WorldWideScience

Sample records for incident surface gravity

  1. Surfing surface gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Nick

    2017-11-01

    A simple criterion for water particles to surf an underlying surface gravity wave is presented. It is found that particles travelling near the phase speed of the wave, in a geometrically confined region on the forward face of the crest, increase in speed. The criterion is derived using the equation of John (Commun. Pure Appl. Maths, vol. 6, 1953, pp. 497-503) for the motion of a zero-stress free surface under the action of gravity. As an example, a breaking water wave is theoretically and numerically examined. Implications for upper-ocean processes, for both shallow- and deep-water waves, are discussed.

  2. The measurement of surface gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, David; Hinderer, Jacques; Riccardi, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    This review covers basic theory and techniques behind the use of ground-based gravimetry at the Earth's surface. The orientation is toward modern instrumentation, data processing and interpretation for observing surface, land-based, time-variable changes to the geopotential. The instrumentation side is covered in some detail, with specifications and performance of the most widely used models of the three main types: the absolute gravimeters (FG5, A10 from Micro-g LaCoste), superconducting gravimeters (OSG, iGrav from GWR instruments), and the new generation of spring instruments (Micro-g LaCoste gPhone, Scintrex CG5 and Burris ZLS). A wide range of applications is covered, with selected examples from tides and ocean loading, atmospheric effects on gravity, local and global hydrology, seismology and normal modes, long period and tectonics, volcanology, exploration gravimetry, and some examples of gravimetry connected to fundamental physics. We show that there are only a modest number of very large signals, i.e. hundreds of µGal (10 −8 m s −2 ), that are easy to see with all gravimeters (e.g. tides, volcanic eruptions, large earthquakes, seasonal hydrology). The majority of signals of interest are in the range 0.1–5.0 µGal and occur at a wide range of time scales (minutes to years) and spatial extent (a few meters to global). Here the competing effects require a careful combination of different gravimeter types and measurement strategies to efficiently characterize and distinguish the signals. Gravimeters are sophisticated instruments, with substantial up-front costs, and they place demands on the operators to maximize the results. Nevertheless their performance characteristics such as drift and precision have improved dramatically in recent years, and their data recording ability and ruggedness have seen similar advances. Many subtle signals are now routinely connected with known geophysical effects such as coseismic earthquake displacements, post

  3. The measurement of surface gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, David; Hinderer, Jacques; Riccardi, Umberto

    2013-04-01

    This review covers basic theory and techniques behind the use of ground-based gravimetry at the Earth's surface. The orientation is toward modern instrumentation, data processing and interpretation for observing surface, land-based, time-variable changes to the geopotential. The instrumentation side is covered in some detail, with specifications and performance of the most widely used models of the three main types: the absolute gravimeters (FG5, A10 from Micro-g LaCoste), superconducting gravimeters (OSG, iGrav from GWR instruments), and the new generation of spring instruments (Micro-g LaCoste gPhone, Scintrex CG5 and Burris ZLS). A wide range of applications is covered, with selected examples from tides and ocean loading, atmospheric effects on gravity, local and global hydrology, seismology and normal modes, long period and tectonics, volcanology, exploration gravimetry, and some examples of gravimetry connected to fundamental physics. We show that there are only a modest number of very large signals, i.e. hundreds of µGal (10-8 m s-2), that are easy to see with all gravimeters (e.g. tides, volcanic eruptions, large earthquakes, seasonal hydrology). The majority of signals of interest are in the range 0.1-5.0 µGal and occur at a wide range of time scales (minutes to years) and spatial extent (a few meters to global). Here the competing effects require a careful combination of different gravimeter types and measurement strategies to efficiently characterize and distinguish the signals. Gravimeters are sophisticated instruments, with substantial up-front costs, and they place demands on the operators to maximize the results. Nevertheless their performance characteristics such as drift and precision have improved dramatically in recent years, and their data recording ability and ruggedness have seen similar advances. Many subtle signals are now routinely connected with known geophysical effects such as coseismic earthquake displacements, post-glacial rebound

  4. Free surface flows under compensated gravity conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyer, Miachel E

    2007-01-01

    This book considers the behavior of fluids in a low-gravity environment with special emphasis on application in PMD (propellant management device) systems . In the compensated gravity environment of a spacecraft, the hydrostatic pressure decreases to very low values depending on the residual acceleration, and surface tension forces become dominant. Consequently, surface tension can be used to transport and position liquids if the residual acceleration and the resulting hydrostatic pressure are small compared to the capillary pressure. One prominent application is the use of PMDs in surface-tension satellite tanks. PMDs must ensure that the tank outlet is covered with liquid whenever outflow is demanded. Furthermore, PMDs are used to ensure expulsion and refilling of tanks for liquids and gases for life support, reactants, and experiment supplies. Since most of the PMD designs are not testable on ground and thus rely on analytical or numerical concepts, this book treats three different flow problems with analy...

  5. Empirical Equations For The Surface Gas Gravity of Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... pressure volume temperature (PVT) data of the gas gravity of gas associated with Niger Delta crude oil. The crude oil is subdivided into 3 broad groups in order of ascending order of American Petroleum Institute (API) gravity. The accuracy of the calculated surface gravity is determined through statistical error analysis.

  6. Gravity-capillary free-surface flows

    CERN Document Server

    Vanden-Broeck, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Free surface problems occur in many aspects of science and of everyday life such as the waves on a beach, bubbles rising in a glass of champagne, melting ice, pouring flows from a container and sails billowing in the wind. Consequently, the effect of surface tension on gravity-capillary flows continues to be a fertile field of research in applied mathematics and engineering. Concentrating on applications arising from fluid dynamics, Vanden-Broeck draws upon his years of experience in the field to address the many challenges involved in attempting to describe such flows mathematically. Whilst careful numerical techniques are implemented to solve the basic equations, an emphasis is placed upon the reader developing a deep understanding of the structure of the resulting solutions. The author also reviews relevant concepts in fluid mechanics to help readers from other scientific fields who are interested in free boundary problems.

  7. Touching random surfaces and Liouville gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klebanov, I.R.

    1995-01-01

    Large N matrix models modified by terms of the form g(TrΦ n ) 2 generate random surfaces which touch at isolated points. Matrix model results indicate that, as g is increased to a special value g t , the string susceptibility exponent suddenly jumps from its conventional value γ to γ/(γ-1). We study this effect in Liouville gravity and attribute it to a change of the interaction term from Oe α + φ for g t to Oe α - φ for g=g t (α + and α - are the two roots of the conformal invariance condition for the Liouville dressing of a matter operator O). Thus, the new critical behavior is explained by the unconventional branch of Liouville dressing in the action

  8. 2D gravity, random surfaces and all that

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambjoern, J.

    1990-11-01

    I review the recent progress in 2d gravity and discuss the new numerical simulations for 2d gravity and for random surfaces in d>2. The random surface theories of interest in d>2 have extrinsic curvature terms, and for a finite value of the extrinsic curvature coupling there seems to be a second order phase transition where the string tension scales. (orig.)

  9. A Multiscale Nested Modeling Framework to Simulate the Interaction of Surface Gravity Waves with Nonlinear Internal Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Interaction of Surface Gravity Waves with Nonlinear Internal Gravity Waves Lian Shen St. Anthony Falls Laboratory and Department of Mechanical...on studying surface gravity wave evolution and spectrum in the presence of surface currents caused by strongly nonlinear internal solitary waves...interaction of surface and internal gravity waves in the South China Sea. We will seek answers to the following questions: 1) How does the wind-wave

  10. Surface singularities in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Paolo; Sotiriou, Thomas P

    2012-12-21

    Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity was recently proposed as an alternative to general relativity that offers a resolution of spacetime singularities. The theory differs from Einstein's gravity only inside matter due to nondynamical degrees of freedom, and it is compatible with all current observations. We show that the theory is reminiscent of Palatini f(R) gravity and that it shares the same pathologies, such as curvature singularities at the surface of polytropic stars and unacceptable Newtonian limit. This casts serious doubt on its viability.

  11. Field verification of ADCP surface gravity wave elevation spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoitink, A.J.F.; Peters, H.C.; Schroevers, M.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can measure orbital velocities induced by surface gravity waves, yet the ADCP estimates of these velocities are subject to a relatively high noise level. The present paper introduces a linear filtration technique to significantly reduce the influence of

  12. Conditions on holographic entangling surfaces in higher curvature gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Flory, Mario; Sleight, Charlotte [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805, Munich (Germany)

    2014-06-17

    We study the extremal surfaces of functionals recently proposed for the holographic calculation of entanglement entropy in general higher curvature theories, using New Massive gravity and Gauss-Bonnet gravity as concrete examples. We show that the entropy functionals admit closed extremal surfaces, which for black hole backgrounds can encircle the event horizon of the black hole. In the examples considered, such closed surfaces correspond to a lower value of the entropy functional than expected from CFT calculations, implying a seeming mismatch between the bulk and boundary calculations. For Lorentzian settings we show that this problem can be resolved by imposing a causality constraint on the extremal surfaces. The possibility of deriving conditions from an alternative conical boundary condition method as proposed by Lewkowycz and Maldacena is explored.

  13. Inversion of gravity and gravity gradiometry data for density contrast surfaces using Cauchy-type integrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhdanov, Michael; Cai, Hongzhu

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new method of modeling and inversion of potential field data generated by a density contrast surface. Our method is based on 3D Cauchy-type integral representation of the potential fields. Traditionally, potential fields are calculated using volume integrals of the domains occupied...... by anomalous masses subdivided into prismatic cells. This discretization is computationally expensive, especially in a 3D case. The Cauchy-type integral technique makes it possible to represent the gravity field and its gradients as surface integrals. This is especially significant in the solution of problems...

  14. Precise surface gravities of δ Scuti stars from asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Hernández, A.; Suárez, J. C.; Moya, A.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Guo, Z.; Reese, D. R.; Pascual-Granado, J.; Barceló Forteza, S.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Garrido, R.; Nieto, J.

    2017-10-01

    The work reported here demonstrates that it is possible to accurately determine surface gravities of δ Scuti (δ Sct) stars using the frequency content from high-precision photometry and a measurement of the parallax. Using a sample of 10 eclipsing binary systems with a δ Sct component and the unique δ Sct star discovered with a transiting planet, WASP-33, we were able to refine the Δν-\\bar{ρ } relation. Using this relation and parallaxes, we obtained independent values for the masses and radii, allowing us to calculate the surface gravities without any constraints from spectroscopic or binary analysis. A remarkably good agreement was found between our results and those published, extracted from the analysis of the radial velocities and light curves of the systems. This reinforces the potential of Δν as a valuable observable for δ Sct stars and settles the degeneracy problem for the log g determination through spectroscopy.

  15. Gravity darkening in stars with surface differential rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorec, J.; Rieutord, M.; Espinosa Lara, F.; Frémat, Y.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Royer, F.

    2017-10-01

    Context. The interpretation of stellar apparent fundamental parameters (viewing-angle dependent) requires that they be treated consistently with the characteristics of their surface rotation law. Aims: We aim to develop a model to determine the distribution of the effective temperature and gravity, which explicitly depend on the surface differential rotation law and on the concomitant stellar external geometry. Methods: The basic assumptions in this model are: a) the external stellar layers are in radiative equilibrium; b) the emergent bolometric flux is anti-parallel with the effective gravity; c) the angular velocity in the surface obeys relations like Ω(θ) = Ωo [ 1 + αΥ(θ,k) ] where Υ(θ,k) = coskθ or sinkθ, and where (α,k) are free parameters. Results: The effective temperature varies with co-latitude θ, with amplitudes that depend on the differential-rotation law through the surface effective gravity and the gravity-darkening function (GDF). Although the derived expressions can be treated numerically, for some low integer values of k, analytical forms of the integral of characteristic curves, on which the determination of the GDF relies, are obtained. The effects of the quantities (η,α,k) (η = ratio between centrifugal and gravitational accelerations at the equator) on the determination of the Vsini parameter and on the gravity-darkening exponent are studied. Depending on the values of (η,α,k) the velocity V in the derived Vsini may strongly deviate from the equatorial rotational velocity. It is shown that the von Zeipel's-like gravity-darkening exponent β1 depends on all parameters (η,α,k) and that its value also depends on the viewing-angle I. Hence, there no unique interpretation of this exponent determined empirically in terms of (I,α). Conclusions: We stress that the data on rotating stars should be analyzed by taking into account the rotational effects through the GDF, by assuming k = 2 as a first approximation. Instead of the classic

  16. Internal gravity wave contributions to global sea surface variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, A.; Arbic, B. K.; Richman, J. G.; Shriver, J. F.; Buijsman, M. C.; Zamudio, L.; Wallcraft, A. J.; Sharma, H.

    2016-02-01

    High-resolution (1/12th and 1/25th degree) 41-layer simulations of the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), forced by both atmospheric fields and the astronomical tidal potential, are used to construct global maps of sea-surface height (SSH). The HYCOM output has been separated into steric, non-steric, and total sea-surface height and the maps display variance in subtidal, tidal, and supertidal bands. Two of the global maps are of particular interest in planning for the upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) wide-swath satellite altimeter mission; (1) a map of the nonstationary tidal signal (estimated after removing the stationary tidal signal via harmonic analysis), and (2) a map of the steric supertidal contributions, which are dominated by the internal gravity wave continuum. Both of these maps display signals of order 1 cm2, the target accuracy for the SWOT mission. Therefore, both non-stationary internal tides and non-tidal internal gravity waves are likely to be important sources of "noise" that must be accurately removed before examination of lower-frequency phenomena can take place.

  17. Quantum surface and intertwiner dynamics in loop quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Alexandre; Livine, Etera R.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce simple generic models of surface dynamics in loop quantum gravity (LQG). A quantum surface is defined as a set of elementary patches of area glued together. We provide it with an extra structure of locality (nearest neighbors), thought of as induced by the whole spin network state defining the 3d bulk geometry around the quantum surface. Here, we focus on classical surface dynamics, using a spinorial description of surface degrees of freedom. We introduce two classes of dynamics, to be thought as templates for future investigation of LQG dynamics with the dynamics of quantum black holes in mind. The first defines global dynamics of the closure defect of the surface, with two basic toy models, either a dissipative dynamics relaxing towards the closure constraint or a Hamiltonian dynamics precessing the closure defect. The second class of dynamics describes the isolated regime, when both area and closure defect are conserved throughout the evolution. The surface dynamics is implemented through U (N ) transformations and generalizes to a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian with a local quadratic potential interaction. We briefly discuss the implications of modeling the quantum black hole dynamics by a surface Bose-Hubbard model.

  18. Normal Incidence for Graded Index Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankhoje, Uday K.; Van Zyl, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    A plane wave is incident normally from vacuum (eta(sub 0) = 1) onto a smooth surface. The substrate has three layers; the top most layer has thickness d(sub 1) and permittivity epsilon(sub 1). The corresponding numbers for the next layer are d(sub 2); epsilon(sub 2), while the third layer which is semi-in nite has index eta(sub 3). The Hallikainen model [1] is used to relate volumetric soil moisture to the permittivity. Here, we consider the relation for the real part of the permittivity for a typical loam soil: acute epsilon(mv) = 2.8571 + 3.9678 x mv + 118:85 x mv(sup 2).

  19. Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gamow, George

    2003-01-01

    A distinguished physicist and teacher, George Gamow also possessed a special gift for making the intricacies of science accessible to a wide audience. In Gravity, he takes an enlightening look at three of the towering figures of science who unlocked many of the mysteries behind the laws of physics: Galileo, the first to take a close look at the process of free and restricted fall; Newton, originator of the concept of gravity as a universal force; and Einstein, who proposed that gravity is no more than the curvature of the four-dimensional space-time continuum.Graced with the author's own draw

  20. Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Gravity is all around us. Learn how it is used in art, technology, and engineering. Five easy-to-read chapters explain the science behind gravity, as well as its real-world applications. Vibrant, full-color photos, bolded glossary words, and a key stats section let readers zoom in even deeper. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Zoom is a division of ABDO.

  1. gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study the cosmological dynamics for R p exp( λ R ) gravity theory in the metric formalism, using dynamical systems approach. Considering higher-dimensional FRW geometries in case of an imperfect fluid which has two different scale factors in the normal and extra dimensions, we find the exact solutions, and study its ...

  2. A Multiscale Nested Modeling Framework to Simulate the Interaction of Surface Gravity Waves with Nonlinear Internal Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    by internal wave surface currents, a process that can be validated with both in-situ observations and synthetic aperature radar (SAR) imagery which...spectrum? How does this affect the detectability of ISWs in SAR imagery? 5) How does the seasonal variability of ISW currents impact the surface gravity...LZSNFS for 2014/02/01 00Z. It shows an intrusion of Kuroshio southwest off Taiwan as often obsevered during winter season. RESULTS A 1.5 year-long

  3. Surface Gravities for 228 M, L, and T Dwarfs in the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Emily C.; Mace, Gregory N.; McLean, Ian S.; Logsdon, Sarah E.; Rice, Emily L.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Burgasser, Adam J.; McGovern, Mark R.; Prato, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    We combine 131 new medium-resolution ( R ∼ 2000) J -band spectra of M, L, and T dwarfs from the Keck NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey (BDSS) with 97 previously published BDSS spectra to study surface-gravity-sensitive indices for 228 low-mass stars and brown dwarfs spanning spectral types M5–T9. Specifically, we use an established set of spectral indices to determine surface gravity classifications for all of the M6–L7 objects in our sample by measuring the equivalent widths (EW) of the K i lines at 1.1692, 1.1778, and 1.2529 μ m, and the 1.2 μ m FeH J absorption index. Our results are consistent with previous surface gravity measurements, showing a distinct double peak—at ∼L5 and T5—in K i EW as a function of spectral type. We analyze the K i EWs of 73 objects of known ages and find a linear trend between log(Age) and EW. From this relationship, we assign age ranges to the very low gravity, intermediate gravity, and field gravity designations for spectral types M6–L0. Interestingly, the ages probed by these designations remain broad, change with spectral type, and depend on the gravity-sensitive index used. Gravity designations are useful indicators of the possibility of youth, but current data sets cannot be used to provide a precise age estimate.

  4. Surface Gravities for 228 M, L, and T Dwarfs in the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Emily C.; Mace, Gregory N.; McLean, Ian S.; Logsdon, Sarah E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Rice, Emily L. [Department of Engineering Science and Physics, College of Staten Island, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10301 (United States); Kirkpatrick, J. Davy [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Burgasser, Adam J. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); McGovern, Mark R. [Math and Sciences Division, Antelope Valley College, 3041 West Avenue K, Lancaster, CA 93536 (United States); Prato, Lisa, E-mail: emartin@astro.ucla.edu [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2017-03-20

    We combine 131 new medium-resolution ( R ∼ 2000) J -band spectra of M, L, and T dwarfs from the Keck NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey (BDSS) with 97 previously published BDSS spectra to study surface-gravity-sensitive indices for 228 low-mass stars and brown dwarfs spanning spectral types M5–T9. Specifically, we use an established set of spectral indices to determine surface gravity classifications for all of the M6–L7 objects in our sample by measuring the equivalent widths (EW) of the K i lines at 1.1692, 1.1778, and 1.2529 μ m, and the 1.2 μ m FeH{sub J} absorption index. Our results are consistent with previous surface gravity measurements, showing a distinct double peak—at ∼L5 and T5—in K i EW as a function of spectral type. We analyze the K i EWs of 73 objects of known ages and find a linear trend between log(Age) and EW. From this relationship, we assign age ranges to the very low gravity, intermediate gravity, and field gravity designations for spectral types M6–L0. Interestingly, the ages probed by these designations remain broad, change with spectral type, and depend on the gravity-sensitive index used. Gravity designations are useful indicators of the possibility of youth, but current data sets cannot be used to provide a precise age estimate.

  5. Two-dimensional free-surface flow under gravity: A new benchmark case for SPH method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. Z.; Fang, L.

    2018-02-01

    Currently there are few free-surface benchmark cases with analytical results for the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation. In the present contribution we introduce a two-dimensional free-surface flow under gravity, and obtain an analytical expression on the surface height difference and a theoretical estimation on the surface fractal dimension. They are preliminarily validated and supported by SPH calculations.

  6. Review of Electrical and Gravity Methods of Near-Surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The theory and practice of electrical and gravity methods of geophysics for groundwater exploration was reviewed with illustrations and data examples. With the goal of reducing cases of borehole/water-well failure attributed to the lack of the knowledge of the methods of geophysics for groundwater exploration and ...

  7. Surface tension of the horizon and Archimedes' principle for gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Liangsuo; Cui, Kaifeng; Liu, Xiaokang; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei

    2018-01-01

    In this letter, by combining the holographic principle with the graviton Bose-Einstein condensates hypothesis of gravitational backgrounds, we provide a theory of gravity, which provides some kinetic details of how the gravitational coupling between matter and spacetime works. The effective radial potential energy of an object in a gravitational field is found to be the sum of the interfacial energy caused by its micro horizon and the energy required to make room for it by displacing graviton...

  8. Numerical Study on the Effects of Gravity and Surface Tension on Condensation Process in Square Minichannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Panpan; Chen, Zhenqian; Shi, Juan

    2017-12-01

    A volume of fluid (VOF) method is adopted to simulate the condensation of R134a in a horizontal single square minichannel with 1 mm side length. The effect of gravity, surface tension and gas-liquid interfacial shear stress are taken into account. The result denotes that condensation is first appeared at the corner of channel, and then the condensation is stretched at the effect of surface tension until the whole channel boundary covered. The effect of gravity on the distribution of the liquid film depends on the channel length. In short channel, the gravity shows no significant effect, the distribution shape of steam in the cross section of the channel is approximately circular. In long channel, due to the influence of gravity, the liquid converges at the bottom under the effect of gravity, and the thickness of the liquid film at the bottom is obviously higher than that of the upper part of the channel. The effect of surface tension on condensation is also analysed. The surface tension can enhance the condensation heat transfer significantly when the inlet mass flux is low. Whilst, at high mass flux, the enhancement of surface tension on heat transfer is unobvious and can be neglected.

  9. Near-surface characterization for seismic exploration based on gravity and resistivity data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrlina, Jan

    (2016), č. článku 41892. [Middle East Geoscience Conference and Exhibition /12./. Manama, 07.03.2016-10.03.2016] Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : gravity and resistivity surveys * near-surface formations * seismic velocity Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  10. Physical Retracking of Jason-1 LRM data for ocean surface height/gravity field determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Maulik; Baltazar Andersen, Ole; Stenseng, Lars; Dall, Jørgen

    2013-04-01

    Jason-1 Low Resolution Mode (LRM) waveforms can be processed to extract accurate heights of the ocean surface. These heights are adjusted taking into account various corrections available. Further the along surface slope/variation of these ocean heights can be used to make an estimation of the gravity field. An important part of this gravity field estimation is dependent on the way the LRM waveform is processed. Thus a physical model based on an error function is used, and the LRM waveforms are fit to this model. A processing system made up of 2 parameter and 3 parameter fitting models are used in order to extract the most reliable ocean surface heights. The quality of the processing system is judged by evaluating the standard deviation of the sea surface anomaly obtained after all corrections and the mean sea surface/geoid are removed. The lower the value of the standard deviation of the sea surface anomaly, the better the quality of processing is. Hence, different processing schemes are considered and evaluated in order to conclude towards the best retracking procedure which would eventually result in high accuracy gravity field estimations.

  11. Combined influence of inertia, gravity, and surface tension on the linear stability of Newtonian fiber spinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechert, M.; Scheid, B.

    2017-11-01

    The draw resonance effect appears in fiber spinning processes if the ratio of take-up to inlet velocity, the so-called draw ratio, exceeds a critical value and manifests itself in steady oscillations of flow velocity and fiber diameter. We study the effect of surface tension on the draw resonance behavior of Newtonian fiber spinning in the presence of inertia and gravity. Utilizing an alternative scaling makes it possible to visualize the results in stability maps of highly practical relevance. The interplay of the destabilizing effect of surface tension and the stabilizing effects of inertia and gravity lead to nonmonotonic stability behavior and local stability maxima with respect to the dimensionless fluidity and the dimensionless inlet velocity. A region of unconditional instability caused by the influence of surface tension is found in addition to the region of unconditional stability caused by inertia, which was described in previous works [M. Bechert, D. W. Schubert, and B. Scheid, Eur. J. Mech B 52, 68 (2015), 10.1016/j.euromechflu.2015.02.005; Phys. Fluids 28, 024109 (2016), 10.1063/1.4941762]. Due to its importance for a particular group of fiber spinning applications, a viscous-gravity-surface-tension regime, i.e., negligible effect of inertia, is analyzed separately. The mechanism underlying the destabilizing effect of surface tension is discussed and established stability criteria are tested for validity in the presence of surface tension.

  12. Surface charges for gravity and electromagnetism in the first order formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frodden, Ernesto; Hidalgo, Diego

    2018-02-01

    A new derivation of surface charges for 3  +  1 gravity coupled to electromagnetism is obtained. Gravity theory is written in the tetrad-connection variables. The general derivation starts from the Lagrangian, and uses the covariant symplectic formalism in the language of forms. For gauge theories, surface charges disentangle physical from gauge symmetries through the use of Noether identities and the exactness symmetry condition. The surface charges are quasilocal, explicitly coordinate independent, gauge invariant and background independent. For a black hole family solution, the surface charge conservation implies the first law of black hole mechanics. As a check, we show the first law for an electrically charged, rotating black hole with an asymptotically constant curvature (the Kerr–Newman (anti-)de Sitter family). The charges, including the would-be mass term appearing in the first law, are quasilocal. No reference to the asymptotic structure of the spacetime nor the boundary conditions is required and therefore topological terms do not play a rôle. Finally, surface charge formulae for Lovelock gravity coupled to electromagnetism are exhibited, generalizing the one derived in a recent work by Barnich et al Proc. Workshop ‘ About Various Kinds of Interactions’ in honour of Philippe Spindel (4–5 June 2015, Mons, Belgium) C15-06-04 (2016 (arXiv:1611.01777 [gr-qc])). The two different symplectic methods to define surface charges are compared and shown equivalent.

  13. The zero gravity curve and surface and radii for geostationary and geosynchronous satellite orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjöberg L.E.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A geosynchronous satellite orbits the Earth along a constant longitude. A special case is the geostationary satellite that is located at a constant position above the equator. The ideal position of a geostationary satellite is at the level of zero gravity, i.e. at the geocentric radius where the gravitational force of the Earth equals the centrifugal force. These forces must be compensated for several perturbing forces, in particular for the lunisolar tides. Considering that the gravity field of the Earth varies not only radially but also laterally, this study focuses on the variations of zero gravity not only on the equator (for geostationary satellites but also for various latitudes. It is found that the radius of a geostationary satellite deviates from its mean value of 42164.2 km only within ±2 m, mainly due to the spherical harmonic coefficient J22, which is related with the equatorial flattening of the Earth. Away from the equator the zero gravity surface deviates from the ideal radius of a geosynchronous satellite, and more so for higher latitudes. While the radius of the former surface increases towards infinity towards the poles, the latter decreases about 520 m from the equator to the pole. Tidal effects vary these radii within ±2.3 km.

  14. Prospects for Improving Gravity-Fed Surface Irrigation Systems in Mediterranean European Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Masseroni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, most irrigation practices in Southern Europe have been based on gravity-fed surface irrigation systems. Currently, these systems remain a relevant typology in the European Union (EU member states of the Mediterranean areas, where it is often the only sustainable method for farmers due to the small size of agricultural holdings, their reduced capacity and readiness to invest and the low ratio between yield profits and irrigation costs. In the last several years, in response to European and national directives, surface irrigation has garnered increasing attention at the political and bureaucratic levels due to frequent criticisms of its postulated low efficiency and high water wastage. However, these systems commonly provide a number of ecosystem services and nature-based solutions that increase the positive externalities in different rural socio-ecological contexts and often have the potential to extend these services and provide solutions that are compatible with economical sustainability. This study aims to discuss the prospects for new practices and for the rehabilitation and modernization of the gravity-fed surface irrigation systems in EU Mediterranean areas to enhance water efficiency, thus gaining both economic advantages and environmental benefits. The difficulties, stimuli for improvements and peculiarities of the irrigation water management of four rural environments located in Italy, Spain and Portugal were analyzed and compared to the current state of the gravity-fed surface irrigation systems with hypothetical future improvements achievable by innovative technologies and practices. In these different case studies, the current gravity-fed surface irrigation systems have an obsolete regulatory structure; water-use efficiency is not a driving criterion for the management of the conveyance and distribution canal network, and farmers are not yet adequately encouraged to adopt more efficient gravity-fed irrigation practices

  15. Liquid free surface response to a step change from terrestrial conditions to zero gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatistas, G. H.; Kozel, V.; Yan, W.; Sankar, T. S.

    Numerical results concerning the dynamic behavior of the free surface of a liquid placed in a rectangular container, during a step transition from terrestrial conditions to weightlessness are presented. The first damped natural frequency of the system is shown to depend strongly on the characteristic Reynolds number (Re) and the contact angle (alpha) but not on the original liquid level. The required time for the surface oscillations to decay to 10 percent of the original amplitude was also found to depend on Re and alpha. The numerically obtained results approach asymptotically the exact zero-gravity equilibrium state, thus confirming the minimum surface energy principle.

  16. Perturbation of higher-genus spatial surfaces in (2+1)-dimensional gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, T.; Ishihara, H.

    1992-01-01

    We study dynamical evolutions of spatial surfaces with genus g≥2 in (2+1)-dimensional pure Einstein gravity by the perturbation analysis around static moduli solutions. We find that an action of the perturbed Teichmueller parameters has a harmonic-oscillator form with a time-dependent mass and frequency. It is also shown that a set of the static moduli solutions is an attractor of nearby solutions

  17. A Gravity-Responsive Time-Keeping Protein of the Plant and Animal Cell Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. James

    2003-01-01

    The hypothesis under investigation was that a ubiquinol (NADH) oxidase protein of the cell surface with protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity (= NOX protein) is a plant and animal time-keeping ultradian (period of less than 24 h) driver of both cell enlargement and the biological clock that responds to gravity. Despite considerable work in a large number of laboratories spanning several decades, this is, to my knowledge, our work is the first demonstration of a time-keeping biochemical reaction that is both gravity-responsive and growth-related and that has been shown to determine circadian periodicity. As such, the NOX protein may represent both the long-sought biological gravity receptor and the core oscillator of the cellular biological clock. Completed studies have resulted in 12 publications and two issued NASA-owned patents of the clock activity. The gravity response and autoentrainment were characterized in cultured mammalian cells and in two plant systems together with entrainment by light and small molecules (melatonin). The molecular basis of the oscillatory behavior was investigated using spectroscopic methods (Fourier transform infrared and circular dichroism) and high resolution electron microscopy. We have also applied these findings to an understanding of the response to hypergravity. Statistical methods for analysis of time series phenomena were developed (Foster et al., 2003).

  18. The gravimeter "B-grave" for the in-situ surface gravity measurements of an asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ruymbeke, Michel; karatekin, ozgur; rasson, jean; wielant, françois; dumont, Phillipe; Ritter, Birgit; zhu, Ping

    2016-04-01

    In the context of the preliminary study phase for the CubeSats supporting ESA's Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) to the Didymos, we investigate a miniaturized gravimeter as part of the geophysical instrument package for the Asteroid Geophysical Explorer (AGEX). AGEX intends to land a CubeSat on the secondary object in the Didymos system, Didymoon in order to characterize the asteroid surface and internal structure A 3D compact gravimeter is developed at the Royal Observatory of Belgium. Its design allows to meter a weak 50 μm/sec² gravity field corresponding to 5 ppm of Earth gravity in a harsh environment. A system with three components mounted in an orthogonal geometry allows obtaining the gravity field in amplitude and in angular position without any requirement of levelling. B-GRAVES will use a in-situ calibration and multi-parameter approach for validation of the measurements. A laboratory simulation is induced with centrifugal forces applied to the pendulum set-up in a vertical position to reject the Earth gravity field. Signal treatment and uncertainties are discussed keeping in mind questions of thermal and vibration influence. The B-GRAVES can serve as a novel and robust instrument for future lander and rover missions .

  19. New and updated stellar parameters for 90 transit hosts. The effect of the surface gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, A.; Santos, N. C.; Sousa, S. G.; Fernandes, J. M.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Delgado Mena, E.; Montalto, M.; Israelian, G.

    2013-10-01

    Context. Precise stellar parameters are crucial in exoplanet research for correctly determining the planetary parameters. For stars hosting a transiting planet, determining the planetary mass and radius depends on the stellar mass and radius, which in turn depend on the atmospheric stellar parameters. Different methods can provide different results, which leads to different planet characteristics. Aims: In this paper, we use a uniform method to spectroscopically derive stellar atmospheric parameters, chemical abundances, stellar masses, and stellar radii for a sample of 90 transit hosts. Surface gravities are also derived photometrically using the stellar density as derived from the light curve. We study the effect of using these different surface gravities on the determination of the chemical abundances and the stellar mass and radius. Methods: A spectroscopic analysis based on Kurucz models in local thermodynamical equilibrium was performed through the MOOG code to derive the atmospheric parameters and the chemical abundances. The photometric surface gravity was determined through isochrone fitting and the use of the stellar density, directly determined from the light curve. Stellar masses and radii are determined through calibration formulae. Results: Spectroscopic and photometric surface gravities differ, but this has very little effect on the precise determination of the stellar mass in our spectroscopic analysis. The stellar radius, and hence the planetary radius, is most affected by the surface gravity discrepancies. For the chemical abundances, the difference is, as expected, only noticable for the abundances derived from analyzing lines of ionized species. The data presented herein are based on observations collected at the La Silla Paranal Observatory, ESO (Chile) with the FEROS spectrograph at the 2.2-m telescope (ESO runs ID 088.C-0892, 089.C-0444, 090.C-0146) and the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6-m telescope (ESO archive), the Paranal Observatory, ESO

  20. Physical Retracking of Cryosat-2 Low Resolution Mode data for ocean surface height and gravity field estimation in open ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Maulik; Baltazar Andersen, Ole; Dall, Jorgen; Stenseng, Lars

    2014-05-01

    Cryosat-2 Low Resolution Mode (LRM) altimetric data is processed to determine precise ocean surface heights and gravity fields in open ocean. These ocean surface heights are corrected using various geophysical corrections available. The along track variation of the ocean surface height anomaly is used to determine the gravity field. The quality of this gravity field estimation is dependent on the precision in the ocean surface height anomaly. Thus a three/two parameter based physical model based on an error function is used, and the Cryosat-2 LRM waveforms are fit to this model. The fitting routines which employ the Levenberg Marquadt technique generate estimated values of retracked epochs which are used to compute the ocean surface heights. A two step processing system made up of sequential 3 parameter (amplitude, rise time, retracked epoch) and 2 parameter (amplitude, retracked epoch) fitting models are used to determine precise ocean surface heights. The quality of the processing system is judged by evaluating the standard deviation of the ocean surface height anomaly obtained after all corrections and the mean sea surface/geoid are removed. The lower the value of the standard deviation of the ocean surface height anomaly, the better the quality of processing is. Hence, different processing schemes are considered and evaluated in order to conclude towards the best retracking procedure which would eventually result in high accuracy gravity field estimations. Also, the quality on the precision is judged by analyzing the standard deviation in the gravity field anomaly. The gravity field anomaly is obtained by subtracting the retracked gravity field with the marine gravity field available. A lower value of the standard deviation in the gravity field anomaly indicates a more precise retracking algorithm. Using the two retracker performance evaluation strategies, namely the ocean surface height anomaly and the gravity field anomaly, it was concluded that the three

  1. Modeling surface water storage from space altimetry, remote sensing and gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy, Jean-Paul; Loomis, Bryant; Luthcke, Scott

    2017-04-01

    Since its launch in 2002, the GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) is recording Earth gravity field variations with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolutions, mainly due to global circulation of surface geophysical fluids. Continental water storage variations estimated with GRACE are classically compared to global hydrology models such as GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation System) or MERRA (Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis) hydrology models. However most of these models do not take into account both the groundwater and the surface water (lakes and rivers) components of the hydrological cycle. We derive surface water storage in several large river basins, characterized by various climates, using a simple routing scheme, forced by runoff outputs of GLDAS and MERRA-land hydrology models. We adjust the flow velocity, i.e. the only free parameter in our modeling by fitting the modeled equivalent water height to the observed water elevation from radar altimetry measurements. The conversion of the observed geometric heights into the modeled equivalent water heights requires the knowledge of the variations of the river widths, which can be derived from MODIS observations. We validate river models by comparing the estimated discharge to independent in-situ measurements. We finally add to the soil-moisture and snow components of the GLDAS and MERRA-land models our estimates of surface water variations and show that they are in better agreement with GRACE. We also compare these estimates to WGHM, which includes both groundwater and surface components.

  2. Second generation diffusion model of interacting gravity waves on the surface of deep fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pushkarev

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a second generation phenomenological model for nonlinear interaction of gravity waves on the surface of deep water. This model takes into account the effects of non-locality of the original Hasselmann diffusion equation still preserving important properties of the first generation model: physically consistent scaling, adherence to conservation laws and the existence of Kolmogorov-Zakharov solutions. Numerical comparison of both models with the original Hasselmann equation shows that the second generation models improves the angular distribution in the evolving wave energy spectrum.

  3. Incorporating NDVI in a gravity model setting to describe spatio-temporal patterns of Lyme borreliosis incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, J. M.; Verstraeten, W. W.; Farifteh, J.; Maes, P.; Aerts, J. M.; Coppin, P.

    2012-04-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is the most common tick-borne disease in Europe and incidence growth has been reported in several European countries during the last decade. LB is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and the main vector of this pathogen in Europe is the tick Ixodes ricinus. LB incidence and spatial spread is greatly dependent on environmental conditions impacting habitat, demography and trophic interactions of ticks and the wide range of organisms ticks parasite. The landscape configuration is also a major determinant of tick habitat conditions and -very important- of the fashion and intensity of human interaction with vegetated areas, i.e. human exposure to the pathogen. Hence, spatial notions as distance and adjacency between urban and vegetated environments are related to human exposure to tick bites and, thus, to risk. This work tested the adequacy of a gravity model setting to model the observed spatio-temporal pattern of LB as a function of location and size of urban and vegetated areas and the seasonal and annual change in the vegetation dynamics as expressed by MODIS NDVI. Opting for this approach implies an analogy with Newton's law of universal gravitation in which the attraction forces between two bodies are directly proportional to the bodies mass and inversely proportional to distance. Similar implementations have proven useful in fields like trade modeling, health care service planning, disease mapping among other. In our implementation, the size of human settlements and vegetated systems and the distance separating these landscape elements are considered the 'bodies'; and the 'attraction' between them is an indicator of exposure to pathogen. A novel element of this implementation is the incorporation of NDVI to account for the seasonal and annual variation in risk. The importance of incorporating this indicator of vegetation activity resides in the fact that alterations of LB incidence pattern observed the last decade have been ascribed

  4. First Gravity Traverse on the Martian Surface from the Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, K. W.; Peters, S. F.; Gonter, K. A.; Vasavada, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Orbital gravity surveys have been a key tool in understanding planetary interiors and shallow crustal structure, exemplified by recent missions such as GRAIL and Juno. However, due to the loss of spatial resolution with altitude, airborne and ground-based survey methods are typically employed on the Earth. Previously, the Lunar Traverse Gravimeter experiment on the Apollo 17 mission has been the only attempt to collect surface gravity measurements on another planetary body. We will describe the results of the first gravity survey on the Martian surface, using data from the Curiosity rover over its >10 km traverse across the floor of Gale crater and lower slopes of Mount Sharp. These results enable us to estimate bulk rock density, and to search for potential subsurface density anomalies. To measure local gravitational acceleration, we use one of the two onboard Rover Inertial Measurement Units (RIMU-A), designed for rover position and fine attitude determination. The IMU contains three-axis micro-electromechanical (MEMS) accelerometers and fiber-optic gyros, and is used for gyrocompassing by integrating data for several minutes on sols with no drive or arm motions (roughly 50% of sols to date). Raw acceleration data are calibrated for biases induced by temperature effects and rover orientation, along with rover elevation over the course of the mission using multiple regression. We use the best fit linear relationship between topographic height and gravitational acceleration to estimate a Bouguer correction for the observed change in magnitude over the mission as the rover has ascended over 100 meters up the lower slopes of Mount Sharp. We find a relatively low best-fit density of 1600 +/- 500 kg/m^3 for the rocks of Mount Sharp, consistent with rover-based measurements of thermal inertial, and potentially indicating pervasive fracturing, high porosity and/or low compaction within the original sediments at least to depths of order 100 meters. Future measurements

  5. Impacts of climate changes on ocean surface gravity waves over the eastern Canadian shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lanli; Sheng, Jinyu

    2017-05-01

    A numerical study is conducted to investigate the impact of climate changes on ocean surface gravity waves over the eastern Canadian shelf (ECS). The "business-as-usual" climate scenario known as Representative Concentration Pathway RCP8.5 is considered in this study. Changes in the ocean surface gravity waves over the study region for the period 1979-2100 are examined based on 3 hourly ocean waves simulated by the third-generation ocean wave model known as WAVEWATCHIII. The wave model is driven by surface winds and ice conditions produced by the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CanRCM4). The whole study period is divided into the present (1979-2008), near future (2021-2050) and far future (2071-2100) periods to quantify possible future changes of ocean waves over the ECS. In comparison with the present ocean wave conditions, the time-mean significant wave heights ( H s ) are expected to increase over most of the ECS in the near future and decrease over this region in the far future period. The time-means of the annual 5% largest H s are projected to increase over the ECS in both near and far future periods due mainly to the changes in surface winds. The future changes in the time-means of the annual 5% largest H s and 10-m wind speeds are projected to be twice as strong as the changes in annual means. An analysis of inverse wave ages suggests that the occurrence of wind seas is projected to increase over the southern Labrador and central Newfoundland Shelves in the near future period, and occurrence of swells is projected to increase over other areas of the ECS in both the near and far future periods.

  6. Capability assessment and challenges for quantum technology gravity sensors for near surface terrestrial geophysical surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddice, Daniel; Metje, Nicole; Tuckwell, George

    2017-11-01

    Geophysical surveying is widely used for the location of subsurface features. Current technology is limited in terms of its resolution (thus size of features it can detect) and penetration depth and a suitable technique is needed to bridge the gap between shallow near surface investigation using techniques such as EM conductivity mapping and GPR commonly used to map the upper 5 m below ground surface, and large features at greater depths detectable using conventional microgravity (> 5 m below ground surface). This will minimise the risks from unknown features buried in and conditions of the ground during civil engineering work. Quantum technology (QT) gravity sensors potentially offer a step-change in technology for locating features which lie outside of the currently detectable range in terms of size and depth, but that potential is currently unknown as field instruments have not been developed. To overcome this, a novel computer simulation was developed for a large range of different targets of interest. The simulation included realistic noise modelling of instrumental, environmental and location sources of noise which limit the accuracy of current microgravity measurements, in order to assess the potential capability of the new QT instruments in realistic situations and determine some of the likely limitations on their implementation. The results of the simulations for near surface features showed that the new technology is best employed in a gradiometer configuration as opposed to the traditional single sensor gravimeter used by current instruments due to the ability to suppress vibrational environmental noise effects due to common mode rejection between the sensors. A significant improvement in detection capability of 1.5-2 times was observed, putting targets such as mineshafts into the detectability zone which would be a major advantage for subsurface surveying. Thus this research, for the first time, has demonstrated clearly the benefits of QT gravity

  7. Atmospheric impacts on climatic variability of surface incident solar radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's climate is driven by surface incident solar radiation (Rs. Direct measurements have shown that Rs has undergone significant decadal variations. However, a large fraction of the global land surface is not covered by these observations. Satellite-derived Rs has a good global coverage but is of low accuracy in its depiction of decadal variability. This paper shows that daily to decadal variations of Rs, from both aerosols and cloud properties, can be accurately estimated using globally available measurements of Sunshine Duration (SunDu. In particular, SunDu shows that since the late 1980's Rs has brightened over Europe due to decreases in aerosols but dimmed over China due to their increases. We found that variation of cloud cover determines Rs at a monthly scale but that aerosols determine the variability of Rs at a decadal time scale, in particular, over Europe and China. Because of its global availability and long-term history, SunDu can provide an accurate and continuous proxy record of Rs, filling in values for the blank areas that are not covered by direct measurements. Compared to its direct measurement, Rs from SunDu appears to be less sensitive to instrument replacement and calibration, and shows that the widely reported sharp increase in Rs during the early 1990s in China was a result of instrument replacement. By merging direct measurements collected by Global Energy Budget Archive with those derived from SunDu, we obtained a good coverage of Rs over the Northern Hemisphere. From this data, the average increase of Rs from 1982 to 2008 is estimated to be 0.87 W m−2 per decade.

  8. The significance of ultra-refracted surface gravity waves on sheltered coasts, with application to San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, D.M.; Erikson, L.H.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean surface gravity waves propagating over shallow bathymetry undergo spatial modification of propagation direction and energy density, commonly due to refraction and shoaling. If the bathymetric variations are significant the waves can undergo changes in their direction of propagation (relative to deepwater) greater than 90° over relatively short spatial scales. We refer to this phenomenon as ultra-refraction. Ultra-refracted swell waves can have a powerful influence on coastal areas that otherwise appear to be sheltered from ocean waves. Through a numerical modeling investigation it is shown that San Francisco Bay, one of the earth's largest and most protected natural harbors, is vulnerable to ultra-refracted ocean waves, particularly southwest incident swell. The flux of wave energy into San Francisco Bay results from wave transformation due to the bathymetry and orientation of the large ebb tidal delta, and deep, narrow channel through the Golden Gate. For example, ultra-refracted swell waves play a critical role in the intermittent closure of the entrance to Crissy Field Marsh, a small restored tidal wetland located on the sheltered north-facing coast approximately 1.5 km east of the Golden Gate Bridge.

  9. Artificial Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Clément, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    Protecting the health, safety, and performance of exploration-class mission crews against the physiological deconditioning resulting from long-term weightlessness during transit and long-term reduced gravity during surface operations will require effective, multi-system countermeasures. Artificial gravity, which would replace terrestrial gravity with inertial forces generated by rotating the transit vehicle or by short-radius human centrifuge devices within the transit vehicle or surface habitat, has long been considered a potential solution. However, despite its attractiveness as an efficient

  10. Damping of short gravity-capillary waves due to oil derivatives film on the water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergievskaya, Irina; Ermakov, Stanislav; Lazareva, Tatyana

    2016-10-01

    In this paper new results of laboratory studies of damping of gravity-capillary waves on the water surface covered by kerosene are presented and compared with our previous analysis of characteristics of crude oil and diesel fuel films. Investigations of kerosene films were carried out in a wide range values of film thicknesses (from some hundreds millimetres to a few millimetres) and in a wide range of surface wave frequencies (from 10 to 27 Hz). The selected frequency range corresponds to the operating wavelengths of microwave, X- to Ka-band radars typically used for the ocean remote sensing. The studied range of film thickness covers typical thicknesses of routine spills in the ocean. It is obtained that characteristics of waves, measured in the presence of oil derivatives films differ from those for crude oil films, in particular, because the volume viscosity of oil derivatives and crude oil is strongly different. To retrieve parameters of kerosene films from the experimental data the surface wave damping was analyzed theoretically in the frame of a model of two-layer fluid. The films are assumed to be soluble, so the elasticity on the upper and lower boundaries is considered as a function of wave frequency. Physical parameters of oil derivative films were estimated when tuning the film parameters to fit theory and experiment. Comparison between wave damping due to crude oil, kerosene and diesel fuel films have shown some capabilities of distinguishing of oil films from remote sensing of short surface waves.

  11. Seismic response of concrete gravity dam reinforced with FRP sheets on dam surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at exploring the effects of anti-seismic reinforcement with the fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP material bonded to the dam surface in dam engineering. Time-history analysis was performed to simulate the seismic failure process of a gravity dam that was assumed to be reinforced at the locations of slope discontinuity at the downstream surface, part of the upstream face, and the dam heel. A damage model considering the influence of concrete heterogeneity was used to model the nonlinearity of concrete. A bond-slip model was applied to the interface between FRP and concrete, and the reinforcement mechanism was analyzed through the bond stress and the stress in FRP. The results of the crack pattern, displacement, and acceleration of the reinforced dam were compared with those of the original one. It is shown that FRP, as a reinforcement material, postpones the occurrence of cracks and slows the crack propagation, and that cracks emanating from the upstream surface and downstream surface are not connected, meaning that the reinforced dam can retain water-impounding function when subjected to the earthquake. Anti-seismic reinforcement with FRP is therefore beneficial to improving the seismic resistant capability of concrete dams.

  12. Unified first law and some general prescription. A redefinition of surface gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haldar, Sourav; Bhattacharjee, Sudipto; Chakraborty, Subenoy [Jadavpur University, Department of Mathematics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India)

    2017-09-15

    The paper contains an extensive study of the unified first law (UFL) in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime model. By projecting the UFL along the Kodama vector the second Friedmann equation can be obtained. Also studying the UFL on the event horizon it is found that the Clausius relation cannot be obtained from the UFL by projecting it along the tangent to the event horizon as it can be for the trapping horizon. However, it is shown in the present work that Clausius relation can be obtained by projecting the UFL along the Kodama vector on the horizon and the result is found to be true for any horizon. Finally motivated by the Unruh temperature for the Rindler observer, surface gravity is redefined and a Clausius relation is obtained from the UFL by projecting it along a vector analogous to the Kodama vector. (orig.)

  13. Isoperimetric surfaces and area-angular momentum inequality in a rotating black hole in new massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceña, Andrés; López, Ericson; Llerena, Mario

    2018-03-01

    We study the existence and stability of isoperimetric surfaces in a family of rotating black holes in new massive gravity. We show that the stability of such surfaces is determined by the sign of the hair parameter. We use the isoperimetric surfaces to find a geometric inequality between the area and the angular momentum of the black hole, conjecturing geometric inequalities for more general black holes.

  14. Wakes behind surface-mounted obstacles: Impact of aspect ratio, incident angle, and surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Nicolas; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2018-03-01

    The so-called wake-moment coefficient C˜h and lateral wake deflection of three-dimensional windbreaks are explored in the near and far wake. Wind-tunnel experiments were performed to study the functional dependence of C˜h with windbreak aspect ratio, incidence angle, and the ratio of the windbreak height and surface roughness (h /z0 ). Supported with the data, we also propose basic models for the wake deflection of the windbreak in the near and far fields. The near-wake model is based on momentum conservation considering the drag on the windbreak, whereas the far-wake counterpart is based on existing models for wakes behind surface-mounted obstacles. Results show that C˜h does not change with windbreak aspect ratios of 10 or greater; however, it may be lower for an aspect ratio of 5. C˜h is found to change roughly with the cosine of the incidence angle, and to depend strongly on h /z0 . The data broadly support the proposed wake-deflection models, though better predictions could be made with improved knowledge of the windbreak drag coefficient.

