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Sample records for incident stroke cases

  1. Trends in Stroke Incidence and 28-Day Case Fatality in a Nationwide Stroke Registry of a Multiethnic Asian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuen Seng; Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk; Ng, Sheryl Hui Xian; Tan, Pei Zheng; Chan, Bernard P L; Tang, Kok-Foo; Ahmad, Aftab; Kong, Keng He; Chang, Hui Meng; Chow, Khuan Yew; Koh, Gerald Choon-Huat; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated trends in stroke incidence and case fatality overall and according to sex, age, ethnicity, and stroke subtype in a multiethnic Asian population. The Singapore Stroke Registry identifies all stroke cases in all public hospitals using medical claims, hospital discharge summaries, and death registry data. Age-standardized incidence rates and 28-day case-fatality rates were calculated for individuals aged ≥15 years between 2006 and 2012. To estimate the annual percentage change of the rates, a linear regression model was fitted to the log rates, and a Wald test was performed to test for trend. P values Chinese (-2.64; 95% CI, -3.15 to -2.13), Indians (-3.78; 95% CI, -5.93 to -1.58), and others (-12.73; 95% CI, -18.93 to -6.06) compared with Malays (2.58; 95% CI, 1.17 to 4.02); and in ischemic stroke subtype (ischemic: -2.43; 95% CI, -3.13 to -1.73; hemorrhagic: -1.02; 95% CI, -2.04 to 0.01). Subgroup-specific findings for case fatality were similar. This is the first countrywide hospital-based registry study in a multiethnic Asian population, and it revealed marked overall reductions in stroke incidence and case fatality. However, it also identified important population groups with less favorable trends, especially younger adults and those of Malay ethnicity. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. First-Ever Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Incidence and 30-Day Case-Fatality Rates in a Population-Based Study in Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahit, M Cecilia; Coppola, Mariano L; Riccio, Patricia M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Epidemiological data about stroke are scarce in low- and middle-income Latin-American countries. We investigated annual incidence of first-ever stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) and 30-day case-fatality rates in a population-based setting in Tandil, Argentina....... METHODS: We prospectively identified all first-ever stroke and TIA cases from overlapping sources between January 5, 2013, and April 30, 2015, in Tandil, Argentina. We calculated crude and standardized incidence rates. We estimated 30-day case-fatality rates. RESULTS: We identified 334 first-ever strokes.......1% (95% CI, 14.2-36.6) for intracerebral hemorrhage, and 1.9% (95% CI, 0.4-5.8) for TIA. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides the first prospective population-based stroke and TIA incidence and case-fatality estimate in Argentina. First-ever stroke incidence was lower than that reported in previous Latin...

  3. Acute cerebrovascular incident in a young woman: Venous or arterial stroke? – Comparative analysis based on two case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sleiman, Katarzyna; Zimny, Anna; Kowalczyk, Edyta; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are the most common neurological disorders. Most of them are arterial strokes, mainly ischemic, less often of hemorrhagic origin. Changes in the course of cerebral venous thrombosis are less common causes of acute cerebrovascular events. Clinical and radiological presentation of arterial and venous strokes (especially in emergency head CT) may pose a diagnostic problem because of great resemblance. However, the distinction between arterial and venous stroke is important from a clinical point of view, as it carries implications for the treatment and determinates patient’s prognosis. In this article, we present cases of two young women (one with an acute venous infarction, the second with an arterial stroke) who presented with similar both clinical and radiological signs of acute vascular incident in the cerebral cortex. We present main similarities and differences between arterial and venous strokes regarding the etiology, clinical symptoms and radiological appearance in various imaging techniques. We emphasize that thorough analysis of CT (including cerebral vessels), knowledge of symptoms and additional clinical information (e.g. risk factors) may facilitate correct diagnosis and allow planning further diagnostic imaging studies. We also emphasize the importance of MRI, especially among young people, in the differential diagnosis of venous and arterial infarcts

  4. Incidence of constipation in stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianxiang; Yuan, Mengguo; Liu, Yunfang; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Jingqing; Guo, Weifeng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There is growing awareness of a link between the gut and cardiovascular disease. Constipation is common among individuals who have had a stroke, and it negatively affects social functioning and quality of life. However, no systematic study on the incidence of constipation in stroke patients has been reported. We selected studies included in Medline, Embase, Cochrane database, and Web of Science. Studies were included if they reported the incidence in stroke patients. Two authors selected the studies, extracted the data independently, and assessed these. Subgroup analyses were conducted according to the stroke subtype and stage of stroke. After detailed evaluations, 8 studies (n  =  1385 participants) were found that contained data that were suitable for meta-analytic synthesis. A forest plot showed that the incidence of constipation was 48% (95% confidence interval [CI]  =  33%–63%). In the analysis of the type of stroke subgroup, the incidence of constipation in patients who had had a hemorrhagic stroke (66% [95% CI  =  40–91%]) was higher than that in patients who had experienced an ischemic stroke (51% [95% CI  =  27%–75%]). The incidence in the acute stage (45% [95% CI  =  36%–54%]) was lower than that in the rehabilitation stage (48% [95% CI  =  23%–73%]). Constipation after a stroke event occurs frequently. This finding may raise awareness about bowel complications to allow correct evaluation and proper management. PMID:28640117

  5. Stroke Incidence and Outcomes in Northeastern Greece: The Evros Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Patousi, Athanasia; Pikilidou, Maria; Birbilis, Theodosis; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Mantatzis, Michalis; Asimis, Aristeidis; Papanas, Nikolaos; Skendros, Panagiotis; Terzoudi, Aikaterini; Karamanli, Aikaterini; Kouroumichakis, Ioannis; Zebekakis, Pantelis; Maltezos, Efstratios; Piperidou, Charitomeni; Vadikolias, Konstantinos; Heliopoulos, Ioannis

    2018-02-01

    Data are scarce on both stroke incidence rates and outcomes in Greece and in rural areas in particular. We performed a prospective population-based study evaluating the incidence of first-ever stroke in the Evros prefecture, a region of a total 147 947 residents located in North Eastern Greece. Adult patients with first-ever stroke were registered during a 24-month period (2010-2012) and followed up for 12 months. To compare our stroke incidence with that observed in other studies, we standardized our incidence rate data according to the European Standard Population, World Health Organization, and Segi population. We also applied criteria of data quality proposed by the Monitoring Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease project. Stroke diagnosis and classification were performed using World Health Organization criteria on the basis of neuroimaging and autopsy data. We prospectively documented 703 stroke cases (mean age: 75±12 years; 52.8% men; ischemic stroke: 80.8%; intracerebral hemorrhage: 11.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage: 4.4%; undefined: 3.0%) with a total follow-up time of 119 805 person-years. The unadjusted and European Standard Population-adjusted incidences of all strokes were 586.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 543.4-630.2) and 534.1 (95% CI, 494.6-573.6) per 100 000 person-years, respectively. The unadjusted incidence rates for ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage were 474.1 (95% CI, 435-513), 69.3 (95% CI, 54-84), and 25.9 (95% CI, 17-35) per 100 000 person-years, respectively. The corresponding European Standard Population-adjusted incidence rates per 100 000 person-years were 425.9 (95% CI, 390.9-460.9), 63.3 (95% CI, 49.7-76.9), and 25.8 (95% CI, 16.7-34.9) for ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, respectively. The overall 28-day case fatality rate was 21.3% (95% CI, 18.3%-24.4%) for all strokes and was higher in hemorrhagic strokes than ischemic stroke (40

  6. A prospective study of stroke sub-type from within an incident ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and thirty-two incident stroke cases were identified in the rural Hai demographic surveillance site (DSS) and 69 in the urban Dar-es-Salaam DSS; 63 patients with stroke due to ischaemia or cerebral haemorrhage from Hai and 17 from Dar-es-Salaam had a CT scan within 15 days of the stroke. Stroke was ...

  7. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and prediction of incident stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Wadley, Virginia G; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Howard, George; Unverzagt, Frederick W; Moy, Claudia; Howard, Virginia J; Kissela, Brett; Judd, Suzanne E

    2015-03-01

    There are limited data on the potential association of adherence to Mediterranean diet (MeD) with incident stroke. We sought to assess the longitudinal association between greater adherence to MeD and risk of incident stroke. We prospectively evaluated a population-based cohort of 30 239 individuals enrolled in REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, after excluding participants with stroke history, missing demographic data or food frequency questionnaires, and unavailable follow-up information. Adherence to MeD was categorized using MeD score. Incident stroke was adjudicated by expert panel review of medical records during a mean follow-up period of 6.5 years. Incident stroke was identified in 565 participants (2.8%; 497 and 68 cases of ischemic stroke [IS] and hemorrhagic stroke, respectively) of 20 197 individuals fulfilling the inclusion criteria. High adherence to MeD (MeD score, 5-9) was associated with lower risk of incident IS in unadjusted analyses (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-1.00; P=0.046). The former association retained its significance (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.96; P=0.016) after adjustment for demographics, vascular risk factors, blood pressure levels, and antihypertensive medications. When MeD was evaluated as a continuous variable, a 1-point increase in MeD score was independently associated with a 5% reduction in the risk of incident IS (95% confidence interval, 0-11%). We documented no association of adherence to MeD with incident hemorrhagic stroke. There was no interaction of race (P=0.37) on the association of adherence to MeD with incident IS. High adherence to MeD seems to be associated with a lower risk of incident IS independent of potential confounders. Adherence to MeD is not related to the risk of incident hemorrhagic stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Stroke Incidence in Victoria, Australia—Emerging Improvements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin B. Clissold

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEvidence of a decline in the incidence of stroke has emerged from population-based studies. These have included retrospective and prospective cohorts. However, in Australia and other countries, government bodies and stroke foundations predict a rise in the prevalence of stroke that is anticipated to increase the burden of stroke across the entire domain of care. This increase in prevalence must be viewed as different from the decline in incidence being observed, a measure of new stroke cases. In Victoria, all public emergency department visits and public and private hospital admissions are reported to the Department of Health and Human Services and include demographic, diagnostic, and procedural/treatment information.MethodsWe obtained data from financial years 1997/1998 to 2007/2008 inclusive, for all cases with a primary stroke diagnosis (ICD-10-AM categories with associated data fields. Incident cases were established by using a 5-year clearance period.ResultsFrom 2003/2004 to 2007/2008 inclusive, there were 53,425 patients with a primary stroke or TIA diagnosis. The crude incident stroke rate for first ever stroke was 211 per 100,000 per year (95% CI 205–217 [females—205 per 100,000 per year (95% CI 196–214 and males—217 per 100,000 per year (95% CI 210–224]. The overall stroke rates were seen to significantly decline over the period [males (per 100,000 per year 227 in 2003/2004 to 202 in 2007/2008 (p = 0.0157 and females (per 100,000 per year 214 in 2003/2004 to 188 in 2007/2008 (p = 0.0482]. Ischemic stroke rates also appeared to decline; however, this change was not significant.ConclusionThese results demonstrate a significant decline in stroke incidence during the study period and may suggest evidence for effectiveness of primary and secondary prevention strategies in cerebrovascular risk factor management.

  9. Incidence of first stroke: a population study in Iceland.

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    Hilmarsson, Agust; Kjartansson, Olafur; Olafsson, Elias

    2013-06-01

    Iceland is an island in the North Atlantic with ≈319 000 inhabitants. The study determines the incidence of first stroke in the adult population of Iceland during 12 months, which has not been previously reported in the entire Icelandic population. The study population consisted of all residents of Iceland, aged ≥ 18 years, during the 12-month study period. Cases were identified by multiple overlapping approaches. Medical records were reviewed to verify diagnosis, to determine stroke subtype and to determine selected risk factors. A total of 343 individuals, aged ≥ 18 years, had a first stroke during the study period. Incidence was 144 per 100 000 person years; 81% ischemic infarction; 9% intracerebral hemorrhage; 7% subarachnoid hemorrhage; and 3% unknown. Fifty percent of the individuals were men. Mean age for ischemic infarction and intracerebral hemorrhage was 71 years for men and 73 years for women. Atrial fibrillation was previously known in 18% with first ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage and another 6% were diagnosed on routine admission ECG. Long-term ECG study (24 hours) found that 12% (18/154) of the remaining individuals had paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Incidence of first stroke in Iceland is similar to other Western countries. The high number of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation found during the 24-hour ECG suggests that atrial fibrillation may be underdiagnosed in patients with stroke.

  10. Ethnic disparities in incidence of stroke subtypes: Auckland Regional Community Stroke Study, 2002-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, Valery; Carter, Kristie; Hackett, Maree; Barber, P Alan; McNaughton, Harry; Dyall, Lorna; Chen, Mei-hua; Anderson, Craig

    2006-02-01

    Limited population-based data exist on differences in the incidence of major pathological stroke types and ischaemic stroke subtypes across ethnic groups. We aimed to provide such data within the large multi-ethnic population of Auckland, New Zealand. All first-ever cases of stroke (n=1423) in a population-based register in 940 000 residents (aged 15 years) in Auckland, New Zealand, for a 12-month period in 2002-2003, were classified into ischaemic stroke, primary intracerebral haemorrhage (PICH), subarachnoid haemorrhage, and undetermined stroke, according to standard definitions and results of neuroimaging/necropsy (in over 90% of cases). Ischaemic stroke was further classified into five subtypes. Ethnicity was self-identified and grouped as New Zealand (NZ)/European, Maori/Pacific, and Asian/other. Incidence rates were standardised to the WHO world population by the direct method, and differences in rates between ethnic groups expressed as rate ratios (RRs), with NZ/European as the reference group. In NZ/European people, ischaemic stroke comprised 73%, PICH 11%, and subarachnoid haemorrhage 6%, but PICH was higher in Maori/Pacific people (17%) and in Asian/other people (22%). Compared with NZ/European people, age-adjusted RRs for PICH were 2.7 (95% CI 1.8-4.0) and 2.3 (95% CI 1.4-3.7) among Maori/Pacific and Asian/other people, respectively. The corresponding RR for ischaemic stroke was greater for Maori/Pacific people (1.7 [95% CI 1.4-2.0]), particularly embolic stroke, and for Asian/other people (1.3 [95% CI 1.0-1.7]). The onset of stroke in Maori/Pacific and Asian/other people began at significantly younger ages (62 years and 64 years, respectively) than in NZ/Europeans (75 years; p<0.0001). There were ethnic differences in the risk factor profiles (such as age, sex, hypertension, cardiac disease, diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia, smoking status, overweight) for the stroke types and subtypes. Compared to NZ/Europeans, Maori/Pacific and Asian/other people are

  11. Epidemiology of stroke in the elderly in the Nordic countries. Incidence, survival, prevalence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgeir Engstad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review what is known at present with respect to incidence, survival, risk factors and prevalence among the elderly stroke patients in the Nordic countries.Method: This article is based mainly on literature identified through search engines (Mc Master Plus, Cochrane Library, Medline and PubMed, restricted to first-ever stroke in Nordic population-based studies and having applied to the standard WHO definition, a prospective study design and no upper age limit.Results: Data from the Nordic countries show an incidence rate of 1250 to 1796/100 000 in the age group 75-84, and 1628 to 2234 in those above 85 years. The incidence rates are higher among men, but women are expected to contribute more to incident cases due to their higher life expectancy. If the age-specific incidence of stroke remains stable, the proportion of stroke patients aged 80 years and older may reach 50% in a few decades. The elderly stroke patients have a higher 30-days case fatality, and a higher risk of dependency. Better treatment of stroke patients has improved the survival over the last two decades. The prevalence is expected to increase due to the decrease in lethality, a slower fall in incidence and a higher proportion of elderly. Cardiovascular risk factors increase with age. Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke mortality in the elderly. Cardioembolic stroke due to atrial fibrillation is the most common stroke subtype in the elderly. Lifestyle risk factors are less prevalent in the older stroke patients.Conclusion: The growing proportion of elderly stroke patients is a major challenge for future stroke care. The elderly stroke patients have a different risk factor profile compared to younger stroke patients. Treatment should focus on regaining independency. The age-specific epidemiology of stroke needs to be studied further in large studies in order to plan for future health care.

  12. Poststroke epilepsy in the Copenhagen stroke study: incidence and predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2005-01-01

    Poststroke epilepsy (PSE) is a feared complication after stroke and is reported in 3% to 5% of stroke survivors. In this study we sought to identify incidence and predictors of PSE in an unselected stroke population with a follow-up period of 7 years. The study was community-based and comprises...... a cohort of 1197 consecutively and prospectively admitted patients with stroke. Patients were followed up for 7 years. We defined PSE as recurrent epileptic seizures with onset after stroke and requiring antiepileptic prophylaxis. PSE was related to clinical factors (age, sex, onset stroke severity, lesion...... size on computed tomography scans, stroke subtype, localization, stroke risk factor profile, and early seizures) in univariate analyses. Independent predictors of PSE were identified through multiple logistic regression analyses. Overall, 38 patients (3.2%) developed PSE. Univariately, PSE...

  13. Periodontal Disease, Regular Dental Care Use, and Incident Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Souvik; Giamberardino, Lauren D; Moss, Kevin; Morelli, Thiago; Rosamond, Wayne D; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Beck, James; Offenbacher, Steven

    2018-02-01

    Periodontal disease is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. Identification of periodontal disease as a risk factor for incident ischemic stroke raises the possibility that regular dental care utilization may reduce the stroke risk. In the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) study, pattern of dental visits were classified as regular or episodic dental care users. In the ancillary dental ARIC study, selected subjects from ARIC underwent fullmouth periodontal measurements collected at 6 sites per tooth and classified into 7 periodontal profile classes (PPCs). In the ARIC study 10 362 stroke-free participants, 584 participants had incident ischemic strokes over a 15-year period. In the dental ARIC study, 6736 dentate subjects were assessed for periodontal disease status using PPC with a total of 299 incident ischemic strokes over the 15-year period. The 7 levels of PPC showed a trend toward an increased stroke risk (χ 2 trend P stroke/1000-person years was 1.29 for PPC-A (health), 2.82 for PPC-B, 4.80 for PPC-C, 3.81 for PPC-D, 3.50 for PPC-E, 4.78 for PPC-F, and 5.03 for PPC-G (severe periodontal disease). Periodontal disease was significantly associated with cardioembolic (hazard ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-5.6) and thrombotic (hazard ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.8) stroke subtypes. Regular dental care utilization was associated with lower adjusted stroke risk (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.94). We confirm an independent association between periodontal disease and incident stroke risk, particularly cardioembolic and thrombotic stroke subtype. Further, we report that regular dental care utilization may lower this risk for stroke. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Stroke in SSA: Review of current literature concerning the incidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-04

    Nov 4, 2013 ... stroke patients were on average 24 years younger than their HIV-negative counterparts [27]. In the same study HIV-positive patients had a lower incidence of common cardiovascular risk factors, further suggesting the causal link between HIV and ischemic stroke. The. Risk Factors. White. Black. Odds Ratio.

  15. Short-term effects of ambient particulates and gaseous pollutants on the incidence of transient ischaemic attack and minor stroke: a case-crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedada Getahun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While several studies have investigated the effects of short-term air pollution on cardiovascular disease, less is known about its effects on cerebrovascular disease, including stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of short-term variation in air pollutants on the onset of TIA and minor stroke. Methods We performed secondary analyses of data collected prospectively in the North West of England in a multi-centre study (NORTHSTAR of patients with recent TIA or minor stroke. A case - crossover study was conducted to determine the association between occurrence of TIA and the concentration of ambient PM10 or gaseous pollutants. Results A total of 709 cases were recruited from the Manchester (n = 335 and Liverpool (n = 374 areas. Data for the Manchester cohort showed an association between ambient nitric oxide (NO and risk of occurrence of TIA and minor stroke with a lag of 3 days (odds ratio 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01 – 1.11, whereas negative association was found for the patients from Liverpool. Effects of similar magnitude, although not statistically significant, were generally observed with other pollutants. In a two pollutant model the effect of NO remained stronger and statistically significant when analysed in combination with CO or SO2, but was marginal in combination with NO2 or ozone and non-significant with PM10. There was evidence of effect modification by age, gender and season. Conclusions Our data suggest an association between NO and occurrence of TIA and minor stroke in Greater Manchester.

  16. Trends in stroke incidence. The Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, T; Prescott, E; Grønbaek, M

    1997-01-01

    in men, whose annual rate ratio was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95 to 0.99), but not in women, whose annual rate ratio was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.95 to 1.00). Throughout four observed periods the stroke incidence among men remained significantly higher than that for women. CONCLUSIONS: During the period from 1976 to 1993......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke incidence has increased in some countries and decreased in others. After 20 years of intensive antihypertensive treatment the latter could be expected, and we have evaluated the sex-specific temporal trends in stroke incidence using 17 years of follow...... at least one of the two first examinations as well as the total cohort including nonresponders. Subjects between 45 and 84 years of age were followed from March 1, 1976 until March 1, 1993. Changes in age-specific stroke incidence were calculated by means of Poisson regression analysis. RESULTS...

  17. Incidence of hemorrhagic stroke in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Wallander, Mari-Ann; González-Pérez, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    and assessed the incidence of these events. METHODS: Patients aged 20-89 years were identified and followed until (i) ICH or SAH was detected, (ii) the patient reached 90 years old (iii) death, or (iv) the end of the study. Computerized patient profiles were reviewed manually; those not discarded became...... stroke in THIN followed by manual review of clinical profiles is a valid method. The incidence of hemorrhagic stroke increases sharply with age. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  18. The Christchurch earthquake stroke incidence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Teddy Y; Cheung, Jeanette; Cole, David; Fink, John N

    2014-03-01

    We examined the impact of major earthquakes on acute stroke admissions by a retrospective review of stroke admissions in the 6 weeks following the 4 September 2010 and 22 February 2011 earthquakes. The control period was the corresponding 6 weeks in the previous year. In the 6 weeks following the September 2010 earthquake there were 97 acute stroke admissions, with 79 (81.4%) ischaemic infarctions. This was similar to the 2009 control period which had 104 acute stroke admissions, of whom 80 (76.9%) had ischaemic infarction. In the 6 weeks following the February 2011 earthquake, there were 71 stroke admissions, and 61 (79.2%) were ischaemic infarction. This was less than the 96 strokes (72 [75%] ischaemic infarction) in the corresponding control period. None of the comparisons were statistically significant. There was also no difference in the rate of cardioembolic infarction from atrial fibrillation between the study periods. Patients admitted during the February 2011 earthquake period were less likely to be discharged directly home when compared to the control period (31.2% versus 46.9%, p=0.036). There was no observable trend in the number of weekly stroke admissions between the 2 weeks leading to and 6 weeks following the earthquakes. Our results suggest that severe psychological stress from earthquakes did not influence the subsequent short term risk of acute stroke, but the severity of the earthquake in February 2011 and associated civil structural damages may have influenced the pattern of discharge for stroke patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Determinants of social inequalities in stroke incidence across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrario, Marco M.; Veronesi, Giovanni; Kee, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Europe. Materials and methods: The MORGAM (MOnica Risk, Genetics, Archiving and Monograph) Study comprises 48 cohorts recruited mostly in the 1980s and 1990s in four European regions using standardised procedures for baseline risk factor assessment and fatal and non-fatal stroke ascertainment......Background: Knowledge on the origins of the social gradient in stroke incidence in different populations is limited. This study aims to estimate the burden of educational class inequalities in stroke incidence and to assess the contribution of risk factors in determining these inequalities across...... and adjudication during follow-up. Among the 126 635 middle-aged participants, initially free of cardiovascular diseases, generating 3788 first stroke events during a median follow-up of 10 years, we estimated differences in stroke rates and HRs for the least versus the most educated individuals. Results: Compared...

  20. Age and ethnic disparities in incidence of stroke over time: the South London Stroke Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanzhong; Rudd, Anthony G; Wolfe, Charles D A

    2013-12-01

    Data on continuous monitoring of stroke risk among different age and ethnic groups are lacking. We aimed to investigate age and ethnic disparities in stroke incidence over time from an inner-city population-based stroke register. Trends in stroke incidence and before-stroke risk factors were investigated with the South London Stroke Register, a population-based register covering a multiethnic population of 357 308 inhabitants. Age-, ethnicity-, and sex-specific incidence rates with 95% confidence intervals were calculated, assuming a Poisson distribution and their trends over time tested by the Cochran-Armitage test. Four thousand two hundred forty-five patients with first-ever stroke were registered between 1995 and 2010. Total stroke incidence reduced by 39.5% during the 16-year period from 247 to 149.5 per 100 000 population (Pstroke incidence were observed in men, women, white groups, and those aged>45 years, but not in those aged 15 to 44 years (12.6-10.1; P=0.2034) and black groups (310.1-267.5; P=0.3633). The mean age at stroke decreased significantly from 71.7 to 69.6 years (P=0.0001). The reduction in prevalence of before-stroke risk factors was mostly seen in white patients aged>55 years, whereas an increase in diabetes mellitus was observed in younger black patients aged 15 to 54 years. Total stroke incidence decreased during the 16-year time period. However, this was not seen in younger age groups and black groups. The advances in risk factor reduction observed in white groups aged>55 years failed to be transferred to younger age groups and black groups.

  1. Incidence and types of sleep disorders in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasic, Zejneba; Smajlovic, Dzevdet; Dostovic, Zikrija; Kojic, Biljana; Selmanovic, Senada

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disorders (SD) after stroke (stroke) are common occurrences, and most often in sleep apnea, insomnia and daytime sleepiness. GOALS. Research goals were to determine the types of SD and their frequency in patients with stroke in relation to the type of stroke and side of lesion. The study analyzed 200 patients with acute stroke hospitalized in the Clinic of Neurology, University Clinical Centre Tuzla in the period from 1st August 2007 to 1st June 2008. All patients have confirmed the existence of stroke by computerized tomography. SD was verified according to the General Curriculum of sleep, the Berlin questionnaire and Epvort scale. Stroke, by type, were divided into hemorrhagic and ischemic, and the localization of the stroke to right and left cerebral hemispheres. Of the total number of respondents, 78% had SD. Very serious level of SD had 42% of respondents, 20% moderate, and 16% of medium-severe degree. There was no statistically significant differences in the frequency of SD among patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke (76.8%: 82.5%, p = 0.58). In relation to the side of lesion there was more patient with SD and stroke in the right cerebral hemisphere, but there were no statistically significant differences (39.5%: 33%, p = 0.1). According Epvort scale sleep apnea and snoring was present in 86%, daytime sleepiness in 49.5% and narcolepsy 0.5%. Sleep disturbance as a neuropsychological disorder has a significant incidence in the acute phase of stroke. SD is slightly more common in hemorrhagic stroke and stroke in the right hemisphere. Sleep Apnea and snoring are the most common types of SD in patients with stroke.

  2. Methodology of a population-based stroke and TIA incidence and outcomes study: the Auckland Regional Community Stroke Study (ARCOS IV) 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, Rita; Jones, Amy; Barber, P Alan; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; McPherson, Kathryn; Bennett, Derrick; Rush, Elaine; Suh, Flora; Starkey, Nicola; Theadom, Alice; Parag, Varsha; Rathnasabapathy, Yogini; Feigin, Valery L

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Stroke burden is immense as it leads to premature deaths, leaves survivors with ongoing disabilities, and has a major financial impact on the individual, their families, and the community. Reliable, high-quality evidence is needed on stroke risk factors, incidence, and outcomes to provide information on how best to reduce this burden. Population-based studies are regarded as the 'gold-standard' of measuring disease burden but are not common due to the logistical and financial challenges they present. The Auckland Regional Community Stroke Studies are among a few in the world that have been carried out at a population level and at regular intervals. The aim of the fourth Auckland Regional Community Stroke Studies IV is to examine the current measures of stroke incidence, prevalence, and outcomes as well the trends over four decades. This article describes the methodology of the Auckland Regional Community Stroke Studies IV with stroke and transient ischemic attacks cases registered over a 12-month period from March 1, 2011 to February 29, 2012. The methodology described may be used as a guide in order to design similar population-based stroke incidence and outcome studies in other countries and populations, thus facilitating the collection of most consistent and accurate stroke epidemiological data. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  3. Increasing Incidence of Hospitalization for Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack in Young Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibæk, Maiken; Dehlendorff, Christian; Jørgensen, Henrik S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have reported increasing incidence of ischemic stroke in adults younger than 50 to 55 years. Information on temporal trends of other stroke subtypes and transient ischemic attack (TIA) is sparse. The aim of this study was to investigate temporal trends of the incidence of hosp......-time hospitalizations for ischemic stroke and TIA in young Danish adults have increased substantially since the mid 1990s. The increase was particularly prominent in the most recent years.......BACKGROUND: Studies have reported increasing incidence of ischemic stroke in adults younger than 50 to 55 years. Information on temporal trends of other stroke subtypes and transient ischemic attack (TIA) is sparse. The aim of this study was to investigate temporal trends of the incidence...... of hospitalizations for TIA and stroke including sex- and subtype-specific trends in young adults aged 15 to 30 years. METHODS AND RESULTS: From the Danish National Patient Register, we identified all cases of first-ever stroke and TIA (age 15-30 years) in Denmark, who were hospitalized during the study period...

  4. Handicap 5 years after stroke in the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Seana L; Dewey, Helen M; Sturm, Jonathan W; Macdonell, Richard A L; Thrift, Amanda G

    2009-01-01

    Handicap is rarely comprehensively examined after stroke. We examined handicap among 5-year stroke survivors from an 'ideal' stroke incidence study. Survivors were assessed with the London Handicap Scale [LHS, score range: 0 (greatest handicap) to 100 (least handicap)]. Multivariable regression was used to examine demographic, risk and stroke-related factors associated with handicap. 351 of 441 (80%) survivors were assessed. Those assessed were more often Australian born than those not assessed (p handicap was present for physical independence and occupation/leisure items. Handicap was associated with older age, manual occupations, smoking, initial stroke severity, recurrent stroke and mood disorders. Reducing recurrent stroke, through better risk factor management, is likely to reduce handicap. The association between handicap and mood disorders, which are potentially modifiable, warrants further investigation. Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Socioeconomic Inequalities in Stroke Incidence Among Migrant Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agyemang, Charles; van Oeffelen, AA; Nørredam, Marie Louise

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose—Low socioeconomic status has been linked to high incidence of stroke in industrialized countries; therefore, reducing socioeconomic disparities is an important goal of health policy. The evidence on migrant groups is, however, limited and inconsistent. We assessed socioecon......Background and Purpose—Low socioeconomic status has been linked to high incidence of stroke in industrialized countries; therefore, reducing socioeconomic disparities is an important goal of health policy. The evidence on migrant groups is, however, limited and inconsistent. We assessed...... socioeconomic inequalities in relation to stroke incidence among major ethnic groups in the Netherlands. Methods—A nationwide register-based cohort study was conducted (n=2 397 446) between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2010, among ethnic Dutch and ethnic minority groups. Standardized disposable household...... income was used as a measure of socioeconomic position. Results—Among ethnic Dutch, the incidence of stroke was higher in the low-income group than in the high-income group (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.16–1.20). Similar socioeconomic inequalities in stroke incidence were found...

  6. Death caused by heat stroke: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Heat stroke is the most dangerous among numerous disorders caused by elevated environmental temperature. It is characterized by an increased body temperature of over 40°C, the dysfunction of the central nervous system and the development of multiple organ failure. The aim of this paper was to highlight problems in the clinical and post-mortal diagnosis of fatal heat stroke. Case Outline. A 20-year-old male was found unconscious on the street; on admission at the Emergency Center, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, he was in a coma. The body temperature of 40°C was maintained despite the applied therapy, meningeal signs were negative, tachycardia with gallop rhythm, hypotension, bleeding from the nose and mouth, and presence of skin bruises. Laboratory findings: highly elevated LDH and creatine kinase, elevated serum creatinine, AST, and signs of DIC. Lethal outcome occurred 6 hours after admission, and the case remained clinically unsolved. Autopsy showed signs of hemorrhagic diathesis, brain and pulmonary edema, and microscopic examination revealed general congestion, internal bleeding in various organs, cerebral edema, massive blood aspiration and pulmonary edema. Toxicological and bacteriological examinations were negative. Based on these findings and subsequently obtained data on the conditions at the workplace where the young man had a part-time job, it was concluded that the violent death was caused by heat stroke. Conclusion. Since heat stroke is associated with a high mortality rate and high incidence of serious and permanent organ damage in survivors, it is important to make the diagnosis of heat stroke as quickly as possible and apply appropriate treatment. Misdiagnosis of heat stroke, and consequently inadequate treatment, with a potential fatal outcome for the patient, can be the reason for blaming doctors for the legal offense of medical malpractice in failing to administer first aid.

  7. Incidence of Stroke in North West Frontier Province of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qamruz Zaman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the study is to find factors which are directly and indirectly related with the incidence of stroke. For this purpose the data of 300 stroke patients was analyzed. The average age was found to be 57.3(+/-15.76 SD years. The average male age is 59.11 (+/- 17.64 SD years as compared to 55.66 (+/-13.65 SD years in females. The investigation showed significant difference between the average age for males and females. The study provides evidence of association between incidence of stroke and DM or/ and HTN. Study also revealed that stroke is highly associated with age. [J Contemp Med 2011; 1(2.000: 35-41

  8. Prevalence, incidence, and mortality of stroke in the chinese island populations: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In China, there are 2.5 million new stroke cases each year and 7.5 million stroke survivors. However, stroke incidence in some island populations is obviously lower compared with inland regions, perhaps due to differences in diet and lifestyle. As the lifestyle in China has changed significantly, along with dramatic transformations in social, economic and environmental conditions, such changes have also been seen in island regions. Thus, we analyzed stroke in the Chinese island regions over the past 30 years. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review to identify reliable and comparable epidemiologic evidence about stroke in the Chinese island regions between 1980 and 2013. Two authors independently assessed the eligibility and the quality of the articles and disagreement was resolved by discussion. Owing to the great heterogeneity among individual study estimates, a random-effects or fixed-effects model was used to incorporate the heterogeneity among records into a pooled estimate for age-standardized rates. Age-standardized rates were calculated by the direct method with the 2000 world population if included records provided the necessary information. RESULTS: During the past three decades, the overall pooled age-standardized prevalence of stroke is 6.17 per 1000 (95% CI 4.56-7.78, an increase from 5.54 per 1000 (95% CI 3.88-7.20 prior to 2000 to 8.34 per 1000 (95% CI 5.98-10.69 after 2000. However, this difference was not found to be statistically significant. The overall pooled age-standardized incidence of stroke is 120.42 per 100,000 person years (95% CI 26.17-214.67. Between 1982 and 2008, the incidence of stroke increased and mortality declined over time. CONCLUSIONS: Effective intervention and specific policy recommendations on stroke prevention should be required, and formulated in a timely fashion to effectively curb the increased trend of stroke in Chinese island regions.

  9. Prevalence, incidence, and mortality of stroke in the chinese island populations: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaomei; Zhu, Bo; Fu, Lingyu; Wang, Hailong; Zhou, Bo; Zou, Safeng; Shi, Jingpu

    2013-01-01

    In China, there are 2.5 million new stroke cases each year and 7.5 million stroke survivors. However, stroke incidence in some island populations is obviously lower compared with inland regions, perhaps due to differences in diet and lifestyle. As the lifestyle in China has changed significantly, along with dramatic transformations in social, economic and environmental conditions, such changes have also been seen in island regions. Thus, we analyzed stroke in the Chinese island regions over the past 30 years. We conducted a systematic review to identify reliable and comparable epidemiologic evidence about stroke in the Chinese island regions between 1980 and 2013. Two authors independently assessed the eligibility and the quality of the articles and disagreement was resolved by discussion. Owing to the great heterogeneity among individual study estimates, a random-effects or fixed-effects model was used to incorporate the heterogeneity among records into a pooled estimate for age-standardized rates. Age-standardized rates were calculated by the direct method with the 2000 world population if included records provided the necessary information. During the past three decades, the overall pooled age-standardized prevalence of stroke is 6.17 per 1000 (95% CI 4.56-7.78), an increase from 5.54 per 1000 (95% CI 3.88-7.20) prior to 2000 to 8.34 per 1000 (95% CI 5.98-10.69) after 2000. However, this difference was not found to be statistically significant. The overall pooled age-standardized incidence of stroke is 120.42 per 100,000 person years (95% CI 26.17-214.67). Between 1982 and 2008, the incidence of stroke increased and mortality declined over time. Effective intervention and specific policy recommendations on stroke prevention should be required, and formulated in a timely fashion to effectively curb the increased trend of stroke in Chinese island regions.

  10. Fine particulate matter exposure and incidence of stroke: A cohort study in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hong; Sun, Shengzhi; Tsang, Hilda; Wong, Chit-Ming; Lee, Ruby Siu-Yin; Schooling, C Mary; Tian, Linwei

    2017-05-02

    We aimed to assess the association of long-term residential exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM 2.5 ) with the incidence of stroke and its major subtypes. We ascertained the first occurrence of emergency hospital admission for stroke in a Hong Kong Chinese cohort of 66,820 older people (65+ years) who enrolled during 1998-2001 (baseline) and were followed up to December 31, 2010. High-resolution (1 × 1 km) yearly mean concentrations of PM 2.5 were predicted from local monitoring data and US National Aeronautics and Space Administration satellite data using linear regression. Baseline residential PM 2.5 exposure was used as a proxy for long-term exposure. We used Cox proportional hazards to evaluate the risk of incident stroke associated with PM 2.5 exposure adjusted for potential confounders, including individual and neighborhood factors. Over a mean follow-up of 9.4 years, we ascertained 6,733 cases of incident stroke, of which 3,526 (52.4%) were ischemic and 1,175 (17.5%) were hemorrhagic. The hazard ratio for every 10 μg/m 3 higher PM 2.5 concentration was statistically significant at 1.21 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.41) for ischemic and non-statistically significant at 0.90 (95% CI 0.70-1.17) for hemorrhagic stroke in fully adjusted model 3. The estimates for ischemic stroke were higher in older participants (>70 years), less educated participants, and in men for current smokers. Long-term PM 2.5 exposure was associated with higher risk of incident ischemic stroke, but the association with incident hemorrhagic stroke was less clear. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Sex Differences in Stroke Incidence, Prevalence, Mortality and Disability-Adjusted Life Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Bennett, Derrick A; Krishnamurthi, Rita V

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accurate information on stroke burden in men and women are important for evidence-based healthcare planning and resource allocation. Previously, limited research suggested that the absolute number of deaths from stroke in women was greater than in men, but the incidence and mortality...... incidence, prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and healthy years lost due to disability were estimated as part of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2013 Study. Data inputs included all available information on stroke incidence, prevalence and death and case fatality rates...... ischemic stroke (IS) and hemorrhagic stroke (HS) incidence (per 100,000) in men (IS 132.77 (95% UI 125.34-142.77); HS 64.89 (95% UI 59.82-68.85)) exceeded those of women (IS 98.85 (95% UI 92.11-106.62); HS 45.48 (95% UI 42.43-48.53)). IS incidence rates were lower in 2013 compared with 1990 rates for both...

  12. Goiania incident case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petterson, J.S.

    1988-06-01

    The reasons for wanting to document this case study and present the findings are simple. According to USDOE technical risk assessments (and our own initial work on the Hanford socioeconomic study), the likelihood of a major accident involving exposure to radioactive materials in the process of site characterization, construction, operation, and closure of a high-level waste repository is extremely remote. Most would agree, however, that there is a relatively high probability that a minor accident involving radiological contamination will occur sometime during the lifetime of the repository -- for example, during transport, at an MRS site or at the permanent site itself during repacking and deposition. Thus, one of the major concerns of the Yucca Mountain Socioeconomic Study is the potential impact of a relatively minor radiation-related accident. A large number of potential impact of a relatively minor radiation-related accident. A large number of potential accident scenarios have been under consideration (such as a transportation or other surface accident which results in a significant decline in tourism, the number of conventions, or the selection of Nevada as a retirement residence). The results of the work in Goiania make it clear, however, that such a significant shift in established social patterns and trends is not likely to occur as a direct outcome of a single nuclear-related accident (even, perhaps, a relatively major one), but rather, are likely to occur as a result of the enduring social interpretations of such an accident -- that is, as a result of the process of understanding, communicating, and socially sustaining a particular set of associations with respect to the initial incident

  13. Population-Based Incidence Rates of First-Ever Stroke in Central Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, Hirotomo; Ngoc, Mai Quang; Huy, Tran Van; Suzuki, Motoi; Tsujino, Akira; Toizumi, Michiko; Takahashi, Kensuke; Thiem, Vu Dinh; Anh, Dang Duc; Anh, Nguyen Thi Hien; Tho, Le Huu; Maeda, Takahiro; Cox, Sharon E; Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Ariyoshi, Koya

    2016-01-01

    Stroke incidence data with methodologically acceptable design in Southeast Asia countries is limited. This study aimed to determine incidence of age-, sex- and subtype-specific first-ever stroke (FES) in Vietnam. We conducted a hospital-based retrospective study, targeting all stroke cases hospitalized at a solo-provider hospital in our study site of Nha Trang from January 2009 to December 2011 with International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) codes I60-69. We calculated positive predictive values (PPVs) of each ICD-10-coded stroke by conducting a detailed case review of 190 randomly selected admissions with ICD-10 codes of I60-I69. These PPVs were then used to estimate annual incident stroke cases from the computerized database. National census data in 2009 was used as a denominator. 2,693 eligible admissions were recorded during the study period. The crude annual incidence rate of total FES was 90.2 per 100,000 population (95% CI 81.1-100.2). The age-adjusted incidence of FES was 115.7 (95% CI 95.9-139.1) when adjusted to the WHO world populations. Importantly, age-adjusted intracerebral hemorrhage was as much as one third of total FES: 36.9 (95% CI 26.1-51.0). We found a considerable proportion of FES in Vietnam to be attributable to intracerebral hemorrhage, which is as high or exceeding levels seen in high-income countries. A high prevalence of improperly treated hypertension in Vietnam may underlie the high prevalence of intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke in this population.

  14. Revised Framingham Stroke Risk Score, Nontraditional Risk Markers, and Incident Stroke in a Multiethnic Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flueckiger, Peter; Longstreth, Will; Herrington, David; Yeboah, Joseph

    2018-02-01

    Limited data exist on the performance of the revised Framingham Stroke Risk Score (R-FSRS) and the R-FSRS in conjunction with nontraditional risk markers. We compared the R-FSRS, original FSRS, and the Pooled Cohort Equation for stroke prediction and assessed the improvement in discrimination by nontraditional risk markers. Six thousand seven hundred twelve of 6814 participants of the MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) were included. Cox proportional hazard, area under the curve, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination increment analysis were used to assess and compare each stroke prediction risk score. Stroke was defined as fatal/nonfatal strokes (hemorrhagic or ischemic). After mean follow-up of 10.7 years, 231 of 6712 (3.4%) strokes were adjudicated (2.7% ischemic strokes). Mean stroke risks using the R-FSRS, original FSRS, and Pooled Cohort Equation were 4.7%, 5.9%, and 13.5%. The R-FSRS had the best calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit, χ 2 =6.55; P =0.59). All risk scores were predictive of incident stroke. C statistics of R-FSRS (0.716) was similar to Pooled Cohort Equation (0.716), but significantly higher than the original FSRS (0.653; P =0.01 for comparison with R-FSRS). Adding nontraditional risk markers individually to the R-FSRS did not improve discrimination of the R-FSRS in the area under the curve analysis, but did improve category-less net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination increment for incident stroke. The addition of coronary artery calcium to R-FSRS produced the highest category-less net reclassification improvement (0.36) and integrated discrimination increment (0.0027). Similar results were obtained when ischemic strokes were used as the outcome. The R-FSRS downgraded stroke risk but had better calibration and discriminative ability for incident stroke compared with the original FSRS. Nontraditional risk markers modestly improved the discriminative ability of the R-FSRS, with

  15. Temporal Trends in Sex Differences With Regard to Stroke Incidence: The Dijon Stroke Registry (1987-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroud, Marie; Delpont, Benoit; Daubail, Benoit; Blanc, Christelle; Durier, Jérôme; Giroud, Maurice; Béjot, Yannick

    2017-04-01

    We evaluated temporal trends in stroke incidence between men and women to determine whether changes in the distribution of vascular risk factors have influenced sex differences in stroke epidemiology. Patients with first-ever stroke including ischemic stroke, spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and undetermined stroke between 1987 and 2012 were identified through the population-based registry of Dijon, France. Incidence rates were calculated for age groups, sex, and stroke subtypes. Sex differences and temporal trends (according to 5-year time periods) were evaluated by calculating incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with Poisson regression. Four thousand six hundred and fourteen patients with a first-ever stroke (53.1% women) were recorded. Incidence was lower in women than in men (112 versus 166 per 100 000/y; IRR, 0.68; P stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage. From 1987 to 2012, the lower incidence of overall stroke in women was stable (IRR ranging between 0.63 and 0.72 according to study periods). When considering stroke subtype, a slight increase in the incidence of ischemic stroke was observed in both men (IRR, 1.011; 95% confidence interval, 1.005-1.016; P =0.001) and women (IRR, 1.013; 95% confidence interval, 1.007-1.018; P =0.001). The sex gap in incidence remained unchanged in ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage. Conversely, the lower subarachnoid hemorrhage incidence in women vanished with time because of an increasing incidence. The sex gap in stroke incidence did not change with time except for subarachnoid hemorrhage. Despite lower rates, more women than men experience an incident stroke each year because of a longer life expectancy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Dietary fiber intake is inversely associated with stroke incidence in healthy Swedish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Susanna C; Wolk, Alicja

    2014-12-01

    Prospective studies of dietary fiber intake in relation to stroke risk have reported inconsistent results. This study assessed the association between intake of total fiber and fiber sources and stroke incidence in healthy Swedish adults. The analysis was based on 69,677 participants (aged 45-83 y) from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men who were free from cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes at baseline (1 January 1998). Diet was assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire. Cases of stroke were ascertained through linkage to the Swedish Inpatient Register and the Swedish Cause of Death Register. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to calculate RRs, adjusted for potential confounders. During 10.3 y of follow-up, 3680 incident stroke cases, including 2722 cerebral infarctions, 363 intracerebral hemorrhages, 160 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 435 unspecified strokes, were ascertained. High intakes of total fiber and fiber from fruits and vegetables but not from cereals were inversely associated with risk of stroke. After adjustment for other risk factors for stroke, the multivariable RRs of total stroke for the highest vs. lowest quintile of intake were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.99) for total fiber, 0.85 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.95) for fruit fiber, 0.90 (95% CI: 0.82, 1.00) for vegetable fiber, and 0.94 (95% CI: 0.84, 1.04) for cereal fiber. These findings indicate that intake of dietary fiber, especially fruit and vegetable fibers, is inversely associated with risk of stroke. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  17. Case fatality of patients with stroke over a 12-month period post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Stroke is among the top 4 causes of death in South Africa and the top 10 leading causes of disability worldwide. There is a dearth of literature on stroke incidence, prevalence and outcome in sub-Saharan Africa. We aimed to establish the case fatality of stroke patients over a 12-month period post discharge ...

  18. Stroke incidence rates among black residents of Harare - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    general practitioners or the city health clinics directly to one of the four general hospitals. The city health clinics do not have beds for acute medical cases and the general practitioners do not visit patients in their homes, and cannot refer cases of stroke to nursing homes before acute treatment and evaluation by physicians in ...

  19. Stock or stroke? Stock market movement and stroke incidence in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chih; Chen, Chin-Shyan; Liu, Tsai-Ching; Lin, Ying-Tzu

    2012-12-01

    This paper investigates the impact of stock market movement on incidences of stroke utilizing population-based aggregate data in Taiwan. Using the daily data from the Taiwan Stock Exchange Capitalization Weighted Stock Index and from the National Health Insurance Research Database during 2001/1/1-2007/12/31, which consist of 2556 observations, we examine the effects of stock market on stroke incidence - the level effect and the daily change effects. In general, we find that both a low stock index level and a daily fall in the stock index are associated with greater incidences of stroke. We further partition the data on sex and age. The level effect is found to be significant for either gender, in the 45-64 and 65 ≥ age groups. In addition, two daily change effects are found to be significant for males and the elderly. Although stockholdings can increase wealth, they can also increase stroke incidence, thereby representing a cost to health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Incidence and predictors of epilepsy after pediatric arterial ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beslow, Lauren A.; Abend, Nicholas S.; Uohara, Michael; Jastrzab, Laura; Licht, Daniel J.; Ichord, Rebecca N.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the cumulative incidence and clinical predictors of remote symptomatic seizures and epilepsy after pediatric arterial ischemic stroke (AIS). Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 218 participants with neonatal AIS (NAIS), presumed perinatal AIS (PPAIS), and childhood AIS (CAIS) from a single-center prospective consecutive cohort enrolled from 2006 to 2014. Medical records were reviewed for timing, semiology, and treatment of acute symptomatic seizures, remote symptomatic seizures (RSS), and epilepsy. Cumulative incidence of RSS and epilepsy were assessed using survival analysis. Results: Acute symptomatic seizures occurred in 94% of NAIS (n = 70/74) and 17% of CAIS (n = 18/105). Younger children were more likely to present with seizures at stroke ictus, and acute symptomatic seizures were predictive of later RSS and epilepsy in CAIS. Median follow-up for the entire cohort was 34 months, interquartile range 44.9 months (16.3–61.2). Estimated cumulative incidence of RSS at 2 years was 19% in NAIS, 24% in PPAIS, and 7% in CAIS. Estimated cumulative incidence of epilepsy at 2 years was 11% in NAIS, 19% in PPAIS, and 7% in CAIS. The median time to these outcomes was <2 years in all stroke subtypes. Among participants developing epilepsy (n = 34), seizures were often well-controlled at last follow-up with median Engel class of ≤2 (<1 seizure/month). Conclusions: RSS and epilepsy are important neurologic sequelae of pediatric AIS. Children with perinatal stroke and CAIS with acute symptomatic seizures are at increased risk of these outcomes. These cohorts need further study to identify biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for epileptogenesis. PMID:28087825

  1. Eosinophil Cationic Protein, Carotid Plaque, and Incidence of Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Johannes; Söderholm, Martin; Borné, Yan; Nilsson, Jan; Persson, Margaretha; Östling, Gerd; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Engström, Gunnar

    2017-10-01

    ECP (eosinophil cationic protein) is a marker of eosinophil activity and degranulation, which has been linked to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We examined the relationship between ECP, carotid plaque, and incidence of stroke in a prospective population-based cohort. The subjects participated in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study between 1991 and 1994. A total of 4706 subjects with no history of stroke were included (40% men; mean age, 57.5 years). Carotid plaque was determined by B-mode ultrasound of the right carotid artery. Incidence of stroke was followed up during a mean period of 16.5 years in relation to plasma ECP levels. Subjects in the third tertile (versus first tertile) of ECP tended to have higher prevalence of carotid plaque (odds ratio: 1.18; 95% confidence interval: 1.003-1.39; P =0.044 after multivariate adjustments). A total of 258 subjects were diagnosed with ischemic stroke (IS) during follow-up. ECP was associated with increased incidence of IS after risk factor adjustment (hazard ratio, 1.57; 95% confidence interval: 1.13-2.18; for third versus first tertile; P =0.007). High ECP was associated with increased risk of IS in subjects with carotid plaque. The risk factor-adjusted hazard ratio for IS was 1.86 (95% confidence interval: 1.32-2.63) in subjects with carotid plaque and ECP in the top tertile, compared with those without plaque and ECP in the first or second tertiles. High ECP is associated with increased incidence of IS. The association between ECP and IS was also present in the subgroup with carotid plaque. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Acupuncture Therapy and Incidence of Depression After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chung-Yen; Huang, Hsin-Chia; Chang, Hen-Hong; Yang, Tsung-Hsien; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chang, Su-Wei; Chen, Pei-Chun

    2017-06-01

    We investigated whether use of acupuncture within a 3-month poststroke period after hospital discharge is associated with reduced risk of depression. This cohort study included 16 046 patients aged ≥18 years with an initial hospitalization for stroke during 2000 and 2012 in the claims database of a universal health insurance program. Patients who had received acupuncture therapies within 3 months of discharge were defined as acupuncture users (n=1714). All patients were followed up for incidence of depression until the end of 2013. We assessed the association between use of acupuncture and incidence of depression using Cox proportional hazards models in all subjects and in propensity score-matched samples consisting of 1714 pairs of users and nonusers. During the follow-up period, the incidence of depression per 1000 person-years was 11.1 and 9.7 in users and nonusers, respectively. Neither multivariable-adjusted Cox models (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-1.29) nor the propensity score-matching model (hazard ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.79-1.42) revealed an association between use of acupuncture and incidence of depression. In patients admitted to hospital for stroke, acupuncture therapy within 3 months after discharge was not associated with subsequent incidence of depression. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Trends in the incidence of ischaemic stroke in young adults between 1985 and 2011: the Dijon Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béjot, Yannick; Daubail, Benoit; Jacquin, Agnès; Durier, Jérôme; Osseby, Guy-Victor; Rouaud, Olivier; Giroud, Maurice

    2014-05-01

    Recent data have suggested that stroke incidence in young people may be rising. In this population-based study, we aimed to determine whether the incidence of stroke in people aged stroke (ischaemic stroke, spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage, and undetermined stroke) occurring in Dijon, France, from 1985 to 2011 were prospectively collected from a population-based registry. Incidence rates were calculated and temporal trends were analysed by age groups and stroke subtypes using a Poisson regression to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR). Risk factors and premorbid treatments were analysed. Over the 27-year study period, 4506 patients were recorded (53% women, mean age 74.6±14.4, 10.1% aged stroke incidence was noted, as was a rise in ischaemic stroke in individuals aged ischaemic stroke in people aged disease and treatment options in the population and among practitioners leading to more frequent referrals for specialised care, and improvements in stroke diagnosis. Stroke prevention must be encouraged even in young adults.

  4. Ethnic disparities in ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage incidence in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyemang, Charles; van Oeffelen, Aloysia A. M.; Norredam, Marie; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Klijn, Catharina J. M.; Bots, Michiel L.; Stronks, Karien; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2014-01-01

    Data on the incidence of stroke subtypes among ethnic minority groups are limited. We assessed ethnic differences in the incidence of stroke subtypes in the Netherlands. A Dutch nationwide register-based cohort study (n=7 423 174) was conducted between 1998 and 2010. We studied the following stroke

  5. Age trajectories of stroke case fatality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Andersen, Klaus Kaae

    2011-01-01

    Mortality rates level off at older ages. Age trajectories of stroke case-fatality rates were studied with the aim of investigating prevalence of this phenomenon, specifically in case-fatality rates at older ages....

  6. Increasing Incidence of Hospitalization for Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack in Young Adults: A Registry-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibæk, Maiken; Dehlendorff, Christian; Jørgensen, Henrik S; Forchhammer, Hysse B; Johnsen, Søren P; Kammersgaard, Lars P

    2016-05-11

    Studies have reported increasing incidence of ischemic stroke in adults younger than 50 to 55 years. Information on temporal trends of other stroke subtypes and transient ischemic attack (TIA) is sparse. The aim of this study was to investigate temporal trends of the incidence of hospitalizations for TIA and stroke including sex- and subtype-specific trends in young adults aged 15 to 30 years. From the Danish National Patient Register, we identified all cases of first-ever stroke and TIA (age 15-30 years) in Denmark, who were hospitalized during the study period of 1994 to 2012. Incidence rates and estimated annual percentage changes (EAPCs) were estimated by using Poisson regression. During the study period, 4156 cases of first-ever hospitalization for stroke/TIA were identified. The age-standardized incidence rates of hospitalizations for stroke increased significantly (EAPC 1.83% [95% CI 1.11-2.55%]) from 11.97/100 000 person-years (PY) in 1994 to 16.77/100 000 PY in 2012. TIA hospitalizations increased from 1.93/100 000 PY in 1994 to 5.81/100 000 PY in 2012 and after 2006 more markedly in men than in women (EAPC 16.61% [95% CI 10.45-23.12%]). The incidence of hospitalizations for ischemic stroke was markedly lower among men, but increased significantly from 2006 (EAPC 14.60% [95% CI 6.22-23.63%]). The incidences of hospitalizations for intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage remained stable during the study period. The incidence rates of first-time hospitalizations for ischemic stroke and TIA in young Danish adults have increased substantially since the mid 1990s. The increase was particularly prominent in the most recent years. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  7. Paediatric stroke

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-02

    Apr 2, 2011 ... Ischemic Stroke Registry yielded an incidence of 3.3 cases per 100 000 children per year, of ... Neonatal stroke. The newborn period confers the highest risk period for childhood ischaemic stroke. Focal patterns of ischaemic brain injury to the perinatal brain are .... family history of young stroke/ thrombosis.

  8. Noonan Syndrome and Stroke: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Nur Mıhçı

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by short stature, webbed neck, typical facial appearance and congenital heart disease. Here we report a 24 year old woman patient with the diagnosis of Noonan syndrome who admitted to our clinic with ischemic stroke caused by atrial fibrillation secondary to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Noonan syndrome patients with stroke due to vascular malformations have been reported, but non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rare cause for stroke in patients with Noonan syndrome. Our aim of presenting the case emphasize that Noonan syndrome should be thought as a differential diagnosis in patients with stroke at a young age and dysmorphic facial appearance.

  9. Conversion Disorder in Stroke: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Yeh Chou

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Conversion disorder is caused by previous severe stress, emotional conflict, or an associated psychiatric disorder, and usually presents with one or more neurologic symptoms. Clinically, it is challenging to diagnose diseases such as transient ischemia attack, stroke, brain tumor, spinal cord injury, and neuropathy. In this case report, we present a male stroke patient who had a typical conversion disorder.

  10. Acute ischemic stroke associated with nephrotic syndrome: Incidence and significance — Retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Iwaki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report 10 cases with arterial ischemic stroke (AIS with nephrotic syndrome (NS, and clarified its incidence and clinical characteristics. The patients having albumin less than 3.0 g/dl and serum cholesterol greater than 250 mg/dl at the same time were retrospectively screened from 11,161 cases of stroke. Furthermore, the patients of AIS showing heavy proteinuria were selected. The 10 cases were diagnosed as AIS with NS. Its incidence was 0.09% of all kinds of stroke and 0.12% of AIS. Their subtypes were 6 large-artery atherosclerosis, 3 small-vessel occlusion, and 1 cardioembolism. We carried out a retrospective cohort study to assess the association between NS and atherosclerosis progression in AIS patients. Seven AIS patients with NS due to diabetic nephropathy (cases; NS group were compared with patients with AIS and diabetes mellitus (DM without NS (control group. Control group subjects were matched in a 2:1 ratio to cases by age, sex, use of medications for DM, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c level. The NS group had high cerebral artery atherosclerosis scores, especially in the anterior circulation. The NS group demonstrated atherosclerosis of the internal carotid and lower extremity arteries, although there were no statistical differences between the two groups. Study subjects had high serum fibrinogen and D-dimer levels, suggesting that AIS patients with NS have a greater degree of hypercoagulability than AIS patients without NS.

  11. Social network, social support, and risk of incident stroke: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Mako; Everson-Rose, Susan A; Iso, Hiroyasu; Mosley, Thomas H; Rose, Kathryn M; Lutsey, Pamela L

    2014-10-01

    Having a small social network and lack of social support have been associated with incident coronary heart disease; however, epidemiological evidence for incident stroke is limited. We assessed the longitudinal association of a small social network and lack of social support with risk of incident stroke and evaluated whether the association was partly mediated by vital exhaustion and inflammation. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study measured social network and social support in 13 686 men and women (mean, 57 years; 56% women; 24% black; 76% white) without a history of stroke. Social network was assessed by the 10-item Lubben Social Network Scale and social support by a 16-item Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-Short Form. During a median follow-up of 18.6 years, 905 incident strokes occurred. Relative to participants with a large social network, those with a small social network had a higher risk of stroke (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.44 [1.02-2.04]) after adjustment for demographics, socioeconomic variables, marital status, behavioral risk factors, and major stroke risk factors. Vital exhaustion, but not inflammation, partly mediated the association between a small social network and incident stroke. Social support was unrelated to incident stroke. In this sample of US community-dwelling men and women, having a small social network was associated with excess risk of incident stroke. As with other cardiovascular conditions, having a small social network may be associated with a modestly increased risk of incident stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Symptoms of Insomnia and Sleep Duration and Their Association with Incident Strokes: Findings from the Population-Based MONICA/KORA Augsburg Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig, A Katharina; Stöckl, Doris; Heier, Margit; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Meisinger, Christa

    2015-01-01

    To examine the relationship between symptoms of insomnia and sleep duration and incident total (non-fatal plus fatal) strokes, non-fatal strokes, and fatal strokes in a large cohort of men and women from the general population in Germany. In four population-based MONICA (monitoring trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease)/KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg) surveys conducted between 1984 and 2001, 17,604 men and women (aged 25 to 74 years) were asked about issues like sleep, health behavior, and medical history. In subsequent surveys and mortality follow-ups, incident stroke cases (cerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, unknown stroke type) were gathered prospectively until 2009. Sex-specific hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using sequential Cox proportional hazards regression models. During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 917 strokes (710 non-fatal strokes and 207 fatal strokes) were observed. Trouble falling asleep and difficulty staying asleep were not significantly related to any incident stroke outcome in either sex in the multivariable models. Among men, the HR for the association between short (≤5 hours) and long (≥10 hours) daily sleep duration and total strokes were 1.44 (95% CI: 1.01-2.06) and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.16-2.29), after adjustment for basic confounding variables. As for non-fatal strokes and fatal strokes, in the analyses adjusted for age, survey, education, physical activity, alcohol consumption, smoking habits, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, the increased risks persisted, albeit somewhat attenuated, but no longer remained significant. Among women, in the multivariable analyses the quantity of sleep was also not related to any stroke outcome. In the present study, symptoms of insomnia and exceptional sleep duration were not significantly predictive of incident total strokes, non-fatal strokes, and fatal strokes in

  13. Symptoms of Insomnia and Sleep Duration and Their Association with Incident Strokes: Findings from the Population-Based MONICA/KORA Augsburg Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Katharina Helbig

    Full Text Available To examine the relationship between symptoms of insomnia and sleep duration and incident total (non-fatal plus fatal strokes, non-fatal strokes, and fatal strokes in a large cohort of men and women from the general population in Germany.In four population-based MONICA (monitoring trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease/KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg surveys conducted between 1984 and 2001, 17,604 men and women (aged 25 to 74 years were asked about issues like sleep, health behavior, and medical history. In subsequent surveys and mortality follow-ups, incident stroke cases (cerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, unknown stroke type were gathered prospectively until 2009. Sex-specific hazard ratios (HR and their 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated using sequential Cox proportional hazards regression models.During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 917 strokes (710 non-fatal strokes and 207 fatal strokes were observed. Trouble falling asleep and difficulty staying asleep were not significantly related to any incident stroke outcome in either sex in the multivariable models. Among men, the HR for the association between short (≤5 hours and long (≥10 hours daily sleep duration and total strokes were 1.44 (95% CI: 1.01-2.06 and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.16-2.29, after adjustment for basic confounding variables. As for non-fatal strokes and fatal strokes, in the analyses adjusted for age, survey, education, physical activity, alcohol consumption, smoking habits, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, the increased risks persisted, albeit somewhat attenuated, but no longer remained significant. Among women, in the multivariable analyses the quantity of sleep was also not related to any stroke outcome.In the present study, symptoms of insomnia and exceptional sleep duration were not significantly predictive of incident total strokes, non-fatal strokes, and fatal strokes in

  14. The association of atopy with incidence of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-03-01

    Allergy is a systemic inflammatory disease that could theoretically affect the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes through inflammatory pathways or mast cell-induced coronary spasm. Whether allergy is associated with an increased risk of CVD and diabetes is largely unknown. We investigated the association between atopy as assessed by IgE sensitization, a well-accepted biomarker of allergy, and incidence of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes in five Danish population-based cohorts. A total of 14,849 participants were included in the study. Atopy was defined as serum-specific IgE positivity to inhalant allergens. The Danish National Diabetes Register enabled identification of incident diabetes. Likewise, the Danish Registry of Causes of Death and the Danish National Patient Register provided information on fatal and non-fatal ischemic heart disease and stroke. Data were analyzed by Cox regression analyses with age as underlying time axis and adjusted for study cohort, gender, education, body mass index, alcohol intake, smoking habits, physical activity during leisure time, serum lipids, and blood pressure. The prevalence of atopy was 26.9 % (n = 3,994). There were 1,170, 817, and 1,063 incident cases of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, respectively (median follow-up 11.2 years). The hazard ratios, HRs (95 % confidence intervals, CIs) for atopics versus non-atopics: for ischemic heart disease (HR 1.00, 95 % CI 0.86, 1.16), stroke (HR 1.18, 95 % CI 0.99, 1.41), and diabetes (HR 1.06, 95 % CI 0.91, 1.23). Our results did not support the hypothesis that atopy is associated with higher risk of ischemic heart disease, stroke, or diabetes. However, a small-moderately increased risk cannot be excluded from our data.

