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Sample records for incident self-reported fibromyalgia

  1. Lack of correlation between the mean tender point score and self-reported pain in fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Johannes W.G.; Rasker, Johannes J.; van der Heide, Agnes; Boersma, Johannes; de Blecourt, Alida C.E.; Griep, Eduard N.; van Rijswijk, Martin H.; Bijlsma, Johannes W.J.

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: To study the validity and nature of self-assessed symptoms among patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and to compare our data with findings reported in the US. To determine whether tender point scores correlate with self-reported pain and other symptoms and to study the influence of

  2. Lack of correlation between the mean tender point score and self-reported pain in fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J. W.; Rasker, J. J.; van der Heide, A.; Boersma, J. W.; de Blécourt, A. C.; Griep, E. N.; van Rijswijk, M. H.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    To study the validity and nature of self-assessed symptoms among patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and to compare our data with findings reported in the US. To determine whether tender point scores correlate with self-reported pain and other symptoms and to study the influence of disease

  3. Comparison of machine classification algorithms for fibromyalgia: neuroimages versus self-report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michael E; O'Shea, Andrew M; Craggs, Jason G; Price, Donald D; Letzen, Janelle E; Staud, Roland

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have posited that machine learning (ML) techniques accurately classify individuals with and without pain solely based on neuroimaging data. These studies claim that self-report is unreliable, making "objective" neuroimaging classification methods imperative. However, the relative performance of ML on neuroimaging and self-report data have not been compared. This study used commonly reported ML algorithms to measure differences between "objective" neuroimaging data and "subjective" self-report (ie, mood and pain intensity) in their ability to discriminate between individuals with and without chronic pain. Structural magnetic resonance imaging data from 26 individuals (14 individuals with fibromyalgia and 12 healthy controls) were processed to derive volumes from 56 brain regions per person. Self-report data included visual analog scale ratings for pain intensity and mood (ie, anger, anxiety, depression, frustration, and fear). Separate models representing brain volumes, mood ratings, and pain intensity ratings were estimated across several ML algorithms. Classification accuracy of brain volumes ranged from 53 to 76%, whereas mood and pain intensity ratings ranged from 79 to 96% and 83 to 96%, respectively. Overall, models derived from self-report data outperformed neuroimaging models by an average of 22%. Although neuroimaging clearly provides useful insights for understanding neural mechanisms underlying pain processing, self-report is reliable and accurate and continues to be clinically vital. The present study compares neuroimaging, self-reported mood, and self-reported pain intensity data in their ability to classify individuals with and without fibromyalgia using ML algorithms. Overall, models derived from self-reported mood and pain intensity data outperformed structural neuroimaging models. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of a self-reporting tool to obtain a Combined Index of Severity of Fibromyalgia (ICAF*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteve-Vives Joaquim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia is a syndrome with heterogeneous symptoms. The evaluation in the clinical setting usually fails to cover the complexity of the syndrome. This study aims to determine how different aspects of fibromyalgia are inter-related when measured by means of a self-reporting tool. The objective is to develop a more complete evaluation model adjusted to the complexity and multi-dimensional nature of the syndrome. Methods Application was made of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Brief Pain Inventory, the Fatigue Assessment Scale, the Health Assessment Questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28, the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory, the Arthritis Self-efficacy Scale and the Sleep Quality Scale. An assessment was made, on the basis of clinical interviews, case histories and specific tests, of the patient sociodemographic data, comorbidity, physical exploration and other clinical indexes. An exploratory factor analysis was made, with comparisons of the clinical index scores in extreme groups of patients. Results The ICAF composed of 59 items was obtained, offering four factors that explain 64% of the variance, and referred to as Emotional Factor (33.7%, Physical-Activity (15%, Active Coping (9% and Passive Coping (6.3%. A t-test between the extreme scores of these factors in the 301 patients revealed statistically significant differences in occupational status, medically unexplained syndromes, number of tender points, the six-minutes walk test, comorbidity and health care costs. Conclusions This study offers a tool allowing more complete and rapid evaluation of patients with fibromyalgia. The test intrinsically evaluates the emotional aspects: anxiety and depression, and their impact upon social aspects. It also evaluates patient functional capacity, fatigue, sleep quality, pain, and the way in which the patient copes with the disease. This is achieved by means of a

  5. Self-reported incidence of injuries among ballroom dancers | Kuisis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ballroom dancing is an increasingly popular sport around the world. However, unlike other forms of dancing such as ballet and modern, very little is known about the incidence, nature and severity of injuries sustained by dancers. The aims of this study were: 1) to quantify the incidence of injuries 2) to identify the nature of ...

  6. Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder that causes muscle pain and fatigue. People with fibromyalgia have "tender points" on the body. Tender points ... when pressure is put on them. People with fibromyalgia may also have other symptoms, such as Trouble ...

  7. The PROMIS FatigueFM Profile: a self-report measure of fatigue for use in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Anna L; Schilling, Stephen; Goesling, Jenna; Williams, David A

    2016-07-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by myriad symptoms and problems. Fatigue is one of the most common, distressing, and disabling symptoms in FM. The purpose of this study was to use fatigue item banks that were developed as part of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) to devise a self-report measure of fatigue for use in individuals with FM. A sample of 532 adults with FM (age range = 18-77, 96.1 % female) completed the PROMIS fatigue item bank. Factor analyses and item response theory analyses were used to identify dimensionality and optimally performing items. These data were used in combination with clinical input to select items for a fatigue self-report measure for use in FM. Factor analyses revealed four distinct factors in the PROMIS fatigue item bank; items for each univariate subscale were identified by selecting four items with high item information values. A 16-item measure, the PROMIS FatigueFM Profile, consisting of four 4-item short forms reflecting fatigue experience ("intensity") and fatigue impact in three subdomains-social, cognitive, and motivation-was created. The new PROMIS FatigueFM Profile short forms showed excellent internal reliability, low ceiling and floor effects, and equivalent or higher test information compared to the standard 4- and 7-item PROMIS fatigue short forms. The newly developed PROMIS FatigueFM Profile, a 16-item measure consisting of four 4-item short forms of self-reported fatigue severity, shows early evidence of good psychometric characteristics, provides the ability to use short forms that assess distinct aspects of fatigue experience and fatigue impact, and demonstrates equivalent or higher levels of test information compared to standard PROMIS fatigue short forms with similar number of items. The PROMIS FatigueFM Profile indicated fatigue experience and impact levels approximately 1.5 standard deviations above the normative sample mean across all short forms. Future work to

  8. Incidence of Self-Reported Diabetes in New York City, 2002, 2004, and 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamany, Shadi; Driver, Cynthia R.; Kerker, Bonnie; Silver, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Prevalence and incidence of diabetes among adults are increasing in the United States. The purpose of this study was to estimate the incidence of self-reported diabetes in New York City, examine factors associated with diabetes incidence, and estimate changes in the incidence over time. Methods We used data from the New York City Community Health Survey in 2002, 2004, and 2008 to estimate the age-adjusted incidence of self-reported diabetes among 24,384 adults aged 18 years or older. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to examine factors associated with incident diabetes. Results Survey results indicated that the age-adjusted incidence of diabetes per 1,000 population was 9.4 in 2002, 11.9 in 2004, and 8.6 in 2008. In multivariable-adjusted analysis, diabetes incidence was significantly associated with being aged 45 or older, being black or Hispanic, being overweight or obese, and having less than a high school diploma. Conclusion Our results suggest that the incidence of diabetes in New York City may be stabilizing. Age, black race, Hispanic ethnicity, elevated body mass index, and low educational attainment are risk factors for diabetes. Large-scale implementation of prevention efforts addressing obesity and sedentary lifestyle and targeting racial/ethnic minority groups and those with low educational attainment are essential to control diabetes in New York City. PMID:22698175

  9. Fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Marek Grabski; Tomasz Wójcik; Iwona Napora

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is classified as a disease of the connective tissue. There are many hypotheses about the causes of fibromyalgia, but none of them is finally confirmed. Due to unexplained etiopathogenesis of the illness, its treatment is difficult. People with fibromyalgia who suffer from generalised pains and chronic fatigue give up sport and increased physical activity in fear of escalation of ailments, limiting themselves to pharmacological therapy or psychotherapy. Meanwhile, properly selecte...

  10. Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Grabski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia is classified as a disease of the connective tissue. There are many hypotheses about the causes of fibromyalgia, but none of them is finally confirmed. Due to unexplained etiopathogenesis of the illness, its treatment is difficult. People with fibromyalgia who suffer from generalised pains and chronic fatigue give up sport and increased physical activity in fear of escalation of ailments, limiting themselves to pharmacological therapy or psychotherapy. Meanwhile, properly selected kinesitherapeutic training can significantly improve the quality of life of people with fibromyalgia. The article discusses the current diagnostic criteria, clinical picture of the disease, and methods of treatment, with particular emphasis on therapeutic exercises.

  11. Self-reported physical work exposures and incident carpal tunnel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Ann Marie; Gardner, Bethany T.; Zeringue, Angelique; Strickland, Jaime; Descatha, Alexis; Franzblau, Alfred; Evanoff, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Background To prospectively evaluate associations between self-reported physical work exposures and incident carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods Newly employed workers (n=1,107) underwent repeated nerve conduction studies (NCS), and periodic surveys on hand symptoms and physical work exposures including average daily duration of wrist bending, forearm rotation, finger pinching, using vibrating tools, finger/thumb pressing, forceful gripping, and lifting >2 pounds. Multiple logistic regression models examined relationships between peak, most recent, and time-weighted average exposures and incident CTS, adjusting for age, gender, and body mass index. Results 710 subjects (64.1%) completed follow-up NCS; 31 incident cases of CTS occurred over 3 year follow-up. All models describing lifting or forceful gripping exposures predicted future CTS. Vibrating tool use was predictive in some models. Conclusions Self-reported exposures showed consistent risks across different exposure models in this prospective study. Workers’ self-reported job demands can provide useful information for targeting work interventions. PMID:25223617

  12. Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... self-management strategies. You can learn about self-management strategies in the section below titled How can I improve my quality of life? Fibromyalgia should be treated by a doctor or team of healthcare professionals who specialize in the treatment of fibromyalgia ...

  13. Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fibromyalgia, the brain misunderstands everyday pain and other sensory experiences, making the person more sensitive to pressure, ... get better with sleep or rest Cognitive and memory problems (sometimes called “fibro fog”) 3 Trouble sleeping ...

  14. Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... practice deep-breathing techniques or meditation. Establish healthy sleep habits Lack of sleep can make your fibromyalgia symptoms ... caught in this cycle, try to have healthy sleeping habits. Avoid caffeine and alcohol before bedtime, go to ...

  15. Self-reported childhood maltreatment, lifelong traumatic events and mental disorders in fibromyalgia syndrome: a comparison of US and German outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuser, Winfried; Hoffmann, Eva-Maria; Wolfe, Frederick; Worthing, Angus B; Stahl, Neil; Rothenberg, Russell; Walitt, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The robustness of findings on retrospective self-reports of childhood maltreatment and lifetime traumatic experiences of adults with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) has not been demonstrated by transcultural studies. This is the first transcultural study to focus on the associations between FMS, childhood maltreatment, lifetime psychological traumas, and potential differences between countries adjusting for psychological distress. 71 age-and sex-matched US and German FMS outpatients were compared. Childhood maltreatment were assessed by the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and potential, traumatic experiences by the trauma list of the Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Potential posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV-TR symptom criteria by the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale. Potential depressive and anxiety disorder were assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire PHQ 4. US and German patients did not significantly differ in the amount of self-reported childhood maltreatment (emotional, physical and sexual abuse or neglect) or in the frequency of lifetime traumatic experiences. No differences in the frequency of potential anxiety, depression, and PTSD were seen. Psychological distress fully accounted for group differences in emotional and sexual abuse and emotional and physical neglect. The study demonstrated the transcultural robustness of findings on the association of adult FMS with self-reports of childhood maltreatment and lifelong traumatic experiences. These associations are mainly explained by current psychological distress.

  16. Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuser, Winfried; Ablin, Jacob; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Littlejohn, Geoffrey; Luciano, Juan V; Usui, Chie; Walitt, Brian

    2015-08-13

    Fibromyalgia is a common illness characterized by chronic widespread pain, sleep problems (including unrefreshing sleep), physical exhaustion and cognitive difficulties. The definition, pathogenesis and treatment are controversial, and some even contest the existence of this disorder. In 1990, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) defined classification criteria that required multiple tender points (areas of tenderness occurring in muscles and muscle-tendon junctions) and chronic widespread pain. In 2010, the ACR preliminary diagnostic criteria excluded tender points, allowed less extensive pain and placed reliance on patient-reported somatic symptoms and cognitive difficulties. Fibromyalgia occurs in all populations worldwide, and symptom prevalence ranges between 2% and 4% in the general population. The prevalence of people who are actually diagnosed with fibromyalgia ('administrative prevalence') is much lower. A model of fibromyalgia pathogenesis has been suggested in which biological and psychosocial variables interact to influence the predisposition, triggering and aggravation of a chronic disease, but the details are unclear. Diagnosis requires the history of a typical cluster of symptoms and the exclusion of a somatic disease that sufficiently explains the symptoms by medical examination. Current evidence-based guidelines emphasize the value of multimodal treatments, which encompass both non-pharmacological and selected pharmacological treatments tailored to individual symptoms, including pain, fatigue, sleep problems and mood problems. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/LIBdDX.

  17. Self-reported nonrestorative sleep in fibromyalgia - relationship to impairments of body functions, personal function factors, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedberg, Gunilla M; Björk, Mathilda; Börsbo, Björn

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was: 1) to determine variables that might characterize good or bad sleep; and 2) to describe the relationship between sleep, impairment of body functions, personal function factors, and quality of life based on quality of sleep in women with fibromyalgia (FM). This cross-sectional descriptive study included 224 consecutive patients diagnosed at a specialist center. These patients were mailed a questionnaire concerning sleep, body functions, personal factors, and health-related quality of life. In total, 145 completed questionnaires were collected. Using sleep variables (sleep quality, waking up unrefreshed, and tiredness when getting up), we identified two subgroups - the good sleep subgroup and the bad sleep subgroup - of women with FM. These subgroups exhibited significantly different characteristics concerning pain intensity, psychological variables (depressed mood, anxiety, catastrophizing, and self-efficacy), impairments of body functions, and generic and health-related quality of life. The good sleep subgroup reported a significantly better situation, including higher employment/study rate. The bad sleep subgroup reported a greater use of sleep medication. Five variables determined inclusion into either a good sleep or a bad sleep subgroup: pain in the evening, self-efficacy, anxiety, and according to the Short Form health survey role emotional and physical functioning. This study found that it was possible to identify two subgroups of women with FM based on quality of sleep variables. The two subgroups differed significantly with respect to pain, psychological factors, impairments of body functions, and perceived quality of life, where the subgroup with bad sleep had a worse situation.

  18. Self-reported heart attack in Mexican-American elders: examination of incidence, prevalence, and 7-year mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otiniano, Max E; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Markides, Kyriakos S; Ray, Laura A; Du, Xianglin L

    2003-07-01

    To examine the prevalence, incidence, and mortality of self-reported heart attack in older Mexican Americans and to identify significant factors associated with heart attack. Cross-sectional and longitudinal study. Baseline and three follow-up interviews in five southwestern states (Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas) of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly. Three thousand fifty Mexican Americans aged 65 to 107 (mean age = 73). Sociodemographic factors (age, sex, marital status, language of interview, health insurance coverage, living arrangements, and financial strain) and health factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, stroke, cancer, hip fracture, arthritis, depression, limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), and mortality) were determined at baseline (1993-94). New heart attacks were assessed at follow-ups in 1995-96, 1998-99, and 2000-01. Vital status was determined over the 7-year follow-up. Prevalence of self-reported heart attack was 9.1% at baseline. Incidence of self-reported heart attack was 6.1%, 9.1%, and 7.9%, respectively, for the three subsequent follow-ups. Older age, male sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and stroke were significantly associated with heart attack at baseline. Age was a significant predictor for new heart attack at each follow-up. Having ADL (odds ratio (OR) = 2.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.19-3.86) and IADL (OR = 2.25, CI = 1.72-2.94) disabilities was significantly associated with self-reported heart attack. Subjects with heart attack were significantly more likely to die at 7 years (hazard ratio = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.29-1.91). Of those with self-reported heart attack, 42.4% had died of heart attack as the underlying cause of death by 7-year follow-up. In Mexican Americans, self-reported heart attack was associated with being older and male and having diabetes

  19. Determinants of self-reported bystander behavior in cyberbullying incidents amongst adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSmet, Ann; Veldeman, Charlene; Poels, Karolien; Bastiaensens, Sara; Van Cleemput, Katrien; Vandebosch, Heidi; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2014-04-01

    This study explores behavioral determinants of self-reported cyberbullying bystander behavior from a behavioral change theoretical perspective, to provide levers for interventions. Nine focus groups were conducted with 61 young adolescents (aged 12-16 years, 52% girls). Assertive defending, reporting to others, providing advice, and seeking support were the most mentioned behaviors. Self-reported bystander behavior heavily depended on contextual factors, and should not be considered a fixed participant role. Bystanders preferred to handle cyberbullying offline and in person, and comforting the victim was considered more feasible than facing the bully. Most prevailing behavioral determinants to defend or support the victim were low moral disengagement, that the victim is an ingroup member, and that the bystander is popular. Youngsters felt they received little encouragement from their environment to perform positive bystanding behavior, since peers have a high acceptance for not defending and perceived parental support for defending behavior is largely lacking. These results suggest multilevel models for cyberbullying research, and interventions are needed. With much previous research into cyberbullying insufficiently founded in theoretical models, the employed framework of the Integrative Model and Social Cognitive Theory may inspire future studies into bystander behavior.

  20. Self-Reported Snoring Frequency and Incidence of Cardiovascular Disease: The Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Mako; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Sakurai, Susumu; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo; Maeda, Kenji; Ohira, Tetsuya; Imano, Hironori; Sato, Shinichi; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2012-01-01

    Background Although associations between snoring and cardiovascular disease have been reported in several prospective studies, there is limited evidence from Asian populations. The objective of this study was to determine if there is an association between self-reported snoring frequency and the incidence of cardiovascular disease in Japanese. Methods The subjects were 2350 men and 4163 women aged 40 to 69 years who lived in 3 communities in Japan. All subjects were participants in the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS) and were followed for 6 years. Incidence of cardiovascular disease during the follow-up period comprised events of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, sudden cardiac death and stroke. Results During the 6-year follow-up period, 97 participants (56 men and 41 women) had cardiovascular events. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, self-reported snoring frequency was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events among women but not men. The hazard ratios (95% CI) for cardiovascular events were 0.9 (0.4–2.0) for sometimes snoring and 2.5 (1.0–6.1) for everyday snoring in women and 0.7 (0.3–1.3) and 1.0 (0.5–2.1), respectively, in men. Further adjustment for body mass index attenuated the association in women; the respective hazard ratios for cardiovascular events were 0.9 (0.4–1.9) and 2.1 (0.9–5.4). Conclusions Self-reported habitual snoring was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events among Japanese women. Overweight may partly mediate this association. PMID:22447210

  1. The incidence of fibromyalgia and its associated comorbidities: a population-based retrospective cohort study based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Peter T; Harlan, Gregory A; Nkoy, Flo L; Jones, Spencer S; Hegmann, Kurt T; Gren, Lisa H; Lyon, Joseph L

    2006-06-01

    The epidemiology of fibromyalgia is poorly defined. The incidence of fibromyalgia has not been determined using a large population base. Previous studies based on prevalence data demonstrated that females are 7 times more likely to have fibromyalgia than males and that the peak age for females is during the childbearing years. We have calculated the incidence rate of fibromyalgia in a large, stable population and determined the strength of association between fibromyalgia and 7 comorbid conditions. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of a large, stable health insurance claims database (62,000 nationwide enrollees per year). Claims from 1997 to 2002 were examined using the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes to identify fibromyalgia cases (ICD code 729.1) and 7 predetermined comorbid conditions. A total of 2595 incident cases of fibromyalgia were identified between 1997 and 2002. Age-adjusted incidence rates were 6.88 cases per 1000 person-years for males and 11.28 cases per 1000 person-years for females. Females were 1.64 times (95% confidence interval = 1.59-1.69) more likely than males to have fibromyalgia. Patients with fibromyalgia were 2.14 to 7.05 times more likely to have one or more of the following comorbid conditions: depression, anxiety, headache, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis. Females are more likely to be diagnosed with fibromyalgia than males, although to a substantially smaller degree than previously reported, and there are strong associations for comorbid conditions that are commonly thought to be associated with fibromyalgia.

  2. Self-reported sleep disturbance and incidence of dementia in ageing men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luojus, Maria K; Lehto, Soili M; Tolmunen, Tommi; Brem, Anna-Katharine; Lönnroos, Eija; Kauhanen, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Sleep disturbance is suggested to contribute to the development of dementia. However, prospective longitudinal data from middle-aged populations are scarce. We investigated a population-based sample of 2386 men aged 42-62 years at baseline during 1984-1989. Participants having a history of mental illnesses, psychiatric medication, Parkinson's disease or dementia within 2 years after baseline (n=296) were excluded. Difficulty falling asleep or maintaining sleep, sleep duration and daytime tiredness were enquired. Dementia diagnoses (n=287) between 1984 and 2014 were obtained through linkage with hospital discharge, national death and special reimbursement registers. Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed for all dementias, and separately for Alzheimer's disease (n=234) and other phenotypes (n=53). Additional analyses were performed on a subsample of an apolipoprotein E ( APOE ) genotype-tested population (n=1199). The risk ratio for dementia was 1.58 (95% CI 1.10 to 2.27) in men with frequent sleep disturbance after adjustments for age, examination year, elevated depressive symptoms, physical activity, alcohol consumption, cumulative smoking history, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-sensitivity C reactive protein, cardiovascular disease history, education years and living alone. Daytime tiredness and sleep duration were not associated with dementia in adjusted analysis. In the APOE subsample, both APOE ε4 genotype and frequent sleep disturbance were associated with increased dementia risk, but in the interaction analysis they had no joint effect. Self-reported frequent sleep disturbance in middle-aged men may relate to the development of dementia in later life. Having an APOE ε4 genotype did not affect the relationship. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Self reported incidence and morbidity of acute respiratory illness among deployed U.S. military in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony W Soltis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Historically, respiratory infections have had a significant impact on U.S. military missions. Deployed troops are particularly at high risk due to close living conditions, stressful work environments and increased exposure to pathogens. To date, there are limited data available on acute respiratory illness (ARI among troops deployed in support of ongoing military operations, specifically Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF. METHODS: Using self-report data from two sources collected from troops deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan and the surrounding region, we analyzed incidence and risk factors for ARI. Military personnel on mid-deployment Rest & Recuperation (R&R or during redeployment were eligible to participate in the voluntary self-report survey. RESULTS: Overall, 39.5% reported having at least one ARI. Of these, 18.5% sought medical care and 33.8% reported having decreased job performance. The rate of self-reported ARI was 15 episodes per 100 person-months among those taking the voluntary survey, and 24.7 episodes per 100 person-months among those taking the clinic health questionnaire. Negative binomial regression analysis found female sex, Navy branch of service and lack of flush toilets to be independently associated with increased rates of ARI. Deployment to OIF, increasing age and higher rank were also positively associated with ARI risk. CONCLUSIONS: The overall percentage of deployed military personnel reporting at least one acute respiratory illness decreased since earlier parts of OIF/OEF. However, the reported effect on job performance increased tremendously. The most important factors associated with increased respiratory infection are female sex, Navy branch of service, lack of improved latrine facilities, deployment to OIF, increasing age and higher rank.

  4. Assessment of functional capacity in women with fibromyalgia: direct and self-reported methods. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n4p292

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Homann

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia can limit activities of daily living (ADLs performance and has a negative impact on the quality of life of these patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between direct and indirect methods for the assessment of functional capacity and their relationship with some features of fibromyalgia. Thirty-eight women with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia participated in the study. Functional capacity was assessed by the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ, distance in the six-minute walk test (6MWT, and handgrip strength (HGS. Pain was rated on a visual analog scale. The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ was applied to assess the impact on quality of life. Body mass index and waist circumference were also evaluated. Pearson’s correlation test was used for parametric data and Spearman’s correlation test for nonparametric data. Multiple regressions were also performed. Pain intensity was high in the patients (median: 9.5. The 6MWT distance was correlated with HAQ score (r=-0.55, p<0.01 and HGS (r=0.34, p<0.01. Pain was correlated with HGS (r=-0.41, p<0.01, HAQ score (r=0.62, p<0.01, and FIQ (r =0.66, p<0.01. Pain intensity explained 40% of the variation in HAQ scores. This variation increased to 60% after inclusion of 6MWT distance. In conclusion, pain seems to compromise HGS, ADLs and quality of life in women with fibromyalgia. The lower performance in the 6MWT might be explained by high body mass index. Taking into account pain, the HAQ seems to be an appropriate tool for the assessment of functional capacity in women with fibromyalgia.

  5. Pesticide exposure and self-reported incident depression among wives in the Agricultural Health Study.

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    Beard, John D; Hoppin, Jane A; Richards, Marie; Alavanja, Michael C R; Blair, Aaron; Sandler, Dale P; Kamel, Freya

    2013-10-01

    Depression in women is a public health problem. Studies have reported positive associations between pesticides and depression, but few studies were prospective or presented results for women separately. We evaluated associations between pesticide exposure and incident depression among farmers' wives in the Agricultural Health Study, a prospective cohort study in Iowa and North Carolina. We used data on 16,893 wives who did not report physician-diagnosed depression at enrollment (1993-1997) and who completed a follow-up telephone interview (2005-2010). Among these wives, 1054 reported physician diagnoses of depression at follow-up. We collected information on potential confounders and on ever use of any pesticide, 11 functional and chemical classes of pesticides, and 50 specific pesticides by wives and their husbands via self-administered questionnaires at enrollment. We used inverse probability weighting to adjust for potential confounders and to account for possible selection bias induced by the death or loss of 10,639 wives during follow-up. We used log-binomial regression models to estimate risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals. After weighting for age at enrollment, state of residence, education level, diabetes diagnosis, and drop out, wives' incident depression was positively associated with diagnosed pesticide poisoning, but was not associated with ever using any pesticide. Use of individual pesticides or functional or chemical classes of pesticides was generally not associated with wives' depression. Among wives who never used pesticides, husbands' ever use of individual pesticides or functional or chemical classes of pesticides was generally not associated with wives' incident depression. Our study adds further evidence that high level pesticide exposure, such as pesticide poisoning, is associated with increased risk of depression and sets a lower bound on the level of exposure related to depression, thereby providing reassurance that the moderate levels

  6. Incidence of self-reported brain injury and the relationship with substance abuse: findings from a longitudinal community survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butterworth Peter

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic or serious brain injury (BI has persistent and well documented adverse outcomes, yet 'mild' or 'moderate' BI, which often does not result in hospital treatment, accounts for half the total days of disability attributed to BI. There are currently few data available from community samples on the incidence and correlates of these injuries. Therefore, the study aimed to assess the 1 incidence of self-reported mild (not requiring hospital admission and moderate (admitted to hospital brain injury (BI, 2 causes of injury 3 physical health scores and 4 relationship between BI and problematic alcohol or marijuana use. Methods An Australian community sequential-cohort study (cohorts aged 20-24, 40-44 and 60-64 years at wave one used a survey methodology to assess BI and substance use at baseline and four years later. Results Of the 7485 wave one participants, 89.7% were re-interviewed at wave two. There were 56 mild (230.8/100000 person-years and 44 moderate BI (180.5/100000 person-years reported between waves one and two. Males and those in the 20-24 year cohort had increased risk of BI. Sports injury was the most frequent cause of BI (40/100 with traffic accidents being a greater proportion of moderate (27% than mild (7% BI. Neither alcohol nor marijuana problems at wave one were predictors of BI. BI was not a predictor of developing substance use problems by wave two. Conclusions BI were prevalent in this community sample, though the incidence declined with age. Factors associated with BI in community samples differ from those reported in clinical samples (e.g. typically traumatic brain injury with traffic accidents the predominate cause. Further, detailed evaluation of the health consequences of these injuries is warranted.

  7. Self-reported somatosensory symptoms of neuropathic pain in fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain correlate with tender point count and pressure-pain thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Jespersen, Anders; Bliddal, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Widespread pain and pain hypersensitivity are the hallmark of fibromyalgia, a complex pain condition linked to central sensitization. In this study the painDETECT questionnaire (PDQ), validated to identify neuropathic pain and based on pain quality items, was applied in a cross-sectional sample...... of patients with chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aims of the study were to assess the patient-reported sensory neuropathic symptoms by PDQ and to correlate these with tender point (TP) count and pressure-pain thresholds. Eighty-one patients (75 F, 6 M) with CWP (ACR-criteria) filled in the PDQ. Manual TP...... examination was conducted according to ACR guidelines. Computerized cuff pressure algometry was used for the assessment of pressure-pain detection thresholds (PDT, unit: kPa) and pressure-pain tolerance thresholds (PTT, unit: kPa). Mean TP count was 14.32 (range: 2-18), mean PDQ score 22.75 (range: 5...

  8. Self-reported somatosensory symptoms of neuropathic pain in fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain correlate with tender point count and pressure-pain thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Jespersen, Anders; Bliddal, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Widespread pain and pain hypersensitivity are the hallmark of fibromyalgia, a complex pain condition linked to central sensitization. In this study the painDETECT questionnaire (PDQ), validated to identify neuropathic pain and based on pain quality items, was applied in a cross-sectional sample...... of patients with chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aims of the study were to assess the patient-reported sensory neuropathic symptoms by PDQ and to correlate these with tender point (TP) count and pressure-pain thresholds. Eighty-one patients (75 F, 6 M) with CWP (ACR-criteria) filled in the PDQ. Manual TP......-37). Mean PDT was 8.8 kPa (range: 2-36) and mean PTT 30.9 kPa (range: 4-85). Deep-tissue hyperalgesia was the predominant somatosensory symptom reported in 83%, but other neuropathic symptoms were also frequent, e.g. burning 51% and prickling 47%. Statistically significant correlations were found between...

  9. Characterizing the distinct structural changes associated with self-reported knee injury among individuals with incident knee osteoarthritis: Data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Julie E; Harkey, Matthew S; Ward, Robert J; Mackay, James W; Lu, Bing; Price, Lori Lyn; Eaton, Charles B; Barbe, Mary F; Lo, Grace H; McAlindon, Timothy E; Driban, Jeffrey B

    2018-04-01

    We aimed to characterize the agreement between distinct structural changes on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and self-reported injury in the 12 months leading to incident common or accelerated knee osteoarthritis (KOA). We conducted a descriptive study using data from baseline and the first 4 annual visits of the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Knees had no radiographic KOA at baseline (Kellgren-Lawrence [KL]self-reported injury data at index visit and year prior. Among 226 people, we found fair agreement between self-reported injuries and distinct structural changes (kappa = 0.24 to 0.31). Most distinct structural changes were medial meniscal pathology. No distinct structural changes (e.g., root or radial tears) appeared to differ between adults who reported or did not report an injury; except, all subchondral fractures occurred in adults who developed accelerated KOA and reported an injury. While there is fair agreement between self-reported knee injuries and distinct structural changes, there is some discordance. Self-reported injury may represent a different construct from distinct structural changes that occur after joint trauma. Clin. Anat. 31:330-334, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Self-Reported Periodontitis and Incident Type 2 Diabetes among Male Workers from a 5-Year Follow-Up to MY Health Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Atsushi; Toyokawa, Satoshi; Inoue, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yuji; Kobayashi, Yasuki

    2016-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to examine whether periodontitis is associated with incident type 2 diabetes in a Japanese male worker cohort. Methods The study participants were Japanese men, aged 36–55 years, without diabetes. Data were extracted from the MY Health Up study, consisting of self-administered questionnaire surveys at baseline and following annual health examinations for an insurance company in Japan. The oral health status of the participants was classified by two self-reported indicators: (1) gingival hemorrhage and (2) tooth loosening. Type 2 diabetes incidence was determined by self-reporting or blood test data. Modified Poisson regression approach was used to estimate the relative risks and the 95% confidence intervals of incident diabetes with periodontitis. Covariates included age, body mass index, family history of diabetes, hypertension, current smoking habits, alcohol use, dyslipidemia, and exercise habits. Results Of the 2895 candidates identified at baseline in 2004, 2469 men were eligible for follow-up analysis, 133 of whom were diagnosed with diabetes during the 5-year follow-up period. Tooth loosening was associated with incident diabetes [adjusted relative risk = 1.73, 95% confidence interval = 1.14–2.64] after adjusting for other confounding factors. Gingival hemorrhage displayed a similar trend but was not significantly associated with incident diabetes [adjusted relative risk = 1.32, 95% confidence interval = 0.95–1.85]. Conclusions Tooth loosening is an independent predictor of incident type 2 diabetes in Japanese men. PMID:27115749

  11. Self-Reported Periodontitis and Incident Type 2 Diabetes among Male Workers from a 5-Year Follow-Up to MY Health Up Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Miyawaki

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine whether periodontitis is associated with incident type 2 diabetes in a Japanese male worker cohort.The study participants were Japanese men, aged 36-55 years, without diabetes. Data were extracted from the MY Health Up study, consisting of self-administered questionnaire surveys at baseline and following annual health examinations for an insurance company in Japan. The oral health status of the participants was classified by two self-reported indicators: (1 gingival hemorrhage and (2 tooth loosening. Type 2 diabetes incidence was determined by self-reporting or blood test data. Modified Poisson regression approach was used to estimate the relative risks and the 95% confidence intervals of incident diabetes with periodontitis. Covariates included age, body mass index, family history of diabetes, hypertension, current smoking habits, alcohol use, dyslipidemia, and exercise habits.Of the 2895 candidates identified at baseline in 2004, 2469 men were eligible for follow-up analysis, 133 of whom were diagnosed with diabetes during the 5-year follow-up period. Tooth loosening was associated with incident diabetes [adjusted relative risk = 1.73, 95% confidence interval = 1.14-2.64] after adjusting for other confounding factors. Gingival hemorrhage displayed a similar trend but was not significantly associated with incident diabetes [adjusted relative risk = 1.32, 95% confidence interval = 0.95-1.85].Tooth loosening is an independent predictor of incident type 2 diabetes in Japanese men.

  12. Self-reported whole-grain intake and plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations in combination in relation to the incidence of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Markus Dines; Kyrø, Cecilie; Olsen, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Self-reported food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) have occasionally been used to investigate the association between whole-grain intake and the incidence of colorectal cancer, but the results from those studies have been inconsistent. We investigated this association using intakes of whole grains......-grain consumption (HELGA, 1992-1998). Incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations alone and Howe's score with ranks were inversely associated with the incidence of distal colon cancer when the highest quartile...... was compared with the lowest (for alkylresorcinol concentrations, incidence rate ratio = 0.34, 95% confidence interval: 0.13, 0.92; for Howe's score with ranks, incidence rate ratio = 0.35, 95% confidence interval: 0.15, 0.86). No association was observed between whole-grain intake and any colorectal cancer...

  13. Self-reported nonrestorative sleep in fibromyalgia – relationship to impairments of body functions, personal function factors, and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liedberg GM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Gunilla M Liedberg,1 Mathilda Björk,2 Björn Börsbo31Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Norrköping, 2Rehabilitation Centre and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, 3Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH, Linköping University, Linköping, SwedenPurpose: The purpose of this study was: 1 to determine variables that might characterize good or bad sleep; and 2 to describe the relationship between sleep, impairment of body functions, personal function factors, and quality of life based on quality of sleep in women with fibromyalgia (FM. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study included 224 consecutive patients diagnosed at a specialist center. These patients were mailed a questionnaire concerning sleep, body functions, personal factors, and health-related quality of life. In total, 145 completed questionnaires were collected. Results: Using sleep variables (sleep quality, waking up unrefreshed, and tiredness when getting up, we identified two subgroups – the good sleep subgroup and the bad sleep subgroup – of women with FM. These subgroups exhibited significantly different characteristics concerning pain intensity, psychological variables (depressed mood, anxiety, catastrophizing, and self-efficacy, impairments of body functions, and generic and health-related quality of life. The good sleep subgroup reported a significantly better situation, including higher employment/study rate. The bad sleep subgroup reported a greater use of sleep medication. Five variables determined inclusion into either a good sleep or a bad sleep subgroup: pain in the evening, self-efficacy, anxiety, and according to the Short Form health survey role emotional and physical functioning. Conclusion: This study found that it was possible to identify two subgroups of women with FM based on quality of sleep variables. The two subgroups differed significantly with respect to pain, psychological

  14. A comparison of self-report and antiretroviral detection to inform estimates of antiretroviral therapy coverage, viral load suppression and HIV incidence in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerga, Helena; Shiferie, Fisseha; Grebe, Eduard; Giuliani, Ruggero; Farhat, Jihane Ben; Van-Cutsem, Gilles; Cohen, Karen

    2017-09-29

    Accurately identifying individuals who are on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is important to determine ART coverage and proportion on ART who are virally suppressed. ART is also included in recent infection testing algorithms used to estimate incidence. We compared estimates of ART coverage, viral load suppression rates and HIV incidence using ART self-report and detection of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and we identified factors associated with discordance between the methods. Cross-sectional population-based survey in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Individuals 15-59 years were eligible. Interviews included questions about ARV use. Rapid HIV testing was performed at the participants' home. Blood specimens were collected for ARV detection, LAg-Avidity HIV incidence testing and viral load quantification in HIV-positive individuals. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify socio-demographic covariates associated with discordance between self-reported ART and ARV detection. Of the 5649 individuals surveyed, 1423 were HIV-positive. Median age was 34 years and 76.3% were women. ART coverage was estimated at 51.4% (95%CI:48.5-54.3), 53.1% (95%CI:50.2-55.9) and 56.1% (95%CI:53.5-58.8) using self-reported ART, ARV detection and both methods combined (classified as ART exposed if ARV detected and/or ART reported) respectively. ART coverage estimates using the 3 methods were fairly similar within sex and age categories except in individuals aged 15-19 years: 33.3% (95%CI:23.3-45.2), 33.8% (95%CI:23.9-45.4%) and 44.3% (95%CI:39.3-46.7) using self-reported ART, ARV detection and both methods combined. Viral suppression below 1000cp/mL in individuals on ART was estimated at 89.8% (95%CI:87.3-91.9), 93.1% (95%CI:91.0-94.8) and 88.7% (95%CI:86.2-90.7) using self-reported ART, ARV detection and both methods combined respectively. HIV incidence was estimated at 1.4 (95%CI:0.8-2.0) new cases/100 person-years when employing no measure of ARV use, 1.1/100PY (95%CI:0

  15. Fibromyalgia Misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibromyalgia misconceptions: Interview with a Mayo Clinic expert Get the facts about these common fibromyalgia myths. Learning all you can about fibromyalgia is the first step toward gaining control of ...

  16. Self-reported whole-grain intake and plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations in combination in relation to the incidence of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Markus Dines; Kyrø, Cecilie; Olsen, Anja; Dragsted, Lars O; Skeie, Guri; Lund, Eiliv; Aman, Per; Nilsson, Lena M; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Tjønneland, Anne; Landberg, Rikard

    2014-05-15

    Self-reported food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) have occasionally been used to investigate the association between whole-grain intake and the incidence of colorectal cancer, but the results from those studies have been inconsistent. We investigated this association using intakes of whole grains and whole-grain products measured via FFQs and plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations, a biomarker of whole-grain wheat and rye intake, both separately and in combination (Howe's score with ranks). We conducted a nested case-control study in a cohort from a research project on Nordic health and whole-grain consumption (HELGA, 1992-1998). Incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations alone and Howe's score with ranks were inversely associated with the incidence of distal colon cancer when the highest quartile was compared with the lowest (for alkylresorcinol concentrations, incidence rate ratio = 0.34, 95% confidence interval: 0.13, 0.92; for Howe's score with ranks, incidence rate ratio = 0.35, 95% confidence interval: 0.15, 0.86). No association was observed between whole-grain intake and any colorectal cancer (colon, proximal, distal or rectum cancer) when using an FFQ as the measure/exposure variable for whole-grain intake. The results suggest that assessing whole-grain intake using a combination of FFQs and biomarkers slightly increases the precision in estimating the risk of colon or rectal cancer by reducing the impact of misclassification, thereby increasing the statistical power of the study.

  17. Self-Reported Hearing Impairment and Incident Frailty in English Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A 4-Year Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljas, Ann E M; Carvalho, Livia A; Papachristou, Efstathios; Oliveira, Cesar De; Wannamethee, S Goya; Ramsay, Sheena E; Walters, Kate

    2017-05-01

    To examine the association between hearing impairment and incident frailty in older adults. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses with 4-year follow-up using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Community. Community-dwelling individuals aged 60 and older with data on hearing and frailty status (N = 2,836). Hearing impairment was defined as poor self-reported hearing. Having none of the five Fried frailty phenotype components (slow walking, weak grip, self-reported exhaustion, weight loss and low physical activity) was defined as not frail, having one or two as prefrail, and having three or more as frail. Participants who were not frail at baseline were followed for incident prefrailty and frailty. Participants who were prefrail at baseline were followed for incident frailty. One thousand three hundred ninety six (49%) participants were not frail, 1,178 (42%) were prefrail, and 262 (9%) were frail according to the Fried phenotype. At follow-up, there were 367 new cases of prefrailty and frailty among those who were not frail at baseline (n = 1,396) and 133 new cases of frailty among those who were prefrail at baseline (n = 1,178). Cross-sectional analysis showed an association between hearing impairment and frailty (age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.37-2.01), which remained after further adjustments for wealth, education, cardiovascular disease, cognition, and depression. In longitudinal analyses, nonfrail participants with hearing impairment were at greater risk of becoming prefrail and frail at follow-up (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.05-1.95), but the association was attenuated after further adjustment. Prefrail participants with hearing impairment had a greater risk of becoming frail at follow-up (OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.07-2.51) even after further adjustment. Hearing impairment in prefrail older adults was associated with greater risk of becoming frail, independent of covariates, suggesting that hearing

  18. Physical activity and 10-year incidence of self-reported vertebral fractures in Japanese women: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Kitamura, K; Inoue, M; Sawada, N; Tsugane, S

    2014-11-01

    This study assessed the effects of physical activity on a 10-year incidence of self-reported vertebral fractures in adult women of a large Japanese cohort. Medium levels of strenuous activity and long-duration sedentary activity were associated with a lower incidence of vertebral fractures; association patterns appear to be different from hip fractures. Physical activity helps prevent hip fracture, but little is known about the longitudinal association between physical activity and vertebral fractures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of physical activity on the 10-year incidence of symptomatic vertebral fractures using data from the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study. Baseline studies were conducted in 1993-1994, and the follow-up study was conducted 10 years later. We analyzed 23,757 women aged 40-69 years. At baseline, physical activity was assessed as a predictor by using a questionnaire. Subjects were asked to report vertebral fractures that occurred during the 10-year follow-up period. Relative risks (RRs) adjusted for confounders were estimated by multiple logistic regression analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of vertebral fractures was 0.67%. Those who engaged in strenuous physical activity of <1 h/day had a significantly lower incidence of vertebral fractures than those who did not engage in such activity (RR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.28-0.97), while those engaged in such activity ≥1 h/day did not (RR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.58-1.14). Long-duration sedentary activity was associated with a low incidence of vertebral fractures (P for trend = 0.0002), but the frequencies of sports activities and metabolic equivalents were not (P for trend = 0.0729 and 0.4341, respectively). Strenuous activity and sedentary activity are associated with the incidence of vertebral fractures, although the association may not be linear. The pattern of association between physical activity and vertebral fractures appears to be

  19. Seventy Years of Asthma in Italy: Age, Period and Cohort Effects on Incidence and Remission of Self-Reported Asthma from 1940 to 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Pesce

    Full Text Available It is well known that asthma prevalence has been increasing all over the world in the last decades. However, few data are available on temporal trends of incidence and remission of asthma.To evaluate the rates of asthma incidence and remission in Italy from 1940 to 2010.The subjects were randomly sampled from the general Italian population between 1991 and 2010 in the three population-based multicentre studies: ECRHS, ISAYA, and GEIRD. Individual information on the history of asthma (age at onset, age at the last attack, use of drugs for asthma control, co-presence of hay-fever was collected on 35,495 subjects aged 20-84 and born between 1925-1989. Temporal changes in rates of asthma incidence and remission in relation to age, birth cohort and calendar period (APC were modelled using Poisson regression and APC models.The average yearly rate of asthma incidence was 2.6/1000 (3,297 new cases among 1,263,885 person-years. The incidence rates have been linearly increasing, with a percentage increase of +3.9% (95%CI: 3.1-4.5, from 1940 up to the year 1995, when the rates begun to level off. The stabilization of asthma incidence was mainly due to a decrease in the rates of atopic asthma after 1995, while non-atopic asthma has continued to increase. The overall rate of remission was 43.2/1000person-years, and it did not vary significantly across generations, but was associated with atopy, age at asthma onset and duration of the disease.After 50 years of a continuous upward trend, the rates of asthma incidence underwent a substantial stabilization in the late 90s. Despite remarkable improvements in the treatment of asthma, the rate of remission did not change significantly in the last seventy years. Some caveats are required in interpreting our results, given that our estimates are based on self-reported events that could be affected by the recall bias.

  20. Perceived dyscognition reported by patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Samantha J; Toussaint, Loren L; Williams, David A; Hoskin, Tanya L; Whipple, Mary O; Vincent, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia often report dyscognition as a symptom; however, the literature on this symptom is sparse. Our objective for this cross-sectional study was to characterize dyscognition among patients with fibromyalgia, identify comorbid symptoms associated with dyscognition, and evaluate its relation with fibromyalgia severity. Dyscognition was assessed with the Multiple Abilities Self-report Questionnaire (MASQ) for 681 patients with fibromyalgia. Other assessed comorbid symptoms were pain, fatigue, sleep problems, mood, physical and mental health, and autonomic function. Correlation and regression modeling were used to identify relations between the MASQ subscales and other fibromyalgia symptoms. Mixed analysis of variance was used to examine the profile of dyscognition in different levels of fibromyalgia. MASQ subscale scores from a previously described healthy normal control population were used for comparison. The mean (SD) age of the study patients was 55.8 (12.6) years, and most patients were female (93%) and white (91%). Perceived dyscognition was most related to depression, anxiety, and autonomic function. Across all fibromyalgia severity levels, patients had significantly higher levels of perceived dyscognition than the healthy controls. Significant differences existed for the MASQ total and most MASQ subscales among patients with mild, moderate, and severe fibromyalgia. Our study results provide further evidence that perceived dyscognition in fibromyalgia is influenced by various comorbid symptoms. In treating patients with fibromyalgia who have dyscognition, clinicians should consider the multiple types of dyscognition and the effects of other fibromyalgia symptoms.

  1. Self-reported vision impairment and incident prefrailty and frailty in English community-dwelling older adults: findings from a 4-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljas, Ann E M; Carvalho, Livia A; Papachristou, Efstathios; De Oliveira, Cesar; Wannamethee, S Goya; Ramsay, Sheena E; Walters, Kate R

    2017-11-01

    Little is known about vision impairment and frailty in older age. We investigated the relationship of poor vision and incident prefrailty and frailty. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses with 4-year follow-up of 2836 English community-dwellers aged ≥60 years. Vision impairment was defined as poor self-reported vision. A score of 0 out of the 5 Fried phenotype components was defined as non-frail, 1-2 prefrail and ≥3 as frail. Participants non-frail at baseline were followed-up for incident prefrailty and frailty. Participants prefrail at baseline were followed-up for incident frailty. 49% of participants (n=1396) were non-frail, 42% (n=1178) prefrail and 9% (n=262) frail. At follow-up, there were 367 new cases of prefrailty and frailty among those non-frail at baseline, and 133 new cases of frailty among those prefrail at baseline. In cross-sectional analysis, vision impairment was associated with frailty (age-adjustedandsex-adjusted OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.95 to 3.30). The association remained after further adjustment for wealth, education, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, falls, cognition and depression. In longitudinal analysis, compared with non-frail participants with no vision impairment, non-frail participants with vision impairment had twofold increased risks of prefrailty or frailty at follow-up (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.32 to 3.24). The association remained after further adjustment. Prefrail participants with vision impairment did not have greater risks of becoming frail at follow-up. Non-frail older adults who experience poor vision have increased risks of becoming prefrail and frail over 4 years. This is of public health importance as both vision impairment and frailty affect a large number of older adults. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Three-Quarters of Persons in the US Population Reporting a Clinical Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia Do Not Satisfy Fibromyalgia Criteria: The 2012 National Health Interview Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Walitt, Brian; Katz, Robert S.; Bergman, Martin J.; Wolfe, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Although fibromyalgia criteria have been in effect for decades, little is known about how the fibromyalgia diagnosis is applied and understood by clinicians and patients. We used the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to determine the prevalence of self-reported clinician diagnosed fibromyalgia and then compared demographics, symptoms, disability and medical utilization measures of persons with a clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia that did not meet diagnostic criteria (false-p...

  3. Trends in the incidence of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia in the UK, 2001-2013: a Clinical Practice Research Datalink study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Simon M; Bakken, Inger J; Nazareth, Irwin; Crawley, Esther; White, Peter D

    2017-06-01

    Objective Trends in recorded diagnoses of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS, also known as 'myalgic encephalomyelitis' (ME)) and fibromyalgia (FM) in the UK were last reported more than ten years ago, for the period 1990-2001. Our aim was to analyse trends in incident diagnoses of CFS/ME and FM for the period 2001-2013, and to investigate whether incidence might vary by index of multiple deprivation (IMD) score. Design Electronic health records cohort study. Setting NHS primary care practices in the UK. Participants Participants: Patients registered with general practices linked to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) primary care database from January 2001 to December 2013. Main outcome measure Incidence of CFS/ME, FM, post-viral fatigue syndrome (PVFS), and asthenia/debility. Results The overall annual incidence of recorded cases of CFS/ME was 14.8 (95% CI 14.5, 15.1) per 100,000 people. Overall annual incidence per 100,000 people for FM was 33.3 (32.8-33.8), for PVFS 12.2 (11.9, 12.5), and for asthenia/debility 7.0 (6.8, 7.2). Annual incidence rates for CFS/ME diagnoses decreased from 17.5 (16.1, 18.9) in 2001 to 12.6 (11.5, 13.8) in 2013 (annual percent change -2.8% (-3.6%, -2.0%)). Annual incidence rates for FM diagnoses decreased from 32.3 (30.4, 34.3) to 27.1 (25.5, 28.6) in 2007, then increased to 38.2 (36.3, 40.1) per 100,000 people in 2013. Overall annual incidence of recorded fatigue symptoms was 2246 (2242, 2250) per 100,000 people. Compared with the least deprived IMD quintile, incidence of CFS/ME in the most deprived quintile was 39% lower (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0.61 (0.50, 0.75)), whereas rates of FM were 40% higher (IRR 1.40 (0.95, 2.06)). Conclusion These analyses suggest a gradual decline in recorded diagnoses of CFS/ME since 2001, and an increase in diagnoses of fibromyalgia, with opposing socioeconomic patterns of lower rates of CFS/ME diagnoses in the poorest areas compared with higher rates of FM diagnoses.

  4. Mortality in a cohort of Danish patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Lene; Kendall, Sally; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2010-01-01

    A previous study demonstrated an association between self-reported widespread body pain and increased mortality. The aim of this study was to analyze whether fibromyalgia (FM) and FM-like symptoms are related to increased mortality.......A previous study demonstrated an association between self-reported widespread body pain and increased mortality. The aim of this study was to analyze whether fibromyalgia (FM) and FM-like symptoms are related to increased mortality....

  5. Fibromyalgia: A Primer for the Anesthesia Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummett, Chad M.; Clauw, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Review The present review is intended to give an overview of fibromyalgia for the anesthesiologist. While the basics of the treatment of fibromyalgia are included, the intent is to provide context to discuss the potential implications in perioperative management. Recent Findings One of the most important changes in the last year is the new criteria established by the American College of Rheumatology for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Instead of a combination of self-report and a tender point examination, there is a new self-report questionnaire that is now used diagnose fibromyalgia. This tool incorporates aspects of widespread body pain and some of the known comorbid symptoms. A score of 0-31 is given, which allows for the disease to be viewed as a continuum of sensitivity and symptomatology, instead of as a binary diagnosis. This continuum has been termed “fibromyalgia-ness.” This article also reviews the advances in understanding of the pathophysiology and emerging therapies. Little is known about the impact of fibromyalgia in the perioperative period. Summary The impact of fibromyalgia on anesthesia care is not known. Years of quality research have clearly demonstrated multiple pathophysiologic changes that could impact anesthesia care and future study is needed. PMID:21799404

  6. Primary fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S; Jensen, L T; Foldager, M

    1990-01-01

    Serum concentrations of procollagen type III aminoterminal peptide have previously been reported to be low in some patients with primary fibromyalgia and the aim of this study was to determine if such patients differ clinically from primary fibromyalgia patients with normal levels of procollagen...... type III aminoterminal peptide. Subjective symptoms, tender points and dynamic muscle strength in 45 women with primary fibromyalgia were related to serum concentrations of procollagen type III aminoterminal peptide. Patients with low serum concentrations of procollagen type III aminoterminal peptide...... concentrations of procollagen type III aminoterminal peptide of primary fibromyalgia patients are connected to the disease impact....

  7. Self-reported accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Katrine Meltofte; Andersen, Camilla Sloth

    2016-01-01

    The main idea behind the self-reporting of accidents is to ask people about their traffic accidents and gain knowledge on these accidents without relying on the official records kept by police and/or hospitals.......The main idea behind the self-reporting of accidents is to ask people about their traffic accidents and gain knowledge on these accidents without relying on the official records kept by police and/or hospitals....

  8. Three-Quarters of Persons in the US Population Reporting a Clinical Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia Do Not Satisfy Fibromyalgia Criteria: The 2012 National Health Interview Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Katz, Robert S.; Bergman, Martin J.; Wolfe, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Although fibromyalgia criteria have been in effect for decades, little is known about how the fibromyalgia diagnosis is applied and understood by clinicians and patients. We used the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to determine the prevalence of self-reported clinician diagnosed fibromyalgia and then compared demographics, symptoms, disability and medical utilization measures of persons with a clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia that did not meet diagnostic criteria (false-positive or prior [F/P] fibromyalgia) to persons with and without criteria-positive fibromyalgia. Methods The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) collected information about both clinical diagnosis and symptoms of fibromyalgia that was appropriately weighted to represent 225,726,257 US adults. Surrogate NHIS diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia were developed based on the level of polysymptomatic distress (PSD) as characterized in the 2011 modified American College of Rheumatology criteria (ACR) for fibromyalgia. Persons with F/P fibromyalgia were compared with persons who do not have fibromyalgia and those meeting surrogate NHIS fibromyalgia criteria. Results Of the 1.78% of persons reporting a clinical diagnosis, 73.5% did not meet NHIS fibromyalgia criteria. The prevalence of F/P fibromyalgia is 1.3%. F/P fibromyalgia is associated with a mild degree of polysymptomatic distress (NHIS PSD score 6.2) and characterized by frequent but not widespread pain and insomnia. Measures of work disability and medical utilization in F/P fibromyalgia were equal to that seen with NHIS criteria positive fibromyalgia and were 6-7x greater in F/P fibromyalgia than in non-fibromyalgia persons. F/P fibromyalgia was best predicted by being female (Odds Ratio [OR] 8.81), married (OR 3.27), and white (OR 1.96). In contrast, being a white, married woman was only modestly predictive of NHIS (criteria positive) fibromyalgia (OR 2.1). Conclusions The majority of clinically diagnosed fibromyalgia

  9. Three-Quarters of Persons in the US Population Reporting a Clinical Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia Do Not Satisfy Fibromyalgia Criteria: The 2012 National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Katz, Robert S; Bergman, Martin J; Wolfe, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Although fibromyalgia criteria have been in effect for decades, little is known about how the fibromyalgia diagnosis is applied and understood by clinicians and patients. We used the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to determine the prevalence of self-reported clinician diagnosed fibromyalgia and then compared demographics, symptoms, disability and medical utilization measures of persons with a clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia that did not meet diagnostic criteria (false-positive or prior [F/P] fibromyalgia) to persons with and without criteria-positive fibromyalgia. The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) collected information about both clinical diagnosis and symptoms of fibromyalgia that was appropriately weighted to represent 225,726,257 US adults. Surrogate NHIS diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia were developed based on the level of polysymptomatic distress (PSD) as characterized in the 2011 modified American College of Rheumatology criteria (ACR) for fibromyalgia. Persons with F/P fibromyalgia were compared with persons who do not have fibromyalgia and those meeting surrogate NHIS fibromyalgia criteria. Of the 1.78% of persons reporting a clinical diagnosis, 73.5% did not meet NHIS fibromyalgia criteria. The prevalence of F/P fibromyalgia is 1.3%. F/P fibromyalgia is associated with a mild degree of polysymptomatic distress (NHIS PSD score 6.2) and characterized by frequent but not widespread pain and insomnia. Measures of work disability and medical utilization in F/P fibromyalgia were equal to that seen with NHIS criteria positive fibromyalgia and were 6-7x greater in F/P fibromyalgia than in non-fibromyalgia persons. F/P fibromyalgia was best predicted by being female (Odds Ratio [OR] 8.81), married (OR 3.27), and white (OR 1.96). In contrast, being a white, married woman was only modestly predictive of NHIS (criteria positive) fibromyalgia (OR 2.1). The majority of clinically diagnosed fibromyalgia cases in the US do not reach levels of

  10. Three-Quarters of Persons in the US Population Reporting a Clinical Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia Do Not Satisfy Fibromyalgia Criteria: The 2012 National Health Interview Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Walitt

    Full Text Available Although fibromyalgia criteria have been in effect for decades, little is known about how the fibromyalgia diagnosis is applied and understood by clinicians and patients. We used the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS to determine the prevalence of self-reported clinician diagnosed fibromyalgia and then compared demographics, symptoms, disability and medical utilization measures of persons with a clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia that did not meet diagnostic criteria (false-positive or prior [F/P] fibromyalgia to persons with and without criteria-positive fibromyalgia.The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS collected information about both clinical diagnosis and symptoms of fibromyalgia that was appropriately weighted to represent 225,726,257 US adults. Surrogate NHIS diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia were developed based on the level of polysymptomatic distress (PSD as characterized in the 2011 modified American College of Rheumatology criteria (ACR for fibromyalgia. Persons with F/P fibromyalgia were compared with persons who do not have fibromyalgia and those meeting surrogate NHIS fibromyalgia criteria.Of the 1.78% of persons reporting a clinical diagnosis, 73.5% did not meet NHIS fibromyalgia criteria. The prevalence of F/P fibromyalgia is 1.3%. F/P fibromyalgia is associated with a mild degree of polysymptomatic distress (NHIS PSD score 6.2 and characterized by frequent but not widespread pain and insomnia. Measures of work disability and medical utilization in F/P fibromyalgia were equal to that seen with NHIS criteria positive fibromyalgia and were 6-7x greater in F/P fibromyalgia than in non-fibromyalgia persons. F/P fibromyalgia was best predicted by being female (Odds Ratio [OR] 8.81, married (OR 3.27, and white (OR 1.96. In contrast, being a white, married woman was only modestly predictive of NHIS (criteria positive fibromyalgia (OR 2.1.The majority of clinically diagnosed fibromyalgia cases in the US do not reach levels

  11. What Is Fibromyalgia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treat your fibromyalgia with medicines, lifestyle changes, and complementary therapies. Fibromyalgia is a long-lasting or chronic disorder that causes muscle pain and fatigue (feeling tired). If you have fibromyalgia, ...

  12. Nivel de actividad física, calidad de vida y niveles de depresión en mujeres mayores con fibromialgia (Physical activity levels, quality of life and incidence of depression in older women with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ignacio Sañudo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to determine the relationship between levels of depression and perceived quality of life based on the level of physical activity in patients with fibromyalgia in Seville (Spain. A total of 67 women diagnosed with fibromyalgia voluntarily participated in the study. The level of physical activity was assessed using the International Questionnaire of Physical Activity, the incidence of depression was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory and their perceived quality of life using the SF-36. Significant differences between physical function and general health based on the depression categories in those with a moderate level of physical activity were found. In addition, high correlations were found between levels of depression and physical functioning (r = -.409, p < .05, general health (r = -.453, p < .05 and mental health (r = -.539, p < .05 among the participants. In conclusion, given the close relationship between depression and the perceived quality of life and the ability of physical activity to modulate these relationships in fibromyalgia patients, professionals should establish prevention strategies based on the promotion of physical activity to help improve health in this population.

  13. Personality and Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Malin, Katrina; Littlejohn, Geoffrey O

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to review how personality characteristics contribute to the onset, maintenance or modulation of fibromyalgia. Method: The databases Medline and PsychINFO were examined from 1967 to 2012 to identify studies that investigated associations between fibromyalgia and personality. Search terms included fibromyalgia and personality, trait psychology, characteristics and individual differences. Results: Numerous studies indicate that patients with fibromyalgia experience psycholog...

  14. Fibromyalgia Patient Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibromyalgia: The Information and the Care You Deserve PATIENT HANDBOOK e Fibromyalgia: You Need the Facts Fibromyalgia (fi’bro-mi-al’je- ) affects more than ... occur in men as well. 1 People with fibromyalgia may experience the following symptoms: 2 • Chronic, widespread ...

  15. Worldwide epidemiology of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Luiz Paulo

    2013-08-01

    Studying the epidemiology of fibromyalgia (FM) is very important to understand the impact of this disorder on persons, families and society. The recent modified 2010 classification criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), without the need of tender points palpation, allows that larger and nationwide surveys may be done, worldwide. This article reviews the prevalence and incidence studies done in the general population, in several countries/continents, the prevalence of FM in special groups/settings, the association of FM with some sociodemographic characteristics of the population, and the comorbidity of FM with others disorders, especially with headaches.

