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Sample records for incident probe field

  1. An Evanescent Field Optical Microscope. Scanning probe Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    1991-01-01

    An Evanescent Field Optical Microscope (EFOM) is presented, which employs frustrated total internal reflection on a highly localized scale by means of a sharp dielectric tip. The coupling of the evanescent field to the sub-micrometer probe as a function of probe-sample distance, angle of incidence

  2. Isotropic Broadband E-Field Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Szentpáli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An E-field probe has been developed for EMC immunity tests performed in closed space. The leads are flexible resistive transmission lines. Their influence on the field distribution is negligible. The probe has an isotropic reception from 100 MHz to 18 GHz; the sensitivity is in the 3 V/m–10 V/m range. The device is an accessory of the EMC test chamber. The readout of the field magnitude is carried out by personal computer, which fulfils also the required corrections of the raw data.

  3. Fast electromagnetic field strength probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes; Serra, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    Diode detectors and thermocouple detectors are conventionally used to measure electromagnetic field strength. Both detectors have some disadvantages for applications where a fast response and a high dynamic range is required. The diode detector is limited in dynamic range. The dynamic range is

  4. Internal field probing of translating FRCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, W.T.; Chrien, R.E.; Milroy, R.D.

    1984-11-01

    Magnetic field probes have been employed to study the internal field structure of Field-Reversed Configurations (FRCs) translating past the probes in the FRX-C/T device. Internal closed flux surfaces can be studied in this manner with minimal perturbation because of the rapid transit of the plasma (translation velocity v/sub z/ approx. 10 cm/μs). Data have been taken using a 5-mtorr-D 2 gas-puff mode of operation in the FRC source coil which yields an initial plasma density of approx. 1 x 10 15 cm -3 and x/sub s/ approx. 0.40. FRCs translate from the approx. 25 cm radius source coil into a 20 cm radius metal translation vessel. Of many translation conditions studied, the condition considered here is translation into a weak guide field resulting in expansion of the FRC to conditions of density approx. 3 x 10 14 and x/sub s/ approx. 0.7. The expected reversed B/sub z/ structure is observed. Evidence of island structure is also observed. Fluctuating levels of B/sub THETA/ are observed with amplitudes less than or equal to B 0 /3 and values of flux approx. 4 x the poloidal flux. Values of β on the separatrix of β/sub s/ approx. = 0.3 (indexed to the external field) are implied from the field measurements. This decrease of β/sub s/ with increased x/sub s/ is expected, and desirable for improved plasma confinement

  5. The FIELDS experiment for Solar Probe Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, S.; Spp/Fields Team

    2010-12-01

    Many of our basic ideas on the plasma physics of acceleration, energy flow, and dissipation, and structure of the solar wind have never been rigorously confronted by direct experimental measurements in the region where these processes are actually occurring. Although Alfven waves, shocks, and magnetic reconnection are often invoked as heating mechanisms, there have never been any direct measurements of Alfvenic waves nor the associated Poynting flux nor any measurements of ion or electron kinetic energy flux in the region from 10 R_s to 30 R_s where the final stages of wind acceleration are believed to occur. The radial profiles of both slow and fast solar wind acceleration are based on remote-sensing measurements and have been obtained for only a few selected events. Thus, the spatial radial and perpendicular scales of the acceleration process have been averaged by line-of-sight effects and the possibility of intense localized acceleration cannot be ruled out. The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission calls for the high quality fields and particles measurements required to solve the coronal heating and wind acceleration problem. The SPP 'FIELDS' experiment measures the electric and magnetic fields fundamental to the plasma physics of the structured and turbulent solar wind, flux ropes, collisionless shocks, and magnetic reconnection. FIELDS will make the first-ever measurements of the DC/Low-Frequency electric field inside of 1 AU allowing for in situ, high cadence measurements of the Poynting vector, the Elsasser variables, and E/B diagnostics of the wave spectrum to fce in the solar wind. SPP/FIELDS measures the radio wave (type III and II) signatures of microflares, energized electrons, and CME propagation. SPP/ FIELDS measures the plasma electron density to ~2% accuracy and the core electron temperature to ~5-10% accuracy more than 90% of the time at perihelion. FIELDS will also measure the in situ density fluctuation spectrum and structures at a very high cadence (

  6. Probing Magnetic Fields with Square Kilometre Array and its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of-sight (along the galactic plane). Probing magnetic fields by FD alone will fail to give complete information about these systematic fields. In radio, these fields are probed by synchrotron emission. Despite the limitation due to assumption of ...

  7. Bunker probe: A plasma potential probe almost insensitive to its orientation with the magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costea, S; Fonda, B; Kovačič, J; Gyergyek, T; Schneider, B S; Schrittwieser, R; Ionita, C

    2016-05-01

    Due to their ability to suppress a large part of the electron current and thus measuring directly the plasma potential, ion sensitive probes have begun to be widely tested and used in fusion devices. For these probes to work, almost perfect alignment with the total magnetic field is necessary. This condition cannot always be fulfilled due to the curvature of magnetic fields, complex magnetic structure, or magnetic field reconnection. In this perspective, we have developed a plasma potential probe (named Bunker probe) based on the principle of the ion sensitive probe but almost insensitive to its orientation with the total magnetic field. Therefore it can be used to measure the plasma potential inside fusion devices, especially in regions with complex magnetic field topology. Experimental results are presented and compared with Ball-Pen probe measurements taken under identical conditions. We have observed that the floating potential of the Bunker probe is indeed little affected by its orientation with the magnetic field for angles ranging from 90° to 30°, in contrast to the Ball-Pen probe whose floating potential decreases towards that of a Langmuir probe if not properly aligned with the magnetic field.

  8. Bunker probe: A plasma potential probe almost insensitive to its orientation with the magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costea, S.; Schneider, B. S.; Schrittwieser, R.; Ionita, C.; Fonda, B.; Kovačič, J.; Gyergyek, T.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their ability to suppress a large part of the electron current and thus measuring directly the plasma potential, ion sensitive probes have begun to be widely tested and used in fusion devices. For these probes to work, almost perfect alignment with the total magnetic field is necessary. This condition cannot always be fulfilled due to the curvature of magnetic fields, complex magnetic structure, or magnetic field reconnection. In this perspective, we have developed a plasma potential probe (named Bunker probe) based on the principle of the ion sensitive probe but almost insensitive to its orientation with the total magnetic field. Therefore it can be used to measure the plasma potential inside fusion devices, especially in regions with complex magnetic field topology. Experimental results are presented and compared with Ball-Pen probe measurements taken under identical conditions. We have observed that the floating potential of the Bunker probe is indeed little affected by its orientation with the magnetic field for angles ranging from 90° to 30°, in contrast to the Ball-Pen probe whose floating potential decreases towards that of a Langmuir probe if not properly aligned with the magnetic field.

