEI; KOBAYASHI, HIROSHI; YOSHIZAWA, TAKAHIRO; MAKINO, TAKASHI; OTSUKA, HAJIME; SANO, GO; SUGINO, KEISHI; SAKAMOTO, SUSUMU; TAKAI, YUJIRO; TOCHIGI, NAOBUMI; IYODA, AKIRA; HOMMA, SAKAE

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This pilot study assessed the association of BIM deletion polymorphism and BIM RNA isoform in patients with EGFR-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: The study included 33 patients with EGFR-positive NSCLC treated with gefitinib. BIM deletion polymorphism and BIM RNA isoform (EL/L/S/γ) were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: BIM-γ expression was significantly higher in patients with BIM deletion polymorphism than among those without BIM ...

  10. RAGE genetic polymorphisms are associated with risk, chemotherapy response and prognosis in patients with advanced NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wang

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the association between genetic polymorphisms of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE and susceptibility, chemotherapy response rate and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. METHOD: This is a prospective study in which 562 patients with NSCLC and 764 healthy controls were enrolled. Three RAGE genetic polymorphisms, namely, -429T/C, -374T/A and 82G/S were genotyped. Platinum-based chemotherapy was given to 432 subjects with advanced inoperable NSCLC and their responses to chemotherapy were evaluated. RESULTS: All the polymorphic genotypes of RAGE polymorphisms were associated with susceptibility for NSCLC. Only the 82G/S polymorphisms denoted a significant difference between responders and non-responders to chemotherapy. The 82SS genotype and 82S allele distribution not only increased the NSCLC risk, but also was associated with a lower chemotherapy response rate and poor prognosis, indicated by overall survival and progression free survival. CONCLUSION: The 82G/S genetic polymorphism of RAGE gene might be used as a genetic marker to screen for patients sensitive to thermotherapy and to predict the prognosis of NSCLC.

  11. [Resistances to targeted therapies and strategy for following therapeutic lines in metastatic NSCLC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Solenn; Oulkhouir, Youssef; Naltet, Charles; Zalcman, Gérard

    2015-06-01

    EGFR, ALK, ROS1 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKis) have changed natural history of 12 to 15% of patients with metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and molecular alterations (mutations or translocations) in these genes. Median Progression Free Survival (PFS) of these patients has increased from 12 months with a platinum-based chemotherapy associated with bevacizumab, to 18 months with TKIs, overall survival reaching several years in these patients. However, rare primary resistance have been described in less than 10% of patients with EGFR or ALK-mutated cancer, whereas secondary resistance occur systematically. New generations TKIs are currently in clinical development, which are active on tumor clones harboring a resistance mutation, and some of them diffuse perfectly well into brain, a classical sanctuary for metastasis. Strategies are developed to delay secondary resistance apparition, to prolong PFS, and then overall survival. These strategies use combinations, as soon as first linesetting, of TKIs with either an anti-angiogenic drug (bevacizumab), or with an immunological checkpoint inhibitors, or with Heat-Shock Protein (Hsp) inhibitors. In order to delay acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs, the French Intergroup (IFCT) has launched a combination trial of EGFR TKIs with an anti-estrogen (fulvestrant) in postmenopausal women, whereas other trials associate EGFR TKIs with EFGR monoclonal antibody cetuximab, or with a monoclonal antibody targeting c-met. Copyright © 2015 Société Françise du Cancer. Publié par Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Prediction of residual metabolic activity after treatment in NSCLC patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios Velazquez, Emmanuel; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; Oberije, Cary; Ruysscher, Dirk De; Lambin, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Metabolic response assessment is often used as a surrogate of local failure and survival. Early identification of patients with residual metabolic activity is essential as this enables selection of patients who could potentially benefit from additional therapy. We report on the development of a pre-treatment prediction model for metabolic response using patient, tumor and treatment factors. Methods. One hundred and one patients with inoperable NSCLC (stage I-IV), treated with 3D conformal radical (chemo)-radiotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. All patients received a pre and post-radiotherapy fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography FDG-PET-CT scan. The electronic medical record system and the medical patient charts were reviewed to obtain demographic, clinical, tumor and treatment data. Primary outcome measure was examined using a metabolic response assessment on a post-radiotherapy FDG-PET-CT scan. Radiotherapy was delivered in fractions of 1.8 Gy, twice a day, with a median prescribed dose of 60 Gy. Results. Overall survival was worse in patients with residual metabolic active areas compared with the patients with a complete metabolic response (p=0.0001). In univariate analysis, three variables were significantly associated with residual disease: larger primary gross tumor volume (GTVprimary, p=0.002), higher pre-treatment maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max , p=0.0005) in the primary tumor and shorter overall treatment time (OTT, p=0.046). A multivariate model including GTVprimary, SUV max , equivalent radiation dose at 2 Gy corrected for time (EQD2, T) and OTT yielded an area under the curve assessed by the leave-one-out cross validation of 0.71 (95% CI, 0.65-0.76). Conclusion. Our results confirmed the validity of metabolic response assessment as a surrogate of survival. We developed a multivariate model that is able to identify patients at risk of residual disease. These patients may benefit from

  13. Risk of intracranial hemorrhage and cerebrovascular accidents in non-small cell lung cancer brain metastasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Geetika; Rana, Vishal; Wallace, Suzy; Taylor, Sarah; Debnam, Matthew; Feng, Lei; Suki, Dima; Karp, Daniel; Stewart, David; Oh, Yun

    2009-03-01

    Brain metastases confer significant morbidity and a poorer survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted antiangiogenic therapies (AAT) have demonstrated benefit for patients with metastatic NSCLC and are expected to directly inhibit the pathophysiology and morbidity of brain metastases, yet patients with brain metastases have been excluded from most clinical trials of AAT for fear of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The underlying risk of ICH from NSCLC brain metastases is low, but needs to be quantitated to plan clinical trials of AAT for NSCLC brain metastases. Data from MD Anderson Cancer Center Tumor Registry and electronic medical records from January 1998 to March 2006 was interrogated. Two thousand one hundred forty-three patients with metastatic NSCLC registering from January 1998 to September 2005 were followed till March 2006. Seven hundred seventy-six patients with and 1,367 patients without brain metastases were followed till death, date of ICH, or last date of study, whichever occurred first. The incidence of ICH seemed to be higher in those with brain metastasis compared with those without brain metastases, in whom they occurred as result of cerebrovascular accidents. However, the rates of symptomatic ICH were not significantly different. All ICH patients with brain metastasis had received radiation therapy for them and had been free of anticoagulation. Most of the brain metastasis-associated ICH's were asymptomatic, detected during increased radiologic surveillance. The rates of symptomatic ICH, or other cerebrovascular accidents in general were similar and not significantly different between the two groups. In metastatic NSCLC patients, the incidence of spontaneous ICH appeared to be higher in those with brain metastases compared with those without, but was very low in both groups without a statistically significant difference. These data suggest a minimal risk of clinically significant ICH for NSCLC

  14. Blood group antigen A type 3 expression is a favorable prognostic factor in advanced NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, L H; Kuemmel, A; Schliemann, C; Schulze, A; Humberg, J; Mohr, M; Görlich, D; Hartmann, W; Bröckling, S; Marra, A; Hillejan, L; Goletz, S; Karsten, U; Berdel, W E; Spieker, T; Wiewrodt, R

    2016-02-01

    Several blood group-related carbohydrate antigens are prognosis-relevant markers of tumor tissues. A type 3 (repetitive A) is a blood group antigen specific for A1 erythrocytes. Its potential expression in tumor tissues has so far not been examined. We have evaluated its expression in normal lung and in lung cancer using a novel antibody (A69-A/E8). For comparison an anti-A antibody specific to A types 1 and 2 was used, because its expression on lung cancer tissue has been previously reported to be of prognostic relevance. Resected tissue samples of 398 NSCLC patients were analyzed in immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. Expression of A type 3 was not observed in non-malignant lung tissues. A type 3 was expressed on tumor cells of around half of NSCLC patients of blood group A1 (ptype 1/2 antigen was observed (p=0.562), the expression of A type 3 by tumor cells indicated a highly significant favorable prognosis among advanced NSCLC patients (p=0.011) and in NSCLC patients with lymphatic spread (p=0.014). Univariate prognostic results were confirmed in a Cox proportional hazards model. In this study we present for the first time prognostic data for A type 3 antigen expression in lung cancer patients. Prospective studies should be performed to confirm the prognostic value of A type 3 expression for an improved risk stratification in NSCLC patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Anamorelin hydrochloride for the treatment of cancer-anorexia-cachexia in NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjie; Garcia, Jose M

    2015-06-01

    Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Anamorelin is a novel, orally active ghrelin receptor agonist in clinical development for the treatment of CACS in NSCLC. The aim of this review is to summarize preclinical and clinical studies evaluating anamorelin as a potential promising treatment for CACS in NSCLC. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and metabolism, clinical efficacy, safety and tolerability of anamorelin for the treatment of CACS in NSCLC were reviewed. Anamorelin administration may lead to increases in food intake, body weight and lean body mass, and a stimulatory effect on growth hormone secretion in NSCLC patients. Anamorelin is well tolerated with no dose-limiting toxicities identified to date. Targeting ghrelin receptors presents the advantage of potentially addressing multiple mechanisms of CACS simultaneously including appetite, muscle protein balance, adipose tissue metabolism, energy expenditure and inflammation. Clinical data suggest that anamorelin is well tolerated and it effectively increases appetite, body weight and lean mass in patients with advanced NSCLC. Long-term safety remains unknown at this time. The potential synergistic effects of anamorelin with nutritional support or exercise as well as its efficacy/safety in other tumor types are also unknown.

  16. Wee1 inhibitor MK1775 sensitizes KRAS mutated NSCLC cells to sorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiola, Elisa; Frapolli, Roberta; Tomanelli, Michele; Valerio, Rossana; Iezzi, Alice; Garassino, Marina C; Broggini, Massimo; Marabese, Mirko

    2018-01-17

    Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) is a poorly chemosensitive tumor and targeted therapies are only used for about 15% of patients where a specific driving and druggable lesion is observed (EGFR, ALK, ROS). KRAS is one of the most frequently mutated genes in NSCLC and patients harboring these mutations do not benefit from specific treatments. Sorafenib, a multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was proposed as a potentially active drug in KRAS-mutated NSCLC patients, but clinical trials results were not conclusive. Here we show that the NSCLC cells' response to sorafenib depends on the type of KRAS mutation. KRAS G12V cells respond less to sorafenib than the wild-type counterpart, in vitro and in vivo. To overcome this resistance, we used high-throughput screening with a siRNA library directed against 719 human kinases, and Wee1 was selected as a sorafenib response modulator. Inhibition of Wee1 by its specific inhibitor MK1775 in combination with sorafenib restored the KRAS mutated cells' response to the multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This combination of the Wee1 inhibitor with sorafenib, if confirmed in models with different genetic backgrounds, might be worth investigating further as a new strategy for KRAS mutated NSCLC.

  17. Pemetrexed as second-line therapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enriqueta Felip

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Enriqueta Felip1, Rafael Rosell21Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain; 2Institut Català d’Oncologia, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: NSCLC accounts for 80% of all cases of lung cancer, which is the leading cause of cancer mortality. The majority of NSCLC patients present with advanced, unresectable disease, which remains incurable. In advanced disease, chemotherapy with platinum (cisplatin or carboplatin in combination with a third-generation cytotoxic drug (vinorelbine, gemcitabine, paclitaxel, or docetaxel can provide a modest improvement in survival without impairing quality of life. In chemotherapy-naïve, advanced, non-squamous NSCLC patients, the combination of bevacizumab with chemotherapy was shown to produce better outcomes than chemotherapy alone. Response rates of 20%–40% can now be expected, with a median survival of 8–11 months and a 1-year survival rate of 30%–40%. In second-line treatment, docetaxel has shown superiority to best supportive care in terms of survival and quality of life. A pooled analysis comparing docetaxel administered weekly versus 3-weekly found similar survival rates between the schedules and a non-significant reduction in febrile neutropenia for the weekly regimen. Pemetrexed, a multitargeted antifolate agent, has shown clear activity in several tumors, including mesothelioma and NSCLC. In a phase III trial, second-line treatment with pemetrexed demonstrated overall survival comparable to docetaxel, with a more manageable toxicity profile.Keywords: pemetrexed, second-line therapy, NSCLC

  18. Improvement of Radiation-Mediated Immunosuppression of Human NSCLC Tumour Xenografts in a Nude Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Tokalov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model have consistently been used as an essential part of preclinical studies for anticancer drugs activity in human. Commonly, these animals receive whole body irradiation to assure immunosuppression. But whole body dose delivery might be inhomogeneous and the resulting incomplete bone marrow depletion may modify tumour behaviour. To improve irradiation-mediated immunosuppression of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model irradiation (2 + 2 Gy from opposite sides of animals has been performed using a conventional X-ray tube. The described modification of whole body irradiation improves growth properties of human NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model. The design of the whole body irradiation mediated immunosuppression described here for NSCLC xenografts may be useful for research applications involving other types of human tumours.

  19. MiR-186 Inhibited Migration of NSCLC via Targeting cdc42 and Effecting EMT Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ying; Jin, Xintian; Sun, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yueming; Song, Xianjing

    2017-03-01

    In this study, qRT-PCR was employed to identify that miR-186 expression level in NSCLC tissues are highly associated with lymph node metastasis. In addition, through the application of western blotting, luciferase assay and qRT-PCR, it was found that miR-186 targeted 3'UTR of cdc42 mRNA and down-regulated cdc42 protein level in a post-transcriptional manner. Transwell assay indicated that cdc42 partially reversed the effect of miR-186 mimics. Besides, miR-186 was proved to regulate EMT by influencing biomarkers of this process and cell adhesion ability. Thus, miR-186 is a potential target for NSCLC therapy. miR-186 is proposed to be one of tumor-suppressors and may serve as a therapeutic target in NSCLC treatment.

  20. Economic impact of tissue testing and treatments of metastatic NSCLC in the era of personalized medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Marie Graham

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A paradigm-shift in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has resulted in many new therapies becoming available for patients with advanced disease. Stratification of treatment by histologic and molecular subtype is recommended in order to obtain the greatest clinical benefit for patients while minimizing adverse effects of treatment. However, these advances in diagnosis and treatment of NSCLC have come at a financial cost. This review highlights the economic impact of screening for molecular abnormalities and targeted treatment for advanced NSCLC. Major determinants of cost are drug acquisition and molecular testing. As technologies advance, molecular testing costs may reduce. However, we must collaborate with payers and manufacturers to ensure that high drug costs do not limit patient accessibility to potentially beneficial treatment.

  1. Overcoming resistance to targeted therapies in NSCLC: current approaches and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maione, Paolo; Sacco, Paola Claudia; Sgambato, Assunta; Casaluce, Francesca; Rossi, Antonio; Gridelli, Cesare

    2015-09-01

    The discovery that a number of aberrant tumorigenic processes and signal transduction pathways are mediated by druggable protein kinases has led to a revolutionary change in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) are the targets of several tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), some of them approved for treatment and others currently in clinical development. First-generation agents offer, in target populations, a substantial improvement of outcomes compared with standard chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. Unfortunately, drug resistance develops after initial benefit through a variety of mechanisms. Novel generation EGFR and ALK inhibitors are currently in advanced clinical development and are producing encouraging results in patients with acquired resistance to previous generation agents. The search for new drugs or strategies to overcome the TKI resistance in patients with EGFR mutations or ALK rearrangements is to be considered a priority for the improvement of outcomes in the treatment of advanced NSCLC.

  2. Levels of cell-free DNA and plasma KRAS during treatment of advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowler Nygaard, Anneli; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    be analysed in plasma and may increase the scientific use of such measurements. In the present study, we investigated: i) the dynamics of cfDNA and plasma mutated KRAS (pmKRAS) during the treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC; and ii) the prognostic value of baseline cfDNA and pmKRAS. Sixty‑nine patients......Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most common malignant tumours in the western world and is associated with a poor prognosis. Biomarkers predicting prognosis and therapeutic effects are highly required, and cell-free DNA (cfDNA) may be a feasible option. Genetic mutations can...... were included in a prospective biomarker trial. Inclusion criteria included advanced NSCLC, candidate for first-line treatment, no previous cancer within the five years prior to this study. Blood samples were drawn at baseline, day 8 and at progression. Analyses of cfDNA and KRAS mutations in plasma...

  3. Combined effects of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and vATPase inhibitors in NSCLC cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hyeon-Ok [KIRAMS Radiation Biobank, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung-Eun [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Soon [Department of Microbiological Engineering, Kon-Kuk University, 120 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul, 143–701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Bora [KIRAMS Radiation Biobank, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, In-Chul, E-mail: parkic@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Kyung, E-mail: jklee@kirams.re.kr [KIRAMS Radiation Biobank, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Despite excellent initial clinical responses of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), many patients eventually develop resistance. According to a recent report, vacuolar H + ATPase (vATPase) is overexpressed and is associated with chemotherapy drug resistance in NSCLC. We investigated the combined effects of EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors and their underlying mechanisms in the regulation of NSCLC cell death. We found that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib, or lapatinib) and vATPase inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A) enhanced synergistic cell death compared to treatments with each drug alone. Treatment with bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A led to the induction of Bnip3 expression in an Hif-1α dependent manner. Knock-down of Hif-1α or Bnip3 by siRNA further enhanced cell death induced by bafilomycin A1, suggesting that Hif-1α/Bnip3 induction promoted resistance to cell death induced by the vATPase inhibitors. EGFR TKIs suppressed Hif-1α and Bnip3 expression induced by the vATPase inhibitors, suggesting that they enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to these inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. Taken together, we conclude that EGFR TKIs enhance the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to vATPase inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. We suggest that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC. - Highlights: • Co-treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors induces synergistic cell death • EGFR TKIs enhance cell sensitivity to vATPase inhibitors via Hif-1α downregulation • Co-treatment of these inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC.

  4. The mechanism involved in the loss of PTEN expression in NSCLC tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Jingfeng; Peng, Xianjing [Department of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin [Ruikang Hospital, Guangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanning 530003 (China); Chen, Yuxiang, E-mail: chenyx008@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); School of Biological Science and Technology, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China)

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation stimulates PTEN reexpression in NSCLC independent of p53 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN reexpression is mediated by miR-29b overexpression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-29b regulates Dnmts expression in NSCLC tumor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Target therapy could be established by overexpressing miR-29b expression. -- Abstract: Loss of PTEN expression is observed in most non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). However, the mechanism by which PTEN expression is regulated in NSCLC has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts), microRNA-29b (miR-29b), and anti-miR-29b inhibitor in PTEN promoter methylation and PTEN gene expression in H358 NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo. PTEN mRNA was measured by RT-PCR. PTEN and Dnmts protein levels were measured by Western blot. miR-29b expression was detected by Northern blot. A xenograft H358 tumor mouse model was established by subcutaneously inoculating H358 cells into the right hind limbs of nude mice. We found that radiation induced cell apoptosis and hypomethylation in PTEN promoter, PTEN and miR-29b expression, and downregulation of Dnmt1, 3a and 3b expression in H358 tumor cells. The effect of radiation on gene expression and apoptosis was blocked by anti-miR-29b inhibitor. In the xenograft H358 tumor model, anti-miR-29b inhibitor reversed radiation-induced tumor growth delay, PTEN reexpression and downregulation of Dnmts expression. Our study suggested that miR-29b is an upstream molecule of PTEN. miR-29b regulates PTEN gene expression through downregulating Dnmts expression and subsequently induces hypomethylation in PTEN promoter. Targeting therapy could be established in NSCLC by upregulating miR-29b expression.

  5. The mechanism involved in the loss of PTEN expression in NSCLC tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Jingfeng; Peng, Xianjing; Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Chen, Yuxiang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Radiation stimulates PTEN reexpression in NSCLC independent of p53 activation. ► PTEN reexpression is mediated by miR-29b overexpression. ► miR-29b regulates Dnmts expression in NSCLC tumor cells. ► Target therapy could be established by overexpressing miR-29b expression. -- Abstract: Loss of PTEN expression is observed in most non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). However, the mechanism by which PTEN expression is regulated in NSCLC has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts), microRNA-29b (miR-29b), and anti-miR-29b inhibitor in PTEN promoter methylation and PTEN gene expression in H358 NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo. PTEN mRNA was measured by RT-PCR. PTEN and Dnmts protein levels were measured by Western blot. miR-29b expression was detected by Northern blot. A xenograft H358 tumor mouse model was established by subcutaneously inoculating H358 cells into the right hind limbs of nude mice. We found that radiation induced cell apoptosis and hypomethylation in PTEN promoter, PTEN and miR-29b expression, and downregulation of Dnmt1, 3a and 3b expression in H358 tumor cells. The effect of radiation on gene expression and apoptosis was blocked by anti-miR-29b inhibitor. In the xenograft H358 tumor model, anti-miR-29b inhibitor reversed radiation-induced tumor growth delay, PTEN reexpression and downregulation of Dnmts expression. Our study suggested that miR-29b is an upstream molecule of PTEN. miR-29b regulates PTEN gene expression through downregulating Dnmts expression and subsequently induces hypomethylation in PTEN promoter. Targeting therapy could be established in NSCLC by upregulating miR-29b expression.

  6. Combined effects of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and vATPase inhibitors in NSCLC cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Bora; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Despite excellent initial clinical responses of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), many patients eventually develop resistance. According to a recent report, vacuolar H + ATPase (vATPase) is overexpressed and is associated with chemotherapy drug resistance in NSCLC. We investigated the combined effects of EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors and their underlying mechanisms in the regulation of NSCLC cell death. We found that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib, or lapatinib) and vATPase inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A) enhanced synergistic cell death compared to treatments with each drug alone. Treatment with bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A led to the induction of Bnip3 expression in an Hif-1α dependent manner. Knock-down of Hif-1α or Bnip3 by siRNA further enhanced cell death induced by bafilomycin A1, suggesting that Hif-1α/Bnip3 induction promoted resistance to cell death induced by the vATPase inhibitors. EGFR TKIs suppressed Hif-1α and Bnip3 expression induced by the vATPase inhibitors, suggesting that they enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to these inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. Taken together, we conclude that EGFR TKIs enhance the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to vATPase inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. We suggest that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC. - Highlights: • Co-treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors induces synergistic cell death • EGFR TKIs enhance cell sensitivity to vATPase inhibitors via Hif-1α downregulation • Co-treatment of these inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC

  7. Involvement of CCR6/CCL20/IL-17 Axis in NSCLC Disease Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Gail; Demma, Jonathan; Vernea, Fiona; Beider, Katia; Shlomai, Zippora; Wald, Hanna; Zamir, Gideon; Shapira, Oz M.; Peled, Amnon; Wald, Ori

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Autocrine and paracrine chemokine/chemokine receptor-based interactions promote non-small-cell-lung-cancer (NSCLC) carcinogenesis. CCL20/CCR6 interactions are involved in prostatic and colonic malignancy pathogenesis. The expression and function of CCL20/CCR6 and its related Th-17 type immune response in NSCLC is not yet defined. We sought to characterize the role of the CCL20/CCR6/IL-17 axis in NSCLC tumor growth. Methods A specialized histopathologist blindly assessed CCL20/CCR6 expression levels in 49 tissue samples of NSCLC patients operated in our department. Results were correlated to disease progression. Colony assays, ERK signaling and chemokine production were measured to assess cancer cell responsiveness to CCL20 and IL-17 stimulation. Results CCL20 was highly expressed in the majority (38/49, 77.5%) of tumor samples. Only a minority of samples (8/49, 16.5%) showed high CCR6 expression. High CCR6 expression was associated with a shorter disease-free survival (P = 0.008) and conferred a disease stage-independent 4.87-fold increased risk for disease recurrence (P = 0.0076, CI 95% 1.52–15.563). Cancerous cell colony-forming capacity was increased by CCL20 stimulation; this effect was dependent in part on ERK phosphorylation and signaling. IL-17 expression was detected in NSCLC; IL-17 potentiated the production of CCL20 by cancerous cells. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the CCL20/CCR6 axis promotes NSCLC disease progression. CCR6 is identified as a potential new prognostic marker and the CCL20/CCR6/IL-17 axis as a potential new therapeutic target. Larger scale studies are required to consolidate these observations. PMID:21949768

  8. Brain accumulation of the EML4-ALK inhibitor ceritinib is restricted by P-glycoprotein (P-GP/ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, Anita; Sparidans, Rolf|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075047144; Wagenaar, Els; Beijnen, Jacob|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071919570; Schinkel, Alfred H.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to clarify the roles of the multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 in oral availability and brain accumulation of ceritinib, an oral anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor used to treat metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after progression on crizotinib. Importantly, NSCLC is

  9. Serum tumor markers CEA, CYFRA21-1, and CA-125 are associated with worse prognosis in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedrés, Susana; Nuñez, Isaac; Longo, Marina; Martinez, Pablo; Checa, Eva; Torrejón, Davis; Felip, Enriqueta

    2011-05-01

    Serum tumor markers are considered a negative prognostic factor in early-stages NSCLC but its role in advanced disease is controversial. The aim of this study is to analyze the prognostic value of tumor markers in advanced NSCLC. Two hundred and seventy seven patients diagnosed in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. Baseline prognostic factors analyzed were gender, histology and brain metastases. Baseline patients characteristics: median age 63 years (30-81 years); males 84.4%, stage IV: 61.7%; adenocarcinoma 38.6%, squamous carcinoma 22.4%. High levels of CEA, CYFRA21-1, and CA125 levels were detected in 179 (55.9%), 119 (65%), and 129 (46.6%) patients respectively. Significant higher levels of CEA and CA125 at baseline were present in adenocarcinoma (P CEA, CYFRA21-1, and CA125 was 5.3 months (m), 3.5 m and 4.6 m versus 7.4 m, 6.2 m and 7.5 m in patients with normal levels (P tumor markers was 10.0 m vs 14.0 m (P = 0.085) for CEA; 5.6 vs 12.1 m for CYFRA21-1 (P = .002), and 8.7 vs 14.0 (P = .03) for CA125. In the multivariate analysis high levels of tumor markers, histology and clinical stage were significant correlated with worse prognostic. Patients with all the tumor markers elevated presented the worst prognosis (3.6 m for PFS and 7.1 m for OS, P tumor markers at baseline are correlated with worse survival in stage III-IV NSCLC patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The challenge of NSCLC diagnosis and predictive analysis on small samples. Practical approach of a working group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thunnissen, Erik; Kerr, Keith M; Herth, Felix J F

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the division of pulmonary carcinomas into small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was adequate for therapy selection. Due to the emergence of new treatment options subtyping of NSCLC and predictive testing have become mandatory. A practical approach to...

  11. Evaluation of NGS and RT-PCR methods for ALK rearrangement in European NSCLC patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Letovanec, Igor; Finn, Stephen; Zygoura, Panagiota

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The reported prevalence of ALK rearrangement in NSCLC ranges from 2%-7%. The primary standard diagnostic method is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Recently, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has also proven to be a reproducible and sensitive technique. Reverse transcriptase-poly...

  12. ERCC1 and histopathology in advanced NSCLC patients randomized in a large multicenter phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, Adam Christian; Santoni-Rugiu, E; Sørensen, J B

    2010-01-01

    Customized chemotherapy is likely to improve outcome in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) is a promising biomarker; however, current evidence is inadequate. Impact of ERCC1 status was evaluated among patients participa...

  13. Octogenarians with early stage NSCLC undergoing SBRT-same outcomes as younger patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Stefan Starup; Schytte, T.; Brink, C.

    2015-01-01

    pts with early stage NSCLC. However, it is unknown if all pts have same benefit of SBRT due to lack of randomized studies. This retrospective single-institution study reports survival and control rates for medical inoperable octogenarians vs. pts 80 and 80 and 137 were 80 and 0.05). No difference...

  14. Genotyping non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Cardona, Andrés Felipe; Federico Bramuglia, Guillermo; Gallo, Aly; Campos-Parra, Alma D; Serrano, Silvia; Castro, Marcelo; Avilés, Alejandro; Amorin, Edgar; Kirchuk, Ricardo; Cuello, Mauricio; Borbolla, José; Riemersma, Omar; Becerra, Henry; Rosell, Rafael

    2011-11-01

    Frequency of mutations in EGFR and KRAS in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is different between ethnic groups; however, there is no information in Latin-American population. A total of 1150 biopsies of NSCLC patients from Latin America (Argentina, Colombia, Peru, and Mexico) were used extracting genomic DNA to perform direct sequencing of EGFR gene (exons 18 and 21) and KRAS gene in 650 samples. In Mexico, Scorpions ARMS was also used to obtain a genetic profile. We report the frequency of mutations in EGFR and KRAS genes in four Latin-American countries (n = 1150). Frequency of EGFR mutations in NSCLC was 33.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 30.5-35.9) (Argentina 19.3%, Colombia 24.8%, Mexico 31.2%, and Peru 67%). The frequency of KRAS mutations was 16.6% (95% CI 13.8-19.4). EGFR mutations were independently associated with adenocarcinoma histology, older age, nonsmokers, and absence of KRAS mutations. Overall response rate to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in EGFR-mutated patients (n = 56) was 62.5% (95% CI 50-75) with a median overall survival of 16.5 months (95% CI 12.4-20.6). Our findings suggest that the frequency of EGFR mutations in Latin America lies between that of Asian and Caucasian populations and therefore support the genetic heterogeneity of NSCLC around the world.

  15. Chromosome 5p Region SNPs Are Associated with Risk of NSCLC among Women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyke, A. L. V.

    2009-01-01

    In a population-based case-control study, we explored the associations between 42 polymorphisms in seven genes in this region and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) risk among Caucasian (364 cases; 380 controls) and African American (95 cases; 103 controls) women. Two TERT region SNPs, rs2075786 and rs2853677, conferred an increased risk of developing NSCLC, especially among African American women, and TERT-rs2735940 was associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer among African Americans. Five of the 20 GHR polymorphisms and SEPP1-rs6413428 were associated with a marginally increased risk of NSCLC among Caucasians. Random forest analysis reinforced the importance of GHR among Caucasians and identified AMACR, TERT, and GHR among African Americans, which were also significant using gene-based risk scores. Smoking-SNP interactions were explored, and haplotype in TERT and GHR associated with NSCLC risk were identified. The roles of TERT, GHR, AMACR and SEPP1 genes in lung carcinogenesis warrant further exploration

  16. Clinicopathological significance and potential drug target of T-cadherin in NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Z

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Zhidong Wang,1 Bin Wang,1 Huanchen Guo,2 Guoyu Shi,2 Xiuqin Hong3 1Oncology Department, Eighth Hospital of Changsha, Changsha, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Shouguang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shouguang, People’s Republic of China; 3Institute of Gerontology, Hunan Geriatric Hospital, Changsha, People’s Republic of China Background: Previous studies demonstrate that T-cadherin is a candidate tumor suppressor in several types of human tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Lack of protein expression of T-cadherin by hypermethylation has been found to play an important role in lung alveolar differentiation regulation and epithelial tumorigenesis. However, the correlation between T-cadherin hypermethylation and clinicopathological characteristics of NSCLC remains unclear. Here we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate the effects of T-cadherin hypermethylation on the incidence of NSCLC and clinicopathological characteristics.Methods: A detailed literature search was carried out for related research publications. Analyses of pooled data were performed. Odds ratio (OR and hazard ratio (HR were calculated and summarized, respectively.Results: Final analysis of 1,172 NSCLC patients from 15 eligible studies was performed. T-cadherin hypermethylation was observed to be significantly higher in NSCLC than in normal lung tissue, based on the pooled OR from nine studies including 532 NSCLC and 372 normal lung tissue samples (OR=8.19, 95% confidence interval [CI]=5.41–12.39, P<0.00001. T-cadherin hypermethylation may also be associated with pathological types. The pooled OR was obtained from four studies including 111patients with squamous cell carcinoma and 106 with adenocarcinoma (OR=0.35, 95% CI=0.19–0.66, P=0.001, which indicated that T-cadherin hypermethylation plays a more important role in the pathogenesis of adenocarcinoma. We did not find

  17. Time evolution of regional CT density changes in normal lung after IMRT for NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Schytte, Tine; Bertelsen, Anders; Bentzen, Søren M.; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the clinical radiobiology of radiation induced lung disease in terms of regional computed tomography (CT) density changes following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: A total of 387 follow-up CT scans in 131 NSCLC patients receiving IMRT to a prescribed dose of 60 or 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions were analyzed. The dose-dependent temporal evolution of the density change was analyzed using a two-component model, a superposition of an early, transient component and a late, persistent component. Results: The CT density of healthy lung tissue was observed to increase significantly (p 12 months. Conclusions: The radiobiology of lung injury may be analyzed in terms of CT density change. The initial transient change in density is consistent with radiation pneumonitis, while the subsequent stabilization of the density is consistent with pulmonary fibrosis

  18. miR-151a induces partial EMT by regulating E-cadherin in NSCLC cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Iben; Sanders, K J; Idica, A

    2017-01-01

    miR-151a and its host gene, focal adhesion kinase, FAK, are located in a region of chromosome 8q that is frequently amplified in solid tumors, including lung cancer. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide and metastasis remains the major challenge in battling lung cancer...... mortality. Here, we demonstrate that miR-151a is overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient specimens, as compared to healthy lung. In addition, miR-151a overexpression promotes proliferation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and induces tumor cell migration and invasion of NSCLC...... cells. Blocking miR-151a expression using anti-miR-151a approaches significantly reduced NCSLC cell proliferative and motility potential. Furthermore, we determined that miR-151a significantly regulates E-cadherin expression. Finally, functional rescue experiments determined that overexpression of E...

  19. Combination of immunotherapy with targeted therapies in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya-Horno, Irene; Viteri, Santiago; Karachaliou, Niki; Rosell, Rafael

    2018-01-01

    Treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been significantly improved in recent years with the incorporation of drugs targeting antiangiogenesis and more specifically genomic alterations such as the EGFR mutations and ALK translocations. However, most patients invariably progress and die. The emergence of immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting the pathways involved in tumor-induced immunosuppression have redefined the management of the disease, achieving significant long-lasting responses with manageable safety profiles, regardless of histology. Still, response rates with immunotherapy are deemed suboptimal. Current efforts are focusing on new potential combination strategies with synergistic antitumor activity, using immune checkpoint blockade as a partner for targeted agents. Herein we discuss the available data on the combined use of immunotherapy, including PD-1/PD-L1 and CTLA-4 inhibitors, with EGFR and ALK inhibitors and comment on the current status of immunotherapy plus antiangiogenic drugs for molecularly unselected advanced NSCLC.

  20. XIAP inhibits mature Smac-induced apoptosis by degrading it through ubiquitination in NSCLC

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Sida; Yang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Boxiang; Li, Xiang; Sun, Xin; Li, Gang; Zhang, Jing; Xiao, Guodong; Gao, Xiao; Huang, Guanghong; Wang, Peili; Ren, Hong

    2016-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and second mitochondrial-derived activator of caspase (Smac) are two important prognostic biomarkers for cancer. They are negatively correlated in many types of cancer. However, their relationship is still unknown in lung cancer. In the present study, we found that there was a negative correlation between Smac and XIAP at the level of protein but not mRNA in NSCLC patients. However, XIAP overexpression had no effect on degrading endogenous Smac i...

  1. Co-clinical quantitative tumor volume imaging in ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishino, Mizuki, E-mail: Mizuki_Nishino@DFCI.HARVARD.EDU [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Sacher, Adrian G.; Gandhi, Leena; Chen, Zhao; Akbay, Esra [Department of Medical Oncology and Department of Medicine Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Fedorov, Andriy; Westin, Carl F.; Hatabu, Hiroto [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Johnson, Bruce E.; Hammerman, Peter; Wong, Kwok-kin [Department of Medical Oncology and Department of Medicine Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Role of co-clinical studies in precision cancer medicine is increasingly recognized. • This study compared tumor volume in co-clinical trials of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. • Similarities and differences of tumor volume changes in mice and humans were noted. • The study provides insights to optimize murine co-clinical trial designs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate and compare the volumetric tumor burden changes during crizotinib therapy in mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Volumetric tumor burden was quantified on serial imaging studies in 8 bitransgenic mice with ALK-rearranged adenocarcinoma treated with crizotinib, and in 33 human subjects with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. The volumetric tumor burden changes and the time to maximal response were compared between mice and humans. Results: The median tumor volume decrease (%) at the maximal response was −40.4% (range: −79.5%–+11.7%) in mice, and −72.9% (range: −100%–+72%) in humans (Wilcoxon p = 0.03). The median time from the initiation of therapy to maximal response was 6 weeks in mice, and 15.7 weeks in humans. Overall volumetric response rate was 50% in mice and 97% in humans. Spider plots of tumor volume changes during therapy demonstrated durable responses in the human cohort, with a median time on therapy of 13.1 months. Conclusion: The present study described an initial attempt to evaluate quantitative tumor burden changes in co-clinical imaging studies of genomically-matched mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. Differences are noted in the degree of maximal volume response between the two cohorts in this well-established paradigm of targeted therapy, indicating a need for further studies to optimize co-clinical trial design and interpretation.

  2. Bone invading NSCLC cells produce IL-7: mice model and human histologic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roato, Ilaria; Mussa, Antonio; Ferracini, Riccardo; Caldo, Davide; Godio, Laura; D'Amico, Lucia; Giannoni, Paolo; Morello, Emanuela; Quarto, Rodolfo; Molfetta, Luigi; Buracco, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Bone metastases are a common and dismal consequence of lung cancer that is a leading cause of death. The role of IL-7 in promoting bone metastases has been previously investigated in NSCLC, but many aspects remain to be disclosed. To further study IL-7 function in bone metastasis, we developed a human-in-mice model of bone aggression by NSCLC and analyzed human bone metastasis biopsies. We used NOD/SCID mice implanted with human bone. After bone engraftment, two groups of mice were injected subcutaneously with A549, a human NSCLC cell line, either close or at the contralateral flank to the human bone implant, while a third control group did not receive cancer cells. Tumor and bone vitality and IL-7 expression were assessed in implanted bone, affected or not by A549. Serum IL-7 levels were evaluated by ELISA. IL-7 immunohistochemistry was performed on 10 human bone NSCLC metastasis biopsies for comparison. At 12 weeks after bone implant, we observed osteogenic activity and neovascularization, confirming bone vitality. Tumor aggressive cells implanted close to human bone invaded the bone tissue. The bone-aggressive cancer cells were positive for IL-7 staining both in the mice model and in human biopsies. Higher IL-7 serum levels were found in mice injected with A549 cells close to the bone implant compared to mice injected with A549 cells in the flank opposite to the bone implant. We demonstrated that bone-invading cells express and produce IL-7, which is known to promote osteoclast activation and osteolytic lesions. Tumor-bone interaction increases IL-7 production, with an increase in IL-7 serum levels. The presented mice model of bone invasion by contiguous tumor is suitable to study bone-tumor cell interaction. IL-7 plays a role in the first steps of metastatic process

  3. Co-clinical quantitative tumor volume imaging in ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Mizuki; Sacher, Adrian G.; Gandhi, Leena; Chen, Zhao; Akbay, Esra; Fedorov, Andriy; Westin, Carl F.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Johnson, Bruce E.; Hammerman, Peter; Wong, Kwok-kin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Role of co-clinical studies in precision cancer medicine is increasingly recognized. • This study compared tumor volume in co-clinical trials of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. • Similarities and differences of tumor volume changes in mice and humans were noted. • The study provides insights to optimize murine co-clinical trial designs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate and compare the volumetric tumor burden changes during crizotinib therapy in mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Volumetric tumor burden was quantified on serial imaging studies in 8 bitransgenic mice with ALK-rearranged adenocarcinoma treated with crizotinib, and in 33 human subjects with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. The volumetric tumor burden changes and the time to maximal response were compared between mice and humans. Results: The median tumor volume decrease (%) at the maximal response was −40.4% (range: −79.5%–+11.7%) in mice, and −72.9% (range: −100%–+72%) in humans (Wilcoxon p = 0.03). The median time from the initiation of therapy to maximal response was 6 weeks in mice, and 15.7 weeks in humans. Overall volumetric response rate was 50% in mice and 97% in humans. Spider plots of tumor volume changes during therapy demonstrated durable responses in the human cohort, with a median time on therapy of 13.1 months. Conclusion: The present study described an initial attempt to evaluate quantitative tumor burden changes in co-clinical imaging studies of genomically-matched mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. Differences are noted in the degree of maximal volume response between the two cohorts in this well-established paradigm of targeted therapy, indicating a need for further studies to optimize co-clinical trial design and interpretation.

  4. Outcomes after combined modality therapy for EGFR-mutant and wild-type locally advanced NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Raymond H; Doran, Elizabeth; Muzikansky, Alona; Kang, Josephine; Neal, Joel W; Baldini, Elizabeth H; Choi, Noah C; Willers, Henning; Jackman, David M; Sequist, Lecia V

    2011-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations identify a unique biological subtype of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Treatment outcomes for EGFR-mutant locally advanced NSCLC patients have not been well described. We retrospectively examined outcomes after combined modality therapy including thoracic radiation therapy (RT) in 123 patients with locally advanced NSCLC and known EGFR mutation status. Outcomes were compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis, the log-rank test, and multivariate Cox regression models. All 123 patients underwent thoracic RT; 25% had tumors with EGFR mutations and 94% had stage III disease. Overall, 81% received chemotherapy concurrent with RT and 55% underwent surgical resection. With a median follow-up of 27.5 months, the overall survival (OS) rate was significantly higher in patients with EGFR-mutant tumors than in those with wild-type EGFR tumors (2-year estimate: 92.6% versus 69.0%; p = .04). The 2-year relapse-free survival and distant recurrence rates did not differ significantly by genotype. The 2-year locoregional recurrence rate (LRR) was significantly lower in EGFR-mutant than in wild-type EGFR patients (17.8% versus 41.7%; p = .005). EGFR-mutant genotype was associated with a lower risk for LRR on multivariate analysis, but not OS, after adjusting for surgery and other potential confounders. We observed that EGFR-mutant patients with locally advanced NSCLC treated with RT had lower rates of LRR than wild-type EGFR patients, raising the hypothesis that EGFR mutations may confer sensitivity to RT and/or chemotherapy. The association between mutation status and OS after combined modality therapy was less robust. Our data may serve as a useful baseline estimate of outcomes by EGFR genotype for future prospective studies.

  5. Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytte, Tine; Hansen, Olfred; Stohlberg-Rohr, Thomine

    2010-01-01

    report the heart toxicities in locally-regionally advanced NSCLC (LA-NSCLC) patients (pts) treated with RT in our centre.   Methods and material: From 01.01.1995-30.11.2007, 287 pts with LA-NSCLC (stage IIB-IIIB) were treated with RT at our centre with planned dose 60-66 Gy. All RT was applied as 3D RT...... year was 64%, 35% and 14%, respectively. In a Cox regression analyses of time to CE, age > 65 year, + induction chemotherapy, smoking, high mean dose to left + right ventricles or whole heart was not a statistically significant factor, whereas low FEV-1, large GTV, low Hb, poor PS, high V20 to lunge......, and gender did.   Discussion: We did not find a correlation between high mean dose to left + right ventricles or whole heart and having a CE. Having a CE was not related to worsen survival.   Factors in model Relative Hazard Ratio (95% CI) p-value   FEV-1 (150 ml) 2.02 (1...

  6. Silibinin Inhibits NSCLC Metastasis by Targeting the EGFR/LOX Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Hou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor metastasis is the most lethal and debilitating process that threatens cancer patients. Among the regulators involved in tumor metastasis, lysyl oxidase (LOX is an important contributor for tumor invasion, migration and the formation of the pre-metastatic niche. Although the relationship between LOX and poor prognosis of lung patients has been preliminary reported, the mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we found that LOX overexpression is closely related to the survival of lung adenocarcinoma patients but not squamous cell carcinoma patients. Moreover, we confirmed that LOX expression is regulated by the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR via the PI3K/AKT, MEK/ERK, and SAPK/JNK signaling pathways in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Meanwhile, the study also suggested that the traditional anti-fibrosis drug silibinin inhibited NSCLC cell migration in an EGFR/LOX dependent manner. In addition, an orthotopic implantation metastasis model also confirmed that the EGFR inhibitor WZ4002 and silibinin decreased tumor metastasis through the EGFR/LOX pathway. Altogether, this study revealed that LOX expression is regulated by the EGFR pathway and this may account for the anti-cancer metastasis effects of silibinin, indicating LOX as a potentially therapeutic target for NSCLC treatment.

  7. Resistance gene expression determines the in vitro chemosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Khalid

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NSCLC exhibits considerable heterogeneity in its sensitivity to chemotherapy and similar heterogeneity is noted in vitro in a variety of model systems. This study has tested the hypothesis that the molecular basis of the observed in vitro chemosensitivity of NSCLC lies within the known resistance mechanisms inherent to these patients' tumors. Methods The chemosensitivity of a series of 49 NSCLC tumors was assessed using the ATP-based tumor chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA and compared with quantitative expression of resistance genes measured by RT-PCR in a Taqman Array™ following extraction of RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue. Results There was considerable heterogeneity between tumors within the ATP-TCA, and while this showed no direct correlation with individual gene expression, there was strong correlation of multi-gene signatures for many of the single agents and combinations tested. For instance, docetaxel activity showed some dependence on the expression of drug pumps, while cisplatin activity showed some dependence on DNA repair enzyme expression. Activity of both drugs was influenced more strongly still by the expression of anti- and pro-apoptotic genes by the tumor for both docetaxel and cisplatin. The doublet combinations of cisplatin with gemcitabine and cisplatin with docetaxel showed gene expression signatures incorporating resistance mechanisms for both agents. Conclusion Genes predicted to be involved in known mechanisms drug sensitivity and resistance correlate well with in vitro chemosensitivity and may allow the definition of predictive signatures to guide individualized chemotherapy in lung cancer.

  8. Vorinostat and metformin sensitize EGFR-TKI resistant NSCLC cells via BIM-dependent apoptosis induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hengyi; Wang, Yubo; Lin, Caiyu; Lu, Conghua; Han, Rui; Jiao, Lin; Li, Li; He, Yong

    2017-11-07

    There is a close relationship between low expression of BIM and resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI). Vorinostat is a pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) that augments BIM expression in various types of tumor cells, however, this effect is attenuated by the high expression of anti-apoptotic proteins in EGFR-TKI resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Vorinostat in combination with metformin - a compound that can inhibit anti-apoptotic proteins expression, might cooperate to activate apoptotic signaling and overcome EGFR-TKI resistance. This study aimed to investigate the cooperative effect and evaluate possible molecular mechanisms. The results showed that vorinostat combined with gefitinib augmented BIM expression and increased the sensitivity of EGFR-TKI resistant NSCLC cells to gefitinib, adding metformin simultaneously could obviously inhibit the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, and further increased expression levels of BIM and BAX, and as a result, further improved the sensitivity of gefitinib both on the NSCLC cells with intrinsic and acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI. In addition, autophagy induced by gefitinib and vorinostat could be significantly suppressed by metformin, which might also contribute to enhance apoptosis and improve sensitivity of gefitinib. These results suggested that the combination of vorinostat and metformin might represent a novel strategy to overcome EGFR-TKI resistance associated with BIM-dependent apoptosis in larger heterogeneous populations.

  9. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of Yunnan in southwestern China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yongchun; Yang, Yanlong; Yang, Chenggang; Chen, Yunlan; Yang, Changshao; Du, Yaxi; Zhao, Guangqiang; Ye, Lianhua; Huang, Yunchao

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) mutation status in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in Yunnan province in southwestern China, we detected EGFR mutation by Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using DNA samples from 447 pathologically confirmed NSCLC specimens (175 tissue, 256 plasma and 16 cytologic samples). The relationship between EGFR mutations and demographic and clinical factors were further explored. Subgroup analy...

  10. Two panels of plasma microRNAs as non-invasive biomarkers for prediction of recurrence in resectable NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Sanfiorenzo

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC at an early stage, as well as better prediction of outcome remains clinically challenging due to the lack of specific and robust non-invasive markers. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs, particularly those found in the bloodstream, has opened up new perspectives for tumor diagnosis and prognosis. The aim of our study was to determine whether expression profiles of specific miRNAs in plasma could accurately discriminate between NSCLC patients and controls, and whether they are able to predict the prognosis of resectable NSCLC patients. We therefore evaluated a series of seventeen NSCLC-related miRNAs by quantitative real-time (qRT-PCR in plasma from 52 patients with I-IIIA stages NSCLC, 10 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and 20-age, sex and smoking status-matched healthy individuals. We identified an eleven-plasma miRNA panel that could distinguish NSCLC patients from healthy subjects (AUC = 0.879. A six-plasma miRNA panel was able to discriminate between NSCLC patients and COPD patients (AUC = 0.944. Furthermore, we identified a three-miRNA plasma signature (high miR-155-5p, high miR-223-3p, and low miR-126-3p that significantly associated with a higher risk for progression in adenocarcinoma patients. In addition, a three-miRNA plasma panel (high miR-20a-5p, low miR-152-3p, and low miR-199a-5p significantly predicted survival of squamous cell carcinoma patients. In conclusion, we identified two plasma miRNA expression profiles that may be useful for predicting the outcome of patients with resectable NSCLC.

  11. Phase II trial of second-line erlotinib and digoxin for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Kayali

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fadi Kayali, Muhamad A Janjua, Damian A Laber, Donald Miller, Goetz H KloeckerUniversity of Louisville, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, KY, USABackground: In vitro digoxin sensitizes cancer cells to the induction of apoptosis by chemotherapy. Inhibition of the Na/K-ATPase enzyme by ouabain disturbs the intracellular ion composition of cancer cells, altering cellular homeostasis. This suggests that inhibition of the Na/K pump results in cellular sensitization of malignant but not benign cells to the induction of apoptosis. Epidemiologic studies have also shown beneficial effects of digitalis in breast cancer incidence. At ASCO (American Society of Clinical Oncology 2007 our group presented a Phase II study showing encouraging results by adding digoxin to biochemotherapy for melanoma. Erlotinib is one of the standard second-line treatments for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, with a response rate (RR of 10%. This study's hypothesis was that adding digoxin to erlotinib will improve the RR and time to progression (TTP in NSCLC.Methods: Patients with progressive disease (PD after chemotherapy were enrolled if they had an ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score from 0 to 2 and good organ function. Daily erlotinib 150 mg and digoxin 0.25 mg were taken by mouth. The digoxin dose was adjusted to keep levels between 1 and 2 ng/mL. Computed tomography scans were done every 6 weeks. Treatment continued until PD or significant toxicity occurred.Results: Patient accrual lasted from March 2006 until August 2008 and was stopped early at the time of interim analysis. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled, and 24 who completed at least 6 weeks of therapy are presented here. All patients had unresectable NSCLC stage III/IV at diagnosis. Median age was 61 (34–78, 14 were female, 17 had prior radiation (not involving the target lesions, 23 had one prior chemotherapy, and one subject had two. Only one patient was a never-smoker. Histologies were

  12. Association of CT perfusion imaging with plasma levels of TGF-β1 and VEGF in patients with NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Wei; Wu, Bao-Zhong; Shi, Yu-Sen; Li, Zhi-Qun; Liu, Xu-Dong; Li, Xiao-Hua

    2016-02-01

    To study the association of CT perfusion imaging parameters with plasma level of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and vascular endothelial growth (VEGF) in patients with non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 67 patients with NSCLC (NSCLC group) and 64 patients with benign lesion (control group) were given with CT perfusion imaging to obtain blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, time to peal and permeability surface through CT perfusion software. The plasma levels of TGF-β1 and VEGF were tested by ELISA. The relationship between plasma levels of TGF-β1, VEGF and CT perfusion imaging parameters were analyzed. CT perfusion imaging parameters and the plasma levels of TGF-β1 and VEGF of NSCLC group were significantly higher than the control group (P CT perfusion parameters and the levels of TGF-β1 and VEGF in NSCLC group showed significant difference in different tumor node metastasis stages (P CT perfusion imaging parameters in patients with NSCLC is closely associated with plasma TGF-β1, VEGF and its biological characteristics. CT perfusion imaging is a convenient method to detect tumor blood perfusion. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical College. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Bevacizumab Plus Radiosurgery for Nonsquamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Brain Metastases: Safe Combination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinde, Julien; Carron, Romain; Tomasini, Pascale; Greillier, Laurent; Régis, Jean; Barlesi, Fabrice

    2017-11-01

    In the context of bronchial cancers, the brain is one of the most frequent sites for metastases. Local treatments of these metastases have evolved and are often combined to obtain greater efficiency, while the main objective remains to reduce the symptoms. Radiosurgery is currently used as a primary option for patients harboring few numbers of small to middle-sized brain metastases. In nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), chemotherapy is often associated with bevacizumab. Our goal was to assess the safety of this early combination. Six patients with advanced nonsquamous NSCLC were treated with radiosurgery for the management of their brain metastases (n = 40), followed within bevacizumab. No systemic or cerebral adverse event of grade 3 (intratumoral or parenchymal hemorrhage) or unexpected toxicity secondary to bevacizumab has been indexed. Radiosurgery may be safely combined with bevacizumab quite early on for patients with nonsquamous NSCLC with brain metastases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Histone deacetylation, as opposed to promoter methylation, results in epigenetic BIM silencing and resistance to EGFR TKI in NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingchuan; Zhang, Yishi; Li, Jiayu; Li, Xuefei; Cheng, Ningning; Wang, Qi; Cai, Weijing; Zhao, Chao; He, Yayi; Chang, Jianhua; Zhou, Caicun

    2018-01-01

    Drug resistance remains a major challenge in epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) therapy. Bcl-2-like protein 11 (BIM), a B-cell lymphoma 2 family pro-apoptotic protein, is a prime target for specific anti-cancer therapeutics. However, the epigenetic regulation of BIM in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and patients with NSCLC in association with EGFR-TKI resistance requires investigation. Methylation-specific PCR (MSP), pyrosequencing, and nested quantitative (q)-MSP were conducted to explore the methylation status of BIM in NSCLC cell lines. In addition, the methylation profile of BIM in patients with NSCLC was assessed by nested q-MSP using circulating free DNA. Cell lines, treated with methylation inhibitor 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AZA) or histone deacetylation inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) prior to gefitinib treatment, were examined for BIM gene expression and resistance to gefitinib. All cell lines used in the present study presented with hypo-methylated BIM . Treatment with AZA had no effect on BIM RNA expression in PC9 cells or the gefitinib-resistant cell lines PC9/R and PC9/G2, nor did it reverse their resistance to gefitinib. In contrast, TSA treatment produced the opposite result. In the present study, 25 (78.1%) patients with hypo-methylated BIM and 7 patients (21.9%) with partial or hyper-methylated BIM were identified. The clinicopathological data revealed a random hypo-methylated BIM distribution amongst patients with NSCLC. In the overall study group and EGFR mutant group, hypo-methylated BIM carriers presented with no significant differences in progression free survival compared with patients with partial or hyper-methylated BIM . All cell lines in the present study and the majority of patients with NSCLC carried hypo-methylated BIM . Histone deacetylation, as opposed to promoter methylation, may contribute to the epigenetic silencing of BIM and lead to EGFR TKI resistance in NSCLC.