  15. Incident energy dependence of scattering behavior of water molecules on Si (100) and graphite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, G.; Kotsubo, Y.; Yoshimoto, Y.; Kinefuchi, I.; Takagi, S.

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between water molecules and solid surfaces has a great impact on water vapor flows in nanostructures. We conduct molecular beam scattering experiments covering the incident energy range corresponding to the thermal energy at room temperature to investigate the scattering behavior of water molecules on silicon and graphite surfaces. The incident energy dependence of the scattering distributions exhibits opposite trends on these surfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the difference is caused by the inertia effect of the incident molecules and the surface corrugations.

  16. 2D instabilities of surface gravity waves on a linear shear current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francius, Marc; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    instabilities due to resonant four-wave interactions, as well as to study the influence of vorticity and nonlinearity on the characteristics of linear instabilities due to resonant five-wave and six-wave interactions. Depending on the dimensionless depth, superharmonic instabilities due to five-wave interactions can become dominant with increasing positive vorticiy. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by the Direction Générale de l'Armement and funded by the ANR project n°. ANR-13-ASTR-0007. References [1] A. Constantin, Two-dimensionality of gravity water flows of constant non-zero vorticity beneath a surface wave train, Eur. J. Mech. B/Fluids, 2011, 30, 12-16. [2] R. S. Johnson, On the modulation of water waves on shear flows, Proc. Royal Soc. Lond. A., 1976, 347, 537-546. [3] M. Oikawa, K. Chow, D. J. Benney, The propagation of nonlinear wave packets in a shear flow with a free surface, Stud. Appl. Math., 1987, 76, 69-92. [4] A. I Baumstein, Modulation of gravity waves with shear in water, Stud. Appl. Math., 1998, 100, 365-90. [5] R. Thomas, C. Kharif, M. Manna, A nonlinear Schrödinger equation for water waves on finite depth with constant vorticity, Phys. Fluids, 2012, 24, 127102. [6] M. M Rienecker, J. D Fenton, A Fourier approximation method for steady water waves , J. Fluid Mech., 1981, 104, 119-137 [7] M. Francius, C. Kharif, Three-dimensional instabilities of periodic gravity waves in shallow water, J. Fluid Mech., 2006, 561, 417-437

  17. Limits on Surface Gravities of Kepler Planet-candidate Host Stars from Non-detection of Solar-like Oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campante, T.L.; Chaplin, W.J.; Lund, M.N.; Huber, D.; Hekker, S.; García, R.A.; Corsaro, E.; Handberg, R.; Miglio, A.; Arentoft, T.; Basu, S.; Bedding, T.R.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Davies, G.R.; Elsworth, Y.P.; Gilliland, R.L.; Karoff, C.; Kawaler, S.D.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lundkvist, M.; Metcalfe, T.S.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Stello, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel method for estimating lower-limit surface gravities (log g) of Kepler targets whose data do not allow the detection of solar-like oscillations. The method is tested using an ensemble of solar-type stars observed in the context of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium. We

  18. A novel facility for reduced-gravity testing: A setup for studying low-velocity collisions into granular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunday, C.; Murdoch, N.; Cherrier, O.; Morales Serrano, S.; Valeria Nardi, C.; Janin, T.; Avila Martinez, I.; Gourinat, Y.; Mimoun, D.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents an experimental design for studying low-velocity collisions into granular surfaces in low-gravity. In the experiment apparatus, reduced-gravity is simulated by releasing a free-falling projectile into a surface container with a downward acceleration less than that of Earth's gravity. The acceleration of the surface is controlled through the use of an Atwood machine, or a system of pulleys and counterweights. The starting height of the surface container and the initial separation distance between the projectile and surface are variable and chosen to accommodate collision velocities up to 20 cm/s and effective accelerations of ˜0.1 to 1.0 m/s2. Accelerometers, placed on the surface container and inside the projectile, provide acceleration data, while high-speed cameras capture the collision and act as secondary data sources. The experiment is built into an existing 5.5 m drop tower frame and requires the custom design of all components, including the projectile, surface sample container, release mechanism, and deceleration system. Data from calibration tests verify the efficiency of the experiment's deceleration system and provide a quantitative understanding of the performance of the Atwood system.

  19. A novel facility for reduced-gravity testing: A setup for studying low-velocity collisions into granular surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunday, C; Murdoch, N; Cherrier, O; Morales Serrano, S; Valeria Nardi, C; Janin, T; Avila Martinez, I; Gourinat, Y; Mimoun, D

    2016-08-01

    This work presents an experimental design for studying low-velocity collisions into granular surfaces in low-gravity. In the experiment apparatus, reduced-gravity is simulated by releasing a free-falling projectile into a surface container with a downward acceleration less than that of Earth's gravity. The acceleration of the surface is controlled through the use of an Atwood machine, or a system of pulleys and counterweights. The starting height of the surface container and the initial separation distance between the projectile and surface are variable and chosen to accommodate collision velocities up to 20 cm/s and effective accelerations of ∼0.1 to 1.0 m/s(2). Accelerometers, placed on the surface container and inside the projectile, provide acceleration data, while high-speed cameras capture the collision and act as secondary data sources. The experiment is built into an existing 5.5 m drop tower frame and requires the custom design of all components, including the projectile, surface sample container, release mechanism, and deceleration system. Data from calibration tests verify the efficiency of the experiment's deceleration system and provide a quantitative understanding of the performance of the Atwood system.

  20. The Effect of the Leeuwin Current on Offshore Surface Gravity Waves in Southwest Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandres, Moritz; Wijeratne, E. M. S.; Cosoli, Simone; Pattiaratchi, Charitha

    2017-11-01

    The knowledge of regional wave regimes is critical for coastal zone planning, protection, and management. In this study, the influence of the offshore current regime on surface gravity waves on the southwest Western Australian (SWWA) continental shelf was examined. This was achieved by coupling the three dimensional, free surface, terrain-following hydrodynamic Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS) and the third generation wave model Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) using the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-WaveSediment Transport (COAWST) model. Different representative states of the Leeuwin Current (LC), a strong pole-ward flowing boundary current with a persistent eddy field along the SWWA shelf edge were simulated and used to investigate their influence on different large wave events. The coupled wave-current simulations were compared to wave only simulations, which represented scenarios in the absence of a background current field. Results showed that the LC and the eddy field significantly impact SWWA waves. Significant wave heights increased (decreased) when currents were opposing (aligning with) the incoming wave directions. During a fully developed LC system significant wave heights were altered by up to ±25% and wave directions by up to ±20°. The change in wave direction indicates that the LC may modify nearshore wave dynamics and consequently alter sediment patterns. Operational regional wave forecasts and hindcasts may give flawed predictions if wave-current interaction is not properly accounted for.

  1. Spectral decomposition of internal gravity wave sea surface height in global models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Anna C.; Arbic, Brian K.; Alford, Matthew H.; Ansong, Joseph K.; Farrar, J. Thomas; Menemenlis, Dimitris; O'Rourke, Amanda K.; Richman, James G.; Shriver, Jay F.; Voet, Gunnar; Wallcraft, Alan J.; Zamudio, Luis

    2017-10-01

    Two global ocean models ranging in horizontal resolution from 1/12° to 1/48° are used to study the space and time scales of sea surface height (SSH) signals associated with internal gravity waves (IGWs). Frequency-horizontal wavenumber SSH spectral densities are computed over seven regions of the world ocean from two simulations of the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) and three simulations of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm). High wavenumber, high-frequency SSH variance follows the predicted IGW linear dispersion curves. The realism of high-frequency motions (>0.87 cpd) in the models is tested through comparison of the frequency spectral density of dynamic height variance computed from the highest-resolution runs of each model (1/25° HYCOM and 1/48° MITgcm) with dynamic height variance frequency spectral density computed from nine in situ profiling instruments. These high-frequency motions are of particular interest because of their contributions to the small-scale SSH variability that will be observed on a global scale in the upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite altimetry mission. The variance at supertidal frequencies can be comparable to the tidal and low-frequency variance for high wavenumbers (length scales smaller than ˜50 km), especially in the higher-resolution simulations. In the highest-resolution simulations, the high-frequency variance can be greater than the low-frequency variance at these scales.

  2. Near-surface gravity actuated pipe (GAP{sup TM}) system for Brazilian deepwater fluid transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fromage, Lionel; Brown, Paul A. [SBM Offshore (Monaco)

    2009-12-19

    The recent discovery of new deep water and ultra-deep water oil and gas fields offshore Brazil, including pre-salt reservoirs, has become a focal point for field development Operators and Contractors. The aggressive nature of fluids (sour, high density) in combination with deeper waters implies potential flow assurance issues. These issues challenge riser and pipeline technology to find cost effective solutions for hydrocarbon fluid transfer in field development scenarios involving phased tied-back. The near-surface GAP{sup TM}, system (Gravity Actuated Pipe{sup TM}), which has been in operation for more than two years on the Kikeh field offshore Malaysia in 1325 m of water between a Dry Tree Unit (SPAR) and a turret-moored FPSO, is considered to meet these challenges since such a product is quasi independent of water depth and takes advantage of being near surface to optimize flow assurance. Furthermore the GAP{sup TM} has undergone technical upgrades when compared to the Kikeh project in order to make it suitable for the more hostile met ocean conditions offshore Brazil. This paper presents the design features, the construction and assembly plans in Brazil and the offshore installation of a GAP fluid transfer system for operation in Brazilian deep waters. (author)

  3. Effect of surface tension on the dynamical behavior of bubble in rotating fluids under low gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Leslie, Fred W.; Hong, B. B.

    1988-01-01

    Time dependent evolutions of the profile of free surface (bubble shapes) for a cylindrical container partially filled with a Newtonian fluid of constant density, rotating about its axis of symmetry, have been studied. Numerical computations of the dynamics of bubble shapes have been carried out with the following situations: (1) linear functions of spin-up and spin-down in low and microgravity environments, (2) linear functions of increasing and decreasing gravity enviroment in high and low rotating cylidner speeds, (3) step functions of spin-up and spin-down in a low gravity environment, and (4) sinusoidal function oscillation of gravity environment in high and low rotating cylinder speeds. The initial condition of bubble profiles was adopted from the steady-state formulations in which the computer algorithms have been developed by Hung and Leslie (1988), and Hung et al. (1988).

  4. Simulation of Solar Radiation Incident on Horizontal and Inclined Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Basunia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A computer model was developed to simulate the hourly, daily and monthly average of daily solar radiation on horizontal and inclined surfaces. The measured hourly and daily solar radiation was compared with simulated radiation, and favourable agreement was observed for the measured and predicted values on clear days. The measured and simulated monthly averages of total (diffuse and beam daily solar radiation were compared and a reasonable agreement was observed for a number of stations in Japan. The simulation showed that during the rice harvesting season, September to October, there is a daily average of 14.7 MJ/m2 of solar irradiation on a horizontal surface in Matsuyama, Japan. There is a similar amount of solar radiation on a horizontal surface during the major rice harvesting season, November to December, in Bangladesh. This radiation can be effectively utilized for drying rough rice and other farm crops.

  5. Ionization by ion impact at grazing incidence on insulator surface

    CERN Document Server

    Martiarena, M L

    2003-01-01

    We have calculated the energy distribution of electrons produced by ionization of the ionic crystal electrons in grazing fast ion-insulator surface collision. The ionized electrons originate in the 2p F sup - orbital. We observe that the binary peak appears as a double change in the slope of the spectra, in the high energy region. The form of the peak is determined by the initial electron distribution and its position will be affected by the binding energy of the 2p F sup - electron in the crystal. This BEP in insulator surfaces will appear slightly shifted to the low energy side with respect the ion-atom one.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Brown dwarf surface gravities with Keck/NIRSPEC (Martin , 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E. C.; Mace, G. N.; McLean, I. S.; Logsdon, S. E.; Rice, E. L.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Burgasser, A. J.; McGovern, M. R.; Prato, L.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we follow up on prior NIR spectroscopy by our group and use a modified Allers & Liu (A13, 2013ApJ...772...79A) method to determine surface gravities for 228 M, L, and T dwarfs. We present medium-resolution (R~20000) J-band spectra of 85 M dwarfs, 92 L dwarfs, and 51 T dwarfs obtained as part of the Keck NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey (BDSS). Ninety-seven spectra were published previously in McLean+ (2003ApJ...596..561M), Burgasser+ (2003ApJ...592.1186B), McGovern+ (2004ApJ...600.1020M), Rice+ (2010ApJS..186...63R), Kirkpatrick+ (2010, J/ApJS/190/100), Luhman (2012ARA&A..50...65L), Thompson+ (2013PASP..125..809T), Mace+ (2013, J/ApJS/205/6), Mace+ (2013ApJ...777...36M), and Kirkpatrick+ (2014, J/ApJ/783/122), and the remaining 131 are presented here for the first time. Observation information (spanning 1999 Apr to 2015 Mar) for all of the targets in our sample is listed in Table 1. (4 data files).

  7. Linear systems formulation of scattering theory for rough surfaces with arbitrary incident and scattering angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krywonos, Andrey; Harvey, James E; Choi, Narak

    2011-06-01

    Scattering effects from microtopographic surface roughness are merely nonparaxial diffraction phenomena resulting from random phase variations in the reflected or transmitted wavefront. Rayleigh-Rice, Beckmann-Kirchhoff. or Harvey-Shack surface scatter theories are commonly used to predict surface scatter effects. Smooth-surface and/or paraxial approximations have severely limited the range of applicability of each of the above theoretical treatments. A recent linear systems formulation of nonparaxial scalar diffraction theory applied to surface scatter phenomena resulted first in an empirically modified Beckmann-Kirchhoff surface scatter model, then a generalized Harvey-Shack theory that produces accurate results for rougher surfaces than the Rayleigh-Rice theory and for larger incident and scattered angles than the classical Beckmann-Kirchhoff and the original Harvey-Shack theories. These new developments simplify the analysis and understanding of nonintuitive scattering behavior from rough surfaces illuminated at arbitrary incident angles.

  8. Rheologic Profile, Specific Gravity, Surface Tension, and pH of Fifteen Over-the-Counter Preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Achi, Antoine; Baghat, Tushar; Chukwubeze, Onah; Dembla, Ishwin

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of the physical characteristics of commercially available over-the-counter preparations can aid the compounding pharmacist in preparing medication. In this study, 15 over-the-counter products were studied with regard to their specific gravity, surface tension, pH, and rheologic profile. The specific gravities of all the products were greater than 1, with the exceptions of Nivea Lotion and rubbing alcohol, which were less than 1. The majority of the products had an acidic pH. With the exception of two products, Citrucel and Chloraseptic, all products demonstrated a surface tension value less than that of water (72.8 dynes/cm). Chloraseptic had the lowest Newtonian viscosity (1.27 cPs), whereas Vicks DayQuil had the highest (098.86 cPs). Citrucel exhibited dilatant-type flow; Suave Shampoo, herbal shampoo, Tangerine Tickle Herbal Shampoo, and Metamucil pseudoplastic flow; the remaining non-Newtonian formulations, plastic flow profiles.

  9. Pulsed CO2 laser interaction with a metal surface at oblique incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, J. A.; Schriempf, J. T.; Cronburg, T. L.; Eninger, J. E.; Woodroffe, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal fluence deposition and surface pressure generation produced by a CO2 laser pulse have been measured as a function of angle of incidence theta on sheet aluminum in air. The paper finds that air plasma ignition depends on the laser beam intensity I sub 0 only, not on the surface-normal flux (I sub 0)(cos theta). Conversely, the fluence deposition and surface pressure depend only on the product (I sub 0)(cos theta), and obey the square-root and two-thirds-power dependences observed with simple I sub 0 variation at normal incidence.

  10. Acoustic-gravity waves generated by atmospheric and near-surface sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitsyn, Viacheslav E.; Kholodov, Alexander S.; Krysanov, Boris Yu.; Andreeva, Elena S.; Nesterov, Ivan A.; Vorontsov, Artem M.

    2013-04-01

    Numerical simulation of the acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) generated by long-period oscillations of the Earth's (oceanic) surface, earthquakes, explosions, thermal heating, seiches, and tsunami is carried out. Wavelike disturbances are quite frequent phenomena in the atmosphere and ionosphere. These events can be caused by the impacts from space and atmosphere, by oscillations of the Earth'as surface and other near-surface events. These wavelike phenomena in the atmosphere and ionosphere appear as the alternating areas of enhanced and depleted density (in the atmosphere) or electron concentration (in the ionosphere). In the paper, AGW with typical frequencies of a few hertz - millihertz are analyzed. AGW are often observed after the atmospheric perturbations, during the earthquakes, and some time (a few days to hours) in advance of the earthquakes. Numerical simulation of the generation of AGW by long-period oscillations of the Earth's and oceanic surface, earthquakes, explosions, thermal heating, seiches, and tsunami is carried out. The AGW generated by the near-surface phenomena within a few hertz-millihertz frequency range build up at the mid-atmospheric and ionospheric altitudes, where they assume their typical spatial scales of the order of a few hundred kilometers. Oscillations of the ionospheric plasma within a few hertz-millihertz frequency range generate electromagnetic waves with corresponding frequencies as well as travelling ionospheric irregularities (TIDs). Such structures can be successfully monitored using satellite radio tomography (RT) techniques. For the purposes of RT diagnostics, 150/400 MHz transmissions from low-orbiting navigational satellites flying in polar orbits at the altitudes of about 1000 km as well as 1.2-1.5 GHz signals form high-orbiting (orbital altitudes about 20000 km) navigation systems like GPS/GLONASS are used. The results of experimental studies on generation of wavelike disturbances by particle precipitation are presented

  11. Modeling ionospheric disturbance features in quasi-vertically incident ionograms using 3-D magnetoionic ray tracing and atmospheric gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, M. A.; Harris, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) has initiated an experimental program, Spatial Ionospheric Correlation Experiment, utilizing state-of-the-art DSTO-designed high frequency digital receivers. This program seeks to understand ionospheric disturbances at scales < 150 km and temporal resolutions under 1 min through the simultaneous observation and recording of multiple quasi-vertical ionograms (QVI) with closely spaced ionospheric control points. A detailed description of and results from the first campaign conducted in February 2008 were presented by Harris et al. (2012). In this paper we employ a 3-D magnetoionic Hamiltonian ray tracing engine, developed by DSTO, to (1) model the various disturbance features observed on both the O and X polarization modes in our QVI data and (2) understand how they are produced. The ionospheric disturbances which produce the observed features were modeled by perturbing the ionosphere with atmospheric gravity waves.

  12. The Effect of Surface Tension on the Gravity-driven Thin Film Flow of Newtonian and Power-law Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Kieweg, Sarah L

    2012-07-15

    Gravity-driven thin film flow is of importance in many fields, as well as for the design of polymeric drug delivery vehicles, such as anti-HIV topical microbicides. There have been many prior works on gravity-driven thin films. However, the incorporation of surface tension effect has not been well studied for non-Newtonian fluids. After surface tension effect was incorporated into our 2D (i.e. 1D spreading) power-law model, we found that surface tension effect not only impacted the spreading speed of the microbicide gel, but also had an influence on the shape of the 2D spreading profile. We observed a capillary ridge at the front of the fluid bolus. Previous literature shows that the emergence of a capillary ridge is strongly related to the contact line fingering instability. Fingering instabilities during epithelial coating may change the microbicide gel distribution and therefore impact how well it can protect the epithelium. In this study, we focused on the capillary ridge in 2D flow and performed a series of simulations and showed how the capillary ridge height varies with other parameters, such as surface tension coefficient, inclination angle, initial thickness, and power-law parameters. As shown in our results, we found that capillary ridge height increased with higher surface tension, steeper inclination angle, bigger initial thickness, and more Newtonian fluids. This study provides the initial insights of how to optimize the flow and prevent the appearance of a capillary ridge and fingering instability.

  13. The Effect of Surface Tension on the Gravity-driven Thin Film Flow of Newtonian and Power-law Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Kieweg, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    Gravity-driven thin film flow is of importance in many fields, as well as for the design of polymeric drug delivery vehicles, such as anti-HIV topical microbicides. There have been many prior works on gravity-driven thin films. However, the incorporation of surface tension effect has not been well studied for non-Newtonian fluids. After surface tension effect was incorporated into our 2D (i.e. 1D spreading) power-law model, we found that surface tension effect not only impacted the spreading speed of the microbicide gel, but also had an influence on the shape of the 2D spreading profile. We observed a capillary ridge at the front of the fluid bolus. Previous literature shows that the emergence of a capillary ridge is strongly related to the contact line fingering instability. Fingering instabilities during epithelial coating may change the microbicide gel distribution and therefore impact how well it can protect the epithelium. In this study, we focused on the capillary ridge in 2D flow and performed a series of simulations and showed how the capillary ridge height varies with other parameters, such as surface tension coefficient, inclination angle, initial thickness, and power-law parameters. As shown in our results, we found that capillary ridge height increased with higher surface tension, steeper inclination angle, bigger initial thickness, and more Newtonian fluids. This study provides the initial insights of how to optimize the flow and prevent the appearance of a capillary ridge and fingering instability. PMID:23687391

  14. Review of Electrical and Gravity Methods of Near-Surface Exploration for Groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. O. Raji

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The theory and practice of electrical and gravity methods of geophysics for groundwater exploration was reviewed with illustrations and data examples. With the goal of reducing cases of borehole/water-well failure attributed to the lack of the knowledge of the methods of geophysics for groundwater exploration and development, the paper reviews the basic concepts, field procedures for data acquisition, data processing, and interpretation as applied to the subject matter. Given a case study of groundwater exploration in University of Ilorin Campus, the three important techniques of electrical method of groundwater exploration are explained and illustrated using field data obtained in a previous study. Interpretation of resistivity data shows that an area measuring low resistivity (high conductivity, having thick pile of unconsolidated rock, and underlained by fracture crystalline is a ‘bright spot’ for citing borehole for groundwater abstraction in a basement complex area. Further to this, gravity method of groundwater exploration was discussed with field data from Wokbedilo community in Ethopia. Bouguer and reduced gravity anomaly results were presented as maps and contours to demonstrate how gravity data can be inverted to map groundwater aquifers and subsurface geological structures during groundwater exploration.

  15. Effects of Rotation and Gravity Field on Surface Waves in Fibre-Reinforced Thermoelastic Media under Four Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Abd-Alla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation is done to investigate the gravitational and rotational parameters effects on surface waves in fibre-reinforced thermoelastic media. The theory of generalized surface waves has been firstly developed and then it has been employed to investigate particular cases of waves, namely, Stoneley waves, Rayleigh waves, and Love waves. The analytical expressions for surface waves velocity and attenuation coefficient are obtained in the physical domain by using the harmonic vibrations and four thermoelastic theories. The wave velocity equations have been obtained in different cases. The numerical results are given for equation of coupled thermoelastic theory (C-T, Lord-Shulman theory (L-S, Green-Lindsay theory (G-L, and the linearized (G-N theory of type II. Comparison was made with the results obtained in the presence and absence of gravity, rotation, and parameters for fibre-reinforced of the material media. The results obtained are displayed by graphs to clear the phenomena physical meaning. The results indicate that the effect of gravity, rotation, relaxation times, and parameters of fibre-reinforced of the material medium is very pronounced.

  16. The earth's shape and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, G D; Wilson, J T

    2013-01-01

    The Earth's Shape and Gravity focuses on the progress of the use of geophysical methods in investigating the interior of the earth and its shape. The publication first offers information on gravity, geophysics, geodesy, and geology and gravity measurements. Discussions focus on gravity measurements and reductions, potential and equipotential surfaces, absolute and relative measurements, and gravity networks. The text then elaborates on the shape of the sea-level surface and reduction of gravity observations. The text takes a look at gravity anomalies and structures in the earth's crust; interp

  17. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent ion-surface interaction at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A new spectroscopy based on the resonant coherently induced electron loss to the continuum in ion-surface scattering under grazing incidence is proposed. A series of peaks, corresponding to the energy differences determined by the resonant interaction with the rows of atoms in the surface, is predicted to appear in the energy distribution of electrons emitted from electronic states bound to the probe. Calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with a glancing angle of 0--2 mrad show a total yield close to 1

  18. Vertical structure of pore pressure under surface gravity waves on a steep, megatidal, mixed sand-gravel-cobble beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Tristan B.; Hay, Alex E.

    2017-01-01

    The vertical structure of surface gravity wave-induced pore pressure is investigated within the intertidal zone of a natural, steeply sloping, megatidal, mixed sand-gravel-cobble beach. Results from a coherent vertical array of buried pore pressure sensors are presented in terms of signal phase lag and attenuation as functions of oscillatory forcing frequency and burial depth. Comparison of the observations with the predictions of a theoretical poro-elastic bed response model indicates that the large observed phase lags and attenuation are attributable to interstitial trapped air. In addition to the dependence on entrapped air volume, the pore pressure phase and attenuation are shown to be sensitive to the hydraulic conductivity of the sediment, to the changing mean water depth during the tidal cycle, and to the redistribution/rearrangement of beach face material by energetic wave action during storm events. The latter result indicates that the effects on pore pressure of sediment column disturbance during instrument burial can persist for days to weeks, depending upon wave forcing conditions. Taken together, these results raise serious questions as to the practicality of using pore pressure measurements to estimate the kinematic properties of surface gravity waves on steep, mixed sand-gravel beaches.

  19. A topological study of gravity free-surface waves generated by bluff bodies using the method of steepest descents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Philippe H.

    2016-07-01

    The standard analytical approach for studying steady gravity free-surface waves generated by a moving body often relies upon a linearization of the physical geometry, where the body is considered asymptotically small in one or several of its dimensions. In this paper, a methodology that avoids any such geometrical simplification is presented for the case of steady-state flows at low speeds. The approach is made possible through a reduction of the water-wave equations to a complex-valued integral equation that can be studied using the method of steepest descents. The main result is a theory that establishes a correspondence between different bluff-bodied free-surface flow configurations, with the topology of the Riemann surface formed by the steepest descent paths. Then, when a geometrical feature of the body is modified, a corresponding change to the Riemann surface is observed, and the resultant effects to the water waves can be derived. This visual procedure is demonstrated for the case of two-dimensional free-surface flow past a surface-piercing ship and over an angled step in a channel.

  20. Surface gravity wave effects in the oceanic boundary layer: large-eddy simulation with vortex force and stochastic breakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Peter P.; McWilliams, James C.; Melville, W. Kendall

    The wind-driven stably stratified mid-latitude oceanic surface turbulent boundary layer is computationally simulated in the presence of a specified surface gravity-wave field. The gravity waves have broad wavenumber and frequency spectra typical of measured conditions in near-equilibrium with the mean wind speed. The simulation model is based on (i) an asymptotic theory for the conservative dynamical effects of waves on the wave-averaged boundary-layer currents and (ii) a boundary-layer forcing by a stochastic representation of the impulses and energy fluxes in a field of breaking waves. The wave influences are shown to be profound on both the mean current profile and turbulent statistics compared to a simulation without these wave influences and forced by an equivalent mean surface stress. As expected from previous studies with partial combinations of these wave influences, Langmuir circulations due to the wave-averaged vortex force make vertical eddy fluxes of momentum and material concentration much more efficient and non-local (i.e. with negative eddy viscosity near the surface), and they combine with the breakers to increase the turbulent energy and dissipation rate. They also combine in an unexpected positive feedback in which breaker-generated vorticity seeds the creation of a new Langmuir circulation and instigates a deep strong intermittent downwelling jet that penetrates through the boundary layer and increases the material entrainment rate at the base of the layer. These wave effects on the boundary layer are greater for smaller wave ages and higher mean wind speeds.

  1. Absorptivity modulation on wavy molten steel surfaces: The influence of laser wavelength and angle of incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, A. F. H.

    2012-10-01

    The modulation of the angle-dependent Fresnel absorptivity across wavy molten steel surfaces during laser materials processing, like drilling, cutting, or welding, has been calculated. The absorptivity is strongly altered by the grazing angle of incidence of the laser beam on the processing front. Owing to its specific Brewster-peak characteristics, the 10.64 μm wavelength CO2-laser shows an opposite trend with respect to roughness and angle-of-incidence compared to lasers in the wavelength range of 532-1070 nm. Plateaus or rings of Brewster-peak absorptivity can lead to hot spots on a wavy surface, often in close proximity to cold spots caused by shadow domains.

  2. Inferring Shallow Subsurface Density Structure from Surface and Underground Gravity Measurements: Calibrating Models for Relatively Undeformed Volcanic Strata at the Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mousumi; Lewis, Megan; Johnson, Alex; George, Nicolas; Rowe, Charlotte; Guardincerri, Elena

    2018-03-01

    Imaging shallow subsurface density structure is an important goal in a variety of applications, from hydrogeology to seismic and volcanic hazard assessment. We assess the effectiveness of surface and subsurface gravity measurements in estimating the density structure of a well-characterized rock volume: the mesa (a small, flat-topped plateau) upon which the town of Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA is located. Our gravity measurements were made on the mesa surface above a horizontal tunnel and underground, within the tunnel. We demonstrate that, in the absence of other geophysical data such as seismic data or muon attenuation, subsurface (tunnel) gravity measurements are critical to accurately recovering geologic structure. Without the tunnel data, our resolution is limited to roughly the surface gravity station spacing, but by including the tunnel data we can resolve structure to a depth of 10 times the surface gravity station spacing. Densities were obtained using both forward modeling and a Bayesian inverse modeling approach, incorporating relevant constraints from geologic observations. We find that Bayesian inversion, with geologically relevant prior, is a superior approach to the forward models in terms of both robustness and efficiency and correctly predicts the orientation and elevation of important geologic features.

  3. influence of gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Mukherjee

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Based upon Biot's [1965] theory of initial stresses of hydrostatic nature produced by the effect of gravity, a study is made of surface waves in higher order visco-elastic media under the influence of gravity. The equation for the wave velocity of Stonely waves in the presence of viscous and gravitational effects is obtained. This is followed by particular cases of surface waves including Rayleigh waves and Love waves in the presence of viscous and gravity effects. In all cases the wave-velocity equations are found to be in perfect agreement with the corresponding classical results when the effects of gravity and viscosity are neglected.

  4. Surface damage through grazing incidence ions investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redinger, Alex

    2009-07-10

    Surface damage, caused by grazing incidence ions, is investigated with variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The experiments are carried out on a Pt(111) crystal. The kinetic energy of noble gas ions is varied between 1-15 keV and the angle of incidence can be adjusted between {theta} = 78.5 and {theta} = 90 measured with respect to the surface normal. The damage patterns of single ion impacts, on flat terraces and at step edges of monoatomic height, are investigated at low surface temperatures. Ions hitting a flat terrace are usually specular reflected. The energy transfer from the ion to the crystal atoms is small and only little damage is produced. In contrast, at ascending step edges, which are illuminated by the ion beam, large angle scattering events occur. Sputtering, adatom and vacancy production is induced. However, a significant fraction of the ions, which hit step edges, enter the crystal and are guided in between two atomic layers parallel to the surface via small angle binary collisions. This steering process is denoted as subsurface channeling. The energy loss per length scale of the channeled particles is low, which results in long ion trajectories (up to 1000A). During the steering process, the ions produce surface damage. Depending on the ion species and the ion energy, adatom and vacancies or surface vacancy trenches of monoatomic width are observed. The surface damage can be used to track the path of the ion. This makes the whole trajectory of single ions with keV energy visible. The number of sputtered atoms per incident ion at ascending step edges, i.e. the step edge sputtering yield, is measured experimentally for different irradiation conditions. For {theta} = 86 , the sputtering yield is determined from the fluence dependent retraction of pre-existing illuminated step edges. An alternative method for the step edge sputtering yield determination, is the analysis of the concentration of ascending steps and of the removed amount

  5. Surface damage through grazing incidence ions investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redinger, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Surface damage, caused by grazing incidence ions, is investigated with variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The experiments are carried out on a Pt(111) crystal. The kinetic energy of noble gas ions is varied between 1-15 keV and the angle of incidence can be adjusted between θ = 78.5 and θ = 90 measured with respect to the surface normal. The damage patterns of single ion impacts, on flat terraces and at step edges of monoatomic height, are investigated at low surface temperatures. Ions hitting a flat terrace are usually specular reflected. The energy transfer from the ion to the crystal atoms is small and only little damage is produced. In contrast, at ascending step edges, which are illuminated by the ion beam, large angle scattering events occur. Sputtering, adatom and vacancy production is induced. However, a significant fraction of the ions, which hit step edges, enter the crystal and are guided in between two atomic layers parallel to the surface via small angle binary collisions. This steering process is denoted as subsurface channeling. The energy loss per length scale of the channeled particles is low, which results in long ion trajectories (up to 1000A). During the steering process, the ions produce surface damage. Depending on the ion species and the ion energy, adatom and vacancies or surface vacancy trenches of monoatomic width are observed. The surface damage can be used to track the path of the ion. This makes the whole trajectory of single ions with keV energy visible. The number of sputtered atoms per incident ion at ascending step edges, i.e. the step edge sputtering yield, is measured experimentally for different irradiation conditions. For θ = 86 , the sputtering yield is determined from the fluence dependent retraction of pre-existing illuminated step edges. An alternative method for the step edge sputtering yield determination, is the analysis of the concentration of ascending steps and of the removed amount of material as a

  6. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., ∼0.9 for 53 MeV B 4+ and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces

  7. The Effects of Surface Gravity Waves on Coastal Currents: Implementation, Phenomenological Explanation, and Realistic Simulation with ROMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-30

    is a dynamical component of sea surface elevation and h is a local resting depth. The primary-wave-averaged effects, which we call WEC (wave effects on...empirical parameters related to wave breaking, and Hrm, is R.M.S. wave height. A comparative simulation with DUCK 94. The barotropic ROMS with WEC and the...driven by obliquely incident waves to beaches. The barotropic ROMS with WEC and CEW is used to carried out an experiment for reproducing shear waves

  8. [Application of means of surfaces with nonhomogeneity in estimating the incidence of pneumoconiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C X; Zhang, J; Hao, S B; Zhang, J; Xu, P; Can, Y W; Zhao, J Q; Li, J G

    2017-01-20

    Objective: To investigate the value of means of surfaces with nonhomogeneity (MSN) in esti-mating the incidence of pneumoconiosis. Methods: Based on the principal component analysis, all counties (districts) of Hebei Province, China, were divided into three categories according to the degree of pneumoconiosis hazards and the MSN model was used to estimate the incidence rate of pneumoconiosis and the number of pneu-moconiosis cases using the data of the incidence of pneumoconiosis in 2010. Results: With reference to the appli-cation requirements of the MSN model, results of the principal component analysis, and expert experience, the 172 counties (districts) in Hebei Province were divided into three categories with mild, moderate, and severe pneumoconiosis hazards. There were 74, 61, and 49 counties in the above categories, respectively, and 12, 12, and 25 counties were selected from them, respectively. The estimated number of pneumoconiosis cases in Hebei Province was 2105, and the incidence rate was 261.5 per hundred thousand, with a standard error of esti-mation of 389.9 per hundred thousand. Conclusion: The MSN model provides a new thought and method for es-timating the number of pneumoconiosis cases.

  9. Evaluation of the Reanalysis Surface Incident Shortwave Radiation Products from NCEP, ECMWF, GSFC, and JMA Using Satellite and Surface Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotong Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation incident at the Earth’s surface (Rs is an essential component of the total energy exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Reanalysis data have been widely used, but a comprehensive validation using surface measurements is still highly needed. In this study, we evaluated the Rs estimates from six current representative global reanalyses (NCEP–NCAR, NCEP-DOE; CFSR; ERA-Interim; MERRA; and JRA-55 using surface measurements from different observation networks [GEBA; BSRN; GC-NET; Buoy; and CMA] (674 sites in total and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES EBAF product from 2001 to 2009. The global mean biases between the reanalysis Rs and surface measurements at all sites ranged from 11.25 W/m2 to 49.80 W/m2. Comparing with the CERES-EBAF Rs product, all the reanalyses overestimate Rs, except for ERA-Interim, with the biases ranging from −2.98 W/m2 to 21.97 W/m2 over the globe. It was also found that the biases of cloud fraction (CF in the reanalyses caused the overestimation of Rs. After removing the averaged bias of CERES-EBAF, weighted by the area of the latitudinal band, a global annual mean Rs values of 184.6 W/m2, 180.0 W/m2, and 182.9 W/m2 were obtained over land, ocean, and the globe, respectively.

  10. Near-surface electron acceleration during intense laser-solid interaction in the grazing incidence regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryakov, D. A.; Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    When a relativistically intense p-polarized laser pulse is grazingly incident onto a planar solid-state target, a slightly superluminal field structure is formed near the target surface due to the incident and reflected waves superposition. This field structure can both extract the electrons from the target and accelerate them. It is theoretically shown that the acceleration is possible and stable for a wide range of electron initial conditions. Particle-in-cell simulations confirm that this mechanism can actually take place for realistic parameters. As a result, the electron bunches with a charge of tens of nC and GeV-level energy can be produced using a laser intensity 1021-1022 W/cm2. It is also shown that the presence of a preplasma can improve acceleration, which becomes possible because of more efficient electron injection into the accelerating field structure.

  11. Massive Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia de Rham

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model (DGP, cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware–Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alternative and related models of massive gravity such as new massive gravity, Lorentz-violating massive gravity and non-local massive gravity.

  12. Study of the grazing-incidence X-ray scattering of strongly disturbed fractal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshchin, B. S., E-mail: ross@crys.ras.ru; Chukhovsky, F. N.; Pavlyuk, M. D.; Opolchentsev, A. M.; Asadchikov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Federal Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The applicability of different approaches to the description of hard X-ray scattering from rough surfaces is generally limited by a maximum surface roughness height of no more than 1 nm. Meanwhile, this value is several times larger for the surfaces of different materials subjected to treatment, especially in the initial treatment stages. To control the roughness parameters in all stages of surface treatment, a new approach has been developed, which is based on a series expansion of wavefield over the plane eigenstate-function waves describing the small-angle scattering of incident X-rays in terms of plane q-waves propagating through the interface between two media with a random function of relief heights. To determine the amplitudes of reflected and transmitted plane q-waves, a system of two linked integral equations was derived. The solutions to these equations correspond (in zero order) to the well-known Fresnel expressions for a smooth plane interface. Based on these solutions, a statistical fractal model of an isotropic rough interface is built in terms of root-mean-square roughness σ, two-point correlation length l, and fractal surface index h. The model is used to interpret X-ray scattering data for polished surfaces of single-crystal cadmium telluride samples.

  13. Processing yttrium-barium-copper oxide superconductor zero gravity using a double float zone surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettit, D.R.; Peterson, D.E.; Kubat-Martin, K.A.; Petrovic, J.J.; Sheinberg, H.; Coulter, Y.; Day, D.E.

    1997-04-01

    The effects of processing YBa 2 Cu 3 O x (Y123) superconductor in the near-zero gravity (0g) environment provided by the NASA KC-135 airplane flying on parabolic trajectories were studied. A new sheet float zone furnace, designed for this study, enabled fast temperature ramps. Up to an 18-gram sample was processed with each parabola. Samples of Y123 were processed as bulk sheets, composites containing Ag and Pd, and films deposited on single crystal Si and MgO substrates. The 0g-processed samples were multi-phase yet retained a localized Y123 stoichiometry where a single ground-based (1g) oxygen anneal at temperatures of 800 C recovered nearly 100-volume percent superconducting Y123. The 1g processed control samples remained multi-phase after the same ground-based anneal with less than 45 volume percent as superconducting Y123. The superconducting transition temperature was 91 K for both 0g and 1g processed samples. A 29 wt.% Ag/Y123 composite had a transition temperature of 93 K. Melt texturing of bulk Y123 in 0g produced aligned grains about a factor of three larger than in analogous 1g samples. Transport critical current densities were at or below 18 A/cm 2 , due to the formation of cracks caused by the rapid heating rates required by the short time at 0g. Y123 deposited on single crystal Si and MgO in 0g was 30 vol.% y123 without an anneal. A weak superconducting transition at 80 K on MgO showed that substrate interactions occurred

  14. A new optical method for measuring surface temperature at large incident probe angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A. S.; Norris, P. M.

    1997-02-01

    A novel thermoreflectance technique has been developed for noncontact temperature measurements using laser light incident at large angles on solid materials and devices. The method involves measuring the differential reflectance from a polarization modulated laser beam. The polarization differential reflectance technique is demonstrated on single-crystal Si wafers and on a polycrystalline carbon thin film over a temperature range of 20-60 °C. The method is shown to be an extremely sensitive temperature probe for near grazing angle measurements, which could be useful for monitoring the surface temperature of closely stacked silicon wafers used in batch processing in the microelectronics industry.

  15. Zero-gravity Mean Free Surface Curvature of a Confined Liquid in a Radially-Vaned Container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongkang; Callahan, Michael; Weislogel, Mark

    2013-01-01

    A variety of increasingly intricate container geometries are under consideration for the passive manipulation of liquids aboard spacecraft where the impact of gravity may be neglected. In this study we examine the mean curvature of a liquid volume confined within a radial array of disconnected vanes of infinite extent. This particular geometry possesses a number of desirable characteristics relevant to waste water treatment aboard spacecraft for life support. It is observed that under certain conditions the slender shape of the free surface approaches an asymptote, which can be predicted analytically using new hybrid boundary conditions proposed herein. This contribution represents possibly the final extension of what has been referred to as the method of de Lazzer et al. (1996). The method enables the integration of the Young-Laplace equation over a domain with its boundaries, including the wetted portion of the solid boundaries, symmetry planes, and circular arcs representing free surfaces at the center plane of the liquid body. Asymptotic solutions at several limits are obtained and the analysis is confirmed with numerical computations.

  16. Characterization of surface Ag nanoparticles in nanocomposite a-C:Ag coatings by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction at sub-critical angles of incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manninen, N.K.; Oliveira, J.C.; Cavaleiro, A. [University of Coimbra, SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Carvalho, S. [University of Minho, GRF-CFUM, Physics Department, Guimaraes (Portugal)

    2016-03-15

    Silver diffusion within nanocomposite films and/or toward the film surface is often observed during annealing of the silver-based nanocomposite films. In order to control and/or minimize this process, it is crucial to characterize the aggregated silver nanoparticles on the films surface. In this paper grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) with both sub-critical and supra-critical angles of incidence is used to characterize the Ag nanoparticles distribution, shape and structure both inside the matrix and on the nanocomposite film surface. The nanocomposite carbon coating containing Ag nanoparticles (a-C:Ag) was deposited by dc magnetron sputtering. The coatings were analyzed by GIXRD using fixed incident angles both below and above the critical angle for total reflection. By using sub-critical angles it was possible to eliminate diffraction from the bulk material allowing to estimate the size distribution of the nanoparticles sitting on the surface. The results obtained by GIXRD analysis were checked through comparison with the observations made by both TEM and SEM analysis. The proposed methodology can be used to characterized nanoparticles deposition on a surface and/or island formation during film growth as long an adequate substrate with high critical angle for total reflection is used. (orig.)

  17. Anti-gravity device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsingh, S. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An educational toy useful in demonstrating fundamental concepts regarding the laws of gravity is described. The device comprises a sphere 10 of radius r resting on top of sphere 12 of radius R. The center of gravity of sphere 10 is displaced from its geometrical center by distance D. The dimensions are so related that D((R+r)/r) is greater than r. With the center of gravity of sphere 10 lying on a vertical line, the device is in equilibrium. When sphere 10 is rolled on the surface of sphere 12 it will return to its equilibrium position upon release. This creates an illusion that sphere 10 is defying the laws of gravity. In reality, due to the above noted relationship of D, R, and r, the center of gravity of sphere 10 rises from its equilibrium position as it rolls a short distance up or down the surface of sphere 12.

  18. Near-surface current meter array measurements of internal gravity waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H.B.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    We have developed various processing algorithms used to estimate the wave forms produced by hydrodynamic Internal Waves. Furthermore, the estimated Internal Waves are used to calculate the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) which relates the current and strain rate subsurface fields to surface scattering phenomenon imaged by radar. Following a brief discussion of LLNL`s measurement platform (a 10 sensor current meter array) we described the generation of representative current and strain rate space-time images from measured or simulated data. Then, we present how our simulation capability highlighted limitations in estimating strain rate. These limitations spurred the application of beamforming techniques to enhance our estimates, albeit at the expense of collapsing our space-time images to 1-D estimates. Finally, we discuss progress with regard to processing the current meter array data captured during the recent Loch Linnhe field trials.

  19. Simulation of Gravity Wave Propagation in Free Surface Flows by an Incompressible SPH Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanifard, N.; Mahnama, S. M.; Neshaei, S. A. L.; Mehrdad, M. A.; Farahani, M. H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics model to simulate wave propagation in a free surface flow. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved in a Lagrangian framework using a three-step fractional method. In the first step, a temporary velocity field is provided according to the relevant body forces. This velocity field is renewed in the second step to include the viscosity effects. A Poisson equation is employed in the third step as an alternative for the equation of state in order to evaluate pressure. This Poisson equation considers a trade-off between density and pressure which is utilized in the third step to impose the incompressibility effect. The computations are compared with the experimental as well as numerical data and a good agreement is observed. In order to validate proposed algorithm, a dam-break problem is solved as a benchmark solution and the computational results are compared with the previous numerical ones.

  20. Pressure-Redistributing Support Surface Use and Pressure Ulcer Incidence in Elderly Hip Fracture Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Shayna E.; Shardell, Michelle; Hawkes, William G.; Margolis, David J.; Amr, Sania; Miller, Ram; Baumgarten, Mona

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the association between pressure-redistributing support surface (PRSS) use and incident pressure ulcers in older adults with hip fracture. DESIGN Secondary analysis of data from prospective cohort with assessments performed as soon as possible after hospital admission and on alternating days for 21 days. SETTING Nine hospitals in the Baltimore Hip Studies network and 105 postacute facilities to which participants were discharged. PARTICIPANTS Six hundred fifty-eight people aged 65 and older who underwent surgery for hip fracture. MEASUREMENTS Full-body examination for pressure ulcers; bedbound status; and PRSS use, recorded as none, powered (alternating pressure mattresses, low-air-loss mattresses, and alternating pressure overlays), or nonpowered (high-density foam, static air, or gel-filled mattresses or pressure-redistributing overlays except for alternating pressure overlays). RESULTS Incident pressure ulcers (IPUs), Stage 2 or higher, were observed at 4.2% (195/4,638) of visits after no PRSS use, 4.5% (28/623) of visits after powered PRSS use, and 3.6% (54/1,496) of visits after nonpowered PRSS use. The rate of IPU per person-day of follow-up did not differ significantly between participants using powered PRSSs and those not using PRSSs. The rate also did not differ significantly between participants using nonpowered PRSSs and those not using PRSSs, except in the subset of bedbound participants (incidence rate ratio = 0.3, 95% confidence interval = 0.1–0.7). CONCLUSION PRSS use was not associated with a lower IPU rate. Clinical guidelines may need revision for the limited effect of PRSS use, and it may be appropriate to target PRSS use to bedbound patients at risk of pressure ulcers. PMID:21649630

  1. Surface folding-induced attraction and motion of particles in a soft elastic gel: cooperative effects of surface tension, elasticity, and gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Aditi; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2013-12-17

    We report some experimental observations regarding a new type of long-range interaction between rigid particles that prevails when they are suspended in an ultrasoft elastic gel. A denser particle submerges itself to a considerable depth inside the gel and becomes elasto-buoyant by balancing its weight against the elastic force exerted by the surrounding medium. By virtue of a large elasto-capillary length, the surface of the gel wraps around the particle and closes to create a line singularity connecting the particle to the free surface of the gel. A substantial amount of tensile strain is thus developed in the gel network parallel to the free surface that penetrates to a significant depth inside the gel. The field of this tensile strain is rather long-range because of a large gravito-elastic correlation length and sufficiently strong to pull two submerged particles into contact. The particles move toward each other with an effective force following an inverse linear distance law. When more monomers or dimers of the particles are released inside the gel, they orient rather freely inside the capsules where they are located and attract each other to form closely packed clusters. Eventually, these clusters themselves interact and coalesce. This is an emergent phenomenon in which gravity, capillarity, and elasticity work in tandem to create a long-range interaction. We also present the results of a related experiment, in which a particle suspended inside a thickness-graded gel moves accompanied by the continuous folding and the relaxation of the gel's surface.

  2. Molecular dynamics study of the interactions of incident N or Ti atoms with the TiN(001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhenhai [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Centre for Precision Manufacturing, Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management, The University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Zeng, Quanren [Centre for Precision Manufacturing, Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management, The University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Yuan, Lin [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Qin, Yi [Centre for Precision Manufacturing, Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management, The University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Chen, Mingjun [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Shan, Debin, E-mail: d.b.shan@gmail.com [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Interactions of incident N or Ti atoms with TiN(001) surface are studied by CMD. • The impact position of incident N on the surface determines the interaction modes. • Adsorption could occur due to the atomic exchange process. • Resputtering and reflection may simultaneously occur. • The initial sticking coefficient of N on TiN(001) is much smaller than that of Ti. - Abstract: The interaction processes between incident N or Ti atoms and the TiN(001) surface are simulated by classical molecular dynamics based on the second nearest-neighbor modified embedded-atom method potentials. The simulations are carried out for substrate temperatures between 300 and 700 K and kinetic energies of the incident atoms within the range of 0.5–10 eV. When N atoms impact against the surface, adsorption, resputtering and reflection of particles are observed; several unique atomic mechanisms are identified to account for these interactions, in which the adsorption could occur due to the atomic exchange process while the resputtering and reflection may simultaneously occur. The impact position of incident N atoms on the surface plays an important role in determining the interaction modes. Their occurrence probabilities are dependent on the kinetic energy of incident N atoms but independent on the substrate temperature. When Ti atoms are the incident particles, adsorption is the predominant interaction mode between particles and the surface. This results in the much smaller initial sticking coefficient of N atoms on the TiN(001) surface compared with that of Ti atoms. Stoichiometric TiN is promoted by N/Ti flux ratios larger than one.