  16. Clinical features in patients with chronic muscle pain--with special reference to fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Petersen, I S; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1993-01-01

    in the other groups of patients, but not to the same extent. In particular, sleep disturbance, subjective swelling, cold and exercise intolerance and low self-reported physical performance were significantly related to fibromyalgia. The major components of fibromyalgia were not wholly different compared...... with other European and North American studies, except for sleep disturbance and subjective swelling, which was somewhat more pronounced in this study. The most used medications in fibromyalgia patients at referral were analgesics, anxiolytic drugs and female sex hormones. Medication in fibromyalgia...

  17. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  18. Personality and Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Katrina; Littlejohn, Geoffrey O

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to review how personality characteristics contribute to the onset, maintenance or modulation of fibromyalgia. Method: The databases Medline and PsychINFO were examined from 1967 to 2012 to identify studies that investigated associations between fibromyalgia and personality. Search terms included fibromyalgia and personality, trait psychology, characteristics and individual differences. Results: Numerous studies indicate that patients with fibromyalgia experience psychological distress. Various instruments have been used to evaluate distress and related psychological domains, such as anxiety or depression, in fibromyalgia. In many cases, these same instruments have been used to study personality characteristics in fibromyalgia with a subsequent blurring of cause and effect between personality and psychological distress. In addition, the symptoms of fibromyalgia may change pre-illness personality characteristics themselves. These issues make it difficult to identify specific personality characteristics that might influence the fibromyalgia process. Despite this inherent problem with the methodologies used in the studies that make up this literature review, or perhaps because of it, we found no defined personality profile specific to fibromyalgia. However, many patients with fibromyalgia do show personality characteristics that facilitate psychological responses to stressful situations, such as catastrophising or poor coping techniques, and these in turn associate with mechanisms contributing to fibromyalgia. Conclusion: No specific fibromyalgia personality is defined but it is proposed that personality is an important filter that modulates a person’s response to psychological stressors. Certain personalities may facilitate translation of these stressors to physiological responses driving the fibromyalgia mechanism. PMID:23002409

  19. Clinical features in patients with chronic muscle pain--with special reference to fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Petersen, I S; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1993-01-01

    Clinical characteristics were studied in patients with chronic muscle pain, divided into three groups according to the characteristics of their pain; "fibromyalgia" (n = 23), "widespread muscle pain" (n = 21), and "regional muscle pain" (n = 28). Typical fibromyalgia features were also seen...... in the other groups of patients, but not to the same extent. In particular, sleep disturbance, subjective swelling, cold and exercise intolerance and low self-reported physical performance were significantly related to fibromyalgia. The major components of fibromyalgia were not wholly different compared...... with other European and North American studies, except for sleep disturbance and subjective swelling, which was somewhat more pronounced in this study. The most used medications in fibromyalgia patients at referral were analgesics, anxiolytic drugs and female sex hormones. Medication in fibromyalgia...

  20. Altered Functional Performance in Patients with Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Isis da Silva; Gamundí, Antoni; Miranda, José G Vivas; França, Lucas G Souza; De Santana, Charles Novaes; Montoya, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common chronic pain condition that exerts a considerable impact on patients' daily activities and quality of life. Objectives: The main objective of the present study was to evaluate kinematic parameters of gait, functional performance, and balance in women with fibromyalgia syndrome. Methods: The study included 26 female patients with fibromyalgia (49.2 ± 8.0 years) according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology, as well as 16 pain-free women (43.5 ± 8.5 years). Gait and balance parameters were extracted from video recordings of participants performing several motor tasks. Non-linear dynamic of body sway time series was also analyzed by computing the Hurst exponent. In addition, functional performance and clinical pain were obtained by using standardized motor tests (Berg's balance scale, 6-min walking test, timed up and go task, Romberg's balance test) and self-report questionnaires (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire). Results: Walking speed was significantly diminished ( p cycle frequency ( p assessment of both psychological responses to pain and physical impairments during postural control and gait.

  1. The Prevalence and Characteristics of Fibromyalgia in the 2012 National Health Interview Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Nahin, Richard L.; Katz, Robert S.; Bergman, Martin J.; Wolfe, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Background Most knowledge of fibromyalgia comes from the clinical setting, where healthcare-seeking behavior and selection issues influence study results. The characteristics of fibromyalgia in the general population have not been studied in detail. Methods We developed and tested surrogate study specific criteria for fibromyalgia in rheumatology practices using variables from the US National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the modification (for surveys) of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) preliminary fibromyalgia criteria. The surrogate criteria were applied to the 2012 NHIS and identified persons who satisfied criteria from symptom data. The NHIS weighted sample of 8446 persons represents 225.7 million US adults. Results Fibromyalgia was identified in 1.75% (95% CI 1.42, 2.07), or 3.94 million persons. However, 73% of identified cases self-reported a physician’s diagnosis other than fibromyalgia. Identified cases had high levels of self-reported pain, non-pain symptoms, comorbidity, psychological distress, medical costs, Social Security and work disability. Caseness was associated with gender, education, ethnicity, citizenship and unhealthy behaviors. Demographics, behaviors, and comorbidity were predictive of case status. Examination of the surrogate polysymptomatic distress scale (PSD) of the 2010 ACR criteria found fibromyalgia symptoms extending through the full length of the scale. Conclusions Persons identified with criteria-based fibromyalgia have severe symptoms, but most (73%) have not received a clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia. The association of fibromyalgia-like symptoms over the full length of the PSD scale with physiological as well as mental stressors suggests PSD may be a universal response variable rather than one restricted to fibromyalgia. PMID:26379048

  2. The Prevalence and Characteristics of Fibromyalgia in the 2012 National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Nahin, Richard L; Katz, Robert S; Bergman, Martin J; Wolfe, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Most knowledge of fibromyalgia comes from the clinical setting, where healthcare-seeking behavior and selection issues influence study results. The characteristics of fibromyalgia in the general population have not been studied in detail. We developed and tested surrogate study specific criteria for fibromyalgia in rheumatology practices using variables from the US National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the modification (for surveys) of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) preliminary fibromyalgia criteria. The surrogate criteria were applied to the 2012 NHIS and identified persons who satisfied criteria from symptom data. The NHIS weighted sample of 8446 persons represents 225.7 million US adults. Fibromyalgia was identified in 1.75% (95% CI 1.42, 2.07), or 3.94 million persons. However, 73% of identified cases self-reported a physician's diagnosis other than fibromyalgia. Identified cases had high levels of self-reported pain, non-pain symptoms, comorbidity, psychological distress, medical costs, Social Security and work disability. Caseness was associated with gender, education, ethnicity, citizenship and unhealthy behaviors. Demographics, behaviors, and comorbidity were predictive of case status. Examination of the surrogate polysymptomatic distress scale (PSD) of the 2010 ACR criteria found fibromyalgia symptoms extending through the full length of the scale. Persons identified with criteria-based fibromyalgia have severe symptoms, but most (73%) have not received a clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia. The association of fibromyalgia-like symptoms over the full length of the PSD scale with physiological as well as mental stressors suggests PSD may be a universal response variable rather than one restricted to fibromyalgia.

  3. Pediatric fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ablin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia (FM is currently defined as chronic widespread pain (CWP with allodynia or hyperalgesia to pressure pain. It is classified as one of the large group of soft-tissue pain syndromes. Pain is the cardinal symptom of FM; however, most patients also experience additional symptoms such as debilitating fatigue, disrupted or non-restorative sleep, functional bowel disturbances, and a variety of neuropsychiatric problems, including cognitive dysfunction, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Its pathogenesis is not entirely understood, although it is currently believed to be the result of a central nervous system (CNS malfunction that increases pain transmission and perception. FMS usually involves females, and in these patients it often makes its first appearance during menopause. But it is often diagnosed both in young as well as elderly individuals. Pediatric FMS is a frustrating condition affecting children and adolescents at a crucial stage of their physical and emotional development. Pediatric FMS is an important differential diagnosis to be considered in the evaluation of children suffering from widespread musculoskeletal pain, and must be differentiated from a spectrum of inflammatory joint disorders such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, etc. The management of pediatric FMS is centered on the issues of education, behavioral and cognitive change (with a strong emphasis on physical exercise, and a relatively minor role for pharmacological treatment with medications such as muscle relaxants, analgesics and tricyclic agents.

  4. Fibromyalgia symptoms and cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogal, Shari S; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Wasan, Ajay D; Szigethy, Eva; Lotrich, Francis; DiMartini, Andrea F

    2015-05-01

    An association between fibromyalgia and hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been previously described. However, the relationship between nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibromyalgia symptoms has not been assessed, though they share several risk factors. We aimed to assess the factors associated with fibromyalgia symptoms across etiologies of liver disease. Patients with cirrhosis due to HCV, NASH, or alcohol were recruited from an outpatient hepatology clinic and administered the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the modified 2010 American College of Rheumatology Diagnostic Criteria for Fibromyalgia. Serum inflammatory markers were measured with standard luminex assays. Of 193 participants, 53 (27 %) met criteria for fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia symptoms were significantly associated with etiology of liver disease (HCV: 35 %, NASH: 30 %, alcohol-related liver disease: 12 %, p etiology of liver disease (NASH vs. HCV not different, alcohol vs. HCV OR 0.19, 95 % CI 0.05, 0.63) were associated with fibromyalgia symptoms. If abdominal pain was included in the model, etiology became nonsignificant, indicating that it may be central sensitization due to abdominal pain in patients with chronic liver disease that explains fibromyalgia symptoms rather than the etiology of liver disease or inflammation. Fibromyalgia symptoms were significantly associated with HCV and NASH cirrhosis and with psychiatric symptoms. Future work should focus on the underlying pathophysiology and management of widespread pain in patients with cirrhosis.

  5. Fibromyalgia and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, William O; Langston, Michael E; Acton, Emily K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this case-matched study was to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders and explore the utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The billing diagnosis codes of 1,730 new, non-selected patient encounters were reviewed over a three-year period for an epileptologist in a neurology clinic to identify all patients with historical diagnoses of fibromyalgia. The frequency with which epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Age and gender case-matched controls were used for a between-group comparison. Wilcoxon tests were used to analyse interval data, and Chi-square was used to analyse categorical data (pFibromyalgia was retrospectively identified in 95/1,730 (5.5%) patients in this cohort. Females represented 95% of the fibromyalgia sample (age: 53 years; 95% CI: 57, 51). Forty-three percent of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis, most commonly chronic pain. Paroxysmal events were present in 57% of fibromyalgia patients and 54% of case-matched controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events, and 12% physiological non-epileptic events (p = 0.009). Fibromyalgia was shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients is less than previously described.

  6. [Fibromyalgia: behavioral medicine interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, F; Holtz, M C; van der Meer, B; Krohn-Grimberghe, B

    2007-10-01

    The etiology of fibromyalgia as a chronic disease is still unexplained. This article gives an overview of the newest treatment methods of behavioral medicine of the fibromyalgia syndrome with regard to the state of research of etiology and diagnosis of this disease. Methods such as operant conditioning, cognitive-behavioral approaches, patient education and relaxation methods are discussed.

  7. Self-reported cardiorespiratory fitness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Andreas; Marott, Jacob Louis; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The predictive value and improved risk classification of self-reported cardiorespiratory fitness (SRCF), when added to traditional risk factors on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and longevity, are unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 3843 males and 5093 females from the Copenhagen...

  8. A Comprehensive Evaluation of Standardized Assessment Tools in the Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia and in the Assessment of Fibromyalgia Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad S. Boomershine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard assessments for fibromyalgia (FM diagnosis and core FM symptom domains are needed for biomarker development and treatment trials. Diagnostic and symptom assessments are reviewed and recommendations are made for standards. Recommendations for existing assessments include the American College of Rheumatology FM classification criteria using the manual tender point Survey for diagnosis, the brief pain inventory average pain visual analogue scale for pain intensity, the function subscale of the revised fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQR for physical function, the patient global impression of change and FIQR for overall/global improvement, the hospital anxiety and depression scale depression subscale for depression, the multiple ability self-report questionnaire for cognitive dysfunction, the fatigue severity scale for fatigue, the FIQR for multidimensional function/health-related quality of life, the jenkins sleep scale for sleep disturbance, and the fibromyalgia intensity score for tenderness. Forthcoming assessments including the FIQR for diagnosis, NIH PROMIS, and FIBRO Change scales are discussed.

  9. Increased risk of a suicide event in patients with primary fibromyalgia and in fibromyalgia patients with concomitant comorbidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chen-Chia; Tseng, Chun-Hung; Chen, Jiunn-Horng; Lan, Joung-Liang; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Tsay, Gregory J.; Hsu, Chung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An increased risk of suicide ideation and death has been reported in patients with fibromyalgia. This study aimed to evaluate the risk of a suicide event in patients with primary fibromyalgia and in fibromyalgia patients with comorbidities. We used the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database, a subset of the national insurance claim dataset, which enrolled 1 million Taiwanese people from 2000 to 2005, to identify 95,150 patients with incident fibromyalgia (ICD-9-CM 729.0–729.1) and 190,299 reference subjects matched by sex, age, and index date of diagnosis, with a mean of 8.46 ± 2.37 years of follow-up until 2011. The risk of a suicide event (ICD-9-CM, External-Cause Codes 950–959) was analyzed with a Cox proportional hazards model. Stratification analysis was performed by separating fibromyalgia patients and reference subjects with respect to each comorbidity to determine the risk of suicide in fibromyalgia patients with or without comorbidity relative to subjects who had neither fibromyalgia nor comorbidity. In this Taiwanese dataset, there were 347 suicide events in patients with fibromyalgia (4.16 per 104 person-years) and 424 in matched reference subjects (2.63 per 104 person-years) with a significant crude hazard ratio (HR) of 1.58 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.38–1.83) and an adjusted HR of 1.38 (95% CI 1.17–1.71) for fibromyalgia patients relative to the matched reference subjects. According to the 2 × 2 stratification analysis, we found that fibromyalgia patients without comorbidity had an independent but mild risk of a suicide event with adjusted HRs ranging from 1.33 to 1.69 relative to subjects with neither fibromyalgia nor comorbidity. Meanwhile, fibromyalgia patients with comorbidity led to a markedly enhanced risk of a suicide event relative to the matched reference subjects, with adjusted HRs ranging from 1.51 to 8.23. Our analysis confirmed a mild-to-moderate risk of a suicide event in patients with primary fibromyalgia

  10. Does association of opioid use with pain and function differ by fibromyalgia or widespread pain status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judith A; Shortreed, Susan M; Saunders, Kathleen W; LeResche, Linda; Thielke, Stephen; Von Korff, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Many consider chronic opioid therapy (COT) to be ineffective for fibromyalgia, but empirical evidence is limited. Among patients identified as initiating COT, we examined whether fibromyalgia was associated with different relationships of opioid use to pain and activity interference outcomes 12 months later. We obtained electronic data on diagnoses and opioid prescriptions. We obtained patient self-report data, including pain and activity interference measures, at baseline, 4 months, and 12 months. Among 1218 patients, 429 (35%) met our definition of fibromyalgia. Patients with and without fibromyalgia who had intermittent/lower-dose or regular/higher-dose opioid use at 12 months had similar 12-month pain intensity scores. However, among patients with minimal/no opioid use at 12 months, 12-month pain intensity was greater for those with fibromyalgia (adjusted mean = 5.15 [95% confidence interval, 4.80-5.51]; 0-10 scale) than for those without (4.44 [4.15-4.72]). Similar patterns were observed for 12-month activity interference. Among patients who discontinued opioids by 12 months, those with fibromyalgia were more likely to report bothersome side effects and less likely to report pain improvement as important reasons for discontinuation (P fibromyalgia had worse outcomes and were less likely to have discontinued because of pain improvement. Among patients continuing COT, pain and activity interference outcomes were worse than those of patients with minimal/no opioid use and did not differ for those with fibromyalgia vs those with diverse other chronic pain conditions.

  11. Diagnosis and diagnostic tests for fibromyalgia (syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuser, W; Wolfe, F

    2012-09-28

    To present diagnostic criteria for the clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and to offer a scheme for diagnostic work-up in clinical practice. Narrative review of the literature, consensus documents by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), evidence-based interdisciplinary German guidelines on the diagnosis and management of FMS. The ACR 1990 classification criteria emphasized tender points and widespread pain as the key features of FMS. In 2010, the ACR proposed preliminary diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia that abandoned the tender point count and placed increased emphasis of patient symptoms. A later modification of the ACR 2010 criteria for use in surveys employed a self-report questionnaire (Fibromyalgia Survey Questionnaire FSQ) to assess patient symptoms. The FSQ can be used to assist physician's diagnosis of FMS. We recommend a stepwise diagnostic work-up of patients with chronic widespread pain (CWP) in primary care: Complete medical history including medication, complete medical examination, basic laboratory tests to screen for inflammatory or endocrinology diseases, referral to specialists only in case of suspected somatic diseases, assessment of limitations of daily functioning, screening for other functional somatic symptoms and mental disorders, and referring to mental health specialists in case of mental disorder. The diagnosis of FMS is easy in most patients with CWP and does not ordinarily require a rheumatologist. A rheumatologist's expertise might be needed to exclude difficult to diagnose or concomitant inflammatory rheumatic diseases. In the presence of mental illness referral to a mental health specialist for evaluation is recommended.

  12. Review of overlap between thermoregulation and pain modulation in fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Alice A.; Pardo, José V.; Pasley, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is characterized by widespread pain that is exacerbated by cold and stress but relieved by warmth. We review the points along thermal and pain pathways where temperature may influence pain. We also present evidence addressing the possibility that brown adipose tissue activity is linked to the pain of fibromyalgia given that cold initiates thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue via adrenergic activity, while warmth suspends thermogenesis. Although females have a higher incidence of fibromyalgia as well as more resting thermogenesis, they are less able to recruit brown adipose tissue in response to chronic stress than males. In addition, conditions that are frequently comorbid with fibromyalgia compromise brown adipose activity making it less responsive to sympathetic stimulation. This results in lower body temperatures, lower metabolic rates, and lower circulating cortisol/corticosterone in response to stress - characteristics of fibromyalgia. In the periphery, sympathetic nerves to brown adipose also project to surrounding tissues, including tender points characterizing fibromyalgia. As a result, the musculoskeletal hyperalgesia associated with conditions like fibromyalgia may result from referred pain in the adjacent muscle and skin. PMID:23887348

  13. Fibromyalgia: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauw, Daniel J

    2014-04-16

    Fibromyalgia is present in as much as 2% to 8% of the population, is characterized by widespread pain, and is often accompanied by fatigue, memory problems, and sleep disturbances. To review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of fibromyalgia. The medical literature on fibromyalgia was reviewed from 1955 to March 2014 via MEDLINE and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, with an emphasis on meta-analyses and contemporary evidence-based treatment guidelines. Treatment recommendations are based on the most recent evidence-based guidelines from the Canadian Pain Society and graded from 1 to 5 based on the level of available evidence. Numerous treatments are available for managing fibromyalgia that are supported by high-quality evidence. These include nonpharmacological therapies (education, exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy) and pharmacological therapies (tricyclics, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and gabapentinoids). Fibromyalgia and other "centralized" pain states are much better understood now than ever before. Fibromyalgia may be considered as a discrete diagnosis or as a constellation of symptoms characterized by central nervous system pain amplification with concomitant fatigue, memory problems, and sleep and mood disturbances. Effective treatment for fibromyalgia is now possible.

  14. The PedsQL™ as a patient-reported outcome in children and adolescents with fibromyalgia: an analysis of OMERACT domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limbers Christine A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia is a chronic health condition characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain, multiple tender points on physical examination, generalized muscular aching, stiffness, fatigue, nonrestorative sleep pattern, cognitive dysfunction, and mood disturbance. Recently, the Outcome Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials (OMERACT Fibromyalgia Syndrome Workshop ranked and prioritized the domains that should be consistently measured in fibromyalgia clinical trials, specifically, pain, generic health-related quality of life, fatigue, sleep quality, and physical function. The focus of these deliberations was exclusively on adult patients, and to our knowledge, these domains have not been previously tested within a multidimensional framework in children and adolescents with fibromyalgia. Methods An analysis to determine the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the PedsQL™ 4.0 (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ Generic Core Scales, PedsQL™ Multidimensional Fatigue Scale, and PedsQL™ Rheumatology Module Pain and Hurt Scale as patient-reported outcome (PRO measures for pediatric patients with fibromyalgia. The PedsQL™ Scales were completed by 59 families in a pediatric rheumatology clinic in a large children's hospital. Results The PedsQL™ evidenced minimal missing responses (0.53% patient self-report, 0.70% parent proxy-report, achieved excellent reliability for the Generic Core Scales Total Scale Score (α = 0.88 patient self-report, 0.87 parent proxy-report, the Multidimensional Fatigue Scale Total Scale Score (α = 0.94 patient self-report, 0.94 parent proxy-report, and acceptable reliability for the 4-item Rheumatology Module Pain and Hurt Scale (α = 0.68 patient self-report, 0.75 parent proxy-report. The PedsQL™ Generic Core Scales and Multidimensional Fatigue Scale significantly distinguished between pediatric patients with fibromyalgia and healthy children. Pediatric patients with

  15. [The fibromyalgia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Von M; Kapfhammer, H P

    2004-07-22

    The Fibromyalgia Syndrome Fibromyalgia is a "pain disorder" and is diagnosed in accordance with the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology. The clinical presentation involves a complexity of symptoms with pains occurring at numerous sites identified by "tender points", disturbed sleep, increased fatigue, and numerous psychovegetative and psychic symptoms. Epidemiological data reveal high prevalence figures for fibromyalgia, and the disease is usually chronic. The etiopathogenesis can be described only within a multifactorial model. Numerous neurobiological and psychosocial factors militate in favor of a central disturbance of stress coping and pain perception. Multimode therapeutic approaches need to be individualized, but in many cases continue to be only moderately successful.

  16. Fibromyalgia: dental aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Panchovska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia is a disease accompanied by diffuse chronic pain for >3 months and tenderness on palpation in at least 11 of 18 anatomic points (American College of Rheumatology criteria. Gnathalgia was also included in the revised fibromyalgia criteria in 2010. Some patients have facial pain spots, symptoms and signs of temporomandibular dysfunction in combination with chronic fatigue and sleep disorder. The paper presents the results of an anonymous questionnaire survey in patients with a valid diagnosis of fibromyalgia. The patients with this disease require a follow-up by a family physician, a rheumatologist, and a dentist.

  17. Humanistic and economic burden of fibromyalgia in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lulu K; Ebata, Nozomi; Hlavacek, Patrick; DiBonaventura, Marco; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Sadosky, Alesia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to examine the health and economic burden associated with fibromyalgia among adults in Japan. Materials and methods Data from the 2011–2014 Japan National Health and Wellness Survey (n=115,271), a nationally representative survey of adults, were analyzed. The greedy matching algorithm was used to match the respondents who self-reported a diagnosis of fibromyalgia with those not having fibromyalgia (n=256). Generalized linear models, controlling for covariates (eg, age and sex), examined whether the respondents with fibromyalgia differed from matched controls based on health status (health utilities; Mental and Physical Component Summary scores from Medical Outcomes Study: 12-item Version 2 and 36-item Version 2 Short Form Survey), sleep quality (ie, sleep difficulty symptoms), work productivity (Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire – General Health Version 2.0), health care resource use, and estimated annual indirect and direct costs (based on published annual wages and resource use events) in Japanese yen (¥). Results After adjustment for covariates, respondents with fibromyalgia relative to matched controls scored significantly lower on health utilities (adjusted means =0.547 vs 0.732), Mental Component Summary score (33.15 vs 45.88), and Physical Component Summary score (39.22 vs 50.81), all with Pfibromyalgia reported significantly poorer sleep quality than those without fibromyalgia. Respondents with fibromyalgia compared with those without fibromyalgia experienced significantly more loss in work productivity and health care resource use, resulting in those with fibromyalgia incurring indirect costs that were more than twice as high (adjusted means =¥2,826,395 vs ¥1,201,547) and direct costs that were nearly six times as high (¥1,941,118 vs ¥335,140), both with Pfibromyalgia experienced significantly poorer health-related quality of life and greater loss in work productivity and health care use than

  18. Fibromyalgia: a clinical challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, I

    1994-01-01

    The syndrome of fibromyalgia includes an unusually large and heterogeneous number of symptoms apart from the core features of generalized pain and widespread tenderness. Widespread tenderness is the only objective criterion. There is no evidence that fibromyalgia is a disease of the muscles...... or a rheumatic syndrome. The experience from an Australian epidemic of fibromyalgia indicates that there is an important psychosomatic component in the pathogenesis. Probably, fibromyalgia is not a disease entity; rather, the symptoms reflect difficulties in coping with various types of environmental stress....... Secondary to this, sleep disturbances, fatigue, a low level of physical activity and poor physical fitness may develop, rendering the patients susceptible to muscle pain and tenderness elicited by sleep disturbances. A vicious circle may be responsible for the chronicity of the syndrome. Identification...

  19. Fibromyalgia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Latin word "fibro" for fibrous tissue, and the Greek "myo" for muscle, and "algos" meaning pain. In ... Doctors diagnose fibromyalgia in someone based on medical history, the person's description of symptoms, and a physical ...

  20. International FItness Scale (IFIS): Construct Validity and Reliability in Women With Fibromyalgia: The al-Ándalus Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto; Segura-Jiménez, Víctor; Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Estévez-López, Fernando; McVeigh, Joseph G; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel; Ortega, Francisco B

    2016-03-01

    To examine the construct validity of the International FItness Scale (IFIS) (ie, self-reported fitness) against objectively measured physical fitness in women with fibromyalgia and in healthy women; and to study the test-retest reliability of the IFIS in women with fibromyalgia. Cross-sectional study. Fibromyalgia patient support groups. Women with fibromyalgia (n=413) and healthy women (controls) (n=195) for validity purposes and women with fibromyalgia (n=101) for the reliability study. The total sample was N=709. Not applicable. Fitness level was both self-reported (IFIS) and measured using performance-based fitness tests. For the reliability study the IFIS was completed on 2 occasions, 1 week apart. Women with fibromyalgia who reported average fitness had better measured fitness than those reporting very poor fitness (all Pfibromyalgia who had very low fitness and distinguish them from those with higher fitness levels. Furthermore, the IFIS was moderately reliable in women with fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fibromyalgia Pain: Options for Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and medications can lessen the severity of your fibromyalgia pain or fatigue, you will continue to have good days and bad days. When fibromyalgia pain or fatigue is severe, it might be tough for you ...

  2. Low incidence of HIV infection in an anonymous HIV counselling and testing clinic cohort in Bangkok, Thailand despite high HIV prevalence and self-report of high-risk behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanuphak, Nittaya; Paris, Robert; Colby, Donn; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Souza, Mark; Teeratakulpisarn, Nipat; Chomchey, Nitiya; Sutthichom, Duanghathai; Sukjitpaiboonphol, Amornrat; Pankam, Tippawan; Kim, Jerome H; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Phanuphak, Praphan

    2015-04-01

    HIV counselling and testing (HCT) clinics have the potential to be entry points for recruiting populations at high risk for HIV infection for HIV prevention and treatment studies. Cohort data from key populations are crucial for HIV study site selection. This cohort study recruited clients at an HCT clinic in Bangkok, Thailand. HIV prevalence was assessed along with demographics, perception of risk and behavioural risk factors. Participants who were HIV negative at baseline were followed up every 4 months for up to 1 year to measure HIV incidence and changes in risk behaviour. A total of 992 subjects enrolled; median age was 30 years, 27% were men who have sex with men (MSM) and 8% were commercial sex workers (CSW). Baseline HIV prevalence was 10%. Factors positively associated with HIV infection were age >30 years, lower educational status and being MSM. Factors negatively associated with HIV infection were self-perception of minimal or moderate risk. Overall dropout rate was 49%, with 24% not returning after enrolment. HIV incidence was lower than expected at 0.50 per 100 person-years overall and 1.95 per 100 person-years for MSM. This HCT population had a high baseline HIV prevalence but a low incidence rate on follow-up. Overall retention in the cohort was poor and may have resulted from suboptimal reminders and characteristics of high-risk clients who use anonymous HIV testing services. MSM had higher HIV incidence and better retention than other high-risk groups.

  3. Aquatic exercise training for fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidonde, Julia; Busch, Angela J; Webber, Sandra C; Schachter, Candice L; Danyliw, Adrienne; Overend, Tom J; Richards, Rachel S; Rader, Tamara

    2014-10-28

    Exercise training is commonly recommended for individuals with fibromyalgia. This review examined the effects of supervised group aquatic training programs (led by an instructor). We defined aquatic training as exercising in a pool while standing at waist, chest, or shoulder depth. This review is part of the update of the 'Exercise for treating fibromyalgia syndrome' review first published in 2002, and previously updated in 2007. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the benefits and harms of aquatic exercise training in adults with fibromyalgia. We searched The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 2 (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Health Technology Assessment Database, NHS Economic Evaluation Database), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDro, Dissertation Abstracts, WHO international Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and AMED, as well as other sources (i.e., reference lists from key journals, identified articles, meta-analyses, and reviews of all types of treatment for fibromyalgia) from inception to October 2013. Using Cochrane methods, we screened citations, abstracts, and full-text articles. Subsequently, we identified aquatic exercise training studies. Selection criteria were: a) full-text publication of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) in adults diagnosed with fibromyalgia based on published criteria, and b) between-group data for an aquatic intervention and a control or other intervention. We excluded studies if exercise in water was less than 50% of the full intervention. We independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data (24 outcomes), of which we designated seven as major outcomes: multidimensional function, self reported physical function, pain, stiffness, muscle strength, submaximal cardiorespiratory function, withdrawal rates and adverse effects. We resolved discordance through discussion. We evaluated interventions using mean differences

  4. Fibromyalgia in Behçet's disease: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobanputra, Claire; Richey, Roberta H; Nair, Jagdish; Moots, Robert J; Goebel, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterised by chronic widespread pain and tenderness. It has often been reported to occur concomitantly with chronic rheumatological conditions. Behçet's disease is a chronic relapsing, multisystem, autoinflammatory disease. There is only limited understanding of a potential relationship between fibromyalgia and Behçet's disease. Given the potential detrimental influence of pain on the outcome of chronic disease, the aim of this narrative review is to gain an understanding of the incidence and presentation of fibromyalgia in Behçet's disease. Electronic databases Scopus, Medline, PubMed and UpToDate were searched. A total of 269 studies were identified, and limitations and exclusion/inclusion criteria were applied to ensure accurate and comparable selection of studies; four studies were selected. All cases were assessed for the presence of fibromyalgia according to the 1990 or 2010 diagnostic criteria of the American College of Rheumatology, with Behçet's disease diagnosed according to the International Study Group (ISG) for Behçet's disease criteria. A higher prevalence of fibromyalgia (5.7-37.1%) was reported in Behçet's disease compared to that of the general population (2.9-4.7%). While an increased prevalence of fibromyalgia was found in patients with Behçet's disease, this needs to be considered within the context of limited available evidence. The potential impact of these conditions on the disease activity of each other is not clear and may require a prospective study. Fibromyalgia appears to be more prevalent in those with Behçet's disease than would be expected in the overall population. Significance: This review provides some evidence that fibromyalgia is more prevalent in those with Behçet's disease. To ensure appropriate patient treatment choices, it is important that both conditions are diagnosed where they co-exist.

  5. Reiki for the treatment of fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefi, Nassim; Bogart, Andy; Goldberg, Jack; Buchwald, Dedra

    2008-11-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common, chronic pain condition for which patients frequently use complementary and alternative medicine, including Reiki. Our objective was to determine whether Reiki is beneficial as an adjunctive fibromyalgia treatment. This was a factorial designed, randomized, sham-controlled trial in which participants, data collection staff, and data analysts were blinded to treatment group. The study setting was private medical offices in the Seattle, Washington metropolitan area. The subjects were comprised 100 adults with fibromyalgia. Four (4) groups received twice-weekly treatment for 8 weeks by either a Reiki master or actor randomized to use direct touch or no touch (distant therapy). The primary outcome was subjective pain as measured by visual analog scale at weeks 4, 8, and 20 (3 months following end of treatment). Secondary outcomes were physical and mental functioning, medication use, and health provider visits. Participant blinding and adverse effects were ascertained by self-report. Improvement between groups was examined in an intention-to-treat analysis. Neither Reiki nor touch had any effect on pain or any of the secondary outcomes. All outcome measures were nearly identical among the 4 treatment groups during the course of the trial. Neither Reiki nor touch improved the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Energy medicine modalities such as Reiki should be rigorously studied before being recommended to patients with chronic pain symptoms.

  6. Cognitive Dysfunction in Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Tulay Koca

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The primary symptom of fibromyalgia is widespread pain with muscle tenderness to light palpation. Howeover many patients report a wide range of symptoms including pain, dyscognition, sleep disturbances, fatigue and mood disorders (frequently depression. Such symptoms seem to be related to one another. Besides, a decrease in concentration and memory disorder has recognised as an independent symptom yet; added into literature under the terms and lsquo;dyscognition' and and lsquo;fibrofog'. Recently clinicians interested in investigations about dyscognition in fibromyalgia syndrome. Cognitive symptoms may be exacerbated by the presence of depression, anxiety, sleep dysorders, endocrine disregulations and pain; but the relationship is unclear. Additionally some of recent studies suggest that insulin resistance may represent a risk factor for memory impairment in these patients. There is lack of standardized tests, treatment methods and studies for understanding pathophysiologic pathways of cognitive problems (memory, concentration in fibromyalgia.

  7. Symptoms accompanying fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maresca

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia is a pain syndrome frequently observed in clinical practice. The classification criteria for fibromyalgia were proposed by Wolfe et al. (1, who clearly indicated the essential clinical features of the syndrome, i.e. chronic widespread pain and muscular tender points in at least 11 out of 18 sites of localisation. It must be noted that the criteria of Wolfe et al. were proposed for epidemiological and research purposes, but are currently used as diagnostic criteria. In patients suffering from fibromyalgia, the intensity of spontaneous pain and of pain provoked by mechanical stimulation of tender points may vary in a wide range and may induce more or less suffering and disability. Therefore, the intensity of spontaneous and provoked pain must be taken into account to evaluate the severity of the syndrome in every patient...

  8. Diagnosis and diagnostic tests for fibromyalgia (syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Wolfe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To present diagnostic criteria for the clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS and to offer a scheme for diagnostic work-up in clinical practice. Methods: Narrative review of the literature, consensus documents by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR, evidence-based interdisciplinary German guidelines on the diagnosis and management of FMS. Results: The ACR 1990 classification criteria emphasized tender points and widespread pain as the key features of FMS. In 2010, the ACR proposed preliminary diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia that abandoned the tender point count and placed increased emphasis of patient symptoms. A later modification of the ACR 2010 criteria for use in surveys employed a self-report questionnaire (Fibromyalgia Survey Questionnaire FSQ to assess patient symptoms. The FSQ can be used to assist physician’s diagnosis of FMS. We recommend a stepwise diagnostic work-up of patients with chronic widespread pain (CWP in primary care: Complete medical history including medication, complete medical examination, basic laboratory tests to screen for inflammatory or endocrinology diseases, referral to specialists only in case of suspected somatic diseases, assessment of limitations of daily functioning, screening for other functional somatic symptoms and mental disorders, and referring to mental health specialists in case of mental disorder. Conclusions: The diagnosis of FMS is easy in most patients with CWP and does not ordinarily require a rheumatologist. A rheumatologist’s expertise might be needed to exclude difficult to diagnose or concomitant inflammatory rheumatic diseases. In the presence of mental illness referral to a mental health specialist for evaluation is recommended.

  9. Toward characterization and definition of fibromyalgia severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh Yating

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no standard criteria for defining or assessing severity of fibromyalgia (FM as a condition as fibromyalgia is associated with multiple symptom domains. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether patient self-reported severity of FM is associated with severity of pain and sleep interference and the presence of core co-morbidities. Methods We recruited individuals ≥ 18 years of age with a clinician-confirmed diagnosis of FM ≥ 3 months and a current pain rating >2 on a 0-10 numeric rating scale (NRS. Patients completed a questionnaire by mail in which they self-rated their FM severity (very mild, mild, moderate, and severe, their current pain severity and extent of sleep interference (NRS; mild, 0-3; moderate, 4-6, severe, 7-10, and provided information (yes/no on the presence of core comorbidities (symptoms of depression, anxiety, sleep problems, back pain, neck pain and medication use for FM. The core symptoms of FM were stratified to assist with patient characterization. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to explore the relationship between self-reported FM severity and continuous variables (pain severity and sleep interference, and Mantel-Haenszel chi-square analysis was used to evaluate the trend in the proportions of patients reporting use of medications and core symptoms of FM by severity of FM. To complement patient-reported FM severity and to understand physicians' perspectives, a survey was performed among 28 physician specialists (rheumatology, neurology, anesthesiology/pain management, family practice, internal medicine, and psychiatry to determine what they assessed when evaluating FM severity in clinical practice. Results The population (N = 129 of FM patients was predominantly female (89.1%, with a mean age of 49.4 ± 11.0 years, and 81.4% reported duration ≥ 2 years. Self-reported FM severity was moderate/severe in 86.0% of patients; mean current pain score was 6.40 ± 2.19 (moderate

  10. Experience-Sampling Methodology with a Mobile Device in Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castilla Diana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the usability studies conducted in the development of an experience-sampling methodology (ESM system running in a mobile device. The goal of the system is to improve the accuracy and ecology in gathering daily self-report data in individuals suffering a chronic pain condition, fibromyalgia. The usability studies showed that the developed software to conduct ESM with mobile devices (smartphones, cell phones can be successfully used by individuals with fibromyalgia of different ages and with low level of expertise in the use of information and communication technologies. 100% of users completed the tasks successfully, although some have completely illiterate. Also there seems to be a clear difference in the way of interaction obtained in the two studies carried out.

  11. Increased risk of a suicide event in patients with primary fibromyalgia and in fibromyalgia patients with concomitant comorbidities: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chen-Chia; Tseng, Chun-Hung; Chen, Jiunn-Horng; Lan, Joung-Liang; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Tsay, Gregory J; Hsu, Chung-Yi

    2016-11-01

    An increased risk of suicide ideation and death has been reported in patients with fibromyalgia. This study aimed to evaluate the risk of a suicide event in patients with primary fibromyalgia and in fibromyalgia patients with comorbidities. We used the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database, a subset of the national insurance claim dataset, which enrolled 1 million Taiwanese people from 2000 to 2005, to identify 95,150 patients with incident fibromyalgia (ICD-9-CM 729.0-729.1) and 190,299 reference subjects matched by sex, age, and index date of diagnosis, with a mean of 8.46 ± 2.37 years of follow-up until 2011. The risk of a suicide event (ICD-9-CM, External-Cause Codes 950-959) was analyzed with a Cox proportional hazards model. Stratification analysis was performed by separating fibromyalgia patients and reference subjects with respect to each comorbidity to determine the risk of suicide in fibromyalgia patients with or without comorbidity relative to subjects who had neither fibromyalgia nor comorbidity. In this Taiwanese dataset, there were 347 suicide events in patients with fibromyalgia (4.16 per 10 person-years) and 424 in matched reference subjects (2.63 per 10 person-years) with a significant crude hazard ratio (HR) of 1.58 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.38-1.83) and an adjusted HR of 1.38 (95% CI 1.17-1.71) for fibromyalgia patients relative to the matched reference subjects. According to the 2 × 2 stratification analysis, we found that fibromyalgia patients without comorbidity had an independent but mild risk of a suicide event with adjusted HRs ranging from 1.33 to 1.69 relative to subjects with neither fibromyalgia nor comorbidity. Meanwhile, fibromyalgia patients with comorbidity led to a markedly enhanced risk of a suicide event relative to the matched reference subjects, with adjusted HRs ranging from 1.51 to 8.23. Our analysis confirmed a mild-to-moderate risk of a suicide event in patients with primary fibromyalgia. Attention should

  12. The 'I' in fibromyalgia - How does fibromyalgia shape academic identity?

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, N.

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition that is characterised by wide-spread pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances, cognitive dysfunctions, increased sensitivity and psychological disorders (White and Harth, 2001). Also, fibromyalgia is typically variable regarding its symptoms and their severity from one day to the next, even from one hour to the next (Wolfe and Walitt, 2013). Globally, between 0.66% and 10.5% of the general population suffer from fibromyalgia (Queiroz, 2013). Wessely (1994) highlig...

  13. 2016 Revisions to the 2010/2011 fibromyalgia diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Frederick; Clauw, Daniel J; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Goldenberg, Don L; Häuser, Winfried; Katz, Robert L; Mease, Philip J; Russell, Anthony S; Russell, Irwin Jon; Walitt, Brian

    2016-12-01

    The provisional criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 2010 and the 2011 self-report modification for survey and clinical research are widely used for fibromyalgia diagnosis. To determine the validity, usefulness, potential problems, and modifications required for the criteria, we assessed multiple research reports published in 2010-2016 in order to provide a 2016 update to the criteria. We reviewed 14 validation studies that compared 2010/2011 criteria with ACR 1990 classification and clinical criteria, as well as epidemiology, clinical, and databank studies that addressed important criteria-level variables. Based on definitional differences between 1990 and 2010/2011 criteria, we interpreted 85% sensitivity and 90% specificity as excellent agreement. Against 1990 and clinical criteria, the median sensitivity and specificity of the 2010/2011 criteria were 86% and 90%, respectively. The 2010/2011 criteria led to misclassification when applied to regional pain syndromes, but when a modified widespread pain criterion (the "generalized pain criterion") was added misclassification was eliminated. Based on the above data and clinic usage data, we developed a (2016) revision to the 2010/2011 fibromyalgia criteria. Fibromyalgia may now be diagnosed in adults when all of the following criteria are met: CONCLUSIONS: The fibromyalgia criteria have good sensitivity and specificity. This revision combines physician and questionnaire criteria, minimizes misclassification of regional pain disorders, and eliminates the previously confusing recommendation regarding diagnostic exclusions. The physician-based criteria are valid for individual patient diagnosis. The self-report version of the criteria is not valid for clinical diagnosis in individual patients but is valid for research studies. These changes allow the criteria to function as diagnostic criteria, while still being useful for classification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The association between metacognitions and the impact of Fibromyalgia in a German sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, Josianne; Gollwitzer, Mario; Spada, Marcantonio M; Fernie, Bruce A

    2016-04-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition of unknown aetiology, characterised by widespread pain, sleep disturbances, and fatigue. In this paper we examined the relationship metacognitions and the impact of Fibromyalgia in a German sample, detailing the translation and validation of a self-report metacognitive instrument. The Metacognitions about Symptoms Control Scale (MaSCS) was translated into German using the back-forward translation process. A total of 348 patients (316 female and 26 male) with Fibromyalgia contributed data to the study to test the structure and psychometric properties of the MaSCS. Confirmatory factor analyses, informed by modification indices, resulted in a 16-item scale consisting of two factors pertaining to positive and negative metacognitions about symptoms control. Further analyses revealed that both factors had good internal consistency. Correlation analyses established convergent validity, indicating that both factors were significantly associated with: (1) established positive and negative metacognitions scales; and (2) with symptoms severity in Fibromyalgia. Regression analyses revealed that positive metacognitions about symptoms control significantly predicted impairment in physical functioning while negative metacognitions about symptoms control significantly predicted the overall Fibromyalgia impact value, when controlling for stress, anxiety, and depression and a general metacognitions. The findings support the potential relevance of metacognitions, and utility of the German version of MaSCS, in examining the role of metacognitions in Fibromyalgia and other chronic health conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of naltrexone on pain sensitivity and mood in fibromyalgia: no evidence for endogenous opioid pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarred W Younger

    Full Text Available The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying fibromyalgia are still unknown, although some evidence points to endogenous opioid dysfunction. We examined how endogenous opioid antagonism affects pain and mood for women with and without fibromyalgia. Ten women with fibromyalgia and ten age- and gender-matched, healthy controls each attended two laboratory sessions. Each participant received naltrexone (50mg at one session, and placebo at the other session, in a randomized and double-blind fashion. Participants were tested for changes in sensitivity to heat, cold, and mechanical pain. Additionally, we collected measures of mood and opioid withdrawal symptoms during the laboratory sessions and at home the night following each session. At baseline, the fibromyalgia group exhibited more somatic complaints, greater sensory sensitivity, more opioid withdrawal somatic symptoms, and lower mechanical and cold pain-tolerance than did the healthy control group. Neither group experienced changes in pain sensitivity due to naltrexone administration. Naltrexone did not differentially affect self-reported withdrawal symptoms, or mood, in the fibromyalgia and control groups. Consistent with prior research, there was no evidence found for abnormal endogenous opioid activity in women with fibromyalgia.

  16. Following and Filming Fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøler, Maja; Blaakilde, Anne Leonora

    2010-01-01

    around is therefore difficult. Fibromyalgia has many side effects such as depression, colon irritability, restless legs, sleeping disorder, and cognitive problems. In sum FM is coined a syndrome, not a disease, since its characteristics do not entail to one specific organ or bodily part. Hence suffering...

  17. Validation of self-reported erythema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B; Thieden, E; Lerche, C M

    2013-01-01

    Most epidemiological data of sunburn related to skin cancer have come from self-reporting in diaries and questionnaires. We thought it important to validate the reliability of such data.......Most epidemiological data of sunburn related to skin cancer have come from self-reporting in diaries and questionnaires. We thought it important to validate the reliability of such data....

  18. Self reported disability and reference groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Soest, A.H.O.; Andreyeva, T.; Kapteyn, A.; Smith, J.P.; Wise, D.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter tests the importance of social interactions in people's self-reported work disability using data from a household survey representative of the Dutch population. It estimates a model of self-reported disability with an emphasis on how the reporting of disability is affected by the

  19. Dysautonomia, fibromyalgia and reflex dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisinger, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Autonomic nervous system dysfunction observed in fibromyalgia, characterized without exception by a sympathetic hyperactivity and hyporeactivity, has been reported. However, several studies demonstrated reduced levels of norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y at rest and after tilt table in some patients, which was improved by beta-stimulating agents. These findings support heterogeneity in fibromyalgia-associated dysautonomia. Fibromyalgia could be a generalized sympathetic dystrophy since both conditions are activated by trauma and partly linked to sympathetic mechanisms. Yet they differ on several points: hormonal and neurochemical abnormalities are observed in fibromyalgia whereas activation by peripheral trauma and hyperosteolysis are observed in reflex sympathetic dystrophy. PMID:17626612

  20. Does Association of Opioid Use with Pain and Function Differ by Fibromyalgia/Widespread Pain Status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judith A.; Shortreed, Susan M.; Saunders, Kathleen W.; LeResche, Linda; Thielke, Stephen; Von Korff, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Many consider chronic opioid therapy (COT) to be ineffective for fibromyalgia, but empirical evidence is limited. Among patients identified as initiating COT, we examined whether fibromyalgia was associated with different relationships of opioid use to pain and activity interference outcomes 12 months later. We obtained electronic data on diagnoses and opioid prescriptions. We obtained patient self-report data, including pain and activity interference measures, at baseline, 4 months, and 12 months. Among 1,218 patients, 429 (35%) met our definition of fibromyalgia. Patients with and without fibromyalgia who had intermittent/lower-dose or regular/higher-dose opioid use at 12 months had similar 12-month pain intensity scores. However, among patients with minimal/no opioid use at 12 months, 12-month pain intensity was greater for those with fibromyalgia (adjusted mean = 5.15 [95% CI = 4.80, 5.51]; 0-10 scale) than for those without (4.44 [4.15, 4.72]). Similar patterns were observed for 12-month activity interference. Among patients who discontinued opioids by 12 months, those with fibromyalgia were more likely to report bothersome side effects and less likely to report pain improvement as important reasons for discontinuation (P-values fibromyalgia had worse outcomes and were less likely to have discontinued due to pain improvement. Among patients continuing COT, pain and activity interference outcomes were worse than those of patients with minimal/no opioid use and did not differ for those with fibromyalgia versus those with diverse other chronic pain conditions. PMID:27643834

  1. The fibromyalgia survey score correlates with preoperative pain phenotypes but does not predict pain outcomes after shoulder arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jennifer; Kahn, Richard L.; YaDeau, Jacques T.; Tsodikov, Alexander; Goytizolo, Enrique A.; Guheen, Carrie R.; Haskins, Stephen C.; Oxendine, Joseph A.; Allen, Answorth A.; Gulotta, Lawrence V.; Dines, David M.; Brummett, Chad M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Fibromyalgia characteristics can be evaluated using a simple, self-reported measure, which correlates with postoperative opioid consumption following lower-extremity joint arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to determine if preoperative pain history and/or the fibromyalgia survey score can predict postoperative outcomes following shoulder arthroscopy, which may cause moderate-to-severe pain. Methods In this prospective study, 100 shoulder arthroscopy patients completed preoperative validated self-report measures to assess baseline quality of recovery score, physical functioning, depression/anxiety, and neuropathic pain. Fibromyalgia characteristics were evaluated using a validated measure of widespread pain and comorbid symptoms on a 0–31 scale. Outcomes were assessed on postoperative days 2 (opioid consumption [primary], pain, physical functioning, quality of recovery score) and 14 (opioid consumption, pain). Results Fibromyalgia survey scores ranged from 0–13. The cohort was divided into tertiles for univariate analyses. Preoperative depression/anxiety (ppain (p=0.008) were higher, and physical functioning was lower (pfibromyalgia survey score groups. The fibromyalgia survey score was not associated with postoperative pain or opioid consumption; however, it was independently associated with poorer quality of recovery scores (p=0.001). The only independent predictor of postoperative opioid use was preoperative opioid use (p=0.038). Discussion Fibromyalgia survey scores were lower than those in a previous study of joint arthroplasty. Although they distinguished a negative preoperative pain phenotype, fibromyalgia scores were not independently associated with postoperative opioid consumption. Further research is needed to elucidate the impact of a fibromyalgia-like phenotype on postoperative analgesic outcomes. PMID:26626295

  2. Fibromyalgia Symptoms or Not? Understand the Fibromyalgia Diagnosis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014;311:1547. Goldman L, et al., eds. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and myofascial pain. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. ... Fibromyalgia. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; ...

  3. Fibromyalgia Flares: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ann; Whipple, Mary O; Rhudy, Lori M

    2016-03-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia report periods of symptom exacerbation, colloquially referred to as "flares" and despite clinical observation of flares, no research has purposefully evaluated the presence and characteristics of flares in fibromyalgia. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe fibromyalgia flares in a sample of patients with fibromyalgia. Using seven open-ended questions, patients were asked to describe how they perceived fibromyalgia flares and triggers and alleviating factors associated with flares. Patients were also asked to describe how a flare differs from their typical fibromyalgia symptoms and how they cope with fibromyalgia flares. Content analysis was used to analyze the text. A total of 44 participants completed the survey. Responses to the seven open-ended questions revealed three main content areas: causes of flares, flare symptoms, and dealing with a flare. Participants identified stress, overdoing it, poor sleep, and weather changes as primary causes of flares. Symptoms characteristic of flares included flu-like body aches/exhaustion, pain, fatigue, and variety of other symptoms. Participants reported using medical treatments, rest, activity and stress avoidance, and waiting it out to cope with flares. Our results demonstrate that periods of symptom exacerbation (i.e., flares) are commonly experienced by patients with fibromyalgia and symptoms of flares can be differentiated from every day or typical symptoms of fibromyalgia. Our study is the first of its kind to qualitatively explore characteristics, causes, and management strategies of fibromyalgia flares. Future studies are needed to quantitatively characterize fibromyalgia flares and evaluate mechanisms of flares. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Self-reported skin morbidity in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Iben Marie; Zarchi, Kian; Ellervik, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Skin diseases are thought to be common in the general population. In 2004, a cross-sectional study in Norway, using a validated questionnaire for 18,770 individuals, revealed a high prevalence of skin diseases in the general population. To describe the prevalence of self-reported skin morbidities...... questionnaire. In total, 17.2% self-reported skin complaints. The most prominent self-reported skin complaint was itch with an overall prevalence of 6.5%. The skin morbidity most influenced by age was pimples. There was a uniform pattern showing fewer skin complaints with increasing education. Women reported...

  5. Health and distress predictors of heart rate variability in fibromyalgia and other forms of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostoufi, Sheeva M; Afari, Niloofar; Ahumada, Sandra M; Reis, Veronica; Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2012-01-01

    To examine health, psychological, and autonomic impairment differences between individuals with fibromyalgia and those with other chronic benign pain in these conditions. The possible role of the autonomic nervous system in the maintenance of chronic benign pain can be examined using heart rate variability (HRV), which measures the interplay between the excitatory sympathetic and the inhibitory parasympathetic nervous system. Predictors of HRV will also be examined. This study examined resting HRV in a sample of 84 patients with chronic benign pain, a subgroup of whom had fibromyalgia. Participants completed a battery of self-report measures and underwent measurements of resting HRV. Individuals with fibromyalgia experienced higher levels of depression (t (82)=-2.27, pfibromyalgia. Future research can further examine the role of physical health functioning, psychological distress, and pain severity in the relationship between chronic pain and autonomic abnormalities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. The evaluation of the fibromyalgia patients

    OpenAIRE

    A. Alciati; G. Arioli; L. Altomonte; R. Casale; S. Stisi; G. Cassisi; G. Biasi; M. Di Franco; M. Spath; D. Buskila; M. Cazzola; F. Ceccherelli; A. Marsico; R. Gorla; R. Torta

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a rheumatic disease characterized by musculoskeletal pain, chronic diffuse tension and/or stiffness from joints and muscles, easy fatigue, sleep and emotional disturbances, and pressure pain sensitivity in at least 11 of 18 tender points (TP) (1, 2). This disease has an incidence of 2% in the general population, but it is found more often in middle-aged women (3.4%) (3, 4). The etiopathogenesis of FM has not been clarified yet. FM patients have a dysregulation of pain neu...

  7. The evaluation of the fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alciati

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia (FM is a rheumatic disease characterized by musculoskeletal pain, chronic diffuse tension and/or stiffness from joints and muscles, easy fatigue, sleep and emotional disturbances, and pressure pain sensitivity in at least 11 of 18 tender points (TP (1, 2. This disease has an incidence of 2% in the general population, but it is found more often in middle-aged women (3.4% (3, 4. The etiopathogenesis of FM has not been clarified yet. FM patients have a dysregulation of pain neurotransmitters and neurohormone-mediated association with irregularities in the physiology of sleep...

  8. PESTICIDE USE AND INCIDENT, SELF-REPORTED RETINAL DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This was a poster presentation at the meeting of the steering committee of the Agricultural Health Study, which occurred at the NIEHS facility in Research Triangle Park, NC on Feb 22-23, 2007. It is not expected that this document will be published in the current format, although...

  9. Crime Self-Reporting Study: Phase 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buck, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    The PERSEREC Crime Self-Reporting Study covers criminal record checks conducted in CY00 on 14,470 subjects of DoD security clearance investigations, including uniformed military, civilian, and contractor personnel...

  10. What's in a Self-report?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Pernille Stemann; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Olsen, Else Marie

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how similar pregnant women with self-reported lifetime eating disorder (ED) were to pregnant women with a hospital diagnosis of ED. A total of 83 731 pregnant women enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort reported on ED, and by linkage to the Danish health...... registers, hospital diagnoses of ED were obtained. Characteristics of women with self-reported ED, hospital diagnosed ED and without ED were compared using chi-square tests, t-test and logistic regression models with robust standard errors. In total, 4.8% women reported ED, and 0.5% had a hospital diagnosis...... of ED recorded in the health registers. Women with self-reported ED were comparable with women with hospital diagnosed ED on most reproductive and health characteristics, while they differed from women without ED concerning all characteristics studied. Our findings highlight that women with self-reported...

  11. Neurobiology Underlying Fibromyalgia Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Ceko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread pain, clinical symptoms that include cognitive and sleep disturbances, and other abnormalities such as increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, increased sensitivity to multiple sensory modalities, and altered pain modulatory mechanisms. Here we relate experimental findings of fibromyalgia symptoms to anatomical and functional brain changes. Neuroimaging studies show augmented sensory processing in pain-related areas, which, together with gray matter decreases and neurochemical abnormalities in areas related to pain modulation, supports the psychophysical evidence of altered pain perception and inhibition. Gray matter decreases in areas related to emotional decision making and working memory suggest that cognitive disturbances could be related to brain alterations. Altered levels of neurotransmitters involved in sleep regulation link disordered sleep to neurochemical abnormalities. Thus, current evidence supports the view that at least some fibromyalgia symptoms are associated with brain dysfunctions or alterations, giving the long-held “it is all in your head” view of the disorder a new meaning.

  12. [Subgroups of fibromyalgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W; Schneider, M; Joos, T; Hsu, H Y; Stratz, T

    2007-10-01

    As has been shown by a number of working groups, primary fibromyalgia syndrome does not represent a single clinical entity. It is possible to distinguish between a subgroup with high pain sensitivity and no associated psychiatric condition, a second subgroup characterized by depression and concomitant pain symptoms associated with fibromyalgia syndrome, and a third group with somatoform pain disorder of the fibromyalgia type. Bland inflammatory processes must be considered as the cause in the first group, while depression is the underlying reason for the development of pain in the second group. In the third group, serious previous or still existing psychological problems or also insufficient coping with illness symptoms must be regarded as the reason for pain chronification. Group 1 benefits from a blocking of the 5-HT3 receptors by means of tropisetron, for example. This not only affects pain chronification but also the inflammatory process itself. Group 2 needs antidepressant treatment, whereas the focus should be on psychotherapy is group 3. Groups 1 and 2 will also profit from multimodal physical treatment programs; to a certain extent this applies to group 3 as well. So-called mixed types require a combination of therapeutic measures.

  13. Increased Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Patients with Primary Fibromyalgia and Those with Concomitant Comorbidity-A Taiwanese Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hsien Su

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia has seldom been associated with coronary heart disease (CHD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of CHD in patients with fibromyalgia.We used a dataset of one million participants, systemically scrambled from the Taiwanese national insurance beneficiaries, to identify 61,612 patients with incident fibromyalgia (ICD-9-CM 729.0-729.1 and 184,834 reference subjects matched by sex, age and index date of diagnosis in a 1:3 ratio from 2000 to 2005, with a mean 8.86 ± 2.68 years of follow-up until 2011. Risk of CHD was analyzed by Cox proportional hazard modeling.Patients with fibromyalgia had a mean age of 44.1 ± 16.5 years. CHD events developed in fibromyalgia patients (n = 8,280; 15.2 per 103 person-years and reference subjects (n = 15,162; 9.26 per 103 person-years with a significant incidence rate ratio of 1.64 (95% confidence interval: 1.61-1.68. The adjusted hazard ratio for CHD in fibromyalgia patients relative to reference subjects was 1.47 (1.43-1.51, after adjusting for age, gender, occupation, monthly income, traditional cardiovascular comorbidities, depression and anxiety. We noted that fibromyalgia and cardiovascular comorbidities had a significant interaction effect on CHD risk (p for interaction <0.01, which was markedly enhanced in fibromyalgia patients with concomitant comorbidities relative to patients with primary fibromyalgia and reference subjects (no fibromyalgia, no comorbidity.Our report shows that fibromyalgia patients have an independent risk for CHD development. Fibromyalgia patients with concomitant comorbidities have markedly increased CHD risk relative to those with primary fibromyalgia.

  14. Increased Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Patients with Primary Fibromyalgia and Those with Concomitant Comorbidity—A Taiwanese Population-Based Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Jiunn-Horng; Lan, Joung-Liang; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Tseng, Chun-Hung; Hsu, Chung-Yi; Huang, Lichi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Fibromyalgia has seldom been associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of CHD in patients with fibromyalgia. Methods We used a dataset of one million participants, systemically scrambled from the Taiwanese national insurance beneficiaries, to identify 61,612 patients with incident fibromyalgia (ICD-9-CM 729.0–729.1) and 184,834 reference subjects matched by sex, age and index date of diagnosis in a 1:3 ratio from 2000 to 2005, with a mean 8.86 ± 2.68 years of follow-up until 2011. Risk of CHD was analyzed by Cox proportional hazard modeling. Results Patients with fibromyalgia had a mean age of 44.1 ± 16.5 years. CHD events developed in fibromyalgia patients (n = 8,280; 15.2 per 103 person-years) and reference subjects (n = 15,162; 9.26 per 103 person-years) with a significant incidence rate ratio of 1.64 (95% confidence interval: 1.61–1.68). The adjusted hazard ratio for CHD in fibromyalgia patients relative to reference subjects was 1.47 (1.43–1.51), after adjusting for age, gender, occupation, monthly income, traditional cardiovascular comorbidities, depression and anxiety. We noted that fibromyalgia and cardiovascular comorbidities had a significant interaction effect on CHD risk (p for interaction fibromyalgia patients with concomitant comorbidities relative to patients with primary fibromyalgia and reference subjects (no fibromyalgia, no comorbidity). Conclusions Our report shows that fibromyalgia patients have an independent risk for CHD development. Fibromyalgia patients with concomitant comorbidities have markedly increased CHD risk relative to those with primary fibromyalgia. PMID:26366998

  15. Capillaroscopic Findings in Primary Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambova, Sevdalina; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2017-06-07

    Although Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is observed in a significant proportion of patients with primary fibromyalgia, the available data on capillaroscopic findings in primary fibromyalgia are scarce. The aim of the study was to evaluate the capillaroscopic pattern in patients with primary fibromyalgia. 26 patients with primary fibromyalgia (25 women and 1 man) were included in the study. Mean age was 55±10 years. As control groups were examined 31 patients with primary RP and 35 healthy volunteers. Capillaroscopic examination was performed with a videocapillaroscope Videocap 3.0 (DS Medica), magnification 200x. The following capillaroscopic parameters were evaluated: distribution, shape, width, length, mean capillary density, presence of avascular areas, haemorrhages, neoangiogenesis, visibility of subpapillary plexus. RP was present in 65% (17/26) of the patients with primary fibromyalgia. The most frequent finding in patients with primary fibromyalgia was presence of dilated capillaries in 85% (22/26) of cases, including patients with RP as well as patients without peripheral vasospasm. However, the mean diameter of the arterial and the venous limb were significantly higher in the subgroup of fibromyalgia patients with clinical symptoms of RP. Analogous changes - the presence of dilated capillaries - were found in 96.6% (29/30) of patients with primary RP. In the group of primary fibromyalgia, signs of microangiopathy characteristic of connective tissue diseases could not be observed. In our study, the most frequent capillaroscopic finding in patients with primary fibromyalgia was presence of dilated capillaries analogous to primary RP. Capillaroscopic signs suggestive of connective tissue disease could not be found in primary fibromyalgia patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Sleep quality and facial pain in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Gui, Maisa Soares; Reimão, Rubens; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia Marisa

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate the sleep conditions in fibromyalgia syndrome and the influence of the temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and fibromyalgia association in self-reported sleep quality. Forty female patients with fibromyalgia (FMS) were compared with 40 healthy women [control group (CG)]. Three questionnaires were used (i.e. RDC/TMD to diagnose TMD and to determine pain intensity and disability and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) to assess sleep conditions). Statistical analyses were performed using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test to ordinal variables, Student's t-test to obtain the quantitative total scores of PSQI and chronic pain classification, Spearman's rho to determine the correlation between facial pain and quality sleep, and Fisher's exact test for other variables. A moderate correlation between facial pain intensity and low sleep quality was found (rho = 0·56; P0·05). Excessive daytime sleepiness was more prevalent in FMS (37·5%; PFibromyalgia patients experience intense facial pain in addition to poor sleep and high disabilities. TMD and FMS association do not appear to worsen this condition; however, facial pain intensity was correlated with low sleep quality.