  9. Response of Magnetic Force Microscopy Probes under AC Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungthong, A.; Ruksasakchai, P.; Saengkaew, K.; Cheowanish, I.; Damrongsak, B.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) probes with different coating materials were characterized under AC magnetic field. A perpendicular magnetic write head similar to those used in hard disk drives was employed as the AC magnetic field generator. In order to measure a response of MFM probes to AC magnetic field, a MFM probe under test was scanned, at a scan height of 10 nm, across the surface of the magnetic write head. During MFM imaging, the write head was biased by a sufficient magnitude of AC current, approximately 30 mA. A spectral analysis for a frequency sweep from 1 kHz to 100 MHz was extracted from post-processing MFM images. As expected, a MFM probe coated with hard magnetic alloys, i.e. FePt, has the lowest response to AC magnetic fields. MFM probes coated with soft magnetic alloys, i.e. NiFe and NiCoCr, have a relatively high and flat response across the frequency range. Ni coated MFM probe has the highest response to AC magnetic fields. In addition, CoCr and NiCo coated MFM probes show lower response than NiFe and NiCoCr probes at low frequencies; however, theirs response to AC magnetic field increase for the AC magnetic field with a frequency above 50 kHz. This can be implied that those MFM probes are a good candidate for being used to study the high-frequency performance of perpendicular magnetic write heads. Noting that response of all MFM probes significantly decreased when driven frequencies above 1 MHz due to the limitation of the hardware, i.e. response of quadrant photodiode and op-amp in a pre-amplifier.

  10. Response time of electromagnetic field strength probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt-Ardatjew, R.A.; Serra, Ramiro; Hiltz, L. Gregory; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Modern signals in for instance wireless communication systems and radars use very complex modulation with high peakto-average ratio. Other signals, such as in reverberation chambers with mode stirring, vary very fast with a high dynamic range. Conventional probes, using thermocouples or diode

  11. Development and field practical performance of smart array probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Kotaro; Shimone, Junri; Akagawa, Junichi; Nagata, Yasuyuki; Harada, Yutaka; Sera, Takehiko; Hirano, Shinro

    2011-01-01

    In 1999, NEL developed the transmit-receive type ECT array probe for steam generator (SG) tubing, called 'X-probe', in cooperation with foreign firms. Recently NEL has developed the advanced ECT array probe, 'Smart Array Probe', characterized with a significantly improved resolution for circumferential cracks. The doubled channels in the circumferential mode have greatly improved the circumferential resolution of Smart Array Probe. With all the circumferential mode channels on the same circle, there is no need for axial position correction of inspection data. This report describes both the field practical performance and the compliance assessment to a Japanese SG-ECT guideline 'JEAG4208' of Smart Array ECT System, composed of Smart Array Probe, pusher-in-tester 'OMNI-200', and NEL's ECT Analysis System. (author)

  12. Probing Magnetic Fields of Early Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    How do magnetic fields form and evolve in early galaxies? A new study has provided some clever observations to help us answer this question.The Puzzle of Growing FieldsDynamo theory is the primary model describing how magnetic fields develop in galaxies. In this picture, magnetic fields start out as weak seed fields that are small and unordered. These fields then become ordered and amplified by large-scale rotation and turbulence in galaxy disks and halos, eventually leading to the magnetic fields we observe in galaxies today.Schematic showinghow to indirectly measure protogalactic magnetic fields. The measured polarization of a background quasar is altered by the fields in a foreground protogalaxy. Click for a closer look! [Farnes et al. 2017/Adolf Schaller/STSCI/NRAO/AUI/NSF]To test this model, we need observations of the magnetic fields in young protogalaxies. Unfortunately, we dont have the sensitivity to be able to measure these fields directly but a team of scientists led by Jamie Farnes (Radboud University in the Netherlands) have come up with a creative alternative.The key is to find early protogalaxies that absorb the light of more distant background objects. If a protogalaxy lies between us and a distant quasar, then magnetic fields of the protogalaxy if present will affect the polarization measurements of the background quasar.Observing Galactic Building BlocksTop: Redshift distribution for the background quasars in the authors sample. Bottom: Redshift distribution for the foreground protogalaxies the authors are exploring. [Farnes et al. 2017]Farnes and collaborators examined two types of foreground protogalaxies: Damped Lyman-Alpha Absorbers (DLAs) and Lyman Limit Systems (LLSs). They obtained polarimetric data for a sample of 114 distant quasars with nothing in the foreground (the control sample), 19 quasars with DLAs in the foreground, and 27 quasars with LLSs in the foreground. They then used statistical analysis techniques to draw conclusions about

  13. Pulsed-laser atom-probe field-ion microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellogg, G.L.; Tsong, T.T.

    1980-01-01

    A time-of-flight atom-probe field-ion microscope has been developed which uses nanosecond laser pulses to field evaporate surface species. The ability to operate an atom-probe without using high-voltage pulses is advantageous for several reasons. The spread in energy arising from the desorption of surface species prior to the voltage pulse attaining its maximum amplitude is eliminated, resulting in increased mass resolution. Semiconductor and insulator samples, for which the electrical resistivity is too high to transmit a short-duration voltage pulse, can be examined using pulsed-laser assisted field desorption. Since the electric field at the surface can be significantly smaller, the dissociation of molecular adsorbates by the field can be reduced or eliminated, permitting well-defined studies of surface chemical reactions. In addition to atom-probe operation, pulsed-laser heating of field emitters can be used to study surface diffusion of adatoms and vacancies over a wide range of temperatures. Examples demonstrating each of these advantages are presented, including the first pulsed-laser atom-probe (PLAP) mass spectra for both metals (W, Mo, Rh) and semiconductors (Si). Molecular hydrogen, which desorbs exclusively as atomic hydrogen in the conventional atom probe, is shown to desorb undissociatively in the PLAP. Field-ion microscope observations of the diffusion and dissociation of atomic clusters, the migration of adatoms, and the formation of vacancies resulting from heating with a 7-ns laser pulse are also presented

  14. Mapping and correcting respiration-induced field changes in the brain using fluorine field probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Hanson, L.G.

    : The experiments were performed on a 7T MRI system (Philips Healthcare, Best, NL) using a 32-channel Nova Medical head coil. Fourteen fluorine T/R NMR field probes3 were firmly distributed around the transmit/receive head coil. A stand-alone spectrometer4 digitized the field probe signals, and calculated field...

  15. Level set methods for modelling field evaporation in atom probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Daniel; Moody, Michael P; Smith, George D W

    2013-12-01

    Atom probe is a nanoscale technique for creating three-dimensional spatially and chemically resolved point datasets, primarily of metallic or semiconductor materials. While atom probe can achieve local high-level resolution, the spatial coherence of the technique is highly dependent upon the evaporative physics in the material and can often result in large geometric distortions in experimental results. The distortions originate from uncertainties in the projection function between the field evaporating specimen and the ion detector. Here we explore the possibility of continuum numerical approximations to the evaporative behavior during an atom probe experiment, and the subsequent propagation of ions to the detector, with particular emphasis placed on the solution of axisymmetric systems, such as isolated particles and multilayer systems. Ultimately, this method may prove critical in rapid modeling of tip shape evolution in atom probe tomography, which itself is a key factor in the rapid generation of spatially accurate reconstructions in atom probe datasets.