  15. Fully automated VMAT treatment planning for advanced-stage NSCLC patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della Gala, Giuseppe [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Universita di Bologna, Scuola di Scienze, Alma Mater Studiorum, Bologna (Italy); Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Hoekstra, Nienke; Fransen, Dennie; Pol, Marjan van de; Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lanconelli, Nico [Universita di Bologna, Scuola di Scienze, Alma Mater Studiorum, Bologna (Italy); Petit, Steven F. [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Massachusetts General Hospital - Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    To develop a fully automated procedure for multicriterial volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning (autoVMAT) for stage III/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with curative intent. After configuring the developed autoVMAT system for NSCLC, autoVMAT plans were compared with manually generated clinically delivered intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for 41 patients. AutoVMAT plans were also compared to manually generated VMAT plans in the absence of time pressure. For 16 patients with reduced planning target volume (PTV) dose prescription in the clinical IMRT plan (to avoid violation of organs at risk tolerances), the potential for dose escalation with autoVMAT was explored. Two physicians evaluated 35/41 autoVMAT plans (85%) as clinically acceptable. Compared to the manually generated IMRT plans, autoVMAT plans showed statistically significant improved PTV coverage (V{sub 95%} increased by 1.1% ± 1.1%), higher dose conformity (R{sub 50} reduced by 12.2% ± 12.7%), and reduced mean lung, heart, and esophagus doses (reductions of 0.9 Gy ± 1.0 Gy, 1.5 Gy ± 1.8 Gy, 3.6 Gy ± 2.8 Gy, respectively, all p < 0.001). To render the six remaining autoVMAT plans clinically acceptable, a dosimetrist needed less than 10 min hands-on time for fine-tuning. AutoVMAT plans were also considered equivalent or better than manually optimized VMAT plans. For 6/16 patients, autoVMAT allowed tumor dose escalation of 5-10 Gy. Clinically deliverable, high-quality autoVMAT plans can be generated fully automatically for the vast majority of advanced-stage NSCLC patients. For a subset of patients, autoVMAT allowed for tumor dose escalation. (orig.) [German] Entwicklung einer vollautomatisierten, auf multiplen Kriterien basierenden volumenmodulierten Arc-Therapie-(VMAT-)Behandlungsplanung (autoVMAT) fuer kurativ behandelte Patienten mit nicht-kleinzelligem Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im Stadium III/IV. Nach Konfiguration unseres auto

  16. Is IMRT Superior or Inferior to 3DCRT in Radiotherapy for NSCLC? A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingsheng Hu

    Full Text Available There are no adequate data to determine whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT is superior to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. This meta-analysis was conducted to compare the clinical outcomes of IMRT and 3DCRT in the treatment of NSCLC.No exclusions were made based on types of study design. We performed a literature search in PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane library databases from their inceptions to April 30, 2015. The overall survival (OS and relative risk (RR of radiation pneumonitis and radiation oesophagitis were evaluated. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality and extracted data. Publication bias was evaluated by funnel plot using Egger's test results.From the literature search, 10 retrospective studies were collected, and of those, 5 (12,896 patients were selected for OS analysis, 4 (981 patients were selected for radiation pneumonitis analysis, and 4 (1339 patients were selected for radiation oesophagitis analysis. Cox multivariate proportional hazards models revealed that 3DCRT and IMRT had similar OS (HR = 0.96, P = 0.477 but that IMRT reduced the incidence of grade 2 radiation pneumonitis (RR = 0.74, P = 0.009 and increased the incidence of grade 3 radiation oesophagitis (RR = 2.47, P = 0.000.OS of IMRT for NSCLC is not inferior to that of 3DCRT, but IMRT significantly reduces the risk of radiation pneumonitis and increases the risk of radiation oesophagitis compared to 3DCRT.

  17. Monocarboxylate transporters 1-4 in NSCLC: MCT1 is an independent prognostic marker for survival.

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    Marte Eilertsen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs 1-4 are lactate transporters crucial for cancers cells adaption to upregulated glycolysis. Herein, we aimed to explore their prognostic impact on disease-specific survival (DSS in both cancer and tumor stromal cells in NSCLC. METHODS: Tissue micro arrays (TMAs were constructed, representing both cancer and stromal tumor tissue from 335 unselected patients diagnosed with stage I-IIIA NSCLC. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of MCT1-4. RESULTS: In univariate analyses; ↓ MCT1 (P = 0.021 and ↑ MCT4 (P = 0.027 expression in cancer cells, and ↑ MCT1 (P = 0.003, ↓ MCT2 (P = 0.006, ↓ MCT3 (P = 0.020 expression in stromal cells correlated significantly with a poor DSS. In multivariate analyses; ↓ MCT1 expression in cancer cells (HR: 1.9, CI 95%: 1.3-2.8, P = 0.001, ↓ MCT2 (HR: 2.4, CI 95%: 1.5-3.9, P<0.001, ↓ MCT3 (HR: 1.9, CI 95%: 1.1-3.5, P = 0.031 and ↑ MCT1 expression in stromal cells (HR: 1.7, CI 95%: 1.1-2.7, P = 0.016 were significant independent poor prognostic markers for DSS. CONCLUSIONS: We provide novel information of MCT1 as a candidate marker for prognostic stratification in NSCLC. Interestingly, MCT1 shows diverging, independent prognostic impact in the cancer cell and stromal cell compartments.

  18. Fully automated VMAT treatment planning for advanced-stage NSCLC patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Gala, Giuseppe; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Hoekstra, Nienke; Fransen, Dennie; Pol, Marjan van de; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Lanconelli, Nico; Petit, Steven F.

    2017-01-01

    To develop a fully automated procedure for multicriterial volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning (autoVMAT) for stage III/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with curative intent. After configuring the developed autoVMAT system for NSCLC, autoVMAT plans were compared with manually generated clinically delivered intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for 41 patients. AutoVMAT plans were also compared to manually generated VMAT plans in the absence of time pressure. For 16 patients with reduced planning target volume (PTV) dose prescription in the clinical IMRT plan (to avoid violation of organs at risk tolerances), the potential for dose escalation with autoVMAT was explored. Two physicians evaluated 35/41 autoVMAT plans (85%) as clinically acceptable. Compared to the manually generated IMRT plans, autoVMAT plans showed statistically significant improved PTV coverage (V 95% increased by 1.1% ± 1.1%), higher dose conformity (R 50 reduced by 12.2% ± 12.7%), and reduced mean lung, heart, and esophagus doses (reductions of 0.9 Gy ± 1.0 Gy, 1.5 Gy ± 1.8 Gy, 3.6 Gy ± 2.8 Gy, respectively, all p < 0.001). To render the six remaining autoVMAT plans clinically acceptable, a dosimetrist needed less than 10 min hands-on time for fine-tuning. AutoVMAT plans were also considered equivalent or better than manually optimized VMAT plans. For 6/16 patients, autoVMAT allowed tumor dose escalation of 5-10 Gy. Clinically deliverable, high-quality autoVMAT plans can be generated fully automatically for the vast majority of advanced-stage NSCLC patients. For a subset of patients, autoVMAT allowed for tumor dose escalation. (orig.) [de

  19. Metabolic activity measured by FDG PET predicts pathological response in locally advanced superior sulcus NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahce, I; Vos, C G; Dickhoff, C; Hartemink, K J; Dahele, M; Smit, E F; Boellaard, R; Hoekstra, O S; Thunnissen, E

    2014-08-01

    Pathological complete response and tumor regression to less than 10% vital tumor cells after induction chemoradiotherapy have been shown to be prognostically important in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Predictive imaging biomarkers could help treatment decision-making. The purpose of this study was to assess whether postinduction changes in tumor FDG uptake could predict pathological response and to evaluate the correlation between residual vital tumor cells and post-induction FDG uptake. NSCLC patients with sulcus superior tumor (SST), planned for trimodality therapy, routinely undergo FDG PET/CT scans before and after induction chemoradiotherapy in our institute. Metabolic end-points based on standardized uptake values (SUV) were calculated, including SUV(max) (maximum SUV), SUV(TTL) (tumor-to-liver ratio), SUV(peak) (SUV within 1 cc sphere with highest activity), and SUV(PTL) (peak-to-liver ratio). Pathology specimens were assessed for residual vital tumor cell percentages and scored as no (grade 3), 10% vital tumor cells (grade 2a/1). 19 and 23 patients were evaluated for (1) metabolic change and (2) postinduction PET-pathology correlation, respectively. Changes in all parameters were predictive for grade 2b/3 response. ΔSUV(TTL) and ΔSUV(PTL) were also predictive for grade 3 response. Remaining vital tumor cells correlated with post-induction SUV(peak) (R=0.55; P=0.007) and postinduction SUV(PTL) (R=0.59; P=0.004). Postinduction SUV(PTL) could predict both grades 3 and 2b/3 response. In NSCLC patients treated with chemoradiotherapy, changes in SUV(max), SUV(TTL), SUV(peak), and SUV(PTL) were predictive for pathological response (grade 2b/3 and for SUV(TTL) and SUV(PTL) grade 3 as well). Postinduction SUV(PTL) correlated with residual tumor cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes as maintenance immunotherapy after first line chemotherapy in NSCLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Benjamin; Charrier, Mélinda; Lapierre, Valérie; Dansin, Eric; Lantz, Olivier; Planchard, David; Le Chevalier, Thierry; Livartoski, Alain; Barlesi, Fabrice; Laplanche, Agnès; Ploix, Stéphanie; Vimond, Nadège; Peguillet, Isabelle; Théry, Clotilde; Lacroix, Ludovic; Zoernig, Inka; Dhodapkar, Kavita; Dhodapkar, Madhav; Viaud, Sophie; Soria, Jean-Charles; Reiners, Katrin S.; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Vély, Frédéric; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Eggermont, Alexander; Pitt, Jonathan M.; Zitvogel, Laurence; Chaput, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendritic cell-derived exosomes (Dex) are small extracellular vesicles secreted by viable dendritic cells. In the two phase-I trials that we conducted using the first generation of Dex (IFN-γ-free) in end-stage cancer, we reported that Dex exerted natural killer (NK) cell effector functions in patients. A second generation of Dex (IFN-γ-Dex) was manufactured with the aim of boosting NK and T cell immune responses. We carried out a phase II clinical trial testing the clinical benefit of IFN-γ-Dex loaded with MHC class I- and class II-restricted cancer antigens as maintenance immunotherapy after induction chemotherapy in patients bearing inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) without tumor progression. The primary endpoint was to observe at least 50% of patients with progression-free survival (PFS) at 4 mo after chemotherapy cessation. Twenty-two patients received IFN-γ-Dex. One patient exhibited a grade three hepatotoxicity. The median time to progression was 2.2 mo and median overall survival (OS) was 15 mo. Seven patients (32%) experienced stabilization of >4 mo. The primary endpoint was not reached. An increase in NKp30-dependent NK cell functions were evidenced in a fraction of these NSCLC patients presenting with defective NKp30 expression. Importantly, MHC class II expression levels of the final IFN-γ-Dex product correlated with expression levels of the NKp30 ligand BAG6 on Dex, and with NKp30-dependent NK functions, the latter being associated with longer progression-free survival. This phase II trial confirmed the capacity of Dex to boost the NK cell arm of antitumor immunity in patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:27141373

  1. Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy in stage I (T1-2 N0 M0) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Frank B.; Geinitz, Hans; Schill, Sabine; Thamm, Reinhard; Nieder, Carsten; Schratzenstaller, Ulrich; Molls, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Stereotactic Radiotherapy has the potential to produce high local control rates with low risk of severe lung toxicity. From December 2000 to January 2006, 68 inoperable patients (median age 76 years) with stage I NSCLC received definitive hSRT. A mean total dose of 37.5 Gy (24-40 Gy; 60%-isodose) in 3-5 fractions was applied. Immobilisation was carried out by means of a vacuum couch and low pressure foil (Medical Intelligence, Schwab Muenchen, Germany). Staging procedures were thoracic and abdominal CT-scan, FDG-PET and CT or MRI of the brain in all patients. Clinical target volume was the tumor as seen in lung windowing of CT and in FDG-PET. Organ movements (6-22 mm) and patient positioning in the couch (3-12 mm) were added as safety margin for the definition of the planning target volume (PTV), that was enclosed by the 60%-isodose. We observed four (6%) local tumor recurrences, resulting in an actuarial local tumor control rate of 96%, 88% and 88% after 1, 2 and 3 year follow-up. Nineteen patients died, with eight patients due to cancer (12%), two to local tumor progression alone. Cancer-specific survival is 96%, 82% and 73% at 1, 2 and 3 years. Eleven patients died from comorbidities, making a 53% overall 3-year survival. Fifty five percent of the patients were affected by mild acute and subacute side effects, with only 3% experiencing pneumonitis III. Late effects were pneumonitis III in 1%, rib fractures in 3%, and benign pleural effusion in 2 patients. Hypofractionated SRT is safe even in elderly patients with stage I NSCLC and significantly reduced lung capacity. It leads to high local control rates and should be offered to patients not amenable for curative resection

  2. Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy in stage I (T1-2 N0 M0) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Frank B.; Geinitz, Hans; Schill, Sabine; Thamm, Reinhard; Nieder, Carsten; Schratzenstaller, Ulrich; Molls, Michael [Technical Univ., Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2006-09-15

    Stereotactic Radiotherapy has the potential to produce high local control rates with low risk of severe lung toxicity. From December 2000 to January 2006, 68 inoperable patients (median age 76 years) with stage I NSCLC received definitive hSRT. A mean total dose of 37.5 Gy (24-40 Gy; 60%-isodose) in 3-5 fractions was applied. Immobilisation was carried out by means of a vacuum couch and low pressure foil (Medical Intelligence, Schwab Muenchen, Germany). Staging procedures were thoracic and abdominal CT-scan, FDG-PET and CT or MRI of the brain in all patients. Clinical target volume was the tumor as seen in lung windowing of CT and in FDG-PET. Organ movements (6-22 mm) and patient positioning in the couch (3-12 mm) were added as safety margin for the definition of the planning target volume (PTV), that was enclosed by the 60%-isodose. We observed four (6%) local tumor recurrences, resulting in an actuarial local tumor control rate of 96%, 88% and 88% after 1, 2 and 3 year follow-up. Nineteen patients died, with eight patients due to cancer (12%), two to local tumor progression alone. Cancer-specific survival is 96%, 82% and 73% at 1, 2 and 3 years. Eleven patients died from comorbidities, making a 53% overall 3-year survival. Fifty five percent of the patients were affected by mild acute and subacute side effects, with only 3% experiencing pneumonitis III. Late effects were pneumonitis III in 1%, rib fractures in 3%, and benign pleural effusion in 2 patients. Hypofractionated SRT is safe even in elderly patients with stage I NSCLC and significantly reduced lung capacity. It leads to high local control rates and should be offered to patients not amenable for curative resection.

  3. Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kirsten Riis; Bødtger, Uffe

    , tobacco pack years, or FEV1. Former malignancy was significantly more prevalent among asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (33 % vs. 11%), with insignificant differences in prevalence of other co-morbidities or in post-surgical TNM (82% vs 85% in stages IA-IIB). 12-months mortality was insignificantly...... higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (23% vs. 12%), and in patients with former malignancy compared to patients with no former cancer (17% vs. 16%). Discussion: Symptoms at diagnosis per se appear unrelated to mortality in patients with NSCLC referred for surgery. Asymptomatic patients were...

  4. EGFR CA repeat polymorphism predict clinical outcome in EGFR mutation positive NSCLC patients treated with erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther Larsen, Anne; Nissen, Peter Henrik; Meldgaard, Peter

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are predictors of efficacy for treatment with the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A CA repeat polymorphism in intron 1 of the EGFR gene influences the transcription...... patients treated with erlotinib irrespective of EGFR mutation status. Patients were dichotomized into harboring short allele (CA≤16 in any allele) or long alleles (CA>16 in both alleles). Number of repeats was correlated with clinical characteristic and outcome. A subgroup analysis was performed based...

  5. Dendrimer-Based Selective Proteostasis-Inhibition Strategy to Control NSCLC Growth and Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyla Walworth

    Full Text Available Elevated valosin containing protein (VCP/p97 levels promote the progression of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. Although many VCP inhibitors are available, most of these therapeutic compounds have low specificity for targeted tumor cell delivery. Hence, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of dendrimer-encapsulated potent VCP-inhibitor drug in controlling non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC progression. The VCP inhibitor(s (either in their pure form or encapsulated in generation-4 PAMAM-dendrimer with hydroxyl surface were tested for their in vitro efficacy in modulating H1299 (NSCLC cells proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Our results show that VCP inhibition by DBeQ was significantly more potent than NMS-873 as evident by decreased cell proliferation (p<0.0001, MTT-assay and migration (p<0.05; scratch-assay, and increased apoptosis (p<0.05; caspase-3/7-assay as compared to untreated control cells. Next, we found that dendrimer-encapsulated DBeQ (DDNDBeQ treatment increased ubiquitinated-protein accumulation in soluble protein-fraction (immunoblotting of H1299 cells as compared to DDN-control, implying the effectiveness of DBeQ in proteostasis-inhibition. We verified by immunostaining that DDNDBeQ treatment increases accumulation of ubiquitinated-proteins that co-localizes with an ER-marker, KDEL. We observed that proteostasis-inhibition with DDNDBeQ, significantly decreased cell migration rate (scratch-assay and transwell-invasion as compared to the control-DDN treatment (p<0.05. Moreover, DDNDBeQ treatment showed a significant decrease in cell proliferation (p<0.01, MTT-assay and increased caspase-3/7 mediated apoptotic cell death (p<0.05 as compared to DDN-control. This was further verified by cell cycle analysis (propidium-iodide-staining that demonstrated significant cell cycle arrest in the G2/M-phase (p<0.001 by DDNDBeQ treatment as compared to control

  6. Plasma PGE-2 levels and altered cytokine profiles in adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirschowitz Edward A

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction PGE-2 is constitutively produced by many non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC and its immunosuppressive effects have been linked to altered immune responses in lung cancer. We asked whether elevated levels of plasma PGE-2 correlated with monocyte IL10 production in the NSCLC environment. Looking for correlation in NSCLC patient blood we assayed plasma from NSCLC patients for PGE2 and IL10; we further evaluated production of IL10 by adherent mononuclear cells from a subset of these patients looking for an altered cytokine profile. Results Our initial in vitro experiments show that monocyte IL10 induction correlates with tumor cell PGE-2 production, confirming similar reports in the literature. Data show plasma PGE-2 levels in 38 NSCLC patients are elevated compared to normal controls. Plasma IL10 levels were not significantly elevated; however, adherent monocytes derived from NSCLC patient blood did produce significantly more IL10 in 24 hr primary culture than those from normal controls (p Conclusions Elevated plasma PGE-2 and monocyte IL10 production are associated with NSCLC. The biological significance to elevated PGE-2 levels in NSCLC are unclear. Further investigation of each as a nonspecific marker for NSCLC tumor is warranted.

  7. XIAP inhibits mature Smac-induced apoptosis by degrading it through ubiquitination in NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Sida; Yang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Boxiang; Li, Xiang; Sun, Xin; Li, Gang; Zhang, Jing; Xiao, Guodong; Gao, Xiao; Huang, Guanghong; Wang, Peili; Ren, Hong

    2016-10-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and second mitochondrial-derived activator of caspase (Smac) are two important prognostic biomarkers for cancer. They are negatively correlated in many types of cancer. However, their relationship is still unknown in lung cancer. In the present study, we found that there was a negative correlation between Smac and XIAP at the level of protein but not mRNA in NSCLC patients. However, XIAP overexpression had no effect on degrading endogenous Smac in lung cancer cell lines. Therefore, we constructed plasmids with full length of Smac (fSmac) and mature Smac (mSmac) which located in cytoplasm instead of original mitochondrial location, and was confirmed by immunofluorescence. Subsequently, we found that mSmac rather than fSmac was degraded by XIAP and inhibited cell viability. CHX chase assay and ubiquitin assay were performed to illustrate XIAP degraded mSmac through ubiquitin pathway. Overexpression of XIAP partially reverted apoptotic induction and cell viability inhibition by mSmac, which was due to inhibiting caspase-3 activation. In nude mouse xenograft experiments, mSmac inhibited Ki-67 expression and slowed down lung cancer growth, while XIAP partially reversed the effect of mSmac by degrading it. In conclusion, XIAP inhibits mature Smac-induced apoptosis by degrading it through ubiquitination in NSCLC.

  8. Aptamer-miRNA-212 Conjugate Sensitizes NSCLC Cells to TRAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Iaboni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a promising antitumor agent for its remarkable ability to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells, without affecting the viability of healthy bystander cells. The TRAIL tumor suppressor pathway is deregulated in many human malignancies including lung cancer. In human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells, sensitization to TRAIL therapy can be restored by increasing the expression levels of the tumor suppressor microRNA-212 (miR-212 leading to inhibition of the anti-apoptotic protein PED/PEA-15 implicated in treatment resistance. In this study, we exploited a previously described RNA aptamer inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase receptor Axl (GL21.T expressed on lung cancer cells, as a means to deliver miR-212 into human NSCLC cells expressing Axl. We demonstrate efficient delivery of miR-212 following conjugation of the miR to GL21.T (GL21.T-miR212 chimera. We show that the chimera downregulates PED and restores TRAIL-mediate cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Importantly, treatment of Axl+ lung cancer cells with the chimera resulted in (i an increase in caspase activation and (ii a reduction of cell viability in combination with TRAIL therapy. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the GL21.T-miR212 chimera can be employed as an adjuvant to TRAIL therapy for the treatment of lung cancer.

  9. Aptamer-miRNA-212 Conjugate Sensitizes NSCLC Cells to TRAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaboni, Margherita; Russo, Valentina; Fontanella, Raffaela; Roscigno, Giuseppina; Fiore, Danilo; Donnarumma, Elvira; Esposito, Carla Lucia; Quintavalle, Cristina; Giangrande, Paloma H; de Franciscis, Vittorio; Condorelli, Gerolama

    2016-03-08

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising antitumor agent for its remarkable ability to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells, without affecting the viability of healthy bystander cells. The TRAIL tumor suppressor pathway is deregulated in many human malignancies including lung cancer. In human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, sensitization to TRAIL therapy can be restored by increasing the expression levels of the tumor suppressor microRNA-212 (miR-212) leading to inhibition of the anti-apoptotic protein PED/PEA-15 implicated in treatment resistance. In this study, we exploited a previously described RNA aptamer inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase receptor Axl (GL21.T) expressed on lung cancer cells, as a means to deliver miR-212 into human NSCLC cells expressing Axl. We demonstrate efficient delivery of miR-212 following conjugation of the miR to GL21.T (GL21.T-miR212 chimera). We show that the chimera downregulates PED and restores TRAIL-mediate cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Importantly, treatment of Axl+ lung cancer cells with the chimera resulted in (i) an increase in caspase activation and (ii) a reduction of cell viability in combination with TRAIL therapy. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the GL21.T-miR212 chimera can be employed as an adjuvant to TRAIL therapy for the treatment of lung cancer.

  10. Inter- and intrafractional movement of the tumour in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy of NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik R; Hansen, Olfred; Hjelm-Hansen, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to determine the inter- and intra-fractional respiration induced tumour movements as well as setup accuracy in a stereotactic body frame for stereotactic treatments of NSCLC patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From August 2005 to March 2008, 26 patients with NSCLC....... These coordinate constitute the data of this study. RESULTS: The standard deviations of the respiration induced intra-fractional movements were: LR: 0.9 mm, AP: 1.6 mm and CC: 2.0 mm (1 SD). The inter-fractional movements were: LR: 1.1 mm, AP: 1.3 mm and CC: 1.7 mm (1 SD). Finally the set up accuracies in the body...... frame were LR: 1.5 mm, AP: 1.1 mm and CC: 1.7 mm (1 SD). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Consecutive CT scans can be used to evaluate the respiration induced tumour movement. For patients immobilized in a stereotactic body frame, large movements of the tumour are rarely seen within the lung...

  11. Stage and tissue-specific prognostic impact of miR-182 in NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenvold, Helge; Donnem, Tom; Andersen, Sigve; Al-Saad, Samer; Busund, Lill-Tove; Bremnes, Roy M

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-182 is frequently upregulated in cancers, has generally been viewed as an oncogene and is possibly connected to angiogenesis. We aimed to explore what impact miR-182 has in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and more explicitly its correlation with angiogenic markers. From 335 unselected stage I to IIIA NSCLC carcinomas, duplicate tumor and tumor-associated stromal cores were collected in tissue microarray blocks (TMAs). In situ hybridization (ISH) was used to detect the expression of miR-182 in tumor cells, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to detect the expression of angiogenesis related protein markers. In univariate analyses, high tumor cell expression of miR-182 was a positive prognostic factor for patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, P = 0.042) and stage II patients (P = 0.003). Also in the multivariate analysis, high tumor cell miR-182 expression was associated with a good prognosis in the same groups (SCC: HR 0.57, CI 95% 0.33-0.99, P = 0.048; stage II: HR 0.50, CI 95% 0.28-0.90, P = 0.020). We found significant correlations between miR-182 and the angiogenesis related markers FGF2, HIF2α and MMP-7. In patients with SCC and in stage II patients, high tumor cell miR-182 expression is an independent positive prognostic factor

  12. Association of BIM Deletion Polymorphism and BIM-γ RNA Expression in NSCLC with EGFR Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Kazutoshi; Kakimoto, Atsushi; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kaburaki, Kyohei; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Takahiro; Makino, Takashi; Otsuka, Hajime; Sano, G O; Sugino, Keishi; Sakamoto, Susumu; Takai, Yujiro; Tochigi, Naobumi; Iyoda, Akira; Homma, Sakae

    This pilot study assessed the association of BIM deletion polymorphism and BIM RNA isoform in patients with EGFR-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study included 33 patients with EGFR-positive NSCLC treated with gefitinib. BIM deletion polymorphism and BIM RNA isoform (EL/L/S/γ) were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). BIM-γ expression was significantly higher in patients with BIM deletion polymorphism than among those without BIM deletion polymorphism inside tumors (p=0.038) and around tumors (p=0.0024). Relative BIM-γ expression was significantly higher in patients with BIM deletion polymorphism than among those without BIM deletion polymorphism (p=0.0017). Patients with BIM-γ had significantly shorter progression-free survival than those without BIM-γ (median: 304 vs. 732 days; p=0.023). Expression of BIM-γ mRNA and BIM deletion polymorphism were strongly associated. BIM-γ overexpression may have a role in apoptosis related to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Copyright© 2016, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of ABCG2/BCRP Expression on Efflux and Uptake of Gefitinib in NSCLC Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricla Galetti

    Full Text Available BCRP/ABCG2 emerged as an important multidrug resistance protein, because it confers resistance to several classes of cancer chemotherapeutic agents and to a number of novel molecularly-targeted therapeutics such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Gefitinib is an orally active, selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of patients with advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC carrying activating EGFR mutations. Membrane transporters may affect the distribution and accumulation of gefitinib in tumour cells; in particular a reduced intracellular level of the drug may result from poor uptake, enhanced efflux or increased metabolism.The present study, performed in a panel of NSCLC cell lines expressing different ABCG2 plasma membrane levels, was designed to investigate the effect of the efflux transporter ABCG2 on intracellular gefitinib accumulation, by dissecting the contribution of uptake and efflux processes.Our findings indicate that gefitinib, in lung cancer cells, inhibits ABCG2 activity, as previously reported. In addition, we suggest that ABCG2 silencing or overexpression affects intracellular gefitinib content by modulating the uptake rather than the efflux. Similarly, overexpression of ABCG2 affected the expression of a number of drug transporters, altering the functional activities of nutrient and drug transport systems, in particular inhibiting MPP, glucose and glutamine uptake.Therefore, we conclude that gefitinib is an inhibitor but not a substrate for ABCG2 and that ABCG2 overexpression may modulate the expression and activity of other transporters involved in the uptake of different substrates into the cells.

  14. Metformin increases antitumor activity of MEK inhibitors through GLI1 downregulation in LKB1 positive human NSCLC cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Corte, Carminia Maria; Ciaramella, Vincenza; Di Mauro, Concetta; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Papaccio, Federica; Fasano, Morena; Sasso, Ferdinando Carlo; Martinelli, Erika; Troiani, Teresa; De Vita, Ferdinando; Orditura, Michele; Bianco, Roberto; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Morgillo, Floriana

    2016-01-26

    Metformin, widely used as antidiabetic drug, showed antitumoral effects expecially in combination with chemotherapy. Our group recently has demonstrated that metformin and gefitinib are synergistic in LKB1-wild-type NSCLC cells. In these models, metformin as single agent induced an activation and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated-protein-kinase (MAPK) through an increased C-RAF/B-RAF heterodimerization. Since single agent metformin enhances proliferating signals through the RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway, and several MEK inhibitors (MEK-I) demonstrated clinical efficacy in combination with other agents in NSCLC, we tested the effects of metformin plus MEK-I (selumetinib or pimasertib) on proliferation, invasiveness, migration abilities in vitro and in vivo in LKB1 positive NSCLC models harboring KRAS wild type and mutated gene. The combination of metformin with MEK-I showed a strong anti-proliferative and proapoptotic effect in Calu-3, H1299, H358 and H1975 human NSCLC cell lines, independently from the KRAS mutational status. The combination reduced the metastatic behaviour of NSCLC cells, via a downregulation of GLI1 trascritional activity, thus affecting the transition from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype. Metformin and MEK-Is combinations also decreased the production and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by reducing the NF-jB (p65) binding to MMP-2 and MMP-9 promoters. Metformin potentiates the antitumor activity of MEK-Is in human LKB1-wild-type NSCLC cell lines, independently from the KRAS mutational status, through GLI1 downregulation and by reducing the NF-jB (p65)-mediated transcription of MMP-2 and MMP-9.

  15. THE MANAGEMENT OF BRAIN METASTASES IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eOwen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastases (BM are a common and lethal complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC which portend a poor prognosis. In addition, their management implies several challenges including preservation of neurological and neuro-cognitive function during surgery or radiation -therapy, minimizing iatrogenic complications of supportive medications, and optimizing drug delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB. Despite these challenges, advancements in combined modality approaches can deliver hope of improved overall survival and quality of life for a subset of NSCLC patients with BM. Moreover, new drugs harnessing our greater understanding of tumour biology promise to build on this hope. In this mini-review, we revised the management of BM in NSCLC including advancements in neurosurgery, radiation therapy, as well as systemic and supportive therapy.

  16. N1-guanyl-1,7-diaminoheptane enhances the chemosensitivity of NSCLC cells to cetuximab through inhibition of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Jiang, R; Cui, E-H; Feng, W-M; Guo, H-H; Gu, D-H; Tang, C-W; Xue, T; Bao, Y

    2016-04-01

    N1-guanyl-1, 7-diaminoheptane (GC7), an inhibitor of deoxyhypusine synthase has been shown to exhibit significant anti-cancer activity. However, the biological role of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 activation (EIF5A2) and GC7 on drug resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been investigated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of GC7 combined with cetuximab in NSCLC therapy. The current study used cell viability assays, EdU incorporation assays, and western blot to detect that the GC7 exhibited synergistic cytotoxicity with cetuximab in NSCLC. CCK-8 assays showed that combined treatment with GC7 and cetuximab significantly inhibited the viabilities in three NSCLC cell lines. In addition, EdU incorporation assays also indicated that GC7 co-treatment remarkably enhanced the cetuximab sensitivity in NSCLC cells. Nevertheless, down-regulation of EIF5A2 diminished the regulatory role of GC7 in cetuximab cytotoxicity. Western blot showed that transfection of EIF5A2 siRNA significantly suppressed the protein expression of EIF5A2 in NSCLC cells. These findings demonstrate that combined treatment with GC7 could enhance cetuximab sensitivity by inhibiting EIF5A2 in NSCLC cells, implying the potential clinical application of GC7 in cetuximab-based chemotherapy for NSCLC patients.

  17. Treatment outcome in performance status 2 advanced NSCLC patients administered platinum-based combination chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbekkmo, Nina; Aasebø, Ulf; Sundstrøm, Stein H

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no consensus regarding chemotherapy to patients with advanced NSCLC (ANSCLC) and performance status (PS) 2. Using data from a national multicenter study comparing two third-generation carboplatin-based regimens in ANSCLC patients, we evaluated the outcome of PS 2 patients....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: The 123 PS 2 patients were compared to 309 PS 0/1 patients regarding survival, quality of life (QOL) and treatment toxicity. RESULTS: PS 2 patients had lower haemoglobin, lower global QOL and more pain, nausea/vomiting and dyspnea at inclusion. 68% of PS 2 patients received three...... chemotherapy courses vs. 85% in the PS 0/1 group (PPS 2 group, 4.5 vs. 8.9 months and 10% vs. 37% (PPS 2 patients needed blood transfusions (P=0.03) and hospitalization (PPS 2 patients had better relief of pain and dyspnea...

  18. Age dependent prognosis in concurrent chemo-radiation of locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine; Nielsen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    . Material and methods. Altogether, 478 patients completed radical radiotherapy in doses of 60-66 Gy/30-33 fractions from 1995 to June 2012; 137 of the patients had concurrent chemotherapy. The data was analyzed in age groups ... specific survival the hazard ratio was related to the use of concurrent chemotherapy was 0.49 (95% CI 0.29; 0.82), 0.68 (95% CI 0.48; 0.98) and 1.01 (95% CI 0.67; 1.51) for the age groups ..., the results might be due to selection bias, thus reports from a cohort of consecutively treated patients are warranted. The current single institution study reports on the influence of age on survival of locally advanced NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy combined with or without concurrent chemotherapy...

  19. Acute esophagitis for patients with Local-regional Advanced NSCLC treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Y.; Brink, C.; Knap, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Esophagitis are one of the acute treatment related toxicities to definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC. Most current researches about the risk factors for acute esophagitis are based on 3DCRT. The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose-effect relationship between esophagitis...... cycles of induction chemotherapy followed by IMRT and CCT (fixed dose of vinorelbine 50 mg three times per week). The maximal esophagitis grade was prospectively scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Clinical and dosimetric variables were analyzed for the correlation with grade >2 esophagitis...... of esophagus and one at the end) irradiated above a certain dose. The dose variable was either maximum dose, mean dose, the physical length of esophagus irradiated above a specific dose (Lx), or the relative volume of esophagus irradiated above a specified dose (Vx). To validate the impact of the fixed dose...

  20. Resveratrol raisesin vitroanticancer effects of paclitaxel in NSCLC cell line A549 through COX-2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanhua; Zhang, Runqi; Zhao, Xudong; Zheng, Guanlin; Wang, Zhou; Wang, Peng

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the raising anticancer effects of resveratrol (Res) on paclitaxel (PA) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line A549. The 10 µg/ml of Res had no effect on human fetal lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells or on A549 cancer cells and the 5 or 10 µg/ml of PA also had no effect on MRC-5 normal cells. PA-L (5 µg/ml) and PA-H (10 µg/ml) had the growth inhibitory effects in NSCLC cell line A549, and Res increased these growth inhibitory effects. By flow cytometry experiment, after Res (5 µg/ml)+PA-H (10 µg/ml) treatment, the A549 cells showed the most apoptosic cells compared to other group treatments, and after additional treatment with Res, the apoptosic cells of both two PA concentrations were raised. Res+PA could reduce the mRNA and protein expressions of COX-2, and Res+PA could reduce the COX-2 related genes of VEGF, MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, NF-κB, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, procollagen I, collagen I, collagen III and CTGF, TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS and raise the TIMP-1, TIMP-2, TIMP-3, IκB-α, p53, p21, caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, Bax genes compared to the control cells and the PA treated cells. From these results, it can be suggested that Res could raise the anticancer effects of PA in A549 cells, thus Res might be used as a good sensitizing agent for PA.

  1. Next-generation sequencing in NSCLC and melanoma patients: a cost and budget impact analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Amerongen, Rosa A; Retèl, Valesca P; Coupé, Veerle MH; Nederlof, Petra M; Vogel, Maartje J; van Harten, Wim H

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has reached the molecular diagnostic laboratories. Although the NGS technology aims to improve the effectiveness of therapies by selecting the most promising therapy, concerns are that NGS testing is expensive and that the ‘benefits’ are not yet in relation to these costs. In this study, we give an estimation of the costs and an institutional and national budget impact of various types of NGS tests in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and melanoma patients within The Netherlands. First, an activity-based costing (ABC) analysis has been conducted on the costs of two examples of NGS panels (small- and medium-targeted gene panel (TGP)) based on data of The Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI). Second, we performed a budget impact analysis (BIA) to estimate the current (2015) and future (2020) budget impact of NGS on molecular diagnostics for NSCLC and melanoma patients in The Netherlands. Literature, expert opinions, and a data set of patients within the NKI (n = 172) have been included in the BIA. Based on our analysis, we expect that the NGS test cost concerns will be limited. In the current situation, NGS can indeed result in higher diagnostic test costs, which is mainly related to required additional tests besides the small TGP. However, in the future, we expect that the use of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) will increase, for which it is expected that additional tests can be (partly) avoided. Although the current clinical benefits are expected to be limited, the research potentials of NGS are already an important advantage. PMID:27899957

  2. Effect of ABCG2/BCRP Expression on Efflux and Uptake of Gefitinib in NSCLC Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetti, Maricla; Petronini, Pier Giorgio; Fumarola, Claudia; Cretella, Daniele; La Monica, Silvia; Bonelli, Mara; Cavazzoni, Andrea; Saccani, Francesca; Caffarra, Cristina; Andreoli, Roberta; Mutti, Antonio; Tiseo, Marcello; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Alfieri, Roberta R.

    2015-01-01

    Background BCRP/ABCG2 emerged as an important multidrug resistance protein, because it confers resistance to several classes of cancer chemotherapeutic agents and to a number of novel molecularly-targeted therapeutics such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Gefitinib is an orally active, selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of patients with advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) carrying activating EGFR mutations. Membrane transporters may affect the distribution and accumulation of gefitinib in tumour cells; in particular a reduced intracellular level of the drug may result from poor uptake, enhanced efflux or increased metabolism. Aim The present study, performed in a panel of NSCLC cell lines expressing different ABCG2 plasma membrane levels, was designed to investigate the effect of the efflux transporter ABCG2 on intracellular gefitinib accumulation, by dissecting the contribution of uptake and efflux processes. Methods and Results Our findings indicate that gefitinib, in lung cancer cells, inhibits ABCG2 activity, as previously reported. In addition, we suggest that ABCG2 silencing or overexpression affects intracellular gefitinib content by modulating the uptake rather than the efflux. Similarly, overexpression of ABCG2 affected the expression of a number of drug transporters, altering the functional activities of nutrient and drug transport systems, in particular inhibiting MPP, glucose and glutamine uptake. Conclusions Therefore, we conclude that gefitinib is an inhibitor but not a substrate for ABCG2 and that ABCG2 overexpression may modulate the expression and activity of other transporters involved in the uptake of different substrates into the cells. PMID:26536031

  3. Interaction between hypoxia, AKT and HIF-1 signaling in HNSCC and NSCLC: implications for future treatment strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, H.; Span, P.N.; Peeters, W.J.M.; Verheijen, M.M.; Grenman, R.; Meijer, T.W.H.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Bussink, J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia is a negative prognostic factor and this study investigated the relationship between hypoxia, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and AKT signaling in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). RESULTS/METHODOLOGY: pAKT was induced by

  4. Class III β-tubulin in advanced NSCLC of adenocarcinoma subtype predicts superior outcome in a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, Adam Christian; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    Platinum-based doublets are the cornerstone of treatment in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and often include vinorelbine or taxanes. A predictive biomarker is greatly needed to select chemotherapy-sensitive patients for these microtubule-interfering agents. Class III β-tubulin (TUBB3...

  5. Class III β-tubulin in advanced NSCLC of adenocarcinoma subtype predicts superior outcome in a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, Adam Christian; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    Platinum-based doublets are the cornerstone of treatment in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and often include vinorelbine or taxanes. A predictive biomarker is greatly needed to select chemotherapy-sensitive patients for these microtubule-interfering agents. Class III ß-tubulin (TUBB3...

  6. Co-activation of STAT3 and YES-Associated Protein 1 (YAP1) Pathway in EGFR-Mutant NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaib, Imane; Karachaliou, Niki; Pilotto, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is limited by adaptive activation of cell survival signals. We hypothesized that both signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) ...

  7. VeriStrat (R) has prognostic value in advanced stage NSCLC patients treated with erlotinib and sorafenib

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, J. L.; Lind, J. S. W.; Groen, H. J. M.; Roder, J.; Grigorieva, J.; Roder, H.; Dingemans, A. M. C.; Smit, E. F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The serum proteomic test VeriStrat has been shown to be able to classify advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients for overall survival (OS) after treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). In this study, VeriStrat was evaluated

  8. Feasibility of curative radiotherapy with a concomitant boost technique in 33 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuster-Uitterhoeve, A. L.; Hulshof, M. C.; Gonzàlez Gonzàlez, D.; Koolen, M.; Sminia, P.

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-three patients with an inoperable NSCLC were treated with a dose of 60 Gy/20 fractions/25 days, using a concomitant boost technique. A dose of 40 Gy/2 Gy/25 days was given to the tumor area and a part (15 patients) or the whole (18 patients) mediastinum. During each session a simultaneous

  9. Efficacy of EGFR-TKI therapy in patients with brain metastases from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This meta-analysis aimed to systematically evaluate the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-TKIs) for patients with brain metastases (BM) from nonsmall- cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and to compare this treatment modality to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Methods: ...

  10. Osimertinib benefit in EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients with T790M-mutation detected by circulating tumour DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remon, J; Caramella, C; Jovelet, C; Lacroix, L; Lawson, A; Smalley, S; Howarth, K; Gale, D; Green, E; Plagnol, V; Rosenfeld, N; Planchard, D; Bluthgen, M V; Gazzah, A; Pannet, C; Nicotra, C; Auclin, E; Soria, J C; Besse, B

    2017-04-01

    Approximately 50% of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) will acquire resistance by the T790M mutation. Osimertinib is the standard of care in this situation. The present study assesses the efficacy of osimertinib when T790M status is determined in circulating cell-free tumour DNA (ctDNA) from blood samples in progressing advanced EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients. ctDNA T790M mutational status was assessed by Inivata InVision™ (eTAm-Seq™) assay in 48 EGFR-mutant advanced NSCLC patients with acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs without a tissue biopsy between April 2015 and April 2016. Progressing T790M-positive NSCLC patients received osimertinib (80 mg daily). The objectives were to assess the response rate to osimertinib according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) 1.1, the progression-free survival (PFS) on osimertinib, and the percentage of T790M positive in ctDNA. The ctDNA T790M mutation was detected in 50% of NSCLC patients. Among assessable patients, osimertinib gave a partial response rate of 62.5% and a stable disease rate of 37.5%. All responses were confirmed responses. After median follow up of 8 months, median PFS by RECIST criteria was not achieved (95% CI: 4-NA), with 6- and 12-months PFS of 66.7% and 52%, respectively. ctDNA from liquid biopsy can be used as a surrogate marker for T790M in tumour tissue. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Recombinant nematode anticoagulant protein c2 inhibits cell invasion by decreasing uPA expression in NSCLC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yu; Yue, Jun; Mao, Meng; Liu, Qingqing; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Jiyun

    2015-04-01

    Nematode anticoagulant protein c2 (NAPc2) is an 85-residue polypeptide originally isolated from the hematophagous hookworm, Ancylostoma caninum. Several studies have shown that rNAPc2 inhibits the growth of primary and metastatic tumors in mice independently of its ability to initiate coagulation. We obtained bioactive recombinant rNAPc2 by splicing of the rNAPc2-intein-CBD fusion proteins expressed in E. coli ER2566. In the in vitro assay, rNAPc2 obviously inhibited the invasive ability of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, rNAPc2 suppressed tumor growth in vivo by daily intraperitoneal injection of rNAPc2 in an NSCLC cell xenograft model of nude mice. Respectively, rNAPc2 downregulated the production of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) (P<0.05) and suppressed nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity. We also identified that inhibition of NF-κB activity impaired cell invasion and reduced the uPA production in NSCLC cells. Meanwhile, NF-κB was found to directly bind to the uPA promoter in vitro. These results demonstrated that rNAPc2 inhibits cell invasion at least in part through the downregulation of the NF-κB-dependent metastasis-related gene expression in NSCLC. Our results also suggest that uPA, a known metastasis-promoting gene, is indirectly regulated by rNAPc2 through NF-κB activation. These results indicate that rNAPc2 may be a potent agent for the prevention of NSCLC progression.

  12. Bevacizumab and gefitinib enhanced whole-brain radiation therapy for brain metastases due to non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R F; Yu, B; Zhang, R Q; Wang, X H; Li, C; Wang, P; Zhang, Y; Han, B; Gao, X X; Zhang, L; Jiang, Z M

    2017-11-17

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who experience brain metastases are usually associated with poor prognostic outcomes. This retrospective study proposed to assess whether bevacizumab or gefitinib can be used to improve the effectiveness of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in managing patients with brain metastases. A total of 218 NSCLC patients with multiple brain metastases were retrospectively included in this study and were randomly allocated to bevacizumab-gefitinib-WBRT group (n=76), gefitinib-WBRT group (n=77) and WBRT group (n=75). Then, tumor responses were evaluated every 2 months based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors version 1.0. Karnofsky performance status and neurologic examination were documented every 6 months after the treatment. Compared to the standard WBRT, bevacizumab and gefitinib could significantly enhance response rate (RR) and disease control rate (DCR) of WBRT (Pbevacizumab-gefitinib-WBRT were higher than those who received gefitinib-WBRT. The overall survival (OS) rates and progression-free survival (PFS) rates also differed significantly among the bevacizumab-gefitinib-WBRT (48.6 and 29.8%), gefitinib-WBRT (36.7 and 29.6%) and WBRT (9.8 and 14.6%) groups (Pbevacizumab-gefitinib-WBRT was slightly more toxic than gefitinib-WBRT, the toxicity was tolerable. As suggested by prolonged PFS and OS status, bevacizumab substantially improved the overall efficacy of WBRT in the management of patients with NSCLC.

  13. An Evidence-Based Approach to the Use of Predictive Biomarkers in the Treatment of Non- Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinton, Cindy [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession, St Hamilton, Hamilton, ON L8V 5C2 (Canada); Ellis, Peter M., E-mail: peter.ellis@jcc.hhsc.ca [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession, St Hamilton, Hamilton, ON L8V 5C2 (Canada); Department of Oncology, McMaster University Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8 (Canada)

    2011-09-13

    Recent advances in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have led to improvements in patient survival and quality of life. It is unclear whether molecular abnormalities associated with NSCLC cell survival, growth and proliferation are useful in predicting treatment benefit. We conducted a systematic review to establish which biomarkers contribute meaningfully to the management of NSCLC. A team of researchers searched PubMed and conference proceedings (ASCO, ESMO, IASLC, USCAP) using MESH terms for NSCLC and randomized trials (RCT), plus keywords for variables of interest. Evidence from multiple RCTs confirmed that histologic subtype is prognostic for survival and predictive of treatment efficacy and/or toxicity in NSCLC. Likewise, activating mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are associated with benefit from EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC and should be assessed routinely. No biomarkers to date reliably predict response to anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) therapies. There are inconsistent data on the role of ERCC1, BRCA, Beta tubulin III, RRM1, K-RAS, or TP-53 in treatment decisions. These tests should not be routinely used in selecting treatment at this time, whereas EML4/ALK translocations predict responses to specific targeted agents, the optimal assessment of this molecular abnormality has yet to be established. Personalized care of patients with NSCLC based on biomarkers is increasingly important to both clinical practice and research.