  15. Sugar- and Artificially Sweetened Beverages and the Risks of Incident Stroke and Dementia: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pase, Matthew P; Himali, Jayandra J; Beiser, Alexa S; Aparicio, Hugo J; Satizabal, Claudia L; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Seshadri, Sudha; Jacques, Paul F

    2017-05-01

    Sugar- and artificially-sweetened beverage intake have been linked to cardiometabolic risk factors, which increase the risk of cerebrovascular disease and dementia. We examined whether sugar- or artificially sweetened beverage consumption was associated with the prospective risks of incident stroke or dementia in the community-based Framingham Heart Study Offspring cohort. We studied 2888 participants aged >45 years for incident stroke (mean age 62 [SD, 9] years; 45% men) and 1484 participants aged >60 years for incident dementia (mean age 69 [SD, 6] years; 46% men). Beverage intake was quantified using a food-frequency questionnaire at cohort examinations 5 (1991-1995), 6 (1995-1998), and 7 (1998-2001). We quantified recent consumption at examination 7 and cumulative consumption by averaging across examinations. Surveillance for incident events commenced at examination 7 and continued for 10 years. We observed 97 cases of incident stroke (82 ischemic) and 81 cases of incident dementia (63 consistent with Alzheimer's disease). After adjustments for age, sex, education (for analysis of dementia), caloric intake, diet quality, physical activity, and smoking, higher recent and higher cumulative intake of artificially sweetened soft drinks were associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, all-cause dementia, and Alzheimer's disease dementia. When comparing daily cumulative intake to 0 per week (reference), the hazard ratios were 2.96 (95% confidence interval, 1.26-6.97) for ischemic stroke and 2.89 (95% confidence interval, 1.18-7.07) for Alzheimer's disease. Sugar-sweetened beverages were not associated with stroke or dementia. Artificially sweetened soft drink consumption was associated with a higher risk of stroke and dementia. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet and Incidence of Stroke: Results From 2 Prospective Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Susanna C; Wallin, Alice; Wolk, Alicja

    2016-04-01

    High adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is associated with lower risk of hypertension, the major risk factor for stroke. We examined whether adherence to the DASH diet is inversely associated with the incidence of stroke. The study population comprised 74 404 men and women (45-83 years of age), without stroke at baseline, from the Cohort of Swedish Men and the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Diet was assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire. A modified DASH diet score was created based on consumption of vegetables, fruits, legumes and nuts, whole grains, low-fat dairy, red meat and processed meat, and sweetened beverages. Stroke cases were identified through linkage to the Swedish National Patient and Cause of Death Registers. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression model. During 882 727 person-years (mean, 11.9 years) of follow-up, 3896 ischemic strokes, 560 intracerebral hemorrhages, and 176 subarachnoid hemorrhages were ascertained. The modified DASH diet score was statistically significantly inversely associated with the risk of ischemic stroke (P for trend=0.002), with a multivariable relative risk of 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.78-0.94) for the highest versus the lowest quartile of the score. The modified DASH diet score was nonsignificantly inversely associated with intracerebral hemorrhage (corresponding relative risk=0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-1.05) but was not associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage. These findings indicate that high adherence to the DASH diet is associated with a reduced risk of ischemic stroke. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT01127698 and NCT01127711 for the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men, respectively. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. A Stroke Mimic: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annia Martínez Rivas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diseases mimicking a stroke are a major health problem for a large number of hospitals. This paper aims at presenting a disease that has a stroke-like presentation. The case of a 46-year-old man admitted to the stroke unit with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral infarction is presented. The patient developed fever and a serious deterioration of consciousness. Changes on computed tomography consistent with a brain abscess were observed. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered and a follow-up tomography was performed. Once the treatment was completed, the clinical and radiological suspicion of a brain abscess was confirmed.

  18. Dietary patterns are associated with incident stroke and contribute to excess risk of stroke in Black Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Suzanne E; Gutiérrez, Orlando M.; Newby, PK; Howard, George; Howard, Virginia J; Locher, Julie L; Kissela, Brett M; Shikany, James M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Black Americans and residents of the Southeastern United States, are at increased risk of stroke. Diet is one of many potential factors proposed that might explain these racial and regional disparities. Methods Between 2003–2007, the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study enrolled 30,239 black and white Americans aged 45 years or older. Dietary patterns were derived using factor analysis and foods from food frequency data. Incident strokes were adjudicated using medical records by a team of physicians. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine risk of stroke. Results Over 5.7 years, 490 incident strokes were observed. In a multivariable-adjusted analysis, greater adherence to the Plant-based pattern was associated with lower stroke risk (HR=0.71; 95% CI=0.56–0.91; ptrend=0.005). This association was attenuated after addition of income, education, total energy intake, smoking, and sedentary behavior. Participants with a higher adherence to the Southern pattern experienced a 39% increased risk of stroke (HR=1.39; 95% CI=1.05, 1.84), with a significant (p = 0.009) trend across quartiles. Including Southern pattern in the model mediated the black-white risk of stroke by 63%. Conclusions These data suggest that adherence to a Southern style diet may increase the risk of stroke while adherence to a more plant-based diet may reduce stroke risk. Given the consistency of finding a dietary impact on stroke risk across studies, discussing nutrition patterns during risk screening may be an important step in reducing stroke. PMID:24159061

  19. Incidence of constipation in stroke patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianxiang; Yuan, Mengguo; Liu, Yunfang; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Jingqing; Guo, Weifeng

    2017-06-01

    There is growing awareness of a link between the gut and cardiovascular disease. Constipation is common among individuals who have had a stroke, and it negatively affects social functioning and quality of life. However, no systematic study on the incidence of constipation in stroke patients has been reported.We selected studies included in Medline, Embase, Cochrane database, and Web of Science. Studies were included if they reported the incidence in stroke patients. Two authors selected the studies, extracted the data independently, and assessed these. Subgroup analyses were conducted according to the stroke subtype and stage of stroke.After detailed evaluations, 8 studies (n  =  1385 participants) were found that contained data that were suitable for meta-analytic synthesis. A forest plot showed that the incidence of constipation was 48% (95% confidence interval [CI]  =  33%-63%). In the analysis of the type of stroke subgroup, the incidence of constipation in patients who had had a hemorrhagic stroke (66% [95% CI  =  40-91%]) was higher than that in patients who had experienced an ischemic stroke (51% [95% CI  =  27%-75%]). The incidence in the acute stage (45% [95% CI  =  36%-54%]) was lower than that in the rehabilitation stage (48% [95% CI  =  23%-73%]).Constipation after a stroke event occurs frequently. This finding may raise awareness about bowel complications to allow correct evaluation and proper management.

  20. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone and incident ischaemic stroke in men in the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shores, Molly M; Arnold, Alice M; Biggs, Mary L; Longstreth, W T; Smith, Nicholas L; Kizer, Jorge R; Cappola, Anne R; Hirsch, Calvin H; Marck, Brett T; Matsumoto, Alvin M

    2014-11-01

    Ischaemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly men. Our main objective was to examine whether testosterone (T) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) was associated with incident ischaemic stroke in elderly men. Cohort study. Elderly men in the Cardiovascular Health Study who had no history of stroke, heart disease or prostate cancer as of 1994 and were followed until December 2010. Adjudicated ischaemic stroke. Among 1032 men (mean age 76, range 66-97), followed for a median of 10 years, 114 had an incident ischaemic stroke. Total T and free T were not significantly associated with stroke risk, while DHT had a nonlinear association with incident stroke (P = 0·006) in analyses adjusted for stroke risk factors. The lowest risk of stroke was at DHT levels of 50-75 ng/dl, with greater risk of stroke at DHT levels above 75 ng/dl or below 50 ng/dl. Results were unchanged when SHBG was added to the model. Calculated free DHT had an inverse linear association with incident ischaemic stroke with HR 0·77 (95% CI, 0·61, 0·98) per standard deviation in analyses adjusted for stroke risk factors. Dihydrotestosterone had a nonlinear association with stroke risk in which there was an optimal DHT level associated with the lowest stroke risk. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to clarify whether there is an optimal androgen range associated with the least risk of adverse outcomes in elderly men. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Stable stroke occurrence despite incidence reduction in an aging population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorvaldsen, P; Davidsen, M; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    A stroke register was established at the Glostrup Population Studies in 1982 with the objective to monitor stroke occurrence in the population continuously during a 10-year period and contribute data to the WHO Monitoring Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease (MONICA) Project....... The purpose of the current analysis was to estimate temporal trends in stroke occurrence....

  2. Incidence of stroke in women in Auckland, New Zealand. Ethnic trends over two decades: 1981-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyall, Lorna; Carter, Kristie; Bonita, Ruth; Anderson, Craig; Feigin, Valery; Kerse, Ngaire; Brown, Paul

    2006-11-17

    Although women have a greater lifetime risk of stroke than men, along with other gender differences in stroke, there is lack of reliable data on long-term trends in stroke in women. This paper presents the results of three population-based registers in Auckland (1981-1982, 1991-1992, and 2002-2003) which aimed to determine the trends in the incidence of stroke in New Zealand. This paper reports on the burden of stroke in women across different ethnic groups over the study period from 1981 to 2003. Three studies using similar methodology and overlapping case finding methods have been conducted in New Zealand to estimate trends in the incidence and outcome of stroke. The studies are recognised as meeting the 'ideal' criteria for stroke incidence and identify all first-ever and recurrent strokes in residents (aged greater than and equal to 15 years) the population of Auckland, New Zealand in the 12-month periods from 1981-1982, 1991-1992, and 2002-2003. There were totals of 307,578 strokes among women in 1981, 372,642 in 1991, and 470,727 in 2001, according to each Census representing over 50% of the population at each period (51%-54%). The WHO standard world population was used for direct age standardisation of annual rates (per 100,000 population), reported with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The proportion of women who have experienced a stroke did not change markedly over the study period but there were ethnic differences emerging which were related to population changes within the New Zealand population. Standardised stroke incidence in women was relatively stable across the three study periods (1981-1982), 133 [95% CI 118-151]; (1991-1992), 143 [95% CI 116-241]; and (2002-2003), 124 [95% CI 115-134]). However, a significant decline of 14% (95% CI 2%-29%) in rates of first-ever stroke was found between 1991-1992 and 2002-2003 in women. In contrast to the significant declines in event rates in European women over two decades (Rate ratio 0.84, 95% CI 0

  3. The incidence of pregnancy-related stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Richard H; Cayley, Megan L; Foley, Norine; Ladhani, Noor Niyar N; Leffert, Lisa; Bushnell, Cheryl; McClure, J A; Lindsay, M Patrice

    2017-10-01

    Background Stroke risk is increased during pregnancy, but estimates of pregnancy-related stroke incidence vary widely. Aims A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to assess the incidence of stroke during pregnancy and the puerperium. Ovid Medline, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Science were searched for studies published between 1990 and January 2017 reporting stroke incidence during pregnancy and postpartum, from defined pregnancy populations. Pooled analyses were conducted using a random effects approach and expressed as an incidence rate per 100,000 pregnancies, with 95% confidence intervals. Subgroup analyses of stroke type and timing were conducted. Summary of review Eleven studies met inclusion criteria. Variation in estimated rates was noted based on geography and study methodology. The pooled crude rate of pregnancy-related stroke was 30.0 per 100,000 pregnancies (95% confidence interval 18.8-47.9). The pooled crude rates from nonhemorrhagic stroke (arterial and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis) were 19.9 (95% confidence interval 10.7-36.9) and from hemorrhage 12.2 (95% confidence interval 6.4-23.2) per 100,000 pregnancies. For studies separately reporting cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the rates were roughly equal between ischemic stroke (12.2, 95% confidence interval 6.7-22.2), cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (9.1, 95% confidence interval 4.3-18.9), and hemorrhage (12.2, 95% confidence interval 6.4-23.2). The crude stroke rate for antenatal/perinatal stroke was 18.3 (95% confidence interval 11.9-28.2), and for postpartum stroke was 14.7 (95% confidence interval 8.3-26.1). Conclusions Stroke affects 30.0 per 100,000 pregnancies, with ischemia, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, and hemorrhage causing roughly equal numbers and with highest risk peripartum and postpartum. Organized approaches to the management of this high-risk population, informed by existing evidence from stroke and obstetrical care are needed.

  4. Risk of vertebrobasilar stroke and chiropractic care: results of a population-based case-control and case-crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, J David; Boyle, Eleanor; Côté, Pierre; He, Yaohua; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Silver, Frank L; Bondy, Susan J

    2009-02-01

    Population-based, case-control and case-crossover study. To investigate associations between chiropractic visits and vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stroke and to contrast this with primary care physician (PCP) visits and VBA stroke. Chiropractic care is popular for neck pain and headache, but may increase the risk for VBA dissection and stroke. Neck pain and headache are common symptoms of VBA dissection, which commonly precedes VBA stroke. Cases included eligible incident VBA strokes admitted to Ontario hospitals from April 1, 1993 to March 31, 2002. Four controls were age and gender matched to each case. Case and control exposures to chiropractors and PCPs were determined from health billing records in the year before the stroke date. In the case-crossover analysis, cases acted as their own controls. There were 818 VBA strokes hospitalized in a population of more than 100 million person-years. In those aged VBA stroke in those older than 45 years. Positive associations were found between PCP visits and VBA stroke in all age groups. Practitioner visits billed for headache and neck complaints were highly associated with subsequent VBA stroke. VBA stroke is a very rare event in the population. The increased risks of VBA stroke associated with chiropractic and PCP visits is likely due to patients with headache and neck pain from VBA dissection seeking care before their stroke. We found no evidence of excess risk of VBA stroke associated chiropractic care compared to primary care.

  5. Combined effects of family history of CVD and heart rate on ischemic stroke incidence among Inner Mongolians in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yipeng; Tian, Yunfan; Zhong, Chongke; Batu, Buren; Xu, Tian; Li, Hongmei; Zhang, Mingzhi; Wang, Aili; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the combined effects of family history of cardiovascular diseases (FHCVD) and heart rate on ischemic stroke incidence among Inner Mongolians in China. A prospective cohort study was conducted among 2589 participants aged 20 years and older from Inner Mongolia, China. The participants were divided into four groups according to status of FHCVD and heart rate and followed up from June 2002 to July 2012. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the combined effects of FHCVD and heart rate on the incidence of ischemic stroke. A total of 76 ischemic stroke occurred during the follow-up period. The observed ischemic stroke cases tended to be older and male, and had higher prevalence of smoking, drinking, hypertension and FHCVD as well as higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures at baseline compared with those who did not experience ischemic stroke. Age- and gender-adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of ischemic stroke in the participants with both FHCVD and heart rate ≥ 80 were 2.89 (1.51-5.53), compared with those without FHCVD and heart rate < 80. After multiple adjustment, the association between ischemic stroke risk and both FHCVD and heart rate ≥ 80 remained statistically significant (hazard ratio, 2.47; 95% confidence interval: 1.22-5.01). Our main finding that participants with both FHCVD and faster heart rate have the highest risk of ischemic stroke suggests that faster heart rate may increase the risk of ischemic stroke among people with FHCVD.

  6. Paraneoplastic Ischemic Stroke: Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Sumer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Paraneoplastic etiology is not frequent among cerebrovascular disorders. This rare disorder is interesting with different mechanisms, clinical manifestations and treatment options. Diagnosis may be overlooked for its rarity. We present a paraneoplastic ischemic stroke patient with its clinical and imaging characteristics for recalling this rare disease. CASE: A sixty years old woman with a history of ovarian and colon cancer and liver metastasis admitted with acute left sided hemiplegia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple ischemic lesions at the same age. Laboratory findings were compatible with chronic disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. She was anticoagulated but the clinical findings were not changed. She died one month after her discharge from the hospital. CONCLUSIONS: Paraneoplastic ischemic stroke is rare and it should be recognized by the clinician to differentiate from other ischemic strokes by its different mechanisms, imaging characteristics and treatment modalities. Prognosis depends on the characteristics of the primary tumor

  7. Stable stroke occurrence despite incidence reduction in an aging population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorvaldsen, P; Davidsen, M; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    A stroke register was established at the Glostrup Population Studies in 1982 with the objective to monitor stroke occurrence in the population continuously during a 10-year period and contribute data to the WHO Monitoring Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease (MONICA) Project. The pur......A stroke register was established at the Glostrup Population Studies in 1982 with the objective to monitor stroke occurrence in the population continuously during a 10-year period and contribute data to the WHO Monitoring Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease (MONICA) Project...

  8. A One Year Prospective Study of Neurogenic Stuttering Following Stroke: Incidence and Co-Occurring Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theys, C.; van Wieringen, A.; Sunaert, S.; Thijs, V.; De Nil, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    In this prospective study, data on incidence, stuttering characteristics, co-occurring speech disorders, and recovery of neurogenic stuttering in a large sample of stroke participants were assessed. Following stroke onset, 17 of 319 participants (5.3%; 95% CI, 3.2-8.3) met the criteria for neurogenic stuttering. Stuttering persisted in at least…

  9. Twenty-four-year trends in the incidence of ischemic stroke in Sweden from 1987 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, Annika; Giang, Kok Wai; Lappas, Georgios; Jern, Christina; Torén, Kjell; Björck, Lena

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of stroke in Sweden increased between 1989 and 2000 among people aged ≤65 years, but more recent data on those aged >65 years are lacking. Through the Swedish Hospital Discharge and Cause of Death registries, we identified all cases of nonfatal and fatal ischemic stroke (IS) among people aged 18 to 84 years during 1987-2010 in Sweden. Of the 391 081 stroke cases identified, 1.6% were 18 to 44 years, 16.7% were 45 to 64 years, and 81.7% were 65 to 84 years. Among people aged 18 to 44 years, there was a continuous increase in the incidence of stroke of 1.3% (95% confidence interval, 0.8%-1.8%) per year for men and 1.6% (1.0%-2.3%) per year for women. Among men and women aged 45 to 64 years, slightly declining rates were observed from the late 1990s, with a mean annual decrease of 0.4% (0.1%-0.7%) among men and 0.6% (0.2%-1.0%) among women. Among men aged 65 to 84 years, a decrease of 3.7% in IS (3.4%-4.0%) per year was observed from the late 1990s. This was more marked in women, where an initial decrease of 2.5% (2.1%-2.9%) per year was followed by an accelerated decrease of 5.1% (4.4%-5.8%) after 2005. Mortality from IS decreased markedly in all age groups. The incidence of IS in elderly people in Sweden is now decreasing, whereas the decline in IS incidence in the middle-aged people is much less steep. The increasing incidence of stroke in the young, particularly if carried forward to an older age, is concerning.

  10. Trends in ethnic disparities in stroke incidence in Auckland, New Zealand, during 1981 to 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kristie; Anderson, Craig; Hacket, Maree; Feigin, Valery; Barber, P Alan; Broad, Joanna B; Bonita, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    Although geographical variations in stroke rates are well documented, limited data exist on temporal trends in ethnic-specific stroke incidence. We assessed trends in ethnic-specific stroke rates using standard diagnostic criteria and community-wide surveillance procedures in Auckland, New Zealand (NZ) in 1981 to 1982, 1991 to 1992, and 2002 to 2003. Indirect and direct methods were used to adjust first-ever (incident) and total (attack) rates for changes in the structure of the population and reported with 95% CIs. Ethnicity was self-defined and categorized as "NZ/European," "Maori," "Pacific peoples," and "Asian and other." Stroke attack (19%; 95% CI, 11% to 26%) and incidence rates (19%; 95% CI, 12% to 24%) declined significantly in NZ/Europeans from 1981 to 1982 to 2002 to 2003. These rates remained high or increased in other ethnic groups, particularly for Pacific peoples in whom stroke attack rates increased by 66% (95% CI; 11% to 225%) over the periods. Some favorable downward trends in vascular risk factors, such as cigarette smoking, were counterbalanced by increasing age, body mass index, and diabetes in certain ethnic groups. Divergent trends in ethnic-specific stroke incidence and attack rates, and of associated risk factors, have occurred in Auckland over recent decades. The findings provide mixed views as to the future burden of stroke in populations undergoing similar lifestyle and structural changes.

  11. Antibody levels to persistent pathogens and incident stroke in Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealy-Jefferson, Shawnita; Gillespie, Brenda W; Aiello, Allison E; Haan, Mary N; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2013-01-01

    Persistent pathogens have been proposed as risk factors for stroke; however, the evidence remains inconclusive. Mexican Americans have an increased risk of stroke especially at younger ages, as well as a higher prevalence of infections caused by several persistent pathogens. Findings Using data from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (n = 1621), the authors used discrete-time regression to examine associations between stroke risk and (1) immunoglobulin G antibody levels to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), Cytomegalovirus, Varicella Zoster Virus, Toxoplasma gondii and Herpes simplex virus 1, and (2) concurrent exposure to several pathogens (pathogen burden), defined as: (a) summed sero-positivity, (b) number of pathogens eliciting high antibody levels, and (c) average antibody level. Models were adjusted for socio-demographics and stroke risk factors. Antibody levels to H. pylori predicted incident stroke in fully adjusted models (Odds Ratio: 1.58; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.09, 2.28). No significant associations were found between stroke risk and antibody levels to the other four pathogens. No associations were found for pathogen burden and incident stroke in fully adjusted models. Our results suggest that exposure to H. pylori may be a stroke risk factor in Mexican Americans and may contribute to ethnic differences in stroke risk given the increased prevalence of exposure to H. pylori in this population. Future studies are needed to confirm this association.

  12. Hemoglobin Concentration and Risk of Incident Stroke in Community-Living Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Judd, Suzanne E; Warnock, David G; McClellan, William M; Booth, John N; Muntner, Paul; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-08-01

    In previous observational studies, hemoglobin concentrations have been associated with an increased risk of stroke. However, these studies were limited by a relatively low number of stroke events, making it difficult to determine whether the association of hemoglobin and stroke differed by demographic or clinical factors. Using Cox proportional hazards analysis and Kaplan-Meier plots, we examined the association of baseline hemoglobin concentrations with incident stroke in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, a cohort of black and white adults aged ≥45 years. A total of 518 participants developed stroke over a mean 7±2 years of follow-up. There was a statistically significant interaction between hemoglobin and sex (P=0.05) on the risk of incident stroke. In Cox regression models adjusted for demographic and clinical variables, there was no association of baseline hemoglobin concentration with incident stroke in men, whereas in women, the lowest (14.0 g/dL) quartiles of hemoglobin were associated with higher risk of stroke when compared with the second quartile (12.4-13.2 g/dL; quartile 1: hazard ratio, 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-2.31; quartile 2: referent; quartile 3: hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-1.38; quartile 4: hazard ratio, 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.35). Similar results were observed in models stratified by hemoglobin and sex and when hemoglobin was modeled as a continuous variable using restricted quadratic spline regression. Lower and higher hemoglobin concentrations were associated with a higher risk of incident stroke in women. No such associations were found in men. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Incidence, Causative Mechanisms, and Anatomic Localization of Stroke in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Treated With Postoperative Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery Alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattler, Margriet G.A., E-mail: g.a.sattler@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Vroomen, Patrick C. [Department of Neurology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Sluiter, Wim J. [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schers, Henk J. [Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (Netherlands); Berg, Gerrit van den [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R. [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Beek, André P. van [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical Center Groningen in The Netherlands was studied. Radiation therapy was administered in 236 patients. The TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) and the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification methods were used to determine causative mechanism and anatomic localization of stroke. Stroke incidences in patients treated with RT were compared with that observed after surgery alone. Risk factors for stroke incidence were studied by log–rank test, without and with stratification for other significant risk factors. In addition, the stroke incidence was compared with the incidence rate in the general Dutch population. Results: Thirteen RT patients were diagnosed with stroke, compared with 12 surgery-alone patients. The relative risk (RR) for stroke in patients treated with postoperative RT was not significantly different compared with surgery-alone patients (univariate RR 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-1.35, P=.23). Stroke risk factors were coronary or peripheral artery disease (univariate and multivariate RR 10.4, 95% CI 4.7-22.8, P<.001) and hypertension (univariate RR 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.8, P=.002). There was no difference in TOAST and Oxfordshire classification of stroke. In this pituitary adenoma cohort 25 strokes were observed, compared with 16.91 expected (standard incidence ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.00-1.96, P=.049). Conclusions: In pituitary adenoma patients, an increased incidence of stroke was observed compared with the general population. However, postoperative RT was not associated with an increased incidence of stroke or differences in causative mechanism or anatomic localization of stroke compared with surgery alone. The primary stroke risk

  14. Spreading depolarizations occur in human ischemic stroke with high incidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohmen, C.; Sakowitz, O.W.; Fabricius, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Cortical spreading depression (CSD) and periinfarct depolarization (PID) have been shown in various experimental models of stroke to cause secondary neuronal damage and infarct expansion. For decades it has been questioned whether CSD or PID occur in human ischemic stroke. Here, we...... for decompressive hernicraniectomy, an electrode strip was placed on the periinfarct region, from which four FCoG channels were acquired. Results: A total of 1,638 hours was recorded; mean monitoring time per patient was 109.2 hours. A total of 127 CSD and 42 PID events were observed. In CSD, a stereotyped slow...... frequency in this study of patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarction. This suggests that the large volume of experimental studies of occlusive stroke that implicate spreading depolarizations in its pathophysiology can be translated, with appropriate caution, to patients and their treatment...

  15. Ischemic stroke in paediatrics - narrative review of the literature and two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klucka, Jozef; Stourac, Petr; Stoudek, Roman; Toukalkova, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinova, Martina; Stouracova, Alena; Mrlian, Andrej; Suk, Petr; Malaska, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Stroke is a rare condition in childhood with an estimated incidence of between 1.3-13/100.000 patients. Clinical manifestation and risk factors for paediatric stroke are different from those of adults. The uncommon incidence, age-associated difference and plethora of clinical symptoms make the diagnosis of such strokes extremely difficult and often delayed. The history and clinical examination should point to diseases or predisposing factors. Neuroimaging (DWI MR) is the golden standard for diagnosis of paediatric stroke and other investigations can be considered according to the clinical condition. Despite advances in paediatric stroke research and clinical care, questions remain unanswered regarding acute treatment, secondary prevention and rehabilitation. The treatment recommendations are mainly extrapolated from studies on adult populations. In the review authors summarized the clinical characteristics and diagnostic steps for stroke in children/adolescents based on the most recent international guidelines and practical directions for recognising and managing the child/adolescent with stroke in paediatric emergency. In the two case reports, we describe the clinical course in both stroke patients.

  16. High incidence of respiratory infections in 'nil by mouth' tube-fed acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, P C; Lee, A H; Binns, C W

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory infections are common in acute stroke. Previous studies have found dysphagia is associated with respiratory infections. Of interest is whether patients who are 'Nil by Mouth' (NBM) and tube fed have higher risk of developing infections due to aspiration of bacteria-laden saliva or refluxed material than stroke patients who are fed orally. Prospective cohort of 330 ischemic stroke survivors were followed for 30 days and infections recorded. 115 infections were treated with antibiotics; these included 51 respiratory infections. Incidence of infection in NBM tube-fed stroke patients (n = 74) was 69%, with 30 respiratory infections occurring in 74 patients who received enteral feeding after stroke. Logistic regression analysis showed tube feeding during admission was a significant risk for respiratory infection. We also saw a significant time-to-event effect with 73% (22/30) respiratory infections in tube-fed survivors diagnosed on days 2-4 after stroke, and 76% (39/51) of infections in all tube-fed survivors occurring by day 7 after stroke. Relevance to a theory of critical period of susceptibility to infection in acute stroke is discussed. NBM tube-fed survivors were unlikely to have aspirated anything other than saliva/secretions or reflux, yet experienced significantly higher rates of respiratory infections than survivors fed orally. Stringent oral care and measures to prevent reflux are potentially modifiable aspects of stroke management. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Ethnic Disparities in Ischemic Stroke, Intracerebral Hemorrhage, and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Incidence in The Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agyemang, Charles; van Oeffelen, Aloysia A M; Nørredam, Marie Louise

    2014-01-01

    . We studied the following stroke subtypes: ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate incidence differences between first-generation ethnic minorities and the Dutch majority population (ethnic Dutch). RESULTS: Compared...... with ethnic Dutch, Surinamese men and women had higher incidence rates of all stroke subtypes combined (adjusted hazard ratios, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.35-1.50 and 1.34; 1.28-1.41), ischemic stroke (1.68; 1.57-1.81 and 1.57; 1.46-1.68), intracerebral hemorrhage (2.08; 1.82-2.39 and 1.74; 1.......50-2.00), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (1.25; 0.92-1.69 and 1.26; 1.04-1.54). By contrast, Moroccan men and women had lower incidence rates of all stroke subtypes combined (0.42; 0.36-0.48 and 0.37; 0.30-0.46), ischemic stroke (0.35; 0.27-0.45 and 0.34; 0.24-0.49), intracerebral hemorrhage (0.61; 0.41-0.92 and 0.32; 0...

  18. Increased Incidence of Interatrial Block in Younger Adults with Cryptogenic Stroke and Patent Foramen Ovale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.E. Cotter

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is often unexplained in younger adults, although it is often associated with a patent foramen ovale (PFO. The reason for the association is not fully explained, and mechanisms other than paradoxical embolism may be involved. Young stroke patients with PFO have more atrial vulnerability than those without PFO. It is plausible that stretching of the interatrial septum may disrupt the interatrial conduction pathways causing interatrial block (IAB. IAB is associated with atrial fibrillation, dysfunctional left atria and stroke. Methods: Electrocardiogram (ECG characteristics of prospectively recruited young patients (≤55 years of age with unexplained stroke (TOAST and A-S-C-O were compared with control data. All stroke cases underwent bubble contrast transthoracic and transoesophageal echography. IAB was defined as a P-wave duration of ≧110 ms. ECG data were converted to electronic format and analysed in a blind manner. Results: Fifty-five patients and 23 datasets were analysed. Patients with unexplained stroke had longer P-wave duration (p = 0.013 and a greater prevalence of IAB (p = 0.02 than healthy controls. Case status was an independent predictor of P-wave duration in a significant multivariate model. There was a significant increase in the proportion of cases with a PFO with IAB compared with cases without PFO and with controls (p = 0.005. Conclusions: Young patients with unexplained stroke, particularly those with PFO, exhibit abnormal atrial electrical characteristics suggesting atrial arrhythmia or atrial dysfunction as a possible mechanism of stroke.

  19. Early consciousness disorder in acute ischemic stroke: incidence, risk factors and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Wang, Deren; Tao, Wendan; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Jie; Liu, Ming

    2016-08-17

    Little is known about the incidence and risk factors of early consciousness disorder (ECD) in patients with acute ischemic stroke, or about how ECD may affect complications and outcomes. Patients admitted to our hospital within 24 h of onset of acute ischemic stroke were consecutively enrolled. ECD was evaluated clinically and using the Glasgow coma scale. Multivariate analysis was used to identify risk factors of ECD, as well as associations between ECD and clinical outcomes. Of the 569 patients enrolled, 199 (35 %) had ECD. Independent risk factors of ECD were advanced age (OR 1.027, 95 % CI 1.007 to 1.048), National Institutes of Health Stroke Score on admission (OR 1.331, 95 % CI 1.257 to 1.410), and massive cerebral infarct (OR 3.211, 95 % CI 1.642 to 6.279). ECD was associated with higher frequency of stroke-related complications (83.4 % vs. 31.1 %, P stroke. Risk factors include advanced age, stroke severity, and massive cerebral infarct. ECD is associated with higher frequency of stroke-related complications and 3-month death/disability.

  20. STROKE IN YOUNG ADULTS: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF 68 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Harirchian

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous etiologies are responsible for cases of stroke in young adults. This study reviews the causes of two types of stroke (ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhage in young adults aged 15 to 40years, admitted to our center (a tertiary care center from 1997 to 2002. The purpose of this study is to determine the relative frequency of causes of stroke in young adults and compare this with published data in the literature. Using the codes 46.0 to 46.8 of the International Classification of Diseases- 10th Edition (ICD-10, cases were identified from the records of the stroke patients admitted in Imam Khomeini Hospital and the data were collected from their files using a comprehensive questionnaire. Forty-two cases of ischemic stroke (62% and 26 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage (38% were identified. The leading cause of ischemic stroke was cardioembolism (38.1%, followed by atherosclerosis in 5 cases (11.9%. Among cardiac causes infarction was attributable to consequences of rheumatic heart disease in 8 cases. In 3 cases a cessation or decrease in dose of warfarin was followed directly by an ischemic stroke. The most leading cause of intracerebral hemorrhage was hypertension (30.8%. Other causes were anticoagulant therapy, intratumoral hemorrhage, aplastic anemia, leukemia, arteriovenous malformations, and chronic active hepatitis. In conclusion, cardioembolism and hypertension were the most leading causes of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in young adults admitted in our hospital.

  1. Purpose in life and reduced incidence of stroke in older adults: 'The Health and Retirement Study'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S; Sun, Jennifer K; Park, Nansook; Peterson, Christopher

    2013-05-01

    To determine whether purpose in life is associated with reduced stroke incidence among older adults after adjusting for relevant sociodemographic, behavioral, biological, and psychosocial factors. We used prospective data from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50. 6739 adults who were stroke-free at baseline were examined. A multiple imputation technique was used to account for missing data. Purpose in life was measured using a validated adaptation of Ryff and Keyes' Scales of Psychological Well-Being. After controlling for a comprehensive list of covariates, we assessed the odds of stroke incidence over a four-year period. We used psychological and covariate data collected in 2006, along with occurrences of stroke reported in 2008, 2010, and during exit interviews. Covariates included sociodemographic factors (age, gender, race/ethnicity, marital status, education level, total wealth, functional status), health behaviors (smoking, exercise, alcohol use), biological factors (hypertension, diabetes, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, BMI, heart disease), negative psychological factors (depression, anxiety, cynical hostility, negative affect), and positive psychological factors (optimism, positive affect, and social participation). Greater baseline purpose in life was associated with a reduced likelihood of stroke during the four-year follow-up. In a model that adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, marital status, education level, total wealth, and functional status, each standard deviation increase in purpose was associated with a multivariate-adjusted odds ratio of 0.78 for stroke (95% CI, 0.67-0.91, p=.002). Purpose remained significantly associated with a reduced likelihood of stroke after adjusting for several additional covariates including: health behaviors, biological factors, and psychological factors. Among older American adults, greater purpose in life is linked

  2. Association of Breakfast Intake With Incident Stroke and Coronary Heart Disease: The Japan Public Health Center-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yasuhiko; Iso, Hiroyasu; Sawada, Norie; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-02-01

    The association between breakfast intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease, including stroke, among Asian people remains unknown. We sought to prospectively investigate whether the omission of breakfast is related to increased risks of stroke and coronary heart disease in general Japanese populations. A total of 82,772 participants (38,676 men and 44,096 women) aged 45 to 74 years without histories of cardiovascular disease or cancer were followed up from 1995 to 2010. Participants were classified as having breakfast 0 to 2, 3 to 4, 5 to 6, or 7 times/wk. The hazard ratios of cardiovascular disease were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. During the 1 050 030 person-years of follow-up, we documented a total of 4642 incident cases, 3772 strokes (1051 cerebral hemorrhages, 417 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 2286 cerebral infarctions), and 870 coronary heart disease. Multivariable analysis showed that those consuming no breakfast per week compared with those consuming breakfast everyday had hazard ratios (95% confidence interval; P for trend) of 1.14 (1.01-1.27; 0.013) for total cardiovascular disease, 1.18 (1.04-1.34; 0.007) for total stroke, and 1.36 (1.10-1.70; 0.004) for cerebral hemorrhage. Similar results were observed even after exclusion of early cardiovascular events. No significant association between the frequency of breakfast intake and the risk of coronary heart disease was observed. The frequency of breakfast intake was inversely associated with the risk of stroke, especially cerebral hemorrhage in Japanese, suggesting that eating breakfast everyday may be beneficial for the prevention of stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Cannabis and stroke: systematic appraisal of case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackam, Daniel G

    2015-03-01

    An increasing number of case reports link cannabis consumption to cerebrovascular events. Yet these case reports have not been scrutinized using criteria for causal inference. All case reports on cannabis and cerebrovascular events were retrieved. Four causality criteria were addressed: temporality, adequacy of stroke work-up, effects of rechallenge, and concomitant risk factors that could account for the cerebrovascular event. There were 34 case reports on 64 patients. Most cases (81%) exhibited a temporal relationship between cannabis exposure and the index event. In 70%, the evaluation was sufficiently comprehensive to exclude other sources for stroke. About a quarter (22%) of patients had another stroke after subsequent re-exposure to cannabis. Finally, half of patients (50%) had concomitant stroke risk factors, most commonly tobacco (34%) and alcohol (11%) consumption. Many case reports support a causal link between cannabis and cerebrovascular events. This accords well with epidemiological and mechanistic research on the cerebrovascular effects of cannabis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Lightning stroke and neuropsychological impairment : cases and questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zomeren, AH; ten Duis, HJ; Minderhoud, JM; Sipma, M

    Objective-To objectify neuropsychological impairments in survivors of lightning stroke with lasting complaints about poor concentration and inability to divide their attention. Design-A series of six cases of lightning stroke were studied. All patients had lost consciousness and reported amnesia of

  5. Stroke in young adults: about 128 cases | Chraa | Pan African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ischemic stroke is rare in young adults, but it is genuinely a serious situation giving the fact that it touch a very active part of our society. We report a series of 128 cases. The purpose is to analyze the risk factors, etiologies and outcomes of ischemic stroke in young adults in Marrakesh. Retrospective study performed at the ...

  6. Incidence of stroke and coronary heart disease in the adult health study sample, 1958 - 78

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kazunori; Shimizu, Yukiko; Sawada, Hisao; Kato, Hiroo.

    1986-04-01

    Approximately 16,000 study subjects in the Adult Health Study sample who had received examination at least once during the 20 years (1958 - 78) in Hiroshima or Nagasaki and were found to have neither stroke nor coronary heart disease (CHD) at the initial examination were studied for the incidence of stroke and CHD and the relationship of these to atomic bomb radiation exposure. Their secular trends were also studied. Findings suggestive of a relationship between stroke and radiation exposure among Hiroshima females were first discovered for the years 1969 - 73, that is, 24 - 28 years after A-bomb exposure. In general, this association is supported by the present analysis. Stroke incidence continued to decrease during the present report's period of observation. Analysis by type showed that cerebral infarction and cerebral hemorrhage both decreased, but the decrease of the latter is especially remarkable. The trend to decrease is observed in both sexes and in both cities. A relationship between CHD and radiation exposure was, as noted for stroke, first observed only in Hiroshima females for the years 1969 - 73, but from this analysis it appears that the trend began earlier and the association is getting stronger with the passage of time. Analysis by type showed myocardial infarction (MI), but not angina pectoris, to be related to radiation exposure. The incidence rate for CHD, especially for MI, was almost constant during the observation period, it being 1.2/1,000 person-years on the average. Comparing by sex, the incidence rate was constant in males. In females, the pattern varied with time. There appear to be no between-city differences in secular trends - essentially constant. (author)

  7. Air Pollution and Subtypes, Severity and Vulnerability to Ischemic Stroke-A Population Based Case-Crossover Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Maheswaran

    Full Text Available Few studies have examined the association between air pollutants and ischemic stroke subtypes. We examined acute effects of outdoor air pollutants (PM10, NO2, O3, CO, SO2 on subtypes and severity of incident ischemic stroke and investigated if pre-existing risk factors increased susceptibility.We used a time stratified case-crossover study and stroke cases from the South London Stroke Register set up to capture all incident cases of first ever stroke occurring amongst residents in a geographically defined area. The Oxford clinical and TOAST etiological classifications were used to classify subtypes. A pragmatic clinical classification system was used to assess severity. Air pollution concentrations from the nearest background air pollution monitoring stations to patients' residential postcode centroids were used. Lags from 0 to 6 days were investigated.There were 2590 incident cases of ischemic stroke (1995-2006. While there were associations at various lag times with several pollutants, overall, there was no consistent pattern between exposure and risk of ischemic stroke subtypes or severity. The possible exception was the association between NO2 exposure and small vessel disease stroke-adjusted odds ratio of 1.51 (1.12-2.02 associated with an inter-quartile range increase in the lag 0-6 day average for NO2. There were no clear associations in relation to pre-existing risk factors.Overall, we found little consistent evidence of association between air pollutants and ischemic stroke subtypes and severity. There was however a suggestion that increasing NO2 exposure might be associated with higher risk of stroke caused by cerebrovascular small vessel disease.

  8. Increase of Stroke Incidence in Young Adults in a Middle-Income Country: A 10-Year Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Norberto Luiz; Freire, Aracélli Tavares; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Dos Santos, Nayara; Reis, Felipe Ibiapina; Nagel, Vivian; Guesser, Vanessa V; Safanelli, Juliana; Longo, Alexandre L

    2017-11-01

    The incidence of stroke is on the rise in young adults in high-income countries. However, there is a gap of knowledge about trends in stroke incidence in young adults from low- and middle-income countries. We aimed to measure trends in incidence of ischemic stroke (IS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (IH) in young people from 2005 to 2015 in Joinville, Brazil. We retrospectively ascertained all first-ever IS subtypes and IH that occurred in Joinville in the periods of 2005 to 2006, 2010 to 2011, and 2014 to 2015. Poisson regression was used to calculate incidence rate ratios of all strokes, IS, and IH. We also compared the prevalence of risk factors and extension of diagnostic work-up across the 3 periods. For 10 years, we registered 2483 patients (7.5% aged stroke incidence significantly increased by 62% (incidence rate ratios, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-2.40) in subjects Stroke incidence is rising in young adults in Joinville, Brazil, because of increase in rates of ischemic but not hemorrhagic strokes. We urgently need better policies of cardiovascular prevention in the young. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Telomere length and ischaemic stroke in women: a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürks, M; Prescott, J; Dushkes, R; De Vivo, I; Rexrode, K M

    2013-07-01

    Telomere shortening has been implicated in cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, prospective data on the association between relative telomere length (RTL) and ischaemic stroke are scarce and inconclusive. We used a nested case-control design among women participating in the prospective Nurses' Health Study. Participants provided blood samples in 1990 and were followed till 2006. Women with confirmed incident ischaemic stroke were matched to controls by age, smoking, postmenopausal status and postmenopausal hormone use. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine RTL in genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine the risk of ischaemic stroke associated with RTL, using RTL quartiles and as dichotomous according to the median. Data on RTL were available from 504 case-control pairs. Results did not suggest an association between RTL and ischaemic stroke. The odds ratio (OR) for ischaemic stroke was 0.82 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52-1.32] comparing lowest with the highest RTL quartile and 0.90 (95% CI 0.65-1.24) comparing RTL below the median with RTL above the median. Associations were unchanged after additional adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. Further analyses suggested an association between RTL and fatal ischaemic stroke (54 case-control pairs; lowest versus highest quartile OR = 1.99, 95%CI 0.26-14.9); however, results were statistically insignificant. In this large nested case-control study among women RTL was not associated with ischaemic stroke. In light of the varying study results in the literature on the association between telomere length and stroke, additional research is warranted. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  10. Plasma d-Dimer and Incident Ischemic Stroke and Coronary Heart Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, Aaron R; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Appiah, Duke; Shahar, Eyal; Mosley, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have documented that plasma d-dimer, a fibrin degradation product, is a risk marker for coronary heart disease, but there is limited prospective evidence for stroke. Given that thrombosis is a key mechanism for many strokes, we studied whether d-dimer is a risk marker for ischemic stroke incidence in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. We measured d-dimer in 11 415 ARIC participants free of stroke and coronary heart disease in 1992 to 1995. We followed them for stroke, stroke subtype, and coronary heart disease events through 2012. Over a median of 18 years of follow-up, 719 participants had incident strokes (628 ischemic and 91 hemorrhagic). d-dimer was associated positively with risk of total, ischemic, and cardioembolic strokes, with risk elevated primarily for the highest quintile of d-dimer. After adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors, the hazard ratio for the highest versus lowest quintile of d-dimer was 1.30 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.67) for total stroke, 1.33 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.73) for ischemic stroke, and 1.79 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.95) for cardioembolic stroke. There was no association with hemorrhagic, lacunar, or nonlacunar stroke categories. d-dimer was positively but weakly associated with coronary heart disease incidence. A higher basal plasma d-dimer concentration in the general population is a risk marker for ischemic stroke, especially cardioembolic stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Executive function, but not memory, associates with incident coronary heart disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamian, Somayeh; van Buchem, Mark A; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Jukema, J Wouter; Mooijaart, Simon P; Sabayan, Behnam; de Craen, Anton J M

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the association of performance in cognitive domains executive function and memory with incident coronary heart disease and stroke in older participants without dementia. We included 3,926 participants (mean age 75 years, 44% male) at risk for cardiovascular diseases from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) with Mini-Mental State Examination score ≥24 points. Scores on the Stroop Color-Word Test (selective attention) and the Letter Digit Substitution Test (processing speed) were converted to Z scores and averaged into a composite executive function score. Likewise, scores of the Picture Learning Test (immediate and delayed memory) were transformed into a composite memory score. Associations of executive function and memory were longitudinally assessed with risk of coronary heart disease and stroke using multivariable Cox regression models. During 3.2 years of follow-up, incidence rates of coronary heart disease and stroke were 30.5 and 12.4 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. In multivariable models, participants in the lowest third of executive function, as compared to participants in the highest third, had 1.85-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39-2.45) higher risk of coronary heart disease and 1.51-fold (95% CI 0.99-2.30) higher risk of stroke. Participants in the lowest third of memory had no increased risk of coronary heart disease (hazard ratio 0.99, 95% CI 0.74-1.32) or stroke (hazard ratio 0.87, 95% CI 0.57-1.32). Lower executive function, but not memory, is associated with higher risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Lower executive function, as an independent risk indicator, might better reflect brain vascular pathologies. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  12. Brain strokes related to aortic aneurysma – the analysis of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastuszak Żanna

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain stroke connected with aortic blood flow disturbances is a rare disease and its incidence is difficult to assume. Nevertheless, 10-50% of patients with aortic dissection may not experience any pain. In case of 18-30% patients with aortic dissection neurological signs are first disease presentation and among them ischemic stroke is the most common. The most popular aortic dissection classification is with use of Stanford system. Type A involves the ascending aorta and type B is occurring distal to the subclavian artery. Aortic dissection risk factors include hypertension, cystic medionecrosis, bicuspid aortic valve and Marfan’s or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  13. Thrombotic CV Stroke in a Young Male with Hyperhomocysteinemia and Protein S Deficiency: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilima Shah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stroke in young poses a major health problem. Thrombophilic factors have been implicated in 4-8% of the young strokes worldwide. Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis but there are few data regarding its role in acute arterial thrombosis without any previous lesion. Overall estimated incidence of deep vein thrombosis is 1 per 1000 persons with Protein S deficiency but very few studies suggest association between arterial thrombosis with Protein S deficiency. We present a case of 18 year old boy who presented to us with acute onset right sided hemiplegia and aphasia whose laboratory findings were suggestive of hyperhomocyseinemia and Protein S deficiency.

  14. Prevalence, Incidence, Prognosis, Early Stroke Risk, and Stroke-Related Prognostic Factors of Definite or Probable Transient Ischemic Attacks in China, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Jiang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiological characteristics of transient ischemic attacks (TIAs in China are unclear. In 2013, we conducted a nationally representative, door-to-door epidemiological survey on TIA in China using a complex, multistage, probability sampling design. Results showed that the weighted prevalence of TIA in China was 103.3 [95% confidence interval (CI: 83.9–127.2] per 100,000 in the population, 92.4 (75.0–113.8 per 100,000 among men, and 114.7 (87.2–151.0 per 100,000 among women. The weighted incidence of TIA was 23.9 (17.8–32.0 per 100,000 in the population, 21.3 (14.3–31.5 per 100,000 among men, and 26.6 (17.0–41.7 per 100,000 among women. No difference in average prognosis was found between TIA and stroke in the population. Weighted risk of stroke among TIA patients was 9.7% (6.5–14.3%, 11.1% (7.5–16.1%, and 12.3% (8.4–17.7% at 2, 30, and 90 days, respectively. The risk of stroke was higher among male patients with a history of TIA than among female patients with a history of TIA (OR: 2.469; 95% CI: 1.172–5.201; P = 0.018, and higher among TIA patients with hypertension than among TIA patients without hypertension (OR: 2.671; 1.547–4.613; P < 0.001. It can be concluded that there are an estimated 1.35 million TIA patients nationwide, with 0.31 million new cases of TIA annually in China. TIA patients were not better managed prior to a stroke event. Early risk of stroke among TIA patients is high. Sex and hypertension may be stroke-associated prognostic factors among TIA patients. TIA clinics and surveillance should be integrated into the national health-care system.

  15. Societal Costs of First-Incident Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation-A Danish Nationwide Registry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Marie; Kolodziejczyk, Christophe; Fredslund, Eskild K; Poulsen, Peter B; Dybro, Lars; Johnsen, Søren P

    2016-06-01

    Oral anticoagulation therapy reduces the risk of ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, more data on the costs of stroke in patients with AF are needed to assess how this therapy affects societal costs. The aim of the study was to estimate the average 3-year societal costs of first-incident ischemic stroke in Danish patients with AF, including costs of health care, social care services, and productivity loss. The study was designed as an incidence-based cost-of-illness study covering the entire Danish population. All patients with a hospital diagnosis of AF were identified, and propensity score-matched analyses were used to estimate costs attributable to first-incident stroke among patients with AF in the period 2002 to 2012. All data were obtained from nationwide registries. A total of 21,673 patients with AF were identified with a first-incident stroke. The average 3-year costs attributable to stroke were US $30,925 per patient (present value) corresponding to US $19,989 in the incidence year and US $7,683 and US $5,176 1 and 2 years after the stroke, respectively. Health care accounted for 66% of the 3-year costs, with hospitalizations in the incidence year as the main cost driver. After the incidence year, costs of social care services exceeded health care costs. Sensitivity analyses showed that the cost estimates were relatively robust. The societal costs of first-incident stroke in patients with AF are substantial. This new evidence can be valuable as an input for decision making regarding the treatment of AF and prevention of future strokes. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The association of atopy with incidence of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk

    2015-01-01

    Allergy is a systemic inflammatory disease that could theoretically affect the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes through inflammatory pathways or mast cell-induced coronary spasm. Whether allergy is associated with an increased risk of CVD and diabetes is largely unknown. We...... investigated the association between atopy as assessed by IgE sensitization, a well-accepted biomarker of allergy, and incidence of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes in five Danish population-based cohorts. A total of 14,849 participants were included in the study. Atopy was defined as serum......-specific IgE positivity to inhalant allergens. The Danish National Diabetes Register enabled identification of incident diabetes. Likewise, the Danish Registry of Causes of Death and the Danish National Patient Register provided information on fatal and non-fatal ischemic heart disease and stroke. Data were...

  17. Socioeconomic status and stroke incidence in the US elderly: the role of risk factors in the EPESE study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avendano, Mauricio; Kawachi, Ichiro; Lenthe, Frank J van; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Mackenbach, Johan P; Bos, G A M van den; Fay, Martha E; Berkman, Lisa F

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study assesses the effect of socioeconomic status on stroke incidence in the elderly, and the contribution of risk factors to stroke disparities. METHODS: Data comprised a sample of 2812 men and women aged 65 years and over from the New Haven cohort of the Established

  18. Socioeconomic status and stroke incidence in the US elderly: the role of risk factors in the EPESE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avendano, Mauricio; Kawachi, Ichiro; van Lenthe, Frank; Boshuizen, Hendriek C.; Mackenbach, Johan P.; van den Bos, G. A. M.; Fay, Martha E.; Berkman, Lisa F.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study assesses the effect of socioeconomic status on stroke incidence in the elderly, and the contribution of risk factors to stroke disparities. METHODS: Data comprised a sample of 2812 men and women aged 65 years and over from the New Haven cohort of the Established

  19. Cerebral Microbleeds and the Risk of Incident Ischemic Stroke in CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy With Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puy, Laurent; De Guio, François; Godin, Ophélia; Duering, Marco; Dichgans, Martin; Chabriat, Hugues; Jouvent, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Cerebral microbleeds are associated with an increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. Recent data suggest that microbleeds may also predict the risk of incident ischemic stroke. However, these results were observed in elderly individuals undertaking various medications and for whom causes of microbleeds and ischemic stroke may differ. We aimed to test the relationship between the presence of microbleeds and incident stroke in CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy With Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy)-a severe monogenic small vessel disease known to be responsible for both highly prevalent microbleeds and a high incidence of ischemic stroke in young patients. We assessed microbleeds on baseline MRI in all 378 patients from the Paris-Munich cohort study. Incident ischemic strokes were recorded during 54 months. Survival analyses were used to test the relationship between microbleeds and incident ischemic stroke. Three hundred sixty-nine patients (mean age, 51.4±11.4 years) were followed-up during a median time of 39 months (interquartile range, 19 months). The risk of incident ischemic stroke was higher in patients with microbleeds than in patients without (35.8% versus 19.6%, hazard ratio, 1.87; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-3.01; P =0.009). These results persisted after adjustment for history of ischemic stroke, age, sex, vascular risk factors, and antiplatelet agents use (hazard ratio, 1.89; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-3.26; P =0.02). The presence of microbleeds is an independent risk marker of incident ischemic stroke in CADASIL, emphasizing the need to carefully interpret MRI data. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Stroke Incidence by Major Pathological Type and Ischemic Subtypes in the Auckland Regional Community Stroke Studies: Changes Between 2002 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, Rita V; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Parag, Varsha; Parmar, Priyakumari; Witt, Emma; Jones, Amy; Mahon, Susan; Anderson, Craig S; Barber, P Alan; Feigin, Valery L

    2018-01-01

    Major pathological stroke types (ischemic stroke [IS], primary intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH], and subarachnoid hemorrhage) and IS subtypes, have differing risk factors, management, and prognosis. We report changes in major stroke types and IS subtypes incidence during 10 years using data from the ARCOS (Auckland Regional Community Stroke Study) III performed during 12 months in 2002 to 2003 and the fourth ARCOS study (ARCOS-IV) performed in 2011 to 2012. ARCOS-III and ARCOS-IV were population-based registers of all new strokes in the greater Auckland region (population aged >15 years, 1 119 192). Strokes were classified into major pathological types (IS, ICH, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and undetermined type). Crude annual age-, sex-, and ethnic-specific stroke incidence with 95% confidence intervals was calculated. ISs were subclassified using TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria into 5 etiologic groups. Rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for differences in age-standardized rates between the 2 studies. In ARCOS-IV, there were 1329 (81%) ISs, 211 (13%) ICHs, 79 (5%) subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 24 (1%) undetermined type strokes. The proportional distribution of IS subtypes was 29% cardioembolism, 21% small-vessel occlusion, 15% large-artery atherosclerosis, 5% other determined etiology, and 31% undetermined type. Between 2002 and 2011, age-standardized incidence decreased for subarachnoid hemorrhage (rate ratios, 0.73; 95% confidence intervals, 0.54-0.99) and undetermined type (rate ratios, 0.14; 95% confidence intervals, 0.09-0.22). Rates were stable for IS and ICH. Among IS subtypes, large-artery atherosclerosis and small-vessel occlusion rates increased significantly. The frequency of all risk factors increased in IS. Ethnic differences were observed for both stroke subtype rates and their risk factor frequencies. A lack of change in IS and ICH incidence may reflect a trend toward increased incidence of younger

  1. Radiology in cases of cerebral stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsting, M.; Reith, W.; Kummer, R. von; Sartor, K.

    1993-01-01

    Today radiologic methods play an important role in the diagnosis of cerebral stroke. The aim of the radiologist, however, should not only be to classify the stroke into the four main categories (ischemic stroke, intracerebral bleeding, subarachnoid hemorrhage, sinovenous thrombis), but also to interprete the findings with regard to the etiology of the disease. The pattern of lesions gives information about the etiology of ischemic stroke; the correct interpretation of these lesion patterns allows one to optimize therapeutic decisions. This paper additionally focusses on the differential diagnosis of intracerebral hemorrhage and the CT and MR signs of sinovenous thrombosis. New developed concepts in the field of stroke therapy and prophylaxis call for authority and continuous education of the radiolgist on this topic. Pure descriptions of radiologic findings without an understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease will be ignored by the clinician. On the other hand, the radiologist can turn the therapeutic decisions in the right direction by combining morphological descriptions with pathogenetic orientated interpretations. In this way, the radiolgist can contribute to the reduction of costs in the public health system. (orig.) [de

  2. Incidence of stroke in young adults in the Reggio Emilia area, northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, D; Baratti, M; Zucco, R G; Greco, G; Terenziani, S; Vescovini, E; Sabadini, R; Bondavalli, M; Masini, L; Salvarani, C

    1993-01-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study on the first episode of stroke in young adults aged 15-44 years was carried out in the territory of the Local Health Unit No. 9 in Reggio Emilia (46,491 km2), Italy, from 1987 to 1989. 29 patients were identified: 17 were affected with cerebral infarction and 12 with hemorrhage. All young patients were discharged with diagnostic codes 430-438 according to the International Classification of Disease, i.e. the criteria of the World Health Organisation for stroke definition. All patients had computed tomography or necropsy. The average annual incidence rate per 100,000 population aged 15-44 for all strokes was 13.6 and the 95% confidence interval (CI 95%) was 9.1-19.6. The general population of the same age on January 1, 1987, was 69,845 and 71,920 on December 31, 1989; the incidence rate of stroke was 14.0 for males (CI 95% 7.9-2.3) and 13.2 (CI 95% 7.1-22.2) for females. The average annual incidence rates were 8.0 (CI 95% 4.7-12.2) for cerebral infarction (8.4, CI 95% 3.9-16 for males, 7.6, CI 95% 3.3-14.9 for females), 5.6 (CI 95% 2.9-9.9) for cerebral hemorrhage and 2.8 (CI 95% 1.0-6.1) for both subarachnoid (SAH) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Based on angiography or necropsy findings, aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations were present in 83% of the patients with SAH and in 66% of the patients with ICH. The 1-month fatality ratio was 0 for cerebral infarction, 50% for SAH and 33% for ICH.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. The incidence, co-occurrence, and predictors of dysphagia, dysarthria, and aphasia after first-ever acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Heather L; Silver, Frank L; Fang, Jiming; Rochon, Elizabeth; Martino, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia, dysarthria and aphasia occur frequently following stroke. Our purpose was to identify the incidence, co-occurrence, and predictors of these impairments after first-ever ischemic stroke. We used the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network's database (2003-2008) from one stroke center to identify a random sample of 250 patients with acute ischemic stroke confirmed by MR imaging. We further conducted a retrospective medical chart review. We established reliable data capture and identified the presence of the three impairments. We derived incidence and co-occurrence estimates along with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dysphagia, dysarthria, and aphasia. We then computed odds ratios (OR) through logistic regression to identify predictors. Twenty-nine patient charts were not available for review. Estimates of the incidence of dysphagia, dysarthria, and aphasia were 44% (95% CI, 38-51), 42% (95% CI, 35-48) and 30% (95% CI, 25-37), respectively. The highest co-occurrence of any two impairments was 28% (95% CI, 23-34) for the presence of both dysphagia and dysarthria. Ten percent of all 221 patients had all three impairments. The highest predictors were non-alert level of consciousness for dysphagia (OR 2.6, CI 1.03-6.5), symptoms of weakness for dysarthria (OR 5.3, CI 2.4-12.0), and right-sided symptoms for aphasia (OR 7.1, CI 3.1-16.6). These findings are a first step toward identifying the incidence and predictors of multiple co-occurring impairments in a homogenous stroke sample. Learning outcomes: Readers will be able to (1) RECOGNIZE the need for research in stroke, whereby outcomes are reported according to stroke etiology and recurrence patterns, (2) identify the incidence and co-occurrence of dysphagia, dysarthria, and aphasia after a first-ever acute ischemic stroke, and (3) describe clinical precursors of these impairments in the acute stage of stroke. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Traffic-related air pollution exposure and incidence of stroke in four cohorts from Stockholm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korek, Michal J; Bellander, Tom D; Lind, Tomas; Bottai, Matteo; Eneroth, Kristina M; Caracciolo, Barbara; de Faire, Ulf H; Fratiglioni, Laura; Hilding, Agneta; Leander, Karin; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Pershagen, Göran; Penell, Johanna C

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the risk of stroke related to long-term ambient air pollution exposure, in particular the role of various exposure time windows, using four cohorts from Stockholm County, Sweden. In total, 22,587 individuals were recruited from 1992 to 2004 and followed until 2011. Yearly air pollution levels resulting from local road traffic emissions were assessed at participant residences using dispersion models for particulate matter (PM10) and nitrogen oxides (NOX). Cohort-specific hazard ratios were estimated for time-weighted air pollution exposure during different time windows and the incidence of stroke, adjusted for common risk factors, and then meta-analysed. Overall, 868 subjects suffered a non-fatal or fatal stroke during 238,731 person-years of follow-up. An increment of 20 μg/m(3) in estimated annual mean of road-traffic related NOX exposure at recruitment was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.16 (95% CI 0.83-1.61), with evidence of heterogeneity between the cohorts. For PM10, an increment of 10 μg/m(3) corresponded to a hazard ratio of 1.14 (95% CI 0.68-1.90). Time-window analyses did not reveal any clear induction-latency pattern. In conclusion, we found suggestive evidence of an association between long-term exposure to NOX and PM10 from local traffic and stroke at comparatively low levels of air pollution.

  5. Drug abuse, a rare cause of stroke: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Özözen Ayas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available At the present time the incidence of illicit drug use increases worldwide among young adults. Abuse of these substances is a rare cause of stroke in young adults. Cocaine, heroin, cannabis, and amphetamines use increase the risk of stroke. Cannabis sativa induce main effects by delta-9-hydrocannabinol. The main mechanism of marijuana-related stroke in young patients is vasospazm. The other possible mechanisms are systemic hypotension, impaired cerebral autoregulation, alteration of cerebral blood flow, cardioembolism due to atrial fibrillation. In this article a 25-year-old young male patient with paresia and paresthesia of right side who had chronic abuse of marijuana is reported. Clinicians must be alert about marijuana can be seriously harmful to cerebrovascular system in chronic use.

  6. A case of meningioma presenting as stroke | Dodiyi-Manuel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Meningioma is a common intracranial tumor that accounts for 14 to 19% of all primary intracranial neoplasms. Over 90% are benign and confirmed by either histology or radiological studies. We report a case of meningioma mimicking a stroke with adult onset tonic clonic seizures. Methods: The case records of ...

  7. Perceived Walking Speed, Measured Tandem Walk, Incident Stroke, and Mortality in Older Latino Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Mayeda, Elizabeth Rose; Elfassy, Tali; Lee, Anne; Odden, Michelle C; Thekkethala, Divya; Wright, Clinton B; Glymour, Maria M; Haan, Mary N

    2017-05-01

    Walking speed is associated with functional status and all-cause mortality. Yet the relationship between walking speed and stroke, also a leading cause of disability, remains poorly understood, especially in older Latino adults who suffer from a significant burden of stroke. A total of 1,486 stroke-free participants from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging, aged 60 and older at baseline in 1998-1999, were followed annually through 2010. Participants reported their usual walking speed outdoors which was classified into slow, medium, or fast. We also assessed timed tandem walk ability (unable or eight or more errors vs less than eight errors). We ascertained three incident stroke endpoints: total stroke, nonfatal stroke, and fatal stroke. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for stroke at different walking speed and timed tandem walk categories. Over an average of 6 years of follow-up (SD = 2.8), the incidence rate of total strokes was 23.2/1,000 person-years for slow walkers compared to 15.6/1,000 person-years for medium walkers, and 7.6/1,000 person-years for fast walkers. In Cox models adjusted for sociodemographics, cardiovascular risk, cognition and functional status, and self-rated health, the hazard of total stroke was 31% lower for medium walkers (HR: 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.47, 1.02) and 56% lower for fast walkers (HR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.24, 0.82) compared with slow walkers. We found similar associations with timed tandem walk ability (fully adjusted HR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.45, 0.98). Our findings suggest perceived walking speed captures more than self-rated health alone and is a strong risk factor for stroke risk in Latino older adults.

  8. Associations between serum uric acid levels and the incidence of nonfatal stroke: a nationwide community-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Keita; Konta, Tsuneo; Hirayama, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Kazunobu; Kubota, Isao; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Moriyama, Toshiki; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Narita, Ichiei; Kondo, Masahide; Shibagaki, Yugo; Kasahara, Masato; Asahi, Koichi; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2017-06-01

    Hyperuricemia is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events and mortality. This study investigated the association between serum uric acid and the incidence of nonfatal stroke in a Japanese community-based population. We used a nationwide database of 155,322 subjects (aged 40-73, male 39 %) who participated in the annual "Specific Health Check and Guidance in Japan" checkup from 2008 to 2010. We examined the relationship between the quintiles of serum uric acid levels at baseline and the incidence of nonfatal stroke during a 2-year study period using self-reported data. The crude incidence of nonfatal stroke was significantly associated with serum uric acid levels at baseline, showing the lowest values in subjects with the 3rd quintile (Q3: men, 5.0-5.6; women, 3.8-4.3) of uric acid levels (mg/dL) and the highest values in subjects with the highest quintile (Q5: men ≥7.1, women ≥5.5) both in men and women (P uric acid levels for incident stroke was high, irrespective of characteristics such as age, sex, and renal function. This study has shown that serum uric acid is independently associated with the incidence of nonfatal stroke in the general Japanese population.

  9. Zone specific fractal dimension of retinal images as predictor of stroke incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliahmad, Behzad; Kumar, Dinesh Kant; Hao, Hao; Unnikrishnan, Premith; Che Azemin, Mohd Zulfaezal; Kawasaki, Ryo; Mitchell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Fractal dimensions (FDs) are frequently used for summarizing the complexity of retinal vascular. However, previous techniques on this topic were not zone specific. A new methodology to measure FD of a specific zone in retinal images has been developed and tested as a marker for stroke prediction. Higuchi's fractal dimension was measured in circumferential direction (FDC) with respect to optic disk (OD), in three concentric regions between OD boundary and 1.5 OD diameter from its margin. The significance of its association with future episode of stroke event was tested using the Blue Mountain Eye Study (BMES) database and compared against spectrum fractal dimension (SFD) and box-counting (BC) dimension. Kruskal-Wallis analysis revealed FDC as a better predictor of stroke (H = 5.80, P = 0.016, α = 0.05) compared with SFD (H = 0.51, P = 0.475, α = 0.05) and BC (H = 0.41, P = 0.520, α = 0.05) with overall lower median value for the cases compared to the control group. This work has shown that there is a significant association between zone specific FDC of eye fundus images with future episode of stroke while this difference is not significant when other FD methods are employed.