  16. Single molecule mapping of the optical field distribution of probes for near-field microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J.A.; Garcia Parajo, M.F.; Kuipers, L.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1999-01-01

    The most difficult task in near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is to make a high quality subwavelength aperture probe, Recently we have developed high definition NSOM probes by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. These probes have a higher brightness, better polarization characteristics,

  17. Microarrays of near-field optical probes with adjustable dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chovin, A. [Laboratoire d' Analyse Chimique par Reconnaissance Moleculaire, Universite Bordeaux I, ENSCPB, 16 avenue Pey-Berland, 33607 Pessac (France); Garrigue, P. [Laboratoire d' Analyse Chimique par Reconnaissance Moleculaire, Universite Bordeaux I, ENSCPB, 16 avenue Pey-Berland, 33607 Pessac (France); Pecastaings, G. [Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal-CNRS, 115 avenue du Dr Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France); Saadaoui, H. [Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal-CNRS, 115 avenue du Dr Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France); Manek-Hoenninger, I. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, Universite Bordeaux I, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence (France)]. E-mail: manek@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr; Sojic, N. [Laboratoire d' Analyse Chimique par Reconnaissance Moleculaire, Universite Bordeaux I, ENSCPB, 16 avenue Pey-Berland, 33607 Pessac (France)]. E-mail: sojic@enscpb.fr

    2006-01-15

    We present the fabrication and the characterization of high-density microarrays comprising thousands of near-field optical probes. Two types of microarrays have been prepared by adapting the SNOM methodology: arrays of uncoated fiber nanotips (i.e. apertureless probes) and arrays of apertures with adjustable subwavelength dimensions. Such arrays were fabricated by retaining the coherent structure of monomode optical fiber bundles and therefore keeping their imaging properties. The size of the apertures in a microarray was tuned at the nanometer scale by modifying the fabrication parameters. Far-field characterization of these near-field probe arrays shows completely different behavior depending both on their architecture and on their characteristic size. The angular distribution of the far-field intensity transmitted through the aperture arrays is used to determine the optical size of such diffracting apertures. Aperture radii ranging from 95 to 250 nm were found in good agreement with SEM data. Furthermore, each nanoaperture of the array is optically independent in the far-field regime. Eventually, this study demonstrates potential applications of these imaging arrays as parallel near-field optical probes in both configurations (apertureless and with apertures)

  18. Microarrays of near-field optical probes with adjustable dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovin, A; Garrigue, P; Pecastaings, G; Saadaoui, H; Manek-Hönninger, I; Sojic, N

    2006-01-01

    We present the fabrication and the characterization of high-density microarrays comprising thousands of near-field optical probes. Two types of microarrays have been prepared by adapting the SNOM methodology: arrays of uncoated fiber nanotips (i.e. apertureless probes) and arrays of apertures with adjustable subwavelength dimensions. Such arrays were fabricated by retaining the coherent structure of monomode optical fiber bundles and therefore keeping their imaging properties. The size of the apertures in a microarray was tuned at the nanometer scale by modifying the fabrication parameters. Far-field characterization of these near-field probe arrays shows completely different behavior depending both on their architecture and on their characteristic size. The angular distribution of the far-field intensity transmitted through the aperture arrays is used to determine the optical size of such diffracting apertures. Aperture radii ranging from 95 to 250 nm were found in good agreement with SEM data. Furthermore, each nanoaperture of the array is optically independent in the far-field regime. Eventually, this study demonstrates potential applications of these imaging arrays as parallel near-field optical probes in both configurations (apertureless and with apertures).

  19. Errors of first-order probe correction for higher-order probes in spherical near-field antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund; Pivnenko, Sergiy

    2004-01-01

    An investigation is performed to study the error of the far-field pattern determined from a spherical near-field antenna measurement in the case where a first-order (mu=+-1) probe correction scheme is applied to the near-field signal measured by a higher-order probe.......An investigation is performed to study the error of the far-field pattern determined from a spherical near-field antenna measurement in the case where a first-order (mu=+-1) probe correction scheme is applied to the near-field signal measured by a higher-order probe....

  20. Laser terahertz emission microscopy with near-field probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Using an AFM, an optical near-field image at 800 nm of a dipole antenna for THz emission is measured, and by simultaneously collecting the emitted THz radiation, the laser light confined under the AFM probe gives a THz emission resolution of less than 50 nm....

  1. Probing a quantum field in a photon box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimond, J M; Meunier, T; Bertet, P; Gleyzes, S; Maioli, P; Auffeves, A; Nogues, G; Brune, M; Haroche, S

    2005-01-01

    Einstein often performed thought experiments with 'photon boxes', storing fields for unlimited times. This is yet but a dream. We can nevertheless store quantum microwave fields in superconducting cavities for billions of periods. Using circular Rydberg atoms, it is possible to probe in a very detailed way the quantum state of these trapped fields. Cavity quantum electrodynamics tools can be used for a direct determination of the Husimi Q and Wigner quasi-probability distributions. They provide a very direct insight into the classical or non-classical nature of the field

  2. Suppression of probe background signals via B1 field inhomogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Jian; Reimer, Jeffrey

    2011-01-27

    A new approach combining a long pulse with the DEPTH sequence (Cory and Ritchey, Journal of Magnetic Resonance, 1988) greatly improves the efficiency for suppressing probe background signals arising from spinning modules. By applying a long initial excitation pulse in the DEPTH sequence, instead of a {pi}/2 pulse, the inhomogeneous B{sub 1} fields outside the coil can dephase the background coherence in the nutation frame. The initial long pulse and the following two consecutive EXORCYCLE {pi} pulses function complementarily and prove most effective in removing background signals from both strong and weak B{sub 1} fields. Experimentally, the length of the long pulse can be optimized around odd multiples of the {pi}/2 pulse, depending on the individual probe design, to preserve signals inside the coil while minimizing those from probe hardware. This method extends the applicability of the DEPTH sequence to probes with small differences in B{sub 1} field strength between the inside and outside of the coil, and can readily combine with well-developed double resonance experiments for quantitative measurement. In general, spin systems with weak internal interactions are required to attain efficient and uniform excitation for powder samples, and the principles to determine the applicability are discussed qualitatively in terms of the relative strength of spin interactions, r.f. power and spinning rate.

  3. Performance of field measuring probes for SSC magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.; Ganetis, G.; Herrera, J.; Hogue, R.; Jain, A.; Louie, W.; Marone, A.; Wanderer, P.

    1994-01-01

    Several years of experience have been acquired on the operation of probes (open-quotes molesclose quotes) constructed for the measurement of the multipole components of the magnetic fields of SSC magnets. The field is measured by rotating coils contained in a 2.4-m long tube that is pulled through the aperture of the magnet by an external device - the transporter. In addition to the measuring coils, the tube contains motors for rotating the coil and a system for sensing local vertical using gravity sensors to provide an absolute reference for the field measurements. The authors describe the steps that must be taken in order to ensure accurate, repeatable measurements; the design changes that have been motivated by difficulties encountered (noise, vibration, variations in temperature); and other performance issues. The mechanical interface between the probe and the beam tube of the magnet is also described

  4. Application of the iterative probe correction technique for a high-order probe in spherical near-field antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2006-01-01

    An iterative probe-correction technique for spherical near-field antenna measurements is examined. This technique has previously been shown to be well-suited for non-ideal first-order probes. In this paper, its performance in the case of a high-order probe (a dual-ridged horn) is examined....

  5. Magnetic field sensor for isotropically sensing an incident magnetic field in a sensor plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor that isotropically senses an incident magnetic field. This is preferably accomplished by providing a magnetic field sensor device that has one or more circular shaped magnetoresistive sensor elements for sensing the incident magnetic field. The magnetoresistive material used is preferably isotropic, and may be a CMR material or some form of a GMR material. Because the sensor elements are circular in shape, shape anisotropy is eliminated. Thus, the resulting magnetic field sensor device provides an output that is relatively independent of the direction of the incident magnetic field in the sensor plane.

  6. Using Jupiter's gravitational field to probe the Jovian convective dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2016-03-23

    Convective motion in the deep metallic hydrogen region of Jupiter is believed to generate its magnetic field, the strongest in the solar system. The amplitude, structure and depth of the convective motion are unknown. A promising way of probing the Jovian convective dynamo is to measure its effect on the external gravitational field, a task to be soon undertaken by the Juno spacecraft. We calculate the gravitational signature of non-axisymmetric convective motion in the Jovian metallic hydrogen region and show that with sufficiently accurate measurements it can reveal the nature of the deep convection.