  3. Towards canonical quantum gravity for 3+1 geometries admitting maximally symmetric two-dimensional surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christodoulakis, T; Doulis, G; Terzis, Petros A [Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, GR 157-71, Athens (Greece); Melas, E [Technological Educational Institution of Lamia, Electrical Engineering Department, GR 35-100, Lamia (Greece); Grammenos, Th [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Thessaly, GR 383-34, Volos (Greece); Papadopoulos, G O [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5 (Canada); Spanou, A, E-mail: tchris@phys.uoa.g, E-mail: gdoulis@phys.uoa.g, E-mail: pterzis@phys.uoa.g, E-mail: evangelosmelas@yahoo.co.u, E-mail: thgramme@uth.g, E-mail: gopapad@mathstat.dal.c, E-mail: aspanou@central.ntua.g [School of Applied Mathematics and Physical Sciences, National Technical University of Athens, GR 157-80, Athens (Greece)

    2010-07-21

    The canonical decomposition of all 3+1 geometries admitting two-dimensional space-like surfaces is exhibited as a generalization of a previous work. A proposal, consisting of a specific renormalization Assumption and an accompanying Requirement, which has been put forward in the 2+1 case is now generalized to 3+1 dimensions. This enables the canonical quantization of these geometries through a generalization of Kuchar's quantization scheme in the case of infinite degrees of freedom. The resulting Wheeler-DeWitt equation is based on a renormalized manifold parameterized by three smooth scalar functionals. The entire space of solutions to this equation is analytically given, a fact that is entirely new to the present case. This is made possible through the exploitation of the residual freedom in the choice of the third functional, which is left by the imposition of the Requirement, and is proven to correspond to a general coordinate transformation in the renormalized manifold.

  4. Massive Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    de Rham, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware–Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alt...

  5. Incidence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in human and animal fecal sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, R.L.; Przybyla-Kelly, K.; Shively, D.A.; Byappanahalli, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in the opportunistic pathogens Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium is well-documented in clinical research. Recently, the esp gene has been proposed as a marker of human pollution in environmental waters; however, information on its relative incidence in various human and animal fecal sources is limited. We have determined the occurrence of the esp gene in enterococci from human (n = 64) and animal (n = 233) fecal samples by polymerase chain reaction using two primer sets: one presumably specific for E. faecium (espfm) and the other for both E. faecalis and E. faecium (espfs/fm). We believe that this research is the first to explore the use of espfs/fm for the detection of human waste in natural environmental settings. The incidence in human sources was 93.1% espfm and 100% espfs/fm in raw sewage influent; 30% for both espfm and espfs/fm in septic waste; and 0% espfm and 80% espfs/fm in active pit toilets. The overall occurrence of the gene in animal feces was 7.7% (espfs/fm) and 4.7% (espfm); animal types with positive results included dogs (9/43, all espfm), gulls (10/34, espfs/fm; 2/34, espfm), mice (3/22, all espfs/fm), and songbirds (5/55, all espfs/fm). The esp gene was not detected in cat (0/34), deer (0/4), goose (0/18), or raccoon (0/23) feces. The inconsistent occurrence, especially in septic and pit toilet sewage, suggests a low statistical power of discrimination between animal and human sources, which means a large number of replicates should be collected. Both espfm and espfs/fm were common in raw sewage, but neither one efficiently differentiated between animal and other human sources.

  6. Industrial processes influenced by gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrach, Simon

    1988-01-01

    In considering new directions for low gravity research with particular regard to broadening the number and types of industrial involvements, it is noted that transport phenomena play a vital role in diverse processes in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and biotech industries. Relatively little attention has been given to the role of gravity in such processes. Accordingly, numerous industrial processes and phenomena are identified which involve gravity and/or surface tension forces. Phase separations and mixing are examples that will be significantly different in low gravity conditions. A basis is presented for expanding the scope of the low gravity research program and the potential benefits of such research is indicated.

  7. Normal incidence sound transmission loss evaluation by upstream surface impedance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneton, Raymond

    2009-03-01

    A method is developed to obtain the normal incidence sound transmission loss of noise control elements used in piping systems from upstream surface impedance measurements only. The noise control element may be a small material specimen in an impedance tube, a sealing part in an automotive hollow body network, an expansion chamber, a resonator, or a muffler. The developments are based on a transfer matrix (four-pole) representation of the noise control element and on the assumption that only plane waves propagate upstream and downstream the element. No assumptions are made on its boundary conditions, dimensions, shape, and material properties (i.e., the element may be symmetrical or not along its thickness, homogeneous or not, isotropic or not). One-load and two-load procedures are also proposed to identify the transfer matrix coefficients needed to obtain the true transmission loss of the tested element. The method can be used with a classical two-microphone impedance tube setup (i.e., no additional downstream tube and downstream acoustical measurements). The method is tested on three different noise control elements: two impedance tube multilayered specimens and one expansion chamber. The results found using the developed method are validated using numerical simulations.

  8. The equivalent incidence angle for porous absorbers backed by a hard surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    experiment using a free-field absorption measurement technique with a source at the equivalent angle. This study investigates the equivalent angle for locally and extendedly reacting porous media mainly by a numerical approach: Numerical minimizations of a cost function that is the difference between...... coefficients by free-field techniques, a broad incidence angle range can be suggested: 20 hi65 for extended reaction and hi65 for locally reacting porous absorbers, if an average difference of 0.05 is allowed.......An equivalent incidence angle is defined as the incidence angle at which the oblique incidence absorption coefficient best approximates the random incidence absorption coefficient. Once the equivalent angle is known, the random incidence absorption coefficient can be estimated by a single...

  9. Polar gravity fields from GOCE and airborne gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Olesen, Arne Vestergaard; Yidiz, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Airborne gravity, together with high-quality surface data and ocean satellite altimetric gravity, may supplement GOCE to make consistent, accurate high resolution global gravity field models. In the polar regions, the special challenge of the GOCE polar gap make the error characteristics...... of combination models especially sensitive to the correct merging of satellite and surface data. We outline comparisons of GOCE to recent airborne gravity surveys in both the Arctic and the Antarctic. The comparison is done to new 8-month GOCE solutions, as well as to a collocation prediction from GOCE gradients...... in Antarctica. It is shown how the enhanced gravity field solutions improve the determination of ocean dynamic topography in both the Arctic and in across the Drake Passage. For the interior of Antarctica, major airborne gravity programs are currently being carried out, and there is an urgent need...

  10. Use of surface water in drinking water production associated with municipal Legionnaires' disease incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Boer, J. W.; Coutinho, R. A.; Yzerman, E. P. F.; van der Sande, M. A. B.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Given an observed geographical variation in Legionnaires' disease incidence in The Netherlands, the aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that the type of drinking water production was an independent determinant of the incidence of Legionnaires' disease. DESIGN: For the

  11. ESTIMATION OF TOTAL SOLAR RADIATION INCIDENT ON AN INCLINED SURFACE OF A SOUTH-FACING GREENHOUSE ROOF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RONOH E.K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation is the driving force for the surface energy balance in buildings such as greenhouses. Greenhouses are generally tilted towards the sun in order to maximize the solar irradiance on the surfaces. Precise computation of the solar radiation received on these surfaces assumes an important role in the energy simulation. It is practical to calculate the total solar irradiance on inclined surfaces based on the solar global and diffuse radiation intensities on horizontal surfaces. This study focused on estimating the total solar radiation incident on inclined greenhouse roof surfaces. In this work, a south-facing thermal box inclined at 26.5° from the horizontal was used for solar radiation measurements. Additionally, recorded solar radiation data were retrieved for the study location and used to develop an empirical correlation. The conversion factors for the beam, the diffuse and the reflected solar radiation components were essential in the prediction of the total solar radiation incident on the tilted surface. The measured solar radiation data were then compared with the simulated data. The model performance was assessed using both graphical and statistical methods. Overall, locally calibrated data led to a satisfactory improvement in estimation of the total solar radiation on an inclined surface.

  12. Characteristics of surface sound pressure and absorption of a finite impedance strip for a grazing incident plane wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sum, K S; Pan, J

    2007-07-01

    Distributions of sound pressure and intensity on the surface of a flat impedance strip flush-mounted on a rigid baffle are studied for a grazing incident plane wave. The distributions are obtained by superimposing the unperturbed wave (the specularly reflected wave as if the strip is rigid plus the incident wave) with the radiated wave from the surface vibration of the strip excited by the unperturbed pressure. The radiated pressure interferes with the unperturbed pressure and distorts the propagating plane wave. When the plane wave propagates in the baffle-strip-baffle direction, it encounters discontinuities in acoustical impedance at the baffle-strip and strip-baffle interfaces. The radiated pressure is highest around the baffle-strip interface, but decreases toward the strip-baffle interface where the plane wave distortion reduces accordingly. As the unperturbed and radiated waves have different magnitudes and superimpose out of phase, the surface pressure and intensity increase across the strip in the plane wave propagation direction. Therefore, the surface absorption of the strip is nonzero and nonuniform. This paper provides an understanding of the surface pressure and intensity behaviors of a finite impedance strip for a grazing incident plane wave, and of how the distributed intensity determines the sound absorption coefficient of the strip.

  13. Nonlocal gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Mashhoon, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    Relativity theory is based on a postulate of locality, which means that the past history of the observer is not directly taken into account. This book argues that the past history should be taken into account. In this way, nonlocality---in the sense of history dependence---is introduced into relativity theory. The deep connection between inertia and gravitation suggests that gravity could be nonlocal, and in nonlocal gravity the fading gravitational memory of past events must then be taken into account. Along this line of thought, a classical nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation has recently been developed. A significant consequence of this theory is that the nonlocal aspect of gravity appears to simulate dark matter. According to nonlocal gravity theory, what astronomers attribute to dark matter should instead be due to the nonlocality of gravitation. Nonlocality dominates on the scale of galaxies and beyond. Memory fades with time; therefore, the nonlocal aspect of gravity becomes wea...

  14. Growth of nano-dots on the grazing incidence mirror surface under FEL irradiation: analytic approach to modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, I. V.; Buzmakov, A. V.; Siewert, F.; Tiedtke, K.; Störmer, M.; Samoylova, L.; Sinn, H.

    2017-05-01

    Simple analytic equation is deduced to explain new physical phenomenon detected experimentally: growth of nano-dots (40-55 nm diameter, 8-13 nm height, 9.4 dots/μm2 surface density) on the grazing incidence mirror surface under the three years irradiation by the free electron laser FLASH (5-45 nm wavelength, 3 degrees grazing incidence angle). The growth model is based on the assumption that the growth of nano-dots is caused by polymerization of incoming hydrocarbon molecules under the action of incident photons directly or photoelectrons knocked out from a mirror surface. The key feature of our approach consists in that we take into account the radiation intensity variation nearby a mirror surface in an explicit form, because the polymerization probability is proportional to it. We demonstrate that the simple analytic approach allows to explain all phenomena observed in experiment and to predict new effects. In particular, we show that the nano-dots growth depends crucially on the grazing angle of incoming beam and its intensity: growth of nano-dots is observed in the limited from above and below intervals of the grazing angle and the radiation intensity. Decrease in the grazing angle by 1 degree only (from 3 to 2 degree) may result in a strong suppression of nanodots growth and their total disappearing. Similarly, decrease in the radiation intensity by several times (replacement of free electron laser by synchrotron) results also in disappearing of nano-dots growth.

  15. Massive gravity from bimetric gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baccetti, Valentina; Martín-Moruno, Prado; Visser, Matt

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the subtle relationship between massive gravity and bimetric gravity, focusing particularly on the manner in which massive gravity may be viewed as a suitable limit of bimetric gravity. The limiting procedure is more delicate than currently appreciated. Specifically, this limiting procedure should not unnecessarily constrain the background metric, which must be externally specified by the theory of massive gravity itself. The fact that in bimetric theories one always has two sets of metric equations of motion continues to have an effect even in the massive gravity limit, leading to additional constraints besides the one set of equations of motion naively expected. Thus, since solutions of bimetric gravity in the limit of vanishing kinetic term are also solutions of massive gravity, but the contrary statement is not necessarily true, there is no complete continuity in the parameter space of the theory. In particular, we study the massive cosmological solutions which are continuous in the parameter space, showing that many interesting cosmologies belong to this class. (paper)

  16. Mars - Hellas Planitia gravity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, W. L.; Wimberley, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    Doppler radio tracking data from Viking Orbiter 1 has provided new detailed observations of gravity variations over Hellas Planitia. Line-of-sight Bouguer gravity definitely indicates that isostatic adjustment has occurred. Two theoretical models were tested to obtain fits to the gravity data. Results for a surface deficit model, and a model with a surface deficit and a mass excess at depth are displayed. The mass-at-depth model produced very marked improvement in the data fit as compared to the surface deficit model. The optimum depth for the mass excess is 130 km.

  17. Analogue Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barceló Carlos

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Analogue models of (and for gravity have a long and distinguished history dating back to the earliest years of general relativity. In this review article we will discuss the history, aims, results, and future prospects for the various analogue models. We start the discussion by presenting a particularly simple example of an analogue model, before exploring the rich history and complex tapestry of models discussed in the literature. The last decade in particular has seen a remarkable and sustained development of analogue gravity ideas, leading to some hundreds of published articles, a workshop, two books, and this review article. Future prospects for the analogue gravity programme also look promising, both on the experimental front (where technology is rapidly advancing and on the theoretical front (where variants of analogue models can be used as a springboard for radical attacks on the problem of quantum gravity.

  18. Gravity brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

  19. Investigation of surface and sub-surface damage in high quality synthetic diamonds by X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence in-plane diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussone, Genziana; Lafford, Tamzin A.; Masiello, Fabio; Carbone, Gerardina; Schuelli, Tobias U.; Rommeveaux, Amparo Vivo; Haertwig, Juergen [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6, Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Gibaud, Alain [Laboratoire PEC, Universite du Maine le Mans, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72 085 Le Mans (France); Connell, Simon H. [University of Johannesburg, cnr Kingsway Ave and University Rd, Auckland Park, 2006, Johannesburg (South Africa); Wormington, Matthew [Jordan Valley Semiconductors Inc., 8601 Cross Park Drive, Suite 200, Austin, TX 78754-4578 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    High quality single-crystal synthetic diamond is the most suitable material for selected X-ray optical applications in the latest generation X-ray light sources. Excellent heat handling properties, as well as low absorption, coupled with high perfection in the crystal bulk and very good surface quality, are crucial for such applications. In recent years, some progress has been made in the fields of surface treatments and growth techniques. Conventional scaife polishing is largely ineffective on the diamond (111) surface. To overcome this disadvantage, one possibility is to use the Hot Metal polishing technique. An investigation of surface and sub-surface damage of Hot Metal polished and cleaved surfaces, has been carried out using depth-sensitive non-destructive X-ray techniques. The near surface crystalline quality was studied as a function of depth using in-plane grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Additionally, X-ray reflectivity was used to investigate the density, thickness and roughness of near-surface layers. The measurements enable us to estimate the thickness of the affected sub-surface layer. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Estimation of surface impedance at oblique incidence based on sparse array processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richard, Antoine Philippe André; Fernandez Grande, Efren; Brunskog, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    on spherical array measurements. The sound field measured by the array is mainly composed of an incident and a reflected wave, so it can be represented as a spatially sparse problem. This makes it possible to use compressive sensing in order to enhance the resolution and the quality of the estimation...

  1. Joint inversion of ambient noise surface wave and gravity data to image the upper crustal structure of the Tanlu fault zone to the southeast of Hefei, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Gu, N.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Tanlu fault is a major fault located in the eastern China, which stretches 2400 km long from Tancheng in the north to Lujiang in the south. It is generally believed that the Tanlu fault zone was formed in Proterozoic era and underwent a series of complicated processes since then. To understand the upper crustal structure around the southern segment of the Tanlu fault zone, in 2017 we deployed 53 short period seismic stations around the fault zone to the southeast of Hefei, capital city of Anhui province. The temporary array continuously recorded the data for about one month from 17 March to 26 April 2017. The seismic array spans an area of about 30km x 30Km with an average station spacing of about 5-6km. The vertical component data were used for extracting Rayleigh wave phase and group velocity dispersion data for the period of 0.2 to 5 seconds. To improve imaging the upper crustal structure of the fault zone, we jointly inverted the surface wave dispersion data and the gravity data because they have complementary strengths. To combine surface wave dispersion data and gravity observations into a single inversion framework, we used an empirical relationship between seismic velocity and density of Maceira and Ammon (2009). By finding the optimal relative weighting between two data types, we are able to find a shear wave velocity (Vs) model that fits both data types. The joint inversion can resolve the upper crustal fault zone structure down to about 7 km in depth. The Vs model shows that in this region the Tanlu fault is associated with high velocity anomalies, corresponding well to the Feidong complex seen on the surface. This indicates that the Tanlu fault zone may provide a channel for the intrusion of hot materials.

  2. Brane-World Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartens Roy

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The observable universe could be a 1+3-surface (the "brane" embedded in a 1+3+$d$-dimensional spacetime (the "bulk", with Standard Model particles and fields trapped on the brane while gravity is free to access the bulk. At least one of the $d$ extra spatial dimensions could be very large relative to the Planck scale, which lowers the fundamental gravity scale, possibly even down to the electroweak ($sim$TeV level. This revolutionary picture arises in the framework of recent developments in M theory. The 1+10-dimensional M theory encompasses the known 1+9-dimensional superstring theories, and is widely considered to be a promising potential route to quantum gravity. General relativity cannot describe gravity at high enough energies and must be replaced by a quantum gravity theory, picking up significant corrections as the fundamental energy scale is approached. At low energies, gravity is localized at the brane and general relativity is recovered, but at high energies gravity "leaks" into the bulk, behaving in a truly higher-dimensional way. This introduces significant changes to gravitational dynamics and perturbations, with interesting and potentially testable implications for high-energy astrophysics, black holes and cosmology. Brane-world models offer a phenomenological way to test some of the novel predictions and corrections to general relativity that are implied by M theory. This review discusses the geometry, dynamics and perturbations of simple brane-world models for cosmology and astrophysics, mainly focusing on warped 5-dimensional brane-worlds based on the Randall-Sundrum models.

  3. Assessment of precise surface-gravity measurements for monitoring the response of a geothermal reservoir to exploitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grannell, R.B.; Whitcomb, J.H.; Aronstam, P.S.; Clover, R.C.

    1981-06-01

    Recommendations for carrying out surveys which achieve 15, 10 and 5 microgal precisions are presented. Achieving the smaller standard deviations will require more field effort and will be more costly. For a 60 station survey, at commercial rates in 1981, typical costs are estimated to be $20,000, $26,000 and $35,000 respectively, for data collection, reduction and interpretation. These figures exclude instrument purchase or rental. Twenty geothermal areas in the western United States which might be suitable for precise repetitive gravity monitoring were evaluated. The evaluation criteria included capability for subsidence on a geological basis, estimated electrical production, environmental impact, and anticipation of production in the near future. It is felt that the most promising areas in order of priority are: (1) the Salton Sea field, California; (2) Valles Caldera, New Mexico; (3) The Geysers-Clear Lake; and (4) Westmorland, California; (5) Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah; and (6) Heber; (7) Brawley; and (8) Long Valley, California.

  4. Ocean tidal loading affecting precise geodetic observations on Greenland: Error account of surface deformations by tidal gravity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jentzsch, G.; Knudsen, Per; Ramatschi, M.

    2000-01-01

    Air-borne and satellite based altimetry are used to monitor the Greenland ice-cap. Since these measurements are related to fiducial sites at the coast, the robustness of the height differences depends on the stability of these reference points. To benefit from the accuracy of these methods...... on the centimeter level, station corrections regarding the Earth tides and the ocean tidal loading have to be applied. Models for global corrections esp. for the body tides are available and sufficient, but local corrections regarding the effect of the adjacent shelf area still have to be inferred from additional...... observations. Near the coast ocean tidal loading causes additional vertical deformations in the order of 1 to 10 cm Therefore, tidal gravity measurements were carried out at four fiducial sites around Greenland in order to provide corrections for the kinematic part of the coordinates of these sites. Starting...

  5. Analogue Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Barceló

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Analogue gravity is a research programme which investigates analogues of general relativistic gravitational fields within other physical systems, typically but not exclusively condensed matter systems, with the aim of gaining new insights into their corresponding problems. Analogue models of (and for gravity have a long and distinguished history dating back to the earliest years of general relativity. In this review article we will discuss the history, aims, results, and future prospects for the various analogue models. We start the discussion by presenting a particularly simple example of an analogue model, before exploring the rich history and complex tapestry of models discussed in the literature. The last decade in particular has seen a remarkable and sustained development of analogue gravity ideas, leading to some hundreds of published articles, a workshop, two books, and this review article. Future prospects for the analogue gravity programme also look promising, both on the experimental front (where technology is rapidly advancing and on the theoretical front (where variants of analogue models can be used as a springboard for radical attacks on the problem of quantum gravity.

  6. Highly charged ions impinging on a stepped metal surface under grazing incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robin, A; Niemann, D; Stolterfoht, N; Heiland, W

    We report on energy loss measurements and charge state distributions for 60 keV N6+ and 75 keV N5+ ions scattered off a Pt(110)(1x2) single crystal surface. In particular, the influence of surface steps on the energy loss and the outgoing charge states is discussed. The scattering angle and the

  7. Effects of Lateral Heterogeneity and Power Law Rheology on Glacially Induced Surface Motion and Gravity Rate of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P.; Wang, H.; van der Wal, W.

    2006-12-01

    Modern geodetic measurements from GPS, satellite altimetry, tide-gauges, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and space-borne gravimetry (such as GRACE) have been used to monitor global change. Since these measurements contain contributions from glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) and other tectonic processes, they must be modeled and removed in order to observe current climate change. In the past, most GIA models assumed that the earth is laterally homogeneous and the rheology is linear. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of lateral heterogeneity and Power-Law rheology on GIA induced land uplift rate, horizontal velocities, relative sealevels, J-dot and the secular gravity rate of change in the southern part of Hudson Bay, which is detected by the GRACE mission. Here, GIA is modeled with a spherical, self-gravitating, compressible viscoelastic, laterally heterogeneous earth using the Finite-Element Method. The effect of gravitationally self-consistent sea levels in realistic oceans is also included. Lateral variations in mantle viscosities and lithospheric thickness are inferred from the seismic tomography model S20A using well known scaling relationships. Power-Law rheologies in the whole mantle or in combination with linear rheologies in the upper or lower mantle are also investigated. Both ICE-5G and ICE-4G deglaciation models are used to investigate their effect on the pattern of rebound. Preliminary results show that both lateral heterogeneity and power-law rheology have strong effects on the direction and magnitude of horizontal velocities. The effects of lateral heterogeneity and power-law rheology are also large enough to be detected in land uplift rate, relative sealevels, J-dot and gravity rate of change. Their implication on observing the effects of global warming will also be discussed.

  8. Gravity and embryonic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between the developing embryo (both plant and animal) and a gravitational field has long been contemplated. The difficulty in designing critical experiments on the surface of the earth because of its background of 1 g, has been an obstacle to a resolution of the problem. Biological responses to gravity (particularly in plants) are obvious in many cases; however, the influence of gravity as an environmental input to the developing embryo is not as obvious and has proven to be extremely difficult to define. In spite of this, over the years numerous attempts have been made using a variety of embryonic materials to come to grips with the role of gravity in development. Three research tools are available: the centrifuge, the clinostat, and the orbiting spacecraft. Experimental results are now available from all three sources. Some tenuous conclusions are drawn, and an attempt at a unifying theory of gravitational influence on embryonic development is made.

  9. Quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kiefer, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The search for a quantum theory of the gravitational field is one of the great open problems in theoretical physics. This book presents a self-contained discussion of the concepts, methods and applications that can be expected in such a theory. The two main approaches to its construction - the direct quantisation of Einstein's general theory of relativity and string theory - are covered. Whereas the first attempts to construct a viable theory for the gravitational field alone, string theory assumes that a quantum theory of gravity will be achieved only through a unification of all the interactions. However, both employ the general method of quantization of constrained systems, which is described together with illustrative examples relevant for quantum gravity. There is a detailed presentation of the main approaches employed in quantum general relativity: path-integral quantization, the background-field method and canonical quantum gravity in the metric, connection and loop formulations. The discussion of stri...

  10. Quantum Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giribet, G E

    2005-01-01

    Claus Kiefer presents his book, Quantum Gravity, with his hope that '[the] book will convince readers of [the] outstanding problem [of unification and quantum gravity] and encourage them to work on its solution'. With this aim, the author presents a clear exposition of the fundamental concepts of gravity and the steps towards the understanding of its quantum aspects. The main part of the text is dedicated to the analysis of standard topics in the formulation of general relativity. An analysis of the Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity and the canonical quantization of gravity is performed in detail. Chapters four, five and eight provide a pedagogical introduction to the basic concepts of gravitational physics. In particular, aspects such as the quantization of constrained systems, the role played by the quadratic constraint, the ADM decomposition, the Wheeler-de Witt equation and the problem of time are treated in an expert and concise way. Moreover, other specific topics, such as the minisuperspace approach and the feasibility of defining extrinsic times for certain models, are discussed as well. The ninth chapter of the book is dedicated to the quantum gravitational aspects of string theory. Here, a minimalistic but clear introduction to string theory is presented, and this is actually done with emphasis on gravity. It is worth mentioning that no hard (nor explicit) computations are presented, even though the exposition covers the main features of the topic. For instance, black hole statistical physics (within the framework of string theory) is developed in a pedagogical and concise way by means of heuristical arguments. As the author asserts in the epilogue, the hope of the book is to give 'some impressions from progress' made in the study of quantum gravity since its beginning, i.e., since the end of 1920s. In my opinion, Kiefer's book does actually achieve this goal and gives an extensive review of the subject. (book review)

  11. PHOENIX MARS SURFACE STEREO IMAGER 5 INCID OVER FLX SCI V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) experiment on the Mars Phoenix Lander consists of one instrument component plus command electronics. This SSI Imaging Science RDR...

  12. Exploring surface landscapes with molecules: rotationally induced diffraction of H2on LiF(001) under fast grazing incidence conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cueto, M; Muzas, A S; Somers, M F; Kroes, G J; Díaz, C; Martín, F

    2017-06-28

    Atomic diffraction by surfaces under fast grazing incidence conditions has been used for almost a decade to characterize surface properties with more accuracy than with more traditional atomic diffraction methods. From six-dimensional solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we show that diffraction of H 2 molecules under fast grazing incidence conditions could be even more informative for the characterization of ionic surfaces, due to the large anisotropic electrostatic interaction between the quadrupole moment of the molecule and the electric field created by the ionic crystal. Using the LiF(001) surface as a benchmark, we show that fast grazing incidence diffraction of H 2 strongly depends on the initial rotational state of the molecule, while rotationally inelastic processes are irrelevant. We demonstrate that, as a result of the anisotropy of the impinging projectile, initial rotational excitation leads to an increase in intensity of high-order diffraction peaks at incidence directions that satisfy precise symmetry constraints, thus providing a more detailed information on the surface characteristics than that obtained from low-order atomic diffraction peaks under fast grazing incidence conditions. As quadrupole-ion surface potentials are expected to accurately represent the interaction between H 2 and any surface with a marked ionic character, our analysis should be of general applicability to any of such surfaces. Finally, we show that a density functional theory description of the molecule-ion surface potential catches the main features observed experimentally.

  13. Simulating Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  14. The effect of playing surface on the incidence of ACL injuries in National Collegiate Athletic Association American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoo, Jason L; Braun, Hillary J; Harris, Alex H S

    2013-06-01

    Artificial playing surfaces are widely used for American football practice and competition and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common. This study analyzed the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System (ISS) men's football ACL injury database from 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 to determine the effect of playing surface on ACL injury in NCAA football athletes. This database was reviewed from the 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 seasons using the specific injury code, "Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) complete tear." The injury rate was computed for competition and practice exposures. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals were calculated using assumptions of a Poisson distribution. Pair-wise, two-sample tests of equality of proportions with a continuity correction were used to estimate the associations of risk factors. There was an incidence rate of 1.73 ACL injuries per 10,000 athlete-exposures (A-Es) (95% CI 1.47-2.0) on artificial playing surfaces compared with a rate of 1.24 per 10,000 A-Es (1.05-1.45, pinjuries occurred more frequently on artificial turf surfaces (44.29%) than on natural grass (36.12%). NCAA football players experience a greater number of ACL injuries when playing on artificial surfaces. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The impact of airport characteristics on airport surface accidents and incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Sabine; Majumdar, Arnab; Ochieng, Washington Y

    2015-06-01

    Airport surface safety and in particular runway and taxiway safety is acknowledged globally as one of aviation's greatest challenges. To improve this key area of aviation safety, it is necessary to identify and understand the causal and contributing factors on safety occurrences. While the contribution of human factors, operations, and procedures has been researched extensively, the impact of the airport and its associated characteristics itself has received little or no attention. This paper introduces a novel methodology for risk and hazard assessment of airport surface operations, and models the relationships between airport characteristics, and (a) the rate of occurrences, (b) the severity of occurrences, and (c) the causal factors underlying occurrences. The results show for the first time how the characteristics of airports, and in particular its infrastructure and operations, influence the safety of surface operations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. and National Safety Council. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mirror and grating surface figure requirements for grazing incidence synchrotron radiation beamlines: Power loading effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Sharma, S.

    1987-01-01

    At present, grazing incidence mirrors are used almost exclusively as the first optical element in VUV and soft x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. The performance of these mirrors is determined by thermal and mechanical stress-induced figure errors as well as by figure errors remaining from the grinding and polishing process. With the advent of VUV and soft x-ray undulators and wigglers has come a new set of thermal stress problems related to both the magnitude and the spatial distribution of power from these devices. In many cases the power load on the entrance slits and gratings in these beamlines is no longer negligible. The dependence of thermally-induced front-end mirror figure errors on various storage ring and insertion device parameters (especially those at the National Synchrotron Light Source) and the effects of these figure errors on two classes of soft x-ray beamlines are presented.

  17. Differential Deposition for Surface Figure Corrections in Grazing Incidence X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Brian D.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Atkins, Carolyn; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Broadway, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Differential deposition corrects the low- and mid- spatial-frequency deviations in the axial figure of Wolter-type grazing incidence X-ray optics. Figure deviations is one of the major contributors to the achievable angular resolution. Minimizing figure errors can significantly improve the imaging quality of X-ray optics. Material of varying thickness is selectively deposited, using DC magnetron sputtering, along the length of optic to minimize figure deviations. Custom vacuum chambers are built that can incorporate full-shell and segmented Xray optics. Metrology data of preliminary corrections on a single meridian of full-shell x-ray optics show an improvement of mid-spatial frequencies from 6.7 to 1.8 arc secs HPD. Efforts are in progress to correct a full-shell and segmented optics and to verify angular-resolution improvement with X-ray testing.

  18. Excitation of a surface wave by an s-polarized electromagnetic wave incident upon a boundary of a dense magnetoactive plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragila, R.; Vukovic, S.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of surfave waves that are associated with a boundary between a rare plasma and a dense magnetoactive plasma and that propagate along a dc magnetic field are investigated. It is shown that the presence of the magnetic field introduces symmetry in terms of the polarization of the incident electromagnetic wave that excites the surface waves. A surface wave excited by an incident p-polarized (s-polarized) electromagnetic wave leaks in the form of an s-polarized (p-polarized) electromagnetic wave. The rate of rotation of polarization is independent of the polarization of the incident wave. Because a surface wave can leak in the form of an s-polarized electromagnetic wave, it can also be pumped by such a wave, and conditions were found for excitation of a surface wave by an s-polarized incident electromagnetic wave

  19. Surface Collisions of Small Cluster Ions at Incident Energies 10-102 eV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herman, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 233, - (2004), s. 361-371 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 561 Grant - others:XE(CZ) EURATOM-IPP.CR Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : surface collisions * cluster ions * unimolecular dissociation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.235, year: 2004

  20. Zooplankton incidence in abnormally high sea surface temperature in the Eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.

    and internal waves may cause zooplankton abundance. Average biomass values in high sea surface temperature areas were higher (0.30 ml.m/3) than at the other stations (0.07 ml.m/3). Crustacean eggs, fish eggs and mysids clustered in pockets of abnormally high...

  1. Off-level corrections for gravity meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebauer, T. M.; Blitz, Thomas; Constantino, Andy

    2016-04-01

    Gravity meters must be aligned with the local gravity at any location on the surface of the earth in order to measure the full amplitude of the gravity vector. The gravitational force on the sensitive component of the gravity meter decreases by the cosine of the angle between the measurement axis and the local gravity vector. Most gravity meters incorporate two horizontal orthogonal levels to orient the gravity meter for a maximum gravity reading. In order to calculate a gravity correction it is often necessary to estimate the overall angular deviation between the gravity meter and the local gravity vector using two measured horizontal tilt meters. Typically this is done assuming that the two horizontal angles are independent and that the product of the cosines of the horizontal tilts is equivalent to the cosine of the overall deviation. These approximations, however, break down at large angles. This paper derives analytic formulae to transform angles measured by two orthogonal tilt meters into the vertical deviation of the third orthogonal axis. The equations can be used to calibrate the tilt sensors attached to the gravity meter or provide a correction for a gravity meter used in an off-of-level condition.

  2. Brane-World Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Maartens

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The observable universe could be a 1+3-surface (the “brane” embedded in a 1+3+d-dimensional spacetime (the “bulk”, with Standard Model particles and fields trapped on the brane while gravity is free to access the bulk. At least one of the d extra spatial dimensions could be very large relative to the Planck scale, which lowers the fundamental gravity scale, possibly even down to the electroweak (∼ TeV level. This revolutionary picture arises in the framework of recent developments in M theory. The 1+10-dimensional M theory encompasses the known 1+9-dimensional superstring theories, and is widely considered to be a promising potential route to quantum gravity. At low energies, gravity is localized at the brane and general relativity is recovered, but at high energies gravity “leaks” into the bulk, behaving in a truly higher-dimensional way. This introduces significant changes to gravitational dynamics and perturbations, with interesting and potentially testable implications for high-energy astrophysics, black holes, and cosmology. Brane-world models offer a phenomenological way to test some of the novel predictions and corrections to general relativity that are implied by M theory. This review analyzes the geometry, dynamics and perturbations of simple brane-world models for cosmology and astrophysics, mainly focusing on warped 5-dimensional brane-worlds based on the Randall–Sundrum models. We also cover the simplest brane-world models in which 4-dimensional gravity on the brane is modified at low energies – the 5-dimensional Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati models. Then we discuss co-dimension two branes in 6-dimensional models.

  3. Experimental study on the effects of surface gravity waves of different wavelengths on the phase averaged performance characteristics of marine current turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luznik, L.; Lust, E.; Flack, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    There are few studies describing the interaction between marine current turbines and an overlying surface gravity wave field. In this work we present an experimental study on the effects of surface gravity waves of different wavelengths on the wave phase averaged performance characteristics of a marine current turbine model. Measurements are performed with a 1/25 scale (diameter D=0.8m) two bladed horizontal axis turbine towed in the large (116m long) towing tank at the U.S. Naval Academy equipped with a dual-flap, servo-controlled wave maker. Three regular waves with wavelengths of 15.8, 8.8 and 3.9m with wave heights adjusted such that all waveforms have the same energy input per unit width are produced by the wave maker and model turbine is towed into the waves at constant carriage speed of 1.68 m/s. This representing the case of waves travelling in the same direction as the mean current. Thrust and torque developed by the model turbine are measured using a dynamometer mounted in line with the turbine shaft. Shaft rotation speed and blade position are measured using in in-house designed shaft position indexing system. The tip speed ratio (TSR) is adjusted using a hysteresis brake which is attached to the output shaft. Free surface elevation and wave parameters are measured with two optical wave height sensors, one located in the turbine rotor plane and other one diameter upstream of the rotor. All instruments are synchronized in time and data is sampled at a rate of 700 Hz. All measured quantities are conditionally sampled as a function of the measured surface elevation and transformed to wave phase space using the Hilbert Transform. Phenomena observed in earlier experiments with the same turbine such as phase lag in the torque signal and an increase in thrust due to Stokes drift are examined and presented with the present data as well as spectral analysis of the torque and thrust data.

  4. Neutralization and equilibration of highly charged argon ions at grazing incidence on a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winecki, S.; Cocke, C.L.; Stoeckli, M.P.; Fry, D.

    1996-01-01

    Final charge state distributions of argon ions, scattered grazingly from a smooth highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface, have been measured as a function of initial charge state (q=4-17) and impact velocity (v=0.15-0.62 a.u.). The final charge state distribution changes strongly with the impact velocity, but is almost independent of the initial charge state. The neutralization during grazing-angle scattering is compared to the charge state equilibration experienced by ions passing through a solid (carbon foil), and these two processes seem to have common properties. A K x-ray spectrum from the K-shell vacancy decay of 51 keV Ar 17+ projectiles was obtained as a function of the angle between the ion beam and the surface. First measurements of x-ray spectra in coincidence with grazingly scattered ions are reported. A simple model for argon neutralization near and below the surface is proposed. The model assumes a direct side-feeding into the Ar M-shell followed by Auger and radiative L and K-shell filling

  5. Measurement of UO2 surface oxidation using grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction: Implications for nuclear forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Cameron L.; Chen, Chien-Hung; Park, Sulgiye; Davisson, M. Lee; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear forensics involves determination of the origin and history of interdicted nuclear materials based on the detection of signatures associated with their production and trafficking. The surface oxidation undergone by UO2 when exposed to air is a potential signature of its atmospheric exposure during handling and transport. To assess the sensitivity of this oxidation to atmospheric parameters, surface sensitive grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) measurements were performed on UO2 samples exposed to air of varying relative humidity (34%, 56%, and 95% RH) and temperature (room temperature, 50 °C, and 100 °C). Near-surface unit cell contraction was observed following exposure, indicating oxidation of the surface and accompanying reduction of the uranium cation ionic radii. The extent of unit cell contraction provides a measure of the extent of oxidation, allowing for comparison of the effects of various exposure conditions. No clear influence of relative humidity on the extent of oxidation was observed, with samples exhibiting similar degrees of unit cell contraction at all relative humidities investigated. In contrast, the thickness of the oxidized layers increased substantially with increasing temperature, such that differences on the order of 10 °C yielded readily observable crystallographic signatures of the exposure conditions.

  6. Dependence of secondary electron emission on the incident angle and the energy of primary electrons bombarding bowl-structured beryllium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Jun; Ohya, Kaoru.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the secondary electron emission from beryllium is combined with a model of bowl structure for surface roughness, for analyzing the difference between the electron emissions for normal and oblique incidences. At normal incidence, with increasing the roughness parameter H/W, the primary energy E pm at which the maximum electron yield occurs becomes higher, and at more than the E pm , the decrease in the yield is slower; where H and W are the depth and width of the bowl structure, respectively. The dispersion of incident angle to the microscopic surface causes a small increase in the yield at oblique incidence, whereas the blocking of primary electrons from bombarding the bottom of the structure causes an opposite trend. The strong anisotropy in the polar angular distribution with respect to the azimuthal angle is calculated at oblique incidence. (author)

  7. Quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, M.A.; West, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the state of the art of quantum gravity, quantum effects in cosmology, quantum black-hole physics, recent developments in supergravity, and quantum gauge theories. Topics considered include the problems of general relativity, pregeometry, complete cosmological theories, quantum fluctuations in cosmology and galaxy formation, a new inflationary universe scenario, grand unified phase transitions and the early Universe, the generalized second law of thermodynamics, vacuum polarization near black holes, the relativity of vacuum, black hole evaporations and their cosmological consequences, currents in supersymmetric theories, the Kaluza-Klein theories, gauge algebra and quantization, and twistor theory. This volume constitutes the proceedings of the Second Seminar on Quantum Gravity held in Moscow in 1981

  8. Quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isham, C.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitational effects are seen as arising from a curvature in spacetime. This must be reconciled with gravity's apparently passive role in quantum theory to achieve a satisfactory quantum theory of gravity. The development of grand unified theories has spurred the search, with forces being of equal strength at a unification energy of 10 15 - 10 18 GeV, with the ''Plank length'', Lp ≅ 10 -35 m. Fundamental principles of general relativity and quantum mechanics are outlined. Gravitons are shown to have spin-0, as mediators of gravitation force in the classical sense or spin-2 which are related to the quantisation of general relativity. Applying the ideas of supersymmetry to gravitation implies partners for the graviton, especially the massless spin 3/2 fermion called a gravitino. The concept of supersymmetric strings is introduced and discussed. (U.K.)

  9. Seasonal gravity changes estimated from GRACE data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengbo Zou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2002, the GRACE program has provided a large amount of high-precision data, which can be used to detect temporal gravity variations related to global mass re-distribution inside the fluid envelop of the surface of the Earth. In order to make use of the GRACE data to investigate earthquake-related gravity changes in China, we first studied the degree variances of the monthly GRACE gravity field models, and then applied decor-relation and Gaussian smoothing method to obtain seasonal gravity changes in China. By deducting the multi-year mean seasonal variations from the seasonal maps, we found some earthquake-related gravity anomalies.

  10. Venus gravity - Analysis of Beta Regio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, P. B.; Sjogren, W. L.; Mottinger, N. A.; Bills, B. G.; Abbott, E.

    1982-01-01

    Radio tracking data acquired over Beta Regio were analyzed to obtain a surface mass distribution from which a detailed vertical gravity field was derived. In addition, a corresponding vertical gravity field was evaluated solely from the topography of the Beta region. A comparison of these two maps confirms the strong correlation between gravity and topography which was previously seen in line-of-sight gravity maps. It also demonstrates that the observed gravity is a significant fraction of that predicted from the topography alone. The effective depth of complete isostatic compensation for the Beta region is estimated to be 330 km, which is somewhat deeper than that found for other areas of Venus.

  11. Prevalence of Candida spp. in Healthy Oral Mucosa Surfaces with Higher Incidence of Chronic Hyperplastic Candidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Claúdia; Artico, Gabriela; Freitas, Roseli; Filho, Antônio; Migliari, Dante

    2016-08-01

    Predisposing factors in chronic hyperplastic candidosis (CHC) have been poorly recognized. This study aimed at assessing the prevalence of Candida spp. in areas of the oral mucosa showing greater prevalent rate of CHC, such as the retrocomissural area, the lateral borders of the tongue, and the hard-palate mucosa in four groups of individuals presenting predisposing factors as follows: Smoking habits (group I); patients with low salivary flow rate (SFR) (hyposalivation - group II); patients with loss of vertical dimension of occlusion (LVDO -group III); and control subjects (group IV). A total of 44 individuals (age 4090 years, mean: 55.8 years) were divided into four groups: Group I (11 smokers); group II (10 hyposalivation patients); group III (10 LVDO patients); and group IV (control, 13 healthy subjects). All individuals were tested for Candida-pseudohyphae form by direct examination and for Candida spp. culture growth in samples obtained from the retrocomissural, tongue's lateral border, and hard-soft palatal mucosa. Direct examination showed a statistically significant prevalence rate for pseudohyphae (p < 0.05) on the retrocomissural and on tongue's lateral borders of individuals with LVDO. A statistically significant (p < 0.05) culture growth for Candida spp. was found on the retrocomissural areas of those with hyposalivation and with LVDO, and on the palate mucosa and on the tongue's lateral borders in the smokers and in the individuals with LVDO when compared with those of the control group. While direct examination is effective for detecting pseudohyphae, LVDO and tobacco smoking seem to be factors of relevance to the development of CHC. Since CHC has been linked to a high rate of malignant transformation, this study analyzes some clinical (and exogenous) factors that may contribute to the development of CHC and addresses some preventive measures to reduce its incidence.

  12. Element sensitive reconstruction of nanostructured surfaces with finite elements and grazing incidence soft X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltwisch, Victor; Hönicke, Philipp; Kayser, Yves; Eilbracht, Janis; Probst, Jürgen; Scholze, Frank; Beckhoff, Burkhard

    2018-03-29

    The geometry of a Si3N4 lamellar grating was investigated experimentally with reference-free grazing-incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis. While simple layered systems are usually treated with the matrix formalism to determine the X-ray standing-wave field, this approach fails for laterally structured surfaces. Maxwell solvers based on finite elements are often used to model electrical field strengths for any 2D or 3D structures in the optical spectral range. We show that this approach can also be applied in the field of X-rays. The electrical field distribution obtained with the Maxwell solver can subsequently be used to calculate the fluorescence intensities in full analogy to the X-ray standing-wave field obtained by the matrix formalism. Only the effective 1D integration for the layer system has to be replaced by a 2D integration of the finite elements, taking into account the local excitation conditions. We will show that this approach is capable of reconstructing the geometric line shape of a structured surface with high elemental sensitivity. This combination of GIXRF and finite-element simulations paves the way for a versatile characterization of nanoscale-structured surfaces.

  13. Incidence of Heterotopic Ossification after Surface and Conventional Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Comparative Study Using Anterolateral Approach and Indomethacin Prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Regis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and severity of heterotopic ossification (HO in two homogeneous groups of patients that received surface replacement arthroplasty (SRA and conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA were evaluated retrospectively. Thirty-nine patients undergoing 42 hip resurfacing procedures and 41 primary cementless THAs through an anterolateral approach received a 10-day course of 150 mg/die of indomethacin postoperatively. The median surgical time was 190 minutes and 156 minutes, respectively (. At a minimum 1-year followup, the development of HO was assessed on standard X-ray using Brooker grading. Ectopic bone formation was detected in five cases (11.9%, two Brooker grade I and three grade II in the SRA group and in 14 hips (34.1%, 12 grade I and two grade II treated with conventional THA, but the difference was not significant (. No clinically relevant periprosthetic ossification (Brooker III or IV occurred in both groups. Although the difference was not statistically significant, the incidence of HO after SRA was lower than conventional THA. More extensive soft tissue trauma, bone debris, and longer operative time in hip resurfacing are not likely to be absolute risk factors for HO. Further investigations including larger patient populations are needed to confirm these findings.

  14. Incidence of loss of heterozygosity at p53 and BRCA1 loci in serous surface carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezado, M M; Moskaluk, C A; Bryant, B; Mills, S E; Merino, M J

    1999-02-01

    Serous surface carcinoma (SSC) is a neoplasm histologically indistinguishable from typical serous carcinomas that arise from the ovary but has a distinct clinical presentation. It is characterized by widespread peritoneal dissemination at presentation, but the ovaries are grossly normal in size and shape. If the carcinoma involves the ovaries microscopically, the tumor is confined to the surface or is minimally invasive. The recognition of this entity is important, because in some studies it appears to have a poorer prognosis than stage-matched serous cancers of the ovary. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the p53 (17p) and BRCA1 (17q) tumor suppressor genes has been frequently identified in sporadic ovarian carcinomas. Although 17p LOH is correlated with common p53 gene mutations, inactivating mutations of the BRCA1 gene are uncommon in sporadic ovarian cases. In contrast, germline BRCA1 mutations are responsible for some hereditary forms of ovarian cancer, where it has been suggested that germline BRCA1 mutations confer a more favorable prognosis. In this study, 12 sporadic SSC were assessed for the presence of allelic deletions on the p53 and BRCA1 gene loci. DNA from both tumor and normal cells was obtained for LOH studies using tissue microdissection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was performed with the polymorphic DNA markers TP53 (17p13.1/p53 gene) and D17S579 (17q/BRCA1 gene). LOH in the p53 and BRCA1 loci was detected in 62.5% and 66.6% of the cases, respectively. In 50% of tumors informative for both markers, it is possible that an entire chromosome may be lost. In conclusion, we have shown that LOH of the p53 and BRCA1 loci is a frequent event in sporadic SSC, similar to what has been described in the usual form of serous ovarian carcinoma. Mutational analysis will be necessary to determine the exact role of these genes in this group of tumors.

  15. Experimental investigation of effect of surface gravity waves and spray on heat and momentum flux at strong wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Vdovin, Maxim; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kazakov, Vassily

    2015-04-01

    The most important characteristics that determine the interaction between atmosphere and ocean are fluxes of momentum, heat and moisture. For their parameterization the dimensionless exchange coefficients (the surface drag coefficient CD and the heat transfer coefficient or the Stanton number CT) are used. Numerous field and laboratory experiments show that CD increases with increasing wind speed at moderate and strong wind, and as it was shows recently CD decreases at hurricane wind speed. Waves are known to increase the sea surface resistance due to enhanced form drag, the sea spray is considered as a possible mechanism of the 'drag reduction' at hurricane conditions. The dependence of heat transfer coefficient CD on the wind speed is not so certain and the role of the mechanism associated with the wave disturbances in the mass transfer is not completely understood. Observations and laboratory data show that this dependence is weaker than for the CD, and there are differences in the character of the dependence in different data sets. The purpose of this paper is investigation of the effect of surface waves on the turbulent exchange of momentum and heat within the laboratory experiment, when wind and wave parameters are maintained and controlled. The effect of spray on turbulent exchange at strong winds is also estimated. A series of experiments to study the processes of turbulent exchange of momentum and heat in a stably stratified temperature turbulent boundary layer air flow over waved water surface were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS, the peculiarity of this experiment was the option to change the surface wave parameters regardless of the speed of the wind flow in the channel. For this purpose a polyethylene net with the variable depth (0.25 mm thick and a cell of 1.6 mm × 1.6mm) has been stretched along the channel. The waves were absent when the net was located at the level of the undisturbed water surface, and had maximum

  16. Numerical investigation of oscillatory thermocapillary flows under zero gravity in a circular liquid film with concave free surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, T.; Takagi, Y.; Okano, Y.; Dost, S.

    2016-03-01

    NASA astronaut Pettit has conducted thermocapillary flow experiments in water films suspended in a solid ring onboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2003 and 2011. In one of these experiments, an oscillatory thermocapillary flow was observed. The developed flow broke its symmetry along the centerline of the film. To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies on such oscillatory thermocapillary flows in thin films, and the flow-mechanism giving rise to such oscillatory flows is also not well understood. In order to shed light on the subject, we have carried out a numerical simulation study. The simulation results have shown that the water film geometry (film surface shape; being concave) is an important parameter and give rise to three oscillatory flow structures in the film, namely, a hydrothermal wave developing near the heated section, a symmetric oscillatory flow due to temperature variations, and a symmetry breaking flow due to the hydrodynamic instability along the free boundary layer (mixing layer) and the development of the hydrothermal waves. Simulation results show that the symmetry-breaking phenomenon observed in the thin film experiment on the ISS can be explained by the hydrodynamic instability and the development of hydrothermal waves.

  17. Southern Africa Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data base (14,559 records) was received in January 1986. Principal gravity parameters include elevation and observed gravity. The observed gravity values are...

  18. NGS Absolute Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Absolute Gravity data (78 stations) was received in July 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Gravity Value, Uncertainty, and Vertical Gradient. The...