  17. Fibromyalgia Impact and Mindfulness Characteristics in 4986 People with Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kim D; Mist, Scott D; Casselberry, Marie A; Ali, Ather; Christopher, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that mindfulness techniques may be beneficial in fibromyalgia. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis of six trials indicated improvement in depressive symptoms and quality of life, calling for increased rigor and use of standardized measures in future trials. The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between mindfulness [as measured by the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ)] and fibromyalgia impact [as measured by the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR)]. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with adults diagnosed with fibromyalgia from a national fibromyalgia advocacy foundation e-mail list. A total of 4986 respondents represented all 50 states in the United States and 30 countries. FIQR scores demonstrated moderate to severe fibromyalgia with the majority of subjects (59%) scoring ≤60. Scores on the FFMQ subscales ranged from 20.8 to 27.3, with highest scores for the observe subscale. All subscale correlations were small to moderate and indicated that more severe fibromyalgia impact was associated with less mindfulness except in the observe scale (r = .15, P > .000). No clinical or demographics explained as much variance in the FIQR total as any of the mindfulness subscales. Fibromyalgia patients experience symptoms that may be alleviated by mindfulness interventions. Baseline values for the observe subscale of the FFMQ were unexpectedly high. Further research is needed to know if this may be due to non-mindful observations and should be noted when the FFMQ is used in fibromyalgia clinical trials. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Fibromyalgia Impact and Mindfulness Characteristics in 4986 People with Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kim D.; Mist, Scott D.; Casselberry, Marie A.; Ali, Ather; Christopher, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Context and Objective A growing body of literature suggests that mindfulness techniques may be beneficial in fibromyalgia. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis of six trials indicated improvement in depressive symptoms and quality of life, calling for increased rigor and use of standardized measures in future trials. The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between mindfulness [as measured by the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ)] and fibromyalgia impact [as measured by the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR)]. Design, Setting, and Participants A cross-sectional survey was conducted with adults diagnosed with fibromyalgia from a national fibromyalgia advocacy foundation e-mail list. Results A total of 4986 respondents represented all 50 states in the United States and 30 countries. FIQR scores demonstrated moderate to severe fibromyalgia with the majority of subjects (59%) scoring ≤60. Scores on the FFMQ subscales ranged from 20.8 to 27.3, with highest scores for the observe subscale. All subscale correlations were small to moderate and indicated that more severe fibromyalgia impact was associated with less mindfulness except in the observe scale (r = .15, P > .000). No clinical or demographics explained as much variance in the FIQR total as any of the mindfulness subscales. Conclusions Fibromyalgia patients experience symptoms that may be alleviated by mindfulness interventions. Baseline values for the observe subscale of the FFMQ were unexpectedly high. Further research is needed to know if this may be due to non-mindful observations and should be noted when the FFMQ is used in fibromyalgia clinical trials. PMID:26005199

  19. Prevalence of fibromyalgia in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimagham, Hamidreza; Haghighi, Anousheh; Tayebi, Mehdi; Jenabi, Arya; Arabi, Mohsen; Kianmehr, Nahid

    2014-05-01

    This study sought to determine the prevalence of fibromyalgia syndrome and to identify whether fibromyalgia was associated with various clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters in hemodialysis patients. One hundred and forty-eight hemodialysis patients were examined for fibromyalgia symptoms according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Demographic characteristics, as well as causes of kidney failure, dialysis duration, and symptoms related to fibromyalgia were investigated. Of 148 patients, 18 (12.2%) were diagnosed with fibromyalgia. Patients with fibromyalgia had significantly poorer sleeping satisfaction than the control group (P = .02).The Beck Depression Inventory score was higher in 77.8% of the fibromyalgia patients than that in the control group (P = .006), but there was no significant difference in the anxiety score between the two groups (P = .86).In conclusion, there was a higher prevalence of fibromyalgia in hemodialysis patients than previously reported. Sleep disturbances and depression levels correlated with fibromyalgia.

  20. Association of abuse history with symptom severity and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Juan; Vincent, Ann; Cha, Stephen S; Luedtke, Connie A; Oh, Terry H

    2015-03-01

    A high prevalence of abuse has been reported in patients with fibromyalgia. We aimed to examine the association between self-reported abuse history and symptom severity and quality of life (QOL) in 962 patients with fibromyalgia. All patients completed the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and the Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36). Multivariate regression analyses were performed. In total, 289 patients (30%) reported a history of abuse. Of those who specified abuse types, 161 patients (59%) reported more than 1 type of abuse (36% emotional, 32% physical, 25% sexual, and 7% verbal). Patients in the abuse group were younger and more likely to be female, unemployed, unmarried, and current smokers compared with patients who reported no abuse. After adjusting for these differences, abuse history was associated with worse symptoms, as indicated by a higher FIQ total score (P anxiety (P fibromyalgia was associated with worse symptoms and QOL compared with those patients without abuse history. Future studies are needed to assess whether additional tailored interventions as part of fibromyalgia treatment are helpful for patients with a history of abuse.

  1. Newer treatments for fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E Harris

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Richard E Harris, Daniel J ClauwDepartment of Anesthesiology, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Fibromyalgia syndrome is a common chronic pain disorder of unknown etiology. The lack of understanding of the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia has made this condition frustrating for patients and clinicians alike. The most common symptoms of this disorder are chronic widespread pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances, difficulty with memory, and morning stiffness. Emerging evidence points towards augmented pain processing within the central nervous system (CNS as having a primary role in the pathophysiology of this disorder. Currently the two drugs that are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the management of fibromyalgia are pregabalin and duloxetine. Newer data suggests that milnacipran, a dual norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitor, may be promising for the treatment of fibromyalgia. A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of milnacipran in 125 fibromyalgia patients showed significant improvements relative to placebo. Milnacipran given either once or twice daily at doses up to 200 mg/day was generally well tolerated and yielded significant improvements relative to placebo on measures of pain, patient’s global impression of change in their disease state, physical function, and fatigue. Future studies are needed to validate the efficacy of milnacipran in fibromyalgia.Keywords: fibromyalgia, pain, pharmacological, treatment

  2. Fibromyalgia diagnosis and diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Frederick; Häuser, Winfried

    2011-11-01

    Abstract Criteria for fibromyalgia developed from the conceptualization and hypotheses of Smythe and Moldofsky in 1977 and gradually evolved to a set of classification criteria endorsed by the American College of Rheumatology that emphasized tender points and widespread pain, measures of decreased pain threshold. In 2010, American College of Rheumatology fibromyalgia diagnostic criteria were published that abandoned the tender point count and placed increased emphasis of patient symptoms. The 2010 criteria also contained severity scales and offered physicians the opportunity to assess polysymptomatic distress on a continuous scale. This enabled physicians who were opposed to the idea of fibromyalgia to also assess and diagnose patients using an alternative nomenclature.

  3. Purine metabolites in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fais, A; Cacace, E; Corda, M; Era, B; Peri, M; Utzeri, S; Ruggiero, V

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate serum purine metabolite concentrations in patients affected by fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and the relationships between their levels and FM clinical parameters. Serum purine levels were quantified using LC/UV-vis in 22 fibromyalgic females (according to the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria) and 22 healthy females. Significantly higher serum inosine, hypoxanthine and xanthine levels (pFibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Study results suggest that purines, in particular adenosine and inosine, may be involved in pain transmission in fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2012 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A randomized controlled trial of qigong for fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mary; Sawynok, Jana; Hiew, Chok; Marcon, Dana

    2012-08-03

    Fibromyalgia is difficult to treat and requires the use of multiple approaches. This study is a randomized controlled trial of qigong compared with a wait-list control group in fibromyalgia. One hundred participants were randomly assigned to immediate or delayed practice groups, with the delayed group receiving training at the end of the control period. Qigong training (level 1 Chaoyi Fanhuan Qigong, CFQ), given over three half-days, was followed by weekly review/practice sessions for eight weeks; participants were also asked to practice at home for 45 to 60 minutes per day for this interval. Outcomes were pain, impact, sleep, physical function and mental function, and these were recorded at baseline, eight weeks, four months and six months. Immediate and delayed practice groups were analyzed individually compared to the control group, and as a combination group. In both the immediate and delayed treatment groups, CFQ demonstrated significant improvements in pain, impact, sleep, physical function and mental function when compared to the wait-list/usual care control group at eight weeks, with benefits extending beyond this time. Analysis of combined data indicated significant changes for all measures at all times for six months, with only one exception. Post-hoc analysis based on self-reported practice times indicated greater benefit with the per protocol group compared to minimal practice. This study demonstrates that CFQ, a particular form of qigong, provides long-term benefits in several core domains in fibromyalgia. CFQ may be a useful adjuvant self-care treatment for fibromyalgia. clinicaltrials.gov NCT00938834.

  5. Fibromyalgia and neuropathic pain - differences and similarities. A comparison of 3057 patients with diabetic painful neuropathy and fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tölle Thomas R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with diabetic neuropathy (DPN and fibromyalgia differ substantially in pathogenetic factors and the spatial distribution of the perceived pain. We questioned whether, despite these obvious differences, similar abnormal sensory complaints and pain qualities exist in both entities. We hypothesized that similar sensory symptoms might be associated with similar mechanisms of pain generation. The aims were (1 to compare epidemiological features and co-morbidities and (2 to identify similarities and differences of sensory symptoms in both entities. Methods The present multi-center study compares epidemiological data and sensory symptoms of a large cohort of 1434 fibromyalgia patients and 1623 patients with painful diabetic neuropathy. Data acquisition included standard demographic questions and self-report questionnaires (MOS sleep scale, PHQ-9, PainDETECT. To identify subgroups of patients with characteristic combinations of symptoms (sensory profiles a cluster analysis was performed using all patients in both cohorts. Results Significant differences in co-morbidities (depression, sleep disturbance were found between both disorders. Patients of both aetiologies chose very similar descriptors to characterize their sensory perceptions. Burning pain, prickling and touch-evoked allodynia were present in the same frequency. Five subgroups with distinct symptom profiles could be detected. Two of the subgroups were characteristic for fibromyalgia whereas one profile occurred predominantly in DPN patients. Two profiles were found frequently in patients of both entities (20-35%. Conclusions DPN and fibromyalgia patients experience very similar sensory phenomena. The combination of sensory symptoms - the sensory profile - is in most cases distinct and almost unique for each one of the two entities indicating aetiology-specific mechanisms of symptom generation. Beside the unique aetiology-specific sensory profiles an overlap of

  6. Fibromyalgia and neuropathic pain - differences and similarities. A comparison of 3057 patients with diabetic painful neuropathy and fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetic neuropathy (DPN) and fibromyalgia differ substantially in pathogenetic factors and the spatial distribution of the perceived pain. We questioned whether, despite these obvious differences, similar abnormal sensory complaints and pain qualities exist in both entities. We hypothesized that similar sensory symptoms might be associated with similar mechanisms of pain generation. The aims were (1) to compare epidemiological features and co-morbidities and (2) to identify similarities and differences of sensory symptoms in both entities. Methods The present multi-center study compares epidemiological data and sensory symptoms of a large cohort of 1434 fibromyalgia patients and 1623 patients with painful diabetic neuropathy. Data acquisition included standard demographic questions and self-report questionnaires (MOS sleep scale, PHQ-9, PainDETECT). To identify subgroups of patients with characteristic combinations of symptoms (sensory profiles) a cluster analysis was performed using all patients in both cohorts. Results Significant differences in co-morbidities (depression, sleep disturbance) were found between both disorders. Patients of both aetiologies chose very similar descriptors to characterize their sensory perceptions. Burning pain, prickling and touch-evoked allodynia were present in the same frequency. Five subgroups with distinct symptom profiles could be detected. Two of the subgroups were characteristic for fibromyalgia whereas one profile occurred predominantly in DPN patients. Two profiles were found frequently in patients of both entities (20-35%). Conclusions DPN and fibromyalgia patients experience very similar sensory phenomena. The combination of sensory symptoms - the sensory profile - is in most cases distinct and almost unique for each one of the two entities indicating aetiology-specific mechanisms of symptom generation. Beside the unique aetiology-specific sensory profiles an overlap of sensory profiles can be

  7. Disability evaluation of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, C V

    2001-08-01

    These cases represent individuals who feel they have a severe impairment and are "disabled." They have been labeled with fibromyalgia. They are truly distressed. Their symptoms, their courses, are more chronic and refractory than those of medically ill patients, and they are high users of medical services, laboratory investigations, and surgical procedures. These patients see multiple providers simultaneously and frequently switch physicians. They are difficult to care for, and they reject psychosocial factors as an influence on their symptoms. Such persons "see themselves as victims worthy of a star appearance on the Oprah Winfrey show. A sense of bitterness emerges...." Shorter, a historian, believes that fibromyalgia is "heaven-sent to doctors as a diagnostic label for pain patients who display an important neurotic component in their illness. Our culture increasingly encourages patients to conceive vague and nonspecific symptoms as evidence of real disease and to seek specialist help for them; and the rising ascendancy of the media and the breakdown of the family encourage patients to acquire the fixed belief that they have a given illness...." Regarding the finding of "disability," this is a social construct, and many authors believe it is society and the judicial system who must decide who can work. To remain objective, the physician should report the objective clinical information. Physicians need not and should not sit in judgment of the veracity of another human being.

  8. Newer treatments for fibromyalgia syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Richard E; Clauw, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    Richard E Harris, Daniel J ClauwDepartment of Anesthesiology, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Fibromyalgia syndrome is a common chronic pain disorder of unknown etiology. The lack of understanding of the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia has made this condition frustrating for patients and clinicians alike. The most common symptoms of this disorder are chronic widespread pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances, difficulty with memory, and morning stiffness. Emerging evidence p...

  9. EAMJ Self Reported May 2010.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-05-01

    May 1, 2010 ... achieve their full academic potentials, even those. East African Medical Journal Vol. 87 No. 5 May 2010. SELF-REPORTED ATTENTION DEFICIT AND HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER SYMPTOMS AMONG UNIVERSITY. STUDENTS IN ELDORET, KENYA. L. Atwoli, MBChB, MMed Psych (UoN), Lecturer, ...

  10. The contribution of sensory system functional connectivity reduction to clinical pain in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Jesus; Macià, Dídac; Garcia-Fontanals, Alba; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; López-Solà, Marina; Garcia-Blanco, Susana; Poca-Dias, Violant; Harrison, Ben J; Contreras-Rodríguez, Oren; Monfort, Jordi; Garcia-Fructuoso, Ferran; Deus, Joan

    2014-08-01

    Fibromyalgia typically presents with spontaneous body pain with no apparent cause and is considered pathophysiologically to be a functional disorder of somatosensory processing. We have investigated potential associations between the degree of self-reported clinical pain and resting-state brain functional connectivity at different levels of putative somatosensory integration. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was obtained in 40 women with fibromyalgia and 36 control subjects. A combination of functional connectivity-based measurements were used to assess (1) the basic pain signal modulation system at the level of the periaqueductal gray (PAG); (2) the sensory cortex with an emphasis on the parietal operculum/secondary somatosensory cortex (SII); and (3) the connectivity of these regions with the self-referential "default mode" network. Compared with control subjects, a reduction of functional connectivity was identified across the 3 levels of neural processing, each showing a significant and complementary correlation with the degree of clinical pain. Specifically, self-reported pain in fibromyalgia patients correlated with (1) reduced connectivity between PAG and anterior insula; (2) reduced connectivity between SII and primary somatosensory, visual, and auditory cortices; and (3) increased connectivity between SII and the default mode network. The results confirm previous research demonstrating abnormal functional connectivity in fibromyalgia and show that alterations at different levels of sensory processing may contribute to account for clinical pain. Importantly, reduced functional connectivity extended beyond the somatosensory domain and implicated visual and auditory sensory modalities. Overall, this study suggests that a general weakening of sensory integration underlies clinical pain in fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence of the Fibromyalgia Phenotype in Spine Pain Patients Presenting to a Tertiary Care Pain Clinic and the Potential Treatment Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummett, Chad M.; Goesling, Jenna; Tsodikov, Alex; Meraj, Taha S.; Wasserman, Ronald A.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Hassett, Afton L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Injections for spinal pain have high failure rates, emphasizing the importance of patient selection. It is possible that detecting the presence of a fibromyalgia-like phenotype could aid in prediction, because in these individuals a peripheral injection would not address pain due to alterations in central neurotransmission. We hypothesized that spine pain patients meeting survey criteria for fibromyalgia would be phenotypically distinct from those who do not meet criteria. Methods 548 patients with a primary spine pain diagnosis were studied. All patients completed validated self-report questionnaires, including the Brief Pain Inventory, PainDETECT, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, measures of physical function, and the American College of Rheumatology survey criteria for fibromyalgia. Results 42% met survey criteria for fibromyalgia (FM+). When compared with criteria negative patients, FM+ patients were more likely to be younger, unemployed, receiving compensation, have greater pain intensity, pain interference and neuropathic pain descriptors, as well as higher levels of depression and anxiety, and lower level of physical function (p pain, pain interference, physical function, and anxiety were independently predictive of fibromyalgia status in a multivariate analysis (p fibromyalgia, we demonstrated profound phenotypic differences in a spine pain population. Although centralized pain cannot be confirmed with a survey alone, the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia may help explain a portion of the variability of responses to spine interventions. PMID:24022710

  12. Cannabinoids for fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Klose, Petra; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Phillips, Tudor; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-07-18

    This review is one of a series on drugs used to treat fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition of unknown aetiology characterised by chronic widespread pain that often co-exists with sleep problems and fatigue affecting approximately 2% of the general population. People often report high disability levels and poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Drug therapy focuses on reducing key symptoms and disability, and improving HRQoL. Cannabis has been used for millennia to reduce pain and other somatic and psychological symptoms. To assess the efficacy, tolerability and safety of cannabinoids for fibromyalgia symptoms in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE to April 2016, together with reference lists of retrieved papers and reviews, three clinical trial registries, and contact with trial authors. We selected randomised controlled trials of at least four weeks' duration of any formulation of cannabis products used for the treatment of adults with fibromyalgia. Two review authors independently extracted the data of all included studies and assessed risk of bias. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. We performed analysis using three tiers of evidence. First tier evidence was derived from data meeting current best standards and subject to minimal risk of bias (outcome equivalent to substantial pain intensity reduction, intention-to-treat analysis without imputation for drop-outs; at least 200 participants in the comparison, eight to 12 weeks' duration, parallel design), second tier evidence from data that did not meet one or more of these criteria and were considered at some risk of bias but with adequate numbers (i.e. data from at least 200 participants) in the comparison, and third tier evidence from data involving small numbers of participants that were considered very likely to be biased or used outcomes of limited clinical utility, or both. We assessed the

  13. Fibromyalgia: Timely diagnosis and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DʼArcy, Yvonne; Kraus, Susan; Clair, Andrew; Kiley, Deborah

    2016-09-22

    Fibromyalgia can be challenging to diagnose and treat, and patients often feel isolated and misunderstood. Surveys of patients with fibromyalgia suggest that patients would benefit from greater understanding and acceptance. NPs can provide this support and play a prominent role in helping patients manage their fibromyalgia.

  14. Fibromyalgia and headache: an epidemiological study supporting migraine as part of the fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Bernstein, Cheryl; Rudy, Thomas E

    2005-11-01

    Fibromyalgia is defined by widespread body pain, tenderness to palpation of tender point areas, and constitutional symptoms. The literature reports headache in about half of fibromyalgia patients. The current epidemiological study was designed to determine the prevalence and characteristics of headache in fibromyalgia patients. Treatment-seeking fibromyalgia patients were evaluated with measures for fibromyalgia, chronic headache, quality of life, and psychological distress. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and t-tests were used to identify significant differences, as appropriate. A total of 100 fibromyalgia patients were screened (24 fibromyalgia without headache and 76 fibromyalgia with headache). International Headache Society diagnoses included: migraine alone (n = 15 with aura, n = 17 without aura), tension-type alone (n = 18), combined migraine and tension-type (n = 16), post-traumatic (n = 4), and probable analgesic overuse headache (n = 6). Fibromyalgia tender point scores and counts and most measures of pain severity, sleep disruption, or psychological distress were not significantly different between fibromyalgia patients with and without headache. As expected, the fibromyalgia patients with headache scored higher on the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6) (62.1 +/- 0.9 vs 48.3 +/- 1.6, p 60 in 80% of fibromyalgia plus headache patients, representing severe impact from headache, and 56-58 in 4%, representing substantial impact. In summary, chronic headache was endorsed by 76% of treatment-seeking fibromyalgia patients, with 84% reporting substantial or severe impact from their headaches. Migraine was diagnosed in 63% of fibromyalgia plus headache patients, with probable analgesic overuse headache in only 8%. General measures of pain, pain-related disability, sleep quality, and psychological distress were similar in fibromyalgia patients with and without headache. Therefore, fibromyalgia patients with headache do not appear to represent a significantly

  15. A famciclovir + celecoxib combination treatment is safe and efficacious in the treatment of fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pridgen WL

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available William L Pridgen,1 Carol Duffy,2 Judy F Gendreau,3 R Michael Gendreau3 1Innovative Med Concepts, LLC, 2Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, 3Gendreau Consulting, LLC, Poway, CA, USA Objective: Infections and other stressors have been implicated in the development of fibromyalgia. We hypothesized that these stressors could result in recurrent reactivations of latent herpes virus infections, which could lead to the development of fibromyalgia. This study evaluated a famciclovir + celecoxib drug combination (IMC-1, active against suspected herpes virus reactivation and infection, for the treatment of fibromyalgia.Methods: A total of 143 fibromyalgia patients were enrolled at 12 sites in a 16-week, double-blinded, placebo-controlled proof-of-concept trial. Randomized patients received either IMC-1 or placebo in a 1:1 ratio. Outcome measures included a 24-hour recall pain Numerical Rating Scale, the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ-R, the Patient’s Global Impression of Change (PGIC questionnaire, the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, the NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS, and the Beck Depression Inventory-II conducted at baseline and weeks 6, 12, and 16 of the study.Results: A significant decrease in fibromyalgia-related pain was observed for patients on IMC-1 treatment versus placebo. PGIC response rates were significantly improved with IMC-1 treatment. Overall, patient self-reported functioning, as measured by the FIQ-R, was significantly improved. Fatigue was also significantly improved as measured by the PROMIS fatigue inventory. The safety profile was encouraging. Despite the celecoxib component of IMC-1, gastrointestinal and nervous system treatment emergent adverse events were reported less frequently in the IMC-1 group, and study completion rates favored IMC-1 treatment.Conclusion: IMC-1 was efficacious and safe in treating symptoms of fibromyalgia

  16. Fibromyalgia syndrome and serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnigenis, M N; Barland, P

    2001-01-01

    Although disturbances in the musculoskeletal system, in the neuroendocrine system and in the central nervous system (CNS) have been implicated in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), the primary mechanisms underlying the etiopathogenesis of FMS remain elusive. It has been postulated that disturbances in serotonin metabolism and transmission, along with disturbances in several other chemical pain mediators, are present in patients with FMS. In this article we review published studies on the pathophysiological role of serotonin in FMS. Although studies that indirectly measured the function of serotonin in the CNS in FMS revealed some abnormalities in the metabolism and transmission of serotonin, the role of serotonin in the pathophysiology of syndrome remains inconclusive and warrants more studies.

  17. Genetics of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskila, Dan; Neumann, Lily

    2005-10-01

    The pathogenesis of fibromyalgia (FM) and related conditions is not entirely understood. Recent evidence suggests that these syndromes may share heritable pathophysiologic features. Familial studies suggest that genetic and familial factors may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of these conditions. There is evidence that polymorphisms of genes in the serotoninergic and catecholaminergic systems are linked to the pathophysiology of FM and related conditions and are associated with personality traits. The precise role of genetic factors in the etiopathology of FM remains unknown, but it is likely that several genes are operating together to initiate this syndrome. Larger longitudinal studies are needed to better clarify the role of genetics in the development of FM.

  18. Following and Filming Fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøler, Maja; Blaakilde, Anne Leonora

    -sited. It contains a flow of embodied experiences between human and non-human agents, both by means of words – on a discoursive level – and by means of tactile, intersubjective transmissions of recognizable corporeal expressions. We would like to make one final comment to this paper: Following the theoretical...... from FM comprises a very complex situation, difficult to grasp, and, unfit for the traditional Cartesian conceptualization. The reaction from the outside to the sufferer is therefore often: "But you look so good!" (Connotatively implying, how can you be in pain?) In response to the difficulties...... in at least 11 spots, she is diagnosed with FM. We will now show a video spot with a woman being tested by the tenderpoint-test. The woman performs pain reactions to 18 of the 18 tenderpoints and thereby suffers of Fibromyalgia at a severe level. Show film (2 min ca.) Method In order to study FM...

  19. Investigation of stress, anxiety and depression in women with fibromyalgia: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiro, Fernanda de Souza; Lombardi Júnior, Império; da Silva, Regina Claudia Barbosa; Montesano, Fábio Tadeu; de Oliveira, Nara Rejane Cruz; Diniz, Ricardo Edésio Amorim Santos; Alambert, Paulo Augusto; Padovani, Ricardo da Costa

    2014-01-01

    Depression has emerged as the most prevalent mental disorder in patients with fibromyalgia. Stress, whose stages are alarm, resistance, near-exhaustion and exhaustion, constitutes a physical reaction to a threatening situation. To investigate the levels of stress, anxiety and depression in women with fibromyalgia, comparing them with those of healthy women. Participants were 50 women, 25 with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology, and 25 without this diagnosis, matched for age. Instruments used: Lipp Inventory of Stress Symptoms for Adults (LISS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The mean age was 49.36 years for the group with fibromyalgia (FM) and 49.20 years for the group without fibromyalgia (non-FM). FM showed a higher incidence of stress (96%) compared with non-FM (5%). The resistance phase was predominant in both groups, FM (42%) and non-FM (100%). In FM there was distribution of the four stages (alarm, resistance, near-exhaustion and exhaustion). The differences between phases in the analyzed groups were significant (p anxiety and of depression in FM were significantly higher, when compared with non-FM (p anxiety (over 50) and clinically relevant depression (greater than 20) in FM were relevant. The understanding of the emotional variables involved in fibromyalgia is important to define the therapeutic strategy.

  20. Self reported stress and risk of breast cancer: prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Naja Hulvej; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Kristensen, Tage S

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation between self reported intensity and frequency of stress and first time incidence of primary breast cancer. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with 18 years of follow-up. SETTING: Copenhagen City heart study, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: The 6689 women participating in th...... be disadvantageous....

  1. Perceived job insecurity as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, George David

    2013-01-01

    To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease.......To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease....

  2. Fibromyalgia: When Distress Becomes (Unsympathetic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Martinez-Lavin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia is a painful stress-related disorder. A key issue in fibromyalgia research is to investigate how distress could be converted into pain. The sympathetic nervous system is the main element of the stress response system. In animal models, physical trauma, infection, or distressing noise can induce abnormal connections between the sympathetic nervous system and the nociceptive system. Dorsal root ganglia sodium channels facilitate this type of sympathetic pain. Similar mechanisms may operate in fibromyalgia. Signs of sympathetic hyperactivity have been described in this condition. Genetic factors and/or distressful lifestyle may lead to this state of sympathetic hyperactivity. Trauma and infection are recognized fibromyalgia triggers. Women who suffer from fibromyalgia have catecholamine-evoked pain. Sympathetic dysfunction may also explain nonpain-related fibromyalgia symptoms. In conclusion, in fibromyalgia, distress could be converted into pain through forced hyperactivity of the sympathetic component of the stress response system.

  3. Validity of self-reported height and weight in elderly Poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Długosz, Anna; Wądołowska, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES In nutritional epidemiology, collecting self-reported respondent height and weight is a simpler procedure of data collection than taking measurements. The aim of this study was to compare self-reported and measured height and weight and to evaluate the possibility of using self-reported estimates in the assessment of nutritional status of elderly Poles aged 65 + years. SUBJECTS/METHODS The research was carried out in elderly Poles aged 65 + years. Respondents were chosen using a quota sampling. The total sample numbered 394 participants and the sub-sample involved 102 participants. Self-reported weight (non-corrected self-reported weight; non-cSrW) and height estimates (non-corrected self-reported height; non-cSrH) were collected. The measurements of weight (measured weight; mW) and height (measured height; mH) were taken. Using multiple regression equations, the corrected self-reported weight (cSrW) and height (cSrH) estimates were calculated. RESULTS Non-cSrH was higher than mH in men on average by 2.4 cm and in women on average by 2.3 cm. In comparison to mW, non-cSrW was higher in men on average by 0.7 kg, while in women no significant difference was found (mean difference of 0.4 kg). In comparison to mBMI, non-cSrBMI was lower on average by 0.6 kg/m2 in men and 0.7 kg/m2 in women. No differences were observed in overweight and obesity incidence when determined by mBMI (68% and 19%, respectively), non-cSrBMI (62% and 14%, respectively), cSrBMI (70% and 22%, respectively) and pcSrBMI (67% and 18%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Since the results showed that the estimated self-reported heights, weights and BMI were accurate, the assessment of overweight and obesity incidence was accurate as well. The use of self-reported height and weight in the nutritional status assessment of elderly Poles on a population level is therefore recommended. On an individual level, the use of regression equations is recommended to correct self-reported height

  4. Early Experience with a Brief, Multimodal, Multidisciplinary Treatment Program for Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ann; Whipple, Mary O.; Oh, Terry H.; Guderian, Janet A.; Barton, Debra L.; Luedtke, Connie A.

    2014-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a complex, heterogeneous disorder for which a multidisciplinary individualized approach is currently advocated. We executed a 1 week multidisciplinary fibromyalgia clinical program with 7 patients, based on our previous experience with our existing 1.5 day multidisciplinary fibromyalgia program that has demonstrated both short- and long-term benefits. The current expanded program was not designed as a clinical study, but rather as a clinical feasibility assessment and was multidisciplinary in nature, with cognitive behavioral therapy, activity pacing and graded exercise therapy as major components. We assessed changes in individual patients at 1 week and 3 months following the program utilizing validated self-report measures of pain, fatigue, and self-efficacy. All patients indicated at least small improvements in pain and physical symptoms both at 1 week and 3 months and all but one patient showed improvement in self-efficacy at 1 week and 3 months. Similar trends were observed for fatigue. Based on our early clinical experience, we conclude that the 1 week multidisciplinary fibromyalgia program is logistically feasible and has potential for clinical efficacy. Further research is needed and is planned to test the clinical efficacy of this program and compare it with other interventions. PMID:24315246

  5. Incidence of self-reported hearing loss and associated risk factors among the elderly in São Paulo, Brazil: the SABE survey La incidencia de pérdida de la audición auto-reportada entre los ancianos en São Paulo, Brasil, y factores asociados: Estudio SABE Incidência de deficiência auditiva referida em idosos no Município de São Paulo, Brasil, e fatores associados: Estudo SABE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira Duarte

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to estimate the incidence of self-reported hearing loss among the elderly in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, and identify associated risk factors. A longitudinal study based on a representative sample of individuals aged 60 years and over interviewed in 2000 was conducted in 2006. The sample was obtained in two stages using the cluster sampling method, adopting the criterion distribution proportional to size, and replacement with probability proportional to population for subjects aged 75 years and over. Statistical analysis was performed using the likelihood ratio test to compare survival curves based on the Cox regression model. A total of 765 individuals were interviewed. The hearing loss incidence rate was 28.9/1,000 persons/year and proportional incidence was 17.4%. Associated risk factors were being aged 80 years and over, being male, having an occupation related to agricultural, industrial or maintenance sectors and having osteoporosis. Steps must be taken to reduce incidence by ameliorating the risks identified, particularly those related to occupational noise and specific diseases, notably osteoporosis.El objetivo fue estimar la incidencia de pérdida de audición auto-reportada por ancianos en São Paulo, Brasil, y factores de riesgo asociados. Se realizó estudio longitudinal en 2006, con base en la población de 60 años o más entrevistada en el año 2000. La muestra se obtuvo por el método de muestreo por conglomerados en dos etapas, según el criterio de reparto proporcional a su tamaño, y la sustitución con una probabilidad proporcional a la población, para los sujetos de 75 años o más. El análisis estadístico se realizó mediante la prueba de razón de verosimilitud para la igualdad de las curvas de supervivencia y regresión de Cox. Se entrevistaron 765 ancianos, con una tasa de incidencia de pérdida de audición auto-reportada de 28,9/1.000 personas-año y una proporción de 17,4%. Los factores de

  6. Facing Fibromyalgia | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Fibromyalgia Facing Fibromyalgia Past Issues / Spring 2016 Table of Contents Amy ... conditions. When did you start having symptoms of fibromyalgia? I actually think I've had it since ...

  7. Self-reported non-severe hypoglycaemic events in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östenson, C G; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, P; Lahtela, J

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Hypoglycaemia presents a barrier to optimum diabetes management but data are limited on the frequency of hypoglycaemia incidents outside of clinical trials. The present study investigated the rates of self-reported non-severe hypoglycaemic events, hypoglycaemia awareness and physician...... discussion of events in people with Type 1 diabetes mellitus or insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: People in seven European countries aged >15 years with Type 1 diabetes or insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes (basal-only, basal-bolus and other insulin regimens) were recruited via consumer panels......, nurses, telephone recruitment and family referrals. Respondents completed four online questionnaires. The first questionnaire collected background information on demographics and hypoglycaemia-related behaviour, whilst all four questionnaires collected data on non-severe hypoglycaemic events...

  8. Juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome. Interdisciplinary treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Siuchnińska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM belongs to soft tissue pain syndromes of unknown cause, also referred to as “soft tissue rheumatism”. It is characterized by chronic widespread pain as well as additional symptoms such as fatigue, sleep and mood disturbance and cognitive problems. There is more and more data showing that this condition may start at a young age or even in childhood, adversely affecting development processes and resulting in dysfunctional social and family relationships. Because of the multifaceted character of fibromyalgia the efficient treatment of this disorder can be difficult and requires comprehensive care. This work reviews most recommended procedures used in integrated treatment programmes for juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome (JFM.

  9. Caffeine as an opioid analgesic adjuvant in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J Ryan; Hassett, Afton L; Brummett, Chad M; Harris, Richard E; Clauw, Daniel J; Harte, Steven E

    2017-01-01

    Caffeine's properties as an analgesic adjuvant with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs/acetaminophen are well documented. However, little clinical research has explored caffeine's effects on opioid analgesia. This study assessed the effects of caffeine consumption on pain and other symptoms in opioid-using and nonusing chronic pain patients meeting the survey criteria for fibromyalgia. Patients presenting to a university-based pain clinic completed validated self-report questionnaires assessing symptoms. Patients (N=962) meeting the fibromyalgia survey criteria were stratified by opioid use and further split into groups based on caffeine amount consumed per day (no caffeine, or low, moderate, high caffeine). Analysis of covariance with Dunnett's post hoc testing compared pain and symptom severity between the no caffeine group and the caffeine consuming groups. In opioid users, caffeine consumption had modest but significant effects on pain, catastrophizing, and physical function. Lower levels of pain interference were associated with low and moderate caffeine use compared to no caffeine intake. Lower pain catastrophizing and higher physical function were observed in all caffeine dose groups, relative to the no caffeine group. Lower pain severity and depression were observed only in the moderate caffeine group. In opioid nonusers, low caffeine intake was associated with higher physical function; however, no other significant effects were observed. Caffeine consumption was associated with decreased pain and symptom severity in opioid users, but not in opioid nonusers, indicating caffeine may act as an opioid adjuvant in fibromyalgia-like chronic pain patients. These data suggest that caffeine consumption concomitant with opioid analgesics could provide therapeutic benefits not seen with opioids or caffeine alone.

  10. Impact of animal-assisted therapy for outpatients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Bernstein, Cheryl D; Constantin, Janet M; Kunkel, Frank A; Breuer, Paula; Hanlon, Raymond B

    2013-01-01

    Animal-assisted therapy using dogs trained to be calm and provide comfort to strangers has been used as a complementary therapy for a range of medical conditions. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of brief therapy dog visits for fibromyalgia patients attending a tertiary outpatient pain management facility compared with time spent in a waiting room. Open label with waiting room control. Tertiary care, university-based, outpatient pain management clinic. A convenience sample of fibromyalgia patients was obtained through advertisements posted in the clinic. Participants were able to spend clinic waiting time with a certified therapy dog instead of waiting in the outpatient waiting area. When the therapy dog was not available, individuals remained in the waiting area. OUTCOME MEASURES.: Self-reported pain, fatigue, and emotional distress were recorded using 11-point numeric rating scales before and after the therapy dog visit or waiting room time. Data were evaluated from 106 therapy dog visits and 49 waiting room controls, with no significant between-group demographic differences in participants. Average intervention duration was 12 minutes for the therapy dog visit and 17 minutes for the waiting room control. Significant improvements were reported for pain, mood, and other measures of distress among patients after the therapy dog visit, but not the waiting room control. Clinically meaningful pain relief (≥2 points pain severity reduction) occurred in 34% after the therapy dog visit and 4% in the waiting room control. Outcome was not affected by the presence of comorbid anxiety or depression. Brief therapy dog visits may provide a valuable complementary therapy for fibromyalgia outpatients. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Etiopathogenetic mechanisms of fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.H. Gracely

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is a common chronic condition of widespread pain with causal mechanisms that are largely unknown. It is characterized by moderate to severe musculoskel - etal pain and allodynia, but its pathogenesis appears confined to the nociceptive structures of the central nervous system. From a pathogenetic point of view, indeed, no clear muscle pathology has been demonstrated in FMS (1, 2, while increasing evidence suggests a disturbance in pain perception that is genetically conditioned. In our review we will consider five “keypoints” that we think determine the origin and maintenance of the pain syndrome that we define as fibromyalgia...

  12. Smoking, depression, & stress: predictors of fibromyalgia health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Breanna M; Santoro, Maya S; Cronan, Terry A

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of smoking, stress, and depression on fibromyalgia health status. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic musculoskeletal pain condition that negatively affects health status. Health status is not only affected by the constellation of physical symptoms, but also by mood symptoms, stress levels, and patient behaviors (e.g. smoking). Participants were 491 individuals with a physician's diagnosis of FMS. They completed self-report measures of their current levels of depression, stress, the number of cigarettes smoked per day, and health status. A linear regression analysis was conducted to determine whether these measures predicted FMS health status. All three measures predicted worse health status, predicting 51.5% of the variance in health status. However, it is important to evaluate and treat more than just the physical symptoms of FMS. Attention should also be paid to mental health status and to engagement in unhealthy behaviors in order to reduce their effects on FMS health status. Future researchers should design and evaluate interventions that target these modifiable risk factors to determine the extent to which they could improve health outcomes.

  13. Update on fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Atzeni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionFibromyalgia (FM is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by widespread pain, fatigue, sleep alterations, and distress. It affects at least 2% of the adult population. The etiology of FM is not completely understood, and the syndrome is influenced by stress, physical illness, and a variety of pain conditions. Emerging evidence indicates that augmented pain processing within the central nervous system plays a primary role in the pathophysiology of this disorder. Diagnosis may be difficult because of the multifaceted nature of the syndrome and its overlap with other chronically painful conditions. This article reviews the most recent data in the literature on FM.Materials and methodsThere are currently no instrumental tests or specific diagnostic markers for FM. In fact, many of the existing indicators are regarded as significant for research purposes only.ResultsDifferential diagnosis requires an extensive clinical examination and complete patient history. Chest-X-rays and abdominal ultrasonography are the first steps in the general evaluation of a patient with suspected FM.ConclusionsA variety of pharmacological treatments have been used to treat FM, including antidepressants, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, sedatives, muscle relaxants, and antiepileptics. Physical exercise and multimodal cognitive-behavioral therapy seem to be the most widely accepted and beneficial forms of non-pharmacological therapy.

  14. Fibromyalgia and sexual problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Scarpellini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to describe the recent literature concerning sexual dysfunction in fibromyalgic patients. To this end, we used the common online databases PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE (up to June 2012 and searched for the key words fibromyalgia (FM and sexual dysfunction. All the studies examined underlined that FM is strictly associated with sexual dysfunction in women. The major findings observed were related to a decreased sexual desire and arousal, decreased experience of orgasm, and in some studies an increase in genital pain. The psychological aspects, together with the stress related to the constant presence of chronic widespread pain, fatigue and sleep disturbances, are certainly a major factor that adversely affects the sexuality of the patient with FM. Moreover, the drugs most commonly used in these cases may interfere negatively on the sexuality and sexual function of these patients. Therefore, the therapeutic intervention should be targeted and the side effects should be weighed up against the positive effects. It is of the utmost importance to recognise the problem of sexuality and sexual dysfunction in a more complex form of its expression and undertake a multidisciplinary therapeutic intervention to improve the quality of FM patients’ life.

  15. Pharmacotherapy for Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard eSmith

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia (FM is a chronic disorder characterized by multifocal pain and other associated somatic symptoms including fatigue, insomnia, cognitive/memory problems, and even psychological distress. It appears that 2%-4% of the general population suffers from FM. FM negatively impacts the physical functioning of its patients, as evidenced by difficulties with multiple daily activities, as well as affecting emotional health, social functioning, and health related quality of life. This review will discuss the potential theories that possibly contribute to the pathogenesis of FM, although the precise mechanism is unknown. The evolution of the assessment of FM will also be examined, with the waning use of tender point examinations and the appearance of new simple, practical diagnostic criteria. Although non-pharmacologic therapeutic options (exercise, education, cognitive-behavioral therapy have been shown to be extremely effective in FM, the focus of this article will be on pharmacologic strategies. Non-FDA approved as well as FDA approved agents will be presented. Each agent’s therapeutic niche in FM management will be discussed based on its pharmacologic profile, patient responsiveness, and tolerability. Finally a clinical algorithm will be presented for the step-wise management of pain and other associated symptoms of FM.

  16. Psychosomatic syndromes in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiggia, Ada; Torta, Riccardo; Tesio, Valentina; Di Tella, Marialaura; Romeo, Annunziata; Colonna, Fabrizio; Geminiani, Giuliano Carlo; Fusaro, Enrico; Batticciotto, Alberto; Castelli, Lorys

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of psychosomatic symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Seventy-six consecutive women with FM and 80 with RA without concomitant FM were assessed using the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR) interview to evaluate the presence of psychosomatic syndromes. Beck Depression Inventory - II (BDI-II) and Form Y of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y) were administered in order to assess the symptoms of anxiety and depression. Significantly higher levels of anxiety and depression were found in the FM patients (ppsychosomatic syndromes revealed high levels of anxiety and depression in the patients with the psychosomatic condition. The findings of this study highlight the greater presence of psychological distress and psychosomatic syndromes in patients with FM than in RA patients. The FM patients with psychosomatic symptoms also showed high levels of psychological distress. A better understanding of the psychosomatic manifestations of FM syndrome could allow clinicians to structure tailored interventions that take more account of the emotional distress associated with the physical complaints.

  17. Acupuncture for treating fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deare, John C; Zheng, Zhen; Xue, Charlie CL; Liu, Jian Ping; Shang, Jingsheng; Scott, Sean W; Littlejohn, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    Background One in five fibromyalgia sufferers use acupuncture treatment within two years of diagnosis. Objectives To examine the benefits and safety of acupuncture treatment for fibromyalgia. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, National Research Register, HSR Project and Current Contents, as well as the Chinese databases VIP and Wangfang to January 2012 with no language restrictions. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised studies evaluating any type of invasive acupuncture for fibromyalgia diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, and reporting any main outcome: pain, physical function, fatigue, sleep, total well-being, stiffness and adverse events. Data collection and analysis Two author pairs selected trials, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Treatment effects were reported as standardised mean differences (SMD) and 95%confidence intervals (CI) for continuous outcomes using different measurement tools (pain, physical function, fatigue, sleep, total well-being and stiffness) and risk ratio (RR) and 95% CI for dichotomous outcomes (adverse events).We pooled data using the random-effects model. Main results Nine trials (395 participants) were included. All studies except one were at low risk of selection bias; five were at risk of selective reporting bias (favouring either treatment group); two were subject to attrition bias (favouring acupuncture); three were subject to performance bias (favouring acupuncture) and one to detection bias (favouring acupuncture). Three studies utilised electro-acupuncture (EA) with the remainder using manual acupuncture (MA) without electrical stimulation. All studies used ’formula acupuncture’ except for one, which used trigger points. Low quality evidence from one study (13 participants) showed EA improved symptoms with no adverse events at one month following treatment. Mean pain in the non-treatment control group was 70 points on a 100 point scale

  18. Acupuncture for treating fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deare, John C; Zheng, Zhen; Xue, Charlie C L; Liu, Jian Ping; Shang, Jingsheng; Scott, Sean W; Littlejohn, Geoff

    2013-05-31

    One in five fibromyalgia sufferers use acupuncture treatment within two years of diagnosis. To examine the benefits and safety of acupuncture treatment for fibromyalgia. We searched CENTRAL, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, National Research Register, HSR Project and Current Contents, as well as the Chinese databases VIP and Wangfang to January 2012 with no language restrictions. Randomised and quasi-randomised studies evaluating any type of invasive acupuncture for fibromyalgia diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, and reporting any main outcome: pain, physical function, fatigue, sleep, total well-being, stiffness and adverse events. Two author pairs selected trials, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Treatment effects were reported as standardised mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for continuous outcomes using different measurement tools (pain, physical function, fatigue, sleep, total well-being and stiffness) and risk ratio (RR) and 95% CI for dichotomous outcomes (adverse events). We pooled data using the random-effects model. Nine trials (395 participants) were included. All studies except one were at low risk of selection bias; five were at risk of selective reporting bias (favouring either treatment group); two were subject to attrition bias (favouring acupuncture); three were subject to performance bias (favouring acupuncture) and one to detection bias (favouring acupuncture). Three studies utilised electro-acupuncture (EA) with the remainder using manual acupuncture (MA) without electrical stimulation. All studies used 'formula acupuncture' except for one, which used trigger points.Low quality evidence from one study (13 participants) showed EA improved symptoms with no adverse events at one month following treatment. Mean pain in the non-treatment control group was 70 points on a 100 point scale; EA reduced pain by a mean of 22 points (95% confidence interval (CI) 4 to 41), or 22% absolute

  19. Increased cancer risk in patients referred to hospital with suspected fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Lene; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Kendall, Sally

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze whether fibromyalgia (FM) and FM-like symptoms are related to an increased incidence of cancer. METHODS: We identified 1361 patients referred on suspicion of FM in the period 1984-99 from hospital records. Following the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, patients...

  20. The association of total and central body fat with pain, fatigue and the impact of fibromyalgia in women; role of physical fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Jiménez, V; Castro-Piñero, J; Soriano-Maldonado, A; Álvarez-Gallardo, I C; Estévez-López, F; Delgado-Fernández, M; Carbonell-Baeza, A

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between estimates of total and central body fat with fibromyalgia pain, fatigue and overall impact has not been fully described. We aimed to assess the individual and combined association of body fat (total and central) with pain, fatigue and the overall impact in fibromyalgia women; and to study the possible mediation role of physical fitness in these associations. A total of 486 fibromyalgia women with a mean (standard deviation) age of 52.2 (8.0) years participated. Pain was measured with self-reported measures and algometry, whereas fatigue with the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory. The impact of fibromyalgia was measured with the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) total score. Total and central body fat were assessed by means of bioelectrical impedance and waist circumference, respectively. The Functional Senior Fitness Test battery and the handgrip strength test were used to assess physical fitness. Total and central body fat were positively associated with pain- and fatigue-related measures and the FIQR total score (β from 0.10 to 0.25; all, p pain (FIQR and 36-item Short-Form Health Survey), general and physical-related fatigue and FIQR total score (all, overall p pain, general fatigue, physical fatigue and reduced activity, and largely mediated (80%) the association of central body fat with the FIQR total score. Physical fitness might potentially explain the association between obesity and fibromyalgia symptoms. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  1. Accuracy of Professional Self-Reports: Medical Student Self-Report and the Scoring of Professional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter Lagha, Regina Anne

    2014-01-01

    Self-report is currently used as an indicator of professional practice in a variety of fields, including medicine and education. Important to consider, therefore, is the ability of self-report to accurately capture professional practice. This study investigated how well professionals' self-reports of behavior agreed with an expert observer's…

  2. Classification and Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Fibromyalgia was recently classified when a sleep disorder was described with diffuse musculoskeletal pain. The standard modern definition was reached on the basis of thorough analysis of pain patterns and characteristic tender points. The principles of classification are reviewed with respect to this diagnosis.

  3. The classification of fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W; Schneider, E M; Stratz, T

    2007-09-01

    As has been shown by a number of working groups, primary fibromyalgia syndrome does not represent a single clinical entity. It is possible to distinguish between a subgroup with high pain sensitivity and no associated psychiatric condition, a second and a third subgroup characterized by depression associated with fibromyalgia syndrome, and a fourth group with somatoform pain disorder of the fibromyalgia type. Mild inflammatory processes must be considered as the cause in the first group, while depression is combined with fibromyalgia in the second and the third group. In the fourth group, serious previous or still existing psychological problems or also insufficient coping with illness symptoms must be regarded as the reason for pain chronification. Group 1 benefits from a blocking of the 5-HT3 receptors by means of tropisetron, for example. This does not only affect pain chronification but also the inflammatory process itself. Group 2 and 3 needs antidepressant treatment, whereas the focus should be on psychotherapy in group 4. Groups 1, 2 and 3 will also profit from multimodal physical treatment programs, to a certain extent this applies to group 4 as well. So-called mixed types require a combination of therapeutic measures.

  4. Classification and Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Merskey

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia was recently classified when a sleep disorder was described with diffuse musculoskeletal pain. The standard modern definition was reached on the basis of thorough analysis of pain patterns and characteristic tender points. The principles of classification are reviewed with respect to this diagnosis.

  5. Validity of self-reported cancer history in the health examinees (HEXA) study: A comparison of self-report and cancer registry records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sooyoung; Shin, Aesun; Song, Daesub; Park, Jae Kyung; Kim, Yeonjung; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Kang, Daehee; Lee, Jong-Koo

    2017-10-01

    To assess the validity of the cohort study participants' self-reported cancer history via data linkage to a cancer registry database. We included 143,965 participants from the Health Examinees (HEXA) study recruited between 2004 and 2013 who gave informed consent for record linkage to the Korean Central Cancer Registry (KCCR). The sensitivity and the positive predictive value of self-reported histories of cancer were calculated and 95% confidence intervals were estimated. A total of 4,860 participants who had at least one record in the KCCR were included in the calculation of sensitivity. In addition, 3,671 participants who reported a cancer history at enrollment were included in the calculation of positive predictive value. The overall sensitivity of self-reported cancer history was 72.0%. Breast cancer history among women showed the highest sensitivity (81.2%), whereas the lowest sensitivity was observed for liver cancer (53.7%) and cervical cancer (52.1%). The overall positive predictive value was 81.9%. The highest positive predictive value was observed for thyroid cancer (96.1%) and prostate cancer (96.1%), and the lowest was observed for cervical cancer (43.7%). The accuracy of self-reported cancer history varied by cancer site and may not be sufficient to ascertain cancer incidence, especially for cervical and bladder cancers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Bone mass and turnover in fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Gam, A; Egsmose, C

    1993-01-01

    in lumbar bone mineral density, femoral neck bone mineral density, serum levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, ionized calcium and phosphate. The urinary excretion of both hydroxyproline and calcium relative to urinary creatinine excretion was significantly higher in patients with fibromyalgia, p = 0.......01. This was linked to lower urinary creatinine excretion (p = 0.02) probably reflecting lower physical activity in the patients with fibromyalgia. We conclude that bone mass and turnover are generally not affected in premenopausal women with fibromyalgia....

  7. Prevalence of fibromyalgia in vasovagal syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Maite; Martínez-Martínez, Laura-Aline; Grijalva-Quijada, Saulo; Olguín-Ruvalcaba, Hector-Manuel; Salas, Elizabeth; Hermosillo, Antonio G; Cárdenas, Manuel; Martínez-Lavín, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Vasovagal syncope is an acute manifestation of autonomic nervous system dysfunction. This type of syncope is often associated with other dysautonomic expressions such as migraine, gastroparesis, or postural tachycardia syndrome. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction has been proposed as a key element in the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia. The objectives of this study were to estimate the frequency of fibromyalgia in a sample of patients with vasovagal syncope and also to correlate the presence of syncope and fibromyalgia with different dysautonomic manifestations. We studied 50 consecutive patients with vasovagal syncope seen at the Syncope Unit of the National Cardiology Institute of Mexico between June 2009 and June 2012. All individuals filled out the Composite Autonomic Symptoms and Signs questionnaire and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire. All cases underwent a head-up tilt test. A rheumatologist examined all participants to assess the presence of fibromyalgia. The median age of the studied population was 21 years. Sixty-eight percent of participants were women. Eight cases (16%) had concomitant fibromyalgia. Significantly, all fibromyalgia cases were female. This subgroup of fibromyalgia subjects had more secretomotor complaints (mainly dry eyes and dry mouth) and more bowel constipation than the remainder of the group. Also in this subgroup of fibromyalgia subjects, several significant associations were found between age, blood pressure, number of syncopal episodes, constipation, insomnia, pupillomotor impairment, and disability. In contrast, no correlations were found in the subgroup of fainters without fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia was relatively frequent in these women with vasovagal syncope and could be associated with dysautonomic symptoms. Therefore, it seems important to search for dysautonomic comorbidities in patients with vasovagal syncope and/or fibromyalgia, to provide a patient-centered holistic approach, instead of the often currently used

  8. Distress influence in fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Saracco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM is a controversial chronic painful syndrome. Although the aetiology is unknown, FM is frequently correlated with stressors events. Recent studies highlighted the frequent comorbidity with anxiety and depression and a close relationship between stress and pain. Methods: We evaluated the relevance of stressors events in 23 patients with FM (mean age: 45.7±7.4 SD, compared with 18 healthy controls (mean age: 41.7±6.4 SD and 17 patients with dysfunctional syndrome (mean age 40.8±6.1. We performed the italian validated rapid assessment of the stress test (VRS for the assessment of stress. Furthermore, we evaluated the psychological history for a semi-quantitative assessment (IVAS of the 49 stress-generating events listed in 1994’s DSM-IV. Results: The group of “healthy” subjects showed stress values at VRS test (mean: 7.00±4.65 SD significantly lower (p=0.0001 than the patients with “dysfunctional syndrome“ (mean 14.82±7.69 SD and those with FM (mean 20.04±9.90 SD. The IVAS test, showed higher values in FM subgroup than healthy (p=0.0001 and dysfunctional syndromes (p=0,007. Also, the patients with FM showed a greater gravity to attribute to single stressors events (p=0.02. Conclusions: Our results emphasize the importance of the perceived stress among the patients with FM, and support the hypothesis that FM could be due to a psycho-neuro-endocrinal response to several stressors events in patients with genetical hyperresponsiveness to stress.

  9. [Distress influence in fibromyalgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stisi, S; Venditti, C; Sarracco, I

    2008-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is a controversial chronic painful syndrome. Although the aetiology is unknown, FM is frequently correlated with stressors events. Recent studies highlighted the frequent comorbidity with anxiety and depression and a close relationship between stress and pain. We evaluated the relevance of stressors events in 23 patients with FM (mean age: 45.7+/-7.4 SD), compared with 18 healthy controls (mean age: 41.7+/-6.4 SD) and 17 patients with dysfunctional syndrome (mean age 40.8+/-6.1). We performed the italian validated rapid assessment of the stress test (VRS) for the assessment of stress. Furthermore, we evaluated the psychological history for a semi-quantitative assessment (IVAS) of the 49 stress-generating events listed in 1994's DSM-IV. The group of "healthy" subjects showed stress values at VRS test (mean: 7.00+/-4.65 SD) significantly lower (p=0.0001) than the patients with "dysfunctional syndrome" (mean 14.82+/-7.69 SD) and those with FM (mean 20.04+/-9.90 SD). The IVAS test, showed higher values in FM subgroup than healthy (p=0.0001) and dysfunctional syndrome (p=0,007). Also, the patients with FM showed a greater gravity to attribute to single stressors events (p=0.02). Our results emphasize the importance of the perceived stress among the patients with FM, and support the hypothesis that FM could be due to a psycho-neuro-endocrinal response to several stressors events in patients with genetical hyperresponsiveness to stress.

  10. A mind-body technique for symptoms related to fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Loren L; Whipple, Mary O; Abboud, Lana L; Vincent, Ann; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L

    2012-01-01

    A novel mind-body approach (amygdala retraining) is hypothesized to improve symptoms related to fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue. To examine the use of a mind-body approach for improving symptoms related to fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue. This was a single-blind, randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a tertiary-care fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue clinic. Patients with fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, or both were included. Patients were randomly assigned to receive amygdala retraining along with standard care or standard care alone. Standard care involved attending a 1.5-day multidisciplinary program. The amygdala retraining group received an additional 2.5-hour training course in which the key tools and techniques adapted from an existing program were taught to the patient. A home-study video course and associated text were provided to supplement the on-site program. Both groups received telephone calls twice a month to answer questions related to technique and to provide support. Validated self-report questionnaires related to general health, well-being, and symptoms, including Short Form-36, Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile, Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire. Of the 44 patients randomly assigned who completed baseline assessments, 21 patients completed the study (14 in the standard care group and 7 in the study group). Median age was 48 years (range, 27-56 years), and female subjects comprised 91% of the group. Analyses demonstrated statistically significant improvements in scores for physical health, energy, pain, symptom distress, and fatigue in patients who received the amygdala retraining compared with standard care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fibromyalgia syndrome in chronic urticaria patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Gözübüyükoğulları

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of fibromyalgia syndrome in chronic urticaria patients. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out with the participation of 100 chronic urticaria patients and 61 control group patients. Chronic urticaria patients were investigated for the etiology of urticaria and the autologous serum skin test was performed in those patients. Both the chronic urticaria patients and the controls were evaluated for fibromyalgia syndrome, and the patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria were diagnosed to have fibromyalgia syndrome. Results: The frequency of fibromyalgia syndrome was significantly higher in chronic urticaria patients (23%, than in the control group (1.6%. All the patients, who were diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome, were female and the rate of female gender was significantly higher than in the group without fibromyalgia syndrome. Thyroid autoimmunity was positive in 26% of chronic urticaria patients. No significant difference was detected in the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity and autologous serum skin test positivity between the patients with and without fibromyalgia syndrome. Conclusion: The prevalence of fibromyalgia syndrome in chronic urticaria patients is higher than in the general population. Therefore, we suggest evaluation of chronic urticaria patients in terms of fibromyalgia syndrome which is a disease that decreases the quality of life considerably. Furthermore, in order to treat these two diseases effectively, future studies are necessary to determine the common points in the pathogenesis.

  12. Fibromyalgia: clinical features, diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jennie

    2016-09-28

    Patients with fibromyalgia experience chronic widespread pain, with associated symptoms of fatigue, sleep disturbance and memory problems. There are many therapies which may be helpful in managing the symptoms of fibromyalgia; however, these often require a process of trial and error to establish optimum management using a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. Nurses can support patients with fibromyalgia using a biopsychosocial approach to symptom management. Understanding the nature of fibromyalgia and management options will enable nurses to deliver holistic patient-centred care.

  13. Fibromyalgia in the adult Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, E; Jacobsen, S; Kjøller, Mette

    1993-01-01

    Clinical characteristics of fibromyalgia have so far been based mainly on patients identified in rheumatologic settings. This paper offers the clinical findings in fibromyalgia based on a national health interview survey, in which 123 persons fulfilled preset criteria for widespread pain. Clinical......, headache, difficulty in stair-climbing, and poorer self-evaluated health with more tender points was found. Contrary to that which was expected, fibromyalgia subjects did not suffer from sleep disturbances, irritable bowels or morning stiffness. Our findings indicate that clinical characteristics...... of fibromyalgia in the general population may differ from those found in rheumatological settings....