  7. Mapping and correcting respiration-induced field changes in the brain using fluorine field probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Madsen, Kristoffer; Hanson, Lars G.

    2014-01-01

    for a single volume was 11s, which was easily tolerated during a breath hold. The field probes were triggered to perform a measurement (3ms duration) 75 ms prior to the first excitation in each dynamic, when no scanner generated RF pulses or gradients were applied. In case of real-time shimming, the scanner......Purpose. Breathing induced dynamic B0 field perturbations in the head can lead to artefacts in ultra-high field MR by causing line broadening in spectroscopy and signal dropout, ghosting, displacement artifacts and blurring in imaging. It has recently been proposed to continuously stabilize...... the magnetic field by real-time updating of the shim fields, based on synchronous field measurements with external probes1,2. A thorough analysis of how accurate such field measurements at few (e.g. 16) positions outside the head can reflect the spatially varying dynamic fields inside the head is currently...

  8. Probing the spectral density of the surface electromagnetic fields through scattering of waveguide photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Yin

    2016-02-10

    The spectral density of the metal-surface electromagnetic fields will be strongly modified in the presence of a closely-spaced quantum emitter. In this work, we propose a feasible way to probe the changes of the spectral density through the scattering of the waveguide photon incident on the quantum emitter. The variances of the lineshape in the transmission spectra indicate the coherent interaction between the emitter and the pseudomode resulting from all the surface electromagnetic modes. We further investigate the quantum coherence between the emitter and the pseudomode of the metal-dielectric interface.

  9. A new optical method for measuring surface temperature at large incident probe angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A. S.; Norris, P. M.

    1997-02-01

    A novel thermoreflectance technique has been developed for noncontact temperature measurements using laser light incident at large angles on solid materials and devices. The method involves measuring the differential reflectance from a polarization modulated laser beam. The polarization differential reflectance technique is demonstrated on single-crystal Si wafers and on a polycrystalline carbon thin film over a temperature range of 20-60 °C. The method is shown to be an extremely sensitive temperature probe for near grazing angle measurements, which could be useful for monitoring the surface temperature of closely stacked silicon wafers used in batch processing in the microelectronics industry.

  10. RFID Antenna Near-field Characterization Using a New 3D Magnetic Field Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassem Jomaa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the design of a new 3D magnetic field (H-field probe with a near-field scanning system is presented, then the near electromagnetic fields radiated by a Library RFID system is characterized. The proposed system is developed in order to determine the magnetic near-field emitted by electronic devices. The designed isotropic H-field probe consists of three orthogonal and identical loops each of diameter of 6 mm having 3 turns. The antenna factor of the designed probe is presented for a frequency range from 10 MHz to 1 GHz. The designed probe is tested and validated using a standard passive circuit as a device under test. An RFID reader antenna is also designed and simulated on HFSS (high frequency structural simulator and the radiated magnetic field, obtained by simulations, is then compared to the real measured one above the fabricated circuit. The obtained levels are checked if they satisfy the European and ICNIRP Electromagnetic Fields Guidelines.

  11. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a bibliography for 1991 on the following topics: Atom probe field ion microscopy; field desorption mass spectrometry; field emission; field ion microscopy; and field emission theory.

  12. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a bibliography for 1991 on the following topics: Atom probe field ion microscopy; field desorption mass spectrometry; field emission; field ion microscopy; and field emission theory

  13. Measurement of gravity and gauge fields using quantum mechanical probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anandan, J.

    1986-01-01

    The author considers the question of which quantities are observed when the gravitational and gauge fields are measured by a quantum mechanical probe. The motion of a quantum mechanical particle can be constructed, via Huyghens' principle, by the interference of secondary wavelets. Three types of interference phenomena are considered: interference of two coherent beams separated in space-time during part of their motion; interference of two coherent beams which are in the same region in spacetime but differ in energy or mass; and the Josphson effect and its generalization. The author shows how to determine the gravitational field by means of quantum interference. The corresponding problem for gauge fields is treated and a simple proof of the previously proved theorem for the reconstruction of the connection from the holonomy transformations is presented. A heuristic principle for the gravitational interaction of two quantum mechanical particles is formulated which implies the equivalence of inertial and active gravitational masses

  14. Measurement of incident sound power using near field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Tiana Roig, Elisabet

    2009-01-01

    ; and it has always been regarded as impossible to measure the sound power that is incident on a wall directly. This paper examines a new method of determining this quantity from sound pressure measurements at positions on the wall using ‘statistically optimised near field acoustic holography’ (SONAH...

  15. Clustered field evaporation of metallic glasses in atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, J; Gerstl, S S A; Löffler, J F; Schönfeld, B

    2016-03-01

    Field evaporation of metallic glasses is a stochastic process combined with spatially and temporally correlated events, which are referred to as clustered evaporation (CE). This phenomenon is investigated by studying the distance between consecutive detector hits. CE is found to be a strongly localized phenomenon (up to 3nm in range) which also depends on the type of evaporating ions. While a similar effect in crystals is attributed to the evaporation of crystalline layers, CE of metallic glasses presumably has a different - as yet unknown - physical origin. The present work provides new perspectives on quantification methods for atom probe tomography of metallic glasses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Laser heating of scanning probe tips for thermal near-field spectroscopy and imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T. O’Callahan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopy and microscopy of the thermal near-field yield valuable insight into the mechanisms of resonant near-field heat transfer and Casimir and Casimir-Polder forces, as well as providing nanoscale spatial resolution for infrared vibrational spectroscopy. A heated scanning probe tip brought close to a sample surface can excite and probe the thermal near-field. Typically, tip temperature control is provided by resistive heating of the tip cantilever. However, this requires specialized tips with limited temperature range and temporal response. By focusing laser radiation onto AFM cantilevers, we achieve heating up to ∼1800 K, with millisecond thermal response time. We demonstrate application to thermal infrared near-field spectroscopy (TINS by acquiring near-field spectra of the vibrational resonances of silicon carbide, hexagonal boron nitride, and polytetrafluoroethylene. We discuss the thermal response as a function of the incident excitation laser power and model the dominant cooling contributions. Our results provide a basis for laser heating as a viable approach for TINS, nanoscale thermal transport measurements, and thermal desorption nano-spectroscopy.

  17. Clustered field evaporation of metallic glasses in atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemp, J.; Gerstl, S.S.A.; Löffler, J.F.; Schönfeld, B.

    2016-01-01

    Field evaporation of metallic glasses is a stochastic process combined with spatially and temporally correlated events, which are referred to as clustered evaporation (CE). This phenomenon is investigated by studying the distance between consecutive detector hits. CE is found to be a strongly localized phenomenon (up to 3 nm in range) which also depends on the type of evaporating ions. While a similar effect in crystals is attributed to the evaporation of crystalline layers, CE of metallic glasses presumably has a different – as yet unknown – physical origin. The present work provides new perspectives on quantification methods for atom probe tomography of metallic glasses. - Highlights: • Field evaporation of metallic glasses is heterogeneous on a scale of up to 3 nm. • Amount of clustered evaporation depends on ion species and temperature. • Length scales of clustered evaporation and correlative evaporation are similar.

  18. Practical aspects of spherical near-field antenna measurements using a high-order probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund

    2006-01-01

    Two practical aspects related to accurate antenna pattern characterization by probe-corrected spherical near-field antenna measurements with a high-order probe are examined. First, the requirements set by an arbitrary high-order probe on the scanning technique are pointed out. Secondly, a channel...... balance calibration procedure for a high-order dual-port probe with non-identical ports is presented, and the requirements set by this procedure for the probe are discussed....