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Incident Ischemic Stroke and Its Atherothrombotic and Cardioembolic Subtypes in 3 US Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Hamidreza; Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Shi, Peilin; Longstreth, W T; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Siscovick, David; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Willett, Walter C; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2017-10-01

    The associations of individual long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids with incident ischemic stroke and its main subtypes are not well established. We aimed to investigate prospectively the relationship of circulating eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) with risk of total ischemic, atherothrombotic, and cardioembolic stroke. We measured circulating phospholipid fatty acids at baseline in 3 separate US cohorts: CHS (Cardiovascular Health Study), NHS (Nurses' Health Study), and HPFS (Health Professionals Follow-Up Study). Ischemic strokes were prospectively adjudicated and classified into atherothrombotic (large- and small-vessel infarctions) or cardioembolic by imaging studies and medical records. Risk according to fatty acid levels was assessed using Cox proportional hazards (CHS) or conditional logistic regression (NHS, HPFS) according to study design. Cohort findings were pooled using fixed-effects meta-analysis. A total of 953 incident ischemic strokes were identified (408 atherothrombotic, 256 cardioembolic, and 289 undetermined subtypes) during median follow-up of 11.2 years (CHS) and 8.3 years (pooled, NHS and HPFS). After multivariable adjustment, lower risk of total ischemic stroke was seen with higher DPA (highest versus lowest quartiles; pooled hazard ratio [HR], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58-0.92) and DHA (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.64-1.00) but not eicosapentaenoic acid (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.77-1.19). DHA was associated with lower risk of atherothrombotic stroke (HR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.34-0.83) and DPA with lower risk of cardioembolic stroke (HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37-0.92). Findings in each individual cohort were consistent with pooled results. In 3 large US cohorts, higher circulating levels of DHA were inversely associated with incident atherothrombotic stroke and DPA with cardioembolic stroke. These novel findings suggest differential pathways of benefit for DHA, DPA, and eicosapentaenoic acid. © 2017

  11. Operational Resilience Improving Criteria in case of Information Security Incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Demin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Resilience management system states and behavior are described with the use of fuzzy Petri net. Operational resilience improving criteria in case of information security incidents is defined. Information security incident response management model is introduced.

  12. Young Ischemic Stroke as Presentation of Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Najib Azmi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a rare disorder with an estimated incidence of 3 - 7/1,000,000. It is an autoimmune disorder characterized by fever, neurological signs, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure. This case report will describe a young lady who presented with acute middle cerebral artery infarct and was subsequently diagnosed to have TTP. Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE did not improve the neurological deficit. This case highlights the importance of recognizing TTP as a possible differential diagnosis in young onset stroke.

  13. Takayasu Arteritis Presenting with Ischemic Stroke: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergane Memmodova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Takayasu arteritis is a rare vasculitic disease characterized with inflamation of vessels. It commonly results stenosis and dilatations of aort and aortic branches. Ischemic Cerebrovascular Disease is one of the major complications of Takayasu arteritis. In this report we concluded two Takayasu arteritis cases in the light of current data whom presented with ischemic stroke clinical symptoms.

  14. Case Report Challenges of stroke management in resource-limited ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    personnel, and specific drugs. In this paper, through a case managed at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH) in. Blantyre, we discuss the challenges of stroke management in resource-limited settings, provide practical tips for general practitioners, and reflect on the potential avenues for short- and long-term action.

  15. Leukocyte count is associated with incidence of coronary events, but not with stroke: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cairu; Engström, Gunnar; Hedblad, Bo

    2010-04-01

    Elevated leukocyte count is a classic marker of systemic inflammation. This study examined whether the leukocyte count is associated with incidence of coronary events (CE) and stroke during a long follow-up period. A total of 17,131 men and 2932 women, aged 27-61 years, without history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), were enrolled. Incidence of CE and stroke was studied in relation to leukocyte concentrations over a mean follow-up of 24 years. During the follow-up period, 2600 CE and 1333 stroke events occurred. After risk factor adjustments, leukocyte concentrations in the highest quartile (vs. lowest, >7.0 vs. leukocytes and CE was most pronounced in younger men (aged 27-46) and men without hypertension. In younger men, high leukocytes were associated with early CE (within 10 years of follow-up) and late CE (>10 years of follow-up). In older men (46-61 years), leukocytes were not associated with CE after more than 10 years of follow-up. The leukocyte count was not associated with incidence of stroke. Elevated leukocyte count in men is associated with increased incidence of CE, but not with stroke. The increased risk persisted after more than 10 years of follow-up in younger, but not in older men. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Excessive Atrial Ectopy and Short Atrial Runs Increase the Risk of Stroke Beyond Incident Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjørn Strøier; Kumarathurai, Preman; Falkenberg, Julie

    2015-01-01

    .3% had diagnosed AF before their stroke. The incidence of stroke in subjects with ESVEA and a CHA2DS2-VASc (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age 75 years or older, diabetes mellitus, previous stroke or transient ischemic attack, vascular disease, age 65 to 74 years, female) score of ≥2 was 2...

  17. Common genetic variation in six lipid-related and statin-related genes, statin use and risk of incident nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindorff, Lucia A; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Smith, Nicholas L; Bis, Joshua C; Marciante, Kristin D; Rice, Kenneth M; Lumley, Thomas; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Li, Guo; Heckbert, Susan R; Psaty, Bruce M

    2008-08-01

    Genetic polymorphisms are associated with lipid-lowering response to statins, but generalizeability to disease endpoints is unclear. The association between 82 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in six lipid-related or statin-related genes (ABCB1, CETP, HMGCR, LDLR, LIPC, NOS3) and incident nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic stroke was analyzed according to current statin use and overall in a population-based case-control study (856 MI, 368 stroke, 2686 controls). Common SNPs were chosen from resequencing data using pairwise linkage disequilibrium. Gene-level analyses (testing global association within a gene) and SNP-level analyses (comparing the number of observed vs. expected associations across all genes) were performed using logistic regression, setting nominal statistical significance at P value of less than 0.05. No gene-level interactions with statin use on MI or stroke were identified. Across all genes, two SNP-statin interactions on MI were observed (one ABCB1, one LIPC) and five interactions on stroke (one CETP, four LIPC). The strongest SNP-statin interaction was for synonymous CETP SNP rs5883 on stroke (P=0.008). Gene-level associations were present for LIPC and MI (P=0.026), but not other genes or outcomes. SNP-level associations included three SNPs with MI (one LDLR, two LIPC) and two SNPs with stroke (one CETP, one LDLR). The number of observed SNP associations was no greater than expected by chance. Several potential novel associations or interactions of SNPs in ABCB1, CETP, LDLR, and LIPC with MI and stroke were identified; however, our results should be regarded as hypothesis generating until corroborated by other studies.

  18. Mortality and Incidence of Hospital Admissions for Stroke among Brazilians Aged 15 to 49 Years between 2008 and 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Adami

    Full Text Available The objective was to analyze rates of stroke-related mortality and incidence of hospital admissions in Brazilians aged 15 to 49 years according to region and age group between 2008 and 2012.Secondary analysis was performed in 2014 using data from the Hospital and Mortality Information Systems and the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics. Stroke was defined by ICD, 10th revision (I60-I64. Crude and standardized mortality (WHO reference and incidence of hospital admissions per 100,000 inhabitants, stratified by region and age group, were estimated. Absolute and relative frequencies; and linear regression were also used. The software used was Stata 11.0.There were 35,005 deaths and 131,344 hospital admissions for stroke in Brazilians aged 15-49 years old between 2008 and 2012. Mortality decreased from 7.54 (95% CI 7.53; 7.54 in 2008 to 6.32 (95% CI 6.31; 6.32 in 2012 (β = -0.27, p = 0.013, r2 = 0.90. During the same time, incidence of hospital admissions stabilized: 24.67 (95% CI 24.66; 24.67 in 2008 and 25.11 (95% CI 25.10; 25.11 in 2012 (β = 0.09, p = 0.692, r2 = 0.05. There was a reduction in mortality in all Brazilian regions and in the age group between 30 and 49 years. Incidence of hospitalizations decreased in the South, but no significant decrease was observed in any age group.We observed a decrease in stroke-related mortality, particularly in individuals over 30 years old, and stability of the incidence of hospitalizations; and also regional variation in stroke-related hospital admission incidence and mortality among Brazilian young adults.

  19. Mortality and Incidence of Hospital Admissions for Stroke among Brazilians Aged 15 to 49 Years between 2008 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Fernando; Figueiredo, Francisco Winter dos Santos; Paiva, Laércio da Silva; de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Santos, Edige Felipe de Sousa; Martins, Bruno Luis; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective was to analyze rates of stroke-related mortality and incidence of hospital admissions in Brazilians aged 15 to 49 years according to region and age group between 2008 and 2012. Methods Secondary analysis was performed in 2014 using data from the Hospital and Mortality Information Systems and the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics. Stroke was defined by ICD, 10th revision (I60–I64). Crude and standardized mortality (WHO reference) and incidence of hospital admissions per 100,000 inhabitants, stratified by region and age group, were estimated. Absolute and relative frequencies; and linear regression were also used. The software used was Stata 11.0. Results There were 35,005 deaths and 131,344 hospital admissions for stroke in Brazilians aged 15–49 years old between 2008 and 2012. Mortality decreased from 7.54 (95% CI 7.53; 7.54) in 2008 to 6.32 (95% CI 6.31; 6.32) in 2012 (β = -0.27, p = 0.013, r2 = 0.90). During the same time, incidence of hospital admissions stabilized: 24.67 (95% CI 24.66; 24.67) in 2008 and 25.11 (95% CI 25.10; 25.11) in 2012 (β = 0.09, p = 0.692, r2 = 0.05). There was a reduction in mortality in all Brazilian regions and in the age group between 30 and 49 years. Incidence of hospitalizations decreased in the South, but no significant decrease was observed in any age group. Conclusion We observed a decrease in stroke-related mortality, particularly in individuals over 30 years old, and stability of the incidence of hospitalizations; and also regional variation in stroke-related hospital admission incidence and mortality among Brazilian young adults. PMID:27332892

  20. Hemorrhagic stroke the first 30 days after an acute myocardial infarction: incidence, time trends and predictors of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binsell-Gerdin, Emil; Graipe, Anna; Ögren, Joachim; Jernberg, Tomas; Mooe, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a rare but serious complication after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aims of our study were to establish the incidence, time trends and predictors of risk for hemorrhagic stroke within 30 days after an AMI in 1998-2008. We collected data from the Register of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart Intensive Care Admissions (RIKS-HIA). All patients with a myocardial infarction 1998-2008 were included, n=173,233. The data was merged with the National Patient Register in order to identify patients suffering a hemorrhagic stroke. To identify predictors of risk we used Cox models. Overall the incidence decreased from 0.2% (n=94) in 1998-2000 to 0.1% (n=41) in 2007-2008. In patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction the corresponding incidences were 0.4% (n=76) in 1998-2000 and 0.2% (n=21) in 2007-2008, and after fibrin specific thrombolytic treatment 0.6% and 1.1%, respectively, with a peak of 1.4% during 2003-2004. In total 375 patients (0.22%) suffered a hemorrhagic stroke within 30 days of the AMI. The preferred method of reperfusion changed from thrombolysis to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Older age (hazard ratio (HR) >65-≤ 75 vs ≤ 65 years 1.84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38-2.45), thrombolysis (HR 6.84, 95% CI 5.51-8.48), history of hemorrhagic stroke (HR 12.52, CI 8.36-18.78) and prior hypertension (HR 1.52, CI 1.23-1.86) independently predicted hemorrhagic stroke within 30 days. The rate of hemorrhagic stroke within 30 days of an AMI has decreased by 50% between 1998 and 2008. The main reason is the shift in reperfusion method from thrombolysis to PCI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Thirty-Day Case Fatality of Stroke at the Lagos University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is some evidence that the case fatality rate of stroke has declined in recent years, although it is not certain that this reduction has been caused by changes in stroke management. There has been no recent review of the case fatality rate of stroke at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital [LUTH].

  2. Dominant modifiable risk factors for stroke in Ghana and Nigeria (SIREN: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayowa O Owolabi, ProfDrMed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Background: Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence, prevalence, and fatality from stroke globally. Yet, only little information about context-specific risk factors for prioritising interventions to reduce the stroke burden in sub-Saharan Africa is available. We aimed to identify and characterise the effect of the top modifiable risk factors for stroke in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: The Stroke Investigative Research and Educational Network (SIREN study is a multicentre, case-control study done at 15 sites in Nigeria and Ghana. Cases were adults (aged ≥18 years with stroke confirmed by CT or MRI. Controls were age-matched and gender-matched stroke-free adults (aged ≥18 years recruited from the communities in catchment areas of cases. Comprehensive assessment for vascular, lifestyle, and psychosocial factors was done using standard instruments. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs and population-attributable risks (PARs with 95% CIs. Findings: Between Aug 28, 2014, and June 15, 2017, we enrolled 2118 case-control pairs (1192 [56%] men with mean ages of 59·0 years (SD 13·8 for cases and 57·8 years (13·7 for controls. 1430 (68% had ischaemic stoke, 682 (32% had haemorrhagic stroke, and six (<1% had discrete ischaemic and haemorrhagic lesions. 98·2% (95% CI 97·2–99·0 of adjusted PAR of stroke was associated with 11 potentially modifiable risk factors with ORs and PARs in descending order of PAR of 19·36 (95% CI 12·11–30·93 and 90·8% (95% CI 87·9–93·7 for hypertension, 1·85 (1·44–2·38 and 35·8% (25·3–46·2 for dyslipidaemia, 1·59 (1·19–2·13 and 31·1% (13·3–48·9 for regular meat consumption, 1·48 (1·13–1·94 and 26·5% (12·9–40·2 for elevated waist-to-hip ratio, 2·58 (1·98–3·37 and 22·1% (17·8–26·4 for diabetes, 2·43 (1·81–3·26 and 18·2% (14·1–22·3 for low green leafy vegetable consumption, 1·89 (1·40–2·54 and 11·6% (6·6–16·7

  3. Incidence and Risk Factors of Stroke or Systemic Embolism in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iguchi, Moritake; Tezuka, Yuji; Ogawa, Hisashi

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is a heterogeneous syndrome, but the effect of the type and severity of HF on the incidence of stroke or systemic embolism (SE) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is unclear.Methods and Results:The Fushimi AF Registry is a community-based prospective survey of AF ...... of HF in patients with AF. The incidence of stroke/SE was markedly increased in the 30 days after admission for HF, but compensated 'stable' HF did not appear to confer an independent risk.......BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is a heterogeneous syndrome, but the effect of the type and severity of HF on the incidence of stroke or systemic embolism (SE) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is unclear.Methods and Results:The Fushimi AF Registry is a community-based prospective survey of AF....... On multivariate analysis, the incidence of stroke/SE was not associated with pre-existing HF (hazard ratio (HR), 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.92-1.64) or each criterion for the definition of pre-existing HF, but was associated with high B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal proBNP levels (above...

  4. Associations of Circulating Growth Differentiation Factor-15 and ST2 Concentrations With Subclinical Vascular Brain Injury and Incident Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Preis, Sarah R; Beiser, Alexa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) and soluble (s)ST2 are markers of cardiac and vascular stress. We investigated the associations between circulating concentrations of these biomarkers and incident stroke and subclinical vascular brain injury in a sample from the F...

  5. Community-based case-control study of childhood stroke risk associated with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christine K; Sidney, Stephen; Fullerton, Heather J

    2015-02-01

    A better understanding of the stroke risk factors in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) could inform stroke prevention strategies. We analyzed pediatric stroke associated with CHD in a large community-based case-control study. From 2.5 million children (aged hemorrhagic strokes and randomly selected age- and facility-matched stroke-free controls (3 per case). We determined exposure to CHD (diagnosed before stroke) and used conditional logistic regression to analyze stroke risk factors. CHD was identified in 15 of 412 cases (4%) versus 7 of 1236 controls (0.6%). Cases of childhood stroke (occurring between ages 29 days to 20 years) with CHD had 19-fold (odds ratio, 19; 95% confidence interval 4.2-83) increased stroke risk compared to controls. History of CHD surgery was associated with >30-fold (odds ratio, 31; confidence interval 4-241) increased risk of stroke in children with CHD when compared with controls. After excluding perioperative strokes, the history of CHD surgery still increased the childhood stroke risk (odds ratio, 13; confidence interval 1.5-114). The majority of children with stroke and CHD were outpatients at the time of stroke, and almost half the cases who underwent cardiac surgery had their stroke >5 years after the most recent procedure. An estimated 7% of ischemic and 2% of hemorrhagic childhood strokes in the population were attributable to CHD. CHD is an important childhood stroke risk factor. Children who undergo CHD surgery remain at elevated risk outside the perioperative period and would benefit from optimized long-term stroke prevention strategies. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Case Study of physioterapy treatment of a patient after hemoragic stroke with left hemiparesis

    OpenAIRE

    Formánková, Dita

    2012-01-01

    Title: Case study of physioterapy treatment of a patient after hemoragic stroke with left hemiparesis. Objectives: The aim of the thesis is to obtain academic findings about stroke concerning anatomy, pathology, therapetuic approaches and methods which can be utilised in cases of stroke. The specific part focuses on the therapeutic care of a patient after hemorragic stroke which was taken during a month practice at Rehabilitation clinic Malvazinky, Medditera s.r.o. Summary: The theory of the ...

  7. Case study of physioterapy treatment of patient after hemoragic stroke with left hemiparesis

    OpenAIRE

    Waldmann, Tadeáš

    2014-01-01

    Title: Case study of physioterapy treatment of a patient after hemoragic stroke with left hemiparesis. Objectives: The aim of the thesis is to obtain academic findings about stroke concerning anatomy, pathology, therapetuic approaches and methods which can be utilised in cases of stroke. The specific part focuses on the therapeutic care of a patient after hemorragic stroke which was taken during a month practice at Regional hospital Kladno Spa Summary: The theory of the thesis discusses anato...

  8. Trends in the incidence of stroke and cardiovascular risk factors on the isolated island of Okinawa: the Miyakojima study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Chikako; Isa, Katsunori; Okumura, Koichiro; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Kinjo, Kozen; Ohya, Yusuke

    2013-10-01

    Rapid deterioration of cardiovascular risk control, especially obesity, has occurred in Okinawa; this may affect cardiovascular disease incidence, including stroke. Cross-sectional field studies were conducted in 2 periods, 1988-1991 as the first period, and 2002-2005 as the second period, in the isolated island of Okinawa, Miyakojima. To evaluate population backgrounds related to cardiovascular risk factors, data from the health checkup programs conducted in 1987 and 2001 were surveyed. Total of 257 patients in the first period and 370 in the second were diagnosed with first-time stroke. The age-adjusted annual incidence rate of first-time stroke of the first and second periods was 124 and 144 per 100,000 standard population of Japan. The age-adjusted annual incidence rate showed an upward trend for brain infarction (50 to 73) and downward trend for brain hemorrhage (61 to 54); however, those trends were not significant. The health checkup surveys illustrated that blood pressure decreased in all age groups during the second survey period. However, the body mass index increased in patients aged 50 years or more. Fasting blood glucose levels of patients aged 30-79 years and non-HDL cholesterol levels of patients aged 50-79 years significantly increased. In Miyakojima, the incidence of first-time stroke and all of its subtypes did not change significantly between two periods, even though blood pressure decreased significantly in the second period. Metabolic deterioration may be associated with the upward trend in incidence of brain infarction. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Red cell distribution width in relation to incidence of stroke and carotid atherosclerosis: a population-based cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Söderholm

    Full Text Available Increased red cell distribution width (RDW has been related to poor prognosis in patients with cardiovascular disease, and is a predictor of cardiovascular mortality in the general population. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if RDW is associated with increased incidence of stroke and its subtypes in individuals from the general population.Red cell distribution width was measured in 26,879 participants (16,561 women and 10,318 men aged 45-73 years without history of coronary events or stroke, from the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Incidences of total stroke and stroke subtypes over a mean follow-up of 15.2 years were calculated in relation to sex-specific quartiles of RDW. The presence of carotid plaque and intima-media thickness, as assessed by ultrasound, was studied in relation to RDW in a randomly selected subcohort (n = 5,309.Incidences of total stroke (n = 1,869 and cerebral infarction (n = 1,544 were both increased in individuals with high RDW. Hazard ratios (HRs in the highest compared to the lowest quartile were 1.31 for total stroke (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11-1.54, p for trend = 0.004 and 1.32 for cerebral infarction (95% CI: 1.10-1.58, p for trend = 0.004 after adjustment for stroke risk factors and hematological parameters. The adjusted HR for intracerebral hemorrhage (n = 230 was 1.44 (95% CI: 0.90-2.30 and the HR for subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 75 was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.43-2.07, in the highest compared to the lowest quartile of RDW. Red cell distribution width was positively associated with intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery (p for trend = 0.011.Red cell distribution width in the highest quartile was associated with increased incidence of total stroke and cerebral infarction. There was no significant association between RDW and incidence of intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  10. Dancing to death: A case of heat stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadesan, K; Kumari, Chandra; Afiq, Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Heat stroke is a medical emergency which may lead to mortality unless diagnosed early and treated effectively. Heat stroke may manifest rapidly, hence making it difficult to differentiate it from other clinical causes in a collapsed victim. 1 We are presenting a case report of twelve patients who were admitted to our emergency department from a music festival held on 13-15th of March 2014. They developed complications arising from a combination of severe adverse weather condition, prolonged outdoor physical exertion due to long hours of dancing and drug-use, resulting in heat stroke. Three of them died while the remaining patients survived. Their condition was initially misdiagnosed as a classical illicit drug overdose. This was based on the history of drug ingestion by some of the patients who attended the music festival on that day. The information in this case report aims, to create awareness amongst members of the medical team on duty in outdoor events, pre hospital responders and ED physicians when treating and managing similar cases in the future. In addition it is intended to warn the organizers of such events to take adequate precautions to avoid such tragedies in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Addition of 24-Hour Heart Rate Variability Parameters to the Cardiovascular Health Study Stroke Risk Score and Prediction of Incident Stroke: The Cardiovascular Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodapati, Rohan K.; Kizer, Jorge R.; Kop, Willem J.; Kamel, Hooman; Stein, Phyllis K.

    2018-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) characterizes cardiac autonomic functioning. The association of HRV with stroke is uncertain. We examined whether 24-hour HRV added predictive value to the Cardiovascular Health Study clinical stroke risk score (CHS-SCORE), previously developed at the baseline examination. Methods and Results N=884 stroke-free CHS participants (age 75.3 ± 4.6), with 24-hour Holters adequate for HRV analysis at the 1994–1995 examination, had 68 strokes over ≤8 year follow-up (median 7.3 [interquartile range 7.1–7.6] years). The value of adding HRV to the CHS-SCORE was assessed with stepwise Cox regression analysis. The CHS-SCORE predicted incident stroke (HR=1.06 per unit increment, P=0.005). Two HRV parameters, decreased coefficient of variance of NN intervals (CV%, P=0.031) and decreased power law slope (SLOPE, P=0.033) also entered the model, but these did not significantly improve the c-statistic (P=0.47). In a secondary analysis, dichotomization of CV% (LOWCV% ≤12.8%) was found to maximally stratify higher-risk participants after adjustment for CHS-SCORE. Similarly, dichotomizing SLOPE (LOWSLOPE <− 1.4) maximally stratified higher-risk participants. When these HRV categories were combined (eg, HIGHCV% with HIGHSLOPE), the c-statistic for the model with the CHS-SCORE and combined HRV categories was 0.68, significantly higher than 0.61 for the CHS-SCORE alone (P=0.02). Conclusions In this sample of older adults, 2 HRV parameters, CV% and power law slope, emerged as significantly associated with incident stroke when added to a validated clinical risk score. After each parameter was dichotomized based on its optimal cut point in this sample, their composite significantly improved prediction of incident stroke during ≤8-year follow-up. These findings will require validation in separate, larger cohorts. PMID:28396041

  12. The social and economic burden of stroke survivors in Italy: a prospective, incidence-based, multi-centre cost of illness study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fattore Giovanni

    2012-11-01

    costs while functional outcomes (Barthel Index and Modified Ranking Scale scores were significantly associated with both healthcare and societal costs at one year. Conclusions The significant role of informal care in stroke management and different distribution of costs over time suggest that appropriate planning should look at both incident and prevalent stroke cases to forecast health infrastructure needs and more importantly, to assure that stroke patients have adequate “social” support.

  13. Snoring Is Not Associated With All-Cause Mortality, Incident Cardiovascular Disease, or Stroke in the Busselton Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Nathaniel S.; Wong, Keith K.H.; Cullen, Stewart R.J.; Knuiman, Matthew W.; Grunstein, Ronald R.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To ascertain whether objectively measured snoring increases mortality, cardiovascular disease, or stroke risk over the effects of obstructive sleep apnea and other established risk factors. Design: Community-based cohort. Participants: 400 residents of the Western Australian town of Busselton. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: Snoring and obstructive sleep apnea were quantified via the percentage of the night spent snoring and the respiratory disturbance index as measured by a single night recording in November-December 1990 by a home sleep apnea monitoring device (MESAM IV), along with a range of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Follow-up for deaths and cardiovascular hospitalizations was ascertained via record linkage until the end of 2007. Results: Our analytical sample of 380 people was made up of the 397 people for whom the authors had follow-up data, minus 17 people who reported a previous stroke or heart attack at baseline (n = 380/400 = 95% of cohort). Snoring was observed for a mean/median of 32.0/27.4% of the night (standard deviation = 23.9%; range = 0-97.2%). There were 46 deaths, 68 cardiovascular events, and 24 strokes during 17 yr of follow-up. Snoring as either a categoric or continuous variable was not significantly associated with death, incident cardiovascular disease, or stroke in both unadjusted Cox regression models and in models that adjusted for obstructive sleep apnea and other risk factors. Conclusions: No measure of snoring was associated with all-cause mortality, or incident cardiovascular disease or stroke over 17 yr in this community-based sample. Citation: Marshall NS; Wong KKH; Cullen SRJ; Knuiman MW; Grunstein RR. Snoring is not associated with all-cause mortality, incident cardiovascular disease, or stroke in the Busselton Health Study. SLEEP 2012;35(9):1235–1240. PMID:22942501

  14. Trends in Age of First-Ever Stroke Following Increased Incidence and Life Expectancy in a Low-Income Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghua; Bai, Lingling; Shi, Min; Yang, Li; An, Zhongping; Li, Bin; Zhao, Wenjuan; Gu, Hongfei; Zhan, Changqing; Tu, Jun; Ning, Xianjia

    2016-04-01

    We investigated secular trends in the age of stroke onset and stroke incidence in a low-income population in rural China. The study population was recruited from a population-based stroke surveillance study conducted in a township in Tianjin, China, from 1992 to 2014. The trends in mean age and incidence of first-ever stroke were assessed by sex and stroke subtype. Risk factor surveys were conducted in the same population in both 1991 and 2011. A total of 1053 patients experienced first-ever stroke from 1992 to 2014. The mean age of stroke onset in men significantly decreased by 0.28 years annually overall, by 0.56 years for intracerebral hemorrhage, and by 0.22 years for ischemic stroke (Ptrend was not observed in women. The age-standardized first-ever stroke incidence in the same population significantly increased across sex and stroke subtypes, increased by 6.3% overall, 5.5% for men, 7.9% for women, 4.6% for intracerebral hemorrhage, and 7.3% for ischemic stroke (P<0.05) during 1992 to 2014. Concurrently, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, current smoking, and alcohol consumption increased significantly in young and middle-aged adults from 1991 to 2011. The age of stroke onset tends to be younger among low-income population in China after the dramatic increased incidence of stroke during the gradual extension of life expectancy of population in China. These findings suggested that stroke burden will continue to increase in the long time, unless the risk factors in low-income populations are effectively controlled. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Acute ischemic stroke secondary to glioblastoma. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Sofia; Carneiro, Ângelo; Rodrigues, Tiago; Samões, Raquel; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Pereira, Cláudia

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma is a malignant infiltrative glial tumor occurring most often over 50 years of age, with diverse clinical presentations. We describe a case of temporal lobe glioblastoma with a rare presentation as an acute ischemic stroke, discussing the imaging and histopathological findings, and reviewing the literature. A 77-year-old woman had sudden onset of left hemiparesis and hemihypoesthesia. The neuroradiological studies revealed an acute ischemic lesion in the right lenticulostriate arteries territory and a right anterior temporal lobe tumor, enhancing heterogeneously after contrast with enhancement of the right middle cerebral artery wall. Histopathological analysis of the resected temporal lesion revealed a glioblastoma multiforme with tumoral infiltration of the vascular wall. Glioblastoma should be considered in the etiology of acute ischemic stroke, where neuroimaging plays an important diagnostic role, enabling a more immediate therapeutic approach, with a consequent impact on survival.

  16. Stroke in Commercial Flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Velasco, Rodrigo; Masjuan, Jaime; DeFelipe, Alicia; Corral, Iñigo; Estévez-Fraga, Carlos; Crespo, Leticia; Alonso-Cánovas, Araceli

    2016-04-01

    Stroke on board aircraft has been reported in retrospective case series, mainly focusing on economy class stroke syndrome. Data on the actual incidence, pathogenesis, and prognosis of stroke in commercial flights are lacking. A prospective registry was designed to include all consecutive patients referred from an international airport (40 million passengers a year) to our hospital with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack and onset of symptoms during a flight or immediately after landing. Forty-four patients (32 ischemic strokes and 12 transient ischemic attacks) were included over a 76-month period (January 2008 to April 2014). The estimated incidence of stroke was 1 stroke in 35 000 flights. Pathogeneses of stroke or transient ischemic attack were atherothrombotic in 16 (36%), economy class stroke syndrome in 8 (18%), cardioembolic in 7 (16%), arterial dissection in 4 (9%), lacunar stroke in 4 (9%), and undetermined in 5 (12%) patients. Carotid stenosis >70% was found in 12 (27%) of the patients. Overall prognosis was good, and thrombolysis was applied in 44% of the cases. The most common reason for not treating patients who had experienced stroke onset midflight was the delay in reaching the hospital. Only 1 patient with symptom onset during the flight prompted a flight diversion. We found a low incidence of stroke in the setting of air travel. Economy class stroke syndrome and arterial dissection were well represented in our sample. However, the main pathogenesis was atherothrombosis with a high proportion of patients with high carotid stenosis. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. For whom the desert bell tolls: heat stroke or stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bolatkale

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat stroke is the most complicated and dangerous amongst heat injuries that can lead to irreversible injury and even death with itself or with creating predisposibility to different diseases. The following case report depicts a patient who presented primarily with impairment of consciousness after walking 45 km in the summer heat to cross the Syria-Turkey border and later syncope. This case report aims to highlight the possibility of higher co-incidence with heat stroke and stroke.

  18. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjust your treatment as needed. Rehabilitation After a stroke, you may need rehabilitation (rehab) to help you recover. Rehab may include working with speech, physical, and occupational therapists. Language, ... may have trouble communicating after a stroke. You may not be able to find the ...

  19. Neurorehabilitation in stroke produced by vertebral artery dissection: case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanescu Ioana

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Arterial dissections are a common cause of stroke in the young (mean age 44 to 46 years. Primary lesion is a tear of the arterial intima, which promotes platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, which further produced vessel stenosis / occlusion, distal embolism or vessel wall rupture. Vertebral artery (VA dissection appear most commonly in extracranial segments V2 and V3, and could be spontaneous (with underlying predispositions or triggered by various traumatisms. Clinicaly, VA dissection produces an ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack , preceded by local symptoms such as neck pain or headache. The diagnosis is confirmed by neurovascular imaging. Treatment of symptomatic VA dissections respect indications of treatment in ischemic strokes. Prognosis is mostly favorable in extracranial dissections. We present the case of a left VA dissection in V2 segment, produced by physical effort (swimming, which causes 2 ischemic lesions, one in the territory of the left posterior cerebral artery and the other in the territory of the left posterolateral chorroidal artery. Patient’s treatment included antiplatelet agents, statines, and an adapted physical rehabilitation program. At three months he showed significant clinical improvement with regain of autonomy and partial recanalisation at angio-MRI of the V2 segment of the dissected artery.

  20. Mechanical thrombectomy in cardiac myxoma stroke: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoon Sang; Lee, Woong Jae; Hong, Joonhwa; Byun, Jun Soo; Kim, Jae Kyun; Chae, Soo Ahn

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac myxoma is the most common primary tumor of the heart. It is a rare cause of acute ischemic stroke and commonly not detected until after the stroke. There is no current guideline for the treatment of cardiac myxoma stroke and only a few cases of mechanical thrombectomy have been reported. We present a case of cardiac myxoma stroke in a 4-year-old boy treated with a stent-retrieval device and review the literature describing the safety and efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy in cardiac myxoma stroke. We also describe imaging features of the myxoma clot on susceptibility weighted images.

  1. Relationship of Self-Rated Health to Stroke Incidence and Mortality in Older Individuals with and without a History of Stroke: A Longitudinal Study of the MRC Cognitive Function and Ageing (CFAS) Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavaddat, Nahal; van der Linde, Rianne; Parker, Richard; Savva, George; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Brayne, Carol; Mant, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Poor self-rated health (SRH) has been associated with increased risk of death and poor health outcomes even after adjusting for confounders. However its' relationship with disease-specific mortality and morbidity has been less studied. SRH may also be particularly predictive of health outcomes in those with pre-existing conditions. We studied whether SRH predicts new stroke in older people who have never had a stroke, or a recurrence in those with a prior history of stroke. MRC CFAS I is a multicentre cohort study of a population representative sample of people in their 65th year and older. A comprehensive interview at baseline included questions about presence of stroke, self-rated health and functional disability. Follow-up at 2 years included self-report of stroke and stroke death obtained from death certificates. Multiple logistical regression determined odds of stroke at 2 years adjusting for confounders including disability and health behaviours. Survival analysis was performed until June 2014 with follow-up for up to 13 years. 11,957 participants were included, of whom 11,181 (93.8%) had no history of stroke and 776 (6.2%) one or more previous strokes. Fewer with no history of stroke reported poor SRH than those with stroke (5 versus 21%). In those with no history of stroke, poor self-rated health predicted stroke incidence (OR 1.5 (1.1-1.9)), but not stroke mortality (OR 1.2 (0.8-1.9)) at 2 years nor for up to 13 years (OR 1.2(0.9-1.7)). In those with a history of stroke, self-rated health did not predict stroke incidence (OR 0.9(0.6-1.4)), stroke mortality (OR 1.1(0.5-2.5)), or survival (OR 1.1(0.6-2.1)). Poor self-rated health predicts risk of stroke at 2 years but not stroke mortality among the older population without a previous history of stroke. SRH may be helpful in predicting who may be at risk of developing a stroke in the near future.

  2. A case of vertebrobasilar stroke during oxygen-ozone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea, Francesco; Amici, Serena; Murgia, Nicola; Tambasco, Nicola

    2004-01-01

    Despite only sporadic observations, the use of medical oxygen-ozone therapy is a largely diffused treatment for lumbar disk herniation that has failed to respond to conservative management. Combined intradiscal and periganglionic injection of medical ozone and periganglionic injection of steroids are presumed to have a cumulative effect enhancing the overall outcome of treatment for pain caused by disk herniation. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of stroke during such medical application. The patient had Anton's syndrome as a result of top of the basilar hypoperfusion.

  3. Mendelian Genes and Risk of Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Small-Vessel Ischemic Stroke in Sporadic Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Michael; O'Donnell, Martin; Thijs, Vincent; Dans, Antonio; López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Gómez-Arbeláez, Diego; Mondo, Charles; Czlonkowska, Anna; Skowronska, Marta; Oveisgharan, Shahram; Yusuf, Salim; Paré, Guillaume

    2017-08-01

    Mendelian strokes are rare genetic disorders characterized by early-onset small-vessel stroke. Although extensively studied among families with syndromic features, whether these genes affect risk among sporadic cases is unknown. We sequenced 8 genes responsible for Mendelian stroke in a case-control study of sporadic stroke cases (≤70 years). Participants included 1251 primary stroke cases of small-vessel pathology (637 intracerebral hemorrhage and 614 small-vessel ischemic stroke cases) and 1716 controls from the INTERSTROKE study (Study of the Importance of Conventional and Emerging Risk Factors of Stroke in Different Regions and Ethnic Groups of the World). Overall, the prevalence of canonical disease-causing mutations was 0.56% in cases and 0.23% in controls (odds ratio=1.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-7.57; P =0.33). CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathies with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathies) mutations were more frequent among cases (0.48%) than controls (0.23%) but were not significantly associated with stroke risk (odds ratio=2.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-8.02; P =0.27). Next, we included all rare nonsynonymous mutations to investigate whether other types of mutations may contribute to stroke risk. Overall, 13.5% of cases and 14.2% of controls were carriers of at least one rare nonsynonymous mutation among the 8 Mendelian stroke genes. Mutation carriers were not at elevated risk of stroke (odds ratio=0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.16; P =0.55). In the absence of syndromic features and family history of stroke, screening for Mendelian mutations among small-vessel stroke patients is unlikely to have high diagnostic utility. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Incidence of DWI-positive stroke in patients with vertigo of unclear etiology, preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leker, Ronen R; Hur, Tamir Ben; Gomori, John M; Paniri, R; Eichel, Roni; Cohen, Jose E

    2013-03-01

    Acute vertigo may be secondary to stroke or to non-ischemic causes. Accurate identification of vertigo secondary to ischemia may lead to appropriate timely intervention that can minimize stroke-related damage and can help in tailoring the most appropriate individual therapy for affected patients. Diffusion weighted MRI (DWI) is very accurate for diagnosing stroke and we therefore aimed to test whether it can aid in making a correct diagnosis of vertigo secondary to stroke. All patients presenting with vertigo in which the diagnosis of stroke was considered underwent DWI only MRI. Data regarding the symptoms and neurological deficits, vascular risk factors, imaging findings, and outcomes was accrued. Patients with stroke on DWI were compared with those without ischemia. Between June 2010 and August 2011, 28 patients fulfilling the entry criteria were identified with a mean age of 62·2±12·8 (60% male). The final diagnosis was stroke in 11 patients (39%). Patients with stroke did not differ from those without stroke in their risk factor profile. However, patients with stroke more often tended to present with vertigo accompanied by other neurological symptoms (73% versus 12% respectively, P = 0·001). After adjusting for age and the presence of diabetes, the presence of multiple symptoms remained the only variable that was associated with a positive DWI scan (odds ratio: 30: 95% confidence interval: 2·6-349). Most patients with stroke had very mild strokes with a median admission NIHSS score of 3 and DWI lesion volumes >2 cm were found in only three patients. Most stroke patients made a good recovery (modified Rankin score ≤2 in seven of nine patients with 90 day data). The most common diagnosis in patients without stroke was of vertigo of peripheral origin (14/17). DWI only MRI can be used to rapidly screen patients presenting with vertigo and suspected vertebrobasilar stroke. The occurrence of vertigo in combination with other focal neurological symptoms may

  5. Use of Occupational Performance Coaching for stroke survivors (OPC-Stroke in late rehabilitation: A descriptive case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danika Belliveau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is a leading cause of disability in adults. Following stroke, 60% of people report needing help with everyday activities, and 80% report having very few meaningful activities. These restrictions often continue for years. This study explored the efficacy of Occupational Performance Coaching for stroke survivors (OPC-Stroke on the participation level of adults in the later stage of stroke rehabilitation. Method: A descriptive case study design was used. One participant in the later stages of rehabilitation was recruited. Outcome measures for participation, goal performance and satisfaction, and emotional well-being were administered pre and postintervention to observe for direction of change. A semi-structured interview was carried out postintervention to explore the participant’s experiences of the intervention. Results: The participant who took part in the study reported improvement with his goal performance and satisfaction. However, the level of participation did not improve and emotional well-being decreased. Qualitative data revealed an appreciation of the intervention and a recommendation of the intervention for others. Conclusion: OPC-Stroke was valued by the participant and shows promise for improving goal performance and satisfaction. Further research is necessary to determine the potential efficacy of OPC-Stroke in later stages of rehabilitation.

  6. Associations of Circulating GDF-15 and ST2 concentrations with Subclinical Vascular Brain Injury and Incident Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Preis, Sarah R.; Beiser, Alexa; DeCarli, Charles; Wollert, Kai C.; Wang, Thomas J; Januzzi, James L.; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Seshadri, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) and soluble (s)ST2 are markers of cardiac and vascular stress. We investigated the associations between circulating concentrations of these biomarkers and incident stroke and subclinical vascular brain injury in a sample from the Framingham Offspring cohort. Methods We followed 3374 stroke- and dementia-free individuals (mean age 59.0±9.7 years, 53% women) attending the Framingham Offspring 6th examination cycle 11.8±3.0 years for incident stroke. A subsample of 2463 individuals underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological testing approximately 4.0±1.7 years after the 6th examination. Results After adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, B-type natriuretic peptide, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and urine albumin levels, higher stress biomarker levels were associated cross-sectionally with lower brain volumes (βs for intracranial volume comparing 4rth [Q4] vs. 1st biomarker [Q1] quartiles −0.71% for GDF-15, p=0.002, and 0.47% for sST2, p=0.02) and worse performance on the visual reproduction test (βs for Q4 vs. Q1=−0.62 for GDF-15, p=0.009, and −0.40 for sST2, p=0.04). Higher GDF-15 concentrations were also associated with greater log-transformed white-matter hyperintensity volumes (β for Q4 vs. Q1=0.19, p=0.01). Prospectively, a total of 203 (6%) individuals developed incident stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) during follow-up. After multivariable adjustment, sST2 remained significantly associated with stroke/TIA, hazard ratio for Q4 vs. Q1 of 1.76, 95% confidence interval 1.06–2.92, p=0.03. Conclusions Circulating GDF-15 and sST2 are associated with subclinical brain injury and cognitive impairment. Higher sST2 concentrations are also associated with incident stroke, suggesting potential links between cardiac stress biomarkers and brain injury. PMID:26219649

  7. A Case of Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Mimicking Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Rabia Koç

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute non-traumatic myelopathy and may present with various clinical phenotypes. Focal neurological symptoms can result in overlooking this differential diagnosis in patients presenting with neurological deficits and assuming the diagnosis of a stroke. Therefore, a thorough documentation of patient history is of great importance, since this can reveal symptoms suggestive of a different etiology. Here, we present a case of an 80-year-old female who was admitted with a hemiparesis without cortical or cranial neurological abnormalities. She mentioned of preceding shoulder and neck pain. Diagnosis of epidural hematoma was made by cervical magnetic resonance imaging. Symptoms resolved partially after surgical intervention. Our case illustrates the variation in the clinical presentation of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma which can be misdiagnosed as stroke. Therefore, in patients with preceding neck, shoulder or interscapular pain and focal neurological deficits, this diagnosis should be included in the differential, particularly when cortical and cranial signs are lacking

  8. Improving stroke transitions: Development and implementation of a social work case management intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Anne K; Woodward, Amanda T; Fritz, Michele C; Reeves, Mathew J

    2018-02-01

    Strokes impact over 800,000 people every year. Stroke care typically begins with inpatient care and then continues across an array of healthcare settings. These transitions are difficult for patients and caregivers, with psychosocial needs going unmet. Our team developed a case management intervention for acute stroke patients and their caregivers aimed at improving stroke transitions. The intervention focusses on four aspects of a successful care transition: support, preparedness, identifying and addressing unmet needs, and stroke education. This paper describes the development and implementation of this program, and is an example of the synergy created between neuroscience and clinical practice.

  9. Automatic Analysis of Critical Incident Reports: Requirements and Use Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, critical incident reports are used as a means to increase patient safety and quality of care. The entire potential of these sources of experiential knowledge remains often unconsidered since retrieval and analysis is difficult and time-consuming, and the reporting systems often do not provide support for these tasks. The objective of this paper is to identify potential use cases for automatic methods that analyse critical incident reports. In more detail, we will describe how faceted search could offer an intuitive retrieval of critical incident reports and how text mining could support in analysing relations among events. To realise an automated analysis, natural language processing needs to be applied. Therefore, we analyse the language of critical incident reports and derive requirements towards automatic processing methods. We learned that there is a huge potential for an automatic analysis of incident reports, but there are still challenges to be solved.

  10. Hemorrhagic stroke secondary to Bothrops spp. venom: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Anna Beatriz Temoteo; Gondim, Caio Cesar Vaz Lacet; Reichert, Lucas Pereira; da Silva, Pedro Hugo Vieira; Souza, Rodrigo Marmo da Costa E; Fernandes, Thiago Monteiro de Paiva; Calvo, Bernardino Fernandez

    2017-06-15

    The Bothrops spp. venom contain metalloproteinases that contributes to vascular and hemorrhagic effects. This case report describes a 58 years-old patient from the city of Dona Inês, Paraiba, Brazil victim of an ophidian accident by Bothrops spp. The vascular and hemorrhagic effects of venom components have triggered a hemorrhagic stroke. Brazil has about 600 deaths annually due to ophidian accidents. However, as reports have been precarious, the obtaining of epidemiological-clinical data has been affected. This case highlights the importance of prior knowledge of possible neurological and vascular complications in Bothrops spp. venom to increase the effectiveness of an adequate treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Air Pollution and Ischemic Stroke Among Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yitshak Sade, Maayan; Novack, Victor; Ifergane, Gal; Horev, Anat; Kloog, Itai

    2015-12-01

    Studies have demonstrated consistent associations between cardiovascular illness and particulate matter (PM) stroke received less attention. We hypothesized that air pollution, an inflammation progenitor, can be associated with stroke incidence in young patients in whom the usual risk factors for stroke are less prevalent. We aimed to evaluate the association between stroke incidence and exposure to PM stroke between 2005 and 2012. Exposure assessment was based on a hybrid model incorporating daily satellite remote sensing data at 1-km spatial resolution. We performed case-crossover analysis, stratified by personal characteristics and distance from main roads. We identified 4837 stroke cases (89.4% ischemic stroke). Interquartile range of PM ischemic stroke and increases of interquartile range average concentrations of particulate matter ischemic stroke associated with PM among young adults. This finding can be explained by the inflammatory mechanism, linking air pollution and stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Patent foramen ovale closure following cryptogenic stroke or transient ischaemic attack: Long-term follow-up of 301 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaali, Mikaeil; Dooley, Maureen; Wynne, Dylan; Cooter, Nina; Lee, Lorraine; Haworth, Peter; Saha, Romi; Gainsborough, Nicola; Hildick-Smith, David

    2015-11-15

    Patent foramen ovale has been identified as a conduit for paradoxical embolism resulting in cryptogenic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). We aimed to establish rates of death, recurrent stroke or TIA among patients undergoing PFO closure for stroke or TIA at our unit. A retrospective analysis of all PFO closure patients was performed between May 2004 and January 2013. Follow up was performed by mortality tracing using the Medical Research Information Service of the Office of National Statistics. With regard to stroke or TIA recurrence, written consent forms and questionnaires were mailed with follow up telephone calls. Medical notes and imaging records were consulted where adverse events were noted. 301 patients aged 48.6 ± 11.0 years, 54.4% male, with ≥1 thromboembolic neurovascular event had percutaneous PFO closure with one of eight devices, with successful implantation in 99% of cases. Follow-up duration was 40.2 ± 26.2 months (range 1.3-105.3); complete in 301 patients for mortality (100%) and 283 patients (94.0%) for neurovascular events. Two patients died during follow-up (respiratory failure n = 1; road traffic accident n = 1). Recurrent stroke (MRI or CT confirmed) was observed in five patients (0.5%; 0.55 per 100 person-years) and TIA in 9 (1.1%; 0.98 per 100 person-years). Atrial fibrillation requiring treatment was documented in 14 patients (1.7%). Percutaneous PFO closure in patients with cryptogenic stroke or TIA is a safe treatment with a low incidence of procedural complications and recurrent neurovascular events. Registry data like these may help to demonstrate the utility of PFO closure in stroke. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Persistent Penumbra in a Rabbit Stroke Model: Incidence and Histologic Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah J. Hennings

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Duration and extent of penumbra determine the window and brain volume in which interventions may save injured tissue after stroke. Understanding the penumbra in animals is necessary in order to design models that translate to effective clinical therapies. New Zealand white rabbits were embolized with aged autologous clot (n=23 or insoluble microspheres (n=21. To examine effects of treatment on penumbra, sphere-stroked animals were treated with 3 μm microbubbles plus ultrasound (n=19. Rabbits were euthanized at 4 or 24 hr. Infarct volume was measured following triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC staining of brain sections. Penumbra was visualized using immunostaining of pimonidazole injected fifteen minutes prior to euthanasia. Potentially reversible penumbra was present in 14.3% stroked rabbits at 4 hours and 15.7% at 24 hours after embolic stroke and represented up to 35% of total lost tissue. Intervention at up to 24 hours may benefit a significant patient population.

  14. The analysis of hyper-homocysteine incidence rate and multi-risk factors in 200 patients with cerebral stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Xiudong; Yang Jianghui; Huo Aimei; Wang Yan; Chu Yanchuang; Dong Mei

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the hyperhomocysteine incidence rate and clinical significance in 200 patients with cerebral stroke, the serum homocysteine, fibrinogen, C-reaction protein, cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol levels in 200 patients with cerebral stroke and 100 normal healthy controls were detected. The results showed that both serum homocysteine and plasma FIB levels in patients with cerebral infarction and intracerebral hemorrhage were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). The hyper-homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for cerebral stoke, and hyperhomocysteine may lead to the increase of Fibrinogen level, which is one of the important reasons for the high blood viscosity in the cerebral infarction patients. (authors)

  15. ISCHAEMIC STROKE IN A 38-YEAR-YOUNG AS A PRESENTING FEATURE OF POLYCYTHAEMIA VERA: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaraf Hussain

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is rare as a presenting feature of polycythaemia. Here, we report a case of polycythaemia whose presenting feature was ischaemic stroke. Recurrence of stroke may occur if polycythaemia is not treated in these patients. Therefore, identifying this cause of stroke timely may prevent recurrence.

  16. Ischemic Stroke in Williams-Beuren Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Der Lee

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A 15-year-old girl was admitted because of an acute onset of facial palsy and right hemiparesis. The patient had a history of moderate mental retardation and developmental delay. On admission, her vital signs were stable, except for high blood pressure. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an infarct involving the left internal capsule and putamen. Because of the patient's young age, an extensive stroke survey was performed. Williams-Beuren syndrome was finally confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Compared with the previously reported cases, no evidence of cerebral arterial stenosis or cardiac abnormalities was found by noninvasive imaging techniques. Because Williams-Beuren syndrome is a complex, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with prominent cardiovascular features, regular assessment and antihypertensive treatment are necessary to minimize the lifelong cardiovascular risk in patients with this syndrome.

  17. Dysphagia in Acute Stroke: Incidence, Burden and Impact on Clinical Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeg-Morvay, Anne; Meisterernst, Julia; Schlager, Markus; Mono, Marie-Luise; El-Koussy, Marwan; Kägi, Georg; Jung, Simon; Sarikaya, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Reported frequency of post-stroke dysphagia in the literature is highly variable. In view of progress in stroke management, we aimed to assess the current burden of dysphagia in acute ischemic stroke. Methods We studied 570 consecutive patients treated in a tertiary stroke center. Dysphagia was evaluated by using the Gugging Swallowing Screen (GUSS). We investigated the relationship of dysphagia with pneumonia, length of hospital stay and discharge destination and compared rates of favourable clinical outcome and mortality at 3 months between dysphagic patients and those without dysphagia. Results Dysphagia was diagnosed in 118 of 570 (20.7%) patients and persisted in 60 (50.9%) at hospital discharge. Thirty-six (30.5%) patients needed nasogastric tube because of severe dysphagia. Stroke severity rather than infarct location was associated with dysphagia. Dysphagic patients suffered more frequently from pneumonia (23.1% vs. 1.1%, pdysphagia. At 3 months, dysphagic patients less often had a favourable outcome (35.7% vs. 69.7%; pdysphagia to be an independent predictor of discharge destination and institutionalization at 3 months, while severe dysphagia requiring tube placement was strongly associated with mortality. Conclusion Dysphagia still affects a substantial portion of stroke patients and may have a large impact on clinical outcome, mortality and institutionalization. PMID:26863627

  18. Stroke care in Galicia: telemedicine in the early, multidisciplinary treatment of all acute stroke cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castro, Emilio; Vázquez-Lima, Manuel José; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; Verde, Luis; Castillo, José

    2018-02-01

    Stroke is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in Spain and in Galicia in particular. Tissue viability after stroke depends on the time taken to restore circulation. The widely dispersed and aging population of this region challenges efforts to provide equal care for patients with time-sensitive emergencies such as stroke. Two regional hospitals (Hospital do Salnés and Hospital do Barbanza) and the reference Hospital Clínico de Santiago launched a telestroke pilot program in 2011 in which patients whose treatment was guided at a distance were discharged with lower levels of stroke severity and mortality. That outcome was probably attributable to more rapid diagnosis. Given those preliminary results and the characteristics of the population, the centrally coordinated Galician Stroke Care Plan was launched in 2016 to provide a telemedicine service that connects all hospitals in the health system of Galicia. This paper summarizes the experience of developing and implementing the program.

  19. Slacklining and stroke: A rehabilitation case study considering balance and lower limb weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Charles P; Rando, Natalie; Melloh, Markus

    2016-01-01

    To ascertain the effectiveness of slacklining as a supplementary therapy for elderly stroke patients who are functionally non-progressing. This case study involved an 18-mo prospective observation of the management of an 87-year-old female stroke-patient of the left hemisphere with reduced balance, reduced lower limb muscular activation, hypertonia, and concurrent postural deficits. This entailed the initial acute care phase through to discharge to home and 18-mo final status in her original independent living setting. The introduction of slacklining as an adjunct therapy was made 12 mo post incident. Slacklining involves balance retention on a tightened band where external environmental changes cause a whole-body dynamic response to retain equilibrium. It is a complex neuromechanical task enabling individualized self-developed response strategies to be learned and adapted. This facilitates the innate process of balance retention, lower-limb and core muscle activation, and stable posture through a combination of learned motor skills and neurological system down regulation. Individuals adopt and follow established sequential motor learning stages where the acquired balance skills are achieved in a challenging composite-chain activity. Slacklining could be considered an adjunct therapy for lower limb stroke rehabilitation where function is compromised due to decreased muscle recruitment, decreased postural control and compromised balance. Initial inpatient rehabilitation involved one-month acute-care, one-month rehabilitation, and one-month transitional care prior to home discharge. A further six months of intensive outpatient rehabilitation was provided with five hourly sessions per week including:supervised and self-managed hydrotherapy, plus one individual and two group falls’ prevention sessions. These were supported by daily home exercises. At 12 mo post incident, recovery plateaued, then regressed following three falls. Rehabilitation was subsequently

  20. Rationale and design of INTERSTROKE: a global case-control study of risk factors for stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donnell, M; Serpault, Damien Xavier; Diener, C

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is a major global health problem. It is the third leading cause of death and the leading cause of adult disability. INTERHEART, a global case-control study of acute myocardial infarction in 52 countries (29,972 participants), identified nine modifiable risk factors that accounted for >90......-income countries is inadequate, where a very large burden of stroke occurs. Accordingly, a similar epidemiological study is required for stroke, to inform effective population-based strategies to reduce the risk of stroke. Methods: INTERSTROKE is an international, multicenter case-control study. Cases are patients...... years). A questionnaire (cases and controls) is used to acquire information on known and proposed risk factors for stroke. Cardiovascular (e.g. blood pressure) and anthropometric (e.g. waist-to-hip ratio) measurements are obtained at the time of interview. Nonfasting blood samples and random urine...

  1. Cocaine-associated stroke: three cases and rehabilitation considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolat, R D; O' Dell, M W; Golamco-Estrella, S P; Avella, H

    2000-04-01

    Cocaine-associated stroke (CAS) is an important cause of disability, especially among younger adults. Improved management has increased survival but little has been discussed about rehabilitation, including medication management. Therefore, experience and therapeutic drug management are described during inpatient rehabilitation with three patients with CAS. Case 14 is a 50-year-old male with a history of hypertension who presented with right hemiparesis, aphasia and depression. He was treated with paroxetine for depression and bromocriptine for poor initiation with a good response, improving by 50 FIM points in 44 days. Case 2 is a 44 year-old female with quadriparesis, aphasia, and deficits in attention and initiation. Methylphenidate for attention deficits and bromocriptine for poor initiation was associated with an excellent functional gain (50 FIM points in 37 days). She eventually returned to work. Case 3 is a 46-year-old female with a history of hypertension who presented with right hemiparesis, aphasia and depression. Without neuropharmacologic intervention, she gained 35 FIM points during an uneventful 47 day rehabilitation stay. Acutely, cocaine can induce cerebral vasoconstriction, cerebrovascular spasm, cerebral vasculitis and intracerebral haemorrhage. Chronic use depletes and destroys dopaminergic pathways, which may be a major factor in depression, and attention and initiation deficits-all observed in these cases. Generally, rapid improvements were seen in mood and cognition in two cases where medication was used. Based on the current literature and pathophysiology of CAS, it is suggested that trials of dopaminergic agents for cognition and extremely cautious use of buproprion for depression may be warrented. Details of the above cases and the practical and theoretical issues of neuropharmacologic intervention in CAS are discussed.

  2. Ischemic Stroke Following Multiple Traumas in a Child: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Jung Lin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an uncommon disorder in children but an increasingly recognized cause of disability. Acute stroke may be attributable to trauma, but this topic is seldom discussed. In limited reports, most ischemic strokes following trauma were detected after a considerable delay. Early recognition of stroke following trauma might reduce secondary neurologic complications. We report a case of posterior cerebral artery area infarct following multiple traumas in a child. A comprehensive etiologic survey was undertaken and discussed. Although the definite pathogenesis is still unclear, adequate, individualized, and uncomplicated management can significantly affect the outcome.

  3. Timing of Incident Stroke Risk After Cervical Artery Dissection Presenting Without Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Nicholas A; Merkler, Alexander E; Gialdini, Gino; Kamel, Hooman

    2017-03-01

    Cervical artery dissection is a common cause of stroke in young people. The temporal profile of stroke risk after cervical artery dissection presenting without ischemia remains uncertain. We performed a crossover cohort study using administrative claims data on all emergency department visits and acute care hospitalizations from 2005 to 2011 in CA, 2006 to 2013 in NY, and 2005 to 2013 in FL. Using previously validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes, we identified patients with a cervical artery dissection and no previous or concurrent stroke or transient ischemic attack diagnosis. We compared the risk of stroke in successive 2-week periods during the 12 weeks after dissection versus the corresponding 2-week period 1 year later. Absolute risk increases were calculated using McNemar test for matched data. In a sensitivity analysis, we limited our population to patients presenting with typical symptoms of cervical artery dissection. We identified 2791 patients with dissection without ischemia. The absolute increase in stroke risk was 1.25% (95% confidence interval, 0.84-1.67%) in the first 2 weeks after dissection compared with the same time period 1 year later. The absolute risk increase was 0.18% (95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.34%) during weeks 3 to 4 and was no longer significant during the remainder of the 12-week postdissection period. Our findings were similar in a sensitivity analysis identifying patients who presented with typical symptoms of acute dissection. The risk of stroke after cervical artery dissection unaccompanied by ischemia at time of diagnosis seems to be limited to the first 2 weeks. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Clinical Characteristics, Risk Factors, and Outcomes Associated With Neonatal Hemorrhagic Stroke: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Lauran; Dewey, Deborah; Letourneau, Nicole; Kaplan, Bonnie J; Chaput, Kathleen; Gallagher, Clare; Hodge, Jacquie; Floer, Amalia; Kirton, Adam

    2017-03-01

    Hemorrhage into the brain of term newborns often results in major injury and lifelong disability. The clinical epidemiology of neonatal hemorrhagic stroke (NHS) remains undefined, hindering the development of strategies to improve outcomes. To characterize the incidence, types, presentations, associated factors, and outcomes of neonatal hemorrhagic stroke. Population-based, nested case-control study. The Alberta Perinatal Stroke Project, a provincial registry, ascertained NHS cases using exhaustive diagnostic code searching (1992-2010, >2500 medical record reviews). Prospective cases were captured through the Calgary Pediatric Stroke Program (2007-2014). Participants included term neonates with magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed NHS including primary and secondary intracerebral hemorrhage, hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic injury, and presumed perinatal hemorrhagic stroke. Control infants with common data were recruited from a population-based study (4 to 1 ratio). Infants with NHS underwent structured medical record review using data-capture forms and blinded scoring of neuroimaging. Clinical risk factor common data elements were explored using logistic regression. Provincial live births were obtained from Statistics Canada. Outcomes were extrapolated to the Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure. We identified 86 cases: 51 infants (59%) with NHS, of which 32 (67%) were idiopathic, 30 (35%) were hemorrhagic transformation of primary ischemic injuries (14 with neonatal cerebral sinovenous thrombosis, 11 with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, and 5 with neonatal arterial ischemic stroke), and 5 were presumed perinatal hemorrhagic stroke. Sixty-two percent were male. Incidence of pure NHS was 1 in 9500 live births and 1 in 6300 for all forms. Most presented in the first week of life with seizures and encephalopathy. Acute neurosurgical intervention was rare (3 of 86 total cases; 3.5%). Temporal lobe was the most common NHS location (16 of 51 pure NHS cases; 31%). A

  5. Variability in Clinical Presentation of Neonatal Stroke: Report of Four Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Sonia; Angelis, Dimitrios; Bennett, Robert; Kola, Bhargavi; Hughes, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal stroke can be a cause of long term neurodevelopmental disability, seizures, and impaired cognitive function. We present four cases of neonatal stroke, associated with different risk factors and clinical presentations. Two of these newborns were born to mothers with no prenatal care.

  6. [Broad ischemic stroke revealing infective endocarditis in a young patient: about a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelosaona, Fanomezantsoa Noella; Razafimahefa, Julien; Randrianasolo, Rahamefy Odilon; Rakotoarimanana, Solofonirina; Tehindrazanarivelo, Djacoba Alain

    2016-01-01

    Broad ischemic stroke is mainly due to a cardiac embolus or to an atheromatous plaque. In young subjects, one of the main causes of ischemic stroke (broad ischemic stroke in particolar) is embolic heart disease including infective endocarditis. Infective endocarditis is a contraindication against the anticoagulant therapy (which is indicated for the treatment of embolic heart disease complicated by ischemic stroke). One neurologic complications of infective endocarditis is ischemic stroke which often occurs in multiple sites. We here report the case of a 44-year old man with afebrile acute onset of severe left hemiplegia associated with a sistolic mitral murmur, who had fever in hospital on day 5 with no other obvious source of infection present. Brain CT scan showed full broad ischaemic stroke of the right middle cerebral artery territory and doppler ultrasound, performed after stroke onset, showed infective endocarditis affecting the small mitral valve. He was treated with 4 weeks of antibiotic therapy without anticoagulant therapy ; evolution was marked by the disappearance of mitral valve vegetations and by movement sequelae involving the left side of the body. In practical terms, our problem was the onset of the fever which didn't accompany or pre-exist patient's deficit, leading us to the misdiagnosis of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin. This case study underlines the importance of doppler ultrasound, in the diagnosis of all broad ischemic strokes, especially superficial, before starting anticoagulant therapy.

  7. Stroke in a child with hemoglobin SC disease: a case report describing use of hydroxyurea after transfusion therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Fridlyand

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Children with hemoglobin SC (HbSC disease suffer a significant incidence of silent cerebral infarcts but stroke is rare. A 2-year-old African American boy with HbSC disease presented with focal neurologic deficits associated with magnetic resonance imaging evidence of cerebral infarction with vascular abnormalities. After the acute episode he was treated with monthly transfusions and subsequently transitioned to hydroxyurea therapy. The benefits of hydroxyurea as a fetal hemoglobin inducer in HbSC disease, to ameliorate clinical symptoms are supported by retrospective studies. This case highlights the rare occurrence of stroke in a child with HbSC disease and the use of hydroxyurea therapy.

  8. The incidence of vasculitis is increased in female stroke-prone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Vascular changes in hypertension share common characteristics with inflammatory wall injury. Since it is known that chronic inflammatory diseases are frequently more prevalent in females, this study tested the hypothesis that vasculitis would be more evident in female stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive ...

  9. Rationale and design of INTERSTROKE: a global case-control study of risk factors for stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donnell, M; Serpault, Damien Xavier; Diener, C

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is a major global health problem. It is the third leading cause of death and the leading cause of adult disability. INTERHEART, a global case-control study of acute myocardial infarction in 52 countries (29,972 participants), identified nine modifiable risk factors that accounted for >90......% of population-attributable risk. However, traditional risk factors (e.g. hypertension, cholesterol) appear to exert contrasting risks for stroke compared with coronary heart disease, and the etiology of stroke is far more heterogeneous. In addition, our knowledge of risk factors for stroke in low...... years). A questionnaire (cases and controls) is used to acquire information on known and proposed risk factors for stroke. Cardiovascular (e.g. blood pressure) and anthropometric (e.g. waist-to-hip ratio) measurements are obtained at the time of interview. Nonfasting blood samples and random urine...