  14. Computed 88% TCP dose for SBRT of NSCLC from tumour hypoxia modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, Ruggero; Naccarato, Stefania; Stavreva, Nadejda; Stavrev, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    In small NSCLC, 88% local control at three years from SBRT was reported both for schedule (20–22 Gy ×3) (Fakiris et al 2009 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 75 677–82), actually close to (18–20 Gy ×3) if density correction is properly applied, and for schedules (18 Gy ×3) and (11 Gy ×5) (Palma et al 2012 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 82 1149–56). Here, we compare our computed iso-TCP = 88% dose per fraction (d 88 ) for three and five fractions (n) with such clinically adopted ones. Our TCP model accounts for tumour repopulation, at rate λ (d −1 ), reoxygenation of chronic hypoxia (ch-), at rate a (d −1 ) and fluctuating oxygenation of acute hypoxia (ah-), with hypoxic fraction (C) of the acutely hypoxic fractional volume (AHF). Out of the eight free parameters whose values we had fitted to in vivo animal data (Ruggieri et al 2012 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 83 1603–8), we here maintained (a(d −1 ), C, OER ch , OER ah /OER ch , AHF, CHF) = (0.026, 0.17, 1.9, 2.2, 0.033, 0.145) while rescaling the initial total number of clonogens (N o ) according to the ratio of NSCLC on animal median tumour volumes. From the clinical literature, the usually assumed (α o /β o (Gy), λ(d −1 )) = (10, 0.217) for the well-oxygenated (o-)cells were taken. By normal (lognormal) random sampling of all parameter values over their 95% C.I., the uncertainty on present d 88 (n) computations was estimated. Finally, SBRT intra-tumour dose heterogeneity was simulated by a 1.3 dose boost ratio on 50% of tumour volume. Computed d 88 (±1σ) were 19.0 (16.3; 21.7) Gy, for n = 3; 10.4 (8.7; 12.1) Gy, for n = 5; 5.8 (5.2; 6.4) Gy, for n = 8; 4.0 (3.6; 4.3) Gy, for n = 12. Furthermore, the iso-TCP = 88% total dose, D 88 (n) = d 88 (n)*n, exhibited a relative minimum around n = 8. Computed d 88 (n = 3, 5) are strictly consistent with the clinically adopted ones, which confirms the validity of LQ-model-based TCP predictions at the doses used in SBRT if a highly

  15. nab-paclitaxel/carboplatin induction in squamous NSCLC: longitudinal quality of life while on chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Michael Thomas,1,2 David R Spigel,3 Robert M Jotte,4 Michael McCleod,5 Mark A Socinski,6 Ray D Page,7 Laurent Gressot,8 Jeanna Knoble,9 Oscar Juan,10 Daniel Morgensztern,11 Dolores Isla,12 Edward S Kim,13 Howard West,14 Amy Ko,15 Teng Jin Ong,15 Nataliya Trunova,15 Cesare Gridelli16 On behalf of ABOUND.sqm investigators 1Department of Thoracic Oncology/Internal Medicine, Thoraxklinik im Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg, 2Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 3Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, TN, 4Department of Medical Oncology/Hematology, Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Denver, CO, 5Florida Cancer Specialists, Fort Myers, 6Florida Hospital Cancer Institute, Orlando, FL, 7The Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Fort Worth, 8North Cypress Cancer Center, Cypress, TX, 9The Mark H. Zangmeister Center, Columbus, OH, USA; 10Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Universitari i Politécnic La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 11Department of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA; 12Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, Spain; 13Levine Cancer Institute, Carolinas HealthCare System, Charlotte, NC, 14Thoracic Oncology Program, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, WA, 15Celgene Corporation, Summit, NJ, USA; 16Department of Oncology/Hematology, S.G. Moscati Hospital, Avellino, Italy Background: Longitudinal data on the impact of treatment on quality of life (QoL in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC are limited. In this palliative setting, treatment that does not deteriorate QoL is key. Here we report longitudinal QoL in patients with squamous NSCLC, receiving ≤4 cycles of nab-paclitaxel/carboplatin combination chemotherapy. Methods: Patients received nab-paclitaxel 100 mg/m2 days 1, 8, 15 + carboplatin area under the curve 6 mg•min/mL day 1 (q3w for four cycles. QoL was assessed by the Lung Cancer Symptom Scale (LCSS and

  16. Ursolic acid sensitizes radioresistant NSCLC cells expressing HIF-1α through reducing endogenous GSH and inhibiting HIF-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bing; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Maohu; Qi, Xinrong; Wang, Gang; Xiao, Linlin; Yi, Qiyi; Jin, Wensen

    2017-02-01

    In previous studies, the present authors demonstrated that effective sensitization of ionizing radiation-induced death of tumor cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, could be produced by oleanolic acid (OA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid present in plants. In the present study, it was investigated whether ursolic acid (UA), an isomer of OA, had also the capacity of sensitizing radioresistant NSCLC cells. The radioresistant cell line H1299/M-hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) was established by transfection with a recombinant plasmid expressing mutant HIF-1α (M-HIF-1α). Compared with parental H1299 cells and H1299 cells transfected with empty plasmid, H1299/M-HIF-1α cells had lower radiosensitivity. Following the use of UA to treat NSCLC cells, elevation of the radiosensitivity of cells was observed by MTT assay. The irradiated H1299/M-HIF-1α cells were more sensitive to UA pretreatment than the irradiated cells with empty plasmid and control. The alteration of DNA damage in the irradiated cells was further measured using micronucleus (MN) assay. The combination of UA treatment with radiation could induce the increase of cellular MN frequencies, in agreement with the change in the tendency observed in the cell viability assay. It was further shown that the endogenous glutathione (GSH) contents were markedly attenuated in the differently irradiated NSCLC cells with UA (80 µmol/l) pretreatment through glutathione reductase/5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrob-enzoic acid) (DTNB) recycling assay. The results revealed that UA treatment alone could effectively decrease the GSH content in H1299/M-HIF-1α cells. In addition, the inhibition of HIF-1α expression in radioresistant cells was confirmed by western blotting. It was then concluded that UA could upregulate the radiosensitivity of NSCLC cells, and in particular reduce the refractory response of cells expressing HIF-1α to ionizing radiation. The primary mechanism is associated with reduction of

  17. Co-activation of STAT3 and YES-Associated Protein 1 (YAP1) Pathway in EGFR-Mutant NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaib, Imane; Karachaliou, Niki; Pilotto, Sara; Codony Servat, Jordi; Cai, Xueting; Li, Xuefei; Drozdowskyj, Ana; Servat, Carles Codony; Yang, Jie; Hu, Chunping; Cardona, Andres Felipe; Vivanco, Guillermo Lopez; Vergnenegre, Alain; Sanchez, Jose Miguel; Provencio, Mariano; de Marinis, Filipo; Passaro, Antonio; Carcereny, Enric; Reguart, Noemi; Campelo, Charo Garcia; Teixido, Christina; Sperduti, Isabella; Rodriguez, Sonia; Lazzari, Chiara; Verlicchi, Alberto; de Aguirre, Itziar; Queralt, Cristina; Wei, Jia; Estrada, Roger; Puig de la Bellacasa, Raimon; Ramirez, Jose Luis; Jacobson, Kirstine; Ditzel, Henrik J; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Viteri, Santiago; Molina, Migual Angel; Zhou, Caicun; Cao, Peng; Ma, Patrick C; Bivona, Trever G; Rosell, Rafael

    2017-09-01

    The efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is limited by adaptive activation of cell survival signals. We hypothesized that both signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and Src-YES-associated protein 1 (YAP1) signaling are dually activated during EGFR TKI treatment to limit therapeutic response. We used MTT and clonogenic assays, immunoblotting, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate the efficacy of EGFR TKI alone and in combination with STAT3 and Src inhibition in three EGFR-mutant NSCLC cell lines. The Chou-Talalay method was used for the quantitative determination of drug interaction. We examined tumor growth inhibition in one EGFR-mutant NSCLC xenograft model (n = 4 mice per group). STAT3 and YAP1 expression was evaluated in tumors from 119 EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients (64 in an initial cohort and 55 in a validation cohort) by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the correlation between survival and gene expression. All statistical tests were two-sided. We discovered that lung cancer cells survive initial EGFR inhibitor treatment through activation of not only STAT3 but also Src-YAP1 signaling. Cotargeting EGFR, STAT3, and Src was synergistic in two EGFR-mutant NSCLC cell lines with a combination index of 0.59 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.54 to 0.63) for the PC-9 and 0.59 (95% CI = 0.54 to 0.63) for the H1975 cell line. High expression of STAT3 or YAP1 predicted worse progression-free survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.02, 95% CI = 1.54 to 5.93, P = .001, and HR = 2.57, 95% CI = 1.30 to 5.09, P = .007, respectively) in an initial cohort of 64 EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients treated with firstline EGFR TKIs. Similar results were observed in a validation cohort. Our study uncovers a coordinated signaling network centered on both STAT3 and Src-YAP signaling

  18. The asphericity of the metabolic tumour volume in NSCLC: correlation with histopathology and molecular markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Ego, Kilian; Steffen, Ingo G.; Buchert, Ralph; Wertzel, Heinz; Achenbach, H.J.; Riedel, Sandra; Schreiber, Jens; Schultz, Meinald; Furth, Christian; Amthauer, Holger; Derlin, Thorsten; Hofheinz, Frank; Kalinski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Asphericity (ASP) is a tumour shape descriptor based on the PET image. It quantitates the deviation from spherical of the shape of the metabolic tumour volume (MTV). In order to identify its biological correlates, we investigated the relationship between ASP and clinically relevant histopathological and molecular signatures in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study included 83 consecutive patients (18 women, aged 66.4 ± 8.9 years) with newly diagnosed NSCLC in whom PET/CT with 18 F-FDG had been performed prior to therapy. Primary tumour resection specimens and core biopsies were used for basic histopathology and determination of the Ki-67 proliferation index. EGFR status, VEGF, p53 and ALK expression were obtained in a subgroup of 44 patients. The FDG PET images of the primary tumours were delineated using an automatic algorithm based on adaptive thresholding taking into account local background. In addition to ASP, SUVmax, MTV and some further descriptors of shape and intratumour heterogeneity were assessed as semiquantitative PET measures. SUVmax, MTV and ASP were associated with pathological T stage (Kruskal-Wallis, p = 0.001, p < 0.0005 and p < 0.0005, respectively) and N stage (p = 0.017, p = 0.003 and p = 0.002, respectively). Only ASP was associated with M stage (p = 0.026). SUVmax, MTV and ASP were correlated with Ki-67 index (Spearman's rho = 0.326/p = 0.003, rho = 0.302/p = 0.006 and rho = 0.271/p = 0.015, respectively). The latter correlations were considerably stronger in adenocarcinomas than in squamous cell carcinomas. ASP, but not SUVmax or MTV, showed a tendency for a significant association with the extent of VEGF expression (p = 0.058). In multivariate Cox regression analysis, ASP (p < 0.0005) and the presence of distant metastases (p = 0.023) were significantly associated with progression-free survival. ASP (p = 0.006), the presence of distant metastases (p = 0.010), and Ki-67 index (p = 0.062) were significantly associated with

  19. Developing and Validating a Survival Prediction Model for NSCLC Patients Through Distributed Learning Across 3 Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochems, Arthur; Deist, Timo M; El Naqa, Issam; Kessler, Marc; Mayo, Chuck; Reeves, Jackson; Jolly, Shruti; Matuszak, Martha; Ten Haken, Randall; van Soest, Johan; Oberije, Cary; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Price, Gareth; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Philippe; Dekker, Andre

    2017-10-01

    Tools for survival prediction for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with chemoradiation or radiation therapy are of limited quality. In this work, we developed a predictive model of survival at 2 years. The model is based on a large volume of historical patient data and serves as a proof of concept to demonstrate the distributed learning approach. Clinical data from 698 lung cancer patients, treated with curative intent with chemoradiation or radiation therapy alone, were collected and stored at 2 different cancer institutes (559 patients at Maastro clinic (Netherlands) and 139 at Michigan university [United States]). The model was further validated on 196 patients originating from The Christie (United Kingdon). A Bayesian network model was adapted for distributed learning (the animation can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDJFOxpwqEA). Two-year posttreatment survival was chosen as the endpoint. The Maastro clinic cohort data are publicly available at https://www.cancerdata.org/publication/developing-and-validating-survival-prediction-model-nsclc-patients-through-distributed, and the developed models can be found at www.predictcancer.org. Variables included in the final model were T and N category, age, performance status, and total tumor dose. The model has an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.66 on the external validation set and an AUC of 0.62 on a 5-fold cross validation. A model based on the T and N category performed with an AUC of 0.47 on the validation set, significantly worse than our model (PLearning the model in a centralized or distributed fashion yields a minor difference on the probabilities of the conditional probability tables (0.6%); the discriminative performance of the models on the validation set is similar (P=.26). Distributed learning from federated databases allows learning of predictive models on data originating from multiple institutions while avoiding many of the data-sharing barriers. We believe that

  20. The asphericity of the metabolic tumour volume in NSCLC: correlation with histopathology and molecular markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Ego, Kilian; Steffen, Ingo G. [University Hospital, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); Buchert, Ralph [University Medicine Charite, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Wertzel, Heinz; Achenbach, H.J. [Lung Clinic Lostau GmbH, Lostau (Germany); Riedel, Sandra; Schreiber, Jens [University Hospital, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Clinic of Pneumology, Magdeburg (Germany); Schultz, Meinald [Institute of Pathology Stendal, Stendal (Germany); Furth, Christian; Amthauer, Holger [University Hospital, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); University Medicine Charite, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Derlin, Thorsten [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Hofheinz, Frank [Helmholtz-Center Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kalinski, Thomas [University Hospital Magdeburg, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Institute for Pathology, Magdeburg (Germany); Institute for Pathology Lademannbogen, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Asphericity (ASP) is a tumour shape descriptor based on the PET image. It quantitates the deviation from spherical of the shape of the metabolic tumour volume (MTV). In order to identify its biological correlates, we investigated the relationship between ASP and clinically relevant histopathological and molecular signatures in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study included 83 consecutive patients (18 women, aged 66.4 ± 8.9 years) with newly diagnosed NSCLC in whom PET/CT with {sup 18}F-FDG had been performed prior to therapy. Primary tumour resection specimens and core biopsies were used for basic histopathology and determination of the Ki-67 proliferation index. EGFR status, VEGF, p53 and ALK expression were obtained in a subgroup of 44 patients. The FDG PET images of the primary tumours were delineated using an automatic algorithm based on adaptive thresholding taking into account local background. In addition to ASP, SUVmax, MTV and some further descriptors of shape and intratumour heterogeneity were assessed as semiquantitative PET measures. SUVmax, MTV and ASP were associated with pathological T stage (Kruskal-Wallis, p = 0.001, p < 0.0005 and p < 0.0005, respectively) and N stage (p = 0.017, p = 0.003 and p = 0.002, respectively). Only ASP was associated with M stage (p = 0.026). SUVmax, MTV and ASP were correlated with Ki-67 index (Spearman's rho = 0.326/p = 0.003, rho = 0.302/p = 0.006 and rho = 0.271/p = 0.015, respectively). The latter correlations were considerably stronger in adenocarcinomas than in squamous cell carcinomas. ASP, but not SUVmax or MTV, showed a tendency for a significant association with the extent of VEGF expression (p = 0.058). In multivariate Cox regression analysis, ASP (p < 0.0005) and the presence of distant metastases (p = 0.023) were significantly associated with progression-free survival. ASP (p = 0.006), the presence of distant metastases (p = 0.010), and Ki-67 index (p = 0.062) were significantly associated with

  1. Detecting expression of 5T4 in CTCs and tumor samples from NSCLC patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R Pirie-Shepherd

    Full Text Available The fetal oncogene 5T4 is a cell surface protein, with overexpression observed in a variety of cancers as compared to normal adult tissue. The ability to select patients with tumors that express high levels of 5T4 may enrich a clinical trial cohort with patients most likely to respond to 5T4 targeted therapy. To that end, we developed assays to measure 5T4 in both tumors and in circulating tumor cells (CTCs. We identified the presence of 5T4 in both adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of lung, in all clinical stages and grades of disease. CTCs were identified in peripheral blood from the majority of patients with NSCLC, and 5T4 was detectable in most samples. Although 5T4 was present in both CTCs and tumors in most patients, there was no concordance between relative amount in either sample type. Clinical response rates of patients treated with the therapies directed against 5T4 in early stage clinical trials, as determined by these assays, may provide important insights into the biology of 5T4 in tumors and the mechanisms of action of 5T4-targeting therapy.

  2. Inhomogeneous dose escalation increases expected local control for NSCLC patients with lymph node involvement without increased mean lung dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine B; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine

    2014-01-01

    but also for patients with involved lymph nodes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Highly modulated IMRT plans with homogeneous dose distributions with a prescribed dose of 66Gy/33F were created for 20 NSCLC patients, staged T1b-T4 N0-N3, using standard PTV dose coverage of 95-107%. For each patient, an inhomogeneous......BACKGROUND: Higher doses to NSCLC tumours are required to increase the low control rates obtained with conventional dose prescriptions. This study presents the concept of inhomogeneous dose distributions as a general way to increase local control probability, not only for isolated lung tumours...... dose distribution was created with dose constraints of: PTV-coverage ≥ 95%, same mean lung dose as obtained in the homogeneous dose plan, maximum doses of 45 and 66 Gy to spinal canal and oesophagus, respectively, and V74Gy

  3. cMET in NSCLC: Can We Cut off the Head of the Hydra? From the Pathway to the Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nele Van Der Steen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the tyrosine kinase receptor cMET, together with its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, has become a target in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Signalization via cMET stimulates several oncological processes amongst which are cell motility, invasion and metastasis. It also confers resistance against several currently used targeted therapies, e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors. In this review, we will discuss the basic structure of cMET and the most important signaling pathways. We will also look into aberrations in the signaling and the effects thereof in cancer growth, with the focus on NSCLC. Finally, we will discuss the role of cMET as resistance mechanism.

  4. Molecular prediction of adjuvant cisplatin efficacy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)-validation in two independent cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Ida Kappel; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Ravn, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Effective predictive biomarkers for selection of patients benefiting from adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are needed. Based on a previously validated methodology, molecular profiles of predicted sensitivity in two patient cohorts are presen......INTRODUCTION: Effective predictive biomarkers for selection of patients benefiting from adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are needed. Based on a previously validated methodology, molecular profiles of predicted sensitivity in two patient cohorts...... are presented. METHODS: The profiles are correlations between in vitro sensitivity to cisplatin and vinorelbine and baseline mRNA expression of the 60 cell lines in the National Cancer Institute panel. An applied clinical samples filter focused the profiles to clinically relevant genes. The profiles were tested...

  5. Failure patterns by prognostic group as determined by recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) of 1547 on four radiation therapy oncology group studies in operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Scott, Charles B.; Byhardt, Roger W.; Emami, Bahman; Asbell, Sucha O.; Russell, Anthony H.; Roach, Mack; Urtasun, Raul C.; Gaspar, Laurie E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To identify groups of patients who might benefit from more aggressive systemic or local treatment based on failure patterns when unresectable NSCLC was treated by radiation therapy alone. Methods: 1547 patients from 4 RTOG trials treated by RT alone were analyzed for the patterns of first failure by PRA class which was defined by prognostic factors, e.g., stage, KPS, weight loss, pleural effusion, age. All patients were AJCC stage II, IIIA or IIIB with KPS of at least 50 and n previous radiotherapy or chemotherapy for their NSCLC. Progressions in the primary (within irradiated fields), thorax (outside irradiated area), brain and distant metastasis other than brain were compared (two-sided) for each failure category by RPA. Results: The RPA classes are four distinct subgroups that had significantly different median survivals of 12.6, 8.3, 6.2 and 3.3 months for classes I, II, III and IV respectively (all groups p=0.0002). Pair comparison showed that RPA I vs IV p<0.0001, I vs III p=0.006, II vs IV p<0.0001, and III vs IV p=0.06. Conclusions: These results suggest the burden of disease and physiologic compromise in class IV patients are sufficient to cause death before specific sites of failure can be discerned. Site specific treatment strategies (intensive local therapy, combination chemotherapy, prophylactic cranial irradiation) may lead to improved outcome in class I and II, but are unlikely to alter outcome in class III and IV

  6. Preoperative Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs) and Outcomes from Resected Early Stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almquist, Daniel; Khanal, Nabin; Smith, Lynette; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2018-05-01

    Preoperative pulmonary function tests (PFTs) predict operative morbidity and mortality after resection in lung cancer. However, the impact of preoperative PFTs on overall outcomes in surgically-resected stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been well studied. This is a retrospective study of 149 patients who underwent surgical resection as first-line treatment for stage I and II NSCLC at a single center between 2003 and 2014. PFTs [forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), Diffusing Capacity (DLCO)], both absolute values and percent predicted values were categorized into quartiles. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to determine whether PFTs predicted for overall survival (OS). Logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of postoperative complications and length of stay (LOS) greater than 10 days based on the results of PFTs. The median age of the cohort was 68 years. The cohort was predominantly males (98.6%), current or ex-smokers (98%), with stage I NSCLC (82.76%). The majority of patients underwent a lobectomy (n=121, 81.21%). The predominant tumor histology was adenocarcinoma (n=70, 47%) followed by squamous cell carcinoma (n=61, 41%). The median follow-up of surviving patients was 53.2 months. DLCO was found to be a significant predictor of OS (HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.87-0.99; p=0.03) on univariate analysis. Although PFTs did not predict for postoperative complications, worse PFTs were significant predictors of length of stay >10 days. Preoperative PFTs did not predict for survival from resected early-stage NSCLC, but did predict for prolonged hospital stay following surgery. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  7. Activity of crizotinib over choroidal metastases in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)-ALK rearranged: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bearz, Alessandra; Santarossa, Sandra; Manfrè, Antonio; Beltrame, Giorgio; Urbani, Martina; Sartor, Ivana; Da Ros, Valentina; Tirelli, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    Background Adenocarcinoma of the lung with EML4-ALK translocation is a rare subtype of Non Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) that has recently shown to benefit from treatment with crizotinib. Despite the concerns about the efficacy of crizotinib over cerebral metastases, some reports have described its activity, although always after local treatment with radiotherapy. Recently it has been reported activity of crizotinib over choroidal metastases, again after radiotherapy. Case presentation Herei...

  8. Bisphosphonates enhance EGFR-TKIs efficacy in advanced NSCLC patients with EGFR activating mutation: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chu-Ying; Wang, Li; Feng, Cheng-Jun; Yu, Ping; Cai, Xiao-Hong; Yao, Wen-Xiu; Xu, Yong; Liu, Xiao-Ke; Zhu, Wen-Jiang; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Jin; Lu, You; Wang, Yong-Sheng

    2016-10-11

    Bisphosphonates have exhibited anti-tumor activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We aimed to evaluate whether the combination of bisphosphonates with tyrosine kinase inhibitors of EGFR (EGFR-TKIs) could obtain a synergistic effect on advanced NSCLC patients with EGFR mutations. Between January 2008 and October 2013, 114 advanced EGFR mutations NSCLC patients who received EGFR-TKIs as first-line therapy were recruited from two cancer centers. Patients were separated into EGFR-TKIs alone or EGFR-TKIs plus bisphosphonates (combination) group. Median progression free survival (mPFS), median overall survival (mOS) distributions and survival curves were analyzed. Among the 114 patients, 62 had bone metastases (19 patients treated with EGFR-TKIs, 43 patients treated with EGFR-TKIs + bisphosphonates). Median PFS and OS were significantly improved in combination group compared with EGFR-TKIs group (mPFS: 15.0 vs 7.3 months, P = 0.0017; mOS: 25.2 vs 10.4 months, P = 0.0015) in patients with bone metastases. Among the 71 patients (19 patients with bone metastases) treated with EGFR-TKIs alone, patients with bone metastases had poor survival prognosis (mPFS:7.3 vs 12.1 months, P = 0.0434; mOS:10.4 vs 22.0 months, P = 0.0036). The survival of patients with bone metastases who received EGFR-TKIs plus bisphosphonates therapy was non-inferior to patients without bone metastases treated with EGFR-TKIs alone (mPFS: 15.0 vs 12.1 months, p = 0.1871; mOS: 25.2 vs 22.0 months, p = 0.9798). Concomitant use of bisphosphonates and EGFR-TKIs improves therapeutic efficacy and brings survival benefits to NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation and bone metastases.

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain ... called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life— ...

  10. Aberrant trafficking of NSCLC-associated EGFR mutants through the endocytic recycling pathway promotes interaction with Src@

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Band Vimla

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR controls a wide range of cellular processes, and altered EGFR signaling contributes to human cancer. EGFR kinase domain mutants found in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC are constitutively active, a trait critical for cell transformation through activation of downstream pathways. Endocytic trafficking of EGFR is a major regulatory mechanism as ligand-induced lysosomal degradation results in termination of signaling. While numerous studies have examined mutant EGFR signaling, the endocytic traffic of mutant EGFR within the NSCLC milieu remains less clear. Results This study shows that mutant EGFRs in NSCLC cell lines are constitutively endocytosed as shown by their colocalization with the early/recycling endosomal marker transferrin and the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP1. Notably, mutant EGFRs, but not the wild-type EGFR, show a perinuclear accumulation and colocalization with recycling endosomal markers such as Rab11 and EHD1 upon treatment of cells with endocytic recycling inhibitor monensin, suggesting that mutant EGFRs preferentially traffic through the endocytic recycling compartments. Importantly, monensin treatment enhanced the mutant EGFR association and colocalization with Src, indicating that aberrant transit through the endocytic recycling compartment promotes mutant EGFR-Src association. Conclusion The findings presented in this study show that mutant EGFRs undergo aberrant traffic into the endocytic recycling compartment which allows mutant EGFRs to engage in a preferential interaction with Src, a critical partner for EGFR-mediated oncogenesis.

  11. Antroquinonol inhibits NSCLC proliferation by altering PI3K/mTOR proteins and miRNA expression profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, V. Bharath; Yuan, Ta-Chun [Department of Life Science and Institute of Biotechnology, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Liou, Je-Wen [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Tzu-Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Yang, Chih-Jen [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Sung, Ping-Jyun [Graduate Institute of Marine Biotechnology, Department of Life Science, National Dong Hwa University, Pingtung, Taiwan (China); Weng, Ching-Feng, E-mail: cfweng@mail.ndhu.edu.tw [Department of Life Science and Institute of Biotechnology, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan (China)

    2011-02-10

    Antroquinonol a derivative of Antrodia camphorata has been reported to have antitumor effects against various cancer cells. However, the effect of antroquinonol on cell signalling and survival pathways in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been fully demarcated. Here we report that antroquinonol treatment significantly reduced the proliferation of three NSCLC cells. Treatment of A549 cells with antroquinonol increased cell shrinkage, apoptotic vacuoles, pore formation, TUNEL positive cells and increased Sub-G1 cell population with respect to time and dose dependent manner. Antroquinonol treatment not only increased the Sub-G1 accumulation but also reduced the protein levels of cdc2 without altering the expression of cyclin B1, cdc25C, pcdc2, and pcdc25C. Antroquinonol induced apoptosis was associated with disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of Caspase 3 and PARP cleavage in A549 cells. Moreover, antroquinonol treatment down regulated the expression of Bcl2 proteins, which was correlated with the decreased PI3K and mTOR protein levels without altering pro apoptotic and anti apoptotic proteins. Results from the microarray analysis demonstrated that antroquinonol altered the expression level of miRNAs compared with untreated control in A549 cells. The data collectively suggested the antiproliferative effect of antroquinonol on NSCLC A549 cells, which provides useful information for understanding the anticancer mechanism influenced by antroquinonol and is the first report to suggest that antroquinonol may be a promising chemotherapeutic agent for lung cancer.

  12. Next-Generation Sequencing Workflow for NSCLC Critical Samples Using a Targeted Sequencing Approach by Ion Torrent PGM™ Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanni, Irene; Coco, Simona; Truini, Anna; Rusmini, Marta; Dal Bello, Maria Giovanna; Alama, Angela; Banelli, Barbara; Mora, Marco; Rijavec, Erika; Barletta, Giulia; Genova, Carlo; Biello, Federica; Maggioni, Claudia; Grossi, Francesco

    2015-12-03

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a cost-effective technology capable of screening several genes simultaneously; however, its application in a clinical context requires an established workflow to acquire reliable sequencing results. Here, we report an optimized NGS workflow analyzing 22 lung cancer-related genes to sequence critical samples such as DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks and circulating free DNA (cfDNA). Snap frozen and matched FFPE gDNA from 12 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, whose gDNA fragmentation status was previously evaluated using a multiplex PCR-based quality control, were successfully sequenced with Ion Torrent PGM™. The robust bioinformatic pipeline allowed us to correctly call both Single Nucleotide Variants (SNVs) and indels with a detection limit of 5%, achieving 100% specificity and 96% sensitivity. This workflow was also validated in 13 FFPE NSCLC biopsies. Furthermore, a specific protocol for low input gDNA capable of producing good sequencing data with high coverage, high uniformity, and a low error rate was also optimized. In conclusion, we demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining gDNA from FFPE samples suitable for NGS by performing appropriate quality controls. The optimized workflow, capable of screening low input gDNA, highlights NGS as a potential tool in the detection, disease monitoring, and treatment of NSCLC.

  13. Expressions of c-Cbl, Cbl-b and EGFR and Its Role of Prognosis in NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin JIAO

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is closely correlated with the progression of lung cancer. Its activity is modulated by Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl family. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression and clinical relevance of c-Cbl, Cbl-b and EGFR in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods Expressions of c-Cbl, Cbl-b and EGFR protein were detected with tissue microarrays and immunohistochemistry technique in 94 cases of NSCLC. The correlations between the expression of the three proteins and clinicopathological parameters were analyzed. Results The positive expression rates of EGFR, c-Cbl and Cbl-b were 60.6% (57/94, 30.9% (29/94 and 84.0% (79/94, respectively. The expression of EGFR, c-Cbl and Cbl-b was not associated with age, pathological type, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis, and smoking history. c-Cbl and Cbl-b status was not significantly correlated with overall survival. Subgroup analyses showed that c-Cbl-positive patients had longer survival than c-Cbl-negative patients in EGFR-positive group (P=0.014. Conclusion Detection of c-Cbl protein levels might contribute to the prognosis evaluation of EGFR-positive NSCLC.

  14. Antroquinonol inhibits NSCLC proliferation by altering PI3K/mTOR proteins and miRNA expression profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V. Bharath; Yuan, Ta-Chun; Liou, Je-Wen; Yang, Chih-Jen; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Antroquinonol a derivative of Antrodia camphorata has been reported to have antitumor effects against various cancer cells. However, the effect of antroquinonol on cell signalling and survival pathways in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been fully demarcated. Here we report that antroquinonol treatment significantly reduced the proliferation of three NSCLC cells. Treatment of A549 cells with antroquinonol increased cell shrinkage, apoptotic vacuoles, pore formation, TUNEL positive cells and increased Sub-G1 cell population with respect to time and dose dependent manner. Antroquinonol treatment not only increased the Sub-G1 accumulation but also reduced the protein levels of cdc2 without altering the expression of cyclin B1, cdc25C, pcdc2, and pcdc25C. Antroquinonol induced apoptosis was associated with disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of Caspase 3 and PARP cleavage in A549 cells. Moreover, antroquinonol treatment down regulated the expression of Bcl2 proteins, which was correlated with the decreased PI3K and mTOR protein levels without altering pro apoptotic and anti apoptotic proteins. Results from the microarray analysis demonstrated that antroquinonol altered the expression level of miRNAs compared with untreated control in A549 cells. The data collectively suggested the antiproliferative effect of antroquinonol on NSCLC A549 cells, which provides useful information for understanding the anticancer mechanism influenced by antroquinonol and is the first report to suggest that antroquinonol may be a promising chemotherapeutic agent for lung cancer.

  15. Overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase-7 and -9 in NSCLC tumor and stromal cells: correlation with a favorable clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenvold, Helge; Donnem, Tom; Andersen, Sigve; Al-Saad, Samer; Al-Shibli, Khalid; Busund, Lill-Tove; Bremnes, Roy M

    2012-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are considered important players in angiogenesis and cancer progression. Several drugs developed for targeting MMPs have until now been without clinical efficacy. As both malignant cells and cells of the surrounding stroma contribute to tumor growth, we have explored the impact of MMP-2, -7 and -9 expression in both the tumor and stromal compartment of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC). From 335 unselected stage I to IIIA NSCLC carcinomas, duplicate tumor and tumor-associated stromal cores were collected in tissue microarrays (TMAs). Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of MMP-2, -7 and -9 in tumor and stromal cells. In univariate analyses, high tumor cell MMP-7 expression (P=0.029) and high stromal MMP-9 expression (P=0.001) were positive prognostic factors. In the multivariate analysis, high tumor cell MMP-7 expression (HR 1.58, CI 1.08-2.32, P=0.020) and high stromal MMP-9 expression (HR 1.92, CI 1.25-2.96, P=0.003) were independent positive prognostic factors for disease-specific survival. High levels of MMP-7 in tumor cells and high levels of MMP-9 in tumor associated stroma were independent positive prognostic factors in NSCLC patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. EGFR testing and clinical management of advanced NSCLC: a Galician Lung Cancer Group study (GGCP 048-10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Sergio; Casal, Joaquín; Afonso Afonso, Francisco Javier; Fírvida, José Luis; Santomé, Lucía; Barón, Francisco; Lázaro, Martín; Pena, Carolina; Amenedo, Margarita; Abdulkader, Ihab; González-Arenas, Carmen; Fachal, Laura; Vega, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the incidence of mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in the Galician region of Spain and the clinical management and outcome of patients carrying EGFR mutations. All newly diagnosed advanced or metastatic NSCLC patients were screened for EGFR mutations in matched tumor samples (tissue or cytology specimens) and serum samples. Of 198 patients screened for EGFR mutations in tumor samples, 184 had evaluable data and, of these, 25 (13.6%) had EGFR mutations (84% sensitizing mutations). EGFR mutation was found in serum in 14 (8.1%) patients (of 174 evaluable). Compared to matched tumor tissue, serum EGFR mutation testing specificity and sensitivity were 99% and 52%, respectively. All but two patients received gefitinib. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 10 (95% confidence interval: 4.8-15.3) months and 17.8 (95% confidence interval: 13.9-21.6) months, respectively, in patients carrying sensitizing mutations. The incidence of EGFR mutations in Galicia is consistent with previous data in Spain. Our results also support the feasibility of EGFR testing to guide treatment decision making using tumor tissue or cytology samples, or serum samples if tumor specimens are unavailable. These findings also confirm that first-line gefitinib is an active treatment option in Caucasians with EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC.

  17. Clinical Significance of Focal Breast Lesions Incidentally Identified by 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Seok; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Su Jin; Hyun, Seung Hyup; Lee, Ji Young; Choi, Yong; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the incidence and malignant risk of focal breast lesions incidentally detected by 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Various PET/CT findings of the breast lesions were also analyzed to improve the differentiation between benign from malignant focal breast lesions. The subjects were 3,768 consecutive 18 F-FDG PET/CT exams performed in adult females without a history of breast cancer. A focal breast lesion was defined as a focal 18 F-FDG uptake or a focal nodular lesion on CT image irrespective of 18 F-FDG uptake in the breasts. The maximum SUV and CT pattern of focal breast lesions were evaluated, and were compared with final diagnosis. The incidence of focal breast lesions on PET/CT in adult female subjects was 1.4% (58 lesions in 53 subjects). In finally confirmed 53 lesions of 48 subjects, 11 lesions of 8 subjects (20.8%) were proven to be malignant. When the PET/CT patterns suggesting benignancy (maximum attenuation value > 75 HU or 20) were added as diagnostic criteria of PET/CT to differentiate benign from malignant breast lesions along with maximum SUV, the area under ROC curve of PET/CT was significantly increased compared with maximum SUV alone (0.680±0.093 vs. 0.786±0.076, p 18 F-FDG PET/CT is not low, deserving further diagnostic confirmation. Image interpretation considering both 18 F-FDG uptake and PET/CT pattern may be helpful to improve the differentiation from malignant and benign focal breast lesion

  18. Combination treatment with erlotinib and ampelopsin overcomes erlotinib resistance in NSCLC cells via the Nox2-ROS-Bim pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung-Woo; Park, Nam-Sook; Noh, Min Hye; Shim, Ju A; Ahn, Byul-Nim; Kim, Yeong Seok; Kim, Daejin; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Hur, Dae Young

    2017-04-01

    Erlotinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), has been shown to have a dramatic effect in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR mutation. However, the presence of primary resistance or acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI is the most common reason for switching to other anti-cancer agents. Even though there are newer agents that have activity in the presence of the T790M mutation, identification of potential agents that could overcome resistance to EGFR-TKI is still needed for the treatment of NSCLC patients. In this study, we used erlotinib-resistant NSCLC cell lines to investigate the effects of combination treatment with erlotinib and ampelopsin. After treatment with either single or combination, cell viability and cell death were determined with WST-1 assay, trypan blue exclusion method, colony forming assay, annexin-V staining assay and western blot assay. The content of ROS was evaluated by FACS analysis using H 2 DCF-staining method. To determine the effect of Nox2 and Bim on the combined treatment with erlotinib and ampelopsin-induced cell death, we transfected with Nox2 or Bim specific siRNA and performed with western blot assay for evaluation of its expression. Combined treatment with erlotinib and ampelopsin at non-cytotoxic concentrations significantly induced caspase-dependent cell death in erlotinib-resistant NSCLC cells. Furthermore, cell death resulted in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through upregulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (Nox2) expression, a direct source of ROS. The expression level of Bim increased with combination treatment, but not with either treatment alone. Here in this study, we demonstrate that the combination of erlotinib and ampelopsin induces cell death via the Nox2-ROS-Bim pathway, and ampelopsin could be used as a novel anti-cancer agent combined with EGFR-TKI to overcome resistance to erlotinib in EGFR-mutant NSCLC

  19. [Clinical verification of a mathematical model for prediction of brain metastases in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binbin; Wang, Siyu; Qu, Wei; Lin, Yongbin; Yang, Hua; Sun, Haibo

    2008-06-20

    Brain metastases are the main determining factor in the failure of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) by multimodality treatments. Whether we can use PCI to the patients with NSCLC and how to screen out high-risk patients are still controversial. We have reported a mathematical model, through which we can predict high-risk brain metastases in patients with postoperative LA-NSCLC. The purpose of this study is to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, using new cases information. A total of 196 patients of stage III NSCLC treated with surgical resection were retrospectively analyzed, to verify the consistency between actual and predictive brain metastases. The median survival time after surgery for all patients was 32.1 months. The one-, two- and three- year survival rate were 84.7%, 63.9%, 51.7%. The incidence rate of brain metastases was 42.3% (83/196). The incidence rate of brain metastases as the first site of recurrence was 28.1% (55/196). Results of accuracy of the mathematical model were sensitivity of 84.3%, specificity of 64.6%, positive predictive value of 63.6% and a negative predictive value of 84.9%, Measure of agreement Kappa value of 0.47 (P mathematical model can predict brain metastases high risk patients with LA-NSCLC after surgery. It can be used as a basis to screening out patients of high risk brain metastases in future clinical trails about PCI.

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses ...

  3. Role of chaperone mediated autophagy (CMA) in the degradation of misfolded N-CoR protein in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Azhar Bin; Nin, Dawn Sijin; Tam, John; Khan, Matiullah

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) plays important role in transcriptional control mediated by several tumor suppressor proteins. Recently, we reported a role of misfolded-conformation dependent loss (MCDL) of N-CoR in the activation of oncogenic survival pathway in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Since N-CoR plays important role in cellular homeostasis in various tissues, therefore, we hypothesized that an APL like MCDL of N-CoR might also be involved in other malignancy. Indeed, our initial screening of N-CoR status in various leukemia and solid tumor cells revealed an APL like MCDL of N-CoR in primary and secondary tumor cells derived from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The NSCLC cell specific N-CoR loss could be blocked by Kaletra, a clinical grade protease inhibitor and by genistein, an inhibitor of N-CoR misfolding previously characterized by us. The misfolded N-CoR presented in NSCLC cells was linked to the amplification of ER stress and was subjected to degradation by NSCLC cell specific aberrant protease activity. In NSCLC cells, misfolded N-CoR was found to be associated with Hsc70, a molecular chaperone involved in chaperone mediated autophagy (CMA). Genetic and chemical inhibition of Lamp2A, a rate limiting factor of CMA, significantly blocked the loss of N-CoR in NSCLC cells, suggesting a crucial role of CMA in N-CoR degradation. These findings identify an important role of CMA-induced degradation of misfolded N-CoR in the neutralization of ER stress and suggest a possible role of misfolded N-CoR protein in the activation of oncogenic survival pathway in NSCLC cells.

  4. Efficacy of sorafenib in BRAF-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and no response in synchronous BRAF wild type-hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Chiadini, Elisa; Faloppi, Luca; Marisi, Giorgia; Delmonte, Angelo; Scartozzi, Mario; Loretelli, Cristian; Lucchesi, Alessandro; Oboldi, Devil; Dubini, Alessandra; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca; Ulivi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor with a demonstrated activity in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and it is currently used for the treatment of these pathologies. Ongoing clinical trials are studying its activity in other malignancies, such as non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, no biological marker is known to define either the sensitivity or resistance to the drug. Here we report a case of a patient with two synchronous tumors, HCC and NSCLC, with metastases in the contralateral lung and bone. The patient was treated with gemcitabine as first line, with a resulting progressive disease after two months, and then with sorafenib at standard dosage in the second line setting. After 6 months of treatment CT scan showed a partial response in the primary lesion of the lung, complete response of the metastasis in the contralateral lung, and stability of HCC. The patient had progression in the lung, liver and bone after 13 months of therapy. A molecular characterization of NSCLC and HCC lesions was performed, revealing a BRAF exon 11 mutation (G469V) only in NSCLC. We hypothesize that the response observed in NSCLC lesions could be due to the presence of BRAF mutation, and that this alteration could be responsible in determining sorafenib sensitivity. Results observed in this case encourage further research on the activity of sorafenib in both HCC and NSCLC, based on the presence of BRAF mutation. This could lead to a selection of HCC patients to be treated with this drug, and could help identify a novel treatment strategy for BRAF-mutated NSCLC patients

  5. Planning benchmark study for SBRT of early stage NSCLC. Results of the DEGRO Working Group Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moustakis, Christos [University Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); German CyberKnife Center, Soest (Germany); Blanck, Oliver [UKSH Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kiel (Germany); Saphir Radiosurgery Center, Guestrow and Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Ebrahimi Tazehmahalleh, Fatemeh [University Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); City Hospital Dessau, Dessau (Germany); Chan, Mark ka heng [UKSH Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kiel (Germany); Ernst, Iris; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); German CyberKnife Center, Soest (Germany); Krieger, Thomas [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Duma, Marciana-Nona; Oechsner, Markus [Technical University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Ganswindt, Ute; Heinz, Christian [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Alheit, Horst; Blank, Hilbert [Radiationtherapy Distler, Bautzen (Germany); Nestle, Ursula; Wiehle, Rolf [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Kornhuber, Christine; Ostheimer, Christian [University Halle, Department of Radiation Oncology, Halle (Germany); Petersen, Cordula [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Pollul, Gerhard [University Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mainz (Germany); Baus, Wolfgang; Altenstein, Georg [University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Beckers, Eric; Jurianz, Katrin [Gamma Knife Center Krefeld, Krefeld (Germany); Sterzing, Florian [University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Kretschmer, Matthias [Radiologische Allianz Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, Heinrich; Maass, Torsten [Radiationtherapy and Cyberknife Center Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Droege, Stefan [Lung Clinic Hemer, Hemer (Germany); Wolf, Ulrich [University Leipzig, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leipzig (Germany); Schoeffler, Juergen [Radiationtherapy Department Boeblingen, Boeblingen (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias [University Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-10-15

    The aim was to evaluate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning variability for early stage nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with respect to the published guidelines of the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). Planning computed tomography (CT) scan and the structure sets (planning target volume, PTV; organs at risk, OARs) of 3 patients with early stage NSCLC were sent to 22 radiotherapy departments with SBRT experience: each department was asked to prepare a treatment plan according to the DEGRO guidelines. The prescription dose was 3 fractions of 15 Gy to the 65% isodose. In all, 87 plans were generated: 36 used intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT), 21 used three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 6 used static field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (SF-IMRT), 9 used helical radiotherapy and 15 used robotic radiosurgery. PTV dose coverage and simultaneously kept OARs doses were within the clinical limits published in the DEGRO guidelines. However, mean PTV dose (mean 58.0 Gy, range 52.8-66.4 Gy) and dose conformity indices (mean 0.75, range 0.60-1.00) varied between institutions and techniques (p ≤ 0.02). OARs doses varied substantially between institutions, but appeared to be technique independent (p = 0.21). All studied treatment techniques are well suited for SBRT of early stage NSCLC according to the DEGRO guidelines. Homogenization of SBRT practice in Germany is possible through the guidelines; however, detailed treatment plan characteristics varied between techniques and institutions and further homogenization is warranted in future studies and recommendations. Optimized treatment planning should always follow the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle. (orig.) [German] Ziel war die Untersuchung der Variabilitaet der Bestrahlungsplanung der stereotaktischen Strahlentherapie (SBRT) fuer das nicht-kleinzellige Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im

  6. Planning benchmark study for SBRT of early stage NSCLC. Results of the DEGRO Working Group Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustakis, Christos; Blanck, Oliver; Ebrahimi Tazehmahalleh, Fatemeh; Chan, Mark ka heng; Ernst, Iris; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor; Krieger, Thomas; Duma, Marciana-Nona; Oechsner, Markus; Ganswindt, Ute; Heinz, Christian; Alheit, Horst; Blank, Hilbert; Nestle, Ursula; Wiehle, Rolf; Kornhuber, Christine; Ostheimer, Christian; Petersen, Cordula; Pollul, Gerhard; Baus, Wolfgang; Altenstein, Georg; Beckers, Eric; Jurianz, Katrin; Sterzing, Florian; Kretschmer, Matthias; Seegenschmiedt, Heinrich; Maass, Torsten; Droege, Stefan; Wolf, Ulrich; Schoeffler, Juergen; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning variability for early stage nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with respect to the published guidelines of the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). Planning computed tomography (CT) scan and the structure sets (planning target volume, PTV; organs at risk, OARs) of 3 patients with early stage NSCLC were sent to 22 radiotherapy departments with SBRT experience: each department was asked to prepare a treatment plan according to the DEGRO guidelines. The prescription dose was 3 fractions of 15 Gy to the 65% isodose. In all, 87 plans were generated: 36 used intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT), 21 used three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 6 used static field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (SF-IMRT), 9 used helical radiotherapy and 15 used robotic radiosurgery. PTV dose coverage and simultaneously kept OARs doses were within the clinical limits published in the DEGRO guidelines. However, mean PTV dose (mean 58.0 Gy, range 52.8-66.4 Gy) and dose conformity indices (mean 0.75, range 0.60-1.00) varied between institutions and techniques (p ≤ 0.02). OARs doses varied substantially between institutions, but appeared to be technique independent (p = 0.21). All studied treatment techniques are well suited for SBRT of early stage NSCLC according to the DEGRO guidelines. Homogenization of SBRT practice in Germany is possible through the guidelines; however, detailed treatment plan characteristics varied between techniques and institutions and further homogenization is warranted in future studies and recommendations. Optimized treatment planning should always follow the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle. (orig.) [de

  7. Antroquinonol inhibits NSCLC proliferation by altering PI3K/mTOR proteins and miRNA expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V Bharath; Yuan, Ta-Chun; Liou, Je-Wen; Yang, Chih-Jen; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2011-02-10

    Antroquinonol a derivative of Antrodia camphorata has been reported to have antitumor effects against various cancer cells. However, the effect of antroquinonol on cell signalling and survival pathways in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been fully demarcated. Here we report that antroquinonol treatment significantly reduced the proliferation of three NSCLC cells. Treatment of A549 cells with antroquinonol increased cell shrinkage, apoptotic vacuoles, pore formation, TUNEL positive cells and increased Sub-G1 cell population with respect to time and dose dependent manner. Antroquinonol treatment not only increased the Sub-G1 accumulation but also reduced the protein levels of cdc2 without altering the expression of cyclin B1, cdc25C, pcdc2, and pcdc25C. Antroquinonol induced apoptosis was associated with disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of Caspase 3 and PARP cleavage in A549 cells. Moreover, antroquinonol treatment down regulated the expression of Bcl2 proteins, which was correlated with the decreased PI3K and mTOR protein levels without altering pro apoptotic and anti apoptotic proteins. Results from the microarray analysis demonstrated that antroquinonol altered the expression level of miRNAs compared with untreated control in A549 cells. The data collectively suggested the antiproliferative effect of antroquinonol on NSCLC A549 cells, which provides useful information for understanding the anticancer mechanism influenced by antroquinonol and is the first report to suggest that antroquinonol may be a promising chemotherapeutic agent for lung cancer. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pathway Targeted Immunotherapy: Rationale and Evidence of Durable Clinical Responses with a Novel, EGF-directed Agent for Advanced NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Rafael; Neninger, Elia; Nicolson, Marianne; Huber, Rudolf M; Thongprasert, Sumitra; Parikh, Purvish M; D'Hondt, Erik

    2016-11-01

    Abnormalities in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and EGFR pathway promote progression of NSCLC. Immunization with EGF vaccine induces specific, neutralizing anti-EGF antibodies that prevent binding of the ligand to its receptor. This concept of pathway targeted immunotherapy (PTI) was validated in vitro by dose-related suppression of EGFR, Akt, and Erk1/2 phosphorylation in cell lines with different mutations. A randomized phase II trial showed improved overall survival (OS) in subgroups with advanced NSCLC showing a clear immunologic response. By per-protocol analysis of the ensuing phase IIb trial, patients receiving EGF PTI survived 3 months longer than controls (12.43 versus 9.43 months; hazard ratio = 0.77 [95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.98]). These data were confirmed in a larger trial showing an OS benefit over control of >3 months. The variable most strongly correlated with efficacy was circulating EGF at enrolment. Patients with serum EGF levels >250 pg/mL benefited most from treatment with EGF PTI. Of 188 patients tested, 94 were above this biomarker threshold. The OS benefit from active versus control treatment was 6.7 months. More than 15% of patients had responses for >5 years. Long-term survivors are seen in all EGF PTI trials. Treatment is well-tolerated, induces high anti-EGF antibody titers, reduces levels of circulating serum EGF, achieves durable responses, and significantly prolongs OS. A threshold of 250 pg/mL has been set to enrich the study population in the ongoing pivotal trial. This biomarker-guided study in an enriched population of patients with both squamous and nonsquamous stage IV NSCLC aims to replicate the favorable efficacy/tolerability balance of earlier studies. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemotherapy with cisplatin and vinorelbine for elderly patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikaedo Sueli M

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although modest improvements in the survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC can be achieved with cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CT, its value is disputed in the geriatric setting. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of vinorelbine/cisplatin CT for elderly NSCLC patients. Methods In this pilot phase I/II trial, all patients received CT with vinorelbine 25 mg/m2, on day 1 and 8, and cisplatin on day 1, in 28 days-cycles. After stratification for age (up to 75 years, younger patients were sequentially allocated to moderate cisplatin doses (80 mg/m2 or 90 mg/m2, and older patients were allocated to lower cisplatin doses (60 mg/m2 or 70 mg/m2. We recruited patients aged over 70 years with newly diagnosed NSCLC, clinical stage III or IV, Karnofsky performance status ≥ 70%, normal serum creatinine, peripheral neuropathy ≤ grade 1, and no prior cancer therapy. Results Analysis was by intention to treat. Main toxicities (grade 3–4 was as follows: neutropenia, 20%; anemia, 11%; and thrombocytopenia, 2%; alopecia, 55%; fatigue, 11%; and peripheral neurotoxicity, 2%. No grade 3–4 emesis or renal toxicity occurred. Global median time to progression (TTP and overall survival (OS were 27.0 (95% CI: 10.1 to 43.7 weeks and 30.1 (95% CI: 24.4 to 35.8 weeks; 1- and 2-year survival rates were 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Overall response rate was 50.0% (95% CI: 35.4% to 64.5%, with 1 complete response; no difference on response rate was noticed according to cisplatin dose. Median overall survival was 30.1 weeks, with 1- and 2-year survival rates of 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Conclusion Age does not preclude assessment on the role of cisplatin-vinorelbine CT for elderly NSCLC patients with good performance status and adequate bodily functions.

  10. Chemotherapy with cisplatin and vinorelbine for elderly patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, José Rodrigues; Martins, Sandro J; Nikaedo, Sueli M; Ikari, Flora K

    2004-01-01

    Although modest improvements in the survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be achieved with cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CT), its value is disputed in the geriatric setting. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of vinorelbine/cisplatin CT for elderly NSCLC patients. In this pilot phase I/II trial, all patients received CT with vinorelbine 25 mg/m 2 , on day 1 and 8, and cisplatin on day 1, in 28 days-cycles. After stratification for age (up to 75 years), younger patients were sequentially allocated to moderate cisplatin doses (80 mg/m 2 or 90 mg/m 2 ), and older patients were allocated to lower cisplatin doses (60 mg/m 2 or 70 mg/m 2 ). We recruited patients aged over 70 years with newly diagnosed NSCLC, clinical stage III or IV, Karnofsky performance status ≥ 70%, normal serum creatinine, peripheral neuropathy ≤ grade 1, and no prior cancer therapy. Analysis was by intention to treat. Main toxicities (grade 3–4) was as follows: neutropenia, 20%; anemia, 11%; and thrombocytopenia, 2%; alopecia, 55%; fatigue, 11%; and peripheral neurotoxicity, 2%. No grade 3–4 emesis or renal toxicity occurred. Global median time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 27.0 (95% CI: 10.1 to 43.7) weeks and 30.1 (95% CI: 24.4 to 35.8) weeks; 1- and 2-year survival rates were 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Overall response rate was 50.0% (95% CI: 35.4% to 64.5%), with 1 complete response; no difference on response rate was noticed according to cisplatin dose. Median overall survival was 30.1 weeks, with 1- and 2-year survival rates of 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Age does not preclude assessment on the role of cisplatin-vinorelbine CT for elderly NSCLC patients with good performance status and adequate bodily functions

  11. Noninvasive image texture analysis differentiates K-ras mutation from pan-wildtype NSCLC and is prognostic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen J Weiss

    Full Text Available Non-invasive characterization of a tumor's molecular features could enhance treatment management. Quantitative computed tomography (CT based texture analysis (QTA has been used to derive tumor heterogeneity information, and the appearance of the tumors has been shown to relate to patient outcome in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and other cancers. In this study, we examined the potential of tumoral QTA to differentiate K-ras mutant from pan-wildtype tumors and its prognostic potential using baseline pre-treatment non-contrast CT imaging in NSCLC.Tumor DNA from patients with early-stage NSCLC was analyzed on the LungCarta Panel. Cases with a K-ras mutation or pan-wildtype for 26 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes were selected for QTA. QTA was applied to regions of interest in the primary tumor. Non-parametric Mann Whitney test assessed the ability of the QTA, clinical and patient characteristics to differentiate between K-ras mutation from pan-wildtype. A recursive decision tree was developed to determine whether the differentiation of K-ras mutant from pan-wildtype tumors could be improved by sequential application of QTA parameters. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis assessed the ability of these markers to predict survival.QTA was applied to 48 cases identified, 27 had a K-ras mutation and 21 cases were pan-wildtype. Positive skewness and lower kurtosis were significantly associated with the presence of a K-ras mutation. A five node decision tree had sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values (95% CI of 96.3% (78.1-100, 81.0% (50.5-97.4, and 89.6% (72.9-97.0; respectively. Kurtosis was a significant predictor of OS and DFS, with a lower kurtosis value linked with poorer survival.Lower kurtosis and positive skewness are significantly associated with K-ras mutations. A QTA feature such as kurtosis is prognostic for OS and DFS. Non-invasive QTA can differentiate the presence of K-ras mutation from pan-wildtype NSCLC and is associated with

  12. Activity of crizotinib over choroidal metastases in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)-ALK rearranged: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearz, Alessandra; Santarossa, Sandra; Manfrè, Antonio; Beltrame, Giorgio; Urbani, Martina; Sartor, Ivana; Da Ros, Valentina; Tirelli, Umberto

    2014-09-02

    Adenocarcinoma of the lung with EML4-ALK translocation is a rare subtype of Non Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) that has recently shown to benefit from treatment with crizotinib. Despite the concerns about the efficacy of crizotinib over cerebral metastases, some reports have described its activity, although always after local treatment with radiotherapy. Recently it has been reported activity of crizotinib over choroidal metastases, again after radiotherapy. Herein we report a case of activity of crizotinib over choroidal metastases not previously treated with radiotherapy. We suggest crizotinib may be active over choroidal metastases in a patient harboring ALK translocation with no need of radiotherapy.