  19. Atom-probe field-ion-microscope mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Osamu

    1983-01-01

    The titled analyzer, called simply atom-probe, has been developed by combining a field ion microscope (FIM) and a mass spectrometer, and is divided into the time-of-flight type, magnetic sector type, and quadrupole type depending on the types of mass spectrometers. In this paper, the author first describes on the principle and construction of a high resolution, time-of-flight atom-probe developed and fabricated in his laboratory. The feature of the atom-probe lies in the analysis of atoms and molecules in hyper-fine structure region one by one utilizing the high resolution of FIM. It also has the advantages of directly determining the composition by a ratio of the numbers of respective ions because of a constant detection sensitivity regardless of mass numbers, of the resolution as high as single atom layer in depth direction, and of detecting the positional relationship among detected ions by the order of detection in a sample. To determine the composition in a hyperfine structure region, the limited small number of atoms and molecules in the region must be identified distinctly one by one. In the analyzed result of Ni-silicide formed by heating Si evaporated on a Ni tip at 1000 K for 5 minutes, each isotope was not only clearly separated, but also their abundance ratio was very close to the natural abundance ratio. The second half of the paper reports on the analysis of TiC promising for a cold cathode material, adsorption of CO and alcohol, and the composition and structure of silicides, as a few application examples. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  20. Probing {N}=2 superconformal field theories with localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiol, Bartomeu; Garolera, Blai; Torrentsa, Genís

    2016-01-01

    We use supersymmetric localization to study probes of four dimensional Lagrangian {N}=2 superconformal field theories. We first derive a unique equation for the eigenvalue density of these theories. We observe that these theories have a Wigner eigenvalue density precisely when they satisfy a necessary condition for having a holographic dual with a sensible higher-derivative expansion. We then compute in the saddle-point approximation the vacuum expectation value of 1/2-BPS circular Wilson loops, and the two-point functions of these Wilson loops with the Lagrangian density and with the stress-energy tensor. This last computation also provides the corresponding Bremsstrahlung functions and entanglement entropies. As expected, whenever a finite fraction of the matter is in the fundamental representation, the results are drastically different from those of {N}=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  1. Probing N=2 superconformal field theories with localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiol, Bartomeu [Departament de Física Fonamental i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Garolera, Blai [Escuela de Física, Universidad de Costa Rica,11501-2060 San José (Costa Rica); Torrents, Genís [Departament de Física Fonamental i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2016-01-27

    We use supersymmetric localization to study probes of four dimensional Lagrangian N=2 superconformal field theories. We first derive a unique equation for the eigenvalue density of these theories. We observe that these theories have a Wigner eigenvalue density precisely when they satisfy a necessary condition for having a holographic dual with a sensible higher-derivative expansion. We then compute in the saddle-point approximation the vacuum expectation value of 1/2-BPS circular Wilson loops, and the two-point functions of these Wilson loops with the Lagrangian density and with the stress-energy tensor. This last computation also provides the corresponding Bremsstrahlung functions and entanglement entropies. As expected, whenever a finite fraction of the matter is in the fundamental representation, the results are drastically different from those of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  2. Probing strong-field general relativity near black holes

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2005-01-01

    Nature has sprinkled black holes of various sizes throughout the universe, from stellar mass black holes in X-ray sources to supermassive black holes of billions of solar masses in quasars. Astronomers today are probing the spacetime near black holes using X-rays, and gravitational waves will open a different view in the near future. These tools give us an unprecedented opportunity to test ultra-strong-field general relativity, including the fundamental theorem of the uniqueness of the Kerr metric and Roger Penrose's cosmic censorship conjecture. Already, fascinating studies of spectral lines are showing the extreme gravitational lensing effects near black holes and allowing crude measurements of black hole spin. When the ESA-NASA gravitational wave detector LISA begins its observations in about 10 years, it will make measurements of dynamical spacetimes near black holes with an accuracy greater even than that which theoreticians can reach with their computations today. Most importantly, when gravitational wa...

  3. Probing photospheric magnetic fields with new spectral line pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitha, H. N.; Solanki, S. K.

    2017-12-01

    Context. The magnetic line ratio (MLR) method has been extensively used in the measurement of photospheric magnetic field strength. It was devised for the neutral iron line pair at 5247.1 Å and 5250.2 Å (5250 Å pair). Other line pairs as well-suited as this pair have not been reported in the literature. Aims: The aim of the present work is to identify new line pairs useful for the MLR technique and to test their reliability. Methods: We used a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic 3D MHD simulation representing the quiet Sun atmosphere to synthesize the Stokes profiles. Then, we applied the MLR technique to the Stokes V profiles to recover the fields in the MHD cube both at original resolution and after degrading with a point spread function. In both these cases, we aim to empirically represent the field strengths returned by the MLR method in terms of the field strengths in the MHD cube. Results: We have identified two new line pairs that are very well adapted to be used for MLR measurements. The first pair is in the visible, Fe I 6820-6842 Å, whose intensity profiles have previously been used to measure stellar magnetic fields, and the other pair is in the infrared (IR), Fe I 15 534-15 542 Å. The lines in these pairs reproduce the magnetic fields in the MHD cube rather well and, in fact, somewhat better than the original 5250 Å pair. Conclusions: The newly identified line pairs complement the old pairs. The lines in the new IR pair, because of their higher Zeeman sensitivity, are ideal for the measurement of weak fields. The new visible pair works best above 300 G. The new IR pair, due to its large Stokes V signal samples more fields in the MHD cube than the old IR pair at 1.56 μm, even in the presence of noise, and hence likely also on the real Sun. Owing to their low formation heights (100-200 km above τ5000 = 1), both the new line pairs are well suited for probing magnetic fields in the lower photosphere.

  4. Measuring Motion-Induced B0-Fluctuations in the Brain Using Field Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Hanson, Lars G.; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2016-01-01

    were compared with scanner acquired B0-maps from experiments with breathing and shoulder movements. A realistic simulation of B0-fluctuations caused by breathing was performed, and used for testing different sets of field probe positions. Results: The B0-fluctuations were well reflected in the field......Purpose: Fluctuations of the background magnetic field (B0) due to body and breathing motion can lead to significant artifacts in brain imaging at ultrahigh field. Corrections based on real-time sensing using external field probes show great potential. This study evaluates different aspects...... of field interpolation from these probes into the brain which is implicit in such methods. Measurements and simulations were performed to quantify how well B0-fluctuations in the brain due to body and breathing motion are reflected in external field probe measurements. Methods: Field probe measurements...

  5. Very high-accuracy calibration of radiation pattern and gain of a near-field probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Sergey; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, very high-accuracy calibration of the radiation pattern and gain of a near-field probe is described. An open-ended waveguide near-field probe has been used in a recent measurement of the C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Antenna Subsystem for the Sentinel 1 mission of the Europ......In this paper, very high-accuracy calibration of the radiation pattern and gain of a near-field probe is described. An open-ended waveguide near-field probe has been used in a recent measurement of the C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Antenna Subsystem for the Sentinel 1 mission...