  10. Delayed-Onset Post-Stroke Delusional Disorder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raíssa B. Barboza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders among patients with cerebrovascular illness is relatively high, there are only few case reports describing post-stroke psychotic symptoms. In general, post-stroke psychoses have been reported to emerge few days after the vascular event and to vanish soon afterwards. In this report, we describe delayed-onset post-stroke delusional disorder, persecutory type. A middle-aged female patient developed a persistent delusional disorder with homicidal behavior about one year after a cerebrovascular accident affecting the right fronto-temporo-parietal region and a long period of chronic post-stroke mixed anxiety and depressive symptoms. Our case suggests that there might be long intervals between stroke and the appearance of psychotic symptoms.

  11. Incidence of Canine Hip Dysplasia : A Survey of 272 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Rao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A total of 272 cases of hip dysplasia were reviewed. A review of clinical cases presented with the clinical signs of hip dysplasia were referred to Radiology Unit of Madras Veterinary College, from May 2007-April 2009 was taken for this study.The incidence was highest in young animals of age group over three months to one year (52.94 percent. The breed-wise incidence was more common in Labrador Retriever (36.76 percent. Male dogs were found to be more affected (59.55 percent than female dogs. Bilateral hip dysplasia was found to be more (88.60 percent than unilateral. Among the unilateral hip dysplasia, left side was found to be more (54.83 percent than right. [Vet. World 2010; 3(5.000: 219-220

  12. Fine particulate matter and incident cognitive impairment in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loop, Matthew Shane; Kent, Shia T; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z; Crosson, William L; Estes, Sue M; Estes, Maurice G; Quattrochi, Dale A; Hemmings, Sarah N; Wadley, Virginia G; McClure, Leslie A

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the effect of air pollution on cognitive health are often limited to populations living near cities that have air monitoring stations. Little is known about whether the estimates from such studies can be generalized to the U.S. population, or whether the relationship differs between urban and rural areas. To address these questions, we used a satellite-derived estimate of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentration to determine whether PM2.5 was associated with incident cognitive impairment in a geographically diverse, biracial US cohort of men and women (n = 20,150). A 1-year mean baseline PM2.5 concentration was estimated for each participant, and cognitive status at the most recent follow-up was assessed over the telephone using the Six-Item Screener (SIS) in a subsample that was cognitively intact at baseline. Logistic regression was used to determine whether PM2.5 was related to the odds of incident cognitive impairment. A 10 µg/m(3) increase in PM2.5 concentration was not reliably associated with an increased odds of incident impairment, after adjusting for temperature, season, incident stroke, and length of follow-up [OR (95% CI): 1.26 (0.97, 1.64)]. The odds ratio was attenuated towards 1 after adding demographic covariates, behavioral factors, and known comorbidities of cognitive impairment. A 10 µg/m(3) increase in PM2.5 concentration was slightly associated with incident impairment in urban areas (1.40 [1.06-1.85]), but this relationship was also attenuated after including additional covariates in the model. Evidence is lacking that the effect of PM2.5 on incident cognitive impairment is robust in a heterogeneous US cohort, even in urban areas.

  13. Fine particulate matter and incident cognitive impairment in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Shane Loop

    Full Text Available Studies of the effect of air pollution on cognitive health are often limited to populations living near cities that have air monitoring stations. Little is known about whether the estimates from such studies can be generalized to the U.S. population, or whether the relationship differs between urban and rural areas. To address these questions, we used a satellite-derived estimate of fine particulate matter (PM2.5 concentration to determine whether PM2.5 was associated with incident cognitive impairment in a geographically diverse, biracial US cohort of men and women (n = 20,150. A 1-year mean baseline PM2.5 concentration was estimated for each participant, and cognitive status at the most recent follow-up was assessed over the telephone using the Six-Item Screener (SIS in a subsample that was cognitively intact at baseline. Logistic regression was used to determine whether PM2.5 was related to the odds of incident cognitive impairment. A 10 µg/m(3 increase in PM2.5 concentration was not reliably associated with an increased odds of incident impairment, after adjusting for temperature, season, incident stroke, and length of follow-up [OR (95% CI: 1.26 (0.97, 1.64]. The odds ratio was attenuated towards 1 after adding demographic covariates, behavioral factors, and known comorbidities of cognitive impairment. A 10 µg/m(3 increase in PM2.5 concentration was slightly associated with incident impairment in urban areas (1.40 [1.06-1.85], but this relationship was also attenuated after including additional covariates in the model. Evidence is lacking that the effect of PM2.5 on incident cognitive impairment is robust in a heterogeneous US cohort, even in urban areas.

  14. Antipsychotic medications and stroke in schizophrenia: A case-crossover study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yin Chen

    Full Text Available The association between antipsychotic use and the risk of stroke in schizophrenic patients is controversial. We sought to study the association in a nationwide cohort with schizophrenia.Using a retrospective cohort of patients with schizophrenia (N = 31,976 derived from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 802 new-onset cases of stroke were identified within 10 years of follow-up (from 2000 through 2010. We designed a case-crossover study using 14-day windows to explore the risk factors of stroke and the association between antipsychotic drugs and the risk of stroke. We analyzed the risks of individual antipsychotics on various subgroups of stroke including ischemic, hemorrhagic, and other strokes, and the risks based on the antipsychotic receptor-binding profile of each drug.Use of any second-generation antipsychotic was associated with an increased risk of stroke (adjusted risk ratio = 1.45, P = .009 within 14 days while the use of any first-generation antipsychotic was not. Intriguingly, the use of any second-generation antipsychotic was associated with ischemic stroke but not hemorrhagic stroke. The antipsychotic receptor-binding profile analysis showed that the antihistamine 1 receptor was significantly associated with ischemic stroke (adjusted risk ratio = 1.72, P = .037, and the sensitivity analysis based on the 7-day window of exposure validated the association (adjusted risk ratio = 1.87, P = .015.Use of second-generation antipsychotic drugs appeared to be associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke in the patients studied, possibly mediated by high affinity for histamine-1 receptor blockade. Further research regarding the underlying biological mechanism and drug safety is suggested.

  15. Neuropathic pain: A personal case reflection on a critical incident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji P Duraisamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a distressing symptom for the patient and a difficult symptom for the physician to treat. There is lack of evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of malignant neuropathic pain. The case reflection is a personal account of what has been learnt from a critical incident in a particular patient in the management of neuropathic pain. Psychological issues are known to increase pain percetion and affect the quality of life. The case reflection explores problem areas, defines lacunae in knowledge, and demonstrates active learning of the management of neuropathic pain through reflective practice.

  16. Successful Intra-Arterial Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Immediate Postpartum Period: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez, Jose C.; Masjuan, J.; Garcia, N.; Lecinana, M. de

    2008-01-01

    Stroke in pregnancy and the puerperium is a rare but potentially devastating event. We present the case of a previously healthy woman who underwent a cesarean delivery and experienced a middle cerebral artery thrombosis in the immediate postpartum period that was subsequently lysed with intra-arterial urokinase. The patient made a complete neurologic recovery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of successful intra-arterial thrombolysis for ischemic stroke in the postpartum period

  17. The impact of health-related quality of life on the incidence of ischaemic heart disease and stroke; a cohort study in an Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadjou, Yahya; Kermani-Alghoraishi, Mohammad; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Talaei, Mohammad; Yousefy, Alireza; Oveisgharan, Shahram; Roohafza, Hamidreza; Rabiei, Katayoun; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2016-04-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of health-related quality of life (QoL) on the occurrence of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke using a validated questionnaire. We followed the 3,283 subjects, aged ≥ 35 years and without history of cardiovascular events (CVE) over four years from 2007 to 2011 from the Isfahan cohort study. The World Health Organization QoL questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF), which contains four separate domains, was used to assess QoL. Incidence rates of IHD and stroke were recorded during follow-up. Socioeconomic demographic data including marital state, educational level, occupation, income and place of living and metabolic risk factors such as diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HTN), dyslipidaemia, body mass index and smoking were also recorded. More IHD (42%) and stroke (57%) patients were illiterate; while the educational status was significantly different only in the IHD group (P = 0.000). Differences in income and occupation were notable in patients with stroke and IHD, respectively, compared to subjects without them (P stroke patients in comparison with subjects without CVE (P = 0.000). Two-way multivariate analyses of covariance test after age, educational status and metabolic risk factors adjustment showed that subjects with stroke had a significantly higher score in all QoL domains in comparison with individuals without stroke (P 0.050). This study indicates that there is no association between QoL and IHD incidence although there was a significant relationship between higher QoL and incidence of stroke.

  18. Alpha-linolenic acid intake and 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in 20,000 middle-aged men and women in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janette de Goede

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whether intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, the plant-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA, could prevent cardiovascular diseases is not yet clear. We examined the associations of ALA intake with 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke in the Netherlands. METHODS: Data were collected from a general population of 20,069 generally healthy men and women, aged 20 to 65 years. Habitual diet was assessed at baseline (1993-1997 with a validated 178-item food frequency questionnaire. Incidences of CHD and stroke were assessed through linkage with mortality and morbidity registers. Hazard ratios (HR were calculated with multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age, gender, lifestyle, and dietary factors. RESULTS: During 8-13 years of follow-up, we observed 280 incident CHD events (19% fatal and 221 strokes (4% fatal. Intakes of energy-adjusted ALA in quintiles ranged from less than 1.0 g/d in the bottom quintile (Q1 to more than 1.9 g/d in the top quintile (Q5. ALA intake was not associated with incident CHD, with HRs varying between 0.89 and 1.01 (all p>0.05 in Q2-Q5 compared with the bottom quintile of ALA intake. For incident stroke, however, participants in Q2-Q5 had a 35-50% lower risk compared with the reference group. HRs were 0.65 (0.43-0.97, 0.49 (0.31-0.76, 0.53 (0.34-0.83, and 0.65 (0.41-1.04 for Q2-Q5 respectively. CONCLUSION: In this general Dutch population, ALA intake was not associated with incident CHD. The data suggested that a low intake of ALA may be a risk factor for incident stroke. These results warrant confirmation in other population-based studies and in trials.

  19. Alpha-linolenic acid intake and 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in 20,000 middle-aged men and women in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goede, Janette; Verschuren, W M Monique; Boer, Jolanda M A; Kromhout, Daan; Geleijnse, Johanna M

    2011-03-25

    Whether intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the plant-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), could prevent cardiovascular diseases is not yet clear. We examined the associations of ALA intake with 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in the Netherlands. Data were collected from a general population of 20,069 generally healthy men and women, aged 20 to 65 years. Habitual diet was assessed at baseline (1993-1997) with a validated 178-item food frequency questionnaire. Incidences of CHD and stroke were assessed through linkage with mortality and morbidity registers. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated with multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age, gender, lifestyle, and dietary factors. During 8-13 years of follow-up, we observed 280 incident CHD events (19% fatal) and 221 strokes (4% fatal). Intakes of energy-adjusted ALA in quintiles ranged from less than 1.0 g/d in the bottom quintile (Q1) to more than 1.9 g/d in the top quintile (Q5). ALA intake was not associated with incident CHD, with HRs varying between 0.89 and 1.01 (all p>0.05) in Q2-Q5 compared with the bottom quintile of ALA intake. For incident stroke, however, participants in Q2-Q5 had a 35-50% lower risk compared with the reference group. HRs were 0.65 (0.43-0.97), 0.49 (0.31-0.76), 0.53 (0.34-0.83), and 0.65 (0.41-1.04) for Q2-Q5 respectively. In this general Dutch population, ALA intake was not associated with incident CHD. The data suggested that a low intake of ALA may be a risk factor for incident stroke. These results warrant confirmation in other population-based studies and in trials.

  20. The organisational context of nursing care in stroke units: a case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Christopher R; Fisher, Andrea; Green, Theresa L

    2009-01-01

    Internationally the stroke unit is recognised as the evidence-based model for patient management, although clarity about the effective components of stroke units is lacking. Whilst skilled nursing care has been proposed as one component, the theoretical and empirical basis for stroke nursing is limited. We attempted to explore the organisational context of stroke unit nursing, to determine those features that staff perceived to be important in facilitating high quality care. A case study approach was used, that included interviews with nurses and members of the multidisciplinary teams in two Canadian acute stroke units. A total of 20 interviews were completed, transcribed and analysed thematically using the Framework Approach. Trustworthiness was established through the review of themes and their interpretation by members of the stroke units. Nine themes that comprised an organisational context that supported the delivery of high quality nursing care in acute stroke units were identified, and provide a framework for organisational development. The study highlighted the importance of an overarching service model to guide the organisation of care and the development of specialist and advanced nursing roles. Whilst multidisciplinary working appears to be a key component of stroke unit nursing, various organisational challenges to its successful implementation were highlighted. In particular the consequence of differences in the therapeutic approach of nurses and therapy staff needs to be explored in greater depth. Successful teamwork appears to depend on opportunities for the development of relationships between team members as much as the use of formal communication systems and structures. A co-ordinated approach to education and training, clinical leadership, a commitment to research, and opportunities for role and practice development also appear to be key organisational features of stroke unit nursing. Recommendations for the development of stroke nursing

  1. Executive function, but not memory, associates with incident coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostamian, Somayeh; van Buchem, Mark A; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2015-01-01

    from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) with Mini-Mental State Examination score ≥24 points. Scores on the Stroop Color-Word Test (selective attention) and the Letter Digit Substitution Test (processing speed) were converted to Z scores and averaged into a composite.......57-1.32). CONCLUSION: Lower executive function, but not memory, is associated with higher risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Lower executive function, as an independent risk indicator, might better reflect brain vascular pathologies....

  2. Extract of Antrodia camphorata Exerts Neuroprotection against Embolic Stroke in Rats without Causing the Risk of Hemorrhagic Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-Ming Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the neuroprotective effect of an extract of Antrodia camphorata (A. camphorata, a fungus commonly used in Chinese folk medicine for treatment of viral hepatitis and cancer, alone or in combination with aspirin was investigated in a rat embolic stroke model. An ischemic stroke was induced in rats by a selective occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA with whole blood clots and then orally treated with A. camphorata (0.25 and 0.75 g/kg/day alone and combined with aspirin (5 mg/kg/day. Sixty days later, the brains were removed, sectioned, and stained with triphenyltetrazolium chloride and analysed by a commercial image processing software program. Brain infarct volume, neurobehavioral score, cerebral blood perfusion, and subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage incidence were perceived. In addition, potential bleeding side effect of the combinative therapy was assessed by measuring hemoglobin (Hb content during intracerebral hemorrhage and gastric bleeding, prothrombin time (PT, and occlusion time (OT after oral administration. Posttreatment with high dose A. camphorata significantly reduced infarct volume and improved neurobehavioral score (P < 0.05. Since A. camphorata alone or with aspirin did not alter the Hb level, this treatment is safe and does not cause hemorrhagic incident. Remarkably, the combination of A. camphorata and aspirin did not show a significant effect on the bleeding time, PT and OT increase suggesting that A. camphorata may have the neuroprotective effect without the prolongation of bleeding time or coagulation time. From these observations, we suggest that combinative therapy of A. camphorata and aspirin might offer enhanced neuroprotective efficacies without increasing side effects.

  3. Challenges of antithrombotic treatment after embolic stroke- case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Stanescu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF represents one of the most common preventable causes of stroke, conferring a fivefold increased risk of stroke. The risk of stroke caused by AF is underestimated, many AF episodes being asymptomatic. Embolic strokes caused by AF can be prevented using anticoagulant therapy. The ESC (European Society of Cardiology guidelines for patients with AF recommend anticoagulant therapy if the risk for embolic stroke / systemic embolism, evaluated with the CHA2DS2-VASc score, is high. Bleeding is the major complication of anticoagulant therapy. For every patient taking anticoagulant medication, HAS-BLED score assessing the risk of bleeding needs to be performed. The priorities in treating patients with atrial fibrillation are protection against embolic events and minimal risk of hemorrhagic events. Vitamin K antagonists, despite their accessibility and long term use, have important limitations. New/direct oral anticoagulants are better options, with alt least identical efficacy and higher safety profile. In real life, the choice of the appropriate anticoagulant agent could be challenging.

  4. Dietary choline and betaine; associations with subclinical markers of cardiovascular disease risk and incidence of CVD, coronary heart disease and stroke: the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Heather R; Musani, Solomon K; Dibaba, Daniel T; Talegawkar, Sameera A; Taylor, Herman A; Tucker, Katherine L; Bidulescu, Aurelian

    2018-02-01

    Several mechanisms have been described through which dietary intake of choline and its derivative betaine may be associated in both directions with subclinical atherosclerosis. We assessed the association of dietary intake of choline and betaine with cardiovascular risk and markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease. Data from 3924 Jackson Heart Study (JHS) African-American participants with complete food frequency questionnaire at baseline and follow-up measurements of heart disease measures were used. Multivariable linear regression models were employed to assess associations between choline and betaine intake with carotid intima-media thickness, coronary artery calcium, abdominal aortic calcium and left ventricular mass. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate associations with time to incident coronary heart disease (CHD), ischemic stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD). During an average nine years of follow-up, 124 incident CHD events, 75 incident stroke events and 153 incident CVD events were documented. In women, greater choline intake was associated with lower left ventricular mass (p = 0.0006 for trend across choline quartiles) and with abdominal aortic calcium score. Among all JHS participants, there was a statistically significant inverse association between dietary choline intake and incident stroke, β = -0.33 (p = 0.04). Betaine intake was associated with greater risk of incident CHD when comparing the third quartile of intake with the lowest quartile of intake (HR 1.89, 95 % CI 1.14, 3.15). Among our African-American participants, higher dietary choline intake was associated with a lower risk of incident ischemic stroke, and thus putative dietary benefits. Higher dietary betaine intake was associated with a nonlinear higher risk of incident CHD.

  5. Fluent Aphasia in Telugu: A Case Comparison Study of Semantic Dementia and Stroke Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladi, Suvarna; Mridula, Rukmini; Mekala, Shailaja; Rupela, Vani; Kaul, Subhash

    2010-01-01

    This study presents two cases with fluent aphasia in Telugu with semantic dementia and post-stroke fluent aphasia. Comparable scores were obtained on the conventional neuropsychological and language tests that were administered on the two cases. Both cases demonstrated fluent, grammatical and well-articulated speech with little content, impaired…

  6. The relation between serum Vitamin D levels and body antioxidant status in ischemic stroke patients: A case?control study

    OpenAIRE

    Afshari, Laleh; Amani, Reza; Soltani, Farhad; Haghighizadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Afsharmanesh, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke is the second cause of death among elderly people. Oxidative stress plays an important role in brain damage after stroke. Currently, Vitamin D has been shown as an antioxidant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the status of Vitamin D, antioxidant enzymes, and the relation between them in ischemic stroke patients. Materials and Methods: This case?control study was carried out on 36 patients with ischemic stroke patients and 36 matched subjects as controls. Intake of fru...

  7. The impact of green tea and coffee consumption on the reduced risk of stroke incidence in Japanese population: the Japan public health center-based study cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Iso, Hiroyasu; Saito, Isao; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Junko; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2013-05-01

    Few prospective studies have examined the impact of both green tea and coffee consumption on strokes. We investigated the association of the combination of those consumption with stroke incidence in a general population. We studied 82 369 Japanese (aged 45-74 years; without cardiovascular disease [CVD] or cancer in 1995 and 1998 for Cohort I and II, respectively) who received 13 years of mean follow-up through the end of 2007. Green tea and coffee consumption was assessed by self-administered food frequency questionnaire at baseline. In the 1 066 718 person-years of follow-up, we documented the incidence of strokes (n=3425) and coronary heart disease (n=910). Compared with seldom drinking green tea, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of all strokes were 0.86 (0.78-0.95) and 0.80 (0.73-0.89) in green tea 2 to 3 and ≥ 4 cups/d, respectively. Higher green tea consumption was associated with inverse risks of CVD and strokes subtypes. Compared with seldom drinking coffee, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of all strokes were 0.89 (0.80-0.99), 0.80 (0.72-0.90), and 0.81 (0.72-0.91) for coffee 3 to 6 times/week and 1 and ≥ 2 times/day, respectively. Coffee consumption was associated with an inverse risk of CVD and cerebral infarction. Higher green tea or coffee consumption reduced the risks of CVD and stroke subtypes (especially in intracerebral hemorrhage, P for interaction between green tea and coffee=0.04). None of the significant association was observed in coronary heart disease. Higher green tea and coffee consumption were inversely associated with risk of CVD and stroke in general population.

  8. Alpha-Linolenic Acid Intake and 10-Year Incidence of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke in 20,000 Middle-Aged Men and Women in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, de J.; Verschuren, W.M.M.; Boer, J.M.A.; Kromhout, D.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background - Whether intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the plant-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), could prevent cardiovascular diseases is not yet clear. We examined the associations of ALA intake with 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in the Netherlands.

  9. Acute ischemic stroke in a 6 year old boy, treated with mechanical thrombectomy: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gi Hong; Lee, Mu Sook; Yang, Tae Ki [Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Pediatric acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a relatively rare disease with an annual estimated incidence of 2.4-13 per 100000 children. However, pediatric AIS can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Stroke in children differs from that in adults with respect to etiology, clinical presentation, or management. Therapeutic options for adult AIS are intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, intra-arterial pharmacological thrombolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy. However, management strategies for pediatric AIS, extrapolated largely from those of adult AIS, remain controversial. In this article, we present our experience in a boy with AIS, who was successfully treated with mechanical thrombectomy, by utilizing the Solitaire FR revascularization device.

  10. Focal cerebral hyperemia in acute stroke. Incidence, pathophysiology and clinical significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Larsen, B; Skriver, E B

    1981-01-01

    tissue pressure on brain tissue. Cortical infarcts (10 patients) all had extensive hyperemic areas. Because the 254 detector camera has an excellent resolution in the cortical surface, our findings strongly suggest that all acute cerebral infarcts are, in fact, associated with hyperemic areas......In a consecutive study comprising 41 patients with completed stroke of less than 72 hours duration, cerebral angiography and measurements of the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were performed within 24 hours after admission. The rCBF study was done using the 133-Xenon intracarotid injection...... method and a 254 multi-detector camera. CT scan was done 24 hours after the rCBF study. Focal cerebral hyperemia was found in 16 patients. The study revealed 3 different types of hyperemia: Border-zone hyperemia, surrounding ischemic areas, was seen in patients with occluded arteries on angiography...

  11. Serum Taurine and Stroke Risk in Women: A Prospective, Nested Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fen; Koenig, Karen L; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Jonas, Saran; Afanasyeva, Yelena; Wójcik, Oktawia P; Costa, Max; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a conditionally essential sulfur-containing amino acid, is mainly obtained from diet in humans. Experimental studies have shown that taurine's main biological actions include bile salt conjugation, blood pressure regulation, anti-oxidation, and anti-inflammation. We conducted a prospective case-control study nested in the New York University Women's Health Study, a cohort study involving 14,274 women enrolled since 1985. Taurine was measured in pre-diagnostic serum samples of 241 stroke cases and 479 matched controls. There was no statistically significant association between serum taurine and stroke risk in the overall study population. The adjusted ORs for stroke were 1.0 (reference), 0.87 (95% CI, 0.59-1.28), and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.69-1.54) in increasing tertiles of taurine (64.3-126.6, 126.7-152.9, and 153.0-308.5 nmol/mL, respectively). A significant inverse association between serum taurine and stroke risk was observed among never smokers, with an adjusted OR of 0.66 (95% CI, 0.37-1.18) and 0.50 (95% CI, 0.26-0.94) for the second and third tertile, respectively (p for trend = 0.01), but not among past or current smokers (p for interaction taurine and stroke risk, although a protective effect was observed in never smokers, which requires further investigation. Taurine, Stroke, Epidemiology, Prospective, Case-control study, NYUWHS.

  12. Treatment with B vitamins and incidence of cancer in patients with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack: results of a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Graeme J; Eikelboom, John W; Yi, Qilong; Lees, Kennedy R; Chen, Christopher; Xavier, Denis; Navarro, Jose C; Ranawaka, Udaya K; Uddin, Wasim; Ricci, Stefano; Gommans, John; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2012-06-01

    To determine the effect of B vitamin treatment on the incidence of cancer among patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack. A total of 8164 patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack were randomly allocated to double-blind treatment with 1 tablet daily of placebo or B vitamins (2 mg folic acid, 25 mg vitamin B(6), 500 μg vitamin B(12)) and followed for a median of 3.4 years for any cancer as an adverse event. There was no significant difference in the incidence of any cancer among participants assigned B vitamins compared with placebo (4.04% versus 4.59%; risk ratio, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.70-1.07) and no difference in cancer mortality (2.35% versus 2.09%; risk ratio, 1.09; 0.81-1.46). Among 1899 patients with diabetes, the incidence of cancer was higher among participants assigned B vitamins compared with placebo (5.35% versus 3.28%; adjusted risk ratio, 2.21; 1.31-3.73), whereas among 6168 patients without diabetes, the incidence of cancer was lower among participants assigned B vitamins compared with placebo (3.66% versus 5.03%; adjusted risk ratio, 0.67; 0.51-0.87; P for interaction=0.0001). Daily administration of folic acid, vitamin B(6), and vitamin B(12) to 8164 patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack for a median of 3.4 years had no significant effect, compared with placebo, on cancer incidence or mortality. However, a post hoc subgroup analysis raises the hypothesis that folic acid treatment may increase the incidence of cancer among diabetics and reduce the incidence of cancer among nondiabetics with a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack.

  13. Parasitic fibroid: case report and novel approach in reducing incidence of future cases

    OpenAIRE

    Sukainah S.; Nasir TK; Zulkifli K.; Roziana R.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of parasitic fibroid which developed less than 1 year following laparoscopic myomectomy using power morcellation. Following this case, a novel approach in reducing the incidence of future parasitic fibroid is described. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(8.000): 2836-2839

  14. Is sodium valproate, an HDAC inhibitor, associated with reduced risk of stroke and myocardial infarction? A nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregan, Alex; Charlton, Judith; Wolfe, Charles D A; Gulliford, Martin C; Markus, Hugh S

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether treatment with sodium valproate (SV) was associated with reduced risk of stroke or myocardial infarction (MI). Electronic health records data were extracted from Clinical Practice Research Database for participants ever diagnosed with epilepsy and prescribed antiepileptic drugs. A nested case-control study was implemented with cases diagnosed with incident non-haemorrhagic stroke and controls matched for sex, year of birth, and study start date (ratio of 1:6). A second nested study was implemented with MI as outcome. The main exposure variable was SV therapy assessed as: ever prescribed, pre-stroke year treatment, number of SV prescriptions, and cumulative time on SV drug therapy. Odds ratios were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Data were analysed for 2002 stroke cases and 13,098 controls. MI analyses included 1153 cases and 7109 controls. Pre-year stroke SV treatment (28%) was associated with increased stroke risk (odds ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09 to 1.38, p < 0.001). No association was observed between ever being prescribed SV with ischemic stroke (OR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.12, p = 0.875). A significant association was observed between ever being prescribed SV with MI (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.67 to 0.90, p < 0.001). Patients in the highest quarter of SV treatment duration had lower odds of ischemic stroke (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.44 to 0.72, p < 0.001) and MI (OR = 0.29, 95% CI: 0.20 to 0.44, p < 0.001). Sodium valproate exposure was associated with the risk of MI, but not ischemic stroke. However, longer exposure to SV was associated with lower odds of stroke, but this might be explained by survivor bias. © 2014 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Juvenile ischemic stroke secondary to cardiogenic embolism: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Soleimanpour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myxomas, the most common primary cardiac tumors, are known as a source of cardiogenic emboli. The possibility of their early detection has made them of great importance for emergency medicines. Detection of the disease is probable at early stages using echocardiography and associate complications such as syncope, cerebral embolic ischemic strokes, and sudden death. We report experience of a rare case of juvenile acute stroke in a patient with cardiac myxoma affecting all cardiac chambers presenting to the emergency department. In young stroke patients with signs and symptoms compatible with cardiovascular involvement, cardiogenic emboli should be taken into consideration; early echocardiographic studies are highly recommended. Prompt myxoma resection is required in both asymptomatic and stroke patients in whom intravenous thrombolysis course has not been implemented due to any limitations.

  16. Sex Differences in the Association Between Insulin Resistance and Incident Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Among Blacks Without Diabetes Mellitus: The Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effoe, Valery S; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Echouffo Tcheugui, Justin B; Chen, Haiying; Joseph, Joshua J; Kalyani, Rita R; Bell, Ronny A; Wu, Wen-Chih H; Casanova, Ramon; Bertoni, Alain G

    2017-02-02

    Studies exploring the association between insulin resistance (IR) and cardiovascular disease in blacks have not been conclusive, especially for coronary heart disease (CHD). The McAuley index and homeostasis model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) perform differently in predicting cardiovascular disease. We investigated this association in the Jackson Heart Study, a large longitudinal cohort of blacks. IR was estimated for 3565 participants without diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease at baseline using the McAuley index and HOMA-IR, and their associations with incident CHD and stroke (composite outcome) were compared. A lower McAuley index and higher HOMA-IR are indicative of IR. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios for incident CHD and/or stroke. There were 158 events (89 CHD-only, 58 stroke-only, and 11 CHD/stroke) over a median follow-up of 8.4 years. After adjustment for demographic factors, the risk of the composite outcome decreased with each SD increase in the McAuley index (hazard ratio 0.80; 95% CI: 0.67-0.96), with no attenuation after further accounting for CHD and stroke risk factors. When considered individually, McAuley index and HOMA-IR were associated with CHD (hazard ratio 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55-0.92 and hazard ratio 1.33, 95% CI: 1.03-1.72, respectively), but not stroke risk. The logHOMA-IR and CHD association was present in men, but not in women (P interaction =0.01). Both HOMA-IR and the McAuley index demonstrate strong associations with CHD but not stroke risk in blacks. The logHOMA-IR and CHD association was present in men, but not in women. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  17. The validity of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score for the prediction of the incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke, and total mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Pankow, James; Lindström, Jaana; Jousilahti, Pekka; Hu, Gang; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2005-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease shares several risk factors with type 2 diabetes. We tested whether the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC), recently developed in a Finnish population to estimate the future risk of diabetes, would also identify individuals at high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, and total mortality in this same population. Independent risk factor surveys were conducted in 1987, 1992, and 1997 in Finland, comprising 8268 men and 9457 women aged 25-64 years and free of CHD and stroke at baseline. During the follow-up until the end of 2001, 699 incident acute CHD events, 324 acute stroke events, and 765 deaths occurred. The data were analysed by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and the Cox-regression model. The areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were 71% for CHD, 73% for stroke, and 68% for total mortality in men and 78, 68, and 72% in women, respectively. The addition of systolic and diastolic blood pressures, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and smoking increased the AUC values modestly (the change of the absolute values from 2.6 to 6.5%), but the additional use of plasma glucose had only a slight effect on the AUC values for CHD and stroke. The FINDRISC is a reasonably good predictor of CHD, stroke and total mortality.

  18. Addition of 24 hour heart rate variability parameters to the cardiovascular health study stroke risk score and prediction of incident stroke : The cardiovascular health study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodapati, R.K.; Kizer, J.R.; Kop, W.J.; Stein, P.K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) characterizes cardiac autonomic functioning. The association of HRV with stroke is uncertain. We examined whether 24‐hour HRV added predictive value to the Cardiovascular Health Study clinical stroke risk score (CHS‐SCORE), previously developed at the baseline

  19. Adherence to a DASH-Style Diet in Relation to Stroke: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknam, Mahdieh; Saadatnia, Mohammad; Shakeri, Forough; Keshteli, Ammar Hassanzadeh; Saneei, Parvane; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing body of evidence from Western societies on the association between dietary patterns and stroke, limited data are available in this regard from developing countries. This study was conducted to examine the association between adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and risk of stroke among the Iranian population. This hospital-based case-control study included 194 stroke patients and 194 controls and was conducted at the Alzahra University Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. The cases were stroke patients who were hospitalized in the neurology ward of the Alzahra University Hospital. Controls were randomly selected from among hospitalized patients in the orthopedic or surgical wards of this center. A validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used to assess the patients' usual dietary intake. We constructed the DASH diet score based on food and nutrients emphasized or minimized in the DASH diet. The prevalence of stroke among those in the top quartile of the DASH diet score was 40%, which was 15% lower than among those in the bottom quartile; this difference was marginally significant (p = 0.10). After controlling for age, sex, and total energy intake, adherence to the DASH diet was inversely associated with the risk of stroke (OR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.28; 0.98). These associations remained significant even after additionally controlling for physical activity, smoking, hypertension, and diabetes, such that individuals in the highest quartile of the DASH diet score had a 58% lower risk of stroke than those in the lowest category (OR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.24, 0.96). However, after further adjustment for body mass index (BMI), the association disappeared (OR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.29, 1.31), indicating an obesity-dependent association. We found an inverse relationship between the DASH-style diet and prevalence of stroke. Prospective studies are needed to confirm this association.

  20. Embedding nursing and therapy consultantship: the case of stroke consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Christopher R; Bennett, Bev; Gibbon, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    As the basis for the design of career development opportunities for current and aspiring nursing and therapy consultants, we aimed to explore the factors that shape how these roles have embedded in UK stroke services. The non-medical consultant role has been introduced into UK health care services to provide opportunities for experienced practitioners to progress their careers in clinical practice. Whilst there have been evaluations of the impact of the role on service delivery, little attention has been paid to the pathways towards consultantship. An exploratory design, incorporating focus group discussions, was used to address the research questions. Participating consultants, both nurses and allied health professionals, worked in stroke services, although it is anticipated that the results will have wider application. Two focus groups were held with non-medical consultants in stroke from across the UK. Participants had the opportunity to comment on an interim paper prior to publication of the results. Thirteen consultants took part in the study. A lack of consensus about the nature of clinical expertise and a diverse range of pathways towards consultantship were identified. Health care policy had presented the opportunity for consultants to be entrepreneurial in the development of stroke services, although this had limited the scope for the development of professional knowledge. Inflexible programmes to support aspiring consultants may limit the opportunities to develop these entrepreneurial skills. This study challenges health care organizations and the education and research departments that support them to think creatively in the way that the non-medical consultant role is embedded, and that this should draw on the commitment of existing consultants to support succession planning. The identification of those aspects of career pathways that current consultants have found to be helpful will be useful in designing opportunities for aspiring consultants.

  1. A rare case of right ventricular myxoma causing recurrent stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Prakash Aroor Sarvotham; Nagendra Prakash, S N; Vasudev, Somanath; Girish, M; Srinivas, Arun; Guru Prasad, H P; Jayakumar, P; Anandaswamy, Venu Gopal

    2016-09-01

    We present a 62-year-old lady admitted in our hospital with two episodes of acute ischemic stroke about 2 weeks apart. She was evaluated for acute ischemic stroke and was thrombolysed for recent stroke in right MCA territory first time. On further evaluation, she was found to have a RVOT mass. A transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiogram revealed a PFO and a large, 5.1cm×2.3cm, ovoid, well circumscribed, echogenic mass in the right ventricle outflow tract attached by small pedicle to the ventricular side of anterior tricuspid leaflet, partly obstructing the right ventricular outflow tract and protruding through the pulmonic valve during systole. She was scheduled for surgery (right ventricular mass excision and PFO closure) after 3 weeks due to the risk of secondary hemorrhage in the infarcted area following thrombolysis and anticoagulation and so was discharged with medications after full neurologic recovery after about a week of hospital stay. She was readmitted 7 days after discharge, before the scheduled date of surgery with history of weakness of right upper limb, slurred speech and mild breathing difficulty lasting for about 20min following which she improved slowly (transient ischemic attack). The tumor was completely removed with the stalk using cardiopulmonary bypass support. The histopathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of myxoma. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. [A case of fatal lightning stroke at an unusual site--the city center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliszan, Michał; Karnecki, Karol; Jankowski, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    A case of a fatal lighting stroke involving a young man staying in a storm near the center of a big city is presented. The atypical character of this case lies in the fact that the lightning stroke usually occurs in open areas (mountains, fields, meadows), or involves people trying to find shelter from the storm under a tree or an isolated object in an open area. In the described case, a contributory factor to the lightning stroke was the fact that during the storm, the man was most probably standing on metal heating pipes, built in the 70's and 80's, long stretches of which were erected high above the ground. Metal used in the construction of the pipes most probably attracted lightning and generated the current which electrocuted the man standing on their surface.

  3. Accuracy of Electronic Health Record Data for Identifying Stroke Cases in Large-Scale Epidemiological Studies: A Systematic Review from the UK Biobank Stroke Outcomes Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Rebecca; Grant, Ian; Sudlow, Cathie L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Long-term follow-up of population-based prospective studies is often achieved through linkages to coded regional or national health care data. Our knowledge of the accuracy of such data is incomplete. To inform methods for identifying stroke cases in UK Biobank (a prospective study of 503,000 UK adults recruited in middle-age), we systematically evaluated the accuracy of these data for stroke and its main pathological types (ischaemic stroke, intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage), determining the optimum codes for case identification. Methods We sought studies published from 1990-November 2013, which compared coded data from death certificates, hospital admissions or primary care with a reference standard for stroke or its pathological types. We extracted information on a range of study characteristics and assessed study quality with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Studies tool (QUADAS-2). To assess accuracy, we extracted data on positive predictive values (PPV) and—where available—on sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values (NPV). Results 37 of 39 eligible studies assessed accuracy of International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-coded hospital or death certificate data. They varied widely in their settings, methods, reporting, quality, and in the choice and accuracy of codes. Although PPVs for stroke and its pathological types ranged from 6–97%, appropriately selected, stroke-specific codes (rather than broad cerebrovascular codes) consistently produced PPVs >70%, and in several studies >90%. The few studies with data on sensitivity, specificity and NPV showed higher sensitivity of hospital versus death certificate data for stroke, with specificity and NPV consistently >96%. Few studies assessed either primary care data or combinations of data sources. Conclusions Particular stroke-specific codes can yield high PPVs (>90%) for stroke/stroke types. Inclusion of primary care data and combining data sources should

  4. Accuracy of Electronic Health Record Data for Identifying Stroke Cases in Large-Scale Epidemiological Studies: A Systematic Review from the UK Biobank Stroke Outcomes Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Woodfield

    Full Text Available Long-term follow-up of population-based prospective studies is often achieved through linkages to coded regional or national health care data. Our knowledge of the accuracy of such data is incomplete. To inform methods for identifying stroke cases in UK Biobank (a prospective study of 503,000 UK adults recruited in middle-age, we systematically evaluated the accuracy of these data for stroke and its main pathological types (ischaemic stroke, intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage, determining the optimum codes for case identification.We sought studies published from 1990-November 2013, which compared coded data from death certificates, hospital admissions or primary care with a reference standard for stroke or its pathological types. We extracted information on a range of study characteristics and assessed study quality with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Studies tool (QUADAS-2. To assess accuracy, we extracted data on positive predictive values (PPV and-where available-on sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values (NPV.37 of 39 eligible studies assessed accuracy of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-coded hospital or death certificate data. They varied widely in their settings, methods, reporting, quality, and in the choice and accuracy of codes. Although PPVs for stroke and its pathological types ranged from 6-97%, appropriately selected, stroke-specific codes (rather than broad cerebrovascular codes consistently produced PPVs >70%, and in several studies >90%. The few studies with data on sensitivity, specificity and NPV showed higher sensitivity of hospital versus death certificate data for stroke, with specificity and NPV consistently >96%. Few studies assessed either primary care data or combinations of data sources.Particular stroke-specific codes can yield high PPVs (>90% for stroke/stroke types. Inclusion of primary care data and combining data sources should improve accuracy in large

  5. Circle of Willis variation in a complex stroke presentation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Carolyn A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of circle of Willis anatomical variation upon the presentation of stroke is probably underrecognised. Case presentation A 63-year-old right-handed woman developed a left hemiparesis and right leg weakness sequentially following a road traffic accident (RTA. Despite initial concern about the possibility of cervical spinal cord injury, the final diagnosis was bilateral artery-to-artery embolic cerebral infarction with dominant right internal carotid artery. Conclusion The case illustrates the complex presentation of stroke as a pseudo-cervical cord lesion and the impact of circle of Willis anatomical variation upon the expression of large vessel cerebrovascular disease.

  6. Common variants of ROCKs and the risk of hypertension, and stroke: Two case-control studies and a follow-up study in Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Song; Zhao, Yanping; Tian, Yuanrui; Chen, Yanchun; Zhao, Xianghai; Li, Ying; Zhao, Hailong; Chen, Xiaotian; Zhu, Lijun; Fang, Zhengmei; Yao, YingShui; Hu, Zhibing; Shen, Chong

    2018-03-01

    The Rho kinases (ROCKs) are recognized as a critical regulator of vascular functions in cardiovascular disorders. It is crucial to illustrate the association of ROCKs genetic variation and hypertension and/or stroke events. Herein we aimed at investigating the association of ROCK1 and ROCK2 with hypertension and stroke in Chinese Han population. Seven tagSNPs at ROCK1 and ROCK2 were genotyped in a community-based case-control study consisting of 2012 hypertension cases and 2210 normotensive controls and 4128 subjects were further followed up. In stroke case-control study, 1471 ischemic stroke (IS) inpatients and 607 hemorrhagic stroke (HS) inpatients were collected, and 2443 age-matched controls were selected from the follow-up population. Risks were estimated as odds ratio (OR) and hazard ratio (HR) by logistic and Cox regression. The community-based case-control study didn't identify any significant tagSNPs associated with hypertension even after adjustment for covariates. The follow-up analysis showed that rs1481280 of ROCK1 significantly associated with incident hypertension (HR=1.130, P=0.048) after adjusting for covariates. rs7589629 and rs978906 of ROCK2 were significantly associated with incident IS (HR=1.373, P=0.004; HR=1.284, P=0.026) respectively. In stroke case-control study, rs288980, rs1481280 and rs7237677 were significantly associated with IS and the adjusted ORs (P values) of additive model were 0.879 (0.010), 0.895 (0.036) and 0.857 (0.002) respectively. Furthermore, rs288980, rs7237677 and rs978906 were significantly associated with HS and the adjusted ORs (P values) of additive model were 0.857 (0.025), 0.848 (0.018) and 0.856 (0.027) respectively. Our findings suggest that ROCK1 and ROCK2 contribute to the genetic susceptibility of hypertension and stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk factors for ischaemic and intracerebral haemorrhagic stroke in 22 countries (the INTERSTROKE study): a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donnell, M.J.; Serpault, Damien Xavier; Xiufeng, Liu

    2010-01-01

    Background The contribution of various risk factors to the burden of stroke worldwide is unknown, particularly in countries of low and middle income. We aimed to establish the association of known and emerging risk factors with stroke and its primary subtypes, assess the contribution of these risk...... factors to the burden of stroke, and explore the differences between risk factors for stroke and myocardial infarction. Methods We undertook a standardised case-control study in 22 countries worldwide between March 1, 2007, and April 23, 2010. Cases were patients with acute first stroke (within 5 days...... of symptoms onset and 72 h of hospital admission). Controls had no history of stroke, and were matched with cases for age and sex. All participants completed a structured questionnaire and a physical examination, and most provided blood and urine samples. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and population...

  8. Bow hunter's stroke associated with atlantooccipital assimilation--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, K; Tsutsui, T

    1999-09-01

    A 39-year-old male presented with bow hunter's stroke manifesting as repeated vertebrobasilar ischemic attacks induced by head rotation 45 degrees to the left. Three-dimensional computed tomography angiography clearly showed the occluded right vertebral artery (VA) between the axis and atlas. Single photon emission computed tomography study showed diffuse hypoperfusion of the brain stem and bilateral cerebellar hemispheres, suggesting hemodynamic compromise of these regions. He refused surgery and was treated conservatively. The most likely mechanism is that the affected VA was fixed by the ossification of the atlantooccipital membrane, vascular groove, and transverse foramen of the atlas, and therefore became elongated and compressed by head-turning.

  9. Stroke with neuropsychiatric sequelae after cannabis use in a man: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giroud Maurice

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The outcome of cerebral ischemic stroke associated with cannabis use is usually favorable. Here we report the first case of cannabis-related stroke followed by neuropsychiatric sequelae. Case presentation A 24-year-old Caucasian man was discovered in a deeply comatose non-reactive state after cannabis use. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of his brain showed bilateral multiple ischemic infarcts. The patient remained deeply comatose for four days, after which time he developed other behavioral impairments and recurrent seizures. Conclusion Stroke related to cannabis use can be followed by severe neuropsychiatric sequelae. Concomitant alcohol intoxication is essential neither to the occurrence of this neurologic event nor to its severity.

  10. Ischaemic stroke in HIV-infected patients: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Pinto, A; Costa, A; Serrão, R; Sarmento, A; Abreu, P

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to provide insights into the contributions of HIV infection stage, antiretroviral therapy (ART) and vascular risk factors to the occurrence of ischaemic stroke in HIV-infected patients. We performed a case-control study of HIV-infected patients followed in our clinic. We compared patients hospitalized between January 2006 and June 2014 with an ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack to age- and gender-matched controls without stroke. Of 2146 patients followed in our clinic, we included 23 cases (20 men and three women; mean age 51.3 years) and 23 controls. Eighty-three per cent of cases had had a stroke and 17% a transient ischaemic attack. According to the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification, small-vessel occlusion was the most frequent aetiology, followed by large-artery atherosclerosis and cardioembolism. Compared with controls, stroke was statistically significantly associated with diabetes, smoking and low concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Illegal drug use, a low CD4 count and a high viral load were also associated with ischaemic cerebral events. There were no statistically significant differences between cases and controls in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) HIV stage, CD4 count nadir and HIV infection time-to-event. No statistically significant differences were found concerning ART or treatment compliance. In our single centre study, we found associations of illegal drug use, HIV replication and some traditional vascular risk factors with the occurrence of ischaemic cerebral events. The paradigm of the care of HIV-infected patients is changing. Concomitant diseases in the ageing patient with HIV infection, including cerebrovascular disease, must also be addressed in view of their impacts on morbidity and mortality. Apart from controlling the HIV infection and immunosuppression with ART, vascular risk factors must also be addressed. © 2016 British HIV

  11. Stroke rehabilitation outcome variation in Veterans Affairs rehabilitation units: accounting for case-mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reker, D M; O'Donnell, J C; Hamilton, B B

    1998-07-01

    To assess variation in stroke outcomes and create a case-mix adjustment model for stroke rehabilitation in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. Observational Within Veteran's Health Administration hospitals, there are 63 acute rehabilitation bedservice units that care for approximately 2,000 stroke patients annually. Functional gain in FIM points, length of stay (LOS), LOS efficiency (FIM gain/LOS). Significant variation in average patient functional gain, LOS, and LOS efficiency was observed among the 37 highest-volume rehabilitation units. Using analysis of covariance, a model was developed that adjusted functional gain and LOS (logged LOS) unit means using 10 potential covariates identified in a literature review and in pilot studies. Four and six covariates, respectively, were retained in the final models for FIM gain and LOS. The R2 for FIM gain and LOS accounted for by rehabilitation unit alone increased from .07 to .31 (FIM gain) and from .13 to .34 (logLOS) with the addition of the significant covariates to each model. As much as 24% of the variation in two important stroke rehabilitation outcomes is attributable to largely immutable patient and system characteristics (eg, patient function on admission, age, days since stroke onset, year of discharge, marital status, and referral source). Hence, controlling for case-mix is critical for accurate comparison of unit outcomes. Further, the variation in LOS efficiency between VA rehabilitation units suggests a large potential for cost and resource utilization savings system-wide.

  12. Evaluating and improving incident management using historical incident data : case studies at Texas transportation management centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The companion guidebook (0-5485-P2) developed as part of this study provides the procedures and : methodologies for effective use of historical incident data at Texas Transportation Management Centers : (TMCs). This research report documents the resu...

  13. Art Therapy Outcomes in the Rehabilitation Treatment of a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Min-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Chun, Sae-il

    2008-01-01

    This case report discusses the potential for art therapy to aid in the recovery of early-chronic stroke patients. The patient was diagnosed with having a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a cerebral aneurysm rupture 1 year prior to hospitalization. Therapies used as part of the patient's treatment included 10 weeks of art therapy conducted twice a…

  14. Rationale and design of INTERSTROKE: a global case-control study of risk factors for stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donnell, M; Serpault, Damien Xavier; Diener, C

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is a major global health problem. It is the third leading cause of death and the leading cause of adult disability. INTERHEART, a global case-control study of acute myocardial infarction in 52 countries (29,972 participants), identified nine modifiable risk factors that accounted for >90% ...

  15. Challenges of information security incident learning: An industrial case study in a Chinese healthcare organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Johnson, Chris

    2017-12-01

    Security incidents can have negative impacts on healthcare organizations, and the security of medical records has become a primary concern of the public. However, previous studies showed that organizations had not effectively learned lessons from security incidents. Incident learning as an essential activity in the "follow-up" phase of security incident response lifecycle has long been addressed but not given enough attention. This paper conducted a case study in a healthcare organization in China to explore their current obstacles in the practice of incident learning. We interviewed both IT professionals and healthcare professionals. The results showed that the organization did not have a structured way to gather and redistribute incident knowledge. Incident response was ineffective in cycling incident knowledge back to inform security management. Incident reporting to multiple stakeholders faced a great challenge. In response to this case study, we suggest the security assurance modeling framework to address those obstacles.

  16. Serum Taurine and Stroke Risk in Women: A Prospective, Nested Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fen; Koenig, Karen L.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Jonas, Saran; Afanasyeva, Yelena; Wójcik, Oktawia P.; Costa, Max; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a conditionally essential sulfur-containing amino acid, is mainly obtained from diet in humans. Experimental studies have shown that taurine’s main biological actions include bile salt conjugation, blood pressure regulation, anti-oxidation, and anti-inflammation. Methods We conducted a prospective case-control study nested in the New York University Women’s Health Study, a cohort study involving 14,274 women enrolled since 1985. Taurine was measured in pre-diagnostic serum samples of 241 stroke cases and 479 matched controls. Results There was no statistically significant association between serum taurine and stroke risk in the overall study population. The adjusted ORs for stroke were 1.0 (reference), 0.87 (95% CI, 0.59–1.28), and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.69–1.54) in increasing tertiles of taurine (64.3–126.6, 126.7–152.9, and 153.0–308.5 nmol/mL, respectively). A significant inverse association between serum taurine and stroke risk was observed among never smokers, with an adjusted OR of 0.66 (95% CI, 0.37–1.18) and 0.50 (95% CI, 0.26–0.94) for the second and third tertile, respectively (p for trend = 0.01), but not among past or current smokers (p for interaction taurine and stroke risk, although a protective effect was observed in never smokers, which requires further investigation. Taurine, Stroke, Epidemiology, Prospective, Case-control study, NYUWHS. PMID:26866594

  17. Prevalence and predictors of 6-month fatigue in patients with ischemic stroke: a population-based stroke incidence study in Auckland, New Zealand, 2002-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, Valery L; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Parag, Varsha; Hackett, Maree L; Kerse, Ngaire; Barber, P Alan; Theadom, Alice; Krishnamurthi, Rita

    2012-10-01

    Although persistent and significant fatigue affects the daily life of stroke survivors, there are no population-based studies examining the prevalence of fatigue in 6-month survivors of ischemic stroke and few studies of predictors of poststroke fatigue. This article examined data from the Auckland Regional Community Stroke study conducted in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2002 to 2003. Presence of fatigue was evaluated at 6 months in 613 patients with ischemic stroke using a Short Form 36 Vitality Score (energy and fatigue) of ≤ 47. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine predictors of fatigue development 6 months poststroke. The prevalence of fatigue was 30% (28% in men and 33% in women). There was a clear association between increased prevalence of fatigue and advancing age. The only baseline variables independently associated with an increased risk of developing fatigue at 6 months poststroke were prestroke incontinence and being of New Zealand European ethnicity. Being independent and living alone at baseline were associated with significant reduction in the risk of being fatigued at 6 months poststroke. Severe depression at 6 months was significantly and independently associated with being fatigued. The prevalence of fatigue found in our study is at the lower level of range reported in other studies. The prevalence of fatigue increased with advancing age, as found in most previous studies. Because fatigue can have a negative impact on stroke recovery, particular attention needs to be paid to those who are older, incontinent before stroke, and those who report severe symptoms of depression at 6 months after stroke.

  18. Incidence of Depression After Stroke, and Associated Risk Factors and Mortality Outcomes, in a Large Cohort of Danish Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Terese S. H.; Wium-Andersen, Ida K.; Wium-Andersen, Marie K.

    2016-01-01

    Importance: More than 30 million people live with a stroke diagnosis worldwide. Depression after stroke is frequent, and greater knowledge of associated risk factors and outcomes is needed to understand the etiology and implications of this disabling complication. Objectives: To examine whether......, history of depression, and stroke severity (in patients with stroke). The associations were strongest for the reference population. In both populations, depressed individuals, especially those with new onset, had increased all-cause mortality (hazard ratio for new-onset depression, 1.89 [95% CI, 1...

  19. Dietary habits in patients with ischemic stroke: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rodríguez-Campello

    Full Text Available Diet appears to have some role in stroke development. The objective of our study was to describe the dietary habits in patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke and compare selected dietary components with healthy controls. Adherence to healthy diet behaviors was also assessed.A case-control study of consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to the Neurology Department of Hospital del Mar from 2007 to 2010. Patients were matched by age and sex with control subjects. A previously validated nutritional survey was administered to patients and controls. Demographic data, vascular risk factors, caloric intake and dietary nutrients were evaluated. Intention to follow a healthy diet was also assessed in both groups.A total of 300 acute ischemic stroke patients and 300 controls with evaluation of dietary habits. No differences were observed in vascular risk factors, except smoking habit, diabetes and ischemic heart disease. Stroke patients reported a higher caloric intake: 2444.8(1736.8-3244.5 vs 2208.7(1753.1-2860.7 Kcal, p = 0.001. After adjusting for energy intake, patients had higher intake of proteins (p<0.001; OR 1.02, total cholesterol (p = 0.001; OR 1.04, and breaded foods (p = 0.001; OR 1.94 and lower consumption of probiotic yogurt (p = 0.002; OR 0.88. Compared to patients, control participants indicated greater intention to eat vegetables (p = 0.002; OR 1.5 and whole foods (p = 0.000; OR 2.4 and reduce their intake of salt (p = 0.002; OR 1.7, fat (p = 0.000; OR 3.7 and sweets (p = 0.004; OR 1.7 than patients.We observed different dietary patterns between stroke patients and controls. Stroke patients have a higher caloric intake and are less concerned about maintaining healthy nutritional habits.

  20. Epidemiology and Etiology of Young Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, Dayna; Sturm, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Stroke in people under 45 years of age is less frequent than in older populations but has a major impact on the individual and society. In this article we provide an overview of the epidemiology and etiology of young stroke. Methods. This paper is based on a review of population-based studies on stroke incidence that have included subgroup analyses for patients under 45 years of age, as well as smaller community-based studies and case-series specifically examining the incidence ...

  1. Critical Incident Analysis through Narrative Reflective Practice: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2013-01-01

    Teachers can reflect on their practices by articulating and exploring incidents they consider critical to themselves or others. By talking about these critical incidents, teachers can make better sense of seemingly random experiences that occur in their teaching because they hold the real inside knowledge, especially personal intuitive knowledge,…

  2. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation combined with treadmill training in the subacute phase following stroke: case series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figlewski, Krystian; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk; Blicher, Jakob

    Background Stroke is a common cause of gait impairment and regaining a normal gait is a major target in stroke rehabilitation. To facilitate motor recovery after stroke, a variety of experimental approaches have been tested. Recent developments include non-invasive brain stimulation techniques...... such as transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS). In neurophysiologic studies an imbalance of interhemispheric interactions has been demonstrated which is believed to interfere with the recovery process. This imbalance can be ameliorated by upregulation of the excitability in the lesioned hemisphere applying...... (Fig.3). No major side effects were reported. Conclusions This case series supports the feasibility of anodal tDCS combined with body weight support treadmill training and demonstrates that this type of intervention carries potential for strategy to improve gait recovery in early phase...

  3. Effects of arm training with the robotic device ARMin I in chronic stroke: three single cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nef, Tobias; Quinter, Gabriela; Müller, Roland; Riener, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Several clinical studies on chronic stroke conducted with end-effector-based robots showed improvement of the motor function in the affected arm. Compared to end-effector-based robots, exoskeleton robots provide improved guidance of the human limb and are better suited to train task-oriented movements with a large range of motions. To test whether intensive arm training with the arm exoskeleton ARMin I is feasible with chronic-stroke patients and whether it improves motor function in the paretic arm. Three single cases with chronic hemiparesis resulting from unilateral stroke (at least 14 months after stroke). A-B design with 2 weeks of multiple baseline measurements (A), 8 weeks of training (B) with repetitive measurements and a follow-up measurement 8 weeks after training. The training included shoulder and elbow movements with the robotic rehabilitation device ARMin I. Two subjects had three 1-hour sessions per week and 1 subject received five 1-hour sessions per week. The main outcome measurement was the upper-limb part of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA). The ARMin training was well tolerated by the patients, and the FMA showed moderate, but significant improvements for all 3 subjects (p arm exoskeleton is feasible with chronic-stroke patients. Moderate improvements were found in all 3 subjects, thus further clinical investigations are justified. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. A Rare Case Series of Ischemic Stroke Following Russell’s Viper Snake Bite in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Krishna Pothukuchi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Snakebite is an important medical problem in India. Among their various manifestations, cerebral complications are uncommonly found in literature. Moreover, Ischemic stroke following snake bite is quite rare. Here we report a case series of two such cases that developed neurological manifestations following Russell’s viper bite. On computerized tomography (CT scan of brain; cerebral infarcts were revealed. Their likely mechanisms are discussed in present study which include disseminated intravascular coagulation, toxin induced vasculitis and endothelial damage.

  5. Process review of a departmental change from conventional coronary artery bypass grafting to totally arterial coronary artery bypass and its effects on the incidence and severity of postoperative stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Alexander; Sergeant, Paul; Florath, Ines; Ismael, Mohammed; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Ennker, Jürgen

    2011-04-01

    We evaluated the process of changing from conventional coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) to totally arterial off-pump coronary artery bypass (TOPCAB) at a single heart center in Germany. We (1) used multivariate statistical methods to assess real-time monitoring of OPCAB effects, (2) conducted a case review to assess preventable deaths and identify areas of improvement, (3) conducted a team survey, and (4) evaluated benchmarking results. All surgeons and assistants (n = 18) at this center were involved and were guided by the department head and one of the consultants, who was trained in this procedure in 2004 at the Leuven OPCAB school. The frequency of OPCAB operations increased abruptly in 2005 from 5% to 43% and then increased gradually to 67% (n = 546) by 2008 (total, 1781 OPCAB cases and 1563 on-pump cases). The in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates for OPCAB surgeries (n = 10 [0.6%] and 21 [1.2%], respectively) were lower than for on-pump surgeries (n = 27 [1.7%] and 26 [1.7%], respectively). Stroke rates were also lower for OPCAB surgeries (7 cases [0.4%] versus 15 cases [1%]). The lower risk of stroke in the OPCAB group was significant (P popularity, and a top national rank). The change from conventional CABG to TOPCAB was effective in decreasing the incidence and severity of stroke, in developing a team routine and a positive team attitude, and in producing excellent benchmarking results. The presence of a training and communication deficiency at the beginning of the study suggested an area for further improvement. After 6 years TOPCAB had largely replaced conventional CABG.

  6. Risk of Carotid Stroke after Chiropractic Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassidy, J. David; Boyle, Eleanor; Côté, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    incident cases of carotid artery stroke admitted to hospitals over a 9-year period were identified. Cases served as their own controls. Exposures to chiropractic and PCP services were determined from health billing records. Results We compared 15,523 cases to 62,092 control periods using exposure windows...

  7. Crossed Aphasia and Visuo-Spatial Neglect Following a Right Thalamic Stroke: A Case Study and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieve De Witte

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Crossed aphasia in dextrals (CAD following pure subcortical lesions is rare. This study describes a right-handed patient with an ischemic lesion in the right thalamus. In the post-acute phase of the stroke, a unique combination of ‘crossed thalamic aphasia’ was found with left visuo-spatial neglect and constructional apraxia. On the basis of the criteria used in Mariën et al. [67], this case-report is the first reliable representative of vascular CAD following an isolated lesion in the right thalamus. Furthermore, this paper presents a detailed analysis of linguistic and cognitive impairments of ‘possible’ and 'reliable' subcortical CAD-cases published since 1975. Out of 25 patients with a pure subcortical lesion, nine cases were considered as ‘possibly reliable or reliable’. A review of these cases reveals that: (1 demographic data are consistent with the general findings for the entire group of vascular CAD, (2 the neurolinguistic findings do not support the data in the general CAD-population with regard to (a the high prevalence of transcortical aphasia and (b the tendency towards a copresence of an oral versus written language dissociation and a ‘mirror-image’ lesion-aphasia profile, (3 subcortical CAD is not a transient phenomenon, (4 the lesion-aphasia correlations are not congruent with the high incidence of anomalous cases in the general CAD-population, (5 neuropsychological impairments may accompany subcortical CAD.

  8. Critical incident analysis through narrative reflective practice: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S. C. Farrell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Teachers can reflect on their practices by articulating and exploring incidents they consider critical to themselves or others. By talking about these critical incidents, teachers can make better sense of seemingly random experiences that occur in their teaching because they hold the real inside knowledge, especially personal intuitive knowledge, expertise and experience that is based on their accumulated years as language educators teaching in schools and classrooms. This paper is about one such critical incident analysis that an ESL teacher in Canada revealed to her critical friend and how both used McCabe’s (2002 narrative framework for analyzing an important critical incident that occurred in the teacher’s class.

  9. Meta-analysis of factor V Leiden and ischemic stroke in young adults: the importance of case ascertainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedani, Ali G; Cole, John W; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J

    2010-08-01

    The factor V Leiden mutation is associated with ischemic stroke in children but not in adults. Whether it is associated with ischemic stroke in young adults, however, is uncertain. To address this issue, we performed a meta-analysis of 18 case-control studies of ischemic stroke in adults 50 years of age and younger published before June 2009. Across all studies, factor V Leiden was detected in 154 of 2045 cases (7.5%) and 217 of 5307 controls (4.1%), yielding a fixed-effect odds ratio of 2.00 (95% CI, 1.59-2.51). However, further analyses revealed substantial heterogeneity among these studies (P=0.005 for Q-test of heterogeneity). Hypothesizing that this heterogeneity could be related to differences among studies in case selection criteria, we stratified the meta-analysis into studies for which case samples were enriched or not enriched to include cases having an increased likelihood of prothrombotic genetic involvement ("selected" ischemic stroke studies, n=9) and those that recruited cases from consecutive neurology referrals or hospitalizations ("unselected" ischemic stroke studies, n=8). Among the 9 "selected" ischemic stroke studies, factor V Leiden was more strongly associated with stroke (OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.98-3.75), whereas among the 8 "unselected" ischemic stroke studies, the association between factor V Leiden and stroke was substantially weaker (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 0.998-1.95). This difference was found to be statistically significant (P=0.003 for Woolf test for heterogeneity). We conclude that factor V Leiden is associated with ischemic stroke in young adults, particularly in patient populations in which there is an increased clinical suspicion of prothrombotic state.

  10. Gastrointestinal Bowel Obstruction in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Outcomes in a U.S. Nationwide Analysis of 3,998,667 Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumalla, Kavelin; Kumar, Ashwath S; Mittal, Manoj K

    2017-10-01

    The prognosis from acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is worsened by poststroke medical complications. The incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of gastrointestinal bowel obstruction (GIBO) in AIS are not known. We queried the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2002-2011) to identify all patients with a primary diagnosis of AIS and subsets with and without a secondary diagnosis of GIBO without hernia. Multivariable analysis was utilized to identify risk factors for GIBO in AIS patients and the association between GIBO, in-hospital complications, and outcomes. We identified 16,987 patients with GIBO (.43%) among 3,988,667 AIS hospitalizations and 4.2% of these patients underwent surgery. In multivariable analysis, patients with 75+ years of age were two times as likely to suffer GIBO compared to younger patients (P Stroke patients with pre-existing comorbidities (coagulopathy, cancer, blood loss anemia, and fluid/electrolyte disorder) were more likely to experience GIBO (all P risk factors identified in this study aim to encourage the monitoring of patients at highest risk for GIBO. The predominant form of stroke-related GIBO is nonmechanical obstruction, although the causative relationship remains unknown. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Five-year outcome of a stroke cohort in Martinique, French West Indies: Etude Réalisée en Martinique et Centrée sur l'Incidence des Accidents vasculaires cérebraux, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chausson, Nicolas; Olindo, Stéphane; Cabre, Philippe; Saint-Vil, Martine; Smadja, Didier

    2010-04-01

    Limited information exists on stroke among black populations outside the United States and United Kingdom. Part 1 of the Etude Réalisée en Martinique et Centrée sur l'Incidence des Accidents vasculaires cérebraux (ERMANCIA) provided strong epidemiologic data on the incidence of first-ever stroke in a black Caribbean population and showed a 40% greater incidence of stroke in Martinique than in continental France. In ERMANCIA part 2, we evaluated the long-term outcomes of our cohort. Survivors of a first stroke from this prospective, community-based, stroke incidence study were reassessed at 5 years according to standardized procedures and criteria, including the modified Rankin scale, Barthel Index, Montgomery-Asberg Depression-Rating Scale, Mini-Mental State Examination, treatment compliance, and blood pressure control. Of the 293 survivors of the original 580 (50.5%) patients who were still alive 5 years after stroke, 262 (89.4%) were assessed. Among these survivors, 66.4% were functionally independent and 43% were completely autonomous for activities of daily living, but 25.8% were depressed and 58.9% were cognitively impaired. Only 50 of 170 (29.4%) of the hypertensive patients achieved their target blood pressure. These results highlight the very poor blood pressure control and the very high rate of cognitive impairment in Martinican patients after stroke. As a consequence, a poststroke prevention network was established in Martinique.