  13. Combination phenylbutyrate/gemcitabine therapy effectively inhibits in vitro and in vivo growth of NSCLC by intrinsic apoptotic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schniewind Bodo

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standard chemotherapy protocols in NSCLC are of limited clinical benefit. Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors represent a new strategy in human cancer therapy. In this study the combination of the HDAC inhibitor phenylbutyrate (PB and the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine (GEM was evaluated and the mechanisms underlying increased cell death were analyzed. Methods Dose escalation studies evaluating the cytotoxicity of PB (0.01–100 mM, GEM (0.01–100 μg/ml and a combination of the two were performed on two NSCLC cell lines (BEN and KNS62. Apoptotic cell death was quantified. The involvement of caspase-dependent cell death and MAP-kinase activation was analyzed. Additionally, mitochondrial damage was determined. In an orthotopic animal model the combined effect of PB and GEM on therapy was analyzed. Results Applied as a single drug both GEM and PB revealed limited potential to induce apoptosis in KNS62 and Ben cells. Combination therapy was 50–80% (p = 0.012 more effective than either agent alone. On the caspase level, combination therapy significantly increased cleavage of the pro-forms compared to single chemotherapy. The broad spectrum caspase-inhibitor zVAD was able to inhibit caspase cleavage completely, but reduced the frequency of apoptotic cells only by 30%. Combination therapy significantly increased changes in MTP and the release of cyto-c, AIF and Smac/Diabolo into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, the inhibitors of apoptosis c-IAP1 and c-IAP2 were downregulated and it was shown that in combination therapy JNK activation contributed significantly to induction of apoptosis. The size of the primary tumors growing orthotopically in SCID mice treated for 4 weeks with GEM and PB was significantly reduced (2.2–2.7 fold compared to GEM therapy alone. The Ki-67 (KNS62: p = 0.015; Ben: p = 0.093 and topoisomerase IIα (KNS62: p = 0.008; Ben: p = 0.064 proliferation indices were clearly reduced in tumors treated by combination

  14. Qualitative Development and Content Validity of the Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Symptom Assessment Questionnaire (NSCLC-SAQ), A Patient-reported Outcome Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarrier, Kelly P; Atkinson, Thomas M; DeBusk, Kendra P A; Liepa, Astra M; Scanlon, Michael; Coons, Stephen Joel

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the process and results of the preliminary qualitative development of a new symptoms-based patient-reported outcome (PRO) measure intended for assessing treatment benefit in clinical trials of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Individual qualitative interviews were conducted in adults with NSCLC (Stages I-IV) in the United States. Experienced interviewers conducted concept-elicitation (CE) and cognitive interviews using semistructured interview guides. The CE interview guide was used for eliciting spontaneous reports of symptom experiences along with probing to further explore and confirm concepts. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed by professional qualitative coders, and were summarized by like content using an iterative coding framework. Data from the CE interviews were considered alongside existing literature and clinical expert opinion during an item-generation process, leading to the development of a preliminary version of the NSCLC Symptom Assessment Questionnaire (SAQ). Three waves of cognitive interviews were conducted to evaluate concept relevance, item interpretability, and structure of the draft items and to facilitate further instrument refinement. Fifty-one subjects (mean [SD] age, 64.9 [11.2] years; 51.0% women) participated in the CE interviews. A total of 1897 expressions of NSCLC-related symptoms were identified and coded in interview transcripts, representing ~42 distinct symptom concepts. A 9-item initial-draft instrument was developed for testing in 3 waves of cognitive interviews with additional subjects with NSCLC (n = 20), during which both paper and electronic versions of the instrument were evaluated and refined. Participant responses and feedback during cognitive interviews led to the removal of 2 items and substantial modifications to others. The NSCLC-SAQ is a 7-item PRO measure intended for use in advanced NSCLC clinical trials to support medical product labelling. The

  15. PKIB promotes cell proliferation and the invasion-metastasis cascade through the PI3K/Akt pathway in NSCLC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Penghui; Zhang, Danfeng; Cheng, Zhuoxin; Zhou, Gang; Zhang, Linyou

    2016-11-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a major subtype of lung cancer. Overgrowth of tumor cells usually results from the intensive proliferation of cancer cells, but the mechanisms by which the proliferation of cancer cells are promoted are currently unclear. Thus, it is necessary to determine the vital factors involved in regulating the growth of NSCLC. The MTT assay, BrdU assay, western blots, and migration and invasion assays were used in our study. Here, we found that PKIB (cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor-β), a novel molecular target, was up-regulated in NSCLC tissues compared with the normal tissues adjacent to the tumors. Moreover, overexpression of PKIB promoted cell proliferation and potentiated the invasion and migration in A549 cells, whereas knocking down PKIB gene expression inhibited the proliferation and attenuated the invasive behavior and metastasis in H1299 cells. However, all of these effects of PKIB on cell proliferation and metastasis were reduced by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway. Our results indicate that PKIB promotes cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway in NSCLC, implying that this is an important underlying mechanism that affects the progression of NSCLC. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  16. Association between BIM deletion polymorphism and clinical outcome of EGFR-mutated NSCLC patient with EGFR-TKI therapy: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ji-Yong; Yan, Hai-Jun; Gu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    BIM deletion polymorphism was deemed to be associated with downregulation of BIM, resulting in a decreased apoptosis induced by epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) in EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, accumulating evidences concerning the association between BIM deletion polymorphism and efficacy of EGFR-TKI and survival in EGFR-mutation-driven NSCLC patient reported contradictory results. A meta-analysis was conducted by combing six original eligible studies including 871 NSCLC patients. Our study showed that BIM deletion polymorphism was significantly associated with poor response to EGFR-TKI therapy in mutant EGFRNSCLC patients (P(h) = 0.309, P(z) = 0.001, OR = 0.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.23-0.67). Disease control rate (DCR) in mutant EGFRNSCLC patient with treatment of EGFR-TKI was significantly decreased in patients with BIM deletion polymorphism comparing to patients harbored BIM wild variant (P(h) = 0.583, P(Z) = 0.007, OR = 0.46, 95%CI = 0.25-0.85). EGFR mutation-derived NSCLC patient carrying BIM deletion polymorphism had a shorter progression-free survival (PFS; P(h) deletion polymorphism might be a cause that contributes to primary EGFR-TKI resistance, and it could be used as a genetic predictor for EGFR-TKI outcome and an independent prognostic factor of EGFR mutation-driven NSCLC patient.

  17. Combined use of anti-ErbB monoclonal antibodies and erlotinib enhances antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of wild-type erlotinib-sensitive NSCLC cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavazzoni Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is an established target for anti-cancer treatment in different tumour types. Two different strategies have been explored to inhibit this pivotal molecule in epithelial cancer development: small molecules TKIs and monoclonal antibodies. ErbB/HER-targeting by monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab and trastuzumab or tyrosine-kinase inhibitors as gefitinib or erlotinib has been proven effective in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. Results In this study we explored the potential of combining either erlotinib with cetuximab or trastuzumab to improve the efficacy of EGFR targeted therapy in EGFR wild-type NSCLC cell lines. Erlotinib treatment was observed to increase EGFR and/or HER2 expression at the plasma membrane level only in NSCLC cell lines sensitive to the drug inducing protein stabilization. The combined treatment had marginal effect on cell proliferation but markedly increased antibody-dependent, NK mediated, cytotoxicity in vitro. Moreover, in the Calu-3 xenograft model, the combination significantly inhibited tumour growth when compared with erlotinib and cetuximab alone. Conclusion Our results indicate that erlotinib increases surface expression of EGFR and/or HER2 only in EGFR-TKI sensitive NSCLC cell lines and, in turns, leads to increased susceptibility to ADCC both in vitro and in a xenograft models. The combination of erlotinib with monoclonal antibodies represents a potential strategy to improve the treatment of wild-type EGFR NSCLC patients sensitive to erlotinib.

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ...

  19. Use of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halasz, Lia M.; Weeks, Jane C.; Neville, Bridget A.; Taback, Nathan; Punglia, Rinaa S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The indications for treatment of brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) remain controversial. We studied patterns, predictors, and cost of SRS use in elderly patients with NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare (SEER-Medicare) database, we identified patients with NSCLC who were diagnosed with brain metastases between 2000 and 2007. Our cohort included patients treated with radiation therapy and not surgical resection as initial treatment for brain metastases. Results: We identified 7684 patients treated with radiation therapy within 2 months after brain metastases diagnosis, of whom 469 (6.1%) cases had billing codes for SRS. Annual SRS use increased from 3.0% in 2000 to 8.2% in 2005 and varied from 3.4% to 12.5% by specific SEER registry site. After controlling for clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, we found SRS use was significantly associated with increasing year of diagnosis, specific SEER registry, higher socioeconomic status, admission to a teaching hospital, no history of participation in low-income state buy-in programs (a proxy for Medicaid eligibility), no extracranial metastases, and longer intervals from NSCLC diagnosis. The average cost per patient associated with radiation therapy was 2.19 times greater for those who received SRS than for those who did not. Conclusions: The use of SRS in patients with metastatic NSCLC increased almost 3-fold from 2000 to 2005. In addition, we found significant variations in SRS use across SEER registries and socioeconomic quartiles. National practice patterns in this study suggested both a lack of consensus and an overall limited use of the approach among elderly patients before 2008.

  20. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  1. MiRNA 17 family regulates cisplatin-resistant and metastasis by targeting TGFbetaR2 in NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyong Jiang

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been proven to play crucial roles in cancer, including tumor chemotherapy resistance and metastasis of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. TGFβ signal pathway abnormality is widely found in cancer and correlates with tumor proliferation, apoptosis and metastasis. Here, miR-17, 20a, 20b were detected down-regulated in A549/DDP cells (cisplatin resistance compared with A549 cells (cisplatin sensitive. Over-expression of miR-17, 20a, 20b can not only decrease cisplatin-resistant but also reduce migration by inhibiting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT in A549/DDP cells. These functions of miR-17, 20a, 20b may be caused at least in part via inhibition of TGFβ signal pathway, as miR-17, 20a, 20b are shown to directly target and repress TGF-beta receptor 2 (TGFβR2 which is an important component of TGFβ signal pathway. Consequently, our study suggests that miRNA 17 family (including miR-17, 20a, 20b can act as TGFβR2 suppressor for reversing cisplatin-resistant and suppressing metastasis in NSCLC.

  2. Current status of radiation therapy. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) of radiation therapy. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Minako

    2002-01-01

    The goal of radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is to improve the survival rate of patients without increasing treatment-related toxicity and to improve patients' quality of life. Several prospective randomized trials have demonstrated a survival advantage in combined modality treatment over radiotherapy or chemotherapy alone when a cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimen is utilized in the treatment plan. Combined modality treatment of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and radiotherapy is standard treatment for selected patients such as those with better performance status with locally or regionally advanced lung cancer including T3-T4 or N2-N3. Determining the contribution of new agents in combined modality treatment will require carefully designed and conducted clinical trials. High-dose involved field radiation therapy using 3D-conformal radiation therapy potentially enables the use of higher doses than standard radiation therapy, because less normal tissue is irradiated, and may improve local control and survival. The combination of radiotherapy with chemotherapy and dose escalation using 3D-conformal radiation therapy is also a possibility in unresectable NSCLC. In surgery cases, the results of several Phase III trials of cisplatin-based preoperative chemotherapy have suggested survival improvement. But the concept needs to be tested in a larger Phase III trial. (author)

  3. Radiosensitization of NSCLC cells by EGFR inhibition is the result of an enhanced p53-dependent G1 arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriegs, Malte; Gurtner, Kristin; Can, Yildiz; Brammer, Ingo; Rieckmann, Thorsten; Oertel, Reinhard; Wysocki, Marek; Dorniok, Franziska; Gal, Andreas; Grob, Tobias J.; Laban, Simon; Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Petersen, Cordula; Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild; Dikomey, Ekkehard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: How EGF receptor (EGFR) inhibition induces cellular radiosensitization and with that increase in tumor control is still a matter of discussion. Since EGFR predominantly regulates cell cycle and proliferation, we studied whether a G1-arrest caused by EGFR inhibition may contribute to these effects. Materials and methods: We analyzed human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines either wild type (wt) or mutated in p53 (A549, H460, vs. H1299, H3122) and HCT116 cells (p21 wt and negative). EGFR was inhibited by BIBX1382BS, erlotinib or cetuximab; p21 was knocked down by siRNA. Functional endpoints analyzed were cell signaling, proliferation, G1-arrest, cell survival as well as tumor control using an A549 tumor model. Results: When combined with IR, EGFR inhibition enhances the radiation-induced permanent G1 arrest, though solely in cells with intact p53/p21 signaling. This increase in G1-arrest was always associated with enhanced cellular radiosensitivity. Strikingly, this effect was abrogated when cells were re-stimulated, suggesting the initiation of dormancy. In line with this, only a small non-significant increase in tumor control was observed for A549 tumors treated with fractionated RT and EGFR inhibition. Conclusion: For NSCLC cells increase in radiosensitivity by EGFR inhibition results from enhanced G1-arrest. However, this effect does not lead to improved tumor control because cells can be released from this arrest by re-stimulation

  4. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) Signaling Capacity and the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Implications for Use of 1,25(OH)2D3 in NSCLC Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Verone, Alissa; Shoemaker, Suzanne; Qin, Maochun; Liu, Song; Campbell, Moray; Hershberger, Pamela A.

    2013-01-01

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ) exerts anti-proliferative activity by binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and regulating gene expression. We previously reported that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells which harbor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations display elevated VDR expression (VDR high ) and are vitamin D-sensitive. Conversely, those with K-ras mutations are VDR low and vitamin D-refractory. Because EGFR mutations are found predominately in NSCLC cells with an epithelial phenotype and K-ras mutations are more common in cells with a mesenchymal phenotype, we investigated the relationship between vitamin D signaling capacity and the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Using NSCLC cell lines and publically available lung cancer cell line microarray data, we identified a relationship between VDR expression, 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 sensitivity, and EMT phenotype. Further, we discovered that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 induces E-cadherin and decreases EMT-related molecules SNAIL, ZEB1, and vimentin in NSCLC cells. 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 -mediated changes in gene expression are associated with a significant decrease in cell migration and maintenance of epithelial morphology. These data indicate that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 opposes EMT in NSCLC cells. Because EMT is associated with increased migration, invasion, and chemoresistance, our data imply that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 may prevent lung cancer progression in a molecularly defined subset of NSCLC patients

  5. Clinical efficacy of percutaneous vertebroplasty combined with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for spinal metastases in patients with NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Yi Li,1,2 Yi Qing,1 Zhimin Zhang,3 Mengxia Li,1 Jiaying Xie,1 Ge Wang,1 Dong Wang1 1Department of Cancer Center, Research Institute of Surgery, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, 2Department of Oncology, Beibei Traditional Chinese Medical Hospital, Chongqing, 3Department of Oncology, Wuhan General Hospital of Guangzhou Command, People’s Liberation Army, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP combined with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for metastatic lesions of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC at centrum vertebrae.Methods: A total of 39 patients with spinal metastatic NSCLC (stage IV were treated with PVP followed by IMRT (30 Gy/10F/2 W for metastatic lesion at centrum vertebrae under local anesthesia. Retrospective analysis was done with medical records and radiological data. The change of visual analog scale (VAS, activities of daily living, and kyphotic angle was measured preoperatively. The presence of complications was assessed preoperatively (baseline at 24 hours, 1 week, and 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively, or until the patient died or was lost to follow-up. Survival was assessed in the group.Results: A total of 39 consecutive patients were successfully treated with PVP via a translateral approach and IMRT. Their mean VAS score decreased from 7.93±1.09 preoperatively to 4.14±1.15 by the 24-hour postoperative time point and was 3.92±1.23 at 1 week, 4.27±1.93 at 1 month, 3.24±1.35 at 3 months, 2.27±0.96 at 6 months, and 2.59±1.55 at 12 months after the procedure. The mean VAS score at all of the postoperative time points was decreased significantly from the preoperative baseline score (P<0.05. Activities of daily living evaluation showed that the patients had a significantly high life quality after the combined approach (50.9±11.7 vs 82.3±9.9, P<0.05. No severe complications

  6. MET gene copy number predicts worse overall survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimou, Anastasios; Non, Lemuel; Chae, Young Kwang; Tester, William J; Syrigos, Konstantinos N

    2014-01-01

    MET is a receptor present in the membrane of NSCLC cells and is known to promote cell proliferation, survival and migration. MET gene copy number is a common genetic alteration and inhibition o MET emerges as a promising targeted therapy in NSCLC. Here we aim to combine in a meta-analysis, data on the effect of high MET gene copy number on the overall survival of patients with resected NSCLC. Two independent investigators applied parallel search strategies with the terms "MET AND lung cancer", "MET AND NSCLC", "MET gene copy number AND prognosis" in PubMed through January 2014. We selected the studies that investigated the association of MET gene copy number with survival, in patients who received surgery. Among 1096 titles that were identified in the initial search, we retrieved 9 studies on retrospective cohorts with adequate retrievable data regarding the prognostic impact of MET gene copy number on the survival of patients with NSCLC. Out of those, 6 used FISH and the remaining 3 used RT PCR to assess the MET gene copy number in the primary tumor. We calculated the I2 statistic to assess heterogeneity (I2 = 72%). MET gene copy number predicted worse overall survival when all studies were combined in a random effects model (HR = 1.78, 95% CI 1.22-2.60). When only the studies that had at least 50% of adenocarcinoma patients in their populations were included, the effect was significant (five studies, HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.23-1.94). This was not true when we included only the studies with no more than 50% of the patients having adenocarcinoma histology (four studies HR 2.18, 95% CI 0.97-4.90). Higher MET gene copy number in the primary tumor at the time of diagnosis predicts worse outcome in patients with NSCLC. This prognostic impact may be adenocarcinoma histology specific.

  7. Brain Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Health Brain Health Home 10 Ways to Love Your Brain Stay Physically Active Adopt a Healthy Diet Stay ... risk factors slowed cognitive decline. 10 Ways to Love Your Brain > 10 tips to help reduce your risk of ...

  8. Sequential Change of Hypometabolic Metastasis from Non-small-cell Lung Cancer on Brain FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soon Ah; Yang, Sei Hoon; Yang, Chung Yong; Choi, Keum Ha [Wonkwang Medical Science, Wonkwang University College of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    A 60-year-old woman, who had non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in left lower lobe underwent brain F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) for evaluation of cerebral metastasis. On follow-up FDG-PET/CT, only hypometaolic lesion was detected and progressed in right frontal lobe at 6 months and 10 months, later. Hypermetabolic metastasis was not detected even at last scan time of FDG-PET/CT. Brain MRI showed brain metastasis in right frontal lobe. As might be expected, the physician should take cerebral metastasis into consideration even though there is only hypometabolic change on subsequent FDG-PET/CT in patients with NSCLC.

  9. Examination of 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) as a therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Mechanisms controlling survival and induction of apoptosis following selective inhibition

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cathcart, Mary Clare

    2011-06-01

    Background: Platelet-type 12-LOX is an arachidonic acid metabolising enzyme resulting in the formation of 12(S)-HETE, which stimulates tumour cell adhesion, invasion and metastasis. This study aimed to examine the expression profile and role of this enzyme in NSCLC, and determine if it is a potential target for intervention. Methods: A panel of retrospective resected lung tumours was stained for 12-LOX expression by IHC. Levels of the 12-LOX metabolite, 12(S)-HETE, were examined in 50 NSCLC serum samples, and correlated with serum VEGF. A panel of NSCLC cell lines were treated with baicalein (10 uM), a selective inhibitor of 12-LOX, or 12(S)-HETE (100 ng\\/ml) and cell survival\\/proliferation examined by BrdU. Apoptosis following 12-LOX inhibition was examined by HCS and validated by FACS and DNA laddering. The effect of 12-LOX inhibition on NSCLC tumour growth and survival was examined in-vivo using an athymic nude mouse model. Gene alterations following 12-LOX inhibition in NSCLC cell lines were assessed by qPCR arrays and validated by RT-PCR. Transient transfection methods were used to examine the effects of 12-LOX overexpression in NSCLC cells. Results: 12-LOX expression was observed to a varying degree in human lung cancers of varying histological subtypes. 12(S)-HETE levels were correlated (p<0.05) with those of VEGF. Baicalein inhibited proliferation\\/survival in all cell lines, while 12(S)-HETE increased proliferation. 12-LOX inhibition increased apoptosis, indicated by a reduction in f-actin content and mitochondrial mass potential. Treatment with baicalein significantly reduced the growth of NSCLC tumours and increased overall survival in athymic nude mice. qPCR array data implicated a number of apoptosis\\/angiogenesis genes regulating these effects, including bcl-2, VEGF, integrin A2 and A4. 12-LOX overexpression resulted in an increase in VEGF secretion, confirming qPCR observations. Conclusions: 12-LOX is a survival factor\\/potential target in

  10. Bevacizumab and gefitinib enhanced whole-brain radiation therapy for brain metastases due to non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, R.F.; Yu, B.; Zhang, R.Q.; Wang, X.H.; Li, C.; Wang, P.; Zhang, Y.; Han, B.; Gao, X.X.; Zhang, L. [Taian City Central Hospital, Taian, Shandong (China); Jiang, Z.M., E-mail: dmyh2436@126.com [Qianfoshan Hospital of Shandong Province, Shandong University, Ji’nan, Shandong (China)

    2018-02-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who experience brain metastases are usually associated with poor prognostic outcomes. This retrospective study proposed to assess whether bevacizumab or gefitinib can be used to improve the effectiveness of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in managing patients with brain metastases. A total of 218 NSCLC patients with multiple brain metastases were retrospectively included in this study and were randomly allocated to bevacizumab-gefitinibWBRT group (n=76), gefitinib-WBRT group (n=77) and WBRT group (n=75). Then, tumor responses were evaluated every 2 months based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors version 1.0. Karnofsky performance status and neurologic examination were documented every 6 months after the treatment. Compared to the standard WBRT, bevacizumab and gefitinib could significantly enhance response rate (RR) and disease control rate (DCR) of WBRT (Po0.001). At the same time, RR and DCR of patients who received bevacizumab-gefitinib-WBRT were higher than those who received gefitinib-WBRT. The overall survival (OS) rates and progression-free survival (PFS) rates also differed significantly among the bevacizumab-gefitinib-WBRT (48.6 and 29.8%), gefitinib-WBRT (36.7 and 29.6%) and WBRT (9.8 and 14.6%) groups (Po0.05). Although bevacizumabgefitinib-WBRT was slightly more toxic than gefitinib-WBRT, the toxicity was tolerable. As suggested by prolonged PFS and OS status, bevacizumab substantially improved the overall efficacy of WBRT in the management of patients with NSCLC. (author)

  11. Prognostic indices in stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, David; Angelidis, Alexander; Budach, Volker; Ghadjar, Pirus; Kufeld, Markus; Badakhshi, Harun

    2015-11-26

    Our purpose was to analyze the long-term clinical outcome and to identify prognostic factors after Linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) on patients with brain metastases (BM) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We performed a retrospective analysis of survival on 90 patients who underwent SRS or FSRT of intracranial NSCLC metastases between 04/2004 and 05/2014 that had not undergone prior surgery or whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for BM. Follow-up data was analyzed until May 2015. Potential prognostic factors were examined in univariable and multivariable analyses. The Golden Grading System (GGS), the disease-specific graded prognostic assessment (DS-GPA), the RADES II prognostic index as well as the NSCLC-specific index proposed by Rades et al. in 2013 (NSCLC-RADES) were calculated and their predictive values were tested in univariable analysis. The median follow-up time of the surviving patients was 14 months. The overall survival (OS) rate was 51 % after 6 months and 29.9 % after 12 months. Statistically significant factors of better OS after univariable analysis were lower International Union Against Cancer (UICC) stage at first diagnosis, histology of adenocarcinoma, prior surgery of the primary tumor and lower total BM volume. After multivariable analysis adenocarcinoma histology remained a significant factor; higher Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) and the presence of extracranial metastases (ECM) were also significant. The RADES II and the NSCLC-RADES indices were significant predictors of OS. However, the NSCLC-RADES failed to differentiate between intermediate- and low-risk patients. The DS-GPA and GGS were not statistically significant predictors of survival in univariable analysis. The ideal prognostic index has not been defined yet. We believe that more specific indices will be developed in the future. Our results indicate that the histologic subtype of NSCLC could add to the prognostic

  12. Evolution of surface-based deformable image registration for adaptive radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richter Anne

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the performance of surface-based deformable image registration (DR for adaptive radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods Based on 13 patients with locally advanced NSCLC, CT images acquired at treatment planning, midway and the end of the radio- (n = 1 or radiochemotherapy (n = 12 course were used for evaluation of DR. All CT images were manually [gross tumor volume (GTV] and automatically [organs-at-risk (OAR lung, spinal cord, vertebral spine, trachea, aorta, outline] segmented. Contours were transformed into 3D meshes using the Pinnacle treatment planning system and corresponding mesh points defined control points for DR with interpolation within the structures. Using these deformation maps, follow-up CT images were transformed into the planning images and compared with the original planning CT images. Results A progressive tumor shrinkage was observed with median GTV volumes of 170 cm3 (range 42 cm3 - 353 cm3, 124 cm3 (19 cm3 - 325 cm3 and 100 cm3 (10 cm3 - 270 cm3 at treatment planning, mid-way and at the end of treatment. Without DR, correlation coefficients (CC were 0.76 ± 0.11 and 0.74 ± 0.10 for comparison of the planning CT and the CT images acquired mid-way and at the end of treatment, respectively; DR significantly improved the CC to 0.88 ± 0.03 and 0.86 ± 0.05 (p = 0.001, respectively. With manual landmark registration as reference, DR reduced uncertainties on the GTV surface from 11.8 mm ± 5.1 mm to 2.9 mm ± 1.2 mm. Regarding the carina and intrapulmonary vessel bifurcations, DR reduced uncertainties by about 40% with residual errors of 4 mm to 6 mm on average. Severe deformation artefacts were observed in patients with resolving atelectasis and pleural effusion, in one patient, where the tumor was located around large bronchi and separate segmentation of the GTV and OARs was not possible, and in one patient, where no clear shrinkage but more a decay of the tumor was observed

  13. Metabolic tumor burden as marker of outcome in advanced EGFR wild-type NSCLC patients treated with erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Larsen, Anne; Fledelius, Joan; Sorensen, Boe Sandahl

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Accurate estimation of the prognosis of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients is essential before initiation of palliative treatment; especially in the second and third-line setting. This study was conducted in order to evaluate tumor burden measured on an 2'-deoxy-2......'-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (F-18-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan as a marker of outcome in advanced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) wild-type patients treated with second or third-line erlotinib.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty-one patients were included from...... a prospectively collected cohort. An F-18-FDG-PET/CT scan was conducted prior to erlotinib treatment and tumor burden was measured in terms of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). Median values of MTV and TLG were used for dichotomization of patients. Survival outcome was compared...

  14. Complex mutations & subpopulations of deletions at exon 19 of EGFR in NSCLC revealed by next generation sequencing: potential clinical implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marchetti

    Full Text Available Microdeletions at exon 19 are the most frequent genetic alterations affecting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR gene in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and they are strongly associated with response to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. A series of 116 NSCLC DNA samples investigated by Sanger Sequencing (SS, including 106 samples carrying exon 19 EGFR deletions and 10 without deletions (control samples, were subjected to deep next generation sequencing (NGS. All samples with deletions at SS showed deletions with NGS. No deletions were seen in control cases. In 93 (88% cases, deletions detected by NGS were exactly corresponding to those identified by SS. In 13 cases (12% NGS resolved deletions not accurately characterized by SS. In 21 (20% cases the NGS showed presence of complex (double/multiple frameshift deletions producing a net in-frame change. In 5 of these cases the SS could not define the exact sequence of mutant alleles, in the other 16 cases the results obtained by SS were conventionally considered as deletions plus insertions. Different interpretative hypotheses for complex mutations are discussed. In 46 (43% tumors deep NGS showed, for the first time to our knowledge, subpopulations of DNA molecules carrying EGFR deletions different from the main one. Each of these subpopulations accounted for 0.1% to 17% of the genomic DNA in the different tumors investigated. Our findings suggest that a region in exon 19 is highly unstable in a large proportion of patients carrying EGFR deletions. As a corollary to this study, NGS data were compared with those obtained by immunohistochemistry using the 6B6 anti-mutant EGFR antibody. The immunoreaction was E746-A750del specific. In conclusion, NGS analysis of EGFR exon 19 in NSCLCs allowed us to formulate a new interpretative hypothesis for complex mutations and revealed the presence of subpopulations of deletions with potential pathogenetic and clinical impact.

  15. Gefitinib inhibits invasive phenotype and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in drug-resistant NSCLC cells with MET amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia La Monica

    Full Text Available Despite the initial response, all patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC eventually develop acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. The EGFR-T790M secondary mutation is responsible for half of acquired resistance cases, while MET amplification has been associated with acquired resistance in about 5-15% of NSCLCs. Clinical findings indicate the retained addiction of resistant tumors on EGFR signaling. Therefore, we evaluated the molecular mechanisms supporting the therapeutic potential of gefitinib maintenance in the HCC827 GR5 NSCLC cell line harbouring MET amplification as acquired resistance mechanism. We demonstrated that resistant cells can proliferate and survive regardless of the presence of gefitinib, whereas the absence of the drug significantly enhanced cell migration and invasion. Moreover, the continuous exposure to gefitinib prevented the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT with increased E-cadherin expression and down-regulation of vimentin and N-cadherin. Importantly, the inhibition of cellular migration was correlated with the suppression of EGFR-dependent Src, STAT5 and p38 signaling as assessed by a specific kinase array, western blot analysis and silencing functional studies. On the contrary, the lack of effect of gefitinib on EGFR phosphorylation in the H1975 cells (EGFR-T790M correlated with the absence of effects on cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, our findings suggest that certain EGFR-mutated patients may still benefit from a second-line therapy including gefitinib based on the specific mechanism underlying tumor cell resistance.

  16. Volumetric response analysis during chemoradiation as predictive tool for optimizing treatment strategy in locally advanced unresectable NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bral, Samuel; Duchateau, Michael; De Ridder, Mark; Everaert, Hendrik; Tournel, Koen; Schallier, Denis; Verellen, Dirk; Storme, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of measuring volumetric changes in the primary tumor on megavoltage-computed tomography (MVCT) during chemoradiation and to examine the correlation with local response. Patients and methods: Fifteen consecutive patients with stage III, inoperable, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated in a prospective dose escalation study protocol of concurrent chemoradiation. They were monitored for acute toxicity and evaluated with daily MVCT imaging. The volumetric changes were fitted to a negative exponential resulting in a regression coefficient (RC). Local response evaluation was done with positron emission tomography using the radio-labeled glucose analogue F18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). Results: The mean volume decrease (±standard deviation) was 73% (±18%). With a mean treatment time of 42 days this treatment schedule resulted in a mean decrease of 1.74%/day. Of the 13 evaluable patients seven developed a metabolic complete remission (MCR). The mean RC of the patients with MCR is 0.050 versus a mean RC of 0.023 in non-responders (p = 0.0074). Using a proposed cut-off value for the RC of 0.03 80% of the non-responders will be detected correctly while misclassifying 16.4% of patients who will eventually achieve an MCR. The total cumulative percentage of esophageal grade 3 or more toxicity was 46.7%. Conclusion: The RC derived from volumetric analysis of daily MVCT is prognostic and predictive for local response in patients treated with chemoradiation for a locally advanced NSCLC. Because this treatment schedule is toxic in nearly half of the patient population, MVCT is a tool in the implementation of patient-individualized treatment strategies.

  17. Beams Arrangement in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) According to PTV and Dosimetric Parameters Predictive of Pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramella, Sara; Trodella, Lucio; Mineo, Tommaso Claudio; Pompeo, Eugenio; Gambacorta, Maria A.; Cellini, Francesco; Ciresa, Marzia; Fiore, Michele; Greco, Carlo; Gaudino, Diego; Stimato, Gerardina; Piermattei, Angelo; Cesario, Alfredo; D'Angelillo, Rolando M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to propose and validate an original new class of solutions for three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment planning for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) according to the different patterns of disease presentation (on the basis of tumor location and volume) and to explore beams arrangement (planar or no-planar solutions) to respect dose constraints to the lung parenchyma. Benchmarks matched to validate the new approach are interuser reproducibility and saving on planning time. Tumor location was explored and specific categories created according to the tumor volume and location. Therefore, by applying planar and no-planar 3D plans, we searched for an optimization of the beams arrangement for each category. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed and a plan comparison performed. Results were then validated (class solution planning confirmation) by applying the same strategy to another group of patients. This has been realized at two dose levels (50.4 and 59.4 Gy). Fifty-nine patients were enrolled in this dosimetric study. In the first 27 patients ('exploratory sample') three main planning target volume location categories were identified according to the pattern of the disease presentation: (1) centrally located; (2) peripheral T and mediastinal N (P+N); and (3) superior sulcus. Original class solutions were proposed for each location category. On the next 32 patients ('validation sample'), the treatment planning started directly with the recommended approach. Mean V 20Gy value was 18.8% (SD ± 7.25); mean V 30Gy :12% (SD ± 4.05); and mean lung dose: 11.6Gy (SD ± 5.77). No differences between the two total dose level groups were observed. These results suggest a simple and reproducible tool for treatment planning in NSCLC, allowing interuser reproducibility and cutting down on planning time.

  18. Dose to heart substructures is associated with non-cancer death after SBRT in stage I-II NSCLC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Barbara; Peulen, Heike; Guckenberger, Matthias; Mantel, Frederick; Hope, Andrew; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Belderbos, Jose; Grills, Inga; O'Connell, Nicolette; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2017-06-01

    To investigate potential associations between dose to heart (sub)structures and non-cancer death, in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 803 patients with early stage NSCLC received SBRT with predominant schedules of 3×18Gy (59%) or 4×12Gy (19%). All patients were registered to an average anatomy, their planned dose deformed accordingly, and dosimetric parameters for heart substructures were obtained. Multivariate Cox regression and a sensitivity analysis were used to identify doses to heart substructures or heart region with a significant association with non-cancer death respectively. Median follow-up was 34.8months. Two year Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate was 67%. Of the deceased patients, 26.8% died of cancer. Multivariate analysis showed that the maximum dose on the left atrium (median 6.5Gy EQD2, range=0.009-197, HR=1.005, p-value=0.035), and the dose to 90% of the superior vena cava (median 0.59Gy EQD2, range=0.003-70, HR=1.025, p-value=0.008) were significantly associated with non-cancer death. Sensitivity analysis identified the upper region of the heart (atria+vessels) to be significantly associated with non-cancer death. Doses to mainly the upper region of the heart were significantly associated with non-cancer death. Consequently, dose sparing in particular of the upper region of the heart could potentially improve outcome, and should be further studied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Percutaneous microwave ablation for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the elderly: a promising outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acksteiner, Christian; Steinke, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a relatively new minimally invasive treatment option for lung cancer with substantially lower morbidity and mortality than surgery. This retrospective study was performed to evaluate the safety, effectiveness and follow-up imaging of MWA in the elderly aged 75 years and above. Eleven percutaneous computed tomography (CT)-guided MWA of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were performed in 10 patients aged 75 years and older. All but one patient were treated with a high-powered MWA system delivering maximally 140 W. Follow-up with CT and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) was carried out over a maximum period of 30 months and a median period of 12 months. There were no peri-procedural deaths or major complications. Seven patients were disease free at the time of manuscript submission. Three patients showed growth of the treated lesions, one patient aged 90 years deceased due to unknown cause after approximately 18 months. One patient presented with local progression and disseminated metastatic disease at 12 months; he is still alive. One patient showed increasing soft tissue at the ablation site 15 months post-treatment. Three consecutive core biopsies over 2 months failed to confirm tumour recurrence. MWA therapy is a promising option of treating early-stage NSCLC in the elderly with good treatment outcome and negligible morbidity. Determining successful treatment outcome may be challenging at times as local tissue increase and PET-CT positivity do not seem to necessarily correlate with recurrence of malignancy.

  20. Randomized cross-over study of patient preference for oral or intravenous vinorelbine in combination with carboplatin in the treatment of advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisa Helene Toft; Østerlind, Kell Erik; Rytter, C.

    2008-01-01

    treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Secondary aims were to evaluate toxicity, efficacy, and subjective reasons the preference. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-one patients were randomized in a cross-over trial to two cycles of carboplatin day 1 and vinorelbine day 1 and day 8 iv followed by two...

  1. Treatment paradigms for patients with metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, squamous lung cancer: first, second and third-line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz eAl Farsi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the treatment algorithm applied to non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC was the same for all histologic subtypes. However, recent advances in our understanding of the molecular profiles of squamous and non-squamous NSCLC have changed this perspective. Histologic subtype and the presence of specific molecular abnormalities have predictive value for response to and toxicity from therapy, as well as overall survival. For patients with squamous NSCLC, a platinum agent plus gemcitabine, or paclitaxel is recommended as first-line therapy. The role of EGFR monoclonal antibodies is uncertain. Maintenance therapy is not widely recommended, although data exist for the use of erlotinib. The standard recommendation for second-line therapy is docetaxel and erlotinib should be considered as second or third-line therapy. There is ongoing research identifying molecular targets in squamous NSCLC and many agents are in early phase clinical trials. Immunotherapeutic approaches targeting programmed death 1 receptor (PD-1 and its ligand (PD-L1 appear promising.

  2. High expression of CIP2A protein is associated with tumor aggressiveness in stage I–III NSCLC and correlates with poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha GQ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Geqi Cha,1 Jianyu Xu,1 Xiangying Xu,1 Bin Li,2 Shan Lu,1 Abiyasi Nanding,3 Songliu Hu,1 Shilong Liu1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 2Department of Plastic Surgery, Nanfang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 3Department of Pathology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin, Heilongjiang, China Abstract: The aim of this work was to examine the expression of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and analyze its correlation with clinical outcomes. CIP2A protein levels were detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC. One hundred and eighty-four of 209 (88.3% primary stage I–III NSCLC specimens and 4 of 38 (10.5% adjacent normal lung tissue specimens expressed CIP2A protein. High expression of CIP2A was detected in 38.8% (81/209 of the NSCLC specimens. Patients diagnosed histologically with late-stage NSCLC (p<0.001 and malignant nodes (p=0.001 exhibited high CIP2A expression. Univariate analysis using the log-rank test identified CIP2A expression as a prognostic predictor for overall survival (p=0.005. In multivariate analyses using the Cox regression test, CIP2A expression, T stage, N stage, histological type, and chemotherapy were identified as independent prognostic factors (p=0.007, 0.001, 0.003, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively. Furthermore, Kaplan–Meier survival curves demonstrated that high CIP2A expression indicated poor prognosis in the subgroup of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (p=0.008. Similar results were noted in the subgroup of patients with adenocarcinoma, but the results did not reach statistical significance (p=0.084. We also used univariate analysis and multivariate analysis to assess the prognostic factors for overall survival in the subgroup of patients who received postoperative chemotherapy. CIP2A expression was also an independent prognostic factor in NSCLC

  3. [Concurrent versus sequential systemic chemotherapy and whole brain radiation therapy for brain matastases in non-small-cell lung cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Han-Fang; Fang, Jian; Ren, Jun; DI, Li-Jun; Song, Gu-Hong; Che, Li; Yu, Jing; Zhu, Yu-Ling

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy, survival and toxicity in patients with brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), treated with concurrent systemic chemotherapy and whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) or sequential systemic chemotherapy/WBRT. A total of 60 NSCLC patients with brain metastases were divided into two groups in this prospective clinical study: concurrent systemic chemotherapy and WBRT group (concurrent group) and sequential systemic chemotherapy/WBRT group (sequential group). Of 59 assessable patients, the overall response rate was 22.0%, and the brain response rate was 35.6%; the median progression-free survival time was 3.0 months, and the overall 1- and 2-year survival rates were 55% and 24.4%, respectively, with a median survival time of 16.0 months. The overall response rate was 20.0% in the concurrent group and 24.1% in sequential group (P > 0.05). The brain response rates of 43.3% in concurrent group and 27.6% in sequential group were also not significantly different (P > 0.05). The median progression-free survival time for the patients in the concurrent group was 3.0 months versus 4.0 months in the sequential group, and the median survival time was 16.0 months versus 13.0 months (all P > 0.05). The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 58.5% and 37.2% versus 52.9% and 18.9%, respectively, with a significant difference in the 2-year survival rate between the two groups (P = 0.011). In the sequential group, leukopenia was more frequent during chemotherapy than that in the concurrent group (P = 0.029). Concurrent systemic chemotherapy and WBRT is effective with tolerable adverse events in treating brain metastasis from NSCLC with an encouraging survival, and deserves further large sample and randomized multicenter clinical trials.

  4. A Phase 3 Trial of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone Versus WBRT and SRS With Temozolomide or Erlotinib for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and 1 to 3 Brain Metastases: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0320

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Wang, Meihua; Robins, H. Ian; Schell, Michael C.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Komaki, Ritsuko; Souhami, Luis; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Khuntia, Deepak; Demas, William; Shah, Sunjay A.; Nedzi, Lucien A.; Perry, Gad; Suh, John H.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: A phase 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) study subset analysis demonstrated improved overall survival (OS) with the addition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Because temozolomide (TMZ) and erlotinib (ETN) cross the blood-brain barrier and have documented activity in NSCLC, a phase 3 study was designed to test whether these drugs would improve the OS associated with WBRT + SRS. Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases were randomized to receive WBRT (2.5 Gy × 15 to 37.5 Gy) and SRS alone, versus WBRT + SRS + TMZ (75 mg/m 2 /day × 21 days) or ETN (150 mg/day). ETN (150 mg/day) or TMZ (150-200 mg/m 2 /day × 5 days/month) could be continued for as long as 6 months after WBRT + SRS. The primary endpoint was OS. Results: After 126 patients were enrolled, the study closed because of accrual limitations. The median survival times (MST) for WBRT + SRS, WBRT + SRS + TMZ, and WBRT + SRS + ETN were qualitatively different (13.4, 6.3, and 6.1 months, respectively), although the differences were not statistically significant. Time to central nervous system progression and performance status at 6 months were better in the WBRT + SRS arm. Grade 3 to 5 toxicity was 11%, 41%, and 49% in arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<.001). Conclusion: The addition of TMZ or ETN to WBRT + SRS in NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases did not improve survival and possibly had a deleterious effect. Because the analysis is underpowered, these data suggest but do not prove that increased toxicity was the cause of inferior survival in the drug arms

  5. A Phase 3 Trial of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone Versus WBRT and SRS With Temozolomide or Erlotinib for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and 1 to 3 Brain Metastases: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0320

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperduto, Paul W., E-mail: psperduto@mropa.com [Metro MN CCOP, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Wang, Meihua [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Robins, H. Ian [University of Wisconsin Medical School Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Schell, Michael C. [Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Souhami, Luis [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Khuntia, Deepak [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Demas, William [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Shah, Sunjay A. [Christiana Care Health Services, Inc, CCOP, Newark, Delaware (United States); Nedzi, Lucien A. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas (United States); Perry, Gad [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Suh, John H. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Background: A phase 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) study subset analysis demonstrated improved overall survival (OS) with the addition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Because temozolomide (TMZ) and erlotinib (ETN) cross the blood-brain barrier and have documented activity in NSCLC, a phase 3 study was designed to test whether these drugs would improve the OS associated with WBRT + SRS. Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases were randomized to receive WBRT (2.5 Gy × 15 to 37.5 Gy) and SRS alone, versus WBRT + SRS + TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 21 days) or ETN (150 mg/day). ETN (150 mg/day) or TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 5 days/month) could be continued for as long as 6 months after WBRT + SRS. The primary endpoint was OS. Results: After 126 patients were enrolled, the study closed because of accrual limitations. The median survival times (MST) for WBRT + SRS, WBRT + SRS + TMZ, and WBRT + SRS + ETN were qualitatively different (13.4, 6.3, and 6.1 months, respectively), although the differences were not statistically significant. Time to central nervous system progression and performance status at 6 months were better in the WBRT + SRS arm. Grade 3 to 5 toxicity was 11%, 41%, and 49% in arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<.001). Conclusion: The addition of TMZ or ETN to WBRT + SRS in NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases did not improve survival and possibly had a deleterious effect. Because the analysis is underpowered, these data suggest but do not prove that increased toxicity was the cause of inferior survival in the drug arms.

  6. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  7. Characteristics, treatment patterns, and survival among ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with crizotinib: A chart review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadranel, Jacques; Park, Keunchil; Arrieta, Oscar; Pless, Miklos; Bendaly, Edmond; Patel, Dony; Sasane, Medha; Nosal, Adam; Swallow, Elyse; Galebach, Philip; Kageleiry, Andrew; Stein, Karen; Degun, Ravi; Zhang, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Second-generation ALK inhibitors are recently available for ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients previously treated with crizotinib. This study described characteristics, treatment sequencing, and outcomes among locally advanced/metastatic crizotinib-experienced ALK+ NSCLC patients. From July 2014 to June 2015, a retrospective patient chart review was conducted among physicians from the US, EU, Korea, and Latin America. Participating clinicians identified their ALK+ NSCLC patients who received crizotinib and reported on their clinical characteristics, treatments, and survival using a pre-defined case report form. Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to describe overall survival (OS) and clinician-defined progression-free survival (PFS). Participating clinicians reviewed charts of 158 ALK+ NSCLC patients treated with crizotinib during the study period. Crizotinib was most commonly received in the second-line setting (41% of patients), though this varied across geographical regions. Roughly half (53%) of the patients who discontinued crizotinib received further antineoplastic therapy; second-generation ALK inhibitors (44%) and chemotherapy (42%) regimens were used most frequently. Following crizotinib discontinuation, median OS was 8.2 months. Among patients who did not initiate a second-generation ALK inhibitor following crizotinib, median OS was 4.9 months; among those who did, median OS was not reached. Among patients who received chemotherapy immediately following crizotinib discontinuation, time to clinician-defined PFS from post-crizotinib chemotherapy initiation was 3.6 months. Following crizotinib discontinuation, many patients received no further antineoplastic therapy, and OS was poor among patients who did not receive a second-generation ALK inhibitor. Recently available second-generation ALK inhibitors may provide important treatment options for ALK+ NSCLC patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence and clinical association of gene mutations through multiplex mutation testing in patients with NSCLC: results from the ETOP Lungscape Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, K M; Dafni, U; Schulze, K; Thunnissen, E; Bubendorf, L; Hager, H; Finn, S; Biernat, W; Vliegen, L; Losa, J H; Marchetti, A; Cheney, R; Warth, A; Speel, E-J; Blackhall, F; Monkhorst, K; Jantus Lewintre, E; Tischler, V; Clark, C; Bertran-Alamillo, J; Meldgaard, P; Gately, K; Wrona, A; Vandenberghe, P; Felip, E; De Luca, G; Savic, S; Muley, T; Smit, E F; Dingemans, A-M C; Priest, L; Baas, P; Camps, C; Weder, W; Polydoropoulou, V; Geiger, T R; Kammler, R; Sumiyoshi, T; Molina, M A; Shames, D S; Stahel, R A; Peters, S

    2018-01-01

    Reported prevalence of driver gene mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is highly variable and clinical correlations are emerging. Using NSCLC biomaterial and clinical data from the European Thoracic Oncology Platform Lungscape iBiobank, we explore the epidemiology of mutations and association to clinicopathologic features and patient outcome (relapse-free survival, time-to-relapse, overall survival). Clinically annotated, resected stage I-III NSCLC FFPE tissue was assessed for gene mutation using a microfluidics-based multiplex PCR platform. Mutant-allele detection sensitivity is >1% for most of the ∼150 (13 genes) mutations covered in the multiplex test. Multiplex testing has been carried out in 2063 (76.2%) of the 2709 Lungscape cases (median follow-up 4.8 years). FFPE samples mostly date from 2005 to 2008, yet recently extracted DNA quality and quantity was generally good. Average DNA yield/case was 2.63 µg; 38 cases (1.4%) failed QC and were excluded from study; 95.1% of included cases allowed the complete panel of mutations to be tested. Most common were KRAS, MET, EGFR and PIK3CA mutations with overall prevalence of 23.0%, 6.8%, 5.4% and 4.9%, respectively. KRAS and EGFR mutations were significantly more frequent in adenocarcinomas: PIK3CA in squamous cell carcinomas. MET mutation prevalence did not differ between histology groups. EGFR mutations were found predominantly in never smokers; KRAS in current/former smokers. For all the above mutations, there was no difference in outcome between mutated and non-mutated cases. Archival FFPE NSCLC material is adequate for multiplex mutation analysis. In this large, predominantly European, clinically annotated stage I-III NSCLC cohort, none of the mutations characterized showed prognostic significance.

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ... grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading ... how the brain is wired and how the normal brain's structure develops and matures helps scientists understand ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  15. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Using MEG, some scientists have found a specific pattern of brain activity that may help predict who ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits ... tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on ...

  19. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) Signaling Capacity and the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Implications for Use of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} in NSCLC Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Verone, Alissa; Shoemaker, Suzanne [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States); Qin, Maochun; Liu, Song [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States); Campbell, Moray; Hershberger, Pamela A., E-mail: pamela.hershberger@roswellpark.org [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States)

    2013-11-08

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) exerts anti-proliferative activity by binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and regulating gene expression. We previously reported that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells which harbor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations display elevated VDR expression (VDR{sup high}) and are vitamin D-sensitive. Conversely, those with K-ras mutations are VDR{sup low} and vitamin D-refractory. Because EGFR mutations are found predominately in NSCLC cells with an epithelial phenotype and K-ras mutations are more common in cells with a mesenchymal phenotype, we investigated the relationship between vitamin D signaling capacity and the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Using NSCLC cell lines and publically available lung cancer cell line microarray data, we identified a relationship between VDR expression, 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} sensitivity, and EMT phenotype. Further, we discovered that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} induces E-cadherin and decreases EMT-related molecules SNAIL, ZEB1, and vimentin in NSCLC cells. 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}-mediated changes in gene expression are associated with a significant decrease in cell migration and maintenance of epithelial morphology. These data indicate that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} opposes EMT in NSCLC cells. Because EMT is associated with increased migration, invasion, and chemoresistance, our data imply that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} may prevent lung cancer progression in a molecularly defined subset of NSCLC patients.

  20. EGFR testing and clinical management of advanced NSCLC: a Galician Lung Cancer Group study (GGCP 048-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Vázquez,1 Joaquín Casal,2 Francisco Javier Afonso Afonso,3 José Luis Fírvida,4 Lucía Santomé,5 Francisco Barón,6 Martín Lázaro,7 Carolina Pena,7 Margarita Amenedo,8 Ihab Abdulkader,9 Carmen González-Arenas,10 Laura Fachal,11 Ana Vega11 On behalf of the Galician Lung Cancer Group (GGCP1Medical Oncology Department, Lucus Augusti University Hospital, Lugo, 2Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Vigo, Pontevedra, 3Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Ferrol, Ferrol, 4Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Ourense, Ourense, 5Medical Oncology Department Povisa Hospital, Vigo, 6Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 7Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Complex of Pontevedra, Pontevedra, 8Medical Oncology Department, Oncology Center of Galicia, A Coruña, 9Anatomical Pathology Department, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 10AstraZeneca, Madrid, 11Galician Public Foundation of Genomic Medicine-SERGAS, Santiago de Compostela Clinic Hospital, Santiago de Compostela, Spain Purpose: This study aimed to assess the incidence of mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients in the Galician region of Spain and the clinical management and outcome of patients carrying EGFR mutations. Patients and methods: All newly diagnosed advanced or metastatic NSCLC patients were screened for EGFR mutations in matched tumor samples (tissue or cytology specimens and serum samples. Results: Of 198 patients screened for EGFR mutations in tumor samples, 184 had evaluable data and, of these, 25 (13.6% had EGFR mutations (84% sensitizing mutations. EGFR mutation was found in serum in 14 (8.1% patients (of 174 evaluable. Compared to matched tumor tissue, serum EGFR mutation testing specificity and sensitivity were 99% and 52

  1. The cost-effectiveness of a NSCLC patient assistance program for pemetrexed maintenance therapy in People's Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Q

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Qiang Shi,1 Shanlian Hu,2 Wesley E Furnback,3 Gregory F Guzauskas,3 Jiejing Shen,1 Bruce CM Wang3 1Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd., Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Shanghai Health Development Research Center, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Elysia Group, Ltd., Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China Background: Eli Lilly and the China Primary Health Care Foundation are currently implementing a patient assistance program (PAP in China, which allows first-line nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients who complete four cycles of pemetrexed induction therapy to receive free, continuous pemetrexed maintenance therapy.Objective: To estimate the cost-effectiveness of pemetrexed maintenance therapy vs basic standard care (BSC and the economic impacts of providing a PAP for pemetrexed maintenance therapy to NSCLC patients who have completed pemetrexed induction therapy in a Chinese health care setting.Methods: We developed a novel decision-analytic model to evaluate the long-term costs and clinical efficacy of pemetrexed plus BSC vs BSC alone. We utilized a three-state (progression-free survival, progressed disease, and dead partition survival model for both the clinical and economic aspects of the analysis. Cost and health utility estimates were derived from the literature. We performed a scenario analysis to estimate the real-world impact of introducing the PAP in China by comparing the use of the PAP vs non-PAP. Model uncertainty was evaluated using one-way and multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis.Results: Compared to BSC, pemetrexed plus BSC resulted in a gain of 0.22 years of life (95% credible range [CR]: 0.04–0.46 and 0.13 quality-adjusted life years (95% CR: 0.04–0.26 per patient, at an increased cost of $28,105 (95% CR: −$22,720 to $48,646 without a PAP and $3,068 (95% CR: −$1,263 to $9,163 with a PAP. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for pemetrexed plus BSC vs BSC alone was cost

  2. AC-93253 iodide, a novel Src inhibitor, suppresses NSCLC progression by modulating multiple Src-related signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yi-Hua; Lin, Sih-Yin; Wu, Yu-Shan; Chen, Huei-Wen; Chen, Jeremy J W

    2017-11-13

    The tyrosine kinase Src is involved in the progression of many cancers. Moreover, inhibiting Src activity has been shown to obstruct several signaling pathways regulated by the EGFR. Thus, Src is a valuable target molecule in drug development. The purpose of this study was to identify compounds that directly or indirectly modulate Src to suppress lung cancer cell growth and motility and to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of these compounds. Human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (PC9, PC9/gef, A549, and H1975) with different EGFR statuses were tested by cytotoxicity and proliferation assays after AC-93253 iodide treatment. Src and Src-related protein expression in AC-93253 iodide-treated PC9, PC9/gef, and A549 cells were assessed by western blotting. The effects of AC-93253 iodide on cancer cell colony formation, invasion, and migration were assessed in PC9 and PC9/gef cells. The synergistic effects of gefitinib and AC-93253 iodide were evaluated by combination index (CI)-isobologram analysis in gefitinib-resistant cell lines. The efficacy of AC-93253 iodide in vivo was determined using nude mice treated with either the compound or the vehicle. Among the compounds, AC-93253 iodide exhibited the most potent dose-independent inhibitory effects on the activity of Src as well as on that of the Src-related proteins EGFR, STAT3, and FAK. Furthermore, AC-93253 iodide significantly suppressed cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion, and migration in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. AC-93253 iodide sensitized tumor cells to gefitinib treatment regardless of whether the cells were gefitinib-sensitive (PC9) or resistant (H1975 and PC9/gef), indicating that it may exert synergistic effects when used in combination with established therapeutic agents. Our findings also suggested that the inhibitory effects of AC-93253 iodide on lung cancer progression may be attributable to its ability to modulate multiple proteins

  3. A Neuro-oncologist's Perspective on Management of Brain Metastases in Patients with EGFR Mutant Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranahan, Tresa; Nagpal, Seema

    2017-04-01

    Management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with brain metastasis (BrM) has been revolutionized by identification of molecular subsets that have targetable oncogenes. Historically, survival for NSCLC with symptomatic BrM was weeks to months. Now, many patients are surviving years with limited data to guide treatment decisions. Tumors with activating mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRact+) have a higher incidence of BrM, but a longer overall survival. The high response rate of both systemic and BrM EGFRact+ NSCLC to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has led to the rapid incorporation of new therapies but is outpacing evidence-based decisions for BrM in NSCLC. While whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) was the foundation of management of BrM, extended survival raises concerns for the subacute and late effects radiotherapy. We favor the use of TKIs and delaying the use of WBRT when able. At inevitable disease progression, we consider alternative dosing schedules to increase CNS penetration (such as pulse dosing of erlotinib) or advance to next generation TKI if available. We utilize local control options of surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for symptomatic accessible lesions based on size and edema. At progression despite available TKIs, we use pemetrexed-based platinum doublet chemotherapy or immunotherapy if the tumor has high expression of PDL-1. We reserve the use of WBRT for patients with more than 10 BrM and progression despite TKI and conventional chemotherapy, if performance status is appropriate.