  6. Standard Practices for Usage of Inductive Magnetic Field Probes with Application to Electric Propulsion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hill, Carrie S.; Turchi, Peter J.; Burton, Rodney L.; Messer, Sarah; Lovberg, Ralph H.; Hallock, Ashley K.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive magnetic field probes (also known as B-dot probes and sometimes as B-probes or magnetic probes) are often employed to perform field measurements in electric propulsion applications where there are time-varying fields. Magnetic field probes provide the means to measure these magnetic fields and can even be used to measure the plasma current density indirectly through the application of Ampere's law. Measurements of this type can yield either global information related to a thruster and its performance or detailed, local data related to the specific physical processes occurring in the plasma. Results of the development of a standard for B-dot probe measurements are presented, condensing the available literature on the subject into an accessible set of rules, guidelines, and techniques to standardize the performance and presentation of future measurements.

  7. On the truncation of the azimuthal mode spectrum of high-order probes in probe-corrected spherical near-field antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Sergey; Laitinen, Tommi

    2011-01-01

    Azimuthal mode (m mode) truncation of a high-order probe pattern in probe-corrected spherical near-field antenna measurements is studied in this paper. The results of this paper provide rules for appropriate and sufficient m-mode truncation for non-ideal first-order probes and odd-order probes wi...

  8. Probing Magnetic Fields with Square Kilometre Array and its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    /fulltext/joaa/037/04/0042. Keywords. Magnetic fields; telescopes; galaxies: magnetic fields; ISM: magnetic fields; stars: magnetic fields; turbulence. Abstract. Origin of magnetic fields, its structure and effects on dynamical processes in stars to ...

  9. Electric field and temperature measurement using ultra wide bandwidth pigtailed electro-optic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Maxime; Gaborit, Gwenaël; Duvillaret, Lionel; Paupert, Alain; Lasserre, Jean-Louis

    2008-05-01

    We present pigtailed electro-optic probes that allow a simultaneous measurement of high frequency electric fields and temperature using a unique laser probe beam. This has been achieved by the development of a novel probe design associated with a fully automated servo-controlled optical bench, initially developed to stabilize the electric field sensor response. The developed electro-optic probes present a stable response in outdoors conditions over a time duration exceeding 1 h, a frequency bandwidth from kHz to tens of GHz with a sensitivity of 0.7 Vm(-1)Hz(-(1/2)), and a temperature accuracy of 40 mK.

  10. Placement of field probes for stabilization of breathing-induced B0-fluctuations in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Madsen, Kristoffer H.; Hanson, Lars G.

    Introduction: B0-fluctuations induced by breathing and body motion lead to artifacts for certain brain imaging sequences at ultra-high field (7T). A promising solution is to monitor the B0-fluctuations during the scan using external field probes, and update the shim currents in real-time (1...... for these spatial terms are determined by least square fitting to the field probe measurements. The probes must be placed carefully to ensure that the spherical harmonics can be distinguished using these few samples, and they must be placed close to the head so that the spatial field model is valid and to have good...

  11. Placement of field probes for stabilization of breathing-induced B0-fluctuations in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Hanson, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: B0-fluctuations induced by breathing and body motion lead to artifacts for certain brain imaging sequences at ultra-high field (7T). A promising solution is to monitor the B0-fluctuations during the scan using external field probes, and update the shim currents in real-time (1...... for these spatial terms are determined by least square fitting to the field probe measurements. The probes must be placed carefully to ensure that the spherical harmonics can be distinguished using these few samples, and they must be placed close to the head so that the spatial field model is valid and to have good...

  12. Probing strong field ionization of solids with a Thomson parabola ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-11

    Jan 11, 2014 ... Ion spectrometry from laser–plasma is convolved with multiple atomic systems, several charge states and a broad energy spread. Conventional mass spectrometric techniques have serious limitations to probe this ionization dynamics. We have developed an imaging ion spectrometer that measures ...

  13. Probing strong field ionization of solids with a Thomson parabola ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-11

    Jan 11, 2014 ... spectrometry from laser–plasma is convolved with multiple atomic systems, several charge states and a broad energy spread. Conventional mass spectrometric techniques have serious limitations to probe this ionization dynamics. We have developed an imaging ion spectrometer that measures.

  14. The time resolved measurement of ultrashort terahertz-band electric fields without an ultrashort probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, D. A.; Snedden, E. W.; Jamison, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    The time-resolved detection of ultrashort pulsed THz-band electric field temporal profiles without an ultrashort laser probe is demonstrated. A non-linear interaction between a narrow-bandwidth optical probe and the THz pulse transposes the THz spectral intensity and phase information to the optical region, thereby generating an optical pulse whose temporal electric field envelope replicates the temporal profile of the real THz electric field. This optical envelope is characterised via an autocorrelation based FROG (frequency resolved optical gating) measurement, hence revealing the THz temporal profile. The combination of a narrow-bandwidth, long duration, optical probe, and self-referenced FROG makes the technique inherently immune to timing jitter between the optical probe and THz pulse and may find particular application where the THz field is not initially generated via ultrashort laser methods, such as the measurement of longitudinal electron bunch profiles in particle accelerators

  15. Probing strong field ionization of solids with a Thomson parabola ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-11

    Jan 11, 2014 ... large electric field drives the electrons to a very high energy. These hot electrons quickly move out of the solid surface, long before the ions move and the electron drift creates a strong quasistatic charge separation sheath electric field. Ions are then accelerated in this sheath field preferentially along the ...

  16. Field emission to control tip-sample distance in magnetic probe recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Fèbre, A.J.; Lüttge, Regina; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    An integrated method using field-emission to control the tip-sample distance for non-contact magnetic probe recording is presented, adopting the exponential relation between current and electric field as feedback. I/V characteristics that correspond well to field emission theory are measured using a

  17. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, K.F.; Godfrey, R.D.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations of books, conference proceedings, journals, and patents published in 1992 on the following types of microscopy: atom probe field ion microscopy (108 items); field emission microscopy (101 items); and field ion microscopy (48 items). An addendum of 34 items missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  18. Electric field measurement by a LiNbO 3 probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, L.; Medugno, M.; Rendina, I.

    2007-05-01

    Optical devices have the potential for large scale integration and can be successfully used in mission critical environments; in particular optical probes interacting with electric fields can be used in several electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and industrial, scientifical and medical (ISM) applications. We describe an electro-optical device based on a LiNbO 3 Mach-Zehnder integrated interferometer which has, with respect to standard metallic probes, a very reduced coupling effect on the electromagnetic field to be measured. The probe is mainly made by non conductive materials, making such device suitable for experimental measurement of electromagnetic fields in near field region (or Fresnel's one) of transmitting antennas or in their reactive zone. Here no simple theory is available in order to evaluate the fields and mutual coupling between antennas and standard probes strongly affect the measurements: the optical probe avoids the coupling of the fields with metallic structures and the loss of antenna calibration which typically yield measurement errors. The probe has been tested in the ELF and VHF bands as shown in the Figures below. The device characterization is discussed and its performance is optimised by an electro-optical device mathematic model.

  19. Cutaneous microcirculation in preterm neonates: comparison between sidestream dark field (SDF) and incident dark field (IDF) imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elteren, H. A.; Ince, C.; Tibboel, D.; Reiss, I. K. M.; de Jonge, R. C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Incident dark field imaging (IDF) is a new generation handheld microscope for bedside visualization and quantification of microcirculatory alterations. IDF is the technical successor of sidestream dark field imaging (SDF), currently the most used device for microcirculatory measurements. In

  20. Probing magnetic fields with Square Kilometre array and its precursors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    48

    2016-11-16

    Nov 16, 2016 ... find measurable Faraday rotation towards only ∼1 source per square degree with an integration ..... of these jets and the role of magnetic fields in their production is ill understood (Ray, 2009). One expects .... (2015a), the theoretical estimate is much smaller than the measured values and this type of field.