  12. Dose-Response Relationship Between Thrombin-Activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor (TAFI) and Stroke: A Chinese Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Huixu; Shi, Jingpu; He, Qiao; Sun, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Background Because TAFI (thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) antigen varies widely among different populations, we performed this case-control study to explore the relationship between TAFI levels and stroke in a Chinese population. Material/Methods Our population-based case-control study included 217 stroke patients and 218 healthy controls. The plasma TAFI level was measured by immune turbidimetry. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the association between different TAFI levels and stroke and its subtypes. Restricted cubic spline (RCS) combined with logistic regression analysis were used to explore the dose-response relationship between TAFI levels and stroke. Results The plasma TAFI levels of cases were much higher than in the control group (p=0.038) and this difference persisted even after adjustment (OR=2.2). In the elderly (aged over 60) and female subgroups, TAFI levels in stroke patients were higher than those in controls, and the results were also noted in ischemic stroke. The dose-response curve showed that, as a whole, with the increase of TAFI levels, the relative risk of stroke first increased and then decreased (p=0.0127). Similarly, in general, with the increase of TAFI levels, the curve showed that the relative risk of ischemic stroke first increased and then decreased (p=0.0110). Conclusions There was a definite correlation between TAFI levels and stroke in this Chinese population, and with the increase of TAFI levels, the relative risk of stroke or ischemic stroke first increased and then decreased. PMID:28890533

  13. Declining Incidence of Ischemic Stroke: What Is the Impact of Changing Risk Factors? The Tromsø Study 1995 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangen-Lønne, Anne M; Wilsgaard, Tom; Johnsen, Stein Harald; Løchen, Maja-Lisa; Njølstad, Inger; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B

    2017-03-01

    It is proposed that 20% to 40% of the decline in first-ever stroke incidence is attributed to the improvement of risk factor control. We estimated the impact of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors on the changing incidence of ischemic stroke (IS) between 1995 and 2012, using individual person data from repeated surveys in a general population. The proportion of the IS incidence decline explained by change in each risk factor over time was estimated from 1995 to 2012 by Poisson regression among 26 329 participants who attended the fourth Tromsø survey in 1994 to 1995. Hazard ratios for IS were estimated with Cox proportional hazards regression among 27 936 participants who attended at least 1 of the Tromsø surveys in 1994 to 1995, 2001, or 2007 to 2008. Age- and sex-adjusted means or prevalences of risk factors over time were estimated by generalized estimating equations. There were 1226 first-ever IS during 367 636 person-years of follow-up. Changes in cardiovascular risk factors accounted for 57% of the decrease in IS incidence from 1995 to 2012. The most important contributors were decreasing mean systolic blood pressure and smoking prevalence, accounting for 26% and 17% of the observed decline, respectively. Conversely, increasing diabetes mellitus prevalence contributed negatively to the declining IS incidence. Changes in cardiovascular risk factors explained 57% of the decrease in IS incidence from 1995 to 2012. Reduction in systolic blood pressure and prevalence of smoking were the most important contributors. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Safety Incident Management Team Report for NIMLT Case 50796

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2017-01-17

    This is a report on the management of a patient safety incident involving BowelScreen and symptomatic colonoscopy services at Wexford General Hospital (WGH). The patient safety incident relates to the work of a Consultant Endoscopist (referred to as Clinician Y) employed by WGH who undertook screening colonoscopies on behalf of the BowelScreen Programme since the commencement of the screening programme in WGH in March 2013. Clinician Y also performed non-screening colonoscopies for the diagnosis of symptomatic patients as part of routine surgical service provision at WGH.\\r\

  15. Socioeconomic position and incidence of ischemic stroke in denmark 2003-2012. A nationwide hospital-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2014-01-01

    of working age (smoking, and high alcohol consumption in particular and, to a lesser extent, previous myocardial infarction or intermittent arterial claudication were significantly overrepresented among stroke...... patients with lower socioeconomic position. Atrial fibrillation and hypertension were not. CONCLUSIONS: In Denmark, there is a strong relation between low socioeconomic position and risk for hospitalization for stroke. Lifestyle, as indicated by smoking, obesity, and alcohol consumption, and diabetes...

  16. Patent Foramen Ovale in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease and Stroke: Case Presentations and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Razdan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD are at increased risk for stroke, the underlying pathophysiology is incompletely understood. Intracardiac shunting via a patent foramen ovale (PFO is associated with cryptogenic stroke in individuals without SCD. Recent evidence suggests that PFOs are associated with stroke in children with SCD, although the role of PFOs in adults with stroke and SCD is unknown. Here, we report 2 young adults with SCD, stroke, and PFOs. The first patient had hemoglobin SC and presented with a transient ischemic attack and a subsequent ischemic stroke. There was no evidence of cerebral vascular disease on imaging studies and the PFO was closed. The second patient had hemoglobin SS and two acute ischemic strokes. She had cerebral vascular disease with moyamoya in addition to a peripheral deep venous thrombosis (DVT. Chronic transfusion therapy was recommended, and the DVT was managed with warfarin. The PFO was not closed, and the patients' neurologic symptoms were stabilized. We review the literature on PFOs and stroke in SCD. Our cases and the literature review illustrate the dire need for further research to evaluate PFO as a potential risk factor for stroke in adults with SCD.

  17. The role of perfusion CT in identifying stroke mimics in the emergency room: a case of status epilepticus presenting with perfusion CT alterations

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, Waldo R; Dababneh, Haitham; Eisenschenk, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Emergency medicine physicians are often faced with the challenging task of differentiating true acute ischemic strokes from stroke mimics. We present a case that was initially diagnosed as acute stroke. However, perfusion CT and EEG eventually led to the final diagnosis of status epilepticus. This case further asserts the role of CT perfusion in the evaluation of patients with stroke mimics in the emergency room setting.

  18. Stroke-related Wernicke's Aphasia Mistaken for Psychosis: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients with isolated Wernicke' aphasia present a variety of challenges to healthcare providers, The presentation of speech and language problems, especially with the features seen in Wernicke's aphasia, can be misinterpreted as psychiatric disorders. The authors present the case of a man who sustained a right-sided ...

  19. The gender effect in stroke thrombolysis: of CASES, controls, and treatment-effect modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, David M; Buchan, Alastair M; Hill, Michael D

    2008-09-30

    Large studies of patients with acute stroke not receiving thrombolytic therapy have repeatedly demonstrated poorer outcomes for women compared to men. An analysis of five pooled randomized controlled trials testing IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) demonstrated that rtPA benefits women more than men; the usual gender difference, apparent among controls, was totally nullified in the rtPA group. This nullification of the usual gender effect among rtPA-treated patients has not been confirmed. We analyzed baseline characteristics and functional outcomes in men vs women in the Canadian Alteplase for Stroke Effectiveness Study (CASES), a multicenter study that collected outcomes data for patients treated with rtPA in Canada to assess the safety and effectiveness of alteplase for stroke in the context of routine care. Among 1,110 patients, including 615 men and 505 women, a normal or near normal outcome at 90 days was found in 37.1% of men vs 36.0% of women (p = 0.71). This was essentially unchanged after adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics, including age >70, glucose, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, hypercholesterolemia, baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Severity, and baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT score (35.2% in men vs 38.2% in women, p = 0.332). Ninety-day mortality was similar between the sexes in both the adjusted and unadjusted analysis. There was no difference in 90-day outcomes in recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA)-treated men and rtPA-treated women. This is consistent with the pooled analysis of randomized controlled trials, showing greater benefit for thrombolysis in women and nullification of the usual gender difference in outcome.

  20. Examining vertebrobasilar artery stroke in two Canadian provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Eleanor; Côté, Pierre; Grier, Alexander R; Cassidy, J David

    2009-02-01

    Ecological study. To determine the annual incidence of hospitalized vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stroke and chiropractic utilization in Saskatchewan and Ontario between 1993 and 2004. To determine whether at an ecological level, the incidence of VBA stroke parallels the incidence of chiropractic utilization. Little is known about the incidence and time trends of VBA stroke diagnoses in the population. Chiropractic manipulation to the neck is believed to be a risk factor for VBA stroke. No study has yet found an association between chiropractic utilization and VBA diagnoses at the population level. All hospitalizations with discharge diagnoses of VBA stroke were extracted from administrative databases for Saskatchewan and Ontario. We included incident cases that were diagnosed between January 1993 and December 2004 for Saskatchewan and from April 1993 to March 2002 for Ontario. VBA cases that had previously been hospitalized for any stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) were excluded. Chiropractic utilization was measured using billing data from Saskatchewan Health and Ontario Health Insurance Plan. Denominators were derived from Statistics Canada's annual population estimates. The incidence rate of VBA stroke was 0.855 per 100,000 person-years for Saskatchewan and 0.750 per 100,000 person-years for Ontario. The annual incidence rate spiked dramatically with a 360% increase for Saskatchewan in 2000. There was a 38% increase for the 2000 incidence rate in Ontario. The rate of chiropractic utilization did not increase significantly during the study period. In Saskatchewan, we observed a dramatic increase in the incidence rate in 2000 and there was a corresponding relatively small increase in chiropractic utilization. In Ontario, there was a small increase in the incidence rate; however, chiropractic utilization decreased. At the ecological level, the increase in VBA stroke does not seem to be associated with an increase in the rate of chiropractic utilization.

  1. A case-control study on potato consumption and risk of stroke in central Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi-Boroujeni, Hossein; Saadatnia, Mohammad; Shakeri, Forough; Keshteli, Ammar Hassanzadeh; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2013-03-01

      Potato, a high- glycemic index (GI) food, is one of the most widely used starchy foods worldwide. Previous studies on the association of dietary intakes with stroke have mostly focused on the dietary GI and there is no information regarding the association between potato consumption and risk of stroke. This case-control study was conducted to evaluate the association between potato consumption and risk of stroke in an Iranian adult population. In this case-control study, 195 patients with stroke, hospitalized in the Neurology Ward of Alzahra University Hospital and 195 controls from other wards of the hospital with convenience non-random sampling method were enrolled. To assess participants' dietary intakes, a validated food frequency questionnaire was used. Information on socioeconomic and demographic variables, physical activity pattern, and smoking were collected by the use of questionnaires. Logistic regression method in different models was applied to explore the associations between potato intake and stroke. First quartile of potato intake was used as a reference in all models. Mantel-Haenszel extension chi-square test was used to assess the overall trend across quartiles of potato consumption. Individuals with stroke were more likely to be male (60% vs. 46%, P < 0.05) and older (68.0 ± 1.0 vs. 61.5 ± 0.8 y, P < 0.001) as compared with controls. They had lower body mass index (BMI) (25.2 ± 0.3 vs. 28.5 ± 1.0 kg/m2, P < 0.05), and were less likely to be obese (11.3% vs. 29.2%, P < 0.001) compared with controls. The mean potato consumption was 31.1 ± 3.4 and 23.4 ± 1.3 g/d for cases and controls, respectively. Participants with the highest potato consumption were younger and more likely to be physically active. High potato consumption was associated with higher intakes of energy, fruits, vegetables, pulses, and grains. After adjustment for age, sex, and total energy intake, we found that individuals with the highest potato consumption were more likely

  2. Risk Factors of Ischemic Stroke and Subsequent Outcome in Patients Receiving Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Mark D; Thomson, Peter C; Fulton, Rachael L; Solbu, Marit D; Jardine, Alan G; Patel, Rajan K; Stevens, Kathryn K; Geddes, Colin C; Dawson, Jesse; Mark, Patrick B

    2015-09-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring hemodialysis carries up to a 10-fold greater risk of stroke than normal renal function. Knowledge on risk factors and management strategies derived from the general population may not be applicable to those with ESRD. We studied a large ESRD population to identify risk factors and outcomes for stroke. All adult patients receiving hemodialysis for ESRD from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2012, were extracted from the electronic patient record. Variables associated with stroke were identified by survival analysis; demographic, clinical, imaging, and dialysis-related variables were assessed, and case-fatality was determined. Follow-up was until December 31, 2013. A total of 1382 patients were identified (mean age, 60.5 years; 58.5% men). The prevalence of atrial fibrillation was 21.2%, and 59.4% were incident hemodialysis patients. One hundred and sixty patients (11.6%) experienced a stroke during 3471 patient-years of follow-up (95% ischemic). Stroke incidence was 41.5/1000 patient-years in prevalent and 50.1/1000 patient-years in incident hemodialysis patients. Factors associated with stroke on regression analysis were prior stroke, diabetes mellitus, and age at starting renal replacement therapy. Atrial fibrillation was not significantly associated with stroke, and warfarin did not affect stroke risk in warfarin-treated patients. Fatality was 18.8% at 7 days, 26.9% at 28 days, and 56.3% at 365 days after stroke. Incidence of stroke is high in patients with ESRD on hemodialysis with high case-fatality. Incident hemodialysis patients had the highest stroke incidence. Many, but not all, important risk factors commonly associated with stroke in the general population were not associated with stroke in patients receiving hemodialysis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Incidence, outcome, risk factors, and long-term prognosis of cryptogenic transient ischaemic attack and ischaemic stroke: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linxin; Yiin, Gabriel S; Geraghty, Olivia C; Schulz, Ursula G; Kuker, Wilhelm; Mehta, Ziyah; Rothwell, Peter M

    2015-09-01

    A third of transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) and ischaemic strokes are of undetermined cause (ie, cryptogenic), potentially undermining secondary prevention. If these events are due to occult atheroma, the risk-factor profile and coronary prognosis should resemble that of overt large artery events. If they have a cardioembolic cause, the risk of future cardioembolic events should be increased. We aimed to assess the burden, outcome, risk factors, and long-term prognosis of cryptogenic TIA and stroke. In a population-based study in Oxfordshire, UK, among patients with a first TIA or ischaemic stroke from April 1, 2002, to March 31, 2014, we compared cryptogenic events versus other causative subtypes according to the TOAST classification. We compared markers of atherosclerosis (ie, risk factors, coronary and peripheral arterial disease, asymptomatic carotid stenosis, and 10-year risk of acute coronary events) and of cardioembolism (ie, risk of cardioembolic stroke, systemic emboli, and new atrial fibrillation [AF] during follow-up, and minor-risk echocardiographic abnormalities and subclinical paroxysmal AF at baseline in patients with index events between 2010 and 2014). Among 2555 patients, 812 (32%) had cryptogenic events (incidence of cryptogenic stroke 0·36 per 1000 population per year, 95% CI 0·23-0·49). Death or dependency at 6 months was similar after cryptogenic stroke compared with non-cardioembolic stroke (23% vs 27% for large artery and small vessel subtypes combined; p=0·26) as was the 10-year risk of recurrence (32% vs 27%; p=0·91). However, the cryptogenic group had fewer atherosclerotic risk factors than the large artery disease (pdisease (p=0·001), and cardioembolic (p=0·008) groups. Compared with patients with large artery events, those with cryptogenic events had less hypertension (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0·41, 95% CI 0·30-0·56; pdisease (0·27, 0·17-0·45; pdisease (adjusted OR 0·64, 95% CI 0·37-1·11; p=0·11) or acute coronary

  4. Ischemic Stroke of the Artery of Percheron with Normal Initial MRI: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Cassourret

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The artery of Percheron is a solitary trunk representing an uncommon anatomic variant that provides bilateral arterial supply to the paramedian thalami and the rostral midbrain. Occlusion of this artery results in bilateral thalamic and mesencephalic infarctions. The clinical diagnosis is difficult because the complex anatomy causes large clinical variability. We report a case of a comatose patient with normal early head-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. A bilateral paramedian thalamic infarct due to an occlusion of the artery of Percheron was revealed two days later by a new head computed tomography. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of a symptomatic patient presenting an acute Percheron stroke with normal early brain magnetic resonance imaging. Our case indicates that a normal initial magnetic resonance imaging cannot formally eliminate the diagnosis of acute stroke of the artery of Percheron. We discuss the causes of noncontributive brain magnetic resonance imaging at the onset of this acute Percheron stroke and the alternative diagnosis and therapy methods.

  5. Longitudinal Follow-Up of Mirror Movements after Stroke: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Ohtsuka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror movement (MM, or visible involuntary movements of a relaxed hand during voluntary fine finger movements of an activated opposite hand, can be observed in the hand that is on the unaffected side of patients with stroke. In the present study, we longitudinally examined the relationship between voluntary movement of the affected hand and MM in the unaffected hand in a single case. We report a 73-year-old woman with a right pontine infarct and left moderate hemiparesis. MM was observed as an extension movement of the unaffected right index finger during extension movement of the affected left index finger. The affected right index movement was found to increase, while MM of the unaffected left index finger was observed to decrease with time. These results indicate that the assessment of MM might be useful for studying the process of motor recovery in patients with stroke.

  6. Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy syndrome: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Ian Goldfinch, MBBS

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy syndrome is a late complication of cranial radiation. It typically presents as reversible, unilateral cortical signs and symptoms such as confusion, hemiparesis, seizures, and headaches. Magnetic resonance imaging is also required for diagnosis, demonstrating cortical linear gadolinium enhancement. Typically, these magnetic resonance imaging findings resolve as patients experience partial or complete improvement in their symptoms and signs after a few weeks. Although a very rare condition, it is becoming increasingly observed as survival rates from brain tumors improve. In this report, we describe a typical case of stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy syndrome and present a review of the literature.

  7. Automated Generation of Traffic Incident Response Plan Based on Case-Based Reasoning and Bayesian Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traffic incident response plan, specifying response agencies and their responsibilities, can guide responders to take actions effectively and timely after traffic incidents. With a reasonable and feasible traffic incident response plan, related agencies will save many losses, such as humans and wealth. In this paper, how to generate traffic incident response plan automatically and specially was solved. Firstly, a well-known and approved method, Case-Based Reasoning (CBR, was introduced. Based on CBR, a detailed case representation and R5-cycle of CBR were developed. To enhance the efficiency of case retrieval, which was an important procedure, Bayesian Theory was introduced. To measure the performance of the proposed method, 23 traffic incidents caused by traffic crashes were selected and three indicators, Precision P, Recall R, and Indicator F, were used. Results showed that 20 of 23 cases could be retrieved effectively and accurately. The method is practicable and accurate to generate traffic incident response plans. The method will promote the intelligent generation and management of traffic incident response plans and also make Traffic Incident Management more scientific and effective.

  8. The Effects of Various Weather Conditions as a Potential Ischemic Stroke Trigger in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Kristy L; Silver, Gena M

    2017-11-16

    Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States, and is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability worldwide. There are at least 795,000 new or recurrent strokes each year, and approximately 85% of all stroke occurrences are ischemic. Unfortunately, companion animals are also at risk for ischemic stroke. Although the exact incidence of ischemic stroke in companion animals is unknown, some studies, and the veterinary information network (VIN), report that approximately 3% of neurological case referrals are due to a stroke. There is a long list of predisposing factors associated with the risk of ischemic stroke in both humans and canines; however, these factors do not explain why a stroke happens at a particular time on a particular day. Our understanding of these potential stroke "triggers" is limited, and the effect of transient environmental exposures may be one such "trigger". The present study investigated the extent to which the natural occurrence of canine ischemic stroke was related to the weather conditions in the time-period immediately preceding the onset of stroke. The results of the present study demonstrated that the change in weather conditions could be a potential stroke trigger, with the strokes evaluated occurring after periods of rapid, large fluctuations in weather conditions. There are currently no epidemiological data on the seasonal variability of ischemic stroke in dogs, and determining whether canine stroke parallels human stroke would further validate the use of companion dogs as an appropriate naturally occurring model.

  9. Knowledge of Stroke Risk Factors among Stroke Survivors in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Vincent-Onabajo; Taritei Moses

    2016-01-01

    Background. Knowledge of stroke risk factors is expected to reduce the incidence of stroke?whether first-ever or recurrent. This study examined knowledge of stroke risk factors and its determinants among stroke survivors. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of consenting stroke survivors at two physiotherapy facilities in Nigeria was carried out. Sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained and knowledge of stroke risk factors (defined as the ability to mention at least one correct risk fac...

  10. Making Mathematics Placement Decisions for High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities: A Collective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murzyn, Amy; Hughes, Trudie

    2015-01-01

    This multiple case study described the experiences of case managers making mathematics placement decisions for high school students with high incidence disabilities. Participants included three parents, three students, three case managers, three mathematics teachers, and three administrators from different high schools across rural, suburban and…

  11. Bronchogenic adenocarcinoma presenting as a synchronous solitary lytic skull lesion with ischaemic stroke--case report and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, David

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a rare case of metastatic bronchogenic adenocarcinoma in a 55-year-old man presenting with concomittant solitary lytic skull lesion and ischaemic stroke. Metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma is known to present as lytic skull lesions. Primary brain tumours are also known to cause ischaemic brain injury. An underlying stroke risk may be exagerated by cranial tumour surgery. Patients with brain tumours are well known to be predisposed to an increased risk of developing thromboembolic disease. It is unusual to see metastatic bronchogenic adenocarcinoma presenting as ischaemic stroke with a background of concomittant cerebral metastasis. The aetio-pathogenesis of this rare occurrence is discussed with a review of literature.

  12. Association between ambient air pollution and hospitalization for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in China: A multicity case-crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Tian, Yaohua; Xu, Yan; Huang, Zhe; Huang, Chao; Hu, Yonghua; Zhang, Jun

    2017-11-01

    There is growing interest in the association between ambient air pollution and stroke, but few studies have investigated the association in developing countries. The primary objective of this study was to examine the association between levels of ambient air pollutants and hospital admission for stroke in China. A time-stratified case-crossover analysis was conducted between 2014 and 2015 in 14 large Chinese cities among 200,958 ischemic stroke and 41,746 hemorrhagic stroke hospitalizations. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate the percentage changes in stroke admissions in relation to interquartile range increases in air pollutants. Air pollution was positively associated with ischemic stroke. A difference of an interquartile range of the 6-day average for particulate matter less than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and ozone corresponded to 0.7% (95% CI: 0%, 1.4%), 1.6% (95% CI: 1.0%, 2.3%), 2.6% (95% CI: 1.8%, 3.5%), 0.5% (95% CI: -0.2%, 1.1%), and 1.3% (95% CI: 0.3%, 2.3%) increases in ischemic stroke admissions, respectively. For hemorrhagic stroke, we observed the only significant association in relation to nitrogen dioxide on the current day (percentage change: 1.6%; 95% CI: 0.3%, 2.9%). Our findings contribute to the limited scientific literature concerning the effect of ambient air pollution on stroke in developing countries. Our findings may have significant public health implications for primary prevention of stroke in China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dual extradural cortical stimulation in chronic stroke patients with large infarcts: technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong-Il; Kim, Hyoungihl; Moon, Seong-Keun; Kim, Hyojoon; Yun, Yong-Soon; Chung, Gyung-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Recent works on extradural cortical stimulation have been successful in improving neurological recovery in chronic stroke patients. On the other hand, single perirolandic stimulations are often associated with disappointing results. We report two cases of chronic stroke in which the magnitude of infarct was too large to be improved with single perirolandic stimulation. Patient 1 had severe hemiplegia associated with large cortical infarct in the right frontoparietal area. The patient could neither stand independently or walk. Patient 2 had hemiplegia and aphasia due to cortical infarct in the left middle cerebral artery territory. Both patients had intensive rehabilitative training for more than 6 months with no beneficial results. Two paddle electrodes covering frontal and parietal area were implanted, followed by dual cortical stimulation with concurrent rehabilitative training in patient 1. After 6 months of stimulation, the patient could walk with a good posture. Two paddle electrodes were implanted to cover pre-motor and motor cortex in patient 2. After similar treatment, the motor function was markedly improved. Dual cortex stimulation, which acts on more diffuse areas or functionally related areas, is beneficial to promote the motor recovery in chronic stroke patients with large infarcts.

  14. Accidental mushroom poisoning mimicking stroke. A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comelli, Ivan; Lippi, Giuseppe; De Blasio, Attilio; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2014-01-23

    We describe here a paradigmatic case of mushroom poisoning mimicking a stroke. A 64-year old male was referred to the emergency department (ED) for a car accident. He was found diaphoretic, hypotensive, bradycardic, and slightly confused at presentation. No signs of trauma were observed on physical examination. The patient had weakness of the right limbs and bilateral severe myosis. The lab tests were normal, except for leukocytosis, mild hyperglycemia, mild hyperazotemia and moderate hypokalemia. The clinical picture, with the exception of miosis, was thereby suggestive for a stroke, which was also considered the cause of the car accident. The patients' wife, who was brought later to the ED, reported that the husband had suffered a stroke 4 years earlier, with residual right hemiparesis. She also referred that the patient showed signs of diaphoresis and confusion, and the car was intentionally driven into the ditch. Among other details, she referred that the husband ate mushrooms that she had personally collected 2 hours before taking the drive. Two mg of atropine, intravenous rehydration and potassium were hence administered in the suspicion of a cholinergic toxydrome, and complete clinical remission was rapidly obtained. Among the mixture of mushrooms eaten by the patient, a mycologist identified Armillaria Mellea (an edible mushroom) and notably Inocybe Fastigiata, a toxic muscarine-containing mushroom, easily confounded with Armillaria. After observation and oral rehydration, the patient was discharged.

  15. Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactate acidosis with stroke-like episodes syndrome (MELAS: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Igor N.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactacidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS represent a multisystemic dysfunction due to various mutations in mitochondrial DNA. Here we report a patient with genetically confirmed MELAS. Case Outline. A patient is presented whose clinical features involved short stature, easy tendency to fatigue, recurrent seizures, progressive cognitive decline, myopathy, sensorineural deafness, diabetes mellitus as well as stroke-like episodes. The major clinical feature of migraine type headache was not present. Neuroimaging studies revealed signs of ischemic infarctions localized in the posterior regions of the brain cortex. Electron microscopy of the skeletal muscle biopsy showed subsarcolemmal accumulation of a large number of mitochondria with paracristal inclusions in the skeletal muscle cells. The diagnosis of MELAS was definitively confirmed by the detection of a specific point mutation A to G at nucleotide position 3243 of mitochondrial DNA. Conclusion. When a relatively young patient without common risk factors for ischemic stroke presents with signs of occipitally localized brain infarctions accompanied with multisystemic dysfunction, MELAS syndrome, it is necessary to conduct investigations in order to diagnose the disease.

  16. Fatal stroke after Bothrops snakebite in the Amazonas state, Brazil: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva de Oliveira, Sâmella; Freitas-de-Sousa, Luciana Aparecida; Alves, Eliane Campos; de Lima Ferreira, Luiz Carlos; da Silva, Iran Mendonça; de Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; Fan, Hui Wen; Moura-da-Silva, Ana Maria; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo

    2017-11-01

    Bothrops atrox is the snake responsible for the majority of snakebites in the Brazilian Amazon. Patients generally evolve to local manifestations such as edema, pain and ecchymoses. Systemic effects of B. atrox venom are usually restricted to blood incoagulability and spontaneous bleeding. However, in a few cases, bleeding in the central nervous system may occur, which can lead to sequels and deaths. Here, we report a case of a 59 year-old woman who presented edema, pain and ecchymoses on the right foot, headache, nausea, diarrhea, hypertension and blood incoagulability after the bite by Bothrops snake in the Brazilian Amazon. This case evolved with stroke resulting in death despite the antivenom and conservative therapy employed. In addition, we were able to identify the presence of venom in the patient's brain tissue after death. Direct action of toxins present in the snake's venom in the induction of systemic hemorrhage allied to blood incoagulability and hypertension presented by the patient could be involved in the mechanism of stroke in this case. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Polymorphisms in prothrombotic genes in young stroke patients in Greece: a case-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranellou, Kyriaki; Paraskeva, Anteia; Kyriazopoulos, Panagiotis; Batistatou, Anna; Evangelou, Aggelos; El-Aly, Mahmoud; Zis, Panagiotis; Tavernarakis, Antonios; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-06-01

    Mechanisms of ischemic stroke in young adults are poorly understood. The aim of the study was to investigate and compare the frequency of common variations in prothrombotic genes between young patients with ischemic stroke and controls. Fifty-one cases of first-ever ischemic stroke and 70 community-based controls aged below 50 years were studied. In both groups, the insertion/deletion 4G/5G variation (-675 4G/5G PAI-1) as well as the single-nucleotide polymorphism-844 G/A of the PAI-1 (-844 G/A PAI-1) gene promoter, factor V Leiden (FVL) G1691Α, the prothrombin variant (allele 20210A, FIIG20210A), factor XIII-A Val34Leu polymorphism (FXIII-AVal34Leu) and C677T methylenotetrahydrofolate reductase (C677T MTHFR) polymorphism have been assessed. The -675 4G/5G PAI-1 allele distribution differed significantly between patients and controls (P = 0.020), but no difference was found regarding the distribution of -844 G/A PAI-1 (P = 0.493), FVL (P = 0.199), FIIG20210A (P = 0.410), FXIII-AVal34leu (P = 0.160) and C677T MTHFR (P = 0.788). A lower frequency of 5G/5G genotype and a higher frequency of the 4G/5G genotype of the PAI -675 4G/5G polymorphism was found in young ischemic stroke patients compared to healthy controls. Further epidemiological studies are needed to investigate the differences between different geographic areas, and prospective cohort studies are needed to investigate the possible protective role of 5G/5G polymorphism.

  18. A case-control study of medium-term exposure to ambient nitrogen dioxide pollution and hospitalization for stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Julie Y M; Rowe, Brian H; Allen, Ryan W; Peters, Paul A; Villeneuve, Paul J

    2013-04-19

    There are several plausible mechanisms whereby either short or long term exposure to pollution can increase the risk of stroke. Over the last decade, several studies have reported associations between short-term (day-to-day) increases in ambient air pollution and stroke. The findings from a smaller number of studies that have looked at long-term exposure to air pollution and stroke have been mixed. Most of these epidemiological studies have assigned exposure to air pollution based on place of residence, but these assignments are typically based on relatively coarse spatial resolutions. To date, few studies have evaluated medium-term exposures (i.e, exposures over the past season or year). To address this research gap, we evaluated associations between highly spatially resolved estimates of ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a marker of traffic pollution, and emergency department visits for stroke in Edmonton, Canada. This was a case-control study with cases defined as those who presented to an Edmonton area hospital emergency department between 2007 and 2009 with an acute ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, or transient ischemic attack. Controls were patients who presented to the same emergency departments for lacerations, sprains, or strains. A land-use regression model provided estimates of NO2 that were assigned to the place of residence. Logistic regression methods were used to estimate odds ratios for stroke in relation to an increase in the interquartile range of NO2 (5 ppb), adjusted for age, sex, meteorological variables, and neighborhood effects. The study included 4,696 stroke (cases) and 37,723 injury patients (controls). For all strokes combined, there was no association with NO2. Namely, the odds ratio associated with an interquartile increase in NO2 was 1.01 (95% confidence interval {CI}: 0.94-1.08). No associations were evident for any of the stroke subtypes examined. When combined with our earlier work in Edmonton, our findings suggest that day

  19. Stroke and methamphetamine use in young adults: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, Julia M; Darke, Shane; Farrell, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Methamphetamine use and stroke are significant public health problems. Strokes among people aged below 45 years are much less common than in older age groups but have significant mortality and morbidity. Methamphetamine is a putative cause of strokes among younger people. A review of methamphetamine-related strokes was conducted. Bibliographic databases were searched until February 2017 for articles related to methamphetamine and stroke. Both haemorrhagic and ischaemic strokes were considered. Of 370 articles screened, 77 were selected for inclusion. There were 81 haemorrhagic and 17 ischaemic strokes reported in case reports and series. Both types were approximately twice as common in males. Route of administration associated with haemorrhagic stroke was typically oral or injecting, but for ischaemic stroke inhalation was most common. Haemorrhagic stroke was associated with vascular abnormalities in a third of cases. One quarter of individuals completely recovered, and a third died following haemorrhagic stroke. One-fifth completely recovered, and one-fifth died following ischaemic stroke. There is a preponderance of haemorrhagic strokes associated with methamphetamine use in young people, and methamphetamine-related stroke is associated with poor clinical outcomes. Mechanisms of methamphetamine-associated stroke include hypertension, vasculitis, direct vascular toxicity and vasospasm. In a period of rising worldwide methamphetamine use, the incidence of methamphetamine-related stroke will increase, with a consequent increase in the burden of disease contributed by such events. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Unipolar and continuous cortical stimulation to enhance motor and language deficit in patients with chronic stroke: report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung-Ihl; Shin, Yong-Il; Moon, Seong-Keun; Chung, Gyung-Ho; Lee, Min-Cheol; Kim, Hyun-Gi

    2008-01-01

    Stroke often leads to permanent neurological deficit despite extensive therapeutic and rehabilitative efforts; and in chronic stages, it is difficult to restore neurological function. Recently, bipolar and intermittent cortical stimulation combined with rehabilitation has been reported to be effective in chronic hemiparetic stroke. However, optimal parameters of cortical stimulation for chronic stroke have not been determined to restore neurological function in chronic stages of stroke. We report 2 cases of chronic stroke whose neurological functions were improved by continuous, unipolar cortical stimulation combined with rehabilitation. Patient 1 presented motor and language deficit associated with cortical infarct in the left middle cerebral artery territory, which occurred 18 months before admission. Patient 2 presented motor deficit associated with subcortical infarct in the internal capsule 8 months before admission. Unipolar electrodes were implanted epidurally to cover the contralateral premotor and motor cortex in both cases, and an additional electrode was implanted over the Broca area in patient 1. Follow-up evaluation after 4 months of stimulation and concurrent rehabilitation showed improvement of Fugl-Meyer and FIM scores in both patients, and of speech and articulation in patient 1, whose electrode covered the Broca area. No adverse effects were observed during the period of treatment. Unipolar and continuous cortical stimulation with rehabilitation is beneficial for improving neurological deficit in selected cases of chronic stroke.

  1. Stroke risk factors, subtypes, and 30‑day case fatality in Abuja, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the leading cause of adult disability worldwide. A better understanding of stroke risk factors and outcome may help guide efforts at reducing the community burden of stroke. This study aimed to understand stroke risk factors, imaging subtypes, and 30‑day ...

  2. Suicide after a stroke: a population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teasdale, T W; Engberg, A W

    2001-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To establish whether there are increased rates of suicide after a stroke and the degree to which any increase is related to gender, age at stroke, diagnosis, duration of hospitalisation, and time since stroke. DESIGN: Cross linkage of national registers for hospitalisations...... cases of suicide were identified. MAIN RESULTS: Annual incidence rates, both observed and expected, together with standardised mortality ratios (SMR) were computed based on annual population and suicide statistics, stratified by age and gender. The overall annual incidence rate of suicide in the cohort.......76) for patients under 50 years of age group and were least for patients 80 years or older (1.3; 0.95, 1.79). There was no clear relation to stroke diagnosis. Suicides were negatively related to duration of hospitalisation, being lowest for those hospitalised for more than three months (0.88; 0.65, 1...

  3. Secular trends in incidence and 30-day case fatality of acute pancreatitis in North Jutland Country

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floyd, A.K.; Pedersen, L; Nielsen, GL

    2002-01-01

    Secular Trends in Incidence and 30-Day Case Fatality of Acute Pancreatitis in North Jutland County, Denmark: A Register-based Study from 1981-2000 A. Floyd, L. Pederson, G. Lauge Nielsen, O. Thorlacius-Ussing and H. T. Sorensen ‌   Background: The incidence rate of acute pancreatitis has been...... reported as having increased during recent decades in Western countries. Reported mortality lies around 10% and has improved during the past 20 years. The incidence rate and 30-day case fatality rate of acute pancreatitis in North Jutland County, Denmark were examined for the period 1981 to 2000. Methods......: Data were collected from the Hospital Discharge Registry of North Jutland County for the period 1981-2000. Sex- and age-standardized incidence rates and 30-day case fatality rate of a first attack of acute pancreatitis were calculated. Data on endoscopic procedures were assessed for the period 1992...

  4. Comparing the Comprehensive Stroke Ward Versus Mixed Rehabilitation Ward-The Importance of the Team in the Acute Stroke Care in a Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Marcos C; de Araujo, Tiago F S; Ferreira, Luiz F T; Ducci, Renata D P; Novak, Edison M; Germiniani, Francisco M B; Zetola, Viviane F

    2017-04-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the most frequent causes of death in Brazil. Many measures have been taken to reduce this tragic outcome, and one of those is the implementation of stroke units in hospitals. The aim of the present study is to analyze the in-hospital complications for patients with ischemic stroke admitted in a comprehensive stroke ward (CSW) as compared to patients admitted in a mixed rehabilitation ward (MRW). A retrospective interventional study with historic controls of patients admitted to the Neurology Division between January 2010 and October 2013. Patients admitted between January 2010 and September 2012 were included in the MRW group, and patients admitted from October 2012 until October 2013 were included in the CSW group. Throughout the whole study period, the same team assisted all the patients. Both groups were paired in relation to age and gender. The rate of in-hospital complications, mortality, and independency on discharge were evaluated in both groups. Each group was comprised of 91 patients. There were no statistically significant differences for any of the risk factors analyzed between the 2 groups nor for outcome measures-in-hospital complications, mortality, and independence on discharge. The present study demonstrated that in-hospital complications, independence on discharge, and mortality have similar rates in patients admitted to an MRW compared to patients admitted to a CSW, when the same staff provided them with specialized in-hospital care. Case-control study-Evidence Level 3.

  5. Spontaneous coronary thrombosis following thrombolytic therapy for acute cardiovascular accident and stroke: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Eric L; Smyth, Susan S

    2012-11-01

    Cardiac complications following stroke or acute cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) are common; however, many of these complications are asymptomatic and do not cause adverse cardiac effects. Symptomatic events (such as acute myocardial infarction after CVA) rarely occur and are often the result of an underlying cardiac embolic source, such as a left ventricular thrombus. We report a case of spontaneous coronary thrombosis following thrombolytic therapy for acute CVA, and discuss the implication that an underlying systemic pro-thrombotic state may predispose individuals to thrombosis in disparate vascular beds.

  6. Stroke in a Young Man Secondary to Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation and Thyrotoxicosis: A Case Report

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    Rodrigo Bazan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a male patient with stroke caused by atrial fibrillation (AF due to thyrotoxicosis. At hospital admission, he presented hypertension and AF. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a right-side ischemic area. The thyrotoxicosis was confirmed by thyroid function and thyroid scintigraphy that showed goiter with diffuse hypercaptation. The patient was treated with tapazole and total thyroidectomy, and pathological findings suggested Graves’ disease. Hyperthyroidism is associated with increased supraventricular ectopic activity in patients with a normal heart, and may be an important causal link between hyperthyroidism and AF. The patient experienced significant clinical improvement, but presented long-term neuropsychiatric disorders.

  7. Myasthenia gravis mimicking stroke: a case series with sudden onset dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremolizzo, Lucio; Giopato, Federico; Piatti, Maria Luisa; Rigamonti, Andrea; Ferrarese, Carlo; Appollonio, Ildebrando

    2015-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by fluctuating fatigue of skeletal muscles, often involving extrinsic ocular or bulbar districts. Myasthenia gravis in the elderly is an under-recognized condition, sometimes confused with cerebrovascular disease. Here we present a case series of myasthenia patients which onset was characterized by sudden dysarthria, clearly raising this diagnostic dilemma. In the workout of sudden onset isolated dysarthria, MG should be always considered. In fact, even if myasthenia is a rare condition, lacunar stroke only with this clinical presentation is also unusual, and significant risks may arise (e.g., unexpected myasthenic crisis).

  8. Effect of vitamin C supplementation on stroke recovery: A case-control study

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    Meheroz H Rabadi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Meheroz H Rabadi1, Bruce S Kristal2,31Burke Rehabilitation Hospital, an affiliate of Weill Medical College of Cornell Medical College, White Plains, NY, USA; 2Burke Medical Research Institute, an affiliate of Weill Medical College of Cornell Medical College, White Plains, NY, USA; 3Department of Neuroscience, Cornell University Medical College, White Plains, NY, USABackground and purpose: Epidemiological studies have associated increased dietary intake of antioxidants (vitamin C, E, and β-carotene in preventing and decreasing the extent of ischemic brain injury. The effect of vitamin C supplementation on functional recovery after stroke has not been studied. Method: In this retrospective, case-control study of 23 patients with ischemic stroke taking vitamin C were identified and matched for age, sex, onset to admission, and admission total functional independence measure (TFIM with 23 patients with ischemic stroke not taking Vitamin C supplementation. Vitamin C 1000 mg daily was prescribed on admission to our unit mainly to patients who were undernourished (defined as significant weight loss and/or 90% or less ideal body weight for age and sex and those with pressure sores. The outcome measures were: change in the TFIM, FIM-Cognition (FIM-Cog, and FIM-Motor sub-scores, discharge disposition, and length of stay (LOS.Results: The change in TFIM (20 ± 13 standard deviation [SD] vs. 26 ± 6, p = 0.20, FIM-Cog (3 ± 3 SD vs. 4 ± 5, p = 0.41, FIM-Motor (15 ± 11 SD vs. 20 ± 13, p = 0.21 sub-scores were less in the vitamin C treated group, but these differences did not reach statistical significance. Similarly, no significant differences were found in LOS (21 ± 9 SD vs. 23 ± 9, p = 0.59, and discharge disposition (home/institution (9/10 vs. 13/9, p = 0.60 between the vitamin C and the control groups.Conclusion: This study suggests vitamin C supplementation did not enhance functional recovery in undernourished ischemic stroke patients

  9. Cost of stroke in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevreul, K; Durand-Zaleski, I; Gouépo, A; Fery-Lemonnier, E; Hommel, M; Woimant, F

    2013-07-01

    A cost of illness study was undertaken on behalf of the French Ministry of Health to estimate the annual cost of stroke in France with the goal of better understanding the current economic burden so that improved strategies for care may be developed. Using primary data from exhaustive national databases and both top-down and bottom-up approaches, the stroke-related costs for healthcare, nursing care and lost productivity were estimated. The total healthcare cost of stroke patients in France in 2007 was €5.3 billion, 92% of which was borne by statutory health insurance. The average cost of incident cases was €16 686 per patient in the first year, while the annual cost of prevalent cases was a little less than half that amount (€8099). Nursing care costs were estimated at €2.4 billion. Lost productivity reached €255.9 million and that income loss for stroke patients was partially compensated by €63.3 million in social benefit payments. With healthcare costs representing 3% of total health expenditure in France, stroke constitutes an ongoing burden for the health system and overall economy. Nursing care added nearly half again the amount spent on healthcare, while productivity losses were more limited because nearly 80% of acute incident strokes were in patients over age 65. The high cost of illness underscores the need for improved prevention and interventions to limit the disabling effects of stroke. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  10. Low socioeconomic status is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke: a case-control study in North Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Prasad, Manya; Kathuria, Prachi; Nair, Pallavi; Pandit, Awadh Kishor; Sahu, Jitendra K; Prasad, Kameshwar

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a multifactorial disease and is influenced by complex environmental interactions. The contribution of various risk factors to the burden of stroke worldwide is not well known, particularly in developing countries. The present case-control study is aimed at exploring the association between a low socioeconomic status and the risk of ischemic stroke among the North Indian population. The study design was a hospital-based, case-control study. Age- and sex-matched controls were included. The demographic characteristics and risk factor variables were documented by means of a personal interview through a standardized case record form. The household asset index for determining the socioeconomic status (HAISS) was used for the assessment of the socioeconomic status of the population. HAISS was validated with the widely used Kuppuswamy scale for measurement of socioeconomic status. The multivariable logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratio associated with stroke. In all, 224 ischemic stroke patients and 224 controls were recruited between February 2009 and February 2012. The mean age of cases and controls was 53.47 ± 14 and 52.92 ± 13.4, respectively. The low economic status was independently associated with the risk of ischemic stroke after adjustment for demographic and risk factor variables (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.2-6.3). Our findings suggest that there is a significant association between a low socioeconomic status and the risk of ischemic stroke risk in North Indian population. Well-designed studies embedded with long-term prospective cohorts are required for confirming the results. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The impact of lesion location on dysphagia incidence, pattern and complications in acute stroke. Part 2: Oropharyngeal residue, swallow and cough response, and pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntrup-Krueger, S; Kemmling, A; Warnecke, T; Hamacher, C; Oelenberg, S; Niederstadt, T; Heindel, W; Wiendl, H; Dziewas, R

    2017-06-01

    Dysphagia is a well-known complication of acute stroke. Given the complexity of cerebral swallowing control it is still difficult to predict which patients are likely to develop swallowing dysfunction based on their neuroimaging. In Part 2 of a comprehensive voxel-based imaging study, whether the location of a stroke lesion can be correlated with further dysfunctional swallowing patterns, pulmonary protective reflexes and pneumonia was evaluated. In all, 200 acute stroke cases were investigated applying flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing within 96 h from admission. Lesions were mapped using patients' computed tomography/magnetic resonance images and these were registered to a standard space. The percentage of lesioned volume of 137 anatomically defined brain regions was determined on a voxel basis (FSL5.0). Region-specific odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with respect to the presence of oropharyngeal residue, delayed swallow response, insufficient cough reflex and occurrence of pneumonia during hospital stay. Colour-coded lesion location maps of brain regions with significant ORs were created (P pneumonia, but substantial overlap between the last two conditions. This study gives new insights on the cortical representation of single components of swallowing and airway protection behaviours. The lesion model may help to risk-stratify patients for dysphagia and pneumonia based on their brain scan. © 2017 EAN.

  12. Improved status following behavioural intervention in a case of severe dysarthria with stroke aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Lowit, Anja

    2012-08-01

    There is little published intervention outcome literature concerning dysarthria acquired from stroke. Single case studies have potential for more detailed specification and interpretation than is generally possible in larger studies so are informative for clinicians dealing with similar cases. Such research also contributes to planning of larger scale investigations. Behavioural intervention is described which was carried out between 7-9 months after stroke with a 69-year-old man with severe dysarthria. Pre-intervention stability between 5-7 months contrasted with post-intervention gains. Significant improvement was demonstrated using randomized, blinded assessment by 10 judges on measures of word and reading intelligibility and communication effectiveness in conversation. A range of speech analyses were undertaken (rate, pause, and intonation characteristics in connected speech and single word phonetic transcription), with the aim of identifying speech components which might explain the listeners' perceptions of improvement. Changes were detected mainly in parameters related to utterance segmentation and intonation. The basis of post-intervention improvement in dysarthria is complex, both in terms of the active therapeutic dimensions and also the specific speech alterations which account for changes to intelligibility and effectiveness.

  13. Meta-analysis in more than 17,900 cases of ischemic stroke reveals a novel association at 12q24.12

    OpenAIRE

    Kilarski, L. L.; Achterberg, S.; Devan, W. J.; Traylor, M.; Malik, R.; Lindgren, A.; Pare, G.; Sharma, P.; Slowik, A.; Thijs, V.; Walters, M.; Worrall, B. B.; Sale, M. M.; Algra, A.; Kappelle, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    textabstractResults: In an overall analysis of 17,970 cases of ischemic stroke and 70,764 controls, we identified a novel association on chromosome 12q24 (rs10744777, odds ratio [OR] 1.10 [1.07-1.13], p 5 7.12 3 10-11) with ischemic stroke. The association was with all ischemic stroke rather than an individual stroke subtype, with similar effect sizes seen in different stroke subtypes. There was no association with intracerebral hemorrhage (OR 1.03 [0.90-1.17], p 5 0.695).Conclusion: Our resu...

  14. Case studies of hydrogen sulphide occupational exposure incidents in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kate

    2014-12-15

    The UK Health and Safety Executive has investigated several incidents of workplace accidents involving hydrogen sulphide exposure in recent years. Biological monitoring has been used in some incidents to determine the cause of unconsciousness resulting from these incidents and as a supporting evidence in regulatory enforcement. This paper reports on three case incidents and discusses the use of biological monitoring in such cases. Biological monitoring has a role in identifying hydrogen sulphide exposure in incidents, whether these are occupational or in the wider environment. Sample type, time of collection and sample storage are important factors in the applicability of this technique. For non-fatal incidents, multiple urine samples are recommended at two or more time points between the incident and 15 h post-exposure. For routine occupational monitoring, post-shift samples should be adequate. Due to endogenous levels of urinary thiosulphate, it is likely that exposures in excess of 12 ppm for 30 min (or 360 ppm/min equivalent) would be detectable using biological monitoring. This is within the Acute Exposure Guideline Level 2 (the level of the chemical in air at or above which there may be irreversible or other serious long-lasting effects or impaired ability to escape) for hydrogen sulphide. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Chinese calligraphy handwriting (CCH: a case of rehabilitative awakening of a coma patient after stroke

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    Kao HSR

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Henry SR Kao,1 Stewart PW Lam,2 Tin Tin Kao3,4 1Calligraphy Therapy Laboratory, Shenzhen Institute of Neuroscience, Shenzhen, China; 2Research and Development Division, Calli-Health Society, 3Department of Geography, 4Department of Psychology, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Introduction: This study investigated the efficacy of Chinese calligraphy handwriting (CCH for the awakening of patients under a vegetative state after stroke. The theories, the instrument, and the treatment protocols were reported. A single case of a severe stroke patient who was in a coma state for 2 years is presented in this study. The objectives were to apply finger writing as a new method to awaken a stroke patient in a coma state and to test the effect of this method in improving the patient’s vegetative states over time. Case presentation: A 55-year-old man suffered a severe stroke in 2004 which left him in a coma for 2 years without any systematic rehabilitation. A culture-based finger-writing method of visual-spatial intervention was then applied to improve his condition. The writing tasks involved aided viewing and finger tracing of sets of innovative characters with enriched visual-spatial and movement characteristics. Following regular treatment protocols involving diverse movement and sensory feedback, the patient was awakened after 12 months. As a consequence, the patient showed significant behavioral changes favoring enhanced focusing, alertness, visual scan, visual span, and quickened visual and motor responses. The treatment continued for another 12 months. As the treatment progressed, we gradually observed improvements in his attention span and mental concentration. His eye ball movements – the left eye in particular – were quickened and showed wider visual angularity in his focal vision. Currently, the patient can now watch television, engage in improved visual sighting, and focus on visual-spatial and cognitive-linguistic materials. Conclusion

  16. Stroke outcome in clinical trial patients deriving from different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Myzoon; Atula, Sari; Bath, Philip M W; Grotta, James; Hacke, Werner; Lyden, Patrick; Marler, John R; Sacco, Ralph L; Lees, Kennedy R

    2009-01-01

    Stroke incidence and outcome vary widely within and across geographical locations. We examined whether differences in index stroke severity, stroke risk factors, mortality, and stroke outcome across geographical locations remain after adjusting for case mix. We analyzed 3284 patients from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (VISTA). We used logistic regression to examine the incidence of mild index stroke, functional, and neurological outcomes after accounting for age, medical history, year of trial recruitment, and initial stroke severity in the functional and neurological outcome analyses. We examined mortality between geographical regions using a Cox proportional hazards model, accounting for age, initial stroke severity, medical history, and year of trial recruitment. Patients enrolled in the USA and Canada had the most severe index strokes. Those recruited in Austria and Switzerland had the best functional and neurological outcomes at 90 days (P<0.05), whereas those enrolled in Germany had the worst functional outcome at 90 days (P=0.013). Patients enrolled in Austria, Switzerland, Belgium, Netherlands, Finland, Germany, Greece, Israel, Spain, and Portugal had a significantly better survival rate when compared with those enrolled in USA and Canada. Patients enrolled in trials after 1998 had more severe index strokes, with no significant difference in outcome compared with those enrolled before 1998. We identified regional variations in index stroke severity, outcome, and mortality for patients enrolled in ischemic stroke clinical trials over the past 13 years that were not fully explained by case mix. Index stroke severity was greater in patients enrolled after 1998, with no significant improvement in outcomes compared to those enrolled before 1998.

  17. Stroke in Asia: a global disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong S

    2014-10-01

    Although stroke is a world-wide problem, the burden of stroke is particularly serious in Asia; its mortality is higher than in Europe or North America. The situation in Asia is dichotomized. Stroke mortality and case fatality has been declining in northern-eastern countries such as Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and urbanized areas of China. This is attributed to both the risk factor control and stroke care improvement. However, declining stroke incidence is rarely observed, which is in part due to rapidly aging population. As a result, there is an increase in the number of stroke survivors who require long-term, costly care. The extremely low birth rate and relatively insecure social health system markedly increases the caregiver burden. The problem in southern Asian countries, such as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Indonesia is more fundamental. With the improving control of infectious diseases, life expectancy is prolonged. However, risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity and cigarette smoking become prevalent, and are poorly controlled. Stroke neurologists, organized stroke centers, and diagnostic tools are insufficient, which has resulted in high stroke fatality and mortality. Throughout Asia, the most urgent priority should be the primary stroke prevention through promoting a healthy lifestyle, e.g. low salt intake, regular physical exercise, stopping smoking, government sectors should take a stronger initiative to accomplish this. The rapidly aging populations and stroke burden will shrink the economy and destabilize the society, not only in Asia but also globally unless appropriate efforts are promptly initiated, this may result in a global disaster. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  18. The impact of socio-economic status on incidence of AIDS cases in Brazilian

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    Márcia Regina Godoy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many researchers have devoted attention to the issue of the importance of social indicators in disease reduction. The objective of this paper is to analyze the statistical association between the reported AIDS cases and some socioeconomic variables. We analyzed a sample of 1,994 Brazilian municipalities with AIDS cases reported in 1991 and 2000. The variables analyzed are: AIDS incidence rate per capita, illiteracy rate, Gini Index, per capita income, access to electricity and television, life expectancy at birth. The approach used in this study was econometric panel data model. The results of this analysis show that socioeconomic variables are important for understanding the incidence of AIDS cases in Brazil, and are important for the design of public policies to combat the increasing incidence of HIV / AIDS, also show a distinct pattern to found in the literature for African countries.

  19. Incidence and risk factors of AIDS-defining cancers in a cohort of HIV-positive adults: Importance of the definition of incident cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-García, Inés; Jarrín, Inmaculada; Iribarren, José Antonio; López-Cortés, Luis Fernando; Lacruz-Rodrigo, José; Masiá, Mar; Gómez-Sirvent, Juan Luis; Hernández-Quero, José; Vidal, Francesc; Alejos-Ferreras, Belén; Moreno, Santiago; Del Amo, Julia

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and risk factors for the development of AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs); and to investigate the effect of making different assumptions on the definition of incident cases. A multicentre cohort study was designed. Poisson regression was used to assess incidence and risk factors. To account for misclassification, incident cases were defined using lag-times of 0, 14 and 30 days after enrolment. A total of 6393 HIV-positive subjects were included in the study. The incidences of ADCs changed as the lag periods were varied from 0 to 30 days. Different risk factors emerged as the definition of incident cases was changed. For a lag time of 0, the risk of Kaposi sarcoma [KS] and non-Hodgkin lymphoma [NHL] increased at CD4 counts sex with men had a higher risk of KS. KS and NHL were not associated with viral load, gender, or hepatitis B or C. The results were similar for a lag-time of 14 and 30 days; however, hepatitis C was significantly associated with NHL. This analysis shows the importance of the definition of incident cases in cohort studies. Alternative definitions gave different incidence estimates, and may have implications for the analysis of risk factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Gaseous Air Pollution and the Risk for Stroke Admissions: A Case-Crossover Study in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fangfang; Luo, Yanxia; Tan, Peng; Xu, Qin; Tao, Lixin; Guo, Jin; Zhang, Feng; Xie, Xueqin; Guo, Xiuhua

    2017-02-14

    Background: Though increasing evidence supports association between gaseous air pollution and stroke, it remains unclear whether the effects differ in season, sex and age. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of gaseous air pollution with stroke admissions in Beijing, 2013-2014 in different subgroups. Methods: Case-crossover design and conditional logistic regression were used to perform the analyses. We examined the exposure-response relationship between air pollution and stroke. Stratified analyses were performed in different seasons, sex, and age groups. Results: There were 147,624 stroke admissions during the study period. In the whole study period, percent changes of stroke admissions were 0.82% (95% CI: 0.52% to 1.13%) and 0.73% (95% CI: 0.44% to 1.03%) per 10 μg/m³ increase in the same day conentration of nitrogen dioxide (NO₂) and sulfur dioxide (SO₂). The positive associations were higher in warm seasons and with patients >65 years ( p 65 years. The associations of CO and ozone with stroke admissions differed across seasons.

  1. Puerperous pulmonary thromboembolism: Incidence, clinical features, treatment and outcome, study of 13 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang CAI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the clinical features, treatment and outcome of puerperium pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE. Methods  To count the cases of spontaneous labor and cesarean section, as well as the incidence of PTE, treated in the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University from Jan. 2006 to Nov. 2011, and retrospectively analyze the data of hospitalized parturients with PTE. Results  A total of 5052 cases of spontaneous delivery were collected at the obstetric ward, of which 2910 cases (57.6% were cesarean sections and 2142 cases (42.4% were vaginal delivery. On the duration of hospital stay, 13 cases (0.26% were diagnosed as puerperal PTE by CT pulmonary angiography, of which 11 cases occurred within 3 days after delivery. The incidence of puerperal PTE was significantly higher in cases with cesarean section than in those with vaginal delivery (0.38% vs0.09%, P=0.043. The most common symptoms of puerperal PTE were breathless (76.9%, cough (53.8%, pleuritic chest pain (23.1% and fever (30.8%. The clinical symptoms were improved by anticoagulation therapy (11 cases or thrombolysis (2 cases with zero mortality. Conclusions  The incidence of puerperal PTE in the hospital the authors served is 0.26%. Puerperal PTE should be considered especially to those parturients with sudden dyspnea, chest tightness or pleuritic chest pain within 3 days after cesarean section.

  2. MicroRNA-410 regulated lipoprotein lipase variant rs13702 is associated with stroke incidence and modulated by diet in the randomized controlled PREDIMED trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corella, Dolores; Sorlí, Jose V; Estruch, Ramon; Coltell, Oscar; Ortega-Azorín, Carolina; Portolés, Olga; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Bulló, Mónica; Fitó, Montserrat; Arós, Fernando; Lapetra, José; Asensio, Eva M; Sáez, Guillermo T; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Muñoz-Bravo, Carlos; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Fiol, Miquel; Vinyoles, Ernest; Pintó, Xavier; Richardson, Kris; Ros, Emilio; Ordovás, Jose M

    2014-08-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as important epigenetic regulators in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Using an observational meta-analysis design, we previously characterized a gain-of-function microRNA-410 target site polymorphism (rs13702T>C) in the 3'untranslated region of the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene. The C allele was associated with lower triglycerides, and this association was modulated by fat intake. We aimed to extend our findings by assessing the interaction between the rs13702 polymorphism and fat intake on triglycerides at baseline and longitudinally by using a dietary intervention design. We also examined as a primary outcome the association of this variant with CVD incidence and its modulation by the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet). We studied 7187 participants in the PREDIMED (Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea) randomized trial that tested a MedDiet intervention compared with a control diet, with a median 4.8-y follow-up. LPL polymorphisms and triglycerides were determined and CVD assessed. Gene-diet interactions for triglycerides were analyzed at baseline (n = 6880) and after a 3-y intervention (n = 4131). Oxidative stress parameters were investigated in a subsample. The rs13702T>C polymorphism was strongly associated with lower triglycerides in C allele carriers and interacted synergistically with dietary monounsaturated (P = 0.038) and unsaturated fat intake (P = 0.037), decreasing triglycerides at baseline. By 3 y, we observed a gene-diet interaction (P = 0.025) in which the C allele was associated with a greater reduction in triglycerides after intervention with MedDiet, high in unsaturated fat. Although the polymorphism was associated with lower stroke risk (HR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.57, 0.97; P = 0.029 per C allele), this association reached statistical significance only in the MedDiet intervention (HR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.37, 0.91; P = 0.019 in C compared with TT carriers), not in the control group (HR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.55, 1.59; P = 0.805). We report a novel

  3. Obstructive carotid and/or intracranial artery disease rarely affects the incidence of haemodynamic ischaemic stroke during cardiac surgery: a study on brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography with acetazolamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imasaka, Ken-ichi; Yasaka, Masahiro; Tayama, Eiki; Tomita, Yukihiro

    2015-11-01

    Ischaemic stroke is a major complication of cardiac surgery. The optimal strategies for operating on patients with obstructive carotid and/or intracranial artery disease (CIAD) are controversial. We aimed to clarify whether single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with acetazolamide, to quantify the cerebral perfusion reserve, could predict the risk of haemodynamic ischaemic stroke during cardiac surgery. The incidence of stroke related to obstructive CIAD and the corresponding autoregulatory reserve were prospectively assessed in 514 consecutive patients who underwent elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (n = 484) and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (n = 30) between 2009 and 2013. Preoperative cerebral blood flow and its reactivity to acetazolamide were quantitatively determined in patients (n = 88) with obstructive CIAD, diagnosed by carotid ultrasonography and/or magnetic resonance angiography. An impaired cerebral perfusion reserve was identified in 1 (1.1%) of the 88 patients. This patient underwent prophylactic superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery anastomosis 1 month before coronary artery bypass surgery. Subsequently, the patient underwent conventional coronary artery bypass surgery, without experiencing perioperative stroke. Seven (1.4%) patients died in-hospital mortality and 5 (1.0%) experienced perioperative stroke. However, no patients experienced perioperative haemodynamic ischaemic stroke. It is unusual for CIAD to affect the incidence of haemodynamic ischaemic stroke during cardiac surgery. Brain perfusion SPECT with acetazolamide is effective for narrowing down patients at high risk of ischaemic stroke during cardiac surgery. Meanwhile, the application of brain perfusion single-photon emission tomography should be confined only to patients with obstructive CIAD because it is an expensive examination tool. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association

  4. Early depressed mood after stroke predicts long-term disability: the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study (NOMASS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Joshua Z; Disla, Norbelina; Moon, Yeseon Park; Paik, Myunghee C; Sacco, Ralph L; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Wright, Clinton B

    2010-09-01

    Depression is highly prevalent after stroke and may influence recovery. We aimed to determine whether depressed mood acutely after stroke predicts subsequent disability and mortality. As part of the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study, a population-based incident stroke case follow-up study performed in a multiethnic urban population, participants were asked about depressed mood within 7 to 10 days after stroke. Participants were followed every 6 months the first 2 years and yearly thereafter for 5 years for death and disability measured by the Barthel Index. We fitted polytomous logistic regression models using a canonical link to examine the association between depressed mood after stroke and disability comparing moderate (Barthel Index 60 to 95) and severe (Barthel Index or=95). Cox proportional hazards models were created to examine the association between depressed mood and mortality. A question about depressed mood within 7 to 10 days after stroke was asked in 340 of 655 patients with ischemic stroke enrolled, and 139 reported that they felt depressed. In multivariate analyses controlling for sociodemographic factors, stroke severity, and medical conditions, depressed mood was associated with a greater odds of severe disability compared with no disability at 1 (OR 2.91, 95% CI 1.07 to 7.91) and 2 years (OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.29 to 10.71) after stroke. Depressed mood was not associated with all-cause mortality or vascular death. Depressed mood after stroke is associated with disability but not mortality after stroke. Early screening and intervention for mood disorders after stroke may improve outcomes and requires further research.

  5. Impaired nocturnal melatonin in acute phase of ischaemic stroke: cross-sectional matched case-control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassova, P A; Terzieva, D D; Dimitrov, B D

    2009-07-01

    Quantitative data on melatonin in stroke patients are scarce. A gender- and age-matched cross-sectional case-control study in 33 patients with ischaemic stroke was performed and associations between nocturnal melatonin and other factors (e.g. cortisol) were evaluated. Clinical and laboratory (e.g. melatonin and cortisol) measurements (03.00 h and 08.00 h) with statistical techniques [e.g. multifactorial regressions, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and curvilinear estimations] were used. We identified mean value and 95% confidence interval (CI) (69.70 pg/ml; 95% CI = 53.86-85.54) for control levels of nocturnal melatonin in healthy subjects. The patients with stroke had lower melatonin (48.1 +/- 35.9 pg/ml) and higher cortisol (297.3 +/- 157.8 nmol/l) at 03.00 h (P 0.05). Stroke was the strongest factor of disturbed nocturnal cortisol (P melatonin depended on stroke (P = 0.010) and gender (P = 0.018). At the same time, vice versa, only nocturnal measures were associated with an increased probability of the presence of stroke (accuracy > 75%, Pmodel melatonin with 1.0 pg/ml might be associated with > 2% increase in the probability of the presence of stroke [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.020; 95% CI = 1.002-1.037] was also suggested. The ROC curve (0.67, P = 0.0119) and optimisation techniques indicated that a novel best cut-off melatonin in the view of the presence of stroke (OR = 3.12, P = 0.0463) might exist. The classification performance of such a cut-off might be confirmed by existing nocturnal melatonin and cortisol differences between the sub-groups; potential differences in diurnal melatonin were also suggested. In conclusion, a novel melatonin cut-off of 51.5 pg/ml may be associated with the presence of ischaemic stroke. As a single marker (84% sensitivity, 74% specificity), it is hypothesised that modelling performance was independent of age, gender and cortisol. These new results, including the suggested hypothesis, might be further tested in

  6. A Review of Stroke Cases in a Military Hospital in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Am J Epidemiology, 1984; 120:236-43. 12. Walker RW, Mclarry DG. Hypertension and stroke in developing countries. Lancet, 1995; 346:778. 13. Joubert J. The MEDUNS. A Stroke between 1986 and 1987. South Africa Med J, 1991; 80:567-570. 14. Bonita R, Stewart AW, Beaglehole R. International trends in stroke motality, ...