  19. Analysis of crustal structure of Venus utilizing residual Line-of-Sight (LOS) gravity acceleration and surface topography data. A trial of global modeling of Venus gravity field using harmonic spline method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ming; Bowin, Carl

    1992-01-01

    To construct Venus' gravity disturbance field (or gravity anomaly) with the spacecraft-observer line of site (LOS) acceleration perturbation data, both a global and a local approach can be used. The global approach, e.g., spherical harmonic coefficients, and the local approach, e.g., the integral operator method, based on geodetic techniques are generally not the same, so that they must be used separately for mapping long wavelength features and short wavelength features. Harmonic spline, as an interpolation and extrapolation technique, is intrinsically flexible to both global and local mapping of a potential field. Theoretically, it preserves the information of the potential field up to the bound by sampling theorem regardless of whether it is global or local mapping, and is never bothered with truncation errors. The improvement of harmonic spline methodology for global mapping is reported. New basis functions, a singular value decomposition (SVD) based modification to Parker & Shure's numerical procedure, and preliminary results are presented.

  20. Newtonian gravity in loop quantum gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Smolin, Lee

    2010-01-01

    We apply a recent argument of Verlinde to loop quantum gravity, to conclude that Newton's law of gravity emerges in an appropriate limit and setting. This is possible because the relationship between area and entropy is realized in loop quantum gravity when boundaries are imposed on a quantum spacetime.

  1. A new method for extracting near-surface mass-density anomalies from land-based gravity data, based on a special case of Poisson's PDE at the Earth's surface: A case study of salt diapirs in the south of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    AllahTavakoli, Y.; Safari, A.; Ardalan, A.; Bahroudi, A.

    2015-12-01

    The current research provides a method for tracking near-surface mass-density anomalies via using only land-based gravity data, which is based on a special version of Poisson's Partial Differential Equation (PDE) of the gravitational field at Earth's surface. The research demonstrates how the Poisson's PDE can provide us with a capability to extract the near-surface mass-density anomalies from land-based gravity data. Herein, this version of the Poisson's PDE is mathematically introduced to the Earth's surface and then it is used to develop the new method for approximating the mass-density via derivatives of the Earth's gravitational field (i.e. via the gradient tensor). Herein, the author believes that the PDE can give us new knowledge about the behavior of the Earth's gravitational field at the Earth's surface which can be so useful for developing new methods of Earth's mass-density determination. In a case study, the proposed method is applied to a set of gravity stations located in the south of Iran. The results were numerically validated via certain knowledge about the geological structures in the area of the case study. Also, the method was compared with two standard methods of mass-density determination. All the numerical experiments show that the proposed approach is well-suited for tracking near-surface mass-density anomalies via using only the gravity data. Finally, the approach is also applied to some petroleum exploration studies of salt diapirs in the south of Iran.

  2. Development of glancing-incidence and glancing-take-off X-ray fluorescence apparatus for surface and thin-film analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Kouichi; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Yamada, Takashi; Utaka, Tadashi

    1997-01-01

    We have studied X-ray fluorescence analysis under glancing incidence and glancing take-off conditions. Recently, we have developed a third apparatus for detecting glancing-incidence and take-off X-ray fluorescence, which makes it possible to measure the incident-angle dependence, the take-off-angle dependence. X-ray reflectivity, and X-ray diffraction. Primarily, we have measured the take-off angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence using this apparatus. Glancing take-off X-ray fluorescence has some advantages in comparison with glancing-incidence X-ray fluorescence. The surface density and the absolute angles were determined by analysing the take-off angle dependence of the fluorescent X-rays emitted from identical atoms with the aid of the reciprocity theorem. (Author)

  3. Quantitative determination of the lateral density and intermolecular correlation between proteins anchored on the membrane surfaces using grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuillan, Wasim; Vorobiev, Alexei; Hartel, Andreas; Jones, Nicola G; Engstler, Markus; Tanaka, Motomu

    2012-11-28

    As a physical model of the surface of cells coated with densely packed, non-crystalline proteins coupled to lipid anchors, we functionalized the surface of phospholipid membranes by coupling of neutravidin to biotinylated lipid anchors. After the characterization of fine structures perpendicular to the plane of membrane using specular X-ray reflectivity, the same membrane was characterized by grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Within the framework of distorted wave Born approximation and two-dimensional Percus-Yevick function, we can analyze the form and structure factors of the non-crystalline, membrane-anchored proteins for the first time. As a new experimental technique to quantify the surface density of proteins on the membrane surface, we utilized grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXF). Here, the mean intermolecular distance between proteins from the sulfur peak intensities can be calculated by applying Abelé's matrix formalism. The characteristic correlation distance between non-crystalline neutravidin obtained by the GISAXS analysis agrees well with the intermolecular distance calculated by GIXF, suggesting a large potential of the combination of GISAXS and GIXF in probing the lateral density and correlation of non-crystalline proteins displayed on the membrane surface.

  4. Training of an incidence of radiation on surfaces by vectorial representation; Didactica del analisis de la incidencia de radiacion solar mediante una representacion vectorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luis, F. J. de; Perez-Garcia, M.; Barbero, F. J.; Batlles, F. J.

    2004-07-01

    This work gathers and it exposes a set of educational contents extracted from the general bibliography and from the own experience in Engineering studies and courses on the application of a vector representation to the description of the apparent movement of the sun, the shading evaluation and the incidence of radiation on surfaces. (Author)

  5. Neutron Stars : Magnetism vs Gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Neutron Stars : Magnetism vs Gravity. WHY do neutron stars have such strong magnetic fields? Conservation of magnetic flux of the collapsing stellar core. ∫ B.ds (over surface of the star) = constant; Radius of the star collapses from ~ 5x108 to 1x104 metres; Hence, ...

  6. Is nonrelativistic gravity possible?

    OpenAIRE

    Kocharyan, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    We study nonrelativistic gravity using the Hamiltonian formalism. For the dynamics of general relativity (relativistic gravity) the formalism is well known and called the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism. We show that if the lapse function is constrained correctly, then nonrelativistic gravity is described by a consistent Hamiltonian system. Surprisingly, nonrelativistic gravity can have solutions identical to relativistic gravity ones. In particular, (anti-)de Sitter black holes of Eins...

  7. Scalable Gravity Offload System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a scalable gravity off-load system that enables controlled integrated testing of Surface System elements such as rovers, habitats, and...

  8. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date

  9. Scalable Gravity Offload System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a scalable gravity off-load system that enables controlled integrated testing of Surface System elements such as rovers, habitats, and...

  10. Failures in sand in reduced gravity environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jason P.; Hurley, Ryan C.; Arthur, Dan; Vlahinic, Ivan; Senatore, Carmine; Iagnemma, Karl; Trease, Brian; Andrade, José E.

    2018-04-01

    The strength of granular materials, specifically sand is important for understanding physical phenomena on other celestial bodies. However, relatively few experiments have been conducted to determine the dependence of strength properties on gravity. In this work, we experimentally investigated relative values of strength (the peak friction angle, the residual friction angle, the angle of repose, and the peak dilatancy angle) in Earth, Martian, Lunar, and near-zero gravity. The various angles were captured in a classical passive Earth pressure experiment conducted on board a reduced gravity flight and analyzed using digital image correlation. The data showed essentially no dependence of the peak friction angle on gravity, a decrease in the residual friction angle between Martian and Lunar gravity, no dependence of the angle of repose on gravity, and an increase in the dilation angle between Martian and Lunar gravity. Additionally, multiple flow surfaces were seen in near-zero gravity. These results highlight the importance of understanding strength and deformation mechanisms of granular materials at different levels of gravity.

  11. Idaho State Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (24,284 records) were compiled by the U. S. Geological Survey. This data base was received on February 23, 1993. Principal gravity...

  12. The space gravity environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beysens, D.A.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Beysens, D.A.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.

    2015-01-01

    It is generally thought that gravity is zero on an object travelling at constant velocity in space. This is not exactly so. We detail in the following those causes that make space gravity not strictly zero.

  13. Urine specific gravity test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003587.htm Urine specific gravity test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration ...

  14. DNAG Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Decade of North American Geology (DNAG) gravity grid values, spaced at 6 km, were used to produce the Gravity Anomaly Map of North America (1987; scale...

  15. Analytic approximation to the scattering of antiplane shear waves by free surfaces of arbitrary shape via superposition of incident, reflected and diffracted rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Juan; Gomez, Juan; Saenz, Mario; Vergara, Juan

    2013-03-01

    The scattering induced by surface topographies of arbitrary shapes, submitted to horizontally polarized shear waves (SH) is studied analytically. In particular, we propose an analysis technique based on a representation of the scattered field like the superposition of incident, reflected and diffracted rays. The diffraction contribution is the result of the interaction of the incident and reflected waves, with the geometric singularities present in the surface topography. This splitting of the solution into different terms, makes the difference between our method and alternative numerical/analytical approaches, where the complete field is described by a single term. The contribution from the incident and reflected fields is considered using standard techniques, while the diffracted field is obtained using the idea of a ray as was introduced by the geometrical theory of diffraction. Our final solution however, is an approximation in the sense that, surface-diffracted rays are neglected while we retain the contribution from corner-diffracted rays and its further diffraction. These surface rays are only present when the problem has smooth boundaries combined with shadow zones, which is far from being the typical scenario in far-field earthquake engineering. The proposed technique was tested in the study of a combined hill-canyon topography and the results were compared with those of a boundary element algorithm. After considering only secondary sources of diffraction, a difference of 0.09 per cent (with respect to the incident field amplitude) was observed. The proposed analysis technique can be used in the interpretation of numerical and experimental results and in the preliminary prediction of the response in complex topographies.

  16. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Harms

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^–23 Hz^–1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our

  17. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10-23 Hz-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  18. Generation of H-, H2(v double-prime), and H atoms by H2+ and H3+ ions incident upon barium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskes, J.R.; Karo, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The generation of vibrationally excited molecules by electron excitation collisions and the subsequent generation of negative ions by dissociative attachment to these molecules has become a standard model for volume source operation. These processes have been supplemented recently by the demonstration of atom-surface recombination to form vibrationally excited molecules, and enhanced negative ion formation by protons incident upon barium electrodes. In this paper we consider the additional processes of molecular vibrational excitation generated by recombination of molecular ions on the electrode surfaces, and negative ion formation by vibrationally excited molecules rebounding from low work-function electrodes. 10 refs., 4 figs

  19. Gravity is Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  20. Covariant w∞ gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Pope, C.N.; Stelle, K.S.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss the notion of higher-spin covariance in w∞ gravity. We show how a recently proposed covariant w∞ gravity action can be obtained from non-chiral w∞ gravity by making field redefinitions that introduce new gauge-field components with corresponding new gauge transformations.

  1. Tribology Experiment in Zero Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, C. H. T.; Gause, R. L.; Whitaker, A. F.; Finckenor, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    A tribology experiment in zero gravity was performed during the orbital flight of Spacelab 1 to study the motion of liquid lubricants over solid surfaces. The absence of a significant gravitational force facilitates observation of such motions as controlled by interfacial and capillary forces. Two experimental configurations were used. One deals with the liquid on one solid surface, and the other with the liquid between a pair of closed spaced surfaces. Time sequence photographs of fluid motion on a solid surface yielded spreading rate data of several fluid-surface combinations. In general, a slow spreading process as governed by the tertiary junction can be distinguished from a more rapid process which is driven by surface tension controlled internal fluid pressure. Photographs were also taken through the transparent bushings of several experimental journal bearings. Morphology of incomplete fluid films and its fluctuation with time suggest the presence or absence of unsteady phenomena of the bearing-rotor system in various arrangements.

  2. Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation as a cause of transition radiation anomalous intensity in case of electron grazing incidence on the silver surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrelov, V.P.; Ruzicka, J.

    1979-01-01

    On the basis of the Vavilov-Cherenkov effect the anomaly in the transition radiation (TR) spectrum is explained which has been first observed by Boersch for grazing particle incidence on the silver surface. The contribution of the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation to the angle distribution of photons of the TR is estimated. Special attention is drawn to a possibility of the nonthreshold character of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation in such a medium as silver, and to a necessity of creating a complete theory of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation for absorbing media

  3. Gravity inversion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhard, N.R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravity inversion code applies stabilized linear inverse theory to determine the topography of a subsurface density anomaly from Bouguer gravity data. The gravity inversion program consists of four source codes: SEARCH, TREND, INVERT, and AVERAGE. TREND and INVERT are used iteratively to converge on a solution. SEARCH forms the input gravity data files for Nevada Test Site data. AVERAGE performs a covariance analysis on the solution. This document describes the necessary input files and the proper operation of the code. 2 figures, 2 tables

  4. Classical Weyl transverse gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Ichiro [University of the Ryukyus, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    We study various classical aspects of the Weyl transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general space-time dimension. First of all, we clarify a classical equivalence among three kinds of gravitational theories, those are, the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity, Einstein's general relativity and the WTDiff gravity via the gauge-fixing procedure. Secondly, we show that in the WTDiff gravity the cosmological constant is a mere integration constant as in unimodular gravity, but it does not receive any radiative corrections unlike the unimodular gravity. A key point in this proof is to construct a covariantly conserved energy-momentum tensor, which is achieved on the basis of this equivalence relation. Thirdly, we demonstrate that the Noether current for the Weyl transformation is identically vanishing, thereby implying that the Weyl symmetry existing in both the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity and the WTDiff gravity is a ''fake'' symmetry. We find it possible to extend this proof to all matter fields, i.e. the Weyl-invariant scalar, vector and spinor fields. Fourthly, it is explicitly shown that in the WTDiff gravity the Schwarzschild black hole metric and a charged black hole one are classical solutions to the equations of motion only when they are expressed in the Cartesian coordinate system. Finally, we consider the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology and provide some exact solutions. (orig.)

  5. Heuristic approximations for sound fields produced by spherical waves incident on locally and non-locally reacting planar surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai Ming; Tao, Hongdan

    2014-01-01

    The classic Weyl-van der Pol (WVDP) formula is a well-known asymptotic solution for accurately predicting sound fields above a locally reacting ground surface. However, the form of the WVDP formula is inadequate for predicting sound fields in the vicinity of non-locally reacting surfaces; a correction term is often required in the formula to provide accurate numerical solutions. Even with this correction, there is a singularity in the diffraction wave term when the source is located directly above or below the receiver. This paper explores a heuristic method to remove this singularity and suggests an analytical form comparable to the WVDP formula. This improved formula offers a physically interpretable solution and allows for accurate predictions of the total sound field above locally and non-locally reacting surfaces for all geometrical configurations.

  6. Reciprocal space XRD mapping with varied incident angle as a probe of structure variation within surface depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qiguang [Norfolk State University; Williams, Frances [Norfolk State University; Zhao, Xin [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Krishnan, Mahadevan [AASC, San Leandro, California

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we used a differential-depth X-Ray diffraction Reciprocal Spacing Mapping (XRD RSM) technique to investigate the crystal quality of a variety of SRF-relevant Nb film and bulk materials. By choosing different X-ray probing depths, the RSM study successfully revealed evolution the of materials microstructure after different materials processes, such as energetic condensation or surface polishing. The RSM data clearly measured the materials crystal quality at different thickness. Through a novel differential-depth RSM technique, this study found: I. for a heteroepitaxy Nb film Nb(100)/MgO(100), the film thickening process, via a cathodic arc-discharge Nb ion deposition, created a near-perfect single crystal Nb on the surfaces top-layer; II. for a mechanically polished single-crystal bulk Nb material, the microstructure on the top surface layer is more disordered than that in-grain.

  7. 3D joint inversion of gravity-gradient and borehole gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Meixia; Yang, Qingjie; Huang, Danian

    2017-12-01

    Borehole gravity is increasingly used in mineral exploration due to the advent of slim-hole gravimeters. Given the full-tensor gradiometry data available nowadays, joint inversion of surface and borehole data is a logical next step. Here, we base our inversions on cokriging, which is a geostatistical method of estimation where the error variance is minimised by applying cross-correlation between several variables. In this study, the density estimates are derived using gravity-gradient data, borehole gravity and known densities along the borehole as a secondary variable and the density as the primary variable. Cokriging is non-iterative and therefore is computationally efficient. In addition, cokriging inversion provides estimates of the error variance for each model, which allows direct assessment of the inverse model. Examples are shown involving data from a single borehole, from multiple boreholes, and combinations of borehole gravity and gravity-gradient data. The results clearly show that the depth resolution of gravity-gradient inversion can be improved significantly by including borehole data in addition to gravity-gradient data. However, the resolution of borehole data falls off rapidly as the distance between the borehole and the feature of interest increases. In the case where the borehole is far away from the target of interest, the inverted result can be improved by incorporating gravity-gradient data, especially all five independent components for inversion.

  8. Measured and Monte Carlo simulated surface dose reduction for superficial X-rays incident on tissue with underlying air or bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, John; Zawlodzka, Sylwia; Markwell, Tim; Chan, Millicent

    2018-02-01

    Measurement of surface dose reduction effects for superficial x-rays incident on tissue with underlying air or bone and comparison with Monte Carlo simulations of such effects. Further to investigate the correlation between surface dose reduction and changes in Compton backscatter spectra with tissue-bone separation. An Advanced Markus chamber with entrance window facing downstream on the surface of a solid water phantom was used to investigate changes in surface dose with an underlying air or bone interface located at various depths below the surface. Chamber readings were obtained for interface depths ranging from 1 to 100 mm using the 50 kV, 100 kV and 150 kV beams of an Xstrahl 150 x-ray unit, with field diameters (ϕ) = 2.5 cm and 5 cm. For each beam quality and field size the dose correction factor, DCF(t), namely the ratio of measured dose (t) to dose (t = 100 mm) was determined. Monte Carlo simulations of DCF(t) for air and bone interfaces in tissue are used to validate corresponding measured data. For a given beam and field size, the difference between simulated spectra with an air or bone interface at t = 3 mm was used to determine the Compton backscatter from bone at the surface. For air, DCF(t tube potentials corresponding factors, ϕ = 2.5 cm, for air(bone) are 0.94(0.96) and 0.92(0.99). Calculated DCF(t) based on Monte Carlo simulations are consistent with experimental observations to within 2%. Monte Carlo simulations of x-ray spectra demonstrate the presence of Compton backscatter from underlying bone in tissue. With bone at 3 mm depth calculated backscatter spectra at the tissue surface suggest that surface dose is influenced by the proximity of bone and that this effect depends on beam quality. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using an Advanced Markus chamber with entrance window facing downstream to investigate surface dose reduction with underlying air or bone in tissue. As the field size decreases and beam quality increases surface

  9. theory of gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-02

    Nov 2, 2016 ... the existence of dark energy and dark matter, several modified theories of gravitation have been proposed as alternative to Einstein's theory. By modifying the geometrical part of Einstein–Hilbert action of general relativity, we obtain the modified gravity. Modified gravity is of great importance because it can ...

  10. Dual gravity and matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Roo, Mees de; Kerstan, Sven F.; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Riccioni, Fabio

    We consider the problem of finding a dual formulation of gravity in the presence of non-trivial matter couplings. In the absence of matter a dual graviton can be introduced only for linearised gravitational interactions. We show that the coupling of linearised gravity to matter poses obstructions to

  11. Entropy and Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Grøn

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of gravity upon changes of the entropy of a gravity-dominated system is discussed. In a universe dominated by vacuum energy, gravity is repulsive, and there is accelerated expansion. Furthermore, inhomogeneities are inflated and the universe approaches a state of thermal equilibrium. The difference between the evolution of the cosmic entropy in a co-moving volume in an inflationary era with repulsive gravity and a matter-dominated era with attractive gravity is discussed. The significance of conversion of gravitational energy to thermal energy in a process with gravitational clumping, in order that the entropy of the universe shall increase, is made clear. Entropy of black holes and cosmic horizons are considered. The contribution to the gravitational entropy according to the Weyl curvature hypothesis is discussed. The entropy history of the Universe is reviewed.

  12. Artificial Gravity Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamman, Michelle R.; Paloski, William H.

    2005-01-01

    Protecting the health, safety, and performance of exploration-class mission crews against the physiological deconditioning resulting from long-term weightlessness during transit and long-term hypogravity during surface operations will require effective, multi-system countermeasures. Artificial gravity (AG), which would replace terrestrial gravity with inertial forces generated by rotating the transit vehicle or by a human centrifuge device within the transit vehicle or surface habitat, has long been considered a potential solution. However, despite its attractiveness as an efficient, multi-system countermeasure and its potential for improving the environment and simplifying operational activities (e.g., WCS, galley, etc.), much still needs to be learned regarding the human response to rotating environments before AG can be successfully implemented. This paper will describe our approach for developing and implementing a rigorous AG Research Project to address the key biomedical research questions that must be answered before developing effective AG countermeasure implementation strategies for exploration-class missions. The AG Research Project will be performed at JSC, ARC, extramural academic and government research venues, and international partner facilities maintained by DLR and IMBP. The Project includes three major ground-based human research subprojects that will lead to flight testing of intermittent short-radius AG in ISS crewmembers after 201 0, continuous long-radius AG in CEV crews transiting to and from the Moon, and intermittent short-radius AG plus exercise in lunar habitats. These human ground-based subprojects include: 1) a directed, managed international short-radius project to investigate the multi-system effectiveness of intermittent AG in human subjects deconditioned by bed rest, 2) a directed, managed long-radius project to investigate the capacity of humans to live and work for extended periods in rotating environments, and 3) a focused

  13. Incidence, mechanisms, and severity of match-related collegiate women's soccer injuries on FieldTurf and natural grass surfaces: a 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Michael C

    2013-10-01

    Numerous injuries have been attributed to playing on artificial turf. Over the past 2 decades, however, newer generations of synthetic turf have been developed to duplicate the playing characteristics of natural grass. Although synthetic turf has been determined to be safer than natural grass in some studies, few long-term studies have been conducted comparing match-related collegiate soccer injuries between the 2 playing surfaces. Collegiate female soccer athletes do not experience any difference in the incidence, mechanisms, and severity of match-related injuries on FieldTurf and on natural grass. Cohort study: Level of evidence, 2. Female soccer athletes from 13 universities were evaluated over 5 competitive seasons for injury incidence, injury category, time of injury, injury time loss, player position, injury mechanism and situation, primary type of injury, injury grade and anatomic location, field location at the time of injury, injury severity, head and lower extremity trauma, cleat design, turf age, and environmental factors. In sum, 797 collegiate games were evaluated for match-related soccer injuries sustained on FieldTurf or natural grass during 5 seasons. Overall, 355 team games (44.5%) were played on FieldTurf versus 442 team games (55.5%) on natural grass. A total of 693 injuries were documented, with 272 (39.2%) occurring during play on FieldTurf and 421 (60.8%) on natural grass. Multivariate analysis per 10 team games indicated a significant playing surface effect: F₂,₆₉₀ = 6.435, P = .002, n-β = .904. A significantly lower total injury incidence rate (IIR) of 7.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.2-8.1) versus 9.5 (95% CI, 9.3-9.7) (P = .0001) and lower rate of substantial injuries, 0.7 (95% CI, 0.5-1.0) versus 1.5 (95% CI, 1.2-1.9) (P = .001), were documented on FieldTurf versus natural grass, respectively. Analyses also indicated significantly less trauma on FieldTurf when comparing injury time loss, player position, injury grade

  14. Scaling in quantum gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ambjørn

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available The 2-point function is the natural object in quantum gravity for extracting critical behavior: The exponential falloff of the 2-point function with geodesic distance determines the fractal dimension dH of space-time. The integral of the 2-point function determines the entropy exponent γ, i.e. the fractal structure related to baby universes, while the short distance behavior of the 2-point function connects γ and dH by a quantum gravity version of Fisher's scaling relation. We verify this behavior in the case of 2d gravity by explicit calculation.

  15. The Future of Gravity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    Of the four fundamental forces, gravity has been studied the longest, yet gravitational physics is one of the most rapidly developing areas of science today. This talk will give a broad brush survey of the past achievements and future prospects of general relativistic gravitational physics. Gravity is a two frontier science being important on both the very largest and smallest length scales considered in contemporary physics. Recent advances and future prospects will be surveyed in precision tests of general relativity, gravitational waves, black holes, cosmology and quantum gravity. The aim will be an overview of a subject that is becoming increasingly integrated with experiment and other branches of physics.

  16. Surface morphological changes on the human dental enamel and cement after the Er:YAG laser irradiation at different incidence angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannous, Jose Trancoso

    2001-01-01

    This is a morphological analysis study through SEM of the differences of the laser tissue interaction as a function of the laser beam irradiation angle, under different parameters of energy. Fourteen freshly extracted molars stored in a 0,9% sodium chloride solution were divided in seven pairs and were irradiated with 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700 mJ per pulse, respectively. Each sample received three enamel irradiations and three cement irradiations, either in the punctual or in the contact mode, one near to the other, with respectively 30, 45 and 90 inclinations degrees of dental surface-laser-beam incidence. Four Er:YAG pulses (2,94 μm, 7-20 Hz, 0,1-1 J energy/pulse - Opus 20 - Opus Dent) with water cooling system (0,4 ml/s) were applied. After the laser irradiation the specimens were analysed through scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results were analysed by SEM micrographs showing a great difference on the laser tissue interaction characteristics as a function of the irradiation angle of the laser beam. All the observations led to conclude that, considering the laser parameters used, the incidence angle variation is a very important parameter regarding the desired morphological effects. This represents an extremely relevant detail on the technical description of the Er:YAG laser irradiation protocols on dental tissues. (author)

  17. Gravity-induced stresses in finite slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, W.Z.

    1994-01-01

    An exact solution for gravity-induced stresses in finite elastic slopes is presented. This solution, which is applied for gravity-induced stresses in 15, 30, 45 and 90?? finite slopes, has application in pit-slope design, compares favorably with published finite element results for this problem and satisfies the conditions that shear and normal stresses vanish on the ground surface. The solution predicts that horizontal stresses are compressive along the top of the slopes (zero in the case of the 90?? slope) and tensile away from the bottom of the slopes, effects which are caused by downward movement and near-surface horizontal extension in front of the slope in response to gravity loading caused by the additional material associated with the finite slope. ?? 1994.

  18. Grazing incidence collisions of ions and atoms with surfaces: from charge exchange to atomic diffraction; Collisions rasantes d'ions ou d'atomes sur les surfaces: de l'echange de charge a la diffraction atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, P

    2006-09-15

    This thesis reports two studies about the interaction with insulating surfaces of keV ions or atoms under grazing incidence. The first part presents a study of charge exchange processes occurring during the interaction of singly charged ions with the surface of NaCl. In particular, by measuring the scattered charge fraction and the energy loss in coincidence with electron emission, the neutralization mechanism is determined for S{sup +}, C{sup +}, Xe{sup +}, H{sup +}, O{sup +}, Kr{sup +}, N{sup +}, Ar{sup +}, F{sup +}, Ne{sup +} and He{sup +}. These results show the importance of the double electron capture as neutralization process for ions having too much potential energy for resonant capture and not enough for Auger neutralization. We have also studied the ionisation of the projectile and of the surface, and the different Auger-like neutralization processes resulting in electron emission, population of conduction band or excited state. For oxygen scattering, we have measured an higher electron yield in coincidence with scattered negative ion than with scattered atom suggesting the transient formation above the surface of the oxygen doubly negative ion. The second study deals with the fast atom diffraction, a new phenomenon observed for the first time during this work. Due to the large parallel velocity, the surface appears as a corrugated wall where rows interfere. Similarly to the Thermal Atom Scattering the diffraction pattern corresponds to the surface potential and is sensitive to vibrations. We have study the H-NaCl and He-LiF atom-surface potentials in the 20 meV - 1 eV range. This new method offers interesting perspectives for surface characterisation. (author)

  19. and three-dimensional gravity modeling along western continental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Three-dimensional gravity modeling of +70 mgal Bouguer gravity highs extending in the north-south direction along the western continental margin rift indicates the presence of a subsurface high density, mafic-ultramafic type, elongated, roughly ellipsoidal body. It is approximately 12.0 ± 1.2 km thick with its upper surface at ...

  20. 3-D GRACE gravity model for the 2011 Japan earthquake

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... the Pacific Plate below the Atlantic Plate and its gravity response closely matches the observed gravity (RMS error of 3.4012×10−13μGal), fully accounting for co-seismic mass redistribution including sea surface deformation. Our inferred rupture length, rupture velocity, average seismic moment magnitude and momentum, ...

  1. GRAVITY ANOMALIES OF THE MOON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Pugacheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The source of gravity anomalies of the Moon are large mascons with a high mass concentration at a depth of volcanic plains and lunar Maria. New data on the gravitational field of the Moon were obtained from two Grail spacecrafts. The article presents the data of physical and mechanical properties of the surface soil layer of the lunar Maria and gives an assessment of the chemical composition of the soil. There have been calculated heterogeneity parameters of the surface macro-relief of the lunar Maria: albedo, soil density, average grain diameter of the particles forming the surface layer and the volume fraction occupied by particles. It can be assumed that mascons include rich KREEP rocks with a high content of thorium and iron oxide. Formation of mascons is connected with intensive development of basaltic volcanism on the Moon in the early periods of its existence.

  2. Surface Plasmon Polariton Resonance of Gold, Silver, and Copper Studied in the Kretschmann Geometry: Dependence on Wavelength, Angle of Incidence, and Film Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Kentaro; Nair, Selvakumar V.; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Seto, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2017-12-01

    Surface plasmon polariton (SPP) resonance spectra for noble metals (Au, Ag, and Cu) were comprehensively studied in the Kretschmann attenuated total reflection (ATR) geometry, in the wavelength (λ) range from 300 to 1000 nm with the angle of incidence (θ) ranging from 45 to 60° and the film thickness (d) ranging from 41 to 76 nm. The experimental plasmon resonance spectra were reproduced by a calculation that included the broadening effects as follows: (1) the imaginary part of the bulk dielectric constant, (2) the thickness-dependent radiative coupling of the SPP at the metal-air interface to the prism, (3) the lack of conservation of the wavevector parallel to the interface kx(k||) caused by the surface roughness, (4) scanning λ at a fixed θ (changing both energy and kx at the same time) over the SPP dispersion relation. For Au and Ag, the experimental results were in good agreement with the calculated results using the bulk dielectric constants, showing no film thickness dependence of the plasmon resonance energy. A method to extract the true width of the plasmon resonance from raw ATR spectra is proposed and the results are rigorously compared with those expected from the bulk dielectric function given in the literature. For Au and Ag, the width increases with energy, in agreement with that expected from the relaxation of bulk free electrons including the electron-electron interaction, but there is clear evidence of extra broadening, which is more significant for thinner films, possibly due to relaxation pathways intrinsic to plasmons near the interface. For Cu, the visibility of the plasmon resonance critically depends on the evaporation conditions, and low pressures and fast deposition rates are required. Otherwise, scattering from the surface roughness causes considerable broadening of the plasmon resonance, resulting in an apparently fixed resonance energy without clear incident angle dependence. For Cu, the observed plasmon dispersion agrees well with

  3. New massive gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Hohm, Olaf; Townsend, Paul K.

    2012-01-01

    We present a brief review of New Massive Gravity, which is a unitary theory of massive gravitons in three dimensions obtained by considering a particular combination of the Einstein-Hilbert and curvature squared terms.

  4. Discrete quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Ruth M

    2006-01-01

    A review is given of a number of approaches to discrete quantum gravity, with a restriction to those likely to be relevant in four dimensions. This paper is dedicated to Rafael Sorkin on the occasion of his sixtieth birthday

  5. Haxby Worldwide Gravity Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1985, Dr. William F. Haxby of the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory of Columbia University prepared this data base of free-air gravity anomalies, based on the...

  6. Carroll versus Galilei gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergshoeff, Eric [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Gomis, Joaquim [Departament de Física Cuàntica i Astrofísica and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rollier, Blaise [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Rosseel, Jan [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna,Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Veldhuis, Tonnis ter [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2017-03-30

    We consider two distinct limits of General Relativity that in contrast to the standard non-relativistic limit can be taken at the level of the Einstein-Hilbert action instead of the equations of motion. One is a non-relativistic limit and leads to a so-called Galilei gravity theory, the other is an ultra-relativistic limit yielding a so-called Carroll gravity theory. We present both gravity theories in a first-order formalism and show that in both cases the equations of motion (i) lead to constraints on the geometry and (ii) are not sufficient to solve for all of the components of the connection fields in terms of the other fields. Using a second-order formalism we show that these independent components serve as Lagrange multipliers for the geometric constraints we found earlier. We point out a few noteworthy differences between Carroll and Galilei gravity and give some examples of matter couplings.

  7. Gravity Data for Egypt

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (71 records) were gathered by various governmental organizations (and academia) using a variety of methods. This data base was received in...

  8. What Is Gravity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, George

    2004-01-01

    Gravity is the name given to the phenomenon that any two masses, like you and the Earth, attract each other. One pulls on the Earth and the Earth pulls on one the same amount. And one does not have to be touching. Gravity acts over vast distances, like the 150 million kilometers (93 million miles) between the Earth and the Sun or the billions of…

  9. Streaming gravity mode instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shui.

    1989-05-01

    In this paper, we study the stability of a current sheet with a sheared flow in a gravitational field which is perpendicular to the magnetic field and plasma flow. This mixing mode caused by a combined role of the sheared flow and gravity is named the streaming gravity mode instability. The conditions of this mode instability are discussed for an ideal four-layer model in the incompressible limit. (author). 5 refs

  10. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, F.F. [Universidade Estadual do Piaui, Centro de Ciencias da Natureza, Teresina, PI (Brazil)

    2016-04-15

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Incidence and interactions of heavy metals and pharmaceutical products in surface waters of a Mediterranean coastal wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Vicente; Pascual, Juan Antonio; Gimeno, Eugenia; Picó, Yolanda

    2013-04-01

    Heavy metals have been during decades a result of the human fingerprint on the ecosystems, mainly in waters, soils or vegetation, being considered as a major s threat also on human health. However, the increasing in human population shows other aspect, such as the so called "emerging contaminants". They constitute an increasing group of compounds that includes, among others, personal care products, drugs of abuse and pharmaceuticals. These contaminants have become, in recent years, of great concern for researchers and, even, for the population. Among these substances, the presence of pharmaceuticals in the ecosystems compartments has becoming an increasing problem for environmental sustainability, and also for human health, with consequences very scarcely known. They reach the nature from waste waters treatment plants, industrial waste effluents, uncontrolled landfills, etc. affecting particularly the fauna in its different levels. Some pharmaceuticals have shown toxicity not only to bacteria, algae and invertebrates but also to fish, mollusks, etc. This work is focused on the study of the presence of 17 relevant pharmaceuticals and 7 heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in surface waters of the irrigation channels and the lagoon of the Pego-Oliva Marsh Natural Park (Valencian Community, Spain), which is characterized by a long history of human pressures, such as marsh transformation for agricultural uses, urbanization, etc. In this area, 34 sampling zones were selected, covering the main land uses. The interactions and possible relationships between both groups of contaminants were studied, together with the influences of the source of water samples, land uses and their spatial distribution. All water samples appeared contaminated with at least with two compounds. Ibuprofen and codeine were the compounds more frequently detected in concentrations between detection limit and a maximum of 59 ng/L and 63 ng/L respectively. Regarding the studied metals, Zn

  12. Gravity Before Einstein and Schwinger Before Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia L.

    2012-05-01

    Julian Schwinger was a child prodigy, and Albert Einstein distinctly not; Schwinger had something like 73 graduate students, and Einstein very few. But both thought gravity was important. They were not, of course, the first, nor is the disagreement on how one should think about gravity that is being highlighted here the first such dispute. The talk will explore, first, several of the earlier dichotomies: was gravity capable of action at a distance (Newton), or was a transmitting ether required (many others). Did it act on everything or only on solids (an odd idea of the Herschels that fed into their ideas of solar structure and sunspots)? Did gravitational information require time for its transmission? Is the exponent of r precisely 2, or 2 plus a smidgeon (a suggestion by Simon Newcomb among others)? And so forth. Second, I will try to say something about Scwinger's lesser known early work and how it might have prefigured his "source theory," beginning with "On the Interaction of Several Electrons (the unpublished, 1934 "zeroth paper," whose title somewhat reminds one of "On the Dynamics of an Asteroid," through his days at Berkeley with Oppenheimer, Gerjuoy, and others, to his application of ideas from nuclear physics to radar and of radar engineering techniques to problems in nuclear physics. And folks who think good jobs are difficult to come by now might want to contemplate the couple of years Schwinger spent teaching elementary physics at Purdue before moving on to the MIT Rad Lab for war work.

  13. Automated borehole gravity meter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautzenhiser, Th.V.; Wirtz, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    An automated borehole gravity meter system for measuring gravity within a wellbore. The gravity meter includes leveling devices for leveling the borehole gravity meter, displacement devices for applying forces to a gravity sensing device within the gravity meter to bring the gravity sensing device to a predetermined or null position. Electronic sensing and control devices are provided for (i) activating the displacement devices, (ii) sensing the forces applied to the gravity sensing device, (iii) electronically converting the values of the forces into a representation of the gravity at the location in the wellbore, and (iv) outputting such representation. The system further includes electronic control devices with the capability of correcting the representation of gravity for tidal effects, as well as, calculating and outputting the formation bulk density and/or porosity

  14. Seasonal gravity change at Yellowstone caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, M. P.; de Zeeuw-van Dalfsen, E.

    2017-12-01

    The driving forces behind Yellowstone's dynamic deformation, vigorous hydrothermal system, and abundant seismicity are usually ascribed to "magmatic fluids," which could refer to magma, water, volatiles, or some combination. Deformation data alone cannot distinguish the relative importance of these fluids. Gravity measurements, however, provide an indication of mass change over time and, when combined with surface displacements, can constrain the density of subsurface fluids. Unfortunately, several decades of gravity surveys at Yellowstone have yielded ambiguous results. We suspect that the difficulty in interpreting Yellowstone gravity data is due to seasonal variations in environmental conditions—especially surface and ground water. Yellowstone gravity surveys are usually carried out at the same time of year (generally late summer) to minimize the impact of seasonality. Nevertheless, surface and subsurface water levels are not likely to be constant from year to year, given annual differences in precipitation. To assess the overall magnitude of seasonal gravity changes, we conducted gravity surveys of benchmarks in and around Yellowstone caldera in May, July, August, and October 2017. Our goal was to characterize seasonal variations due to snow melt/accumulation, changes in river and lake levels, changes in groundwater levels, and changes in hydrothermal activity. We also hope to identify sites that show little variation in gravity over the course of the 2017 surveys, as these locations may be less prone to seasonal changes and more likely to detect small variations due to magmatic processes. Preliminary examination of data collected in May and July 2017 emphasizes the importance of site location relative to sources of water. For example, a site on the banks of the Yellowstone River showed a gravity increase of several hundred microgals associated with a 50 cm increase in the river level. A high-altitude site far from rivers and lakes, in contrast, showed a

  15. Magmatic underplating beneath the Rajmahal Traps: Gravity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    surface correlative basalt in seismic and drilling results is ..... 2-D gravity model, partially constrained by available seismic section, along the DSS profile-II. SP is the DSS ... interpretation. One established procedure is to sep- arate regional and residual fields through convo- lution. Another common procedure is the manual.

  16. Manufacturing techniques for Gravity Probe B gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasquin, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Additional and improved techniques for the manufacture of Gravity Probe B gyroscopes are reported. Improvements discussed include the redesign of the housings, new techniques for indentation of the electrode surfaces, and a new rotor ball lapping machine. These three items represent a significant improvement in operation of the gyroscope and also make possible the fabrication of a gyroscope which will meet flight requirements.

  17. Regional models of the gravity field from terrestrial gravity data of heterogeneous quality and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talvik, Silja; Oja, Tõnis; Ellmann, Artu; Jürgenson, Harli

    2014-05-01

    Gravity field models in a regional scale are needed for a number of applications, for example national geoid computation, processing of precise levelling data and geological modelling. Thus the methods applied for modelling the gravity field from surveyed gravimetric information need to be considered carefully. The influence of using different gridding methods, the inclusion of unit or realistic weights and indirect gridding of free air anomalies (FAA) are investigated in the study. Known gridding methods such as kriging (KRIG), least squares collocation (LSCO), continuous curvature (CCUR) and optimal Delaunay triangulation (ODET) are used for production of gridded gravity field surfaces. As the quality of data collected varies considerably depending on the methods and instruments available or used in surveying it is important to somehow weigh the input data. This puts additional demands on data maintenance as accuracy information needs to be available for each data point participating in the modelling which is complicated by older gravity datasets where the uncertainties of not only gravity values but also supplementary information such as survey point position are not always known very accurately. A number of gravity field applications (e.g. geoid computation) demand foran FAA model, the acquisition of which is also investigated. Instead of direct gridding it could be more appropriate to proceed with indirect FAA modelling using a Bouguer anomaly grid to reduce the effect of topography on the resulting FAA model (e.g. near terraced landforms). The inclusion of different gridding methods, weights and indirect FAA modelling helps to improve gravity field modelling methods. It becomes possible to estimate the impact of varying methodical approaches on the gravity field modelling as statistical output is compared. Such knowledge helps assess the accuracy of gravity field models and their effect on the aforementioned applications.

  18. Construction of topological W3 gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.

    1990-01-01

    Topological W 3 gravity is constructed in detail from its definition as topological Yang-Mills theory in two dimensions with the gauge group being a contraction of SL(3, R). The gauge transformation of the Yang-Mills gauge field can be rewritten to resemble that of the spin-2 and -3 gauge fields describing W 3 gravity. This fact provides a local parametrization of the moduli space of the flat connections in terms of spin- 2 and -3 Beltrami differentials on Riemann surfaces. The variations of the action with respect to the moduli give the stress tensor and the spin-3 W current, and the BRST charge can be expressed in terms of these currents in a way similar to that of W 3 gravity. The physical content of the model is briefly discussed. (orig.)

  19. Spatial and Temporal Antarctic Ice Sheet Mass Trends, Glacio-Isostatic Adjustment, and Surface Processes from a Joint Inversion of Satellite Altimeter, Gravity, and GPS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Espanol, Alba; Zammit-Mangion, Andrew; Clarke, Peter J.; Flament, Thomas; Helm, Veit; King, Matt A.; Luthcke, Scott B.; Petrie, Elizabeth; Remy, Frederique; Schon, Nana; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present spatiotemporal mass balance trends for the Antarctic Ice Sheet from a statistical inversion of satellite altimetry, gravimetry, and elastic-corrected GPS data for the period 2003-2013. Our method simultaneously determines annual trends in ice dynamics, surface mass balance anomalies, and a time-invariant solution for glacio-isostatic adjustment while remaining largely independent of forward models. We establish that over the period 2003-2013, Antarctica has been losing mass at a rateof -84 +/- 22 Gt per yr, with a sustained negative mean trend of dynamic imbalance of -111 +/- 13 Gt per yr. West Antarctica is the largest contributor with -112 +/- 10 Gt per yr, mainly triggered by high thinning rates of glaciers draining into the Amundsen Sea Embayment. The Antarctic Peninsula has experienced a dramatic increase in mass loss in the last decade, with a mean rate of -28 +/- 7 Gt per yr and significantly higher values for the most recent years following the destabilization of the Southern Antarctic Peninsula around 2010. The total mass loss is partly compensated by a significant mass gain of 56 +/- 18 Gt per yr in East Antarctica due to a positive trend of surface mass balance anomalies.

  20. Induced classical gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novozhilov, Yu.V.; Vassilevich, D.V.

    1991-01-01

    We review the induced-gravity approach according to which the Einstein gravity is a long-wavelength effect induced by underlying fundamental quantum fields due to the dynamical-scale symmetry breaking. It is shown that no ambiguities arise in the definition of the induced Newton and cosmological constants if one works with the path integral for fundamental fields in the low-scale region. The main accent is on a specification of the path integral which enables us to utilize the unitarity condition and thereby avoid ambiguities. Induced Einstein equations appear from the symmetry condition that the path integral of fundamental fields for a slowly varying metric is invariant under the local vertical strokeGL(4, R)-transformations of a tetrad, which contain the local Euclidean Lorentz, O(4)-rotations as a subgroup. The relatinship to induced quantum gravity is briefly outlined. (orig.)

  1. The quantization of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gerhardt, Claus

    2018-01-01

    A unified quantum theory incorporating the four fundamental forces of nature is one of the major open problems in physics. The Standard Model combines electro-magnetism, the strong force and the weak force, but ignores gravity. The quantization of gravity is therefore a necessary first step to achieve a unified quantum theory. In this monograph a canonical quantization of gravity has been achieved by quantizing a geometric evolution equation resulting in a gravitational wave equation in a globally hyperbolic spacetime. Applying the technique of separation of variables we obtain eigenvalue problems for temporal and spatial self-adjoint operators where the temporal operator has a pure point spectrum with eigenvalues $\\lambda_i$ and related eigenfunctions, while, for the spatial operator, it is possible to find corresponding eigendistributions for each of the eigenvalues $\\lambda_i$, if the Cauchy hypersurface is asymptotically Euclidean or if the quantized spacetime is a black hole with a negative cosmological ...

  2. Gravity and strings

    CERN Document Server

    Ortín, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    Self-contained and comprehensive, this definitive new edition of Gravity and Strings is a unique resource for graduate students and researchers in theoretical physics. From basic differential geometry through to the construction and study of black-hole and black-brane solutions in quantum gravity - via all the intermediate stages - this book provides a complete overview of the intersection of gravity, supergravity, and superstrings. Now fully revised, this second edition covers an extensive array of topics, including new material on non-linear electric-magnetic duality, the electric-tensor formalism, matter-coupled supergravity, supersymmetric solutions, the geometries of scalar manifolds appearing in 4- and 5-dimensional supergravities, and much more. Covering reviews of important solutions and numerous solution-generating techniques, and accompanied by an exhaustive index and bibliography, this is an exceptional reference work.

  3. Stochastic quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumpf, H.

    1987-01-01

    We begin with a naive application of the Parisi-Wu scheme to linearized gravity. This will lead into trouble as one peculiarity of the full theory, the indefiniteness of the Euclidean action, shows up already at this level. After discussing some proposals to overcome this problem, Minkowski space stochastic quantization will be introduced. This will still not result in an acceptable quantum theory of linearized gravity, as the Feynman propagator turns out to be non-causal. This defect will be remedied only after a careful analysis of general covariance in stochastic quantization has been performed. The analysis requires the notion of a metric on the manifold of metrics, and a natural candidate for this is singled out. With this a consistent stochastic quantization of Einstein gravity becomes possible. It is even possible, at least perturbatively, to return to the Euclidean regime. 25 refs. (Author)

  4. Quantum Gravity Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new quantum gravity experiment is reported with the data confirming the generali- sation of the Schrödinger equation to include the interaction of the wave function with dynamical space. Dynamical space turbulence, via this interaction process, raises and lowers the energy of the electron wave function, which is detected by observing conse- quent variations in the electron quantum barrier tunnelling rate in reverse-biased Zener diodes. This process has previously been reported and enabled the measurement of the speed of the dynamical space flow, which is consistent with numerous other detection experiments. The interaction process is dependent on the angle between the dynamical space flow velocity and the direction of the electron flow in the diode, and this depen- dence is experimentally demonstrated. This interaction process explains gravity as an emergent quantum process, so unifying quantum phenomena and gravity. Gravitational waves are easily detected.

  5. Gravity and Heater Size Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungho; Raj, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    The current work is based on observations of boiling heat transfer over a continuous range of gravity levels between 0g to 1.8g and varying heater sizes with a fluorinert as the test liquid (FC-72/n-perfluorohexane). Variable gravity pool boiling heat transfer measurements over a wide range of gravity levels were made during parabolic flight campaigns as well as onboard the International Space Station. For large heaters and-or higher gravity conditions, buoyancy dominated boiling and heat transfer results were heater size independent. The power law coefficient for gravity in the heat transfer equation was found to be a function of wall temperature under these conditions. Under low gravity conditions and-or for smaller heaters, surface tension forces dominated and heat transfer results were heater size dependent. A pool boiling regime map differentiating buoyancy and surface tension dominated regimes was developed along with a unified framework that allowed for scaling of pool boiling over a wide range of gravity levels and heater sizes. The scaling laws developed in this study are expected to allow performance quantification of phase change based technologies under variable gravity environments eventually leading to their implementation in space based applications.

  6. Wheelchair incidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drongelen AW van; Roszek B; Hilbers-Modderman ESM; Kallewaard M; Wassenaar C; LGM

    2002-01-01

    This RIVM study was performed to gain insight into wheelchair-related incidents with powered and manual wheelchairs reported to the USA FDA, the British MDA and the Dutch Center for Quality and Usability Research of Technical Aids (KBOH). The data in the databases do not indicate that incidents with

  7. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CS06 (2012 & 2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Texas collected in 2012 & 2013 over 2 surveys. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical...

  8. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN01 (2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for New York, Canada, and Lake Ontario collected in 2011 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the...

  9. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CN02 (2013 & 2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Nebraska collected in 2013 & 2014 over 3 surveys. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical...

  10. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for ES01 (2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Florida, the Bahamas, and the Atlantic Ocean collected in 2013 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of...

  11. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CN03 (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Nebraska collected in 2014 over one survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum...

  12. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for AN03 (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Alaska collected in 2010 and 2012 over 2 surveys. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum...

  13. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for PN01 (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for California and Oregon collected in 2011 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical...

  14. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for AN08 (2016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Alaska collected in 2016 over one survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum...

  15. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for TS01 (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands collected in 2009 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the...

  16. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN04 (2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Michigan and Lake Huron collected in 2012 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American...

  17. Towards a quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romney, B.; Barrau, A.; Vidotto, F.; Le Meur, H.; Noui, K.

    2011-01-01

    The loop quantum gravity is the only theory that proposes a quantum description of space-time and therefore of gravitation. This theory predicts that space is not infinitely divisible but that is has a granular structure at the Planck scale (10 -35 m). Another feature of loop quantum gravity is that it gets rid of the Big-Bang singularity: our expanding universe may come from the bouncing of a previous contracting universe, in this theory the Big-Bang is replaced with a big bounce. The loop quantum theory predicts also the huge number of quantum states that accounts for the entropy of large black holes. (A.C.)