  1. Attosecond electron emission probes of ultrafast nanolocalized fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    Ongoing experimental and theoretical work on the temporal and spatial characterization of nanolocalized plasmonic fields will be presented. Because of their broad spectral bandwidth, plasmons in metal nanoparticles undergo ultrafast dynamics with timescales as short as a few hundred attoseconds. So far, the spatiotemporal dynamics of optical fields localized on the nanoscale has been hidden from direct access in the real space and time domain. Our ultimate goal is to characterize the nanoplasmonic fields not only on a nanometer spatial scale but also on ~100 attosecond temporal scale. Information about the nanoplasmonic fields, which are excited by few-cycle laser pulses with stable electric field waveform, can be obtained by the measurement of photoemitted electrons. We will present recent results on the large acceleration of recollision electrons in nanolocalized fields near dielectric nanoparticles following the excitation by 5-fs near-infrared laser pulses with controlled electric field waveforms. This work has been carried out in collaboration with Th. Fennel (University of Rostock), E. Ruehl (FU Berlin), and M.I. Stockman (GSU Atlanta). We acknowledge support by the DFG via Emmy-Noether program and SPP1391.

  2. A scanning probe mounted on a field-effect transistor: Characterization of ion damage in Si.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kumjae; Lee, Hoontaek; Sung, Min; Lee, Sang Hoon; Shin, Hyunjung; Moon, Wonkyu

    2017-10-01

    We have examined the capabilities of a Tip-On-Gate of Field-Effect Transistor (ToGoFET) probe for characterization of FIB-induced damage in Si surface. A ToGoFET probe is the SPM probe which the Field Effect Transistor(FET) is embedded at the end of a cantilever and a Pt tip was mounted at the gate of FET. The ToGoFET probe can detect the surface electrical properties by measuring source-drain current directly modulated by the charge on the tip. In this study, a Si specimen whose surface was processed with Ga+ ion beam was prepared. Irradiation and implantation with Ga+ ions induce highly localized modifications to the contact potential. The FET embedded on ToGoFET probe detected the surface electric field profile generated by schottky contact between the Pt tip and the sample surface. Experimentally, it was shown that significant differences of electric field due to the contact potential barrier in differently processed specimens were observed using ToGOFET probe. This result shows the potential that the local contact potential difference can be measured by simple working principle with high sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Counting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Tomoaki

    1976-01-01

    Electron counting method has been devised and experimented for the purpose of measuring electron temperature and density, the most fundamental quantities to represent plasma conditions. Electron counting is a method to count the electrons in plasma directly by equipping a probe with the secondary electron multiplier. It has three advantages of adjustable sensitivity, high sensitivity of the secondary electron multiplier, and directional property. Sensitivity adjustment is performed by changing the size of collecting hole (pin hole) on the incident front of the multiplier. The probe is usable as a direct reading thermometer of electron temperature because it requires to collect very small amount of electrons, thus it doesn't disturb the surrounding plasma, and the narrow sweep width of the probe voltage is enough. Therefore it can measure anisotropy more sensitively than a Langmuir probe, and it can be used for very low density plasma. Though many problems remain on anisotropy, computer simulation has been carried out. Also it is planned to provide a Helmholtz coil in the vacuum chamber to eliminate the effect of earth magnetic field. In practical experiments, the measurement with a Langmuir probe and an emission probe mounted to the movable structure, the comparison with the results obtained in reverse magnetic field by using a Helmholtz coil, and the measurement of ionic sound wave are scheduled. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. Probing electric field control of magnetism using ferromagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ziyao; Trassin, Morgan; Gao, Ya; Gao, Yuan; Qiu, Diana; Ashraf, Khalid; Nan, Tianxiang; Yang, Xi; Bowden, S. R.; Pierce, D. T.; Stiles, M. D.; Unguris, J.; Liu, Ming; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.; Salahuddin, S.; Ramesh, R.; Sun, Nian X.

    2015-01-01

    Exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 thin-film heterostructures show great promise for power-efficient electric field-induced 180° magnetization switching. However, the coupling mechanism and precise qualification of the exchange coupling in CoFe/BiFeO3 heterostructures have been elusive. Here we show direct evidence for electric field control of the magnetic state in exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 through electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy and nanoscale spatially resolved magnetic imaging. Scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis images reveal the coupling of the magnetization in the CoFe layer to the canted moment in the BiFeO3 layer. Electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance measurements quantify the exchange coupling strength and reveal that the CoFe magnetization is directly and reversibly modulated by the applied electric field through a ~180° switching of the canted moment in BiFeO3. This constitutes an important step towards robust repeatable and non-volatile voltage-induced 180° magnetization switching in thin-film multiferroic heterostructures and tunable RF/microwave devices.

  5. Gallium nitride nanowire probe for near-field scanning microwave microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J. C.; Blanchard, P. T.; Sanders, A. W.; Imtiaz, A.; Wallis, T. M.; Coakley, K. J.; Bertness, K. A.; Kabos, P.; Sanford, N. A.; Bright, V. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of a GaN nanowire probe for near-field scanning microwave microscopy. A single nanowire was Pt-bonded to a commercial Si cantilever prior to evaporation of a Ti/Al coating to provide a microwave signal pathway. Testing over a microcapacitor calibration sample shows the probe to have capacitance resolution of at least 0.7 fF with improved sensitivity and reduced uncertainty compared with a commercial microwave probe. High wear resistance of the defect-free nanowire enabled it to maintain a tip radius of 150 nm after multiple contact-mode scans while demonstrating nanometer-scale topographical resolution.

  6. Probing High Temperature Superconductors with Magnetometry in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lu [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-07-26

    The objective of this research is to investigate the high-field magnetic properties of high temperature superconductors, materials that conduct electricity without loss. A technique known as high-resolution torque magnetometry that was developed to directly measure the magnetization of high temperature superconductors. This technique was implemented using the 65 Tesla pulsed magnetic field facility that is part of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This research addressed unanswered questions about the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity, determine the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors, and shed light on the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity and on potential applications of these materials in areas such as energy generation and power transmission. Further applications of the technology resolve the novel physical phenomena such as correlated topological insulators, and spin liquid state in quantum magnets.

  7. Heat pulse probe measurements of soil water evaporation in a corn field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latent heat fluxes from cropped fields consist of soil water evaporation and plant transpiration. It is difficult to accurately separate evapotranspiration into evaporation and transpiration. Heat pulse probes have been used to measure bare field subsurface soil water evaporation, however, the appl...

  8. Near-field optical microscope using a silicon-nitride probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Noordman, O.F.J.; Noordman, O.F.J.; Tack, R.G.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1993-01-01

    Operation of an alternative near-field optical microscope is presented. The microscope uses a microfabricated silicon- nitride probe with integrated cantilever, as originally developed for force microscopy. The cantilever allows routine close contact near-field imaging o­n arbitrary surfaces without

  9. Analysis at the atomic level: The atom probe field-ion microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    The atom probe field-ion microscope (APFIM) is a unique analytical instrument that can analyze metals and semiconducting materials on the atomic scale. In recent years, the atom probe has developed into one of the most powerful instruments available for routine microstructural and microchemical analysis of materials. The types of investigations that have been performed have encompassed many diverse metallurgical subjects including phase transformations, segregation, diffusion, catalysis, and radiation damage. 3 refs., 3 figs

  10. Probing magnetic fields with Square Kilometre array and its precursors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    48

    2016-11-16

    Nov 16, 2016 ... redshift will provide important information on magnetic field evolution as a function of redshift. The background ... determines the typical masses of stars and the initial mass function, regulating the propagation and confinement of ..... Since cosmic ray spectrum in the Galaxy is known (Ackermann et al., 2012) ...