  7. Handedness in stroke: A review of 450 cases at Enugu, south east ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The relationship between stroke and subsequent handedness of limb weakness has been the subject of several studies. Handedness has been associated with several factors including quality of life and post stroke depression amongst others. The aim of this paper is to examine the pattern of stroke and ...

  8. Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke as Amusement Park Injury: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby Baumgartle

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Strokes as amusement park injuries are rare, but have been reported in the literature. Only about 20 cases of cerebrovascular accidents after amusement park visits have been described. We report a healthy 12-year-old boy who presented with facial droop, slurred speech, and inability to use his right arm after riding roller coasters at a local amusement park. He was evaluated and found to have a left middle cerebral artery (MCA infarction. The patient was treated with anticoagulants and has recovered with no major residual symptoms. It is likely that his neurological symptoms occurred due to the high head accelerations experienced on the roller coasters, which are more detrimental to children due to immature cervical spine development and muscle strength. Early diagnosis of dissection and stroke results in a favorable prognosis. Providers and parents should be aware of the potential risk of roller coasters and act quickly on neurologic changes in children that have recently been to an amusement park.

  9. Consideration of Two Cases of Ascending Aortic Dissection That Began with Stroke-Like Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaki Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently experienced two patients with stroke-like symptoms and ascending aortic dissection (AAD in our outpatient department. Both patients were transferred to our hospital presenting with neurological deficit such as hemiparesis and conjugate deviation. They did not complain from any chest or abdominal pain. Their MRI did not show fresh infarction or main branch occlusion. A chest CT image showed AAD. The former patient was immediately transferred to a tertiary hospital and the latter received conservative management in the cardiovascular department. Discussion. As neither patient was experiencing any pain, we initially diagnosed them with ischemic stroke and began treatment. Fortunately, bleeding complications did not occur. In such cases, problems are caused when intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA injection is administered with the aim of reopening the occluded intracranial arteries. In fact, patients with AAD undergoing t-PA injection have been reported to die from bleeding complications without any recognition of the dissection. These findings suggest that confirmation using carotid ultrasound, carotid MR angiography, and a D-dimer test is crucial and should be adopted in emergency departments.

  10. A CLINICAL STUDY OF STROKE IN YOUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumbha Thulasi Ram

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available NTRIDUCTION : Stroke is one of the important causes of morbidity and mortality all over the world. Incidence of stroke steadily increases with age. Experts are concerned of the emerging stroke epidemic in India. Stroke affecting the young has potentially devastating consequence son the individual and his family. Certain risk factors are unique to the young. I t needs more studies for identification and modification of risk factors. The study aims to evaluate clinical features, risk factors, etiology and mortality of stroke in young patients. METHODS : 74 young patients satisfying the inclusion criteria were included in this study. A detailed history was taken from young stroke patients, systemic examination and required investigations were done. Data was collected in standardized proforma and analysed. RESULTS: Stroke in young accounts for 7.95% of stroke cases of all age groups. The mean age of the patients was 34.66 ± 7.48 years. Among 74 patients, 47(63.51% were male and 27(36.49% were female. Seizures, decreased consciousness, speech involvement and motor deficit were observed in 33.78%, 44.59%, 22.97% and 100% of cases respectively. 82.43% patients had ischemic and 17.57% patients had hemorrhagic stroke. Among ischemic stroke, large artery atherosclerosis was 16.21%, tuberculous meningoencephalitis with vasculitis was 16.21%, lacunar stroke was 10.81%, CVT was 10.81% and cardio embolic stroke was 6.76%. Smoking (59.45%, alcoholism (58.10%, hypertension (43.24%, coronary artery disease (8.10%, diabetes mellitus (10.81%, elevated total cholesterol (25.67%, elevated low density lipo proteins (22.97%, elevated triglycerides (27.02% and low HDL (22.97% were important risk factors. Carotid doppler was abnormal in 9.45% of patients. 6.76% patients had mitral stenosis in echocardiogram. Low protein C and protein S were found in 1.35% of patients. Eight (10.81% patients died during the hospital stay. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: The major risk

  11. [Etiologic mechanism and prevention of perioperative stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Ujifuku, Kenta; Hiu, Takeshi; Kitagawa, Naoki; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Izumi

    2008-05-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques and improvements in perioperative care, the incidence of perioperative strokes has not decreased, reflecting the aging of the population and the increased number of patients with complication. We investigated the cases who were consulted due to perioperative stroke. From April, 2004 to March, 2007, a total of 102 patients were referred for neurological evaluation because of perioperative stroke. Types of planned or performed surgery, risk factors, types of stroke and timing of the events were analyzed. Sixty-seven cases were consulted preoperatively for history or risk factors of stroke. Forty-seven cases had ischemic risk factors and cerebral vascular recanalization was carried out in four patients who experienced severe cerebral hypoperfusion. The other patients with ischemic risk factors were treated to avoid dehydration or hypotension perioperatively. Nine cases with hemorrhagic risk factors, such as cerebral aneurysm, were treated to avoid significant hypertension during surgery. The types of planned surgery were cardiovascular surgery in 29 cases, abdominal surgery in 13, cervical surgery in 7, and thoracic surgery in 6. Except for one case, who suffered cerebral embolism due to cardiac surgery, those who were consulted preoperatively did not experience stroke. Neurological events had occurred in 35 patients and they were consulted postoperatively. The surgical procedures were cardiovascular surgery in 19 patients, thoracic surgery in 6, abdominal surgery in 6. The types of stroke were cerebral infarction in 20 cases, hypoxic brain in 8, and transient ischemic attack in 5. The cause of the cerebral infarction was considered as cerebral embolism in 19 cases. Those who were consulted preoperatively were treated to prevent intraoperative stroke and did not suffer neurological complication. Most stoke in patients undergoing surgery were not related to hypoperfusion but due to embolism.

  12. Mycoplasma pneumoniae in elderly patients with stroke. a case-control study on the seroprevalence of M. pneumoniae in elderly patients with acute cerebrovascular disease - the M-PEPS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeh, Joseph; Gupta, Sandeep; Goodbourn, Colin; McElligott, Geraldine

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested certain infections as potential risk factors for stroke. Chlamydia pneumoniae, an atypical respiratory pathogen, has been linked to atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Mycoplasma pneumoniae, another atypical respiratory micro-organism, can rarely cause stroke. We investigated whether serological markers of M. pneumoniae infection were associated with acute stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) in elderly patients. This case-control study was nested within the C-PEPS study - a case-control study on the seroprevalence of C. pneumoniae in elderly stroke and medical patients. Ninety-five incident cases of patients admitted consecutively with acute stroke or TIA, and 82 control subjects admitted concurrently with acute non-cardiopulmonary, non-infective disorders, were included in this study (both groups aged 65 years or older). Using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits, the presence of M. pneumoniae immunoglobulins IgA, IgG and IgM in patients' sera was determined. The seroprevalence of M. pneumoniae IgA, IgG and IgM in the stroke or TIA group (median age = 80) were 79, 61 and 6%, respectively. In the control group (median age = 80), the seroprevalence of respective M. pneumoniae IgA, IgG and IgM were 84, 50 and 11%. Using a logistic regression statistical model, adjusting for history of hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, age and sex, history of ischaemic heart disease, and ischaemic electrocardiogram, the odds ratios of having a stroke or TIA in relation to M. pneumoniae IgA, IgG and IgM were 0.63 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.26-1.52, p = 0.31), 1.32 (95% CI = 0.66-2.64, p = 0.43) and 0.52 (95% CI = 0.14-1.92, p = 0.32), respectively. The study showed a high seroprevalence of M. pneumoniae in an elderly hospital population, using ELISA. Although the study ruled out M. pneumoniae seropositivity as a major risk factor for stroke in this elderly population, a smaller effect could not be excluded due to

  13. Excess Stroke in Mexican Americans Compared with Non-Hispanic Whites: The Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project

    OpenAIRE

    Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Smith, Melinda A.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Risser, Jan M. H.; Uchino, Ken; Garcia, Nelda; Longwell, Paxton J.; McFarling, David A.; Akuwumi, Olubumi; Al-Wabil, Areej; Al-Senani, Fahmi; Brown, Devin L.; Moyé, Lemuel A.

    2004-01-01

    Mexican Americans are the largest subgroup of Hispanics, the largest minority population in the United States. Stroke is the leading cause of disability and third leading cause of death. The authors compared stroke incidence among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Whites in a population-based study. Stroke cases were ascertained in Nueces County, Texas, utilizing concomitant active and passive surveillance. Cases were validated on the basis of source documentation by board-certified neurolog...

  14. Game-based versus traditional case-based learning: comparing effectiveness in stroke continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telner, Deanna; Bujas-Bobanovic, Maja; Chan, David; Chester, Bob; Marlow, Bernard; Meuser, James; Rothman, Arthur; Harvey, Bart

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate family physicians' enjoyment of and knowledge gained from game-based learning, compared with traditional case-based learning, in a continuing medical education (CME) event on stroke prevention and management. An equivalence trial to determine if game-based learning was as effective as case-based learning in terms of attained knowledge levels. Game questions and small group cases were developed. Participants were randomized to either a game-based or a case-based group and took part in the event. Ontario provincial family medicine conference. Thirty-two family physicians and 3 senior family medicine residents attending the conference. Participation in either a game-based or a case-based CME learning group. Scores on 40-item immediate and 3-month posttests of knowledge and a satisfaction survey. Results from knowledge testing immediately after the event and 3 months later showed no significant difference in scoring between groups. Participants in the game-based group reported higher levels of satisfaction with the learning experience. Games provide a novel way of organizing CME events. They might provide more group interaction and discussion, as well as improve recruitment to CME events. They might also provide a forum for interdisciplinary CME. Using games in future CME events appears to be a promising approach to facilitate participant learning.

  15. Gingivitis and periodontitis as a risk factor for stroke: A case-control study in the Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemipour, Maryam Alsadat; Afshar, Afsaneh Jahanshahi; Borna, Roya; Seddighi, Behnas; Motamedi, Amin

    2013-09-01

    Periodontitis and gingivitis are one of the most infectious diseases in human. Several studies have been carried out on dependence of periodontitis and stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate the gingivitis and periodontitis as a risk factor for stroke in Iranian population. A case-control study was conducted on 100 patients suffering from stroke as case group, and 100 hospitalized patients as control group. The case group included 42 males and 58 females, and in control group there were 44 males and 56 females. Using a University of North Carolina-15 manual probe, the clinical attachment level, the distance between the cemento-enamel junction and the probed base of the periodontal pocket, were recorded by gingival and periodontal indexes. The data were analyzed by multiple logistic regressions, Chi-square test, Fisher's test, t-test, Man Whitney, and SPSS11.5 software program. P > 0.05 was considered as significant. The case group included 42 males and 58 females, and in control group 44 males and 56 females were included. In this investigation, the average of gingival index in men and women of case group was 1.22 ± 0.55 and 1.31 ± 0.55, respectively. This study showed that the average of gingival index in case group was more than control group. Periodontal index in both groups in men was more than women. The moderate and severe periodontitis in case group were more than that of control group (P = 0.003, P = 0.001). The result of this study shows that there is a significant relation between stroke and periodontal index; however, there isn't any significant relation between stroke and gingival index.

  16. Frequency of risk factors of cerebral infarction in stroke patients. a study of 100 cases in naseer teaching hospital, peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safeer, M.; Tariq, M.; Rehman, U.U.

    2008-01-01

    To study the risk factors of cerebral infarction in stroke patients. It is a descriptive hospital based study conducted at the Department of Medicine, Naseer Teaching Hospital, Peshawar from January 2005 to December 2005. One hundred patients of stroke with cerebral infarction confirmed on C.T. scan brain and more than twenty years of age were included. Risk factors for cerebral infarction were defined in terms of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, smoking, dyslipidaemia, TIAs (transient ischemic attacks), carotid artery stenosis and family history of stroke. Data of 100 cases with cerebral infarction was recorded. Most of the patients had more than one risk factors for cerebral infarction. hypertension was commonest risk factor (55%), smoking (30%), ischemic heart disease (34%), diabetes mellitus) (26%), hyperlipedaemia (30%), atrial fibrillation (25%), carotid artery stenosis (27%), obesity (15%) and family history of stroke (12%). 39% of patients had physical inactivity. Males were slightly predominant than females (51% vs 49%) and mean age was 50 years. females were rather older with mean age of 53 years. Cerebral infarction accounts for 80% to 85% of cases of stroke, which is a common neurological disorder. It increases a burden of disability and misery for patients and their families. Most of the risk factors of cerebral infarction are modifiable, its prevention should be the main cause of concern for the community. (author)

  17. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation combined with treadmill training in the subacute phase following stroke: case series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figlewski, Krystian; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk; Blicher, Jakob

    anodal tDCS. Aims: to evaluate the feasibility of anodal tDCS with body weight support treadmill training (BWSTT) in the subacute stroke patients. Methods Four subjects (Table 1.) participated in BWSTT coupled with anodal tDCS thrice per week for 4 weeks. Subjects were included within 14 days from stroke......Background Stroke is a common cause of gait impairment and regaining a normal gait is a major target in stroke rehabilitation. To facilitate motor recovery after stroke, a variety of experimental approaches have been tested. Recent developments include non-invasive brain stimulation techniques...

  18. [Ischemic stroke in the young adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, D

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is not rare in young adults since one in ten stroke patients are less than 50 years old. This incidence increased over the past last years, mainly due to the rise in the prevalence of traditional vascular risk factors in this sub-group of age but also of illegal drug use. Even though both survival and functional outcome of young stroke patients are better than those observed in older patients, socio-economic and quality of life consequences make this disease a main objective in terms of primary and secondary prevention. Identifying the cause of ischemic stroke in young adults is of major importance to prevent stroke recurrence. However, given the wide variety of potential underlying causes, the etiologic work-up of stroke in young adults requires a different approach from that in the elderly. In this context, a sequential diagnostic work-up is needed in order to optimize the yield of diagnostic tests, to reduce their cost and risks for the patient. Arterial dissection is the most frequent cause of stroke in young adults but other less frequent causes are numerous. Despite a comprehensive work-up, about one third of cases remains unexplained leading to the diagnosis of cryptogenic ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Population-based study of ischemic stroke risk after trauma in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christine K; Hills, Nancy K; Vinson, David R; Numis, Adam L; Dicker, Rochelle A; Sidney, Stephen; Fullerton, Heather J

    2017-12-05

    To quantify the incidence, timing, and risk of ischemic stroke after trauma in a population-based young cohort. We electronically identified trauma patients (ischemic stroke within 4 weeks of trauma and 3 controls per case. A physician panel reviewed medical records, confirmed cases, and adjudicated whether the stroke was related to trauma. We calculated the 4-week stroke incidence and estimated stroke odds ratios (OR) by injury location using logistic regression. From 1,308,009 trauma encounters, we confirmed 52 trauma-related ischemic strokes. The 4-week stroke incidence was 4.0 per 100,000 encounters (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.0-5.2). Trauma was multisystem in 26 (50%). In 19 (37%), the stroke occurred on the day of trauma, and all occurred within 15 days. In 7/28 cases with cerebrovascular angiography at the time of trauma, no abnormalities were detected. In unadjusted analyses, head, neck, chest, back, and abdominal injuries increased stroke risk. Only head (OR 4.1, CI 1.1-14.9) and neck (OR 5.6, CI 1.03-30.9) injuries remained associated with stroke after adjusting for demographics and trauma severity markers (multisystem trauma, motor vehicle collision, arrival by ambulance, intubation). Stroke risk is elevated for 2 weeks after trauma. Onset is frequently delayed, providing an opportunity for stroke prevention during this period. However, in one-quarter of stroke cases with cerebrovascular angiography at the time of trauma, no vascular abnormality was detected. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Imported dengue cases, weather variation and autochthonous dengue incidence in Cairns, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue fever (DF outbreaks often arise from imported DF cases in Cairns, Australia. Few studies have incorporated imported DF cases in the estimation of the relationship between weather variability and incidence of autochthonous DF. The study aimed to examine the impact of weather variability on autochthonous DF infection after accounting for imported DF cases and then to explore the possibility of developing an empirical forecast system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDS: Data on weather variables, notified DF cases (including those acquired locally and overseas, and population size in Cairns were supplied by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, Queensland Health, and Australian Bureau of Statistics. A time-series negative-binomial hurdle model was used to assess the effects of imported DF cases and weather variability on autochthonous DF incidence. Our results showed that monthly autochthonous DF incidences were significantly associated with monthly imported DF cases (Relative Risk (RR:1.52; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.01-2.28, monthly minimum temperature ((oC (RR: 2.28; 95% CI: 1.77-2.93, monthly relative humidity (% (RR: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.06-1.37, monthly rainfall (mm (RR: 0.50; 95% CI: 0.31-0.81 and monthly standard deviation of daily relative humidity (% (RR: 1.27; 95% CI: 1.08-1.50. In the zero hurdle component, the occurrence of monthly autochthonous DF cases was significantly associated with monthly minimum temperature (Odds Ratio (OR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.01-2.67. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our research suggested that incidences of monthly autochthonous DF were strongly positively associated with monthly imported DF cases, local minimum temperature and inter-month relative humidity variability in Cairns. Moreover, DF outbreak in Cairns was driven by imported DF cases only under favourable seasons and weather conditions in the study.

  1. Sex, drugs and the medical role: A case report of a man prescribed Alprazolam following stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Hamam

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that sexual dysfunction can result from many classes of drugs including sedatives, anti-hypertensives and anti-depressants. Untreated sexual dysfunction can lead to patient distress.A 64-year-old man with a history of a left cerebrovascular accident participated in a qualitative research study on sex after stroke. He had been experiencing sexual dysfunction for four years.Discussions with the patient were difficult due to his expressive dysphasia. The researcher asked him to re-visit his general practitioner (GP who reviewed his medications and changed the prescribed sleeping tablet. Sexual function returned within a week. This case report highlights the contribution of medication to sexual dysfunction and the need for doctors to initiate conversations about sexual concerns.

  2. [Thalamic Stroke and Associated Behavior Disorders. Possibilities for Integral Management: Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Loida Camargo; Sánchez, Katherine Parra

    2012-06-01

    Since ancient Greece, cerebrovascular accidents have been described with no variation. Even today, they are still a catastrophic event in the lives of patients with a high risk of disabling sequelae. Case report of a 56-year male patient with thalamic ischemia. The intervention with integral strategies involving pharmacological management and cognitive interventions was decisive for the satisfactory evolution of the patient. The management of patients with cerebrovascular accidents cannot be limited to the emergency room. Pharmacological advances in programs and cognitive intervention methods provide intervention tools from the very beginning of the stroke thus reducing the impact of long-term sequelae, and consequently enabling a better reintegration of the patient to his family. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. The first documented case of hemorrhagic stroke caused by Group B streptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beenish Siddiqui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 47 year-old female with Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B beta-hemolytic streptococcus meningitis complicated by hemorrhagic stroke. The patient presented to the emergency department with altered mental status, agitation, confusion, respiratory distress and fever of one-day duration. Labs showed left shift leukocytosis. CSF exhibited a high white blood cell count with a predominant population of polymononuclear cells, high glucose and protein concentration. CSF cultures grew S. agalactiae. Despite appropriate antimicrobial treatment, her mental status did not improve and head CT showed two hemorrhages, diffuse cerebral edema and a right to left midline shift. After completing the course of her therapy, her mental status improved and the patient was discharged.

  4. Sex differences in stroke: a socioeconomic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delbari A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad Delbari,1 Farzane Keyghobadi,2 Yadollah Abolfathi Momtaz,1,3 Fariba Keyghobadi,2 Reza Akbari,2 Houman Kamranian,2 Mohammad Shouride Yazdi,2 Sayed Shahaboddin Tabatabaei,1 Seyed-Mohammad Fereshtehnejad4 1Iranian Research Center on Aging, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Research Center on Healthy Aging, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, Sabzevar, Khorasan, Iran; 3Malaysian Research Institute on Ageing (MyAgeing™, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 4Department of Neurobiology, Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Care Sciences and Society (NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Background: A number of studies have explored the issue of sex differences in stroke from biomedical perspective; however, there are still large gaps in the existing knowledge. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the differences in socioeconomic status and living conditions between men and women may explain the part of the sex differences in incidence and outcomes of stroke. Methods: All stroke participants aged ≥60 years admitted in Vaseie Hospital in Sabzevar, Iran, from March 21, 2013, until March 20, 2014, were included in this study. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were used to confirm stroke. A series of χ2 tests were performed and Statistical Program for Social Sciences, Version 21.0, was used to investigate the potential differences between older men and women in stroke incidence and outcomes. Results: A total of 159 incident stroke cases were documented during 1 year. The annual rate of stroke was statistically significantly higher in elderly women than in elderly men (401 vs 357 per 100,000; P<0.001. Female elderly participants had significantly lower socioeconomic status, poorer living conditions, and higher lifetime history of depression, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus than their male counterparts. Conclusion: The findings from this study

  5. Sensitivity of routine system for reporting patient safety incidents in an NHS hospital: retrospective patient case note review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Ali Baba-Akbari; Sheldon, Trevor A; Cracknell, Alison; Turnbull, Alastair

    2007-01-13

    To evaluate the performance of a routine incident reporting system in identifying patient safety incidents. Two stage retrospective review of patients' case notes and analysis of data submitted to the routine incident reporting system on the same patients. A large NHS hospital in England. 1006 hospital admissions between January and May 2004: surgery (n=311), general medicine (n=251), elderly care (n=184), orthopaedics (n=131), urology (n=61), and three other specialties (n=68). Proportion of admissions with at least one patient safety incident; proportion and type of patient safety incidents missed by routine incident reporting and case note review methods. 324 patient safety incidents were identified in 230/1006 admissions (22.9%; 95% confidence interval 20.3% to 25.5%). 270 (83%) patient safety incidents were identified by case note review only, 21 (7%) by the routine reporting system only, and 33 (10%) by both methods. 110 admissions (10.9%; 9.0% to 12.8%) had at least one patient safety incident resulting in patient harm, all of which were detected by the case note review and six (5%) by the reporting system. The routine incident reporting system may be poor at identifying patient safety incidents, particularly those resulting in harm. Structured case note review may have a useful role in surveillance of routine incident reporting and associated quality improvement programmes.

  6. Incorporating robotic-assisted telerehabilitation in a home program to improve arm function following stroke: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Susan M.; Reiss, Aimee; Buchanan, Sharon; Sahu, Komal; Rosenfeldt, Anson B.; Clark, Cindy; Wolf, Steven L.; Alberts, Jay L.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose After stroke, many individuals lack resources to receive the intensive rehabilitation thought to improve upper extremity motor function. This case study describes the application of a telerehabilitation intervention using a portable robotic device combined with a home exercise program (HEP) designed to improve upper extremity function. Case Description The participant was a 54 year-old male, 22 weeks following right medullary pyramidal ischemic infarct. At baseline, he exhibited residual paresis of the left upper extremity resulting in impaired motor control consistent with a flexion synergistic pattern, scoring 22/66 on the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (FMA). Intervention The participant completed 85 total hours of training (38 hours of robotic device and 47 hours of HEP) over the 8-week intervention period. Outcomes The participant demonstrated an improvement of 26 points on the Action Research Arm Test, 5 points on the Functional Ability Scale portion of the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), and 20 points on the FMA, all of which surpassed the minimal clinically important difference (MCID). Of the 17 tasks of the WMFT, he demonstrated improvement on 11 of the 15 time-based tasks and both strength measures. The participant reported an overall improvement in his stroke recovery on the Stroke Impact Scale quality of life questionnaire from 40/100 to 65/100. His score on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale improved by 19 points. Discussion This case demonstrates that robotic-assisted therapy paired with a HEP can be successfully delivered within a home environment to a person with stroke. Robotic assisted therapy may be a feasible and efficacious adjunct to a HEP program to elicit substantial improvements in upper extremity motor function especially in those persons with stroke who lack access to stroke rehabilitation centers. Video Abstract available (See Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1.) for more insights from the

  7. Plasma enterolactone and incidence of endometrial cancer in a case-cohort study of Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Julie; Kyrø, Cecilie; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2013-01-01

    The phyto-oestrogen enterolactone has been hypothesised to protect against hormone-dependent cancers, probably through its anti-oestrogenic potential. We investigated whether a higher level of plasma enterolactone was associated with a lower incidence of endometrial cancer in a case-cohort study ...

  8. Cooperation of the site and public fire and safety services in case of an incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauch, M.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the cooperation between the site and the public fire and safety services in case of an incident. As an example, the measures and facilities of the Hoechst site of the Hoechst AG and the organisational and technical background are presented. (orig.) [de

  9. Perceived value of stroke outcome measures across the post-acute care continuum: a qualitative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzl, Megan M; Hunter, Elizabeth G

    2013-04-01

    Connecting the continuum of post-acute care stroke services may be important for easing patients' transition between settings and facilitating recovery and community reintegration. The use of outcome measures is suggested as one means of connecting the continuum. The purpose of this qualitative case study is to describe administrators' and physiotherapists' perceived value of an outcomes program across the post-acute care stroke continuum at a rehabilitation hospital. Data were collected through individual interviews and focus groups with 18 participants. Three themes emerged on the value of the outcomes program: 1) enhanced communication; 2) supports clinical decision-making; and 3) value of objective data. These findings lend support for the use of standardized outcome measures by physiotherapists in stroke rehabilitation. Findings from this study may be useful for organizations and physiotherapists who wish to integrate outcome measures into practice.

  10. Pure Motor Stroke Secondary to Cerebral Infarction of Recurrent Artery of Heubner after Mild Head Trauma: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ali; Kizilay, Zahir; Ozkul, Ayca; Çirak, Bayram

    2016-03-15

    The recurrent Heubner's artery is the distal part of the medial striate artery. Occlusion of the recurrent artery of Heubner, classically contralateral hemiparesis with fasciobrachiocrural predominance, is attributed to the occlusion of the recurrent artery of Heubner and is widely known as a stroke syndrome in adults. However, isolated occlusion of the deep perforating arteries following mild head trauma also occurs extremely rarely in childhood. Here we report the case of an 11-year-old boy with pure motor stroke. The brain MRI showed an acute ischemia in the recurrent artery of Heubner supply area following mild head trauma. His fasciobrachial hemiparesis and dysarthria were thought to be secondary to the stretching of deep perforating arteries leading to occlusion of the recurrent artery of Heubner. Post-traumatic pure motor ischemic stroke can be secondary to stretching of the deep perforating arteries especially in childhood.

  11. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene A1298C polymorphism in pediatric stroke--case-control and family-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerzyk, Anna; Niemiec, Paweł; Kopyta, Ilona; Emich-Widera, Ewa; Pilarska, Ewa; Pienczk-Ręcławowicz, Karolina; Kaciński, Marek; Wendorff, Janusz; Żak, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is one of the risk factors of pediatric stroke. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is an important enzyme, which regulates homocysteine metabolism, and some polymorphisms of gene encoding this enzyme are associated with a decreased activity of the enzyme. The aim of the study was to assess an association between the A1298C polymorphism and pediatric stroke. We also evaluated a possible synergistic effect of A1298C and C677T polymorphisms of this gene. The study group consisted of 88 children after ischemic stroke, 142 of their parents and 111 controls. The A1298C polymorphism was genotyped using the restriction fragment length polymorphism method. We used 2 study designs: a case-control model and a family-based association test. The Statistica 7.1 and EpiInfo 6 softwares were used in all analyses. We did not observe any statistically significant differences either in the transmission of the A allele in the family-based test or in the frequency of the A allele in the patients group compared with the controls. We also did not notice any significant additive or synergistic effects between the A1298C and C677T polymorphisms. An analysis of the results obtained in this study and a critical review of previously published studies indicate that the A1298C polymorphism of the MTHFR gene is not related to ischemic stroke in children. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Association of cardiovascular emerging risk factors with acute coronary syndrome and stroke: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Linares, José Manuel; Guisado Barrilao, Rafael; Ocaña Peinado, Francisco Manuel; Salgado Parreño, Francisco Javier

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we estimated the risk of acute coronary syndrome and stroke associated with several emerging cardiovascular risk factors. This was a case-control study, where an age - and sex-matched acute coronary syndrome group and stroke group were compared with controls. Demographic and clinical data were collected through patient interviews, and blood samples were taken for analysis. In the bivariate analysis, all cardiovascular risk factors analyzed showed as predictors of acute coronary syndrome and stroke, except total cholesterol and smoking. In the multivariate logistic regression model for acute coronary syndrome, hypertension and body mass index, N-terminal section brain natriuretic peptide and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A were independent predictors. For stroke, the predictors were hypertension, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, and N-terminal section brain natriuretic peptide. Controlling for age, sex, and classical cardiovascular risk factors, N-terminal section brain natriuretic peptide and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A were independent emerging cardiovascular risk factors for acute coronary syndrome, but pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A was not for stroke. High levels of cardiovascular risk factors in individuals with no episodes of cardiovascular disease requires the implementation of prevention programs, given that at least half of them are modifiable. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Heat stroke leading to acute liver injury & failure: A case series from the Acute Liver Failure Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian C; Tillman, Holly; Chung, Raymond T; Stravitz, Richard T; Reddy, Rajender; Fontana, Robert J; McGuire, Brendan; Davern, Timothy; Lee, William M

    2017-04-01

    In the United States, nearly 1000 annual cases of heat stroke are reported but the frequency and outcome of severe liver injury in such patients is not well described. The aim of this study was to describe cases of acute liver injury (ALI) or failure (ALF) caused by heat stroke in a large ALF registry. Amongst 2675 consecutive subjects enrolled in a prospective observational cohort of patients with ALI or ALF between January 1998 and April 2015, there were eight subjects with heat stroke. Five patients had ALF and three had ALI. Seven patients developed acute kidney injury, all eight had lactic acidosis and rhabdomyolysis. Six patients underwent cooling treatments, three received N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), three required mechanical ventilation, three required renal replacement therapy, two received vasopressors, one underwent liver transplantation, and two patients died-both within 48 hours of presentation. All cases occurred between May and August, mainly in healthy young men because of excessive exertion. Management of ALI and ALF secondary to heat stroke should focus on cooling protocols and supportive care, with consideration of liver transplantation in refractory patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A Case Report of Stroke in a Woman with Paradoxical Embolism Associated with Ebstein's Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazdeh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ebstein's anomaly (EA is a rare congenital malformation of the tricuspid valve, often associated with PFO, which is present in 80-90% of patients & predisposes to para-doxical embolization. Case Report: The case described was a 30 year old female, in the post partum phase, (ten days after normal vaginal delivery who was presented to the emergency department with seizure & Rt sided hemiplegia & aphasia. On brain computed tomography scan there was large in-farct of Lt sided hemisphere in fronto temporopartial, and her brain MRI subsequently con-firmed the infarct. Laboratory tests including coagulation study & infectious tests were nor-mal. But electrocardiogram showed AG block grade I. Trans thoracic and Trans esophageal echocardiography revealed Ebstein's anomaly. Dynamic cardiac MRI showed severe tricus-pid regurgitation due to sown ward displacement of tricuspid valve to apical heart associated with patent foramen oral & ASD (Ejection fraction of right chamber was normal and no evi-dence of clot. Conclusion: After ruling out the other diagnoses, paradoxical emboli was considered as the cause leading to the stroke in this case. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (1:72-75

  15. Computed tomography scan in the evaluation of patients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PK Chhetri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular accident is a frequent cause of death and disability in most parts of the globe. The incidence of cerebrovascular diseases increases with age and the number of strokes is projected to increase as the elderly population grows. This study was undertaken to determine the type of stroke and also to relate the risks factors associated with stroke. Hundred consecutive patients presenting with stroke in the emergency department / neurology clinic were subjected to computed tomography scan of the brain. Sixty – four patients had ischemic infarct and 36 had intracranial hemorrhage which included 2 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and 1 with underlying cavernous angioma. Ischemic stroke was thus commoner than hemorrhagic stroke. Previous infarct or lacunes were noted in 25 % of the patients presenting with stroke. Risk factors were present in most (77 % of the patients presenting with stroke. Among the various risk factors, the single most common was smoking seen in 38 cases, followed by hypertension in 28 cases, obesity in 8 cases and diabetes in 3 cases. Twenty- one patients had multiple combinations of the above risk factors. Among the multiple risk factors, combination of alcohol and smoking was the commonest seen in 11 cases, followed by hypertension and obesity in 8 cases and alcohol with obesity in 2 cases. Change in lifestyle and eating habits may thus help reduce the incidence of stroke. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal,2012,Vol-8,No-2, 24-31 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i2.6834

  16. A clinical study on cognitive impairment in post-ischemic stroke patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Chen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the relation between metabolic syndrome (MetS and cognitive impairment after ischemic stroke. Methods Ninety-four cases of first ischemic stroke patients were divided into stroke without MetS group (n = 54 and stroke with MetS group (n = 40 according to the diagnostic criteria for MetS defined by Metabolic Syndrome Researching Group of Chinese Diabetes Society. All patients underwent Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Clock Drawing Test (CDT, animal Verbal Fluency Test (aVFT, Trial Making Test-A (TMT-A at 2 weeks and 3 months after stroke to evaluate mental state such as verbal learning memory, and executive, attentional and visuospatial abilities. The incidence and development of cognitive impairment were also assessed. Results At 2 weeks and 3 months after stroke, the incidence of cognitive impairment were 24.47% (23/94 and 22.34% (21/94, respectively, and in the cognitive impairment patients the incidence of non-dementia were 21.28% (20/94 and 19.15% (18/94, while the incidence of dementia were 3.19% (3/94 and 3.19% (3/94, respectively. The incidence of cognitive impairment was higher in the stroke patients with MetS than the stroke patients without MetS, 37.50% (15/40 vs 14.81% (8/54 (Z = 2.500, P = 0.012 at 2 weeks after stroke and 35.00% (14/40 vs 12.96% (7/54 (Z = 2.513, P = 0.012 at 3 months after stroke. In the scores of MMSE, delay recall and CDT of the stroke patients with MetS were all lower than those without MetS at 2 weeks after stroke and at 3 months after stroke (P < 0.05, for all. The stroke patients with MetS had more cognition deterioration than the stroke patients without MetS at 3 months after stroke, the difference was significant (Z = 2.134, P = 0.033. Conclusion MetS can increase the incidence of cognitive impairment, especially non-dementia cognitive impairment in post ischemic stroke. Executive dysfunction and hypomnesis are often seen. The development of cognitive impairment in stroke patients

  17. Recurrent Hemorrhagic Conversion of Ischemic Stroke in a Patient with Mechanical Heart Valve: A Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Micheal Jace Tarver; Tyler Schmidt; Michael T. Koltz

    2018-01-01

    The authors present a unique case of recurrent stroke, discovered to be secondary to hemorrhagic conversion of microemboli from a mechanical aortic valve despite anticoagulation with Coumadin. The complexity of this case was magnified by the patient’s young age, a mechanical heart valve (MHV), and a need for anticoagulation to maintain MHV patency in a setting of potentially life-threatening intracranial hemorrhage. Anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy are risk factors for hemorrhagic conve...

  18. Playing Piano Can Improve Upper Extremity Function after Stroke: Case Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Villeneuve, Myriam; Lamontagne, Anouk

    2013-01-01

    Music-supported therapy (MST) is an innovative approach that was shown to improve manual dexterity in acute stroke survivors. The feasibility of such intervention in chronic stroke survivors and its longer-term benefits, however, remain unknown. The objective of this pilot study was to estimate the short- and long-term effects of a 3-week piano training program on upper extremity function in persons with chronic stroke. A multiple pre-post sequential design was used, with measurements taken a...

  19. Primary prevention of stroke by a healthy lifestyle in a high-risk group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Susanna C; Åkesson, Agneta; Wolk, Alicja

    2015-06-02

    To examine the impact of a healthy lifestyle on stroke risk in men at higher risk of stroke because of other cardiovascular diseases or conditions. Our study population comprised 11,450 men in the Cohort of Swedish Men who had a history of hypertension, high cholesterol levels, diabetes, heart failure, or atrial fibrillation. Participants had completed a questionnaire about diet and lifestyle and were free from stroke and ischemic heart disease at baseline (January 1, 1998). We defined a healthy lifestyle as a low-risk diet (≥5 servings/d of fruits and vegetables and 0 to ≤30 g/d). Ascertainment of stroke cases was accomplished through linkage with the National Inpatient Register and the Swedish Cause of Death Register. During a mean follow-up of 9.8 years, we ascertained 1,062 incident stroke cases. The risk of total stroke and stroke types decreased with increasing number of healthy lifestyle factors. The multivariable relative risk of total stroke for men who achieved all 5 healthy lifestyle factors compared with men who achieved 0 or 1 factor was 0.28 (95% confidence interval 0.14-0.55). The corresponding relative risks (95% confidence interval) were 0.31 (0.15-0.66) for ischemic stroke and 0.32 (0.04-2.51) for hemorrhagic stroke. A healthy lifestyle is associated with a substantially reduced risk of stroke in men at higher risk of stroke. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Arsenic Exposure in Relation to Ischemic Stroke: The Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsinovoi, Cari L; Xun, Pengcheng; McClure, Leslie A; Carioni, Vivian M O; Brockman, John D; Cai, Jianwen; Guallar, Eliseo; Cushman, Mary; Unverzagt, Frederick W; Howard, Virginia J; He, Ka

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this case-cohort study was to examine urinary arsenic levels in relation to incident ischemic stroke in the United States. We performed a case-cohort study nested within the REGARDS (REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) cohort. A subcohort (n=2486) of controls was randomly sampled within region-race-sex strata while all incident ischemic stroke cases from the full REGARDS cohort (n=671) were included. Baseline urinary arsenic was measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Arsenic species, including urinary inorganic arsenic and its metabolites monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid, were measured in a random subset (n=199). Weighted Cox's proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals of ischemic stroke by arsenic and its species. The average follow-up was 6.7 years. Although incident ischemic stroke showed no association with total arsenic or total inorganic arsenic, for each unit higher level of urinary monomethylarsonic acid on a log-scale, after adjustment for potential confounders, ischemic stroke risk increased ≈2-fold (hazard ratio=1.98; 95% confidence interval: 1.12-3.50). Effect modification by age, race, sex, or geographic region was not evident. A metabolite of arsenic was positively associated with incident ischemic stroke in this case-cohort study of the US general population, a low-to-moderate exposure area. Overall, these findings suggest a potential role for arsenic methylation in the pathogenesis of stroke, having important implications for future cerebrovascular research. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. [Ischemic stroke in a young woman with mitral valve prolapse and atrial septal aneurysm using hormonal contraception--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peregud-Pogorzelska, Małgorzata; Fabian, Andrzej; Wojtarowicz, Andrzej; Goracy, Jarosław; Honczarenko, Krystyna; Kornacewicz-Jach, Zdzisława

    2004-03-01

    It is believed that there is an association between mitral valve prolapse, septal aneurysm and cerebral embolism. The real threat of cerebral stroke in patients with mitral valve prolapse or septal aneurysm is unknown. We present a case of a young woman with two previously described heart anomalies, who developed ischemic stroke during anticonception therapy.

  2. Number of nursing staff and falls: a case-control study on falls by stroke patients in acute-care settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tutuarima, J. A.; de Haan, R. J.; Limburg, M.

    1993-01-01

    Falls occur frequently in patients with a stroke and have serious consequences: discharge delays and hip fractures can result. In order to evaluate the impact of nursing workload on stroke-patient falls, we assessed the patients per nurse ratio in a detailed case-control study carried out in nine

  3. Increase of Meningitis Risk in Stroke Patients in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chie-Hong Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purposeThe blood–brain barrier (BBB not only provides a physical obstruction but also recruits and activates neutrophils in cases of infection. Hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke reportedly induces the disruption of the BBB. However, few studies have reported a correlation between the incidence of meningitis in patients with a history of stroke. This study tested the hypothesis that patients with a history of stroke may be more vulnerable to meningitis.MethodsStroke and age-matched comparison (n = 29,436 and 87,951, respectively cohorts were recruited from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database (2000–2011. Correlations between the two cohorts were evaluated by Cox proportional hazard regression model, Kaplan–Meier curve, and log-rank tests.ResultsThe incidence of meningitis was higher in the stroke cohort compared to that in the comparison cohort [hazard ratio (HR, 2.89; 95% confidence interval (CI, 2.23–3.74, p < 0.001]. After adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities, the estimated HR in the stroke cohort was 2.55-fold higher than that in the comparison cohort (CI, 1.94–3.37; p < 0.001. Notably, patients who had experienced hemorrhagic stroke had a higher incidence rate of meningitis than those with a history of ischemic stroke, except for patients older than 75 years (incidence rates in hemorrhagic/ischemic stroke patients, 3.14/1.48 in patients younger than 45 years, 1.52/0.41 in 45- to 64-year group, 1.15/0.90 in 65- to 74-year group, 0.74/0.93 in patients older than 75 years. Moreover, stroke patients who had undergone head surgery had the highest meningitis risk (adjusted HR, 8.66; 95% CI, 5.55–13.5; p < 0.001 followed by stroke patients who had not undergone head surgery (adjusted HR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.57–2.82; p < 0.001.ConclusionOur results indicated that stroke patients have higher risks of meningitis. Compromised BBB integrity in stroke patients may lead to increased

  4. Stroke Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz Stroke Treatment Stroke used to rank fourth in leading causes of ... type of treatment depends on the type of stroke. Ischemic stroke happens when a clot blocks a ...

  5. Heat Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...... not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat...

  6. Combining Mental Training and Physical Training With Goal-Oriented Protocols in Stroke Rehabilitation: A Feasibility Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the leading causes of permanent disability in adults. The literature suggests that rehabilitation is key to early motor recovery. However, conventional therapy is labor and cost intensive. Robotic and functional electrical stimulation (FES devices can provide a high dose of repetitions and as such may provide an alternative, or an adjunct, to conventional rehabilitation therapy. Brain-computer interfaces (BCI could augment neuroplasticity by introducing mental training. However, mental training alone is not enough; but combining mental with physical training could boost outcomes. In the current case study, a portable rehabilitative platform and goal-oriented supporting training protocols were introduced and tested with a chronic stroke participant. A novel training method was introduced with the proposed rehabilitative platform. A 37-year old individual with chronic stroke participated in 6-weeks of training (18 sessions in total, 3 sessions a week, and 1 h per session. In this case study, we show that an individual with chronic stroke can tolerate a 6-week training bout with our system and protocol. The participant was actively engaged throughout the training. Changes in the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT suggest that the training positively affected arm motor function (12% improvement in WMFT score.

  7. [Ingestion of anabolic steroids and ischaemic stroke. A clinical case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Esperón, Carlos; Hervás-García, José Vicente; Jiménez-González, Marta; Pérez de la Ossa-Herrero, Natalia; Gomis-Cortina, Meritxell; Dorado-Bouix, Laura; López-Cancio Martinez, Elena; Castaño-Duque, Carlos H; Millán-Torné, Mónica; Dávalos, Antonio

    2013-03-16

    INTRODUCTION. Anabolic-androgenic steroids are synthetic substances derived from testosterone that are employed for their trophic effect on muscle tissue, among other uses. Their consumption can give trigger a series of adverse side effects on the body, including the suppression of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis as well as liver, psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders. The most common effects are altered fat profiles and blood pressure values, cardiac remodelling, arrhythmias or myocardial infarcts. CASE REPORT. We report the case of a young male, with a background of anabolic-androgenic steroids abuse, who visited because of an acute neurological focus in the right hemisphere related with an ischaemic stroke. The aetiological study, including cardiac monitoring, echocardiograph and imaging studies (magnetic resonance and arteriography) and lab findings (thrombophilia, serology, autoimmunity, tumour markers) showed no alterations. CONCLUSIONS. The association between consumption of anabolic-androgenic steroids and cardiovascular pathologies is known, but its relation with cerebrovascular disease has not received so much attention from researchers.

  8. Residential relocation by older adults in response to incident cardiovascular health events : A case-crossover analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lovasi, G.; Richardson, J.M.; Rodriguez, C.J.; Kop, W.J.; Ahmed, A.; Brown, A.F.; Greenlee, H.; Siscovick, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We use a case-crossover analysis to explore the association between incident cardiovascular events and residential relocation to a new home address. Methods. We conducted an ambidirectional case-crossover analysis to explore the association between incident cardiovascular events and

  9. Associations of serum n-3 and n-6 PUFA and hair mercury with the risk of incident stroke in men: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study (KIHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, Roya; Kurl, Sudhir; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Virtanen, Jyrki K

    2016-05-28

    PUFA have been associated with lower risk of CVD, but less is known about their association with stroke risk. Fish, a major source of n-3 PUFA, may also contain methylmercury, which has been associated with higher risk of CVD and attenuation of the benefits of long-chain n-3 PUFA. We investigated the associations of serum n-3 and n-6 PUFA and hair Hg with risk of stroke in men. A total of 1828 men from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, aged 42-60 years and free of CVD at baseline in 1984-1989 were studied. Cox regression models were used for the analyses. During the mean follow-up of 21·2 years, 202 stroke cases occurred, of which 153 were ischaemic strokes. After adjustment for age and examination year, the only statistically significant association among the n-3 and n-6 PUFA was observed between the n-3 PUFA α-linolenic acid and risk of haemorrhagic stroke (hazard ratio in the highest v. the lowest quartile 0·33; 95 % CI 0·13, 0·86; P trend=0·03). However, further adjustments attenuated the association to statistically non-significant. Hair Hg was not associated with stroke risk, but among those with hair Hg above the median level, higher serum long-chain n-3 PUFA concentrations were associated with a higher risk of ischaemic stroke. In our cohort of men, serum n-3 or n-6 PUFA or hair Hg were not associated with stroke risk; however, the interaction between Hg and long-chain n-3 PUFA with regard to ischaemic stroke risk warrants further investigation.

  10. Abnormal P-Wave Axis and Ischemic Stroke: The ARIC Study (Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Ankit; Norby, Faye L; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Koene, Ryan J; Rooney, Mary R; O'Neal, Wesley T; Alonso, Alvaro; Chen, Lin Y

    2017-08-01

    Abnormal P-wave axis (aPWA) has been linked to incident atrial fibrillation and mortality; however, the relationship between aPWA and stroke has not been reported. We hypothesized that aPWA is associated with ischemic stroke independent of atrial fibrillation and other stroke risk factors and tested our hypothesis in the ARIC study (Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities), a community-based prospective cohort study. We included 15 102 participants (aged 54.2±5.7 years; 55.2% women; 26.5% blacks) who attended the baseline examination (1987-1989) and without prevalent stroke. We defined aPWA as any value outside 0 to 75° using 12-lead ECGs obtained during study visits. Each case of incident ischemic stroke was classified in accordance with criteria from the National Survey of Stroke by a computer algorithm and adjudicated by physician review. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association of aPWA with stroke. During a mean follow-up of 20.2 years, there were 657 incident ischemic stroke cases. aPWA was independently associated with a 1.50-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.85) increased risk of ischemic stroke in the multivariable model that included atrial fibrillation. When subtyped, aPWA was associated with a 2.04-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.42-2.95) increased risk of cardioembolic stroke and a 1.32-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.71) increased risk of thrombotic stroke. aPWA is independently associated with ischemic stroke. This association seems to be stronger for cardioembolic strokes. Collectively, our findings suggest that alterations in atrial electric activation may predispose to cardiac thromboembolism independent of atrial fibrillation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Student Socioeconomic Status and Teacher Stroke: A Case of Female Students in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irajzad, Fatemeh; Shahriari, Hesamoddin

    2017-01-01

    Supportive teacher-student relationships play a significant role in the trajectory of students' academic life. Teachers may use various strategies to improve this relationship, one of which is teacher stroke (teacher encouragement). The stroking behavior of teachers might be influenced by several factors, including the socioeconomic status (SES)…

  12. Airplane stroke syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humaidan, Hani; Yassi, Nawaf; Weir, Louise; Davis, Stephen M; Meretoja, Atte

    2016-07-01

    Only 37 cases of stroke during or soon after long-haul flights have been published to our knowledge. In this retrospective observational study, we searched the Royal Melbourne Hospital prospective stroke database and all discharge summaries from 1 September 2003 to 30 September 2014 for flight-related strokes, defined as patients presenting with stroke within 14days of air travel. We hypothesised that a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is an important, but not the only mechanism, of flight-related stroke. We describe the patient, stroke, and flight characteristics. Over the study period, 131 million passengers arrived at Melbourne airport. Our centre admitted 5727 stroke patients, of whom 42 (0.73%) had flight-related strokes. Flight-related stroke patients were younger (median age 65 versus 73, p<0.001), had similar stroke severity, and received intravenous thrombolysis more often than non-flight-related stroke patients. Seven patients had flight-related intracerebral haemorrhage. The aetiology of the ischaemic strokes was cardioembolic in 14/35 (40%), including seven patients with confirmed PFO, one with atrial septal defect, four with atrial fibrillation, one with endocarditis, and one with aortic arch atheroma. Paradoxical embolism was confirmed in six patients. Stroke related to air travel is a rare occurrence, less than one in a million. Although 20% of patients had a PFO, distribution of stroke aetiologies was diverse and was not limited to PFO and paradoxical embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Genetics of ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, A; Dichgans, M

    2013-02-01

    Stroke is one of the most widespread causes of mortality und disability worldwide. Around 80 % of strokes are ischemic and different forms of intracranial bleeding account for the remaining cases. Monogenic stroke disorders are rare but the diagnosis may lead to specific therapeutic consequences for the affected patients who are predominantly young. In common sporadic stroke, genetic factors play a role in the form of susceptibility genes. Their discovery may give rise to new therapeutic options in the future.

  14. Hemorrhagic Stroke in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan M.D., Lori C.; Hillis M.D., Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately half of stroke in childhood. Unlike arterial ischemic stroke, there are no consensus guidelines to assist in the evaluation and treatment of these children. We review the literature on the evaluation, treatment, etiology and neurologic outcome of hemorrhagic stroke in children. Important differences between pediatric and adult hemorrhage are highlighted, as treatment guidelines for adults may not be applicable in all cases. Needed future research ...

  15. Cervical Radiculopathy: Incidence and Treatment of 1,420 Consecutive Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemani, Venu M.; Piyaskulkaew, Chaiwat; Vargas, Samuel Romero; Riew, K. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To determine the incidence of cervical radiculopathy requiring operative intervention by level and to report on the methods of treatment. Overview of Literature Cervical radiculopathy is a common cause of pain and can result in progressive neurological deficits. Although the pathology is well understood, the actual incidence of cervical radiculopathy at particular spinal levels ultimately requiring operative intervention is unknown. Methods A large consecutive series of patients operated on by a single surgeon were retrospectively analyzed. The incidence of cervical radiculopathy at each level was defined for every patient. Procedures used for operative treatment were noted. Health related quality of life (HRQL) scores were collected both pre-operatively and postoperatively. Results There were 1305 primary and 115 revision operations performed. The most common primary procedures performed were anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF, 50%) and anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF, 28%). The most commonly affected levels were C6 (66%) and C7 (62%). Reasons for revision were pseudarthrosis (27%), clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP, 63%), persistent radiculopathy (11%), and hardware-related (2.6%). The most common procedures performed in the revision group were posterior cervical decompression and fusion (PCDF, 42%) and ACDF (40%). The most commonly affected levels were C7 (43%) and C5 (30%). Among patients that had their index surgery at our institution, the revision rate was 6.4%. In both primary and revision cases there was a significant improvement in Neck Disability Index and visual analogue scale scores postoperatively. Postoperative HRQL scores in the revision cases were significantly worse than those in the primary cases (p cervical radiculopathy by level and operative outcomes in patients undergoing cervical decompression. The incidence of CASP was 4.2% in 3.3 years in this single

  16. Papillary Fibroelastoma as a Cause of Cardiogenic Embolic Stroke in a β-Thalassemia Patient: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Re-I Chin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of a young male without stroke risk factors who presented with a sudden onset of left-sided weakness, left hand numbness, and left eye blurriness. CT scan of the head without contrast and diffusion-weighted MRI of the brain with contrast revealed an ischemic stroke in the right middle cerebral artery distribution. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE revealed a mobile pedunculated mass on the posterior surface of the mitral valve. This mass was resected and pathology showed a cardiac papillary fibroelastoma (CPFE, which was determined to be the cause of the patient’s cardioembolic stroke. Further workup also found that patient had microcytic anemia secondary to β-thalassemia intermedia, a rare hematologic disorder due to defective hemoglobin synthesis. Recently, another case report suggested β-thalassemia major may underlie the pathogenesis of CPFE. β-Thalassemia major causes a state of chronic inflammation and endothelial damage, which can mediate CPFE formation. Based on literature review, this is the first case report of a CPFE in a patient with β-thalassemia intermedia. This hypothesis-generating case report calls attention to the need for elucidating the relationship between CPFE and β-thalassemia in future studies to better understand the diagnosis and management of a rare cardiac tumor.

  17. Recurrent Hemorrhagic Conversion of Ischemic Stroke in a Patient with Mechanical Heart Valve: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheal Jace Tarver

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a unique case of recurrent stroke, discovered to be secondary to hemorrhagic conversion of microemboli from a mechanical aortic valve despite anticoagulation with Coumadin. The complexity of this case was magnified by the patient’s young age, a mechanical heart valve (MHV, and a need for anticoagulation to maintain MHV patency in a setting of potentially life-threatening intracranial hemorrhage. Anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy are risk factors for hemorrhagic conversion post-cerebral ischemia; however, the pathophysiology underlying endothelial cell dysfunction causing red blood cell extravasation is an active area of basic and clinical research. The need for randomized clinical trials to aid in the creation of standardized treatment protocol continues to go unmet. Consequently, there is marked variation in therapeutic approaches to treating intracranial hemorrhage in patients with an MHV. Unfortunately, patients with an MHV are considered at high thromboembolic (TE risk, and these patients are often excluded from clinical trials of acute stroke due to their increased TE potential. The authors feel this case represents an example of endothelial dysfunction secondary to microthrombotic events originating from an MHV, which caused ischemic stroke with hemorrhagic conversion complicated by the need for anticoagulation for an MHV. This case offers a definitive treatment algorithm for a complex clinical dilemma.

  18. Analysis of clinical and imaging characters and prognosis in patients with epilepsy after stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yongguang; Zeng Huiliang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between clinical, imaging characters and prognosis in patients with epilepsy after stroke. Methods: In total 78 cases of post-stroke epilepsy were studied retrospectively out of 840 cases. Results: The incidence of post-stroke epilepsy was 9.29%. The early-stage epilepsy (less than 2 weeks) accounted for 61.54%. The major type of seizure were partial seizure and general tonic-clonic seizure. The incidence was higher in patients with cerebral hemorrhage or with lesions involving the cortex. Symptomatolytic medication was effective. Compared with non-epilepsy group, the mortality of epilepsy was higher. Conclusion: Post-stroke epilepsy is usually accompanied with cortical focus, which is more often seen in patients with cerebral hemorrhage than in patients with cerebral infarction. Post-stroke epilepsy responses well to the medication but indicates a poor prognosis

  19. Uncertainty and variability in the exposure reconstruction of chemical incidents--the case of acrylonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizer, Daan; Ragas, Ad M J; Oldenkamp, Rik; van Rooij, Joost G M; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2014-12-15

    The application of human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling combined with measured biomonitoring data, has a great potential to backtrack external exposure to chemicals during chemical incidents. So far, an important shortcoming of 'reversed dosimetry' is that uncertainty and variability in the model predictions are often neglected. The aim of this paper is to characterize the variation in predicted environmental air concentrations by means of reversed dosimetry as a result of uncertainty in chemical-specific input data and variability in physiological parameters. Human biomonitoring data (N-2-cyanoethylvaline in blood) from a chemical incident with acrylonitrile (ACN) combined with the BioNormtox PBPK model are used as a case to reconstruct the air concentration and uncertainty thereof at the time of the incident. The influence of uncertainty in chemical-specific properties and exposure duration, and interindividual variability in physiological parameters on the reconstructed air exposure concentrations were quantified via nested Monte Carlo simulation. The range in the reconstructed air concentrations of ACN during the incident was within a factor of 3. Uncertainty in the exact exposure duration directly after the chemical accident was found to have a dominant influence on the model outcomes. It was also shown that uncertainty can be further reduced by collecting human biomonitoring data as soon as possible after the incident. Finally, the collection of specific information about individual physiological parameters from the victims, such as body weight, may further reduce the variation by 5 to 20% in our case study. Future research should include the comparison of reversed dosimetry model outcomes with measured air and biological concentrations to further increase the confidence in the model approach and its implementation in practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Update on the Global Burden of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke in 1990-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feigin, Valery L; Krishnamurthi, Rita V; Parmar, Priya

    2015-01-01

    (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs) and their trends for ischemic stroke (IS) and hemorrhagic stroke (HS) for 188 countries from 1990 to 2013. METHODOLOGY: Stroke incidence, prevalence, mortality, DALYs and YLDs were estimated using all available data on mortality and stroke incidence...... the stroke pandemic, while universal access to organized stroke services should be a priority. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel....

  1. Plasma Magnesium and the Risk of Ischemic Stroke among Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarolo-Anthony, Sally N.; Jiménez, Monik C.; Chiuve, Stephanie E.; Spiegelman, Donna; Willett, Walter C.; Rexrode, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Lower plasma magnesium levels may be associated with higher blood pressure and endothelial dysfunction, but sparse prospective data are available for stroke. Methods Among 32,826 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study who provided blood samples in 1989–1990, incident ischemic strokes were identified and confirmed by medical records through 2006. We conducted a nested case-control analysis of 459 cases, matched 1:1 to controls on age, race/ethnicity, smoking status, date of blood draw, fasting status, menopausal status and hormone use. We used conditional logistic regression models to estimate the multivariable adjusted association of plasma magnesium and the risk of ischemic stroke and ischemic stroke subtypes. Results Median magnesium levels did not differ between ischemic stroke cases and controls (median=0.86 mmol/l for both; p-value=0.14). Conditional on matching factors, women in the lowest magnesium quintile had a relative risk (RR) of 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.86–2.10, p trend=0.13) for total ischemic stroke, compared to women in the highest quintile. Additional adjustment for risk factors and confounders did not substantially alter the risk estimates for total ischemic stroke. Women with magnesium levels magnesium levels ≥0.82 mmol/l. No significant effect modification was observed by age, body mass index, hypertension or diabetes. Conclusions Lower plasma magnesium levels may contribute to higher risk of ischemic stroke among women. PMID:25116874

  2. Pion-proton elastic scattering at 20 and 50 GeV/c incident momenta in the momentum transfer range 0. 7 < vertical stroketvertical stroke < 8. 0 (GeV/c)/sup 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asa' d, Z.; Coupland, M.; Davis, D.G.; Duff, B.G.; Gjerpe, I.; Heymann, F.F.; Imrie, D.C.; Lowndes, R.; Lush, G.J.; Phillips, M. (University Coll., London (UK))

    1982-12-09

    Measurements of the differential elastic cross sections for ..pi../sup -/p scattering at incident momenta of 20 and 50 GeV/c and ..pi../sup +/p at 50 GeV/c in the momentum transfer range 0.7 < vertical stroketvertical stroke < 8.0 (GeV/c)/sup 2/ are presented. The data are compared with various models of elastic scattering.

  3. Pontine stroke presenting as isolated facial nerve palsy mimicking Bell's palsy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saluja Paramveer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated facial nerve palsy usually manifests as Bell's palsy. Lacunar infarct involving the lower pons is a rare cause of solitary infranuclear facial paralysis. The present unusual case is one in which the patient appeared to have Bell's palsy but turned out to have a pontine infarct. Case presentation A 47-year-old Asian Indian man with a medical history of hypertension presented to our institution with nausea, vomiting, generalized weakness, facial droop, and slurred speech of 14 hours' duration. His physical examination revealed that he was conscious, lethargic, and had mildly slurred speech. His blood pressure was 216/142 mmHg. His neurologic examination showed that he had loss of left-sided forehead creases, inability to close his left eye, left facial muscle weakness, rightward deviation of the angle of the mouth on smiling, and loss of the left nasolabial fold. Afferent corneal reflexes were present bilaterally. MRI of the head was initially read as negative for acute stroke. Bell's palsy appeared less likely because of the acuity of his presentation, encephalopathy-like imaging, and hypertension. The MRI was re-evaluated with a neurologist's assistance, which revealed a tiny 4 mm infarct involving the left dorsal aspect of the pons. The final diagnosis was isolated facial nerve palsy due to lacunar infarct of dorsal pons and hypertensive encephalopathy. Conclusion The facial nerve has a predominant motor component which supplies all muscles concerned with unilateral facial expression. Anatomic knowledge is crucial for clinical localization. Bell's palsy accounts for around 72% of facial palsies. Other causes such as tumors and pontine infarcts can also present as facial palsy. Isolated dorsal infarct presenting as isolated facial palsy is very rare. Our case emphasizes that isolated facial palsy should not always be attributed to Bell's palsy. It can be a presentation of a rare dorsal pontine infarct as observed

  4. The rs10757278 Polymorphism of the 9p21.3 Locus in Children with Arterial Ischemic Stroke: A Family-Based and Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Pawel; Balcerzyk, Anna; Iwanicki, Tomasz; Emich-Widera, Ewa; Kopyta, Ilona; Nowak, Tomasz; Pilarska, Ewa; Pienczk-Ręcławowicz, Karolina; Kaciński, Marek; Wendorff, Janusz; Gorczynska-Kosiorz, Sylwia; Trautsolt, Wanda; Grzeszczak, Władysław; Zak, Iwona

    2017-12-01

    The association of 9p21.3 locus single nucleotide polymorphisms with arterial ischemic stroke in adults was demonstrated in many studies, but there are no studies in pediatric arterial ischemic stroke patients. We investigated whether the 9p21.3 locus polymorphism, namely rs10757278, is associated with the arterial ischemic stroke risk in children. The study group consisted of 335 individuals: 80 children with arterial ischemic stroke, their biological parents (n = 122), and 133 children (age and sex matched) without any symptoms of arterial ischemic stroke as a control group. The rs10757278 polymorphism was genotyped using the TaqMan® Pre-designed SNP Genotyping Assay (Applied Biosystems). Two different study design models were used: family-based association test (transmission-disequilibrium test) and case-control model. There were no statistically significant differences in the distribution of genotypes and alleles of the rs10757278 polymorphism between groups of children with arterial ischemic stroke and controls. The frequency of both transmitted alleles in transmission-disequilibrium test analysis was identical (50%). The A allele carrier state (AA+AG genotype) was more frequent in arterial ischemic stroke children with hemiparesis than in patients without this symptom (94.5% versus 68.0%, P = .004). There is no evidence to consider the 9p21.3 locus polymorphism as a risk factor for childhood arterial ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Case report of a young stroke patient showing interim normalization of the MRI diffusion-weighted imaging lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Usnich, Tatiana; Nolte, Christian H.; Villringer, Kersten; Fiebach, Jochen B.

    2015-01-01

    In acute ischemic stroke, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) shows hyperintensities and is considered to indicate irreversibly damaged tissue. We present the case of a young stroke patient with unusual variability in the development of signal intensities within the same vessel territory. A 35-year-old patient presented with symptoms of global aphasia and hypesthesia of the left hand. MRI demonstrated a scattered lesion in the MCA territory. After rtPA therapy the patient received further MRI examination, three times on day 1, and once on day 2, 3, 5 and 43. The posterior part of the lesion showed the usual pattern with increasing DWI hyperintensity and decreased ADC, as well as delayed FLAIR positivity. However, the anterior part of the lesion, which was clearly visible in the first examination completely normalized on the first day and only reappeared on day 2. This was accompanied by a normalization of the ADC as well as an even further delayed FLAIR positivity. We showed that interim normalization of DWI and ADC in the acute phase can not only be found in rodent models of stroke, but also in humans. We propose that DWI lesion development might be more variable during the first 24 h after stroke than previously assumed

  6. Action research in rehabilitation with chronic stroke recovery: A case report with a focus on neural plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Malene; Bundgaard, Tina H; Zeeman, Peter; Jørgensen, Jørgen R; Sørensen, Peter M B; Berro, Hamza M; Larsson, Bodil W

    2016-06-27

    Chronic stroke patients are primarily referred to general rehabilitation, rather than to specific neurorehabilitation. Currently, there are no Danish clinical guidelines for chronic stroke, but recent research in neuroplasticity has contributed to possible rehabilitation interventions for these patients. The purpose of this project is to describe the use of a specialized neuroplastic approach in combination with an already existing training program. The project is designed as an action research project concerning four participants with chronic stroke. Through ten intervention, a neuroplastic focus has been added to their group training program including daily home training. Participants were tested before and after the intervention with MAS, DGI, 6MWT, SSQLS. All four participants improved their functional levels and their quality of life following the intervention. This report indicates that a specific neuroplastic focus in combination with action research has an impact on the participants with chronic stroke. However, there is still no clarity regarding what type of rehabilitation methods can be considered the most efficacious in promoting neuroplasticity. This case report serves as a pilot project for further studies of how to implement neuroplasticity in physical therapy.

  7. Migraine as a risk factor for young patients with ischemic stroke: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanoz, Yasin; Gülen Abanoz, Yeşim; Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uludüz, Derya; İnce, Birsen; Yavuz, Burcu; Göksan, Baki

    2017-04-01

    Studies have suggested a possible association of migraine and increased risk of ischemic stroke in young adults, particularly in smokers and in women who use oral contraceptive drugs. We aimed to analyze the association between migraine and ischemic stroke in young population in a hospital-based cohort. We included 202 consecutive patients with the diagnosis of ischemic stroke who were between 15 and 50 years and age- and gender-matched 250 volunteers with no history of stroke. All participants were interviewed using a questionnaire for migraine. Localization of ischemic lesion was classified as anterior and posterior circulation according to neuroimaging findings. The cause of ischemic lesion and all risk factors were recorded. Undetermined etiology was the most frequent (43.1%) and the most common determined cause was cardioembolism (22.3%) in young stroke patients. Frequency of migraine was 30.2% among patients with stroke whereas 16.8% of healthy subjects had migraine (p = 0.001). Migraine with aura was significantly more common among patients with stroke compared to healthy subjects (18.3 vs 4.4%; p = 0.000) whereas the frequency of migraine without aura was similar in both groups (11.9 vs 12.4%). Using logistic regression, migraine with aura was shown to be an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke in young population (p = 0.000) and separate analysis for gender demonstrated that it was only a risk factor for women (p = 0.009) but not for men (p = 0.107). Migraine with aura was found to be more common in ischemic stroke in young patients. It was an independent risk factor in women.