  4. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: High-Throughput siRNA Screening of a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Cell Line Panel | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project is to use siRNA screens to identify NSCLC-selective siRNAs from two genome-wide libraries that will allow us to functionally define genetic dependencies of subtypes of NSCLC. Using bioinformatics tools, the CTD2 center at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center are discovering associations between this functional data (siRNAs) and NSCLC mutational status, methylation arrays, gene expression arrays, and copy number variation data that will help us identify new targets and enrollment biomarkers. 

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... time in healthy people and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental ... the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ...

  6. A case of lung adenocarcinoma with multiple intracranial hemorrhages of brain metastases after whole-brain radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamichi, Shinji; Hirano, Satoshi; Asao, Tetsuhiko; Takeda, Yuichiro; Sugiyama, Haruhito; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is widely applied in cases of brain metastases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, there are few case reports on hemorrhages of brain metastases occurring after WBRT. A 63-year-old woman was given a diagnosis of stage IV (T4N0M1b) lung adenocarcinoma about 4 years previously, and received chemotherapy regimens and gamma knife radiosurgery. However, her brain metastases exacerbated and she received WBRT in November 2010 and docetaxel monotherapy in December 2010. Two weeks after completing WBRT, she experienced dysarthria and an MRI showed multiple hemorrhages within brain metastases. Over a period of careful observation, these hemorrhages repeatedly alternated between improvement and exacerbation. Radiotherapy for metastatic brain tumors is considered to suppress hemorrhagic events of brain metastases. However, multiple intracranial hemorrhages of brain metastases occurred after WBRT in the present case. The accumulation of further studies of similar cases is necessary to identify the exact mechanism of these hemorrhages. (author)

  7. Ablative dose proton beam therapy for stage I and recurrent non-small cell lung carcinomas. Ablative dose PBT for NSCLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Joo Young; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Suh, Yang-Gun; Kim, Yeon-Joo [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sung Ho [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Center for Lung Cancer, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryull [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ablative dose hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT) for patients with stage I and recurrent non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). A total of 55 patients with stage I (n = 42) and recurrent (n = 13) NSCLC underwent hypofractionated PBT and were retrospectively reviewed. A total dose of 50-72 CGE (cobalt gray equivalent) in 5-12 fractions was delivered. The median follow-up duration was 29 months (range 4-95 months). There were 24 deaths (43.6%) during the follow-up period: 11 died of disease progression and 13 from other causes. Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate (OS) at 3 years was 54.9% and the median OS was 48.6 months (range 4-95 months). Local progression was observed in 7 patients and the median time to local progression was 9.3 months (range 5-14 months). Cumulative actuarial local control rate (LCR), lymph node metastasis-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates at 3 years were 85.4, 78.4, and 76.5%, respectively. Larger tumor diameter was significantly associated with poorer LCR (3-year: 94% for ≤3 cm vs. 65% for >3 cm, p = 0.006) on univariate analysis and also an independent prognostic factor for LCR (HR 6.9, 95% CI = 1.3-37.8, p = 0.026) on multivariate analysis. No grade 3 or 4 treatment-related toxicities developed. One grade 5 treatment-related adverse event occurred in a patient with symptomatic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Ablative dose hypofractionated PBT was safe and promising for stage I and recurrent NSCLC. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung von Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit hypofraktionierter Protonentherapie (PBT) mit ablativen Dosen fuer nichtkleinzellige Lungenkarzinome (NSCLC) im Stadium I und rekurrierende NSCLC. Retrospektiv wurden insgesamt 55 NSCLC-Patienten (Stadium I: n = 42; rekurrierender Tumor: n = 13), analysiert. Sie waren mit einer Gesamtdosis von 50-72 CGE (''cobalt gray equivalent'') in 5-12 Fraktionen behandelt worden. Der Median der Follow

  8. CXCR4/CXCL12 in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Metastasis to the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Cavallaro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer represents the leading cause of cancer-related mortality throughout the world. Patients die of local progression, disseminated disease, or both. At least one third of the people with lung cancer develop brain metastases at some point during their disease, even often before the diagnosis of lung cancer is made. The high rate of brain metastasis makes lung cancer the most common type of tumor to spread to the brain. It is critical to understand the biologic basis of brain metastases to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. This review will focus on the emerging data supporting the involvement of the chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 in the brain metastatic evolution of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC and the pharmacological tools that may be used to interfere with this signaling axis.

  9. Mathematical modeling for Phase I cancer trials: A study of metronomic vinorelbine for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and mesothelioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlesi, Fabrice; Imbs, Diane-Charlotte; Tomasini, Pascale; Greillier, Laurent; Galloux, Melissa; Testot-Ferry, Albane; Garcia, Mélanie; Elharrar, Xavier; Pelletier, Annick; André, Nicolas; Mascaux, Céline; Lacarelle, Bruno; Cheikh, Raouf El; Serre, Raphaël; Ciccolini, Joseph; Barbolosi, Dominique

    2017-07-18

    Using mathematical modelling allows to select a treatment's regimen across infinite possibilities. Here, we report the phase I assessment of a new schedule for metronomic vinorelbine in treating refractory advanced NSCLC and mesothelioma patients. Overall, 13 patients were screened and 12 were treated (50% male, median age: 68yrs), including 9 NSCLC patients. All patients received at least one week (3 doses) of treatment. At data cut-off, the median length of treatment was 6.5 weeks (1-32+). All the patients presented with at least one adverse event (AE) and six patients with a severe AE (SAE). One partial response and 5 stable diseases were observed. The median OS was 6.4 months (95% CI, 4.8 to 12 months). The median and mean vinorelbine's AUC were 122 ng/ml*h and 159 ng/ml*h, respectively, with the higher plasmatic vinorelbine exposure associated with the best ORR (difference of AUC comparison between responders and non-responders, p-value 0.017). The mathematical modelling determined the administration of vinorelbine, 60 mg on Day 1, 30 mg on Day 2 and 60 mg on Day 4 weekly until progression, as the best schedule. Advanced NSCLC or mesothelioma patients progressing after standard treatment were eligible for the trial. NCT02555007. Responses with acceptable safety profile were observed in heavily pretreated NSCLC and mesothelioma patients using oral vinorelbine at this metronomic dosage based on a mathematic modeling. This study demonstrates the feasibility of this new type of approach, as mathematical modeling may help to rationally decide the better regimen to be clinically tested across infinite possibilities.

  10. Positive expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins is correlated with survival rates of NSCLC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yujin; Wang, Liancong; Zheng, Xiao; Liu, Guan; Wang, Yuezhen; Lai, Xiaojing; Li, Jianqiang

    2013-05-01

    The incidence of lung cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic and predictive importance of p53, c-erbB2 and multidrug resistance proteins (MRP) expression and its correlation with clinicopathological characteristics of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins in 152 tumor samples from resected primary NSCLCs was detected by immunohistochemical staining. The correlation of proteins, survival and clinicopathological characteristics was investigated in 152 patients undergoing potentially curative surgery. The positive rates of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP expression were 53.9 (82/152), 44.1 (67/152) and 43.4% (66/152), respectively. Overall survival rates of patients were markedly correlated with the overexpression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins. One, 2- and 3-year survival rates of patients exhibiting a positive expression of these proteins were 72.6, 54.8 and 32.2%, respectively. These rates were lower compared with those of patients with a negative expression of these proteins (92.1, 78.5 and 63.4%) (P=0.02, 0.01 or 0.00, respectively). Results of Cox's regression analysis showed that c-erbB2 expression and cell differentiation were independent prognostic factors in patients with NSCLC. These findings suggest that the positive expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins is correlated with the survival rates of NSCLC patients. Detection of positive p53, c-erbB2 and MRP expression may be a useful predictive indicator of prognosis. Positive c-erbB2 expression is an independent prognostic factor, with a potential to be used as a predictive indicator of chemotherapy efficacy in NSCLC patients.

  11. RT-PCR versus immunohistochemistry for correlation and quantification of ERCC1, BRCA1, TUBB3 and RRM1 in NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, Adam Christian; Garcia-Foncillas, J; Huarriz, M

    2012-01-01

    Customized chemotherapy is increasingly used in the management of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the most reliable methodology to determine biomarker status is neither fully elucidated nor agreed upon. Accordingly, we evaluated the predictive efficiency of q......RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis (IHC) on excision cross complementation group 1 (ERCC1), breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1), ribonucleotide reductase subunit M1 (RRM1) and class III ß-tubulin (TUBB3)....

  12. Long-term survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and synchronous brain metastasis treated with whole-brain radiotherapy and thoracic chemoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Zamora, Jesús; Blake-Cerda, Mónika; Mata, María D de la; Zavala, Diego G; Muñiz-Hernández, Saé; Garza, Jaime de la

    2011-01-01

    Brain metastases occur in 30-50% of Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and confer a worse prognosis and quality of life. These patients are usually treated with Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) followed by systemic therapy. Few studies have evaluated the role of chemoradiotherapy to the primary tumor after WBRT as definitive treatment in the management of these patients. We reviewed the outcome of 30 patients with primary NSCLC and brain metastasis at diagnosis without evidence of other metastatic sites. Patients were treated with WBRT and after induction chemotherapy with paclitaxel and cisplatin for two cycles. In the absence of progression, concurrent chemoradiotherapy for the primary tumor with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin was indicated, with a total effective dose of 60 Gy. If disease progression was ruled out, four chemotherapy cycles followed. Median Progression-free survival (PFS) and Overall survival (OS) were 8.43 ± 1.5 and 31.8 ± 15.8 months, respectively. PFS was 39.5% at 1 year and 24.7% at 2 years. The 1- and 2-year OS rates were 71.1 and 60.2%, respectively. Three-year OS was significantly superior for patients with N0-N1 stage disease vs. N2-N3 (60 vs. 24%, respectively; Response rate [RR], 0.03; p= 0.038). Patients with NSCLC and brain metastasis might benefit from treatment with WBRT and concurrent thoracic chemoradiotherapy. The subgroup of N0-N1 patients appears to achieve the greatest benefit. The result of this study warrants a prospective trial to confirm the benefit of this treatment

  13. Survival prediction using temporal muscle thickness measurements on cranial magnetic resonance images in patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furtner, Julia; Prayer, Daniela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumor Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Berghoff, Anna S.; Zielinski, Christoph C.; Preusser, Matthias [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumor Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Albtoush, Omar M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); University of Jordan, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amman (Jordan); Woitek, Ramona; Asenbaum, Ulrika [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Widhalm, Georg; Gatterbauer, Brigitte [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumor Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurosurgery, Vienna (Austria); Dieckmann, Karin [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumor Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Birner, Peter [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumor Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pathology, Vienna (Austria); Aretin, Bernadette [General Hospital Vienna, Pharmacy Department, Vienna (Austria); Bartsch, Rupert [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumor Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Schoepf, Veronika [University of Graz, Institute of Psychology, Graz (Austria); BioTechMed, Graz (Austria)

    2017-08-15

    To evaluate the prognostic relevance of temporal muscle thickness (TMT) in brain metastasis patients. We retrospectively analysed TMT on magnetic resonance (MR) images at diagnosis of brain metastasis in two independent cohorts of 188 breast cancer (BC) and 247 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (overall: 435 patients). Survival analysis using a Cox regression model showed a reduced risk of death by 19% with every additional millimetre of baseline TMT in the BC cohort and by 24% in the NSCLC cohort. Multivariate analysis included TMT and diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment (DS-GPA) as covariates in the BC cohort (TMT: HR 0.791/CI [0.703-0.889]/p < 0.001; DS-GPA: HR 1.433/CI [1.160-1.771]/p = 0.001), and TMT, gender and DS-GPA in the NSCLC cohort (TMT: HR 0.710/CI [0.646-0.780]/p < 0.001; gender: HR 0.516/CI [0.387-0.687]/p < 0.001; DS-GPA: HR 1.205/CI [1.018-1.426]/p = 0.030). TMT is easily and reproducibly assessable on routine MR images and is an independent predictor of survival in patients with newly diagnosed brain metastasis from BC and NSCLC. TMT may help to better define frail patient populations and thus facilitate patient selection for therapeutic measures or clinical trials. Further prospective studies are needed to correlate TMT with other clinical frailty parameters of patients. (orig.)

  14. Comparative Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Coding and Noncoding RNA Differences in NSCLC from African Americans and European Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Khadijah A; Zingone, Adriana; Toulabi, Leila; Boeckelman, Jacob; Ryan, Bríd M

    2017-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether racial differences in gene and miRNA expression translates to differences in lung tumor biology with clinical relevance in African Americans (AAs) and European Americans (EAs). Experimental Design: The NCI-Maryland Case Control Study includes seven Baltimore City hospitals and is overrepresented with AA patients (∼40%). Patients that underwent curative NSCLC surgery between 1998 and 2014 were enrolled. Comparative molecular profiling used mRNA ( n = 22 AAs and 19 EAs) and miRNA ( n = 42 AAs and 55 EAs) expression arrays to track differences in paired fresh frozen normal tissues and lung tumor specimens from AAs and EAs. Pathway enrichment, predicted drug response, tumor microenvironment infiltration, cancer immunotherapy antigen profiling, and miRNA target enrichment were assessed. Results: AA-enriched differential gene expression was characterized by stem cell and invasion pathways. Differential gene expression in lung tumors from EAs was primarily characterized by cell proliferation pathways. Population-specific gene expression was partly driven by population-specific miRNA expression profiles. Drug susceptibility predictions revealed a strong inverse correlation between AA resistance and EA sensitivity to the same panel of drugs. Statistically significant differences in M1 and M2 macrophage infiltration were observed in AAs ( P profiling revealed clear differences in lung tumor biology between AAs and EAs. Increased participation by AAs in lung cancer clinical trials are needed to integrate, and leverage, transcriptomic differences with other clinical information to maximize therapeutic benefit in both AAs and EAs. Clin Cancer Res; 23(23); 7412-25. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the ... mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons ...

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    Full Text Available ... in mental illnesses. Scientists have already begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy ... Using MEG, some scientists have found a specific pattern of brain activity that may help predict who ...

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ...

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    Full Text Available ... and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ... people and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues ...

  5. Brain Aneurysm

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    ... thin tissues covering the brain. This type of hemorrhagic stroke is called a subarachnoid hemorrhage. A ruptured aneurysm quickly becomes life-threatening and requires prompt medical treatment. Most brain aneurysms, however, don't rupture, create ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... their final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain ... studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's ... resonance imaging (MRI) mdash;An imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's ...

  9. Brain Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Karl

    2002-01-01

    Reviews significant findings of recent brain research, including the concept of five minds: automatic, subconscious, practical, creative, and spiritual. Suggests approaches to training the brain that are related to this hierarchy of thinking. (JOW)

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many others. Some people who develop a mental illness may recover completely; ... how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can ...

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    Full Text Available ... Evidence shows that they can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the ... brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain can lead to mental disorders, ...

  13. Brain surgery

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    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... Barnett J, Mohanty A, Desai SK, Patterson JT. Neurosurgery. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

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    Full Text Available ... works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues ...

  17. Brain Diseases

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    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. ...

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  8. Brain Basics

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  9. Brain Basics

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  10. Brain Aneurysm

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    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Through research, we know that mental disorders are brain disorders. Evidence shows that they can be related to ... work with each other How changes in the brain can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the ...

  12. Does {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT add diagnostic accuracy in incidentally identified non-secreting adrenal tumours?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessonnier, L.; Colavolpe, C.; Mundler, O.; Taieb, D. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Sebag, F.; Palazzo, F.F.; Henry, J.F. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Service de Chirurgie Generale et Endocrinienne, Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Micco, C. de [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Faculte de Medecine, Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (U555), Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Mancini, J. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Service de Sante Publique et d' Information Medicale, Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Conte-Devolx, B. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Service d' Endocrinologie, Diabete et des Maladies Metaboliques, Marseille Cedex 5 (France)

    2008-11-15

    The widespread use of high-resolution cross-sectional imaging such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the investigation of the abdomen is associated with an increasing detection of incidental adrenal masses. We evaluated the ability of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to distinguish benign from malignant adrenal masses when CT or MRI results had been inconclusive. We included only patients with no evidence of hormonal hypersecretion and no personal history of cancer or in whom previously diagnosed cancer was in prolonged remission. PET/CT scans were acquired after 90 min (mean, range 60-140 min) after FDG injection. The visual interpretation, maximum standardised uptake values (SUVmax) and adrenal compared to liver uptake ratio were correlated with the final histological diagnosis or clinico-radiological follow-up when surgery had not been performed. Thirty-seven patients with 41 adrenal masses were prospectively evaluated. The final diagnosis was 12 malignant, 17 benign tumours, and 12 tumours classified as benign on follow-up. The visual interpretation was more accurate than SUVmax alone, tumour diameter or unenhanced density, with a sensitivity of 100% (12/12), a specificity of 86% (25/29) and a negative predictive value of 100% (25/25). The use of 1.8 as the threshold for tumour/liver SUVmax ratio, retrospectively established, demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity. FDG PET/CT accurately characterises adrenal tumours, with an excellent sensitivity and negative predictive values. Thus, a negative PET may predict a benign tumour that would potentially prevent the need for surgery of adrenal tumours with inconclusive conventional imaging. (orig.)

  13. The Brains Behind the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcangelo, Marcia

    1998-01-01

    Interviews with five neuroscientists--Martin Diamond, Pat Wolfe, Robert Sylwester, Geoffrey Caine, and Eric Jensen--disclose brain-research findings of practical interest to educators. Topics include brain physiology, environmental enrichment, memorization, windows of learning opportunity, brain learning capacity, attention span, student interest,…

  14. Targeting brain metastases in ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Isabella; Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Palmer, Joshua D; Mehra, Ranee; Lu, Bo

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of brain metastases has increased as a result of improved systemic control and advances in imaging. However, development of novel therapeutics with CNS activity has not advanced at the same rate. Research on molecular markers has revealed many potential targets for antineoplastic agents, and a particularly important aberration is translocation in the ALK gene, identified in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ALK inhibitors have shown systemic efficacy against ALK-rearranged NSCLC in many clinical trials, but the effectiveness of crizotinib in CNS disease is limited by poor blood-brain barrier penetration and acquired drug resistance. In this Review, we discuss potential pathways to target ALK-rearranged brain metastases, including next generation ALK inhibitors with greater CNS penetration and mechanisms to overcome resistance. Other important mechanisms to control CNS disease include targeting pathways downstream of ALK phosphorylation, increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, modifying the tumour microenvironment, and adding concurrent radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of Biomarkers Predictive of Benefit from the PD-1 Inhibitor MK-3475 in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Brain Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    including in the CNS, where the tumor microenvironment may alter marker expression. Understanding biomarker variability is critical as we explore which...trial. We proposed to study the immunophenotypic pattern of NSCLC tumor samples including T-cell infiltration and immune marker expression as well as...The objective of this proposal is to study the immunophenotypic characteristics of primary lung tumors , brain metastases and extra-cerebral

  16. Combined EGFR and VEGFR versus single EGFR signaling pathways inhibition therapy for NSCLC: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinji Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease with multiple signaling pathways influencing tumor cell survival and proliferation, and it is likely that blocking only one of these pathways allows others to act as salvage or escape mechanisms for cancer cells. Whether combined inhibition therapy has greater anti-tumor activity than single inhibition therapy is a matter of debate. Hence, a meta-analysis comparing therapy inhibiting both VEGFR and EGFR signaling pathways with that inhibiting EGFR signaling pathway alone was performed. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE database and the proceedings of major conferences for relevant clinical trials. Outcomes analyzed were objective tumor response rate (ORR, progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS and toxicity. Besides, subgroup analyses were performed to investigate whether the combined inhibition therapy is best performed using combination of selective agents or a single agent with multiple targets. Six trials recruiting 3,302 patients were included in the analysis. Combined inhibition therapy was associated with a 3% improvement in OS as compared with single-targeted therapy, but this difference was not statistically significant (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.89-1.05; P=0.472. Patients receiving combined inhibition therapy had significant longer PFS than the group with single-targeted therapy (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.67-0.95; P=0.011. There was no difference in the ORR between the groups (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 0.95-2.18; P=0.085. Subgroup analysis revealed that combined inhibition therapy using combination regimens was associated with statistically significant improvement in both ORR and PFS. Toxicity was greater in combined inhibition therapy. CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence to support the use of combined inhibition therapy in unselected patients with advanced NSCLC. However, given the significant advantage in ORR and PFS, combined inhibition therapy using combination

  17. Inferring Growth Control Mechanisms in Growing Multi-cellular Spheroids of NSCLC Cells from Spatial-Temporal Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Margareta; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.; Drasdo, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantitative single cell-based mathematical model for multi-cellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) of SK-MES-1 cells, a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, growing under various nutrient conditions: we confront the simulations performed with this model with data on the growth kinetics and spatial labeling patterns for cell proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM), cell distribution and cell death. We start with a simple model capturing part of the experimental observations. We then show, by performing a sensitivity analysis at each development stage of the model that its complexity needs to be stepwise increased to account for further experimental growth conditions. We thus ultimately arrive at a model that mimics the MCTS growth under multiple conditions to a great extent. Interestingly, the final model, is a minimal model capable of explaining all data simultaneously in the sense, that the number of mechanisms it contains is sufficient to explain the data and missing out any of its mechanisms did not permit fit between all data and the model within physiological parameter ranges. Nevertheless, compared to earlier models it is quite complex i.e., it includes a wide range of mechanisms discussed in biological literature. In this model, the cells lacking oxygen switch from aerobe to anaerobe glycolysis and produce lactate. Too high concentrations of lactate or too low concentrations of ATP promote cell death. Only if the extracellular matrix density overcomes a certain threshold, cells are able to enter the cell cycle. Dying cells produce a diffusive growth inhibitor. Missing out the spatial information would not permit to infer the mechanisms at work. Our findings suggest that this iterative data integration together with intermediate model sensitivity analysis at each model development stage, provide a promising strategy to infer predictive yet minimal (in the above sense) quantitative models of tumor growth, as prospectively of other tissue

  18. The efficacy and safety of alectinib in the treatment of ALK+ NSCLC: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan JS

    2018-03-01

    crizotinib. Conclusion: Generally, alectinib is a drug with preferable efficacy and tolerable adverse effects, and it is suitable for the treatment of intracranial metastases. Keywords: alectinib, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, ALK, ALK inhibitor, non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC, meta-analysis

  19. The Hsp90 inhibitor IPI-504 rapidly lowers EML4-ALK levels and induces tumor regression in ALK-driven NSCLC models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normant, E; Paez, G; West, K A; Lim, A R; Slocum, K L; Tunkey, C; McDougall, J; Wylie, A A; Robison, K; Caliri, K; Palombella, V J; Fritz, C C

    2011-06-02

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an emerging target for cancer therapy due to its important role in maintaining the activity and stability of key oncogenic signaling proteins. We show here that the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion protein, presumed to be the oncogenic driver in about 5% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), is associated with Hsp90 in cells and is rapidly degraded upon exposure of cells to IPI-504. We find EML4-ALK to be more sensitive to Hsp90 inhibition than either HER2 or mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with an inhibitory concentration (IC)(50) for protein degradation in the low nanomolar range. This degradation leads to a potent inhibition of downstream signaling pathways and to the induction of growth arrest and apoptosis in cells carrying the EML4-ALK fusion. To generate a causative link between the expression of EML4-ALK and sensitivity to IPI-504, we introduced an EML4-ALK cDNA into HEK293 cells and show that the expression of the fusion protein sensitizes cells to IPI-504 both in vitro and in vivo. In a xenograft model of a human NSCLC cell line containing the ALK rearrangement, we observe tumor regression at clinically relevant doses of IPI-504. Finally, cells that have been selected for resistance to ALK kinase inhibitors retain their sensitivity to IPI-504. We have recently observed partial responses to administration of IPI-504 as a single agent in a phase 2 clinical trial in patients with NSCLC, specifically in patients that carry an ALK rearrangement. This study provides a molecular explanation for these clinical observations.

  20. Incidental Prophylactic Nodal Irradiation and Patterns of Nodal Relapse in Inoperable Early Stage NSCLC Patients Treated With SBRT: A Case-Matched Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lao, Louis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Hope, Andrew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Maganti, Manjula [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brade, Anthony; Bezjak, Andrea; Saibishkumar, Elantholi P.; Giuliani, Meredith; Sun, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cho, B. C. John, E-mail: john.cho@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Reported rates of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) nodal failure following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are lower than those reported in the surgical series when matched for stage. We hypothesized that this effect was due to incidental prophylactic nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: A prospectively collected group of medically inoperable early stage NSCLC patients from 2004 to 2010 was used to identify cases with nodal relapses. Controls were matched to cases, 2:1, controlling for tumor volume (ie, same or greater) and tumor location (ie, same lobe). Reference (normalized to equivalent dose for 2-Gy fractions [EQD2]) point doses at the ipsilateral hilum and carina, demographic data, and clinical outcomes were extracted from the medical records. Univariate conditional logistical regression analyses were performed with variables of interest. Results: Cases and controls were well matched except for size. The controls, as expected, had larger gross tumor volumes (P=.02). The mean ipsilateral hilar doses were 9.6 Gy and 22.4 Gy for cases and controls, respectively (P=.014). The mean carinal doses were 7.0 Gy and 9.2 Gy, respectively (P=.13). Mediastinal nodal relapses, with and without ipsilateral hilar relapse, were associated with mean ipsilateral hilar doses of 3.6 Gy and 19.8 Gy, respectively (P=.01). The conditional density plot appears to demonstrate an inverse dose-effect relationship between ipsilateral hilar normalized total dose and risk of ipsilateral hilar relapse. Conclusions: Incidental hilar dose greater than 20 Gy is significantly associated with fewer ipsilateral hilar relapses in inoperable early stage NSCLC patients treated with SBRT.

  1. CyberKnife with tumor tracking: An effective alternative to wedge resection for high-risk surgical patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean eCollins

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Published data suggests that wedge resection for stage I NSCLC results in improved overall survival compared to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. We report CyberKnife outcomes for high-risk surgical patients with biopsy-proven stage I NSCLC. PET/CT imaging was completed for staging. Three-to-five gold fiducial markers were implanted in or near tumors to serve as targeting references. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs were contoured using lung windows; the margins were expanded by 5 mm to establish the planning treatment volume (PTV. Treatment plans were designed using hundreds of pencil beams. Doses delivered to the PTV ranged from 42-60 Gy in 3 fractions. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended at least 1cm from the GTV to eradicate microscopic disease. Treatments were delivered using the CyberKnife system with tumor tracking. Examination and PET/CT imaging occurred at 3-month follow-up intervals. Forty patients (median age 76 with a median maximum tumor diameter of 2.6 cm (range, 1.4-5.0 cm and a mean post-bronchodilator percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 of 57% (range, 21 - 111% were treated. A mean dose of 50 Gy was delivered to the PTV over 3 to 13 days (median, 7 days. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended a mean 1.9 cm from the GTV. At a median 44 months (range, 12 -72 months follow-up, the 3-year Kaplan-Meier locoregional control and overall survival estimates compare favorably with contemporary wedge resection outcomes at 91% and 75% , respectively. CyberKnife is an effective treatment approach for stage I NSCLC that is similar to wedge resection, eradicating tumors with 1 to 2 cm margins in order to preserve lung function. Prospective randomized trials comparing CyberKnife with wedge resection are necessary to confirm equivalence.

  2. SU-F-T-112: Long-Term Follow-Up of NSCLC Patients Treated with Lung SBRT Using the Modified Conformal Arc (MDCA) Planning Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, E; Desai, A [Frank H Netter, MD, School of Medicine, North Haven, CT (United States); Fang, D; Lawrence, C; Iannuzzi, C; Shi, C [St. Vincent’s Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess long-term toxicity and primary tumor changes for Stage I/II non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients after treatment with lung SBRT using the modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) planning technique. Methods: Clinical and radiograph data from electronic health records of 15 NSCLC patients treated with lung SBRT utilizing the MDCA technique between October 2011 and July 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. MDCA uses a coplanar beam arrangement, patient body center for the beam isocenter, and six partial rotation conformal arcs to target the tumor. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines for treatment parameters were followed. Most patients received 5 radiation fractions (Range: 3 to 7 fractions) with 48 hours between each fraction. Median total dose was 60 Gy (range: 45 to 70 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 18 months (range: 6–51 months). Median age was 72.5 years (range: 48–90 years). Post-treatment findings included fatigue (n = 5) and chronic chest wall pain (n=1). Seven patients reported respiratory symptoms, which included: cough (n = 4), dyspnea (n = 5), and hemoptysis (n = 1). No patients deaths or grade ≥4 toxicity were recorded. Radiographic scarring was seen on computed tomography (CT) imaging in 6 patients. Local control rate was 93.3% (n = 14) and 1 patient had local recurrence. Conclusion: Our results were very similar to RTOG 0236 findings reported by Timmerman et al. – our local control rate was 93.3% compared to their 3-year primary tumor control rate of 97.6%. Toxicity rates were also similar – RTOG 0236 constitutional symptoms and pulmonary/upper respiratory symptoms rates were 36.4% and 60.0%, respectively, while ours were 33.3% and 46.7%, respectively. We were limited by a small sample size and relatively short follow-up but our findings support the use of the MDCA technique for lung SBRT treatment of Stage I/II NSCLC.

  3. Prevalence and clinical association of MET gene overexpression and amplification in patients with NSCLC: Results from the European Thoracic Oncology Platform (ETOP) Lungscape project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubendorf, Lukas; Dafni, Urania; Schöbel, Martin; Finn, Stephen P; Tischler, Verena; Sejda, Aleksandra; Marchetti, Antonio; Thunnissen, Erik; Verbeken, Eric K; Warth, Arne; Sansano, Irene; Cheney, Richard; Speel, Ernst Jan M; Nonaka, Daisuke; Monkhorst, Kim; Hager, Henrik; Martorell, Miguel; Savic, Spasenija; Kerr, Keith M; Tan, Qiang; Tsourti, Zoi; Geiger, Thomas R; Kammler, Roswitha; Schulze, Katja; Das-Gupta, Ashis; Shames, David; Peters, Solange; Stahel, Rolf A

    2017-09-01

    In a well-defined NSCLC cohort of the ETOP Lungscape program, we explored the epidemiology of IHC MET overexpression and amplification, their inter-correlation, and their association to outcome. Resected NSCLC were assessed for MET gene copy number (GCN) and expression using silver in-situ hybridization (SISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) on TMAs in a multicenter setting. MET amplification was defined as MET/centromere ratio≥2 (with average MET GCN≥4), high MET GCN as CGN≥5 and MET IHC+ as ≥2+ intensity in ≥50% of tumor cells. A total of 182 MET IHC+ and EGFR/KRAS WT tumors were analyzed for METex14 skipping mutation. MET IHC+ was found in 23.8% of 2432 patients, significantly associated with female gender, small tumor size, and adenocarcinoma histology. We observed a high inter-laboratory variability in IHC and SISH analysis. MET amplification prevailed in 4.6% and MET GCN≥5 in 4.1% of 1572 patients. MET amplification and MET GCN≥5 were not significantly associated with any tumor characteristics or stage. Both were significantly associated with IHC MET positivity (poverexpression, SISH MET amplification or high MET GCN was found with OS, RFS or TTR. MET overexpression is found in 23.8% of surgically resected NSCLC. MET amplification prevails in 4.6% and is associated with MET overexpression. Both have no influence on prognosis. The large inter-laboratory variability in IHC highlights the challenge of MET IHC analysis in routine practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Final toxicity results of a radiation-dose escalation study in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Predictors for radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, F.-M.; Hayman, James A.; Griffith, Kent A.; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Arenberg, Douglas; Lyons, Susan; Turrisi, Andrew; Lichter, Allen; Fraass, Benedick; Eisbruch, Avraham; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Haken, Randall K. ten

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to report the final toxicity results on a radiation-dose escalation trial designed to test a hypothesis that very high doses of radiation could be safely administered to patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by quantifying the dose-volume toxicity relationship of the lung. Methods and Materials: A total of 109 patients with unresectable or medically inoperable NSCLC were enrolled and treated with radiation-dose escalation (on the basis of predicted normal-lung toxicity) either alone or with neoadjuvant chemotherapy by use of 3D conformal techniques. Eighty-four patients (77%) received more than 69 Gy, the trial was stopped after the dose reached 103 Gy. Estimated median follow-up was 110 months. Results: There were 17 (14.6%) Grade 2 to 3 pneumonitis and 15 (13.8%) Grade 2 to 3 fibrosis and no Grade 4 to 5 lung toxicity. Multivariate analyses showed them to be (1) not associated with the dose prescribed to the tumor, and (2) significantly (p < 0.001) associated with lung-dosimetric parameters such as the mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung that received at least 20 Gy (V20), and the normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the lung. If cutoffs are 30% for V20, 20 Gy for MLD, and 10% for NTCP, these factors have positive predictive values of 50% to 71% and negative predictive value of 85% to 89%. Conclusions: With long-term follow-up for toxicity, we have demonstrated that much higher doses of radiation than are traditionally administered can be safely delivered to a majority of patients with NSCLC. Quantitative lung dose-volume toxicity-based dose escalation can form the basis for individualized high-dose radiation treatment to maximize the therapeutic ratio in these patients

  5. The tissue microlocalisation and cellular expression of CD163, VEGF, HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14 is correlated to clinical outcome in NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri, Chandra M; Shikotra, Aarti; Green, Ruth H; Waller, David A; Bradding, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We have previously investigated the microlocalisation of M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. This study investigated the non-macrophage (NM) expression of proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. Using immunohistochemistry, CD68(+) macrophages and proteins associated with either a cytotoxic M1 phenotype (HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14), or a non-cytotoxic M2 phenotype (CD163 and VEGF) were identified. NM expression of the markers was analysed in the islets and stroma of surgically resected tumours from 20 patients with extended survival (ES) (median 92.7 months) and 20 patients with poor survival (PS) (median 7.7 months). The NM expression of NM-HLA-DR (pMRP 8/14 (p = 0.02) was increased in ES compared to PS patients in the tumour islets. The tumour islet expression of NM-VEGF, was decreased in ES compared to PS patients (pMRP 8/14 (p = 0.01) expression in the stroma of ES patients compared with PS patients. The 5-year survival for patients with above and below median NM expression of the markers in the islets was 74.9% versus 4.7% (NM-HLA-DR pMRP 8/14 p = 0.04), as opposed to 34.1% versus 44.4% (NM-CD163 p = 0.41) and 19.4% versus 59.0% (NM-VEGF p = 0.001). Cell proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages are also expressed by other cell types in the tumour islets and stroma of patients with NSCLC. Their tissue and cellular microlocalisation is associated with important differences in clinical outcome.

  6. Activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling in EGFR mutant non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codony-Servat, Carles; Codony-Servat, Jordi; Karachaliou, Niki; Molina, Miguel Angel; Chaib, Imane; Ramirez, Jose Luis; de Los Llanos Gil, Maria; Solca, Flavio; Bivona, Trever G; Rosell, Rafael

    2017-07-18

    Gefitinib, erlotinib or afatinib are the current treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring an activating mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), but less than 5% of patients achieve a complete response and the median progression-free survival is no longer than 12 months. Early adaptive resistance can occur as soon as two hours after starting treatment by activating signal transducer and activation of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling. We investigated the activation of STAT3 in a panel of gefitinib-sensitive EGFR mutant cell lines, and gefitinib-resistant PC9 cell lines developed in our laboratory. Afatinib has great activity in gefitinib-sensitive as well as in gefitinib-resistant EGFR mutant NSCLC cell lines. However, afatinib therapy causes phosphorylation of STAT3 tyrosine 705 (pSTAT3Tyr705) and elevation of STAT3 and RANTES mRNA levels. The combination of afatinib with TPCA-1 (a STAT3 inhibitor) ablated pSTAT3Tyr705 and down-regulated STAT3 and RANTES mRNA levels with significant growth inhibitory effect in both gefitinib-sensitive and gefitinib-resistant EGFR mutant NSCLC cell lines. Aldehyde dehydrogenase positive (ALDH+) cells were still observed with the combination at the time that Hairy and Enhancer of Split 1 (HES1) mRNA expression was elevated following therapy. Although the combination of afatinib with STAT3 inhibition cannot eliminate the potential problem of a remnant cancer stem cell population, it represents a substantial advantage and opportunity to further prolong progression free survival and probably could increase the response rate in comparison to the current standard of single therapy.

  7. Glutathione S-transferase PI (GST-PI) mRNA expression and DNA methylation is involved in the pathogenesis and prognosis of NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimminger, Peter P; Maus, Martin K H; Schneider, Paul M; Metzger, Ralf; Hölscher, Arnulf H; Sugita, Hirofumi; Danenberg, Peter V; Alakus, Hakan; Brabender, Jan

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance of mRNA expression and DNA methylation of GST-PI in tumor and non-tumor lung tissue from NSCLC patients in terms of prognostic and pathogenetic value of this biomarker. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA expression and DNA methylation of GST-PI in paired tumor (T) and non-tumor (N) lung tissue of 91 NSCLC patients. Of all 91 patients 49% were stage I, 21% stage II and 30% stage IIIA. Forty-seven percent of the patients had squamous cell carcinoma, 36% adenocarcinoma and 17% large cell carcinoma. All patients were R0 resected. GST-PI mRNA expression could be measured in 100% in both (T and N) tissues; GST-PI DNA methylation was detected in 14% (N) and 14% (T). The median GST-PI mRNA expression in N was 7.83 (range: 0.01-19.43) and in T 13.15 (range: 0.01-116.8; p≤0.001). The median GST-PI methylation was not significantly different between T and N. No associations were seen between the mRNA expression or DNA methylation levels and clinical or histopathologic parameters such as gender, age, TNM stage, tumor histology and grading. The median survival of the investigated patients was 59.7 years (the median follow-up was 85.9 months). High GST-PI DNA methylation was significantly associated with a worse prognosis (p=0.041, log rank test). No correlation was found between the GST-PI DNA methylation levels and the correlating mRNA expression levels. GST-PI mRNA expression seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of NSCLC. High levels of GST-PI DNA methylation in tumor tissue of NSCLC patients have a potential as a biomarker identifying subpopulations with a more aggressive tumor biology. Quantitation of GST-PI DNA methylation may be a useful method to identify patients with a poor prognosis after curative resection and who will benefit from intensive adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression of DNA repair and replication genes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a role for thymidylate synthetase (TYMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotoula, Vassiliki; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Kosmidis, Paris A; Fountzilas, George; Krikelis, Dimitrios; Karavasilis, Vasilios; Koletsa, Triantafillia; Eleftheraki, Anastasia G; Televantou, Despina; Christodoulou, Christos; Dimoudis, Stefanos; Korantzis, Ippokratis

    2012-01-01

    BRCA1 (B), ERCC1 (E), RRM1 (R) and TYMS (T) mRNA expression has been extensively studied with respect to NSCLC patient outcome upon various chemotherapy agents. However, these markers have not been introduced into clinical practice yet. One of the reasons seems to be lack of a standard approach for the classification of the reported high/low mRNA expression. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic/predictive impact of B, E, R, T in routinely-treated NSCLC patients by taking into account the expression of these genes in the normal lung parenchyma. B, E, R, T mRNA expression was examined in 276 NSCLC samples (real-time PCR). The normal range of B, E, R, T transcript levels was first determined in matched tumor – normal pairs and then applied to the entire tumor series. Four main chemotherapy categories were examined: taxanes-without-platinum (Tax); platinum-without-taxanes (Plat); taxanes/platinum doublets (Tax/Plat); and, all-other combinations. In comparison to remotely located normal lung parenchyma, B, E, R, T mRNA expression was generally increased in matched tumors, as well as in the entire tumor series. Therefore, tumors were classified as expressing normal or aberrant B, E, R, T mRNA. In general, no marker was associated with overall and progression free survival (OS, PFS). Upon multivariate analysis, aberrant intratumoral TYMS predicted for shorter PFS than normal TYMS in 1st line chemo-naïve treated patients (p = 0.012). In the same setting, specific interactions were observed for aberrant TYMS with Plat and Tax/Plat (p = 0.003 and p = 0.006, respectively). Corresponding patients had longer PFS in comparison to those treated with Tax (Plat: HR = 0.234, 95% CI:0.108-0.506, Wald’s p < 0.0001; Tax/Plat: HR = 0.242, 95% CI:0.131-0.447, Wald’s p < 0.0001). Similar results were obtained for PFS in 1st line chemo-naïve and (neo)adjuvant pre-treated patients. Adenocarcinoma, early disease stage, and treatment with Tax/Plat doublets

  9. Discovery of 2',4'-dimethoxychalcone as a Hsp90 inhibitor and its effect on iressa-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young Ho

    2015-10-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a ATP dependent molecular chaperone and has emerged as an attractive therapeutic target in the war on cancer due to its role in regulating maturation and stabilization of numerous oncogenic proteins. In this study, we discovered that 2',4'-dimethoxychalcone (1b) disrupted Hsp90 chaperoning function and inhibited the growth of iressa-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, H1975). The result suggested that 2',4'-dimethoxychalcone (1b) could serve as a potential therapeutic lead to circumvent the drug resistance acquired by EGFR mutation and Met amplification.

  10. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the most common neurotransmitter, glutamate has many roles throughout the brain and nervous ...

  12. Gender, Race, and Survival: A Study in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases Patients Utilizing the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis Classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Chao, Samuel T.; Rice, Thomas W.; Adelstein, David J.; Barnett, Gene H.; Mekhail, Tarek M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Suh, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To explore whether gender and race influence survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with brain metastases, using our large single-institution brain tumor database and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) brain metastases classification. Methods and materials: A retrospective review of a single-institution brain metastasis database for the interval January 1982 to September 2004 yielded 835 NSCLC patients with brain metastases for analysis. Patient subsets based on combinations of gender, race, and RPA class were then analyzed for survival differences. Results: Median follow-up was 5.4 months (range, 0-122.9 months). There were 485 male patients (M) (58.4%) and 346 female patients (F) (41.6%). Of the 828 evaluable patients (99%), 143 (17%) were black/African American (B) and 685 (83%) were white/Caucasian (W). Median survival time (MST) from time of brain metastasis diagnosis for all patients was 5.8 months. Median survival time by gender (F vs. M) and race (W vs. B) was 6.3 months vs. 5.5 months (p = 0.013) and 6.0 months vs. 5.2 months (p = 0.08), respectively. For patients stratified by RPA class, gender, and race, MST significantly favored BFs over BMs in Class II: 11.2 months vs. 4.6 months (p = 0.021). On multivariable analysis, significant variables were gender (p = 0.041, relative risk [RR] 0.83) and RPA class (p < 0.0001, RR 0.28 for I vs. III; p < 0.0001, RR 0.51 for II vs. III) but not race. Conclusions: Gender significantly influences NSCLC brain metastasis survival. Race trended to significance in overall survival but was not significant on multivariable analysis. Multivariable analysis identified gender and RPA classification as significant variables with respect to survival.

  13. Optimised Pre-Analytical Methods Improve KRAS Mutation Detection in Circulating Tumour DNA (ctDNA) from Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James L.; Corcoran, Claire; Brown, Helen; Sharpe, Alan D.; Musilova, Milena; Kohlmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive mutation testing using circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is an attractive premise. This could enable patients without available tumour sample to access more treatment options. Materials & Methods Peripheral blood and matched tumours were analysed from 45 NSCLC patients. We investigated the impact of pre-analytical variables on DNA yield and/or KRAS mutation detection: sample collection tube type, incubation time, centrifugation steps, plasma input volume and DNA extraction kits. Results 2 hr incubation time and double plasma centrifugation (2000 x g) reduced overall DNA yield resulting in lowered levels of contaminating genomic DNA (gDNA). Reduced “contamination” and increased KRAS mutation detection was observed using cell-free DNA Blood Collection Tubes (cfDNA BCT) (Streck), after 72 hrs following blood draw compared to EDTA tubes. Plasma input volume and use of different DNA extraction kits impacted DNA yield. Conclusion This study demonstrated that successful ctDNA recovery for mutation detection in NSCLC is dependent on pre-analytical steps. Development of standardised methods for the detection of KRAS mutations from ctDNA specimens is recommended to minimise the impact of pre-analytical steps on mutation detection rates. Where rapid sample processing is not possible the use of cfDNA BCT tubes would be advantageous. PMID:26918901

  14. Optimised Pre-Analytical Methods Improve KRAS Mutation Detection in Circulating Tumour DNA (ctDNA from Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Sherwood

    Full Text Available Non-invasive mutation testing using circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA is an attractive premise. This could enable patients without available tumour sample to access more treatment options.Peripheral blood and matched tumours were analysed from 45 NSCLC patients. We investigated the impact of pre-analytical variables on DNA yield and/or KRAS mutation detection: sample collection tube type, incubation time, centrifugation steps, plasma input volume and DNA extraction kits.2 hr incubation time and double plasma centrifugation (2000 x g reduced overall DNA yield resulting in lowered levels of contaminating genomic DNA (gDNA. Reduced "contamination" and increased KRAS mutation detection was observed using cell-free DNA Blood Collection Tubes (cfDNA BCT (Streck, after 72 hrs following blood draw compared to EDTA tubes. Plasma input volume and use of different DNA extraction kits impacted DNA yield.This study demonstrated that successful ctDNA recovery for mutation detection in NSCLC is dependent on pre-analytical steps. Development of standardised methods for the detection of KRAS mutations from ctDNA specimens is recommended to minimise the impact of pre-analytical steps on mutation detection rates. Where rapid sample processing is not possible the use of cfDNA BCT tubes would be advantageous.

  15. Multidisciplinary management of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in stage III: clinical case description. Recommendations and state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Carnio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in industrialized countries with progressive increase of its mortality rate. Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC is approximately 80-85% of all lung cancers, being adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma the most common histologies. The majority of the patients with stage III clinical stage, presents a mediastinal lymph node involvement described with computed tomography (TC and/or positron emission tomography (PET. The current approach to patients with NSCLC is multidisciplinary, especially for those staged as potentially operable, both for staging and for a correct definition of best treatment strategy. Updated international and national Guidelines and recommendations can provide valuable support to the clinician.The case described concerns the accidental detection of a tumour in the lung in a 58-year-old man with arterial hypertension controlled with ACE inhibitors. The treatments agreed after a multidisciplinary approach are cisplatin and docetaxel, the surgical resection, and the radiotherapy. After three months the patient has neither metastasis nor relapse.

  16. Clinical evaluation of chemosensitivity testing for patients with unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using collagen gel droplet embedded culture drug sensitivity test (CD-DST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Masafumi; Gika, Masatoshi; Abiko, Tomohiro; Inoue, Yoshimasa; Oyama, Takahiko; Izumi, Yotaro; Kobayashi, Hisayuki; Kobayashi, Koichi

    2007-03-01

    In the present study, we prospectively evaluated the clinical feasibility and efficacy of collagen gel droplet embedded culture drug sensitivity test (CD-DST) in unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) without previous treatment. Eighty patients with unresectable NSCLC, aged less than 81 years old, PS 0-1, and with evaluable tumor lesions, entered the study. If the patient had CD-DST active drugs, more than three cycles of chemotherapy containing these drugs were administered. If the patient did not have CD-DST active drugs, the patient could choose any treatment including best supportive care. Of the 80 patients in this study, CD-DST yielded results successfully in 49 patients (61.3%). CD-DST active drugs were present in 22 patients, and significantly more female patients had in vitro active anticancer agents than male (P=0.0008). All of the patients with CD-DST active agents received chemotherapy including these agents. In these patients, the response rate was 72.7%, and median survival was 15.0 months. In the patients without CD-DST active agents, 11 patients received standard, empirical chemotherapy. In these patients, response rate was 0%, and median survival was 6.0 months. The results show that CD-DST is capable of selecting the responders and the respective optimal regimens, and also delineating the patients less likely benefit from treatment.

  17. Reduced folate carrier (RFC) as a predictive marker for response to pemetrexed in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Fernandez, Carlos; Perez-Arnillas, Quionia; Ruiz-Echeverria, Lucrecia; Rodriguez-Rubi, David; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Luisa; Li-Torres, Walter; Izquierdo-Manuel, Marta; Berros, Jose P; Luque-Cabal, Maria; Jimenez-Fonseca, Paula; Villanueva-Palicio, Noemi; Esteban-Gonzalez, Emilio

    2014-04-01

    RFC is the major transport system in mammalian cells for folate cofactors and antifolate therapeutics. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of RFC expression in patients receiving pemetrexed for advanced NSCLC. The study was carried out in a population of 48 patients with advanced NSCLC which have received pemetrexed monotherapy in second and third line. RFC expression was assessed using a two-step model of immunohistochemical staining in paraffin-embedded tissue samples. RFC expression was detected in 16 (33 %) patients. In the global population, the median progression free survival (PFS) and the median overall survival (OS) were 3.3 and 6.5 months respectively. The subgroup of patients with expression of RFC had a tendency to better median PFS (4.5 vs 2.8 months; p = 0.926) and median OS (11.7 vs 4.8; p = 0.150). In patients with adenocarcinoma histology and RFC expression median OS after treatment with pemetrexed was 14.4 months versus 5.0 in those with adenocarcinoma but without RFC expression (p = 0.039). These results suggest the possible relation between RFC expression and response to treatment with antifolates (pemetrexed) independently of the tumor histology. Further studies are required to confirm these results.

  18. Texture analysis of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) on contrast-enhanced computed tomography: prediction of the response to the first-line chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Davide; Morassi, Mauro; Maroldi, Roberto; Roca, Elisa; Tassi, Gianfranco; Cavalleri, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    To assess whether tumour heterogeneity, quantified by texture analysis (TA) on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT), can predict response to chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty-three CECT studies of patients with advanced NSCLC who had undergone first-line chemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Response to chemotherapy was evaluated according to RECIST1.1. Tumour uniformity was assessed by a TA method based on Laplacian of Gaussian filtering. The resulting parameters were correlated with treatment response and overall survival by multivariate analysis. Thirty-one out of 53 patients were non-responders and 22 were responders. Average overall survival was 13 months (4-35), minimum follow-up was 12 months. In the adenocarcinoma group (n = 31), the product of tumour uniformity and grey level (GL*U) was the unique independent variable correlating with treatment response. Dividing the GL*U (range 8.5-46.6) into tertiles, lesions belonging to the second and the third tertiles had an 8.3-fold higher probability of treatment response compared with those in the first tertile. No association between texture features and response to treatment was observed in the non-adenocarcinoma group (n = 22). GL*U did not correlate with overall survival. TA on CECT images in advanced lung adenocarcinoma provides an independent predictive indicator of response to first-line chemotherapy. (orig.)