  18. In situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy/synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray diffraction-A powerful new technique for the characterization of electrochemical surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marco, Roland; Jiang, Z.-T.; Martizano, Jay; Lowe, Alex; Pejcic, Bobby; Riessen, Arie van

    2006-01-01

    A marriage of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and in situ synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (SR-GIXRD) has provided a powerful new technique for the elucidation of the mechanistic chemistry of electrochemical systems. In this study, EIS/SR-GIXRD has been used to investigate the influence of metal ion buffer calibration ligands, along with natural organic ligands in seawater, on the behaviour of the iron chalcogenide glass ion-selective electrode (ISE). The SR-GIXRD data demonstrated that citrate - a previously reported poor iron calibration ligand for the analysis of seawater - induced an instantaneous and total dissolution of crystalline GeSe and Sb 2 Se 3 in the modified surface layer (MSL) of the ISE, while natural organic ligands in seawater and a mixture of ligands in a mimetic seawater ligand system protected the MSL's crystalline inclusions of GeSe and Sb 2 Se 3 from oxidative attack. Expectedly, the EIS data showed that citrate induced a loss in the medium frequency time constant for the MSL of the ISE, while seawater's natural organic ligands and the mimetic ligand system preserved the medium frequency EIS response characteristics of the ISE's MSL. The new EIS/SR-GIXRD technique has provided insights into the suitability of iron calibration ligands for the analysis of iron in seawater

  19. Sound conversion phenomena at the free surface of liquid helium. I. Calculation of the coefficients of reflection, transmission, and transformation of sound waves incident on the liquid--vapor interface of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiechert, H.; Buchholz, F.I.

    1980-01-01

    On the basis of a set of boundary conditions describing quite generally mass and energy transport processes across the free surface of helium II, the acoustic coefficients of reflection, transmission, and transformation of first sound, second sound, and the sound wave propagating in the vapor are calculated in the case of perpendicular incidence of sound waves against the liquid--vapor phase boundary. Considering rigoroulsy the influences of the Onsager surface coefficients, the isobaric thermal expansion coefficients, and the thermal conductivities of the liquid and the vapor, we derive sets of equations from which the acoustic coefficients are determined numerically. For estimations, simple explicit formulas of the acoustic coefficients are given. It is shown that the evaporation and energy transport processes occurring at the free surface of helium II due to the incidence of sound waves may be connected with appreciable energy dissipation. The surface absorption coefficients of first, second, and gas sound waves are deduced

  20. Three-dimensional gravity investigation of the Hanford reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, B.H.; Deju, R.A.

    1977-07-01

    Models of the basalt surface buried under the Hanford reservation are constructed from gravity data. The method uses a modified third order polynomial surface to remove the regional effects and a gravity-geologic method to remove the water table effects. When these influences are subtracted from previous data, the anomaly remaining directly reflects the irregularity of the underlying basalt surface. The Umtanum Anticline and the Cold Creek Syncline are delineated beneath the overlying surficial deposits. Along the crest of the Umtanum Anticline, a number of gravity lows are evident. These may identify locations of breaching by an ancestral river. In addition, the data are examined to determine optimum gravity data spacing for modeling. Optimum results were obtained using a station separation of one per four square miles. Less will delineate only the major underlying structures. It is also very important to have all data points distributed in a regularly spaced grid

  1. Gravity Data for South America

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (152,624 records) were compiled by the University of Texas at Dallas. This data base was received in June 1992. Principal gravity parameters...

  2. Gravity Station Data for Portugal

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data total 3064 records. This data base was received in April 1997. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air Anomalies which have been...

  3. Gravity Station Data for Spain

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data total 28493 records. This data base was received in April 1997. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air Anomalies which have been...

  4. Modes of log gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Hohm, Olaf; Rosseel, Jan; Townsend, Paul K.

    2011-01-01

    The physical modes of a recently proposed D-dimensional "critical gravity'', linearized about its anti-de Sitter vacuum, are investigated. All "log mode'' solutions, which we categorize as "spin-2'' or "Proca'', arise as limits of the massive spin-2 modes of the noncritical theory. The linearized

  5. Venus - Ishtar gravity anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, W. L.; Bills, B. G.; Mottinger, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    The gravity anomaly associated with Ishtar Terra on Venus is characterized, comparing line-of-sight acceleration profiles derived by differentiating Pioneer Venus Orbiter Doppler residual profiles with an Airy-compensated topographic model. The results are presented in graphs and maps, confirming the preliminary findings of Phillips et al. (1979). The isostatic compensation depth is found to be 150 + or - 30 km.

  6. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of finding the quantum theory of the gravitational field, and thus understanding what is quantum spacetime, is still open. One of the most active of the current approaches is loop quantum gravity. Loop quantum gravity is a mathematically well-defined, non-perturbative and background independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Research in loop quantum gravity today forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained are: (i The computation of the physical spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yields quantitative predictions on Planck-scale physics. (ii A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy formula. (iii An intriguing physical picture of the microstructure of quantum physical space, characterized by a polymer-like Planck scale discreteness. This discreteness emerges naturally from the quantum theory and provides a mathematically well-defined realization of Wheeler's intuition of a spacetime ``foam''. Long standing open problems within the approach (lack of a scalar product, over-completeness of the loop basis, implementation of reality conditions have been fully solved. The weak part of the approach is the treatment of the dynamics: at present there exist several proposals, which are intensely debated. Here, I provide a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  7. Statistical origin of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2010-01-01

    Starting from the definition of entropy used in statistical mechanics we show that it is proportional to the gravity action. For a stationary black hole this entropy is expressed as S=E/2T, where T is the Hawking temperature and E is shown to be the Komar energy. This relation is also compatible with the generalized Smarr formula for mass.

  8. Artificial Gravity Research Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the forward working plan to identify what countermeasure resources are needed for a vehicle with an artificial gravity module (intermittent centrifugation) and what Countermeasure Resources are needed for a rotating transit vehicle (continuous centrifugation) to minimize the effects of microgravity to Mars Exploration crewmembers.

  9. A Trick of Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    It's both surprising and rewarding when an old, standard problem reveals a subtlety that expands its pedagogic value. I realized recently that the role of gravity in the range equation for a projectile is not so simple as first appears. This realization may be completely obvious to others but was quite new to me.

  10. Colossal creations of gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skielboe, Andreas

    Gravity governs the evolution of the universe on the largest scales, and powers some of the most extreme objects at the centers of galaxies. Determining the masses and kinematics of galaxy clusters provides essential constraints on the large-scale structure of the universe, and act as direct probes...

  11. Understanding of Gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunstone, Richard F.; White, Richard T.

    1981-01-01

    Reports results of a large-scale study that investigated the knowledge of gravity and related principles of mechanics possessed by first-year physics students (N=468) at Monash University, Australia. One conclusion is that students know a lot of physics but do not relate it to the everyday world. (CS)

  12. Torsion induces gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aros, Rodrigo; Contreras, Mauricio

    2006-01-01

    In this work the Poincare-Chern-Simons and anti-de Sitter-Chern-Simons gravities are studied. For both, a solution that can be cast as a black hole with manifest torsion is found. Those solutions resemble Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-AdS solutions, respectively

  13. Quantum gravity. Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, P. G.; de Sabbata, V.; Treder, H.-J.

    The following topics were dealt with: relativistic heat theories; unified field theory; mixed field theories; de Sitter gauges; black hole entropy; null hypersurface canonical formalism; gauge aspects; superluminal behavior; general relativity; twistor theory; quantum geometry and gravity; strings; Poincaré gauge theory and spacetime quantization.

  14. Cubesat Gravity Field Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burla, Santoshkumar; Mueller, Vitali; Flury, Jakob; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2016-04-01

    CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions have been successful in the field of satellite geodesy (especially to improve Earth's gravity field models) and have established the necessity towards the next generation gravity field missions. Especially, GRACE has shown its capabilities beyond any other gravity field missions. GRACE Follow-On mission is going to continue GRACE's legacy which is almost identical to GRACE mission with addition of laser interferometry. But these missions are not only quite expensive but also takes quite an effort to plan and to execute. Still there are few drawbacks such as under-sampling and incapability of exploring new ideas within a single mission (ex: to perform different orbit configurations with multi satellite mission(s) at different altitudes). The budget is the major limiting factor to build multi satellite mission(s). Here, we offer a solution to overcome these drawbacks using cubesat/ nanosatellite mission. Cubesats are widely used in research because they are cheaper, smaller in size and building them is easy and faster than bigger satellites. Here, we design a 3D model of GRACE like mission with available sensors and explain how the Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) works. The expected accuracies on final results of gravity field are also explained here.

  15. Softly Massive Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gabadadze, Gregory T

    2004-01-01

    Large-distance modification of gravity may be the mechanism for solving the cosmological constant problem. A simple model of the large-distance modification -- four-dimensional (4D) gravity with the hard mass term-- is problematic from the theoretical standpoint. Here we discuss a different model, the brane-induced gravity, that effectively introduces a soft graviton mass. We study the issues of unitarity, analyticity and causality in this model in more than five dimensions. We show that a consistent prescription for the poles of the Green's function can be specified so that 4D unitarity is preserved. However, in certain instances 4D analyticity cannot be maintained when theory becomes higher dimensional. As a result, one has to sacrifice 4D causality at distances of the order of the present-day Hubble scale. This is a welcome feature for solving the cosmological constant problem, as was recently argued in the literature. We also show that, unlike the 4D massive gravity, the model has no strong-coupling probl...

  16. Gravity separation for oil wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Golomeova, Mirjana; Zendelska, Afrodita; Krstev, Boris; Krstev, Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the applications of gravity separation for oil wastewater treatment are presented. Described is operation on conventional gravity separation and parallel plate separation. Key words: gravity separation, oil, conventional gravity separation, parallel plate separation.

  17. Predicting gravity and sediment thickness in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, W.; Brozena, J.; Peters, M.

    2013-02-01

    The US Naval Research Laboratory conducted comprehensive high-altitude (7 km above mean sea level) aero-geophysical surveys over Afghanistan in 2006 (Rampant Lion I). The surveys were done in collaboration with the US Geological Survey and upon the request of Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Ministry of Mines. In this study, we show that a best fitting admittance between topography and airborne gravity in western Afghanistan can be used to predict airborne gravity for the no-data area of eastern Afghanistan where the mountains are too high to conduct airborne surveys, due to the threat of ground fire. The differences between the airborne and the predicted gravity along a tie-track through the no-data area were found to be within ±12 mGal range with rms difference 7.3 mGal, while those between the predicted gravity from a simple Airy model (with compensation depth of 32 km and crustal density of 2.67 g cm-3) and the airborne gravity were within ±22 mGal range with rms difference 10.3 mGal. A combined airborne free-air anomaly has been constructed by merging the predicted gravity with the airborne data. We also demonstrate that sediment thickness can be estimated for basin areas where surface topography and airborne free-air anomaly profiles do not show a correlation presumably because of thick sediments. In order to estimate sediment thickness, we first determine a simple linear relationship from a scatter plot of the airborne gravity points and the interpolated Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) topography along the Rampant Lion I tracks, and computed corresponding quasi-topography tracks by multiplying the linear relationship with the airborne free-air anomalies. We then take the differences between the SRTM and quasi-topography as a first-order estimate of sediment thickness. A global gravity model (GOCO02S), upward continued to the same altitude (7 km above mean sea level) as the data collection, was compared with the low-pass filtered (with cutoff

  18. 10-year survival rate and the incidence of peri-implant disease of 374 titanium dental implants with a SLA surface: a prospective cohort study in 177 fully and partially edentulous patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, F.J.J.; Ofec, R.; Schulten, E.A.J.M.; ten Bruggenkate, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This prospective cohort study evaluates the 10-year survival and incidence of peri-implant disease at implant and patient level of sandblasted, large grid, and acid-etched titanium dental implants (Straumann, soft tissue level, SLA surface) in fully and partially edentulous patients.

  19. 10-year survival rate and the incidence of peri-implant disease of 374 titanium dental implants with a SLA surface: a prospective cohort study in 177 fully and partially edentulous patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, F.J.J.; Ofec, R.; Schulten, E.A.J.M.; ten Bruggenkate, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective cohort study evaluates the 10-year survival and incidence of peri-implant disease at implant and patient level of sandblasted, large grid, and acid-etched titanium dental implants (Straumann, soft tissue level, SLA surface) in fully and partially edentulous patients.

  20. Quantum Gravity Effects in Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Je-An

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the geometrodynamic approach to quantum cosmology, we studied the quantum gravity effects in cosmology. The Gibbons-Hawking temperature is corrected by quantum gravity due to spacetime fluctuations and the power spectrum as well as any probe field will experience the effective temperature, a quantum gravity effect.

  1. Quantum Gravity Effects in Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Je-An; Pyo Kim, Sang; Shen, Che-Min

    2018-01-01

    Within the geometrodynamic approach to quantum cosmology, we studied the quantum gravity effects in cosmology. The Gibbons-Hawking temperature is corrected by quantum gravity due to spacetime fluctuations and the power spectrum as well as any probe field will experience the effective temperature, a quantum gravity effect.

  2. GEODYNAMIC WAVES AND GRAVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vikulin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available  Gravity phenomena related to the Earth movements in the Solar System and through the Galaxy are reviewed. Such movements are manifested by geological processes on the Earth and correlate with geophysical fields of the Earth. It is concluded that geodynamic processes and the gravity phenomena (including those of cosmic nature are related.  The state of the geomedium composed of blocks is determined by stresses with force moment and by slow rotational waves that are considered as a new type of movements [Vikulin, 2008, 2010]. It is shown that the geomedium has typical rheid properties [Carey, 1954], specifically an ability to flow while being in the solid state [Leonov, 2008]. Within the framework of the rotational model with a symmetric stress tensor, which is developed by the authors [Vikulin, Ivanchin, 1998; Vikulin et al., 2012a, 2013], such movement of the geomedium may explain the energy-saturated state of the geomedium and a possibility of its movements in the form of vortex geological structures [Lee, 1928]. The article discusses the gravity wave detection method based on the concept of interactions between gravity waves and crustal blocks [Braginsky et al., 1985]. It is concluded that gravity waves can be recorded by the proposed technique that detects slow rotational waves. It is shown that geo-gravitational movements can be described by both the concept of potential with account of gravitational energy of bodies [Kondratyev, 2003] and the nonlinear physical acoustics [Gurbatov et al., 2008]. Based on the combined description of geophysical and gravitational wave movements, the authors suggest a hypothesis about the nature of spin, i.e. own moment as a demonstration of the space-time ‘vortex’ properties.  

  3. Gravity reduction with three-dimensional atmospheric pressure data for precise ground gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeyer, Juergen; Hagedoorn, Jan; Leitloff, Jens; Schmidt, Torsten

    2004-10-01

    The redistribution of air masses induces gravity variations (atmospheric pressure effect) up to about 20 μgal. These variations are disturbing signals in gravity records and they must be removed very carefully for detecting weak gravity signals. In the past, different methods have been developed for modelling of the atmospheric pressure effect. These methods use local or two-dimensional (2D) surface atmospheric pressure data and a standard height-dependent air density distribution. The atmospheric pressure effect is consisting of the elastic deformation and attraction term. The deformation term can be well modelled with 2D surface atmospheric pressure data, for instance with the Green's function method. For modelling of the attraction term, three-dimensional (3D) data are required. Results with 2D data are insufficient. From European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 3D atmospheric pressure data are now available. The ECMWF data used here are characterised by a spacing of Δ ϕ and Δ λ = 0.5°, 60 pressure levels up to a height of 60 km and an interval of 6 h. These data are used for modelling of the atmospheric attraction term. Two attraction models have been developed based on the point mass attraction of air segments and the gravity potential of the air masses. The modelling shows a surface pressure-independent part of gravity variations induced by mass redistribution of the atmosphere in the order of some μgal. This part can only be determined by using 3D atmospheric pressure data. It has been calculated for the Vienna Superconducting Gravimeter site. From this follows that the gravity reduction can be improved by applying the 3D atmospheric attraction model for analysing long-periodic tidal waves including the polar tide. The same improvement is expected for reduction of long-term absolute gravity measurements or comparison of gravity measurements at different seasonal times. By using 3D atmospheric pressure data, the gravity correction can

  4. Analog Systems for Gravity Duals

    OpenAIRE

    Hossenfelder, S.

    2014-01-01

    We show that analog gravity systems exist for charged, planar black holes in asymptotic Anti-de Sitter space. These black holes have been employed to describe, via the gauge-gravity duality, strongly coupled condensed matter systems on the boundary of AdS-space. The analog gravity system is a different condensed matter system that, in a suitable limit, describes the same bulk physics as the theory on the AdS boundary. This combination of the gauge-gravity duality and analog gravity therefore ...

  5. Normal gravity field in relativistic geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Vlasov, Igor; Han, Wen-Biao

    2018-02-01

    Modern geodesy is subject to a dramatic change from the Newtonian paradigm to Einstein's theory of general relativity. This is motivated by the ongoing advance in development of quantum sensors for applications in geodesy including quantum gravimeters and gradientometers, atomic clocks and fiber optics for making ultra-precise measurements of the geoid and multipolar structure of the Earth's gravitational field. At the same time, very long baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging, and global navigation satellite systems have achieved an unprecedented level of accuracy in measuring 3-d coordinates of the reference points of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame and the world height system. The main geodetic reference standard to which gravimetric measurements of the of Earth's gravitational field are referred is a normal gravity field represented in the Newtonian gravity by the field of a uniformly rotating, homogeneous Maclaurin ellipsoid of which mass and quadrupole momentum are equal to the total mass and (tide-free) quadrupole moment of Earth's gravitational field. The present paper extends the concept of the normal gravity field from the Newtonian theory to the realm of general relativity. We focus our attention on the calculation of the post-Newtonian approximation of the normal field that is sufficient for current and near-future practical applications. We show that in general relativity the level surface of homogeneous and uniformly rotating fluid is no longer described by the Maclaurin ellipsoid in the most general case but represents an axisymmetric spheroid of the fourth order with respect to the geodetic Cartesian coordinates. At the same time, admitting a post-Newtonian inhomogeneity of the mass density in the form of concentric elliptical shells allows one to preserve the level surface of the fluid as an exact ellipsoid of rotation. We parametrize the mass density distribution and the level surface with two parameters which are

  6. The gravity field and GGOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Sideris, M.G.; Shum, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    The gravity field of the earth is a natural element of the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). Gravity field quantities are like spatial geodetic observations of potential very high accuracy, with measurements, currently at part-per-billion (ppb) accuracy, but gravity field quantities are also...... unique as they can be globally represented by harmonic functions (long-wavelength geopotential model primarily from satellite gravity field missions), or based on point sampling (airborne and in situ absolute and superconducting gravimetry). From a GGOS global perspective, one of the main challenges...... is to ensure the consistency of the global and regional geopotential and geoid models, and the temporal changes of the gravity field at large spatial scales. The International Gravity Field Service, an umbrella "level-2" IAG service (incorporating the International Gravity Bureau, International Geoid Service...

  7. The inverse gravimetric problem in gravity modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanso, F.; Tscherning, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main purposes of geodesy is to determine the gravity field of the Earth in the space outside its physical surface. This purpose can be pursued without any particular knowledge of the internal density even if the exact shape of the physical surface of the Earth is not known, though this seems to entangle the two domains, as it was in the old Stoke's theory before the appearance of Molodensky's approach. Nevertheless, even when large, dense and homogeneous data sets are available, it was always recognized that subtracting from the gravity field the effect of the outer layer of the masses (topographic effect) yields a much smoother field. This is obviously more important when a sparse data set is bad so that any smoothing of the gravity field helps in interpolating between the data without raising the modeling error, this approach is generally followed because it has become very cheap in terms of computing time since the appearance of spectral techniques. The mathematical description of the Inverse Gravimetric Problem (IGP) is dominated mainly by two principles, which in loose terms can be formulated as follows: the knowledge of the external gravity field determines mainly the lateral variations of the density; and the deeper the density anomaly giving rise to a gravity anomaly, the more improperly posed is the problem of recovering the former from the latter. The statistical relation between rho and n (and its inverse) is also investigated in its general form, proving that degree cross-covariances have to be introduced to describe the behavior of rho. The problem of the simultaneous estimate of a spherical anomalous potential and of the external, topographic masses is addressed criticizing the choice of the mixed collection approach.

  8. Incidents analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, P.

    1996-01-01

    We undertook a study programme at the end of 1991. To start with, we performed some exploratory studies aimed at learning some preliminary lessons on this type of analysis: Assessment of the interest of probabilistic incident analysis; possibility of using PSA scenarios; skills and resources required. At the same time, EPN created a working group whose assignment was to define a new approach for analysis of incidents on NPPs. This working group gave thought to both aspects of Operating Feedback that EPN wished to improve: Analysis of significant incidents; analysis of potential consequences. We took part in the work of this group, and for the second aspects, we proposed a method based on an adaptation of the event-tree method in order to establish a link between existing PSA models and actual incidents. Since PSA provides an exhaustive database of accident scenarios applicable to the two most common types of units in France, they are obviously of interest for this sort of analysis. With this method we performed some incident analyses, and at the same time explores some methods employed abroad, particularly ASP (Accident Sequence Precursor, a method used by the NRC). Early in 1994 EDF began a systematic analysis programme. The first, transient phase will set up methods and an organizational structure. 7 figs

  9. The relativistic gravity train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seel, Max

    2018-05-01

    The gravity train that takes 42.2 min from any point A to any other point B that is connected by a straight-line tunnel through Earth has captured the imagination more than most other applications in calculus or introductory physics courses. Brachystochron and, most recently, nonlinear density solutions have been discussed. Here relativistic corrections are presented. It is discussed how the corrections affect the time to fall through Earth, the Sun, a white dwarf, a neutron star, and—the ultimate limit—the difference in time measured by a moving, a stationary and the fiducial observer at infinity if the density of the sphere approaches the density of a black hole. The relativistic gravity train can serve as a problem with approximate and exact analytic solutions and as numerical exercise in any introductory course on relativity.

  10. Topics in quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamon, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Quantum gravity is an attempt to unify general relativity with quantum mechanics which are the two highly successful fundamental theories of theoretical physics. The main difficulty in this unification arises from the fact that, while general relativity describes gravity as a macroscopic geometrical theory, quantum mechanics explains microscopic phenomena. As a further complication, not only do both theories describe different scales but also their philosophical ramifications and the mathematics used to describe them differ in a dramatic way. Consequently, one possible starting point of an attempt at a unification is quantum mechanics, i.e. particle physics, and try to incorporate gravitation. This pathway has been chosen by particle physicists which led to string theory. On the other hand, loop quantum gravity (LQG) chooses the other possibility, i.e. it takes the geometrical aspects of gravity seriously and quantizes geometry. The first part of this thesis deals with a generalization of loop quantum cosmology (LQC) to toroidal topologies. LQC is a quantization of homogenous solutions of Einstein's field equations using tools from LQG. First the general concepts of closed topologies is introduced with special emphasis on Thurston's theorem and its consequences. It is shown that new degrees of freedom called Teichmueller parameters come into play and their dynamics can be described by a Hamiltonian. Several numerical solutions for a toroidal universe are presented and discussed. Following the guidelines of LQG this dynamics are rewritten using the Ashtekar variables and numerical solutions are shown. However, in order to find a suitable Hilbert space a canonical transformation must be performed. On the other hand this transformation makes the quantization of geometrical quantities less tractable such that two different ways are presented. It is shown that in both cases the spectrum of such geometrical operators depends on the initial value problem. Furthermore, we

  11. Topics in quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamon, Raphael

    2010-06-29

    Quantum gravity is an attempt to unify general relativity with quantum mechanics which are the two highly successful fundamental theories of theoretical physics. The main difficulty in this unification arises from the fact that, while general relativity describes gravity as a macroscopic geometrical theory, quantum mechanics explains microscopic phenomena. As a further complication, not only do both theories describe different scales but also their philosophical ramifications and the mathematics used to describe them differ in a dramatic way. Consequently, one possible starting point of an attempt at a unification is quantum mechanics, i.e. particle physics, and try to incorporate gravitation. This pathway has been chosen by particle physicists which led to string theory. On the other hand, loop quantum gravity (LQG) chooses the other possibility, i.e. it takes the geometrical aspects of gravity seriously and quantizes geometry. The first part of this thesis deals with a generalization of loop quantum cosmology (LQC) to toroidal topologies. LQC is a quantization of homogenous solutions of Einstein's field equations using tools from LQG. First the general concepts of closed topologies is introduced with special emphasis on Thurston's theorem and its consequences. It is shown that new degrees of freedom called Teichmueller parameters come into play and their dynamics can be described by a Hamiltonian. Several numerical solutions for a toroidal universe are presented and discussed. Following the guidelines of LQG this dynamics are rewritten using the Ashtekar variables and numerical solutions are shown. However, in order to find a suitable Hilbert space a canonical transformation must be performed. On the other hand this transformation makes the quantization of geometrical quantities less tractable such that two different ways are presented. It is shown that in both cases the spectrum of such geometrical operators depends on the initial value problem

  12. Simplicial quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartle, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Simplicial approximation and the ideas associated with the Regge calculus provide a concrete way of implementing a sum over histories formulation of quantum gravity. A simplicial geometry is made up of flat simplices joined together in a prescribed way together with an assignment of lengths to their edges. A sum over simplicial geometries is a sum over the different ways the simplices can be joined together with an integral over their edge lengths. The construction of the simplicial Euclidean action for this approach to quantum general relativity is illustrated. The recovery of the diffeomorphism group in the continuum limit is discussed. Some possible classes of simplicial complexes with which to define a sum over topologies are described. In two dimensional quantum gravity it is argued that a reasonable class is the class of pseudomanifolds

  13. Lectures on Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gomberoff, Andres

    2006-01-01

    The 2002 Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute School on Quantum Gravity was held at the Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS),Valdivia, Chile, January 4-14, 2002. The school featured lectures by ten speakers, and was attended by nearly 70 students from over 14 countries. A primary goal was to foster interaction and communication between participants from different cultures, both in the layman’s sense of the term and in terms of approaches to quantum gravity. We hope that the links formed by students and the school will persist throughout their professional lives, continuing to promote interaction and the essential exchange of ideas that drives research forward. This volume contains improved and updated versions of the lectures given at the School. It has been prepared both as a reminder for the participants, and so that these pedagogical introductions can be made available to others who were unable to attend. We expect them to serve students of all ages well.

  14. Cosmological Tests of Gravity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Extensions of Einstein’s theory of General Relativity are under investigation as a potential explanation of the accelerating expansion rate of the universe. I’ll present a cosmologist’s overview of attempts to test these ideas in an efficient and unbiased manner. I’ll start by introducing the bestiary of alternative gravity theories that have been put forwards. This proliferation of models motivates us to develop model-independent, agnostic tools for comparing the theory space to cosmological data. I’ll introduce the effective field theory for cosmological perturbations, a framework designed to unify modified gravity theories in terms of a manageable set of parameters. Having outlined the formalism, I’ll talk about the current constraints on this framework, and the improvements expected from the next generation of large galaxy clustering, weak lensing and intensity mapping experiments.

  15. Instantons and gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopleva, N.P.

    1996-01-01

    The problems of application of nonperturbative quantization methods in the theories of the gauge fields and gravity are discussed. Unification of interactions is considered in the framework of the geometrical gauge fields theory. Vacuum conception in the unified theory of interactions and instantons role in the vacuum structure are analyzed. The role of vacuum solutions of Einstein equations in definition of the gauge field vacuum is demonstrated

  16. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler’s “spacetime foam” intuition. (iii Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv A derivation of the Bekenstein–Hawking black-hole entropy. (v Low-energy calculations, yielding n-point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  17. Loop Quantum Gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime , is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i) The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii) A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler's "spacetime foam" intuition. (iii) Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv) A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black-hole entropy. (v) Low-energy calculations, yielding n -point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  18. Gravity, Time, and Lagrangians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2010-01-01

    Feynman mentioned to us that he understood a topic in physics if he could explain it to a college freshman, a high school student, or a dinner guest. Here we will discuss two topics that took us a while to get to that level. One is the relationship between gravity and time. The other is the minus sign that appears in the Lagrangian. (Why would one…

  19. Semiclassical unimodular gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiol, Bartomeu; Garriga, Jaume

    2010-01-01

    Classically, unimodular gravity is known to be equivalent to General Relativity (GR), except for the fact that the effective cosmological constant Λ has the status of an integration constant. Here, we explore various formulations of unimodular gravity beyond the classical limit. We first consider the non-generally covariant action formulation in which the determinant of the metric is held fixed to unity. We argue that the corresponding quantum theory is also equivalent to General Relativity for localized perturbative processes which take place in generic backgrounds of infinite volume (such as asymptotically flat spacetimes). Next, using the same action, we calculate semiclassical non-perturbative quantities, which we expect will be dominated by Euclidean instanton solutions. We derive the entropy/area ratio for cosmological and black hole horizons, finding agreement with GR for solutions in backgrounds of infinite volume, but disagreement for backgrounds with finite volume. In deriving the above results, the path integral is taken over histories with fixed 4-volume. We point out that the results are different if we allow the 4-volume of the different histories to vary over a continuum range. In this ''generalized'' version of unimodular gravity, one recovers the full set of Einstein's equations in the classical limit, including the trace, so Λ is no longer an integration constant. Finally, we consider the generally covariant theory due to Henneaux and Teitelboim, which is classically equivalent to unimodular gravity. In this case, the standard semiclassical GR results are recovered provided that the boundary term in the Euclidean action is chosen appropriately

  20. 2+1 gravity for genus >1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.E.; Regge, T.

    1991-01-01

    We analysed the algebra of observables for the simple case of a genus 1 initial data surface Σ 2 for 2+1 De Sitter gravity. Here we extend the analysis to higher genus. We construct for genus 2 the group of automorphisms H of the homotopy group π 1 induced by the mapping class group. The group H induces a group D of canonical transformations on the algebra of observables which is related to the braid group for 6 threads. (orig.)

  1. Venus gravity fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, W. L.; Ananda, M.; Williams, B. G.; Birkeland, P. W.; Esposito, P. S.; Wimberly, R. N.; Ritke, S. J.

    1981-01-01

    Results of Pioneer Venus Orbiter observations concerning the gravity field of Venus are presented. The gravitational data was obtained from reductions of Doppler radio tracking data for the Orbiter, which is in a highly eccentric orbit with periapsis altitude varying from 145 to 180 km and nearly fixed periapsis latitude of 15 deg N. The global gravity field was obtained through the simultaneous estimation of the orbit state parameters and gravity coefficients from long-period variations in orbital element rates. The global field has been described with sixth degree and order spherical harmonic coefficients, which are capable of resolving the three major topographical features on Venus. Local anomalies have been mapped using line-of-sight accelerations derived from the Doppler residuals between 40 deg N and 10 deg S latitude at approximately 300 km spatial resolution. Gravitational data is observed to correspond to topographical data obtained by radar altimeter, with most of the gravitational anomalies about 20-30 milligals. Simulations evaluating the isostatic states of two topographic features indicate that at least partial isostasy prevails, with the possibility of complete compensation.

  2. Effect of External Disturbing Gravity Field on Spacecraft Guidance and Surveying Line Layout for Marine Gravity Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Motao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Centred on the support requirement of flying track control for a long range spacecraft, a detail research is made on the computation of external disturbing gravity field, the survey accuracy of gravity anomaly on the earth' surface and the program of surveying line layout for marine gravity survey. Firstly, the solution expression of navigation error for a long range spacecraft is analyzed and modified, and the influence of the earth's gravity field on flying track of spacecraft is evaluated. Then with a given limited quota of biased error of spacecraft drop point, the accuracy requirement for calculating the external disturbing gravity field is discussed and researched. Secondly, the data truncation error and the propagated data error are studied and estimated, and the quotas of survey resolution and computation accuracy for gravity anomaly on the earth' surface are determined. Finally, based on the above quotas, a corresponding program of surveying line layout for marine gravity survey is proposed. A numerical test has been made to prove the reasonableness and validity of the suggested program.

  3. MODIFIED GRAVITY SPINS UP GALACTIC HALOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jounghun [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, FPRD, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Zhao, Gong-Bo [National Astronomy Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Baojiu [Institute of Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Koyama, Kazuya, E-mail: jounghun@astro.snu.ac.kr [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the effect of modified gravity on the specific angular momentum of galactic halos by analyzing the halo catalogs at z = 0 from high-resolution N-body simulations for a f(R) gravity model that meets the solar-system constraint. It is shown that the galactic halos in the f(R) gravity model tend to acquire significantly higher specific angular momentum than those in the standard {Lambda}CDM model. The largest difference in the specific angular momentum distribution between these two models occurs for the case of isolated galactic halos with mass less than 10{sup 11} h {sup -1} M {sub Sun }, which are likely least shielded by the chameleon screening mechanism. As the specific angular momentum of galactic halos is rather insensitive to other cosmological parameters, it can in principle be an independent discriminator of modified gravity. We speculate a possibility of using the relative abundance of low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) as a test of general relativity given that the formation of the LSBGs occurs in fast spinning dark halos.

  4. Getting the Swing of Surface Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian C.; Quick, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Sports are a popular and effective way to illustrate physics principles. Baseball in particular presents a number of opportunities to motivate student interest and teach concepts. Several articles have appeared in this journal on this topic, illustrating a wide variety of areas of physics. In addition, several websites and an entire book are…

  5. On the Resolvability of Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage Reservoirs Using Time-Lapse Gravity Gradiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, E. Judith; Braun, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    Unconventional heavy oil resource plays are important contributors to oil and gas production, as well as controversial for posing environmental hazards. Monitoring those reservoirs before, during, and after operations would assist both the optimization of economic benefits and the mitigation of potential environmental hazards. This study investigates how gravity gradiometry using superconducting gravimeters could resolve depletion areas in steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) reservoirs. This is achieved through modelling of a SAGD reservoir at 1.25 and 5 years of operation. Specifically, the density change structure identified from geological, petrological, and seismic observations is forward modelled for gravity and gradients. Three main parameters have an impact on the resolvability of bitumen depletion volumes and are varied through a suitable parameter space: well pair separation, depth to the well pairs, and survey grid sampling. The results include a resolvability matrix, which identifies reservoirs that could benefit from time-lapse gravity gradiometry monitoring. After 1.25 years of operation, during the rising phase, the resolvable maximum reservoir depth ranges between the surface and 230 m, considering a well pair separation between 80 and 200 m. After 5 years of production, during the spreading phase, the resolvability of depletion volumes around single well pairs is greatly compromised as the depletion volume is closer to the surface, which translates to a larger portion of the gravity signal. The modelled resolvability matrices were derived from visual inspection and spectral analysis of the gravity gradient signatures and can be used to assess the applicability of time-lapse gradiometry to monitor reservoir density changes.

  6. Artificial gravity in space and in medical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardus, D.

    1994-01-01

    The history of manned space flight has repeatedly documented the fact that prolonged sojourn in space causes physiological deconditioning. Physiological deterioration has raised a legitimate concern about man's ability to adequately perform in the course of long missions and even the possibility of leading to circumstances threatening survival. One of the possible countermeasures of physiological deconditioning, theoretically more complete than others presently used since it affects all bodily systems, is artificial gravity. Space stations and spacecrafts can be equipped with artificial gravity, but is artificial gravity necessary? The term "necessary" must be qualified because a meaningful answer to the question depends entirely on further defining the purpose of space travel. If man intends to stay only temporarily in space, then he must keep himself in good physical condition so as to be able to return to earth or to land on any other planetary surface without undue exposure to major physiological problems resulting from transition through variable gravitational fields. Such a situation makes artificial gravity highly desirable, although perhaps not absolutely necessary in the case of relative short exposure to microgravity, but certainly necessary in interplanetary flight and planetary landings. If the intent is to remain indefinitely in space, to colonize space, then artificial gravity may not be necessary, but in this case the consequences of long term effects of adaptation to weightlessness will have to be weighed against the biological evolutionary outcomes that are to be expected. At the moment, plans for establishing permanent colonies in space seem still remote. More likely, the initial phase of exploration of the uncharted solar system will take place through successive, scope limited, research ventures ending with return to earth. This will require man to be ready to operate in gravitational fields of variable intensity. Equipping spacecrafts or space

  7. Cosmological tests of modified gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard [Formula: see text]CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  8. Bringing Gravity to Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsk, P.; Shelhamer, M.

    2016-01-01

    This panel will present NASA's plans for ongoing and future research to define the requirements for Artificial Gravity (AG) as a countermeasure against the negative health effects of long-duration weightlessness. AG could mitigate the gravity-sensitive effects of spaceflight across a host of physiological systems. Bringing gravity to space could mitigate the sensorimotor and neuro-vestibular disturbances induced by G-transitions upon reaching a planetary body, and the cardiovascular deconditioning and musculoskeletal weakness induced by weightlessness. Of particular interest for AG during deep-space missions is mitigation of the Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome that the majority of astronauts exhibit in space to varying degrees, and which presumably is associated with weightlessness-induced fluid shift from lower to upper body segments. AG could be very effective for reversing the fluid shift and thus help prevent VIIP. The first presentation by Dr. Charles will summarize some of the ground-based and (very little) space-based research that has been conducted on AG by the various space programs. Dr. Paloski will address the use of AG during deep-space exploration-class missions and describe the different AG scenarios such as intra-vehicular, part-of-vehicle, or whole-vehicle centrifugations. Dr. Clement will discuss currently planned NASA research as well as how to coordinate future activities among NASA's international partners. Dr. Barr will describe some possible future plans for using space- and ground-based partial-G analogs to define the relationship between physiological responses and G levels between 0 and 1. Finally, Dr. Stenger will summarize how the human cardiovascular system could benefit from intermittent short-radius centrifugations during long-duration missions.

  9. Active Response Gravity Offload System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Paul; Dungan, Larry; Cunningham, Thomas; Lieberman, Asher; Poncia, Dina

    2011-01-01

    The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) provides the ability to simulate with one system the gravity effect of planets, moons, comets, asteroids, and microgravity, where the gravity is less than Earth fs gravity. The system works by providing a constant force offload through an overhead hoist system and horizontal motion through a rail and trolley system. The facility covers a 20 by 40-ft (approximately equals 6.1 by 12.2m) horizontal area with 15 ft (approximately equals4.6 m) of lifting vertical range.

  10. Gravity Independent Compressor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop and demonstrate a small, gravity independent, vapor compression refrigeration system using a linear motor compressor which effectively...

  11. The combined gravity field model GOCO05c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecher, Thomas; Pail, Roland; Gruber, Thomas; GOCO Project Team

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the static gravity field is of importance for various scientific disciplines, such as geodesy, geophysics and oceanography. While for geophysics the gravity field provides insight into the Earth's interior, the geoid serves as an important reference surface for oceanographic applications. Moreover this reference surface is a key parameter on the way to a globally unified height system. In order to exploit the full potential of gravity measurements and to achieve the best gravity field solution, all kinds of complementary gravity field information have to be combined. By combining GRACE and GOCE information, a state of the art satellite-only gravity field is available, which is highly accurate at the very long to medium wavelengths (80-100 km). By adding information from terrestrial/airborne gravimetry and satellite altimetry, which both are measurement techniques providing short wavelength gravity information beyond the resolution of GOCE, the full gravity field spectrum can be obtained. This paper focuses on the presentation of the combined gravity field model GOCO05c, a global gravity field model up to degree and order 720 based on full normal equation systems (more than 500,000 parameters). During the calculation of GOCO05c we put emphasis on the question how the complementary data types can be combined in a global gravity field model in the way that all data types keep their specific strengths and are not degraded by the combination with other information in certain wavelengths. Realistic stochastic modelling and a tailored weighting scheme among all available data results in different regional relative weighting of satellite and terrestrial data in the combined solution, mainly depending on the quality of the available terrestrial gravity information. From this procedure, as complementary product realistic error estimates are available in terms of a full-covariance matrix, which can be mapped in a spatial error grid reflecting regionally specific

  12. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for AN02 (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Alaska collected in 2010 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D)...

  13. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CS05 (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Texas collected in 2014 over 2 surveys. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D)...

  14. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for AN05 (2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Alaska collected in 2011 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D)...

  15. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for AN06 (2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Alaska collected in 2011 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D)...

  16. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CS04 (2009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Texas collected in 2009 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D)...

  17. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for AS01 (2008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Alaska collected in 2008 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D)...

  18. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for AN04 (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Alaska collected in 2010 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D)...

  19. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CS08 (2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for CS08 collected in 2006 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D)...

  20. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for ES02 (2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Florida and the Gulf of Mexico collected in 2013 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American...

  1. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for AS02 (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Alaska collected in 2010 over 2 surveys. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D)...

  2. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CS07 (2014 & 2016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Texas collected in 2014 & 2016 over 3 surveys,TX14-2, TX16-1 and TX16-2. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of...

  3. Virtual environment application with partial gravity simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, David M.; Vanchau, Michael N.

    1994-01-01

    To support manned missions to the surface of Mars and missions requiring manipulation of payloads and locomotion in space, a training facility is required to simulate the conditions of both partial and microgravity. A partial gravity simulator (Pogo) which uses pneumatic suspension is being studied for use in virtual reality training. Pogo maintains a constant partial gravity simulation with a variation of simulated body force between 2.2 and 10 percent, depending on the type of locomotion inputs. this paper is based on the concept and application of a virtual environment system with Pogo including a head-mounted display and glove. The reality engine consists of a high end SGI workstation and PC's which drive Pogo's sensors and data acquisition hardware used for tracking and control. The tracking system is a hybrid of magnetic and optical trackers integrated for this application.

  4. Newtonian quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.R.W.

    1995-01-01

    We develop a nonlinear quantum theory of Newtonian gravity consistent with an objective interpretation of the wavefunction. Inspired by the ideas of Schroedinger, and Bell, we seek a dimensional reduction procedure to map complex wavefunctions in configuration space onto a family of observable fields in space-time. Consideration of quasi-classical conservation laws selects the reduced one-body quantities as the basis for an explicit quasi-classical coarse-graining. These we interpret as describing the objective reality of the laboratory. Thereafter, we examine what may stand in the role of the usual Copenhagen observer to localise this quantity against macroscopic dispersion. Only a tiny change is needed, via a generically attractive self-potential. A nonlinear treatment of gravitational self-energy is thus advanced. This term sets a scale for all wavepackets. The Newtonian cosmology is thus closed, without need of an external observer. Finally, the concept of quantisation is re-interpreted as a nonlinear eigenvalue problem. To illustrate, we exhibit an elementary family of gravitationally self-bound solitary waves. Contrasting this theory with its canonically quantised analogue, we find that the given interpretation is empirically distinguishable, in principle. This result encourages deeper study of nonlinear field theories as a testable alternative to canonically quantised gravity. (author). 46 refs., 5 figs

  5. Aspects of Quadratic Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Gaume, Luis; Kounnas, Costas; Lust, Dieter; Riotto, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We discuss quadratic gravity where terms quadratic in the curvature tensor are included in the action. After reviewing the corresponding field equations, we analyze in detail the physical propagating modes in some specific backgrounds. First we confirm that the pure $R^2$ theory is indeed ghost free. Then we point out that for flat backgrounds the pure $R^2$ theory propagates only a scalar massless mode and no spin-two tensor mode. However, the latter emerges either by expanding the theory around curved backgrounds like de Sitter or anti-de Sitter, or by changing the long-distance dynamics by introducing the standard Einstein term. In both cases, the theory is modified in the infrared and a propagating graviton is recovered. Hence we recognize a subtle interplay between the UV and IR properties of higher order gravity. We also calculate the corresponding Newton's law for general quadratic curvature theories. Finally, we discuss how quadratic actions may be obtained from a fundamental theory like string- or M-...

  6. Modifications of gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skordis, Constantinos

    2011-12-28

    General relativity (GR) is a phenomenologically successful theory that rests on firm foundations, but has not been tested on cosmological scales. The deep mystery of dark energy (and possibly even the requirement of cold dark matter (CDM)) has increased the need for testing modifications to GR, as the inference of such otherwise undetected fluids depends crucially on the theory of gravity. Here, I discuss a general scheme for constructing consistent and covariant modifications to the Einstein equations. This framework is such that there is a clear connection between the modification and the underlying field content that produces it. I argue that this is mandatory for distinguishing modifications of gravity from conventional fluids. I give a non-trivial example, a simple metric-based modification of the fluctuation equations for which the background is exact ΛCDM, but differs from it in the perturbations. I show how this can be generalized and solved in terms of two arbitrary functions. Finally, I discuss future prospects and directions of research.

  7. Time lapse gravity monitoring at Coso geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Rachel Vest

    An extensive time lapse gravity data set was acquired over the Coso geothermal field near Ridgecrest, California starting in 1987, with the latest data set acquired in 2013. In this thesis I use these gravity data to obtain a better understanding of mass changes occurring within the geothermal field. Geothermal energy is produced by flashing naturally heated ground water into steam which is used to turn turbines. Brine and re-condensed steam are then re-injected into the reservoir. A percentage of the water removed from the system is lost to the process. The time lapse gravity method consists of gravity measurements taken at the same locations over time, capturing snap shots of the changing field. After careful processing, the final data are differenced to extract the change in gravity over time. This change in gravity can then be inverted to recover the change in density and therefore mass over time. The inversion process also produces information on the three dimensional locations of these mass changes. Thirty five gravity data sets were processed and a subsection were inverted with two different starting times, a sixteen point data set collected continuously between 1991 and 2005, and a thirty-eight point data set collected between 1996 and 2005. The maximum change in gravity in the 1991 data group was -350 microGal observed near station CSE2. For the 1996 data group the maximum gravity change observed over the nine year period was -248 microGal. The gravity data were then inverted using the surface inversion method. Three values of density contrast were used, -0.05 g/cm3, -0.10 g/cm3, and -0.20 g/cm3. The starting surface in 1991 was set to 2,500 ft above sea level. The changes in surfaces were then converted to mass changes. The largest total mass change recovered was -1.39x1011 kg. This mass value is of the same order of magnitude as published well production data for the field. Additionally, the gravity data produces a better understanding of the spatial

  8. Arctic Ocean gravity, geoid and sea-ice freeboard heights from ICESat and GRACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Skourup, Henriette

    2005-01-01

    ICESat laser measurements provide a high-resolution mapping of the sea-ice surface of the Arctic Ocean, which can be inverted to determine gravity anomalies and sea-ice freeboard heights by a "lowest-level'' filtering scheme. In this paper we use updated terrestrial gravity data from the Arctic...... Gravity Project in combination with GRACE gravity field models to derive an improved Arctic geoid model. This model is then used to convert ICESat measurements to sea-ice freeboard heights with a coarse lowest-level surface method. The derived freeboard heights show a good qualitative agreement...... to the coverage of multi-year sea-ice; however, comparison to an airborne lidar underflight north of Greenland shows that the lowest-level filtering scheme may introduce a bias. We finally use the ICESat and GRACE results to derive new gravity anomalies by Fourier inversion. The satellite-only gravity field shows...

  9. Pressure Profiles in a Loop Heat Pipe under Gravity Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    During the operation of a loop heat pipe (LHP), the viscous flow induces pressure drops in various elements of the loop. The total pressure drop is equal to the sum of pressure drops in vapor grooves, vapor line, condenser, liquid line and primary wick, and is sustained by menisci at liquid and vapor interfaces on the outer surface of the primary wick in the evaporator. The menisci will curve naturally so that the resulting capillary pressure matches the total pressure drop. In ground testing, an additional gravitational pressure head may be present and must be included in the total pressure drop when LHP components are placed in a non-planar configuration. Under gravity-neutral and anti-gravity conditions, the fluid circulation in the LHP is driven solely by the capillary force. With gravity assist, however, the flow circulation can be driven by the combination of capillary and gravitational forces, or by the gravitational force alone. For a gravity-assist LHP at a given elevation between the horizontal condenser and evaporator, there exists a threshold heat load below which the LHP operation is gravity driven and above which the LHP operation is capillary force and gravity co-driven. The gravitational pressure head can have profound effects on the LHP operation, and such effects depend on the elevation, evaporator heat load, and condenser sink temperature. This paper presents a theoretical study on LHP operations under gravity-neutral, anti-gravity, and gravity-assist modes using pressure diagrams to help understand the underlying physical processes. Effects of the condenser configuration on the gravitational pressure head and LHP operation are also discussed.

  10. Assessing GOCE Gravity Models using Altimetry and Drifters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    The improved gravity models provided by the GOCE mission have enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features and the associated geostrophic surface currents reveal improvements for all of the ocean’s current systems. There are still important signals to be recovered and is...... surface currents from drifters. This is done to analyse correlations and to derive resolution capacities associated with the ocean circulation and to derive requirements to future gravity missions.......The improved gravity models provided by the GOCE mission have enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features and the associated geostrophic surface currents reveal improvements for all of the ocean’s current systems. There are still important signals to be recovered...

  11. Safety of gravity dams and spillways against floods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lariviere, R.; Leger, P.; Tinawi, R.; Roussel, M.

    1997-01-01

    The structural safety of concrete gravity dams and spillways during major floods was discussed, concentrating on failure mechanisms, the methodology for hydrological safety evaluation for existing dams, the notion of imminent failure flood, the resistance to overtopping and the effects of floating debris. In particular, the incidence of overtopping on structural stability of typical gravity dams was investigated using a variety of assumptions concerning the peak and residual shear strength parameters of construction joints according to CDSA guidelines. Some considerations regarding rehabilitation techniques to increase the hydrological safety of gravity dams and spillways, such as functional safety analysis of electro-mechanical equipment of gated spillways in case of major floods, emergency planning, and the availability of qualified personnel to ensure the safety of the installation, were also discussed. 19 refs., 8 figs

  12. Reduced Gravity Zblan Optical Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    2000-01-01

    Two optical fiber pullers have been designed for pulling ZBLAN optical fiber in reduced gravity. One fiber puller was designed, built and flown on board NASA's KC135 reduced gravity aircraft. A second fiber puller has been designed for use on board the International Space Station.

  13. Fixed points of quantum gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Litim, D F

    2003-01-01

    Euclidean quantum gravity is studied with renormalisation group methods. Analytical results for a non-trivial ultraviolet fixed point are found for arbitrary dimensions and gauge fixing parameter in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation. Implications for quantum gravity in four dimensions are discussed.

  14. Measuring wood specific gravity, correctly

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Bruce Williamson; Michael C. Wiemann

    2010-01-01

    The specific gravity (SG) of wood is a measure of the amount of structural material a tree species allocates to support and strength. In recent years, wood specific gravity, traditionally a forester’s variable, has become the domain of ecologists exploring the universality of plant functional traits and conservationists estimating global carbon stocks. While these...

  15. Quantum Gravity in Two Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ipsen, Asger Cronberg

    The topic of this thesis is quantum gravity in 1 + 1 dimensions. We will focus on two formalisms, namely Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDT) and Dy- namical Triangulations (DT). Both theories regularize the gravity path integral as a sum over triangulations. The difference lies in the class...