  8. Improved function after combined physical and mental practice after stroke: a case of hemiparesis and apraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Andy J; Radel, Jeff; Hanna-Pladdy, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    This study describes change in functional performance and self-perception after participation in combined training with physical practice followed by mental practice. The patient was a 44-yr-old white man who experienced a single left ischemic stroke 7 mo before enrollment in the study. He engaged in physical and mental practice of two functional tasks: (1) reaching for and grasping a cup and (2) turning pages in a book with the more-affected arm. Practice took place 3 times per week during 60-min sessions for 6 consecutive wk. Primary outcome measures were the Arm Motor Ability Test (AMAT) and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). An abbreviated version of the Florida Apraxia Battery gesture-to-verbal command test approximated severity of ideomotor apraxia. After intervention, the patient demonstrated increased functional performance (AMAT) and self-perception of performance (COPM) despite persistent ideomotor apraxia. The results of this single-case report indicate functional benefit from traditional rehabilitation techniques despite comorbid, persisting ideomotor apraxia.

  9. Modeling and localization of web-based fusion image using VRML in clinical stroke case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ho; Yoo, Sun K.; Kim, Yong Oock; Jung, Haijo; Kim, Sae Rome; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2004-05-01

    Three dimensional (3D) modeling and visualization of the brain fusion images on the World Wide Web (WWW) is an effective way of sharing anatomic and functional information of the brain over the Internet, particularly for morphometry-based research and resident training in neuroradiology and neurosurgery. In this paper, 3D modeling, visualization, dynamic manipulation techniques, and the localization techniques for obtaining distance measurements of the inside and outside of the brain are integrated in an interactive and platform-independent manner and implemented over the WWW. The T1 weighted- and diffusion-weighted MR data of a stroke case which forms the subject of this study were digitally segmented, and used to visualize VRML-fused models in the form of polygonal surfaces based on the marching cube algorithm. Also, 2D cross sectional images were sequentially displayed for the purpose of 3D volume rendering, and user interface tools were embedded with ECMA script routines for the purpose of setting the appearance and transparency of the 3D objects. Finally, a 3D measurement tool was built in order to determine the spatial positions and sizes of the 3D objects.

  10. Effectively managing intractable central hyperthermia in a stroke patient by bromocriptine: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu KW

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kuo-Wei Yu,1,* Yu-Hui Huang,2,3 Chien-Lin Lin,1,4,* Chang-Zern Hong,5 Li-Wei Chou1,41Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 2School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 4School of Chinese Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 5Department of Physical Therapy, Hungkuang University, Taichung, Taiwan*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Central hyperthermia is characterized by a rapid onset, high temperature, marked temperature fluctuation, and poor response to antipyretics and antibiotics. Although poststroke central hyperthermia is common, prolonged instances are rare. We report a case of prolonged central fever after an intracranial hemorrhage. Before the accurate diagnosis and management of central fever, the patient underwent long-term antibiotic use that led to pseudomembranous colitis. Bromocriptine was used to treat the prolonged central hyperthermia, after which the fever did not exceed 39°C. A week later, the body temperature baseline was reduced to 37°C and a low-grade fever with minor temperature fluctuation occurred only a few times. No fever occurred in the month following the treatment. After the fever subsided, the patient could undergo an aggressive rehabilitation program.Keywords: bromocriptine, central hyperthermia, fever, stroke

  11. Physical Therapy for an Adult with Chronic Stroke after Botulinum Toxin Injection for Spasticity: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Shannon; Phadke, Chetan P.; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this case report, we describe the type and duration of a physical therapy and botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) intervention directed at lower limb spasticity and the gait and balance improvement in a patient post-stroke. Treatment of focal spasticity with BoNTA intramuscular injections combined with physical therapy is recommended by rehabilitation experts. However, the optimal type and duration of physical therapy intervention to optimize any functional gains that follow chemodener...

  12. Association between self-perceived psychological stress and transitory ischaemic attack and minor stroke: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Moreno, J M; Muñoz Vega, P; Espada, S; Bartolomé Alberca, S; Aguirre, J; Peral, D

    2017-12-22

    Stroke has a complex aetiopathogenesis influenced by numerous risk factors. There is growing interest in the study of the pathophysiological changes associated with stress and their potential relationship with cerebrovascular disease. The purpose of this paper is to assess the strength of association between exposure to stress and stroke. We conducted a case-control study (1:1) to compare exposure to stress in a group of patients with a history of a first transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke and in a control group. Participants were asked a subjective question about their perception of stress in the previous months and completed the standardised Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) questionnaire. Logistic regression models were used for data analysis. The study included data on 50 cases and 50 controls. There were no significant differences in demographic variables and economic, social, and employment status between cases and controls. Fifty percent of the cases reported moderate to severe stress, compared to 30% of controls (OR: 2.33; 95% CI: 1.02-5.30; P=.041). ERI questionnaire results found that greater effort at work (OR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.19-1.83) and greater commitment is associated with stroke (OR: 1.34; 95% CI: 1.17-1.54), while higher reward constitutes a protective factor against the disease (OR: 0.71; 95% CI: 0.61-0.82). There is a strong association between self-perceived psychological stress and TIA. The imbalance between effort and reward at work is also clearly related to TIA. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Ischemic stroke as a rare manifestation of aluminum phosphide poisoning: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini, Mahmoud; Fatehi, Farzad; Tabrizi, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a solid fumigant which is widely used for a suicide attempt in Iran. Although neurologic symptoms are commonly reported, cerebrovascular stenosis is rare in AlP poisoning. We described ischemic stroke as a delayed complication of AlP intoxication. A 30-year-old man was admitted because of sudden onset left side hemiplegia, 11 days after intentional ingestion of three rice tablets. Investigations revealed in situ thrombosis in right middle cerebral artery (MCA) while other causes of stroke in young adults were excluded. Ischemic stroke should be considered as a delayed complication of AlP intoxication even after the acute phase of intoxication.

  14. Clinical Epidemiology Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a huge public health problem because of its high morbidity and disability. The epidemiology of stroke is of relevance to construct practical paradigms to tackle this major health issue in the community. Recent data have shown that about 72-86% of strokes are ischemic, 9-18% are due to hemorrhage (intracerebral of subarachnoid and the rest are undefined. The risk factors for stroke are multiple and combined. At present, stroke is no more considered as unavoidable and untreatable. It is an emergency and specialized units and teams improve outcome and lower costs. Death related to stroke is declining in many countries and in both sexes. This decrease in multifactorial. The detection and more effective treatment of hypertension may play an important factor, as well as the improved medical care and improvement in diagnostic procedures. While stroke incidence appears stable and stroke mortality is slowly declining, the absolute magnitude of stroke is likely to grow over the next 30 years. as the population ages, the absolute number of stroke victims and demands on healthcare and other support systems is likely to increase substantially in the future. Keeping this in perspective, this chapter shall focus on the epidemiology of stroke in the world and in Indian, in particular.

  15. Pregnancy and puerperium-related strokes in Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Maria; Wasay, Mohammad; Menon, Bindu; Saadatnia, Mohammad; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Gunaratne, Padma; Mehndiratta, M M; Dai, Alper; Kaul, Subhash

    2013-11-01

    Despite an increased risk of stroke in pregnancy and puerperium, the overall incidence of the condition in this population is low. Therefore, there is limited data pertaining to these patients particularly from Asian countries. Our objective was to describe the risk factors and outcomes of 110 pregnancy-related ischemic strokes from 5 Asian countries. Data were collected by retrospective chart review in most cases and prospectively in the rest. Inclusion criteria for this subanalysis were women, pregnant or within 1-month postpartum, presenting to the study center with acute ischemic stroke (arterial or venous) confirmed by neuroimaging. Intracranial hemorrhages other than the ones associated with cerebral venous thrombosis or hemorrhagic infarct were excluded. Risk factors were diagnosed based on already published criteria. Outcomes were measured using modified Rankin score. Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 19.0. In all, 110 women with mean age of 27.94 years presented with pregnancy-related ischemic strokes; 58.2% of the strokes occurred postpartum and 49.1% were secondary to cerebral venous thrombosis. Venous strokes were significantly more likely to occur postpartum compared with arterial strokes (P=.01), to have abnormal "hypercoagulable panel result on admission" (PAsian women. Both traditional and pregnancy-specific risk factors should be addressed to control ischemic stroke risk in these women. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. American football and fatal exertional heat stroke: a case study of Korey Stringer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundstein, Andrew; Knox, John A.; Vanos, Jennifer; Cooper, Earl R.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2017-08-01

    On August 1, 2001, Korey Stringer, a Pro Bowl offensive tackle for the Minnesota Vikings, became the first and to date the only professional American football player to die from exertional heat stroke (EHS). The death helped raise awareness of the dangers of exertional heat illnesses in athletes and prompted the development of heat safety policies at the professional, collegiate, and interscholastic levels. Despite the public awareness of this death, no published study has examined in detail the circumstances surrounding Stringer's fatal EHS. Using the well-documented details of the case, our study shows that Stringer's fatal EHS was the result of a combination of physiological limitations, organizational and treatment failings, and extreme environmental conditions. The COMfort FormulA (COMFA) energy budget model was used to assess the relative importance of several extrinsic factors on Stringer's EHS, including weather conditions, clothing insulation, and activity levels. We found that Stringer's high-intensity training in relation to the oppressive environmental conditions was the most prominent factor in producing dangerous, uncompensable heat stress conditions and that the full football uniform played a smaller role in influencing Stringer's energy budget. The extreme energy budget levels that led to the fatal EHS would have been avoided according to our modeling through a combination of reduced intensity and lower clothing insulation. Finally, a long delay in providing medical treatment made the EHS fatal. These results highlight the importance of modern heat safety guidelines that provide controls on extrinsic factors, such as the adjustment of duration and intensity of training along with protective equipment modifications based on environmental conditions and the presence of an emergency action plan focused on rapid recognition and immediate on-site aggressive cooling of EHS cases.

  17. Systemic Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke after Dabigatran Etexilate Reversal with Idarucizumab—A Case Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tireli, Derya; He, Jun; Nordling, Mette Maria

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Idarucizumab is a reversal agent for dabigatran etexilate. By reversing the anticoagulating effect of dabigatran etexilate with idarucizumab (Praxbind), patients presenting with an acute ischemic stroke can now be eligible for thrombolysis. Patient We describe our experience with ida...

  18. Morning and Evening Home Blood Pressure and Risks of Incident Stroke and Coronary Artery Disease in the Japanese General Practice Population: The Japan Morning Surge-Home Blood Pressure Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshide, Satoshi; Yano, Yuichiro; Haimoto, Hajime; Yamagiwa, Kayo; Uchiba, Kiyoshi; Nagasaka, Shoichiro; Matsui, Yoshio; Nakamura, Akira; Fukutomi, Motoki; Eguchi, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Joji; Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-07-01

    Our aim is to determine the optimal time schedule for home blood pressure (BP) monitoring that best predicts stroke and coronary artery disease in general practice. The Japan Morning Surge-Home Blood Pressure (J-HOP) study is a nationwide practice-based study that included 4310 Japanese with a history of or risk factors for cardiovascular disease, or both (mean age, 65 years; 79% used antihypertensive medication). Home BP measures were taken twice daily (morning and evening) over 14 days at baseline. During a mean follow-up of 4 years (16 929 person-years), 74 stroke and 77 coronary artery disease events occurred. Morning systolic BP (SBP) improved the discrimination of incident stroke (C statistics, 0.802; 95% confidence interval, 0.692-0.911) beyond traditional risk factors including office SBP (0.756; 0.646-0.866), whereas the changes were smaller with evening SBP (0.764; 0.653-0.874). The addition of evening SBP to the model (including traditional risk factors plus morning SBP) significantly reduced the discrimination of incident stroke (C statistics difference, -0.008; 95% confidence interval: -0.015 to -0.008; P=0.03). The category-free net reclassification improvement (0.3606; 95% confidence interval, 0.1317-0.5896), absolute integrated discrimination improvement (0.015; SE, 0.005), and relative integrated discrimination improvement (58.3%; all Pmorning SBP to the model (including traditional risk factors) were greater than those with evening SBP and with combined morning and evening SBP. Neither morning nor evening SBP improved coronary artery disease risk prediction. Morning home SBP itself should be evaluated to ensure best stroke prediction in clinical practice, at least in Japan. This should be confirmed in the different ethnic groups. URL: http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/. Unique identifier: UMIN000000894. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Mobility training using a bionic knee orthosis in patients in a post-stroke chronic state: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byl, Nancy N

    2012-07-23

    An emerging area of neurorehabilitation is the use of robotic devices to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of lower extremity physical therapy post-stroke. Many of the robotic devices currently available rely on computer-driven locomotive algorithms combined with partial bodyweight-supported treadmill training that drive reflex stepping with minimal patient intention during therapy. In this case series, we examined the effect of task-oriented mobility training in patients in a post-stroke chronic state using a novel, wearable, mobile, intention-based robotic leg orthosis. Three individuals, all of whom had reached a plateau with conventional bodyweight-supported treadmill training, participated in task-oriented mobility therapy (1.5 hours, two to four times per week for four weeks) with a robotic leg orthosis under supervision by a physical therapist. Participant 1 was a 59-year-old Caucasian man, who had an ischemic left stroke six years previously with resultant right hemiparesis. Participant 2 was a 42-year-old Caucasian woman with left hemiparesis after a right stroke 15 months previously. Participant 3 was a 62-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of a right middle cerebral artery aneurysm with third degree sub-arachnoid hemorrhage 10 years ago.Immediately after training, all participants demonstrated improved gait speed (10 meter walk), stride length and walking endurance (6 minute walk) compared with baseline measurements. Improvements were maintained one month after training. Timed up and go and five times sit-to-stand were maintained for all three participants, with only one individual remaining outside the safety performance norm. Lower extremity training integrating an intention-based robotic leg orthosis may improve gait speed, endurance and community levels of participation in select patients in a post-stroke chronic state after plateauing within a bodyweight-supported treadmill training program. The wearable, mobile assistive robotic device

  20. Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults and Preexisting Psychiatric Disorders: A Nationwide Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Chuan; Bai, Ya-Mei; Su, Tung-Ping; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chen, Mu-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies showed that psychiatric disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorders, and alcohol misuse are associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke. However, the link between psychiatric disorders and stroke in the young population is rarely investigated. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 2063 young adults aged between 18 and 45 years with ischemic stroke and 8252 age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in our study between 1998 and 2011. Participants who had preexisting psychiatric disorders were identified. After adjusting for preexisting physical disorders and demographic data, patients with ischemic stroke had an increased risk of having preexisting psychiatric disorders, including bipolar disorder (odds ratio [OR]: 2.23, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06∼4.67), unipolar depression (OR: 2.15, 95% CI: 1.62∼2.86), anxiety disorders (OR: 2.63, 95% CI: 1.87∼3.69), and alcohol use disorders (OR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.79∼4.57). Young ischemic stroke (age ≥30 years) was related to the risk of preexisting unipolar depression (OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.05∼2.11), anxiety disorders (OR: 1.99, 95% CI: 1.33∼2.97), and alcohol use disorders (OR: 2.54, 95% CI: 1.55∼4.14); very young stroke (age ischemic stroke at age younger than 45 years had a higher risk of having pre-existing bipolar disorder, unipolar depression, anxiety disorders, and alcohol use disorders than those who did not after adjusting for demographic data and stroke-related medical comorbidities.

  1. Cerebral and extracerebral vasoreactivity in symptomatic lacunar stroke patients: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deplanque, Dominique; Lavallee, Philippa C; Labreuche, Julien; Gongora-Rivera, Fernando; Jaramillo, Arturo; Brenner, David; Abboud, Halim; Klein, Isabelle F; Touboul, Pierre-Jean; Vicaut, Eric; Amarenco, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    Whether cerebral artery endothelial dysfunction is a key factor of symptomatic lacunar stroke and cerebral small vessel disease remains unclear. Cerebral and extracerebral vasoreactivity were measured in 81 patients with recent symptomatic lacunar stroke and in 81 control subjects matched for main vascular risk factors. Cerebral vasoreactivity and carotid endothelial-dependent vasodilation were measured after five-minutes of carbon dioxide-induced hypercapnia. Brachial endothelial-dependent vasodilation was assessed after hyperemia induced by deflating a cuff around the forearm previously inflated to 200 mmHg for four-minutes. Carotid and brachial endothelial-independent vasodilation were measured five-minutes after administration of sublingual nitroglycerin 300 μg. Brain magnetic resonance imaging were analyzed in lacunar stroke patients. One-month after stroke onset, patients had more severely impaired cerebral vasoreactivitys than matched controls (mean ± standard deviation, 14·4 ± 12·1% vs. 19·4 ± 17·4%; P = 0·049). Severe alterations of both carotid and brachial endothelial-dependent and at a lesser degree of carotid and brachial endothelial-independent vasodilation were observed in both groups. After adjustment for confounders, subjects with a cerebral vasoreactivity value in the two lower tertiles (≤19·6%) were more likely to have had a symptomatic lacunar stroke (adjusted odds ratio, 3·78; 95% confidence interval, 1·42 to 10·08; P = 0·008). Only alteration of brachial endothelial-independent vasodilation correlated with parenchymal abnormalities, namely microbleeds and leukoaraiosis. While abnormalities in extracerebral vasoreactivity seem related to vascular risk factors, the severity of endothelial dysfunction in cerebral arteries may be determinant in the occurrence of symptomatic lacunar stroke in patients with small vessel disease. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke

  2. Evaluation of self-reported ethnicity in a case-control population: the stroke prevention in young women study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wozniak Marcella A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population-based association studies are used to identify common susceptibility variants for complex genetic traits. These studies are susceptible to confounding from unknown population substructure. Here we apply a model-based clustering approach to our case-control study of stroke among young women to examine if self-reported ethnicity can serve as a proxy for genetic ancestry. Findings A population-based case-control study of stroke among women aged 15-49 identified 361 cases of first ischemic stroke and 401 age-comparable control subjects. Thirty single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs throughout the genome unrelated to stroke risk and with established ancestry-based allele frequency differences were genotyped in all participants. The Structure program was used to iteratively evaluate for K = 1 to 5 potential genetic-based subpopulations. Evaluating the population as a whole, the Structure output plateaued at K = 2 clusters. 98% of self-reported Caucasians had an estimated probability ≥50% of belonging to Cluster 1, while 94% of self-reported African-Americans had an estimated probability ≥50% of belonging to Cluster 2. Stratifying the participants by self-reported ethnicity and repeating the analyses revealed the presence of two clusters among Caucasians, suggesting that potential substructure may exist. Conclusions Among our combined sample of African-American and Caucasian participants there is no large unknown subpopulation and self-reported ethnicity can serve as a proxy for genetic ancestry. Ethnicity-specific analyses indicate that population substructure may exist among the Caucasian participants indicating that further studies are warranted.

  3. A new clinical decision support tool for improving the adequacy of anticoagulant therapy and reducing the incidence of stroke in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmau Llorca, Maria Rosa; Gonçalves, Alessandra Queiroga; Forcadell Drago, Emma; Fernández-Sáez, José; Hernández Rojas, Zojaina; Pepió Vilaubí, Josep Maria; Rodríguez Cumplido, Dolores; Morral Parente, Rosa Maria; Aguilar Martín, Carina

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and increases the risk of ischemic stroke 4 to 5-fold. The first choice of anticoagulant therapy (AT) is the vitamin K antagonist (VKA). Contraindication to VKA or poor control of the International Normalized Ratio leads to the administration of direct-acting oral anticoagulants. There is a trend toward inadequate AT in nonvalvular AF (NVAF) patients. Aim: To evaluate the impact of the implementation of a decision support tool linked to the digital clinical history on the adequacy of AT, the incidence of complications, and the mortality in patients with NVAF in primary care centers (PCCs) of the Catalan Institute of Health (ICS). Methods and analysis: Randomized clinical trial in 287 PCCs, formed by 2 groups (intervention and control). Population: patients controlled in PCCs, diagnosed with NVAF 1 year before the implementation of the decision support tool and with VKA treatment over a minimum of 1 year. A simple randomization method will be performed at a sector level. The decision support tool will be available for 1 year. The time in therapeutic range (TTR) will be available in the digital clinical history only to professionals of the intervention group. The information system for primary care research development database will be used for the data extraction. Statistical analysis will be done at 3 time points: before the implementation of the tool, at 1 year, and at 2 years after the beginning of the intervention. Multilevel (patient and professional levels) logistic regression models will be used to estimate the effect of the intervention. Ethics and dissemination: This study protocol was approved by the Ethical Committee of Clinical Investigation of the Institut Universitari d’Investigació en Atenció Primària Jordi Gol (code P17/091). Articles will be published in scientific journals. Trial registration: Clinical-Trials.gov: NCT03367325. PMID:29504981

  4. A clinical study of major stroke cases of a low-perfusion pattern on a dynamic CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Tsutomu; Kaneko, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Keisei; Sugiura, Masashi

    1986-01-01

    Preoperative dynamic CT scans have been done for the past 4 years in order to estimate the degree of ischemia in the region responsible. The hemodynamic patterns on the dynamic CT scans were consequently classified into three particular types: Type 1: The collateral flow was preserved considerably, and the peak value of the time-density curve exceeded 50 % of the opposite healthy side. Type 2: The residual flow was moderate, and the peak value was approximately from one-third to one-half of the normal side. Type 3: The residual flow was minimal, and the time-density curve was almost flat or the peak value did not reach even approximately one-third of the opposite side. In general, major stroke cases with a Type 1 pattern on the dynamic CT scan showed a considerably good recovery if the revascularization was completed within 6 hours after the attack. However, cases of the Type 3 pattern often developed into a massive cerebral infarction associated with a marked mid-line shift, and sometimes they were fulminent even after acute revascularization. In this paper, clinical results of 11 major stroke cases with the Type 2 pattern on dynamic CT scans were evaluated. All of them showed hemiplegia, with or without aphasia, just after the onset of the stroke, and dynamic CT scans were performed within 24 hours. The site of the occluded vessel was in the internal carotid artery (ICA) in 4 cases and in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in 6; severe stenosis in ICA and MCA was found in only one case. The functional recovery was rather poor. Only one was capable of self-care at home; four others required partial care at home, and the other six were bed-ridden. In the 4 surgical cases of acute revascularization, the clinical symptoms did not improve, and the functional recovery was almost equivalent to the natural course. (J.P.N.)

  5. Physical therapy for an adult with chronic stroke after botulinum toxin injection for spasticity: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Shannon; Phadke, Chetan P; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In this case report, we describe the type and duration of a physical therapy and botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) intervention directed at lower limb spasticity and the gait and balance improvement in a patient post-stroke. Treatment of focal spasticity with BoNTA intramuscular injections combined with physical therapy is recommended by rehabilitation experts. However, the optimal type and duration of physical therapy intervention to optimize any functional gains that follow chemodenervation induced by BoNTA has not been established. One individual with chronic stroke who received BoNTA injections for upper and lower extremity spasticity was included. Physical therapy intervention consisted of 45- to 60-min sessions twice weekly for 12 weeks, based on the Bobath-neurodevelopmental therapy approach, and an activity-based home program. After BoNTA injections and physical therapy, the patient made clinically significant improvements in balance and gait speed and became more independent with his ambulation. This case report demonstrates that physical therapy after BoNTA injections can result in significant functional improvements for individuals with spasticity after chronic stroke that may not be possible with BoNTA injections alone.

  6. Physical Therapy for an Adult with Chronic Stroke after Botulinum Toxin Injection for Spasticity: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Chetan P.; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: In this case report, we describe the type and duration of a physical therapy and botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) intervention directed at lower limb spasticity and the gait and balance improvement in a patient post-stroke. Treatment of focal spasticity with BoNTA intramuscular injections combined with physical therapy is recommended by rehabilitation experts. However, the optimal type and duration of physical therapy intervention to optimize any functional gains that follow chemodenervation induced by BoNTA has not been established. Method: One individual with chronic stroke who received BoNTA injections for upper and lower extremity spasticity was included. Physical therapy intervention consisted of 45- to 60-min sessions twice weekly for 12 weeks, based on the Bobath–neurodevelopmental therapy approach, and an activity-based home program. Results: After BoNTA injections and physical therapy, the patient made clinically significant improvements in balance and gait speed and became more independent with his ambulation. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates that physical therapy after BoNTA injections can result in significant functional improvements for individuals with spasticity after chronic stroke that may not be possible with BoNTA injections alone. PMID:25931655

  7. Incidence of multiple myeloma in Great Britain, Sweden, and Malmö, Sweden: the impact of differences in case ascertainment on observed incidence trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, Ramón; Turesson, Ingemar; Landgren, Ola; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Cuzick, Jack

    2016-01-21

    The increased incidence of multiple myeloma (MM) across China and East Asia stimulated us to examine the current rates in Great Britain, where rates increased dramatically in the second half of the 20th century. However, rates have been stable and high during this period in Malmö, Sweden, where there is a keen interest in MM. We thus assessed recent changes in MM incidence in Great Britain, Sweden overall, and Malmö, Sweden, and examined how these changes might explain recent reports of increased MM incidence across Asia. Estimation of MM incidence for Great Britain, Sweden overall, and Malmö, Sweden. MM incidence data for Great Britain (1975-2009) were obtained from Cancer Research UK and for Sweden (1970-2009) from the Swedish Cancer Registry. MM incidence data from Malmö, Sweden, were available from 1950 to 2012. Age-specific incidence of MM in Great Britain, Sweden overall, and Malmö, Sweden. MM incidence in Great Britain, Sweden overall, and Malmö increased progressively with age, even among the oldest group. The MM age-adjusted incidence (European standard population) increased by 69% from 1975-1979 to 2005-2009 in Great Britain, from 3.2/100,000 to 5.4/100,000. The largest increases occurred among those 70-79 years of age, for whom rates increased from 17.9/100,000 to 33.6/100,000; reflecting an increase of 69%. During this same period, the age-adjusted incidence (European stand population) in Sweden overall remained stable, at approximately 4.7/100,000. MM age-specific incidence is now similar in Great Britain, Sweden overall, and Malmö. We believe this is a result of improvements in case ascertainment in Great Britain, particularly among the elderly. Similar changes can be predicted to occur across Asia as improved access to healthcare contributes to better diagnosis of MM. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Strokes are possible complications of cannabinoids use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Valérie; Jouanjus, Emilie

    2017-05-01

    It is critically important to identify all factors that may play a role in the recent increase of the incidence of stroke among the young population. Considering the worldwide use of cannabinoids (cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids), the recent legalization of their consumption in some countries, and their supposed involvement in cardiovascular events, we evaluated their role in the occurrence of neurovascular complications among the young. Ninety-eight patients were described in the literature as having a cannabinoids-related stroke (85 after cannabis use and 13 after synthetic cannabinoids). The distribution by type of stroke was as follows: 4 patients with an undetermined type of stroke, 85 with an ischemic stroke and/or a transient ischemic attack, and 9 with a hemorrhagic stroke. The mean age of patients was 32.3±11.8years (range 15-63), and the majority of them were male with a sex ratio of 3.7:1. Cannabis was often smoked with tobacco in 66% of cases. Most of the patients with cannabinoids-related strokes were chronic cannabis users in 81% of cases, and for 18% of them, there was a recent increase of the amount of cannabis consumption during the days before the occurrence of stroke. Even if the prognosis of stroke was globally favorable in 46% of cases, with no or few sequelae, 5 patients died after the neurovascular event. One striking element reported in the majority of the reports was a temporal relationship between cannabinoids use, whether natural or synthetic, and the occurrence of stroke. However, a temporal correlation does not mean causation, and other factors may be involved. Cannabis may be considered as a risk factor of stroke until research shows evidence of an underlying mechanism that, alone or in association with others, contributes to the development of stroke. As of today, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction triggered by cannabinoids use may be a convincing mechanism of stroke in 27% of cases. Indeed, despite the widespread use of

  9. Thromboembolic events and haematological diseases: a case of stroke as clinical onset of a paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viggiano Vito

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Some haematological diseases are associated to an increased risk of thromboembolic events. We report a case of paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH in which a cerebrovascular event represented the first clinical manifestation of disease. PNH is associated to thromboembolic events, generally of venous districts often involving unusual locations such as mesenteric vessels, sagittal veins, inferior vena cava and renal veins. To our knowledge arterial thrombotic episodes are rare and the involvement of arterial cerebral vessels is exceptional. Then, our case points out the importance of investigating about haematological disorders in all patients presenting with a stroke, in which the common predisposing conditions are excluded.

  10. Occupational Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for a Neonate with Perinatal Stroke: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roan, Cecilia; Bell, Alison

    2017-08-01

    This case report describes an occupational therapy intervention based on synactive theory for a neonate born full-term with a diagnosis of perinatal stroke. Occupational therapy was provided 4-5 times a week for 3 weeks. The focus was improving infant state regulation and motor skills to support developmentally appropriate behaviors through environmental modifications, positioning, guided progression of sensory stimulation, and promotion of motor and postural skills. At discharge on day 24, the infant had improved state regulation, behavioral organization, and motor performance. Occupational therapy based on synactive theory was an effective therapeutic approach for improving the behavioral and motor organization of a full term infant diagnosed with perinatal stroke.

  11. Methodological Issues in Monitoring Health Services and Outcomes for Stroke Survivors: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Mary; Papini, Donato; Benvenuti, Francesco; Nerattini, Marco; Roccato, Enrico; Macellari, Velio; Stanhope, Steven; Macko, Richard; Weinrich, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Obtaining comprehensive health outcomes and health services utilization data on stroke patients has been difficult. This research grew out of a memorandum of understanding between the NIH and the ISS (its Italian equivalent) to foster collaborative research on rehabilitation. Objective The purpose of this study was to pilot a methodology using administrative data to monitor and improve health outcomes for stroke survivors in Tuscany. Methods This study used qualitative and quantitative methods to study health resources available to and utilized by stroke survivors during the first 12 months post-stroke in two Italian health authorities (AUSL10 and 11). Mortality rates were used as an outcome measure. Results Number of inpatient days, number of prescriptions, and prescription costs were significantly higher for patients in AUSL 10 compared to AUSL 11. There was no significant difference between mortality rates. Conclusion Using administrative data to monitor process and outcomes for chronic stroke has the potential to save money and improve outcomes. However, measures of functional impairment and more sensitive outcome measures than mortality are important. Additional recommendations for enhanced data collection and reporting are discussed. PMID:21057665

  12. Playing piano can improve upper extremity function after stroke: case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Myriam; Lamontagne, Anouk

    2013-01-01

    Music-supported therapy (MST) is an innovative approach that was shown to improve manual dexterity in acute stroke survivors. The feasibility of such intervention in chronic stroke survivors and its longer-term benefits, however, remain unknown. The objective of this pilot study was to estimate the short- and long-term effects of a 3-week piano training program on upper extremity function in persons with chronic stroke. A multiple pre-post sequential design was used, with measurements taken at baseline (week0, week3), prior to (week6) and after the intervention (week9), and at 3-week follow-up (week12). Three persons with stroke participated in the 3-week piano training program that combined structured piano lessons to home practice program. The songs, played on an electronic keyboard, involved all 5 digits of the affected hand and were displayed using a user-friendly MIDI program. After intervention, all the three participants showed improvements in their fine (nine hole peg test) and gross (box and block test) manual dexterity, as well as in the functional use of the upper extremity (Jebsen hand function test). Improvements were maintained at follow-up. These preliminary results support the feasibility of using an MST approach that combines structured lessons to home practice to improve upper extremity function in chronic stroke.

  13. Playing Piano Can Improve Upper Extremity Function after Stroke: Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Villeneuve

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Music-supported therapy (MST is an innovative approach that was shown to improve manual dexterity in acute stroke survivors. The feasibility of such intervention in chronic stroke survivors and its longer-term benefits, however, remain unknown. The objective of this pilot study was to estimate the short- and long-term effects of a 3-week piano training program on upper extremity function in persons with chronic stroke. A multiple pre-post sequential design was used, with measurements taken at baseline (week0, week3, prior to (week6 and after the intervention (week9, and at 3-week follow-up (week12. Three persons with stroke participated in the 3-week piano training program that combined structured piano lessons to home practice program. The songs, played on an electronic keyboard, involved all 5 digits of the affected hand and were displayed using a user-friendly MIDI program. After intervention, all the three participants showed improvements in their fine (nine hole peg test and gross (box and block test manual dexterity, as well as in the functional use of the upper extremity (Jebsen hand function test. Improvements were maintained at follow-up. These preliminary results support the feasibility of using an MST approach that combines structured lessons to home practice to improve upper extremity function in chronic stroke.

  14. Hypercholesterolemia in patients of ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, E.; Ali, R.; Din, M.J.U.; Saeed, A.; Jadoon, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a common neurological disease that results in significant mortality and morbidity globally. Several risk factors have been identified for stroke among which hyperlipidaemia is one of the modifiable risk factors. Recent clinical trials have shown a reduction in ischemic stroke for patients taking lipid lowering medications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find out the frequency of hypercholesterolemia in patients of ischemic stroke in Hazara region. Method: This cross sectional study was carried out in the Medical Department of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad. Ninety patients of stroke confirmed as ischemic by CT scan brain were enrolled in the study after informed consent. The frequency of hypercholesterolemia in patients was recorded. Results: There were 55 (61.1 percentage) males. The mean age of patients was 64.4±11.5 years. The mean serum cholesterol in all patients was 4.16±1.1 mmol/l. The mean serum cholesterol of male patients was 4.3±1.2 mmol/l and 4.0±10.9 mmol/l in the case of females. Conclusions: Hypercholesterolemia could not be established as a major risk factor for stroke in our setup through this study that allude to the fact that other risk factors might be contributing more to the incidence of cerebrovascular accident in our population. (author)

  15. Association of hormone therapy and incident gout: population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruderer, Saskia G; Bodmer, Michael; Jick, Susan S; Meier, Christoph R

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to assess the odds of developing incident gout in association with the use of postmenopausal estrogen-progestogen therapy, according to type, timing, duration, and route of administration of estrogen-progestogen therapy. We conducted a retrospective population-based case-control analysis using the United Kingdom-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink. We identified women (aged 45 y or older) who had a first-time diagnosis of gout recorded between 1990 and 2010. We matched one female control with each case on age, general practice, calendar time, and years of active history in the database. We used multivariate conditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs (adjusted for confounders). The adjusted OR for gout with current use of oral formulations of opposed estrogens (estrogen-progestogen) was 0.69 (95% CI, 0.56-0.86) compared with never use. Current use was associated with a decreased OR for gout in women without renal failure (adjusted OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.57-0.87) and hypertension (adjusted OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.44-0.87) compared with never use. Tibolone was associated with a decreased OR for gout (adjusted OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.63-0.95) compared with never use. Estrogens alone did not alter the OR for gout. Current use of oral opposed estrogens, but not unopposed estrogens, is associated with a decreased OR for incident gout in women without renal failure and is more pronounced in women with hypertension. Use of tibolone is associated with a decreased OR for incident gout. The decreased OR for gout may be related to the progestogen component rather than the estrogen component.

  16. Ischemic stroke as a rare manifestation of aluminum phosphide poisoning: a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Abedini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum phosphide (AlP is a solid fumigant which is widely used for a suicide attempt in Iran. Although neurologic symptoms are commonly reported, cerebrovascular stenosis is rare in AlP poisoning. We described ischemic stroke as a delayed complication of AlP intoxication. A 30-year-old man was admitted because of sudden onset left side hemiplegia, 11 days after intentional ingestion of three rice tablets. Investigations revealed in situ thrombosis in right middle cerebral artery (MCA while other causes of stroke in young adults were excluded. Ischemic stroke should be considered as a delayed complication of AlP intoxication even after the acute phase of intoxication.

  17. Asthma Status and Risk of Incident Myocardial Infarction: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Duk Won; Wi, Chung-Il; Kim, Eun Na; Hagan, John; Roger, Veronique; Manemann, Sheila; Lahr, Brian; Ryu, Euijung; Juhn, Young J

    2016-01-01

    The role of asthma status and characteristics of asthma in the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) are poorly understood. We determined whether asthma and its characteristics are associated with risk of MI. The study was designed as a population-based retrospective case-control study, which included all eligible incident MI cases between November 1, 2002, and May 31, 2006, and their matched controls. Asthma was ascertained using predetermined criteria. Active (current) asthma was defined as the occurrence of asthma-related episodes (asthma symptoms, use of asthma medications, unscheduled medical or emergency department visit, or hospitalization for asthma) within 1 year before MI index date. There were 543 eligible incident MI cases during the study period. Of the 543 MI cases, 81 (15%) had a history of asthma before index date of MI, whereas 52 of 543 controls (10%) had such a history (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.06-2.66) adjusting for risk factors for MI and comorbid conditions (excluding chronic obstructive lung disease). Although inactive asthma did not increase the risk of MI, individuals with active asthma had a higher odds of MI, compared with those without asthma (adjusted OR: 3.18; 95% CI: 1.57-6.44) without controlling for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). After adjusting for COPD, although asthma overall was no longer statistically significant (adjusted OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 0.84-2.15), active asthma still was associated (adjusted OR: 2.33, 95% CI: 1.12-4.82). Active asthma is an unrecognized risk factor for MI. Further studies are needed to assess the role of asthma control and medications in the risk of MI. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Does left atrial appendage closure with a cardiac plug system reduce the stroke risk in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients? A single-center case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danna, Paolo; Proietti, Riccardo; Sagone, Antonio; Arensi, Andrea; Viecca, Maurizio; Rago, Anna; Russo, Vincenzo

    2013-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia and it is associated with an increased stroke risk, due mainly to cardiac embolism from the left atrial appendage (LAA). Percutaneous LAA closure is a method to reduce stroke risk in AF without using anticoagulant agents. In this study we report data from an Italian experience with the LAA occluder Amplatzer Cardiac Plug (ACP) device (Aga Medical Corporation, Plymouth, MN, USA). The study was designed to evaluate the safety of LAA closure using ACP and the efficacy of the procedure in preventing strokes during a 1-year follow-up. Patients with permanent or paroxysmal AF, high stroke risk, and contraindication to warfarin therapy were selected for the procedure. The LAA closure was attempted in 37 patients and succeeded in 34 cases (91.9%). Four patients experienced serious complications (one cardiac tamponade requiring pericardiocentesis, two device embolizations, one low-rate response AF requiring artificial pacing). During a 1-year follow-up, ischemic stroke occurred in one of 34 patients, resulting in a stroke rate of 2.94%; thus there was a stroke rate reduction of 50.2% and 26.5% compared to the expected stroke rate, according to CHADS2 and CHA2 DS2 VASc score. None of the patients who received ACP experienced major bleeding during the follow-up. LAA closure using ACP is a relatively feasible procedure which can be performed by highly experienced operators to reduce stroke rate in patients with AF, high stroke risk, and contraindication to oral anticoagulants. ©2012, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fulminant Vasculitis Associated with Extracranial Dissections and Occlusion, Ischemic Strokes, and Aneurysm Rupture: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Osama; Taussky, Philipp; Schmidt, Richard H; Park, Min S

    2016-07-01

    Central nervous system vasculitis has multiple presentations, including stroke, seizures, cranial nerve palsies, and encephalopathy. We present the case of an unresponsive 45-year-old woman with vasculitis associated with fulminant intracranial vessel dissection and occlusion with ischemic strokes and subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to aneurysm rupture. Imaging studies demonstrated both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. She had a ruptured right internal carotid artery dorsal variant aneurysm, right vertebral artery dissection with occlusion and posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarct, left vertebral artery dissection, and severe vasculitis involving intracranial and extracranial vessels. She initially was treated for her vasculitis with high-dose steroids followed by clip wrapping of the dorsal variant aneurysm. Unfortunately, her surgery was complicated by intraprocedural rupture, and the patient died during her hospitalization. Fulminant central nervous system vasculitis can occur with critical vascular anomalies that require emergent intervention and should be part of the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these multiple vascular pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reducing robotic guidance during robot-assisted gait training improves gait function: a case report on a stroke survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Kotsapouikis, Despina; Dhaher, Yasin Y; Rymer, William Z

    2013-06-01

    To test the feasibility of patient-cooperative robotic gait training for improving locomotor function of a chronic stroke survivor with severe lower-extremity motor impairments. Single-subject crossover design. Performed in a controlled laboratory setting. A 62-year-old man with right temporal lobe ischemic stroke was recruited for this study. The baseline lower-extremity Fugl-Meyer score of the subject was 10 on a scale of 34, which represented severe impairment in the paretic leg. However, the subject had a good ambulation level (community walker with the aid of a stick cane and ankle-foot orthosis) and showed no signs of sensory or cognitive impairments. The subject underwent 12 sessions (3 times per week for 4wk) of conventional robotic training with the Lokomat, where the robot provided full assistance to leg movements while walking, followed by 12 sessions (3 times per week for 4wk) of patient-cooperative robotic control training, where the robot provided minimal guidance to leg movements during walking. Clinical outcomes were evaluated before the start of the intervention, immediately after 4 weeks of conventional robotic training, and immediately after 4 weeks of cooperative control robotic training. These included: (1) self-selected and fast walking speed, (2) 6-minute walk test, (3) Timed Up & Go test, and (4) lower-extremity Fugl-Meyer score. Results showed that clinical outcomes changed minimally after full guidance robotic training, but improved considerably after 4 weeks of reduced guidance robotic training. The findings from this case study suggest that cooperative control robotic training is superior to conventional robotic training and is a feasible option to restoring locomotor function in ambulatory stroke survivors with severe motor impairments. A larger trial is needed to verify the efficacy of this advanced robotic control strategy in facilitating gait recovery after stroke. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

  1. Speed-dependent body weight supported sit-to-stand training in chronic stroke: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyne, Pierce; Israel, Susan; Dunning, Kari

    2011-12-01

    Body weight support (BWS) and speed-dependent training protocols have each been used for poststroke gait training, but neither approach has been tested in the context of sit-to-stand (STS) training. This study evaluated the feasibility and outcomes of speed-dependent BWS STS training for 2 persons with chronic stroke. Two individuals 68 and 75 years old, and 2.3 and 8.7 years post-ischemic stroke, respectively, participated. Both exhibited right hemiparesis, required moderate (25%-50%) assistance for STS, and ambulated household distances with assistive devices. Participants performed speed-dependent BWS STS training 3 days/week for 45 to 60 minutes until able to perform STS independently. Gait parameters, the Stroke Impact Scale Mobility Domain (SIS-mobility), and the 3-Repetition STS test (3RSTS) were assessed before and after intervention. Each participant completed more than 750 STS repetitions over the course of the intervention, achieving independence in 8 to 11 sessions. Aside from muscle soreness, no adverse effects occurred. Participants also exhibited increased gait velocity (0.17-0.24 m/s and 0.25-0.42 m/s), SIS-mobility score (78-88 and 63-66), and decreased 3RSTS time (18-8 seconds and 40-21 seconds). Speed-dependent BWS STS training appears to be a feasible and promising method to increase STS independence and speed for persons with chronic stroke. In this small case series, a potential transfer effect to gait parameters was also observed. Future randomized controlled study is warranted to evaluate efficacy and long-term effects.

  2. Effects of Transfer Training on Musculoskeletal pain in the Caregiver of a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

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    Atefeh Taghizadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this case report was to evaluate the effectiveness of training of transfer techniques to a caregiver of a person who had suffered a stroke in decreasing musculoskeletal pain, depression and anxiety. This study adopted a single subject research design to evaluate the effectiveness of transfer-techniques training on musculoskeletal pain, depression, and anxiety in a 25-year-old female caregiver of a person with a stroke. The study was completed in four phases, including a baseline evaluation (1st and 3rd week, training (3rd, 5th and 7th week, post-training (9th week, and follow-up evaluation (11th week. During the 1st week, demographic and descriptive information  (such as age, time since diagnosis, cognition and independence of daily living were collected from the stroke patient. Also, pain severity, anxiety and depression levels of the caregiver were evaluated. In weeks 3, 5 and 7, transfer training was undertaken. The patient was involved in the training with the caregiver under the supervision of an occupational therapist in their own home. The effectiveness of the training with regard to musculoskeletal pain and depression and anxiety levels of the caregiver was evaluated in the 5th, 9th and 11th weeks. The data were analyzed using a visual analysis of trends and levels. The results showed a decrease in pain severity, anxiety and depression during training and post-training. The changes continued during the follow-up stage. This study suggests promising results for the effectiveness of the transfer-techniques training and justifies further clinical trials. A larger trial is required to confirm the effectiveness of transfer training in improving pain management in caregivers of stroke survivors.

  3. Heat stroke in dogs: A retrospective study of 54 cases (1999-2004) and analysis of risk factors for death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchim, Yaron; Klement, Eyal; Saragusty, Joseph; Finkeilstein, Efrat; Kass, Philip; Aroch, Itamar

    2006-01-01

    The medical records of 54 dogs presented to the Hebrew University Veterinary Teaching Hospital and diagnosed with heat stroke were retrospectively reviewed. Data abstracted included history, clinical and clinicopathological signs at admission, treatment, disease progression, and outcome. Exertional and environmental heat stroke were present in 63% (34 of 54) and 37% (20 of 54) of the dogs, respectively, and 78% (42 of 54) were examined between June and August. The mean temperature and heat discomfort index in the particular days of heat stroke were significantly increased (P dogs the body temperature was > or = 41 degrees C (105.8 degrees F). Belgian Malinois (15%, odds ratio [OR] = 24, 95% confidence interval [CI95%] 8.2-64.5), Golden and Labrador Retrievers (21%, OR = 2.08, CI95% 0.95-4.2), and brachycephalic breeds (25%, OR = 1.7, CI95%], 0.81-3.21) were overrepresented, whereas small breeds (dogs) and prolongation of the prothrombin (PT) and activated thromboplastin (aPTT) times (27 of 47 dogs) were recorded during hospitalization. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (P = .013) and acute renal failure (P = .008), diagnosed in 28 of 54 and 18 of 54 of the cases, respectively, were risk factors for death. The overall mortality rate was 50%. Hypoglycemia (18 seconds, P = .05), and aPTT (>30 sec, P 1.5 mg/dL (P = .003) after 24 hours, delayed admission (>90 minutes, P = .032), seizures (P = .02), and obesity (P = .04) were also risk factors for death. Heat stroke in dogs results in serious complications and high fatality rate despite appropriate treatment.

  4. Sex-specific responses to stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Turtzo, L Christine; McCullough, Louise D

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is a sexually dimorphic disease, with differences between males and females observed both clinically and in the laboratory. While males have a higher incidence of stroke throughout much of the lifespan, aged females have a higher burden of stroke. Sex differences in stroke result from a combination of factors, including elements intrinsic to the sex chromosomes as well as the effects of sex hormone exposure throughout the lifespan. Research investigating the sexual dimorphism of stroke...

  5. Mobility training using a bionic knee orthosis in patients in a post-stroke chronic state: a case series

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    Byl Nancy N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction An emerging area of neurorehabilitation is the use of robotic devices to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of lower extremity physical therapy post-stroke. Many of the robotic devices currently available rely on computer-driven locomotive algorithms combined with partial bodyweight-supported treadmill training that drive reflex stepping with minimal patient intention during therapy. In this case series, we examined the effect of task-oriented mobility training in patients in a post-stroke chronic state using a novel, wearable, mobile, intention-based robotic leg orthosis. Case presentation Three individuals, all of whom had reached a plateau with conventional bodyweight-supported treadmill training, participated in task-oriented mobility therapy (1.5 hours, two to four times per week for four weeks with a robotic leg orthosis under supervision by a physical therapist. Participant 1 was a 59-year-old Caucasian man, who had an ischemic left stroke six years previously with resultant right hemiparesis. Participant 2 was a 42-year-old Caucasian woman with left hemiparesis after a right stroke 15 months previously. Participant 3 was a 62-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of a right middle cerebral artery aneurysm with third degree sub-arachnoid hemorrhage 10 years ago. Immediately after training, all participants demonstrated improved gait speed (10 meter walk, stride length and walking endurance (6 minute walk compared with baseline measurements. Improvements were maintained one month after training. Timed up and go and five times sit-to-stand were maintained for all three participants, with only one individual remaining outside the safety performance norm. Conclusions Lower extremity training integrating an intention-based robotic leg orthosis may improve gait speed, endurance and community levels of participation in select patients in a post-stroke chronic state after plateauing within a bodyweight

  6. [Early treatment and nursing role in the case of a haemorrhagic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héraud-Carré, Séverine; Le Roy, Bruno; Prével, Gladys

    Paediatric stroke constitute a medical and/or surgical emergency. The speed and timeliness of the treatment have a significant impact on the prognosis. The nursing role, from carrying out continuous observation to specific procedures, is essential in the assessment, the care pathway and the short-, medium- and long-term outcome for the child. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Intracardiac tumor: A risk factor for stroke in the young –A case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intracardiac mass should be considered a possible risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adult, especially in the absence of other risk factors such as connective tissue disorders, HIV/AIDS, hemoglobinopathy or use of recreational drugs. High index of suspicion is required in order not to overlook such source of emboli.

  8. A Review of Stroke Cases in a Military Hospital in Nigeria | Ukoha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: CVA (Stroke) remains one of the most common neurological illnesses in the country, accounting for a greater percentage of morbidity and morality. Its increasing prevalence is a source of worry to most health personnel. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study is to review the patient characteristic, risk factors, ...

  9. Relationship between Factor V Leiden Gene Variant and Risk of Ischemic Stroke: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Misra, Shubham; Sagar, Ram; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Arun K; Talwar, Pumanshi; Raj, Ritesh; Prasad, Kameshwar

    2017-01-01

    Factor V Leiden is the most common genetic variation among the blood coagulation pathway which leads to prothrombotic state, therefore, is considered an important gene for understating the stroke mechanism. The aim of the present study is to determine the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism at G1691A position of Factor V gene and risk of ischemic stroke (IS) in North Indian population. In a retrospective case-control study, 250 patients with IS and 250 age- and gender-matched controls were enrolled in the period of October 2012 to September 2014 from in- and out-patient department of Neurology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Deoxyribonucleic acid for each case and control was isolated from peripheral blood using phenol-chloroform extraction method. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method was used to determine the polymorphism. Data were analyzed using STATA Software Version 13. The mean age of IS patient was 52.8 ± 12.5 years and in control group was 50.97 ± 12.7 years. Genotypic frequency distributions were in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both cases and controls. As expected hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking, heavy alcohol intake, family history of stroke, and poor economic status were significantly associated with the risk of IS. Multivariate analysis revealed 5.17 times higher odds for developing the risk of large vessel subtype of IS in patients carrying Factor V Leiden G1691A gene variation as compared to control subjects (OR, 5.17; 95% CI, 1.32-20.3, P = 0.01). The present study suggests that Factor V Leiden G1691A polymorphism may be significantly associated with the risk of large vessel subtype of IS. Large sample size studies using prospective cohort designs are required to corroborate the present findings.

  10. Sexual dimorphism in tuberculosis incidence: children cases compared to adult cases in Tuscany from 1997 to 2011.

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    Alessia Stival

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In most countries, men seem to be more susceptible to tuberculosis (TB than women, but only few studies have investigated the reasons of this gender incidence difference. The effect of sexual hormones on immunity is possible. METHODS: Data from children and adults, living in Tuscany, hospitalized for TB in all the thirty-one regional hospitals from January 1st 1997 to December 31st 2011, were analyzed using the International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification. RESULTS: During the study period, 10,744 patients were hospitalized with TB diagnosis, precisely 279 (2.6% children [0-14 years], 205 (1.9% adolescents [15-18 years] and 10,260 (95.5% adults [≥ 18 years]. The male population ranged from 249 patients (51.4% in children and adolescents, to 6,253 (60.9% in adults. Pulmonary TB was the most common form both in children and adults. Men were more likely than women to have pulmonary TB after puberty, while no significant differences were found between males and females in the hospitalized children. The male gender also resulted the most affected for the extra-pulmonary disease sites, excluding the lymphatic system, during the reproductive age. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest a possible role of sexual hormones in the development of TB. No significant male-female difference was found in TB incidence among children, while a sex ratio significantly different from 1:1 emerged among reproductive age classes. An increased incidence difference also persisted in older men, suggesting that male-biased risk factors could influence TB progression. Some limitations of the study are the sample size, the method of discharge diagnosis which could be deficient in accuracy in some cases, the increasing number of immigrants and the lack of possible individual risk factors (smoke and alcohol. Further studies are needed to investigate the possible hormone-driven immune mechanisms determining the sexual dimorphism in TB.

  11. Consequences of Comorbidity of Elevated Stress and/or Depressive Symptoms and Incident Cardiovascular Outcomes in Diabetes: Results From the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Doyle M; Kirian, Kari; Howard, George; Howard, Virginia; Yuan, Ya; Muntner, Paul; Kissela, Brett; Redmond, Nicole; Judd, Suzanne E; Safford, Monika M

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of comorbid depressive symptoms and/or stress on adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in individuals with diabetes compared with those without diabetes. Investigators examined the relationship between baseline depressive symptoms and/or stress in adults with and without diabetes and physician-adjudicated incident CV outcomes including stroke, myocardial infarction/acute coronary heart disease, and CV death over a median follow-up of 5.95 years in the national REGARDS cohort study. Subjects included 22,003 adults (4,090 with diabetes) (mean age 64 years, 58% female, 42% black, and 56% living in the southeastern "Stroke Belt"). Elevated stress and/or depressive symptoms were more common in subjects with diabetes (36.8% vs. 29.5%; P stress or depressive symptoms was associated with a significantly increased incidence of stroke (HR 1.57 [95% CI 1.05, 2.33] vs. 1.01 [0.79, 1.30]) and CV death (1.53 [1.08, 2.17] vs. 1.12 [0.90, 1.38]) in subjects with diabetes but not in those without diabetes. The combination of both elevated stress and depressive symptoms in subjects with diabetes was associated with a higher incidence of CV death (2.15 [1.33, 3.47]) than either behavioral comorbidity alone (1.53 [1.08, 2.17]) and higher than in those with both elevated stress and depressive symptoms but without diabetes (1.27 [0.86, 1.88]). Comorbid stress and/or depressive symptoms are common in individuals with diabetes and together are associated with progressively increased risks for adverse CV outcomes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  12. Predictors of stroke - associated mortality in Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo-Mbenza, B; Tonduangu, K; Muyeno, K; Phanzu, M; Kebolo Baku, A; Muvova, D; Lelo, T; Odio, W; Lukoki, L; Bikangi Nkiabungu, F; Kilembe, M; Tshiamala, P; Katalay, L; Mwema, M; Muyembe, T

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the association of the stroke-related mortality with gender, age, ethnicity, social class, blood pressure, fibrinogen, selected clinical data and meteorologic parameters in hospitalized Africans. A series of 1032 consecutively hospitalized incident cases of acute stroke between 1987 and 1991 was studied. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to estimate the risk (odds ratio=OR) of stroke mortality for meteorologic parameters on the month before the accident onset and selected sociodemophysiological variables on the day of admission. The variables significantly associated with stroke mortality in multivariate analysis were male sex (OR= 2.3 [1.3 - 4.1]), low social class (OR= 2.0 [1.2 - 4.0]), migrant tribes (OR= 1.7 [1.5 - 1.8]), ischemic stroke (OR= 1.4 [1.2 - 1.6]), heart rate >=100 bpm (OR= 1.1 [1.0 - 1.2]), age > or =60 years (OR= 1.03 [1.01 - 1.06]), systolic blood pressure> 160 mmHg (OR= 1. 02 [1.01 - 1.03]), and fibrinogen > or =400 mg/dl (OR= 1.01 [1.002 - 1. 02]). However, diastolic blood pressure > 90 mmHg and global radiation< 340 Cal/cm(2)/day were significantly (p< 0.05) and inversely associated with stroke mortality. Our results indicate that male sex, older age, low social class, migration, ischemic stroke and higher baseline levels of heart rate, systolic blood pressure and fibrinogen are significant predictors of stroke mortality, but lower global radiation and higher diastolic blood pressure are inversely linked.

  13. Is personality associated with cancer incidence and mortality? An individual-participant meta-analysis of 2156 incident cancer cases among 42,843 men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, M; Batty, G D; Hintsa, T; Elovainio, M; Hakulinen, C; Kivimäki, M

    2014-04-02

    The putative role of personality in cancer risk has been controversial, and the evidence remains inconclusive. We pooled data from six prospective cohort studies (British Household Panel Survey; Health and Retirement Study; Household, Income, and Labour Dynamics in Australia; Midlife in the United Survey; Wisconsin Longitudinal Study Graduate; and Sibling samples) for an individual-participant meta-analysis to examine whether personality traits of the Five Factor Model (extraversion, neuroticism, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness to experience) were associated with the incidence of cancer and cancer mortality in 42,843 cancer-free men and women at baseline (mean age 52.2 years, 55.6% women). During an average follow-up of 5.4 years, there were 2156 incident cancer cases. In random-effects meta-analysis adjusted for age, sex, and race/ethnicity, none of the personality traits were associated with the incidence of all cancers or any of the six site-specific cancers included in the analysis (lung, colon, breast, prostate, skin, and leukaemia/lymphoma). In the three cohorts with cause-specific mortality data (421 cancer deaths among 21,835 participants), none of the personality traits were associated with cancer mortality. These data suggest that personality is not associated with increased risk of incident cancer or cancer-related mortality.

  14. On the Appropriateness of Incident Management Systems in Developing Countries: A Case from the UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faouzi Kamoun

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic incidents are eliciting growing public concerns due to their devastating social, economical, and environmental impacts. The severity of these random events is particularly alarming in developing countries, where the situation is just worsening. Recently, Incident Management Systems (IMSs have been proposed as powerful tools to enhance the coordination and management of rescue operations during traffic accidents. However, most of the available commercial IMS solutions are designed for large metropolitan cities and within the contexts of developed nations. This paper explores the issues of appropriateness and customization of IMS solutions in developing countries through an exploratory inquiry consisting of a case study from the United Arab Emirates (UAE. The paper also explores the important issues related to managing the organizational changes that an IMS introduces to the operations of the command and control room. This contribution calls for the development of more comprehensive theoretical frameworks that can guide towards the implementation of appropriate IMS solutions in developing countries. Our research highlights the need for developing countries to acquire appropriate IMS solutions that are tailored to the local organizational work context in which these systems will be used. The experience reported herein can also inspire other public safety agencies in developing countries to consider the option of developing customized IMS solutions that best suit their needs.

  15. Leukaemia incidence among workers in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry: a case-control study

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    Forand Steven P

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous reports have indicated an excess of leukaemia in Broome County, New York, particularly in the Town of Union. Surveillance of cancer incidence data indicates that a large proportion of these cases occurred among males ages 65 and older. Shoe and boot manufacturing has been the largest single industry in this area throughout much of the past century. Occupational studies from Europe suggest a link between leukaemia and employment in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry. However, researchers have not found a positive association between leukaemia and employment in the shoe industry among workers in the United States. Methods A matched case-control study was conducted to investigate the association between leukaemia incidence among males 65 and older and employment in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry. Thirty-six cases of leukaemia occurring between 1981–1990; among males age 65 and older; residing in the town of Union met the study case criteria. Death certificates were obtained for each of the cases. These were matched to death certificates of 144 controls on date of death and date of birth +/- 1 year. Death certificates were then examined to determine the employer and occupation of each study subject. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine the risk of leukaemia among those working in the industry. Results The risk of both leukaemia (OR = 1.47; 95% CI 0.70, 3.09 and acute myeloid leukaemia (OR = 1.19; 95% CI 0.33, 4.28 were elevated among those employed in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry, however neither was statistically significant. Conclusion The results, though suggestive of an association between leukaemia and employment in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry, were not statistically conclusive due mainly to limited study power. Several additional limitations may also have prevented the observance of more conclusive findings. Better exposure assessment, information on

  16. Incidence estimate and guideline-oriented treatment for post-stroke spasticity: an analysis based on German statutory health insurance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egen-Lappe V

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Veronika Egen-Lappe, Ingrid Köster, Ingrid SchubertPMV Research Group, Department of Child and Adolescence Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyBackground: Spasticity after stroke has been internationally recognized as an important health problem causing impairment of mobility, deformity, and pain. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of first-ever and recurrent stroke and of subsequent spastic and flaccid paresis. Factors influencing the development of spasticity were analyzed. A further major aim was to provide a "real-life" assessment of the treatment of spasticity in Germany and to discuss this in view of the treatment recommended by German and international clinical guidelines.Methods: The database used in this study comprised a cohort of 242,090 insurants from a large statutory health insurance fund in the federal state of Hesse, Germany. A first hospital discharge diagnosis in 2009 with any of the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10 codes I60–I64 was used to identify patients with acute stroke (hemorrhage and ischemic. These patients were followed up six months after stroke to monitor whether they developed spastic or flaccid paresis (hospital or ambulatory care diagnoses ICD-10 code G81–G83 [excluding G82.6/G83.4/G83.8]. For patients with spastic paresis after stroke the spasticity treatment was analyzed for a six-month period (physiotherapy, oral muscle relaxants, intrathecal baclofen, and botulinum toxin.Results: Standardized to the population of Germany, 3.7 per 1000 persons suffered a stroke in 2009 (raw 5.2/1000. Of all surviving patients, 10.2% developed spasticity within 6 months. Cox regression revealed no significant influence of patient age, gender, morbidity (diabetes, hypertensive diseases, ischemic heart diseases or type of stroke on development of spasticity. 97% of surviving patients with spasticity received physiotherapy (inpatient care 89

  17. Burden and seasonality of testicular torsion in tropical Africa: Analysis of incident cases in a Nigerian community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibril O. Bello

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children, adolescents and young adults in tropical Africa occasionally presents to the emergency department with testicular torsion. However, no estimates of the burden of the condition is available and there is also sparse evidence of a seasonal variation in incidence. Objective: To determine the incidence and seasonality of the condition in a Nigerian community. Subjects and methods: A retrospective review of incident cases of testicular torsion occurring in a typical tropical sub-Saharan African community between January 2011 and December 2016 was performed. Incidence rates were calculated and trend analysis performed to evaluate for seasonality. Results: Twenty-three patients were seen during the study period and the average annual incidence of testicular torsion among ‘at risk’ males (<40 years was 2.7/100,000. Testicular salvage rate was 81%. Cases occurred 91% higher than average during the cold season (November to January. Trend analysis revealed a significant seasonal difference in the number of cases seen (p = 0.045 and Post Hoc tests (Tukey further showed that this is attributable to the seasonal difference between the cold season and the warmer early rains period (p = 0.036. Conclusion: The burden of testicular torsion found in the studied tropical sub-Saharan community is comparable to other regions of the world and seasonal variation in incidence does occur with a significant increase in cases during the cold season. Keywords: Testicular torsion, Seasonality, Disease burden, Orchiopexy, Orchiectomy

  18. Incidence of basilar invagination in patients with tonsillar herniation ? a case control craniometrical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei F Joaquim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective case-control study based on craniometrical evaluation was performed to evaluate the incidence of basilar invagination (BI. Patients with symptomatic tonsillar herniation treated surgically had craniometrical parameters evaluated based on CT scan reconstructions before surgery. BI was diagnosed when the tip of the odontoid trespassed the Chamberlain’s line in three different thresholds found in the literature: 2, 5 or 6.6 mm. In the surgical group (SU, the mean distance of the tip of the odontoid process above the Chamberlain’s line was 12 mm versus 1.2 mm in the control (CO group (p<0.0001. The number of patients with BI according to the threshold used (2, 5 or 6.6 mm in the SU group was respectively 19 (95%, 16 (80% and 15 (75% and in the CO group it was 15 (37%, 4 (10% and 2 (5%.

  19. Cryptosporidium hominis genotypes involved in increased incidence and clusters of cases, Navarra, Spain, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, I; Martín, C; Beristain, X; Mazón, A; Saugar, J M; Blanco, A; García Cenoz, M; Valle-Cristia, M; Ezpeleta, C; Castilla, J

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY Two clusters of confirmed cryptosporidiosis infections were detected in Navarra, Spain, in the summer of 2012, in the context of an increased incidence in the region. Molecular subtyping of Cryptosporidium hominis determined that one cluster, occurring in an urban area, was due to the predominant circulating subtype IbA10G2R2 and the other cluster, with cases occurring in a rural area, was due to a rare subtype IaA18R3. No single exposure was associated with infection, although exposure to certain children's pools was reported by a majority of patients interviewed in each cluster. Genotyping tools were useful in the investigation and could aid investigation of cryptosporidiosis outbreaks in Spain in the future.

  20. Genomic analysis of head and neck cancer cases from two high incidence regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Perdomo

    Full Text Available We investigated how somatic changes in HNSCC interact with environmental and host risk factors and whether they influence the risk of HNSCC occurrence and outcome. 180-paired samples diagnosed as HNSCC in two high incidence regions of Europe and South America underwent targeted sequencing (14 genes and evaluation of copy number alterations (SCNAs. TP53, PIK3CA, NOTCH1, TP63 and CDKN2A were the most frequently mutated genes. Cases were characterized by a low copy number burden with recurrent focal amplification in 11q13.3 and deletion in 15q22. Cases with low SCNAs showed an improved overall survival. We found significant correlations with decreased overall survival between focal amplified regions 4p16, 10q22 and 22q11, and losses in 12p12, 15q14 and 15q22. The mutational landscape in our cases showed an association to both environmental exposures and clinical characteristics. We confirmed that somatic copy number alterations are an important predictor of HNSCC overall survival.