  14. Fibromyalgia in the adult Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, E; Kjøller, Mette; Jacobsen, S

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of fibromyalgia have so far been based on rheumatologic and general practice settings, which are poor proxies for the underlying population. The study is based on a national health interview survey carried out by the Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology in 1990......%). Eight subjects, all female, met the 1990 American College of Rheumatism criteria for fibromyalgia. Dropouts were regarded as not having fibromyalgia. The prevalence of fibromyalgia in the Danish population between 18 and 79 years of age was found to be a minimum estimate of 0.66% (95% confidence limits...

  15. Aerobic exercise training for adults with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidonde, Julia; Busch, Angela J; Schachter, Candice L; Overend, Tom J; Kim, Soo Y; Góes, Suelen M; Boden, Catherine; Foulds, Heather Ja

    2017-06-21

    data, performed a risk of bias assessment, and assessed the quality of the body of evidence for major outcomes using the GRADE approach. We used a 15% threshold for calculation of clinically relevant differences between groups. We included 13 RCTs (839 people). Studies were at risk of selection, performance, and detection bias (owing to lack of blinding for self-reported outcomes) and had low risk of attrition and reporting bias. We prioritized the findings when aerobic exercise was compared with no exercise control and present them fully here.Eight trials (with 456 participants) provided low-quality evidence for pain intensity, fatigue, stiffness, and physical function; and moderate-quality evidence for withdrawals and HRQL at completion of the intervention (6 to 24 weeks). With the exception of withdrawals and adverse events, major outcome measures were self-reported and were expressed on a 0 to 100 scale (lower values are best, negative mean differences (MDs)/standardized mean differences (SMDs) indicate improvement). Effects for aerobic exercise versus control were as follows: HRQL: mean 56.08; five studies; N = 372; MD -7.89, 95% CI -13.23 to -2.55; absolute improvement of 8% (3% to 13%) and relative improvement of 15% (5% to 24%); pain intensity: mean 65.31; six studies; N = 351; MD -11.06, 95% CI -18.34 to -3.77; absolute improvement of 11% (95% CI 4% to 18%) and relative improvement of 18% (7% to 30%); stiffness: mean 69; one study; N = 143; MD -7.96, 95% CI -14.95 to -0.97; absolute difference in improvement of 8% (1% to 15%) and relative change in improvement of 11.4% (21.4% to 1.4%); physical function: mean 38.32; three studies; N = 246; MD -10.16, 95% CI -15.39 to -4.94; absolute change in improvement of 10% (15% to 5%) and relative change in improvement of 21.9% (33% to 11%); and fatigue: mean 68; three studies; N = 286; MD -6.48, 95% CI -14.33 to 1.38; absolute change in improvement of 6% (12% improvement to 0.3% worse) and relative change in improvement

  16. Caffeine as an opioid analgesic adjuvant in fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott JR

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available J Ryan Scott,1 Afton L Hassett,1 Chad M Brummett,1 Richard E Harris,1,2 Daniel J Clauw,1,2 Steven E Harte1,2 1Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center, Department of Anesthesiology, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Background: Caffeine’s properties as an analgesic adjuvant with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs/acetaminophen are well documented. However, little clinical research has explored ca­ffeine’s effects on opioid analgesia. This study assessed the effects of caffeine consumption on pain and other symptoms in opioid-using and nonusing chronic pain patients meeting the survey criteria for fibromyalgia. Materials and methods: Patients presenting to a university-based pain clinic completed validated self-report questionnaires assessing symptoms. Patients (N=962 meeting the fibromyalgia survey criteria were stratified by opioid use and further split into groups based on caffeine amount consumed per day (no caffeine, or low, moderate, high caffeine. Analysis of covariance with Dunnett’s post hoc testing compared pain and symptom severity between the no caffeine group and the caffeine consuming groups. Results: In opioid users, caffeine consumption had modest but significant effects on pain, catastrophizing, and physical function. Lower levels of pain interference were associated with low and moderate caffeine use compared to no caffeine intake. Lower pain catastrophizing and higher physical function were observed in all caffeine dose groups, relative to the no caffeine group. Lower pain severity and depression were observed only in the moderate caffeine group. In opioid nonusers, low caffeine intake was associated with higher physical function; however, no other significant effects were observed. Conclusion: Caffeine consumption was associated with decreased pain and symptom severity in opioid users, but not in opioid nonusers, indicating caffeine may act as an

  17. Self-reported occupational injuries among industrial beef slaughterhouse workers in the Midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibler, Jessica H; Perry, Melissa J

    2017-01-01

    Although workers in meatpacking facilities in the U.S. experience high rates of occupational injury, their injury experiences have received limited research attention. Prior research indicates underreporting in injury rates in this industry as well significant variation in injury rates among facilities. To add detail to the rates and circumstances surrounding occupational injury among meatpacking workers, we conducted a cross-sectional study of workers employed at an industrial beefpacking plant in Nebraska (n = 137) and interviewed workers about recent injury experiences. We assessed frequency, cause and nature of self-reported injury. We estimated annual incidence rates of self-reported injuries using the OSHA formula and compared these rates to industry-wide data. We also evaluated psychological distress in this workforce as measured by the Kessler-6 scale to assess whether distress was associated with recent occupational injury. In this study, 15.1% of workers experienced occupational injuries that required time off work, job transfer, or restriction during the past three months. The estimated annual incidence rate was 15.2 injuries per 100 full-time workers for these injuries at this plant. Rushing was identified as the cause of nearly 50% of injuries, and repetitive work as the cause of an additional 20% of injuries. Use of metal mesh sleeves (POR: 0.10 (p = 0.008)) and metal mesh gloves (POR: 0.41 (p = 0.05) were associated with reduced risk of injury. Use of a carbon steel for knife sharpening (POR: 5.2 (p = 0.02)) was associated with elevated risk of moderate and severe injury. There were no associations between self-reported occupational injury and overall measures of psychological distress. Self-reported incidence rate of severe injury in this plant was more than twice official industry estimates. Worker self-reports may illustrate key areas for injury prevention.

  18. Positive associations between physical and cognitive performance measures in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Barbara J; Zettel-Watson, Laura; Chang, Jennifer C; Shimizu, Renee; Rutledge, Dana N; Jones, C Jessie

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the associations between perceived physical function (self-report) and physical and cognitive performance (objective assessments) in persons with fibromyalgia (FM). Correlational study. Exercise testing laboratory in Southern California. Community-residing ambulatory adults meeting the American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria for FM (N=68; mean age, 59.5y). Not applicable. Composite Physical Function scale, Senior Fitness Test (3 items), Fullerton Advanced Balance scale, 30-foot walk, Trail Making Test parts A and B, Digit Symbol Substitution Test, a composite score of these 3 cognitive measures, attention/executive function composite, processing speed composite, problem solving, inhibition, and episodic memory composite. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that after controlling for age and FM symptoms, better physical performance (based on assessments, not self-report) was associated with higher cognitive function in attention/executive function, processing speed, problem solving, and inhibition. Researchers should continue to investigate the relationship between physical and cognitive function in both clinical and nonclinical populations, as well as explore changes across time. Because physical activity has been associated with neural improvements, further research may identify whether particular mechanisms, such as neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, or changes in inflammatory marker levels, are involved. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The frequency and validity of self-reported diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease in the UK elderly: MRC CFAS cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltynie, Thomas; Matthews, Fiona E; Ishihara, Lianna; Brayne, Carol

    2006-01-01

    Background Estimates of the incidence and prevalence of chronic diseases can be made using established cohort studies but these estimates may have lower reliability if based purely on self-reported diagnosis. Methods The MRC Cognitive Function & Ageing Study (MRC CFAS) has collected longitudinal data from a population-based random sample of 13004 individuals over the age of 65 years from 5 centres within the UK. Participants were asked at baseline and after a two-year follow-up whether they had received a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Our aim was to make estimates of the incidence and prevalence of PD using self-reporting, and then investigate the validity of self-reported diagnosis using other data sources where available, namely death certification and neuropathological examination. Results The self-reported prevalence of Parkinson's disease (PD) amongst these individuals increases with age from 0.7% (95%CI 0.5–0.9) for 65–75, 1.4% (95%CI 1.0–1.7) for 75–85, and 1.6% (95%CI 1.0–2.3) for 85+ age groups respectively. The overall incidence of self reported PD in this cohort was 200/100,000 per year (95%CI 144–278). Only 40% of the deceased individuals reporting prevalent PD and 35% of those reporting incident PD had diagnoses of PD recorded on their death certificates. Neuropathological examination of individuals reporting PD also showed typical PD changes in only 40%, with the remainder showing basal ganglia pathologies causing parkinsonism rather than true PD pathology. Conclusion Self-reporting of PD status may be used as a screening tool to identify patients for epidemiological study, but inevitably identifies a heterogeneous group of movement disorders patients. Within this group, age, male sex, a family history of PD and reduced cigarette smoking appear to act as independent risk factors for self-reported PD. PMID:16925826

  20. Can 'partial' PTSD explain differences in diagnosis of PTSD by questionnaire self-report and interview after head injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalton, L D; McMillan, T M

    2009-02-01

    Can the concept of 'partial' PTSD explain the disparity between the relatively high incidence of PTSD found using self-report questionnaires and the relatively low incidence using structured interview? It was hypothesized that self-report of greater PTSD symptom severity is associated with increased heart rate and movement when responding to questions about the traumatic event, if 'partial' PTSD is an explanation. A within participants single group design. Twenty-one adults with head injury underwent self-report (Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Scale) and interview (Clinical Assessment of PTSD) assessments of PTSD, the Traumatic Memory Interview, self-report of mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and cognitive assessment (Wechsler Test of Adult Reading, Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Hayling Test, Digit Symbol Test), during which heart rate and motor activity were recorded. Self-report of greater PTSD symptom severity was not associated with increases in heart rate or movement during questions about the traumatic event. In fact, heart rate decreased from baseline in those with higher self-report scores for PTSD, consistent with curiosity about the traumatic event and not 'partial' PTSD. These preliminary findings agree with an emerging theme suggesting that, although PTSD can occur after head injury, it is easily over-diagnosed.

  1. Fibromyalgia: Presentation and Management with a Focus on Pharmacological Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sumpton, Janice E; Moulin, Dwight E

    2008-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a condition with widespread muscle pain. Prevalence studies showed that 2% to 7% of the population have fibromyalgia, which affects approximately one million Canadians. Fibromyalgia is most common in women, but it also involves men and children. As with most chronic illnesses, the causes of fibromyalgia are unknown. However, recent research supports underlying abnormalities in the central nervous system, which supports fibromyalgia as a chronic disease state and valid clinical...

  2. Perspectives on Living With Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Gill Taylor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Perceptions of people living with chronic illness change over time, contributing to health-related stress that necessitates coping skills. Paterson’s shifting perspectives model provides an explanation of chronically ill people’s variations in attention to their symptoms. In this qualitative study, 20 people with fibromyalgia living in a rural setting were interviewed in 2013 with the aim of gaining insight into their experiences and the meaning-making associated with their chronic condition. Analysis of the interview data categorized five recurrent, or common, themes: experiences of loss, feelings of fear and uncertainty, influence of stress, stigmatization of the disease, and coping through courage. Difficulties attendant to losses, distress, and stigma associated with this chronic condition led the participants to report poor health-related quality of life. The study findings can be useful across clinical settings to nurses and other health care providers in understanding those diagnosed with fibromyalgia and their care needs.

  3. Hypnosis for management of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Pascale; Jusseaume, Catherine; Boutet, Maryse; Dualé, Christian; Mulliez, Aurélin; Aublet-Cuvellier, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    This randomized, controlled trial contrasted the effects of 5 not-standardized sessions of hypnosis over 2 months in 59 women with fibromyalgia who were randomly assigned to treatment (n = 30) or a wait-list control group (n = 29). Patients in the treated group were encouraged to practice self-hypnosis. Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), MOS-Sleep Scale, Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI), Cognitive Strategy Questionnaire (CSQ), and Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) were administered at baseline, 3 months (M3), and 6 months (M6) after inclusion. Compared to the control, the hypnosis group reported better improvement on PGIC (p = .001 at M3, p = .01 at M6) and a significant improvement in sleep and CSQ dramatization subscale (both at M6).

  4. Alterations of brain activity in fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaddiruk, Passakorn; Paiboonworachat, Sahattaya; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2017-04-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome, characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain with diffuse tenderness at multiple tender points. Despite intense investigations, the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia remains elusive. Evidence shows that it could be due to changes in either the peripheral or central nervous system (CNS). For the CNS changes, alterations in the high brain area of fibromyalgia patients have been investigated but the definite mechanisms are still unclear. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI) have been used to gather evidence regarding the changes of brain morphologies and activities in fibromyalgia patients. Nevertheless, due to few studies, limited knowledge for alterations in brain activities in fibromyalgia is currently available. In this review, the changes in brain activity in various brain areas obtained from reports in fibromyalgia patients are comprehensively summarized. Changes of the grey matter in multiple regions such as the superior temporal gyrus, posterior thalamus, amygdala, basal ganglia, cerebellum, cingulate cortex, SII, caudate and putamen from the MRI as well as the increase of brain activities in the cerebellum, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, thalamus, somatosensory cortex, insula in fMRI studies are presented and discussed. Moreover, evidence from pharmacological interventions offering benefits for fibromyalgia patients by reducing brain activity is presented. Because of limited knowledge regarding the roles of brain activity alterations in fibromyalgia, this summarized review will encourage more future studies to elucidate the underlying mechanisms involved in the brains of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Autonomic changes in fibromyalgia: Clinical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noha El-Sawy

    2012-03-14

    Mar 14, 2012 ... Fibromyalgia;. Tilt table test;. Standing and supine blood pressure and heart rate;. Sympathetic skin response. Abstract Background: Autonomic nervous ... Depression(HRSD) and 4 – functional status by Fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ). ..... may affect the sleep pattern and psychological state of the.

  6. Unique immunologic patterns in fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Behm, Frederick G; Gavin, Igor M; Karpenko, Oleksiy; Lindgren, Valerie; Gaitonde, Sujata; Gashkoff, Peter A; Gillis, Bruce S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is a clinical syndrome characterized by chronic pain and allodynia. The diagnosis of FM has been one of exclusion as a test to confirm the diagnosis is lacking. Recent data highlight the role of the immune system in FM. Aberrant expressions of immune mediators, such as cytokines, have been linked to the pathogenesis and traits of FM. We therefore determined whether cytokine production by immune cells is altered in FM patients by comparing the cellular res...

  7. Development of the Sensory Hypersensitivity Scale (SHS): a self-report tool for assessing sensitivity to sensory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Eric A; Benham, Grant; Sturgeon, John A; Mackey, Sean; Johnson, Kevin A; Younger, Jarred

    2016-06-01

    Sensory hypersensitivity is one manifestation of the central sensitization that may underlie conditions such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. We conducted five studies designed to develop and validate the Sensory Hypersensitive Scale (SHS); a 25-item self-report measure of sensory hypersensitivity. The SHS assesses both general sensitivity and modality-specific sensitivity (e.g. touch, taste, and hearing). 1202 participants (157 individuals with chronic pain) completed the SHS, which demonstrated an adequate overall internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha) of 0.81, suggesting the tool can be used as a cross-modality assessment of sensitivity. SHS scores demonstrated only modest correlations (Pearson's r) with depressive symptoms (0.19) and anxiety (0.28), suggesting a low level of overlap with psychiatric complaints. Overall SHS scores showed significant but relatively modest correlations (Pearson's r) with three measures of sensory testing: cold pain tolerance (-0.34); heat pain tolerance (-0.285); heat pain threshold (-0.271). Women reported significantly higher scores on the SHS than did men, although gender-based differences were small. In a chronic pain sample, individuals with fibromyalgia syndrome demonstrated significantly higher SHS scores than did individuals with osteoarthritis or back pain. The SHS appears suitable as a screening measure for sensory hypersensitivity, though additional research is warranted to determine its suitability as a proxy for central sensitization.

  8. Qigong and Fibromyalgia circa 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawynok, Jana; Lynch, Mary E

    2017-06-06

    Qigong is an internal art practice with a long history in China. It is currently characterized as meditative movement (or as movement-based embodied contemplative practice), but is also considered as complementary and alternative exercise or mind-body therapy. There are now six controlled trials and nine other reports on the effects of qigong in fibromyalgia. Outcomes are related to amount of practice so it is important to consider this factor in overview analyses. If one considers the 4 trials (201 subjects) that involve diligent practice (30-45 min daily, 6-8 weeks), there are consistent benefits in pain, sleep, impact, and physical and mental function following the regimen, with benefits maintained at 4-6 months. Effect sizes are consistently in the large range. There are also reports of even more extensive practice of qigong for 1-3 years, even up to a decade, indicating marked benefits in other health areas beyond core domains for fibromyalgia. While the latter reports involve a limited number of subjects and represent a self-selected population, the marked health benefits that occur are noteworthy. Qigong merits further study as a complementary practice for those with fibromyalgia. Current treatment guidelines do not consider amount of practice, and usually make indeterminate recommendations.

  9. Qigong and Fibromyalgia circa 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Sawynok

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Qigong is an internal art practice with a long history in China. It is currently characterized as meditative movement (or as movement-based embodied contemplative practice, but is also considered as complementary and alternative exercise or mind–body therapy. There are now six controlled trials and nine other reports on the effects of qigong in fibromyalgia. Outcomes are related to amount of practice so it is important to consider this factor in overview analyses. If one considers the 4 trials (201 subjects that involve diligent practice (30–45 min daily, 6–8 weeks, there are consistent benefits in pain, sleep, impact, and physical and mental function following the regimen, with benefits maintained at 4–6 months. Effect sizes are consistently in the large range. There are also reports of even more extensive practice of qigong for 1–3 years, even up to a decade, indicating marked benefits in other health areas beyond core domains for fibromyalgia. While the latter reports involve a limited number of subjects and represent a self-selected population, the marked health benefits that occur are noteworthy. Qigong merits further study as a complementary practice for those with fibromyalgia. Current treatment guidelines do not consider amount of practice, and usually make indeterminate recommendations.

  10. Bone mass and turnover in fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Gam, A; Egsmose, C

    1993-01-01

    Physical inactivity accelerates bone loss. Since patients with fibromyalgia are relatively physically inactive, bone mass and markers of bone metabolism were determined in 12 premenopausal women with fibromyalgia and in healthy age matched female control subjects. No differences were found...... in lumbar bone mineral density, femoral neck bone mineral density, serum levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, ionized calcium and phosphate. The urinary excretion of both hydroxyproline and calcium relative to urinary creatinine excretion was significantly higher in patients with fibromyalgia, p = 0.......01. This was linked to lower urinary creatinine excretion (p = 0.02) probably reflecting lower physical activity in the patients with fibromyalgia. We conclude that bone mass and turnover are generally not affected in premenopausal women with fibromyalgia....

  11. Neuropsychological assessment of patients with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Goulart

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate associations among symptoms of depression, anxiety, pain perception and cognitive impairment in patients with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia. We evaluated 32 women volunteers with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia based on the criteria of the ACR. The control group was matched to the patient group for age, schooling and income. The volunteers were submitted to a neuropsychological battery focused on Memory, Attention, Executive Functions, Perceived Pain, Anxiety and Depression. Anxiety was more relevant than depression in the group of women with fibromyalgia, the perception of pain was very high and cognitive impairment was more evident in executive functions, especially planning and inhibitory control. Memory and attention were more impaired in the fibromyalgia group, especially on tasks that require executive functions. Patients with fibromyalgia seem to be less efficient in tasks related to executive functions.

  12. Self-reported head injury among refugee survivors of torture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, Eva; Ashman, Teresa; Im, Brian; Rasmussen, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    To examine the prevalence of self-reported head injury among treatment-seeking refugee survivors of torture, a population at high risk for such injuries. A total of 488 survivors of torture accepted at a torture treatment clinic between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011. Harvard Trauma Questionnaire, incidence of head injury and resulting loss of consciousness (LOC), chief physical complaints, general health scale, indicators of torture severity (length of detention, sexual assault, and number of different persecution types). Of the 488 cases reviewed, 335 (69%) patients reported sustaining a blow to the head. Of the 335 with head injury, 185 (55%) reported LOC following the injury. Those who reported sustaining a head injury were significantly more likely to be men, to have a greater number of types of torture experiences, and report sleep disturbances and headaches as their primary medical complaints. The high rates of head injury and head injury followed by LOC among treatment-seeking survivors of torture indicates the need for torture treatment centers to assess for possible brain injury. Our findings suggest that patients with possible traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be at a higher risk of negative physical outcomes than those without possible TBI.

  13. Fear of Falling in Women with Fibromyalgia and Its Relation with Number of Falls and Balance Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Collado-Mateo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate fear of falling, number of falls, and balance performance in women with FM and to examine the relationship between these variables and others, such as balance performance, quality of life, age, pain, and impact of fibromyalgia. Methods. A total of 240 women participated in this cross-sectional study. Of these, 125 had fibromyalgia. Several variables were assessed: age, fear of falling from 0 to 100, number of falls, body composition, balance performance, lower limb strength, health-related quality of life, and impact of fibromyalgia. Results. Women with fibromyalgia reported more falls and more fear of falling. Fear of falling was associated with number of falls in the last year, stiffness, perceived balance problems, impact of FM, and HRQoL whereas the number of falls was related to fear of falling, balance performance with eyes closed, pain, tenderness to touch level, anxiety, self-reported balance problems, impact of FM, and HRQoL. Conclusion. FM has an impact on fear of falling, balance performance, and number of falls. Perceived balance problems seem to be more closely associated with fear of falling than objective balance performance.

  14. Pressure Pain Threshold and Anxiety in Adolescent Females With and Without Juvenile Fibromyalgia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Christopher D; Jastrowski Mano, Kristen E; Barnett, Kimberly A; Pfeiffer, Megan; Ting, Tracy V; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

    2017-07-01

    Reduced pain thresholds have been documented in adult fibromyalgia, but there are no quantitative studies of altered pain sensitivity in adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM). The current study examined differences in pressure pain sensitivity between adolescent females with JFM and healthy controls. The relationship between levels of anxiety and pain were also examined. A total of 34 JFM (15.4±1.4 y old) and 31 controls (14.5±1.3 y old) completed self-report measures of pain and anxiety. Pressure pain threshold was assessed (palm and forehead sites) with a hand-held algometer. Participants indicated the first sensation of pain and then rated the intensity of pain on a Numerical Rating Scale. Adolescents with JFM exhibited greater sensitivity to pressure pain compared with controls. While the difference between JFM and controls was only observed at the forehead, the intensity of pain produced by the pressure algometry at both sites was significantly higher in the JFM participants compared with controls. Correlations between clinical pain and anxiety were significant for the JFM group only. No relationships were observed between anxiety and pressure pain for either group. This study is a first step toward investigating mechanisms of altered pain processing in adolescents with JFM. Adolescents with JFM were found be more sensitive to pressure pain than their healthy peers, which suggests a propensity for sensitization of peripheral and/or central nociceptive information often reported in adult fibromyalgia, and which does not appear to be affected by anxiety.

  15. Self-reported bruxism mirrors anxiety and stress in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahlberg, J.; Lobbezoo, F.; Ahlberg, K.; Manfredini, D.; Hublin, C.; Sinisalo, J.; Könönen, M.; Savolainen, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aims were to analyze whether the levels of self-reported bruxism and anxiety associate among otherwise healthy subjects, and to investigate the independent effects of anxiety and stress experience on the probability of self-reported bruxism. Study Design: As part of a study on

  16. Regional differences in self-reported body dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, A.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Choi, H.; Robinette K.M.

    2009-01-01

    Self-reported values of height and weight are used increasingly despite warnings that these data might be biased. The present study investigates whether differences between self-reported and measured values are the same for populations from different regions, and the influences of gender and age.

  17. Self-Reported Health of People with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiura, Glenn T.

    2012-01-01

    Self-reported health is an important outcome in the evaluation of health care but is largely ignored in favor of proxy-based reporting for people with an intellectual disability. This study briefly reviews the role of self-report in health assessment of people with intellectual disability and the challenges and recommendations that have emerged…

  18. Validation of Self-Reported Cognitive Problems with Objective ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a lack of validation of self-reported cognitive problems with objective neuropsychological measures. The validity of four self-reported cognitive items from a health questionnaire (HQ) and the Symptoms Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R) was examined with objective clinical neuropsychological test performance in 147 manganese (Mn) exposed residents. These residents were from two Ohio towns exposed to ambient air-Mn from an industrial source with modeled average air-Mn concentrations of 0.54 µg/m3 (range: 0.01-4.58) and were part of a larger study of cognitive, motor, tremor abnormalities and their relationship to Mn exposure.The primarily white (94.6%) participants (aged 30-64) lived in the towns for at least 10 years (range: 10-64) and had 13.9 years of education, on average. In the last 7 days before testing, 94 (64.4%) participants self-reported concentration problems and 105 (71.8%) self-reported memory problems. After adjusting for age and education, participants who self-reported cognitive problems did not perform worse on the objective neuropsychological measures than those who reported not having problems, except on 1 of 17 neuropsychological tests (Stroop Color). Greater levels of depression and female sex predicted having more self-reported cognitive problems. Higher education was associated with fewer self-reported cognitive problems. Measures of Mn in air, blood, hair, and toenails were not associated with subjective cognitive self-reported p

  19. Construct Validity of Self-Reported Metacognitive Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jean-Louis; Karabenick, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite their significant contributions to research on self-regulated learning, those favoring online and trace approaches have questioned the use of self-report to assess learners' use of learning strategies. An important rejoinder to such criticisms consists of examining the validity of self-report items. The present study was designed to assess…

  20. Validity of College Self-Reported Gains at Diverse Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of self-reported gains to assess college student learning and development, these measures may not be valid indicators of student growth in most circumstances. However, some evidence suggests that self-reported gains may assess student outcomes more accurately at certain types of colleges and universities. This study used…

  1. Detecting Careless Responses to Self-Reported Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kountur, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: The use of self-report questionnaires may lead to biases such as careless responses that distort the research outcomes. Early detection of careless responses in self-report questionnaires may reduce error, but little guidance exists in the literature regarding techniques for detecting such careless or random responses in…

  2. the relationship between self-reported health status and spirituality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. Self-reported health (SRH) is among the most frequently assessed health perceptions in epidemiological research because a person's appraisal of his or her general health is a powerful predictor of future morbidity and mortality.1 Fayers and Springers in 2002 reported that self-reported health status.

  3. Severity of fibromyalgia symptoms is associated with socioeconomic status and not obesity in Korean patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji-Hyoun; Park, Dong-Jin; Kim, Seong-Ho; Nah, Seong-Su; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Lee, Yeon-Ah; Hong, Seung-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Hyoun Ah; Joung, Chung-Il; Kim, Sang-Hyon; Lee, Shin-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Several studies conducted in Western countries have shown that obese or overweight patients with fibromyalgia (FM) exhibit more severe symptoms than patients of normal weight. However, there has been no study on the relationship between obesity and FM symptom severity in Asian patients. In this study, we evaluated the association between obesity, and other related factors such as socioeconomic status (SES), and FM symptom severity in Korean patients. A total of 343 participants were enrolled in this prospective cohort study, which used a nationwide survey of FM patients who were followed on an annual basis. We investigated health-related quality of life (QoL) and associated factors, such as demographic characteristics, SES, and physical and psychological function. The FM patients were assessed using the following self-reported questionnaires: the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, the Brief Fatigue Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Social Support Scale. Of the 343 patients, 76 (22.1%) were obese; these patients did not differ from the non-obese patients in terms of tender points or self-reported questionnaire scores. FM patients with lower SES - as indexed by unemployment, lower income, and education levels - had more severe symptoms, and poorer QoL and function compared to those with higher SES. In contrast to Western patients, symptom severity in Korean FM patients is associated with SES, but not with obesity.

  4. Validity of self-reported height and weight among adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mette; Holstein, Bjørn E; Melkevik, Ole

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a new approach for investigating bias in self-reported data on height and weight among adolescents by studying the relevance of participants' self-reported response capability. The objectives were 1) to estimate the prevalence of students with high and low self-reported response...... adolescents' response capability is of importance for the accuracy and precision of self-reported height and weight. Also, the study investigated the impact of students' response capability on estimating prevalence rates of overweight....... capability for weight and height in a self-administrated questionnaire survey among 11--15 year old Danish adolescents, 2) to estimate the proportion of missing values on self-reported height and weight in relation to capability for reporting height and weight, and 3) to investigate the extent to which...

  5. Designing hunting regulation under population uncertainty and self-reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark

    2016-01-01

    A number of methods exist for estimating the size of animal populations. All methods generate an uncertain estimate of population size, and have different properties, which can be taken into account when designing regulation. We consider hunting regulation when the population size is uncertain...... and when the self-reported bag is used to estimate the population size. The properties of a population tax and a tax on self-reported bag are analyzed and we begin by considering a baseline situation with full certainty and no use of self-reporting for population size estimation. Here individual hunters...... self-report a bag on zero and a population tax alone can secure an optimum. Next we show that when facing uncertain population size, a risk-averse hunter will self-report part of the bag to reduce the uncertain population tax payment, making both tax instruments necessary for reaching an optimum...

  6. Fibromyalgia: A Critical and Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, Andrea T; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder that is part of a spectrum of syndromes that lack precise classification. It is often considered as part of the global overview of functional somatic syndromes that are otherwise medically unexplained or part of a somatization disorder. Patients with fibromyalgia share symptoms with other functional somatic problems, including issues of myalgias, arthralgias, fatigue and sleep disturbances. Indeed, there is often diagnostic and classification overlap for the case definitions of a variety of somatization disorders. Fibromyalgia, however, is a critically important syndrome for physicians and scientists to be aware of. Patients should be taken very seriously and provided optimal care. Although inflammatory, infectious, and autoimmune disorders have all been ascribed to be etiological events in the development of fibromyalgia, there is very little data to support such a thesis. Many of these disorders are associated with depression and anxiety and may even be part of what has been sometimes called affected spectrum disorders. There is no evidence that physical trauma, i.e., automobile accidents, is associated with the development or exacerbation of fibromyalgia. Treatment should be placed on education, patient support, physical therapy, nutrition, and exercise, including the use of drugs that are approved for the treatment of fibromyalgia. Treatment should not include opiates and patients should not become poly pharmacies in which the treatment itself can lead to significant morbidities. Patients with fibromyalgia are living and not dying of this disorder and positive outlooks and family support are key elements in the management of patients.

  7. The Tie that Binds: The Role of Self-Reported High School Gains in Self-Reported College Gains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Tricia A.; Asel, Ashley M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to investigate the extent to which students' retrospective self-reported gains from high school are associated with college self-reported gains. As such, the chapter offers an empirical test of how accounting for one's predisposition to report educational impact changes estimates of the effects of college experiences…

  8. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkaya, Nuray; Akkaya, Semih; Polat, Yusuf; Turk, Meral; Turk, Tufan; Turhal, Elif; Sahin, Fusun

    2011-01-01

    Although there are some studies suggesting relation between different types of infection and fibromyalgia syndrome (FM), there is presently no proof that FM is caused by an infection. Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection may cause extragastric manifestations. Inflammation is an important mediator of increased sympathetic nervous system activity and may lead to pain in fibromyalgia patients. In this study, we aimed to investigate the HP seropositivity in fibromyalgia patients compared with controls for possible role of HP infection in FM. Sixty-seven patients with fibromyalgia were evaluated. Two of them were excluded from the study because of high level of acute phase reactants. Sixty-five female patients with fibromyalgia and 41 randomly selected age-matched female healthy controls were enrolled to study. Serum HP IgA and IgG antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire was assessed in patients and controls. Seropositivity of HP IgG antibody in the fibromyalgia patients was significantly higher than in the control group. No statistically significant differences were found regarding the clinical features between fibromyalgia patients with HP IgG antibody and patients without IgG antibody. Our study suggests that former HP infection may have a role in the etiopathogenesis of fibromyalgia syndrome or may act as a triggering factor. However, high seroprevalence of HP in general population and prevalent asymptomatic infection make it difficult to interpret these results for the definite role of HP in FM. Highlighting the pathophysiologic mechanisms of FM will result in more effective treatment regimens.

  9. Prevalence of fibromyalgia: literature review update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Amelia Pasqual; Santo, Adriana de Sousa do Espírito; Berssaneti, Ana Assumpção; Matsutani, Luciana Akemi; Yuan, Susan Lee King

    The present study aimed to update the literature review on the prevalence of fibromyalgia published in 2006. A bibliographical survey was carried out from 2005 to 2014 in the MEDLINE, Web of Science, Embase, LILACS and SciELO databases and 3274 records were identified. Five researchers selected the studies, following the inclusion criteria: studies that obtained the prevalence of fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia studies in associated diseases were excluded. When screening by title and abstract, 2073 irrelevant articles were excluded. The full texts of 210 articles were evaluated for eligibility and this review included 39 studies, described in 41 articles. The selected studies were grouped into four categories: (A) prevalence of fibromyalgia in the general population; (B) prevalence of fibromyalgia in women; (C) prevalence of fibromyalgia in rural and urban areas; (D) prevalence of fibromyalgia in special populations. The literature shows values of fibromyalgia prevalence in the general population between 0.2 and 6.6%, in women between 2.4 and 6.8%, in urban areas between 0.7 and 11.4%, in rural areas between 0.1 and 5.2%, and in special populations values between 0.6 and 15%. This literature review update shows a significant increase in fibromyalgia prevalence studies in the world. The new 2010 American College of Rheumatology criteria have not been widely used yet and the COPCORD (Community-oriented program for control of Rheumatic Diseases) methodology has increased the quality of studies on the prevalence of rheumatic diseases in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Spiritual well-being in individuals with fibromyalgia syndrome: relationships with symptom pattern variability, uncertainty, and psychosocial adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anema, Cheryl; Johnson, Mary; Zeller, Janice M; Fogg, Louis; Zetterlund, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This study examined relationships among symptom pattern variability, uncertainty, spiritual well-being, and psychosocial adaptation in individuals with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). A survey design was used with 58 individuals with FMS. The Fibromyalgia Symptom Pattern Questionnaire, Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale--Community Form, Spiritual Well-Being Scale, and Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale-Self Report were used to collect data. Positive relationships were found between symptom pattern variability and uncertainty and between uncertainty and poor psychosocial adaptation; spiritual well-being moderated the relationship between uncertainty and psychosocial adaptation. A positive sense of well-being aided adaptation to symptoms and uncertainties of FMS. Spiritual well-being had a greater effect on the relationship between symptom pattern variability and uncertainty than expected.

  11. Beyond fibromyalgia: ideas on etiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, R M

    1989-11-01

    A common syndrome of musculoskeletal pain, currently called fibrositis or fibromyalgia, accounts for 10-30% of all rheumatology consultations in North America. Lacking a distinctive pathophysiological basis the nature of the pain experienced by these patients remains elusive and treatment is not based on sound scientific principles. An hypothesis is advanced which suggests that skeletal muscle is the "end organ" responsible for the pain of fibromyalgia and that previous studies on muscle deconditioning and microtrauma may be relevant to the etiopathogenesis of fibromyalgia syndrome.

  12. Self-efficacy and affect as mediators between pain dimensions and emotional symptoms and functional limitation in women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñacoba Puente, Cecilia; Velasco Furlong, Lilian; Écija Gallardo, Carmen; Cigarán Méndez, Margarita; Bedmar Cruz, Dolores; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of self-efficacy and affect as mediators of the relationship between pain and several fibromyalgia (FM) symptoms (functional limitation, depression, and anxiety). We evaluated 144 women with FM for self-reported pain (numerical pain scale), pressure pain sensitivity (pressure pain thresholds), functional limitation (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire), self-efficacy (Chronic Pain Self-Efficacy Scale), depression-anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and positive-negative affect (Positive-Negative Affect Scale). Mediating analyses were conducted with ordinary least squares multiple regression analysis. The results demonstrated that self-reported pain and pressure pain sensitivity exhibited significant relationships with functional limitation, anxiety, depression, self-efficacy, and affect. Affect mediated the relationship between pressure pain sensitivity and anxiety, whereas self-efficacy was the mediating variable between self-reported pain and functional limitation and depression. Our results support a complex nature of pain in women presenting with FM, as cognitive and emotional variables have different mediator relationships between pain dimensions and functional and emotional outcomes in women with FM. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Subgrouping of fibromyalgia patients on the basis of pressure-pain thresholds and psychological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesecke, Thorsten; Williams, David A; Harris, Richard E; Cupps, Thomas R; Tian, Xiaoming; Tian, Thomas X; Gracely, Richard H; Clauw, Daniel J

    2003-10-01

    Although the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for fibromyalgia are used to identify individuals with both widespread pain and tenderness, individuals who meet these criteria are not a homogeneous group. Patients differ in their accompanying clinical symptoms, as well as in the relative contributions of biologic, psychological, and cognitive factors to their symptom expression. Therefore, it seems useful to identify subsets of fibromyalgia patients on the basis of which of these factors are present. Previous attempts at identifying subsets have been based solely on psychological and cognitive features. In this study, we attempt to identify patient subsets by incorporating these features as well as the degree of hyperalgesia/tenderness, which is a key neurobiologic feature of this illness. Ninety-seven individuals meeting the ACR criteria for fibromyalgia finished the same battery of self-report and evoked-pain testing. Analyzed variables were obtained from several domains, consisting of 1) mood (evaluated by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale [for depression] and the State-Trait Personality Inventory [for symptoms of trait-related anxiety]), 2) cognition (by the catastrophizing and control of pain subscales of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire), and 3) hyperalgesia/tenderness (by dolorimetry and random pressure-pain applied at suprathreshold values). Cluster analytic procedures were used to distinguish subgroups of fibromyalgia patients based on these domains. Three clusters best fit the data. Multivariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) confirmed that each variable was differentiated by the cluster solution (Wilks' lambda [degrees of freedom 6,89] = 0.123, P subgroup of patients (n = 50) was characterized by moderate mood ratings, moderate levels of catastrophizing and perceived control over pain, and low levels of tenderness. A second subgroup (n = 31) displayed significantly elevated values on the mood assessments, the highest

  14. Treatment of Fibromyalgia with Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Patrick G; Balden, Erin; Tomkins, Glen; Santoro, James; Kroenke, Kurt; Jackson, Jeffrey L

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fibromyalgia is a common, poorly understood musculoskeletal pain syndrome with limited therapeutic options. OBJECTIVE To systematically review the efficacy of antidepressants in the treatment of fibromyalgia and examine whether this effect was independent of depression. DESIGN Meta-analysis of English-language, randomized, placebo-controlled trials. Studies were obtained from searching medline, embase, and psyclit(1966-1999), the Cochrane Library, unpublished literature, and bibliographies. We performed independent duplicate review of each study for both inclusion and data extraction. MAIN RESULTS Sixteen randomized, placebo-controlled trials were identified, of which 13 were appropriate for data extraction. There were 3 classes of antidepressants evaluated: tricyclics (9 trials), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (3 trials), and S-adenosylmethionine (2 trials). Overall, the quality of the studies was good (mean score 5.6, scale 0-8). The odds ratio for improvement with therapy was 4.2 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.6 to 6.8). The pooled risk difference for these studies was 0.25 (95% CI, 0.16 to 0.34), which calculates to 4 (95% CI, 2.9 to 6.3) individuals needing treatment for 1 patient to experience symptom improvement. When the effect on individual symptoms was combined, antidepressants improved sleep, fatigue, pain, and well-being, but not trigger points. In the 5 studies where there was adequate assessment for an effect independent of depression, only 1 study found a correlation between symptom improvement and depression scores. Outcomes were not affected by class of agent or quality score using meta-regression. CONCLUSION Antidepressants are efficacious in treating many of the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Patients were more than 4 times as likely to report overall improvement, and reported moderate reductions in individual symptoms, particularly pain. Whether this effect is independent of depression needs further study. PMID:11029681

  15. Whole body vibration exercise training for fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidonde, Julia; Busch, Angela J; van der Spuy, Ina; Tupper, Susan; Kim, Soo Y; Boden, Catherine

    2017-09-26

    measured outcomes), attrition, and other biases; as unclear for selection bias (allocation concealment); and as high for performance, detection (self-report outcomes), and selective reporting biases.The WBV versus control comparison reported on three major outcomes assessed at 12 weeks post intervention based on the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) (0 to 100 scale, lower score is better). Results for HRQL in the control group at end of treatment (59.13) showed a mean difference (MD) of -3.73 (95% confidence interval [CI] -10.81 to 3.35) for absolute HRQL, or improvement of 4% (11% better to 3% worse) and relative improvement of 6.7% (19.6% better to 6.1% worse). Results for withdrawals indicate that 14 per 100 and 10 per 100 in the intervention and control groups, respectively, withdrew from the intervention (RR 1.43, 95% CI 0.27 to 7.67; absolute change 4%, 95% CI 16% fewer to 24% more; relative change 43% more, 95% CI 73% fewer to 667% more). The only adverse event reported was acute pain in the legs, for which one participant dropped out of the program. We judged the quality of evidence for all outcomes as very low. This study did not measure pain intensity, fatigue, stiffness, or physical function. No outcomes in this comparison met the 15% threshold for clinical relevance.The WBV plus mixed exercise (aerobic, strength, flexibility, and relaxation) versus control study (N = 21) evaluated symptoms at six weeks post intervention using the FIQ. Results for HRQL at end of treatment (59.64) showed an MD of -16.02 (95% CI -31.57 to -0.47) for absolute HRQL, with improvement of 16% (0.5% to 32%) and relative change in HRQL of 24% (0.7% to 47%). Data showed a pain intensity MD of -28.22 (95% CI -43.26 to -13.18) for an absolute difference of 28% (13% to 43%) and a relative change of 39% improvement (18% to 60%); as well as a fatigue MD of -33 (95% CI -49 to -16) for an absolute difference of 33% (16% to 49%) and relative difference of 47% (95% CI 23% to 60%); and a

  16. Validation of self-reported periodontal measures among health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshipura, Kaumudi J; Pitiphat, Waranuch; Douglass, Chester W

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the validity of self-reported periodontal measures among nondentist health professionals. Valid self-reported measures could provide a time- and cost-efficient alternative for large epidemiologic studies. A subsample of 212 male nondentists sampled on the basis of their reported periodontal severity from the Health Professional Follow-up Study (HPFS) provided dental radiographs and completed questionnaires assessing self-reported oral health. Alveolar bone loss was evaluated from the radiographs at 32 posterior sites and used as the standard measure of cumulative periodontal disease. The self-reported ordinal periodontal measure had a linear relationship with mean radiographic bone loss (r = .61). The positive and negative predictive values of the dichotomized self-reported periodontal measures were 83 percent and 69 percent. Self-reported history of periodontal surgery was also a good surrogate for bone loss (predictive value positive 78 percent and negative 71 percent). Self-reports can provide discrimination and ranking information of cumulative periodontal disease among health professionals and can be used to provide valid results in etiologic studies in health professionals' populations.

  17. Sexual orientation and bias in self-reported BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Tracy K; Walls, Courtney E; Austin, S Bryn

    2012-08-01

    Our objective was to determine if sexual orientation groups differ in accuracy of BMI (kg/m(2)) calculated from self-reported height and weight and if weight status modifies possible differences. Using gender-stratified multiple linear regression to analyze Wave III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 12,197), we examined the association of sexual orientation with BMI calculated from self-reported height and weight (self-reported BMI), controlling for BMI calculated from objectively measured height and weight (objectively measured BMI) as well as demographic, health, and behavioral variables. We tested for effect modification of the relationship between sexual orientation and self-reported BMI by objectively measured BMI. The population underestimated their BMI (females: β = 0.87, P Sexual orientation groups differed little in their accuracy of reporting; only gay males had significant underreporting (β = -0.37, P = 0.038) relative to their heterosexual peers. We found no evidence of effect modification of the relationship of sexual orientation and self-reported BMI by objectively measured BMI. With the exception of gay males, sexual orientation groups are consistent in their underreporting of BMI thus providing confidence in most comparisons of weight status based on self-report. Self-reporting of weight and height by gay males may exaggerate the differences in BMI between gay and heterosexual males.

  18. Non pharmacological treatments in fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Spath

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available To fully answer the complex question of what modes of non pharmacological treatments are useful for fibromyalgia (FM one should ask different layers of questions, and as with peeling layers of onions, be prepared to shed some tears. The first painful question, or layer of the onion, is related to understanding patients’ complaints. Patients who experience recurrent as well as persistent physical symptoms without any objective evidence are too often classified as “psychosomatic disorders” or worse as “non disease” (see Sarzi this issue...

  19. Heritability and environmental effects for self-reported periods with stuttering: A twin study from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagnani, Corrado; Fibiger, Steen; Skytthe, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Genetic influence for stuttering was studied based on adult self-reporting. Using nation-wide questionnaire answers from 33,317 Danish twins, a univariate biometric analysis based on the liability threshold model was performed in order to estimate the heritability of stuttering. The self......-reported incidences for stuttering were from less than 4% for females to near 9% for males. Both probandwise concordance rate and tetrachoric correlation were substantially higher for monozygotic compared to dizygotic pairs, indicating substantial genetic influence on individual liability. Univariate biometric...... analyses showed that additive genetic and unique environmental factors best explained the observed concordance patterns. Heritability estimates for males/females were 0.84/0.81. Moderate unique environmental effects were also found. Genetic influence for stuttering was studied based on adult self...

  20. The identification of factors contributing to self-reported anomalies in civil aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejczak, Chris; Karwowski, Waldemar; Thompson, William

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyze anomalies voluntarily reported by pilots in civil aviation sector and identify factors leading to such anomalies. Experimental data were obtained from the NASA aviation safety reporting system (ASRS) database. These data contained a range of text records spanning 30 years of civilian aviation, both commercial (airline operations) and general aviation (private aircraft). Narrative data as well as categorical data were used. The associations between incident contributing factors and self-reported anomalies were investigated using data mining and correspondence analysis. The results revealed that a broadly defined human factors category and weather conditions were the main contributors to self-reported civil aviation anomalies. New associations between identified factors and reported anomaly conditions were also reported.

  1. Can mastalgia be another somatic symptom in fibromyalgia syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Meral; Kilic, Murat Ozgur; Cemeroglu, Ozlem; Icen, Duygu

    2015-11-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the coexistence of mastalgia and fibromyalgia, to investigate the effects of this combination on pain patterns, and to discuss the status of breast pain in the diagnostic algorithm of fibromyalgia syndrome. Sixty-one female patients reporting breast pain during the last three months and 53 female patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome were enrolled in this study. The Breast Pain Questionnaire was administered to all participants in the mastalgia group and to those in the fibromyalgia syndrome group who had experienced mastalgia during the past three months. The patients in the fibromyalgia syndrome group were evaluated using the 2010 preliminary American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. All of the patients in the mastalgia group were evaluated for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia syndrome by a single physiatrist. The coexistence and pain patterns of mastalgia and fibromyalgia were assessed statistically. Approximately half of the patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (47.2%) reported having mastalgia at the time of admission and 37.7% of the patients with mastalgia met the diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia syndrome. The patients with mastalgia in the fibromyalgia syndrome group had significantly higher total breast pain scores compared with the women in the mastalgia group. In addition, the patients with fibromyalgia syndrome in the mastalgia group had significantly higher Widespread Pain Index and Symptom Severity Scale scores than the patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. We suggest that mastalgia can be an aspect of the central sensitivity syndrome and can be added to the somatic symptoms of fibromyalgia.

  2. Water sanitation, access, use and self-reported diarrheal disease in rural Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Gabriela E; Bearman, Gonzalo; Sanogo, Kakotan; Stevens, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Only 79% of individuals living in rural Honduras use improved water sources. Inadequate drinking water quality is related to diarrheal illness, which in Honduras contributes to 18.6 episodes of diarrhea per child year in children under five years of age. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare access to drinking water and sanitation, as well as self-reported diarrheal disease incidence among three proximal communities in the Department of Yoro area of Honduras. An 11-item language-specific, interviewer-administered, anonymous questionnaire was administered to 263 randomly selected adults attending a June 2011 medical brigade held in the communities of Coyoles, La Hicaca, and Lomitas. Chi-square with Fisher exact tests were utilized to compare water access, sanitation, and self-reported diarrheal incidence among these communities. Coyoles and La Hicaca used private faucets as their primary water sources. Coyoles had the greatest use of bottled water. Lomitas used rivers as their primary water source, and did not use bottled water. Mostly, females were responsible for acquiring water. Usage of multiple water sanitation methods was most common in Coyoles, while no sanitation method was most common in Lomitas. In Lomitas and La Hicaca, water filters were mostly provided via donation by non-governmental organizations. Lomitas had the highest reported incidence of diarrhea among self and other household members. Critical differences in water access, sanitation, and self-reported diarrheal incidence among three geographically distinct, yet proximal, communities highlights the need for targeted interventions even in geographically proximal rural areas.

  3. Diagnosis, etiology, and therapy of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, D; Wilke, W S

    1999-04-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by diffuse pain, multiple tender points, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. Its frequent concurrence with rheumatic diseases modifies the clinical picture of the "primary" disease. This article reviews new information about the etiopathogenesis and treatment of this syndrome.

  4. Fibromyalgia in the adult Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, E; Kjøller, Mette; Jacobsen, S

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of fibromyalgia have so far been based on rheumatologic and general practice settings, which are poor proxies for the underlying population. The study is based on a national health interview survey carried out by the Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology in 1990....../91 on approx. 6000 randomly selected Danish citizens. For this study 1219 subjects from the eastern part of Denmark aged 18 to 79 years were asked about widespread muscle pain. One-hundred-and-twenty-three persons fulfilled the screening criteria. Clinical examination could be performed on 65 persons (53......%). Eight subjects, all female, met the 1990 American College of Rheumatism criteria for fibromyalgia. Dropouts were regarded as not having fibromyalgia. The prevalence of fibromyalgia in the Danish population between 18 and 79 years of age was found to be a minimum estimate of 0.66% (95% confidence limits...

  5. Fibromyalgia in the adult Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, E; Kjøller, Mette; Jacobsen, S

    1993-01-01

    %). Eight subjects, all female, met the 1990 American College of Rheumatism criteria for fibromyalgia. Dropouts were regarded as not having fibromyalgia. The prevalence of fibromyalgia in the Danish population between 18 and 79 years of age was found to be a minimum estimate of 0.66% (95% confidence limits......Epidemiologic studies of fibromyalgia have so far been based on rheumatologic and general practice settings, which are poor proxies for the underlying population. The study is based on a national health interview survey carried out by the Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology in 1990....../91 on approx. 6000 randomly selected Danish citizens. For this study 1219 subjects from the eastern part of Denmark aged 18 to 79 years were asked about widespread muscle pain. One-hundred-and-twenty-three persons fulfilled the screening criteria. Clinical examination could be performed on 65 persons (53...

  6. Alexithymia and fibromyalgia: clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marialaura eDi Tella

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This review proposes a critical discussion of the latest studies investigating the presence of alexithymia in patients with fibromyalgia (FM and its relation to other psychological disorders. The focus is on the most relevant literature exploring the relationship between FM, a chronic pain syndrome, and alexithymia, an affective dysregulation, largely observed in psychosomatic diseases. The articles were selected from the Medline/Pubmed database using the search terms Fibromyalgia, Alexithymia, and Psychological Distress. Of the seven studies fulfilling these criteria, one found no differences between FM patients and the control group, four found significant differences, with higher levels of alexithymia in the FM sample, while two showed unclear results. Overall, the majority of findings highlighted the high prevalence of alexithymia in FM patients. Future studies should clarify the role of alexithymia in FM, paying attention to two principal aspects: the use, as a control group, of patients with chronic pain conditions but a low psychosomatic component, and the use of other measures, in addition to the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20, to assess alexithymia.

  7. Vegan diet alleviates fibromyalgia symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaartinen, K; Lammi, K; Hypen, M; Nenonen, M; Hanninen, O; Rauma, A L

    2000-01-01

    The effect of a strict, low-salt, uncooked vegan diet rich in lactobacteria on symptoms in 18 fibromyalgia patients during and after a 3-month intervention period in an open, non-randomized controlled study was evaluated. As control 15 patients continued their omnivorous diet. The groups did not differ significantly from each other in the beginning of the study in any other parameters except in pain and urine sodium. The results revealed significant improvements in Visual analogue scale of pain (VAS) (p=0.005), joint stiffness (p=0.001), quality of sleep (p=0.0001), Health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) (p=0.031), General health questionnaire (GHQ) (p=0.021), and a rheumatologist's own questionnaire (p=0.038). The majority of patients were overweight to some extent at the beginning of the study and shifting to a vegan food caused a significant reduction in body mass index (BMI) (p=0.0001). Total serum cholesterol showed a statistically significant lowering (p=0.003). Urine sodium dropped to 1/3 of the beginning values (p=0.0001) indicating good diet compliance. It can be concluded that vegan diet had beneficial effects on fibromyalgia symptoms at least in the short run.

  8. Vestibular findings in fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fibromyalgia (FM is a non-inflammatory musculoskeletal chronic syndrome, whose etiology is unknown, characterized by a diffuse pain, increase in palpation sensitivity and such symptoms as tiredness, insomnia, anxiety, depression, cold intolerance and otologic complaints. Objective: Evaluate the vestibular behavior in fibromyalgia patients. Method: A retrospective transversal study was performed. 25 patients aged between 26 and 65 (average age - 52.2 and standard deviation - 10.3 were evaluated and submitted to the following procedures: anamnesis, otorhinolaryngologic and vestibular evaluation by way of vector electronystamography. Results: a The most evident otoneurologic symptoms were: difficulty or pain when moving the neck and pain was spread to an arm or shoulder (92.0% in each, dizziness (84.0% and headache (76.0%. The different clinical symptoms mostly reported were: depression (80.0%, anxiety (76.0% and insomnia (72.0%; b vestibular examination showed an alteration in 12 patients (48.0% in the caloric test; c an alteration in the peripheral vestibular system prevailed, and d deficient peripheral vestibular disorders were prevalent. Conclusion: This study enabled the importance of the labyrinthic test to be verified, thus emphasizing that this kind of people must be studied better, since a range of rheumatologic diseases can cause severe vestibular changes as a result of their manifestations and impairment areas.

  9. The genetics of fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskila, Dan; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Ablin, Jacob N

    2007-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a common chronic widespread pain syndrome mainly affecting women. Although the etiology of FMS is not completely understood, varieties of neuroendocrine disturbances, as well as abnormalities of autonomic function, have been implicated in its pathogenesis. The exposure of a genetically predisposed individual to a host of environmental stressors is presumed to lead to the development of FMS. Fibromyalgia overlaps with several related syndromes, collectively compromising the spectrum of the functional somatic disorder. FMS is characterized by a strong familial aggregation. Recent evidence suggests a role for polymorphisms of genes in the serotoninergic, dopaminergic and catecholaminergic systems in the etiopathogenesis of FMS. These polymorphisms are not specific for FMS and are similarly associated with additional comorbid conditions. The mode of inheritance in FMS is unknown, but it is most probably polygenic. Recognition of these gene polymorphisms may help to better subgroup FMS patients and to guide a more rational pharmacological approach. Future genetic studies conducted in larger cohorts of FMS patients and matched control groups may further illuminate the role of genetics in FMS.

  10. Is fibromyalgia a cause of failure in the treatment of a painful shoulder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonna, D; Bellato, E; Marini, E; Barbasetti, N; Mattei, L; Fissore, F; Arrigoni, C; Castoldi, F

    2013-06-01

    This study aims to review the incidence of fibromyalgia in a cohort of patients who were treated for shoulder pain and address whether a concomitant fibromyalgia could have had detrimental effect on outcomes. The treatment of 286 consecutive patients for shoulder pain was reviewed. Eighteen patients (6.3 %) were diagnosed as having fibromyalgia, but in 13 of them (72 %), the diagnosis was initially missed. Five patients received a total of 11 surgeries for treatment of the shoulder. At an average follow-up of 15 months (range 12-27), the average new Oxford shoulder score (OS score) was 49 % (range 6-87 %). The average physical component of the Short-Form-12 Healthy Survey (SF-12) was 36 (range 21-55), and the mental component 30 (range 15-46). The Summary Outcome Determination score (SOD score) was 1.3 (range-3 to 6). Fibromyalgia occurs relatively frequently in patients who complain of shoulder pain and it can be a cause of failure in the treatment of concomitant painful shoulder conditions.

  11. Patients’ and Professionals’ Views on Managing Fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Briones-Vozmediano, Erica; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Ronda-Pérez, Elena; Gil-González, Diana

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Managing fibromyalgia is a challenge for both health care systems and the professionals caring for these patients, due, in part, to the fact that the etiology of this disease is unknown, its symptoms are not specific and there is no standardized treatment. OBJECTIVE: The present study examines three aspects of fibromyalgia management, namely diagnostic approach, therapeutic management and the health professional-patient relationship, to explore specific areas of the health care pr...

  12. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Etiology, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Enrico Bellato; Eleonora Marini; Filippo Castoldi; Nicola Barbasetti; Lorenzo Mattei; Davide Edoardo Bonasia; Davide Blonna

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is mainly characterized by pain, fatigue, and sleep disruption. The etiology of fibromyalgia is still unclear: if central sensitization is considered to be the main mechanism involved, then many other factors, genetic, immunological, and hormonal, may play an important role. The diagnosis is typically clinical (there are no laboratory abnormalities) and the physician must concentrate on pain and on its features. Additional symptoms (e.g., Raynaud's phenomenon, irritable ...

  13. New guidelines for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Roberto E; Paiva, Eduardo S; Martinez, José Eduardo; Helfenstein, Milton; Rezende, Marcelo C; Provenza, Jose Roberto; Ranzolin, Aline; Assis, Marcos Renato de; Feldman, Daniel P; Ribeiro, Luiz Severiano; Souza, Eduardo J R

    2017-01-01

    To establish guidelines based on scientific evidence for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Evidence collection was performed based on 9 questions regarding the diagnosis of fibromyalgia, structured using the Patient, Intervention or Indicator, Comparison and Outcome (P.I.C.O.), with searches in the main, primary databases of scientific information. After defining the potential studies to support the recommendations, they were graded according to evidence and degree of recommendation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  14. Prevalence of self reported musculoskeletal diseases is high

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.S.J. Picavet (Susan); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To present the prevalence of self reported musculoskeletal diseases, the coexistence of these diseases, the test-retest reliability with six months in between, and the association with musculoskeletal pain symptoms. METHODS: Twelve layman descriptions of

  15. Focusing on Fibromyalgia : A Puzzling and Painful Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe February 2016 Print this issue Focusing on Fibromyalgia A Puzzling and Painful Condition En español Send ... Vary by Joint Wise Choices Feeling Better with Fibromyalgia Get enough sleep . Getting the right kind of ...

  16. Validation of self-reported periodontal disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blicher, B; Joshipura, K; Eke, P

    2005-10-01

    Self-report is an efficient and accepted means of assessing many population characteristics, risk factors, and diseases, but has rarely been used for periodontal disease (chronic periodontitis). The availability of valid self-reported measures of periodontal disease would facilitate epidemiologic studies on a much larger scale, allow for integration of new studies of periodontal disease within large ongoing studies, and facilitate lower-cost population surveillance of periodontitis. Several studies have been conducted to validate self-reported measures for periodontal disease, but results have been inconsistent. In this report, we conducted a systematic review of the validation studies. We reviewed the 16 studies that assessed the validity of self-reported periodontal and gingivitis measures against clinical gold standards. Seven of the studies included self-reported measures specific to gingivitis, four included measures only for periodontitis, and five included both gingivitis and periodontal measures. Three of the studies used a self-assessment method where they provided the patient with a detailed manual for performing a self-exam. The remaining 13 studies asked participants to self-report symptoms, presence of periodontal disease itself, or their recollection of a dental health professional diagnosing them or providing treatment for periodontal disease. The review indicates that some measures showed promise, but results varied across populations and self-reported measures. One example of a good measure is, "Has any dentist/hygienist told you that you have deep pockets?", which had a sensitivity of 55%, a specificity of 90%, positive predictive value of 77%, and negative predictive value of 75% against clinical pocket depth. Higher validity could be potentially obtained by the use of combinations of several self-reported questions and other predictors of periodontal disease.

  17. Self-report reliability and symptomatology of habitual caffeine consumption.

    OpenAIRE

    James, J E; Bruce, M S; Lader, M H; Scott, N R

    1989-01-01

    1. A large body of research on the demography of caffeine use and its potential health consequences has been undermined by the absence of empirical data on the reliability of retrospective self-reports of caffeine consumption. 2. The principal aim of the present study was to use standard bioanalytic method to assess the reliability of subjects' self-reported caffeine use. Saliva samples were obtained from 142 first-and second-year medical students and assayed for caffeine and paraxanthine. 3....

  18. Neurobiology of fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluka, Kathleen A; Clauw, Daniel J

    2016-12-03

    Fibromyalgia is the current term for chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain for which no alternative cause can be identified. The underlying mechanisms, in both human and animal studies, for the continued pain in individuals with fibromyalgia will be explored in this review. There is a substantial amount of support for alterations of central nervous system nociceptive processing in people with fibromyalgia, and that psychological factors such as stress can enhance the pain experience. Emerging evidence has begun exploring other potential mechanisms including a peripheral nervous system component to the generation of pain and the role of systemic inflammation. We will explore the data and neurobiology related to the role of the CNS in nociceptive processing, followed by a short review of studies examining potential peripheral nervous system changes and cytokine involvement. We will not only explore the data from human subjects with fibromyalgia but will relate this to findings from animal models of fibromyalgia. We conclude that fibromyalgia and related disorders are heterogenous conditions with a complicated pathobiology with patients falling along a continuum with one end a purely peripherally driven painful condition and the other end of the continuum is when pain is purely centrally driven. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessing knowledge on fibromyalgia among Internet users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Felipe Azevedo; Heymann, Roberto Ezequiel; Marvulle, Valdecir; Pollak, Daniel Feldman; Riera, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    To assess knowledge on fibromyalgia in a sample of patients, their families, and professionals interested on the theme from some Brazilian states. Analysis of the results of an electronic fibromyalgia knowledge questionnaire completed by 362 adults who had access to the the support group for fibromyalgia site (www.unifesp.br/grupos/fibromialgia). The answers were grouped according to age, sex, years of schooling, and type of interest in the condition. 92% of the responders were women and 62% had higher educational level. The worst results were observed in the "joint protection and energy conservation" domain, followed by the "medication in fibromyalgia" domain. The best results were recorded in the "exercises in fibromyalgia" domain. The answers differed significantly between sexes, and women achieved a higher percentage of correct answers. The female sex accounted for a statistically superior result in five statistical analyses (four questions and one domain). The study suggests the need for a strategic planning for an educational approach to fibromyalgia in Brazil.