  19. Accuracy of diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI with background signal suppression (MR-DWIBS) in diagnosis of mediastinal lymph node metastasis of nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Tian, Jiakai; Liu, Yuhui; Li, Chuanfu

    2014-07-01

    To prospectively evaluate the accuracy of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with background signal suppression (MR-DWIBS) for detecting mediastinal lymph node metastasis of nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MR-DWIBS was performed in 42 consecutive patients (27 men, 15 women; age range, 42-78 years; median age, 55 years) with histologically proven NSCLC. The visualization rate of metastatic lymph node (MLN) and benign lymph node (BLN) of enlarged lymph nodes (ELN) and normal-sized lymph nodes (NLN) was compared by using a chi-square test or Fisher's exact test on a per-nodal basis. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of MLN and BLN was measured and compared by using two-tailed unpaired Student's t-test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the overall diagnostic accuracy of ADC for ELN and NLN. The optimal cutoff value was determined and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy was calculated. Thirty-five out of 119 lymph resected nodes were confirmed to be metastatic by histologic examination. The visualization rate of MLN was significantly higher than that of BLN for ELN (P accuracy were 75.0%, 90.9%, 66.7%, 93.8%, and 87.8%, respectively. MR-DWIBS may be clinically useful to visually detect mediastinal lymph nodes and ADC measurement can aid in malignant node discrimination. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ... imaging (MRI) mdash;An imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation — ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response ... neurotransmitters) or electrical signals. amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which helps activate the fight-or-flight response ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... mental illnesses. Search the NIMH Website: Home Health & Education Mental Health Information Statistics Consumer Health Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at ... Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She ... containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ... increases neuronal activity, is involved in early brain development, and may ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... MSC 9663 Bethesda, MD 20892-9663 Follow Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Google Plus NIMH Newsletter NIMH RSS ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. ... brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain involved in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse —An ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or MEG, can capture split-second ... Contact Us U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health USA.gov The National ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where ...

  11. Reference Data for Standardized Quality of Life Questionnaires in Indian Patients with Brain Metastases from Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Results from a Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Jaiprakash; Chakraborty, Santam; Ghosh Laskar, Sarbani; Patil, Vijay M; Prabhash, Kumar; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Noronha, Vanita; Purandare, Nilendu C; Joshi, Amit; Mummudi, Naveen; Arora, Jitendra; Badhe, Rupali

    2017-04-10

    Reference data for European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life questionnaires do not include studies from the Indian subcontinent. The objective of the current study was to establish a reference dataset for Indian patients of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) presenting with brain metastases (BM). One hundred forty patients with NSCLC with BM treated between 2012-2015 were registered in a prospective cohort study (CTRI/2013/01/003299). The baseline quality of life was evaluated using the EORTC general quality of life questionnaire QLQ-C30 and lung cancer specific module LC13. Minimum important difference (MID) scores for individual domains of the EORTC QLQ-C30 and LC13 questionnaires were derived (MID = 0.2 x standard deviation) from the reference data for patients with recurrent/metastatic lung cancers. In addition, a systematic review was conducted to identify studies reporting baseline quality of life scores for recurrent/metastatic NSCLC. Scores of several functional as well as symptom scales in the current NSCLC population differed by more than the MID from the baseline mean scores in the reference EORTC population as well as that reported from other studies. Differences in mean score from the EORTC reference data ranged from 6.2 and 9.4 points for the role functioning and cognitive functioning domains. In the symptom scales, the largest differences were observed for the financial difficulties (23.9) scores for the QLQ-C30 and peripheral neuropathy (21.7) for LC13 questionnaires. The current study demonstrates that baseline reference scores need to be established for patients from the Indian subcontinent. The findings from the current study have important implications for studies employing quality of life (QOL) assessment in the Indian NSCLC patient population.

  12. Combining Whole-Brain Radiotherapy with Gefitinib/Erlotinib for Brain Metastases from Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-hua Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To comprehensively assess the efficacy and safety of whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT combined with gefitinib/erlotinib for treatment of brain metastases (BM from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE.com, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library were searched from inception to April 12, 2015. Studies on randomized controlled trials (RCTs and case-control trials comparing WBRT combined with gefitinib/erlotinib versus WBRT alone for BM from NSCLC were included. Literature selection, data extraction, and quality assessment were performed independently by two trained reviewers. RevMan 5.3 software was used to analyze data. Results. A total of 7 trials involving 622 patients were included. Compared with WBRT alone or WBRT plus chemotherapy, WBRT plus gefitinib/erlotinib could significantly improve response rate (OR = 2.16, 95% CI: 1.35–3.47; P=0.001, remission rate of central nervous system (OR = 6.06, 95% CI: 2.57–14.29; P<0.0001, disease control rate (OR = 3.34, 95% CI: 1.84–6.07; P<0.0001, overall survival (HR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.58–0.89; P=0.002, and 1-year survival rate (OR = 2.43, 95% CI: 1.51–3.91; P=0.0002. In adverse events (III-IV, statistically significant differences were not found, except for rash (OR = 7.96, 95% CI: 2.02–31.34; P=0.003 and myelosuppression (OR = 0.19, 95% CI: 0.07–0.51; P=0.0010. Conclusions. WBRT plus gefitinib/erlotinib was superior to WBRT alone and well tolerated in patients with BM from NSCLC.

  13. Brain Stimulation Therapies

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    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  14. Brain radiation - discharge

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    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... to produce a specific protein. Scientists believe epigenetics play a major role in mental disorders and the ... thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention ...

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    Full Text Available ... another as chemical or electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the ... how she's responding to the treatment. She also begins regular talk therapy sessions with her psychiatrist. In ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the most common neurotransmitter, glutamate has many roles throughout the brain and nervous system. Glutamate is an excitatory transmitter: when it is ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... studied in mental health research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural " ... confront or escape from a dangerous situation. The amygdala also appears to be involved in learning to ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... husband questions about Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many others. ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... environment; this all helps the cell maintain its balance with the environment. Synapses are tiny gaps between ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ...

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  4. Brain Basics

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  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare ... listless, and had no appetite most of the time. Weeks later, Sarah realized she was having trouble ...

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  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... or "working" memory and in retrieving long-term memories. This area of the brain also helps to control the amygdala during stressful events. Some research shows that people who have PTSD or ADHD ...

  12. Brain Basics

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  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Funding Home Opportunities & Announcements Funding Strategy for Grants Application Process Managing Grants Clinical Research Training Small Business ... works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, and responds to ... brain's structure develops and matures helps scientists understand what goes wrong in mental illnesses. Scientists have already ...

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  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. ... and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    ... it increases the chance that the neuron will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells ... for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... it increases the chance that the neuron will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells ... for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... each other How changes in the brain can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing ... understanding of genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and information that the cell needs for growth, metabolism, and repair. Cytoplasm is the substance that fills ... possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on neurons communicating with ...

  2. Brain Lesions

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    ... contents/search. Accessed Aug. 14, 2017. Sports-related concussion. Merck Manual Professional Version http://www.merckmanuals.com/ ... injuries-poisoning/traumatic-brain-injury-tbi/sports-related-concussion. Accessed Aug. 14, 2017. Jan. 11, 2018 Original ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and Groups Strategic Plan Offices and Divisions Budget Careers at ... electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the outer layer of a ...

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    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... or-flight response and is also involved in emotions and memory. anterior cingulate cortex —Is involved in ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the most common ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and information that the cell needs for growth, metabolism, and repair. Cytoplasm is the substance that fills ... functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. Knowing ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare that ... that everyone gets "the blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that ...

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using ... as many neurons working together form a circuit, many circuits working together ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, and responds ... via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the PFC ... a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... fear, such as overcoming a fear of spiders. Studying how the amygdala helps create memories of fear ... her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's ... as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone or together in complex ways, to change ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on neurons communicating with ... axon, most neurons release a chemical message (a neurotransmitter) which crosses the synapse and binds to receptors ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ... how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... deciding her symptoms were not caused by a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred ... helpful, but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... embryo. As the cells grow and differentiate, neurons travel from a central "birthplace" to their final destination. ... begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... amount of serotonin in the brain and help reduce symptoms of depression. Sarah also has several follow- ... Knowing who might respond to such medications could reduce the amount of trial and error and frustration ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... stay focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... bind onto, leading to more normal mood functioning. Dopamine —mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the ... reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... doctor that she had experienced long periods of deep sadness throughout her teenage years, but had never ... the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many others. ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... heart rate to responding when we sense a mistake, helping us feel motivated and stay focused on ... peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar ...

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    Full Text Available ... genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for mental disorders. ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... cell. Axons can range in length from a fraction of an inch to several feet. Each neuron ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... health research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" ... also appears to be involved in learning to fear an event, such as touching a hot stove, ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, such as ... medication used to treat depression. SSRIs boost the amount of serotonin in the brain and help reduce ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. Knowing how the ... as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control and memory. serotonin —A neurotransmitter ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, ... studies suggest that having too little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions ...

  13. Brain glutaminases.

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    Márquez, Javier; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Segura, Juan A; Matés, José M; Campos-Sandoval, José A; Alonso, Francisco J

    2010-05-01

    Glutaminase is considered as the main glutamate producer enzyme in brain. Consequently, the enzyme is essential for both glutamatergic and gabaergic transmissions. Glutamine-derived glutamate and ammonia, the products of glutaminase reaction, fulfill crucial roles in energy metabolism and in the biosynthesis of basic metabolites, such as GABA, proteins and glutathione. However, glutamate and ammonia are also hazardous compounds and danger lurks in their generation beyond normal physiological thresholds; hence, glutaminase activity must be carefully regulated in the mammalian brain. The differential distribution and regulation of glutaminase are key factors to modulate the metabolism of glutamate and glutamine in brain. The discovery of novel isoenzymes, protein interacting partners and subcellular localizations indicate new functions for brain glutaminase. In this short review, we summarize recent findings that point consistently towards glutaminase as a multifaceted protein able to perform different tasks. Finally, we will highlight the involvement of glutaminase in pathological states and its consideration as a potential therapeutic target.

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... people with depression often have lower than normal levels of serotonin. The types of medications most commonly ...

  15. Chemo Brain

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    ... chemo brain is a widely used term, it's misleading. It's unlikely that chemotherapy is the sole cause ... Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She ... body. dopamine —A neurotransmitter mainly involved in controlling movement, managing the release of various hormones, and aiding ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into ... factors that can affect our bodies, such as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ...

  19. The tissue microlocalisation and cellular expression of CD163, VEGF, HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14 is correlated to clinical outcome in NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra M Ohri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously investigated the microlocalisation of M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. This study investigated the non-macrophage (NM expression of proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. METHODS: Using immunohistochemistry, CD68(+ macrophages and proteins associated with either a cytotoxic M1 phenotype (HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14, or a non-cytotoxic M2 phenotype (CD163 and VEGF were identified. NM expression of the markers was analysed in the islets and stroma of surgically resected tumours from 20 patients with extended survival (ES (median 92.7 months and 20 patients with poor survival (PS (median 7.7 months. RESULTS: The NM expression of NM-HLA-DR (p<0.001, NM-iNOS (p = 0.02 and NM-MRP 8/14 (p = 0.02 was increased in ES compared to PS patients in the tumour islets. The tumour islet expression of NM-VEGF, was decreased in ES compared to PS patients (p<0.001. There was more NM-CD163 expression (p = 0.04 but less NM-iNOS (p = 0.002 and MRP 8/14 (p = 0.01 expression in the stroma of ES patients compared with PS patients. The 5-year survival for patients with above and below median NM expression of the markers in the islets was 74.9% versus 4.7% (NM-HLA-DR p<0.001, 65.0% versus 14.6% (NM-iNOS p = 0.003, and 54.3% versus 22.2% (NM-MRP 8/14 p = 0.04, as opposed to 34.1% versus 44.4% (NM-CD163 p = 0.41 and 19.4% versus 59.0% (NM-VEGF p = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Cell proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages are also expressed by other cell types in the tumour islets and stroma of patients with NSCLC. Their tissue and cellular microlocalisation is associated with important differences in clinical outcome.

  20. WE-AB-207B-02: A Bayesian Network Approach for Joint Prediction of Tumor Control and Radiation Pneumonitis (RP) in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y; McShan, D; Matuszak, M; Hobson, S; Jolly, S; Ten Haken, R; El Naqa, I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: NSCLC radiotherapy treatment is a trade-off between controlling the tumor while limiting radiation-induced toxicities. Here we identify hierarchical biophysical relationships that could simultaneously influence both local control (LC) and RP by using an integrated Bayesian Networks (BN) approach. Methods: We studied 79 NSCLC patients treated on prospective protocol with 56 cases of LC and 21 events of RP. Beyond dosimetric information, each patient had 193 features including 12 clinical factors, 60 circulating blood cytokines before and during radiotherapy, 62 microRNAs, and 59 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The most relevant biophysical predictors for both LC and RP were identified using a Markov blanket local discovery algorithm and the corresponding BN was constructed using a score-learning algorithm. The area under the free-response receiver operating characteristics (AU-FROC) was used for performance evaluation. Cross-validation was employed to guard against overfitting pitfalls. Results: A BN revealing the biophysical interrelationships jointly in terms of LC and RP was developed and evaluated. The integrated BN included two SNPs, one microRNA, one clinical factor, three pre-treatment cytokines, relative changes of two cytokines between pre and during-treatment, and gEUDs of the GTV (a=-20) and lung (a=1). On cross-validation, the AUC prediction of independent LC was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.75–0.95) and RP was 0.83 (0.73–0.92). The AU-FROC of the integrated BN to predict both LC/RP was 0.81 (0.71–0.90) based on 2000 stratified bootstrap, indicating minimal loss in joint prediction power. Conclusions: We developed a new approach for multiple outcome utility application in radiotherapy based on integrated BN techniques. The BN developed from large-scale retrospective data is able to simultaneously predict LC and RP in NSCLC treatments based on individual patient characteristics. The joint prediction is only slightly compromised compared to

  1. Signaling networks associated with AKT activation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC: new insights on the role of phosphatydil-inositol-3 kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Scrima

    Full Text Available Aberrant activation of PI3K/AKT signalling represents one of the most common molecular alterations in lung cancer, though the relative contribution of the single components of the cascade to the NSCLC development is still poorly defined. In this manuscript we have investigated the relationship between expression and genetic alterations of the components of the PI3K/AKT pathway [KRAS, the catalytic subunit of PI3K (p110α, PTEN, AKT1 and AKT2] and the activation of AKT in 107 surgically resected NSCLCs and have analyzed the existing relationships with clinico-pathologic features. Expression analysis was performed by immunohistochemistry on Tissue Micro Arrays (TMA; mutation analysis was performed by DNA sequencing; copy number variation was determined by FISH. We report that activation of PI3K/AKT pathway in Italian NSCLC patients is associated with high grade (G3-G4 compared with G1-G2; n = 83; p<0.05 and more advanced disease (TNM stage III vs. stages I and II; n = 26; p<0.05. In addition, we found that PTEN loss (41/104, 39% and the overexpression of p110α (27/92, 29% represent the most frequent aberration observed in NSCLCs. Less frequent molecular lesions comprised the overexpression of AKT2 (18/83, 22% or AKT1 (17/96, 18%, and KRAS mutation (7/63, 11%. Our results indicate that, among all genes, only p110α overexpression was significantly associated to AKT activation in NSCLCs (p = 0.02. Manipulation of p110α expression in lung cancer cells carrying an active PI3K allele (NCI-H460 efficiently reduced proliferation of NSCLC cells in vitro and tumour growth in vivo. Finally, RNA profiling of lung epithelial cells (BEAS-2B expressing a mutant allele of PIK3 (E545K identified a network of transcription factors such as MYC, FOS and HMGA1, not previously recognised to be associated with aberrant PI3K signalling in lung cancer.

  2. Brain imaging and brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokoloff, L.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a survey of the applications of imaging studies of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism to the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Contributors review imaging techniques and strategies for measuring regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, for mapping functional neural systems, and for imaging normal brain functions. They then examine the applications of brain imaging techniques to the study of such neurological and psychiatric disorders as: cerebral ischemia; convulsive disorders; cerebral tumors; Huntington's disease; Alzheimer's disease; depression and other mood disorders. A state-of-the-art report on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and central nervous system rounds out the book's coverage

  3. Alternating radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC): long-term results of two phase II cooperative trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirimanoff, R.O.; Alberto, P.; Bolla, M.; Mermillod, B.; Michel, G.; Mirabell, R.; Moro, D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The treatment of inoperable Stage III NSCLC with conventional RT alone results in a high incidence of local and distant failures and in very limited long-term survival rates. In two consecutive phase II cooperative trials, we evaluated the combination of alternating hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: A total of one hundred and thirty two patients were enrolled. Between 2/86 and 9/89, 65 patients were entered in the first trial (G.I) and between 12/89 and 10/92 67 were enrolled in the second trial (G.II). In both protocols, RT was administered twice daily, with 6 hours interval, 5 days a week, to a total dose of 63 Gy in 42 fractions of 1.5 Gy. RT was given during weeks 2, 3 and 6, 7, over an elapsed time of 6 weeks. In G.I, 3 cycles of cisplatin, 60 mg/m2 d.1, mitomycin, 8 mg/m2 d.1 and vindesin 3 mg/m2 d.1 and 8, were given during weeks 1, 5 and 9, whereas in G.II, cisplatin 70 mg/m2 d.1 and vinblastin 5 mg/m2 d.1 and 8 were given during weeks 1, 5, 9, 13, 17 and 21. Patients' characteristics included the following : median age was 55.5 years (28-70), male to female ratio was 7.3 : 1, tumor Stage were III A in 44% and III B in 56%, performance status (P.S.) were 0 in 36%, 1 in 52% and 2 in 12%. Histologic type consisted in squamous cell carcinoma in 60%, adenocarcinoma in 22%, large cell carcinoma in 14% and undifferentiated NSCLC in 4%. Results: With a minimum follow-up of 3 years, the 1, 2, 5 and 8 year overall survival probability was 56% (95% C.I. 47% - 64%), 27% (20% - 35%), 12% (7% - 18%) and 9% (3% - 16%) respectively, with a median survival of 13.6 months (11.4 - 16.8). Median follow-up for survivors was 6 years (3.3 - 9.9). There were no survival differences between Stage III A and III B (p = .84), PS 0, ,, 2 (p = .87), sex (p = .45) or between the two treatment protocols. At this time, 14 patients are alive, and 118 have died : 102 from NSCLC, 4 from acute toxicity, 2

  4. Randomized cross-over study of patient preference for oral or intravenous vinorelbine in combination with carboplatin in the treatment of advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisa Helene Toft; Østerlind, Kell Erik; Rytter, C.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most chemotherapeutics are administrated intravenously (iv), but some are also available in an oral (po) formulation. This study was designed with the primary objective to estimate the patients' preference for po or iv vinorelbine in combination with carboplatin for the palliative...... treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Secondary aims were to evaluate toxicity, efficacy, and subjective reasons the preference. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-one patients were randomized in a cross-over trial to two cycles of carboplatin day 1 and vinorelbine day 1 and day 8 iv followed by two...... cycles of carboplatin and vinorelbine po, or the opposite. Patients, who did not show progressive disease after four cycles, had a free choice of iv or po vinorelbine for the next two cycles. RESULTS: Forty-three patients were evaluable for preference and 32 (74%, 95% CI 61-88%) chose po (p

  5. The correlation between cell-free DNA and tumour burden was estimated by PET/CT in patients with advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, A D; Holdgaard, Paw; Spindler, K-L G

    2014-01-01

    Background:Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) circulating in the blood holds a possible prognostic value in malignant diseases. Under malignant conditions, the level of cfDNA increases but the biological mechanism remains to be fully understood. We aimed to examine the correlation between cfDNA and total tumour...... burden defined by positron emission tomography (PET) parameters.Methods:Patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were enrolled into a prospective biomarker trial. Before treatment, plasma was extracted and the level of cfDNA was determined by qPCR. An (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F...... analysis. MTV>the median was associated with a significantly shorter OS (P=0.02). There was no significant difference in OS according to TLG (P=0.08).Conclusion:Cell-free DNA may not be a simple measure of tumour burden, but seems to reflect more complex mechanisms of tumour biology, making it attractive...

  6. A randomized phase II trial of concurrent chemo-RT of oral vinorelbine and 60 Gy or 66 Gy, in locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, O.; Knap, M.; Khalil, A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Concurrent chemo-radiation (CRT) is the treatment of choice for local advanced NSCLC patients. Despite the curative intent of the treatment, survival is poor with a median survival of about 16-18 months (m) and a 5 year (y) survival of 15%. The loco-regional control rate at 2 y...... is only about 30% in clinical trials. This randomized phase-II trial tested a dose intense oral vinorelbine (Nav) regimen with two doses of RT, 60 Gy/30 F (arm A) and 66 Gy/33 F (arm B). Materials and Methods: Before randomization to arm A or B, the patients were treated with 2 cycles of induction...

  7. Effectiveness of accelerated radiotherapy for patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and borderline prognostic factors without distant metastasis: a retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Linh N.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Allen, Pamela; Schea, Randi A.; Milas, Luka

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The standard treatment for patients with unresectable or medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and good prognostic factors (e.g., weight loss [WL] ≤5% and Karnofsky performance status [KPS] ≥70) is induction chemotherapy followed by definitive radiotherapy to the primary site at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a total dose of 60-63 Gy to the target volume. Patients with poor prognostic factors usually receive radiotherapy alone, but the fractionation schedule and total dose have not been standardized. To attempt to optimize irradiation doses and schedule, we compared the effectiveness of accelerated radiotherapy (ACRT) alone to 45 Gy at 3 Gy per fraction with standard radiation therapy (STRT) of 60-66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in regard to tumor response, local control, distant metastasis, toxicity, and survival. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients treated with radiation for NSCLC at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1990 and 1994 were identified. All 55 patients had node-positive, and no distant metastasis (N+, M0) of NSCLC. Two cohorts were identified. One cohort (26 patients) had borderline poor prognostic factors (KPS less than 70 but higher than 50, and/or WL of more than 5%) and was treated with radiotherapy alone to 45 Gy over 3 weeks at 3 Gy/fraction (ACRT). The second cohort (29 patients) had significantly better prognostic factors (KPS ≥70 and WL ≤5%) and was treated to 60-66 Gy over 6 to 6((1)/(2)) weeks at 2 Gy per fraction (STRT) during the same period. Results: In the first cohort treated by ACRT, the distribution of patients by AJCC stage was IIB 8%, IIIA 19%, and IIIB 73%. Sixty-two percent had KPS 5%. The maximum response rate as determined by chest X-ray was 60% among 45 of 55 patients who were evaluable for response: combined complete responses (20%) and partial responses (40%). Overall survival in these patients was 13% at 2 and 5 years, with a locoregional control rate of 42% and a

  8. Targeted therapy of brain metastases: latest evidence and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Rodica; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S

    2017-12-01

    Brain metastases (BM) occur in 20-40% of patients with cancer and 60-75% of patients with BM become symptomatic. Due to an aging population and advances in the treatment of primary cancers, patients are living longer and are more likely to experience complications from BM. The diagnosis of BM drastically worsens long-term survival rates, with multiple metastases being a poor prognostic factor. Until recently, the mainstay of treatment consisted of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), surgical resection, whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT), or a combination of these modalities. Systemic chemotherapy has been felt largely ineffective in the treatment of BM due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which includes efflux pumps on brain capillaries. Over the past decade however, researchers have identified therapeutic agents that are able to cross the BBB. These findings could make a multimodality treatment approach possible, consisting of surgery, radiation, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, which could lead to better disease control in this patient population and prolong survival. In this review, we discuss present evidence on available targeted therapies and their role in the treatment of BM from primary tumors with the highest prevalence of central nervous system (CNS) involvement, specifically non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), breast cancer melanoma, and renal cell carcinoma.

  9. Genistein mediates the selective radiosensitizing effect in NSCLC A549 cells via inhibiting methylation of the keap1 gene promoter region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiongxiong; Sun, Chao; Liu, Bingtao; Jin, Xiaodong; Li, Ping; Zheng, Xiaogang; Zhao, Ting; Li, Feifei; Li, Qiang

    2016-05-10

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells often possess a hypermethylated Keap1 promoter, which decreases Keap1 mRNA and protein expression levels, thus impairing the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway and thereby leading to chemo- or radio-resistance. In this study, we showed that genistein selectively exhibited a radiosensitizing effect on NSCLC A549 cells but not on normal lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells. Genistein caused oxidative stress in A549 cells rather than MRC-5 cells, as determined by the oxidation of the ROS-sensitive probe DCFH-DA and oxidative damage marked by MDA, PCO or 8-OHdG content. In A549 instead of MRC-5 cells, genistein reduced the level of methylation in the Keap1 promoter region, leading to an increased mRNA expression, thus effectively inhibited the transcription of Nrf2 to the nucleus, which suppressed the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant and resulted in the upregulation of ROS. Importantly, when combined with radiation, genistein further increased the ROS levels in A549 cells whereas decreasing the radiation-induced oxidative stress in MRC-5 cells, possibly via increasing the expression levels of Nrf2, GSH and HO-1. Moreover, radiation combined with genistein significantly increased cell apoptosis in A549 but not MRC-5 cells. Together, the results herein show that the intrinsic difference in the redox status of A549 and MRC-5 cells could be the target for genistein to selectively sensitize A549 cells to radiation, thereby leading to an increase in radiosensitivity for A549 cells.

  10. Correlation of F-18 FDG PET with morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced (stage III) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Bonnet, R.; Presselt, N.; Przetak, C.; Junker, K.; Schneider, C.P.; Hoeffken, K.; Wendt, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To determine the role of 2-[(18)F] fluoro-2- deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation, findings in 32 patients were analyzed prospectively in an ongoing multicenter trial (LUCAS-MD, Germany). Material and Methods: Inclusion criteria was histologically confirmed NSCLC stage IIIA/IIIB. For staging all patients received a PET scan in addition to a spiral CT and/or MRI before therapy. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of 2-3 cycles of chemotherapy with paclitaxel (225 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC 6), each d1 q22 and a block of chemoradiation (45Gy, 1.5Gy b.i.d., concomitant with paclitaxel (50 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC = 2), each d1, d8, d15) followed by surgery. All patients received a second PET after completion of neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Whole-body PET (ECAT Exact 47) studies (attenuation corrected, iteratively reconstructed) were obtained 60 min. after injection of 6 MBq/kg body weight F-18 FDG. For semi-quantitative analysis, the tumor standardized uptake values (SUV), the tumor to background SUV ratio (T/B ratio), the metabolic tumor diameter (MTD) and the metabolic tumor index (MTI = SUV x MTD) were assessed in all primary tumors and in metastatic lymph nodes. Additionally, image fusion of PET with CT data was applied (using a HERMES Computer, Nuclear Diagnostics, Sweden). Results: So far, all patients (7/32) with complete metabolic response in lymph node metastases detected by PET, had no vital tumor cells (morphometric regression grade III). In primary tumors showing complete metabolic response, the regression grade was IIB (less than 10% vital tumor cells) or III. Conclusion: Morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant therapy correlates strongly with metabolic remission by FDG-PET. PET precedes the tumor response as measured by CT after neoadjuvant treatment and may predict the long term therapeutic outcome in stage III NSCLC

  11. Meta-analysis of first-line therapies with maintenance regimens for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in molecularly and clinically selected populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Pui San; Bilger, Marcel; de Lima Lopes, Gilberto; Acharyya, Sanchalika; Haaland, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Evidence has suggested survival benefits of maintenance for advanced NSCLC patients not progressing after first-line chemotherapy. Additionally, particular first-line targeted therapies have shown survival improvements in selected populations. Optimal first-line and maintenance therapies remain unclear. Here, currently available evidence was synthesized to elucidate optimal first-line and maintenance therapy within patient groups. Literature was searched for randomized trials evaluating first-line and maintenance regimens in advanced NSCLC patients. Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed within molecularly and clinically selected groups. The primary outcome was combined clinically meaningful OS and PFS benefits. A total of 87 records on 56 trials evaluating first-line treatments with maintenance were included. Results showed combined clinically meaningful OS and PFS benefits with particular first-line with maintenance treatments, (1) first-line intercalated chemotherapy+erlotinib, maintenance erlotinib in patients with EGFR mutations, (2) first-line afatinib, maintenance afatinib in patients with EGFR deletion 19, (3) first-line chemotherapy + bevacizumab, maintenance bevacizumab in EGFR wild-type patients, (4) chemotherapy+conatumumab, maintenance conatumumab in patients with squamous histology, (5) chemotherapy+cetuximab, maintenance cetuximab or chemotherapy + necitumumab, maintenance necitumumab in EGFR FISH-positive patients with squamous histology, and (6) first-line chemotherapy+bevacizumab, maintenance bevacizumab or first-line sequential chemotherapy+gefitinib, maintenance gefitinib in patients clinically enriched for EGFR mutations with nonsquamous histology. No treatment showed combined clinically meaningful OS and PFS benefits in patients with EGFR L858R or nonsquamous histology. Particular first-line with maintenance treatments show meaningful OS and PFS benefits in patients selected by EGFR mutation or histology. Further research is needed

  12. Prediction of sensitivity to gefitinib/erlotinib for EGFR mutations in NSCLC based on structural interaction fingerprints and multilinear principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bin; Lee, Victor H F; Yan, Hong

    2018-03-07

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with activating EGFR mutations, especially exon 19 deletions and the L858R point mutation, is particularly responsive to gefitinib and erlotinib. However, the sensitivity varies for less common and rare EGFR mutations. There are various explanations for the low sensitivity of EGFR exon 20 insertions and the exon 20 T790 M point mutation to gefitinib/erlotinib. However, few studies discuss, from a structural perspective, why less common mutations, like G719X and L861Q, have moderate sensitivity to gefitinib/erlotinib. To decode the drug sensitivity/selectivity of EGFR mutants, it is important to analyze the interaction between EGFR mutants and EGFR inhibitors. In this paper, the 30 most common EGFR mutants were selected and the technique of protein-ligand interaction fingerprint (IFP) was applied to analyze and compare the binding modes of EGFR mutant-gefitinib/erlotinib complexes. Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to obtain the dynamic trajectory and a matrix of IFPs for each EGFR mutant-inhibitor complex. Multilinear Principal Component Analysis (MPCA) was applied for dimensionality reduction and feature selection. The selected features were further analyzed for use as a drug sensitivity predictor. The results showed that the accuracy of prediction of drug sensitivity was very high for both gefitinib and erlotinib. Targeted Projection Pursuit (TPP) was used to show that the data points can be easily separated based on their sensitivities to gefetinib/erlotinib. We can conclude that the IFP features of EGFR mutant-TKI complexes and the MPCA-based tensor object feature extraction are useful to predict the drug sensitivity of EGFR mutants. The findings provide new insights for studying and predicting drug resistance/sensitivity of EGFR mutations in NSCLC and can be beneficial to the design of future targeted therapies and innovative drug discovery.

  13. A comparison of QuantStudio™ 3D Digital PCR and ARMS-PCR for measuring plasma EGFR T790M mutations of NSCLC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qin; Gai, Fei; Sang, Yaxiong; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Ping; Wang, Yue; Liu, Bing; Lin, Dongmei; Yu, Yang; Fang, Jian

    2018-01-01

    The AURA3 clinical trial has shown that advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR T790M mutations in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) could benefit from osimertinib. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of QuantStudio™ 3D Digital PCR System platform for the detection of plasma EGFR T790M mutations in NSCLC patients, and compare the performances of 3D Digital PCR and ARMS-PCR. A total of 119 Chinese patients were enrolled in this study. Mutant allele frequency of plasma EGFR T790M was detected by 3D Digital PCR, then 25 selected samples were verified by ARMS-PCR and four of them were verified by next generation sequencing (NGS). In total, 52.94% (69/119) had EGFR T790M mutations detected by 3D Digital PCR. In 69 positive samples, the median mutant allele frequency (AF) was 1.09% and three cases presented low concentration (AF PCR. Four of those samples were verified by NGS as a third verification method. Among the selected 17 positive cases, ten samples presented mutant allele frequency PCR, namely, P6 (AF =1.09%), P7 (AF =2.09%), and P8 (AF =2.21%). It is worth mentioning that sample P9 (AF =2.05%, analyzed by 3D Digital PCR) was identified as T790M- by ARMS-PCR. Four samples were identified as T790M+ by both NGS and 3D Digital PCR, and typically three samples (3/4) presented at a low ratio (AF PCR is a novel method with high sensitivity and specificity to detect EGFR T790M mutation in plasma.

  14. CT-guided 125I seeds implantation combined with NP chemotherapy for the treatment of intractable central airway stenosis caused by NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yongjin; Du Xueming; Xu Jianhui; Wu Chunwa

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of radioactive 125 I seeds implantation combined with NP in treating intractable central airway stenosis caused by non-small cell cancer (NSCLC). Methods: A prospective cohort study of 80 patients, who were admitted to Beichen hospital (Tianjin, China) during the period from January 2004 to March 2010, were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomly divided into study group (n=42) and control group (n=38). Percutaneous CT-guided intratumoral implantation of 125 I seeds was carried out in the patients of the study group. Treatment plan system (TPS) was used to design the distribution and the number of 125 I seeds with PD=80-100 CY, and the source intensity was 0.8 mCi. Three days after operation the NP chemotherapy started and it was performed for 2 cycles. Only two cycles of NP chemotherapy was used for the patients in the control group. After the treatment, the cross area of the airway at its narrowest level was measured and the dyspnea index was evaluated. Results: All the patients were followed up for two months. The preoperative and postoperative stenosis rate of the airway in study group was 47.82%±17.55% and 15.76%±4.65%, respectively. The trachea was unobstructed and the dyspnea was markedly improved. The postoperative cross area of the airway at its narrowest level was significantly bigger than the preoperative one (P 0.05). Conclusion: Radioactive 125 I seeds implantation combined with NP chemotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for NSCLC. (authors)

  15. Phase I Study of Oral Vinorelbine in Combination with Erlotinib in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC Using Two Different Schedules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Sutiman

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of the combination of oral vinorelbine with erlotinib using the conventional (CSV and metronomic (MSV dosing schedules in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC.This was an open-label, multiple dose-escalation phase I study. An alternating 3+3 phase I design was employed to allow each schedule to enroll three patients sequentially at each dose level. Thirty patients with Stage IIIB/IV NSCLC were treated with escalating doses of oral vinorelbine starting at 40 mg/m2 on day 1 and 8 in the CSV group (N = 16 and at 100 mg/week in the MSV group (N = 14. Erlotinib was administered orally daily.The maximum tolerated dose was vinorelbine 80 mg/m2 with erlotinib 100 mg in the CSV group and vinorelbine 120 mg/week with erlotinib 100 mg in the MSV group. Grade 3/4 toxicities included neutropenia (N = 2; 13% and hyponatremia (N = 1; 6% in the CSV group, and neutropenia (N = 5; 36% in the MSV group. Objective response was achieved in 38% and 29% in the CSV and MSV groups respectively. Vinorelbine co-administration did not significantly affect the pharmacokinetics of erlotinib and OSI-420 after initial dose. However, at steady-state, significantly higher Cmax, higher Cmin and lower CL/F of erlotinib were observed with increasing dose levels of vinorelbine in the CSV group. Significantly higher steady-state Cmin, Cavg and AUCss of erlotinib were observed with increasing dose levels of vinorelbine in the MSV group.Combination of oral vinorelbine with erlotinib is feasible and tolerable in both the CSV and MSV groups.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00702182.

  16. Sequence-dependent antiproliferative effects of gefitinib and docetaxel on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells and the possible mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Chen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Recent clinical trials showed that the sequential combination of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs and chemotherapy could prolong the PFS and/or OS of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation. The aim of present study was to assess the optimal combination sequence and to explore its possible mechanism. METHODS: PC-9 cells and A549 cells, the lung adenocarcinoma cells with mutant and wide-type EGFR respectively, were treated with docetaxel/gefitinib alone or in different combination schedules. The EGFR and K-ras gene status was determined by qPCR-HRM technique. Cell proliferation was detected by MTT assay. The expression and phosphorylation of EGFR, ERK, Akt and IGF-1R were detected by western blot. Cell cycle distribution was observed by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Only sequential administration of docetaxel followed by gefitinib (D → G induced significant synergistic effect in both cell lines (Combination Index1.1, whereas the concurrent administration (D+G showed additive (0.9NSCLC cells, and the phosphorylation of EGFR and ERK might contribute to this effect.

  17. Risk factors of brain metastases in completely resected pathological stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Xiao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain metastases (BM is one of the most common failures of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC after combined-modality therapy. The outcome of trials on prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI has prompted us to identify the highest-risk subset most likely to benefit from PCI. Focusing on patients with completely resected pathological stage IIIA-N2 (pIIIA-N2 NSCLC, we aimed to assess risk factors of BM and to define the highest-risk subset. Methods Between 2003 and 2005, the records of 217 consecutive patients with pIIIA-N2 NSCLC in our institution were reviewed. The cumulative incidence of BM was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method, and differences between the groups were analyzed using log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was applied to assess risk factors of BM. Results Fifty-three (24.4 % patients developed BM at some point during their clinical course. On multivariate analysis, non-squamous cell cancer (relative risk [RR]: 4.13, 95 % CI: 1.86–9.19; P = 0.001 and the ratio of metastatic to examined nodes or lymph node ratio (LNR ≥ 30 % (RR: 3.33, 95 % CI: 1.79–6.18; P = 0.000 were found to be associated with an increased risk of BM. In patients with non-squamous cell cancer and LNR ≥ 30 %, the 5-year actuarial risk of BM was 57.3 %. Conclusions In NSCLC, patients with completely resected pIIIA-N2 non-squamous cell cancer and LNR ≥ 30 % are at the highest risk for BM, and are most likely to benefit from PCI. Further studies are warranted to investigate the effect of PCI on this subset of patients.

  18. Brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feistel, H.

    1991-01-01

    Brain SPECT investigations have gained broad acceptance since the introduction of the lipophilic tracer Tc-99m-HMPAO. Depending on equipment and objectives in different departments, the examinations can be divided into three groups: 1. Under normal conditions and standardised patient preparation the 'rest' SPECT can be performed in every department with a tomographic camera. In cerebrovascular disease there is a demand for determination of either the perfusion reserve in reversible ischemia or prognostic values in completed stroke. In cases of dementia, SPECT may yield useful results according to differential diagnosis. Central cerebral system involvement in immunologic disease may be estimated with higher sensitivity than in conventional brain imaging procedures. In psychiatric diseases there is only a relative indication for brain SPECT, since results during recent years have been contradictory and may be derived only in interventional manner. In brain tumor diagnostics SPECT with Tl-201 possibly permits grading. In inflammatory disease, especially in viral encephalitis, SPECT may be used to obtain early diagnosis. Normal pressure hydrocephalus can be distinguished from other forms of dementia and, consequently, the necessity for shunting surgery can be recognised. 2. In departments equipped for emergency cases an 'acute' SPECT can be performed in illnesses with rapid changing symptoms such as different forms of migraine, transient global amnesia, epileptic seizures (so-called 'ictal SPECT') or urgent forms like trauma. 3. In cooperation with several departments brain SPECT can be practised as an interventional procedure in clinical and in scientific studies. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Brain computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah N. Abdulkader

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain computer interface technology represents a highly growing field of research with application systems. Its contributions in medical fields range from prevention to neuronal rehabilitation for serious injuries. Mind reading and remote communication have their unique fingerprint in numerous fields such as educational, self-regulation, production, marketing, security as well as games and entertainment. It creates a mutual understanding between users and the surrounding systems. This paper shows the application areas that could benefit from brain waves in facilitating or achieving their goals. We also discuss major usability and technical challenges that face brain signals utilization in various components of BCI system. Different solutions that aim to limit and decrease their effects have also been reviewed.

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ... NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science Education : Resources for science educators Pillbox: How to identify ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... ClinicalTrials.gov : Federally and privately supported research using human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... A highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... National Institutes of Health (NIH), a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Top

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive ... events. Some research shows that people who have PTSD or ADHD have reduced activity in their PFCs. ...

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    Full Text Available ... like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such ... for growing, staying alive, and making new neurons. prefrontal cortex —A highly developed area at the front of ...

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    Full Text Available ... different roles, from controlling blood pressure and heart rate to responding when we sense a mistake, helping us feel motivated and stay focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this brain ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... to control the amygdala during stressful events. Some research shows that people who ... social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah and her ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as mood, ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... common neurotransmitter in a person's body, which increases neuronal activity, is involved in early brain development, and ... rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... She continues taking SSRIs and has joined an online support group. Sharing her experiences with others also dealing with depression helps Sarah to better cope with her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists ...

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    Full Text Available ... help us talk, help us make sense of what we see, and help us to solve a problem. Some of the regions most commonly studied in mental health research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ... medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ... had experienced long periods of deep sadness throughout her teenage years, ...

  12. Smart Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca

    1995-01-01

    New techniques have opened windows to the brain. Although the biochemistry of learning remains largely a mystery, the following findings seem to have clear implications for education: (1) the importance of early-learning opportunities for the very young; (2) the connection between music and abstract reasoning; and (3) the importance of good…

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... making it faster, easier, and more affordable to study genes. Scientists have found many different genes and groups of ... environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists to make ... Mental Health supports many studies on mental health and the brain. You can ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... helps create memories of fear and safety may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the PFC ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Join A Study News & Events News & Events Home Science News Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds About Us About Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... supports many studies on mental health and the brain. You can read about some of these studies online at www.nimh.nih.gov . Glossary action potential —Transmission of signal from the cell body to the ...

  17. Brain Fog

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    ... relationship with your doctor(s): • Always report changes in cognition/memory and mood (depression, anxiety). • Make sure your physician ... joint pain. • Exercise regularly. Adequate physical exercise enhances cognition/memory. • Train the Brain! “If you don’t use ...

  18. Brain Tumor Symptoms

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    ... Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Headaches Seizures Memory Depression Mood Swings & Cognitive Changes Fatigue Other Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us ...

  19. Anatomy of the Brain

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    ... Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us Our Founders Board ... Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning Donate to the ABTA Help ...

  20. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  1. Prognostic predictors for non-small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastasis after radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhong FAN

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Brain metastasis (BM is often found in the patients with lung cancer. Radiotherapy is regular and effective means of therapy and it aims at palliating symptoms and prolonging survival time. However, now there are different viewpoints on protocols of radiotherapy and prognostic factors. A retrospective analysis is used to evaluate the results of treatment for 82 cases with brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and explore the prognostic factors to establish a prognostic index (PI model. Methods From Feb.1995 to Oct. 2006, 82 patients irradiated for BM from NSCLC, with both complete medical charts and follow-up data available, were eligible for this retrospective analysis. A number of potential factors which might affect prognosis after irradiation were evaluated. The significance of prognostic variables in the survival resulted from both univariate analysis by Kaplan-Meier combining with log-rank test and multivariate Cox regression model. The prognostic index (PI was established based on Cox regression analysis and subgrouping values. Results The follow-up time was 1-120 months. For the entire cohort, the median survival from the start of radiation for BM was 10.5 months, and the actuarial overall survival rate was 50.8%, 23.7% and 5.1% at 0.5, 1 and 2 years respectively. Univariate analysis showed KPS, control of primary tumor, interval from the beginning of diagnostic to BM, extracranial systemic metastasis, counts of lymphocyte and solitary BM were predictors of prognosis. However, in the Cox multivariate analysis, only KPS, control of primary tumor, interval from the beginning of diagnostic to BM and solitary BM were significant prognostic factors. The prognostic index was established based on Cox regression analysis and 82 patients were stratified good, intermediate and poor prognostic sub-groups. The difference of survival rate among 3 subgroups is significant (P<0.001. Conclusion Radiotherapy is

  2. Efficacy and Safety of rh-Endostatin Combined with Chemotherapy 
versus Chemotherapy Alone for Advanced NSCLC: A Meta-analysis Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhong ZHANG

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective In recent years, there has been a large number of studies and reports about the efficacy and safety of recombinant human endostatin (rh-endostatin, an anti-angiogenic drug, in treatment of advanced lung cancer. Authentic assessment of rh-endostatin treatment in lung cancer is important. The aim of this study is to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of rh-endostatin combined with chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods Cochrane systematic review methods were used in the data selection, and data were selected from the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Medline, SCI, CBM, CNKI, and etc electronic database to get all clinical controlled trials. The retrieval time was March 2010. The objects of these randomized controlled trials were advanced NSCLC patients and in the experimental group was rh-endostatin combination chemotherapy, in the control group was chemotherapy alone to compare the efficacy of two groups. The quality of included trials were evaluated by two reviewers independently. The software RevMan 5.0 was used for meta-analyses. Results Fifteen trials with 1,326 patients were included according to the including criterion. All trials were randomized controlled trials, and two trials were adequate in reporting randomization. Thirteen trials didn’t mention the blinding methods. Meta analysis indicated that the NPE arm (Vinorelbine+cisplatin+rh-endostatin had a different response rate compared with NP (Vinorelbine+cisplatin arm (OR=2.16, 95%CI: 1.57-2.99. The incidences of severe leukopenia (OR=0.94, 95%CI: 0.66-1.32 and severe thrombocytopenia (OR=1.00, 95%CI: 0.64-1.57 and nausea and vomiting (OR=0.85, 95%CI: 0.61-1.20 were similar in the NPE arm compared with those in the NP arm. The NPE plus radiotherapy (RT arm had a similar response rate compared with NP plus RT arm (OR=2.39, 95%CI: 0.99-5.79. The incidences of leukopenia (OR=0.83, 95%CI: 0.35-1.94 and

  3. Factors which influence quality of life in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A radiation therapy oncology group study (RTOG 89-01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, C.B.; Sause, W.T.; Johnson, D.; Dar, A.R.; Wasserman, T.H.; Rubin, P.; Khandekar, J.; Byhardt, R.B.; Taylor, S.; McDonald, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Prospectively evaluate the quality of life (QOL) of patients with NSCLC participating in a randomized phase III study conducted by the RTOG and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group. Determine the factors which influence QOL during and post therapy. Materials and Methods: From (4(90)) to (4(94)) to 75 patients (pts) were randomized on RTOG 89-01 between a regimen containing radiation therapy (RT) versus a regimen containing surgery (S). All pts received induction vinblastine and cisplatin, followed by either S or RT and consolidation chemotherapy (CT). Pts were given the self-assessment QOL forms prior to the start of therapy, post induction CT, post RT or S, and periodically during follow-up. Two questionnaires were used: Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy for lung cancer patients (FACT-L) and Functional Living Index-Cancer (FLIC). The FACT-L consists of 44 questions covering 6 domains (physical, social, and emotional well-being, relationship with physician, fulfilment, and lung cancer specific concerns), FLIC contains 22 questions summing to one total score. Results: 51 pts participated in the QOL endpoint, 24 were excluded: 3 pts refused, institution did not administer QOL questionnaires in 9 pts, 3 completed QOL after start of therapy, 1 institution refused to participate, 5 questionnaires were incomplete/unusable, 1 pt could not read English, and 2 were ineligible for treatment. Participation in QOL was not predicted by any pretreatment characteristic. Women had worse pretreatment QOL (p<0.005, by FLIC) and more problems with disease-related symptoms (p<0.005, by FACT) than men. Pts with KPS 90-100 had better pretreatment QOL than pts with KPS 60-80 (p<0.025, FLIC). Neither race, marital status, education level, age, prior weight loss, nor disease symptoms statistically significantly influenced pretreatment QOL. Initial QOL did not predict overall survival. FACT-L was reported on 25 pts post induction CT. Follow-up FACT-L was available on 12 pts

  4. NSCLC: primary tumor size - radiation dose-related accelerated, twice daily radiotherapy by target splitting, preceded by 2 cycles of chemotherapy. First results of a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurstbauer, K.; Deutschmann, H.; Kopp, P.; Kranzinger, M.; Merz, F.; Nairz, O.; Sedlmayer, F. [Univ. Clinic of Radiation Oncology, Salzburger Landeskliniken und Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Studnicka, M. [Univ. Clinic of Pneumology, Salzburger Landeskliniken und Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria)

    2007-12-15

    Ensuing a phase I trial of accelerated, twice daily high dose radiotherapy showing good tolerability, a prospective study relating primary tumor size with radiation dose in non-operated patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was started. From 01/2004 until 12/2006 79 patients with 81 histologically/cytologically proven NSCLC tumors were treated, representing 94% of all referred non-operated NSCLC patients in stage Mo, malignant pleural effusions excluded. For the majority of patients the conformal target splitting technique has been employed. The target is split into a cranial and a caudal part; beam arrangements in the two parts are completely independent. In order to reduce internal margins slow planning CTs (4 sec./slice) were used, patients freely breathing, 7 mm margins from gross tumor volume to planning target volume. We formed 4 groups with primary tumor sizes (mean number of 3 perpendicular diameters) < 2,5; 2,5-4,5; 4,5-6,0; > 6,0 cm (11/41/22/7 patients, respectively); tumor doses of 73,8, 79,2, 84,6 and 90,0 Gy (ICRU) were applied to the primary tumors of the patients in the respective groups. Single dose 1,8 Gy; twice daily, interval 11 h; 5 days/week; duration 33 days median (range 29-42). Macroscopically involved nodes 61,2 Gy median (range 54,0-75,6 Gy), nodes electively 45,0 Gy (to volume about 6 cm cranial to apparently involved nodes). In 62 patients chemotherapy before radiotherapy was given, 2 cycles median, generally a cisplatin or carboplatin containing doublet; no concurrent chemotherapy. Median follow-up of all patients 16,7 months, of patients alive 19,3 months. Until now 10 local failures (0/11, 3/41, 5/22, 2/7 in the respective groups) and 2 regional failures occured, resulting in an actuarial local and regional tumor control of 80,1% and 96% at 2 years, respectively. Local failures relate to the primary tumor site, regional failures to the regional node sites. Overall actuarial 1-, 2-year survival rate for all patients: 76

  5. Gefitinib-induced killing of NSCLC cell lines expressing mutant EGFR requires BIM and can be enhanced by BH3 mimetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S Cragg

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR plays a critical role in the control of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Abnormalities in EGF-EGFR signaling, such as mutations that render the EGFR hyperactive or cause overexpression of the wild-type receptor, have been found in a broad range of cancers, including carcinomas of the lung, breast, and colon. EGFR inhibitors such as gefitinib have proven successful in the treatment of certain cancers, particularly non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs harboring activating mutations within the EGFR gene, but the molecular mechanisms leading to tumor regression remain unknown. Therefore, we wished to delineate these mechanisms.We performed biochemical and genetic studies to investigate the mechanisms by which inhibitors of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity, such as gefitinib, inhibit the growth of human NSCLCs. We found that gefitinib triggered intrinsic (also called "mitochondrial" apoptosis signaling, involving the activation of BAX and mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, ultimately unleashing the caspase cascade. Gefitinib caused a rapid increase in the level of the proapoptotic BH3-only protein BIM (also called BCL2-like 11 through both transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Experiments with pharmacological inhibitors indicated that blockade of MEK-ERK1/2 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 signaling, but not blockade of PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase or mitogen-activated protein kinase 8, or AKT (protein kinase B, was critical for BIM activation. Using RNA interference, we demonstrated that BIM is essential for gefitinib-induced killing of NSCLC cells. Moreover, we found that gefitinib-induced apoptosis is enhanced by addition of the BH3 mimetic ABT-737.Inhibitors of the EGFR tyrosine kinase have proven useful in the therapy of certain cancers, in particular NSCLCs possessing

  6. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy combined with daily cisplatin in stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scolaro, T.; Ardizzoni, A.; Giudici, S.; Grossi, F.; Cosso, M.; Pennucci, M.C.; Bacigalupo, A.; Rosso, R.; Vitale, V.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Results of radical radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable NSCLC can be improved by either concurrent daily low-dose Cisplatin as radiosensitizer (Shaake-Koning, N Engl J Med, 1992; 326: 524) or by using neoadiuvant chemotherapy (Dillman, N Engl J Med, 1990; 323: 940). The aim of present study was to evaluate the activity and feasibility of a new chemo-radiotherapy (CT-RT) regimen in which both strategies of RT improvement will be used. Methods: Thirty consecutive patients (pts) were treated with induction CT (Cisplatin 100 mg/m 2 i.v. day 1,22 + Vinblastine 5 mg/m 2 i.v. day 1,8,15,22,29) followed by RT (60 Gy/30 fractions in 6 wks) combined with Cisplatin 5 mg/m 2 daily before RT. Patients' characteristics were: 29 pts were male and 1 female; median age 60.5 yrs (range 44-69); median PS 1 (range 0-1); 21 squamous cell carcinoma and 9 adenocarcinoma; stage III A in 9 pts and stage IIIB in 21 pts. Results: Twenty-three pts were evaluable for RT plus daily Cisplatin toxicity and 29 for CT toxicity (according to WHO). For RT plus daily cisplatin hematological toxicity consisted of grade III leukopenia in 22%, grade III anemia 9% and grade III thrombocytopenia in 9% of pts. Only 2 patients developed severe esophagitis. Only one case of radiation pneumonitis was reported. For induction CT hematological toxicity consisted of grade III-IV leukopenia in 31%, grade II anemia 10% and grade IV thrombocitopenia in 14% of cases. Non-hematological toxicity consisted mainly of grade I peripheral neuropaty and occured in 17% of pts. One case of minor hearing loss and 4 cases of tinnitus were observed at the end of treatment. Twenty-seven pts were evaluable for response. Response rate was 59% with 7 CRs (26%) and 9 PRs (33%); 1 patient had SD (4%), 5 pts PD (20%) and 5 pts (19%) died early (3 for early progression, 1 for toxicity and 1 for cardiac failure). All pts with CR are still alive with a median event-free survival of 23.9 months (range 12.3-41.9). Actuarial

  7. Evaluation of NGS and RT-PCR Methods for ALK Rearrangement in European NSCLC Patients: Results from the European Thoracic Oncology Platform Lungscape Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letovanec, Igor; Finn, Stephen; Zygoura, Panagiota; Smyth, Paul; Soltermann, Alex; Bubendorf, Lukas; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Marchetti, Antonio; Nonaka, Daisuke; Monkhorst, Kim; Hager, Henrik; Martorell, Miguel; Sejda, Aleksandra; Cheney, Richard; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Verbeken, Eric; Weder, Walter; Savic, Spasenija; Di Lorito, Alessia; Navarro, Atilio; Felip, Enriqueta; Warth, Arne; Baas, Paul; Meldgaard, Peter; Blackhall, Fiona; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Dienemann, Hendrik; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Vansteenkiste, Johan; O'Brien, Cathal; Geiger, Thomas; Sherlock, Jon; Schageman, Jeoffrey; Dafni, Urania; Kammler, Roswitha; Kerr, Keith; Thunnissen, Erik; Stahel, Rolf; Peters, Solange

    2018-03-01

    The reported prevalence of ALK receptor tyrosine kinase gene (ALK) rearrangement in NSCLC ranges from 2% to 7%. The primary standard diagnostic method is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Recently, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has also proved to be a reproducible and sensitive technique. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has also been advocated, and most recently, the advent of targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) for ALK and other fusions has become possible. This study compares anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) evaluation with all four techniques in resected NSCLC from the large European Thoracic Oncology Platform Lungscape cohort. A total of 96 cases from the European Thoracic Oncology Platform Lungscape iBiobank, with any ALK immunoreactivity were examined by FISH, central RT-PCR, and NGS. An H-score higher than 120 defines IHC positivity. RNA was extracted from the same formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. For RT-PCR, primers covered the most frequent ALK translocations. For NGS, the Oncomine Solid Tumour Fusion Transcript Kit (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA) was used. The concordance was assessed using the Cohen κ coefficient (two-sided α ≤ 5%). NGS provided results for 77 of the 95 cases tested (81.1%), whereas RT-PCR provided results for 77 of 96 (80.2%). Concordance occurred in 55 cases of the 60 cases tested with all four methods (43 ALK negative and 12 ALK positive). Using ALK copositivity for IHC and FISH as the criterion standard, we derived a sensitivity for RT-PCR/NGS of 70.0%/85.0%, with a specificity of 87.1%/79.0%. When either RT-PCR or NGS was combined with IHC, the sensitivity remained the same, whereas the specificity increased to 88.7% and 83.9% respectively. NGS evaluation with the Oncomine Solid Tumour Fusion transcript kit and RT-PCR proved to have high sensitivity and specificity, advocating their use in routine practice. For maximal sensitivity and specificity, ALK status should be

  8. Preclinical PK/PD model for combined administration of erlotinib and sunitinib in the treatment of A549 human NSCLC xenograft mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Yun; Ren, Yu-Peng; Yuan, Yin; Ji, Shuang-Min; Zhou, Shu-Pei; Wang, Li-Jie; Mou, Zhen-Zhen; Li, Liang; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-Yan

    2016-07-01

    Combined therapy of EGFR TKI and VEGFR TKI may produce a greater therapeutic benefit and overcome EGFR TKI-induced resistance. However, a previous study shows that a combination of EGFR TKI erlotinib (ER) with VEGFR TKI sunitinib (SU) did not improve the overall survival in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study we examined the anticancer effect of ER, SU and their combination in the treatment of A549 human NSCLC xenograft mice, and conducted PK/PD modeling and simulations to optimize the dose regimen. ER (20, 50 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) or SU (5, 10, 20 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) alone, or their combination were administered to BALB/c nude mice bearing A549 tumors for 22 days. The tumor size and body weight were recorded daily. The experimental data were used to develop PK/PD models describing the quantitative relationship between the plasma concentrations and tumor suppression in different dose regimens. The models were further evaluated and validated, and used to predict the efficacy of different combination regimens and to select the optimal regimen. The in vivo anticancer efficacy of the combination groups was much stronger than that of either drug administered alone. A PK/PD model was developed with a combination index (φ) of 4.4, revealing a strong synergistic effect between ER and SU. The model simulation predicted the tumor growth in different dosage regimens, and showed that the dose of SU played a decisive role in the combination treatment, and suggested that a lower dose of ER (≤5 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) and adjusting the dose of SU might yield a better dosage regimen for clinical research. The experimental data and modeling confirm synergistic anticancer effect of ER and SU in the treatment of A549 xenograft mice. The optimal dosage regimen determined by the PK/PD modeling and simulation can be used in future preclinical study and provide a reference for clinical application.