  1. Joint Effects of PON1 Polymorphisms and Vegetable Intake on Ischemic Stroke: A Family-Based Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Juan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Paraoxonase 1 gene (PON1 polymorphisms and dietary vegetable and fruit intake are both established determinants of ischemic stroke (IS. However, little is known about whether these factors jointly influence the risk of IS. We analyzed the main effects of PON1, as well as the interactions between PON1 and dietary vegetable or fruit intake with the risk of total IS and its subtypes in a family-based case-control study conducted among 2158 Chinese participants (1007 IS cases and 1151 IS-free controls from 918 families. Conditional logistic regression models, with each family as a stratum, were used to examine the association between rs662 and IS. Gene-diet interactions were tested by including a cross-product term of dietary vegetable or fruit intake by rs662_G allele count in the models. Each copy of the PON1 rs662_G allele was associated with 28% higher risk of total IS (p = 0.008 and 32% higher risk of large artery atherosclerosis subtype (LAA (p = 0.01. We observed an interaction between rs662 and vegetable intake for both total IS (p = 0.006 and LAA (p = 0.02 after adjustment for covariates. Individuals who carry the rs662_A allele may benefit to a greater extent from intake of vegetables and thus be more effectively protected from ischemic stroke, whereas carriers of the G allele may still remain at greater risk for ischemic stroke due to their genetic backgrounds even when they consume a high level of vegetables. More studies are needed to replicate our findings among other populations.

  2. Unusual case of recurrent SMART (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramnath Santosh Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART syndrome is a rare delayed complication of cerebral radiation therapy. A 53-year-old female initially presented with headache, confusion and left homonymous hemianopia. Her medical history was notable for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, which was treated with radiation in 1987. Her initial brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging revealed cortical enhancement in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. She improved spontaneously in 2 weeks and follow-up scan at 4 weeks revealed no residual enhancement or encephalomalacia. She presented 6 weeks later with aphasia. Her MRI brain revealed similar contrast-enhancing cortical lesion but on the left side. Repeat CSF studies was again negative other than elevated protein. She was treated conservatively and recovered completely within a week. Before diagnosing SMART syndrome, it is important to rule out tumor recurrence, encephalitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES and stroke. Typically the condition is self-limiting, and gradually resolves.

  3. Unusual case of recurrent SMART (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Ramnath Santosh; Sreedher, Gayathri; Malhotra, Konark; Guduru, Zain; Agarwal, Deeksha; Flaherty, Mary; Leichliter, Timothy; Rana, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare delayed complication of cerebral radiation therapy. A 53-year-old female initially presented with headache, confusion and left homonymous hemianopia. Her medical history was notable for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, which was treated with radiation in 1987. Her initial brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) revealed cortical enhancement in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. She improved spontaneously in 2 weeks and follow-up scan at 4 weeks revealed no residual enhancement or encephalomalacia. She presented 6 weeks later with aphasia. Her MRI brain revealed similar contrast-enhancing cortical lesion but on the left side. Repeat CSF studies was again negative other than elevated protein. She was treated conservatively and recovered completely within a week. Before diagnosing SMART syndrome, it is important to rule out tumor recurrence, encephalitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and stroke. Typically the condition is self-limiting, and gradually resolves.

  4. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajlović D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dževdet Smajlović Department of Neurology, University Clinical Centre Tuzla, School of Medicine, University of Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina Abstract: Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%–15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more

  5. Impact of metabolic disorders on the relation between overweight/obesity and incident myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke in fertile women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S S; Andersson, C; Berger, S M

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Whether overweight is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in the absence of metabolic disorders remains under debate and is largely unexamined in young women. We evaluated the risk of myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke in fertile women conditional on time-dependent presence of ...... be beneficial to reduce cardiovascular disease in overweight/obese young women.......AIMS: Whether overweight is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in the absence of metabolic disorders remains under debate and is largely unexamined in young women. We evaluated the risk of myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke in fertile women conditional on time-dependent presence...

  6. Ischemic stroke as a rare manifestation of aluminum phosphide poisoning: a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Abedini; Farzad Fatehi; Nasim Tabrizi

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a solid fumigant which is widely used for a suicide attempt in Iran. Although neurologic symptoms are commonly reported, cerebrovascular stenosis is rare in AlP poisoning. We described ischemic stroke as a delayed complication of AlP intoxication. A 30-year-old man was admitted because of sudden onset left side hemiplegia, 11 days after intentional ingestion of three rice tablets. Investigations revealed in situ thrombosis in right middle cerebral artery (MCA) whil...

  7. Prognostic Value of Cortically Induced Motor Evoked Activity by TMS in Chronic Stroke: Caveats from a Revealing Single Clinical Case

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Amengual, Julià L

    2012-06-08

    AbstractBackgroundWe report the case of a chronic stroke patient (62 months after injury) showing total absence of motor activity evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of spared regions of the left motor cortex, but near-to-complete recovery of motor abilities in the affected hand.Case presentationMultimodal investigations included detailed TMS based motor mapping, motor evoked potentials (MEP), and Cortical Silent period (CSP) as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of motor activity, MRI based lesion analysis and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) Tractography of corticospinal tract (CST). Anatomical analysis revealed a left hemisphere subinsular lesion interrupting the descending left CST at the level of the internal capsule. The absence of MEPs after intense TMS pulses to the ipsilesional M1, and the reversible suppression of ongoing electromyographic (EMG) activity (indexed by CSP) demonstrate a weak modulation of subcortical systems by the ipsilesional left frontal cortex, but an inability to induce efficient descending volleys from those cortical locations to right hand and forearm muscles. Functional MRI recordings under grasping and finger tapping patterns involving the affected hand showed slight signs of subcortical recruitment, as compared to the unaffected hand and hemisphere, as well as the expected cortical activations.ConclusionsThe potential sources of motor voluntary activity for the affected hand in absence of MEPs are discussed. We conclude that multimodal analysis may contribute to a more accurate prognosis of stroke patients.

  8. Forced Aerobic Exercise Enhances Motor Recovery After Stroke: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeldt, Anson B.; Rasanow, Matthew; Alberts, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Previously, we demonstrated that forced aerobic exercise (FE) increases the pattern of neural activation in Parkinson’s disease. We sought to evaluate whether FE, when coupled with repetitive task practice, could promote motor recovery poststroke. METHOD. A 46-yr-old man with ischemic stroke exhibited chronic residual upper-extremity deficits, scoring 35/66 on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) at baseline. He completed 24 training sessions comprising 45 min of FE on a motorized stationary bicycle followed by 45 min of upper-extremity repetitive task practice. RESULTS. From baseline to end of treatment, the FMA score improved by 20 points, perceived level of recovery on the Stroke Impact Scale increased by 20 percentage points, and cardiovascular function measured by peak oxygen uptake improved 30%. These improvements persisted 4 wk after the intervention ceased. CONCLUSION. FE may be a safe and feasible rehabilitation approach to augment recovery of motor and nonmotor function while improving aerobic fitness in people with chronic stroke. PMID:26114455

  9. Growth hormone treatment for childhood short stature and risk of stroke in early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poidvin, Amélie; Touzé, Emmanuel; Ecosse, Emmanuel; Landier, Fabienne; Béjot, Yannick; Giroud, Maurice; Rothwell, Peter M; Carel, Jean-Claude; Coste, Joël

    2014-08-26

    We investigated the incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes in a population-based cohort of patients in France treated with growth hormone (GH) for short stature in childhood. Adult morbidity data were obtained in 2008-2010 for 6,874 children with idiopathic isolated GH deficiency or short stature who started GH treatment between 1985 and 1996. Cerebrovascular events were validated using medical reports and imaging data and classified according to standard definitions of subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. Case ascertainment completeness was estimated with capture-recapture methods. The incidence of stroke and of stroke subtypes was calculated and compared with population values extracted from registries in Dijon and Oxford, between 2000 and 2012. Using both Dijon and Oxford population-based registries as references, there was a significantly higher risk of stroke among patients treated with GH in childhood. The excess risk of stroke was mainly attributable to a very substantially and significantly higher risk of hemorrhagic stroke (standardized incidence ratio from 3.5 to 7.0 according to the registry rates considered, and accounting or not accounting for missed cases), and particularly subarachnoid hemorrhage (standardized incidence ratio from 5.7 to 9.3). We report a strong relationship between hemorrhagic stroke and GH treatment in childhood for isolated growth hormone deficiency or childhood short stature. Patients treated with GH worldwide should be advised about this association and further studies should evaluate the potentially causal role of GH treatment in these findings. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Case Report: Impact of Botulinum Toxin Injection on Function of Affected Upper Extremity in A Patient, 16 Years after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek Amini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Case report Impact of Botulinum Toxin injection on function of affected upper extremity in a patient after 16 years since stroke (CVA. Botulinum toxin injection is one the treatments in spasticity reduction and consequently in recovery of upper limb function in stroke patients. The purpose of this case study is to report the effect of Botulinum toxin injection on upper extremity function after 16 years of stroke. Materials & Methods: The patient was a 63-year-old man who has had a cerebrovascular accident that happened in the left hemisphere about 16 years ago, and as a result, a paresis in dominant hand and arm. Although the patient was able to perform simple movements but he was complaining about the slowness and stiffness in the movements. To treat spasticity the Botulinum toxin type A was used. Injection into selected muscles of hemiparetic upper limb was done by a specialist physician and was between 50-150IU based on specific volume of each muscle. After injection, the patient was monitored for 3 months and at the end of each month, the assessments were reevaluated. During this period, although research team suggested the patient to continue the rehabilitation but for personal reasons he didn’t participate in any treatment and didn`t receive any other antispasmodic medications. Results: An increase in range of motion was seen in all joints but this improvement was not significant. The greatest improvement in passive and active range of motion was seen in Metacarpophalengeal joints. At the end of each month, compared to the first month the recovery of function in upper extremity was significant. Maximum recovery of upper extremity function was related to the hand section of fugl-meyer assessment. At the end of the first month, spasticity significantly decreased so that the patient was able to extend all his joints more easily than before injection. Although spasticity never reached zero. Conclusion: Botulinum toxin injection

  11. Preventing stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hemorrhagic Stroke Ischemic Stroke Stroke Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should ...

  12. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  13. Modifications in ankle dorsiflexor activation by applying a torque perturbation during walking in persons post-stroke: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Andreanne K; Noël, Martin; Richards, Carol L; Nadeau, Sylvie; Bouyer, Laurent J

    2014-06-09

    Results obtained in a previous study (Gait Posture 34:358-363, 2011) have shown that, in non-disabled participants, a specific increase in ankle dorsiflexor (Tibialis anterior [TA]) activation can be induced by walking with a torque perturbation that plantarflexes the ankle during the swing phase. After perturbation removal, the increased TA activation persisted temporarily and was associated with a more dorsiflexed ankle during swing. The objective of the present case-series study was to verify if these results can be reproduced in persons post-stroke. Six participants who sustained a stroke walked on a treadmill before, during and after exposure to a torque perturbation applied at the ankle by a robotized ankle-foot orthosis. Spatiotemporal gait parameters, ankle and knee kinematics, and the electromyographic activity of TA and Soleus were recorded. Mean amplitude of the TA burst located around toe off and peak ankle dorsiflexion angle during swing were compared across the 3 walking periods for each participant. At the end of the walking period with the perturbation, TA mean amplitude was significantly increased in 4 of the 6 participants. Among these 4 participants, modifications in TA activation persisted after perturbation removal in 3 of them, and led to a statistically significant increase in peak dorsiflexion during swing. This approach may be helpful to evaluate the residual adaptive capacity in the ankle dorsiflexors after a stroke and guide decision-making for the selection of optimal rehabilitation interventions. Future work will investigate the clinical impact of a multiple-session gait training based on this approach in persons presenting a reduced ankle dorsiflexion during the swing phase of walking.

  14. 'This stroke was sent…': Stroke-related illness concepts and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Though there is evidence that stroke incidence is increasing even in low and middle income countries, there is no study of stroke-related illness concepts and HSB in Nigerians. Data from 960 educated Nigerians were analysed. Eight hundred and fifty four respondents (431 aged 20-40 years and 423 aged 41 years or ...

  15. Thromboxane biosynthesis in stroke and post-stroke dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. van Kooten (Fop)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractWith 25 to 30 thousand new patients per year and an incidence of 170/100.000, stroke is a major health problem in the Netherlands, as it is in other western countries. It accounts for almost I 0% of the annual death in the Netherlands. Approximately 80% of stroke is of ischemic

  16. Thromboxane biosynthesis in stroke and post-stroke dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. van Kooten (Fop)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractWith 25 to 30 thousand new patients per year and an incidence of 170/100.000, stroke is a major health problem in the Netherlands, as it is in other western countries. It accounts for almost I 0% of the annual death in the Netherlands. Approximately 80% of stroke is of ischemic origin,

  17. Intraventricular Transplantation of Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells via Ommaya Reservoir in Persistent Vegetative State Patients after Haemorrhagic Stroke: Report of Two Cases & Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi, Asra Al; Suroto, Nur Setiawan; Bajamal, Abdul Hafid; Machfoed, Moh Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most devastating diseases, stroke, is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide with severe emotional and economic consequences. The purpose of this article is mainly to report the effect of intraventricular transplantation via an Ommaya reservoir using autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) in haemorrhagic stroke patients. Case Presentations: Two patients, aged 51 and 52, bearing sequels of haemorrhagic stroke were managed by intraventricular transplantation of BM-MSCs obtained from their own bone marrow. Before the procedure, both patients were bedridden, tracheostomised, on nasogastric (NG) tube feeding and in hemiparesis. The cells were transplanted intraventricularly (20 x 10 6 cells/2.5 ml) using an Ommaya reservoir, and then repeated transplantations were done after 1 and 2 months consecutively. The safety and efficacy of the procedures were evaluated 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was used to evaluate the patients' neurological status before and after treatment. No adverse events derived from the procedures or transplants were observed in the one-year follow-up period, and the neurological status of both patients improved after treatment. Conclusions: Our report demonstrates that the intraventricular transplantation of BM-MSCs via an Ommaya reservoir is safe and it improves the neurological status of post-haemorrhagic stroke patients. The repeated transplantation procedure is easier and safer to perform via a subcutaneously implanted Ommaya reservoir. Key Words: Haemorrhagic stroke, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), intraventricular transplantation.

  18. Stroke and Episodic Memory Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun; Alexander, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Memory impairments are common after stroke, and the anatomical basis for impairments may be quite variable. To determine the range of stroke-related memory impairment, we identified all case reports and group studies through the Medline database and the Science Citation Index. There is no hypothesis about memory that is unique to stroke, but there…

  19. Trends in incidence, case-fatality and recurrence of myocardial infarction in the Danish MONICA population 1982-1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, M; Brønnum-Hansen, H; Jørgensen, Torben

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Growing awareness of risk factors for myocardial infarction (MI), continuous mass campaigns on lifestyle factors, increasing use of heart rehabilitation and improved treatment should imply decreases in the incidence, case-fatality and recurrence rates of MI. The purpose of the study......, Denmark. Fatal and non-fatal attacks classified as definite MI and non-fatal attacks classified as possible MI were included. The incidence rate was analysed by Poisson regression, the case-fatality rate by logistic regression, and the rate of recurrence by Cox regression. Age-period-cohort analyses were...

  20. Risk of Stroke in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhilong; Pei, Zhimin; Yuan, Min; Li, Xueli; Chen, Shenjian; Xu, Lijun

    2015-12-01

    Observational studies, to date, have provided inconsistent findings on whether inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with an increased risk of stroke. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the association of IBD and its specific subtypes with risk of stroke. We searched electronic databases for studies through May 13, 2015 assessing risk of stroke in patients with IBD. Cohort and case-control studies that reported incident cases of stroke in patients with IBD and a non-IBD control population were eligible. We calculated pooled hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 8 articles (126,493 IBD patients and 4748 cases of stroke) were included in this meta-analysis. The presence of IBD revealed a trend toward a modest increase in the risk of stroke incidence (HR = 1.29; 95% CI, 1.16-1.43). After subgroup analysis, Crohn's disease showed an increased risk of stroke incidence (7 studies: HR = 1.32; 95% CI, 1.13-1.56), and a significant association was also identified in ulcerative colitis (6 studies: HR = 1.18; 95% CI, 1.06-1.31). In addition, this risk is higher in women (6 studies: HR = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.24-1.79) than in men (HR = 1.22; 95% CI, 1.12-1.32). In the overall analysis we found considerable heterogeneity. Our results show a positive association between IBD and the risk of stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Stroke in Renaissance time: the case of Francesco I de' Medici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arba, Francesco; Inzitari, Domenico; Barnett, Henry Joseph Macaulay; Lippi, Donatella

    2012-01-01

    Francesco I de' Medici (1541-1587), the second Grand Duke of Tuscany, was one of the members of the Medici family who ruled Florence during the centuries of the Renaissance. When, in 1857, all members of the Medici family were exhumed and definitively buried in the place where they still lie buried today, a painter, Giuseppe Moricci (Florence 1806-1879), who attended the ceremony, depicted the corpse of Francesco I in a perfect state of preservation. The painting shows a right spastic hemiparesis with a facial droop, a claw-hand appearance, the right shoulder internally rotated, the calf muscle wasted and the clubfoot confirmed by an orthopedic footwear in the coffin. The hemiparesis and consequent disability were likely concealed when Francesco I was alive, since in official portraits the Grand Duke appeared in perfect physical condition. However, chronicles reported that he had suffered from malaria and syphilis. Later in his life, temper and behavioral changes as well as emotional instability were documented, together with handwriting deterioration and seizures. We postulate that Francesco I had suffered from a stroke consequent to syphilis, a new aggressive and rapidly spreading infectious disease at that time in Italy. Francesco's governmental skills were presumably altered due to these diseases. Disability consequent to stroke was likely concealed by official portrayers and biographers of Francesco I during his life, consistent with the King's two bodies theory common since the Middle Ages: while the King's physical body is destined to die, the political one is everlasting. Infectious diseases have remained a leading cause of stroke in underdeveloped countries until recently, but noncommunicable causes are now prevailing worldwide. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Sudden unexpected death caused by stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågesen, Frederik Nybye; Risgaard, Bjarke; Zachariasardóttir, Sára

    2018-01-01

    Background Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in young individuals globally. Data on the burden of sudden death by stroke are sparse in the young. Aims The aim of this study was to report mortality rates, cause of death, stroke subtype, and symptoms in children and young adults who suffered...... contacted the healthcare system because of neurological symptoms, whereof one was suspected of having a stroke (6%). Conclusions Sudden death by stroke in children and young adults occurs primarily due to hemorrhagic stroke. We report a high frequency of neurological symptoms prior to sudden death by stroke....... Increased awareness among healthcare professionals towards stroke symptoms in children and young adults may lead to earlier detection of stroke, and thereby potentially lowering the incidence of sudden death by stroke....

  3. Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy syndrome: Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Achint K; Tantiwongkosi, Bundhit; Moise, Anna-Marieta; Altmeyer, Wilson B

    2017-12-01

    A 26-year-old female presented with vision loss accompanied by migraine-like headaches. A contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed which revealed findings suggestive of stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome. SMART syndrome is a delayed complication of brain radiation characterized by neurologic symptoms including migraine-like headaches, seizures, and hemispheric impairment. The purpose of this article is to make the readers aware of this rare complication of brain irradiation. Appropriate diagnosis of SMART syndrome is essential to avoid invasive tests.

  4. Relearning to eat late after a stroke by systematic nursing intervention: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, K; Norberg, A; Asplund, K

    1986-09-01

    Using a training programme developed by Heimlich, we have attempted to train swallowing in a 78-year-old man who had been fed by a nasogastric tube for 3 years after a stroke. The training was successful and, during a follow-up of 1 year, the patient was eating normal food. The training process is analysed as a two-level communication between the patient and his trainer; the therapeutic relationship and the training programme. The development of the patient's attitudes during training is interpreted with reference to Erikson's theory of 'eight stages of man'.

  5. Improving Outcomes Achieved by a New Stroke Program in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla Égi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is a devastating disease with increasing incidence and prevalence due to population aging. Even with the best care, a proportion of patients dies or is left with significant neurological and cognitive disability. Organization of stroke centers markedly improved outcomes worldwide. We initiated a ‘lysis alarm' program in September 2013 at our medical center. Methods: This is a retrospective review of electronic data from patients with acute ischemic stroke before (October 2012-June 2013 and after (October 2013-June 2014 the ‘lysis alarm' program was introduced at our medical center. Results: Prior to the introduction of the stroke program, there were only 19 thrombolysis procedures in 777 acute stroke patients in 9 months, while this figure rose to 32 thrombolysis procedures in 737 acute stroke patients after the initiation of the program. The ‘door-to-needle' time decreased from 88 to 71 min when the two study periods were compared. These changes were associated with decreased stroke mortality in patients receiving thrombolytic treatment (16% prior to the program and 9% during the program. In 2013, there were 1,439 thrombolysis procedures, representing 3.2% of all stroke cases throughout Hungary. After the introduction of the ‘lysis alarm' program, we have reached a 4% thrombolysis rate at our medical center. Conclusions: Our thrombolysis rate is higher than the national average, but still low compared to the rates of Western European countries. We are continuously working to enhance our stroke program. Here, we discuss those components that need to be further refined in order to improve stroke intervention and outcome.

  6. The Effects of Listening to Persian Music on the Hand Dexterity and Depression in a Patient with Stroke: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyhaneh Maktoufi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays the use of music therapy for neurological disorders in developed countries is widely emphasized. Despite this, there is little scientific evidence regarding the use of this method for the treatment of Iranian patients with stroke. Case report: Since Iranian patients are more familiar with Persian music, this study was performed to describe the effects of listening to the Persian music played with Daf (an Iranian music instrument in a 54-year-old man with chronic stroke. Discussion: This case report could show for the first time, the positive effect of passive listening to Persian music with Iranian Daf instrument on the hand dexterity and depression in a patient with chronic stroke.

  7. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Fernanda Spitoni

    Full Text Available Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited evidence for the effective treatments of this disease. Here we used caloric vestibular stimulation to reduce pain and somatoparaphrenia in a 57-year-old woman suffering from central post-stroke pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the neurological effects of this treatment. Following vestibular stimulation we observed impressive improvements in motor skills, pain, and somatic delusions. In the functional connectivity study before the vestibular stimulation, we observed differences in the patient's left thalamus functional connectivity, with respect to the thalamus connectivity of a control group (N = 20, in the bilateral cingulate cortex and left insula. After the caloric stimulation, the left thalamus functional connectivity with these regions, which are known to be involved in the cortical response to pain, disappeared as in the control group. The beneficial use of vestibular stimulation in the reduction of pain and somatic delusion in a CPSP patient is now documented by behavioral and imaging data. This evidence can be applied to theoretical models of pain and body delusions.

  8. Lactate and risk of incident diabetes in a case-cohort of the atherosclerosis risk in communities (ARIC study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P Juraschek

    Full Text Available Oxidative capacity is decreased in type 2 diabetes. Whether decreased oxidative capacity is a cause or consequence of diabetes is unknown. Our purpose is to evaluate whether lactate, a marker of oxidative capacity, is associated with incident diabetes.We conducted a case-cohort study in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC study at year 9 of follow-up. We evaluated lactate's association with diabetes risk factors at baseline and estimated the hazard ratio for incident diabetes by quartiles of plasma lactate in 544 incident diabetic cases and 533 non-cases. Plasma lactate showed a graded positive relationship with fasting glucose and insulin (P<0.001. The relative hazard for incident diabetes increased across lactate quartiles (P-trend ≤0.001. Following adjustment for demographic factors, medical history, physical activity, adiposity, and serum lipids, the hazard ratio in the highest quartile was 2.05 times the hazard in the lowest quartile (95% CI: 1.28, 3.28. After including fasting glucose and insulin the association became non-significant.Lactate, an indicator of oxidative capacity, predicts incident diabetes independent of many other risk factors and is strongly related to markers of insulin resistance. Future studies should evaluate the temporal relationship between elevated lactate and impaired fasting glucose and insulin resistance.

  9. Ischemic stroke in a young adult with extremely elevated lipoprotein(a): A case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayan, Dharshan; Elajami, Tarec K; Devabhaktuni, Suresh; Welty, Francine K

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an apolipoprotein(a) molecule bound to 1 apolipoprotein B-100. Elevated levels of Lp(a) are thought to be an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis and to promote thrombosis through incompletely understood mechanisms. We report a 34-year-old man with an ischemic stroke in the setting of an extremely high Lp(a) level-212 mg/dL. He developed severe carotid artery stenosis over a 6-year period and had thrombus formation post-carotid endarterectomy. To our knowledge, this case is unique because the Lp(a) is the highest reported level in a patient without renal disease. Moreover, this is the first reported case of the youngest individual with a stroke presumably related to development of carotid plaque over a 6-year period. The thrombotic complication after endarterectomy may have been related to the prothrombotic properties of Lp(a). Of note, the Lp(a) level did not respond to atorvastatin but did decrease 15% after aspirin 325 mg was added although his Lp(a) levels were variable, and it is not clear that this was cause and effect. This case highlights the need to better understand the relation between Lp(a) and vascular disease and the need to screen family members for elevated Lp(a). We also review treatment options to lower Lp(a) and ongoing clinical trials of newer lipid-lowering drugs that can also lower Lp(a). Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lessons Learnt from the Improvement of Customer Support Processes: A Case Study on Incident Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäntti, Marko

    IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) is the most widely used IT service management framework that provides guidelines how to create, manage and support IT services. Service support processes, such as incident management and problem management, are among the first ITIL processes that organizations start to implement. However, several challenges may exist in the process implementation. The research question of this study is: which issues are important in establishing an ITIL-based incident management process? The main contribution of this paper is to present lessons learnt from an ITIL-based process improvement project that focused on establishing an incident management process in an IS department of a university hospital. Our results show that key issues in implementing incident management are to 1) define the basic concepts of incident management with concrete examples and 2) define process interfaces between incident management and other support processes.

  11. Hand function recovery in chronic stroke with HEXORR robotic training: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Sasha Blue; Schabowsky, Christopher N; Holley, Rahsaan J; Lum, Peter S

    2010-01-01

    After a stroke, many survivors have impaired motor function. Robotic rehabilitation techniques have emerged to provide a repetitive, activity-based therapy at potentially lower cost than conventional methods. Many patients exhibit intrinsic resistance to hand extension in the form of spasticity and/or hypertonia. We have developed a therapy program using the Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot (HEXORR) that is capable of compensating for tone to assist patients in opening the paretic hand. The system can move the user's hand, assist movement, allow free movement, or restrict movement to allow static force production. These options combine with an interactive virtual reality game to enhance user motivation. Four chronic stroke subjects received 18 sessions of robot therapy as well as pre and post evaluation sessions. All subjects showed at least modest gains in active finger range of motion (ROM) measured in the robot, and all but one subject had gains in active thumb ROM. Most of these gains carried over to ROM gains outside of the robot. The clinical measures (Fugl-Meyer, Box-and-Blocks) showed clear improvements in two subjects and mixed results in two subjects. Overall, the robot therapy was well received by subjects and shows promising results. We conclude HEXORR therapy is best suited for patients with mild-moderate tone and at least minimal extension.

  12. Mobile platform for treatment of stroke: A case study of tele-assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Zenteno, Arturo Henry; Fernández, Francisco; Palomino-García, Alfredo; Moniche, Francisco; Escudero, Irene; Jiménez-Hernández, M Dolores; Caballero, Auxiliadora; Escobar-Rodriguez, Germán; Parra, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the technological solution of a tele-assistance process for stroke patients in acute phase in the Seville metropolitan area. The main objective of this process is to reduce time from symptom onset to treatment of acute phase stroke patients by means of telemedicine, regarding mobility between an intensive care unit ambulance and an expert center and activating the pre-hospital care phase. The technological platform covering the process has been defined following an interoperability model based on standards and with a focus on service-oriented architecture focus. Messaging definition has been designed according to the reference model of the CEN/ISO 13606, messages content follows the structure of archetypes. An XDS-b (Cross-Enterprise Document Sharing-b) transaction messaging has been designed according to Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise profile for archetype notifications and update enquiries.This research has been performed by a multidisciplinary group. The Virgen del Rocío University Hospital acts as Reference Hospital and the Public Company for Healthcare as mobility surroundings. PMID:25975806

  13. A stepwise approach to stroke surveillance in Brazil: the EMMA (Estudo de Mortalidade e Morbidade do Acidente Vascular Cerebral) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Alessandra C; Bustos, Iara R; Abe, Ivana M; Pereira, Alexandre C; Fedeli, Ligia M; Benseñor, Isabela M; Lotufo, Paulo A

    2010-08-01

    Stroke mortality rates in Brazil are the highest in the Americas. Deaths from cerebrovascular disease surpass coronary heart disease. To verify stroke mortality rates and morbidity in an area of São Paulo, Brazil, using the World Health Organization Stepwise Approach to Stroke Surveillance. We used the World Health Organization Stepwise Approach to Stroke Surveillance structure of stroke surveillance. The hospital-based data comprised fatal and nonfatal stroke (Step 1). We gathered stroke-related mortality data in the community using World Health Organization questionnaires (Step 2). The questionnaire determining stroke prevalence was activated door to door in a family-health-programme neighbourhood (Step 3). A total of 682 patients 18 years and above, including 472 incident cases, presented with cerebrovascular disease and were enrolled in Step 1 during April-May 2009. Cerebral infarction (84.3%) and first-ever stroke (85.2%) were the most frequent. In Step 2, 256 deaths from stroke were identified during 2006-2007. Forty-four per cent of deaths were classified as unspecified stroke, 1/3 as ischaemic stroke, and 1/4 due to haemorrhagic subtype. In Step 3, 577 subjects over 35 years old were evaluated at home, and 244 cases of stroke survival were diagnosed via a questionnaire, validated by a board-certified neurologist. The population demographic characteristics were similar in the three steps, except in terms of age and gender. By including data from all settings, World Health Organization stroke surveillance can provide data to help plan future resources that meet the needs of the public-health system.

  14. Management Of Post Stroke Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of seizures in relation to stroke is 8.9%, with a frequency of 10.6 and 8.6% in haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke, respectively. In subarachnoid haemorrhage the incidence is 8.5%. Due to the fact that infarcts are significantly more frequent than haemorrhages, seizures are mainly related to occlusive vascular disease of the brain. The general view is to consider stroke-related seizures as harmless complications in the course of a prolonged vascular disease involving the heart and brain. Seizures can be classified as those of early and those of late onset in a paradigm comparable to post-traumatic epilepsy, with an arbitrary dividing point of two weeks after the event. Most early-onset seizures occur during the first day after the stroke. Late-onset seizures occur three times more often than early-onset ones. A first late-onset epileptic event is most likely to take place between six months and two years after the stroke. However, up to 28% of patients develop their first seizure several years later. Simple partial seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, account for about 50% of total seizures, while complex partial spells, with or without secondary generalisation, and primary generalised tonic–clonic insults account for approximately 25% each. Status epilepticus occurs in 12% of stroke patients, but the recurrence rate after an initial status epilepticus is not higher than after a single seizure. Inhibitory seizures, mimicking transient ischaemic attacks, are observed in 7.1% of cases. The only clinical predictor of late-onset seizures is the initial presentation of partial anterior circulation syndrome due to a territorial infarct. Patients with total anterior circulation syndrome have less chance of developing epileptic spells, not only due to their shorter life expectancy but also due to the fact that the large infarcts are sharply demarcated in these patients. The optimal timing and type of antiepileptic drug

  15. Incidence of medically attended influenza infection and cases averted by vaccination, 2011/12 and 2012/13 influenza seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michael L.; Jackson, Lisa A.; Kieke, Burney; McClure, David; Gaglani, Manjusha; Murthy, Kempapura; Malosh, Ryan; Monto, Arnold; Zimmerman, Richard K.; Foppa, Ivo M.; Flannery, Brendan; Thompson, Mark G.

    2018-01-01

    Background We estimated the burden of outpatient influenza and cases prevented by vaccination during the 2011/12 and 2012/13 influenza seasons using data from the United States Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness (US Flu VE) Network. Methods We defined source populations of persons who could seek care for acute respiratory illness (ARI) at each of the five US Flu VE Network sites. We identified all members of the source population who were tested for influenza during US Flu VE influenza surveillance. Each influenza-positive subject received a sampling weight based on the proportion of source population members who were tested for influenza, stratified by site, age, and other factors. We used the sampling weights to estimate the cumulative incidence of medically attended influenza in the source populations. We estimated cases averted by vaccination using estimates of cumulative incidence, vaccine coverage, and vaccine effectiveness. Results Cumulative incidence of medically attended influenza ranged from 0.8% to 2.8% across sites during 2011/12 and from 2.6% to 6.5% during the 2012/13 season. Stratified by age, incidence ranged from 1.2% among adults 50 years of age and older in 2011/12 to 10.9% among children 6 months to 8 years of age in 2012/13. Cases averted by vaccination ranged from 4 to 41 per 1,000 vaccinees, depending on the study site and year. Conclusions The incidence of medically attended influenza varies greatly by year and even by geographic region within the same year. The number of cases averted by vaccination varies greatly based on overall incidence and on vaccine coverage. PMID:26271827

  16. Incidence of social resistance in provincial mining legislation. The cases of Córdoba and Catamarca (2003-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Christel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade in Argentina, the growth of open pit mining has faced strong social resistance and provincial laws prohibiting such activity. This work aims to analyse the ways in which the different subnational political regimes and economic systems impact upon the possibility of incidence of social resistance on provincial mining legislation, looking at the cases of Cordoba and Catamarca.

  17. The Diffuse Involvement of Bilateral Breasts in the Incidence of Burkitt's Lymphoma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Su; Lee, Sa Rah; Yang, Woo Ick; Kim, Eun Kyung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hae Kyoung [CHA University, Bundang CHA Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    The incidence of Burkitt's lymphoma involving both breasts is rare. We report such a case that was diagnosed by a core biopsy of a hypoechoic lesion visualized from the ultrasonographic results of a patient that was clinically suspected of mastitis.

  18. Incidence of non-lung solid cancers in Czech uranium miners: A case-cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulich, M.; Rericha, V.; Rericha, R.; Shore, D.L.; Sandler, D.P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon and its progeny, which are known to cause lung cancer and may be associated with leukemia. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners in Pribram region, Czech Republic. Methods: A retrospective stratified case-cohort study in a cohort of 22,816 underground miners who were employed between 1949 and 1975. All incident non-lung solid cancers were ascertained among miners who worked underground for at least 12 months (n=1020). A subcohort of 1707 subjects was randomly drawn from the same population by random sampling stratified on age. The follow-up period lasted from 1977 to 1996. Results: Relative risks comparing 180 WLM (90th percentile) of cumulative lifetime radon exposure to 3 WLM (10th percentile) were 0.88 for all non-lung solid cancers combined (95% CI 0.73-1.04, n=1020), 0.87 for all digestive cancers (95% CI 0.69-1.09, n=561), 2.39 for gallbladder cancer (95% CI 0.52-10.98, n=13), 0.79 for larynx cancer (95% CI 0.38-1.64, n=62), 2.92 for malignant melanoma (95% CI 0.91-9.42, n=23), 0.84 for bladder cancer (95% CI 0.43-1.65, n=73), and 1.13 for kidney cancer (95% CI 0.62-2.04, n=66). No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure; only malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed elevated but non-significant association with radon. Conclusions: Radon was not significantly associated with incidence of any cancer of interest, although a positive association of radon with malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer cannot be entirely ruled out. - Research highlights: → Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon. → We evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners. → No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure. → Malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed non-significant elevated risk.

  19. Acute Myocardial Infarction Population Incidence and Mortality Rates, and 28-day Case-fatality in Older Adults. The REGICOR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Oliva, Gabriel; Zamora, Alberto; Ramos, Rafel; Marti, Ruth; Subirana, Isaac; Grau, María; R Degano, Irene; Marrugat, Jaume; Elosua, Roberto

    2017-11-21

    Our aims were to determine acute myocardial infarction (AMI) incidence and mortality rates, and population and in-hospital case-fatality in the population older than 74 years; variability in clinical characteristics and AMI management of hospitalized patients, and changes in the incidence and mortality rates, case-fatality, and management by age groups from 1996 to 1997 and 2007 to 2008. A population-based AMI registry in Girona (Catalonia, Spain) including individuals with suspected AMI older than 34 years. The incidence rate increased with age from 169 and 28 cases/100 000 per year in the group aged 35 to 64 years to 2306 and 1384 cases/100 000 per year in the group aged 85 to 94 years, in men and women, respectively. Population case-fatality also increased with age, from 19% in the group aged 35 to 64 years to 84% in the group aged 85 to 94 years. A lower population case-fatality was observed in the second period, mainly explained by a lower in-hospital case-fatality. The use of invasive procedures and effective drugs decreased with age but increased in the second period in all ages up to 84 years. Acute myocardial infarction incidence, mortality, and case-fatality increased exponentially with age. There is still a gap in the use of invasive procedures and effective drugs between younger and older patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. A Left Atrial Myxoma Case with a History of Stroke on whom a Coronary Bypass Surgery was Performed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihangir Kaymaz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac myxomas are the most frequently encountered benign cardiac tumors in adult groups. Patients with myxoma may suffer from variety of clinical features. A patient who had suffered from stroke a yearago came to our hospital with a chest pain complaint. In the echocardiography of the patient suffering from acute coronary syndrome, left ventricular disfunction and left atrial mass was determined. In the coronary angiography, LAD and Cx critical stenosis, and an abnormal feeding artery which roots from Cxperformed was observed. LIMA-AD, Ao-RCA bypass and mass exision withleft atriotomy was made. Cardiac tumor embolism which makes up a rare cause of cerebral embolies should be considered especiallyin patients with sinus rhythm. In the coronary angiography the feeding artery of the myxoma was shown. A patient who has underwent coronary bypass operation and left atrial myxoma exision has beenpresented as a case.

  1. Transient Sensory Recovery in Stroke Patients After Pulsed Radiofrequency Electrical Stimulation on Dorsal Root Ganglia: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apiliogullari, Seza; Gezer, Ilknur A; Levendoglu, Funda

    2017-01-01

    The integrity of the somatosensory system is important for motor recovery and neuroplasticity after strokes. Peripheral stimulation or central stimulation in patients with central nervous system lesions can be an effective modality in improving function and in facilitating neuroplasticity. We present 2 hemiplegic cases with sensory motor deficit and the result of the pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) electrical stimulation to the dorsal root ganglia. After PRF electrical stimulation, significant improvement was achieved in the examination of patients with superficial and deep sensation. However, during the follow-up visits were observed that the effect of PRF electrical stimulation disappeared. We believe that these preliminary results could be used in the development of future prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trials that focus on the effect of PRF electrical stimulation on dorsal root ganglia to treat sensory deficits in poststroke patients.

  2. Drip-and-ship stroke thrombolysis in the emergency department of a healthcare center - a possibility for those fallen ill in rural settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, Joonas H; Raatiniemi, Lasse; Isokangas, Juha-Matti; Martikainen, Matti; Piironen, Katja

    Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator is the mainstay in the treatment of acute stroke. Reducing the delay of thrombolysis treatment improves patient prognosis and reduces the incidence of complications. Variable telestroke regimens have improved the availability of stroke thrombolysis, especially in rural settings, where neurologists are not readily available. In the drip-and-ship strategy, stroke thrombolysis is initiated in a peripheral hospital and the patient is then transferred to a tertiary care unit. We report the first case of drip-and-ship stroke thrombolysis in a rural health care center in Northeastern Finland.

  3. Apathy and depressive symptoms in older people and incident myocardial infarction, stroke, and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eurelings LSM

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Lisa SM Eurelings,1,* Jan Willem van Dalen,1,* Gerben ter Riet,2 Eric P Moll van Charante,2 Edo Richard,1,3 Willem A van Gool1 On behalf of the ICARA Study Group 1Department of Neurology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 2Department of General Practice, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 3Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Department of Neurology, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Previous findings suggest that apathy symptoms independently of depressive symptoms measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD in older individuals.Aims: To study whether apathy and depressive symptoms in older people are associated with future CVD, stroke, and mortality using individual patient-data meta-analysis.Methods: Medline, Embase, and PsycInfo databases up to September 3, 2013, were systematically searched without language restrictions. We sought prospective studies with older (mean age ≥65 years community-dwelling populations in which the GDS was employed and subsequent stroke and/or CVD were recorded to provide individual participant data. Apathy symptoms were defined as the three apathy-related subitems of the GDS, with depressive symptoms the remaining items. We used myocardial infarction (MI, stroke, and all-cause mortality as main outcomes. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, and MI/stroke history. An adaptation of the Newcastle–Ottawa scale was used to evaluate bias. Hazard ratios were calculated using one-stage random-effect Cox regression models.Results: Of the 52 eligible studies, 21 (40.4% were included, comprising 47,625 older people (mean age [standard deviation] 74 [7.4] years, over a median follow-up of 8.8 years. Participants with apathy symptoms had a 21% higher risk of MI (95% confidence

  4. Quality of Service and Crime Incidents in Public Transport: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crime incident is one of the greatest endemic challenges in public transport system. This study examined the relationship between quality of public transport and crime incidents with the view to examine the sustainability of public transport system in an African mega-city-Lagos, Nigeria. Multi-stage sampling procedure and ...

  5. 'Incidence Of Dry Socket\\' In Benin City: Analysis Of 21 Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zinc oxide/Eugenol dressing was the mainstay of treatment after irrigation of the socket with normal saline. The low incidence of dry socket in this review shows that it is not a common complication of tooth extraction in our hospital. Keywords: Dry socket, incidence. Annals of Biomedical Science Vol. 2 (2) 2003: pp. 82-87 ...

  6. Active Case Finding Among Homeless People as a Means of Reducing the Incidence of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaszko, J; Siemaszko, A; Bodzioch, M; Buciński, A; Doboszyńska, A

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis (TB) declined more than two-fold, compared with the national average, in the northeastern region of Poland in the period of 2003-2012. During that time, four programs of active case finding of TB were conducted as part of which a total of 944 homeless individuals were examined and 21 cases of active TB were detected. The objective of the present study was to find out whether the observed beneficial epidemiological trend could be a result of those programs. We addressed the issue of how the active case finding programs in the homeless community affected the TB incidence in the general population using a modified crisscross SIS-type (Susceptible - Infected - Susceptible) model which describes the dynamics of TB spread between the homeless and non-homeless populations. The values calculated from our model proved highly congruent with the actual epidemiological data. Our analysis showed a significant decline in TB incidence within 1 year of completion of each active case finding program. The model shows that each identified and cured case in the homeless community reduced the number of new cases in the general population by 3-4 within 1 year and by up to 20 within 5 years.

  7. Tuberculosis Incidence and Case Notification Rates in Kosovo and the Balkans in 2012: Cross-country Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurhasani, Xhevat; Hafizi, Hasan; Toci, Ervin; Burazeri, Genc

    2014-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a considerable burden especially for millions of young adults and disadvantaged people worldwide. The TB incidence and notification rates are good indicators of TB situation in a country. Our aim was to compare TB incidence and notification rates in Kosovo and in seven other Balkan countries. Retrospective epidemiologic analysis of published data on TB incidence and notification rates in eight Balkan countries in 2012. Notification rates were expressed per 100,000 inhabitants and were calculated based on the number of TB cases reported divided by the population of each country under analysis. The TB incidence in Kosovo (47/100,000) was considerably higher compared to its four neighboring countries: Albania (16/100,000), Macedonia, Montenegro (18/100,000) and Serbia (23/100,000). The TB notification rates in Kosovo and other countries closely mimicked the incidence rates in these countries. The exceptionally high TB incidence rate in Kosovo could be due to many factors including low health and medical-seeking behaviors of the local population, poverty and low education levels. Effective interventions should be adapted to the local context in order to increase the chances of success.

  8. How should an incident case of atopic dermatitis be defined? A systematic review of primary prevention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Eric L; Keck, Laura E; Chalmers, Joanne R; Williams, Hywel C

    2012-07-01

    Eczema prevention is now an active area of dermatologic and allergy research. Defining an incident case is therefore a prerequisite for such a study. We sought to examine how an incident case of atopic dermatitis was defined in previous atopic dermatitis prevention studies in order to make recommendations on a standard definition of new atopic dermatitis cases for use in future prevention trials. We conducted a systematic review of controlled interventional atopic dermatitis prevention studies by using searches of MEDLINE and Cochrane databases for studies published from 1980 to the end of January 2011. Studies that included atopic dermatitis as a secondary outcome, such as asthma prevention trials, were included. One hundred two studies were included in the final analysis, of which 27 (26.5%) did not describe any criteria for defining an incident case of atopic dermatitis. Of the remaining 75 studies with reported disease criteria, the Hanifin-Rajka criteria were the most commonly used (28 studies). A disease definition unique to that particular study (21 studies) was the second most commonly used disease definition, although the sources for such novel definitions were not cited. The results from this systematic review highlight the need for improved reporting and standardization of the definition used for an incident case in atopic dermatitis prevention studies. Most prevention studies have used disease definitions such as the Hanifin-Rajka criteria that include disease chronicity. While acceptable for cumulative incidence outcomes, inclusion of disease chronicity precludes the precise measurement of disease onset. We propose a definition based on existing scientific studies that could be used in future prospective studies. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Global and regional effects of potentially modifiable risk factors associated with acute stroke in 32 countries (INTERSTROKE): a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Martin J; Chin, Siu Lim; Rangarajan, Sumathy; Xavier, Denis; Liu, Lisheng; Zhang, Hongye; Rao-Melacini, Purnima; Zhang, Xiaohe; Pais, Prem; Agapay, Steven; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Damasceno, Albertino; Langhorne, Peter; McQueen, Matthew J; Rosengren, Annika; Dehghan, Mahshid; Hankey, Graeme J; Dans, Antonio L; Elsayed, Ahmed; Avezum, Alvaro; Mondo, Charles; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Ryglewicz, Danuta; Czlonkowska, Anna; Pogosova, Nana; Weimar, Christian; Iqbal, Romaina; Diaz, Rafael; Yusoff, Khalid; Yusufali, Afzalhussein; Oguz, Aytekin; Wang, Xingyu; Penaherrera, Ernesto; Lanas, Fernando; Ogah, Okechukwu S; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Iversen, Helle K; Malaga, German; Rumboldt, Zvonko; Oveisgharan, Shahram; Al Hussain, Fawaz; Magazi, Daliwonga; Nilanont, Yongchai; Ferguson, John; Pare, Guillaume; Yusuf, Salim

    2016-08-20

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, especially in low-income and middle-income countries. We sought to quantify the importance of potentially modifiable risk factors for stroke in different regions of the world, and in key populations and primary pathological subtypes of stroke. We completed a standardised international case-control study in 32 countries in Asia, America, Europe, Australia, the Middle East, and Africa. Cases were patients with acute first stroke (within 5 days of symptom onset and 72 h of hospital admission). Controls were hospital-based or community-based individuals with no history of stroke, and were matched with cases, recruited in a 1:1 ratio, for age and sex. All participants completed a clinical assessment and were requested to provide blood and urine samples. Odds ratios (OR) and their population attributable risks (PARs) were calculated, with 99% confidence intervals. Between Jan 11, 2007, and Aug 8, 2015, 26 919 participants were recruited from 32 countries (13 447 cases [10 388 with ischaemic stroke and 3059 intracerebral haemorrhage] and 13 472 controls). Previous history of hypertension or blood pressure of 140/90 mm Hg or higher (OR 2·98, 99% CI 2·72-3·28; PAR 47·9%, 99% CI 45·1-50·6), regular physical activity (0·60, 0·52-0·70; 35·8%, 27·7-44·7), apolipoprotein (Apo)B/ApoA1 ratio (1·84, 1·65-2·06 for highest vs lowest tertile; 26·8%, 22·2-31·9 for top two tertiles vs lowest tertile), diet (0·60, 0·53-0·67 for highest vs lowest tertile of modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index [mAHEI]; 23·2%, 18·2-28·9 for lowest two tertiles vs highest tertile of mAHEI), waist-to-hip ratio (1·44, 1·27-1·64 for highest vs lowest tertile; 18·6%, 13·3-25·3 for top two tertiles vs lowest), psychosocial factors (2·20, 1·78-2·72; 17·4%, 13·1-22·6), current smoking (1·67, 1·49-1·87; 12·4%, 10·2-14·9), cardiac causes (3·17, 2·68-3·75; 9·1%, 8·0-10·2), alcohol consumption (2·09, 1·64

  10. Computerized tomographic pattern of stroke seen in University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Findings of ischaemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) were more common than haemorrhagic CVD at 63.2%. Conclusion: This study revealed a higher incidence of ischaemic stroke compared to haemorrhagic stroke. Keywords: Computed tomography;Cerebrovascular disease;Ischaemic stroke;Haemorrhagic stroke ...

  11. Stroke in sickle cell anemia: New concepts in diagnosis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke is a devastating and potentially fatal complication of sickle cell disease. The highest incidence of cerebrovascular disease is in the first 10 years and especially between 2 to 5 years. Two types of stroke occur in these patients – infarctive and hemorrhagic strokes. While infarctive strokes occur frequently in children, ...

  12. Intraventricular Transplantation of Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells via Ommaya Reservoir in Persistent Vegetative State Patients after Haemorrhagic Stroke: Report of Two Cases & Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzi AA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most devastating diseases, stroke, is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide with severe emotional and economic consequences. The purpose of this article is mainly to report the effect of intraventricular transplantation via an Ommaya reservoir using autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs in haemorrhagic stroke patients. Case Presentations: Two patients, aged 51 and 52, bearing sequels of haemorrhagic stroke were managed by intraventricular transplantation of BM-MSCs obtained from their own bone marrow. Before the procedure, both patients were bedridden, tracheostomised, on nasogastric (NG tube feeding and in hemiparesis. The cells were transplanted intraventricularly (20 x 106 cells/2.5 ml using an Ommaya reservoir, and then repeated transplantations were done after 1 and 2 months consecutively. The safety and efficacy of the procedures were evaluated 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS was used to evaluate the patients' neurological status before and after treatment. No adverse events derived from the procedures or transplants were observed in the one-year follow-up period, and the neurological status of both patients improved after treatment. Conclusions: Our report demonstrates that the intraventricular transplantation of BM-MSCs via an Ommaya reservoir is safe and it improves the neurological status of post-haemorrhagic stroke patients. The repeated transplantation procedure is easier and safer to perform via a subcutaneously implanted Ommaya reservoir.

  13. Stroke in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia patients. New evidence for repeated screening and early treatment of pulmonary vascular malformations: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viader Fausto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paradoxical embolism due to pulmonary arteriovenous malformations is the main mechanism of brain infarction in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. International Guidelines have recently been published to clarify the performance of screening tests and the effectiveness of treatment for pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. Case Presentation We present two cases of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia patients of our hospital who experienced an acute stroke secondary to paradoxical embolism. Conclusions These two cases show that the guidelines must be followed to prevent the occurrence of ischemic stroke in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and that although they may be adequate in most cases, there are some patients who need a more personalized approach.

  14. Impact of metabolic disorders on the relation between overweight/obesity and incident myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke in fertile women: a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, S S; Andersson, C; Berger, S M; Jensen, T B; Torp-Pedersen, C T; Gislason, G H; Køber, L; Schmiegelow, M D

    2015-06-01

    Whether overweight is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in the absence of metabolic disorders remains under debate and is largely unexamined in young women. We evaluated the risk of myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke in fertile women conditional on time-dependent presence of metabolic disorders. From nationwide registers we identified all normal weight (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 18.5 to fertile women. Targeting prevention of metabolic disorders might be beneficial to reduce cardiovascular disease in overweight/obese young women. © 2015 World Obesity.

  15. Cardiac Myxoma With Unusual Obstructive and Embolic Presentations: Concurrent Stroke and Angiography-Negative Myocardial Infarction--A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Robert Jeen-Chen; Chou, Hsin-Hua; Tsai, Kuei-Ton; Shen, Ta-Chung; Hu, Chin-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    We present a case of cardiac myxoma with atypical presentations of concurrent stroke and angiography-negative myocardial infarction. The case emphasizes the importance of basic echocardiography and timely surgery in the management of cardiac myxoma. An elderly woman presented to the emergency department in an unconscious state. Electrocardiogram and elevated cardiac enzymes suggested acute myocardial infarction; however, immediate coronary angiography proved patency. Basic echocardiography revealed an oscillating left atrial myxoma obstructing inflow through the mitral valve. After regaining consciousness while in the intensive care unit, the patient developed respiratory distress and shock, and emergent en bloc resection was performed. Ataxia was noted in her postoperative course and multiple small cerebellar infarcts were found on magnetic resonance imaging. After a 1-month period of rehabilitation, the patient recovered well and continues to be followed as an outpatient. Cardiac myxoma requires timely management and may be missed if not included in the differential diagnoses. Basic echocardiography, also called focused cardiac ultrasound, may aid in the diagnosing of perplexing cardiac cases.

  16. A Case Report of Ischemic Stroke in a Patient with Metastatic Gastric Cancer Secondary to Treatment with the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 Inhibitor Ramucirumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Christiansen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramucirumab is an antiangiogenesis agent targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2, approved to treat advanced gastric and colon cancer. In clinical trials, it was shown to cause a small increase in arterial thromboembolism compared to placebo, including cerebral and myocardial ischemia, which was not statistically significant. Detailed case reports are lacking and we here present one of the first case reports of stroke secondary to ramucirumab-induced in situ thrombosis.

  17. 30-Year Trends in Stroke Rates and Outcome in Auckland, New Zealand (1981-2012: A Multi-Ethnic Population-Based Series of Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery L Feigin

    Full Text Available Insufficient data exist on population-based trends in morbidity and mortality to determine the success of prevention strategies and improvements in health care delivery in stroke. The aim of this study was to determine trends in incidence and outcome (1-year mortality, 28-day case-fatality in relation to management and risk factors for stroke in the multi-ethnic population of Auckland, New Zealand (NZ over 30-years.Four stroke incidence population-based register studies were undertaken in adult residents (aged ≥15 years of Auckland NZ in 1981-1982, 1991-1992, 2002-2003 and 2011-2012. All used standard World Health Organization (WHO diagnostic criteria and multiple overlapping sources of case-ascertainment for hospitalised and non-hospitalised, fatal and non-fatal, new stroke events. Ethnicity was consistently self-identified into four major groups. Crude and age-adjusted (WHO world population standard annual incidence and mortality with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated per 100,000 people, assuming a Poisson distribution.5400 new stroke patients were registered in four 12 month recruitment phases over the 30-year study period; 79% were NZ/European, 6% Māori, 8% Pacific people, and 7% were of Asian or other origin. Overall stroke incidence and 1-year mortality decreased by 23% (95% CI 5%-31% and 62% (95% CI 36%-86%, respectively, from 1981 to 2012. Whilst stroke incidence and mortality declined across all groups in NZ from 1991, Māori and Pacific groups had the slowest rate of decline and continue to experience stroke at a significantly younger age (mean ages 60 and 62 years, respectively compared with NZ/Europeans (mean age 75 years. There was also a decline in 28-day stroke case fatality (overall by 14%, 95% CI 11%-17% across all ethnic groups from 1981 to 2012. However, there were significant increases in the frequencies of pre-morbid hypertension, myocardial infarction, and diabetes mellitus, but a reduction in

  18. 30-Year Trends in Stroke Rates and Outcome in Auckland, New Zealand (1981-2012): A Multi-Ethnic Population-Based Series of Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, Valery L; Krishnamurthi, Rita V; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; McPherson, Kathryn M; Barber, P Alan; Parag, Varsha; Arroll, Bruce; Bennett, Derrick A; Tobias, Martin; Jones, Amy; Witt, Emma; Brown, Paul; Abbott, Max; Bhattacharjee, Rohit; Rush, Elaine; Suh, Flora Minsun; Theadom, Alice; Rathnasabapathy, Yogini; Te Ao, Braden; Parmar, Priya G; Anderson, Craig; Bonita, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient data exist on population-based trends in morbidity and mortality to determine the success of prevention strategies and improvements in health care delivery in stroke. The aim of this study was to determine trends in incidence and outcome (1-year mortality, 28-day case-fatality) in relation to management and risk factors for stroke in the multi-ethnic population of Auckland, New Zealand (NZ) over 30-years. Four stroke incidence population-based register studies were undertaken in adult residents (aged ≥15 years) of Auckland NZ in 1981-1982, 1991-1992, 2002-2003 and 2011-2012. All used standard World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic criteria and multiple overlapping sources of case-ascertainment for hospitalised and non-hospitalised, fatal and non-fatal, new stroke events. Ethnicity was consistently self-identified into four major groups. Crude and age-adjusted (WHO world population standard) annual incidence and mortality with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated per 100,000 people, assuming a Poisson distribution. 5400 new stroke patients were registered in four 12 month recruitment phases over the 30-year study period; 79% were NZ/European, 6% Māori, 8% Pacific people, and 7% were of Asian or other origin. Overall stroke incidence and 1-year mortality decreased by 23% (95% CI 5%-31%) and 62% (95% CI 36%-86%), respectively, from 1981 to 2012. Whilst stroke incidence and mortality declined across all groups in NZ from 1991, Māori and Pacific groups had the slowest rate of decline and continue to experience stroke at a significantly younger age (mean ages 60 and 62 years, respectively) compared with NZ/Europeans (mean age 75 years). There was also a decline in 28-day stroke case fatality (overall by 14%, 95% CI 11%-17%) across all ethnic groups from 1981 to 2012. However, there were significant increases in the frequencies of pre-morbid hypertension, myocardial infarction, and diabetes mellitus, but a reduction in frequency

  19. Non-invasive Adenocarcinoma of the Vermiform Appendix: Incidence and Report of Four Cases among 512 Appendectomies

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    Terada, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    Tumors of the vermiform appendix are relatively rare. More than 50% of appendiceal tumors are carcinoid tumors. The author reviewed 512 consecutive pathological specimens of appendectomies in last ten years in our pathology laboratory in search for appendiceal tumors. As the results, 4 cases (incidence: 0.8%) of non-invasive adenocarcinoma were found. No other tumors including carcinoid tumors were recognized. The age of the 4 patients with adenocarcinoma was 48, 39, 84 and 86 years, respectively. Male to female ratio was 3:1. The clinical diagnoses were acute appendicitis in 2 cases and suspected malignancy in 2 cases. The post-operative outcome was good without metastasis, recurrence, and pseudomyxoma peritonei. Pathologically, all the 4 tumors were non-invasive adenocarcinomas: 2 cases were flat type adenocarcinoma, 1 case was papillary adenocarcinoma, and 1 case was mucinous adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemically, expression of p53 protein was observed in all the 4 cases, and Ki-67 labeling ranged from 40% to 90%. The results suggest that incidence of appendiceal adenocarcinoma was 0.8% of all appendectomies, and that non-invasive adenocarcinoma of the appendix shows variable morphologies, and that postoperative clinical outcome of non-invasive appendiceal tumor is good. PMID:27942282

  20. Brain-Computer Interfaces With Multi-Sensory Feedback for Stroke Rehabilitation: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, Danut C; Cho, Woosang; Ortner, Rupert; Allison, Brendan Z; Ignat, Bogdan E; Edlinger, Guenter; Guger, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    Conventional therapies do not provide paralyzed patients with closed-loop sensorimotor integration for motor rehabilitation. This work presents the recoveriX system, a hardware and software platform that combines a motor imagery (MI)-based brain-computer interface (BCI), functional electrical stimulation (FES), and visual feedback technologies for a complete sensorimotor closed-loop therapy system for poststroke rehabilitation. The proposed system was tested on two chronic stroke patients in a clinical environment. The patients were instructed to imagine the movement of either the left or right hand in random order. During these two MI tasks, two types of feedback were provided: a bar extending to the left or right side of a monitor as visual feedback and passive hand opening stimulated from FES as proprioceptive feedback. Both types of feedback relied on the BCI classification result achieved using common spatial patterns and a linear discriminant analysis classifier. After 10 sessions of recoveriX training, one patient partially regained control of wrist extension in her paretic wrist and the other patient increased the range of middle finger movement by 1 cm. A controlled group study is planned with a new version of the recoveriX system, which will have several improvements. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Calculation of numbers-needed-to-treat in parallel group trials assessing ordinal outcomes: case examples from acute stroke and stroke prevention.

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    Bath, Philip; Hogg, Cheryl; Tracy, Michael; Pocock, Stuart

    2011-12-01

    Number-needed-to-treat describes the magnitude of the effect of an intervention, underpins health economic analyses, and is typically calculated for binary events. Ordered categorical outcomes provide more clinical information and their analysis using ordinal approaches is usually more efficient statistically. However, to date, techniques to calculate number-needed-to-treat based on ordinal outcomes for parallel group trials have had important limitations. Aims Numbers-needed-to-treat may be calculated for ordinal data from parallel group trials by using an unmatched comparison of all subjects or by generating matched pairs of patients nested within the study. The above approaches were assessed and compared with numbers-needed-to-treat calculated for binary outcomes using individual patient data from acute and prevention stroke trials testing the effect of interventions of varying utility and efficacy. Numbers-needed-to-treat were generally lower numerically for ordinal vs. binary, and matched vs. unmatched analyses, and the lowest in highly efficacious interventions: hemicraniectomy, ordinal matched 2.4 vs. ordinal unmatched 2.5 vs. binary matched 12 vs. binary unmatched 9 (one trial, 12 month outcome); alteplase, 4.5 vs. 6.6 vs. 8.4 vs. 8.4 (one trial with two parts, three-months); aspirin, 42 vs. 58 vs. 76 vs. 80 (one trial, six-months); and stroke units, 3.6-5.3 vs. 6.2 vs. 4.7-5.9 vs. 6.3-7.0 (two trials, three- to 60 months). Similar trends were seen for aspirin/dipyridamole vs. aspirin in secondary prevention, 22 vs. 20 vs. 31 vs. 31 (one trial, 24 months). Number-needed-to-treat may be calculated for ordinal outcome data derived from parallel group stroke trials; such numbers-needed-to-treat are lower than those calculated for binary outcomes. Their use complements the use of ordinal statistical approaches in the analysis of ordered categorical data. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2011 World Stroke Organization.

  2. Stroke Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation Stroke Stories Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents ... these well-known personalities suffered one or more strokes. In each case, he or she has returned ...

  3. Stroke in Southern Europe: A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo V. Vasiliadis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is a leading cause of death and acquired disability worldwide. In Europe, strokes account for almost 1.1 million death per year. In particular, countries in Southern Europe constitute populations with a different lifestyle and dietary habits from those in Northern Europe and that may influence stroke incidence, type and risk factors.Aim: The objective of this study was to review and summarise the trends of the incidence of stroke in Southern Europe, as well as,to mention stroke subtypes and recognise the risk factors for stroke.Methods: A systematic review in PubMed was conducted.Results: Therefore, twenty-three articles, representing seven countries, related to incidence, type and risk factors of stroke in this specific geographical area of Europe were identified. The annual stroke incidence varied from approximately 1.41 to 3.73 per 1000 population per year. Currently, in all the countries studied, ischemic stroke was the commonest stroke type in all series. Hypertension remains the main risk factor for both ischemic andhemorrhagic strokes, followed by diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia and other factors.Conclusions: A wide range of stroke incidence may be due to the different lifestyle and behavioural factors among countries. Further research that uses the best possible methods to study the incidence, type and risk factors of stroke are urgently needed in Balkan Peninsula.

  4. Rehabilitation of the Upper Extremity after Stroke: A Case Series Evaluating REO Therapy and an Auditory Sensor Feedback for Trunk Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thielman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Training in the virtual environment in post stroke rehab is being established as a new approach for neurorehabilitation, specifically, ReoTherapy (REO a robot-assisted virtual training device. Trunk stabilization strapping has been part of the concept with this device, and literature is lacking to support this for long-term functional changes with individuals after stroke. The purpose of this case series was to measure the feasibility of auditory trunk sensor feedback during REO therapy, in moderate to severely impaired individuals after stroke. Case Description. Using an open label crossover comparison design, 3 chronic stroke subjects were trained for 12 sessions over six weeks on either the REO or the control condition of task related training (TRT; after a washout period of 4 weeks; the alternative therapy was given. Outcomes. With both interventions, clinically relevant improvements were found for measures of body function and structure, as well as for activity, for two participants. Providing auditory feedback during REO training for trunk control was found to be feasible. Discussion. The degree of changes evident varied per protocol and may be due to the appropriateness of the technique chosen, as well as based on patients impaired arm motor control.

  5. A study of cases reported as incidents in a public hospital from 2011 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttems, Leila Bernarda Donato; Santos, Maria do Livramento Gomes Dos; Carvalho, Paloma Aparecida; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing incidents reported in a public hospital in the Federal District, Brasilia, according to the characteristics and outcomes involving patients. A descriptive and retrospective study of incidents reported between January 2011 and September 2014. 209 reported incidents were categorized as reportable occurrences (n = 22, 10.5%), near misses (n = 16, 7.7%); incident without injury (n = 4, 1.9%) and incident with injury (adverse events) (n = 167, 79.9%). The average age of patients was 44 years and the hospitalization time until the moment of the incident was on average 38.5 days. Nurses were the healthcare professionals who most reported the incidents (n = 55, 67%). No outcomes resul