  20. Validity of self-reported anthropometry in adult Mexican women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ortiz-Panozo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare direct and self-reported anthro­pometry in Mexican women. Materials and methods. Women aged 30-72 years, participating in the Mexican Teach­ers’ Cohort, completed a questionnaire with their anthropo­metric data in 2006-2008. After eleven months (median time, technicians performed anthropometry in 3 756 participants. We calculated correlations and multivariable-adjusted mean differences between direct and self-reported anthropomet­ric measures. Results. Correlations between direct and self-reported anthropometric measures ranged from 0.78 (waist circumference to 0.93 (weight. On average, women over-reported their height by 2.2 cm and underreported their weight, body mass index (BMI and waist and hip circumfer­ences by 1.3 kg, 1.3 kg/m2, 1.8 cm and 1.9 cm, respectively. Errors in self-reported anthropometry increased with rising measured BMI and were also independently associated with age, education and socioeconomic status. Conclusion. Self-reported anthropometry is sufficiently valid for epide­miological purposes in adult Mexican women. Errors in self-reported anthropometry might result in underestimation of the prevalence of overweight and obesity.

  1. Fibromyalgia : towards an integration of somatic and psychological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blécourt, Alida Cornelia Ebelina de; Knipping, Alexander

    1995-01-01

    In this dissertation various aspects of the fibromyalgia syndrome are discussed. Fibromyalgia (syndrome) is a common disorder seen in rheumatology practices, and has been known under a variety of names during the years. The introduction to the syndrome and a historical review of fibromyalgia are

  2. Correctness of Self-Reported Task Durations: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Jean A; Barrero, Lope H; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2017-12-15

    Duration of tasks in a job is an essential interest in occupational epidemiology. Such duration is frequently measured using self-reports, which may, however, be associated with both bias and random errors. The present systematic literature review examines the correctness of self-reported durations of tasks, i.e. the extent to which they differ from more valid reference data due to either systematic or random errors, and factors influencing this correctness, with particular emphasis on the assessment of exposures of relevance to musculoskeletal disorders. The search for relevant studies included the databases ISI Web of Science, MEDLINE, EBSCO HOST, Proquest, and Psycnet. Thirty-two articles were identified; of which, 23 examined occupational tasks and 9 examined non-occupational tasks. Agreement between self-reports and a more correct reference was reported for, in total, 182 tasks. Average proportional errors were, for most tasks, between -50% (i.e. underestimations) and +100%, with a dominance of overestimations; 22% of all results considered overestimations of 100% or more. For 15% of the 182 reported tasks, the mean difference between the self-reported and the reference duration value was self-reports and reference data, including type of task, true task duration, task pattern across time (continuous versus discontinuous), and whether the addressed task is composed of subtasks. The musculoskeletal health status of the respondent did not have a clear effect on the ability to correctly report task durations. Studies differed in key design characteristics and detail of information reported, which hampers a formal aggregation of results. The correctness of self-reported task durations is, at the best, moderate at the individual level, and this may present a significant problem when using self-reports in task-based assessment of individual job exposures. However, average self-reports at the group level appear reasonably correct and may thus be a viable method in

  3. Fibromyalgia: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietta, P

    2004-02-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common and complex condition, defined as long lasting, widespread musculoskeletal pain, in the presence of tender points (TPs) at specific anatomical sites. Dysautonomic and functional symptoms, such as orthostatic hypotension, tachycardia, effort intolerance, marked fatigue, sleep disorders, cognitive disturbances, psychological distress, paresthesias, headache, genitourinary manifestations, irritable bowel syndrome and bladder dyskinesia, frequently occur. The etiopathogenesis of FM is presently unknown, but nociceptor, autonomic and neuro-endocrine system dysfunctions have been found in patients. Since specific serological or instrumental markers of the syndrome are not yet identifiable, TP search is the only useful diagnostic hallmark. The development of an effective therapy of FM has hitherto been hampered by the incomplete knowledge of its pathogenic mechanisms. In this paper, the most recent information on FM is reviewed.

  4. The fibromyalgia syndrome: musculoskeletal pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geel, S E

    1994-04-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain disorder that afflicts predominantly middle-aged women with cardinal symptoms of diffuse musculoskeletal pain, defined tender points, deprived sleep, and fatigue. The etiology and pathological mechanisms are poorly understood, and treatment approaches are largely ineffective. The clinical features of the syndrome are presented, and the relevance of muscle dysfunction in the etiopathogenesis of the disorder is explored. The evidence for involvement of muscle pathophysiology as a primary mechanism mediating the onset of symptoms is not compelling. Musculoskeletal dysfunction can be considered secondary to central abnormalities of pain modulation and altered sleep physiology precipitated by emotional stress in genetically predisposed individuals. Contemporary evidence favors treatment strategies that emphasize pain control, sleep enhancement, and a program of conditioning.

  5. Current therapy of fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Chichasova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The data on pathogenetically significant parameters that are involved in pain perception in fibromyalgia (FM patients (increased sensitivity or density of dopamine receptors D2, enhanced pain signal due to the elevated substance P level or insufficient modification of the pain signal caused by low serotonin level; allodynia phenomenon; and the psychosomatic component are reported. New classification criteria of FM and assessment of severity of the symptoms included in these criteria are presented. The changes that have taken place in therapy of FM pain over the past decade are demonstrated: less frequent use of peripheral analgesics, tricyclic antidepressants; more frequent use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran and pregabalin. The effectiveness and fair pain tolerability of pregabalin are demonstrated. The effectiveness and tolerability of duloxetine, milnacipran, and pregabalin are compared using the data of 17 randomized controlled trials. 

  6. Current therapy of fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Chichasova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The data on pathogenetically significant parameters that are involved in pain perception in fibromyalgia (FM patients (increased sensitivity or density of dopamine receptors D2, enhanced pain signal due to the elevated substance P level or insufficient modification of the pain signal caused by low serotonin level; allodynia phenomenon; and the psychosomatic component are reported. New classification criteria of FM and assessment of severity of the symptoms included in these criteria are presented. The changes that have taken place in therapy of FM pain over the past decade are demonstrated: less frequent use of peripheral analgesics, tricyclic antidepressants; more frequent use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran and pregabalin. The effectiveness and fair pain tolerability of pregabalin are demonstrated. The effectiveness and tolerability of duloxetine, milnacipran, and pregabalin are compared using the data of 17 randomized controlled trials. 

  7. Self-reported nonrestorative sleep in fibromyalgia ? relationship to impairments of body functions, personal function factors, and quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Liedberg, Gunilla M; Bj?rk, Mathilda; B?rsbo, Bj?rn

    2015-01-01

    Gunilla M Liedberg,1 Mathilda Björk,2 Björn Börsbo31Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Norrköping, 2Rehabilitation Centre and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, 3Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH), Linköping University, Linköping, SwedenPurpose: The purpose of this study was: 1) to determine variables that might characterize good or bad sleep; and 2) to de...

  8. Vitamin D deficiency in Fibromyalgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatty, S.A.; Shaikh, N.A.; Irfan, M.; Kashif, S.M.; Vaswani, A.S.; Sumbhai, A.; Gunpat

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To check the Vitamin D levels in patients diagnosed as fibromyagia in our population. Methods: Study was done at Medical OPD of Civil Hospital Karachi, from January to March 2009. Female patients diagnosed as Fibromyalgia according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and exclusion of systemic illness on examination, and normal reports of blood CP, ESR, serum calcium, phosphate and Alkaline Phosphatase, were asked to get Vitamin D levels in their serum. Vitamin D deficiency is defined as 30 ng/ml. Result: Forty female patients were included in the study. The mean age was 37.65 +- 11.5 years. Mean Vitamin D level was 17.41 +- 5.497 ng/ml. Thirty two (80%) of patients had Vitamin D deficiency, mean levels of 15.855 +- 4.918 ng/ml and 8(20%) had Vitamin D insufficiency, mean levels of 23.64 +- 2.39 ng/ml. Patients with vitamin D deficiency and age less than 45 years were 22 (68.75%), had mean vitamin D level 16.87 +- 4.48 ng/ml whereas in age ranging from 46-75 years were 10 (31.25%) had mean vitamin D level 16.09 +- 6.45 ng/ml. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency is frequently seen in patients diagnosed as fibromyalgia and nonspecific musculoskeletal pain in our population. Although the sample size of the study is small, but the figures are so alarming that it is an eye opener towards the need of a population based study, including normal population as well as those presenting with musculoskeletal pain. (author)

  9. Effect of fibromyalgia on bone mineral density in patients with fibromylagia and rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Buyukbese

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Fibromyalgia (FM may t cause a decrease in bone mineral density (BMD because of decreased mobility. The condition is relatively frequent in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and RA patients with FM have more disability than those without FM. We evaluated the effect of FM on BMD and investigated the effect of FM on BMD in RA patients. Materials and Methods: We included age-matched 56 FM, 52 RA patients, and 37 healthy females as controls. Twenty three of all RA subjects met 1990 ACR FM criteria. Patients using the antiresorptive drugs, those on hormone replacement therapy, patients with thyroid or parathyroid dysfunction were excluded. Self-reported pain and fatigue severity, functional items of FM impact questionnaire were questioned in FM and RA patients. In all subjects, BMD of the lumbar spine and femur neck were determined by dual X-ray absorptiometry, and T-scores were recorded. Results: Self-reported pain and fatigue scores in FM subjects were significantly higher than in RA patients (P00.05. There was a significant negative correlation between self-reported pain score and lumbar spine BMD in FM subjects (r=–0.41, P=0.006. Conclusions: In spite of functional disability, FM does not cause a decrease in BMD. The presence of FM in RA patients does not result in a change in BMD.

  10. Antipsychotics for fibromyalgia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Klose, Petra; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Phillips, Tudor; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-06-02

    This review is one of a series on drugs used to treat fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition of unknown aetiology characterised by chronic widespread pain that often co-exists with sleep problems and fatigue. It affects approximately 2% of the general population. Up to 70% of patients with fibromyalgia meet the criteria for a depressive or anxiety disorder. People often report high disability levels and poor health-related quality of life. Drug therapy focuses on reducing key symptoms and disability, and improving health-related quality of life. Antipsychotics might reduce fibromyalgia and associated mental health symptoms. To assess the efficacy, tolerability and safety of antipsychotics in fibromyalgia in adults. We searched CENTRAL (2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE and EMBASE to 20 May 2016, together with reference lists of retrieved papers and reviews and two clinical trial registries. We also contacted trial authors. We selected controlled trials of at least four weeks duration of any formulation of antipsychotics used for the treatment of fibromyalgia in adults. We extracted the data from all included studies and two review authors independently assessed study risks of bias. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. We performed analysis using three tiers of evidence. We derived first tier evidence from data meeting current best standards and subject to minimal risk of bias (outcome equivalent to substantial pain intensity reduction, intention-to-treat analysis without imputation for drop-outs, at least 200 participants in the comparison, eight to 12 weeks duration, parallel design), second tier evidence from data that failed to meet one or more of these criteria and that we considered at some risk of bias but with adequate numbers in the comparison, and third tier evidence from data involving small numbers of participants that we considered very likely to be biased or used outcomes of limited clinical utility, or both. We rated the

  11. A narrative review on the difficulties associated with fibromyalgia diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhare, Dinesh; Ahmed, Sara; Watter, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Fibromyalgia presents a clinical enigma as its pathophysiology is not well understood and its symptoms are nonspecific and overlap with many disorders, making its diagnosis a challenge for clinicians and researchers. Efforts have been made to develop a set of diagnostic criteria for this disorder. However, these criteria rely heavily on expert clinician opinion and produce a large heterogeneity within the diagnosed population. With no present specific technique reflecting the underlying pathophysiology of fibromyalgia, a definitive diagnosis of fibromyalgia remains elusive. This review discusses some problems and challenges associated with fibromyalgia diagnosis and presents some novel findings on the pathophysiological nature of fibromyalgia. PMID:29290763

  12. Soluble fractalkine in the plasma of fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN J. GARCIA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia is a form of non-articular rheumatism in which inflammatory cytokines seem to be involved. However, there is still no analytical specific diagnostic criterion for this disease. The aim was to examine a possible role of fractalkine as a biomarker in fibromyalgia. Plasma levels of soluble fractalkine were compared between women diagnosed with fibromyalgia (n=17 and healthy women (n=10 as controls. Fractalkine released by monocytes was also evaluated. Fibromyalgia patients showed lower plasma fractalkine than healthy women. Since most inflammatory pathologies show elevated plasma levels of soluble fractalkine, the results may contribute towards a differential diagnosis for fibromyalgia.

  13. Sleep Characteristics of Self-Reported Long Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay R.; Blackwell, Terri; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Stone, Katie L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Self-reported long habitual sleep durations (≥ 9 h per night) consistently predict increased mortality. We compared objective sleep parameters of self-reported long versus normal duration sleepers to determine whether long sleepers truly sleep more or have an underlying sleep abnormality. Methods: Older men participating in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (MrOS) were recruited for a comprehensive sleep assessment, which included wrist actigraphy, overnight polysomnography (PSG), and a question about usual nocturnal sleep duration. Results: Of the 3134 participants (mean age 76.4 ± 5.6; 89.9% Caucasian), 1888 (60.2%) reported sleeping 7-8 h (normal sleepers) and 174 (5.6%) reported ≥ 9 h (long sleepers). On actigraphy, long sleepers spent on average 63.0 min more per night in bed (P sleep stage distribution did not differ. After adjusting for differences in demographics, comorbidities, and medication usage, self-reported long sleepers continued to spend more time in bed and sleep more, based on both actigraphy and PSG. Each additional 30 min in bed or asleep as measured by actigraphy increased the odds of being a self-reported long-sleeper 1.74-fold and 1.33-fold, respectively (P sleep disorders. Citation: Patel SR; Blackwell T; Ancoli-Israel S; Stone KL. Sleep characteristics of self-reported long sleepers. SLEEP 2012;35(5):641-648. PMID:22547890

  14. Self-reported sleepwalking in Australian senior secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallman, H M; Kohler, M; Wilson, A; Biggs, S; Dollman, J; Martin, J; Kennedy, D; Lushington, K

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have examined self-reported sleepwalking in older adolescents. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence rates of sleepwalking in a one-month self-report period in Australian adolescents. Participants were 532 Australian adolescents in their final two years of secondary school. The prevalence of sleepwalking in the one-month self-report period was 2.9% (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.47-4.33) in this sample-1% reported sleepwalking at least once a week in the previous month. A significant proportion (17.5%) of the participants was unsure if they had sleepwalked. The results provide data on the self-reported prevalence rate of sleepwalking in older adolescents. Compared with the population data, this rate falls within the confidence intervals of child and adult prevalence rates of sleepwalking and is consistent with a decline in sleepwalking from childhood and adulthood. Further research is needed to explore how adolescents know they sleepwalk to understand the reliability of self-report measures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Accuracy of self-reported reason for colorectal cancer testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberth, Jan M; Vernon, Sally W; White, Arica; Abotchie, Peter N; Coan, Sharon P

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of accuracy of self-reported reason for colorectal cancer testing has been limited. We examined the accuracy and correlates of self-reported reason (screening or diagnosis) for having a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy. Patients who had received at least one sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy within the past 5 years were recruited from a large multispecialty clinic in Houston, TX, between 2005 and 2007. We calculated concordance, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity, and specificity between self-reported reason and the medical record (gold standard). Logistic regression was performed to identify correlates of accurate self-report. Self-reported reason for testing was more accurate when the sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy was done for screening, rather than diagnosis. In the multivariable analysis for sigmoidoscopy, age was positively associated with accurately reporting reason for testing, whereas having two or more colorectal cancer tests during the study period (compared with only one test) was negatively associated with accuracy. In the multivariable analysis, none of the correlates was statistically associated with colonoscopy although a similar pattern was observed for number of tests. Determining the best way to identify those who have been tested for diagnosis, rather than screening, is an important next step.

  16. Self-reported stress and psychophysiological reactivity in paramedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janka, A; Duschek, S

    2018-03-20

    As an important group of health care professionals, paramedics accomplish sophisticated and frequently stressful tasks. The study investigated self-reported stress burden, self-reported health status, coping strategies, personality traits and psychophysiological reactivity in paramedics. 30 paramedics were compared with 30 professionals from other disciplines, in terms of self-reported stress, physical complaints, coping strategies, personality traits and psychophysiological reactivity during aversive visual and acoustic stimuli, and cognitive challenge. Regression analyses were performed for the prediction of stress burden and physical complaints in paramedics according to coping and personality factors. Paramedics reported lower stress and less somatic complaints, and exhibited reduced electrodermal activity and heart rate responses to experimental stimuli, as well as higher respiratory sinus arrhythmia. They indicated less negative coping strategies, reduced empathy, and higher conscientiousness and sensation seeking. Higher self-reported stress burden and more physical symptoms were associated inter alia with more negative coping strategies, less conscientiousness and lower empathy. The findings support the notion of reduced self-reported stress burden, and improved general health and stress resistance in paramedics. In addition to health benefits, stress tolerance may contribute to the prevention of performance decline during situations in which health and life are at stake.

  17. Self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control in problem gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorains, Felicity K; Stout, Julie C; Bradshaw, John L; Dowling, Nicki A; Enticott, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is considered a core feature of problem gambling; however, self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control may reflect disparate constructs. We examined self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control in 39 treatment-seeking problem gamblers and 41 matched controls using a range of self-report questionnaires and laboratory inhibitory control tasks. We also investigated differences between treatment-seeking problem gamblers who prefer strategic (e.g., sports betting) and nonstrategic (e.g., electronic gaming machines) gambling activities. Treatment-seeking problem gamblers demonstrated elevated self-reported impulsivity, more go errors on the Stop Signal Task, and a lower gap score on the Random Number Generation task than matched controls. However, overall we did not find strong evidence that treatment-seeking problem gamblers are more impulsive on laboratory inhibitory control measures. Furthermore, strategic and nonstrategic problem gamblers did not differ from their respective controls on either self-reported impulsivity questionnaires or laboratory inhibitory control measures. Contrary to expectations, our results suggest that inhibitory dyscontrol may not be a key component for some treatment-seeking problem gamblers.

  18. Construction of a US fibromyalgia registry using the Fibromyalgia Research Survey criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Mary O; McAllister, Samantha J; Oh, Terry H; Luedtke, Connie A; Toussaint, Loren L; Vincent, Ann

    2013-10-01

    Utilizing billing records, we identified patients seen at Mayo Clinic with a diagnosis or history of fibromyalgia who were then contacted for enrollment in a fibromyalgia research registry. Fibromyalgia was confirmed through medical record review. Eligible patients were mailed an invitation that included a demographic questionnaire and the Fibromyalgia Research Survey. The Fibromyalgia Research Survey yields a widespread pain score (scale range 0-19) and a symptom severity score (scale range 0-12). A total of 4,034 patients returned the completed survey; 92.8% were female, their mean age was 57.4 (±13.4), and 83.7% were from the Midwest region of the United States. The mean widespread pain score for all participants was 11.3 (±4.5) and the mean symptom severity score was 8.2 (±2.4), indicating moderate-to-severe fibromyalgia symptoms, which is not unusual for patients presenting to a tertiary care center. Using a systematic process, we describe the creation of a fibromyalgia registry for future research. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Evaluation of the fibromyalgia diagnostic screen in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Susan A; Coon, Cheryl D; McLeod, Lori D; Chandran, Arthi; Arnold, Lesley M

    2014-04-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is challenging to diagnose, especially in primary care settings. The Fibromyalgia Diagnostic Screen was developed to facilitate the diagnosis of FM in clinical practice. The objectives of this study were to assess the performance of the Fibromyalgia Diagnostic Screen in primary care and specialty clinics, using the 1990 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria as the gold standard, and comparing the Fibromyalgia Diagnostic Screen with the London Fibromyalgia Epidemiology Study Screening Questionnaire (LFESSQ) and the modified 2010 ACR Fibromyalgia Diagnostic Criteria (ACR-FDC). This multicenter, cross-sectional study included 150 adult chronic pain patients who underwent a physician-administered structured history and physical exam and completed the Fibromyalgia Diagnostic Screen, the LFESSQ and the modified ACR-FDC. The analyses determined the predictive ability of the Fibromyalgia Diagnostic Screen for FM. Item-level analyses provided support for the response categories and predictive ability of most of the Fibromyalgia Diagnostic Screen items. Additionally, the evaluation of the Fibromyalgia Diagnostic Screen scoring models demonstrated the greatest accuracy in predicting an FM diagnosis with a combination of patient items and clinician items that included an abbreviated tender point exam (sensitivity 0.68, specificity, 0.82). Sensitivity of the modified ACR-FDC and the LFESSQ was 0.87 and 0.86, respectively, with specificity 0.62 and 0.49, respectively. The Fibromyalgia Diagnostic Screen is a useful new clinical tool to aid in the evaluation of FM in clinical practice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Differences between questionnaire- and interview-based measures of activities of daily living (ADL) ability and their association with observed ADL ability in women with rheumatoid arthritis, knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, E E; Bliddal, H; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    2012-01-01

    Although self-report based on questionnaire is the common method to obtain information about activities of daily living (ADL) ability in rheumatic diseases, little is known about the relationship between measures of ADL ability based on questionnaire, interview, and observation. The present study...... examined whether measures of self-reported ADL ability based on questionnaire and interview yielded different results, determined whether the magnitude of the difference varied among women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), knee osteoarthritis (OA), and fibromyalgia (FM), and investigated the relationships...

  1. Fibromyalgia: pathogenetic, diagnostic and therapeutic concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolecki, Tomasz; Podolecki, Andrzej; Hrycek, Antoni

    2009-03-01

    Musculoskeletal pains are one of the most common complaints reported by patients. In 1972, Smythe described the generalized pain and tenderness on palpation at specific points and, 4 years later, the term fibromyalgia was introduced for determining the disease syndrome. The etiology and pathogenesis of fibromyalgia are still unknown. This disease appears probably multi-factorial. It is considered that the changes in the neuronal activity in the central nervous system, abnormal metabolism of biogenic amines and immunological disorders may among other things, contribute to the development of the disease. The complaints are non characteristic and highly sujective, which makes it substantially difficult to differentiate between fibromialgia and both chronic fatigue syndrome and psychosomatic diseases. The treatment of fibromyalgia is complex and long-term. The antidepressants and psychotherapy is of vital importance. The effectiveness of locally used agents is also being emphasized. Fibromyalgia has become a serious social problem in the well developed countries in the recent years. Therefore, of importance are efforts to appropriately diagnose fibromyalgia and to implement its appropriate treatment that resolves disease symptoms in a possibly maximum degree.

  2. Polysomnography with quantitative EEG in patients with and without fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Victor W; Rutledge, Dana N; Stern, John M

    2015-04-01

    Characterize the polysomnographic (PSG) and quantitative EEG (qEEG) features of fibromyalgia and determine whether fibromyalgia patients differ in these measures when compared with a control sleep disorder population. All undergoing all-night PSG for evaluation of a sleep disorder were evaluated for fibromyalgia. The PSGs were interpreted for routine sleep measures, and qEEG was performed to measure the delta and alpha frequency power during non-rapid eye movement sleep. Measures and qEEG were analyzed according to fibromyalgia diagnosis. Community-based sleep medicine center. All patients undergoing PSG over a 2-year period. None. Of the 385 patients in the study population, 133 had fibromyalgia according to American College of Rheumatology criteria. The population's average Epworth Sleepiness Score was 10.5, the average sleep efficiency was 78%, and the Periodic Limb Movement disorder prevalence was 15%. None of these sleep measures differed significantly between the fibromyalgia and non-fibromyalgia groups. Obstructive sleep apnea was present in 45% of the fibromyalgia group. Significant differences were present in the qEEG ratio of delta to alpha frequency power, which was 95% specific for fibromyalgia when ≤1. A qEEG ratio ≤10.5 was 85% sensitive for fibromyalgia, and a qEEG ratio >10.5 had an 89% negative predictive value for fibromyalgia. Among patients with fibromyalgia who were not taking a benzodiazepine or benzodiazepine agonist, a qEEG ratio ≤10.5 was 84% specific and had a 78% positive predictive value. Sleep disorders identified by routine PSG, including obstructive sleep apnea, are common in fibromyalgia, but periodic leg movement disorder and poor sleep efficiency are not. A qEEG low delta/alpha ratio during non-rapid eye movement sleep can differentiate patients with fibromyalgia from others who are referred for PSG. Consideration of benzodiazepine and benzodiazepine agonist use is important when interpreting the delta/alpha ratio.

  3. Correlation between self-reported gestational age and ultrasound measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Annette Wind; Westergaard, Jes Grabow; Thomsen, Sten Grove

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We studied the agreement between different measurements of gestational age, i.e. self-reported gestational age in the Danish National Birth Cohort Study, ultrasound-estimated gestational age from the medical records in one Danish county and gestational age from the Danish National...... and the gestational ages based on corrected last menstrual period did not differ significantly. CONCLUSION: The self-reported gestational age in The Danish National Birth Cohort is in good concordance both with data from the National Hospital Discharge Register and with ultrasound-estimated gestational age....

  4. Morning Versus Evening Bright Light Treatment at Home to Improve Function and Pain Sensitivity for Women with Fibromyalgia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Helen J; Park, Margaret; Ong, Jason C; Shakoor, Najia; Williams, David A; Burns, John

    2017-01-01

    To test the feasibility, acceptability, and effects of a home-based morning versus evening bright light treatment on function and pain sensitivity in women with fibromyalgia. A single blind randomized study with two treatment arms: 6 days of a 1 hour morning light treatment or 6 days of a 1 hour evening light treatment. Function, pain sensitivity, and circadian timing were assessed before and after treatment. Participants slept at home, except for two nights in Sleep Center. Ten women meeting the American College of Rheumatology's diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, including normal blood test results. Self-reported function was assessed with the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Pain sensitivity was assessed using a heat stimulus that gave measures of threshold and tolerance. Circadian timing was assessed with the dim light melatonin onset. Both morning and evening light treatments led to improvements in function and pain sensitivity. However, only the morning light treatment led to a clinically meaningful improvement in function (>14% reduction from baseline FIQ) and morning light significantly increased pain threshold more than evening light ( P  pain tolerance (r = 0.67, P  fibromyalgia. Those who undergo morning light treatment may show improvements in function and pain sensitivity. Advances in circadian timing may be one mechanism by which morning light improves pain sensitivity. Findings can inform the design of a randomized controlled trial. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. A pilot study: pain, fatigue and stress in maternal relatives of adolescent female psychiatric inpatients assessed for juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommel, Karen; Bamford, Jaime; Jhavari, Malhar; Martin, Catherine; Crofford, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the presence of pain and impaired functioning in the maternal relatives of adolescent females in an inpatient adolescent psychiatric population. We compared the relatives of adolescents who met the criteria for juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome (JPFS) to relatives of adolescents who did not meet the criteria for JPFS. A total of 55 biological maternal relatives of adolescent females admitted to a psychiatric unit were recruited to participate in the study. Participants completed four self-administered questionnaires: Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Survey (SF36v2), and the EPIFUND Health Survey. The maternal relatives of adolescents who met the criteria for JPFS did not score higher than the maternal relatives of adolescents who did not meet the criteria for JPFS. However, all maternal relatives consistently scored higher on self-reported measures of pain, impaired functioning, fatigue, and fibromyalgia symptoms than the average patient diagnosed with fibromyalgia or a chronic pain syndrome. Mood disorders and pain disorders share genetic risk factors and vulnerability. Future research is needed to further delineate other factors impacting the maternal caregivers' functioning. These could include stress associated with an adolescent child with psychiatric issues severe enough to warrant hospitalization.

  6. Incidence and Risk Factors for Pelvic Pain After Mesh Implant Surgery for the Treatment of Pelvic Floor Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Elizabeth J.; Babb, Emma; Nackley, Andrea G.; Zolnoun, Denniz

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective Our aim was to assess incidence and risk factors for pelvic pain after pelvic mesh implantation. Design Retrospective study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Setting Single university hospital. Patients Women who have undergone surgery with pelvic mesh implant for treatment of pelvic floor disorders including prolapse and incontinence. Interventions Telephone interviews to assess pain, sexual function, and general health. Measurements and Main Results Pain was measured by the McGill Short-Form Pain Questionnaire for somatic pain, Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory for neuropathic pain, Pennebaker Inventory of Limbic Languidness for somatization, and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) for sexual health and dyspareunia. General health was assessed with the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey. Among 160 enrolled women, mean time since surgery was 20.8 ± 10.5 months, mean age was 62.1 ± 11.2 years, 93.8% were white, 86.3% were postmenopausal, and 3.1% were tobacco users. Types of mesh included midurethral sling for stress incontinence (78.8%), abdominal/robotic sacrocolpopexy (35.7%), transvaginal for prolapse (6.3%), and perirectal for fecal incontinence (1.9%), with 23.8% concomitant mesh implants for both prolapse and incontinence. Our main outcome, self-reported pelvic pain at least 1 year after surgery, was 15.6%. Women reporting pain were younger, with fibromyalgia, worse physical health, higher somatization, and lower surgery satisfaction (all p pelvic pain correlated with early postoperative pelvic pain (p pelvic pain after pelvic mesh implant surgery, with decreased sexual function. Risk factors included younger age, fibromyalgia, early postoperative pain, poorer physical health, and somatization. Understanding risk factors for pelvic pain after mesh implantation may improve patient selectionq. PMID:27773810

  7. Fibromyalgia: A Puzzling and Painful Condition | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Fibromyalgia Fibromyalgia: A Puzzling and Painful Condition Past Issues / Spring ... or internal organs. Wise Choices: Feeling Better with Fibromyalgia Get enough sleep. Getting the right kind of ...

  8. Time to Talk: 6 Things to Know about Mind and Body Practices for Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Know About Mind and Body Practices for Fibromyalgia Share: Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic disorder characterized by widespread ... carry out daily activities. It is estimated that fibromyalgia affects 5 million American adults. Most people with ...

  9. Self-Reported Stroke Risk Stratification: Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, George; McClure, Leslie A; Moy, Claudia S; Howard, Virginia J; Judd, Suzanne E; Yuan, Ya; Long, D Leann; Muntner, Paul; Safford, Monika M; Kleindorfer, Dawn O

    2017-07-01

    The standard for stroke risk stratification is the Framingham Stroke Risk Function (FSRF), an equation requiring an examination for blood pressure assessment, venipuncture for glucose assessment, and ECG to determine atrial fibrillation and heart disease. We assess a self-reported stroke risk function (SRSRF) to stratify stroke risk in comparison to the FSRF. Participants from the REGARDS study (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) were evaluated at baseline and followed for incident stroke. The FSRF was calculated using directly assessed stroke risk factors. The SRSRF was calculated from 13 self-reported questions to exclude those with prevalent stroke and assess stroke risk. Proportional hazards analysis was used to assess incident stroke risk using the FSRF and SRSRF. Over an average 8.2-year follow-up, 939 of 23 983 participants had a stroke. The FSRF and SRSRF produced highly correlated risk scores ( r Spearman =0.852; 95% confidence interval, 0.849-0.856); however, the SRSRF had higher discrimination of stroke risk than the FSRF (c SRSRF =0.7266; 95% confidence interval, 0.7076-0.7457; c FSRF =0.7075; 95% confidence interval, 0.6877-0.7273; P =0.0038). The 10-year stroke risk in the highest decile of predicted risk was 11.1% for the FSRF and 13.4% for the SRSRF. A simple self-reported questionnaire can be used to identify those at high risk for stroke better than the gold standard FSRF. This instrument can be used clinically to easily identify individuals at high risk for stroke and also scientifically to identify a subpopulation enriched for stroke risk. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Fibromyalgia: Prevalence, epidemiologic profiles and economic costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabo-Meseguer, Asensi; Cerdá-Olmedo, Germán; Trillo-Mata, José Luis

    2017-11-22

    Fibromyalgia is an idiopathic chronic condition that causes widespread musculoskeletal pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia. This review aims to approach the general epidemiology of fibromyalgia according to the most recent published studies, identifying the general worldwide prevalence of the disease, its basic epidemiological profiles and its economic costs, with specific interest in the Spanish and Comunidad Valenciana cases. Fibromyalgia affects, on average, 2.10% of the world's population; 2.31% of the European population; 2.40% of the Spanish population; and 3.69% of the population in the Comunidad Valenciana. It supposes a painful loss of the quality of life of the people who suffer it and the economic costs are enormous: in Spain is has been estimated at more than 12,993 million euros annually. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. [Fibromyalgia and menopause. Association or coincidence?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyro, José Luis; Franco, Ricardo; Rodríguez, Esteban; Carrero, Ariany; Palacios, Santiago

    2011-09-01

    Fibromyalgia constitutes today, in the western world, an important problem of health that affects fundamentally in women from 45 years. The studies on the influence of the hormones on the symptomatology of the patients with fibromyalgia have not managed to establish a link of causal union between the hormonal climacteric decline and the development of the painful syndrome. Nevertheless, there are studies that relate the pain, the anxiety and the depression to the level of sexual steroids. It is our aim to check these associations. We will have to expect to the development of the intracrinology and, possibly, to know more the relationship between sexual steroids and neurotransmitters to be able to know the exact relation between fibromyalgia and menopause.

  12. Ethnicity, desirable responding, and self-reports of abuse: a comparison of European- and Asian-ancestry undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meston, C M; Heiman, J R; Trapnell, P D; Carlin, A S

    1999-02-01

    One thousand fifty-two (582 non-Asian, 470 Asian) university students were assessed regarding levels of physical abuse, emotional abuse, sexual abuse, neglect, and socially desirable responding. Differences between Asian-ancestry and European-ancestry students in self-reported incidence and expression of abuse were evaluated, as was gender and the relation between self-reported abuse and socially desirable responding. Asian-ancestry men and women reported higher levels of physical abuse, emotional abuse, and neglect than did their Euro-ancestry counterparts, and Euro-ancestry women reported a higher incidence of sexual abuse than did Asian-ancestry women. Across ethnicity, men reported higher levels of physical abuse and neglect but lower levels of sexual abuse than did women. Socially desirable responding was not related to measures of abuse. Findings are discussed in terms of cultural influences on child-rearing and disciplinary practices.

  13. Self-Reported Fractures in Dermatitis Herpetiformis Compared to Coeliac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Pasternack

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH is a cutaneous manifestation of coeliac disease. Increased bone fracture risk is known to associate with coeliac disease, but this has been only scantly studied in DH. In this study, self-reported fractures and fracture-associated factors in DH were investigated and compared to coeliac disease. Altogether, 222 DH patients and 129 coeliac disease-suffering controls were enrolled in this study. The Disease Related Questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale and Psychological General Well-Being questionnaires were mailed to participants; 45 out of 222 (20% DH patients and 35 out of 129 (27% of the coeliac disease controls had experienced at least one fracture (p = 0.140. The cumulative lifetime fracture incidence did not differ between DH and coeliac disease patients, but the cumulative incidence of fractures after diagnosis was statistically significantly higher in females with coeliac disease compared to females with DH. The DH patients and the coeliac disease controls with fractures reported more severe reflux symptoms compared to those without, and they also more frequently used proton-pump inhibitor medication. To conclude, the self-reported lifetime bone fracture risk is equal for DH and coeliac disease. After diagnosis, females with coeliac disease have a higher fracture risk than females with DH.

  14. Self-Reported Fractures in Dermatitis Herpetiformis Compared to Coeliac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternack, Camilla; Mansikka, Eriika; Kaukinen, Katri; Hervonen, Kaisa; Reunala, Timo; Collin, Pekka; Huhtala, Heini; Mattila, Ville M; Salmi, Teea

    2018-03-14

    Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is a cutaneous manifestation of coeliac disease. Increased bone fracture risk is known to associate with coeliac disease, but this has been only scantly studied in DH. In this study, self-reported fractures and fracture-associated factors in DH were investigated and compared to coeliac disease. Altogether, 222 DH patients and 129 coeliac disease-suffering controls were enrolled in this study. The Disease Related Questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale and Psychological General Well-Being questionnaires were mailed to participants; 45 out of 222 (20%) DH patients and 35 out of 129 (27%) of the coeliac disease controls had experienced at least one fracture ( p = 0.140). The cumulative lifetime fracture incidence did not differ between DH and coeliac disease patients, but the cumulative incidence of fractures after diagnosis was statistically significantly higher in females with coeliac disease compared to females with DH. The DH patients and the coeliac disease controls with fractures reported more severe reflux symptoms compared to those without, and they also more frequently used proton-pump inhibitor medication. To conclude, the self-reported lifetime bone fracture risk is equal for DH and coeliac disease. After diagnosis, females with coeliac disease have a higher fracture risk than females with DH.

  15. Profile of patients with fibromyalgia being treated in primary care centers in Terrassa, a city in northeastern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mur Martí, Teresa; Llordés Llordés, Montse; Custal Jordà, Mercè; López Juan, Gemma; Martínez Pardo, Silvia

    To perform an extensive clinical and epidemiological characterization of our fibromyalgia patients. Two-year observational study in 3 primary care centers in Terrassa, Spain. We recruited a sample of 235 individuals diagnosed with fibromyalgia being treated in primary care or rheumatology clinics who, when offered inclusion in a multidisciplinary program, agreed to provide the initial data we requested. The main measures were sociodemographic data, unhealthy habits and physical activity, comorbidities, treatment for fibromyalgia, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and a family functioning scale (family APGAR). In all, 97.8% were women and the average age was 54.6 years. Most of the patients had a primary school education and the majority was on sick leave. Ninety-four percent had associated comorbidity and only 3% were not taking any medication for their disease. Many were taking drugs with no proven efficacy in fibromyalgia. The majority had intermediate scores on the FIQ, the HADS showed that 63% and 53% had an anxious and/or probable depressive disorder, respectively, and, according to the family APGAR score, 62% received proper family support. In agreement with the literature, the major findings in our fibromyalgia patients were a marked predominance of women, a high incidence of comorbidities-mainly psychiatric disorders-a moderate impact of the disease and widespread use of drugs with no demonstrated efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  16. Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or more of the following: Ongoing problems with sleep Fatigue Thinking or memory problems It is no longer necessary to find ... caffeine. Practice a good sleep routine to improve quality of sleep. Exercise regularly, starting with low-level exercise. Nighttime ...

  17. Comparison of Physician-Based and Patient-Based Criteria for the Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Frederick; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Goldenberg, Don L; Häuser, Winfried; Katz, Robert L; Mease, Philip J; Russell, Anthony S; Jon Russell, I; Walitt, Brian

    2016-05-01

    The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 2010 preliminary fibromyalgia diagnostic criteria require symptom ascertainment by physicians. The 2011 survey or research modified ACR criteria use only patient self-report. We compared physician-based (MD) (2010) and patient-based (PT) (2011) criteria and criteria components to determine the degree of agreement between criteria methodology. We studied prospectively collected, previously unreported rheumatology practice data from 514 patients and 30 physicians in the ACR 2010 study. We evaluated the widespread pain index, polysymptomatic distress (PSD) scale, tender point count (TPC), and fibromyalgia diagnosis using 2010 and 2011 rules. Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement (LOA), kappa statistic, Lin's concordance coefficient, and the area under the receiver operating curve (ROC) were used to measure agreement and discrimination. MD and PT diagnostic agreement was substantial (83.4%, κ = 0.67). PSD scores differed slightly (12.3 MD, 12.8 PT; P = 0.213). LOA for PSD were -8.5 and 7.7, with bias of -0.42. The TPC was strongly associated with both the MD (r = 0.779) and PT PSD scales (r = 0.702). There was good agreement in MD and PT fibromyalgia diagnosis and other measures among rheumatology patients. Low bias scores indicate consistent results for physician and patient measures, but large values for LOA indicate many widely discordant pairs. There is acceptable agreement in diagnosis and PSD for research, but insufficient agreement for clinical decisions and diagnosis. We suggest adjudication of symptom data by patients and physicians, as recommended by the 2010 ACR criteria. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Ineffective ADL skills in women with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Von Bülow, Cecilie; Amris, Kirstine; la Cour, Karen

    2016-01-01

    at improving ADL ability. OBJECTIVE: To identify frequently reported ADL skill deficits of significance in subgroups of women with fibromyalgia who have decreased ADL motor ability in combination with decreased or competent ADL process ability. METHOD: Women with fibromyalgia were evaluated with the Assessment...... of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS). If they demonstrated decreased ADL motor ability, the calibrated AMPS raters identified and reported ineffective ADL skills of significance. Descriptive comparisons were made between subgroups displaying either decreased or competent ADL process ability. RESULTS: Moves...

  19. Management of fibromyalgia syndrome in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okifuji, Akiko; Gao, Jeff; Bokat, Christina; Hare, Bradford D

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic pain disorder and defies definitively efficacious therapy. In this review, we summarize the results from the early treatment research as well as recent research evaluating the pharmacological, interventional and nonpharmacological therapies. We further discuss future directions of fibromyalgia syndrome management; we specifically focus on the issues that are associated with currently available treatments, such as the need for personalized approach, new technologically oriented and interventional treatments, the importance of understanding and harnessing placebo effects and enhancement of patient engagement in therapy. PMID:27306300

  20. Fibromyalgia syndrome: the pharmacological treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marsico

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia (FM, also known as fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS, is a frequently observed systemic disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain (1, 2. Its prevalence in the general population is 1-3%, and it is more common among females than males. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR classification criteria defines it as widespread pain with patients endorsing at least 11 of 18 tender points as painful (3. Although its defining feature is chronic, widespread pain, FM patients may also have a number of other symptoms including sleep disturbance, fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, headache and mood disorders (1....

  1. International variation in socioeconomic inequalities in self reported health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, A. E.; Geurts, J. J.; van den Berg, J.

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To assess the extent to which the size of socioeconomic inequalities in self reported health varies among industrialised countries. DESIGN--Cross sectional data on the association between educational level and several health indicators were obtained from national health interview

  2. Self-Report and Psychophysiological Responses to Fear Appeals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonana, Juan R.; Gonzalez-Javier, Francisca; Espin-Lopez, Laura; Gomez-Amor, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the relationship between self-report and psychophysiological responses to fear appeals and behavioral changes elicited by these. Ninety-two subjects watched one of four messages that varied in level of threat (high vs. low) and efficacy (high vs. low). Concomitantly, psychophysiological measures (heart rate and…

  3. Cognitive Abilities Relate to Self-Reported Hearing Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekveld, Adriana A.; George, Erwin L. J.; Houtgast, Tammo; Kramer, Sophia E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this explorative study, the authors investigated the relationship between auditory and cognitive abilities and self-reported hearing disability. Method: Thirty-two adults with mild to moderate hearing loss completed the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap (AIADH; Kramer, Kapteyn, Festen, & Tobi, 1996) and…

  4. Blouse sizing using self-reported body dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, Hein A M; Byvoet, Michel B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The challenge for companies selling clothing over the internet is to combine a minimal requested effort of the visitor in entering (body) information with low-percentage no-fit returns. The purpose of this paper is to present a method that converts self-reported information to individual

  5. Psychiatric Diagnoses of Self-Reported Child Abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwiddie, Stephen H.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.

    1993-01-01

    Subjects who self-reported episodes of abusing a child were compared to those without a history of child battery. It was concluded that self-identified child abusers have increased lifetime rates of antisocial personality disorder, alcoholism, and depression. (DB)

  6. Am I dyslexic? Parental self-report of literacy difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavett, Ruth; Nash, Hannah M; Snowling, Margaret J

    2014-11-01

    In the absence of criteria for the diagnosis of dyslexia, considerable weight is given to self-report, in particular in studies of children at family risk of dyslexia. The present paper uses secondary data from a previous study to compare parents who self-report as dyslexic and those who do not, in relation to objectively determined levels of ability. In general, adults are more likely to self-report as 'dyslexic' if they have poorer reading and spelling skills and also if there is a discrepancy between IQ and measured literacy. However, parents of higher social status who have mild literacy difficulties are more likely to self-report as dyslexic than parents who have weaker literacy skills but are less socially advantaged. Together the findings suggest that the judgement as to whether or not a parent considers themselves 'dyslexic' is made relative to others in the same social sphere. Those who are socially disadvantaged may, in turn, be less likely to seek support for their children. © 2014 The Authors Dyslexia Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Prevalence and gender difference in self-reported depressive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Encounter with depressive symptoms is one of the reasons why university students visit university counselling centres. This study sought to examine the present prevalence of depression among university students as well as gender dissimilarity in self-reported depression. 550 (male-46; female-306) randomly selected ...

  8. Cognitive abilities relate to self-reported hearing disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zekveld, A.A.; George, E.L.J.; Houtgast, T.; Kramer, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this explorative study, the authors investigated the relationship between auditory and cognitive abilities and self-reported hearing disability. Method: Thirty-two adults with mild to moderate hearing loss completed the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap (AIADH;

  9. Clinical, cultural and psychosocial impediments to self reporting of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Affected men are more likely to patronize complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners than medical practitioners or may be out rightly indifferent. Acceptability of sexual evaluation of men is low when ED is absent and high when it has occurred. Keywords: Erectile dysfunction; Self reporting; Assessment; ...

  10. Prevalence of self-reported hypertension and diabetes and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of self-reported hypertension and diabetes and associated risk factors among university employees in Jos, Nigeria. ... Concerted efforts to implement NCD prevention measures will serve to reduce the high burden of NCDs. Keywords: Non-communicable disease, Diabetes mellitus, Hypertension, Lifestyle, risk ...

  11. Self-reported acne is not associated with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Ruben G; Aben, Katja K; Vermeulen, Sita H; den Heijer, Martin; van Oort, Inge M; van de Kerkhof, Peter C; Schalken, Jack A; Kiemeney, Lambertus A

    2014-10-01

    Some studies have suggested an inverse association between acne vulgaris and the acne-related bacterium Propionibacterium acnes and prostate cancer (PCa). Self-reported acne might be an easily obtainable marker to identify men at relatively low risk of PCa and might be incorporated into PCa risk calculators. This study aimed to evaluate the association between self-reported acne and PCa in a large case-referent study. The case group comprised 942 patients with PCa recruited from a population-based cancer registry in 2003 to 2006, 647 of whom met the criteria for aggressive PCa. The referents (n = 2,062) were a random sample of the male general population. All subjects completed a questionnaire on risk factors for cancer, including questions about acne. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression for PCa and aggressive PCa as separate end points, while adjusting for age and family history of PCa. A history of acne was reported by 320 cases (33.9%) and 739 referents (35.8%). Self-reported acne was significantly associated neither with PCa (adjusted OR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.80-1.12) nor with aggressive PCa (adjusted OR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.80-1.18). Self-reported acne is not suitable as a marker to identify men at low risk of aggressive PCa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cognitive psychology and self-reports: models and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobe, Jared B

    2003-05-01

    This article describes the models and methods that cognitive psychologists and survey researchers use to evaluate and experimentally test cognitive issues in questionnaire design and subsequently improve self-report instruments. These models and methods assess the cognitive processes underlying how respondents comprehend and generate answers to self-report questions. Cognitive processing models are briefly described. Non-experimental methods--expert cognitive review, cognitive task analysis, focus groups, and cognitive interviews--are described. Examples are provided of how these methods were effectively used to identify cognitive self-report issues. Experimental methods--cognitive laboratory experiments, field tests, and experiments embedded in field surveys--are described. Examples are provided of: (a) how laboratory experiments were designed to test the capability and accuracy of respondents in performing the cognitive tasks required to answer self-report questions, (b) how a field experiment was conducted in which a cognitively designed questionnaire was effectively tested against the original questionnaire, and (c) how a cognitive experiment embedded in a field survey was conducted to test cognitive predictions.

  13. Asking Adolescents to Explain Discrepancies in Self-Reported Suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velting, Drew M.; Rathus, Jill H.; Asnis, Gregory M.

    1998-01-01

    Determining suicide risk is a complex matter. A typology of adolescents' most common explanations for discrepant reporting of suicidal behavior is presented. Answers to interview questions were compared to a self-report measure, and adolescent in-patients (N=48) were asked to clarify discrepancies. Seven mutually exclusive and exhaustive…

  14. Self-Reported Expression of Embarrassment in Five European Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Robert J.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Self-report data on the physiological/behavioral response associated with embarrassment were collected by questionnaire in Greece, Italy, Spain, the United Kingdom, and West Germany. Blushing/increased temperature and smiling/grinning were reported consistently, with considerable variation, across nations. Understatement and overstatement of…

  15. Research Paper Reliability of self report questionnaires for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study aimed to assess the reliability of a number of self report questionnaires for epidemiological investigations of adolescents' mental health in Cape Town, South Africa. The scales used were: the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (SMFQ), Zung Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), Self-esteem ...

  16. Predicting anxiety diagnoses with the youth self-report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferdinand, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Empirical studies that assess which items of the Youth Self-Report (YSR) are the best predictors of anxiety disorders in adolescents are lacking, whereas several attempts have been made to construct an anxiety scale for the YSR. It is important to gap the bridge between existing YSR and DSM-IV

  17. Personality, psychological stress, and self-reported influenza symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croon Marcel A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological stress and negative mood have been related to increased vulnerability to influenza-like illness (ILI. This prospective study re-evaluated the predictive value of perceived stress for self-reported ILI. We additionally explored the role of the negative affectivity and social inhibition traits. Methods In this study, 5,404 respondents from the general population were assessed in terms of perceived stress, personality, and control variables (vaccination, vitamin use, exercise, etc.. ILI were registered weekly using self-report measures during a follow-up period of four weeks. Results Multivariable logistic regression analysis on ILI was performed to test the predictive power of stress and personality. In this model, negative affectivity (OR = 1.05, p = 0.009, social inhibition (OR = 0.97, p = 0.011, and perceived stress (OR = 1.03, p = 0.048 predicted ILI reporting. Having a history of asthma (OR = 2.33, p = Conclusion Elderly and socially inhibited persons tend to report less ILI as compared to their younger and less socially inhibited counterparts. In contrast, asthma, trait negative affectivity, and perceived stress were associated with higher self-report of ILI. Our results demonstrate the importance of including trait markers in future studies examining the relation between stress and self-report symptom measures.

  18. Reliability of self-reported eating disorders : Optimizing population screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Sihvola, Elina; Raevuori, Anu; Kaukoranta, Jutta; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Hoek, Hans W.; Rissanen, Aila; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess whether short self-report eating disorder screening questions are useful population screening methods. Method: We screened the female participants (N = 2881) from the 1975-1079 birth cohorts of Finnish twins for eating disorders, using several

  19. Self-reported sexual behaviour among adolescent girls in Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Information about risk factors revealed in individual interviews and by the midwives taking a history was incongruent. Any approach for management of STIs, which is built on self-reported risk factors, needs careful assessment of reliability. Keywords: Adolescents, Risk factors, reliability, STI, Uganda

  20. Validity of a self-reported periodontal disease measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshipura, K J; Douglass, C W; Garcia, R I; Valachovic, R; Willett, W C

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of a self-reported periodontal disease measure for use in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Participating dentists responded to the question "Have you had periodontal disease with bone loss?" Radiographs obtained from 140 participants were evaluated for bone loss at 32 posterior sites and used as the standard. A site was positive if it had bone loss > 2 mm and/or complete loss of crestal lamina dura. To avoid falsely classifying participants as positive, three blinded examiners independently evaluated each participant's radiographs. An a priori decision rule was used to classify a participant positive if all examiners independently assessed the same two or more sites positive. The validity of the self-reported measure was good among dentists, with positive and negative predictive values of 0.76 and 0.74, respectively. Among nondentists, the self-reported measure showed discriminatory power by confirming associations with known risk factors such as age and smoking. Dentists have a good perception of their periodontal status, and there is reasonable consensus among dentists regarding the threshold for defining periodontal disease. Self-reported measures might have potential for use in studies of other populations with substantial cost reduction, and deserve further evaluation.

  1. Validation of self-reported cellular phone use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samkange-Zeeb, Florence; Berg, Gabriele; Blettner, Maria

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, concern has been raised over possible adverse health effects of cellular telephone use. In epidemiological studies of cancer risk associated with the use of cellular telephones, the validity of self-reported cellular phone use has been problematic. Up to now there is ...

  2. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptom self-report among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of self-reported attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms among medical students in Eldoret, Kenya. Method: A cross-sectional descriptive study of all medical students who gave consent to participate in the study. Undertaken at Moi University's School of Medicine in ...

  3. Self-reported symptoms of eating disorders amongst university ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eating disturbances are common amongst female athletes, especially those participating in dance. We investigated the prevalence and correlates of eating disorder risk symptoms amongst female student dancers. Fifty-eight female university dancers completed a self-report measure of eating disorders and eating disorder ...

  4. Self-reported preparedness for medical emergencies among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Medical emergencies have been known to occur in dental offices and can lead to loss of life if not well managed. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess self-reported preparedness by practicing dentists for management of medical emergencies in Benin City, Nigeria. Methods: A self-administered ...

  5. Prevalence and perception of self reported dentine hypersensivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine by questionnaire the prevalence and perception of DH in general dentate populations in south western Nigeria. Study Design: A descriptive study of self reported dentine hypersensitivity among dentate populations selected by multistage sampling technique in south western Nigeria. Subjects and ...

  6. Severity of self-reported diseases and symptoms in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iburg, Kim Moesgaard; Rasmussen, Niels Kristian; Avlund, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate and rank the relative severity of self-reported diseases and symptoms in Denmark. METHOD: The 1994 Danish Health and Morbidity Survey collected data from 5,472 Danes older than 16 years of age. Interviews (response frequency: 79%) gave information on diseases and symptoms...

  7. pedometer-measured physical activity, self-reported physical activity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The association between self-perceived and actual physical activity, with particular reference to physical activity guidelines, ... were 6 574 (3 541). Of a total of 312 participants' self-reported data, those meeting guidelines (n=63) ... of the limitations of recall-and-response bias evident in indirect measures.

  8. Assessing the Accuracy of Self-Reported Self-Talk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Brinthaupt

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Self-Talk Scale (STS; Brinthaupt, Hein, & Kramer, 2009 is a self-report measure of self-talk frequency that has been shown to possess acceptable reliability and validity. However, no research using the STS has examined the accuracy of respondents’ self-reports. In the present paper, we report a series of studies directly examining the measurement of self-talk frequency and functions using the STS. The studies examine ways to validate self-reported self-talk by (1 comparing STS responses from 6 weeks earlier to recent experiences that might precipitate self-talk, (2 using experience sampling methods to determine whether STS scores are related to recent reports of self-talk over a period of a week, and (3 comparing self-reported STS scores to those provided by a significant other who rated the target on the STS. Results showed that (1 overall self-talk scores, particularly self-critical and self-reinforcing self-talk, were significantly related to reports of context-specific self-talk; (2 high STS scorers reported talking to themselves significantly more often during recent events compared to low STS scorers, and, contrary to expectations, (3 friends reported less agreement than strangers in their self-other self-talk ratings. Implications of the results for the validity of the STS and for measuring self-talk are presented.

  9. Smoking Habit and Self Reported Periodontal Treatment Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study ai 's to determine by questionnaire the prevalence of smoking and its associated sociodemographic factors in adult dentate populations in Southwestern Nigeria and to examine self reported periodontal treatment experience between smokers and nonsmokers. A descriptive study of prevalence of smoking and ...

  10. Self-reported acne is not associated with prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Vermeulen, S.; Heijer, M. den; Oort, I.M. van; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Schalken, J.A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Some studies have suggested an inverse association between acne vulgaris and the acne-related bacterium Propionibacterium acnes and prostate cancer (PCa). Self-reported acne might be an easily obtainable marker to identify men at relatively low risk of PCa and might be incorporated into

  11. Self-reported acne is not associated with prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, R.G.; Aben, K.K.; Verrneulen, S.H.; den Heijer, M.; van Oort, I.M.; van de Kerkhof, P.C.; Schalken, JA; Kiemeney, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Some studies have suggested an inverse association between acne vulgaris and the acne-related bacterium Propionibacterium acnes and prostate cancer (PCa). Self-reported acne might be an easily obtainable marker to identify men at relatively low risk of PCa and might be incorporated into

  12. Anxiety Self Report (ASR (1,2,3,4,). X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Jane S.

    The Anxiety Self Report (ASR 1,2,3,4) is provided, followed by information about the report. The ASR is discussed as to its development, description, response bias, scoring procedures, reliability, stability, validity, and correlation between the ASR and the Manifest Anxiety Scale. (For related documents, see TM 002 928, 929.) (DB)

  13. Postural control deficits in people with fibromyalgia: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Postural instability and falls are increasingly recognized problems in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). The purpose of this study was to determine whether FM patients, compared to age-matched healthy controls (HCs), have differences in dynamic posturography, including sensory, motor, and limits of stability. We further sought to determine whether postural instability is associated with strength, proprioception and lower-extremity myofascial trigger points (MTPs); FM symptoms and physical function; dyscognition; balance confidence; and medication use. Last, we evaluated self-reported of falls over the past six months. Methods In this cross-sectional study, we compared middle-aged FM patients and age-matched HCs who underwent computerized dynamic posturography testing and completed the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised (FIQR) and balance and fall questionnaires. All subjects underwent a neurological and musculoskeletal examination. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and explore the relationships between variables. The relationships between subjective, clinical and objective variables were evaluated by correlation and regression analyses. Results Twenty-five FM patients and twenty-seven HCs (combined mean age ± standard deviation (SD): 48.6 ± 9.7 years) completed testing. FM patients scored statistically lower on composite sensory organization tests (primary outcome; P < 0.010), as well as with regard to vestibular, visual and somatosensory ratio scores on dynamic posturography. Balance confidence was significantly different between groups, with FM patients reporting less confidence than HCs (mean ± SD: 81.24 ± 19.52 vs. 98.52 ± 2.45; P < 0.001). Interestingly, 76% to 84% of FM patients had gastrocnemius and/or anterior tibialis MTPs. Postural stability was best predicted by dyscognition, FIQR score and body mass index. Regarding falls, 3 (11%) of 27 HCs had fallen only once during the past 6 months, whereas 18 (72

  14. Psychometric Properties of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ in Patients with Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Feliu-Soler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Given that Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS is associated with problems in emotion regulation, the importance of assessing this construct is widely acknowledged by clinical psychologists and pain specialists. Although the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ is a self-report measure used worldwide, there are no data on its psychometric properties in patients with FMS. This study analyzed the dimensionality, reliability, and validity of the CERQ in a sample of 231 patients with FMS. Given that “fibrofog” is one of the most disabling FMS symptoms, in the present study, items in the CERQ were grouped by dimension. This change in item presentation was conceived as an efficient way of facilitating responses as a result of a clear understanding of what the items related to each dimension are attempting to measure. The following battery of measures was administered: the CERQ, the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Four models of the CERQ structure were examined and confirmatory factor analyses supported the original factor model, consisting of nine factors—Self-blame, Acceptance, Rumination, Positive refocusing, Refocus on planning, Positive reappraisal, Putting into perspective, Catastrophizing, and Other-blame. There was minimal overlap between CERQ subscales and their internal consistency was adequate. Correlational and regression analyses supported the construct validity of the CERQ. Our findings indicate that the CERQ (items-grouped version is a sound instrument for assessing cognitive emotion regulation in patients with FMS.

  15. Fibromyalgia: Presentation and Management with a Focus on Pharmacological Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice E Sumpton

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia is a condition with widespread muscle pain. Prevalence studies showed that 2% to 7% of the population have fibromyalgia, which affects approximately one million Canadians. Fibromyalgia is most common in women, but it also involves men and children. As with most chronic illnesses, the causes of fibromyalgia are unknown. However, recent research supports underlying abnormalities in the central nervous system, which supports fibromyalgia as a chronic disease state and valid clinical entity. Pain is the primary symptom, often accompanied by overwhelming fatigue, sleep dysfunction and cognitive impairment. In 1990, the American College of Rheumatology developed diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Lifestyle changes, including pacing of activities and aerobic exercise, are very important in managing fibromyalgia symptoms. Emotional and behavioural therapy can also be helpful. Controlled trials of antidepressants, gabapentinoids, tramadol, zopiclone and sodium oxybate have shown effectiveness in fibromyalgia patients. Pregabalin and duloxetine were recently approved in the United States. Effective management of fibromyalgia is complex and requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. Response and tolerance of different therapeutic interventions vary from patient to patient. Recent advances in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia offer hope for new and improved therapies in the management of this disabling condition.