  9. A retrospective analysis of RET translocation, gene copy number gain and expression in NSCLC patients treated with vandetanib in four randomized Phase III studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Adam; Morten, John; Ji, Qunsheng; Elvin, Paul; Womack, Chris; Su, Xinying; Donald, Emma; Gray, Neil; Read, Jessica; Bigley, Graham; Blockley, Laura; Cresswell, Carl; Dale, Angela; Davies, Amanda; Zhang, Tianwei; Fan, Shuqiong; Fu, Haihua; Gladwin, Amanda; Harrod, Grace; Stevens, James; Williams, Victoria; Ye, Qingqing; Zheng, Li; de Boer, Richard; Herbst, Roy S; Lee, Jin-Soo; Vasselli, James

    2015-03-23

    To determine the prevalence of RET rearrangement genes, RET copy number gains and expression in tumor samples from four Phase III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) trials of vandetanib, a selective inhibitor of VEGFR, RET and EGFR signaling, and to determine any association with outcome to vandetanib treatment. Archival tumor samples from the ZODIAC ( NCT00312377 , vandetanib ± docetaxel), ZEAL ( NCT00418886 , vandetanib ± pemetrexed), ZEPHYR ( NCT00404924 , vandetanib vs placebo) and ZEST ( NCT00364351 , vandetanib vs erlotinib) studies were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 944 and 1102 patients. The prevalence of RET rearrangements by FISH was 0.7% (95% CI 0.3-1.5%) among patients with a known result. Seven tumor samples were positive for RET rearrangements (vandetanib, n = 3; comparator, n = 4). 2.8% (n = 26) of samples had RET amplification (innumerable RET clusters, or ≥7 copies in > 10% of tumor cells), 8.1% (n = 76) had low RET gene copy number gain (4-6 copies in ≥40% of tumor cells) and 8.3% (n = 92) were RET expression positive (signal intensity ++ or +++ in >10% of tumor cells). Of RET-rearrangement-positive patients, none had an objective response in the vandetanib arm and one patient responded in the comparator arm. Radiologic evidence of tumor shrinkage was observed in two patients treated with vandetanib and one treated with comparator drug. The objective response rate was similar in the vandetanib and comparator arms for patients positive for RET copy number gains or RET protein expression. We have identified prevalence for three RET biomarkers in a population predominated by non-Asians and smokers. RET rearrangement prevalence was lower than previously reported. We found no evidence of a differential benefit for efficacy by IHC and RET gene copy number gains. The low prevalence of RET rearrangements (0.7%) prevents firm conclusions regarding association of vandetanib treatment with

  10. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the various imaging tools with examples of the different diseases shown best with each modality. It includes 100 case presentations covering the gamut of brain diseases. These examples are grouped according to the clinical presentation of the patient: headache, acute headache, sudden unilateral weakness, unilateral weakness of gradual onset, speech disorders, seizures, pituitary and parasellar lesions, sensory disorders, posterior fossa and cranial nerve disorders, dementia, and congenital lesions

  11. Whole brain radiotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    Full Text Available The aim of the present meta-analysis is to evaluate the response rate, median survival time (MST and toxicity in patients with brain metastases (BM originating from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and who were treated using either whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT plus concurrent chemotherapy or WBRT alone.PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, clinical trials and current controlled trials were searched to identify any relevant publications. After screening the literature and undertaking quality assessment and data extraction, the meta-analysis was performed using Stata11.0 software.In total, six randomized controlled trials (RCT involving 910 participants were included in the meta-analysis. The results of the analysis indicate that WBRT plus concurrent chemotherapy was more effective at improving response rate (RR = 2.06, 95% CI [1.13, 3.77]; P = 0.019 than WBRT alone. However, WBRT plus concurrent chemotherapy did not improve median survival time (MST (HR = 1.09, 95%CI [0.94, 1.26]; P = 0.233 or time of neurological progression (CNS-TTP (HR = 0.93, 95%CI [0.75, 1.16]; P = 0.543, and increased adverse events (Grade≥3 (RR = 2.59, 95% CI [1.88, 3.58]; P = 0.000. There were no significant differences in Grade 3-5 neurological or hematological toxicity between two patient groups (RR = 1.08, 95%CI [0.23, 5.1]; P = 0.92.The combination of chemotherapy plus WBRT in patients with BM originating from NSCLC may increase treatment response rates of brain metastases with limited toxicity. Although the therapy schedule did not prolong MST or CNS-TTP, further assessment is warranted.

  12. EGFR-TKI therapy for patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer: a pooled analysis of published data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Y

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yun Fan,1,2 Xiaoling Xu,3 Conghua Xie4 1Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Chemotherapy, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 4Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China Introduction: Brain metastases are one of the leading causes of death from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The use of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs to treat brain metastases remains controversial. Thus, we performed a pooled analysis of published data to evaluate the efficacy of EGFR-TKIs in NSCLC patients with brain metastases, particularly for tumors with activating EGFR mutations. Methods: Several data sources were searched, including PubMed, Web of Science, and ASCO Annual Meetings databases. The end points were intracranial overall response rate (ORR, disease control rate (DCR, progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS, and adverse events. The pooled ORR, DCR, PFS, and OS with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated employing fixed- or random-effect models, depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Results: Sixteen published studies were included in this analysis, with a total of 464 enrolled patients. The EGFR mutational status was unknown for 362 (unselected group, and 102 had activating EGFR mutations. The pooled intracranial ORR and DCR were 51.8% (95% CI: 45.8%–57.8% and 75.7% (95% CI: 70.3%–80.5%, respectively. A higher ORR was observed in the EGFR mutation group than in the unselected group (85.0% vs 45.1%; a similar trend was observed for the DCR (94.6% vs 71.3%. The pooled median PFS and OS were 7.4 months (95% CI, 4.9–9.9 and 11.9 months (95% CI, 7.7–16.2, respectively, with longer PFS (12.3 months vs 5.9 months and OS (16.2 months vs

  13. Radiological differential diagnosis between fibrosis and recurrence after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frakulli, Rezarta; Salvi, Fabrizio; Balestrini, Damiano; Palombarini, Marcella; Akshija, Ilir; Cammelli, Silvia; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Zompatori, Maurizio; Frezza, Giovanni

    2017-12-01

    Parenchymal changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) make differential diagnosis between treatment outcomes and disease recurrence often difficult. The purpose of our study was to identify the radiographic features detectable at computed tomography (CT) scan [high-risk features (HRFs)] that allow enough specificity and sensitivity for early detection of recurrence. We retrospectively evaluated patients who underwent SBRT for inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The median delivered dose performed was 50 Gy in 5 fractions prescribed to 80% isodose. All patients underwent chest CT scan before SBRT and at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 months after, and then annually. Each CT scan was evaluated and benign and HRFs were recorded. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-CT was not used routinely. Forty-five patients were included (34 males, 11 females; median age: 77 years; stage IA: 77.8%, stage IB: 22.2%; median follow-up: 21.7 months). Two year and actuarial local control was 77%. HRFs were identified in 20 patients. The most significant predictor of relapse was an enlarging opacity at 12 months (P2 HRFs.

  14. A randomized phase II trial of concurrent chemoradiation with two doses of radiotherapy, 60Gy and 66Gy, concomitant with a fixed dose of oral vinorelbine in locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Olfred; Knap, Marianne; Khalil, Azza A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In order to test the best performing radiation dose with a convenient chemotherapy schedule of an oral formulation of radio-sensitizing vinorelbine in inoperable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we performed a randomized phase II trial based on a "pick the winner......" design. Methods: After 2 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 117 patients with NSCLC stage IIB-IIIB in performance status 0-1 were randomized to radiotherapy 60. Gy/30 fractions or 66. Gy/33 fractions concurrent with a fixed dose of oral vinorelbine 50. mg administered 3 times weekly. The primary...... endpoint was local progression free interval. A scheduled FDG-PET-CT-scan was performed 9. months after randomization. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT 00887783). Results: Both arms were well tolerated. The local progression free interval at 9. months was 54% in the 60. Gy arm and 59...

  15. The management impact of clinically significant incidental lesions detected on staging FDG PET-CT in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): an analysis of 649 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Michael; Ambati, Chaitanya

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate FDG PET-CT in the detection of unexpected pre-malignancy or second malignancy at the initial staging of patients with histologically proven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its impact on management. Staging FDG PET-CT scans acquired between February 2006 and July 2010 in 649 patients (M=389; F=260) with NSCLC were reviewed for the presence of unexpected pre-malignancy or second primary. A "True-Positive" lesion represented a second primary or pre-malignant lesion. A "False-Positive" lesion was due to benign causes or an atypical site of metastasis from NSCLC. 77 (12%) patients were identified on PET-CT as having a potential pre-malignancy or second primary. 39 out of 77 (51%) patients had diagnostic verification where histopathology served as reference standard in 33 patients (85%) and the rest had endoscopy and progress PET-CT scans. 20 patients (3.1%) had a second primary (n=11) or pre-malignant lesions comprising dysplastic colorectal polyps (n=9), and additional therapy and/or management change for the index tumour was instigated in 17 patients (85%). In patients with a second primary, 3 (27%) patients had a high impact change in management from an initial curative intent to palliative. Staging FDG PET-CT is highly valuable in identifying second primary cancers or pre-malignant lesions in patients with NSCLC. When a second primary is detected on PET-CT, there is a high impact change in management in 27% of patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Prognostic role of a comprehensive geriatric assessment on the management of elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a pooled analysis of two prospective phase II trials by the GFPC Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Caer, Hervé; Borget, Isabelle; Corre, Romain; Locher, Chrystele; Raynaud, Christine; Decroisette, Chantal; Berard, Henri; Audigier-Valette, Clarisse; Dujon, Cecile; Auliac, Jean Bernard; Crequit, Jacquy; Monnet, Isabelle; Vergnenegre, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Background The prognostic role of a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) on the management of elderly patients with advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains to be established. The objective of this analysis was to determine the prognostic role of each CGA domain on overall survival (OS) among elderly patients with advanced-stage NSCLC. Methods We pooled individual data from two prospective, randomized phases II trials in patients over 65 years old with advanced-stage NSCLC, who were considered fit (0405 trial) or no-fit (0505 trial) based on a CGA. Both trials compared first-line chemotherapy followed by second-line erlotinib with the reverse strategy in terms of progression-free survival (PFS) and OS. Factors prognostic of OS were sought by using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log rank test for univariate analysis, and a Cox model for multivariate analysis. Results Analysis performed on 194 patients (mean age: 77 years, male gender: 70%, never- or ex-smokers: 56%) showed, in univariate analysis that performance status (PS), smoking status, Charlson, simplified Charlson, nutritional scores, and a mobility score were prognostics of OS. In multivariate analysis, PS [HR: 1.4 (1.02–1.9), P=0.04] and the Charlson score [HR: 1.46 (1.07–1.99), P=0.02] were independently prognostic of OS, while the nutritional score [HR: 0.69 (0.46–1.04), P=0.07] and the mobility score [HR: 0.25 (0.06–1.01), P=0.06] were close to significance. Conclusions PS and comorbidities appear to be the main predictors of OS in elderly advanced NSCLC patients selected on the basis of CGA. PMID:29268382

  17. Brain metastasis development and poor survival associated with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA level in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a prospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo Patricia

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central nervous system is a common site of metastasis in NSCLC and confers worse prognosis and quality of life. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of clinical-pathological factors (CPF, serum CEA levels, and EGFR and HER2 tissue-expression in brain metastasis (BM and overall survival (OS in patients with advanced NSCLC. Methods In a prospective manner, we studied 293 patients with NSCLC in IIIB-IV clinical stage. They received standard chemotherapy. CEA was measured prior to treatment; EGFR and HER2 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. BM development was confirmed by MRI in symptomatic patients. Results BM developed in 27, and 32% of patients at 1 and 2 years of diagnosis with adenocarcinoma (RR 5.2; 95% CI, 1.002–29; p = 0.05 and CEA ≥ 40 ng/mL (RR 11.4; 95% CI, 1.7–74; p p = 0.048, poor performance status (RR 1.8; 95% CI, 1.5–2.3; p = 0.002, advanced clinical stage (RR 1.44; 95% CI, 1.02–2; p = 0.04, CEA ≥ 40 ng/mL (RR 1.5; 95% CI, 1.09–2.2; p = 0.014 and EGFR expression (RR 1.6; 95% CI, 1.4–1.9; p = 0.012 were independent associated factors to worse OS. Conclusion High CEA serum level is a risk factor for BM development and is associated with poor prognosis in patients with advanced NSCLC. Surface expression of CEA in tumor cells could be the physiopathological mechanism for invasion to CNS.

  18. ERCC1 expression in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) using a novel detection platform correlates with progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving platinum chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Millie; Riess, Jonathan W; Frankel, Paul; Schwartz, Erich; Bennis, Robyn; Hsieh, H Ben; Liu, Xiaohe; Ly, Janey C; Zhou, Lisa; Nieva, Jorge J; Wakelee, Heather A; Bruce, Richard H

    2012-08-01

    To utilize a novel circulating tumor cell (CTC) technology to quantify ERCC1 expression on CTCs and determine whether ERCC1 expression levels predict efficacy of platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ERCC1 expression was measured in 17 metastatic NSCLC patients who received platinum-based therapy and had ≥2 intact CTCs with acceptable ERCC1 expression assay results. ERCC1 levels were determined from average expression on individual CTCs in each sample. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated from the date of therapy initiation. PFS decreased with increasing ERCC1 expression (ptest, linear regression). Lack of ERCC1 expression was associated with longer PFS (266 days versus 172 days, log-rank, ptest (linear regression)). The hazard ratio is 4.38 (95% CI 1.76-10.9) for each log-change in CK value until progression was noted on imaging. Low expression of ERCC1 on CTCs correlates with PFS in patients with metastatic NSCLC receiving platinum-based therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multicenter Phase II Study Evaluating Two Cycles of Docetaxel, Cisplatin and Cetuximab as Induction Regimen Prior to Surgery in Chemotherapy-Naive Patients with NSCLC Stage IB-IIIA (INN06-Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hilbe

    Full Text Available Different strategies for neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with early stage NSCLC have already been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of a chemoimmunotherapy when limited to two cycles.Between 01/2007 and 03/2010 41 patients with primarily resectable NSCLC stage IB to IIIA were included. Treatment consisted of two cycles cisplatin (40 mg/m2 d1+2 and docetaxel (75 mg/m2 d1 q3 weeks, accompanied by the administration of cetuximab (400 mg/m2 d1, then 250 mg weekly. The primary endpoint was radiological response according to RECIST.40 patients were evaluable for toxicity, 39 for response. The main grade 3/4 toxicities were: neutropenia 25%, leucopenia 11%, febrile neutropenia 6%, nausea 8% and rash 8%. 20 patients achieved a partial response, 17 a stable disease, 2 were not evaluable. 37 patients (95% underwent surgery and in three of them a complete pathological response was achieved. At a median follow-up of 44.2 months, 41% of the patients had died, median progression-free survival was 22.5 months.Two cycles of cisplatin/ docetaxel/ cetuximab showed promising efficacy in the neoadjuvant treatment of early-stage NSCLC and rapid operation was possible in 95% of patients. Toxicities were manageable and as expected.EU Clinical Trials Register; Eudract-Nr: 2006-004639-31.

  20. Practical integration of [18F]-FDG-PET and PET-CT in the planning of radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): the technical basis, ICRU-target volumes, problems, perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, Ursula; Kremp, Stephanie; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2006-11-01

    The value of positron emission tomography using [18F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG-PET) for pretherapeutic evaluation of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is beyond doubt. Due to the increasing availability of PET and PET-CT scanners the method is now widely available, and its technical integration has become possible for radiotherapy planning systems. Due to the depiction of malignant tissue with high diagnostic accuracy, the use of FDG-PET in radiotherapy planning of NSCLC is very promising. However, by uncritical application, PET could impair rather than improve the prognosis of patients. Therefore, in the present paper we give an overview of technical factors influencing PET and PET-CT data, and their consequences for radiotherapy planning. We further review the relevant literature concerning the diagnostic value of FDG-PET and on the integration of FDG-PET data in RT planning for NSCLC. We point out the possible impact in gross tumor volume (GTV) definition and describe methods of target volume contouring of the primary tumor, as well as concepts for the integration of diagnostic information on lymph node involvement into the clinical target volume (CTV), and the possible implications of PET data on the definition of the planning target volume (PTV). Finally, we give an idea of the possible future use of tracers other than [18F]-FDG in lung cancer.

  1. Systemic therapy of brain metastases: non–small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, and melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Christina S.; Gadi, Vijayakrishna K.; Bhatia, Shailender; Chow, Laura Q.M.

    2017-01-01

    Brain metastases (BM) occur frequently in many cancers, particularly non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), breast cancer, and melanoma. The development of BM is associated with poor prognosis and has an adverse impact on survival and quality of life. Commonly used therapies for BM such as surgery or radiotherapy are associated with only modest benefits. However, recent advances in systemic therapy of many cancers have generated considerable interest in exploration of those therapies for treatment of intracranial metastases. This review discusses the epidemiology of BM from the aforementioned primary tumors and the challenges of using systemic therapies for metastatic disease located within the central nervous system. Cumulative data from several retrospective and small prospective studies suggest that molecularly targeted systemic therapies may be an effective option for the treatment of BM from NSCLC, breast cancer, and melanoma, either as monotherapy or in conjunction with other therapies. Larger prospective studies are warranted to further characterize the efficacy and safety profiles of these targeted agents for the treatment of BM. PMID:28031389

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  3. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  4. Brain-based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Ruth Palombo

    2000-01-01

    Discusses brain research and how new imaging technologies allow scientists to explore how human brains process memory, emotion, attention, patterning, motivation, and context. Explains how brain research is being used to revise learning theories. (JOW)

  5. Optimal dose and volume for postoperative radiotherapy in brain oligometastases from lung cancer: a retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung Yeun; Kim, Hye Ryun; Cho, Byoung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol; Suh, Chang Ok [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jong Hee [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate intracranial control after surgical resection according to the adjuvant treatment received in order to assess the optimal radiotherapy (RT) dose and volume. Between 2003 and 2015, a total of 53 patients with brain oligometastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) underwent metastasectomy. The patients were divided into three groups according to the adjuvant treatment received: whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) ± boost (WBRT ± boost group, n = 26), local RT/Gamma Knife surgery (local RT group, n = 14), and the observation group (n = 13). The most commonly used dose schedule was WBRT (25 Gy in 10 fractions, equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions [EQD2] 26.04 Gy) with tumor bed boost (15 Gy in 5 fractions, EQD2 16.25 Gy). The WBRT ± boost group showed the lowest 1-year intracranial recurrence rate of 30.4%, followed by the local RT and observation groups, at 66.7%, and 76.9%, respectively (p = 0.006). In the WBRT ± boost group, there was no significant increase in the 1-year new site recurrence rate of patients receiving a lower dose of WBRT (EQD2) <27 Gy compared to that in patients receiving a higher WBRT dose (p = 0.553). The 1-year initial tumor site recurrence rate was lower in patients receiving tumor bed dose (EQD2) of ≥42.3 Gy compared to those receiving <42.3 Gy, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.347). Adding WBRT after resection of brain oligometastases from NSCLC seems to enhance intracranial control. Furthermore, combining lower-dose WBRT with a tumor bed boost may be an attractive option.

  6. Feasibility of the use of the Active Breathing Co ordinatorTM (ABC) in patients receiving radical radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNair, Helen A.; Brock, Juliet; Symonds-Tayler, J. Richard N.; Ashley, Sue; Eagle, Sally; Evans, Philip M.; Kavanagh, Anthony; Panakis, Niki; Brada, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: One method to overcome the problem of lung tumour movement in patients treated with radiotherapy is to restrict tumour motion with an active breathing control (ABC) device. This study evaluated the feasibility of using ABC in patients receiving radical radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Eighteen patients, median (range) age of 66 (44-82) years, consented to the study. A training session was conducted to establish the patient's breath hold level and breath hold time. Three planning scans were acquired using the ABC device. Reproducibility of breath hold was assessed by comparing lung volumes measured from the planning scans and the volume recorded by ABC. Patients were treated with a 3-field coplanar beam arrangement and treatment time (patient on and off the bed) and number of breath holds recorded. The tolerability of the device was assessed by weekly questionnaire. Quality assurance was performed on the two ABC devices used. Results: 17/18 patients completed 32 fractions of radiotherapy using ABC. All patients tolerated a maximum breath hold time >15 s. The mean (SD) patient training time was 13.8 (4.8) min and no patient found the ABC very uncomfortable. Six to thirteen breath holds of 10-14 s were required per session. The mean treatment time was 15.8 min (5.8 min). The breath hold volumes were reproducible during treatment and also between the two ABC devices. Conclusion: The use of ABC in patients receiving radical radiotherapy for NSCLC is feasible. It was not possible to predict a patient's ability to hold breath. A minimum tolerated breath hold time of 15 s is recommended prior to commencing treatment.

  7. The Influence of Tissue Ischemia Time on RNA Integrity and Patient-Derived Xenografts (PDX) Engraftment Rate in a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrera, Francesco; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Bessone, Luca; Maletta, Francesca; Gaudiano, Marcello; Ercole, Elisabetta; Annaratone, Laura; Todaro, Maria; Boita, Monica; Filosso, Pier Luigi; Solidoro, Paolo; Delsedime, Luisa; Oliaro, Alberto; Sapino, Anna; Ruffini, Enrico; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Bio-repositories are invaluable resources to implement translational cancer research and clinical programs. They represent one of the most powerful tools for biomolecular studies of clinically annotated cohorts, but high quality samples are required to generate reliable molecular readouts and functional studies. The objective of our study was to define the impact of cancer tissue ischemia time on RNA and DNA quality, and for the generation of Patient-Derived Xenografts (PDXs). One-hundred thirty-five lung cancer specimens were selected among our Institutional BioBank samples. Associations between different warm (surgical) and cold (ex-vivo) ischemia time ranges and RNA quality or PDXs engraftment rates were assessed. RNA quality was determined by RNA integrity number (RINs) values. Fresh viable tissue fragments were implanted subcutaneously in NSG mice and serially transplanted. RNAs with a RIN>7 were detected in 51% of the sample (70/135), with values of RIN significantly lower (OR 0.08, P = 0.01) in samples preserved for more than 3 hours before cryopreservation. Higher quality DNA samples had a concomitant high RIN. Sixty-three primary tumors (41 adenocarcinoma) were implanted with an overall engraftment rate of 33%. Both prolonged warm (>2 hours) and ex-vivo ischemia time (>10 hours) were associated to a lower engraftment rate (OR 0.09 P = 0.01 and OR 0.04 P = 0.008, respectively). RNA quality and PDXs engraftment rate were adversely affected by prolonged ischemia times. Proper tissue collection and processing reduce failure rate. Overall, NSCLC BioBanking represents an innovative modality, which can be successfully executed in routine clinical settings, when stringent Standard Operating Procedures are adopted.

  8. SU-F-J-64: Comparison of Dosimetric Robustness Between Proton Therapy and IMRT Plans Following Tumor Regression for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, C; Ainsley, C; Teo, B; Burgdorf, B; Berman, A; Levin, W; Xiao, Y; Lin, L; Simone, C; Solberg, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Janssens, G [IBA, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the light of tumor regression and normal tissue changes, dose distributions can deviate undesirably from what was planned. As a consequence, replanning is sometimes necessary during treatment to ensure continued tumor coverage or to avoid overdosing organs at risk (OARs). Proton plans are generally thought to be less robust than photon plans because of the proton beam’s higher sensitivity to changes in tissue composition, suggesting also a higher likely replanning rate due to tumor regression. The purpose of this study is to compare dosimetric deviations between forward-calculated double scattering (DS) proton plans with IMRT plans upon tumor regression, and assesses their impact on clinical replanning decisions. Methods: Ten consecutive locally advanced NSCLC patients whose tumors shrank > 50% in volume and who received four or more CT scans during radiotherapy were analyzed. All the patients received proton radiotherapy (6660 cGy, 180 cGy/fx). Dosimetric robustness during therapy was characterized by changes in the planning objective metrics as well as by point-by-point root-mean-squared differences for the entire PTV, ITV, and OARs (heart, cord, esophagus, brachial plexus and lungs) DVHs. Results: Sixty-four pairs of DVHs were reviewed by three clinicians, who requested a replanning rate of 16.7% and 18.6% for DS and IMRT plans, respectively, with a high agreement between providers. Robustness of clinical indicators was found to depend on the beam orientation and dose level on the DVH curve. Proton dose increased most in OARs distal to the PTV along the beam path, but these changes were primarily in the mid to low dose levels. In contrast, the variation in IMRT plans occurred primarily in the high dose region. Conclusion: Robustness of clinical indicators depends where on the DVH curves comparisons are made. Similar replanning rates were observed for DS and IMRT plans upon large tumor regression.

  9. Co-culture with NK-92MI cells enhanced the anti-cancer effect of bee venom on NSCLC cells by inactivation of NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollipara, Pushpa Saranya; Kim, Jung Hyun; Won, Dohee; Lee, Sang Min; Sung, Ha Chang; Chang, Hyun Sok; Lee, Kang Tae; Lee, Kang Sik; Park, Mi Hee; Song, Min Jong; Song, Ho Sueb; Hong, Jin Tae

    2014-03-01

    In the present study we experimented on a multimodal therapeutic approach, such as combining chemotherapy agent (Bee venom) with cellular (NK-92MI) immunotherapy. Previously bee venom has been found to show anti-cancer effect in various cancer cell lines. In lung cancer cells bee venom showed an IC(50) value of 3 μg/ml in both cell lines. The co-culture of NK-92MI cell lines with lung cancer cells also show a decrease in viability upto 50 % at 48 h time point. Hence we used bee venom treated NK-92MI cells to co-culture with NSCLC cells and found that there is a further decrease in cell viability upto 70 and 75 % in A549 and NCI-H460 cell lines respectively. We further investigated the expression of various apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins and found that Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and -8 were increasing where as Bcl-2 and cIAP-2 was decreasing. The expression of various death receptor proteins like DR3, DR6 and Fas was also increasing. Concomitantly the expression of various death receptor ligands (TNFalpha, Apo3L and FasL) was also increasing of NK-92MI cells after co-culture. Further the DNA binding activity and luciferase activity of NF-κB was also inhibited after co-culture with bee venom treated NK-92MI cell lines. The knock down of death receptors with si-RNA has reversed the decrease in cell viability and NF-κB activity after co-culture with bee venom treated NK-92MI cells. Thus this new approach can enhance the anti-cancer effect of bee venom at a much lower concentration.

  10. EGFR Mutation Testing of non-squamous NSCLC: Impact and Uptake during Implementation of Testing Guidelines in a Population-Based Registry Cohort from Northern New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeage, Mark; Elwood, Mark; Tin Tin, Sandar; Khwaounjoo, Prashannata; Aye, Phyu; Li, Angie; Sheath, Karen; Shepherd, Phillip; Laking, George; Kingston, Nicola; Lewis, Christopher; Love, Donald

    2017-10-01

    Since 2013, clinical practice guidelines recommend EGFR mutation testing of non-squamous NSCLC to select advanced-stage patients for first-line treatment using EGFR-TKIs. We aimed to determine population-based trends in the real-world uptake and impact in routine practice of these recently updated testing guidelines. A population-based observational study was conducted of notifications to the New Zealand Cancer Registry of patients eligible for EGFR testing diagnosed in northern New Zealand between January 2010 and April 2014. The main study variable was EGFR mutation testing. Main outcome measures (overall survival and dispensing of EGFR-TKIs) were extracted from prospectively archived electronic databases until October 2015. The population-based cohort of 1857 patients had an average age of 70 years. Most had adenocarcinoma and metastatic disease at diagnosis. EGFR testing was undertaken in 500 patients (27%) with mutations detected in 109 patients (22%). EGFR testing increased during the period of study from testing by all eligible patients was limited by a lack of availability of specimens for testing and variable testing referral practices. The proportion of patients treated with EGFR-TKIs decreased during the same time period, both among untested patients (from 12.2% to 2.8% (P testing was associated with prolonged overall survival (Adjusted HR = 0.76 (95% CI, 0.65-0.89) Log-rank P testing was achieved and associated with major changes in EGFR-TKI prescribing and improved health outcomes. Modifiable factors determined testing uptake. Study registration ACTRN12615000998549.

  11. Brain SPECT in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyot, M.; Baulieu, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Brain SPECT in child involves specific trends regarding the patient cooperation, irradiation, resolution and especially interpretation because of the rapid scintigraphic modifications related to the brain maturation. In a general nuclear medicine department, child brain SPECT represents about 2 % of the activity. The choice indications are the perfusion children: thallium and MIBI in brain tumours, pharmacological and neuropsychological interventions. In the future, brain dedicated detectors and new radiopharmaceuticals will promote the development of brain SPECT in children. (author)

  12. Management of Brain Metastases in Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor-Naïve Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Mutant Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Retrospective Multi-Institutional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, William J; Lester-Coll, Nataniel H; Wu, Abraham J; Yang, T Jonathan; Lockney, Natalie A; Gerber, Naamit K; Beal, Kathryn; Amini, Arya; Patil, Tejas; Kavanagh, Brian D; Camidge, D Ross; Braunstein, Steven E; Boreta, Lauren C; Balasubramanian, Suresh K; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Rana, Niteshkumar G; Attia, Albert; Gettinger, Scott N; Contessa, Joseph N; Yu, James B; Chiang, Veronica L

    2017-04-01

    Purpose Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are treatment options for brain metastases in patients with EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This multi-institutional analysis sought to determine the optimal management of patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC who develop brain metastases and have not received EGFR-TKI. Materials and Methods A total of 351 patients from six institutions with EGFR-mutant NSCLC developed brain metastases and met inclusion criteria for the study. Exclusion criteria included prior EGFR-TKI use, EGFR-TKI resistance mutation, failure to receive EGFR-TKI after WBRT/SRS, or insufficient follow-up. Patients were treated with SRS followed by EGFR-TKI, WBRT followed by EGFR-TKI, or EGFR-TKI followed by SRS or WBRT at intracranial progression. Overall survival (OS) and intracranial progression-free survival were measured from the date of brain metastases. Results The median OS for the SRS (n = 100), WBRT (n = 120), and EGFR-TKI (n = 131) cohorts was 46, 30, and 25 months, respectively ( P < .001). On multivariable analysis, SRS versus EGFR-TKI, WBRT versus EGFR-TKI, age, performance status, EGFR exon 19 mutation, and absence of extracranial metastases were associated with improved OS. Although the SRS and EGFR-TKI cohorts shared similar prognostic features, the WBRT cohort was more likely to have a less favorable prognosis ( P = .001). Conclusion This multi-institutional analysis demonstrated that the use of upfront EGFR-TKI, and deferral of radiotherapy, is associated with inferior OS in patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC who develop brain metastases. SRS followed by EGFR-TKI resulted in the longest OS and allowed patients to avoid the potential neurocognitive sequelae of WBRT. A prospective, multi-institutional randomized trial of SRS followed by EGFR-TKI versus EGFR-TKI followed by SRS at intracranial progression is urgently needed.

  13. Revisiting Einstein's brain in Brain Awareness Week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Chen, Su; Zeng, Lidan; Zhou, Lin; Hou, Shengtao

    2014-10-01

    Albert Einstein's brain has long been an object of fascination to both neuroscience specialists and the general public. However, without records of advanced neuro-imaging of his brain, conclusions regarding Einstein's extraordinary cognitive capabilities can only be drawn based on the unique external features of his brain and through comparison of the external features with those of other human brain samples. The recent discovery of 14 previously unpublished photographs of Einstein's brain taken at unconventional angles by Dr. Thomas Stoltz Harvey, the pathologist, ignited a renewed frenzy about clues to explain Einstein's genius. Dr. Dean Falk and her colleagues, in their landmark paper published in Brain (2013; 136:1304-1327), described in such details about the unusual features of Einstein's brain, which shed new light on Einstein's intelligence. In this article, we ask what are the unique structures of his brain? What can we learn from this new information? Can we really explain his extraordinary cognitive capabilities based on these unique brain structures? We conclude that studying the brain of a remarkable person like Albert Einstein indeed provides us a better example to comprehensively appreciate the relationship between brain structures and advanced cognitive functions. However, caution must be exercised so as not to over-interpret his intelligence solely based on the understanding of the surface structures of his brain.

  14. DART-bid for loco-regionally advanced NSCLC. Summary of acute and late toxicity with long-term follow-up; experiences with pulmonary dose constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurstbauer, Karl; Zehentmayr, Franz; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix; Dagn, Karin; Exeli, Ann-Katrin; Kopp, Peter; Porsch, Peter; Maurer, Birgit; Studnicka, Michael

    2017-01-01

    To report acute and late toxicity with long-term follow-up, and to describe our experiences with pulmonary dose constraints. Between 2002 and 2009, 150 patients with 155 histologically/cytologically proven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; tumor stages II, IIIA, IIIB in 6, 55 and 39%, respectively) received the following median doses: primary tumors 79.2 Gy (range 72.0-90.0 Gy), lymph node metastases 59.4 Gy (54.0-73.8 Gy), nodes electively 45 Gy; with fractional doses of 1.8 Gy twice daily (bid). In all, 86% of patients received 2 cycles of chemotherapy previously. Five treatment-related deaths occurred: pneumonitis, n = 1; progressive pulmonary fibrosis in patients with pre-existing pulmonary fibrosis, n = 2; haemorrhage, n = 2. In all, 8% of patients experienced grade 3 and 1.3% grade 4 pneumonitis; 11% showed late fibrotic alterations grade 2 in lung parenchyma. Clinically relevant acute esophagitis (grade 2 and 3) was seen in 33.3% of patients, 2 patients developed late esophageal stenosis (G3). Patients with upper lobe, middle lobe and central lower lobe tumours (n = 130) were treated with V20 (total lung) up to 50% and patients with peripheral lower lobe tumours (n = 14, basal lateral tumours excluded) up to 42%, without observing acute or late pulmonary toxicity >grade 3. Only patients with basal lateral lower lobe tumours (n = 5) experienced grade 4/5 pulmonary toxicity; V20 for this latter group ranged between 30 and 53%. The mean lung dose was below the QUANTEC recommendation of 20-23 Gy in all patients. The median follow-up time of all patients is 26.3 months (range 2.9-149.4) and of patients alive 80.2 months (range 63.9-149.4.). The median overall survival time of all patients is 26.3 months; the 2-, 5- and 8-year survival rates of 54, 21 and 15%, respectively. The local tumour control rate at 2 and 5 years is 70 and 64%, the regional control rate 90 and 88%, respectively. Grade 4 or 5 toxicity occurred in 7/150 patients (4.7%), which can be

  15. Brain evolution by brain pathway duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Jarvis, Erich D

    2015-12-19

    Understanding the mechanisms of evolution of brain pathways for complex behaviours is still in its infancy. Making further advances requires a deeper understanding of brain homologies, novelties and analogies. It also requires an understanding of how adaptive genetic modifications lead to restructuring of the brain. Recent advances in genomic and molecular biology techniques applied to brain research have provided exciting insights into how complex behaviours are shaped by selection of novel brain pathways and functions of the nervous system. Here, we review and further develop some insights to a new hypothesis on one mechanism that may contribute to nervous system evolution, in particular by brain pathway duplication. Like gene duplication, we propose that whole brain pathways can duplicate and the duplicated pathway diverge to take on new functions. We suggest that one mechanism of brain pathway duplication could be through gene duplication, although other mechanisms are possible. We focus on brain pathways for vocal learning and spoken language in song-learning birds and humans as example systems. This view presents a new framework for future research in our understanding of brain evolution and novel behavioural traits. © 2015 The Authors.

  16. Risk Factors for Brain Metastases in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Definitive Chest Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Zhe; Bi, Nan; Wang, Jingbo; Hui, Zhouguang; Xiao, Zefen; Feng, Qinfu; Zhou, Zongmei; Chen, Dongfu; Lv, Jima; Liang, Jun; Fan, Chengcheng; Liu, Lipin; Wang, Luhua, E-mail: wlhwq@yahoo.com

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We intended to identify risk factors that affect brain metastases (BM) in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) receiving definitive radiation therapy, which may guide the choice of selective prevention strategies. Methods and Materials: The characteristics of 346 patients with stage III NSCLC treated with thoracic radiation therapy from January 2008 to December 2010 in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. BM rates were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for BM. Results: The median follow-up time was 48.3 months in surviving patients. A total of 74 patients (21.4%) experienced BM at the time of analysis, and for 40 (11.7%) of them, the brain was the first site of failure. The 1-year and 3-year brain metastasis rates were 15% and 28.1%, respectively. In univariate analysis, female sex, age ≤60 years, non-squamous cell carcinoma, T3-4, N3, >3 areas of lymph node metastasis, high lactate dehydrogenase and serum levels of tumor markers (CEA, NSE, CA125) before treatment were significantly associated with BM (P<.05). In multivariate analysis, age ≤60 years (P=.004, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.491), non-squamous cell carcinoma (P=.000, HR=3.726), NSE >18 ng/mL (P=.008, HR=1.968) and CA125 ≥ 35 U/mL (P=.002, HR=2.129) were independent risk factors for BM. For patients with 0, 1, 2, and 3 to 4 risk factors, the 3-year BM rates were 7.3%, 18.9%, 35.8%, and 70.3%, respectively (P<.001). Conclusions: Age ≤60 years, non-squamous cell carcinoma, serum NSE >18 ng/mL, and CA125 ≥ 35 U/mL were independent risk factors for brain metastasis. The possibilities of selectively using prophylactic cranial irradiation in higher-risk patients with LA-NSCLC should be further explored in the future.

  17. Role of interim {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT for the early prediction of clinical outcomes of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) during radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy. A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, Marta; Garibaldi, Cristina [European Institute of Oncology, Radiation Research Unit, Milano (Italy); Gilardi, Laura; Travaini, Laura Lavinia; Grana, Chiara Maria [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milano (Italy); Ferrari, Mahila Esmeralda; Botta, Francesca [Medical Physics Unit, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Piperno, Gaia; Ronchi, Sara; Ciardo, Delia [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Milano (Italy); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dallas, TX (United States); Baroni, Guido [Politecnico di Milano University, Department of Electronics, Information and Bioengineering, Milano (Italy); Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Milano (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, Milano (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [University of Milan, Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, Milano (Italy); European Institute of Oncology, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Milano (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) is characterized by aggressiveness and includes the majority of thorax malignancies. The possibility of early stratification of patients as responsive and non-responsive to radiotherapy with a non-invasive method is extremely appealing. The distribution of the Fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in tumours, provided by Positron-Emission-Tomography (PET) images, has been proved to be useful to assess the initial staging of the disease, recurrence, and response to chemotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy (CRT). In the last years, particular efforts have been focused on the possibility of using ad interim {sup 18}F-FDG PET (FDG{sub int}) to evaluate response already in the course of radiotherapy. However, controversial findings have been reported for various malignancies, although several results would support the use of FDG{sub int} for individual therapeutic decisions, at least in some pathologies. The objective of the present review is to assemble comprehensively the literature concerning NSCLC, to evaluate where and whether FDG{sub int} may offer predictive potential. Several searches were completed on Medline and the Embase database, combining different keywords. Original papers published in the English language from 2005 to 2016 with studies involving FDG{sub int} in patients affected by NSCLC and treated with radiation therapy or chemo-radiotherapy only were chosen. Twenty-one studies out of 970 in Pubmed and 1256 in Embase were selected, reporting on 627 patients. Certainly, the lack of univocal PET parameters was identified as a major drawback, while standardization would be required for best practice. In any case, all these papers denoted FDG{sub int} as promising and a challenging examination for early assessment of outcomes during CRT, sustaining its predictivity in lung cancer. (orig.)

  18. Influence of the number and interval of treatment cycles on cytokine-induced killer cells and their adjuvant therapeutic effects in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuanlong; Lv, Huimin; Zhao, Juan; Li, Qi; Mu, Guannan; Li, Jiade; Wuyang, Jiazi; Lou, Ge; Wang, Ruitao; Zhang, Yanqiao; Huang, Xiaoyi

    2017-09-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells have important therapeutic effects in adoptive cell transfer (ACT) for the treatment of various malignancies. In this study, we focused on in vitro expansion of CIK cells and their clinical efficacy in combination with chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 64 patients with NSCLC (enrolled from 2011 to 2012), including 32 patients who received chemotherapy alone or with sequential radiotherapy (conventional treatment, control group) and 32 patients who received conventional treatment and sequential CIK infusion (study group), were retrospectively analyzed. The time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS) and adverse effects were analyzed and the phenotype of lymphocytes in CIK population was also determined by flow cytometry. After in vitro expansion, the average percentage of CIK cells was 26.35%. During the 54-month follow up, the median OS and TTP were significantly longer in the study group than in the control group (P=0.0189 and P=0.0129, respectively). The median OS of the ACT≥4cycles subgroup was significantly longer than that of the ACTcells in patients who received ≥4cycles of ACT was higher than that in patients treated with cells were difficult to expand in vitro in some patients after the first ACT cycle but became much easier as the treatment cycles increased monthly. Longer treatment interval negatively impacted the expansion of CIK cells. Systematic immune levels can be increasingly boosted by reinfusion of ACT. Conventional treatment plus CIK cells is an effective therapeutic strategy to prevent progression and prolong survival of patients with advanced NSCLC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Open-label, randomized study of individualized, pharmacokinetically (PK)-guided dosing of paclitaxel combined with carboplatin or cisplatin in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerger, M; von Pawel, J; Kraff, S; Fischer, J R; Eberhardt, W; Gauler, T C; Mueller, L; Reinmuth, N; Reck, M; Kimmich, M; Mayer, F; Kopp, H-G; Behringer, D M; Ko, Y-D; Hilger, R A; Roessler, M; Kloft, C; Henrich, A; Moritz, B; Miller, M C; Salamone, S J; Jaehde, U

    2016-10-01

    Variable chemotherapy exposure may cause toxicity or lack of efficacy. This study was initiated to validate pharmacokinetically (PK)-guided paclitaxel dosing in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to avoid supra- or subtherapeutic exposure. Patients with newly diagnosed, advanced NSCLC were randomly assigned to receive up to 6 cycles of 3-weekly carboplatin AUC 6 or cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) either with standard paclitaxel at 200 mg/m(2) (arm A) or PK-guided dosing of paclitaxel (arm B). In arm B, initial paclitaxel dose was adjusted to body surface area, age, sex, and subsequent doses were guided by neutropenia and previous-cycle paclitaxel exposure [time above a plasma concentration of 0.05 µM (Tc>0.05)] determined from a single blood sample on day 2. The primary end point was grade 4 neutropenia; secondary end points included neuropathy, radiological response, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Among 365 patients randomly assigned, grade 4 neutropenia was similar in both arms (19% versus 16%; P = 0.10). Neuropathy grade ≥2 (38% versus 23%, P PK-guided dosing of paclitaxel does not improve severe neutropenia, but reduces paclitaxel-associated neuropathy and thereby improves the benefit-risk profile in patients with advanced NSCLC. NCT01326767 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01326767). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. E-Cadherin and EpCAM expression by NSCLC tumour cells associate with normal fibroblast activation through a pathway initiated by integrin αvβ6 and maintained through TGFβ signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlein, C; Rooney, C; Ross, S J; Farren, M; Weir, H M; Barry, S T

    2015-02-05

    Fibroblasts in the tumour stroma (cancer-associated fibroblasts) influence tumour progression and response to therapeutics; little is known about the mechanisms through which the tumour cell co-opts a normal fibroblast. To study the activation of fibroblasts by tumour cells, a panel of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and normal human dermal fibroblasts were co-cultured. A subset of the NSCLC cells induced an activated cancer-associated fibroblast-like fibroblast phenotype defined by induction of fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. Tumour cells that activated fibroblasts were associated with E-Cadherin and EpCAM expression and expression of integrin αvβ6. Co-culture of activating tumour cells with fibroblasts resulted in induction of transcripts associated with tumour cell invasion and growth, TGFβ1 and TGFBR1, SERPINE-1, BMP6, SPHK1 and MMP9. Fibroblast activation was inhibited by an αvβ6/8 integrin blocking antibody (264RAD) and a small molecule inhibitor of the TGF-beta type I receptor activin-like kinase (ALK5) (SB431542), demonstrating that transactivation of the TGFβ pathway initiates fibroblast activation. Both integrin and ALK5 antagonists inhibited initiation. Only ALK5 was effective when added after 3 days of co-culture. This suggests that although activation is αvβ6-dependent, once fibroblasts are activated alternative TGFβ pathway regulators maintain an activation loop. In co-culture activating cells had reduced sensitivity to selumetinib, AZD8931 and afatinib compared with mono-culture. In contrast, non-activating cells were insensitive to selumetinib and AZD8931 in both mono-culture and co-culture. In conclusion NSCLC cell lines, positive for E-Cadherin, EpCAM and αvβ6 expression, activate normal fibroblasts through avβ6/TGFβ signalling in vitro, and influence both gene expression and response to therapeutic agents.

  1. Phase I/II trial of vorinostat (SAHA) and erlotinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations after erlotinib progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguart, Noemi; Rosell, Rafael; Cardenal, Felipe; Cardona, Andres F; Isla, Dolores; Palmero, Ramon; Moran, Teresa; Rolfo, Christian; Pallarès, M Cinta; Insa, Amelia; Carcereny, Enric; Majem, Margarita; De Castro, Javier; Queralt, Cristina; Molina, Miguel A; Taron, Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Vorinostat or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with demonstrated antiproliferative effects due to drug-induced accumulation of acetylated proteins, including the heat shock protein 90. We prospectively studied the activity of vorinostat plus erlotinib in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients with progression to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We conducted this prospective, non-randomized, multicenter, phase I/II trial to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose, toxicity profile and efficacy of erlotinib and vorinostat. Patients with advanced NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations and progressive disease after a minimum of 12 weeks on erlotinib were included. The maximum tolerated dose of vorinostat plus erlotinib was used as recommended dose for the phase II (RDP2) to assess the efficacy of the combination. The primary end point was progression-free-survival rate at 12 weeks (PFSR12w). Pre-treatment plasma samples were required to assess T790M resistant mutation. A total of 33 patients were enrolled in the phase I-II trial. The maximum tolerated dose was erlotinib 150 mg p.o., QD, and 400mg p.o., QD, on days 1-7 and 15-21 in a 28-day cycle. Among the 25 patients treated at the RDP2, the most common toxicities included anemia, fatigue and diarrhea. No responses were observed. PFSR12w was 28% (IC 95%: 18.0-37.2); median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8 weeks (IC 95%: 7.43-8.45) and overall survival (OS) 10.3 months (95% CI: 2.4-18.1). Full dose of continuous erlotinib with vorinostat 400mg p.o., QD on alternative weeks can be safely administered. Still, the combination has no meaningful activity in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients after TKI progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A phase II trial of erlotinib as maintenance treatment after concurrent chemoradiotherapy in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a Galician Lung Cancer Group (GGCP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal Rubio, J; Fírvida-Pérez, J L; Lázaro-Quintela, M; Barón-Duarte, F J; Alonso-Jáudenes, G; Santomé, L; Afonso-Afonso, F J; Amenedo, M; Huidobro, G; Campos-Balea, B; López-Vázquez, M D; Vázquez, S

    2014-03-01

    This single arm, phase II study aims to evaluate the role of epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine-kinase inhibitor erlotinib as maintenance therapy following concurrent chemoradiotherapy (cCRT) in unresectable locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with unresectable stage IIIA o dry IIIB NSCLC with no evidence of tumor progression after receiving a standard cCRT regimen with curative intent were included. Oral erlotinib 150 mg/day was administered within 4-6 weeks after the end of the cCRT for a maximum of 6 months if no disease progression or intolerable toxicity occurred. Primary end point was the progression-free rate (PFR) at 6 months. Secondary end points included time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS). Sixty-six patients were enrolled and received maintenance treatment with erlotinib [average: 4.5 months (95 % CI 4.0-5.0)]. PFR at 6 months was 63.5 % (41/66). With a median follow-up of 22.7 months (95 % CI 13.5-37.1), the median TTP was 9.9 months (95 % CI 6.2-12.1), and the median OS was 24.0 months (95 % CI 17.3-48.6). Most common adverse events (AEs) related to erlotinib were rash (78.8 %; 16.7 % grade 3), diarrhea (28.8 %; 1.5 % grade 3), fatigue (15.2 %; 1.5 % grade 3), anorexia (7.6 %; 1.5 % grade 3) and vomiting (4.6 %; none grade 3). Five patients (7.6 %) were withdrawn due to AEs. Erlotinib as maintenance therapy is an active treatment after cCRT in unselected patients with stage III NSCLC, reaching a 6-month PFR of 63.5 % and a median OS of 24 months. The safety profile of maintenance erlotinib was as expected and manageable.