  16. Minimal massive 3D gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Hohm, Olaf; Merbis, Wout; Routh, Alasdair J.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    We present an alternative to topologically massive gravity (TMG) with the same 'minimal' bulk properties; i.e. a single local degree of freedom that is realized as a massive graviton in linearization about an anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacuum. However, in contrast to TMG, the new 'minimal massive gravity'

  17. GOCE and Future Gravity Missions for Geothermal Energy Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorutti, Alberto; Braitenberg, Carla; Pivetta, Tommaso; Mariani, Patrizia

    2016-08-01

    Geothermal energy is a valuable renewable energy source the exploitation of which contributes to the worldwide reduction of consumption of fossil fuels oil and gas. The exploitation of geothermal energy is facilitated where the thermal gradient is higher than average leading to increased surface heat flow. Apart from the hydrologic circulation properties which depend on rock fractures and are important due to the heat transportation from the hotter layers to the surface, essential properties that increase the thermal gradient are crustal thinning and radiogenic heat producing rocks. Crustal thickness and rock composition form the link to the exploration with the satellite derived gravity field, because both induce subsurface mass changes that generate observable gravity anomalies. The recognition of gravity as a useful investigation tool for geothermal energy lead to a cooperation with ESA and the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) that included the GOCE derived gravity field in the online geothermal energy investigation tool of the IRENA database. The relation between the gravity field products as the free air gravity anomaly, the Bouguer and isostatic anomalies and the heat flow values is though not straightforward and has not a unique relationship. It is complicated by the fact that it depends on the geodynamical context, on the geologic context and the age of the crustal rocks. Globally the geological context and geodynamical history of an area is known close to everywhere, so that a specific known relationship between gravity and geothermal potential can be applied. In this study we show the results of a systematic analysis of the problem, including some simulations of the key factors. The study relies on the data of GOCE and the resolution and accuracy of this satellite. We also give conclusions on the improved exploration power of a gravity mission with higher spatial resolution and reduced data error, as could be achieved in principle by flying

  18. Magnetic Fields Versus Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kerry

    2018-04-01

    Deep within giant molecular clouds, hidden by dense gas and dust, stars form. Unprecedented data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reveal the intricate magnetic structureswoven throughout one of the most massive star-forming regions in the Milky Way.How Stars Are BornThe Horsehead Nebulasdense column of gas and dust is opaque to visible light, but this infrared image reveals the young stars hidden in the dust. [NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team]Simple theory dictates that when a dense clump of molecular gas becomes massive enough that its self-gravity overwhelms the thermal pressure of the cloud, the gas collapses and forms a star. In reality, however, star formation is more complicated than a simple give and take between gravity and pressure. Thedusty molecular gas in stellar nurseries is permeated with magnetic fields, which are thought to impede the inward pull of gravity and slow the rate of star formation.How can we learn about the magnetic fields of distant objects? One way is by measuring dust polarization. An elongated dust grain will tend to align itself with its short axis parallel to the direction of the magnetic field. This systematic alignment of the dust grains along the magnetic field lines polarizes the dust grains emission perpendicular to the local magnetic field. This allows us to infer the direction of the magnetic field from the direction of polarization.Magnetic field orientations for protostars e2 and e8 derived from Submillimeter Array observations (panels a through c) and ALMA observations (panels d and e). Click to enlarge. [Adapted from Koch et al. 2018]Tracing Magnetic FieldsPatrick Koch (Academia Sinica, Taiwan) and collaborators used high-sensitivity ALMA observations of dust polarization to learn more about the magnetic field morphology of Milky Way star-forming region W51. W51 is one of the largest star-forming regions in our galaxy, home to high-mass protostars e2, e8, and North.The ALMA observations reveal

  19. Experimental search for quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This book summarizes recent developments in the research area of quantum gravity phenomenology. A series of short and nontechnical essays lays out the prospects of various experimental possibilities and their current status. Finding observational evidence for the quantization of space-time was long thought impossible. In the last decade however, new experimental design and technological advances have changed the research landscape and opened new perspectives on quantum gravity. Formerly dominated by purely theoretical constructions, quantum gravity now has a lively phenomenology to offer. From high precision measurements using macroscopic quantum oscillators to new analysis methods of the cosmic microwave background, no stone is being left unturned in the experimental search for quantum gravity. This book sheds new light on the connection of astroparticle physics with the quantum gravity problem. Gravitational waves and their detection are covered. It illustrates findings from the interconnection between gene...

  20. Higher derivative mimetic gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini; Firouzjahi, Hassan

    2018-01-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in mimetic gravity in the presence of classified higher derivative terms which can make the mimetic perturbations stable. We show that the quadratic higher derivative terms which are independent of curvature and the cubic higher derivative terms which come from curvature corrections are sufficient to remove instabilities in mimetic perturbations. The classified higher derivative terms have the same dimensions but they contribute differently in the background and perturbed equations. Therefore, we can control both the background and the perturbation equations allowing us to construct the higher derivative extension of mimetic dark matter and the mimetic nonsingular bouncing scenarios. The latter can be thought as a new higher derivative effective action for the loop quantum cosmology scenario in which the equations of motion coincide with those suggested by loop quantum cosmology. We investigate a possible connection between the mimetic cosmology and the Randall-Sundrum cosmology.

  1. Brane-Localized Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    The study of braneworlds has been an area of intense activity over the past decade, with thousands of papers being written, and many important technical advances being made. This book focuses on a particular aspect of braneworlds, namely perturbative gravity in one specific model: the Randall-Sundrum model. The book starts with an overview of the Randall-Sundrum model, discussing anti-de Sitter (AdS) space and the Israel equations in some detail. It then moves on to discuss cosmological branes, focusing on branes with constant curvature. The book then turns to brane gravity, i.e. what do we, as brane observers, perceive the gravitational interaction to be on the brane as derived from the actual five-dimensional gravitational physics? After a derivation of the general brane equations from the Israel equations, the remainder of the book deals with perturbative gravity. This part of the book is extremely detailed, with calculations given explicitly. Overall, the book is quite pedagogical in style, with the aim being to explain in detail the topics it chooses to cover. While it is not unusual to have books written on current and extremely popular research areas, it is unusual to have calculations written so explicitly. This is both a strength and a weakness of this book. It is a strength because the calculations are presented in a detail that students learning the topic will definitely appreciate; however, the narrow focus of the book also means that it lacks perspective and fails to present the broader context. In choosing to focus on one particular aspect of Randall-Sundrum branes, the book has not managed to communicate why a large number of theorists have worked so intensively on this model. In its early stages, the explicit detail of the Randall-Sundrum model would be extremely useful for a student starting out in this research area. In addition, the calculational detail later in the computation of the graviton propagator on the brane would also be welcome not

  2. Brane-Localized Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, Ruth [Department of Mathematical Sciences Science Laboratory, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-18

    The study of braneworlds has been an area of intense activity over the past decade, with thousands of papers being written, and many important technical advances being made. This book focuses on a particular aspect of braneworlds, namely perturbative gravity in one specific model: the Randall-Sundrum model. The book starts with an overview of the Randall-Sundrum model, discussing anti-de Sitter (AdS) space and the Israel equations in some detail. It then moves on to discuss cosmological branes, focusing on branes with constant curvature. The book then turns to brane gravity, i.e. what do we, as brane observers, perceive the gravitational interaction to be on the brane as derived from the actual five-dimensional gravitational physics? After a derivation of the general brane equations from the Israel equations, the remainder of the book deals with perturbative gravity. This part of the book is extremely detailed, with calculations given explicitly. Overall, the book is quite pedagogical in style, with the aim being to explain in detail the topics it chooses to cover. While it is not unusual to have books written on current and extremely popular research areas, it is unusual to have calculations written so explicitly. This is both a strength and a weakness of this book. It is a strength because the calculations are presented in a detail that students learning the topic will definitely appreciate; however, the narrow focus of the book also means that it lacks perspective and fails to present the broader context. In choosing to focus on one particular aspect of Randall-Sundrum branes, the book has not managed to communicate why a large number of theorists have worked so intensively on this model. In its early stages, the explicit detail of the Randall-Sundrum model would be extremely useful for a student starting out in this research area. In addition, the calculational detail later in the computation of the graviton propagator on the brane would also be welcome not

  3. DBI from gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxfield, Travis; Sethi, Savdeep [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago,Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2017-02-22

    We study the dynamics of gravitational lumps. By a lump, we mean a metric configuration that asymptotes to a flat space-time. Such lumps emerge in string theory as strong coupling descriptions of D-branes. We provide a physical argument that the broken global symmetries of such a background, generated by certain large diffeomorphisms, constrain the dynamics of localized modes. These modes include the translation zero modes and any localized tensor modes. The constraints we find are gravitational analogues of those found in brane physics. For the example of a Taub-NUT metric in eleven-dimensional supergravity, we argue that a critical value for the electric field arises from standard gravity without higher derivative interactions.

  4. Gravity, a geometrical course

    CERN Document Server

    Frè, Pietro Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Gravity, a Geometrical Course’ presents general relativity (GR) in a systematic and exhaustive way, covering three aspects that are homogenized into a single texture: i) the mathematical, geometrical foundations, exposed in a self consistent contemporary formalism, ii) the main physical, astrophysical and cosmological applications,  updated to the issues of contemporary research and observations, with glimpses on supergravity and superstring theory, iii) the historical development of scientific ideas underlying both the birth of general relativity and its subsequent evolution. The book is divided in two volumes.   Volume One is dedicated to the development of the theory and basic physical applications. It guides the reader from the foundation of special relativity to Einstein field equations, illustrating some basic applications in astrophysics. A detailed  account  of the historical and conceptual development of the theory is combined with the presentation of its mathematical foundations.  Differe...

  5. Alternative gravity theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francaviglia, M.

    1990-01-01

    Although general relativity is a well-established discipline the theory deserves efforts aimed at producing alternative or more general frameworks for investigating the classical properties of gravity. These are either devoted to producing alternative viewpoints or interpretations of standard general relativity, or at constructing, discussing and proposing experimental tests for alternative descriptions of the dynamics of the gravitational field and its interaction (or unification) with external matter fields. Classical alternative theories of gravitation can roughly classified as follows; theories based on a still 4-dimensional picture, under the assumption that the dynamics of the gravitational field is more complicated than Einstein's and theories based on higher-dimensional pictures. This leads to supergravity and strings which are not included here. Theories based on higher-dimensional pictures on the assumption that space-time is replaced by a higher-dimensional manifold. Papers on these classifications are reviewed. (author)

  6. Stochastic quantization and gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumpf, H.

    1984-01-01

    We give a preliminary account of the application of stochastic quantization to the gravitational field. We start in Section I from Nelson's formulation of quantum mechanics as Newtonian stochastic mechanics and only then introduce the Parisi-Wu stochastic quantization scheme on which all the later discussion will be based. In Section II we present a generalization of the scheme that is applicable to fields in physical (i.e. Lorentzian) space-time and treat the free linearized gravitational field in this manner. The most remarkable result of this is the noncausal propagation of conformal gravitons. Moreover the concept of stochastic gauge-fixing is introduced and a complete discussion of all the covariant gauges is given. A special symmetry relating two classes of covariant gauges is exhibited. Finally Section III contains some preliminary remarks on full nonlinear gravity. In particular we argue that in contrast to gauge fields the stochastic gravitational field cannot be transformed to a Gaussian process. (Author)

  7. Teleparallel Gravity An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Aldrovandi, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    Teleparallel Gravity (TG) is an alternative theory for gravitation, which is equivalent to General Relativity (GR). However, it is conceptually different. For example in GR geometry replaces the concept of force, and the trajectories are determined by geodesics. TG attributes gravitation to torsion, which accounts for gravitation by acting as a force. TG has already solved some old problems of gravitation (like the energy-momentum density of the gravitational field). The interest in TG has grown in the last few years. The book here proposed will be the first one dedicated exclusively to TG, and will include the foundations of the theory, as well as applications to specific problems to illustrate how the theory works.

  8. Brane-Localized Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Mannheim, Philip D

    2005-01-01

    This timely and valuable book provides a detailed pedagogical introduction and treatment of the brane-localized gravity program of Randall and Sundrum, in which gravitational signals are able to localize around our four-dimensional world in the event that it is a brane embedded in an infinitely-sized, higher dimensional anti-de Sitter bulk space. A completely self-contained development of the material needed for brane-world studies is provided for both students and workers in the field, with a significant amount of the material being previously unpublished. Particular attention is given to issues not ordinarily treated in the brane-world literature, such as the completeness of tensor gravitational fluctuation modes, the causality of brane-world propagators, and the status of the massless graviton fluctuation mode in brane worlds in which it is not normalizable.

  9. Impact Of GOCE On The Nordic Gravity Field Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yidiz, Hasan; Forsberg, René; Tscherning, C. C.

    2011-01-01

    GOCE level-2 Tzz and Txx gravity gradients at satellite altitude are used in combination as input data to predict surface free air gravity anomalies over the Nordic region using Least Square Collocation. We test the performance of using covariance functions created separately from Tzz gradients a...... Surface model, both the NKG-2004 quasi-geoid model of the Nordic and Baltic Area and the one obtained using second generation GOCE spherical harmonic coefficients based on time-wise method can successfully reproduce the higher level of the Baltic Sea relative to the Atlantic Ocean....

  10. Active Absorption of Irregular Gravity Waves in BEM-Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    1992-01-01

    The boundary element method is applied to the computation of irregular gravity waves. The boundary conditions at the open boundaries are obtained by a digital filtering technique, where the surface elevations in front of the open boundary are filtered numerically yielding the velocity to be presc......The boundary element method is applied to the computation of irregular gravity waves. The boundary conditions at the open boundaries are obtained by a digital filtering technique, where the surface elevations in front of the open boundary are filtered numerically yielding the velocity...

  11. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  12. Tests of chameleon gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrage, Clare; Sakstein, Jeremy

    2018-03-01

    Theories of modified gravity, where light scalars with non-trivial self-interactions and non-minimal couplings to matter—chameleon and symmetron theories—dynamically suppress deviations from general relativity in the solar system. On other scales, the environmental nature of the screening means that such scalars may be relevant. The highly-nonlinear nature of screening mechanisms means that they evade classical fifth-force searches, and there has been an intense effort towards designing new and novel tests to probe them, both in the laboratory and using astrophysical objects, and by reinterpreting existing datasets. The results of these searches are often presented using different parametrizations, which can make it difficult to compare constraints coming from different probes. The purpose of this review is to summarize the present state-of-the-art searches for screened scalars coupled to matter, and to translate the current bounds into a single parametrization to survey the state of the models. Presently, commonly studied chameleon models are well-constrained but less commonly studied models have large regions of parameter space that are still viable. Symmetron models are constrained well by astrophysical and laboratory tests, but there is a desert separating the two scales where the model is unconstrained. The coupling of chameleons to photons is tightly constrained but the symmetron coupling has yet to be explored. We also summarize the current bounds on f( R) models that exhibit the chameleon mechanism (Hu and Sawicki models). The simplest of these are well constrained by astrophysical probes, but there are currently few reported bounds for theories with higher powers of R. The review ends by discussing the future prospects for constraining screened modified gravity models further using upcoming and planned experiments.

  13. Three kinds of high-energy Pb ion tracks on the LiF crystal surface at grazing angles of incidence

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyova, I V

    2002-01-01

    Tracks induced on a surface of a LiF crystal by Pb ions with energy of 4.46 MeV/u were studied by the method of shadow replica electron microscopy. The irradiation was carried out at angles of 0.5 deg. and 2 deg. relative to the surface plane of the crystal. Lengths and widths of three kinds of tracks were compared: (1) surface tracks which are formed on a pure crystal surface; (2) island tracks which are formed in an island film of gold (with island radius and separation of <=5 nm) deposited on the crystal surface prior to irradiation and (3) island tracks which are formed in the same island film pressed against the crystal surface by the carbon layer. It was established: (1) At angle of irradiation of 0.5 deg. , the surface track formation is initiated at a point where the ion has not yet crossed the crystal surface, but rather moves above the surface plane at a distance of <=1 nm. (2) When the island track is formed in the free island film, the islands completely removed from the track zone. (3) When...

  14. Measuring antimatter gravity with muonium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The gravitational acceleration of antimatter, ḡ, has never been directly measured and could bear importantly on our understanding of gravity, the possible existence of a fifth force, and the nature and early history of the universe. Only two avenues for such a measurement appear to be feasible: antihydrogen and muonium. The muonium measurement requires a novel, monoenergetic, low-velocity, horizontal muonium beam directed at an atom interferometer. The precision three-grating interferometer can be produced in silicon nitride or ultrananocrystalline diamond using state-of-the-art nanofabrication. The required precision alignment and calibration at the picometer level also appear to be feasible. With 100 nm grating pitch, a 10% measurement of ḡ can be made using some months of surface-muon beam time, and a 1% or better measurement with a correspondingly larger exposure. This could constitute the first gravitational measurement of leptonic matter, of 2nd-generation matter and, possibly, the first measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter.

  15. Stochastic Gravity: Theory and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Bei Lok

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Whereas semiclassical gravity is based on the semiclassical Einstein equation with sources given by the expectation value of the stress-energy tensor of quantum fields, stochastic semiclassical gravity is based on the Einstein–Langevin equation, which has, in addition, sources due to the noise kernel. The noise kernel is the vacuum expectation value of the (operator-valued stress-energy bitensor, which describes the fluctuations of quantum-matter fields in curved spacetimes. A new improved criterion for the validity of semiclassical gravity may also be formulated from the viewpoint of this theory. In the first part of this review we describe the fundamentals of this new theory via two approaches: the axiomatic and the functional. The axiomatic approach is useful to see the structure of the theory from the framework of semiclassical gravity, showing the link from the mean value of the stress-energy tensor to the correlation functions. The functional approach uses the Feynman–Vernon influence functional and the Schwinger–Keldysh closed-time-path effective action methods. In the second part, we describe three applications of stochastic gravity. First, we consider metric perturbations in a Minkowski spacetime, compute the two-point correlation functions of these perturbations and prove that Minkowski spacetime is a stable solution of semiclassical gravity. Second, we discuss structure formation from the stochastic-gravity viewpoint, which can go beyond the standard treatment by incorporating the full quantum effect of the inflaton fluctuations. Third, using the Einstein–Langevin equation, we discuss the backreaction of Hawking radiation and the behavior of metric fluctuations for both the quasi-equilibrium condition of a black-hole in a box and the fully nonequilibrium condition of an evaporating black hole spacetime. Finally, we briefly discuss the theoretical structure of stochastic gravity in relation to quantum gravity and point out

  16. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN10 (2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Connecticut and the Atlantic Ocean collected in 2013 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the...

  17. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN09 (2016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, New York, and the Atlantic Ocean collected in 2012 over 1 survey. This data set is...

  18. Compact objects in Horndeski gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Hector O.; Maselli, Andrea; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Horndeski gravity holds a special position as the most general extension of Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) with a single scalar degree of freedom and second-order field equations. Because of these features, Horndeski gravity is an attractive phenomenological playground to investigate the consequences of modifications of GR in cosmology and astrophysics. We present a review of the progress made so far in the study of compact objects (black holes (BHs) and neutron stars (NSs)) within Horndeski gravity. In particular, we review our recent work on slowly rotating BHs and present some new results on slowly rotating NSs.

  19. Natural inflation and quantum gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Anton; Saraswat, Prashant; Sundrum, Raman

    2015-04-17

    Cosmic inflation provides an attractive framework for understanding the early Universe and the cosmic microwave background. It can readily involve energies close to the scale at which quantum gravity effects become important. General considerations of black hole quantum mechanics suggest nontrivial constraints on any effective field theory model of inflation that emerges as a low-energy limit of quantum gravity, in particular, the constraint of the weak gravity conjecture. We show that higher-dimensional gauge and gravitational dynamics can elegantly satisfy these constraints and lead to a viable, theoretically controlled and predictive class of natural inflation models.

  20. Cosmic string in gravity's rainbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Davood; Upadhyay, Sudhaker; Myrzakulov, Yerlan; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we study the various cylindrical solutions (cosmic strings) in gravity's rainbow scenario. In particular, we calculate the gravitational field equations corresponding to energy-dependent background. Further, we discuss the possible Kasner, quasi-Kasner and non-Kasner exact solutions of the field equations. In this framework, we find that quasi-Kasner solutions cannot be realized in gravity's rainbow. Assuming only time-dependent metric functions, we also analyse the time-dependent vacuum cosmic strings in gravity's rainbow, which are completely different than the other GR solutions.

  1. Ion desorption from solid surfaces under slow (KeV) and fast (MeV) ion sputtering. Influence of the charge state and of the incidence angle on the input channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joret, H.

    1990-06-01

    Solid surfaces of organic and inorganic materials have been bombarded by fast heavy ions (several MeV). It is shown that the charge state of the projectile has a strong influence on the atomic and molecular ion desorption yield. Experimental studies proved that molecular ions can be emitted intact from deep layers underneath the surface (volume emission) with the existence of a crater emission. On the other hand light ions like H(+), H(+)-2, H(+)-3 are emitted from the surface of the solid in a time around 10 -16 second. The H(+) depends on the incident charge state g-i. When using slow ions (keV) the same dependence was observed for the first time and compared to the fast ion results. The equilibrum charge state of fast ions passing through solids was measured. The influence of the angle of incidence was investigated. Langmuir-Blodgett films of fatty acid were used. A geometrical model is developed for the 50 angstroms layer [fr

  2. Lightning incidents in Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myagmar Doljinsuren

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is one of the first studies that has been conducted in Mongolia on the distribution of lightning incidents. The study covers a 10-year period from 2004 to 2013. The country records a human death rate of 15.4 deaths per 10 million people per year, which is much higher than that of many countries with similar isokeraunic level. The reason may be the low-grown vegetation observed in most rural areas of Mongolia, a surface topography, typical to steppe climate. We suggest modifications to Gomes–Kadir equation for such countries, as it predicts a much lower annual death rate for Mongolia. The lightning incidents spread over the period from May to August with the peak of the number of incidents occurring in July. The worst lightning affected region in the country is the central part. Compared with impacts of other convective disasters such as squalls, thunderstorms and hail, lightning stands as the second highest in the number of incidents, human deaths and animal deaths. Economic losses due to lightning is only about 1% of the total losses due to the four extreme weather phenomena. However, unless precautionary measures are not promoted among the public, this figure of losses may significantly increase with time as the country is undergoing rapid industrialization at present.

  3. Gravity and seismicity over the Guerrero Seismic Gap, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostoglodov, V.; Bandy, W.; Domínguez, J.; Mena, M.

    Four detailed (average station interval = 5 km) gravity transects were recently conducted in the Pacific coastal region of Mexico. A differential GPS technique was used to determine the elevation and coordinates of the gravity stations. The profiles are oriented northeast-southwest and extend from the coast up to ˜60 km inland. The Bouguer gravity anomaly is decreasing consistently along every profile from 60-80 mGal at the coast with an approximately constant regional gradient of -2.2 mGal/km normal to the trench. A plot of the gravity anomaly against the distance from the trench axis demonstrates that the regional slope in the gravity anomaly is shifting gradually (20-25 mGal) inland along the coast of Guerrero from the southeast (Atoyac) to the northwest (Petatlán - Zihuatanejo). A model cross section of the Mexican subduction zone (MSZ) based on the tomography inversion for the Guerrero region shows that the gravity anomaly values and the regional anomaly trend can be explained mostly by the effect of the density contrast between the slab and the continental crust. The upper surface of the subducted slab (USS) and the seismogenic contact zone between the upper plate and the slab is traced clearly in several seismicity cross sections based on the data of the regional seismic network in Guerrero. The depth and shape of the USS revealed from the seismicity and gravity anomaly data for the same profiles are in good agreement. This correlation may be fairly useful when applied to gravity profiles in order to estimate the depth of the USS and the seismogenic contact in other parts of the MSZ which lack reliable seismicity data.

  4. Assessing GOCE Gravity Models using Altimetry and In-situ Ocean Current Observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Honecker, Johanna

    The Gravity and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission measures Earth's gravity field with an unprecedented accuracy at short spatial scales. Previous results have demonstrated a significant advance in our ability to determine the ocean's general circulation. The improved...... gravity models provided by the GOCE mission have enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features and the associated geostrophic surface currents reveal improvements for all of the ocean's current systems. In this study, a series of 23 newer gravity models including observations from...

  5. Effects of gravity level on bubble formation and rise in low-viscosity liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suñol, Francesc; González-Cinca, Ricard

    2015-05-01

    We present an experimental analysis of the effects of gravity level on the formation and rise dynamics of bubbles. Experiments were carried out with millimeter-diameter bubbles in the hypergravity environment provided by the large-diameter centrifuge of the European Space Agency. Bubble detachment from a nozzle is determined by buoyancy and surface tension forces regardless of the gravity level. Immediately after detachment, bubble trajectory is deviated by the Coriolis force. Subsequent bubble rise is dominated by inertial forces and follows a zig-zag trajectory with amplitude and frequency dependent on the gravity level. Vorticity production is enhanced as gravity increases, which destabilizes the flow and therefore the bubble path.

  6. Local subsystems in gauge theory and gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, William; Freidel, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    We consider the problem of defining localized subsystems in gauge theory and gravity. Such systems are associated to spacelike hypersurfaces with boundaries and provide the natural setting for studying entanglement entropy of localized subsystems. We present a general formalism to associate a gauge-invariant classical phase space to a spatial slice with boundary by introducing new degrees of freedom on the boundary. In Yang-Mills theory the new degrees of freedom are a choice of gauge on the boundary, transformations of which are generated by the normal component of the nonabelian electric field. In general relativity the new degrees of freedom are the location of a codimension-2 surface and a choice of conformal normal frame. These degrees of freedom transform under a group of surface symmetries, consisting of diffeomorphisms of the codimension-2 boundary, and position-dependent linear deformations of its normal plane. We find the observables which generate these symmetries, consisting of the conformal normal metric and curvature of the normal connection. We discuss the implications for the problem of defining entanglement entropy in quantum gravity. Our work suggests that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy may arise from the different ways of gluing together two partial Cauchy surfaces at a cross-section of the horizon.

  7. Cutoff for extensions of massive gravity and bi-gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matas, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Recently there has been interest in extending ghost-free massive gravity, bi-gravity, and multi-gravity by including non-standard kinetic terms and matter couplings. We first review recent proposals for this class of extensions, emphasizing how modifications of the kinetic and potential structure of the graviton and modifications of the coupling to matter are related. We then generalize existing no-go arguments in the metric language to the vielbein language in second-order form. We give an ADM argument to show that the most promising extensions to the kinetic term and matter coupling contain a Boulware–Deser ghost. However, as recently emphasized, we may still be able to view these extensions as effective field theories below some cutoff scale. To address this possibility, we show that there is a decoupling limit where a ghost appears for a wide class of matter couplings and kinetic terms. In particular, we show that there is a decoupling limit where the linear effective vielbein matter coupling contains a ghost. Using the insight we gain from this decoupling limit analysis, we place an upper bound on the cutoff for the linear effective vielbein coupling. This result can be generalized to new kinetic interactions in the vielbein language in second-order form. Combined with recent results, this provides a strong uniqueness argument on the form of ghost-free massive gravity, bi-gravity, and multi-gravity. (paper)

  8. Phases of massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dubovsky, S L

    2004-01-01

    We systematically study the most general Lorentz-violating graviton mass invariant under three-dimensional Eucledian group using the explicitly covariant language. We find that at general values of mass parameters the massive graviton has six propagating degrees of freedom, and some of them are ghosts or lead to rapid classical instabilities. However, there is a number of different regions in the mass parameter space where massive gravity can be described by a consistent low-energy effective theory with cutoff $\\sim\\sqrt{mM_{Pl}}$ free of rapid instabilities and vDVZ discontinuity. Each of these regions is characterized by certain fine-tuning relations between mass parameters, generalizing the Fierz--Pauli condition. In some cases the required fine-tunings are consequences of the existence of the subgroups of the diffeomorphism group that are left unbroken by the graviton mass. We found two new cases, when the resulting theories have a property of UV insensitivity, i.e. remain well behaved after inclusion of ...

  9. Miscible Viscous Gravity Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Bruce; Cote, Kristen; Hong, Youn Sub; Steverango, Luke; Surma, Chris

    2017-11-01

    Full- and partial-depth lock-release laboratory experiments are performed examining the evolution of a glycerol solution being released into an ambient fluid of either fresh or salty water. The advance of the current front and the depth of the current from its head back to the lock are tracked over time. While the viscosity of pure glycerol is sufficiently high to retard mixing between the current and ambient fluid, where mixing does occur the viscosity reduces significantly so permitting more turbulent mixing to occur. Meanwhile viscous stresses at the bottom of the current introduces shear within the boundary layer which extends vertically over a significant fraction of the current's depth. Thus, even though there is no evidence of a lubrication layer below the current, the current nonetheless advances initially at speeds close to those of effectively inviscid gravity currents. As the viscous boundary layer depth becomes comparable to the current depth in the tail the fluid slows dramatically while the turbulent front continues to advance, slowing as it becomes depleted of fluid. NSERC Discovery Grant.

  10. Gravity from strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deser, S.

    1987-01-01

    We obtain the Einstein action plus quadratic curvature corrections generated by closed bosonic, heterotic and supersymmetric strings by matching the four-graviton amplitude (to first order in the slope parameter and fourth power of momenta) with an effective local gravitational action. The resulting corrections are first shown to be of the Gauss-Bonnet form. It is then noted that, by the very nature of the slope expansion, the field-redefinition theorem applies. Consequently, only the curvature-squared term is determined, while squares of its contractions are explicitly seen not to contribute. This latter property has a generalization to all orders which implies that the effective gravitational action is unavoidably ghost-free. The properties of solutions to these corrected theories are then examined. First neglecting dilatons, we find the explicit 'Schwarzschild' metrics. Both asymptotically flat and de Sitter solutions are present. The latter are however shown to be unstable. The former have horizons and singularities which are respectively smaller and less violent than in Einstein gravity; the correct sign of the slope parameter also ensures absence of naked singularities. When dilatons are included, the cosmological vacua are gratifyingly excluded. (orig.)

  11. Distinguishing modified gravity models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brax, Philippe [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris-Saclay, CEA, CNRS, F-91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Davis, Anne-Christine, E-mail: philippe.brax@cea.fr, E-mail: A.C.Davis@damtp.cam.ac.uk [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-01

    Modified gravity models with screening in local environments appear in three different guises: chameleon, K-mouflage and Vainshtein mechanisms. We propose to look for differences between these classes of models by considering cosmological observations at low redshift. In particular, we analyse the redshift dependence of the fine structure constant and the proton to electron mass ratio in each of these scenarios. When the absorption lines belong to unscreened regions of space such as dwarf galaxies, a time variation would be present for chameleons. For both K-mouflage and Vainshtein mechanisms, the cosmological time variation of the scalar field is not suppressed in both unscreened and screened environments, therefore enhancing the variation of constants and their detection prospect. We also consider the time variation of the redshift of distant objects using their spectrocopic velocities. We find that models of the K-mouflage and Vainshtein types have very different spectroscopic velocities as a function of redshift and that their differences with the Λ-CDM template should be within reach of the future ELT-HIRES observations.

  12. Distinguishing modified gravity models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Modified gravity models with screening in local environments appear in three different guises: chameleon, K-mouflage and Vainshtein mechanisms. We propose to look for differences between these classes of models by considering cosmological observations at low redshift. In particular, we analyse the redshift dependence of the fine structure constant and the proton to electron mass ratio in each of these scenarios. When the absorption lines belong to unscreened regions of space such as dwarf galaxies, a time variation would be present for chameleons. For both K-mouflage and Vainshtein mechanisms, the cosmological time variation of the scalar field is not suppressed in both unscreened and screened environments, therefore enhancing the variation of constants and their detection prospect. We also consider the time variation of the redshift of distant objects using their spectrocopic velocities. We find that models of the K-mouflage and Vainshtein types have very different spectroscopic velocities as a function of redshift and that their differences with the Λ-CDM template should be within reach of the future ELT-HIRES observations

  13. Entropy and Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard S. Kay

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We give a review, in the style of an essay, of the author’s 1998 matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis which, unlike the standard approach to entropy based on coarse-graining, offers a definition for the entropy of a closed system as a real and objective quantity. We explain how this approach offers an explanation for the Second Law of Thermodynamics in general and a non-paradoxical understanding of information loss during black hole formation and evaporation in particular. It also involves a radically different from usual description of black hole equilibrium states in which the total state of a black hole in a box together with its atmosphere is a pure state—entangled in just such a way that the reduced state of the black hole and of its atmosphere are each separately approximately thermal. We also briefly recall some recent work of the author which involves a reworking of the string-theory understanding of black hole entropy consistent with this alternative description of black hole equilibrium states and point out that this is free from some unsatisfactory features of the usual string theory understanding. We also recall the author’s recent arguments based on this alternative description which suggest that the Anti de Sitter space (AdS/conformal field theory (CFT correspondence is a bijection between the boundary CFT and just the matter degrees of freedom of the bulk theory.

  14. Path integral of unimodular gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de León Ardón, R.; Ohta, N.; Percacci, R.

    2018-01-01

    We compute the one-loop effective action in unimodular gravity, starting from two different classical formulations of the theory. We find that the effective action is the same in both cases, and agrees with the one of general relativity.

  15. Neutron stars in Horndeski gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, Andrea; Silva, Hector O.; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-06-01

    Horndeski's theory of gravity is the most general scalar-tensor theory with a single scalar whose equations of motion contain at most second-order derivatives. A subsector of Horndeski's theory known as "Fab Four" gravity allows for dynamical self-tuning of the quantum vacuum energy, and therefore it has received particular attention in cosmology as a possible alternative to the Λ CDM model. Here we study compact stars in Fab Four gravity, which includes as special cases general relativity ("George"), Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity ("Ringo"), theories with a nonminimal coupling with the Einstein tensor ("John"), and theories involving the double-dual of the Riemann tensor ("Paul"). We generalize and extend previous results in theories of the John class and were not able to find realistic compact stars in theories involving the Paul class.

  16. Gravity in a Mine Shaft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Peter M.; Hall, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the effects of gravity, local density compared to the density of the earth, the mine shaft, centrifugal force, and air buoyancy on the weight of an object at the top and at the bottom of a mine shaft. (JRH)

  17. Topological gravity with minimal matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Keke

    1991-01-01

    Topological minimal matter, obtained by twisting the minimal N = 2 supeconformal field theory, is coupled to two-dimensional topological gravity. The free field formulation of the coupled system allows explicit representations of BRST charge, physical operators and their correlation functions. The contact terms of the physical operators may be evaluated by extending the argument used in a recent solution of topological gravity without matter. The consistency of the contact terms in correlation functions implies recursion relations which coincide with the Virasoro constraints derived from the multi-matrix models. Topological gravity with minimal matter thus provides the field theoretic description for the multi-matrix models of two-dimensional quantum gravity. (orig.)

  18. Some remarks about quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Alfaro, V.; Fubini, S.; Turin Univ.; Furlan, G.; Trieste Univ.

    1982-02-01

    Ideas concerning the normalization of quantum gravity are set forth. The approach is to ascribe the correct dimensionality to the field gsub(μnu), to interpret Newton's constant as a vacuum effect, and to work with inverse operators

  19. Quantum gravity and quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Papantonopoulos, Lefteris; Siopsis, George; Tsamis, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Quantum gravity has developed into a fast-growing subject in physics and it is expected that probing the high-energy and high-curvature regimes of gravitating systems will shed some light on how to eventually achieve an ultraviolet complete quantum theory of gravity. Such a theory would provide the much needed information about fundamental problems of classical gravity, such as the initial big-bang singularity, the cosmological constant problem, Planck scale physics and the early-time inflationary evolution of our Universe.   While in the first part of this book concepts of quantum gravity are introduced and approached from different angles, the second part discusses these theories in connection with cosmological models and observations, thereby exploring which types of signatures of modern and mathematically rigorous frameworks can be detected by experiments. The third and final part briefly reviews the observational status of dark matter and dark energy, and introduces alternative cosmological models.   ...

  20. Defying gravity using Jenga™ blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yin-Soo; Yap, Kueh-Chin

    2007-11-01

    This paper describes how Jenga™ blocks can be used to demonstrate the physics of an overhanging tower that appears to defy gravity. We also propose ideas for how this demonstration can be adapted for the A-level physics curriculum.

  1. Zero-gravity movement studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badler, N. I.; Fishwick, P.; Taft, N.; Agrawala, M.

    1985-01-01

    The use of computer graphics to simulate the movement of articulated animals and mechanisms has a number of uses ranging over many fields. Human motion simulation systems can be useful in education, medicine, anatomy, physiology, and dance. In biomechanics, computer displays help to understand and analyze performance. Simulations can be used to help understand the effect of external or internal forces. Similarly, zero-gravity simulation systems should provide a means of designing and exploring the capabilities of hypothetical zero-gravity situations before actually carrying out such actions. The advantage of using a simulation of the motion is that one can experiment with variations of a maneuver before attempting to teach it to an individual. The zero-gravity motion simulation problem can be divided into two broad areas: human movement and behavior in zero-gravity, and simulation of articulated mechanisms.

  2. Gravity Data For Colombia 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (9,050 records), were observed and processed by the Instituto Geografico Agustin Codazzi(IGAC), in Colombia from 1958 to 1996. This data...

  3. Chern-Simons-like Gravity Theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Hohm, Olaf; Merbis, Wout; Routh, Alasdair J.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    A wide class of three-dimensional gravity models can be put into "Chern-Simons-like" form. We perform a Hamiltonian analysis of the general model and then specialise to Einstein-Cartan Gravity, General Massive Gravity, the recently proposed Zwei-Dreibein Gravity and a further parity violating

  4. Radion and holographic brane gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro

    2002-01-01

    The low energy effective theory for the Randall-Sundrum two-brane system is investigated with an emphasis on the role of the nonlinear radion in the brane world. The equations of motion in the bulk are solved using a low energy expansion method. This allows us, through the junction conditions, to deduce the effective equations of motion for gravity on the brane. It is shown that the gravity on the brane world is described by a quasi-scalar-tensor theory with a specific coupling function ω(Ψ)=3Ψ/2(1-Ψ) on the positive tension brane and ω(Φ)=-3Φ/2(1+Φ) on the negative tension brane, where Ψ and Φ are nonlinear realizations of the radion on the positive and negative tension branes, respectively. In contrast with the usual scalar-tensor gravity, the quasi-scalar-tensor gravity couples with two kinds of matter; namely, the matter on both positive and negative tension branes, with different effective gravitational coupling constants. In particular, the radion disguised as the scalar fields Ψ and Φ couples with the sum of the traces of the energy-momentum tensor on both branes. In the course of the derivation, it is revealed that the radion plays an essential role in converting the nonlocal Einstein gravity with generalized dark radiation to local quasi-scalar-tensor gravity. For completeness, we also derive the effective action for our theory by substituting the bulk solution into the original action. It is also shown that quasi-scalar-tensor gravity works as a hologram at low energy in the sense that the bulk geometry can be reconstructed from the solution of quasi-scalar-tensor gravity

  5. The quest for quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Au, G.

    1995-03-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing theoretical physics lies in reconciling Einstein`s classical theory of gravity - general relativity -with quantum field theory. Although both theories have been experimentally supported in their respective regimes, they are as compatible as a square peg and a round hole. This article summarises the current status of the superstring approach to the problem, the status of the Ashtekar program, and problem of time in quantum gravity.

  6. The quest for quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au, G.

    1995-03-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing theoretical physics lies in reconciling Einstein's classical theory of gravity - general relativity -with quantum field theory. Although both theories have been experimentally supported in their respective regimes, they are as compatible as a square peg and a round hole. This article summarises the current status of the superstring approach to the problem, the status of the Ashtekar program, and problem of time in quantum gravity

  7. Astrophysical Tests of Modified Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Einstein's theory of general relativity has been the accepted theory of gravity for nearly a century but how well have we really tested it? The laws of gravity have been probed in our solar system to extremely high precision using several different tests and general relativity has passed each one with flying colours. Despite this, there are still some mysteries it cannot account for, one of which being the recently discovered acceleration of the universe and this has prompted a theoretical st...

  8. PPN-limit of Fourth Order Gravity inspired by Scalar-Tensor Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Capozziello, S.; Troisi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Based on the {\\it dynamical} equivalence between higher order gravity and scalar-tensor gravity the PPN-limit of fourth order gravity is discussed. We exploit this analogy developing a fourth order gravity version of the Eddington PPN-parameters. As a result, Solar System experiments can be reconciled with higher order gravity, if physical constraints descending from experiments are fulfilled.

  9. Gravity a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Clifton, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Gravity is one of the four fundamental interactions that exist in nature. It also has the distinction of being the oldest, weakest, and most difficult force to quantize. Understanding gravity is not only essential for understanding the motion of objects on Earth, but also the motion of all celestial objects, and even the expansion of the Universe itself. It was the study of gravity that led Einstein to his profound realizations about the nature of space and time. Gravity is not only universal, it is also essential for understanding the behavior of the Universe, and all astrophysical bodies within it. In this Very Short Introduction Timothy Clifton looks at the development of our understanding of gravity since the early observations of Kepler and Newtonian theory. He discusses Einstein's theory of gravity, which now supplants Newton's, showing how it allows us to understand why the frequency of light changes as it passes through a gravitational field, why GPS satellites need their clocks corrected as they orbi...

  10. Hydrological feasibility of gravity diversion of the west flowing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The concept of collecting surface runoff on the slopes in canals cut across the western slopes of the Western Ghats, in order to divert part of a flow in the west flowing rivers to the east by gravity, is being promoted in Karnataka. This paper presents a study of the hydrological feasibility of such canals, termed 'garland canals' ...

  11. Hydrological feasibility of gravity diversion of the west flowing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The concept of collecting surface runoff on the slopes in canals cut across the western slopes of the. Western Ghats, in order to divert part of a flow in the west flowing rivers to the east by gravity, is being promoted in Karnataka. This paper presents a study of the hydrological feasibility of such canals, termed 'garland canals' ...

  12. Effect of the Earth's inner structure on the gravity in definitions of height systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenzer, Robert; Foroughi, Ismael; Pitoňák, Martin; Šprlák, Michal

    2017-04-01

    In context of the vertical datum unification, the geoid-to-quasi-geoid separation has been of significant interest in recent years, because most of existing local vertical datums are realized in the system of either normal or orthometric heights. Nevertheless, the normal-orthometric heights are still used in many other countries where the normal gravity values along leveling lines were adopted instead of the observed gravity. Whereas the conversion between the orthometric and normal heights is defined by means of the mean gravity disturbances (i.e. differences between the mean values of the actual and normal gravity) along the plumbline within the topography, differences between the normal and normal-orthometric heights can be described by means of the surface gravity disturbances. Since the normal gravity field does not reflect the topographic masses and actual mass density distribution inside the Earth, the definition of gravity represents a principal aspect for a realization of particular vertical datum. To address this issue in this study, we investigate effects of the Earth's inner density structure on the surface and mean gravity disturbances, and discuss their impact on the vertical datum realization. These two gravity field quantities are computed globally with a spectral resolution complete to a spherical harmonic degree 2160 using the global gravity, terrain, ice-thickness, inland bathymetry and crustal structure models. Our results reveal that both, the surface and mean gravity disturbances mostly comprise the gravitational signal of topography and masses distributed below the geoid surface. Moreover, in polar areas, a significant contribution comes from large glaciers. In contrast, the contributions of anomalous density distribution within the topography attributed to major lakes, sediments and bedrock density variations are much less pronounced. We also demonstrate that the mean gravity disturbances within the topography are significantly modified

  13. Relativistic theory of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This work presents an unambiguous construction of the relativistic theory of gravity (RTG) in the framework of relativity and the geometrization principle. The gauge principle has been formulated, and the Lagrangian density of the gravitational field has thus been constructed. This theory explains the totality of the available experimental data on the solar system and predicts the existence of gravitational waves of the Faraday-Maxwell type. According to the RTG, the Universe is infinite and ''flat'', hence it follows that its matter density should be equal to its critical density. Therefore, an appreciable ''hidden mass'' exceeding the presently observed mass of the matter almost 40-fold should exist in the Universe in some form of the matter or other. In accordance with the RTG, a massive body having a finite density ceases to contract under gravitational forces within a finite interval of proper time. From the viewpoint of an external reference frame, the brightness of the body decreases exponentially (it is getting darker), but nothing extraordinary happens in this case because its density always remains finite and, for example, for a body with the mass of about 10 8 M 0 it is equal to 2 g/cm 3 . That is why it follows from the RTG that there could be no object whatsoever (black holes) in which gravitational collapse of matter develops to an infinite density. As has been shown, the presence of a cosmological term necessarily requires the introduction of a term with an explicit dependence on the Minkowski metrics. For the long-range gravitational forces the cosmological constant vanishes

  14. Superconducting gravity gradiometer for sensitive gravity measurements. II. Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, H.A.; Moody, M.V.; Paik, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    A sensitive superconducting gravity gradiometer has been constructed and tested. Coupling to gravity signals is obtained by having two superconducting proof masses modulate magnetic fields produced by persistent currents. The induced electrical currents are differenced by a passive superconducting circuit coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device. The experimental behavior of this device has been shown to follow the theoretical model closely in both signal transfer and noise characteristics. While its intrinsic noise level is shown to be 0.07 E Hz/sup -1/2/ (1 Eequivalent10/sup -9/ sec/sup -2/), the actual performance of the gravity gradiometer on a passive platform has been limited to 0.3--0.7 E Hz/sup -1/2/ due to its coupling to the environmental noise. The detailed structure of this excess noise is understood in terms of an analytical error model of the instrument. The calibration of the gradiometer has been obtained by two independent methods: by applying a linear acceleration and a gravity signal in two different operational modes of the instrument. This device has been successfully operated as a detector in a new null experiment for the gravitational inverse-square law. In this paper we report the design, fabrication, and detailed test results of the superconducting gravity gradiometer. We also present additional theoretical analyses which predict the specific dynamic behavior of the gradiometer and of the test

  15. Heat Transfer Manipulation via Switchable Wettability Surfaces

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research seeks to manipulate heat transfer during flow condensation in low-gravity environments by employing switchable wettability surfaces....

  16. Geometric scalar theory of gravity beyond spherical symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschella, U.; Novello, M.

    2017-04-01

    We construct several exact solutions for a recently proposed geometric scalar theory of gravity. We focus on a class of axisymmetric geometries and a big-bang-like geometry and discuss their Lorentzian character. The axisymmetric solutions are parametrized by an integer angular momentum l . The l =0 (spherical) case gives rise to the Schwarzschild geometry. The other solutions have naked singular surfaces. While not a priori obvious, all the solutions that we present here are globally Lorentzian. The Lorentzian signature appears to be a robust property of the disformal geometries solving the vacuum geometric scalar theory of gravity equations.

  17. Measured and modelled absolute gravity changes in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Emil; Forsberg, René; Strykowski, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    In glaciated areas, the Earth is responding to the ongoing changes of the ice sheets, a response knownas glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). GIA can be investigated through observations of gravity change.For the ongoing assessment of the ice sheets mass balance, where satellite data are used......, the study ofGIA is important since it acts as an error source. GIA consists of three signals as seen by a gravimeter onthe surface of the Earth. These signals are investigated in this study. The ICE-5G ice history and recentlydeveloped ice models of present day changes are used to model the gravity change...

  18. Characterization and flux of marine oil snow settling toward the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon incident: Evidence for input from surface oil and impact on shallow shelf sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Scott A; German, Christopher R

    2017-11-03

    Sediment trap samples from the shelf edge area (400-450m water depth), 58km northeast of the failed Macondo well, were collected before, during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Detailed chemical analyses of particulates revealed that fluxes of spill-derived TPH (2356μg/m 2 /day), total PAH (5.4μg/m 2 /day), and hopane (0.89μg/m 2 /day) settling to the seafloor directly beneath the surface-plume were 19- to 44-times higher during the active spill than pre- and post-spill background values. The oil was variably biodegraded, evaporated and photo-oxidized indicating that it derived from the sinking of surface oil. The hopane-based oil flux that we calculate (10bbl/km 2 ) indicates that at least 76,000bbl of Macondo oil that reached the ocean surface subsequently sank over an area of approximately 7600km 2 . We explore how this flux of sunken surface oil contributed to the total volume of oil deposited on the seafloor following the Deepwater Horizon incident. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Entanglement entropy in three dimensional gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxfield, Henry [Centre for Particle Theory & Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University,South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-07

    The Ryu-Takayanagi (RT) and covariant Hubeny-Rangamani-Takayanagi (HRT) proposals relate entanglement entropy in CFTs with holographic duals to the areas of minimal or extremal surfaces in the bulk geometry. We show how, in three dimensional pure gravity, the relevant regulated geodesic lengths can be obtained by writing a spacetime as a quotient of AdS{sub 3}, with the problem reduced to a simple purely algebraic calculation. We explain how this works in both Lorentzian and Euclidean formalisms, before illustrating its use to obtain novel results in a number of examples, including rotating BTZ, the ℝℙ{sup 2} geon, and several wormhole geometries. This includes spatial and temporal dependence of single-interval entanglement entropy, despite these symmetries being broken only behind an event horizon. We also discuss considerations allowing HRT to be derived from analytic continuation of Euclidean computations in certain contexts, and a related class of complexified extremal surfaces.

  20. (2+1)-dimensional quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Akio; Nakao, Ken-ichi.

    1989-05-01

    The (2+1)-dimensional pure Einstein gravity is studied in the canonical ADM formalism, assuming that the spatial surface is closed and compact. Owing to the constraints, the dynamical variables are reduced to the moduli parameters of the 2-surface. Upon quantization, the system becomes a quantum mechanics of moduli parameters in a curved space endowed with the Weil-Petersson metric. In the case of torus in particular, the superspace, on which the wave function of universe is defined, turns out to be the fundamental region is the moduli space. The solution of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation is explicitly given as the Maass form which is perfectly regular in the superspace. (author)

  1. Self Completeness of Einstein Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2010-01-01

    We argue, that in Einsteinian gravity the Planck length is the shortest length of nature, and any attempt of resolving trans-Planckian physics bounces back to macroscopic distances due to black hole formation. In Einstein gravity trans-Planckian propagating quantum degrees of freedom cannot exist, instead they are equivalent to the classical black holes that are fully described by lighter infra-red degrees of freedom and give exponentially-soft contribution into the virtual processes. Based on this property we argue that pure-Einstein (super)gravity and its high-dimensional generalizations are self-complete in deep-UV, but not in standard Wilsonian sense. We suggest that certain strong-coupling limit of string theory is built-in in pure Einstein gravity, whereas the role of weakly-coupled string theory limit is to consistently couple gravity to other particle species, with their number being set by the inverse string coupling. We also discuss some speculative ideas generalizing the notion of non-Wilsonian sel...