  16. Self-reported halitosis and associated demographic and behavioral factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Fernanda Carpes; Kauer, Bruno; Wagner, Tassiane Panta; Daudt, Luciana Dondonis; Haas, Alex Nogueira

    2016-08-22

    Halitosis is still poorly studied in young adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of self-reported halitosis and associate it with demographic and behavioral factors in young adult dental students. This cross-sectional study was designed as a census of students enrolled in three initial and three final semesters of a dental course in a Brazilian public university. Of 284 eligible students, 257 (90.5%) completed a self-administered questionnaire. Self-reported halitosis was the primary study outcome, and was assessed with the question "do you feel you have bad breath?". Data on age, gender, frequency of tooth brushing and interproximal cleaning, tongue cleaning, mouth rinse use and dry mouth were collected using the questionnaire, and were considered independent variables. Of the students surveyed, 26.5% reported as never, 51.7% as rarely, 21.4% as sometimes, and 0.4% as always feeling they had halitosis. Morning halitosis was reported by 90.6% of those who reported halitosis. In the final multiple model, last semester students had a 55% lower chance of reporting halitosis, compared with students from the first semesters [odds ratio (OR) 0.46; 95%CI 0.24-0.89]. Women had a 2.57fold higher chance of reporting halitosis (OR = 2.57; 95%CI 1.12-5.93). Dry mouth increased the chance of self-reported halitosis 3.95-fold, compared with absence of dry mouth (OR = 3.95; 95%CI 2.03-7.68). It can be concluded that self-reports of halitosis were low among dental students, but may represent an important complaint. Gender, dry mouth and level of college education of the dentist were factors significantly associated with self-reported halitosis.

  17. Employment Status and Inequalities in Self-Reported Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sofie Hiswåls

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of employment status on self-reported health in Gävleborg County. Methods: The study used data from the 2010 Health in Equal terms survey, a cross-sectional survey carried out in Gävleborg County in Sweden. A total of 4,245 individuals, aged 16–65 years were included in the analysis. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between employment status and self-reported health Results: People who were outside the labour market had odds of poor health of 2.64 (Cl 2.28–3.05 compared to their employed counterparts. Controlling for other covariates reduced the risk slightly to 2.10 (1.69-2.60 but remained statistically significant. In addition, other variables were associated with self-reported poor healthConclusion: This study found a statistically significant association between being outside the labour market and poor self-reported health. The relation was explained partially by socio-economic and demographic variables. Further studies are needed to further investigate the observed relationships. Longitudinal studies are needed to further investigate the observed relationship. Policy-makers within the Gävleborg County need to pay attention to the health status of those out of work, especially during times of combined economic and labour market fluctuations.  Results of the study suggest the need to pay attention to the health status of those outside the labour market especially during times of economic hardship.Keywords: Employment status, self-reported health, health inequalities

  18. Can mastalgia be another somatic symptom in fibromyalgia syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral Sen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purposes of this study were to determine the coexistence of mastalgia and fibromyalgia, to investigate the effects of this combination on pain patterns, and to discuss the status of breast pain in the diagnostic algorithm of fibromyalgia syndrome. METHODS: Sixty-one female patients reporting breast pain during the last three months and 53 female patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome were enrolled in this study. The Breast Pain Questionnaire was administered to all participants in the mastalgia group and to those in the fibromyalgia syndrome group who had experienced mastalgia during the past three months. The patients in the fibromyalgia syndrome group were evaluated using the 2010 preliminary American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. All of the patients in the mastalgia group were evaluated for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia syndrome by a single physiatrist. The coexistence and pain patterns of mastalgia and fibromyalgia were assessed statistically. RESULTS: Approximately half of the patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (47.2% reported having mastalgia at the time of admission and 37.7% of the patients with mastalgia met the diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia syndrome. The patients with mastalgia in the fibromyalgia syndrome group had significantly higher total breast pain scores compared with the women in the mastalgia group. In addition, the patients with fibromyalgia syndrome in the mastalgia group had significantly higher Widespread Pain Index and Symptom Severity Scale scores than the patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that mastalgia can be an aspect of the central sensitivity syndrome and can be added to the somatic symptoms of fibromyalgia.

  19. Associations Between Cognitive Performance and Pain in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Comorbidity with Fibromyalgia Does Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickmans, Kelly; Meeus, Mira; De Kooning, Margot; Lambrecht, Luc; Pattyn, Nathalie; Nijs, Jo

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the frequently reported pain complaints, performance-based cognitive capabilities in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) with and without comorbid fibromyalgia (FM) are significantly worse than those of healthy controls. In various chronic pain populations, cognitive impairments are known to be related to pain severity. However, to the best of our knowledge, the association between cognitive performance and experimental pain measurements has never been examined in CFS patients. This study aimed to examine the association between cognitive performance and self-reported as well as experimental pain measurements in CFS patients with and without FM. Observational study. The present study took place at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel and the University of Antwerp. Forty-eight (18 CFS-only and 30 CFS+FM) patients and 30 healthy controls were studied. Participants first completed 3 performance-based cognitive tests designed to assess selective and sustained attention, cognitive inhibition, and working memory capacity. Seven days later, experimental pain measurements (pressure pain thresholds [PPT], temporal summation [TS], and conditioned pain modulation [CPM]) took place and participants were asked to fill out 3 questionnaires to assess self-reported pain, fatigue, and depressive symptoms. In the CFS+FM group, the capacity of pain inhibition was significantly associated with cognitive inhibition. Self-reported pain was significantly associated with simple reaction time in CFS-only patients. The CFS+FM but not the CFS-only group showed a significantly lower PPT and enhanced TS compared with controls. The cross-sectional nature of this study does not allow for inferences of causation. The results underline disease heterogeneity in CFS by indicating that a measure of endogenous pain inhibition might be a significant predictor of cognitive functioning in CFS patients with FM, while self-reported pain appears more appropriate to predict cognitive

  20. Is fibromyalgia a neurologic disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Laurence A; McKendree-Smith, Nancy L; Alarcón, Graciela S; Cianfrini, Leanne R

    2002-04-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by abnormal pain sensitivity in response to diverse stimuli as well as persistent widespread pain and other symptoms such as fatigue and sleep disturbance. Progress has been made in identifying factors that contribute to the etiopathogenesis of abnormal pain sensitivity, but there is no single model of pathophysiology or treatment of FM that has gained wide acceptance among health care professionals. We review the literature on the etiopathogenesis of abnormal pain sensitivity in FM and describe an explanatory model that serves as a source of testable hypotheses in our laboratory. This model posits that interactions of exogenous (e.g., environmental stressors) and endogenous (e.g., neuroendocrine dysfunction) abnormalities in genetically predisposed individuals lead to a final common pathway, i.e., alterations in central nervous system function and neuropeptide production that underlie central sensitization and abnormal pain sensitivity. This model also suggests that efforts to develop and evaluate treatments for FM should focus on interventions with direct or indirect effects on central functions that influence pain sensitivity.

  1. Fibromyalgia: clinical and occupational aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, Milton; Goldenfum, Marco Aurélio; Siena, César Augusto Fávaro

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a clinical syndrome commonly observed in daily medical practice and its etiopathogenesis is still unclear. As it is characterized by chronic musculoskeletal pain associated with several symptoms, FM may be confused with several other rheumatic and nonrheumatic diseases when they course with pictures of diffuse pain and chronic fatigue. FM treatment should be multidisciplinary, individualized, count on active participation of the patient, and based on combined pharmacological and nonpharmacological modalities. It is found both in work and non-work settings, and there is no scientific evidence in the literature showing that FM might be caused by occupation. FM seldom leads to incapacity to work. In cases where pain or fatigue do not respond to appropriate treatment, reaching significant levels, a short period away from work can be considered. As FM is a relevant subject, this review article was based on exploratory, qualitative, and bibliographic investigation, aiming to study the main clinical and occupational aspects of FM, emphasizing the theoretical-conceptual background and the experience of specialists.

  2. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Ernest; Clauw, Daniel J.; Goldenberg, Don L.; Harris, Richard E.; Helfenstein, Milton; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Noguchi, Koichi; Silverman, Stuart L.; Ushida, Takahiro; Wang, Guochun

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript, developed by a group of chronic pain researchers and clinicians from around the world, aims to address the state of knowledge about fibromyalgia (FM) and identify ongoing challenges in the field of FM and other chronic pain syndromes that may be characterized by pain centralization/amplification/hypersensitivity. There have been many exciting developments in research studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of FM and related syndromes that have the potential to improve the recognition and management of patients with FM and other conditions with FM-like pain. However, much of the new information has not reached all clinicians, especially primary care clinicians, who have the greatest potential to use this new knowledge to positively impact their patients’ lives. Furthermore, there are persistent misconceptions about FM and a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of FM. This paper presents a framework for future global efforts to improve the understanding and treatment of FM and other associated chronic pain syndromes, disseminate research findings, identify ways to enhance advocacy for these patients, and improve global efforts to collaborate and reach consensus about key issues related to FM and chronic pain in general. PMID:27022674

  3. Fibromyalgia syndrome: a somatoform disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuser, W; Henningsen, P

    2014-09-01

    Whether fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) can be classified as a somatoform disorder is under debate. Literature searches on the classification of FMS as a somatoform disorder were performed in Medline and in evidence-based guideline databases. A somatoform disorder is defined by medically unexplained somatic symptoms that persist for at least 6 months and lead to a significant impairment of the ability to function in everyday life. The nature and extent of the symptoms or the distress and pre-occupation of the patient cannot be explained fully by a general medical condition or by the direct effect of a substance, and are not attributable to another mental disorder. Emotional and psychosocial conflicts play a major role in the onset, severity, exacerbation or maintenance of the physical symptoms. There is disagreement in the FMS research community on the existence of somatic factors sufficiently explaining FMS symptoms. Psychosocial factors play a major role in the onset, exacerbation or maintenance of FMS symptoms in the majority of patients. A biopsychosocial model of interacting biological and psychosocial factors in the predisposition, onset and maintenance of FMS symptoms is more appropriate than the dichotomy between a somatic disease and a mental (somatoform) disorder. The clinical features of FMS and persistent somatoform pain disorder or somatization disorder according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 overlap in individuals with chronic widespread pain without specific somatic disease factors. FMS is not synonymous with somatoform disorder. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  4. Inflammatory Fibromyalgia: Is it Real?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metyas, Samy K; Solyman, John S; Arkfeld, Daniel G

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a characterized by generalized pain with widespread tender points in specific areas and is frequently accompanied by fatigue, stiffness, and a non-restorative sleep pattern. In the current retrospective study, we identified a subgroup of FM patients who had clinically important markers of inflammation. The study also explored the use of the original American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria in the diagnosis of FM. Our data suggested there was a distinct subset of patients with FM who had positive ESR, CRP, ANA and RF; a group that we considered representative of inflammatory FM. None of the FM patients in this study developed a documented coexisting autoimmune illness during the retrospective review period. The existence of FM subgroups further puts into question the already controversial use of either the new or old ACR classification criteria in the diagnosis of FM, as they do not address the issue of systemic inflammation which appears to be significant. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Assessing self-reported adherence to HIV therapy by questionnaire: the SERAD (Self-Reported Adherence) Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Moreno, J.A.; Fumaz, C.R.; Ferrer, M.J.; Tuldra, A.; Rovira, T.; Viladrich, C.; Bayes, R.; Burger, D.M.; Negredo, E.; Clotet, B.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and RNA-HIV viral load outcomes has been extensively shown. Although there are different procedures for assessing treatment adherence, there is no ideal method. We present the SERAD (Self-Reported Adherence)

  6. What is the relationship between self-reported aberrant driving behaviours, mindfulness and self-reported crashes and infringements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Sjaan; Stephens, Amanda N; Young, Kristie L; Hua, Phuong; Chambers, Richard; Hassed, Craig

    2018-03-26

    This study investigated the relationship between self-reported aberrant driving behaviours, mindfulness and self-reported crashes and infringements. Three hundred and eighteen participants (M = 46.0 years, SD = 13.7 years; Female: 81.8%) completed an online survey that assessed aberrant driving behaviours, mindfulness (including regular mindfulness meditation [MM]) and self-reported crashes and infringements across the past two years. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) was used to examine the relationship between self-reported aberrant driving behaviours and mindfulness simultaneously, as well as with participants' age and estimated kilometres driven over the past year. The results of the SEM showed that mindfulness was negatively related to each self-reported aberrant driving behaviour, with the strongest relationships being between mindfulness and driving-related lapses (-0.58) and errors (-0.46). Participants who practice MM had significantly fewer crashes in the past two years and reported significantly fewer driving-related violations and lapses compared to participants who did not practice MM (crashes: 9.3% vs. 18.8%, p<0.05; violations: M = 6.66 [SD = 3.44] vs. M = 7.68 [SD = 4.53], p<0.05; errors: M = 5.17 [SD = 3.44] vs. M = 6.19 [SD = 4.12], p<0.05). More research is needed to understand whether MM results in more mindful and attentive drivers or whether individuals who practice MM may have other traits or behaviours that are linked to improved safety.

  7. Nationwide Prevalence of Self-Reported Serious Sensory Impairments and Their Associations with Self-Reported Cognitive and Functional Difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Spencer D; Mudie, Lucy I; Siordia, Carlos; Swenor, Bonnielin K; Friedman, David S

    2018-04-01

    To estimate the nationwide prevalence of self-reported serious vision impairment (SVI), serious hearing impairment (SHI), and serious dual sensory impairment (DSI; i.e., concomitant SVI and SHI) and to characterize their associations with self-reported cognitive, independent living, self-care, and ambulatory difficulties. The American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide cross-sectional survey administered by the United States Census Bureau. The 2011-2015 ACS sample contains data on 7 210 535 individuals 45 years of age or older. Descriptive statistics for each of the 4 mutually exclusive sensory impairment categories no sensory impairment (NSI), SVI, SHI, and serious DSI were calculated using the weighted sample. Adjusted odds ratios using several logistic regressions were calculated using the unweighted sample to measure the magnitude of associations between sensory impairment status and the outcome difficulties. Self-reported cognitive, independent living, self-care, and ambulatory difficulty. Among individuals 45 years of age or older, the estimated nationwide prevalence of self-reported SVI alone is 2.8%, that of SHI alone is 6.0%, and that of serious DSI is 1.6%. The prevalence of each sensory impairment increases with age. A greater proportion of American Indians or Alaskan Natives experience SVI (4.8%), SHI (8.5%), and serious DSI (3.7%) than any other race or ethnic group (P self-reported serious sensory impairment increases with age and is distributed unequally among different racial and ethnic groups. Any sensory impairment is associated with greater cognitive and functional difficulties than NSI. Additionally, serious DSI is associated with greater difficulties than SVI or SHI alone, and SVI alone is more serious than SHI alone in each of the 4 cognitive and functional difficulties. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychological Resilience, Affective Mechanisms, and Symptom Burden in a Tertiary Care Sample of Patients with Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Samantha J; Vincent, Ann; Hassett, Afton L; Whipple, Mary O; Oh, Terry H; Benzo, Roberto P; Toussaint, Loren L

    2014-01-01

    Research demonstrates that patients with fibromyalgia who have higher positive and lower negative affect have lower symptom burden. Affect has been shown to be associated with resilience. This study examined the relationship between affect, resilience, and fibromyalgia symptom burden in a clinical sample of patients with fibromyalgia. We hypothesized that (a) positive and negative affect would be associated with fibromyalgia symptom burden; (b) resilience would be associated with positive and negative affect; (c) resilience would be associated with fibromyalgia symptom burden; and (d) the connection between resilience and fibromyalgia symptom burden would be mediated by both positive and negative affect. A sample of 858 patients with fibromyalgia completed questionnaires. Mediation modeling revealed statistically significant direct effects of resilience on fibromyalgia symptom burden (β =−.10, P fibromyalgia symptom burden through affect (β =−.36, P fibromyalgia symptom burden. Our results suggest that improving affect through resiliency training could be studied as a modality for improving fibromyalgia symptom burden. PMID:24376184

  9. One year in review 2016: fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzichi, Laura; Giacomelli, Camillo; Consensi, Arianna; Atzeni, Fabiola; Batticciotto, Alberto; Di Franco, Manuela; Casale, Roberto; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome is a chronic disease with unknown aetiology, characterised by widespread pain, fatigue and other functional symptoms. We reviewed the literature of the past year to underline the recent progress in the etiopathogenesis, assessment and therapies of this syndrome, evaluating the articles published between January 2015 and January 2016.

  10. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Etiology, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Bellato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome is mainly characterized by pain, fatigue, and sleep disruption. The etiology of fibromyalgia is still unclear: if central sensitization is considered to be the main mechanism involved, then many other factors, genetic, immunological, and hormonal, may play an important role. The diagnosis is typically clinical (there are no laboratory abnormalities and the physician must concentrate on pain and on its features. Additional symptoms (e.g., Raynaud’s phenomenon, irritable bowel disease, and heat and cold intolerance can be associated with this condition. A careful differential diagnosis is mandatory: fibromyalgia is not a diagnosis of exclusion. Since 1990, diagnosis has been principally based on the two major diagnostic criteria defined by the ACR. Recently, new criteria have been proposed. The main goals of the treatment are to alleviate pain, increase restorative sleep, and improve physical function. A multidisciplinary approach is optimal. While most nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids have limited benefit, an important role is played by antidepressants and neuromodulating antiepileptics: currently duloxetine (NNT for a 30% pain reduction 7.2, milnacipran (NNT 19, and pregabalin (NNT 8.6 are the only drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia. In addition, nonpharmacological treatments should be associated with drug therapy.

  11. Illness perceptions in patients with fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ittersum, M.W.; van Wilgen, C.P.; Hilberdink, W.K.; Groothoff, J.W.; van der Schans, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Former studies in chronic diseases showed the importance of patients' beliefs and perceptions. The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire was developed to assess these illness perceptions. Our goal was to investigate psychometric properties of the IPQ-R for Fibromyalgia Dutch language

  12. Patients’ and Professionals’ Views on Managing Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Briones-Vozmediano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Managing fibromyalgia is a challenge for both health care systems and the professionals caring for these patients, due, in part, to the fact that the etiology of this disease is unknown, its symptoms are not specific and there is no standardized treatment.

  13. Fibromyalgia as a neuropathic pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Martinez-Lavin

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses scientific evidence supporting the notion that all fibromyalgia (FM features can be explained on the basis of autonomic (sympathetic nervous system dysfunction. Also suggests that FM main features (widespread pain and tenderness at palpation on specific anatomic points are manifestations of painful neuropathy. On these bases, a holistic approach for FM treatment is proposed.

  14. WEATHER CONDITIONS AND COMPLAINTS IN FIBROMYALGIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBLECOURT, ACE; KNIPPING, AA; DEVOOGD, N; VANRIJSWIJK, MH

    1993-01-01

    Patients with musculoskeletal disorders, including fibromyalgia syndrome (FS), often state that weather conditions modulate their complaints. There have been a few studies concerning this issue, but the results appear to be contradictory. We tried to relate the subjective symptoms of pain,

  15. Fibromyalgia Pathogenesis and Treatment Options Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Steven; Caldwell, William; Gritsenko, Karina

    2016-04-01

    This review article presents and summarizes up-to-date literature on the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, pathophysiological mechanisms, and treatment options for fibromyalgia patients. First, the most recent diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, as put forth by the American College of Rheumatology will be summarized. Clinical features, including chronic widespread pain, hyperalgesia, mood disorders, anxiety, and disturbed sleep patterns will be explored in-depth. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of fibromyalgia involves alterations in multiple ascending and descending central nervous system pathways, as well as peripheral pathways, leading to heightened pain sensitivity. Risk factors have been studied extensively, and the most recent research focuses on various genetic influences and the contributions of stress and poor sleep. Lastly, the discussion in this article focuses on treatment options for fibromyalgia; some have been mainstay options for many years. Pharmacological agents include tricyclic antidepressants, anti-epileptic drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitors, as well as some investigational agents. The evidence behind non-pharmacologic treatments, including massage therapy, exercise, and acupuncture, are discussed.

  16. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Etiology, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellato, Enrico; Marini, Eleonora; Castoldi, Filippo; Barbasetti, Nicola; Mattei, Lorenzo; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Blonna, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is mainly characterized by pain, fatigue, and sleep disruption. The etiology of fibromyalgia is still unclear: if central sensitization is considered to be the main mechanism involved, then many other factors, genetic, immunological, and hormonal, may play an important role. The diagnosis is typically clinical (there are no laboratory abnormalities) and the physician must concentrate on pain and on its features. Additional symptoms (e.g., Raynaud's phenomenon, irritable bowel disease, and heat and cold intolerance) can be associated with this condition. A careful differential diagnosis is mandatory: fibromyalgia is not a diagnosis of exclusion. Since 1990, diagnosis has been principally based on the two major diagnostic criteria defined by the ACR. Recently, new criteria have been proposed. The main goals of the treatment are to alleviate pain, increase restorative sleep, and improve physical function. A multidisciplinary approach is optimal. While most nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids have limited benefit, an important role is played by antidepressants and neuromodulating antiepileptics: currently duloxetine (NNT for a 30% pain reduction 7.2), milnacipran (NNT 19), and pregabalin (NNT 8.6) are the only drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia. In addition, nonpharmacological treatments should be associated with drug therapy. PMID:23213512

  17. Autonomic changes in fibromyalgia: Clinical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction is one of the suggested pathophysiological mechanisms of fibromyalgia (FM). Its dysfunction may contribute to enhanced pain and other clinical problems associated with FM. Previous studies showed conflicting results regarding ANS function in FM. Some studies ...

  18. Illness perceptions in patients with fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ittersum, M. W.; van Wilgen, C. P.; Hilberdink, W. K. H. A.; Groothoff, J. W.; van der Schans, C. P.

    Objective: Former studies in chronic diseases showed the importance of patients' beliefs and perceptions. The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire was developed to assess these illness perceptions. Our goal was to investigate psychometric properties of the IPQ-R for Fibromyalgia Dutch language

  19. Amitriptyline for the treatment of fibromyalgia: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Slim, Mahmoud; Calandre, Elena P

    2015-10-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic generalized pain accompanied by a wide range of clinical manifestations. Most clinical practice guidelines recommend multidisciplinary treatment using a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies. The tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline has been most thoroughly studied in fibromyalgia. Amitriptyline has been evaluated in placebo-controlled studies, and it has served as an active comparator to other therapeutic interventions in the treatment of fibromyalgia. In addition, several systematic reviews and meta-analyses have evaluated its efficacy and safety for the treatment of fibromyalgia. Data from individual studies as well as from systematic reviews indicate that low doses (10-75 mg/day) of amitriptyline are effective for the treatment of fibromyalgia and, despite the limited quality of the data, they do not seem to be associated with relevant tolerability or safety issues. Consistent with some clinical guidelines, we believe amitriptyline in low doses should be considered a first-line drug for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

  20. Gabapentin for fibromyalgia pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Tess E; Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J; Moore, R Andrew

    2017-01-03

    This review replaces part of an earlier review that evaluated gabapentin for both neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia, now split into separate reviews for the two conditions. This review will consider pain in fibromyalgia only.Fibromyalgia is associated with widespread pain lasting longer than three months, and is frequently associated with symptoms such as poor sleep, fatigue, depression, and reduced quality of life. Fibromyalgia is more common in women.Gabapentin is an antiepileptic drug widely licensed for treatment of neuropathic pain. It is not licensed for the treatment of fibromyalgia, but is commonly used because fibromyalgia can respond to the same medicines as neuropathic pain. To assess the analgesic efficacy of gabapentin for fibromyalgia pain in adults and the adverse events associated with its use in clinical trials. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online, MEDLINE via Ovid and Embase via Ovid from inception to 24 May 2016. We also searched the reference lists of retrieved studies and reviews, and searched online clinical trial registries. Randomised, double-blind trials of eight weeks' duration or longer for treating fibromyalgia pain in adults, comparing gabapentin with placebo or an active comparator. Two independent review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality and risk of bias. We planned to use dichotomous data to calculate risk ratio and number needed to treat for one additional event, using standard methods. We assessed the evidence using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) and created a 'Summary of findings' table. Two studies tested gabapentin to treat fibromyalgia pain. One was identified in previous versions of the review and is included here. We identified another study as a conference abstract, with insufficient detail to determine eligibility for inclusion; it is awaiting assessment. The one included study of 150

  1. High prevalence of self-reported injuries and illnesses in talented female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A; Clarsen, B; Verhagen, E A L M; Stubbe, J H

    2017-01-01

    A thorough knowledge of the epidemiology and severity of injuries and illness in youth female elite sports is lacking due to the methodological challenges involved in recording them. In this study, the prevalence and incidence of injuries and illness are assessed among youth female elite athletes. Instead of solely focusing on time-loss injuries, our study included all substantial and non-substantial health problems (ie, injuries, mental problems and illnesses). Sixty young elite Dutch female athletes (age: 16.6 years (SD: 2.3), weight: 58.3 kg (SD: 15.1), height: 154.1 cm (SD: 44.2)) participating in soccer (n=23), basketball (n=22) and gymnastic (n=15) talent development programmes were prospectively followed during one season (September 2014 to April 2015). To collect health problem data, all athletes completed the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center Questionnaire on Health Problems every other week. Main outcome measures were average prevalence of injury and incidence density of injury. At any given time, 47.9% of the athletes reported an injury (95% CI 43.6% to 52.6%) and 9.1% reported an illness (95% CI 5.1 to 19.0). The average injury incidence density was 8.6 per 1000 hours of athlete exposure. The average number of self-reported injuries per athlete per season was significantly higher in soccer athletes (4.3±2.7) than in basketball athletes (2.6±2.0) (p=0.03) and not significantly higher than in the gymnastic squad. The knee and the ankle were two of the most common injury locations for all squads. Knee injuries in basketball and soccer and heel injuries in the gymnastic squad had the highest impact on sports participation. High prevalence of self-reported injuries among talented female athletes suggests that future efforts towards their prevention are warranted.

  2. Effect of supervised physical exercise on flexibility of fibromyalgia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Leonardo Hernandes de Souza; Mattos, Rafael da Silva; Castro, Juliana Brandão Pinto de; Barbosa, José Silvio de Oliveira; Chame, Flávio; Vale, Rodrigo Gomes de Souza

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic diffuse musculoskeletal pain. The syndrome, of still unknown etiology, predominantly affects females. Considering that aerobic, resisted and flexibility exercises may help improving the negative impact of fibromyalgia on quality of life, this study aimed at observing the effect of supervised physical exercise on the flexibility of female patients with fibromyalgia treated in the Extension Project "Interdisciplinary ...

  3. Can mastalgia be another somatic symptom in fibromyalgia syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Meral; Kilic, Murat Ozgur; Cemeroglu, Ozlem; Icen, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purposes of this study were to determine the coexistence of mastalgia and fibromyalgia, to investigate the effects of this combination on pain patterns, and to discuss the status of breast pain in the diagnostic algorithm of fibromyalgia syndrome. METHODS: Sixty-one female patients reporting breast pain during the last three months and 53 female patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome were enrolled in this study. The Breast Pain Questionnaire was administered to all part...

  4. Effect of duloxetine in patients with fibromyalgia: tiredness subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, Laurence A; Bennett, Robert; Russell, Irwin J; Wohlreich, Madelaine M; Chappell, Amy S; Wang, Fujun; D'Souza, Deborah N; Moldofsky, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This study tested the hypothesis that baseline ratings of fatigue/tiredness would be negatively associated with the efficacy of duloxetine on measures of pain and functional ability in patients with fibromyalgia. Methods A post hoc analysis of pooled data from 4 double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of duloxetine in fibromyalgia was performed. The fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ) tiredness item score (0 to 10 scale) was used to define tiredness subgroups. Patients were ...

  5. Impact of migraine on fibromyalgia symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamberardino, Maria Adele; Affaitati, Giannapia; Martelletti, Paolo; Tana, Claudio; Negro, Andrea; Lapenna, Domenico; Curto, Martina; Schiavone, Cosima; Stellin, Luisa; Cipollone, Francesco; Costantini, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FMS) and high frequency episodic/chronic migraine (M) very frequently co-occur, suggesting common pathophysiological mechanisms; both conditions display generalized somatic hyperalgesia. In FMS-M comorbidity we assessed if: a different level of hyperalgesia is present compared to one condition only; hyperalgesia is a function of migraine frequency; migraine attacks trigger FMS symptoms. Female patients with fibromyalgia (FMS)(n.40), high frequency episodic migraine (M1)(n.41), chronic migraine (M2)(n.40), FMS + M1 (n.42) and FMS + M2 (n.40) underwent recording of: -electrical pain thresholds in skin, subcutis and muscle and pressure pain thresholds in control sites, -pressure pain thresholds in tender points (TePs), -number of monthly migraine attacks and fibromyalgia flares (3-month diary). Migraine and FMS parameters were evaluated before and after migraine prophylaxis, or no prophylaxis, for 3 months with calcium-channel blockers, in two further FMS + H1 groups (n.49, n.39). 1-way ANOVA was applied to test trends among groups, Student's t-test for paired samples was used to compare pre and post-treatment values. The lowest electrical and pressure thresholds at all sites and tissues were found in FMS + M2, followed by FMS + H1, FMS, M2 and M1 (trend: p fibromyalgia and migraine involves heightened somatic hyperalgesia compared to one condition only. Increased migraine frequency - with shift towards chronicity - enhances both hyperalgesia and spontaneous FMS pain, which is reversed by effective migraine prophylaxis. These results suggest different levels of central sensitization in patients with migraine, fibromyalgia or both conditions and a role for migraine as a triggering factor for FMS.

  6. International survey of self-reported medicine use among adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ebba H; Holstein, Bjørn E; Due, Pernille

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine gender, age, and country variations in adolescents' self-reported medicine use. DESIGN: Cross-sectional school surveys of representative samples of 11- to 15-year-old girls and boys were used. The 1997/1998 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study was referenced....... A standardized questionnaire was completed during school hours. SETTING: Canada, US, Greenland, Israel, and 24 European countries. PARTICIPANTS: 123 227 participants equally distributed by gender and by 3 age groups (mean 11.7, 13.6, 15.6 y). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported medicine use for headache.......22), difficulties in getting to sleep 0.96 (0.91 to 1.00), and nervousness 1.04 (0.99 to 1.08). CONCLUSIONS: Substantial proportions of adolescents used medicine for common health problems. The prevalence of use differed between type of symptom for which the medicine was used, between countries, and between gender...

  7. Systematic Review of Self-Report Family Assessment Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Elena; Carr, Alan

    2016-03-01

    A systematic review of self-report family assessment measures was conducted with reference to their psychometric properties, clinical utility and theoretical underpinnings. Eight instruments were reviewed: The McMaster Family Assessment Device (FAD); Circumplex Model Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales (FACES); Beavers Systems Model Self-Report Family Inventory (SFI); Family Assessment Measure III (FAM III); Family Environment Scale (FES); Family Relations Scale (FRS); and Systemic Therapy Inventory of Change (STIC); and the Systemic Clinical Outcome Routine Evaluation (SCORE). Results indicated that five family assessment measures are suitable for clinical use (FAD, FACES-IV, SFI, FAM III, SCORE), two are not (FES, FRS), and one is a new system currently under-going validation (STIC). © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  8. Anger and self-reported delinquency in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire A. J. Bloxsom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between anger and criminal, particularly violent, behaviour is firmly established in the literature. However, most of the extant research has been conducted with clinical and legally sanctioned forensic populations. The present study sought to examine anger in a non forensic population using a self-report measure of delinquency. The Novaco Anger Scale and Provocation Inventory (NAS-PI; Novaco, 2003 and the Self-Report Delinquency Questionnaire (Elliot & Ageton, 1980 were completed by male and female university students. The total anger score was associated with overall delinquency and specifically with crimes against the person and against property. Males reported higher levels of anger and a greater involvement in criminal acts. The practical implications of the findings within a legal context are discussed.

  9. Self-reported delinquency in a probation service in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lylla Cysne Frota D'Abreu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available International research shows that self-reported delinquency is a successful strategy to improve data collection on the identification of the so-called "dark figure", ie, offenses that are not reported to the justice system. This technique, however, is still little used in Brazil. Through documentary research from data archive, this study described the socio-demographic variables and the severity of unofficial delinquency of a sample of 211 adolescents who attended a probation service in Brazil. The results showed that adolescents in conflict with the law have delinquent engagement with higher polymorphism and intensity than the official data are able to identify. Self-reported delinquency can improve data collection, provide more reliable rates and guide more assertive intervention actions in these services.

  10. Unique immunologic patterns in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, Frederick G; Gavin, Igor M; Karpenko, Oleksiy; Lindgren, Valerie; Gaitonde, Sujata; Gashkoff, Peter A; Gillis, Bruce S

    2012-12-17

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a clinical syndrome characterized by chronic pain and allodynia. The diagnosis of FM has been one of exclusion as a test to confirm the diagnosis is lacking. Recent data highlight the role of the immune system in FM. Aberrant expressions of immune mediators, such as cytokines, have been linked to the pathogenesis and traits of FM. We therefore determined whether cytokine production by immune cells is altered in FM patients by comparing the cellular responses to mitogenic activators of stimulated blood mononuclear cells of a large number of patients with FM to those of healthy matched individuals. Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were collected from 110 patients with the clinical diagnosis of FM and 91 healthy donors. Parallel samples of PBMC were cultured overnight in medium alone or in the presence of mitogenic activators; PHA or PMA in combination with ionomycin. The cytokine concentrations of IFN-γ, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, MIP-1β , MCP-1, and MIP1-α in plasma as well as in cultured supernatants were determined using a multiplex immunoassay using bead array technology. Cytokine levels of stimulated PBMC cultures of healthy control subjects were significantly increased as compared to matched non-stimulated PBMC cultures. In contrast, the concentrations of most cytokines were lower in stimulated samples from patients with FM compared to controls. The decreases of cytokine concentrations in patients samples ranged from 1.5-fold for MIP-1β to 10.2-fold for IL-6 in PHA challenges. In PMA challenges, we observed 1.8 to 4-fold decreases in the concentrations of cytokines in patient samples. The cytokine responses to mitogenic activators of PBMC isolated from patients with FM were significantly lower than those of healthy individuals, implying that cell-mediated immunity is impaired in FM patients. This novel cytokine assay reveals unique and valuable immunologic traits, which, when combined with clinical patterns, can offer

  11. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilula, Marshall F

    2007-07-01

    Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) is a well-documented neuroelectrical modality that has been proven effective in some good studies of fibromyalgia (FM) patients. CES is no panacea but, for some FM patients, the modality can be valuable. This article discusses aspects of both CES and FM and how they relate to the individual with the condition. FM frequently has many comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, insomnia and a great variety of different rheumatologic and neurological symptoms that often resemble multiple sclerosis, dysautonomias, chronic fatigue syndrome and others. However, despite long-standing criteria from the American College of Rheumatology for FM, some physicians believe there is probably no single homogeneous condition that can be labeled as FM. Whether it is a disease, a syndrome or something else, sufferers feel like they are living one disaster after another. Active self-involvement in care usually enhances the therapeutic results of various treatments and also improves the patient's sense of being in control of the condition. D-ribose supplementation may prove to significantly enhance energy, sleep, mental clarity, pain control and well-being in FM patients. A form of evoked potential biofeedback, the EPFX, is a powerful stress reduction technique which assesses the chief stressors and risk factors for illness that can impede the FM patient's built-in healing abilities. Future healthcare will likely expand the diagnostic criteria of FM and/or illuminate a group of related conditions and the ways in which the conditions relate to each other. Future medicine for FM and related conditions may increasingly involve multimodality treatment that features CES as one significant part of the therapeutic regimen. Future medicine may also include CES as an invaluable, cost-effective add-on to many facets of clinical pharmacology and medical therapeutics.

  12. Consistency of Self-Reported Concussion History in Adolescent Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Magdalena; Iverson, Grant L; Silverberg, Noah D; Mannix, Rebekah; Zafonte, Ross; Maxwell, Bruce; Berkner, Paul D

    2017-01-15

    Relying on self-reported concussion injury history is common in both clinical care and research. However, young athletes may not provide consistent medical information. To date, little is known about the reliability of self-reported concussion history in high school students. This study examined whether student athletes reported their lifetime history of concussions consistently over time. Self-reported concussion history was examined in 4792 student athletes (ages 13-18) from Maine who completed a preseason health survey on two occasions (median re-test interval = 23.7 months; standard deviation = 7.3; interquartile range = 12.4-24.5). Consistency of self-reported concussion history was determined by differences in the number of concussions reported during the second survey. Inconsistent concussion history was defined primarily by a decrease in the number of lifetime concussions reported at the second testing, compared with at the first testing. The majority of the sample (80.3%) reported no change in the number of concussions between the two baseline assessments. A minority (15.9%; n = 763) reported more concussions during the second assessment. Only 3.8% (n = 181) of student athletes provided inconsistent concussion histories, defined as fewer concussions at the second assessment. Boys provided inconsistent concussion histories a little more frequently, compared with girls (5.3% and 2.0%, respectively; p concussion histories somewhat more frequently, compared with those without ADHD (7.8% and 3.5%, respectively; p concussion histories, greater degree of inconsistency was associated with a greater number of concussions initially reported at baseline (r s  = 0.54; p concussion histories. Male gender, ADHD, and greater number of baseline concussions were significantly associated with inconsistency in reporting. Overall, these findings suggest that student athletes are quite consistent when reporting their concussion history when

  13. Smartphone addiction, daily interruptions and self-reported productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Éilish Duke; Christian Montag

    2017-01-01

    The advent of the smartphone has dramatically altered how we communicate, navigate, work and entertain ourselves. While the advantages of this new technology are clear, constant use may also bring negative consequences, such as a loss of productivity due to interruptions in work life. A link between smartphone overuse and loss of productivity has often been hypothesized, but empirical evidence on this question is scarce. The present study addressed this question by collecting self-report data...

  14. The Fibromyalgia Family Study: A Genome-Scan Linkage Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Lesley M.; Fan, Jinbo; Russell, I. Jon; Yunus, Muhammad B.; Khan, Muhammad Asim; Kushner, Irving; Olson, Jane M.; Iyengar, Sudha K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Familial aggregation of fibromyalgia has been increasingly recognized. The goal of the current study was to conduct a genome wide linkage scan to identify susceptibility loci for fibromyalgia. Methods We genotyped members of 116 families from the Fibromyalgia Family Study and performed a model-free genome-wide linkage analysis of fibromyalgia with 341 microsatellite markers, using the Haseman-Elston regression approach. Results The estimated sibling recurrence risk ratio (λs) for fibromyalgia was 13.6 (95% CI: 10.0–18.5), based on a reported population prevalence of 2%. Genome-wide suggestive evidence of linkage was found at marker D17S2196 (Empirical P =0.00030) and D17S1294 (Empirical P =0.00035) on chromosome 17p11.2-q11.2. Conclusion The estimated sibling recurrence risk ratio suggests a strong genetic component of fibromyalgia. This is the first study to report genome-wide suggestive linkage of fibromyalgia to the chromosome 17p11.2-q11.2 region. Further investigation of these multi-case families from the Fibromyalgia Family Study is warranted to identify potential causal risk variants for fibromyalgia. PMID:23280346

  15. Correction for faking in self-report personality tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Lennart

    2015-10-01

    Faking is a common problem in testing with self-report personality tests, especially in high-stakes situations. A possible way to correct for it is statistical control on the basis of social desirability scales. Two such scales were developed and applied in the present paper. It was stressed that the statistical models of faking need to be adapted to different properties of the personality scales, since such scales correlate with faking to different extents. In four empirical studies of self-report personality tests, correction for faking was investigated. One of the studies was experimental, and asked participants to fake or to be honest. In the other studies, job or school applicants were investigated. It was found that the approach to correct for effects of faking in self-report personality tests advocated in the paper removed a large share of the effects, about 90%. It was found in one study that faking varied as a function of degree of how important the consequences of test results could be expected to be, more high-stakes situations being associated with more faking. The latter finding is incompatible with the claim that social desirability scales measure a general personality trait. It is concluded that faking can be measured and that correction for faking, based on such measures, can be expected to remove about 90% of its effects. © 2015 Psykologisk Metod AB. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology published by Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A Self-report of reading disabilities for adults: ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Giménez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a self-report questionnaire on reading-writing difficulties for adults in Spanish (ATLAS is presented. Studies that use self-report questionnaires as a tool for screening of reading-writing difficulties in adults were reviewed. Two studies were carried out to determine the validity and reliability of ATLAS. The first study was aimed to select the critical items and to assess their reliability and their ability to discriminate. In the second study the assessment reported through the answers to the questionnaire was contrasted with the results of psychometric tests. Results showed that (a items were suitable descriptors for adult difficulties, (b there were significant correlations between self-report scores and reading measures, and (c the items discriminate between good and poor readers. The results of this study demonstrated that ATLAS is a sensitive tool to screen adults with reading difficulties. As a further advantage, ATLAS is an easy-to-use and time-saving instrument.

  17. Text mining a self-report back-translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, Angel; Aluja, Anton

    2016-06-01

    There are several recommendations about the routine to undertake when back translating self-report instruments in cross-cultural research. However, text mining methods have been generally ignored within this field. This work describes a text mining innovative application useful to adapt a personality questionnaire to 12 different languages. The method is divided in 3 different stages, a descriptive analysis of the available back-translated instrument versions, a dissimilarity assessment between the source language instrument and the 12 back-translations, and an item assessment of item meaning equivalence. The suggested method contributes to improve the back-translation process of self-report instruments for cross-cultural research in 2 significant intertwined ways. First, it defines a systematic approach to the back translation issue, allowing for a more orderly and informed evaluation concerning the equivalence of different versions of the same instrument in different languages. Second, it provides more accurate instrument back-translations, which has direct implications for the reliability and validity of the instrument's test scores when used in different cultures/languages. In addition, this procedure can be extended to the back-translation of self-reports measuring psychological constructs in clinical assessment. Future research works could refine the suggested methodology and use additional available text mining tools. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Suicide risk in patients with migraine and comorbid fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hung-Yu; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Lin, Yung-Yang; Chen, Wei-Ta; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2015-09-22

    To identify the frequency, clinical effects, and suicide risk in comorbid fibromyalgia(FM) among patients with migraine. We surveyed patients with migraine who attended a headache clinic. All patients completed questionnaires containing demographics, headache profiles based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition, FM questionnaires based on the modified 2010 American College of Rheumatology preliminary diagnostic criteria, Migraine Disability Assessment, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Suicide risk was evaluated by self-report of lifetime suicidal ideation and attempts. Of the 1,318 recruited patients with migraine (aged 42.6 ± 12.7 years; female/male = 4.5), 10.1% (aged 44.3 ± 12.6 years; female/male = 7.9) had comorbidity of FM. Patients with migraine and comorbid FM had higher headache frequency and headache-related disability, poor sleep quality, and were more depressed/anxious than those with migraine only (p < 0.001). Suicidal ideation and attempts were reported in 27.3% and 6.9% of patients with migraine, respectively, and were higher in patients with comorbid FM than in those without (ideation: 58.3% vs 24%; attempt: 17.6% vs 5.7%; p < 0.001). In addition, comorbidity of FM was associated with a higher suicide risk in 3 different migraine subgroups, i.e., migraine without aura, migraine with aura, and chronic migraine. After controlling for covariates, comorbidity of FM remained as a predictor of suicidal ideation and attempts (odds ratio 2.61 and 1.99, respectively, p < 0.05)in patients with migraine. Comorbidity with FM is associated with a high suicide risk in patients with migraine.

  19. Frequency of self-reported sexual aggression and victimization in Brazil: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lylla Winzer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The lack of official data on rape has been a challenge for researchers in Brazil. Two recently published studies were based on law enforcement and medical records. Although these studies represent important progress in research on rape in the country, they have several limitations. In order to obtain more realistic rates, the current article reviews Brazilian studies on self-reported sexual aggression and victimization in individuals over 14 years of age. Forty-one studies were identified through electronic searches and reference verification. From 1% to 40% of women and 1% to 35% of men reported some form of victimization in the previous year. The male perpetration incidence ranged from 2% to 44%. Despite the wide variability, these rates were much higher than those provided by official data. The results suggest that sexual orientation is associated with vulnerability. Mixed findings were found concerning race. Most studies were based on convenience samples and focused on female victimization. Male victimization has received increasing attention, but studies on self-reported perpetration are still limited.

  20. Surveillane of Middle and High School Mental Health Risk by Student Self-Report Screener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget V Dever

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A 2009 National Academies of Sciences report on child mental health prevention and treatment concluded that screening for mental health risk is an essential component of service delivery. To date, however, there are few practical assessments available or practices in place that measure individual child risk, or risk aggregated at the school or community level. This study examined the utility of a 30-item paper and pencil student self-report screener of behavioral and emotional risk (BER for surveying community risk among 7 schools. Methods: In 2010, 2,222 students in 3 middle and 4 high schools in a medium-sized school district in Georgia were administered the Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Self-Report Child/Adolescent form (BESS Student. The BESS is designed to measure 4 sub-syndromal BER factors for developing mental health disorders: inattention/hyperactivity, internalizing, school problems, and personal adjustment. Analysis of Variance and Chi Square analyses were used to assess the association between adolescent self-reported BER as an indicator of school BER, grade level, child ethnic identification and gender, socioeconomic status, and special education placement status.Results: BESS scores differentiated well between schools for overall BER and special education status, as well as between grade levels, ethnicity, and gender groups. One high school, known by the school administration to have numerous incidents of student behavior problems, had the most deviant 4 BER domain scores of all 7 schools. Girls rated themselves as having a higher prevalence of BER (14% than boys (12%; middle school students reported fewer difficulties than high school students.Conclusion: Middle and high school students were capable of identifying significant differences in their own BER across schools, suggesting that universal mental health risk screening viastudent self-report is potentially useful for identifying aggregated community

  1. How do teachers with self-reported voice problems differ from their peers with self-reported voice health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyberg Åhlander, Viveka; Rydell, Roland; Löfqvist, Anders

    2012-07-01

    This randomized case-control study compares teachers with self-reported voice problems to age-, gender-, and school-matched colleagues with self-reported voice health. The self-assessed voice function is related to factors known to influence the voice: laryngeal findings, voice quality, personality, psychosocial and coping aspects, searching for causative factors of voice problems in teachers. Subjects and controls, recruited from a teacher group in an earlier questionnaire study, underwent examinations of the larynx by high-speed imaging and kymograms; voice recordings; voice range profile; audiometry; self-assessment of voice handicap and voice function; teaching and environmental aspects; personality; coping; burnout, and work-related issues. The laryngeal and voice recordings were assessed by experienced phoniatricians and speech pathologists. The subjects with self-assessed voice problems differed from their peers with self-assessed voice health by significantly longer recovery time from voice problems and scored higher on all subscales of the Voice Handicap Index-Throat. The results show that the cause of voice dysfunction in this group of teachers with self-reported voice problems is not found in the vocal apparatus or within the individual. The individual's perception of a voice problem seems to be based on a combination of the number of symptoms and of how often the symptoms occur, along with the recovery time. The results also underline the importance of using self-assessed reports of voice dysfunction. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical Manifestations Associated with Overweight/Obesity in Puerto Ricans with Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth M. Fred-Jiménez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the clinical manifestations associated with overweight/obesity in Hispanics from Puerto Rico with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. Methods. A cross-sectional study was performed in 144 patients with FMS (per American College of Rheumatology (ACR classification criteria. Sociodemographic features, FMS-related symptoms, tender points (per ACR criteria, comorbidities, and FMS treatment were examined. BMI was calculated and patients were grouped into two categories: BMI ≤ 24.9 kg/m2 (nonoverweight/obese and BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (overweight/obese. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate differences between the study groups. Results. The mean (standard deviation (SD age of patients was 50.2 (9.9 years; 95.1% were females and 75.7% were overweight/obese. In the bivariate analysis, overweight/obese patients were more likely to have self-reported memory impairment, anxiety, shortness of breath, and urinary frequency than nonoverweight/obese patients. In addition, the tender point count was higher in the overweight/obese group. In the logistic regression analyses, self-reported memory impairment and urinary frequency differences remained significant after adjusting for confounding variables. Conclusion. In this population of Puerto Ricans with FMS, overweight/obese patients experienced more FMS-related manifestations than nonoverweight/obese individuals. However, prospective studies are needed to confirm these associations and to elucidate if weight reduction interventions could favorably impact the severity of FMS.

  3. Clinical Manifestations Associated with Overweight/Obesity in Puerto Ricans with Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fred-Jiménez, Ruth M; Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Mayor, Ángel M; Ríos, Grissel; Vilá, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the clinical manifestations associated with overweight/obesity in Hispanics from Puerto Rico with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Methods. A cross-sectional study was performed in 144 patients with FMS (per American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria). Sociodemographic features, FMS-related symptoms, tender points (per ACR criteria), comorbidities, and FMS treatment were examined. BMI was calculated and patients were grouped into two categories: BMI ≤ 24.9 kg/m(2) (nonoverweight/obese) and BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) (overweight/obese). Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate differences between the study groups. Results. The mean (standard deviation (SD)) age of patients was 50.2 (9.9) years; 95.1% were females and 75.7% were overweight/obese. In the bivariate analysis, overweight/obese patients were more likely to have self-reported memory impairment, anxiety, shortness of breath, and urinary frequency than nonoverweight/obese patients. In addition, the tender point count was higher in the overweight/obese group. In the logistic regression analyses, self-reported memory impairment and urinary frequency differences remained significant after adjusting for confounding variables. Conclusion. In this population of Puerto Ricans with FMS, overweight/obese patients experienced more FMS-related manifestations than nonoverweight/obese individuals. However, prospective studies are needed to confirm these associations and to elucidate if weight reduction interventions could favorably impact the severity of FMS.

  4. Heterogeneity in fibromyalgia based upon cognitive and physical performance and psychological symptomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follick, Brian T; Cherry, Barbara J; Rutledge, Dana N; Zettel-Watson, Laura; Jones, C Jessie

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the existence of subgroups within a fibromyalgia (FM) sample based on physical and cognitive performance measures, as well as self-report psychological measures. A multisystem disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and co-morbid conditions, FM can lead to declines in cognitive functioning and difficulty with psychological health. Community participants (n = 57 women) recruited from support groups and university center databases provided documentation of having met the criteria for diagnosis of FM. Measures included validated performance and self-report instruments. Analysis was completed using hierarchical cluster analysis; a four cluster solution was chosen for its level of interpretability. The resulting model identified four distinct subgroups based upon patterns of performance and symptomology. Significant group differences were found on pain, fatigue, stiffness, and level of physical activity. Study results support the existence of subgroups among the FM population based on levels of cognitive and physical performance and psychological symptoms. Nurse practitioners aware of potential subgroups within FM should be better prepared to recommend treatment options for patients that target subgroup characteristics (e.g., high vs. low levels of psychological symptoms). ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  5. Factors associated with self-reported driver sleepiness and incidents in city bus drivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anund, A.; Ihlström, J.; Fors, C.; Kecklund, L.G.; Filtness, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Driver fatigue has received increased attention during recent years and is now considered to be a major contributor to approximately 15-30% of all crashes. However, little is known about fatigue in city bus drivers. It is hypothesized that city bus drivers suffer from sleepiness, which is due to a

  6. Biomedical survey of ATC facilities, 1. Incidence of self-reported symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-03-01

    From six enroute and six terminal air traffic control facilities selected on the basis of differences between shift rotation schedules and high IFR traffic volume, 300 journeymen and assistant controllers were selected as volunteer subjects to comple...

  7. Unique immunologic patterns in fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behm Frederick G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia (FM is a clinical syndrome characterized by chronic pain and allodynia. The diagnosis of FM has been one of exclusion as a test to confirm the diagnosis is lacking. Recent data highlight the role of the immune system in FM. Aberrant expressions of immune mediators, such as cytokines, have been linked to the pathogenesis and traits of FM. We therefore determined whether cytokine production by immune cells is altered in FM patients by comparing the cellular responses to mitogenic activators of stimulated blood mononuclear cells of a large number of patients with FM to those of healthy matched individuals. Methods Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were collected from 110 patients with the clinical diagnosis of FM and 91 healthy donors. Parallel samples of PBMC were cultured overnight in medium alone or in the presence of mitogenic activators; PHA or PMA in combination with ionomycin. The cytokine concentrations of IFN-γ, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, MIP-1β , MCP-1, and MIP1-α in plasma as well as in cultured supernatants were determined using a multiplex immunoassay using bead array technology. Results Cytokine levels of stimulated PBMC cultures of healthy control subjects were significantly increased as compared to matched non-stimulated PBMC cultures. In contrast, the concentrations of most cytokines were lower in stimulated samples from patients with FM compared to controls. The decreases of cytokine concentrations in patients samples ranged from 1.5-fold for MIP-1β to 10.2-fold for IL-6 in PHA challenges. In PMA challenges, we observed 1.8 to 4-fold decreases in the concentrations of cytokines in patient samples. Conclusion The cytokine responses to mitogenic activators of PBMC isolated from patients with FM were significantly lower than those of healthy individuals, implying that cell-mediated immunity is impaired in FM patients. This novel cytokine assay reveals unique and valuable

  8. Validity of self-reported adult secondhand smoke exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Judith J; Grossman, William; Young-Wolff, Kelly C; Benowitz, Neal L

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of adults to secondhand smoke (SHS) has immediate adverse effects on the cardiovascular system and causes coronary heart disease. The current study evaluated brief self-report screening measures for accurately identifying adult cardiology patients with clinically significant levels of SHS exposure in need of intervention. A cross-sectional study conducted in a university-affiliated cardiology clinic and cardiology inpatient service. Participants were 118 non-smoking patients (59% male, mean age=63.6 years, SD=16.8) seeking cardiology services. Serum cotinine levels and self-reported SHS exposure in the past 24 h and 7 days on 13 adult secondhand exposure to smoke (ASHES) items. A single item assessment of SHS exposure in one's own home in the past 7 days was significantly correlated with serum cotinine levels (r=0.41, p85% and correct classification rates >85% at cotinine cut-off points of >0.215 and >0.80 ng/mL. The item outperformed multi-item scales, an assessment of home smoking rules, and SHS exposure assessed in other residential areas, automobiles and public settings. The sample was less accurate at self-reporting lower levels of SHS exposure (cotinine 0.05-0.215 ng/mL). The single item ASHES-7d Home screener is brief, assesses recent SHS exposure over a week's time, and yielded the optimal balance of sensitivity and specificity. The current findings support use of the ASHES-7d Home screener to detect SHS exposure and can be easily incorporated into assessment of other major vital signs in cardiology. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Fibromyalgia, Spirituality, Coping and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biccheri, Eliane; Roussiau, Nicolas; Mambet-Doué, Constance

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the impact of spirituality on coping strategies and on the quality of life of fibromyalgia patients. The study was carried out on 590 people suffering from fibromyalgia. The data were collected with the French version of the WCC-R (The Ways of Coping Checklist: Cousson et al. 1996), the questionnaire of spirituality (Evaluation de La Spiritualité: Renard and Roussiau, 2016) and Diener's Satisfaction with Life Scale questionnaire, translated into French (Blais et al. 1989). An analysis carried out with the software SPSS and Hayes' models showed that both problem-focused coping and coping through social support seeking are mediating variables that enable an indirect link between spirituality and quality of life.

  10. Daytime napping associated with increased symptom severity in fibromyalgia syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theadom, Alice; Cropley, Mark; Kantermann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous qualitative research has revealed that people with fibromyalgia use daytime napping as a coping strategy for managing symptoms against clinical advice. Yet there is no evidence to suggest whether daytime napping is beneficial or detrimental for people with fibromyalgia. The

  11. Humanistic and economic burden of fibromyalgia in Japan [Corrigendum

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    Lee LK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lee LK, Ebata N, Hlavacek P, DiBonaventura M, Cappelleri JC, Sadosky A. Humanistic and economic burden of fibromyalgia in Japan. Journal of Pain Research. 2016;9:967–978.Figures 3, 4, 5, and 6 contain errors in the key. Fibromyalgia should be dark gray and matched controls should be light gray.Read the original article.

  12. Neural and psychosocial mechanisms of pain sensitivity in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Brian

    2014-06-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder that affects an estimated 5 million adults in the U.S. The hallmark is burning, searing, tingling, shooting, stabbing, deep aching, or sharp pain. Fibromyalgia is generally considered to be a "central sensitivity syndrome" where central sensitization is regarded as the cause of pain in its own right. Nonetheless, the case continues to be made that all central and spatially distributed peripheral components of fibromyalgia pain would fade if the peripheral generators could be silenced. Although neural mechanisms are clearly important in pain sensitivity, cognitive and social mechanisms also need to be considered. The aim of this review is to examine four mechanisms responsible for heightened pain sensitivity in fibromyalgia: peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, cognitive-emotional sensitization, and interpersonal sensitization. The purpose of framing the review in terms of pain sensitivity in fibromyalgia is to highlight that different mechanisms of sensitization are appropriately regarded as intervening variables when it comes to understanding individual differences in the experience of pain. The paper concludes by considering the implications of the findings of the review for explanations of fibromyalgia pain by nurses working in multidisciplinary teams. The trend appears to be able to explain the cause of fibromyalgia pain in terms of sensitization per se. The recommended alternative is to explain fibromyalgia pain in terms of changes in pain sensitivity and the role of underlying neural and psychosocial mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Exploratory Factor Analysis of Self-Reported Symptoms in a Large, Population-Based Military Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    dreams of past experiences” also had loadings of at least 0.80 for this factor. 2. Chest pain, short breath, etc (5.7 percent of total variance...analysis suggests that it could be a manifestation of it or another condition associated with anxiety such as fibromyalgia [33]. Factor 3...military population. However, general muscle pain can accompany many other illnesses, such as infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, fibromyalgia

  14. Perceived injustice in fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Robert; Russell, Anthony Science

    2014-01-01

    This is a pilot study to compare levels of perceived injustice via the Injustice Experience Questionnaire in patients with fibromyalgia or rheumatoid arthritis. Two cohorts of patients, one with fibromyalgia (FM), one with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), completed the Injustice Experience Questionnaire, a visual analogue pain scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Inferential statistics were then used to determine whether participants in the two diagnostic groups had significantly different scores on the Perceived Injustice Questionnaire. This was done univariately using t tests and after adjusting for potential confounders using ANCOVA. We also examined crude associations between the variables using Pearson correlation coefficients, then examined the adjusted association between diagnostic group and perceived injustice using multivariable linear regression. Our final models were built in a blocked fashion by initially entering diagnostic category into the model, then entering other variables simultaneously using a stepwise strategy (p-to-enter ≤.05, p-to-remove ≥.10). A total of 126 participants (64 FM, 62 RA) completed all questionnaires. The FM group had a greater percentage of female participants, more severe pain, more severe anxiety and more severe depression. In unadjusted analysis, the FM group had higher Injustice Experience Questionnaire scores. When the RA and FM group scores for the Injustice Experience Questionnaire are adjusted for pain levels, there is no statistically significant difference between groups. Adjustment for HADS anxiety and HADS depression does not significantly affect the Injustice Experience Questionnaire scores after adjustment for pain. Fibromyalgia is associated with a higher level of perceived injustice than is seen with rheumatoid arthritis. This difference appears to be associated with higher levels of pain reported by fibromyalgia patients, and therefore may not be specific to the diagnosis. Prospective

  15. Fibromyalgia syndrome in chronic urticaria patients

    OpenAIRE

    Aylin Gözübüyükoğulları; Duru Tabanlıoğlu Onan; Nuran Allı

    2014-01-01

    Background and Design: The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of fibromyalgia syndrome in chronic urticaria patients. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out with the participation of 100 chronic urticaria patients and 61 control group patients. Chronic urticaria patients were investigated for the etiology of urticaria and the autologous serum skin test was performed in those patients. Both the chronic urticaria patients and the controls were evaluated for fibromyalgi...

  16. Symptoms and signs in fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Leardini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia (FM is currently classified as chronic widespread pain with widespread allodynia/hyperalgesia to pressure pain and is categorized among the large group of soft-tissue pain syndromes. FM remains an elusive condition of unknown etiology in which patients report not only chronic widespread pain but also a variety of other complaints, so that it is one of several relatively common overlapping syndromes characterized by otherwise unexplained chronic pain and fatigue (1, 2...

  17. Illness perceptions in patients with fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Van Ittersum, M. W.; van Wilgen, C. P.; Hilberdink, W. K. H. A.; Groothoff, J. W.; van der Schans, C. P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Former studies in chronic diseases showed the importance of patients' beliefs and perceptions. The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire was developed to assess these illness perceptions. Our goal was to investigate psychometric properties of the IPQ-R for Fibromyalgia Dutch language version (IPQ-R FM-Dlv) and to describe illness perceptions of participants with FM. Methods: 196 patients completed the IPQ-R FM-Dlv. Internal consistency, domain structure and inter domain correlat...

  18. Fibromyalgia syndrome: preventive, social and economic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cazzola

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia (FM is a central pain syndrome that is characterized, in part, by specific tender points (TPs in the musculoskeletal system which are exceptionally sensitive to pressure. Pain, specifically characterized as hyperalgesia and allodynia, is the cardinal symptom of FM; however, most patients also experience additional symptoms such as debilitating fatigue, disrupted or nonrestorative sleep, functional bowel disturbances, and a variety of neuropsychiatric problems, including cognitive dysfunction, anxiety and depressive symptoms (1....