  3. The combination of anti-KIR monoclonal antibodies with anti-PD-1/PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies could be a critical breakthrough in overcoming tumor immune escape in NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He YY

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Yayi He,1,2,* Sangtian Liu,1,* Jane Mattei,3 Paul A Bunn Jr,2 Caicun Zhou,1 Daniel Chan2 1Department of Medical Oncology, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University Medical School Cancer Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; 2Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA; 3Oncology Department, Moinhos de Vento Hospital, Porto Alegre, Brazil *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1/programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1 monoclonal antibody has a good effect in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, but not all PD-1/PD-L1 positive patients can get benefit from it. Compensatory expression of other immune checkpoints may be correlated with the poor efficacy of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies. The inhibitory human leukocyte antigen (HLA/killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR can effectively block the killing effect of natural killer (NK cells on tumors. Our previous studies have confirmed that high expression of KIR was correlated with poor prognosis of NSCLC. Inhibitory KIR expression was positively correlated with the expression of PD-1. Methods: The expressions of KIR 2D (L1, L3, L4, S4 (BC032422/ADQ31987/NP_002246/NP_036446, Abcam and PD-1 (NAT 105, Cell marque proteins was assessed by immunohis­tochemistry. Results: The expression of inhibitory KIR in tumor cells or tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs is associated with PD-1 expression. Among PD-1 positive patients, 76.3% were KIR 2D (L1, L3, L4, S4 positive on tumor cells, and 74.6% were KIR 2D (L1, L3, L4, S4 positive on TILs. We compared the expression of inhibitory KIR before and after treatment with nivolumab in 11 patients with NSCLC. We found that five (45.5% patients had positive expression of inhibitory KIR in tumor tissue after being treated with anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibodies, two of whom exhibited a significant

  4. How to Make the Choice in the Retreatment of EGFR-TKI for Advanced NSCLC Patients Who Benefited from Prior Gefitinib Therapy: the Original Drug or Switching to A Second EGFR-TKI?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanhao TANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective For advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients who benefited from prior epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI therapy, the choice of a second TKI therapy has gradually become a new strategy for the treatment. Some investigators recommend that the second therapy should be continued with the original TKI; however, other investigators recommend the administration of another TKI. The aim of this study is to explore which choice is more reasonable. Methods In retrospect, patients with advanced NSCLC or with postoperative relapse of advanced NSCLC achieved complete response (CR, partial response (PR or stable disease (SD in prior Gefitinib therapy, progression free survival (PFS ≥3 months. They received repeated Gefitinib or Erlotinib at an interval of at least one month. The analysis was carried out with respect to efficacy and optimal population of the two groups. Results A total of 61 patients were enrolled into the study, 30 in Gefitinib group and 31 in Erlotinib group. Baseline characteristics of the two groups were comparable. In the comparison between patients treated with Gefitinib and with Erlotinib, no statistical differences were seen for response rate (10% vs 22.6%, P=0.300,6, disease control rate (60% vs 74.2%, P=0.237,8, median PFS (3.0 vs 3.5 months, P=0.494,5, or median OS (8.3 vs 8.5 months, P=0.140,8. Multivariate analysis showed that in the initial dose of Gefitinib, PFS≥6 months (HR=0.317, 95%CI: 0.102-0.984, P=0.046,9. With an interval ≥3 months (HR=0.224, 95%CI: 0.071-0.713, P=0.011,3 between two doses of TKI, the risk of disease progression was reduced; but if with an interval ≥3 months (HR=0.262, 95%CI: 0.097-0.705, P=0.008,0, the risk of death was reduced. Conclusion Advanced NSCLC patients who benefited from prior Gefitinib therapy can benefit again either with the original drug Gefitinib or the alternative drug Erlotinib when a second TKI therapy is

  5. Correlation of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC with the standardized uptake value (SUV in lymph node metastases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients using hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Michael Schaarschmidt

    Full Text Available To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC in lymph node metastases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with standardized uptake values (SUV derived from combined 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (18F-FDG PET/MRI.38 patients with histopathologically proven NSCLC (mean age 60.1 ± 9.5 y received whole-body PET/CT (Siemens mCT™ 60 min after injection of a mean dose of 280 ± 50 MBq 18F-FDG and subsequent PET/MRI (mean time after tracer injection: 139 ± 26 min, Siemens Biograph mMR. During PET acquisition, simultaneous diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, b values: 0, 500, 1000 s/mm² was performed. A maximum of 10 lymph nodes per patient suspicious for malignancy were analyzed. Regions of interest (ROI were drawn covering the entire lymph node on the attenuation-corrected PET-image and the monoexponential ADC-map. According to histopathology or radiological follow-up, lymph nodes were classified as benign or malignant. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for all lymph node metastases correlating SUVmax and SUVmean with ADCmean.A total of 146 suspicious lymph nodes were found in 25 patients. One hundred lymph nodes were eligible for final analysis. Ninety-one lymph nodes were classified as malignant and 9 as benign according to the reference standard. In malignant lesions, mean SUVmax was 9.1 ± 3.8 and mean SUVmean was 6.0 ± 2.5 while mean ADCmean was 877.0 ± 128.6 x10(-5 mm²/s in PET/MRI. For all malignant lymph nodes, a weak, inverse correlation between SUVmax and ADCmean as well as SUVmean and ADCmean (r = -0.30, p<0.05 and r = -0.36, p<0.05 existed.The present data show a weak inverse correlation between increased glucose-metabolism and cellularity in lymph node metastases of NSCLC patients. 18F-FDG-PET and DWI thus may offer complementary information for the evaluation of treatment response in lymph node metastases of NSCLC.

  6. DART-bid for loco-regionally advanced NSCLC. Summary of acute and late toxicity with long-term follow-up; experiences with pulmonary dose constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurstbauer, Karl [Paracelsus Medical University, Institute for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Salzburg (Austria); Zehentmayr, Franz; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University, Institute for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Salzburg (Austria); Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Landeskrankenhaus, Salzburg (Austria); Dagn, Karin; Exeli, Ann-Katrin; Kopp, Peter [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Landeskrankenhaus, Salzburg (Austria); Porsch, Peter; Maurer, Birgit; Studnicka, Michael [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Departement of Pneumology, Salzburg (Austria)

    2017-04-15

    To report acute and late toxicity with long-term follow-up, and to describe our experiences with pulmonary dose constraints. Between 2002 and 2009, 150 patients with 155 histologically/cytologically proven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; tumor stages II, IIIA, IIIB in 6, 55 and 39%, respectively) received the following median doses: primary tumors 79.2 Gy (range 72.0-90.0 Gy), lymph node metastases 59.4 Gy (54.0-73.8 Gy), nodes electively 45 Gy; with fractional doses of 1.8 Gy twice daily (bid). In all, 86% of patients received 2 cycles of chemotherapy previously. Five treatment-related deaths occurred: pneumonitis, n = 1; progressive pulmonary fibrosis in patients with pre-existing pulmonary fibrosis, n = 2; haemorrhage, n = 2. In all, 8% of patients experienced grade 3 and 1.3% grade 4 pneumonitis; 11% showed late fibrotic alterations grade 2 in lung parenchyma. Clinically relevant acute esophagitis (grade 2 and 3) was seen in 33.3% of patients, 2 patients developed late esophageal stenosis (G3). Patients with upper lobe, middle lobe and central lower lobe tumours (n = 130) were treated with V20 (total lung) up to 50% and patients with peripheral lower lobe tumours (n = 14, basal lateral tumours excluded) up to 42%, without observing acute or late pulmonary toxicity >grade 3. Only patients with basal lateral lower lobe tumours (n = 5) experienced grade 4/5 pulmonary toxicity; V20 for this latter group ranged between 30 and 53%. The mean lung dose was below the QUANTEC recommendation of 20-23 Gy in all patients. The median follow-up time of all patients is 26.3 months (range 2.9-149.4) and of patients alive 80.2 months (range 63.9-149.4.). The median overall survival time of all patients is 26.3 months; the 2-, 5- and 8-year survival rates of 54, 21 and 15%, respectively. The local tumour control rate at 2 and 5 years is 70 and 64%, the regional control rate 90 and 88%, respectively. Grade 4 or 5 toxicity occurred in 7/150 patients (4.7%), which can be

  7. Prophylactic cranial irradiation for preventing brain metastases in patients undergoing radical treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer: A Cochrane Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lester, Jason Francis; MacBeth, Fergus R.; Coles, Bernadette

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) has a role in the management of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with curative intent. Methods and Materials: A search strategy was designed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing PCI with no PCI in NSCLC patients treated with curative intent. The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and Cancerlit were searched, along with relevant journals, books, and review articles to identify potentially eligible trials. Four RCTs were identified and reviewed. A total of 951 patients were randomized in these RCTs, of whom 833 were evaluable and reported. Forty-two patients with small-cell lung cancer were excluded, leaving 791 patients in total. Because of the small patient numbers and trial heterogeneity, no meta-analysis was attempted. Results: Prophylactic cranial irradiation did significantly reduce the incidence of brain metastases in three trials. No trial reported a survival advantage with PCI over observation. Toxicity data were poorly collected and no quality of life assessments were carried out in any trial. Conclusion: Prophylactic cranial irradiation may reduce the incidence of brain metastases, but there is no evidence of a survival benefit. It was not possible to evaluate whether any radiotherapy regimen is superior, and the effect of PCI on quality of life is not known. There is insufficient evidence to support the use of PCI in clinical practice. Where possible, patients should be offered entry into a clinical trial

  8. Interim data from the Medical Research Council QUARTZ Trial: does whole brain radiotherapy affect the survival and quality of life of patients with brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, R E; Stephens, R J; Nankivell, M; Pugh, C; Moore, B; Navani, N; Wilson, P; Faivre-Finn, C; Barton, R; Parmar, M K B; Mulvenna, P M

    2013-03-01

    Over 30% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) develop brain metastases. If inoperable, optimal supportive care (OSC), including steroids, and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) are generally considered to be standard care, although there is no randomised evidence demonstrating that the addition of WBRT to OSC improves survival or quality of life. QUARTZ is a randomised, non-inferiority, phase III trial comparing OSC + WBRT versus OSC in patients with inoperable brain metastases from NSCLC. The primary outcome measure is quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). QUARTZ was threatened with both loss of funding and early closure due to poor accrual. A lack of preliminary randomised data supporting the trial's hypotheses was thought to underlie the poor accrual, so, with no knowledge of the data, the independent trial steering committee agreed to the unusual step of releasing interim data. Between March 2007 and April 2010, 151 (of the planned 534) patients were randomised (75 OSC + WBRT, 76 OSC). Participants' baseline demographics included median age 67 years (interquartile range 62-73), 60% male, 50% with a Karnofsky performance status Quality of life assessed using EQ-5D showed no evidence of a difference. The estimated mean QALYs was: OSC + WBRT 31 days and OSC 30 days, difference -1 day (95% confidence interval -12.0 to +13.2 days). These interim data indicate no early evidence of detriment to quality of life, overall survival or QALYs for patients allocated to OSC alone. They provide key information for discussing the trial with patients and strengthen the argument for continuing QUARTZ to definitively answer this important clinical question. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Drug interaction between erlotinib and phenytoin for brain metastases in a patient with nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Masahiro; Kaburagi, Takayuki; Kurosawa, Atsuhiko; Homma, Masato

    2016-11-01

    Erlotinib, a substrate drug metabolized by the CYP3A4 enzyme, is an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor used to treat nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Concomitant use of erlotinib and the antiepileptic drug phenytoin, an inducer of CYP3A4, may result in a drug-drug interaction accompanied by changes in the blood concentrations of both drugs. We determined the blood concentration of each drug to confirm the interaction between phenytoin and erlotinib in a case of NSCLC with brain metastases. The phenytoin blood concentration (8.2-10.0μg/mL) gradually increased 3-fold (to 24.2μg/mL) 7 months after the start of erlotinib (150mg/d) co-administration. The erlotinib blood concentration which was maintained at 0.15-0.37μg/mL under phenytoin co-administration, increased 12-fold (to 1.77μg/mL) after the stoppage of phenytoin co-administration. The present case revealed that blood phenytoin increased and blood erlotinib decreased subsequent to the interaction of the 2 drugs in the CYP3A4 metabolic enzyme system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. DART-bid for loco-regionally advanced NSCLC : Summary of acute and late toxicity with long-term follow-up; experiences with pulmonary dose constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurstbauer, Karl; Zehentmayr, Franz; Deutschmann, Heinz; Dagn, Karin; Exeli, Ann-Katrin; Kopp, Peter; Porsch, Peter; Maurer, Birgit; Studnicka, Michael; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2017-04-01

    To report acute and late toxicity with long-term follow-up, and to describe our experiences with pulmonary dose constraints. Between 2002 and 2009, 150 patients with 155 histologically/cytologically proven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; tumor stages II, IIIA, IIIB in 6, 55 and 39%, respectively) received the following median doses: primary tumors 79.2 Gy (range 72.0-90.0 Gy), lymph node metastases 59.4 Gy (54.0-73.8 Gy), nodes electively 45 Gy; with fractional doses of 1.8 Gy twice daily (bid). In all, 86% of patients received 2 cycles of chemotherapy previously. Five treatment-related deaths occurred: pneumonitis, n = 1; progressive pulmonary fibrosis in patients with pre-existing pulmonary fibrosis, n = 2; haemorrhage, n = 2. In all, 8% of patients experienced grade 3 and 1.3% grade 4 pneumonitis; 11% showed late fibrotic alterations grade 2 in lung parenchyma. Clinically relevant acute esophagitis (grade 2 and 3) was seen in 33.3% of patients, 2 patients developed late esophageal stenosis (G3). Patients with upper lobe, middle lobe and central lower lobe tumours (n = 130) were treated with V20 (total lung) up to 50% and patients with peripheral lower lobe tumours (n = 14, basal lateral tumours excluded) up to 42%, without observing acute or late pulmonary toxicity >grade 3. Only patients with basal lateral lower lobe tumours (n = 5) experienced grade 4/5 pulmonary toxicity; V20 for this latter group ranged between 30 and 53%. The mean lung dose was below the QUANTEC recommendation of 20-23 Gy in all patients. The median follow-up time of all patients is 26.3 months (range 2.9-149.4) and of patients alive 80.2 months (range 63.9-149.4.). The median overall survival time of all patients is 26.3 months; the 2-, 5- and 8‑year survival rates of 54, 21 and 15%, respectively. The local tumour control rate at 2 and 5 years is 70 and 64%, the regional control rate 90 and 88%, respectively. Grade 4 or 5 toxicity occurred in 7/150 patients

  11. Serial assessment of FDG-PET FDG uptake and functional volume during radiotherapy (RT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edet-Sanson, Agathe; Dubray, Bernard; Doyeux, Kaya; Back, Adeline; Hapdey, Sebastien; Modzelewski, Romain; Bohn, Pierre; Gardin, Isabelle; Vera, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives were (i) to confirm that diagnostic FDG-PET images could be obtained during thoracic radiotherapy, (ii) to verify that significant changes in FDG uptake or volume could be measured early enough to adapt the radiotherapy plan and (iii) to determine an optimal time window during the radiotherapy course to acquire a single FDG-PET examination that would be representative of tumour response. Methods: Ten non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients with significant PET/CT-FDG tumour radioactivity uptake (versus the background level), candidates for curative radiotherapy (RT, n = 4; 60–70 Gy, 2 Gray per fraction, 5 fractions per week) or RT plus chemotherapy (CT-RT, n = 6), were prospectively evaluated. Using a Siemens Biograph, 5 or 6 PET/CT scans (PET n , n = 0–5) were performed for each patient. Each acquisition included a 15-min thoracic PET with respiratory gating (RG) 60 ± 5 min post-injection of the FDG (3.5 MBq/kg), followed by a standard, 5-min non-gated (STD) thoracic PET. PET 0 was performed before the first RT fraction. During RT, PET 1–5 were performed every 7 fractions, i.e., at 14 Gy total dose increment. FDG uptake was measured as the variation of SUV max,PETn versus SUV max,PET0 . Each lesions’ volume was measured by (i) visual delineation by an experienced nuclear physician, (ii) 40% SUV max fixed threshold and (iii) a semi-automatic adaptive threshold method. Results: A total of 53 FDG-PET scans were acquired. Seventeen lesions (6 tumours and 11 nodes) were visible on PET 0 in the 10 patients. The lesions were located either in or near the mediastinum or in the apex, without significant respiratory displacements at visual inspection of the gated images. Healthy lung did not cause motion artefacts in the PET images. As measured on 89 lesions, both the absolute and relative SUV max values decreased as the RT dose increased. A 50% SUV max decrease was obtained around a total dose of 45 Gy. Out of the 89 lesions, 75

  12. Correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune markers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are candidates for upfront surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopci, Egesta; Olivari, Laura; Toschi, Luca; Marchetti, Silvia; Pistillo, Daniela; Grizzi, Fabio; Castino, Giovanni Francesco; Cortese, Nina; Qehajaj, Dorina; Rahal, Daoud; Alloisio, Marco; Roncalli, Massimo; Allavena, Paola; Santoro, Armando; Marchesi, Federica; Chiti, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Eliciting antitumor T-cell response by targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis with checkpoint inhibitors has emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The identification of predictors for sensitivity or resistance to these agents is, therefore, needed. Herein, we investigate the correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune-checkpoints and other markers of tumor-related immunity in resected NSCLC patients. All patients referred to our institution for upfront surgical resection of NSCLC, who were investigated with FDG-PET prior to surgery, were consecutively included in the study. From January 2010 to May 2014, 55 patients (stage IA-IIIB; M:F = 42:13; mean age 68.9 years) were investigated. Sampled surgical tumor specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD68-TAMs (tumor-associated macrophages), CD8-TILs (tumor infiltrating lymphocytes), PD-1-TILs, and PD-L1 tumor expression. Immunoreactivity was evaluated, and scores were compared with imaging findings. FDG-PET images were analyzed to define semi-quantitative parameters: SUVmax and SUVmean. Metabolic information on FDG-PET was correlated with tissue markers expression and disease-free survival (DFS) considering a median follow-up of 16.2 months. Thirty-six adenocarcinomas (ADC), 18 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and one sarcomatoid carcinoma were analyzed. All tumors resulted positive at FDG-PET: median SUVmax 11.3 (range: 2.3-32.5) and SUVmean 6.4 (range: 1.5-13) both resulted significantly higher in SCC compared to other NSCLC histotypes (p = 0.007 and 0.048, respectively). IHC demonstrated a median immunoreactive surface covered by CD68-TAMs of 5.41 % (range: 0.84-14.01 %), CD8-TILs of 2.9 % (range: 0.11-11.92 %), PD-1 of 0.65 % (range: 0.02-5.87 %), and PD-L1 of 0.7 % (range: 0.03-10.29 %). We found a statistically significant correlation between SUVmax and SUVmean with the expression of CD8 TILs (rho = 0.31; p = 0.027) and PD-1

  13. Gefitinib versus vinorelbine plus cisplatin as adjuvant treatment for stage II-IIIA (N1-N2) EGFR-mutant NSCLC (ADJUVANT/CTONG1104): a randomised, open-label, phase 3 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wen-Zhao; Wang, Qun; Mao, Wei-Min; Xu, Song-Tao; Wu, Lin; Shen, Yi; Liu, Yong-Yu; Chen, Chun; Cheng, Ying; Xu, Lin; Wang, Jun; Fei, Ke; Li, Xiao-Fei; Li, Jian; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Zhi-Dong; Xu, Shun; Chen, Ke-Neng; Xu, Shi-Dong; Liu, Lun-Xu; Yu, Ping; Wang, Bu-Hai; Ma, Hai-Tao; Yan, Hong-Hong; Yang, Xue-Ning; Zhou, Qing; Wu, Yi-Long

    2018-01-01

    Cisplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard of care for patients with resected stage II-IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). RADIANT and SELECT trial data suggest patients with EGFR-mutant stage IB-IIIA resected NSCLC could benefit from adjuvant EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. We aimed to compare the efficacy of adjuvant gefitinib versus vinorelbine plus cisplatin in patients with completely resected EGFR-mutant stage II-IIIA (N1-N2) NSCLC. We did a randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial at 27 centres in China. We enrolled patients aged 18-75 years with completely resected (R0), stage II-IIIA (N1-N2), EGFR-mutant (exon 19 deletion or exon 21 Leu858Arg) NSCLC. Patients were stratified by N stage and EGFR mutation status and randomised (1:1) by Pocock and Simon minimisation with a random element to either gefitinib (250 mg once daily) for 24 months or intravenous vinorelbine (25 mg/m 2 on days 1 and 8) plus intravenous cisplatin (75 mg/m 2 on day 1) every 3 weeks for four cycles. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival in the intention-to-treat population, which comprised all randomised patients; the safety population included all randomised patients who received at least one dose of study medication. Enrolment to the study is closed but survival follow-up is ongoing. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01405079. Between Sept 19, 2011, and April 24, 2014, 483 patients were screened and 222 patients were randomised, 111 to gefitinib and 111 to vinorelbine plus cisplatin. Median follow-up was 36·5 months (IQR 23·8-44·8). Median disease-free survival was significantly longer with gefitinib (28·7 months [95% CI 24·9-32·5]) than with vinorelbine plus cisplatin (18·0 months [13·6-22·3]; hazard ratio [HR] 0·60, 95% CI 0·42-0·87; p=0·0054). In the safety population, the most commonly reported grade 3 or worse adverse events in the gefitinib group (n=106) were raised alanine aminotransferase and asparate

  14. Correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune markers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are candidates for upfront surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopci, Egesta; Olivari, Laura [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Toschi, Luca; Marchetti, Silvia; Pistillo, Daniela [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Oncology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Grizzi, Fabio; Castino, Giovanni Francesco; Cortese, Nina; Qehajaj, Dorina [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Rahal, Daoud [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Alloisio, Marco [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Thoracic Surgery, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Roncalli, Massimo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Allavena, Paola [Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Santoro, Armando [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Oncology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Marchesi, Federica [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Translational Medicine, Milan (Italy); Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    Eliciting antitumor T-cell response by targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis with checkpoint inhibitors has emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The identification of predictors for sensitivity or resistance to these agents is, therefore, needed. Herein, we investigate the correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune-checkpoints and other markers of tumor-related immunity in resected NSCLC patients. All patients referred to our institution for upfront surgical resection of NSCLC, who were investigated with FDG-PET prior to surgery, were consecutively included in the study. From January 2010 to May 2014, 55 patients (stage IA-IIIB; M:F = 42:13; mean age 68.9 years) were investigated. Sampled surgical tumor specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD68-TAMs (tumor-associated macrophages), CD8-TILs (tumor infiltrating lymphocytes), PD-1-TILs, and PD-L1 tumor expression. Immunoreactivity was evaluated, and scores were compared with imaging findings. FDG-PET images were analyzed to define semi-quantitative parameters: SUVmax and SUVmean. Metabolic information on FDG-PET was correlated with tissue markers expression and disease-free survival (DFS) considering a median follow-up of 16.2 months. Thirty-six adenocarcinomas (ADC), 18 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and one sarcomatoid carcinoma were analyzed. All tumors resulted positive at FDG-PET: median SUVmax 11.3 (range: 2.3-32.5) and SUVmean 6.4 (range: 1.5-13) both resulted significantly higher in SCC compared to other NSCLC histotypes (p = 0.007 and 0.048, respectively). IHC demonstrated a median immunoreactive surface covered by CD68-TAMs of 5.41 % (range: 0.84-14.01 %), CD8-TILs of 2.9 % (range: 0.11-11.92 %), PD-1 of 0.65 % (range: 0.02-5.87 %), and PD-L1 of 0.7 % (range: 0.03-10.29 %). We found a statistically significant correlation between SUVmax and SUVmean with the expression of CD8 TILs (rho = 0.31; p = 0.027) and PD-1

  15. Nourish Your Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does your brain. You can’t stop normal cognitive decline, just as you can’t stop other parts of normal aging. However, you can maintain your body and brain health by making healthy choices about your lifestyle, diet, ...

  16. Aneurysm in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/001414.htm Aneurysm in the brain To use the sharing features on this page, ... aneurysm occurs in a blood vessel of the brain, it is called a cerebral, or intracranial, aneurysm. ...

  17. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  18. Genetic Brain Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  19. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  20. Brain AVM (Arteriovenous Malformation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... middle age, however, brain AVMs tend to remain stable and are less likely to cause symptoms. Some ... path because it isn't slowed down by channels of smaller blood vessels. Surrounding brain tissues can' ...

  1. Biomechanics of the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol

    2011-01-01

    With contributions from scientists at major institutions, this book presents an introduction to brain anatomy for engineers and scientists. It provides, for the first time, a comprehensive resource in the field of brain biomechanics.

  2. Insulin and the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosu Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain represents an important site for the action of insulin. Besides the traditionally known importance in glucoregulation, insulin has significant neurotrophic properties and influences the brain activity: insulin influences eating behavior, regulates the storage of energy and several aspects concerning memory and knowledge. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism could be associated with brain aging, vascular and metabolic pathologies. Elucidating the pathways and metabolism of brain insulin could have a major impact on future targeted therapies.

  3. Brain cancer spreads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perryman, Lara; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that ~20% of patients with brain cancer have circulating tumor cells breaks the dogma that these cells are confined to the brain and has important clinical implications (Müller et al., this issue).......The discovery that ~20% of patients with brain cancer have circulating tumor cells breaks the dogma that these cells are confined to the brain and has important clinical implications (Müller et al., this issue)....

  4. Brain imaging and schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinot, J.L.; Dao-Castellana, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Brain structures and brain function have been investigated by the new brain imaging techniques for more than ten years. In Psychiatry, these techniques could afford a new understanding of mental diseases. In schizophrenic patients, CAT scanner and RMI pointed out statistically significant ventricular enlargments which are presently considered as evidence for abnormalities in brain maturation. Functional imaging techniques reported metabolic dysfunctions in the cortical associative areas which are probably linked to the cognitive features of schizophrenics [fr

  5. Neuromythology of Einstein's brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Terence

    2014-07-01

    The idea that the brain of the great physicist Albert Einstein is different from "average" brains in both cellular structure and external shape is widespread. This belief is based on several studies examining Einstein's brain both histologically and morphologically. This paper reviews these studies and finds them wanting. Their results do not, in fact, provide support for the claim that the structure of Einstein's brain reflects his intellectual abilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Brain Migration Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokur, Annie

    2006-01-01

    The "brain drain/brain gain" debate has been going on for the past 40 years, with irresolvable theoretical disputes and unenforceable policy recommendations that economists commonly ascribe to the lack of reliable empirical data. The recent report of the World Bank, "International migration, remittances and the brain drain", documents the…

  7. Brain atrophy during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Takeda, Shumpei; Hatazawa, Jun

    1985-01-01

    Age-related brain atrophy was investigated in thousands of persons with no neurologic disturbances using X-CT and NMR-CT and following results were obtained. Brain atrophy was minimal in 34 -- 35 years old in both sexes, increased exponentially to the increasing age after 34 -- 35 years, and probably resulted in dementia, such as vascular or multiinfarct dementia. Brain atrophy was significantly greater in men than in women at all ages. Brain volumes were maximal in 34 -- 35 years old in both sexes with minimal individual differences which increased proportionally to the increasing age. Remarkable individual differences in the extents of brain atrophy (20 -- 30 %) existed among aged subjects. Some aged subjects had little or no atrophy of their brains, as seen in young subjects, and others had markedly shrunken brains associated with senility. From these results there must be pathological factors promoting brain atrophy with a great individual difference. We have studied the relation of intelligence to brain volume, and have ascertained that progression of brain atrophy was closely related to loss of mental activities independently of their ages. Our longitudinal study has revealed that the most important factors promoting brain atrophy during aging was decrease in the cerebral blood flow. MNR-CT can easily detected small infarction (lacunae) and edematous lesions resulting from ischemia and hypertensive encephalopathy, while X-CT can not. Therefore NMR-CT is very useful for detection of subtle changes in the brain. (J.P.N.)

  8. The connected brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    The connected brain Martijn van den Heuvel, 2009 Our brain is a network. It is a network of different brain regions that are all functionally and structurally linked to each other. In the past decades, neuroimaging studies have provided a lot of information about the specific functions of each

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals for brain - SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretti, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Perfusion tracers for brain SPECT imaging suitable for regional cerebral blood flow measurement and regional cerebral blood volume determination, with respect to their ability to pass the blood-brain-barrier, are described. Problems related t the use of specific radiotracers to map receptors distribution in the brain are also discussed in this lecture. 9 figs, 6 tabs

  10. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  11. Brain atrophy during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Yamada, Kenji; Yamada, Susumu; Ono, Shuichi; Takeda, Shunpei; Hatazawa, Jun; Ito, Masatoshi; Kubota, Kazuo

    1985-01-01

    Age-related brain atrophy was investigated in thousands of persons with no neurologic disturbances using X-CT and NMR-CT. Brain atrophy was minimal in 34-35 years old in both sexes, increased exponentially to the increasing age after 34-35 years, and probably resulted in dementia, such as vascular or multi-infarct dementia. Brain atrophy was significantly greater in men than in women at all ages. Brain volumes were maximal in 34-35 years old in both sexes with minimal individual differences which increased proportionally to the increasing age. Remarkable individual differences in the extent of brain atrophy (20 - 30 %) existed among aged subjects. Progression of brain atrophy was closely related to loss of mental activities independently of their ages. Our longitudinal study has revealed that the most important factors promoting brain atrophy during aging was the decrease in the cerebral blood flow. We have classified brain atrophy into sulcal and cisternal enlargement type (type I), ventricular enlargement type (type II) and mixed type (type III) according to the clinical study using NMR-CT. Brain atrophy of type I progresses significantly in almost all of the geriatric disorders. This type of brain atrophy progresses significantly in heavy smokers and drinkers. Therefore this type of brain atrophy might be caused by the decline in the blood flow in anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Brain atrophy of type II was caused by the disturbance of cerebrospinal fluid circulation after cerebral bleeding and subarachnoid bleeding. Brain atrophy of type III was seen in vascular dementia or multi-infarct dementia which was caused by loss of brain matter after multiple infarction, and was seen also in dementia of Alzheimer type in which degeneration of nerve cells results in brain atrophy. NMR-CT can easily detect small infarction (lacunae) and edematous lesions resulting from ischemia and hypertensive encephalopathy. (J.P.N.)

  12. Instant BrainShark

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. ""Instant BrainShark"" is a step-by-step guide to creating online presentations using BrainShark. The book covers digital marketing best practices alongside tips for sales conversions. The book is written in an easy-to-read style for anybody to easily pick up and get started with BrainShark.Instant BrainShark is for anyone who wants to use BrainShark to create presentations online and share them around the community. The book is also useful for developers who are looking to explore

  13. Neuroradiology of the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Susan

    2016-03-01

    A variety of imaging modalities are currently used to evaluate the brain. Prior to the 1970s, neurologic imaging involved radiographs, invasive procedures for spinal and carotid artery air and contrast injection, and painful patient manipulation. The brain was considered inaccessible to imaging and referred to as "the dark continent." Since then, advances in neuroradiology have moved the brain from being a dark continent to evaluation techniques that illuminate brain contents and pathology. These advances enable quick acquisition of images for prompt diagnosis and treatment. This article reviews anatomy, diagnostic principles, and clinical application of brain imaging beyond plain radiographs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. David Ferrier: brain drawings and brain maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, J Wayne

    2013-01-01

    This chapter has two emphases, one is about the men who influenced the visual representations that David Ferrier (1843-1928) used to illustrate his work on localization of brain functions during the years 1873-1875, namely, Alexander Ecker, John C. Galton, and Ernest Waterlow, and the other is about the nature of medical representations and of Ferrier's illustrations in particular. Medical illustrations are characterized either as pictures, line drawings, or brain maps. Ferrier's illustrations will be shown to be increasingly sophisticated brain maps that contrast with early nineteenth-century standards of medical illustrations, as exemplified by John Bell (1763-1829). © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Prognostic significance of Ki67 proliferation index, HIF1 alpha index and microvascular density in patients with non-small cell lung cancer brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berghoff, A.S. [Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Ilhan-Mutlu, A.; Preusser, M. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Woehrer, A.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Hackl, M. [Austrian National Cancer Registry, Statistics Austria, Vienna (Austria); Widhalm, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurosurgery, Vienna (Austria); Dieckmann, K. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Melchardt, T. [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital Salzburg, Third Medical Department, Salzburg (Austria); Dome, B. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Heinzl, H. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Vienna (Austria); Birner, P. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Clinical Pathology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Survival upon diagnosis of brain metastases (BM) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is highly variable and established prognostic scores do not include tissue-based parameters. Patients who underwent neurosurgical resection as first-line therapy for newly diagnosed NSCLC BM were included. Microvascular density (MVD), Ki67 tumor cell proliferation index and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha) index were determined by immunohistochemistry. NSCLC BM specimens from 230 patients (151 male, 79 female; median age 56 years; 199 nonsquamous histology) and 53/230 (23.0 %) matched primary tumor samples were available. Adjuvant whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) was given to 153/230 (66.5 %) patients after neurosurgical resection. MVD and HIF-1 alpha indices were significantly higher in BM than in matched primary tumors. In patients treated with adjuvant WBRT, low BM HIF-1 alpha expression was associated with favorable overall survival (OS), while among patients not treated with adjuvant WBRT, BM HIF-1 alpha expression did not correlate with OS. Low diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment score (DS-GPA), low Ki67 index, high MVD, low HIF-1 alpha index and administration of adjuvant WBRT were independently associated with favorable OS. Incorporation of tissue-based parameters into the commonly used DS-GPA allowed refined discrimination of prognostic subgroups. Ki67 index, MVD and HIF-1 alpha index have promising prognostic value in BM and should be validated in further studies. (orig.) [German] Die Ueberlebensprognose von Patienten mit zerebralen Metastasen eines nicht-kleinzelligen Lungenkarzinoms (NSCLC) ist sehr variabel. Bisher werden gewebsbasierte Parameter nicht in die prognostische Beurteilung inkludiert. Neurochirurgische Resektate zerebraler NSCLC-Metastasen wurden in dieser Studie untersucht. Die Gefaessdichte (''microvascular density'', MVD), der Ki67-Proliferationsindex sowie der HIF-1α-Index wurden mittels

  16. Endothelial cell marker PAL-E reactivity in brain tumor, developing brain, and brain disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenstra, S.; Troost, D.; Das, P. K.; Claessen, N.; Becker, A. E.; Bosch, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The endothelial cell marker PAL-E is not reactive to vessels in the normal brain. The present study concerns the PAL-E reactivity in brain tumors in contrast to normal brain and nonneoplastic brain disease. A total of 122 specimens were examined: brain tumors (n = 94), nonneoplastic brain disease (n

  17. Mapping brain function to brain anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentino, D.J.; Huang, H.K.; Mazziotta, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    In Imaging the human brain, MRI is commonly used to reveal anatomical structure, while PET is used to reveal tissue function. This paper presents a protocol for correlating data between these two imaging modalities; this correlation can provide in vivo regional measurements of brain function which are essential to our understanding of the human brain. The authors propose a general protocol to standardize the acquisition and analysis of functional image data. First, MR and PET images are collected to form three-dimensional volumes of structural and functional image data. Second, these volumes of image data are corrected for distortions inherent in each imaging modality. Third, the image volumes are correlated to provide correctly aligned structural and functional images. The functional images are then mapped onto the structural images in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional representations. Finally, morphometric techniques can be used to provide statistical measures of the structure and function of the human brain

  18. Textural features in pre-treatment [F18]-FDG-PET/CT are correlated with risk of local recurrence and disease-specific survival in early stage NSCLC patients receiving primary stereotactic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyka, Thomas; Bundschuh, Ralph A; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Mayer, Benedikt; Specht, Hanno M; Papp, Laszló; Zsótér, Norbert; Essler, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Textural features in FDG-PET have been shown to provide prognostic information in a variety of tumor entities. Here we evaluate their predictive value for recurrence and prognosis in NSCLC patients receiving primary stereotactic radiation therapy (SBRT). 45 patients with early stage NSCLC (T1 or T2 tumor, no lymph node or distant metastases) were included in this retrospective study and followed over a median of 21.4 months (range 3.1–71.1). All patients were considered non-operable due to concomitant disease and referred to SBRT as the primary treatment modality. Pre-treatment FDG-PET/CT scans were obtained from all patients. SUV and volume-based analysis as well as extraction of textural features based on neighborhood gray-tone difference matrices (NGTDM) and gray-level co-occurence matrices (GLCM) were performed using InterView Fusion™ (Mediso Inc., Budapest). The ability to predict local recurrence (LR), lymph node (LN) and distant metastases (DM) was measured using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC). Univariate and multivariate analysis of overall and disease-specific survival were executed. 7 out of 45 patients (16%) experienced LR, 11 (24%) LN and 11 (24%) DM. ROC revealed a significant correlation of several textural parameters with LR with an AUC value for entropy of 0.872. While there was also a significant correlation of LR with tumor size in the overall cohort, only texture was predictive when examining T1 (tumor diameter < = 3 cm) and T2 (>3 cm) subgroups. No correlation of the examined PET parameters with LN or DM was shown. In univariate survival analysis, both heterogeneity and tumor size were predictive for disease-specific survival, but only texture determined by entropy was determined as an independent factor in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 7.48, p = .016). Overall survival was not significantly correlated to any examined parameter, most likely due to the high comorbidity in our cohort. Our study adds to the growing evidence

  19. EGFR immunohistochemistry as biomarker for antibody-based therapy of squamous NSCLC - Experience from the first ring trial of the German Quality Assurance Initiative for Pathology (QuIP®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Iver; Dietel, Manfred; Geilenkeuser, Wolf J; Mireskandari, Masoud; Weichert, Wilko; Steiger, Katja; Scheel, Andreas H; Büttner, Reinhard; Schirmacher, Peter; Warth, Arne; Lasitschka, Felix; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Kirchner, Thomas; Reu, Simone; Kreipe, Hans; Länger, Florian; Tiemann, Markus; Schulte, Christoph; Jöhrens, Korinna

    2017-12-01

    EGFR and its downstream signaling pathway are important targets for cancer therapy. Recently, the monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody Necitumumab in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin was approved (EMA/14106/2016) for first-line treatment of squamous non-small cell carcinoma (SqNSCLC). Eligibility was restricted to cases with positive EGFR expression. In this context, a ring trial of the Quality Assurance Initiative for Pathology (QuIP ® ) was launched to prepare the German pathology community for a reliable and reproducible, immunohistochemically based biomarker test. The trial was set up by a three-step approach. Two lead institutes were nominated to organize the trial process and to select appropriate cancer samples. These were first tested by the H-score (range 0-300) to identify positive and negative cases. Seven additional pathology institutes with experience in EGFR immunohistochemistry each tested the selected panel of identical cases (internal ring trial) to confirm the suitability of samples and scoring criteria. Then the open ring trial for all institutes of pathology in German speaking countries was announced. For the internal trial 8 EGFR-positive and 2 negative lung sqNSCLC samples were selected. A cut-off value of cell membranous staining in≥1% of tumor cells was introduced to define a case as EGFR negative or positive. Two points were attainable per correctly assessed sample leading to a maximum of 20 points,≥18 points were required for a successful participation. All 7 panel institute passed this barrier, 5 with the maximum of 20 points and two with one error (18 points) being related to one case with incorrect interpretation of cytoplasmic versus membranous staining and one case with an H-score of 2 as being considered EGFR positive. A second cut-off value (H-score≥3) was therefore introduced. In the open ring trial, 34 institutions participated of which 28 were successful according to the above criteria. The trial revealed a high

  20. Handbook of Brain Connectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Jirsa, Viktor K

    2007-01-01

    Our contemporary understanding of brain function is deeply rooted in the ideas of the nonlinear dynamics of distributed networks. Cognition and motor coordination seem to arise from the interactions of local neuronal networks, which themselves are connected in large scales across the entire brain. The spatial architectures between various scales inevitably influence the dynamics of the brain and thereby its function. But how can we integrate brain connectivity amongst these structural and functional domains? Our Handbook provides an account of the current knowledge on the measurement, analysis and theory of the anatomical and functional connectivity of the brain. All contributors are leading experts in various fields concerning structural and functional brain connectivity. In the first part of the Handbook, the chapters focus on an introduction and discussion of the principles underlying connected neural systems. The second part introduces the currently available non-invasive technologies for measuring struct...

  1. MiR-488 inhibits proliferation and cisplatin sensibility in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells by activating the eIF3a-mediated NER signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chao; Chen, Yi-Xin; Wu, Na-Yiyuan; Yin, Ji-Ye; Li, Xiang-Ping; Huang, Hsuan-Shun; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2017-01-11

    Our previous studied indicated that eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3a (eIF3a) increases the sensitive of platinum-based chemotherapy in lung cancer. MiRNAs play an important role in lung carcinogenesis and drug response. In this study, we aimed to identify potential endogenous miRNAs that inhibit eIF3a expression and determine their influence of this inhibition on cisplatin resistance. Using bioinformatics analysis prediction and confirmation with dual-luciferase reporter assays, we found that miRNA-488 inhibited eIF3a expression by directly binding to the 3'UTR of eIF3a. In addition, the overexpression of miRNA-488 inhibited cell migration and invasion in A549 cells, and also inhibited cell proliferation, cell cycle progression by elevated P27 expression. Compared to the parental cell line, A549/cisplatin (DDP) resistant cells exhibited a higher level of miRNA-488. Moreover, we found that miRNA-488 was associated with cisplatin resistance in three NSCLC cells (A549, H1299 and SK-MES-1). The mechanism of miRNA-488 induced cisplatin resistance was that miRNA-488 activated nucleotide excision repair (NER) by increasing the expression of Replication Protein A (RPA) 14 and Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC). In conclusion, our results demonstrated that miRNA-488 is a tumor suppressor miRNA that acts by targeting eIF3a. Moreover, miRNA-488 also participates in eIF3a mediated cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells.

  2. Brain-gut interactions.

    OpenAIRE

    Olden, K W

    1994-01-01

    International audience; Our digestive tract has an autonomous functioning but also has a bidirectional relation with our brain known as brain-gut interactions. This communication is mediated by the autonomous nervous system, i.e., the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, with a mixed afferent and efferent component, and the circumventricular organs located outside the blood-brain barrier. The vagus nerve, known as the principal component of the parasympathetic nervous system, is a...

  3. Understanding primate brain evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Dunbar, R.I.M; Shultz, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed reanalysis of the comparative brain data for primates, and develop a model using path analysis that seeks to present the coevolution of primate brain (neocortex) and sociality within a broader ecological and life-history framework. We show that body size, basal metabolic rate and life history act as constraints on brain evolution and through this influence the coevolution of neocortex size and group size. However, they do not determine either of these variables, which ap...

  4. Coregistered whole body magnetic resonance imaging-positron emission tomography (MRI-PET) versus PET-computed tomography plus brain MRI in staging resectable lung cancer: comparisons of clinical effectiveness in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chin A; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Seonwoo; Kwon, O Jung; Kim, Hojoong; Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Byung-Tae; Hwang, Hye Sun; Shim, Young Mog

    2013-05-15

    The objective of this study was to assess whether coregistered whole brain (WB) magnetic resonance imaging-positron emission tomography (MRI-PET) would increase the number of correctly upstaged patients compared with WB PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) plus dedicated brain MRI in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From January 2010 through November 2011, patients with NSCLC who had resectable disease based on conventional staging were assigned randomly either to coregistered MRI-PET or WB PET-CT plus brain MRI (ClinicalTrials.gov trial NCT01065415). The primary endpoint was correct upstaging (the identification of lesions with higher tumor, lymph node, or metastasis classification, verified with biopsy or other diagnostic test) to have the advantage of avoiding unnecessary thoracotomy, to determine appropriate treatment, and to accurately predict patient prognosis. The secondary endpoints were over staging and under staging compared with pathologic staging. Lung cancer was correctly upstaged in 37 of 143 patients (25.9%) in the MRI-PET group and in 26 of 120 patients (21.7%) in the PET-CT plus brain MRI group (4.2% difference; 95% confidence interval, -6.1% to 14.5%; P = .426). Lung cancer was over staged in 26 of 143 patients (18.2%) in the MRI-PET group and in 7 of 120 patients (5.8%) in the PET-CT plus brain MRI group (12.4% difference; 95% confidence interval, 4.8%-20%; P = .003), whereas lung cancer was under staged in 18 of 143 patients (12.6%) and in 28 of 120 patients (23.3%), respectively (-10.7% difference; 95% confidence interval, -20.1% to -1.4%; P = .022). Although both staging tools allowed greater than 20% correct upstaging compared with conventional staging methods, coregistered MRI-PET did not appear to help identify significantly more correctly upstaged patients than PET-CT plus brain MRI in patients with NSCLC. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  5. Consciousness, brain, neuroplasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Jean; Lehmann, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Subjectivity, intentionality, self-awareness and will are major components of consciousness in human beings. Changes in consciousness and its content following different brain processes and malfunction have long been studied. Cognitive sciences assume that brain activities have an infrastructure, but there is also evidence that consciousness itself may change this infrastructure. The two-way influence between brain and consciousness has been at the center of philosophy and less so, of science. This so-called bottom-up and top-down interrelationship is controversial and is the subject of our article. We would like to ask: how does it happen that consciousness may provoke structural changes in the brain? The living brain means continuous changes at the synaptic level with every new experience, with every new process of learning, memorizing or mastering new and existing skills. Synapses are generated and dissolved, while others are preserved, in an ever-changing process of so-called neuroplasticity. Ongoing processes of synaptic reinforcements and decay occur during wakefulness when consciousness is present, but also during sleep when it is mostly absent. We suggest that consciousness influences brain neuroplasticity both during wakefulness as well as sleep in a top-down way. This means that consciousness really activates synaptic flow and changes brain structures and functional organization. The dynamic impact of consciousness on brain never stops despite the relative stationary structure of the brain. Such a process can be a target for medical intervention, e.g., by cognitive training. PMID:23847580

  6. Mapping the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begley, S.; Wright, L.; Church, V.; Hager, M.

    1992-01-01

    With powerful new technologies such as positron tomography and superconducting quantum interference device that peer through the skull and see the brain at work, neuroscientists seek the wellsprings of thoughts and emotions, the genesis of intelligence and language. A functional map of the brain is thus obtained and its challenge is to move beyond brain structure to create a detailed diagram of which part do what. For that the brain's cartographers rely on a variety of technologies such as positron tomography and superconducting quantum interference devices. Their performances and uses are briefly reviewed. ills

  7. Multi-disciplinary management for patients with oligometastases to the brain: results of a 5 year cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maclean, Jillian; Fersht, Naomi; Singhera, Mausam; Mulholland, Paul; McKee, Orla; Kitchen, Neil; Short, Susan C

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of oligometastases to the brain in good performance status patients is increasing due to improvements in systemic therapy and MRI screening, but specific management pathways are often lacking. We established a multi-disciplinary brain metastases clinic with specific referral guidelines and standard follow-up for good prognosis patients with the view that improving the process of care may improve outcomes. We evaluated patient demographic and outcome data for patients first seen between February 2007 and November 2011. The clinic was feasible to run and referrals were appropriate. 87% of patients referred received a localised therapy during their treatment course. 114 patients were seen and patient numbers increased during the 5 years that the clinic has been running as relationships between clinicians were developed. Median follow-up for those still alive was 23.1 months (6.1-79.1 months). Primary treatments were: surgery alone 52%, surgery plus whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) 9%, radiosurgery 14%, WBRT alone 23%, supportive care 2%. 43% received subsequent treatment for brain metastases. 25%, 11% and 15% respectively developed local neurological progression only, new brain metastases only or both. Median overall survival following brain metastases diagnosis was 16.0 months (range 1–79.1 months). Breast (32%) and NSCLC (26%) were the most common primary tumours with median survivals of 26 and 16.9 months respectively (HR 0.6, p=0.07). Overall one year survival was 55% and two year survival 31.5%. 85 patients died of whom 37 (44%) had a neurological death. Careful patient selection and multi-disciplinary management identifies a subset of patients with oligometastatic brain disease who benefit from aggressive local treatment. A dedicated joint neurosurgical/ neuro-oncology clinic for such patients is feasible and effective. It also offers the opportunity to better define management strategies and further research in this field. Consideration should be

  8. Banking brain tissue for research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klioueva, Natasja; Bovenberg, Jasper; Huitinga, I.

    2017-01-01

    Well-characterized human brain tissue is crucial for scientific breakthroughs in research of the human brain and brain diseases. However, the collection, characterization, management, and accessibility of brain human tissue are rather complex. Well-characterized human brain tissue is often provided

  9. MRI of 'brain death'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shigeki; Itoh, Takahiko; Tuchida, Shohei; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Asari, Shoji; Nishimoto, Akira; Sanou, Kazuo.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was undertaken for two patients who suffered from severe cerebrovascular diseases and were clinically brain dead. The MRI system we used was Resona (Yokogawa Medical Systems, superconductive system 0.5 T) and the CT apparatus was Toshiba TCT-300. Initial CT and MRI were undertaken as soon as possible after admission, and repeated sequentially. After diagnosis of brain death, we performed angiography to determine cerebral circulatory arrest, and MRI obtained at the same time was compared with the angiogram and CT. Case 1 was a 77-year-old man who was admitted in an unconscious state. CT and MRI on the second day after hospitalization revealed cerebellar infarction. He was diagnosed as brain dead on day 4. Case 2 was a 35-year-old man. When he was transferred to our hospital, he was in cardiorespiratory arrested. Cardiac resuscitation was successful but no spontaneous respiration appeared. CT and MRI on admission revealed right intracerebral hemorrhage. Angiography revealed cessation of contrast medium in intracranial vessels in both of the patients. We found no 'flow signal void sign' in the bilateral internal carotid and basilar arteries on MRI images in both cases after brain death. MRI, showing us the anatomical changes of the brain, clearly revealed brain herniations, even though only nuclear findings of 'brain tamponade' were seen on CT. But in Case 1, we could not see the infarct lesions in the cerebellum on MR images obtained after brain death. This phenomenon was caused by the whole brain ischemia masking the initial ischemic lesions. We concluded that MRI was useful not only the anatomical display of lesions and brain herniation with high contrast resolution but for obtaining information on cerebral circulation of brain death. (author)

  10. Drugs and the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet explores various aspects of drug addiction, with a special focus on drugs' effects on the brain. A brief introduction presents information on the rampant use of drugs in society and elaborates the distinction between drug abuse and drug addiction. Next, a detailed analysis of the brain and its functions is given. Drugs target the more…

  11. Brain Aneurysm Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... We realized … Continue Reading View More Research From the Blog Depression Following Aneurysm November 11, 2017 05/29/15 Depression Following a Brain Aneurysm by Stanley J. Berman, PhD Some patients will experience depression following a brain aneurysm. This is certainly ...

  12. Baby brain atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Kenichi; Chang, Linda; Huang, Hao

    2018-04-03

    The baby brain is constantly changing due to its active neurodevelopment, and research into the baby brain is one of the frontiers in neuroscience. To help guide neuroscientists and clinicians in their investigation of this frontier, maps of the baby brain, which contain a priori knowledge about neurodevelopment and anatomy, are essential. "Brain atlas" in this review refers to a 3D-brain image with a set of reference labels, such as a parcellation map, as the anatomical reference that guides the mapping of the brain. Recent advancements in scanners, sequences, and motion control methodologies enable the creation of various types of high-resolution baby brain atlases. What is becoming clear is that one atlas is not sufficient to characterize the existing knowledge about the anatomical variations, disease-related anatomical alterations, and the variations in time-dependent changes. In this review, the types and roles of the human baby brain MRI atlases that are currently available are described and discussed, and future directions in the field of developmental neuroscience and its clinical applications are proposed. The potential use of disease-based atlases to characterize clinically relevant information, such as clinical labels, in addition to conventional anatomical labels, is also discussed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The multilingual brain

    OpenAIRE

    Engel de Abreu, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The multilingual brain. Is a multilingual education beneficial for children? What are the optimal conditions under which a child can become perfectly multilingual? The given lecture will focus on the "cognitive advantages" of multilingualism and illustrate the impact that being multilingual has on the cognitive organisation of the brain. Practical questions regarding multilingual education will also be discussed.

  14. Brain PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results on a PET scan. Blood sugar or insulin levels may affect the test results in people with diabetes . PET scans may be done along with a CT scan. This combination scan is called a PET/CT. Alternative Names Brain positron emission tomography; PET scan - brain References Chernecky ...

  15. Brain Tumors - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Brain Tumors URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Brain Tumors - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  16. Brain Diseases - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Brain Diseases URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Brain Diseases - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not always visible on your skin. A skull fracture is when the skull cracks. Sometimes broken bones cut into your brain and cause bleeding or ... brain. They show if there is a skull fracture or bleeding, bruising, or blood ... skating, horse riding, and skiing and snowboarding avoid dangerous sports ...

  18. Complement in the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerhuis, R.; Nielsen, J.M.; Tenner, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is considered to be an immune privileged site, because the blood-brain barrier limits entry of blood borne cells and proteins into the central nervous system (CNS). As a result, the detection and clearance of invading microorganisms and senescent cells as well as surplus neurotransmitters,

  19. Demystifying the Adolescent Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the nature of brain development in adolescence helps explain why adolescents can vacillate so often between mature and immature behavior. Early and middle adolescence, in particular, are times of heightened vulnerability to risky and reckless behavior because the brain's reward center is easily aroused, but the systems that control…

  20. Inside the Adolescent Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Stacy S.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Jay Giedd says that the main alterations in the adolescent brain are the inverted U-shaped developmental trajectories with late childhood/early teen peaks for gray matter volume among others. Giedd adds that the adolescent brain is vulnerable to substances that artificially modulate dopamine levels since its reward system is in a state of flux.