  2. Scale-invariant gravity: geometrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Edward; Barbour, Julian; Foster, Brendan; Murchadha, Niall O

    2003-01-01

    We present a scale-invariant theory, conformal gravity, which closely resembles the geometrodynamical formulation of general relativity (GR). While previous attempts to create scale-invariant theories of gravity have been based on Weyl's idea of a compensating field, our direct approach dispenses with this and is built by extension of the method of best matching w.r.t. scaling developed in the parallel particle dynamics paper by one of the authors. In spatially compact GR, there is an infinity of degrees of freedom that describe the shape of 3-space which interact with a single volume degree of freedom. In conformal gravity, the shape degrees of freedom remain, but the volume is no longer a dynamical variable. Further theories and formulations related to GR and conformal gravity are presented. Conformal gravity is successfully coupled to scalars and the gauge fields of nature. It should describe the solar system observations as well as GR does, but its cosmology and quantization will be completely different

  3. Dualities and emergent gravity: Gauge/gravity duality

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haro, Sebastian

    2017-08-01

    In this paper I develop a framework for relating dualities and emergence: two notions that are close to each other but also exclude one another. I adopt the conception of duality as 'isomorphism', from the physics literature, cashing it out in terms of three conditions. These three conditions prompt two conceptually different ways in which a duality can be modified to make room for emergence; and I argue that this exhausts the possibilities for combining dualities and emergence (via coarse-graining). I apply this framework to gauge/gravity dualities, considering in detail three examples: AdS/CFT, Verlinde's scheme, and black holes. My main point about gauge/gravity dualities is that the theories involved, qua theories of gravity, must be background-independent. I distinguish two senses of background-independence: (i) minimalistic and (ii) extended. I argue that the former is sufficiently strong to allow for a consistent theory of quantum gravity; and that AdS/CFT is background-independent on this account; while Verlinde's scheme best fits the extended sense of background-independence. I argue that this extended sense should be applied with some caution: on pain of throwing the baby (general relativity) out with the bath-water (extended background-independence). Nevertheless, it is an interesting and potentially fruitful heuristic principle for quantum gravity theory construction. It suggests some directions for possible generalisations of gauge/gravity dualities. The interpretation of dualities is discussed; and the so-called 'internal' vs. 'external' viewpoints are articulated in terms of: (i) epistemic and metaphysical commitments; (ii) parts vs. wholes. I then analyse the emergence of gravity in gauge/gravity dualities in terms of the two available conceptualisations of emergence; and I show how emergence in AdS/CFT and in Verlinde's scenario differ from each other. Finally, I give a novel derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy formula based on

  4. Improved Airborne Gravity Results Using New Relative Gravity Sensor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, N.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne gravity data has contributed greatly to our knowledge of subsurface geophysics particularly in rugged and otherwise inaccessible areas such as Antarctica. Reliable high quality GPS data has renewed interest in improving the accuracy of airborne gravity systems and recent improvements in the electronic control of the sensor have increased the accuracy and ability of the classic Lacoste and Romberg zero length spring gravity meters to operate in turbulent air conditions. Lacoste and Romberg type gravity meters provide increased sensitivity over other relative gravity meters by utilizing a mass attached to a horizontal beam which is balanced by a ';zero length spring'. This type of dynamic gravity sensor is capable of measuring gravity changes on the order of 0.05 milliGals in laboratory conditions but more commonly 0.7 to 1 milliGal in survey use. The sensor may have errors induced by the electronics used to read the beam position as well as noise induced by unwanted accelerations, commonly turbulence, which moves the beam away from its ideal balance position otherwise known as the reading line. The sensor relies on a measuring screw controlled by a computer which attempts to bring the beam back to the reading line position. The beam is also heavily damped so that it does not react to most unwanted high frequency accelerations. However this heavily damped system is slow to react, particularly in turns where there are very high Eotvos effects. New sensor technology utilizes magnetic damping of the beam coupled with an active feedback system which acts to effectively keep the beam locked at the reading line position. The feedback system operates over the entire range of the system so there is now no requirement for a measuring screw. The feedback system operates at very high speed so that even large turbulent events have minimal impact on data quality and very little, if any, survey line data is lost because of large beam displacement errors. Airborne testing

  5. Probing the surface microstructure of layer-by-layer self-assembly chitosan/poly(L-glutamic acid) multilayers: A grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Nie; Yang, Chunming, E-mail: yangchunming@sinap.ac.cn; Wang, Yuzhu; Zhao, Binyu; Bian, Fenggang; Li, Xiuhong; Wang, Jie, E-mail: wangjie@sinap.ac.cn

    2016-01-01

    This study characterized the surface structure of layer-by-layer self-assembly chitosan/poly(L-glutamic acid) multilayers through grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A weakly long-period ordered structure along the in-plane direction was firstly observed in the polyelectrolyte multilayer by the GISAXS technique. This structure can be attributed to the specific domains on the film surface. In the domain, nanodroplets that were formed by polyelectrolyte molecules were orderly arranged along the free surface of the films. This ordered structure gradually disappeared with the increasing bilayer number because of the complex merging behavior of nanodroplets into large islands. Furthermore, resonant diffuse scattering became evident in the GISAXS patterns as the number of bilayers in the polyelectrolyte multilayer was increased. Notably, the lateral cutoff length of resonant diffuse scattering for these polyelectrolyte films was comparable with the long-period value of the ordered nanodroplets in the polyelectrolyte multilayer. Therefore, the nanodroplets could be considered as a basic transmission unit for structure propagation from the inner interface to the film surface. It suggests that the surface structure with length scale larger than the size of nanodroplets was partially complicated from the interface structure near the substrate, but surface structure smaller than the cutoff length was mainly depended on the conformation of nanodroplets. - Highlights: • The growth of ordered nanodroplets in PEMs was characterized by the GISAXS technique. • The basic transmission units for structure propagation within PEMs were nanodroplets. • High-performance of wave-guiding devices prepared by PEMs was predicted.

  6. Measured and modelled absolute gravity changes in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, J. Emil; Forsberg, Rene; Strykowski, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    In glaciated areas, the Earth is responding to the ongoing changes of the ice sheets, a response known as glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). GIA can be investigated through observations of gravity change. For the ongoing assessment of the ice sheets mass balance, where satellite data are used, the study of GIA is important since it acts as an error source. GIA consists of three signals as seen by a gravimeter on the surface of the Earth. These signals are investigated in this study. The ICE-5G ice history and recently developed ice models of present day changes are used to model the gravity change in Greenland. The result is compared with the initial measurements of absolute gravity (AG) change at selected Greenland Network (GNET) sites.

  7. Testing gravity via next-generation lunar laser-ranging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, T.W.; Adelberger, E.G.; Strasburg, J.D.; Stubbs, C.W.; Nordtvedt, K.

    2004-01-01

    Lunar laser ranging has a long history of performing the most precise tests of various gravitational phenomena, dating from the placement of retroreflector arrays on the lunar surface by the Apollo astronauts. Gravity is the least well understood of the fundamental forces of nature, our current model being incompatible with quantum mechanics. We must therefore push our tests of gravity further, with the expectation that general relativity will fail to reproduce exactly measurements of sufficient precision. We aim to improve lunar ranging performance by an order-of-magnitude, resulting in comparable sensitivity gains in various tests of the basic nature of gravity. Here we describe the scientific motivation and techniques behind this next-generation lunar ranging effort, APOLLO

  8. Polyhedral shape model for terrain correction of gravity and gravity gradient data based on an adaptive mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhikui; Chen, Chao; Tao, Chunhui

    2016-04-01

    Since 2007, there are four China Da yang cruises (CDCs), which have been carried out to investigate polymetallic sulfides in the southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) and have acquired both gravity data and bathymetry data on the corresponding survey lines(Tao et al., 2014). Sandwell et al. (2014) published a new global marine gravity model including the free air gravity data and its first order vertical gradient (Vzz). Gravity data and its gradient can be used to extract unknown density structure information(e.g. crust thickness) under surface of the earth, but they contain all the mass effect under the observation point. Therefore, how to get accurate gravity and its gradient effect of the existing density structure (e.g. terrain) has been a key issue. Using the bathymetry data or ETOPO1 (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/global/global.html) model at a full resolution to calculate the terrain effect could spend too much computation time. We expect to develop an effective method that takes less time but can still yield the desired accuracy. In this study, a constant-density polyhedral model is used to calculate the gravity field and its vertical gradient, which is based on the work of Tsoulis (2012). According to gravity field attenuation with distance and variance of bathymetry, we present an adaptive mesh refinement and coarsening strategies to merge both global topography data and multi-beam bathymetry data. The local coarsening or size of mesh depends on user-defined accuracy and terrain variation (Davis et al., 2011). To depict terrain better, triangular surface element and rectangular surface element are used in fine and coarse mesh respectively. This strategy can also be applied to spherical coordinate in large region and global scale. Finally, we applied this method to calculate Bouguer gravity anomaly (BGA), mantle Bouguer anomaly(MBA) and their vertical gradient in SWIR. Further, we compared the result with previous results in the literature. Both synthetic model

  9. Equation of state in the presence of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Kang, Gungwon

    2016-11-01

    We investigate how an equation of state for matter is affected when a gravity is present. For this purpose, we consider a box of ideal gas in the presence of Newtonian gravity. In addition to the ordinary thermodynamic quantities, a characteristic variable that represents a weight per unit area relative to the average pressure is required in order to describe a macroscopic state of the gas. Although the density and the pressure are not uniform due to the presence of gravity, the ideal gas law itself is satisfied for the thermodynamic quantities when averaged over the system. Assuming that the system follows an adiabatic process further, we obtain a new relation between the averaged pressure and density, which differs from the conventional equation of state for the ideal gas in the absence of gravity. Applying our results to a small volume in a Newtonian star, however, we find that the conventional one is reliable for most astrophysical situations when the characteristic scale is small. On the other hand, gravity effects become significant near the surface of a Newtonian star.

  10. Gravitation. [consideration of black holes in gravity theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennelly, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations of several problems of gravitation are discussed. The question of the existence of black holes is considered. While black holes like those in Einstein's theory may not exist in other gravity theories, trapped surfaces implying such black holes certainly do. The theories include those of Brans-Dicke, Lightman-Lee, Rosen, and Yang. A similar two-tensor theory of Yilmaz is investigated and found inconsistent and nonviable. The Newman-Penrose formalism for Riemannian geometries is adapted to general gravity theories and used to implement a search for twisting solutions of the gravity theories for empty and nonempty spaces. The method can be used to find the gravitational fields for all viable gravity theories. The rotating solutions are of particular importance for strong field interpretation of the Stanford/Marshall gyroscope experiment. Inhomogeneous cosmologies are examined in Einstein's theory as generalizations of homogeneous ones by raising the dimension of the invariance groups by one more parameter. The nine Bianchi classifications are extended to Rosen's theory of gravity for homogeneous cosmological models.

  11. Nonperturbative models of quark stars in f(R gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artyom V. Astashenok

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Quark star models with realistic equation of state in nonperturbative f(R gravity are considered. The mass-radius relation for f(R=R+αR2 model is obtained. Considering scalar curvature R as an independent function, one can find out, for each value of central density, the unique value of central curvature for which one has solutions with the required asymptotic R→0 for r→∞. In other words, one needs a fine-tuning for R to achieve quark stars in f(R gravity. We consider also the analogue description in corresponding scalar-tensor gravity. The fine-tuning on R is equivalent to the fine-tuning on the scalar field ϕ in this description. For distant observers, the gravitational mass of the star increases with increasing α (α>0 but the interpretation of this fact depends on frame where we work. Considering directly f(R gravity, one can say that increasing of mass occurs by the “gravitational sphere” outside the star with some “effective mass”. On the other hand, in conformal scalar-tensor theory, we also have a dilaton sphere (or “disphere” outside the star but its contribution to gravitational mass for distant observer is negligible. We show that it is possible to discriminate modified theories of gravity from General Relativity due to the gravitational redshift of the thermal spectrum emerging from the surface of the star.

  12. Partial gravity - Human impacts on facility design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Stephen; Moore, Nathan

    1990-01-01

    Partial gravity affects the body differently than earth gravity and microgravity environments. The main difference from earth gravity is human locomotion; while the main dfference from microgravity is the specific updown orientation and reach envelopes which increase volume requirements. Much data are available on earth gravity and microgravity design; however, very little information is available on human reactions to reduced gravity levels in IVA situations (without pressure suits). Therefore, if humans commit to permanent lunar habitation, much research should be conducted in the area of partial gravity effects on habitat design.

  13. Gravity with Intermediate Goods Trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Jang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper derives the gravity equation with intermediate goods trade. We extend a standard monopolistic competition model to incorporate intermediate goods trade, and show that the gravity equation with intermediates trade is identical to the one without it except in that gross output should be used as the output measure instead of value added. We also show that the output elasticity of trade is significantly underestimated when value added is used as the output measure. This implies that with the conventional gravity equation, the contribution of output growth can be substantially underestimated and the role of trade costs reduction can be exaggerated in explaining trade expansion, as we demonstrate for the case of Korea's trade growth between 1995 and 2007.

  14. Studies in gravity and supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, L.

    1981-01-01

    The canonical treatment for theories with local gauge invariances is reviewed and an algorithm for the construction of all the gauge generators is found. This algorithm is then applied to Yang-Mills theories and to (metric) gravity. The first part of the work is concluded with a complete treatment of hamiltonian first order tetrad gravity. In the second part, the geometrical aspects of (super)gravity theories are concentrated on. After an interlude with path integrals in curved space (equivalence is shown with canonical quantization), N = 2 supergravity in superspace, and conformal supergravity in the group manifold scenario are studied. A progress report is added, regarding a study on higher divergences in quantum field theory

  15. The Philosophy behind Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik ZINKERNAGEL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates some of the philosophical and conceptual issues raised by the search for a quantum theory of gravity. It is critically discussed whether such a theory is necessary in the first place, and how much would be accomplished if it is eventually constructed. I argue that the motivations behind, and expectations to, a theory of quantum gravity are entangled with central themes in the philosophy of science, in particular unification, reductionism, and the interpretation of quantum mechanics. I further argue that there are —contrary to claims made on behalf of string theory— no good reasons to think that a quantum theory of gravity, if constructed, will provide a theory of everything, that is, a fundamental theory from which all physics in principle can be derived.

  16. The Lighter Side of Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narlikar, Jayant V.

    2002-09-01

    This talk presents a light-hearted look at the phenomenon of gravity, the most enigmatic of all known natural interactions. The fact that a major international society is wholly devoted towards understanding this basic interaction of nature is ample testimony to its intellectual challenges. The GR-meetings are held once every three years to bring together workers in the field to share their ignorance as well as expertise in the field of gravity. It would be presumptuous on my part to attempt to tell anything new to the experts gathered here. This evening I will stay away from the complexities and take a light hearted look at some ideas and phenomena that make gravity so peculiar.

  17. Dynamics of flexural gravity waves: from sea ice to Hawking radiation and analogue gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S.; Sahoo, T.; Meylan, M. H.

    2018-01-01

    The propagation of flexural gravity waves, routinely used to model wave interaction with sea ice, is studied, including the effect of compression and current. A number of significant and surprising properties are shown to exist. The occurrence of blocking above a critical value of compression is illustrated. This is analogous to propagation of surface gravity waves in the presence of opposing current and light wave propagation in the curved space-time near a black hole, therefore providing a novel system for studying analogue gravity. Between the blocking and buckling limit of the compressive force, the dispersion relation possesses three positive real roots, contrary to an earlier observation of having a single positive real root. Negative energy waves, in which the phase and group velocity point in opposite directions, are also shown to exist. In the presence of an opposing current and certain critical ranges of compressive force, the second blocking point shifts from the positive to the negative branch of the dispersion relation. Such a shift is known as the Hawking effect from the analogous behaviour in the theory of relativity which leads to Hawking radiation. The theory we develop is illustrated with simulations of linear waves in the time domain.

  18. Enhanced Gravity Tractor Technique for Planetary Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Reeves, David M.; Hopkins, Joshua B.; Wade, Darren W.; Tantardini, Marco; Shen, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Given sufficient warning time, Earth-impacting asteroids and comets can be deflected with a variety of different "slow push/pull" techniques. The gravity tractor is one technique that uses the gravitational attraction of a rendezvous spacecraft to the impactor and a low-thrust, high-efficiency propulsion system to provide a gradual velocity change and alter its trajectory. An innovation to this technique, known as the Enhanced Gravity Tractor (EGT), uses mass collected in-situ to augment the mass of the spacecraft, thereby greatly increasing the gravitational force between the objects. The collected material can be a single boulder, multiple boulders, regolith or a combination of different sources. The collected mass would likely range from tens to hundreds of metric tons depending on the size of the impactor and warning time available. Depending on the propulsion system's capability and the mass collected, the EGT approach can reduce the deflection times by a factor of 10 to 50 or more, thus reducing the deflection times of several decades to years or less and overcoming the main criticism of the traditional gravity tractor approach. Additionally, multiple spacecraft can orbit the target in formation to provide the necessary velocity change and further reduce the time needed by the EGT technique to divert hazardous asteroids and comets. The robotic segment of NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) will collect a multi-ton boulder from the surface of a large Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) and will provide the first ever demonstration of the EGT technique and validate one method of collecting in-situ mass on an asteroid of hazardous size.

  19. Testing chameleon gravity with the Coma cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Lombriser, Lucas; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel method to test the gravitational interactions in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. When gravity is modified, this is typically accompanied by the introduction of an additional scalar degree of freedom, which mediates an attractive fifth force. The presence of an extra gravitational coupling, however, is tightly constrained by local measurements. In chameleon modifications of gravity, local tests can be evaded by employing a screening mechanism that suppresses the fifth force in dense environments. While the chameleon field may be screened in the interior of the cluster, its outer region can still be affected by the extra force, introducing a deviation between the hydrostatic and lensing mass of the cluster. Thus, the chameleon modification can be tested by combining the gas and lensing measurements of the cluster. We demonstrate the operability of our method with the Coma cluster, for which both a lensing measurement and gas observations from the X-ray surface brightness, the X-ray temperature, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are available. Using the joint observational data set, we perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the parameter space describing the different profiles in both the Newtonian and chameleon scenarios. We report competitive constraints on the chameleon field amplitude and its coupling strength to matter. In the case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a specific choice of the coupling, we find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of |f R0 | < 6 × 10 −5 , which is currently the tightest constraint on cosmological scales

  20. Testing chameleon gravity with the Coma cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, 739-8526 (Japan); Lombriser, Lucas; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C., E-mail: telkina@theo.phys.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: lucas.lombriser@port.ac.uk, E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: david.bacon@port.ac.uk, E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk, E-mail: bob.nichol@port.ac.uk [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel method to test the gravitational interactions in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. When gravity is modified, this is typically accompanied by the introduction of an additional scalar degree of freedom, which mediates an attractive fifth force. The presence of an extra gravitational coupling, however, is tightly constrained by local measurements. In chameleon modifications of gravity, local tests can be evaded by employing a screening mechanism that suppresses the fifth force in dense environments. While the chameleon field may be screened in the interior of the cluster, its outer region can still be affected by the extra force, introducing a deviation between the hydrostatic and lensing mass of the cluster. Thus, the chameleon modification can be tested by combining the gas and lensing measurements of the cluster. We demonstrate the operability of our method with the Coma cluster, for which both a lensing measurement and gas observations from the X-ray surface brightness, the X-ray temperature, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are available. Using the joint observational data set, we perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the parameter space describing the different profiles in both the Newtonian and chameleon scenarios. We report competitive constraints on the chameleon field amplitude and its coupling strength to matter. In the case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a specific choice of the coupling, we find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of |f{sub R0}| < 6 × 10{sup −5}, which is currently the tightest constraint on cosmological scales.

  1. Flexion-relaxation response to gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Michael; Solomonow, Moshe; Li, Li

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this report was to study the influence of the orientation of gravitational loading on the behavior of anterior and posterior trunk muscles during anterior trunk flexion-extension. Participants (N=13) performed five (5) cycles of trunk flexion-extension while standing with gravity parallel to the body axis and five (5) cycles while in the supine condition (e.g. sit-ups) with gravity perpendicular to the body axis. Surface electromyographic (EMG) patterns from lumbar paraspinal, rectus abdominis, external oblique, rectus femoris, semimembranosis, and biceps femoris muscles were analyzed during each condition. EMG signals were synchronized with lumbar flexion and trunk inclination angles. Flexion-extension from the standing position resulted in a myoelectric silent period of the lumbar posterior muscles (e.g. flexion-relaxation phenomena (FRP)) as well as the hamstring muscles through deep angles during which activity was observed in abdominal muscles. Flexion-extension during sit-ups, however, resulted in a myoelectric silent period of the abdominal muscles and the quadriceps through deep angles during which the lumbar posterior muscles were active. In this condition, the FRP was not observed in posterior muscles. The new findings demonstrate the profound impact of the orientation of the gravity vector on the FRP, the abdominal muscles reaction to gravitational loads during sit-ups and its relationships with lumbar antagonists and thigh musculature. The new findings suggest that gravitational moments requirements dominate the FRP through the prevailing kinematics, load sharing and reflex activation-inhibition of muscles in various conditions. Lumbar kinematics or fixed sensory motor programs by themselves, however, are not the major contributor to the FRP. The new findings improve our insights into spinal biomechanics as well as understanding and evaluating low back disorders.

  2. Observational tests of modified gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; Zhang Pengjie

    2008-01-01

    Modifications of general relativity provide an alternative explanation to dark energy for the observed acceleration of the Universe. Modified gravity theories have richer observational consequences for large-scale structures than conventional dark energy models, in that different observables are not described by a single growth factor even in the linear regime. We examine the relationships between perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields, and discuss strategies for measuring them using gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster abundances, galaxy clustering/dynamics, and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. We show how a broad class of gravity theories can be tested by combining these probes. A robust way to interpret observations is by constraining two key functions: the ratio of the two metric potentials, and the ratio of the gravitational 'constant' in the Poisson equation to Newton's constant. We also discuss quasilinear effects that carry signatures of gravity, such as through induced three-point correlations. Clustering of dark energy can mimic features of modified gravity theories and thus confuse the search for distinct signatures of such theories. It can produce pressure perturbations and anisotropic stresses, which break the equality between the two metric potentials even in general relativity. With these two extra degrees of freedom, can a clustered dark energy model mimic modified gravity models in all observational tests? We show with specific examples that observational constraints on both the metric potentials and density perturbations can in principle distinguish modifications of gravity from dark energy models. We compare our result with other recent studies that have slightly different assumptions (and apparently contradictory conclusions).

  3. The Gravity of the Situation

    OpenAIRE

    Scalettar, Joyce; Mathias, Theoren

    2014-01-01

    Summary: In The Gravity of the Situation, you play the role of a squirrel who is born into a tribe of squirrels. This tribe is gathering nuts for the winter when it is discovered that our newly born protagonist can create nuts out of thin air. The leaders of the tribe are ecstatic when they discover this, and quickly tell the squirrel to begin creating nuts for their food stock. The moment our young friend releases one of his magically crafted nuts, a huge well of gravity engulfs the acorn st...

  4. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for MS02 (2016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data over southern Arizona and New Mexico overlapping into Mexico collected in 2016 over 2 surveys, AZ16-1 and AZ16-2. This data set is part of the...

  5. Deep Orographic Gravity Wave Dynamics over Subantarctic Islands as Observed and Modeled during the Deep Propagating Gravity Wave Experiment (DEEPWAVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckermann, S. D.; Broutman, D.; Ma, J.; Doyle, J. D.; Pautet, P. D.; Taylor, M. J.; Bossert, K.; Williams, B. P.; Fritts, D. C.; Smith, R. B.; Kuhl, D.; Hoppel, K.; McCormack, J. P.; Ruston, B. C.; Baker, N. L.; Viner, K.; Whitcomb, T.; Hogan, T. F.; Peng, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Deep Propagating Gravity Wave Experiment (DEEPWAVE) was an international aircraft-based field program to observe and study the end-to-end dynamics of atmospheric gravity waves from 0-100 km altitude and the effects on atmospheric circulations. On 14 July 2014, aircraft remote-sensing instruments detected large-amplitude gravity-wave oscillations within mesospheric airglow and sodium layers downstream of the Auckland Islands, located 1000 km south of Christchurch, New Zealand. A high-altitude reanalysis and a three-dimensional Fourier gravity wave model are used to investigate the dynamics of this event from the surface to the mesosphere. At 0700 UTC when first observations were made, surface flow across the islands' terrain generated linear three-dimensional wavefields that propagated rapidly to ˜78 km altitude, where intense breaking occurred in a narrow layer beneath a zero-wind region at ˜83 km altitude. In the following hours, the altitude of weak winds descended under the influence of a large-amplitude migrating semidiurnal tide, leading to intense breaking of these wavefields in subsequent observations starting at 1000 UTC. The linear Fourier model constrained by upstream reanalysis reproduces the salient aspects of observed wavefields, including horizontal wavelengths, phase orientations, temperature and vertical displacement amplitudes, heights and locations of incipient wave breaking, and momentum fluxes. Wave breaking has huge effects on local circulations, with inferred layer-averaged westward mean-flow accelerations of ˜350 m s-1 hour-1 and dynamical heating rates of ˜8 K hour-1, supporting recent speculation of important impacts of orographic gravity waves from subantarctic islands on the mean circulation and climate of the middle atmosphere during austral winter. We also study deep orographic gravity waves from islands during DEEPWAVE more widely using observations from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and high-resolution high

  6. Seismic displacement of gravity retaining walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mohamed Hafez Ismail Ibrahim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Seismic displacement of gravity walls had been studied using conventional static methods for controlled displacement design. In this study plain strain numerical analysis is performed using Plaxis dynamic program where prescribed displacement is applied at the bottom boundary of the soil to simulate the applied seismic load. Constrained absorbent side boundaries are introduced to prevent any wave reflection. The studied soil is chosen dense granular sand and modeled as elasto-plastic material according to Mohr–Column criteria while the gravity wall is assumed elastic. By comparing the resulted seismic wall displacements calculated by numerical analysis for six historical ground motions with that calculated by the pseudo-static method, it is found that numerical seismic displacements are either equal to or greater than corresponding pseudo-static values. Permissible seismic wall displacement calculated by AASHTO can be used for empirical estimation of seismic displacement. It is also found that seismic wall displacement is directly proportional with the positive angle of inclination of the back surface of the wall, soil flexibility and with the earthquake maximum ground acceleration. Seismic wall sliding is dominant and rotation is negligible for rigid walls when the ratio between the wall height and the foundation width is less than 1.4, while for greater ratios the wall becomes more flexible and rotation (rocking increases till the ratio reaches 1.8 where overturning is susceptible to take place. Cumulative seismic wall rotation increases with dynamic time and tends to be constant at the end of earthquake.

  7. Wisconsin Gravity Data for the Prentice Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (898 records) were compiled by Professor Ervin. This data base was received in January 1987. Principal gravity parameters include Free-Air...

  8. Gravity Data for California and Southern Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity data (88,514 records) were compiled largely from a state-wide regional gravity study program organized by the California Division of Mines and Geology in...

  9. Maine Onshore Complete Bouguer Gravity Anomaly Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (18,461 records) were compiled by the U. S. Geological Survey. This data base was received on February 23, 1993. Principal gravity...

  10. SEG US Bouguer Gravity Anomaly Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SEG gravity data are the product of the ad hoc Gravity Anomaly Map (GAM) Committee, sponsored by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the U.S....

  11. Gravity Data For The State of Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (6,591 records) were compiled by the U. S. Geological Survey. This data base was received on February 23, 1993. Principal gravity parameters...

  12. Gravity Data for the State of Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gravity data for the entire state of Nevada and adjacent parts of California, Utah, and Arizona are presented. About 80,000 gravity stations were compiled primarily...

  13. Gravity Data For The State of Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (41,960 records) were compiled by the U. S. Geological Survey. This data base was received on February 23, 1993. Principal gravity...

  14. Gravity Data for portions of Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (1,037 records) were compiled by Doctor Stierman. This data base was received in June 1992. Principal gravity parameters include Free-Air...

  15. Kerr geometry in f(T) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejarano, Cecilia; Guzman, Maria Jose [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ferraro, Rafael [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-02-01

    Null tetrads are shown to be a valuable tool in teleparallel theories of modified gravity. We use them to prove that Kerr geometry remains a solution for a wide family of f(T) theories of gravity. (orig.)

  16. Gravity Data for Indiana (300 records compiled)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity data (300 records) were compiled by Purdue University. This data base was received in February 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air...

  17. Nevada Isostatic Residual Gravity Over Basement

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study of gravity data from Nevada is part of a statewide analysis of mineral resources. The main objective of the gravity study were: 1) to infer the structure...

  18. Wisconsin Gravity Data for the Ashland Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (327 records) were compiled by Mr. Bernard Coakley. This data base was received in June 1985. Principal gravity parameters include latitude,...

  19. Gravity theories in more than four dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumino, B.

    1985-03-01

    String theories suggest particular forms for gravity interactions in higher dimensions. We consider an interesting class of gravity theories in more than four dimensions, clarify their geometric meaning and discuss their special properties. 9 refs

  20. Wisconsin Gravity Data for the Sawyers Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (3814 records) were compiled by Professor Ervin. This data base was received in April 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Free-Air...

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Canonical Gravity and Applications: Cosmology, Black Holes, and Quantum Gravity Canonical Gravity and Applications: Cosmology, Black Holes, and Quantum Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Viqar

    2012-03-01

    book are also covered in detail, and with more worked examples, in the former book, and the entire focus of the latter is Bianchi models. After a brief introduction outlining the aim of the book, the second chapter provides the canonical theory of homogeneous isotropic cosmology with scalar matter; this covers the basics and linear perturbation theory, and is meant as a first taste of what is to come. The next chapter is a thorough introduction of the canonical formulation of general relativity in both the ADM and Ashtekar-Barbero variables. This chapter contains details useful for graduate students which are either scattered or missing in the literature. Applications of the canonical formalism are in the following chapter. These cover standard material and techniques for obtaining mini(midi)-superspace models, including the Bianchi and Gowdy cosmologies, and spherically symmetric reductions. There is also a brief discussion of the two-dimensional dilaton gravity. The spherically symmetric reduction is presented in detail also in the connection-triad variables. The chapter on global and asymptotic properties gives introductions to geodesic and null congruences, trapped surfaces, a survey of singularity theorems, horizons and asymptotic properties. The chapter ends with a discussion of junction conditions and the Vaidya solution. As already mentioned, this material is covered in detail in Poisson's book. The final chapter on quantization describes and contrasts the Dirac and reduced phase space methods. It also gives an introduction to background independent quantization using the holonomy-flux operators, which forms the basis of the LQG program. The application of this method to cosmology and its affect on the Friedmann equation is covered next, followed by a brief introduction to the effective constraint method, which is another area developed by the author. I think this book is a useful addition to the literature for graduate students, and potentially also for

  2. Light, Gravity and Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falla, David

    2012-01-01

    The nature of light and how it is affected by gravity is discussed. Einstein's prediction of the deflection of light as it passes near the Sun was verified by observations made during the solar eclipse of 1919. Another prediction was that of gravitational redshift, which occurs when light emitted by a star loses energy in the gravitational field…

  3. Ghost quintessence in fractal gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, using the time-like fractal theory of gravity, we mainly focus on the ghost dark energy model which was recently suggested to explain the present acceleration of the cosmic expansion. Next, we establish a connection between the quintessence scalar field and fractal ghost dark energy density.

  4. Gravity and the fermion mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, K.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that gravity generates mass for the fermion. It does so by coupling directly the spinor field. The coupling term is invariant with respect to the electroweak gauge group U(1) SU(2) L . It replaces the fermion mass term mψψ.

  5. Electrostatic analogy for symmetron gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Lillie; Brown, Katherine; Mathur, Harsh; Rovelli, Kevin

    2017-12-01

    The symmetron model is a scalar-tensor theory of gravity with a screening mechanism that suppresses the effect of the symmetron field at high densities characteristic of the Solar System and laboratory scales but allows it to act with gravitational strength at low density on the cosmological scale. We elucidate the screening mechanism by showing that in the quasistatic Newtonian limit there are precise analogies between symmetron gravity and electrostatics for both strong and weak screening. For strong screening we find that large dense bodies behave in a manner analogous to perfect conductors in electrostatics. Based on this analogy we find that the symmetron field exhibits a lightning rod effect wherein the field gradients are enhanced near the ends of pointed or elongated objects. An ellipsoid placed in a uniform symmetron gradient is shown to experience a torque. By symmetry there is no gravitational torque in this case. Hence this effect unmasks the symmetron and might serve as the basis for future laboratory experiments. The symmetron force between a point mass and a large dense body includes a component corresponding to the interaction of the point mass with its image in the larger body. None of these effects have counterparts in the Newtonian limit of Einstein gravity. We discuss the similarities between symmetron gravity and the chameleon model as well as the differences between the two.

  6. Gravity across Space and Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klasing, Mariko; Milionis, Petros; Zymek, Robert

    2016-01-01

    How well can the standard gravity equation account for the evolution of global trade flows over the long run? This paper provides the first systematic attempt to answer this question using a newly-assembled data set of bilateral trade flows, income levels and trade frictions that spans the years

  7. Three-dimensional tricritical gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; de Haan, Sjoerd; Merbis, Wout; Rosseel, Jan; Zojer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of parity-even, six-derivative gravity theories in three dimensions. After linearizing around anti-de Sitter space, the theories have one massless and two massive graviton solutions for generic values of the parameters. At a special, so-called tricritical, point in parameter

  8. Massive Gravity in Three Dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Hohm, Olaf; Townsend, Paul K.

    2009-01-01

    A particular higher-derivative extension of the Einstein-Hilbert action in three spacetime dimensions is shown to be equivalent at the linearized level to the (unitary) Pauli-Fierz action for a massive spin-2 field. A more general model, which also includes "topologically-massive" gravity as a

  9. Antihydrogen Experiment Gravity Interferometry Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Trezzi, D; Dassa, L; Rienacker, B; Khalidova, O; Ferrari, G; Krasnicky, D; Perini, D; Cerchiari, G; Belov, A; Boscolo, I; Sacerdoti, M G; Ferragut, R O; Nedelec, P; Hinterberger, A; Al-qaradawi, I; Malbrunot, C L S; Brusa, R S; Prelz, F; Manuzio, G; Riccardi, C; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Haider, S; Haug, F; Turbabin, A; Castelli, F; Testera, G; Lagomarsino, V E; Doser, M; Penasa, L; Gninenko, S; Cataneo, F; Zenoni, A; Cabaret, L; Comparat, D P; Zmeskal, J; Scampoli, P; Nesteruk, K P; Dudarev, A; Kellerbauer, A G; Mariazzi, S; Carraro, C; Zavatarelli, S M

    The AEGIS experiment (Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) has the aim of carrying out the first measurement of the gravitational interaction of antimatter to a precision of 1%, by applying techniques from atomic physics, laser spectroscopy and interferometry to a beam of antihydrogen atoms. A further goal of the experiment is to carry out spectroscopy of the antihydrogen atoms in flight.

  10. Two-dimensional Quantum Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolf, Juri

    1998-10-01

    This Ph.D. thesis pursues two goals: The study of the geometrical structure of two-dimensional quantum gravity and in particular its fractal nature. To address these questions we review the continuum formalism of quantum gravity with special focus on the scaling properties of the theory. We discuss several concepts of fractal dimensions which characterize the extrinsic and intrinsic geometry of quantum gravity. This work is partly based on work done in collaboration with Jan Ambjørn, Dimitrij Boulatov, Jakob L. Nielsen and Yoshiyuki Watabiki (1997). The other goal is the discussion of the discretization of quantum gravity and to address the so called quantum failure of Regge calculus. We review dynamical triangulations and show that it agrees with the continuum theory in two dimensions. Then we discuss Regge calculus and prove that a continuum limit cannot be taken in a sensible way and that it does not reproduce continuum results. This work is partly based on work done in collaboration with Jan Ambjørn, Jakob L. Nielsen and George Savvidy (1997).

  11. Quintic quasi-topological gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cisterna, Adolfo [Vicerrectoría académica, Universidad Central de Chile,Toesca 1783 Santiago (Chile); Instituto de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad Austral de Chile,Casilla 567, Valdivia (Chile); Guajardo, Luis; Hassaïne, Mokhtar [Instituto de Matemática y Física, Universidad de Talca,Casilla 747, Talca (Chile); Oliva, Julio [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción,Casilla, 160-C, Concepción (Chile)

    2017-04-11

    We construct a quintic quasi-topological gravity in five dimensions, i.e. a theory with a Lagrangian containing R{sup 5} terms and whose field equations are of second order on spherically (hyperbolic or planar) symmetric spacetimes. These theories have recently received attention since when formulated on asymptotically AdS spacetimes might provide for gravity duals of a broad class of CFTs. For simplicity we focus on five dimensions. We show that this theory fulfils a Birkhoff’s Theorem as it is the case in Lovelock gravity and therefore, for generic values of the couplings, there is no s-wave propagating mode. We prove that the spherically symmetric solution is determined by a quintic algebraic polynomial equation which resembles Wheeler’s polynomial of Lovelock gravity. For the black hole solutions we compute the temperature, mass and entropy and show that the first law of black holes thermodynamics is fulfilled. Besides of being of fourth order in general, we show that the field equations, when linearized around AdS are of second order, and therefore the theory does not propagate ghosts around this background. Besides the class of theories originally introduced in https://arxiv.org/abs/1003.4773, the general geometric structure of these Lagrangians remains an open problem.

  12. Solidifying Cast Iron in Low Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, J. C.; Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes study of solidification of cast iron in low and normal gravity. Because flotation, sedimentation, and convection suppressed, alloys that solidify at nearly zero gravity have unusual and potentially useful characteristics. Study conducted in airplane that repeatedly flew along parabolic trajectories. Appears iron/carbon alloys made at low gravity have greater carbon content (as high as 5 to 10 percent) than those made of Earth gravity because carbon particles do not float to top of melt.

  13. Modified gravity from the quantum part of the metric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir [KazNU, Department of Theoretical and Nuclear Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); IETP, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); NAS of the Kyrgyz Republic, Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan). Institute of Physicotechnical Problems and Material Science; Universitaet Oldenburg, Institut fuer Physik, Oldenburg (Germany); Folomeev, Vladimir [IETP, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); NAS of the Kyrgyz Republic, Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan). Institute of Physicotechnical Problems and Material Science; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta [Universitaet Oldenburg, Institut fuer Physik, Oldenburg (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    It is shown that if a metric in quantum gravity can be decomposed as a sum of classical and quantum parts, then Einstein quantum gravity looks approximately like modified gravity with a nonminimal interaction between gravity and matter. (orig.)

  14. The potential of ground gravity measurements to validate GRACE data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, D.; Hinderer, J.; Llubes, M.; Florsch, N.

    2003-06-01

    New satellite missions are returning high precision, time-varying, satellite measurements of the Earth's gravity field. The GRACE mission is now in its calibration/- validation phase and first results of the gravity field solutions are imminent. We consider here the possibility of external validation using data from the superconducting gravimeters in the European sub-array of the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) as ‘ground truth' for comparison with GRACE. This is a pilot study in which we use 14 months of 1-hour data from the beginning of GGP (1 July 1997) to 30 August 1998, when the Potsdam instrument was relocated to South Africa. There are 7 stations clustered in west central Europe, and one station, Metsahovi in Finland. We remove local tides, polar motion, local and global air pressure, and instrument drift and then decimate to 6-hour samples. We see large variations in the time series of 5-10µgal between even some neighboring stations, but there are also common features that correlate well over the 427-day period. The 8 stations are used to interpolate a minimum curvature (gridded) surface that extends over the geographical region. This surface shows time and spatial coherency at the level of 2- 4µgal over the first half of the data and 1-2µgal over the latter half. The mean value of the surface clearly shows a rise in European gravity of about 3µgal over the first 150 days and a fairly constant value for the rest of the data. The accuracy of this mean is estimated at 1µgal, which compares favorably with GRACE predictions for wavelengths of 500 km or less. Preliminary studies of hydrology loading over Western Europe shows the difficulty of correlating the local hydrology, which can be highly variable, with large-scale gravity variations.Key words. GRACE, satellite gravity, superconducting gravimeter, GGP, ground truth

  15. The potential of ground gravity measurements to validate GRACE data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Crossley

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available New satellite missions are returning high precision, time-varying, satellite measurements of the Earth’s gravity field. The GRACE mission is now in its calibration/- validation phase and first results of the gravity field solutions are imminent. We consider here the possibility of external validation using data from the superconducting gravimeters in the European sub-array of the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP as ‘ground truth’ for comparison with GRACE. This is a pilot study in which we use 14 months of 1-hour data from the beginning of GGP (1 July 1997 to 30 August 1998, when the Potsdam instrument was relocated to South Africa. There are 7 stations clustered in west central Europe, and one station, Metsahovi in Finland. We remove local tides, polar motion, local and global air pressure, and instrument drift and then decimate to 6-hour samples. We see large variations in the time series of 5–10µgal between even some neighboring stations, but there are also common features that correlate well over the 427-day period. The 8 stations are used to interpolate a minimum curvature (gridded surface that extends over the geographical region. This surface shows time and spatial coherency at the level of 2– 4µgal over the first half of the data and 1–2µgal over the latter half. The mean value of the surface clearly shows a rise in European gravity of about 3µgal over the first 150 days and a fairly constant value for the rest of the data. The accuracy of this mean is estimated at 1µgal, which compares favorably with GRACE predictions for wavelengths of 500 km or less. Preliminary studies of hydrology loading over Western Europe shows the difficulty of correlating the local hydrology, which can be highly variable, with large-scale gravity variations.Key words. GRACE, satellite gravity, superconducting gravimeter, GGP, ground truth

  16. Gravity in minesmdashAn investigation of Newton's law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holding, S.C.; Stacey, F.D.; Tuck, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that the value of the Newtonian gravitational constant G inferred from measurements of gravity g in mines and boreholes is of order 1% higher than the laboratory value is hardened with new and improved data from two mines in northwest Queensland. Surface-gravity surveys and more than 14 000 bore-core density values have been used to establish density structures for the mines, permitting full three-dimensional inversion to obtain G. Further constraint is imposed by requiring that the density structure give the same value of G for several vertical profiles of g, separated by hundreds of meters. The only residual doubt arises from the possibility of bias by an anomalous regional gravity gradient. Neither measurements of gravity gradient above ground level (in tall chimneys) nor surface surveys are yet adequate to remove this doubt, but the coincidence of conclusions derived from mine data obtained in different parts of the world makes such an anomaly appear an improbable explanation. If Newton's law is modified by adding a Yukawa term to the gravitational potential of a point mass m at distance r, V = -(G/sub infinity/m/r)(1+αe/sup -r/lambda/), then the mine data provide a mutual constraint on the values of α and lambda, although they cannot be determined independently. Our results give αroughly-equal-0.0075 if lambda or =10 4 m, with intermediate values of α between these ranges, but values greater than α = -0.010, lambda = 800 m appear to be disallowed by a comparison of satellite and land-surface estimates of gravity

  17. Observing coseismic gravity change from the Japan Tohoku-Oki 2011 earthquake with GOCE gravity gradiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, M.J.; Bouman, J.; Broerse, D.B.T.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Tohoku-Oki earthquake (9.0 Mw) of 11 March 2011 has left signatures in the Earth's gravity field that are detectable by data of the Gravity field Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Because the European Space Agency's (ESA) satellite gravity mission Gravity field and

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum Gravity: third edition Quantum Gravity: third edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2012-09-01

    The request by Classical and Quantum Gravity to review the third edition of Claus Kiefer's 'Quantum Gravity' puts me in a slightly awkward position. This is a remarkably good book, which every person working in quantum gravity should have on the shelf. But in my opinion quantum gravity has undergone some dramatic advances in the last few years, of which the book makes no mention. Perhaps the omission only attests to the current vitality of the field, where progress is happening fast, but it is strange for me to review a thoughtful, knowledgeable and comprehensive book on my own field of research, which ignores what I myself consider the most interesting results to date. Kiefer's book is unique as a broad introduction and a reliable overview of quantum gravity. There are numerous books in the field which (often notwithstanding titles) focus on a single approach. There are also countless conference proceedings and article collections aiming to be encyclopaedic, but offering disorganized patchworks. Kiefer's book is a careful and thoughtful presentation of all aspects of the immense problem of quantum gravity. Kiefer is very learned, and brings together three rare qualities: he is pedagogical, he is capable of simplifying matter to the bones and capturing the essential, and he offers a serious and balanced evaluation of views and ideas. In a fractured field based on a major problem that does not yet have a solution, these qualities are precious. I recommend Kiefer's book to my students entering the field: to work in quantum gravity one needs a vast amount of technical knowledge as well as a grasp of different ideas, and Kiefer's book offers this with remarkable clarity. This novel third edition simplifies and improves the presentation of several topics, but also adds very valuable new material on quantum gravity phenomenology, loop quantum cosmology, asymptotic safety, Horava-Lifshitz gravity, analogue gravity, the holographic principle, and more. This is a testament

  19. Workshop on Topics in Three Dimensional Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Gravity in three dimensions has rather special features which makes it particularly suitable for addressing questions related to the quantization of gravity and puzzles concerning black hole physics. AdS3 gravity and in particular AdS3/CFT2 has played a crucial role in black hole microstate counting, and more recently in studying holographic entanglement entropy and higher spin theories.

  20. Einstein-Riemann Gravity on Deformed Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Wess

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A differential calculus, differential geometry and the E-R Gravity theory are studied on noncommutative spaces. Noncommutativity is formulated in the star product formalism. The basis for the gravity theory is the infinitesimal algebra of diffeomorphisms. Considering the corresponding Hopf algebra we find that the deformed gravity is based on a deformation of the Hopf algebra.

  1. Generalized geometry and non-symmetric gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Jurco, Branislav; Khoo, Fech Scen; Schupp, Peter; Vysoky, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Generalized geometry provides the framework for a systematic approach to non-symmetric metric gravity theory and naturally leads to an Einstein-Kalb-Ramond gravity theory with totally anti-symmetric contortion. The approach is related to the study of the low-energy effective closed string gravity actions.

  2. Spin Entanglement Witness for Quantum Gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bose, Sougato; Mazumdar, Anupam; Morley, Gavin W.; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Toros, Marko; Paternostro, Mauro; Geraci, Andrew A.; Barker, Peter F.; Kim, M. S.; Milburn, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Understanding gravity in the framework of quantum mechanics is one of the great challenges in modern physics. However, the lack of empirical evidence has lead to a debate on whether gravity is a quantum entity. Despite varied proposed probes for quantum gravity, it is fair to say that there are no

  3. Earthquake precursors: spatial-temporal gravity changes before the great earthquakes in the Sichuan-Yunnan area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi-Qing; Liang, Wei-Feng; Zhang, Song

    2018-01-01

    Using multiple-scale mobile gravity data in the Sichuan-Yunnan area, we systematically analyzed the relationships between spatial-temporal gravity changes and the 2014 Ludian, Yunnan Province Ms6.5 earthquake and the 2014 Kangding Ms6.3, 2013 Lushan Ms7.0, and 2008 Wenchuan Ms8.0 earthquakes in Sichuan Province. Our main results are as follows. (1) Before the occurrence of large earthquakes, gravity anomalies occur in a large area around the epicenters. The directions of gravity change gradient belts usually agree roughly with the directions of the main fault zones of the study area. Such gravity changes might reflect the increase of crustal stress, as well as the significant active tectonic movements and surface deformations along fault zones, during the period of gestation of great earthquakes. (2) Continuous significant changes of the multiple-scale gravity fields, as well as greater gravity changes with larger time scales, can be regarded as medium-range precursors of large earthquakes. The subsequent large earthquakes always occur in the area where the gravity changes greatly. (3) The spatial-temporal gravity changes are very useful in determining the epicenter of coming large earthquakes. The large gravity networks are useful to determine the general areas of coming large earthquakes. However, the local gravity networks with high spatial-temporal resolution are suitable for determining the location of epicenters. Therefore, denser gravity observation networks are necessary for better forecasts of the epicenters of large earthquakes. (4) Using gravity changes from mobile observation data, we made medium-range forecasts of the Kangding, Ludian, Lushan, and Wenchuan earthquakes, with especially successful forecasts of the location of their epicenters. Based on the above discussions, we emphasize that medium-/long-term potential for large earthquakes might exist nowadays in some areas with significant gravity anomalies in the study region. Thus, the monitoring

  4. Complex research of the areas of the Moon gravity anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugacheva, Svetlana

    The report presents the results of a research study of the lunar surface in the areas of gravity anomalies. The source of gravity anomalies of the Moon are large mascons with a high mass concentration at a depth of volcanic plains and lunar Maria. Formation of mascons is connected with intensive development of basaltic volcanism on the Moon in the early periods of its existence. Many volcanic structures have been found by the Grail spacecraft. These are tectonic structures, basins of impact craters, ancient linear gravity anomalies. The article presents the data of physical and mechanical properties of the surface soil layer of the lunar Maria and gives an assessment of the chemical composition of the soil. All measurements have been performed according to the theoretical models of light scattering on the basis of survey of the lunar surface by in-orbit spacecrafts and analysis of the lunar soil samples. There have been calculated heterogeneity parameters of the surface macro-relief of the lunar Maria: albedo, soil density, average grain diameter of the particles forming the surface layer and the volume fraction occupied by particles. Previous articles showed correlation dependence of the chemical composition of rocks on the macrostructure of the lunar surface. The surface macrostructure was evaluated by comparing the local phase function with the lunar spatial scattering indicatrix. Phase function difference at an 18-degree phase is properly consistent with the chemical composition of the surface layer of soil, in particular with the content of thorium and iron oxide. It can be assumed that mascons include rich KREEP rocks with a high content of thorium and iron oxide. KREEP rocks in the areas of the lunar Maria covered by volcanic lava are probably located on the surface or at a shallow depth.

  5. Gravity monitoring of CO2 movement during sequestration: Model studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasperikova, E.; Hoversten, G.M.