  19. [Application of an uncertainty model for fibromyalgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triviño Martínez, Ángeles; Solano Ruiz, M Carmen; Siles González, José

    2016-04-01

    Finding out women's experiences diagnosed with fibromyalgia applying the Theory of Uncertainty proposed by M. Mishel. A qualitative study was conducted, using a phenomenological approach. An Association of patients in the province of Alicante during the months of June 2012 to November 2013. A total of 14 women diagnosed with fibromyalgia participated in the study as volunteers, aged between 45 and 65 years. Information generated through structured interviews with recording and transcription, prior confidentiality pledge and informed consent. Analysis content by extracting different categories according to the theory proposed. The study patients perceive a high level of uncertainty related to the difficulty to deal with symptoms, uncertainty about diagnosis and treatment complexity. Moreover, the ability of coping with the disease it is influenced by social support, relationships with health professionals and help and information attending to patient associations. The health professional must provide clear information on the pathology to the fibromyalgia suffers, the larger lever of knowledge of the patients about their disease and the better the quality of the information provided, it is reported to be the less anxiety and uncertainty in the experience of the disease. Likewise patient associations should have health professionals in order to avoid bias in the information and advice with scientific evidence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Fibromyalgia syndrome: classification, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuser, Winfried; Eich, Wolfgang; Herrmann, Markus; Nutzinger, Detlev O; Schiltenwolf, Marcus; Henningsen, Peter

    2009-06-01

    This S3 guideline takes positions on currently contentious issues in the classification and treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). A panel of experts from 10 specialist societies and patients belonging to 2 patient self-help organizations reviewed a total of approximately 8000 publications. Recommendations were developed according to the suggested procedure for S3 guidelines and were then reviewed and approved by the boards of the participating specialist societies. The steering committee ensured that the literature review and the recommendations were kept up to date. Because this disorder is defined by its symptoms and signs, rather than by any consistently identifiable bodily lesion, the term "fibromyalgia syndrome" is a more appropriate designation for it than "fibromyalgia." FMS is defined by the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology and is classified as a functional somatic syndrome. FMS is diagnosed from the typical constellation of symptoms and by the exclusion of inflammatory and metabolic diseases that could cause the same symptoms. A stepwise treatment approach in which the patient and the physician decide jointly on the treatment options is recommended. The most strongly recommended forms of treatment are aerobic exercise, amitriptyline, cognitive behavioral therapy, and spa therapy. The guideline recommendations are intended to promote more effective treatment of this disorder.

  1. Fibromyalgia Complicating Disease Management in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, L.; Haidri, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate frequency of fibromyalgia in rheumatoid arthritis and its effect on disease activity score. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The Indus Hospital, Karachi, from December 2010 to May 2011. Methodology: All adult patients of either gender diagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis on the basis of clinical, laboratory and X-ray criteria were included in the study. The sample data was separated into two groups depending on presence or absence of fibromyalgia and 28 joint disease activity score (DAS-28) value was evaluated. Results: There were 31 (25.83%) patients with rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia (RAFM) out of the total 120. The median (IQR) age of patients was 40 (32 - 51) years. All were females. The overall female frequency was 79 (88.8%). The median (IQR) DAS-28 score in RA group was 4.9 (3.66 - 5.71), while the median (IQR) DAS-28 score in RAFM was 7.04 (6.62 - 7.64) [p < 0.0001]. The number of patient getting combination therapy of DMARD in RAFM group was 61.3% while in RA group was 42.7%. Conclusion: DAS-28 was found to be significantly higher in RAFM patients probably because of higher perception of pain. (author)

  2. The role of tendinitis in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genç, Hakan; Saracoğlu, Meryem; Duyur, Burcu; Erdem, Hatice Rana

    2003-08-30

    Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FS) is a common disease characterized by diffuse, widespread pain and multiple tender points. The syndrome has been subclassified as primary (PFS) and secondary (SFS) fibromyalgia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of common tendinitis (rotator cuff tendinitis, bicipital tendinitis, lateral epicondylitis, De-Quervain's tendinitis and pes anserinus tendinitis) in FS. Twenty female patients with PFS, 20 with SFS and 20 female controls, matched by age and body mass index, participated in the study. Existence of common tendinitis was evaluated with specific examination methods. Right and left rotator cuff tendinitis, pes anserinus tendinitis and left lateral epicondylitis were significantly more common in patients with PFS and SFS than in control subjects. As a result, considering the central hyperexcitability present in the fibromyalgia patients, concomitant pathologies such as tendinitis which lead to shoulder, arm, and leg pain must be evaluated. Follow up and therapy for the disease must be planned according to these factors which are not only probable symptoms of FS, but also leading causes for the occurrence and continuity of the pain in this disease.

  3. Recent strategies for drug development in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, David E; Malemud, Charles J

    2016-12-01

    The US Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approved 3 medications for treating fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). There have been no additional FDA approvals since January 2009 and the efficacy of the FDA-approved medications for FMS has been questioned. Areas covered: The "search for studies" tool using clinicaltrials.gov and PubMed were employed. The term, "fibromyalgia" was used for clinicaltrials.gov. The terms employed for PubMed were "Name-of-Drug Fibromyalgia", "Fibromyalgia Treatment" or "Fibromyalgia Drug Treatment." Clinical trials were reviewed if they were prospective and blinded, and if they employed a comparator, either placebo or another pharmaceutical. Expert commentary: Progress toward standardizing the outcome measures for FMS clinical trials have been made but challenges remain. Several pharmaceutical candidates for FMS have been tested since 2009. The results of these studies with potential novel targets for drug development for FMS were reviewed including the results of trials with sodium oxybate, quetiapine, esreboxetine, nabilone, memantine, naltrexone, and melatonin.

  4. The association between pain and sleep in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskindag, Buse; Karaaziz, Meryem

    2017-05-01

    To clarify the association between pain and sleep in fibromyalgia.  Methods: Electronic databases, including PsycINFO, the Cochrane database for systematic reviews, PubMed, EMBASE, and Ovid were searched to identify eligible articles. Databases independently screened and  the quality of evidence using a reliable and valid quality assessment tool was assessed.  Results: In total, 16 quantitative studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. According to the results, increased pain in fibromyalgia was associated with reduced sleep quality, efficiency, and duration and increased sleep disturbance and onset latency and total wake time. Remarkably, depressive symptoms were also related to both pain and sleep in patients with fibromyalgia.   Conclusion: Management strategies should be  developed to decrease pain while increasing sleep quality in patients with fibromyalgia. Future studies should also consider mood disorders and emotional dysfunction, as comorbid conditions could occur with both pain and sleep disorder in fibromyalgia.

  5. Common questions about the diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodner, Charles

    2015-04-01

    Fibromyalgia has a distinct pathophysiology involving central amplification of peripheral sensory signals. Core symptoms are chronic widespread pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. Most patients with fibromyalgia have muscle pain and tenderness, forgetfulness or problems concentrating, and significant functional limitations. Fibromyalgia is diagnosed using an updated set of clinical criteria that no longer depend on tender point examination; laboratory testing may rule out other disorders that commonly present with fatigue, such as anemia and thyroid disease. Patients with fibromyalgia should be evaluated for comorbid functional pain syndromes and mood disorders. Management of fibromyalgia should include patient education, symptom relief, and regular aerobic physical activity. Serotoninnorepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, antiepileptics, and muscle relaxants have the strongest evidence of benefit for improving pain, fatigue, sleep symptoms, and quality of life. Multiple complementary and alternative medicine therapies have been used but have limited evidence of effectiveness. Opioids should be used to relieve pain in carefully selected patients only if alternative therapies are ineffective.

  6. Predicting Drug Use at Electronic Music Dance Events: Self-Reports and Biological Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert A.; Miller, Brenda A.; Holder, Harold D.

    2009-01-01

    Most information on the prevalence of drug use comes from self-report surveys. The sensitivity of such information is cause for concern about the accuracy of self-report measures. In this study, self-reported drug use in the last 48 hr is compared to results from biological assays of saliva samples from 371 young adults entering clubs. The…

  7. Self-Reported Inattention in Early Adolescence in a Community Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Laura L.; Connolly, Jennifer; Toplak, Maggie E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Inattention is typically associated with ADHD, but less research has been done to examine the correlates of self-reported inattention in youth in a community sample. Method: Associations among self-reported inattention, parent-reported inattention, and self-reported psychopathology in children aged 10 to 11 years are examined.…

  8. Smartphone addiction, daily interruptions and self-reported productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Éilish; Montag, Christian

    2017-12-01

    The advent of the smartphone has dramatically altered how we communicate, navigate, work and entertain ourselves. While the advantages of this new technology are clear, constant use may also bring negative consequences, such as a loss of productivity due to interruptions in work life. A link between smartphone overuse and loss of productivity has often been hypothesized, but empirical evidence on this question is scarce. The present study addressed this question by collecting self-report data from N  = 262 participants, assessing private and work-related smartphone use, smartphone addiction and self-rated productivity. Our results indicate a moderate relationship between smartphone addiction and a self-reported decrease in productivity due to spending time on the smartphone during work, as well as with the number of work hours lost to smartphone use. Smartphone addiction was also related to a greater amount of leisure time spent on the smartphone and was strongly related to a negative impact of smartphone use on daily non-work related activities. These data support the idea that tendencies towards smartphone addiction and overt checking of the smartphone could result in less productivity both in the workplace and at home. Results are discussed in relation to productivity and technostress.

  9. Smartphone addiction, daily interruptions and self-reported productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éilish Duke

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The advent of the smartphone has dramatically altered how we communicate, navigate, work and entertain ourselves. While the advantages of this new technology are clear, constant use may also bring negative consequences, such as a loss of productivity due to interruptions in work life. A link between smartphone overuse and loss of productivity has often been hypothesized, but empirical evidence on this question is scarce. The present study addressed this question by collecting self-report data from N=262 participants, assessing private and work-related smartphone use, smartphone addiction and self-rated productivity. Our results indicate a moderate relationship between smartphone addiction and a self-reported decrease in productivity due to spending time on the smartphone during work, as well as with the number of work hours lost to smartphone use. Smartphone addiction was also related to a greater amount of leisure time spent on the smartphone and was strongly related to a negative impact of smartphone use on daily non-work related activities. These data support the idea that tendencies towards smartphone addiction and overt checking of the smartphone could result in less productivity both in the workplace and at home. Results are discussed in relation to productivity and technostress.

  10. Monitoring Athletes Through Self-Report: Factors Influencing Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. Saw

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring athletic preparation facilitates the evaluation and adjustment of practices to optimize performance outcomes. Self-report measures such as questionnaires and diaries are suggested to be a simple and cost-effective approach to monitoring an athlete’s response to training, however their efficacy is dependent on how they are implemented and used. This study sought to identify the perceived factors influencing the implementation of athlete self-report measures (ASRM in elite sport settings. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with athletes, coaches and sports science and medicine staff at a national sporting institute (n = 30. Interviewees represented 20 different sports programs and had varying experience with ASRM. Purported factors influencing the implementation of ASRM related to the measure itself (e.g., accessibility, timing of completion, and the social environment (e.g., buy-in, reinforcement. Social environmental factors included individual, inter-personal and organizational levels which is consistent with a social ecological framework. An adaptation of this framework was combined with the factors associated with the measure to illustrate the inter-relations and influence upon compliance, data accuracy and athletic outcomes. To improve implementation of ASRM and ultimately athletic outcomes, a multi-factorial and multi-level approach is needed.

  11. Self-Reported Acute and Chronic Voice Disorders in Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi-Barbosa, Luiza Augusta Rosa; Barbosa, Mirna Rossi; Morais, Renata Martins; de Sousa, Kamilla Ferreira; Silveira, Marise Fagundes; Gama, Ana Cristina Côrtes; Caldeira, Antônio Prates

    2016-11-01

    The present study aimed to identify factors associated with self-reported acute and chronic voice disorders among municipal elementary school teachers in the city of Montes Claros, in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The dependent variable, self-reported dysphonia, was determined via a single question, "Have you noticed changes in your voice quality?" and if so, a follow-up question queried the duration of this change, acute or chronic. The independent variables were dichotomized and divided into five categories: sociodemographic and economic data; lifestyle; organizational and environmental data; health-disease processes; and voice. Analyses of associated factors were performed via a hierarchical multiple logistic regression model. The present study included 226 teachers, of whom 38.9% reported no voice disorders, 35.4% reported an acute disorder, and 25.7% reported a chronic disorder. Excessive voice use daily, consuming more than one alcoholic drink per time, and seeking medical treatment because of voice disorders were associated factors for acute and chronic voice disorders. Consuming up to three glasses of water per day was associated with acute voice disorders. Among teachers who reported chronic voice disorders, teaching for over 15 years and the perception of disturbing or unbearable noise outside the school were both associated factors. Identification of organizational, environmental, and predisposing risk factors for voice disorders is critical, and furthermore, a vocal health promotion program may address these issues. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Self-Reported Disability in Adults with Severe Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kyrou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-reported disability in performing daily life activities was assessed in adults with severe obesity (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 using the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ. 262 participants were recruited into three BMI groups: Group I: 35–39.99 kg/m2; Group II: 40–44.99 kg/m2; Group III: ≥45.0 kg/m2. Progressively increasing HAQ scores were documented with higher BMI; Group I HAQ score: 0.125 (median (range: 0–1.75; Group II HAQ score: 0.375 (0–2.5; Group III HAQ score: 0.75 (0–2.65 (Group III versus II P 0. The prevalence of this degree of disability increased with increasing BMI and age. It also correlated to type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and clinical depression, but not to gender. Our data suggest that severe obesity is associated with self-reported disability in performing common daily life activities, with increasing degree of disability as BMI increases over 35 kg/m2. Functional assessment is crucial in obesity management, and establishing the disability profiles of obese patients is integral to both meet the specific healthcare needs of individuals and develop evidence-based public health programs, interventions, and priorities.

  13. Relationships between the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire, tender point count, and muscle strength in female patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Lund, Hans Peter; Christensen, Robin

    2009-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that fibromyalgia (FM) patients with reduced lower extremity strength are more symptomatic and tender than FM patients with normal muscle strength.......To test the hypothesis that fibromyalgia (FM) patients with reduced lower extremity strength are more symptomatic and tender than FM patients with normal muscle strength....

  14. Childhood risk factors for developing fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivieri P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Olivieri,1 Bruce Solitar,2,* Michel Dubois3,*1NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Rheumatology, 3Department of Pain Management, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Fibromyalgia is a disease process without an obvious etiology. While some evidence suggests that adverse experiences in childhood contribute to its development, specific evidence has been equivocal.Methods: A total of 36 patients with fibromyalgia from the greater New York area were recruited and surveyed using the Centers for Disease Control's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, and questions from the section on adverse childhood experiences were administered. The results were compared to those obtained from over 400,000 people surveyed by the Centers for Disease control each year, and were monitored for statistically significant differences.Results: A statistically significant difference was noted among the control group, suggesting that individuals reported growing up with someone who was depressed when the respondents were between the ages of 0 and 18 years old. Moreover, respondents reported that they were hit by their parents in some way, were insulted or cursed at by their parents, and had been forced to have sex with someone at least 5 years older than them or with an adult. No correlation was found with the following variables and the development of fibromyalgia: growing up with divorced or separated parents; growing up with someone sentenced to serve time in jail; or having parents that abused each other. Additionally, statistically significant differences were found for the following categories: lack of emotional support; life dissatisfaction; fair or poor health; physical, mental or emotional disability; and being divorced or not married.Discussion: Using this well-validated survey, it became clear that at least six specific adverse childhood

  15. Hearing loss in fibromyalgia? Somatic sensory and non-sensory symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia and other rheumatic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Frederick; Rasker, Johannes J; Häuser, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that fibromyalgia can be understood as a disorder of central sensitisation and dysregulation (CD) and that characteristic somatic symptoms are the result of 'central augmentation'. We examined this hypothesis by analysing sensory and non-sensory variables in the context of the updated (2010) American College of Rheumatology definition of fibromyalgia and the fibromyalgianess (polysymptomatic distress) scale. We studied 11,288 patients, including those with fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). We divided somatic symptoms into sensory (hearing difficulties) and evaluative (easy bruising and hair loss) non-sensory symptoms, and included a non-symptom that was neutral as to psychological content or meaning (influenza vaccination). Data were analysed by logistic regression and adjusted for age and sex. Fibromyalgia patients reported more sensory and non-sensory symptoms than patients with RA and OA, but not more non-symptoms. At all levels of fibromyalgianess (or fibromyalgia intensity) the probability of sensory and non-sensory symptoms was similar across all rheumatic diseases, and this association occurred in FM criteria (+) and criteria (-) patients. No association was noted with the non-symptom control question. While the CD hypothesis is consistent with hearing problems in fibromyalgia, there is no medical explanation for the evaluative symptoms of hair loss and bruising being increased. The associations between fibromyalgia/fibromyalgianess and evaluative (not sensory) symptoms must occur through mechanisms other than central sensitization and augmentation, and are consistent with over-reporting that has a psychological basis. However, augmentation of sensory symptoms does not preclude simultaneous over-reporting.

  16. Use of portable ladders - field observations and self-reported safety performance in the cable TV industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Brunette, Christopher; Lee, Jin

    2017-11-01

    Portable ladders incidents remain a major cause of falls from heights. This study reported field observations of environments, work conditions and safety behaviour involving portable ladders and their correlations with self-reported safety performance. Seventy-five professional installers of a company in the cable and other pay TV industry were observed for 320 ladder usages at their worksites. The participants also filled out a questionnaire to measure self-reported safety performance. Proper setup on slippery surfaces, correct method for ladder inclination setup and ladder secured at the bottom had the lowest compliance with best practices and training guidelines. The observation compliance score was found to have significant correlation with straight ladder inclined angle (Pearson's r = 0.23, p self-reported safety participation (r = 0.29, p < 0.01). The results provide a broad perspective on employees' safety compliance and identify areas for improving safety behaviours. Practitioner Summary: A checklist was used while observing professional installers of a cable company for portable ladder usage at their worksites. Items that had the lowest compliance with best practices and training guidelines were identified. The results provide a broad perspective on employees' safety compliance and identify areas for improving safety behaviours.

  17. Prospective Evaluation of Self-Reported Aggression in Transgender Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defreyne, Justine; T'Sjoen, Guy; Bouman, Walter Pierre; Brewin, Nicola; Arcelus, Jon

    2018-05-01

    Although research on the relation between testosterone and aggression in humans is inconclusive, guidelines (including the World Professional Association for Transgender Health Standards of Care, edition 7) have warned for an increase in aggression in transgender men taking testosterone treatment. To investigate the association between levels of testosterone and aggression in treatment-seeking transgender people and explore the role of mental health psychopathology (anxiety and depressive symptoms) and social support in aggression in this population. Every transgender person invited for assessment at a national transgender health clinic in the United Kingdom during a 3-year period (2012-2015) completed self-report measures for interpersonal problems, including levels of aggression (Inventory of Interpersonal Problems [IIP-32]), symptoms of anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]), social support (Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support), and experiences of transphobia before and 1 year after the initiation of gender-affirming hormonal therapy. Correlations between prospective scores for the IIP-32 factor "too aggressive" and prospective levels of sex steroids, prospective psychological (HADS), and baseline psychosocial measurements were tested. Prospective scores for the factor "too aggressive" were not correlated to prospective serum testosterone levels. Results of 140 people (56 transgender men, 84 transgender women) were analyzed. A prospective increase in scores for the factor "too aggressive" of the IIP-32 in transgender men 1 year after being treated with testosterone treatment or a decrease of the IIP-32 aggression scores in transgender women 1 year after gender-affirming hormonal therapy was not found. However, a positive correlation was found between increasing HADS anxiety scores and increasing scores for the IIP-32 "too aggressive" score in the entire study population and a positive correlation with lower support

  18. Accuracy of self-reported family history is strongly influenced by the accuracy of self-reported personal health status of relatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, A.C.J.W.; Henneman, L.; Detmar, S.B.; Khoury, M.J.; Steyerberg, E.W.; Eijkemans, M.J.C.; Mushkudiani, N.; Oostra, B.A.; Duijn, C.M. van; MacKenbach, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the accuracy of self-reported family history for diabetes, hypertension, and overweight against two reference standards: family history based on physician-assessed health status of relatives and on self-reported personal health status of relatives. Study Design and

  19. Effectiveness of Aquatic Therapy vs Land-based Therapy for Balance and Pain in Women with Fibromyalgia: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas Neira, Sabela; Pasqual Marques, Amélia; Pegito Pérez, Irene; Fernández Cervantes, Ramón; Vivas Costa, Jamile

    2017-01-19

    Fibromyalgia is a disease with an increasing incidence. It impairs the quality of life of patients and decreases their functional capacity. Aquatic therapy has already been used for managing the symptoms of this syndrome. However, aquatic therapy has only recently been introduced as a treatment modality for improving proprioception in fibromyalgia. The main objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of two physiotherapy protocols, one in and one out of water, for improving balance and decreasing pain in women with fibromyalgia. The study protocol will be a single-blind randomised controlled trial. Forty women diagnosed with fibromyalgia will be randomly assigned into 2 groups: Aquatic Therapy (n = 20) or Land-based Therapy (n = 20). Both interventions include 60-min therapy sessions, structured into 4 sections: Warm-up, Proprioceptive Exercises, Stretching and Relaxation. These sessions will be carried out 3 times a week for 3 months. Primary outcomes are balance (static and dynamic) and pain (intensity and threshold). Secondary outcomes include functional balance, quality of life, quality of sleep, fatigue, self-confidence in balance and physical ability. Outcome measures will be evaluated at baseline, at the end of the 3-month intervention period, and 6-weeks post-treatment. Statistical analysis will be carried out using the SPSS 21.0 program for Windows and a significance level of p ≤ 0.05 will be used for all tests. This study protocol details two physiotherapy interventions in women with fibromyalgia to improve balance and decrease pain: aquatic therapy and land-based therapy. In current literature there is a lack of methodological rigour and a limited number of studies that describe physiotherapy protocols to manage fibromyalgia symptoms. High-quality scientific works are required to highlight physiotherapy as one of the most recommended treatment options for this syndrome. Date of publication in ClinicalTrials.gov: 18

  20. High prevalence of self-reported photophobia in adult ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise eBijlenga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many adult outpatients with ADHD report an oversensitivity to light. We explored the link between ADHD and photophobia in an online survey (N=494. Self-reported photophobia was prevalent in 69% of respondents with, and in 28% of respondents without, ADHD (symptoms. The ADHD (symptoms group wore sunglasses longer during daytime in all seasons. Photophobia may be related to the functioning of the eyes, which mediate dopamine and melatonin production systems in the eye. In the brain, dopamine and melatonin are involved in both ADHD and circadian rhythm disturbances. Possibly, the regulation of the dopamine and melatonin systems in the eyes and in the brain are related. Despite the study’s limitations, the results are encouraging for further study on the pathophysiology of ADHD, eye functioning, and circadian rhythm disturbances.

  1. Recalling sexual partners: the accuracy of self-reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, James; McDonald, Robert; Wan, Choi K; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Dittus, Patricia; Quinlan, Shannon

    2004-11-01

    Accuracy of recall of the number of sexual partners individuals had over a period of one month, three months, six months and one year was studied in a group of 285 young, single, heterosexual adults. Self-reports of the number of partners were obtained on a weekly basis and then compared with recall of behavior over longer time periods that overlapped the weekly measures. For individuals who claimed abstinence or who claimed to be monogamous, accuracy of recall was relatively high, especially at the shorter time frames. Level of education was related to accuracy for claimed abstainers, such that lower levels of education were associated with lower accuracy of recall. Accuracy rates for individuals who reported having multiple sexual partners tended to be lower and were found to be related to one's propensity to engage in casual sex.

  2. Self-reported quality care for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerås, N; Jordan, K P; Clausen, B

    2015-01-01

    % (IQR 28%, 64%; range 0-100%) for the total sample with relatively similar medians across three of four countries. Achievement rates on individual QIs showed a large variation ranging from 11% (referral to services for losing weight) to 67% (information about the importance of exercise) with significant...... a cross-sectional survey including quality indicators (QI) for OA care. A QI was considered as eligible if the participant had checked 'Yes' or 'No', and as achieved if the participant had checked 'Yes' to the indicator. The median percentage (with IQR and range) of eligible QIs achieved by country...... was determined and compared in negative binominal regression analysis. Achievement of individual QIs by country was determined and compared using logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: A total of 354 participants self-reported QI achievement. The median percentage of eligible QIs achieved (checked 'Yes') was 48...

  3. Physical activity in police beyond self-report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Sandra L; Perkhounkova, Yelena; Moon, Mikyung; Tseng, Hui-Chen; Wilson, Annerose; Hein, Maria; Hood, Kristin; Franke, Warren D

    2014-03-01

    Police officers have a higher risk for cardiovascular disease. Reductions in occupational physical activity may contribute to the risk, yet there have been few efforts to characterize the physical demands of police work beyond self-report. To compare measured physical activity between work and off-duty hours and assess the effects of stress on physical activity. Officers (n = 119) from six departments wore a pattern recognition monitor for 96 hours to measure total energy expenditure (kilocalorie per hour) (1k/cal = 4184 joules), activity intensity, and step count per hour. Participants were more active on their off-duty days than at work; the effects of stress on physical activity seemed moderated by sex. Police work is primarily a sedentary occupation, and officers tend to be more active on their off-duty days than during their work hours.

  4. Contributions of Social Desirability to Self-Reported Ageism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Katie E; Allen, Priscilla D; Denver, Jenny Y; Holland, Kayla R

    2015-09-01

    The authors examined the role of social desirability in 445 participants' responses to self-reported measures of ageism across two studies. In Study 1, college students and community adults completed the Relating to Older People Evaluation (ROPE) and a short form of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (M-C SDS). Study 2 was a conceptual replication that included the Fraboni Scale of Ageism (FSA). Correlation analyses confirmed a small but significant relationship between scores on the positive ageist items and the social desirability scale in both studies. Ageist attitudes were correlated with negative ageist behaviors in Study 2. Implications for current views on ageism and strategies for reducing ageist attitudes and behaviors in everyday life are discussed. © The Author(s) 2013.

  5. Cholinesterase and self-reported pesticide exposure among pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Peyster, A; Willis, W O; Molgaard, C A; MacKendrick, T M; Walker, C

    1993-01-01

    Ascertainment of exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides in pregnant subjects is complicated by altered enzyme activity that results from metabolic changes associated with pregnancy. Nevertheless, this study found a high correlation (Pearson chi-square = 13.67, p = .008) between classification of pesticide exposure using self-reported interview information and plasma cholinesterase activity for 203 pregnant women for whom three trimester cholinesterase values were available. All plasma cholinesterase activity values were referenced, by trimester, to a larger sample of 1,050 plasma cholinesterase values from 535 pregnant women. Subjects who lived nearest to agricultural land and who reported that they worked with pesticides in agricultural and other occupations tended to have lower plasma cholinesterase activity than those who reported use of household pesticides only.

  6. Towards Tailored Patient's Management Approach: Integrating the Modified 2010 ACR Criteria for Fibromyalgia in Multidimensional Patient Reported Outcome Measures Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Miedany, Yasser; El Gaafary, Maha; Youssef, Sally; Ahmed, Ihab

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the validity, reliability, and responsiveness to change of a patient self-reported questionnaire combining the Widespread Pain Index and the Symptom Severity Score as well as construct outcome measures and comorbidities assessment in fibromyalgia patients. Methods. The PROMs-FM was conceptualized based on frameworks used by the WHO Quality of Life tool and the PROMIS. Initially, cognitive interviews were conducted to identify item pool of questions. Item selection and reduction were achieved based on patients as well as an interdisciplinary group of specialists. Rasch and internal consistency reliability analyses were implemented. The questionnaire included the modified ACR criteria main items (Symptom Severity Score and Widespread Pain Index), in addition to assessment of functional disability, quality of life (QoL), review of the systems, and comorbidities. Every patient completed HAQ and EQ-5D questionnaires. Results. A total of 146 fibromyalgia patients completed the questionnaire. The PROMs-FM questionnaire was reliable as demonstrated by a high standardized alpha (0.886-0.982). Content construct assessment of the functional disability and QoL revealed significant correlation (p < 0.01) with both HAQ and EQ-5D. Changes in functional disability and QoL showed significant (p < 0.01) variation with diseases activity status in response to therapy. There was higher prevalence of autonomic symptoms, CVS risk, sexual dysfunction, and falling. Conclusions. The developed PROMs-FM questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for assessment of fibromyalgia patients. A phased treatment regimen depending on the severity of FMS as well as preferences and comorbidities of the patient is the best approach to tailored patient management.

  7. Earthquake vulnerability of fibromyalgia patients: six-month follow-up after the catastrophic disasters in central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaffi, Fausto; Atzeni, Fabiola; Talotta, Rossella; Di Carlo, Marco; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the 6-month impact of the catastrophic earthquakes that struck central Italy in August and October 2016 on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with fibromyalgia (FM). We compared a cohort of 55 consecutive FM patients who had been exposed to an earthquake with a control group of 49 FM patients who had not been exposed to it. At each time-point (baseline, and after one, two, four and six months), the patients completed self-reported electronic versions of the revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) and the Fibromyalgia Activity Score (FAS) on a web platform. At baseline, there were no significant between-group differences in the total FIQR score or the scores of its three domains of function, overall impact and symptoms, and no significant differences in the total FAS score or the FAS fatigue, quality of sleep, and Self-Assessment Pain Scale (SAPS) scores. However, after six months of observation, the median total FIQR score was higher in the earthquake-exposed patients (241.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 230.55-255.35) than in the unexposed patients (177.50, 95% CI 157.30-185.48; p<0.0001), and the same was true of the median total FAS score (26.86, 95% CI 25.78-28.18 vs. 22.76, 95% CI 20.92-24.34; p<0.0001). Moreover, there were also significant differences in all of the FIQR and FAS domain scores. A natural catastrophe such as an earthquake can have a significant impact on the major domains of pain, fatigue, sleep, and the overall quality of life of FM patients.

  8. Cortisol Profile Mediates the Relation Between Childhood Neglect and Pain and Emotional Symptoms among Patients with Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ellen W; Davis, Mary C; Ciaramitaro, Marissa C

    2016-02-01

    The relation between childhood trauma and chronic pain and emotional symptoms in adulthood has been well-documented, although physiological mechanisms mediating this link have not been elaborated. This study examined the mediating role of cortisol profile in the linkage between childhood maltreatment and pain and emotional symptoms in individuals with fibromyalgia (FM). One hundred seventy-nine adults with FM first provided retrospective self-reports of childhood maltreatment, then attended a standardized session during which cortisol was sampled across 1.5 hours and, subsequently, completed assessments of daily pain, depressive symptoms, and anxiety. Latent growth curve modeling estimated the hypothesized mediation models. Childhood neglect predicted a flattened cortisol profile, which, in turn, predicted elevated daily pain and emotional symptoms. The cortisol profile partially mediated the neglect-symptom relation. Early maltreatment may exert enduring effects on endocrine regulation that contributes to pain and emotional symptoms in adults with chronic pain.

  9. Body awareness: construct and self-report measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf E Mehling

    Full Text Available Heightened body awareness can be adaptive and maladaptive. Improving body awareness has been suggested as an approach for treating patients with conditions such as chronic pain, obesity and post-traumatic stress disorder. We assessed the psychometric quality of selected self-report measures and examined their items for underlying definitions of the construct.PubMed, PsychINFO, HaPI, Embase, Digital Dissertations Database.Abstracts were screened; potentially relevant instruments were obtained and systematically reviewed. Instruments were excluded if they exclusively measured anxiety, covered emotions without related physical sensations, used observer ratings only, or were unobtainable. We restricted our study to the proprioceptive and interoceptive channels of body awareness. The psychometric properties of each scale were rated using a structured evaluation according to the method of McDowell. Following a working definition of the multi-dimensional construct, an inter-disciplinary team systematically examined the items of existing body awareness instruments, identified the dimensions queried and used an iterative qualitative process to refine the dimensions of the construct.From 1,825 abstracts, 39 instruments were screened. 12 were included for psychometric evaluation. Only two were rated as high standard for reliability, four for validity. Four domains of body awareness with 11 sub-domains emerged. Neither a single nor a compilation of several instruments covered all dimensions. Key domains that might potentially differentiate adaptive and maladaptive aspects of body awareness were missing in the reviewed instruments.Existing self-report instruments do not address important domains of the construct of body awareness, are unable to discern between adaptive and maladaptive aspects of body awareness, or exhibit other psychometric limitations. Restricting the construct to its proprio- and interoceptive channels, we explore the current understanding

  10. Self-reported hearing performance in workers exposed to solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Fuente

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare hearing performance relating to the peripheral and central auditory system between solvent-exposed and non-exposed workers. METHODS: Forty-eight workers exposed to a mixture of solvents and 48 non-exposed control subjects of matched age, gender and educational level were selected to participate in the study. The evaluation procedures included: pure-tone audiometry (500 - 8,000 Hz, to investigate the peripheral auditory system; the Random Gap Detection test, to assess the central auditory system; and the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap, to investigate subjects' self-reported hearing performance in daily-life activities. A Student t test and analyses of covariance (ANCOVA were computed to determine possible significant differences between solvent-exposed and non-exposed subjects for the hearing level, Random Gap Detection test and Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap. Pearson correlations among the three measures were also calculated. RESULTS: Solvent-exposed subjects exhibited significantly poorer hearing thresholds for the right ear than non-exposed subjects. Also, solvent-exposed subjects exhibited poorer results for the Random Gap Detection test and self-reported poorer listening performance than non-exposed subjects. Results of the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap were significantly correlated with the binaural average of subject pure-tone thresholds and Random Gap Detection test performance. CONCLUSIONS: Solvent exposure is associated with poorer hearing performance in daily life activities that relate to the function of the peripheral and central auditory system.

  11. Distribution and Correlates of Self-Reported Crimes of Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Scott; Morris, Robert G; Gerber, Jurg; Covey, Herbert C

    2011-11-01

    This study examines the distribution and correlates of a special class of property crimes, crimes of trust, using longitudinal and cross sectional self-report data from a national sample. We begin by defining crimes of trust and consider their conceptual relationship to "conventional" property crimes, which we here characterize as crimes of stealth, and to white collar crimes, which are defined in terms of the social status of the perpetrators. Crimes of trust are here defined as property crimes that typically involve deliberate contact with the victim or, where there is more than one victim, with at least one or more victims, in which there is typically more of a focus on concealing the fact that a crime has been committed than on concealing the identity of the perpetrator (as is the case in crimes of stealth), without regard to the socioeconomic status of the perpetrator (thus including but not limited to white collar crimes). The focus here is on crimes of trust committed by individuals (as opposed to corporate crime). We first examine their distribution by sociodemographic characteristics, then examine the correlation of crimes of trust with other types of illegal behavior, using data from the National Youth Survey Family Study, including (1) longitudinal self-report data from a nationally representative panel of individuals who were 11-18 years old in 1976-77 and who were followed through early middle age (ages 36-44) in 2002-2003, plus (2) cross-sectional data on these individuals plus their parents, spouses, and children age 11 and older in 2002-2003 (total age range 11-88). The results suggest that crimes of trust have a different age-crime curve from conventional crimes, and that they are not as strongly correlated with problem substance use, gender, and other socioeconomic indicators as conventional crimes.

  12. Marijuana Use and Self-reported Quality of Eyesight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akano, Obinna F

    2017-05-01

    There is increasing use of marijuana among young adults and more states in the United States are legalizing medical marijuana use. A number of studies have revealed both the beneficial and harmful effects of marijuana to the human system. Despite some beneficial effects, studies have shown marijuana to have a lot of deleterious effects on the visual system, which subsequently reduces the quality of eyesight. The aim of this study was to investigate if heavy marijuana smoking is associated with a poor quality of eyesight compared with light/no use of marijuana. The National Longitudinal Survey of Youths (NLSY79), a nationally representative sample of 12,686 young men and women surveyed in 1979 to 2010 was used for this study. The quality of eyesight of 1304 heavy marijuana users was compared with 1304 respondents with light or no marijuana use. The t test, multivariate and weighted logistic regression were used in the data analysis. There was no statistically significant difference in the self-reported quality of eyesight among heavy marijuana smokers compared with youths who never used marijuana or are light marijuana users. Among heavy marijuana smokers, males and high school graduates have decreased odds of reporting a poor quality of eyesight, whereas blacks have increased odds of reporting a poor quality of eyesight. The self-reported quality of eyesight among marijuana users can aid clinicians and other health practitioners facilitate the development of sex-, racial/ethnic-, and educational level-informed prevention and early intervention programs and also help characterize public opinions regarding cannabis, which are particularly relevant given the ongoing debate concerning the medicalization and legalization of cannabis in the United States.

  13. Objective Versus Self-Reported Sleep Quality at High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paul J; Wood-Wentz, Christina M; Bailey, Kent R; Johnson, Bruce D

    2017-11-27

    Anderson, Paul J., Christina M. Wood-Wentz, Kent R. Bailey, and Bruce D. Johnson. Objective versus self-reported sleep quality at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 16:000-000, 2017. Previous studies have found little relationship between polysomnography and a diagnosis of acute mountain sickness (AMS) using the Lake Louise Symptom Questionnaire (LLSQ). The correlation between sleep question responses on the LLSQ and polysomnography results has not been explored. We compared LLSQ sleep responses and polysomnography data from our previous study of workers rapidly transported to the South Pole. Sixty-three subjects completed a 3-hour flight from sea level to the South Pole (3200 m, 9800 ft). Participants completed limited overnight polysomnography on their first night and completed LLSQ upon awakening. We compared polysomnography results at the South Pole with sleep question responses on the LLSQ to assess their degree of correspondence. Twenty-two (30%) individuals reported no sleep problems whereas 20 (32%) reported some problems and 20 (33%) individuals reported poor sleep and 1 reported no sleep (n = 1). Median sleep efficiency was (94%) among response groups and mean overnight oxygen saturation was 81%. Median apnea hypopnea index (AHI; events/hour) was 10.2 in those who reported no problems sleeping, 5.1 in those reporting some problems sleeping, and 13.7 in those who reported poor sleep. These differences were not statistically significant. Self-reported sleep quality varied but there were no associated significant differences in sleep efficiency, overnight oxygen saturation, nor AHI. Studies that explore the role of objective sleep quality in the development of AMS should remove the sleep question on the LLSQ from AMS scoring algorithms.

  14. SELF-REPORTED DRUG ALLERGIES IN SURGICAL POPULATION IN SERBIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velicković, Jelena; Palibrk, Ivan; Miljković, Bojana; Velicković, Dejan; Jovanović, Bojan; Bumbasirević, Vesna; Djukanović, Marija; Sljukić, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    History of drug allergy is of major concern during perioperative period. Medical records usually lack documents confirming the stated allergy. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of self-reported drug allergies and their characteristics in adult Serbian surgical population, and to analyze their influence on drug prescription during perioperative period. The study enrolled patients scheduled for general surgery during a one-year period at a tertiary care hospital. They were questioned using a structured questionnaire about the existence of drug allergy and its nature. Medical records were examined after discharge to assess medical prescription during hospitalization. Of 1126 patients evaluated during the study period, 434 (38.5%) reported a total of 635 drug reactions. The most common allergy claim was to antibiotics (68%), nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (16.4%) and iodine (3.9%). Women, urban residents and herbal drug consumers were more likely to state an allergy. The majority of reported reactions were cutaneous (72%) and respiratory (34%), while anaphylaxis was reported by 3.2% of patients. Only 38 (8.7%) patients had previously undergone any allergology testing. Retrospective chart review revealed that 26 (6%) patients were administered the drug to which they had reported allergic reaction in the past, with no adverse effects. Drug allergies are frequently self-reported in surgical population in Serbia, which is in contrast to a very low rate of explored and documented allergies. In order not to deny an effective treatment or postpone a surgery, health care practitioners should pay more attention to an accurate classification of adverse drug reactions.

  15. Validity of Self-Reported Measures for Surveillance of Periodontal Disease in Two Western New York Population-Based Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genco, Robert J; Falkner, Karen L; Grossi, Sara; Dunford, Robert; Trevisan, Maurizio

    2007-07-01

    Public health and other population-based studies often depend on participants' self-reported disease status to assess prevalence, incidence, and disease trends. We sought to assess the feasibility of self-reported periodontal disease measures using dental history questions combined with demographic and medical history to predict periodontal disease. We evaluated results from two separate population-based studies carried out at the University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, i.e., the "Periodontal Infection and Risk for Myocardial Infarction Study," a study of 1,578 adults assessing the association between periodontal disease and myocardial infarction and the "Periodontal Disease Research Center" (the Erie County Study), an epidemiologic risk assessment study of 1,438 adults. In each study, an extensive list of oral health questions was asked, and a comprehensive medical history, blood analysis using chemistry and hematology tests, and demographic data were collected. Using a predefined measure of severity of periodontal disease, we compared patients with severe disease to all others (i.e., those with moderate and no or mild disease). We examined areas under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating curve to determine the best models, adding one, two, or three dental variables in all possible combinations. The AUC maximized at 0.76, and the combined sensitivity and specificity maximized at 142 and were comparable in both studies. Self-reported measures of periodontal disease are moderately predictive of clinical attachment loss. The demographic variables of age, race, smoking, gender, and diabetes mellitus accounted for much of the predictive power for self-reported periodontal disease; however, increases in sensitivity and specificity in the C statistics occurred when questions, including "Gum surgery in the past?," "Sore gums in the past?," "Scaling in the past?," "Bleeding gums now?," "Periodontal surgery in the past 2 years?," and "Chewing satisfaction?," were

  16. Emerging trends and patterns of self-reported morbidity in India: Evidence from three rounds of national sample survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Kalosona; Singh, Jayakant

    2017-08-09

    India is rapidly undergoing an epidemiological transition with a sudden change in the disease profile of its population. It is important to understand the changing nature of the burden of disease across the states of India for adequate policy intervention. We analyzed the trend and pattern of self-reported morbidity across states of India using three rounds of (52nd, 60th and 71st) National Sample Survey Organization (NSSO) data. Descriptive analysis was carried out to understand the prevalence of self-reported morbidity variation over a period of two decades (1995-2014) and multivariate analysis was performed to identify the significant determinants of various types of self-reported morbidities. The results indicated an increasing trend of infectious disease, Cardio Vascular Diseases (CVDs) and Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) over the last two decades (1995-2014). CVDs increased by a whopping eight-fold and the NCDs increased by three times during this period. A higher prevalence of self-reported morbidity was observed among the elderly and female, particularly in the urban locality. The growing incidence of CVDs and NCDs, especially among the elderly were reported from Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Punjab and West Bengal. The already constrained public health system in India is likely to face serious challenges with a double burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases. An effective and responsive public health system needs to be in place to make health care services available for NCDs and CVDs at the primary level. In order to ameliorate caregiving, the involvement of family will be critical. Informing the people inculcate healthy habits may be an effective health promotion measure.

  17. Social comparison processes and catastrophising in fibromyalgia: A path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Perona, V; Buunk, A P; Terol-Cantero, M C; Quiles-Marcos, Y; Martín-Aragón, M

    2017-06-01

    In addition to coping strategies, social comparison may play a role in illness adjustment. However, little is known about the role of contrast and identification in social comparison in adaptation to fibromyalgia. To evaluate through a path analysis in a sample of fibromyalgia patients, the association between identification and contrast in social comparison, catastrophising and specific health outcomes (fibromyalgia illness impact and psychological distress). 131 Spanish fibromyalgia outpatients (mean age: 50.15, SD = 11.1) filled out a questionnaire. We present a model that explained 33% of the variance in catastrophising by direct effects of more use of upward contrast and downward identification. In addition, 35% of fibromyalgia illness impact variance was explained by less upward identification, more upward contrast and more catastrophising and 42% of the variance in psychological distress by a direct effect of more use of upward contrast together with higher fibromyalgia illness impact. We suggest that intervention programmes with chronic pain and fibromyalgia patients should focus on enhancing the use of upward identification in social comparison, and on minimising the use of upward contrast and downward identification in social comparison.

  18. [Alexithymia and anger in women with fibromyalgia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güleç, Hüseyin; Sayar, Kemal; Topbaş, Murat; Karkucak, Murat; Ak, Ismail

    2004-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is characterized by both somatic and psychic symptoms and it is suggested that psychic factors contribute to the clinical presentation of this syndrome. This study was planned to have a better understanding of fibromyalgia through elaborating the role of alexithymia and anger in the pathogenesis of this illness. The study was carried out in the Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation outpatient clinic with 101 women with fibromyalgia syndrome, 30 women with rheumatoid arthritis and 59 healthy women with no current or past medical history. The subjects were evaluated by the Visual Analog Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 items, Spielberger State-Trait Anger Inventory, Beck Depression Scale, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and a sociodemographic data form. All these groups were similar to each other in means of age, years of education, marital and economical status. In the fibromyalgia syndrome group, the scores of anxiety and anger-in were calculated significantly higher than other groups. The depression and alexithymia scores were found higher than healthy group. These findings suggest that fibromyalgia patients suffer more anxiety and anger toward oneself, which is anger-in, than rheumatoid arthritis patients. Though the patient groups were more alexithymic than the healthy group, alexitimia scores of the two patient groups were not different. This situation suggest that anger-in, which is suppressed and unexpressed anger style is a part of the fibromyalgia syndrome together as well as high anxiety.

  19. Stair negotiation in women with fibromyalgia: A descriptive correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Mateo, Daniel; Domínguez-Muñoz, Francisco J; Olivares, Pedro R; Adsuar, José C; Gusi, Narcis

    2017-10-01

    Walking up and down stairs is a common and important activity of daily living. Women with fibromyalgia often show a reduced ability to perform this task.The objective of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of stair negotiation tasks and to assess the impact of fibromyalgia symptoms on the ability to negotiate stairs.Forty-two women with fibromyalgia participated in this descriptive correlational study. The relevance of the stair negotiation (both walking up and down) was evaluated by assessing its association with the revised version of the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ-R) and other health-related variables. Test-retest reliability was also analyzed. The main outcome measures were time spent walking up and down stairs and impact of fibromyalgia, quality of life, number of falls, weight, and lower limb strength and endurance.The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for stair descent was 0.929 whereas that for ascent was 0.972. The score in these tests correlated significantly with the total score for the FIQ-R and the score for many of dimensions and symptoms: that is, physical function, overall impact of fibromyalgia, pain, energy, stiffness, restorative sleep, tenderness, self-perceived balance problems, and sensitivity.Given the importance of the stair negotiation as activity of daily living and the high reliability, both stair ascent and descent tasks may be useful as outcome measures in studies on patients with fibromyalgia.

  20. The prevalence of fibromyalgia among patients with psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thune, Per O

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of fibromyalgia and allied symptoms in patients with psoriasis. During a 3-year period from 1997 until 2000, 1269 patients were consecutively diagnosed with psoriasis. All patients were questioned about musculoskeletal symptoms and those with such symptoms were further examined according to a standardized protocol. In total 335 of 1269 patients had musculoskeletal symptoms. More women than men had such complaints, 33% versus 18.5%, respectively. As many as 13% of the women fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology 1990 (ACR-90) criteria for fibromyalgia, while 14.1% had symptoms compatible with chronic widespread pain without meeting the fibromyalgia criteria. In total, 8.3% suffered from fibromyalgia and 9% from chronic widespread pain. The results indicate that fibromyalgia and allied symptoms are frequent in female patients with psoriasis and constitute important problems with regard to disability and health-related quality of life. Only 35 of 105 patients with fibromyalgia had previously been diagnosed with psoriasis and the diagnostic label of fibromyalgia was new to 51 of them. Female patients with symptoms of psoriasis and pain seem to constitute a subgroup which deserves further studies.

  1. Functionally oriented rehabilitation program for patients with fibromyalgia: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennemer, Heidi K; Borg-Stein, Joanne; Gomba, Lorraine; Delaney, Bobbi; Rothmund, Astrid; Barlow, David; Breeze, Gail; Thompson, Anita

    2006-08-01

    To evaluate function and disability in patients with fibromyalgia before and after participation in a functionally oriented, multidisciplinary, 8-wk treatment program. A total of 23 patients who met American College of Rheumatology criteria for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia were enrolled in the study. Outcome measures included: range of motion, 6-min walk test, a modified Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, a modified SF-36 Physical Functioning Scale, and the Fibromyalgia Health Assessment Questionnaire. Pretreatment and posttreatment scores were analyzed using paired t tests. All subjects completed the program, and there were no reported injuries. Three subjects failed to complete the survey instruments at the conclusion of the study. Intention to treat analysis including these subjects was carried out but did not significantly change results. For the remaining subjects (n = 20), a significant improvement was found on the Physical Functioning Scale (P = 0.01). Trends toward improvement on the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (P = 0.40) and Fibromyalgia Health Assessment Questionnaire (P = 0.14) were seen but did not achieve statistical significance. Range of motion testing revealed significant improvements in lumbar spine extension (P Borg scale did not change. There were no injuries or other adverse consequences of the program. This study utilized multiple functional outcome measures to demonstrate improved function and decreased disability in patients with fibromyalgia. Our patients reported significantly improved physical function after participation in the 8-wk intensive multidisciplinary treatment program. This progressive, functionally based exercise training program was well tolerated by all participants and outlines an effective exercise prescription for patients with fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia patients in this study responded favorably to a treatment program that focused on function instead of pain.

  2. The relationship between sleep quality and fibromyalgia symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Alexandro; Vilarino, Guilherme Torres; Sieczkowska, Sofia Mendes; Coimbra, Danilo Reis; Bevilacqua, Guilherme Guimarães; Steffens, Ricardo de Azevedo Klumb

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between sleep quality and fibromyalgia symptoms in 326 patients. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used to assess the presence of sleep disorders. Multivariate analysis of variance was performed to determine the influence of fibromyalgia symptoms on sleep quality. The prevalence of sleep disorders was 92.9 percent. Patients reported generalized pain (88.3%), memory failure (78.5%), moodiness (59%), excessive anxiety (77.5%), and concentration difficulties (69.1%). Patients with more symptoms reported poor sleep quality ( p Sleep Quality Index score correlated with the number of symptoms ( p Sleep quality has an important association with fibromyalgia symptoms.

  3. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: An Overview of Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdous Jahan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS is a chronic condition causing pain, stiffness, and tenderness of the muscles, tendons, and joints. It is also characterized by restless sleep, tiredness, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and disturbances in bowel functions. The etiology of fibromyalgia remains unknown, but recent advances and discoveries have helped to unravel some of the mysteries of this disease. Research highlights some of the biochemical, metabolic, and immunoregulatory abnormalities associated with fibromyalgia. Management of FMS at the present time is very difficult as it has multiple etiological factors and psychological predispositions; however, a patient centered approach is essential to handle this problem.

  4. The prevalence of fibromyalgia in the general population: a comparison of the American College of Rheumatology 1990, 2010, and modified 2010 classification criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth T; Atzeni, Fabiola; Beasley, Marcus; Flüß, Elisa; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Macfarlane, Gary J

    2015-02-01

    The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 1990 fibromyalgia classification criteria are based on the presence of widespread pain and tenderness. In 2010, new criteria were proposed that focused more on multiple symptoms, and these criteria were later modified to require only self report of symptoms. The current study aimed to determine the population prevalence of fibromyalgia and to compare differences in prevalence using the alternative criteria. A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Questionnaires, including items on pain, symptoms, and rheumatologic diagnoses, were mailed to 4,600 adults in northeast Scotland. Participants who had chronic widespread pain or those who met the modified 2010 criteria, plus a subsample of other participants, were invited to attend a research clinic. Attendees completed an additional questionnaire and underwent a rheumatologic examination, and their signs and symptoms were classified according to the ACR 1990, 2010, and modified 2010 criteria. The prevalence of fibromyalgia according to each set of criteria was calculated, weighting back to the target population by age, sex, and area of residence. Of 1,604 questionnaire participants, 269 were invited to attend the research clinic, and 104 (39%) attended; 32 of these subjects (31%) met ≥1 set of fibromyalgia criteria. The prevalence of fibromyalgia according to the 1990, 2010, and modified 2010 criteria was 1.7% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.7-2.8), 1.2% (95% CI 0.3-2.1), and 5.4% (95% CI 4.7-6.1), respectively. The ratio of females to males was 13.7:1, 4.8:1, and 2.3:1 of those meeting the respective criteria sets. Fibromyalgia prevalence varies with the different sets of classification criteria applied. In particular, prevalence is higher and a greater proportion of men are identified with the modified 2010 criteria as compared to the criteria sets requiring clinician input. This has important implications for the use of the new criteria, both in research and in clinical

  5. Fibromyalgia and fatigue: central processing, widespread dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finan, Patrick H; Zautra, Alex J

    2010-05-01

    Biological and psychological bases for the covariation of pain and fatigue in fibromyalgia (FM) are reviewed. FM is characterized as a disorder of central sensitization, with pain and fatigue as the most prominent symptoms. The roles of sleep disturbance and affective dysregulation as both precipitants and consequences of pain and fatigue in FM are discussed. It is argued that a positive affective disturbance may uniquely characterize pain and fatigue symptoms in FM. Finally, pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments for FM are highlighted, with an emphasis on the efficacy of these treatments in alleviating pain and fatigue symptoms. Copyright (c) 2010 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fibromyalgia syndrome: still a medical dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This issue of “Reumatismo” deals with a variety of aspects of chronic widespread pain (CWP and its rheumatological quasi-synonym of fibromyalgia (FM. The definitions of CWP and FM both have a long history. Chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions are universally prevalent in both genders and all age groups and, although their pathophysiology varies, they are inter-related anatomically and by their association with pain and impaired physical function. However, there is still no consensus as to whether FM should be considered a discrete entity or just the tip of the iceberg of CWP...

  7. Pathology of skeletal muscle in fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewes, A M; Andreasen, A; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    of muscle disease. Nevertheless, we subjected biopsies from nine of the patients and five other controls for further ultrastructural evaluations and demonstrated pathologic findings e.g. empty sleeves of basement membrane, many lipofuschin bodies and other degenerative changes. We conclude......The value of muscle biopsy in fibromyalgia is still questioned. In this study we obtained 50 quadriceps biopsies from 20 patients and compared them blindly to 10 biopsies from five normal controls. Using light microscopy, histochemical and immunoenzymatic methods we found no definite evidence...

  8. [Self-reported obituary columns in a local daily newspaper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yosikazu; Matsubara, Yuri; Sasahara, Teppei; Kojo, Takao; Ae, Ryusuke; Aoyama, Yasuko; Makino, Nobuko; Koike, Soichi; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To reveal the features of death and subsequent funeral services, we analyzed self-reported obituaries in The Shimotsuke, a local daily newspaper in Tochigi, Japan. In addition, the usefulness and disadvantages of such a database of deaths based on the obituaries were discussed.Method For a 5-year period, from January 2011 through December 2015, all the obituary columns in The Shimotsuke were computerized as a database and analyzed. Some results were compared with the vital statistics data in the corresponding period of time. Data analyzed were: dead persons' address (municipalities), name, sex, cause of death, age at death, date of death and funeral services, the chief mourner (Moshu), and so on.Results During the observed 5-year period, 69,793 deaths appeared in the columns, which were 67.6% of the all deaths in the vital statistics. No difference was observed in the proportions between the sexes in the published deaths in comparison with the vital statistics. In both sexes, the proportion was low in 0-9 years old, then high among 10-19 years, decreasing in 20s, and after then the proportion increased according to the age. The proportion was low in city areas, such as Utsunomiya and Oyama, and high in some cities and towns in the northern or eastern parts of Tochigi prefecture. The highest was in Motegi Town (88.0%), and the lowest was Nogi Town (38.0%), which is located in the southern-most part of the prefecture and is closest to the Tokyo metropolitan area. Almost all the funeral services were conducted within a week of the death, and no delays were observed to have been caused by the short supply of cremation services, which exists in large cities in Japan. In case where the chief mourner was a child, a parent, or a spouse of a child, the male sex was dominant. Analyses of death from senile decay, suicide, and homicide indicated that the accuracy of the published cause of death was low. The date of the funeral services was strongly influenced

  9. [An evaluation of anxiety and depression symptoms in fibromyalgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Emanuella Barros; Quintans Junior, Lucindo José; Fraga, Byanka Porto; Macieira, José Caetano; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the frequency of anxiety and depression symptoms by verifying the association between anxiety traits, current depression and anxiety symptoms in fibromyalgia patients. Interviews were performed with 60 subjects diagnosed with fibromyalgia at the Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic at Universidade Federal de Sergipe between August 2007 and March 2008, in which two questionnaires were administered: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The frequency of anxiety and depression symptoms was, respectively, 50% and 86% for individuals with fibromyalgia, and the mean trait-anxiety score was 59.38. An association was observed between trait and state anxiety. Anxiety and depression were frequent symptoms among patients with fibromyalgia. However, anxiety appeared as a secondary symptom to depression, appearing in a more severe form, and, therefore, this comorbidity should be more valued and studied.

  10. Mind and Body Practices for Fibromyalgia: What the Science Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body therapies for fibromyalgia. The review found no advantage observed for mindfulness compared to usual care (control) ... links Pinterest Read our disclaimer about external links Instagram Read our disclaimer about external links LinkedIn E- ...

  11. Fibromyalgia Is Correlated with Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martin, Elena; Garcia-Campayo, Javier; Puebla-Guedea, Marta; Ascaso, Francisco J; Roca, Miguel; Gutierrez-Ruiz, Fernando; Vilades, Elisa; Polo, Vicente; Larrosa, Jose M; Pablo, Luis E; Satue, Maria

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether fibromyalgia induces axonal damage in the optic nerve that can be detected using optical coherence tomography (OCT), as the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) is atrophied in patients with fibromyalgia compared with controls. Fibromyalgia patients (n = 116) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 144) were included in this observational and prospective cohort study. All subjects underwent visual acuity measurement and structural analysis of the RNFL using two OCT devices (Cirrus and Spectralis). Fibromyalgia patients were evaluated according to Giesecke's fibromyalgia subgroups, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ5D) scale. We compared the differences between fibromyalgia patients and controls, and analyzed the correlations between OCT measurements, disease duration, fibromyalgia subgroups, severity, and quality of life. The impact on quality of life in fibromyalgia subgroups and in patients with different disease severity was also analyzed. A significant decrease in the RNFL was detected in fibromyalgia patients compared with controls using the two OCT devices: Cirrus OCT ganglion cell layer analysis registered a significant decrease in the minimum thickness of the inner plexiform layer (74.99±16.63 vs 79.36±3.38 μm, respectively; p = 0.023), nasal inferior, temporal inferior and temporal superior sectors (p = 0.040; 0.011 and 0.046 respectively). The Glaucoma application of the Spectralis OCT revealed thinning in the nasal, temporal inferior and temporal superior sectors (p = 0.009, 0.006, and 0.002 respectively) of fibromyalgia patients and the Axonal application in all sectors, except the nasal superior and temporal sectors. The odds ratio (OR) to estimate the size effect of FM in RNFL thickness was 1.39. RNFL atrophy was detected in patients with FIQ scores fibromyalgia (FIQ≥60) compared with patients with mild fibromyalgia (FIQfibromyalgia exhibited significant thinning in the

  12. Muscle strength, working capacity and effort in patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Bülow, P M; Lykkegaard, J J

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the physical capacity and effort in patients with fibromyalgia. Muscle strength and the coefficient of variation of the strength measurements of 181 female fibromyalgia patients and 126 healthy females were compared. These measurements and ergometer...... exercise capacity, work status and psychometric scoring (SCL-90-R) were correlated. The fibromyalgia patients exhibited significant reduction in voluntary muscle strength of the knee and elbow, flexors and extensors in the order of 20-30%. However, the coefficient of variation was higher among patients...... scores. Work status was related to psychometric scoring, but not to physical capacity or effort. In conclusion, we found a low degree of effort but near normal physical capacity in the fibromyalgia patients....

  13. Living with Fibromyalgia, Drugs Approved to Manage Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with fibromyalgia also experience depression. Savella, marketed by Forest Pharmaceuticals, Inc., is the first drug introduced primarily ... person more likely to have it. Getting a Diagnosis Matallana says she felt her suffering was being ...

  14. Prospective monitoring and self-report of previous falls among older women at high risk of falls and fractures: a study of comparison and agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patrícia A.; Dias, João M. D.; Silva, Silvia L. A.; Dias, Rosângela C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The identification of the occurrence of falls is an important step for screening and for rehabilitation processes for the elderly. The methods of monitoring these events are susceptible to recording biases, and the choice of the most accurate method remains challenging. Objectives: (i) To investigate the agreement between retrospective self-reporting and prospective monitoring of methods of recording falls, and (ii) to compare the retrospective self-reporting of falls and the prospective monitoring of falls and recurrent falls over a 12-month period among older women at high risk of falls and fractures. Method: A total of 118 community-dwelling older women with low bone density were recruited. The incidence of falls was monitored prospectively in 116 older women (2 losses) via monthly phone calls over the course of a year. At the end of this monitoring period, the older women were asked about their recall of falls in the same 12-month period. The agreement between the two methods was analyzed, and the sensitivity and specificity of self-reported previous falls in relation to the prospective monitoring were calculated. Results: There was moderate agreement between the prospective monitoring and the retrospective self-reporting of falls in classifying fallers (Kappa=0.595) and recurrent fallers (Kappa=0.589). The limits of agreement were 0.35±1.66 falls. The self-reporting of prior falls had a 67.2% sensitivity and a 94.2% specificity in classifying fallers among older women and a 50% sensitivity and a 98.9% specificity in classifying recurrent fallers. Conclusion: Self-reporting of falls over a 12-month period underestimated 32.8% of falls and 50% of recurrent falls. The findings recommend caution if one is considering replacing monthly monitoring with annual retrospective questioning. PMID:26083603

  15. Accuracy of self-reported tobacco assessments in a head and neck cancer treatment population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Graham W.; Arnold, Susanne M.; Valentino, Joseph P.; Gal, Thomas J.; Hyland, Andrew J.; Singh, Anurag K.; Rangnekar, Vivek M.; Cummings, K. Michael; Marshall, James R.; Kudrimoti, Mahesh R.

    2012-01-01

    Prospective analysis was performed of self-reported and biochemically confirmed tobacco use in 50 head and neck cancer patients during treatment. With 93.5% compliance to complete weekly self-report and biochemical confirmatory tests, 29.4% of smokers required biochemical assessment for identification. Accuracy increased by 14.9% with weekly vs. baseline self-reported assessments. Data confirm that head and neck cancer patients misrepresent true tobacco use during treatment.

  16. Comparing the Self-Report and Measured Smartphone Usage of College Students: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Heyoung; Ahn, Heejune; Nguyen, Trung Giang; Choi, Sam-Wook; Kim, Dae Jin

    2017-01-01

    Objective Nowadays smartphone overuse has become a social and medical concern. For the diagnosis and treatment, clinicians use the self-report information, but the report data often does not match actual usage pattern. The paper examines the similarity and variance in smartphone usage patterns between the measured data and self-reported data. Methods Together with the self-reported data, the real usage log data is collected from 35 college students in a metropolitan region of Northeast Asia, ...

  17. Comparison of Self-Reported and Behavioral Pain Assessment Tools in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouajram, Rima H; Sebat, Christian M; Love, Dawn; Louie, Erin L; Wilson, Machelle D; Duby, Jeremiah J

    2018-01-01

    Self-reported and behavioral pain assessment scales are often used interchangeably in critically ill patients due to fluctuations in mental status. The correlation between scales is not well elucidated. The purpose of this study was to describe the correlation between self-reported and behavioral pain scores in critically ill patients. Pain was assessed using behavioral and self-reported pain assessment tools. Behavioral pain tools included Critical Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) and Behavioral Pain Scale (BPS). Self-reported pain tools included Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) and Wong-Baker Faces Pain Scales. Delirium was assessed using the confusion assessment method for the intensive care unit. Patient preference regarding pain assessment method was queried. Correlation between scores was evaluated. A total of 115 patients were included: 67 patients were nondelirious and 48 patients were delirious. The overall correlation between self-reported (NRS) and behavioral (CPOT) pain scales was poor (0.30, P = .018). In patients without delirium, a strong correlation was found between the 2 BPSs (0.94, P self-reported pain scales (0.77, P Self-reported pain scale (NRS) and BPS (CPOT) were poorly correlated with each other (0.28, P = .021). In patients with delirium, there was a strong correlation between BPSs (0.86, P self-reported pain scales (0.69, P self-reported (NRS) and BPSs (CPOT) in patients with delirium (0.23, P = .12). Most participants preferred self-reported pain assessment. Self-reported pain scale and BPS cannot be used interchangeably. Current validated BPSs may not accurately reflect self-reported pain in critically ill patients.

  18. Applicant versus employee scores on self-report emotional intelligence measures

    OpenAIRE

    Lievens, Filip; Klehe, Ute-Christine; Libbrecht, Nele

    2011-01-01

    There exists growing interest to assess applicants’ emotional intelligence (EI) via self-report trait-based measures of EI as part of the selection process. However, some studies that experimentally manipulated applicant conditions have cautioned that in these conditions use of self-report measures for assessing EI might lead to considerably higher scores than current norm scores suggest. So far, no studies have scrutinized self-reported EI scores among a sample of actual job applicants. Ther...

  19. Spiritual Needs in Patients Suffering from Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Offenbaecher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess spiritual needs of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS and to evaluate correlations with disease and health associated variables. Using a set of standardized questionnaires (i.e., Spiritual Needs Questionnaire, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, SF-36's Quality of Life, Brief Multidimensional Life Satisfaction Scale, etc., we enrolled 141 patients (95% women, mean age 58 ± 10 years. Here, needs for inner peace and giving/generativity scored the highest, while existential needs and religious needs scored lowest. Particularly inner peace needs and existential needs correlated with different domains of reduced mental health, particularly with anxiety, the intention to escape from illness, and psychosocial restrictions. Thirty-eight percent of the patients stated needs to be forgiven and nearly half to forgive someone from their past life. Therefore, the specific spiritual needs of patients with chronic diseases should be addressed in clinical care in order to identify potential therapeutic avenues to support and stabilize their psychoemotional situation.

  20. Duloxetine for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth A Scholz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Beth A Scholz, Cara L Hammonds, Chad S BoomershineDepartment of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is a widespread pain condition associated with a wide range of additional symptoms including fatigue, insomnia, depression, anxiety and stiffness. Duloxetine is one of three medications currently FDA approved for use in FMS management. Duloxetine is a mixed serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI that functions by increasing central nervous system levels of serotonin and norepinephrine. This review is a primer on use of duloxetine in FMS management and includes information on pharmacology and pharmacokinetics, a review of the three duloxetine FMS treatment trials currently in publication, a discussion of the safety and tolerability of duloxetine, and patient-focused perspectives on duloxetine use in FMS management. Duloxetine has proven efficacy in managing pain and mood symptoms in adult FMS patients with and without major depressive disorder. However, due to side effects, duloxetine must be used with caution in patients with fatigue, insomnia, gastrointestinal complaints, headache, cardiovascular disease, bleeding-risk, and in those 24 years of age and younger due to risk of suicidality. Duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with liver disease or alcoholics. As with all medications, duloxetine is best used as part of an individualized regimen that includes nonpharmacologic modalities of exercise, education and behavioral therapies.Keywords: fibromyalgia, duloxetine, SNRI, safety

  1. Growth hormone perturbations in fibromyalgia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kim D; Deodhar, Parimal; Lorentzen, Ashley; Bennett, Robert M; Deodhar, Atul A

    2007-06-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome characterized by chronic widespread pain, fatigue, disrupted sleep, depression, and physical deconditioning. In this article, we review the literature on the normal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 (HP-GH-IGF-1) axis and its perturbations in FM subjects. Studies included in this review were accessed through an English language search of Cochrane Collaboration Reviews. Keyword MeSH terms included "fibromyalgia," "growth hormone" (GH), or "insulin-like growth factor-1" (IGF-1). Twenty-six studies enrolling 2006 subjects were reviewed. Overall, low levels of IGF-1 were found in a subgroup of subjects. Growth hormone stimulation tests often revealed a suboptimal response, which did not always correlate with IGF-1 levels. No consistent defects in pituitary function were found. Of the 3 randomized placebo controlled studies, only 9 months of daily injectable recombinant GH reduced FM symptoms and normalized IGF-1. These studies suggest that pituitary function is normal in FM and that reported changes in the HP-GH-IGF-1 axis are most likely hypothalamic in origin. The therapeutic efficacy of supplemental GH therapy in FM requires further study before any solid recommendations can be made.

  2. Self-reported sleep patterns in a British population cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yue; Wainwright, Nick W J; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Surtees, Paul G; Luben, Robert; Wareham, Nick; Brayne, Carol; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2014-03-01

    Sleep patterns have been linked to various health outcomes, but sleep patterns in the British population have not been extensively reported. We aimed to describe the sleep characteristics reported by the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk participants, with a particular emphasis on the comparison of measures of sleep quantity. From 2006 to 2007, a total of 8480 participants aged 45-90 years reported sleep timing, nighttime sleep duration, and sleep difficulties. Time in bed (TIB) was calculated from the difference between rise time and bedtime, and sleep proportion was defined as the ratio of sleep duration and TIB. On average, the reported TIB was more than 1.5h longer than sleep durations. Compared to men, women spent 15 min longer in bed, but they slept for 11 min less and reported more sleep difficulties. In multivariate analysis sleep duration and TIB varied with socioeconomic factors, but sleep proportion was consistently lower among women, nonworkers, and older individuals, as well as those who were widowed, separated, or divorced; those who reported sleep difficulties and more frequently used sleep medication; and those who had lower education, poorer general health, or a major depressive disorder (MDD). Self-reported sleep duration and TIB have different meanings and implications for health. Sleep proportion may be a useful indicator of sleep patterns in the general population. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Leadership: validation of a self-report scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussault, Marc; Frenette, Eric; Fernet, Claude

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to propose and test the factor structure of a new self-report questionnaire on leadership. A sample of 373 school principals in the Province of Quebec, Canada completed the initial 46-item version of the questionnaire. In order to obtain a questionnaire of minimal length, a four-step procedure was retained. First, items analysis was performed using Classical Test Theory. Second, Rasch analysis was used to identify non-fitting or overlapping items. Third, a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using structural equation modelling was performed on the 21 remaining items to verify the factor structure of the scale. Results show that the model with a single third-order dimension (leadership), two second-order dimensions (transactional and transformational leadership), and one first-order dimension (laissez-faire leadership) provides a good fit to the data. Finally, invariance of factor structure was assessed with a second sample of 222 vice-principals in the Province of Quebec, Canada. This model is in agreement with the theoretical model developed by Bass (1985), upon which the questionnaire is based.

  4. Factors associated with self-reported health: implications for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Advocates for environmental justice, local, state, and national public health officials, exposure scientists, need broad-based heath indices to identify vulnerable communities. Longitudinal studies show that perception of current health status predicts subsequent mortality, suggesting that self-reported health (SRH) may be useful in screening-level community assessments. This paper evaluates whether SRH is an appropriate surrogate indicator of health status by evaluating relationships between SRH and sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health care factors as well as serological indicators of nutrition, health risk, and environmental exposures.METHODS: Data were combined from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys for 1372 nonsmoking 20-50 year olds. Ordinal and binary logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals of reporting poorer health based on measures of nutrition, health condition, environmental contaminants, and sociodemographic, health care, and lifestyle factors.RESULTS: Poorer SRH was associated with several serological measures of nutrition, health condition, and biomarkers of toluene, cadmium, lead, and mercury exposure. Race/ethnicity, income, education, access to health care, food security, exercise, poor mental and physical health, prescription drug use, and multiple health outcome measures (e.g., diabetes, thyroid problems, asthma) were also associated with poorer SRH.CONCLUS

  5. Burnout, engagement and resident physicians' self-reported errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, J T; van der Heijden, F M M A; Hoekstra-Weebers, J E H M; Bakker, A B; van de Wiel, H B M; Jacobs, B; Gazendam-Donofrio, S M

    2009-12-01

    Burnout is a work-related syndrome that may negatively affect more than just the resident physician. On the other hand, engagement has been shown to protect employees; it may also positively affect the patient care that the residents provide. Little is known about the relationship between residents' self-reported errors and burnout and engagement. In our national study that included all residents and physicians in The Netherlands, 2115 questionnaires were returned (response rate 41.1%). The residents reported on burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory-Health and Social Services), engagement (Utrecht Work Engagement Scale) and self-assessed patient care practices (six items, two factors: errors in action/judgment, errors due to lack of time). Ninety-four percent of the residents reported making one or more mistake without negative consequences for the patient during their training. Seventy-one percent reported performing procedures for which they did not feel properly trained. More than half (56%) of the residents stated they had made a mistake with a negative consequence. Seventy-six percent felt they had fallen short in the quality of care they provided on at least one occasion. Men reported more errors in action/judgment than women. Significant effects of specialty and clinical setting were found on both types of errors. Residents with burnout reported significantly more errors (p engaged residents reported fewer errors (p burnout and to keep residents engaged in their work.

  6. Cultural values: can they explain self-reported health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudijk, Bram; Donders, Rogier; Stalmeier, Peep

    2017-06-01

    Self-reported health (SRH) is a measure widely used in health research and population studies. Differences in SRH have been observed between countries and cultural values have been hypothesized to partly explain such differences. Cultural values can be operationalized by two cultural dimensions using the World Values Survey (WVS), namely the traditional/rational-secular and the survival/self-expression dimension. We investigate whether there is an association between the WVS cultural dimensions and SRH, both within and between countries. Data from 51 countries in the WVS is used and combined with macroeconomic data from the Worldbank database. The association between SRH and the WVS cultural dimensions is tested within each of the 51 countries and multilevel mixed models are used to test differences between these countries. Socio-demographic and macroeconomic variables are used to correct for non-cultural variables related to SRH. Within countries, the survival/self-expression dimension was positively associated with SRH, while in most countries there was a negative association for the traditional/rational-secular dimension. Values range between 4 and 17% within countries. Further analyses show that the associations within countries and between countries are similar. Controlling for macroeconomic and socio-demographic factors did not change our results. The WVS cultural dimensions predict SRH within and between countries. Contrary to our expectations, traditional/rational-secular values were negatively associated with SRH. As SRH is associated with cultural values between countries, cultural values could be considered when interpreting SRH between countries.

  7. The properties of self-report research measures: beyond psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Claire; Evans, Chris; Birch, Sarah; Warren, Fiona; Norton, Kingsley

    2002-06-01

    Self-report measures pertinent for personality disorder are widely used and many are available. Their relative merits are usually assessed on nomothetic psychometrics and acceptability to users is neglected. We report reactions of lay, patient and professional groups to the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire (PDQ-IV); Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-III); the Borderline Syndrome Index (BSI); Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSE) and the Social Functioning Questionnaire (SFQ). These were sent to 148 professionals, ex-patients and lay people for comment. Thirty-six per cent were returned. Pattern-coding by three raters revealed problematic themes across all measures, including inappropriate length, vague items and language, cultural assumptions and slang, state-bias and response-set. Measures can be depressing and upsetting for some participants (both patients and non-patients), hence administration of measures should be sensitive. Treatment may make people more self-aware, which may compromise validity for outcome research. This evaluation raises issues and concerns, which are missed in traditional psychometric evaluation.

  8. Nano-in-Micro Self-Reporting Hydrogel Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirella, Annalisa; La Marca, Margherita; Brace, Leigh-Anne; Mattei, Giorgio; Aylott, Jonathan W; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2015-08-01

    Highly reproducible Nano-in-Micro constructs are fabricated to provide a well-defined and self-reporting biomimetic environment for hepatocytes. Based on a protein/hydrogel formulation with controlled shape, size and composition, the constructs enable efficient nutrient exchange and provide an adhesive 3D framework to cells. Co-encapsulation of hepatocytes and ratiometric optical nanosensors with pH sensitivity in the physiological range allows continuous monitoring of the microenvironment. The lobule-sized microbeads are fabricated using an automated droplet generator, Sphyga (Spherical Hydrogel Generator) combining alginate, collagen, decellularized hepatic tissue, pH-nanosensors and hepatocytes. The pH inside the Nano-in-Micro constructs is monitored during culture, while assaying media for hepatic function and vitality markers. Although the local pH changes by several units during bead fabrication, when encapsulated cells are most likely to undergo stress, it is stable and buffered by cell culture media thereafter. Albumin secretion and urea production are significantly higher in the microbeads compared with controls, indicating that the encapsulated Nano-in-Micro environment is conducive to enhanced hepatic function.

  9. AN EVALUATION OF ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION SYMPTOMS IN FIBROMYALGIA

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Emanuella Barros dos; Quintans Junior, Lucindo Jose; Fraga, Byanka Porto; Macieira, Jose Caetano; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the frequency of anxiety and depression symptoms by verifying the association between anxiety traits, current depression and anxiety symptoms in fibromyalgia patients. Interviews were performed with 60 subjects diagnosed with fibromyalgia at the Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic at Universidade Federal de Sergipe between August 2007 and March 2008, in which two questionnaires were administered: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the S...

  10. Epidemiology, costs, and the economic burden of fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Spaeth, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The assumption that fibromyalgia is associated with a major impact on the utilization of both healthcare and nonhealthcare resources has not been thoroughly supported by evidence-based data. Despite the differences between healthcare and sociopolitical systems in various countries, more recent results from epidemiological research now clearly demonstrate the socioeconomic burden of fibromyalgia and its comorbidities. The costs of the disease, calculated in single studies and countries, allow ...

  11. Quality of life and associated clinical distress in fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    G. Perpignano; L. Minerba; A. Denotti; C. Anedda; V. Ruggiero; E. Cacace

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome characterized by chronic, diffuse musculoskeletal pain and by a low pain threshold at specific anatomical points (tender points). Numerous other conditions (Irritable bowel syndrome, tension-type headache, migraine headaches, etc.) may overlap with FM. Aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of life and associated clinical distress in patients with FM. Methods: 53 females affected by primary fibromyalgia and 40 healthy females were examined we...

  12. Fibromyalgia in 300 adult index patients with primary immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, James C; Bertoli, Luigi F; Barton, Jackson C; Acton, Ronald T

    2017-01-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence and clinical and laboratory associations of fibromyalgia in adults with primary immunodeficiency (immunoglobulin (Ig) G subclass deficiency (IgGSD) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We performed a retrospective analysis of these observations in 300 non-Hispanic white adult index patients with recurrent/severe respiratory tract infections and IgGSD or CVID: age; sex; IgGSD; fibromyalgia; chronic fatigue; autoimmune conditions (ACs); interstitial cystitis (IC); diabetes; body mass index; serum Ig isotypes; blood lymphocytes and subsets; and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A and -B types and haplotypes. We performed univariate comparisons, logistic multivariable regressions, and an analysis of covariance. Mean age was 49 ± 12 (standard deviation) y. There were 246 women (82.0%). IgGSD was diagnosed in 276 patients (92.0%). Fifty-six patients had fibromyalgia (18.7%; female:male 13:1). Other characteristics included: chronic fatigue, 63.0%; aggregate ACs, 35.3%; Sjögren's syndrome, 8.0%; IC, 3.0%; diabetes, 10.3%; and HLA-A*29, B*44 positivity, 9.7%. Prevalences of female sex; chronic fatigue; IC; and HLA-A*29, B*44 positivity were greater in patients with fibromyalgia. Logistic regression on fibromyalgia revealed three positive associations: chronic fatigue (p=0.0149; odds ratio 2.6 [95% confidence interval 1.2, 5.6]); Sjögren's syndrome (p=0.0004; 5.2 [2.1, 13.2]); and IC (p=0.0232; 5.7 [1.3, 25.7]). In an analysis of covariance, there were significant interactions of chronic fatigue, Sjögren's syndrome, and interstitial cystitis on fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia is common in non-Hispanic white adult index patients with primary immunodeficiency, especially women. Chronic fatigue, Sjögren's syndrome, and IC are significantly associated with fibromyalgia after adjustment for other independent variables.

  13. Nurse Practitioners' Education, Awareness, and Therapeutic Approaches for the Management of Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Linda; Adair, Jean; Feng, Feng; Maciejewski, Stephanie; Sharma, Harsha

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, fibromyalgia affects 2%-5% of the adult population, rendering it the most common chronic, widespread pain condition. The American College of Rheumatology has published diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, with the latest version in 2010. The purpose of this study was to evaluate nurse practitioners' education and awareness of fibromyalgia and to evaluate nurse practitioners' practices for the management of fibromyalgia. Sixty-six nurse practitioners voluntarily completed an online survey regarding their education, diagnosis, and treatment options for patients with fibromyalgia. The majority of participants reported that they always or occasionally had difficulty diagnosing fibromyalgia and worried about labeling their patients as having fibromyalgia. The most commonly used agents were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (70%), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (61%), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (51%), and muscle relaxants (44%). Nondrug therapies included exercise (88%), cognitive behavior therapy (58%), and nutrition (56%). Further education is needed for nurse practitioners to increase confidence in diagnosing and managing fibromyalgia.

  14. Effects of tianeptine on symptoms of fibromyalgia via BDNF signaling in a fibromyalgia animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hwayoung; Im, Jiyun; Won, Hansol; Nam, Wooyoung; Kim, Young Ock; Lee, Sang Won; Lee, Sanghyun; Cho, Ik-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Ki; Kwon, Jun-Tack; Kim, Hak-Jae

    2017-01-01

    Previous reports have suggested that physical and psychological stresses may trigger fibromyalgia (FM). Stress is an important risk factor in the development of depression and memory impairments. Antidepressants have been used to prevent stress-induced abnormal pain sensation. Among various antidepressants, tianeptine has been reported to be able to prevent neurodegeneration due to chronic stress and reverse decreases in hippocampal volume. To assess the possible effect of tianeptine on FM sy...

  15. Psychometric properties of the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR – a contribution to the Portuguese validation of the scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Costa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fibromyalgia (FM remains a relatively misunderstood and clinically challenging condition that impact significantly in the individual´s life, impairing global functioning and diminishing quality of life. Management is complex and frequently unsatisfactory, requiring personal tailoring and adaptation of interventions according to the fluctuations of the disease manifestations and their response to therapy. The use of comprehensive and quantified assessment tools constitutes, therefore, an essential component of the management of patients with FM. The Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR is currently one of the most used and well validated instruments to assess functional (incapacity and global impact of FM and associated symptoms. Objectives: To translate to Portuguese the FIQR and to study its psychometric properties. Material and Methods: The total sample comprised 103 women with fibromyalgia, defined according to the established criteria for FM. A self-report battery composed by the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR, the Portuguese version of Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II and the Profile of Mood States (PoMS was administered. The FIQR was re-administered to twenty-four participants, six weeks after the first evaluation. Internal reliability was assessed through Cronbach’s alpha, corrected item-total score correlations and alpha if item deleted. Spearman and Pearson correlations along with repeated measures tests were computed to assess the temporal stability of the scale. Convergent and divergent validity were assessed via Spearman and Pearson correlations. Results: The FIQR demonstrated a good to very good internal consistency (from α = 0.87 to α = 0.94. All items correlated to a good degree (above 0.30 to the total score and contributed significantly to the overall reliability. Moreover, FIQR presented a good temporal stability (from r = .617 to r = .886, p ≤ .001 and favorable convergent and

  16. Beyond pain in fibromyalgia: insights into the symptom of fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ann; Benzo, Roberto P; Whipple, Mary O; McAllister, Samantha J; Erwin, Patricia J; Saligan, Leorey N

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is a disabling, multifaceted symptom that is highly prevalent and stubbornly persistent. Although fatigue is a frequent complaint among patients with fibromyalgia, it has not received the same attention as pain. Reasons for this include lack of standardized nomenclature to communicate about fatigue, lack of evidence-based guidelines for fatigue assessment, and a deficiency in effective treatment strategies. Fatigue does not occur in isolation; rather, it is present concurrently in varying severity with other fibromyalgia symptoms such as chronic widespread pain, unrefreshing sleep, anxiety, depression, cognitive difficulties, and so on. Survey-based and preliminary mechanistic studies indicate that multiple symptoms feed into fatigue and it may be associated with a variety of physiological mechanisms. Therefore, fatigue assessment in clinical and research settings must consider this multi-dimensionality. While no clinical trial to date has specifically targeted fatigue, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses indicate that treatment modalities studied in the context of other fibromyalgia symptoms could also improve fatigue. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Fibromyalgia Working Group and the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) have been instrumental in propelling the study of fatigue in fibromyalgia to the forefront. The ongoing efforts by PROMIS to develop a brief fibromyalgia-specific fatigue measure for use in clinical and research settings will help define fatigue, allow for better assessment, and advance our understanding of fatigue.

  17. The importance of lactic acid in migraines and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Ribeiro, Guido Assis Cachuba; Scola, Rosana Hermínia; Piovesan, Elcio Juliato; Wollmann Junior, Darley Rugeri; Paiva, Eduardo Dos Santos; da Cunha, Claudio Leinig Pereira; Werneck, Lineu Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid is a byproduct of both muscle metabolism and the central nervous system. Changes in metabolism are related to various physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between migraine and fibromyalgia with the levels of lactic acid in the blood. We study of 93 patients was divided into five groups: 1) patients with fibromyalgia (n=20); 2) episodic migraine (n=20); 3) chronic migraine (n=20); 4) fibromyalgia and episodic migraine (n= 13); and 5) fibromyalgia and chronic migraine (n=20), and 20 healthy subjects (control group). Blood levels of lactic acid were measured at four different time points: at rest, during aerobic exercise, during anaerobic physical activity and while resting after anaerobic exercise. Lactic acid increased in all groups during anaerobic physical activity without predominance for either group. During aerobic physical activity, all groups increased lactic acid levels, but the increase was more expressive in the chronic migraine group and the chronic migraine with fibromyalgia group without statistical significance. We did not found abnormalities involving the metabolism of lactic acid in episodic and chronic migraine with or without fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Altered neuromuscular control mechanisms of the trapezius muscle in fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Stefan J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background fibromyalgia is a relatively common condition with widespread pain and pressure allodynia, but unknown aetiology. For decades, the association between motor control strategies and chronic pain has been a topic for debate. One long held functional neuromuscular control mechanism is differential activation between regions within a single muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in neuromuscular control, i.e. differential activation, between myalgic trapezius in fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls. Methods 27 fibromyalgia patients and 30 healthy controls performed 3 minutes bilateral shoulder elevations with different loads (0-4 Kg with a high-density surface electromyographical (EMG grid placed above the upper trapezius. Differential activation was quantified by the power spectral median frequency of the difference in EMG amplitude between the cranial and caudal parts of the upper trapezius. The average duration of the differential activation was described by the inverse of the median frequency of the differential activations. Results the median frequency of the differential activations was significantly lower, and the average duration of the differential activations significantly longer in fibromyalgia compared with controls at the two lowest load levels (0-1 Kg (p Conclusion these findings illustrate a different neuromuscular control between fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls during a low load functional task, either sustaining or resulting from the chronic painful condition. The findings may have clinical relevance for rehabilitation strategies for fibromyalgia.

  19. Beyond pain in fibromyalgia: insights into the symptom of fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is a disabling, multifaceted symptom that is highly prevalent and stubbornly persistent. Although fatigue is a frequent complaint among patients with fibromyalgia, it has not received the same attention as pain. Reasons for this include lack of standardized nomenclature to communicate about fatigue, lack of evidence-based guidelines for fatigue assessment, and a deficiency in effective treatment strategies. Fatigue does not occur in isolation; rather, it is present concurrently in varying severity with other fibromyalgia symptoms such as chronic widespread pain, unrefreshing sleep, anxiety, depression, cognitive difficulties, and so on. Survey-based and preliminary mechanistic studies indicate that multiple symptoms feed into fatigue and it may be associated with a variety of physiological mechanisms. Therefore, fatigue assessment in clinical and research settings must consider this multi-dimensionality. While no clinical trial to date has specifically targeted fatigue, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses indicate that treatment modalities studied in the context of other fibromyalgia symptoms could also improve fatigue. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Fibromyalgia Working Group and the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) have been instrumental in propelling the study of fatigue in fibromyalgia to the forefront. The ongoing efforts by PROMIS to develop a brief fibromyalgia-specific fatigue measure for use in clinical and research settings will help define fatigue, allow for better assessment, and advance our understanding of fatigue. PMID:24289848

  20. Subgrouping patients with fibromyalgia according to the results of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandre, Elena P; Garcia-Carrillo, Jocelyne; Garcia-Leiva, Juan M; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Molina-Barea, Rocío; Rodriguez-Lopez, Carmen M

    2011-12-01

    Fibromyalgia is a complex and heterogeneous disease, and several attempts have been made in order to identify different subgroups of patients sharing a common symptomatology. The purpose of the present study has been to replicate a subgroup classification proposed by de Souza et al. based in the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) in a large sample of patients with a cultural and clinical setting different from the original one. Four hundred twenty-one patients were classified, according to the results of the visual analog FIQ subscales in type I o type II subgroups. Demographic and clinical data, as well as results of scales assessing disease's severity, quality of life, sleep quality, anxiety and depression, were compared between the two groups. The profiles of type I and type II patients from our sample strikingly paralleled those of the original study, demonstrating the reproducibility of the classification. In our sample, 18.8% of the patients appertained to type I subgroup and 81.2% to type II subgroup. Patients from this later subgroup had higher comorbidity and received more drugs than those of the former. They were also more physically ill, with higher FIQ total scores and worse sleep quality, and more psychologically distressed, with higher levels of anxiety and depression and lower scores in the mental component summary of the Short-Form Health Questionnaire (SF-12). Our study shows that the proposed fibromyalgia classification is reliable and easy to perform and could be applied in further studies.

  1. Fibromyalgia and the therapeutic domain. A philosophical study on the origins of fibromyalgia in a specific social setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazemeijer, I; Rasker, J J

    2003-04-01

    Fibromyalgia has always attracted controversy. Wolfe states that fibromyalgia will always exist regardless of the name given to the syndrome. Hadler describes fibromyalgia as a form of illness behaviour escalated by labelling. However, we believe that fibromyalgia, as other functional somatic syndromes, is not waiting below the surface until it becomes manifest by labelling. We developed our hypothesis on the relationship between a specific social setting (called the therapeutic domain) and fibromyalgia using empirical philosophical arguments based on Foucault and Hacking. A therapeutic domain is a real and heterogeneous medical domain in which people, their thoughts and practices, and medical technology in any form coexist and communicate. In this domain blood is aspirated, radiographs are taken and classification criteria are made and applied. It is a domain where patient and therapist have initiated a relationship, which is influenced by the media and political pressure. This results in a looping effect where classification criteria and images give structure to perceptions and form the description for human behaviour; the person thus diagnosed (!) constantly has to grow into the conformity of these classification criteria, which also have to be constantly revised. The fibromyalgia concept becomes manifest in an individual as non-specific aches and pains along with other features. In other times and settings this resulted in analogue syndromes like railway spine, telegraph wrists, neurocirculatory asthenia or perhaps repetitive strain injury. In the application of American College of Rheumatology fibromyalgia classification criteria, labels and medical technology it is possible that invisible experiences manifest themselves in a therapeutic domain. It is not only a phenotype induced by the physician, but in this domain a certain power creates reality making the 'disease' become manifest. The only certainty in fibromyalgia is that it is still being diagnosed. For

  2. Influence of Craniosacral Therapy on Anxiety, Depression and Quality of Life in Patients with Fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A.; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; García, Gloria Carballo; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Carreño, Tesifón Parrón; Zafra, María Dolores Onieva

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is considered as a combination of physical, psychological and social disabilities. The causes of pathologic mechanism underlying fibromyalgia are unknown, but fibromyalgia may lead to reduced quality of life. The objective of this study was to analyze the repercussions of craniosacral therapy on depression, anxiety and quality of life in fibromyalgia patients with painful symptoms. An experimental, double-blind longitudinal clinical trial design was undertaken. Eighty-four patien...

  3. A Brief Review of the Pharmacology of Amitriptyline and Clinical Outcomes in Treating Fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a complex chronic condition characterized by pain, physical fatigue, sleep disorder and cognitive impairment. Evidence-based guidelines recommend antidepressants as treatments of fibromyalgia where tricyclics are often considered to have the greatest efficacy, with amitriptyline often being a first-line treatment. Amitriptyline evokes a preferential reduction in pain and fatigue of fibromyalgia, and in the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) score, which is a quality of li...

  4. Impact of fibromyalgia on functioning in obese patients undergoing comprehensive rehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Arreghini

    Full Text Available A possible link between fibromyalgia (FM and obesity has been recently suggested but very scanty data on the prevalence of FM in obese populations are available. The aims of the present cross-sectional study were: 1 to estimate the prevalence of FM in a population of obese patients undergoing rehabilitation and 2 to investigate the effect of FM on obese patients' functional capacities. One hundred and thirty Italian obese (Body Mass Index, BMI ≥ 30 patients admitted to hospital for 1-month rehabilitation treatment took part in the study. All participants were interviewed by a rheumatologist according to the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR diagnostic criteria for FM. At admission and discharge from hospital (on average, after 28 days, the following measures were compared between the group of patients with FM and the other patients: body weight, body mass index, functional independence (FIM, obesity-related disability (TSD-OC, self-reported functioning and the Timed-Up-Go (TUG test. Thirty seven patients out of 130 fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for FM. The prevalence rate was 27.7% (95% CI: 20 to 35.4. Between-group comparisons showed that FM patients had higher disability level at the first assessment, had lower scores on the FIM at the final assessment, scored lower on self-reported functioning both at the first and the final assessments and had a lower body weight. The prevalence of FM in our study is much higher than the rates reported in the general normal-weight population (on average, 3.5% and the 5.15% rate previously reported in a bariatric population. Functional data showed that the FM obese group yielded lower performance capacity and higher disability level as compared to the non-FM obese group. However, due to the relatively small sample size and the selected population, such results need to be confirmed in larger obese subpopulations.

  5. Relationship between Self-Reported Dietary Nutrient Intake and Self-Reported Sleep Duration among Japanese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Komada

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported that short sleep duration is a risk factor for obesity and metabolic disease. Moreover, both sleep duration and sleep timing might independently be associated with dietary nutrient intake. In this study, we investigated the associations between self-reported sleep duration and dietary nutrient intake, with and without adjustments for variations in sleep timing (i.e., the midpoint of sleep. We conducted a questionnaire survey, comprising a validated brief self-administered diet history questionnaire (BDHQ and the Japanese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI among 1902 healthy Japanese adults and found that the dietary intakes of several nutrients correlated with sleep duration among men regardless of adjustment for the midpoint of sleep. Particularly, (1 small but significant correlations were observed between sleep duration and the percentage of energy from protein, regardless of adjustment for the midpoint of sleep; (2 energy-adjusted intakes of sodium, vitamin D, and vitamin B12 also significantly correlated with sleep duration; and (3 intakes of bread, pulses, and fish and shellfish correlated with sleep duration. In contrast, no significant correlations were observed between sleep duration and dietary intakes among women. This study revealed that after controlling for the midpoint of sleep, sleep duration correlated significantly with the dietary intake of specific nutrients and foods in a population of Japanese men.

  6. Subtle Symptoms Associated with Self-Reported Mild Head Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalowitz, Sidney J.; Lawson, Sheila

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 1,345 high school students and 2,321 university students found that 30-37% reported having experienced a head injury, with 12-15% reporting loss of consciousness. Significant relationships were found between mild head injury incidence and gender; sleep difficulties; social difficulties; handedness pattern; and diagnoses of attention…

  7. Are self-reports of health and morbidities in developing countries misleading? Evidence from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, S V; Subramanyam, Malavika A; Selvaraj, Sakthivel; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Self-reported measures of poor health and morbidities from developing countries tend to be viewed with considerable skepticism. Examination of the social gradient in self-reported health and morbidity measures provides a useful test of the validity of self-reports of poor health and morbidities. The prevailing view, in part influenced by Amartya Sen, is that socially disadvantaged individuals will fail to perceive and report the presence of illness or health-deficits because an individual's assessment of their health is directly contingent on their social experience. In this study, we tested whether the association between self-reported poor health/morbidities and socioeconomic status (SES) in India follows the expected direction or not. Cross-sectional logistic regression analyses were carried out on a nationally representative population-based sample from the 1998 to 1999 Indian National Family Health Survey (INFHS); and 1995-1996 and 2004 Indian National Sample Survey (INSS). Four binary outcomes were analyzed: any self-reported morbidity; self-reported sickness in the last 15 days; self-reported sickness in the past year; and poor self-rated health. In separate adjusted models, individuals with no education reported higher levels of any self-reported, self-reported sickness in the last 15 days, self-reported sickness in the last year, and poor self-rated health compared to those with most education. Contrary to the prevailing thesis, we find that the use of self-rated ill-health has face validity as assessed via its relationship to SES. A less dismissive and pessimistic view of health data obtained through self-reports seems warranted.

  8. The Japanese version of the modified ACR preliminary diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia and the fibromyalgia symptom scale: reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Chie; Hatta, Kotaro; Aratani, Satoko; Yagishita, Naoko; Nishioka, Kenya; Kanazawa, Teruhisa; Itoh, Kenji; Yamano, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Toshihiro; Nishioka, Kusuki

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the reliability and validity of the Japanese version of the modified American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Preliminary Diagnostic Criteria for Fibromyalgia (mACR 2010-J) and the Fibromyalgia Symptom Scale (mFS-J). According to the ACR 1990 classification criteria, patients with chronic pain were divided into the fibromyalgia group and nonfibromyalgia group (rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis). Patients in both groups were assessed using mACR 2010-J and mFS-J. 294 of 462 (64 %) patients in the fibromyalgia group met mACR 2010-J, whereas 4 % (9/231) of the nonfibromyalgia group did, with sensitivity of 64 %, specificity of 96 %, positive predictive value of 97 %, negative predictive value of 56 %, and positive likelihood ratio of 16.3. Mean total scores on mFS-J significantly differentiated the fibromyalgia from the nonfibromyalgia group. According to the value of the Youden index, the best cutoff score for the mFS-J was 9/10. Our findings indicate that mACR 2010-J as a positive test and mFS-J as a quantification scale might be suitable for assessing fibromyalgia among Japanese chronic pain populations.

  9. Self-reported food skills of university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Courtney K; Matthews, June I; Seabrook, Jamie A; Dworatzek, Paula D N

    2017-01-01

    University students experience a life transition that often results in poor dietary behaviors and weight gain. Adequate food skills may improve diet quality and prevent chronic disease. Research is limited, however, on students' food skills and food-related behaviors. The objective of this study was to assess whether self-perceived food skills and related behaviors of students at a large, Canadian university differed based on sex, having taken a Food and Nutrition (FN) course, and living conditions, using a cross-sectional online survey. The response rate was 21.9% (n = 6638). Students (age, M ± SD 19.9 ± 2.1 years) self-reported their abilities for seven distinct food skills. Students rated (out of 100) their ability for some skills significantly higher than others (79.7 ± 20.9 for peeling, chopping, and slicing vs. 56.1 ± 29.1 for weekly meal planning; p Students who resided away from their parental home for longer than one year reported significantly higher total food skill scores than those living away for one year or less (488.9 ± 134.6 vs. 443.3 ± 153.0, respectively; p students' self-perceived food skills vary by sex, FN education, and living condition. Higher abilities were reported for mechanical food skills; conceptual skills were significantly lower. These results may assist in effectively targeting this population with nutrition education interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a self-report scale of spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Steve; Horton, Mike; Kent, Ruth M; Tennant, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Although the Modified Ashworth Scale is the most common instrument used to grade spasticity, it is unsuitable for busy follow-up clinics, longer term follow-up, or community surveys. To establish a simple questionnaire that would indicate the presence and extent of spasticity and would be suitable for use in everyday outpatient clinical practice and/or community follow-up. Qualitative exploration of the experience and impact of spasticity among stroke patients led to the development of a short questionnaire. Rasch analysis was performed on the data and the scale items were externally validated by correlation with comparator measures. Forty-eight subjects were recruited for the qualitative interviews, half of whom were more than 2 years post stroke. Interviews generated items relating to spasticity that were categorized into pain, spasm, fatigue, restricted movement, loss of balance, and altered appearance. Eight items were chosen for the draft questionnaire. Five hundred questionnaires were sent, and 188 (38%) were returned. The mean age of the 188 responders was 72.6 years. In regard to health, 18.5% reported that they were in good or excellent health, and 49.7% reported only fair or poor health. Data from the 8-item scale were fitted to the Rasch measurement model. Initial fit of the 8 items was good, and all the assumptions of the model were satisfied. A strong and significant gradient was found between the summed 8-item scale and self-reported health. A short self-perceived scale for spasticity has been developed from grounded theory, which satisfies the most rigorous standards for measurement with fit to the Rasch model.

  11. Transgender transitioning and change of self-reported sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Matthias K; Fuss, Johannes; Höhne, Nina; Stalla, Günter K; Sievers, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Sexual orientation is usually considered to be determined in early life and stable in the course of adulthood. In contrast, some transgender individuals report a change in sexual orientation. A common reason for this phenomenon is not known. We included 115 transsexual persons (70 male-to-female "MtF" and 45 female-to-male "FtM") patients from our endocrine outpatient clinic, who completed a questionnaire, retrospectively evaluating the history of their gender transition phase. The questionnaire focused on sexual orientation and recalled time points of changes in sexual orientation in the context of transition. Participants were further asked to provide a personal concept for a potential change in sexual orientation. In total, 32.9% (n = 23) MtF reported a change in sexual orientation in contrast to 22.2% (n = 10) FtM transsexual persons (p = 0.132). Out of these patients, 39.1% (MtF) and 60% (FtM) reported a change in sexual orientation before having undergone any sex reassignment surgery. FtM that had initially been sexually oriented towards males ( = androphilic), were significantly more likely to report on a change in sexual orientation than gynephilic, analloerotic or bisexual FtM (p = 0.012). Similarly, gynephilic MtF reported a change in sexual orientation more frequently than androphilic, analloerotic or bisexual MtF transsexual persons (p =0.05). In line with earlier reports, we reveal that a change in self-reported sexual orientation is frequent and does not solely occur in the context of particular transition events. Transsexual persons that are attracted by individuals of the opposite biological sex are more likely to change sexual orientation. Qualitative reports suggest that the individual's biography, autogynephilic and autoandrophilic sexual arousal, confusion before and after transitioning, social and self-acceptance, as well as concept of sexual orientation itself may explain this phenomenon.

  12. Validity and limitations of self-reported periodontal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhlin, Kåre; Gustafsson, Anders; Andersson, Kerstin; Håkansson, Jan; Klinge, Björn

    2002-12-01

    To study the agreement between self-reported dental conditions and clinical findings in an adult population (20-84 years of age), and thus evaluate questionnaires as a tool in epidemiological studies of oral health, in general, and periodontal health, in particular. A questionnaire was sent to 900 randomly selected subjects in the age groups 20-29, 50-59 and 75-84 years. Of these, 723 subjects (81.0%) answered the questionnaire and 20% of them underwent a clinical examination. As regards the remaining teeth, there was a mean difference of 1.4 teeth between the number indicated in the questionnaire and that found on the clinical examination. This difference was most marked in the older subjects. Eight of the nine subjects with removable dentures reported in their answers that they had removable dentures. Periodontal variables--we found significantly more subjects with pathological gingival pockets among those who stated that they had pockets than among those who answered that they did not (P = 0.01; chi-square independent test). Gingival bleeding was common in those who answered 'Yes' than in those who answered 'No' to the question concerning bleeding gums. This difference was significant (P = 0.05; chi-square independent test) in the three age groups. However, there was no correlation between the questionnaires and the clinical examination concerning tooth mobility. Questionnaires concerning oral status are valid concerning the number of remaining teeth and use of removable dentures. They are less reliable about specific periodontal variables, but can still become a valuable tool for epidemiological studies of periodontal health.

  13. Self-reported periodontal conditions among Dutch women during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmakh, V; Slot, D E; van der Weijden, G A

    2017-11-01

    Women can experience symptoms of gingival inflammation during pregnancy. However, whether clinical signs of gingival inflammation were present already before pregnancy and whether women perceive an alteration in their periodontal health status during pregnancy compared to their periodontal health status before pregnancy remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the self-reported periodontal conditions in pregnant Dutch women as perceived before and during pregnancy. This cross-sectional survey was performed by asking women visiting two midwifery practices to complete a structured questionnaire. The data, which considered the women's oral hygiene habits, perceived periodontal health status before and during pregnancy and dental visits, were gathered and analysed. Parametric and nonparametric tests were used when appropriate. Most of the respondents (mean age: 29.6 years) brushed their teeth twice a day (72.2%), and 62.0% used interdental cleaning devices. Significant differences in periodontal health before and during pregnancy were perceived. No differences with respect to periodontal disease symptoms between the three trimesters during pregnancy were found. The symptom with the greatest increase was bleeding gums. This was followed by symptoms of painful and swollen gums. Of the 61.5% women who disclosed their plans to become pregnant to their dental care practitioner, 53.9% received information regarding the possibility of alterations in oral health status during pregnancy. Because of the perceived alterations in oral health status during pregnancy, approximately 11% of the women scheduled an additional appointment with their dental care professional for advice. During the pregnancy period, perceived alterations in periodontal health status were reported as compared to the oral health situation before pregnancy. Furthermore, approximately 50% of the women who visited a dental professional and disclosed their (plans) of pregnancy did not receive

  14. Stereotype threat lowers older adults’ self-reported hearing abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Sarah J.; Lee, Soohyoung Rain

    2016-01-01

    Background Although stereotype threat is a well-documented phenomenon, previous studies examining it in older adults have almost exclusively focused on objective cognitive outcomes. Considerably less attention has been paid to the impact of stereotype threat on older adults’ subjective assessments of their own abilities or to the impact of stereotype threat in non-cognitive domains. Objective Older adults are stereotyped as having experienced not only cognitive declines, but physical declines as well. The current study tested the prediction that stereotype threat can negatively influence older adult's subjective hearing abilities. Methods To test this, 115 adults (M age = 50.02, range = 41-67) read either a positive or negative description about how aging affects hearing. All participants then answered a questionnaire in which they assessed their own hearing abilities. Results The impact of stereotype threat on self-reported hearing was moderated by chronological age. Participants in their 40's and early 50's were unaffected by the stereotype threat manipulation. In contrast, participants in their late 50's and 60's rated their hearing as being subjectively worse when under stereotype threat. Conclusion The current study provides a clear demonstration that stereotype threat negatively impacts older adults’ subjective assessments of their own abilities. It is also the first study to demonstrate an effect of stereotype threat within the domain of hearing. These results have important implications for researchers investigating age-related hearing decline. Stereotype threat can lead to overestimation of the prevalence of age-related hearing decline. It can also serve as a confounding variable when examining the psychosocial correlates of hearing loss. Because of this, researchers studying age-related hearing loss should aim to provide a stereotype-threat free testing environment and also include assessments of stereotype threat within their studies. PMID:26461273

  15. Stereotype Threat Lowers Older Adults' Self-Reported Hearing Abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Sarah J; Lee, Soohyoung Rain

    2015-01-01

    Although stereotype threat is a well-documented phenomenon, previous studies examining it in older adults have almost exclusively focused on objective cognitive outcomes. Considerably less attention has been paid to the impact of stereotype threat on older adults' subjective assessments of their own abilities or to the impact of stereotype threat in noncognitive domains. Older adults are stereotyped as having experienced not only cognitive declines, but physical declines as well. The current study tested the prediction that stereotype threat can negatively influence older adults' subjective hearing abilities. To test this, 115 adults (mean age 50.03 years, range 41-67) read either a positive or negative description about how aging affects hearing. All participants then answered a questionnaire in which they assessed their own hearing abilities. The impact of stereotype threat on self-reported hearing was moderated by chronological age. Participants in their 40s and early 50s were unaffected by the stereotype threat manipulation. In contrast, participants in their late 50s and 60s rated their hearing as being subjectively worse when under stereotype threat. The current study provides a clear demonstration that stereotype threat negatively impacts older adults' subjective assessments of their own abilities. It is also the first study to demonstrate an effect of stereotype threat within the domain of hearing. These results have important implications for researchers investigating age-related hearing decline. Stereotype threat can lead to overestimation of the prevalence of age-related hearing decline. It can also serve as a confounding variable when examining the psychosocial correlates of hearing loss. Because of this, researchers studying age-related hearing loss should aim to provide a stereotype threat-free testing environment and also include assessments of stereotype threat within their studies. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Walitt

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition with a biopsychosocial aetiology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep problems, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue. Patients often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Since there is no specific treatment that alters the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia, drug therapy focuses on pain reduction and improvement of other aversive symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in the treatment of fibromyalgia. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5, MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014, EMBASE (1946 to June 2014, and the reference lists of reviewed articles. Selection criteria: We selected all randomized, double-blind trials of SSRIs used for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms in adult participants. We considered the following SSRIs in this review: citalopram, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. Data collection and analysis: Three authors extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. MAIN RESULTS: The quality of evidence was very low for each outcome. We downgraded the quality of evidence to very low due to concerns about risk of bias and studies with few participants. We included seven placebo-controlled studies, two with citalopram, three with fluoxetine and two with paroxetine, with a median study duration of eight weeks (4 to 16 weeks and 383 participants, who were pooled together. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias. There was a small (10% difference in patients who reported a 30% pain reduction between SSRIs (56/172 (32.6% and placebo (39/171 (22.8% risk difference (RD 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.01 to 0.20; number needed to treat for an

  17. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Urrútia, Gerard; Nishishinya, María Betina; Cantrell, Sarah E; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition with a biopsychosocial aetiology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep problems, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue. Patients often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Since there is no specific treatment that alters the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia, drug therapy focuses on pain reduction and improvement of other aversive symptoms. Objectives The objective was to assess the benefits and harms of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014), EMBASE (1946 to June 2014), and the reference lists of reviewed articles. Selection criteria We selected all randomized, double-blind trials of SSRIs used for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms in adult participants. We considered the following SSRIs in this review: citalopram, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. Data collection and analysis Three authors extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. Main results The quality of evidence was very low for each outcome. We downgraded the quality of evidence to very low due to concerns about risk of bias and studies with few participants. We included seven placebo-controlled studies, two with citalopram, three with fluoxetine and two with paroxetine, with a median study duration of eight weeks (4 to 16 weeks) and 383 participants, who were pooled together. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias. There was a small (10%) difference in patients who reported a 30% pain reduction between SSRIs (56/172 (32.6%)) and placebo (39/171 (22.8%)) risk difference (RD) 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 0.20; number needed to treat for an additional

  18. Immune markers in fibromyalgia: comparison with major depressed patients and normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorso, S; Lin, A H; Verkerk, R; Van Hunsel, F; Libbrecht, I; Scharpé, S; DeClerck, L; Biondi, M; Janca, A; Maes, M

    1998-02-01

    There is a high degree of comorbidity between fibromyalgia and major depression. The latter is characterized by signs of immune activation, whereas the immune status in fibromyalgia is not yet elucidated. The aims of the present study were to examine (i) neopterin and biopterin excretion in 24-h urine of patients with fibromyalgia compared with normal volunteers and patients with major depression; and (ii) the effects of subchronic treatment with sertraline (11 weeks) on the urinary excretion of neopterin and biopterin. Measurements of neopterin, biopterin, pseudouridine, creatinine and uric acid in 24-h urine were performed by means of HPLC in 14 fibromyalgia and ten major depressed patients and 17 normal volunteers. There were no significant differences in urine excretion of the above five analytes between patients with fibromyalgia and normal volunteers. Patients with major depression showed significantly higher urinary neopterin excretion than normal volunteers and fibromyalgia patients. Patients with fibromyalgia and major depression had a significantly increased neopterin/creatinine ratio. Fibromyalgia patients had significantly lower urinary excretion of creatinine than patients with major depression. In fibromyalgia patients, there were no significant effects of sertraline treatment on any of the urine analytes. The findings suggest that fibromyalgia, in contrast to major depression, may not be accompanied by activation of cell-mediated immunity. Other immune markers should be measured in fibromyalgia before drawing definite conclusions. Increased urinary excretion of neopterin can be used as a marker for major depression, but not fibromyalgia.

  19. Results of a multidisciplinary program for patients with fibromyalgia implemented in the primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Bloten, H.; Oeseburg, B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. Fibromyalgia is a syndrome of unknown origin with a high prevalence. Multimodal approaches seem to be the treatment of choice in fibromyalgia. A multidisciplinary program was developed and implemented for patients with fibromyalgia in the primary care setting. The program included education

  20. Physical fitness reference standards in fibromyalgia : The al-Ándalus project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Álvarez-Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Carbonell-Baeza, A; Segura-Jiménez, V.; Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto; Intemann, T; Aparicio, Virgina A; Estévez-López, F; Camiletti-Moirón, Daniel; Herrador-Colmenero, Manuel; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Delgado-Fernández, M.; Ortega, Francisco B

    2017-01-01

    We aimed (1) to report age-specific physical fitness levels in people with fibromyalgia of a representative sample from Andalusia; and (2) to compare the fitness levels of people with fibromyalgia with non-fibromyalgia controls. This cross-sectional study included 468 (21 men) patients with

  1. The Fibromyalgia Survey Score Correlates With Preoperative Pain Phenotypes But Does Not Predict Pain Outcomes After Shoulder Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jennifer; Kahn, Richard L; YaDeau, Jacques T; Tsodikov, Alexander; Goytizolo, Enrique A; Guheen, Carrie R; Haskins, Stephen C; Oxendine, Joseph A; Allen, Answorth A; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Dines, David M; Brummett, Chad M

    2016-08-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) characteristics can be evaluated using a simple, self-reported measure that correlates with postoperative opioid consumption after lower-extremity joint arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to determine whether preoperative pain history and the FM survey score can predict postoperative outcomes after shoulder arthroscopy, which may cause moderate to severe pain. In this prospective study, 100 shoulder arthroscopy patients completed preoperative validated self-report measures to assess baseline quality of recovery score, physical functioning, depression, anxiety, and neuropathic pain. FM characteristics were evaluated using a validated measure of widespread pain and comorbid symptoms on a 0 to 31 scale. Outcomes were assessed on postoperative day 2 (opioid consumption [primary], pain, physical functioning, quality of recovery score), and day 14 (opioid consumption, pain). FM survey scores ranged from 0 to 13. The cohort was divided into tertiles for univariate analyses. Preoperative depression and anxiety (Ppain (P=0.008) were higher, and physical functioning was lower (Ppain or opioid consumption; however, it was independently associated with poorer quality of recovery scores (P=0.001). The only independent predictor of postoperative opioid use was preoperative opioid use (P=0.038). FM survey scores were lower than those in a previous study of joint arthroplasty. Although they distinguished a negative preoperative pain phenotype, FM scores were not independently associated with postoperative opioid consumption. Further research is needed to elucidate the impact of a FM-like phenotype on postoperative analgesic outcomes.

  2. Patient Health Questionnaire 15 as a generic measure of severity in fibromyalgia syndrome: surveys with patients of three different settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuser, Winfried; Brähler, Elmar; Wolfe, Frederick; Henningsen, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Graduated treatment of patients with functional somatic syndromes (FSS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) depending on their severity has been recommended by recent guidelines. The Patient Health Questionnaire 15 (PHQ 15) is a validated measure of somatic symptom severity in FSS. We tested the discriminant and transcultural validity of the PHQ 15 as a generic measure of severity in persons with FMS. Persons meeting recognized FMS-criteria of the general German population (N=98), of the US National Data Bank of Rheumatic Diseases (N=440), and of a single German pain medicine center (N=167) completed validated self-report questionnaires on somatic and psychological distress (Polysymptomatic Distress Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire 4), health-related quality of life (HRQOL) (Short Form Health Survey 12 or 36) and disability (Pain Disability Index). In addition, self-reports of working status were assessed in the clinical setting. Overall severity of FMS was defined by PHQ 15 scores: mild (0-9), moderate (10-14) and severe (15-30). Persons with mild, moderate and severe FMS did not differ in age and gender. Irrespective of the setting, persons with severe FMS reported more pain sites, fatigue, depressed mood, impaired HRQOL and disability than persons with moderate or mild FMS. Patients with severe FMS in the NDB and in the German clinical center reported more work-related disability than patients with mild FMS. The PHQ 15 is a valid generic measure of overall severity in FMS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characteristics of pornography film actors: self-report versus perceptions of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James D; Hayworth, Michelle; Adams, Lea T; Mitchell, Sharon; Hart, Christian

    2013-05-01

    The assumed characteristics of individuals in the adult entertainment industry have been used to advocate positions for and against pornography. Although prior studies have investigated perceptions of porn actors, no data on the actual characteristics of this group exist. The present study compared the self-reports of 105 male and 177 female porn actors to the perceptions of 399 college students on childhood sexual abuse (CSA), self-esteem, work and non-work sexual behaviors, and safe sex issues. College students were asked to identify the characteristics associated with either a male or female porn star. College students provided underestimates for both female and male porn actors on self-esteem, age of first intercourse, lifetime number of partners outside of work, ideal experience in a romantic partner, concerns regarding sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), enjoyment of sex, and condom use during a first time sexual encounter, but overestimated earnings. Additional differences among male porn stars included an underestimate of the number of partners at work. For female porn stars, college students underestimated their enjoyment of work, the probability of catching an STD, and having unprotected sex. Although there were no significant differences on perceived rates of childhood abuse of porn actors, the incidence of CSA among the porn actor participants were within the ranges of the general population. The majority of college student stereotypes were not supported regarding the perceptions of porn actors. These findings were discussed within the context of attributing unfounded characteristics of individuals to an entire industry.

  4. Prospective study of alcohol consumption and self-reported hearing loss in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curhan, Sharon G; Eavey, Roland; Wang, Molin; Stampfer, Meir J; Curhan, Gary C

    2015-02-01

    Chronic excess alcohol intake has been associated with irreversible hearing loss and acute alcohol intake may temporarily impair auditory function; however, some evidence suggests that long-term moderate alcohol intake may be related to lower risk of hearing loss. This study prospectively examined the association between total alcohol and individual alcoholic beverage consumption and risk of hearing loss in women. Data were prospectively collected from 65,424 participants in the Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II), aged 27-44 years at baseline (follow-up 1991-2009). Alcohol consumption was assessed using a validated questionnaire every 4 years. An incident case was defined as a self-reported hearing problem that began after 1991. Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. During 1,024,555 person-years of follow-up, 12,384 cases of hearing loss occurred. After multivariate adjustment, there was no significant association between total alcohol consumption and risk of hearing loss. In exploratory analyses, beer consumption was associated with increased risk and wine consumption was associated with reduced risk. No significant association was observed for consumption of liquor. Total alcohol consumption is not associated with risk of hearing loss in women. The modest associations observed for beer (direct) and wine (inverse) may be due to chance or residual confounding but merit further study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Predicting long-term sickness absence and early retirement pension from self-reported work ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sell, Lea; Bültmann, Ute; Rugulies, Reiner Ernst

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the relationship between self-reported work ability and long-term term of sickness absence or early retirement from the labour market.......The aim of this paper is to examine the relationship between self-reported work ability and long-term term of sickness absence or early retirement from the labour market....

  6. Self-Report Measures of Parent-Adolescent Attachment and Separation-Individuation: A Selective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Frederick G.; Gover, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews and critiques three self-report measures of parent-adolescent attachment (Parental Bonding Instrument, Parental Attachment Questionnaire, Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment) and three self-report measures of parent-adolescent separation-individuation (Psychological Separation Inventory, Personal Authority in the Family System…

  7. Just Ask Me: Convergent Validity of Self-Reported Measures of Music Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elpus, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the convergent validity of self-reported and objective measures of school music ensemble participation. Self-reported survey responses to a question about high school music ensemble participation and administrative data in the form of high school transcript-indicated ensemble enrollments were compared…

  8. Validation of Self-Reported Cognitive Problems with Objective Neuropsychological Performance in Manganese-Exposed Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a lack of validation of self-reported cognitive problems with objective neuropsychological measures. The validity of four self-reported cognitive items from a health questionnaire (HQ) and the Symptoms Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R) was examined with objective clinical ...

  9. The Stability of Self-Reported Anxiety in Youth with Autism versus ADHD or Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiltz, Hillary; McIntyre, Nancy; Swain-Lerro, Lindsay; Zajic, Matthew; Mundy, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk for anxiety symptoms. Few anxiety measures are validated for individuals with ASD, and the nature of ASD raises questions about reliability of self-reported anxiety. This study examined longitudinal stability and change of self-reported anxiety in higher functioning youth with ASD (HFASD)…

  10. Clearing the AIR about the Use of Self-Reported Gains in Institutional Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonyea, Robert M.; Miller, Angie

    2011-01-01

    Correlations between self-reported learning gains and direct, longitudinal measures that ostensibly correspond in content area are generally inadequate. This chapter clarifies that self-reported measures of learning are more properly used and interpreted as evidence of students' perceived learning and affective outcomes. In this context, the…

  11. Validating the Factor Structure of the Self-Report Psychopathy Scale in a Community Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmut, Mehmet K.; Menictas, Con; Stevenson, Richard J.; Homewood, Judi

    2011-01-01

    Currently, there is no standard self-report measure of psychopathy in community-dwelling samples that parallels the most commonly used measure of psychopathy in forensic and clinical samples, the Psychopathy Checklist. A promising instrument is the Self-Report Psychopathy scale (SRP), which was derived from the original version the Psychopathy…

  12. Self-Reported Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier-Dykstra, Laura M.; Pinchevsky, Gillian M.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; Arria, Amelia M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Report the distribution of scores from the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) and estimate the prevalence of self-reported attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms as compared to clinical diagnoses. Participants: Participants were 1,080 college students, divided into 3 groups: (1) no ADHD diagnosis (n = 972), (2)…

  13. Can You Trust Self-Report Data Provided by Homeless Mentally Ill Individuals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calsyn, Robert J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reliability and validity of self-report data provided by 178 mentally ill homeless persons were generally favorable. Self-reports of service use also generally agreed with treatment staff estimates, providing further validity evidence. Researchers and administrators can be relatively confident in using such data. (SLD)

  14. Congruence of Self-Reported Medications with Pharmacy Prescription Records in Low-Income Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskie, Grace I. L.; Willis, Sherry L.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the congruence of self-reported medications with computerized pharmacy records. Design and Methods: Pharmacy records and self-reported medications were obtained for 294 members of a state pharmaceutical assistance program who also participated in ACTIVE, a clinical trial on cognitive training in nondemented elderly…

  15. Usefulness of Self-Report Instruments in Assessing Men Accused of Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfritz, Laura E.; Stanford, Matthew S.; Conklin, Sarah M.; Greve, Kevin W.; Villemarette-Pittman, Nicole R.; Houston, Rebecca J.

    2006-01-01

    Clinical assessment of domestic violence has traditionally relied on self-report methods of data collection, using structured interviews and lengthy questionnaires such as the MMPI-2. However, in certain situations such as court-ordered domestic violence evaluations, information obtained through self-report methods may be tainted because of…

  16. Validation of Self-Report on Smoking among University Students in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung Yul; Shin, Sunmi; Lee, Hyeon Kyeong; Hong, Yoon Mi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To validate the self-reported smoking status of Korean university students. Methods: Subjects included 322 Korean university in Korea, who participated in an annual health screening. Data on smoking were collected through a self-reported questionnaire and urine test. The data were analyzed by the McNemar test. Results: In the…

  17. Gender Differences in Self-Reported Symptomatology and Working Memory in College Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kercood, Suneeta; Lineweaver, Tara T.; Kugler, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences in self-reported symptomatology and working memory (visuospatial and auditory) in college students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Forty-seven college students with ADHD and 44 non-affected control participants completed two self-report questionnaires and six tests…

  18. Correction Equations to Adjust Self-Reported Height and Weight for Obesity Estimates among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozumdar, Arupendra; Liguori, Gary

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to generate correction equations for self-reported height and weight quartiles and to test the accuracy of the body mass index (BMI) classification based on corrected self-reported height and weight among 739 male and 434 female college students. The BMIqc (from height and weight quartile-specific, corrected…

  19. Applicant versus employee scores on self-report emotional intelligence measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lievens, F.; Klehe, U.-C.; Libbrecht, N.

    2011-01-01

    There exists growing interest to assess applicants’ emotional intelligence (EI) via self-report trait-based measures of EI as part of the selection process. However, some studies that experimentally manipulated applicant conditions have cautioned that in these conditions use of self-report measures

  20. Comparing genetic ancestry and self-reported race/ethnicity in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Self-reported race/ethnicity is frequently used in epidemiological studies to assess an individual's background origin. However, in admixed populations such as Hispanic, self-reported race/ethnicity may not accurately represent them genetically because they are admixed with European, African and Native American ...