    2008-07-15

    We examine the relative merits of gravity measurements as a monitoring tool for geological CO{sub 2} sequestration in three different modeling scenarios. The first is a combined CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the second is sequestration in a brine formation, and the third is for a coalbed methane formation. EOR/sequestration petroleum reservoirs have relatively thin injection intervals with multiple fluid components (oil, hydrocarbon gas, brine, and CO{sub 2}), whereas brine formations usually have much thicker injection intervals and only two components (brine and CO{sub 2}). Coal formations undergoing methane extraction tend to be thin (3-10 m), but shallow compared to either EOR or brine formations. The injection of CO{sub 2} into the oil reservoir produced a bulk density decrease in the reservoir. The spatial pattern of the change in the vertical component of gravity (G{sub z}) is directly correlated with the net change in reservoir density. Furthermore, time-lapse changes in the borehole G{sub z} clearly identified the vertical section of the reservoir where fluid saturations are changing. The CO{sub 2}-brine front, on the order of 1 km within a 20 m thick brine formation at 1900 m depth, with 30% CO{sub 2} and 70% brine saturations, respectively, produced a -10 Gal surface gravity anomaly. Such anomaly would be detectable in the field. The amount of CO{sub 2} in a coalbed methane test scenario did not produce a large enough surface gravity response; however, we would expect that for an industrial size injection, the surface gravity response would be measurable. Gravity inversions in all three scenarios illustrated that the general position of density changes caused by CO{sub 2} can be recovered, but not the absolute value of the change. Analysis of the spatial resolution and detectability limits shows that gravity measurements could, under certain circumstances, be used as a lower-cost alternative to seismic

  6. Vaidya spacetime in massive gravity's rainbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarzade, Yaghoub; Rudra, Prabir; Darabi, Farhad; Ali, Ahmed Farag; Faizal, Mir

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we will analyze the energy dependent deformation of massive gravity using the formalism of massive gravity's rainbow. So, we will use the Vainshtein mechanism and the dRGT mechanism for the energy dependent massive gravity, and thus analyze a ghost free theory of massive gravity's rainbow. We study the energy dependence of a time-dependent geometry, by analyzing the radiating Vaidya solution in this theory of massive gravity's rainbow. The energy dependent deformation of this Vaidya metric will be performed using suitable rainbow functions.

  7. Vaidya spacetime in massive gravity's rainbow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaghoub Heydarzade

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will analyze the energy dependent deformation of massive gravity using the formalism of massive gravity's rainbow. So, we will use the Vainshtein mechanism and the dRGT mechanism for the energy dependent massive gravity, and thus analyze a ghost free theory of massive gravity's rainbow. We study the energy dependence of a time-dependent geometry, by analyzing the radiating Vaidya solution in this theory of massive gravity's rainbow. The energy dependent deformation of this Vaidya metric will be performed using suitable rainbow functions.

  8. Observational constraints on transverse gravity: A generalization of unimodular gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Villarejo, J J

    2010-01-01

    We explore the hypothesis that the set of symmetries enjoyed by the theory that describes gravity is not the full group of diffeomorphisms (Diff(M)), as in General Relativity, but a maximal subgroup of it (TransverseDiff(M)), with its elements having a jacobian equal to unity; at the infinitesimal level, the parameter describing the coordinate change x μ → x μ + ξ μ (x) is transverse, i.e., δ μ ξ μ = 0. Incidentally, this is the smaller symmetry one needs to propagate consistently a graviton, which is a great theoretical motivation for considering these theories. Also, the determinant of the metric, g, behaves as a 'transverse scalar', so that these theories can be seen as a generalization of the better-known unimodular gravity. We present our results on the observational constraints on transverse gravity, in close relation with the claim of equivalence with general scalar-tensor theory. We also comment on the structure of the divergences of the quantum theory to the one-loop order.

  9. Nonsingular universe in massive gravity's rainbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendi, S. H.; Momennia, M.; Eslam Panah, B.; Panahiyan, S.

    2017-06-01

    One of the fundamental open questions in cosmology is whether we can regard the universe evolution without singularity like a Big Bang or a Big Rip. This challenging subject stimulates one to regard a nonsingular universe in the far past with an arbitrarily large vacuum energy. Considering the high energy regime in the cosmic history, it is believed that Einstein gravity should be corrected to an effective energy dependent theory which could be acquired by gravity's rainbow. On the other hand, employing massive gravity provided us with solutions to some of the long standing fundamental problems of cosmology such as cosmological constant problem and self acceleration of the universe. Considering these aspects of gravity's rainbow and massive gravity, in this paper, we initiate studying FRW cosmology in the massive gravity's rainbow formalism. At first, we show that although massive gravity modifies the FRW cosmology, but it does not itself remove the big bang singularity. Then, we generalize the massive gravity to the case of energy dependent spacetime and find that massive gravity's rainbow can remove the early universe singularity. We bring together all the essential conditions for having a nonsingular universe and the effects of both gravity's rainbow and massive gravity generalizations on such criteria are determined.

  10. The Border Effect in the Japanese Market: Gravity Model Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Okubo, Toshihiro

    2000-01-01

    This paper analyzes the border effect, which indicates how biased interregional trade is, compared with international trade, by means of the Gravity Model. The border effect reveals how open to the foreign countries the nation is. This research suggests that the border effect in Japan is much lower than that of the US and Canada, and has declined year by year. Furthermore, in 1990, the border effect faded out. These trends may be reflected by international incidents such as the surge of the f...

  11. A global mean ocean circulation estimation using goce gravity models - the DTU12MDT mean dynamic topography model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2012-01-01

    The Gravity and Ocean Circulation Experiment - GOCE satellite mission measure the Earth gravity field with unprecedented accuracy leading to substantial improvements in the modelling of the ocean circulation and transport. In this study of the performance of GOCE, a newer gravity model have been...... have been improved significantly compared to results obtained using pre-GOCE gravity field models. The results of this study show that geostrophic surface currents associated with the mean circulation have been further improved and that currents having speeds down to 5 cm/s have been recovered....

  12. Topics in string theory and quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Gaume, Luis

    1992-01-01

    These are the lecture notes for the Les Houches Summer School on Quantum Gravity held in July 1992. The notes present some general critical assessment of other (non-string) approaches to quantum gravity, and a selected set of topics concerning what we have learned so far about the subject from string theory. Since these lectures are long (133 A4 pages), we include in this abstract the table of contents, which should help the user of the bulletin board in deciding whether to latex and print the full file. 1-FIELD THEORETICAL APPROACH TO QUANTUM GRAVITY: Linearized gravity; Supergravity; Kaluza-Klein theories; Quantum field theory and classical gravity; Euclidean approach to Quantum Gravity; Canonical quantization of gravity; Gravitational Instantons. 2-CONSISTENCY CONDITIONS: ANOMALIES: Generalities about anomalies; Spinors in 2n dimensions; When can we expect to find anomalies?; The Atiyah-Singer Index Theorem and the computation of anomalies; Examples: Green-Schwarz cancellation mechanism and Witten's SU(2) ...

  13. Butterfly effect in 3D gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaemmaqami, Mohammad M.

    2017-11-01

    We study the butterfly effect by considering shock wave solutions near the horizon of the anti-de Sitter black hole in some three-dimensional gravity models including 3D Einstein gravity, minimal massive 3D gravity, new massive gravity, generalized massive gravity, Born-Infeld 3D gravity, and new bigravity. We calculate the butterfly velocities of these models and also we consider the critical points and different limits in some of these models. By studying the butterfly effect in the generalized massive gravity, we observe a correspondence between the butterfly velocities and right-left moving degrees of freedom or the central charges of the dual 2D conformal field theories.

  14. Conformal transformation route to gravity's rainbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Miao; Li, Ping; Wang, Zi-Liang; Ding, Jia-Cheng; Deng, Jian-Bo

    2018-02-01

    Conformal transformation as a mathematical tool has been used in many areas of gravitational physics. In this paper, we consider gravity's rainbow, in which the metric can be treated as a conformal rescaling of the original metric. By using the conformal transformation technique, we get a specific form of a modified Newton's constant and cosmological constant in gravity's rainbow, which implies that the total vacuum energy is dependent on probe energy. Moreover, the result shows that Einstein gravity's rainbow can be described by energy-dependent f(E,\\tilde{R}) gravity. At last, we study the f( R) gravity, when gravity's rainbow is considered, which can also be described as energy-dependent \\tilde{f}(E,\\tilde{R}) gravity.

  15. Geophysical investigation using gravity data in Kinigi geothermal field, northwest Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwiduhaye, Jean d.'Amour; Mizunaga, Hideki; Saibi, Hakim

    2018-03-01

    A land gravity survey was carried out in the Kinigi geothermal field, Northwest Rwanda using 184 gravity stations during August and September, 2015. The aim of the gravity survey was to understand the subsurface structure and its relation to the observed surface manifestations in the study area. The complete Bouguer Gravity anomaly was produced with a reduction density of 2.4 g/cm3. Bouguer anomalies ranging from -52 to -35 mGals were observed in the study area with relatively high anomalies in the east and northwest zones while low anomalies are observed in the southwest side of the studied area. A decrease of 17 mGals is observed in the southwestern part of the study area and caused by the low-density of the Tertiary rocks. Horizontal gradient, tilt angle and analytical signal methods were applied to the observed gravity data and showed that Mubona, Mpenge and Cyabararika surface springs are structurally controlled while Rubindi spring is not. The integrated results of gravity gradient interpretation methods delineated a dominant geological structure trending in the NW-SE, which is in agreement with the regional geological trend. The results of this gravity study will help aid future geothermal exploration and development in the Kinigi geothermal field.

  16. Action and entanglement in gravity and field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, Yasha

    2013-12-27

    In nongravitational quantum field theory, the entanglement entropy across a surface depends on the short-distance regularization. Quantum gravity should not require such regularization, and it has been conjectured that the entanglement entropy there is always given by the black hole entropy formula evaluated on the entangling surface. We show that these statements have precise classical counterparts at the level of the action. Specifically, we point out that the action can have a nonadditive imaginary part. In gravity, the latter is fixed by the black hole entropy formula, while in nongravitating theories it is arbitrary. From these classical facts, the entanglement entropy conjecture follows by heuristically applying the relation between actions and wave functions.

  17. Basement structures over Rio Grande Rise from gravity inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Renata; Hackspacker, Peter Christian; Anderson de Souza, Iata; Sousa Lima Costa, Iago

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we show that from satellite-derived gravity field, bathymetry and sediment thicknesses, it is possible to give a 3-D model of the basement over oceanic areas, and for this purpose, we have chosen the Rio Grande Rise, in South Atlantic Ocean, to build a gravity-equivalent basement topography. The advantages of the method applied in this study are manifold: does not depend directly on reflection seismic data; can be applied quickly and with fewer costs for acquiring and interpreting the data; and as the main result, presents the physical surface below the sedimentary layer, which may be different from the acoustic basement. We evaluated the gravity effect of the sediments using the global sediment thickness model of NOAA, fitting a sediment compaction model to observed density values from Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) reports. The Global Relief Model ETOPO1 and constraining data from seismic interpretation on crustal thickness are integrated in the gravity inversion procedure. The modeled Moho depth values vary between 6 to 27 km over the area, being thicker under the Rio Grande Rise and also in the direction of São Paulo Plateau. The inversion for the gravity-equivalent basement topography is applied for a gravity residual data, which is free from the gravity effect of sediments and from the gravity effect of the estimated Moho interface. A description of the basement depth over Rio Grande Rise area is unprecedented in the literature, however, our results could be compared to in situ data, provided by DSDP, and a small difference of only 9 m between our basement depth and leg 516 F was found. Our model shows a rift crossing the entire Rio Grande Rise deeper than previously presented in literature, with depths up to 5 km in the East Rio Grande Rise (ERGR) and deeper in the West Rio Grande Rise (WRGR), reaching 6.4 km. We find several short-wavelengths structures not present in the bathymetry data. Seamounts, guyots and fracture zones are much more

  18. A Transportable Gravity Gradiometer Based on Atom Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Thompson, Robert J.; Kellogg, James R.; Aveline, David C.; Maleki, Lute; Kohel, James M.

    2010-01-01

    rest frame for the trapped atoms. While still in this moving-frame molasses, the laser frequencies are further detuned from the atomic resonance (while maintaining this relative frequency shift) to cool the atom cloud's temperature to 2 K or below, corresponding to an rms velocity of less than 2 cm/s. After launch, the cold atoms undergo further state and velocity selection to prepare for atom interferometry. The atom interferometers are then realized using laser-induced stimulated Raman transitions to perform the necessary manipulations of each atom, and the resulting interferometer phase is measured using laser-induced fluorescence for state-normalized detection. More than 20 laser beams with independent controls of frequency, phase, and intensity are required for this measurement sequence. This instrument can facilitate the study of Earth's gravitational field from surface and air vehicles, as well as from space by allowing gravity mapping from a low-cost, single spacecraft mission. In addition, the operation of atom interferometer-based instruments in space offers greater sensitivity than is possible in terrestrial instruments due to the much longer interrogation times available in the microgravity environment. A space-based quantum gravity gradiometer has the potential to achieve sensitivities similar to the GRACE mission at long spatial wavelengths, and will also have resolution similar to GOCE for measurement at shorter length scales.

  19. Unexpected Cancellations in Gravity Theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bern, Z.; Carrasco, J.J.; Forde, D.; Ita, H.; Johansson, H.

    2007-01-01

    Recent computations of scattering amplitudes show that N = 8 supergravity is surprisingly well behaved in the ultraviolet and may even be ultraviolet finite in perturbation theory. The novel cancellations necessary for ultraviolet finiteness first appear at one loop in the guise of the ''no-triangle hypothesis''. We study one-loop amplitudes in pure Einstein gravity and point out the existence of cancellations similar to those found previously in N = 8 supergravity. These cancellations go beyond those found in the one-loop effective action. Using unitarity, this suggests that generic theories of quantum gravity based on the Einstein-Hilbert action may be better behaved in the ultraviolet at higher loops than suggested by naive power counting, though without additional (supersymmetric) cancellations they diverge. We comment on future studies that should be performed to support this proposal

  20. New Perspectives in Canonical Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtekar, A.

    A new approach to non-perturbative quantum gravity is developed. The key idea is to express general relativity in·terms of variables which are similar to those used in Yang-Mills theory. In terms of these variables, Einstein's equation simplifies considerably and this enables one to deal with the exact theory, without having to make an essential use of perturbation expansions. Furthermore, one can import into quantum gravity several ideas and techniques from gauge theories. The framework also has applications to classical generaI relativity and differential geometry. The first four parts of the book are based on a special topics course that Abhay Ashtekar taught at Syracuse University in the spring of 1987. The last part contains invited contributions from Ted Jacobson, Paul Renteln, David C. Robinson, Carlo Rovelli, Lee Smolin and Charles Torre. These reports discuss the current research in this area.

  1. Canonical Chern-Simons gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Souvik; Vaz, Cenalo

    2017-07-01

    We study the canonical description of the axisymmetric vacuum in 2 +1 -dimensional gravity, treating Einstein's gravity as a Chern-Simons gauge theory on a manifold with the restriction that the dreibein is invertible. Our treatment is in the spirit of Kuchař's description of the Schwarzschild black hole in 3 +1 dimensions, where the mass and angular momentum are expressed in terms of the canonical variables and a series of canonical transformations that turn the curvature coordinates and their conjugate momenta into new canonical variables is performed. In their final form, the constraints are seen to require that the momenta conjugate to the Killing time and curvature radius vanish, and what remains is the mass, the angular momentum, and their conjugate momenta, which we derive. The Wheeler-DeWitt equation is trivial and describes time independent systems with wave functions described only by the total mass and total angular momentum.

  2. Low-gravity experiments of lightweight flexible heat pipe panels with self-rewetting fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kotaro; Abe, Yoshiyuki; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Piccolo, Chiara; Savino, Raffaele

    2009-04-01

    Fluids with a unique surface tension behavior, the so-called "self-rewetting fluids," are considered to be promising working fluids not only in reduced-gravity environments but also in terrestrial applications. Ultralightweight polyimide-based wickless heat pipe panels with flexible, inflatable, and deployable functions were fabricated using self-rewetting fluids. Fundamental operation tests of these panels were conducted under conditions of reduced gravity during parabolic flight. We obtained promising experimental results on the thermal performance of the panels in reduced gravity, although the experimental conditions were not entirely satisfactory.

  3. Exact solutions to quadratic gravity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravda, Vojtěch; Pravdová, Alena; Podolský, J.; Švarc, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 8 (2017), č. článku 084025. ISSN 2470-0010 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37086G Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : quadratic gravity * exact solutions * Kundt spacetimes Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 4.568, year: 2016 https://journals.aps.org/prd/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevD.95.084025

  4. Gravity waves from relativistic binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Janna; O'Reilly, Rachel; Copeland, E. J.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of binary orbits can significantly shape the gravity wave signal which future Earth-based interferometers hope to detect. The inner most stable circular orbit has been of interest as it marks the transition from the late inspiral to final plunge. We consider purely relativistic orbits beyond the circular assumption. Homoclinic orbits are of particular importance to the question of stability as they lie on the boundary between dynamical stability and instability. We identify thes...

  5. Exact solutions to quadratic gravity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravda, Vojtěch; Pravdová, Alena; Podolský, J.; Švarc, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 8 (2017), č. článku 084025. ISSN 2470-0010 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37086G Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : quadratic gravity * exact solutions * Kundt spacetimes Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 4.568, year: 2016 https://journals. aps .org/prd/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevD.95.084025

  6. Gravity inferred subsurface structure of Gadwal schist belt, Andhra ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gravity inferred subsurface structure of Gadwal schist belt,. Andhra Pradesh. G RAMADASS, I B ... structure having a width of 1.8 km at the surface, tapering at a depth of about 2.6 km with a positive density contrast of 0.15 gm/cc with ... bed rock pegmatites (0.035 to 0.25 ppm) and soil samples (0.035 to 4.25 ppm) in a shear ...

  7. Spacetime structure of an evaporating black hole in quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanno, A.; Reuter, M.

    2006-01-01

    The impact of the leading quantum gravity effects on the dynamics of the Hawking evaporation process of a black hole is investigated. Its spacetime structure is described by a renormalization group improved Vaidya metric. Its event horizon, apparent horizon, and timelike limit surface are obtained by taking the scale dependence of Newton's constant into account. The emergence of a quantum ergosphere is discussed. The final state of the evaporation process is a cold, Planck size remnant

  8. Compact objects in relativistic theories of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada da Silva, Hector

    2017-05-01

    In this dissertation we discuss several aspects of compact objects, i.e. neutron stars and black holes, in relativistic theories of gravity. We start by studying the role of nuclear physics (encoded in the so-called equation of state) in determining the properties of neutron stars in general relativity. We show that low-mass neutron stars are potentially useful astrophysical laboratories that can be used to constrain the properties of the equation of state. More specifically, we show that various bulk properties of these objects, such as their quadrupole moment and tidal deformability, are tightly correlated. Next, we develop a formalism that aims to capture how generic modifications from general relativity affect the structure of neutron stars, as predicted by a broad class of gravity theories, in the spirit of the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism (PPN). Our "post-Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff" formalism provides a toolbox to study both stellar structure and the interior/exterior geometries of static, spherically symmetric relativistic stars. We also apply the formalism to parametrize deviations from general relativity in various astrophysical observables related with neutron stars, including surface redshift, apparent radius, Eddington luminosity. We then turn our attention to what is arguably the most well-motivated and well-investigated generalization of general relativity: scalar-tensor theory. We start by considering theories where gravity is mediated by a single extra scalar degree of freedom (in addition to the metric tensor). An interesting class of scalar-tensor theories passes all experimental tests in the weak-field regime of gravity, yet considerably deviates from general relativity in the strong-field regime in the presence of matter. A common assumption in modeling neutron stars is that the pressure within these object is spatially isotropic. We relax this assumption and examine how pressure anisotropy affects the mass, radius and moment of inertia

  9. No Presentism in Quantum Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Christian

    This essay offers a reaction to the recent resurgence of presentism in the philosophy of time. What is of particular interest in this renaissance is that a number of recent arguments supporting presentism are crafted in an untypically naturalistic vein, breathing new life into a metaphysics of time with a bad track record of co-habitation with modern physics. Against this trend, the present essay argues that the pressure on presentism exerted by special relativity and its core lesson of Lorentz symmetry cannot easily be shirked. A categorization of presentist responses to this pressure is offered. As a case in point, I analyze a recent argument by Monton (Presentism and quantum gravity, 263-280, 2006) presenting a case for the compatibility of presentism with quantum gravity. Monton claims that this compatibility arises because there are quantum theories of gravity that use fixed foliations of spacetime and that such fixed foliations provide a natural home for a metaphysically robust notion of the present. A careful analysis leaves Monton's argument wanting. In sum, the prospects of presentism to be alleviated from the stress applied by fundamental physics are faint.

  10. The affine quantum gravity programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klauder, John R

    2002-01-01

    The central principle of affine quantum gravity is securing and maintaining the strict positivity of the matrix { g-hat ab (x)} composed of the spatial components of the local metric operator. On spectral grounds, canonical commutation relations are incompatible with this principle, and they must be replaced by noncanonical, affine commutation relations. Due to the partial second-class nature of the quantum gravitational constraints, it is advantageous to use the recently developed projection operator method, which treats all quantum constraints on an equal footing. Using this method, enforcement of regularized versions of the gravitational operator constraints is formulated quite naturally by means of a novel and relatively well-defined functional integral involving only the same set of variables that appears in the usual classical formulation. It is anticipated that skills and insight to study this formulation can be developed by studying special, reduced-variable models that still retain some basic characteristics of gravity, specifically a partial second-class constraint operator structure. Although perturbatively nonrenormalizable, gravity may possibly be understood nonperturbatively from a hard-core perspective that has proved valuable for specialized models. Finally, developing a procedure to pass to the genuine physical Hilbert space involves several interconnected steps that require careful coordination

  11. Induced gravity II: grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einhorn, Martin B. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall,University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States); Jones, D.R. Timothy [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall,University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States); Dept. of Mathematical Sciences, University of Liverpool,Peach Street, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-31

    As an illustration of a renormalizable, asymptotically-free model of induced gravity, we consider an SO(10) gauge theory interacting with a real scalar multiplet in the adjoint representation. We show that dimensional transmutation can occur, spontaneously breaking SO(10) to SU(5)⊗U(1), while inducing the Planck mass and a positive cosmological constant, all proportional to the same scale v. All mass ratios are functions of the values of coupling constants at that scale. Below this scale (at which the Big Bang may occur), the model takes the usual form of Einstein-Hilbert gravity in de Sitter space plus calculable corrections. We show that there exist regions of parameter space in which the breaking results in a local minimum of the effective action giving a positive dilaton (mass){sup 2} from two-loop corrections associated with the conformal anomaly. Furthermore, unlike the singlet case we considered previously, some minima lie within the basin of attraction of the ultraviolet fixed point. Moreover, the asymptotic behavior of the coupling constants also lie within the range of convergence of the Euclidean path integral, so there is hope that there will be candidates for sensible vacua. Although open questions remain concerning unitarity of all such renormalizable models of gravity, it is not obvious that, in curved backgrounds such as those considered here, unitarity is violated. In any case, any violation that may remain will be suppressed by inverse powers of the reduced Planck mass.

  12. Induced gravity II: grand unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einhorn, Martin B.; Jones, D. R. Timothy

    2016-05-01

    As an illustration of a renormalizable, asymptotically-free model of induced gravity, we consider an SO(10) gauge theory interacting with a real scalar multiplet in the adjoint representation. We show that dimensional transmutation can occur, spontaneously breaking SO(10) to SU(5)⊗U(1), while inducing the Planck mass and a positive cosmological constant, all proportional to the same scale v. All mass ratios are functions of the values of coupling constants at that scale. Below this scale (at which the Big Bang may occur), the model takes the usual form of Einstein-Hilbert gravity in de Sitter space plus calculable corrections. We show that there exist regions of parameter space in which the breaking results in a local minimum of the effective action giving a positive dilaton (mass)2 from two-loop corrections associated with the conformal anomaly. Furthermore, unlike the singlet case we considered previously, some minima lie within the basin of attraction of the ultraviolet fixed point. Moreover, the asymptotic behavior of the coupling constants also lie within the range of convergence of the Euclidean path integral, so there is hope that there will be candidates for sensible vacua. Although open questions remain concerning unitarity of all such renormalizable models of gravity, it is not obvious that, in curved backgrounds such as those considered here, unitarity is violated. In any case, any violation that may remain will be suppressed by inverse powers of the reduced Planck mass.

  13. Cosmological dynamics of mimetic gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Jibitesh; Khyllep, Wompherdeiki; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.; Tamanini, Nicola; Vagnozzi, Sunny

    2018-02-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the dynamical behavior of mimetic gravity with a general potential for the mimetic scalar field. Performing a phase-space and stability analysis, we show that the scenario at hand can successfully describe the thermal history of the universe, namely the successive sequence of radiation, matter, and dark-energy eras. Additionally, at late times the universe can either approach a de Sitter solution, or a scaling accelerated attractor where the dark-matter and dark-energy density parameters are of the same order, thus offering an alleviation of the cosmic coincidence problem. Applying our general analysis to various specific potential choices, including the power-law and the exponential ones, we show that mimetic gravity can be brought into good agreement with the observed behavior of the universe. Moreover, with an inverse square potential we find that mimetic gravity offers an appealing unified cosmological scenario where both dark energy and dark matter are characterized by a single scalar field, and where the cosmic coincidence problem is alleviated.

  14. The meaning of quantum gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Borzeszkowski, H.-H.; Treder, H.-J.

    Should the general theory of relativity be quantized? Indeed, can the general theory of relativity be quantized? These two questions are central to modern physics. The authors of this book take the Bohr-Rosenfeld analysis of quantum electrodynamics as their starting point and develop arguments in support of Einstein's own thesis that, due to the validity of the strong principle of equivalence, the general theory cannot be rigorously quantized. They show that the concept of gravitons is an approximate formalization only, which has its use in the harmonization of the gravitational equations with the matter field, but which does not predict any effect that may be used to distinguish quantum from classical gravity.Contents: 1. Quantum theory and gravitation. 2. Quantum mechanics and classical gravitation. 3. Measurement in quantum gravity. 4. Mathematical descriptions of quantum gravity.5. Quantum postulates and the strong principle of equivalence. 6. Planckions. Appendix A: Massive shell models and shock waves in gravitational theories with higher derivatives. Appendix B: On the physical meaning of Planck's "natural units".

  15. In-orbit Calibration and Local Gravity Field Continuation Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pail, R.

    In the course of the GOCE data processing many calibration tasks have to be per- formed. Towards the final part of the data stream, an absolute calibration and vali- dation of the gradiometer signal is required. One of the most promising methods for such an in-orbit calibration is the use of well-surveyed areas on the Earth's surface, where the accuracy of the known gravity field information is high enough to meet the mission requirements. For this purpose ground gravity data have to be continued upward to the GOCE satellite altitude of approximately 250 km, where a comparison with the actual observations is performed. Since there are only very few regions on the globe which fulfil the accuracy requirements, the corresponding gravity information is extremely locally bounded, dismissing standard global continuation strategies and simultaneously resulting in edge effect and windowing problems. Based on a synthetic gravity test environment ­ providing in addition to statistical er- ror information also absolute error estimates ­ several upward continuation methods, e.g. least squares collocation, equivalent source techniques using point masses or area density distributions defined on a spherical surface section, are described, assessed and compared. It turns out that all these strictly local approaches fail to work suffi- ciently accurate. Consequently, a combined solution strategy is proposed, supporting the high-quality gravity field information within the well-surveyed test area with a low accuracy, but globally defined Earth model. Under quite realistic assumptions the upward continuation is performed with rms errors of gravity gradients in the order of 1 mE. The most crucial limiting factor of this method is spectral leakage in the course of an adequate representation of the initial gravity information. We will particularly focus on the consequences and effects of the different approaches on the accuracy of GOCE level 1b and 2 products. In order to demonstrate

  16. Cap integration in spectral gravity forward modelling: near- and far-zone gravity effects via Molodensky's truncation coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucha, Blažej; Hirt, Christian; Kuhn, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Spectral gravity forward modelling is a technique that converts a band-limited topography into its implied gravitational field. This conversion implicitly relies on global integration of topographic masses. In this paper, a modification of the spectral technique is presented that provides gravity effects induced only by the masses located inside or outside a spherical cap centred at the evaluation point. This is achieved by altitude-dependent Molodensky's truncation coefficients, for which we provide infinite series expansions and recurrence relations with a fixed number of terms. Both representations are generalized for an arbitrary integer power of the topography and arbitrary radial derivative. Because of the altitude-dependency of the truncation coefficients, a straightforward synthesis of the near- and far-zone gravity effects at dense grids on irregular surfaces (e.g. the Earth's topography) is computationally extremely demanding. However, we show that this task can be efficiently performed using an analytical continuation based on the gradient approach, provided that formulae for radial derivatives of the truncation coefficients are available. To demonstrate the new cap-modified spectral technique, we forward model the Earth's degree-360 topography, obtaining near- and far-zone effects on gravity disturbances expanded up to degree 3600. The computation is carried out on the Earth's surface and the results are validated against an independent spatial-domain Newtonian integration (1 μGal RMS agreement). The new technique is expected to assist in mitigating the spectral filter problem of residual terrain modelling and in the efficient construction of full-scale global gravity maps of highest spatial resolution.

  17. Holographic entanglement entropy for the most general higher derivative gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Rong-Xin; Guo, Wu-zhong

    2015-01-01

    The holographic entanglement entropy for the most general higher derivative gravity is investigated. We find a new type of Wald entropy, which appears on entangling surface without the rotational symmetry and reduces to usual Wald entropy on Killing horizon. Furthermore, we obtain a formal formula of HEE for the most general higher derivative gravity and work it out exactly for some squashed cones. As an important application, we derive HEE for gravitational action with one derivative of the curvature when the extrinsic curvature vanishes. We also study some toy models with non-zero extrinsic curvature. We prove that our formula yields the correct universal term of entanglement entropy for 4d CFTs. Furthermore, we solve the puzzle raised by Hung, Myers and Smolkin that the logarithmic term of entanglement entropy derived from Weyl anomaly of CFTs does not match the holographic result even if the extrinsic curvature vanishes. We find that such mismatch comes from the ‘anomaly of entropy’ of the derivative of curvature. After considering such contributions carefully, we resolve the puzzle successfully. In general, we need to fix the splitting problem for the conical metrics in order to derive the holographic entanglement entropy. We find that, at least for Einstein gravity, the splitting problem can be fixed by using equations of motion. How to derive the splittings for higher derivative gravity is a non-trivial and open question. For simplicity, we ignore the splitting problem in this paper and find that it does not affect our main results.

  18. Holographic entanglement entropy for the most general higher derivative gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Rong-Xin [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm (Germany); Guo, Wu-zhong [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Key Laboratory of Frontiers in Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics (YITP), Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    The holographic entanglement entropy for the most general higher derivative gravity is investigated. We find a new type of Wald entropy, which appears on entangling surface without the rotational symmetry and reduces to usual Wald entropy on Killing horizon. Furthermore, we obtain a formal formula of HEE for the most general higher derivative gravity and work it out exactly for some squashed cones. As an important application, we derive HEE for gravitational action with one derivative of the curvature when the extrinsic curvature vanishes. We also study some toy models with non-zero extrinsic curvature. We prove that our formula yields the correct universal term of entanglement entropy for 4d CFTs. Furthermore, we solve the puzzle raised by Hung, Myers and Smolkin that the logarithmic term of entanglement entropy derived from Weyl anomaly of CFTs does not match the holographic result even if the extrinsic curvature vanishes. We find that such mismatch comes from the ‘anomaly of entropy’ of the derivative of curvature. After considering such contributions carefully, we resolve the puzzle successfully. In general, we need to fix the splitting problem for the conical metrics in order to derive the holographic entanglement entropy. We find that, at least for Einstein gravity, the splitting problem can be fixed by using equations of motion. How to derive the splittings for higher derivative gravity is a non-trivial and open question. For simplicity, we ignore the splitting problem in this paper and find that it does not affect our main results.

  19. Measuring Gravity in International Trade Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Young Song

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is two-fold. One is to clarify the concept of gravity in international trade flows. The other is to measure the strength of gravity in international trade flows in a way that is consistent with a well-defined concept of gravity. This paper shows that the widely accepted belief that specialization is the source of gravity is not well grounded on theory. We propose to define gravity in international trade as the force that makes the market shares of an exporting country constant in all importing countries, regardless of their sizes. In a stochastic context, we should interpret it as implying that the strength of gravity increases i as the correlation between market shares and market sizes gets weaker and ii as the variance of market shares gets smaller. We estimate an empirical gravity equation thoroughly based on this definition of gravity. We find that a strong degree of gravity exists in most bilateral trade, regardless of income levels of countries, and in trade of most manThe purpose of this paper is two-fold. One is to clarify the concept of gravity in international trade flows. The other is to measure the strength of gravity in international trade flows in a way that is consistent with a well-defined concept of gravity. This paper shows that the widely accepted belief that specialization is the source of gravity is not well grounded on theory. We propose to define gravity in international trade as the force that makes the market shares of an exporting country constant in all importing countries, regardless of their sizes. In a stochastic context, we should interpret it as implying that the strength of gravity increases i as the correlation between market shares and market sizes gets weaker and ii as the variance of market shares gets smaller. We estimate an empirical gravity equation thoroughly based on this definition of gravity. We find that a strong degree of gravity exists in most bilateral trade, regardless of

  20. Testing the influence of gravity on flower symmetry in five Saxifraga species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koethe, Sebastian; Bloemer, Judith; Lunau, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    Flower symmetry is considered a species-specific trait and is categorized in asymmetry, actinomorphic symmetry, bisymmetry and zygomorphic symmetry. Here we report on the intra-individual variation of flower symmetry in the genus Saxifraga and the influence of light, gravity and intrinsic factors on the development of flower symmetry. We tested five species-Saxifraga cuneifolia, Saxifraga imparilis, Saxifraga rotundifolia, Saxifraga stolonifera and Saxifraga umbrosa-concerning six flower parameters-angles between petals, petal length, petal pigmentation, angular position of carpels, movement of stamens and (only for S. imparilis and S. stolonifera) the length of the two lower elongated petals in regard to their position towards the stem. Specimens of all species were tested on a vertical clinostat as a gravity compensator, on a horizontal clinostat as a light incidence compensator and on a stationary control. The results show that the angle of incident light has no apparent impact on flower symmetry, whereas gravity affects the angular position of petals in S. cuneifolia and S. umbrosa and the petal colouration in S. rotundifolia. In S. cuneifolia and S. umbrosa, the absence of directional gravity resulted in the development of actinomorphic flowers, whereas the corresponding control flowers were zygomorphic. The development of flowers in S. rotundifolia was not altered by this treatment. The length of the two elongated petals in S. stolonifera and S. imparilis was not affected by gravity, but rather was determined by position of the flower within the inflorescence and resulted in asymmetrical flowers.

  1. Stochastic Gravity: Theory and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Bei Lok

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Whereas semiclassical gravity is based on the semiclassical Einstein equation with sources given by the expectation value of the stress-energy tensor of quantum fields, stochastic semiclassical gravity is based on the Einstein-Langevin equation, which has in addition sources due to the noise kernel. The noise kernel is the vacuum expectation value of the (operator-valued stress-energy bi-tensor which describes the fluctuations of quantum matter fields in curved spacetimes. In the first part, we describe the fundamentals of this new theory via two approaches: the axiomatic and the functional. The axiomatic approach is useful to see the structure of the theory from the framework of semiclassical gravity, showing the link from the mean value of the stress-energy tensor to their correlation functions. The functional approach uses the Feynman-Vernon influence functional and the Schwinger-Keldysh closed-time-path effective action methods which are convenient for computations. It also brings out the open systems concepts and the statistical and stochastic contents of the theory such as dissipation, fluctuations, noise, and decoherence. We then focus on the properties of the stress-energy bi-tensor. We obtain a general expression for the noise kernel of a quantum field defined at two distinct points in an arbitrary curved spacetime as products of covariant derivatives of the quantum field's Green function. In the second part, we describe three applications of stochastic gravity theory. First, we consider metric perturbations in a Minkowski spacetime. We offer an analytical solution of the Einstein-Langevin equation and compute the two-point correlation functions for the linearized Einstein tensor and for the metric perturbations. Second, we discuss structure formation from the stochastic gravity viewpoint, which can go beyond the standard treatment by incorporating the full quantum effect of the inflaton fluctuations. Third, we discuss the backreaction

  2. Gravity effects on endogenous movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Anders; Antonsen, Frank

    Gravity effects on endogenous movements A. Johnsson * and F. Antonsen *+ * Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,NO-7491, Trond-heim, Norway, E-mail: anders.johnsson@ntnu.no + Present address: Statoil Research Center Trondheim, NO-7005, Trondheim, Norway Circumnutations in stems/shoots exist in many plants and often consists of more or less regular helical movements around the plumb line under Earth conditions. Recent results on circumnu-tations of Arabidopsis in space (Johnsson et al. 2009) showed that minute amplitude oscilla-tions exist in weightlessness, but that centripetal acceleration (mimicking the gravity) amplified and/or created large amplitude oscillations. Fundamental mechanisms underlying these results will be discussed by modeling the plant tissue as a cylinder of cells coupled together. As a starting point we have modeled (Antonsen 1998) standing waves on a ring of biological cells, as first discussed in a classical paper (Turing 1952). If the coupled cells can change their water content, an `extension' wave could move around the ring. We have studied several, stacked rings of cells coupled into a cylinder that together represent a cylindrical plant tissue. Waves of extensions travelling around the cylinder could then represent the observable circumnutations. The coupling between cells can be due to cell-to-cell diffusion, or to transport via channels, and the coupling can be modeled to vary in both longitudinal and transversal direction of the cylinder. The results from ISS experiments indicate that this cylindrical model of coupled cells should be able to 1) show self-sustained oscillations without the impact of gravity (being en-dogenous) and 2) show how an environmental factor like gravity can amplify or generate the oscillatory movements. Gravity has been introduced in the model by a negative, time-delayed feed-back transport across the cylinder. This represents the physiological reactions to acceler

  3. Dual geometric-gauge field aspects of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huei Peng; Wang, K.

    1992-01-01

    We propose that the geometric and standard gauge field aspects of gravity are equally essential for a complete description of gravity and can be reconciled. We show that this dualism of gravity resolves the dimensional Newtonian constant problem in both quantum gravity and unification schemes involving gravity (i.e., the Newtonian constant is no longer the coupling constant in the gauge aspect of gravity) and reveals the profound similarity between gravity and other fields. 23 refs., 3 tabs

  4. Approach of regional gravity field modeling from GRACE data for improvement of geoid modeling for Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroishi, Y.; Lemoine, F. G.; Rowlands, D. D.

    2006-12-01

    The latest gravimetric geoid model for Japan, JGEOID2004, suffers from errors at long wavelengths (around 1000 km) in a range of +/- 30 cm. The model was developed by combining surface gravity data with a global marine altimetric gravity model, using EGM96 as a foundation, and the errors at long wavelength are presumably attributed to EGM96 errors. The Japanese islands and their vicinity are located in a region of plate convergence boundaries, producing substantial gravity and geoid undulations in a wide range of wavelengths. Because of the geometry of the islands and trenches, precise information on gravity in the surrounding oceans should be incorporated in detail, even if the geoid model is required to be accurate only over land. The Kuroshio Current, which runs south of Japan, causes high sea surface variability, making altimetric gravity field determination complicated. To reduce the long-wavelength errors in the geoid model, we are investigating GRACE data for regional gravity field modeling at long wavelengths in the vicinity of Japan. Our approach is based on exclusive use of inter- satellite range-rate data with calibrated accelerometer data and attitude data, for regional or global gravity field recovery. In the first step, we calibrate accelerometer data in terms of scales and biases by fitting dynamically calculated orbits to GPS-determined precise orbits. The calibration parameters of accelerometer data thus obtained are used in the second step to recover a global/regional gravity anomaly field. This approach is applied to GRACE data obtained for the year 2005 and resulting global/regional gravity models are presented and discussed.

  5. MCFRS Incidents by Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset contains the monthly summary data indicating incident occurred in each fire station response area. The summary data is the incident count broken down by...

  6. Police Incident Reports Written

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — This table contains incident reports filed with the Chapel Hill Police Department. Multiple incidents may have been reported at the same time. The most serious...

  7. The interior structure of Enceladus from Cassini gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iess, Luciano

    2015-04-01

    The Cassini spacecraft flew by the small Saturnian moon Enceladus in three close flybys (April 28, 2010, November 30, 2010 and May 2, 2012, to carry out measurements of the satellite's gravity field [1]. One of the main motivations was the search for a hemispherical asymmetry in the gravity field, the gravitational counterpart of the striking North-South asymmetry shown by optical imaging and other Cassini instruments in the geological features of the moon. The estimation of Enceladus' gravity field by Cassini was especially complex because of the small surface gravity (0.11 m/s2), the short duration of the gravitational interaction (only a few minutes) and the small, nearly impulsive, neutral particles drag occurring when the spacecraft crossed the south polar plume during the first and the third flyby. Including the non-gravitational acceleration due to the plume in the dynamical model was crucial to obtain a reliable solution for the gravity field. In order to maximize the sensitivity to the hemispherical asymmetry, controlled by the spherical harmonic coefficient J3, the closest approaches occurred at the low altitudes (respectively 100, 48 and 70 km), and at high latitudes in both hemispheres (89°S, 62°N, and 72°S). Enceladus' gravity field is dominated by large quadrupole terms not far from those expected for a body in a relaxed shape. Although the deviations from the hydrostaticity are weak (J2/C22=3.55±0.05), the straightforward application of the Radau-Darwin approximation yields a value of the moment of inertia factor (MOIF=C/MR2) that is incompatible (0.34) with the differentiated interior structure suggested by cryovolcanism and the large heat flow. The other remarkable feature of the gravity field is the small but still statistically significant value of J3 (106 x J3 = -115.3±22.9). A differentiated interior structure (corresponding to a smaller MOIF) may be reconciled with the gravity measurement by assuming that the rocky core has retained some

  8. Improving GOCE cross-track gravity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemes, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The GOCE gravity gradiometer measured highly accurate gravity gradients along the orbit during GOCE's mission lifetime from March 17, 2009, to November 11, 2013. These measurements contain unique information on the gravity field at a spatial resolution of 80 km half wavelength, which is not provided to the same accuracy level by any other satellite mission now and in the foreseeable future. Unfortunately, the gravity gradient in cross-track direction is heavily perturbed in the regions around the geomagnetic poles. We show in this paper that the perturbing effect can be modeled accurately as a quadratic function of the non-gravitational acceleration of the satellite in cross-track direction. Most importantly, we can remove the perturbation from the cross-track gravity gradient to a great extent, which significantly improves the accuracy of the latter and offers opportunities for better scientific exploitation of the GOCE gravity gradient data set.

  9. Quantum Gravity Mathematical Models and Experimental Bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Fauser, Bertfried; Zeidler, Eberhard

    2007-01-01

    The construction of a quantum theory of gravity is the most fundamental challenge confronting contemporary theoretical physics. The different physical ideas which evolved while developing a theory of quantum gravity require highly advanced mathematical methods. This book presents different mathematical approaches to formulate a theory of quantum gravity. It represents a carefully selected cross-section of lively discussions about the issue of quantum gravity which took place at the second workshop "Mathematical and Physical Aspects of Quantum Gravity" in Blaubeuren, Germany. This collection covers in a unique way aspects of various competing approaches. A unique feature of the book is the presentation of different approaches to quantum gravity making comparison feasible. This feature is supported by an extensive index. The book is mainly addressed to mathematicians and physicists who are interested in questions related to mathematical physics. It allows the reader to obtain a broad and up-to-date overview on ...

  10. Emergent spacetime and the origin of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hyun Seok

    2009-01-01

    We present an exposition on the geometrization of the electromagnetic force. We show that, in noncommutative (NC) spacetime, there always exists a coordinate transformation to locally eliminate the electromagnetic force, which is precisely the Darboux theorem in symplectic geometry. As a consequence, the electromagnetism can be realized as a geometrical property of spacetime like gravity. We show that the geometrization of the electromagnetic force in NC spacetime is the origin of gravity, dubbed as the emergent gravity. We discuss how the emergent gravity reveals a novel, radically different picture about the origin of spacetime. In particular, the emergent gravity naturally explains the dynamical origin of flat spacetime, which is absent in Einstein gravity. This spacetime picture turns out to be crucial for a tenable solution of the cosmological constant problem.

  11. What goes up... gravity and scientific method

    CERN Document Server

    Kosso, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The concept of gravity provides a natural phenomenon that is simultaneously obvious and obscure; we all know what it is, but rarely question why it is. The simple observation that 'what goes up must come down' contrasts starkly with our current scientific explanation of gravity, which involves challenging and sometimes counterintuitive concepts. With such extremes between the plain and the perplexing, gravity forces a sharp focus on scientific method. Following the history of gravity from Aristotle to Einstein, this clear account highlights the logic of scientific method for non-specialists. Successive theories of gravity and the evidence for each are presented clearly and rationally, focusing on the fundamental ideas behind them. Using only high-school level algebra and geometry, the author emphasizes what the equations mean rather than how they are derived, making this accessible for all those curious about gravity and how science really works.

  12. Logamediate Inflation in f ( T ) Teleparallel Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezazadeh, Kazem; Karami, Kayoomars [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran Street, P.O. Box 66177-15175, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdolmaleki, Asrin, E-mail: rezazadeh86@gmail.com [Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-20

    We study logamediate inflation in the context of f ( T ) teleparallel gravity. f ( T )-gravity is a generalization of the teleparallel gravity which is formulated on the Weitzenbock spacetime, characterized by the vanishing curvature tensor (absolute parallelism) and the non-vanishing torsion tensor. We consider an f ( T )-gravity model which is sourced by a canonical scalar field. Assuming a power-law f ( T ) function in the action, we investigate an inflationary universe with a logamediate scale factor. Our results show that, although logamediate inflation is completely ruled out by observational data in the standard inflationary scenario based on Einstein gravity, it can be compatible with the 68% confidence limit joint region of Planck 2015 TT,TE,EE+lowP data in the framework of f ( T )-gravity.

  13. Matter scattering in quadratic gravity and unitarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yugo; Inami, Takeo; Izumi, Keisuke; Kitamura, Tomotaka

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the ultraviolet (UV) behavior of two-scalar elastic scattering with graviton exchanges in higher-curvature gravity theory. In Einstein gravity, matter scattering is shown not to satisfy the unitarity bound at tree level at high energy. Among some of the possible directions for the UV completion of Einstein gravity, such as string theory, modified gravity, and inclusion of high-mass/high-spin states, we take R_{μν}^2 gravity coupled to matter. We show that matter scattering with graviton interactions satisfies the unitarity bound at high energy, even with negative norm states due to the higher-order derivatives of metric components. The difference in the unitarity property of these two gravity theories is probably connected to that in another UV property, namely, the renormalizability property of the two.

  14. Active Response Gravity Offload and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, Larry K. (Inventor); Valle, Paul S. (Inventor); Bankieris, Derek R. (Inventor); Lieberman, Asher P. (Inventor); Redden, Lee (Inventor); Shy, Cecil (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A variable gravity field simulator can be utilized to provide three dimensional simulations for simulated gravity fields selectively ranging from Moon, Mars, and micro-gravity environments and/or other selectable gravity fields. The gravity field simulator utilizes a horizontally moveable carriage with a cable extending from a hoist. The cable can be attached to a load which experiences the effects of the simulated gravity environment. The load can be a human being or robot that makes movements that induce swinging of the cable whereby a horizontal control system reduces swinging energy. A vertical control system uses a non-linear feedback filter to remove noise from a load sensor that is in the same frequency range as signals from the load sensor.

  15. Horizon thermodynamics in fourth-order gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Sen Ma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of horizon thermodynamics, the field equations of Einstein gravity and some other second-order gravities can be rewritten as the thermodynamic identity: dE=TdS−PdV. However, in order to construct the horizon thermodynamics in higher-order gravity, we have to simplify the field equations firstly. In this paper, we study the fourth-order gravity and convert it to second-order gravity via a so-called “Legendre transformation” at the cost of introducing two other fields besides the metric field. With this simplified theory, we implement the conventional procedure in the construction of the horizon thermodynamics in 3 and 4 dimensional spacetime. We find that the field equations in the fourth-order gravity can also be written as the thermodynamic identity. Moreover, we can use this approach to derive the same black hole mass as that by other methods.

  16. A proof of the weak gravity conjecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Shahar

    The weak gravity conjecture suggests that, in a self-consistent theory of quantum gravity, the strength of gravity is bounded from above by the strengths of the various gauge forces in the theory. In particular, this intriguing conjecture asserts that in a theory describing a U(1) gauge field coupled consistently to gravity, there must exist a particle whose proper mass is bounded (in Planck units) by its charge: m/mP attracted the attention of physicists and mathematicians over the last decade. It should be emphasized, however, that despite the fact that there are numerous examples from field theory and string theory that support the conjecture, we still lack a general proof of its validity. In the present paper, we prove that the weak gravity conjecture (and, in particular, the mass-charge upper bound m/mP law of thermodynamics, a law which is widely believed to reflect a fundamental aspect of the elusive theory of quantum gravity.

  17. Surface morphology of vacuum-evaporated pentacene film on Si substrate studied by in situ grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering: I. The initial stage of formation of pentacene film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirosawa, Ichiro; Watanabe, Takeshi; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki; Kikuchi, Mamoru; Yoshimoto, Noriyuki

    2018-03-01

    The progress of the surface morphology of a growing sub-monolayered pentacene film on a Si substrate was studied by in situ grazing-incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). The observed GISAXS profiles did not show sizes of pentacene islands but mainly protuberances on the boundaries around pentacene film. Scattering of X-ray by residual pits in the pentacene film was also detected in the GISAXS profiles of an almost fully covered film. The average radius of pentacene protuberances increased from 13 to 24 nm as the coverage increased to 0.83 monolayer, and the most frequent radius was almost constant at approximately 9 nm. This result suggests that the population of larger protuberances increase with increasing lengths of boundaries of the pentacene film. It can also be considered that the detected protuberances were crystallites of pentacene, since the average size of protuberances was nearly equal to crystallite sizes of pentacene films. The almost constant characteristic distance of 610 nm and amplitudes of pair correlation functions at low coverages suggest that the growth of pentacene films obeyed the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model, as previously reported. It is also considered that the sites of islands show a triangular distribution for small variations of estimated correlation distances.

  18. Incident Information Management Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Pejovic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Flaws of\tcurrent incident information management at CMS and CERN\tare discussed. A new data\tmodel for future incident database is\tproposed and briefly described. Recently developed draft version of GIS-­‐based tool for incident tracking is presented.

  19. Algebraic definition of topological W gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, S.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors propose a definition of the topological W gravity using some properties of the principal three-dimensional subalgebra of a simple Lie algebra due to Kostant. In the authors' definition, structures of the two-dimensional topological gravity are naturally embedded in the extended theories. In accordance with the definition, the authors will present some explicit calculations for the W 3 gravity

  20. Cosmic censorship in quantum Einstein gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, A.; Koch, B.; Platania, A.

    2017-05-01

    We study the quantum gravity modification of the Kuroda-Papapetrou model induced by the running of the Newton’s constant at high energy in quantum Einstein gravity. We argue that although the antiscreening character of the gravitational interaction favours the formation of a naked singularity, quantum gravity effects turn the classical singularity into a ‘whimper’ singularity which remains naked for a finite amount of advanced time.