  11. Single-molecule probes in organic field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolet, Aurélien Armel Louis

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to study charge transport phenomena in organic materials. This is done optically by means of single-molecule spectroscopy in a field-effect transistor based on a molecular crystal. We present (in Chapter 2) a fundamental requirement for single-molecule spectroscopy

  12. Magnification bias as a novel probe for primordial magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camera, S.; Fedeli, C.; Moscardini, L.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we investigate magnetic fields generated in the early Universe. These fields are important candidates at explaining the origin of astrophysical magnetism observed in galaxies and galaxy clusters, whose genesis is still by and large unclear. Compared to the standard inflationary power spectrum, intermediate to small scales would experience further substantial matter clustering, were a cosmological magnetic field present prior to recombination. As a consequence, the bias and redshift distribution of galaxies would also be modified. Hitherto, primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) have been tested and constrained with a number of cosmological observables, e.g. the cosmic microwave background radiation, galaxy clustering and, more recently, weak gravitational lensing. Here, we explore the constraining potential of the density fluctuation bias induced by gravitational lensing magnification onto the galaxy-galaxy angular power spectrum. Such an effect is known as magnification bias. Compared to the usual galaxy clustering approach, magnification bias helps in lifting the pathological degeneracy present amongst power spectrum normalisation and galaxy bias. This is because magnification bias cross-correlates galaxy number density fluctuations of nearby objects with weak lensing distortions of high-redshift sources. Thus, it takes advantage of the gravitational deflection of light, which is insensitive to galaxy bias but powerful in constraining the density fluctuation amplitude. To scrutinise the potentiality of this method, we adopt a deep and wide-field spectroscopic galaxy survey. We show that magnification bias does contain important information on primordial magnetism, which will be useful in combination with galaxy clustering and shear. We find we shall be able to rule out at 95.4% CL amplitudes of PMFs larger than 5 × 10 −4 nG for values of the PMF power spectral index n B ∼ 0

  13. Probing correlations of early magnetic fields using mu-distortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganc, Jonathan; Sloth, Martin Snoager

    2014-01-01

    the perturbations which produce the $\\mu$-distortion will be much smaller scale than the relevant density perturbations, the observation of this correlation is sensitive to the squeezed limit of $\\langle B^2\\zeta\\rangle$, which is naturally parameterized by $b_{\\text{NL}}$ (a parameter defined analogously to $f_{\\text......{NL}}$). We find that a PIXIE-like CMB experiments has a signal to noise $S/N\\approx 1.0 \\times b_{\\text{NL}} (\\tilde B_\\mu/10\\text{ nG})^2$, where $\\tilde B_\\mu$ is the magnetic field's strength on $\\mu$-distortion scales normalized to today's redshift; thus, a 10 nG field would be detectable with $b_{\\text...

  14. THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN TAURUS PROBED BY INFRARED POLARIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Li Di; Clemens, D. P.; Krco, Marko

    2011-01-01

    We present maps of the plane-of-sky magnetic field within two regions of the Taurus molecular cloud: one in the dense core L1495/B213 filament and the other in a diffuse region to the west. The field is measured from the polarization of background starlight seen through the cloud. In total, we measured 287 high-quality near-infrared polarization vectors in these regions. In L1495/B213, the percent polarization increases with column density up to A V ∼ 9 mag, the limits of our data. The radiative torques model for grain alignment can explain this behavior, but models that invoke turbulence are inconsistent with the data. We also combine our data with published optical and near-infrared polarization measurements in Taurus. Using this large sample, we estimate the strength of the plane-of-sky component of the magnetic field in nine subregions. This estimation is done with two different techniques that use the observed dispersion in polarization angles. Our values range from 5 to 82 μG and tend to be higher in denser regions. In all subregions, the critical index of the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio is sub-unity, implying that Taurus is magnetically supported on large scales (∼2 pc). Within the region observed, the B213 filament takes a sharp turn to the north and the direction of the magnetic field also takes a sharp turn, switching from being perpendicular to the filament to becoming parallel. This behavior can be understood if we are observing the rim of a bubble. We argue that it has resulted from a supernova remnant associated with a recently discovered nearby gamma-ray pulsar.

  15. Observation of nanostructure by scanning near-field optical microscope with small sphere probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Oshikane, Toshihiko Kataoka, Mitsuru Okuda, Seiji Hara, Haruyuki Inoue and Motohiro Nakano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Step and terrace structure has been observed in an area of 1 μm×1 μm on the cleaved surface of KCl–KBr solid-solution single crystal by scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM with a small sphere probe of 500 nm diameter. Lateral spatial resolution of the SNOM system was estimated to be 20 nm from the observation of step width and the scanning-step interval. Vertical spatial resolution was estimated to be 5–2 nm from the observation of step height and noise level of photomultiplier tube (PMT. With applying a dielectric dipole radiation model to the probe surface, the reason why such a high spatial resolution was obtained in spite of the 500 nm sphere probe, was understood as the effect of the near-field term appeared in the radiation field equations.

  16. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.; Russell, K.F.

    1990-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion spectroscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), liquid metal ion sources (LMIS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and theory. Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. This bibliography covers the period 1989. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications.

  17. Atom probe field-ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.

    1989-10-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: field-ion microscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), atom probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM), and liquid metal ion sources (LMIS). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles.

  18. Probing Dense Sprays with Gated, Picosecond, Digital Particle Field Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Trolinger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes work that demonstrated the feasibility of producing a gated digital holography system that is capable of producing high-resolution images of three-dimensional particle and structure details deep within dense particle fields of a spray. We developed a gated picosecond digital holocamera, using optical Kerr cell gating, to demonstrate features of gated digital holography that make it an exceptional candidate for this application. The Kerr cell gate shuttered the camera after the initial burst of ballistic and snake photons had been recorded, suppressing longer path, multiple scattered illumination. By starting with a CW laser without gating and then incorporating a picosecond laser and an optical Kerr gate, we were able to assess the imaging quality of the gated holograms, and determine improvement gained by gating. We produced high quality images of 50–200 μm diameter particles, hairs and USAF resolution charts from digital holograms recorded through turbid media where more than 98% of the light was scattered from the field. The system can gate pulses as short as 3 mm in pathlength (10 ps, enabling image-improving features of the system. The experiments lead us to the conclusion that this method has an excellent capability as a diagnostics tool in dense spray combustion research.

  19. Design and Application of Hybrid Magnetic Field-Eddy Current Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Wallace, Terryl; Newman, Andy; Leser, Paul; Simpson, John

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of magnetic field sensors into eddy current probes can result in novel probe designs with unique performance characteristics. One such example is a recently developed electromagnetic probe consisting of a two-channel magnetoresistive sensor with an embedded single-strand eddy current inducer. Magnetic flux leakage maps of ferrous materials are generated from the DC sensor response while high-resolution eddy current imaging is simultaneously performed at frequencies up to 5 megahertz. In this work the design and optimization of this probe will be presented, along with an application toward analysis of sensory materials with embedded ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy (FSMA) particles. The sensory material is designed to produce a paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition in the FSMA particles under strain. Mapping of the stray magnetic field and eddy current response of the sample with the hybrid probe can thereby image locations in the structure which have experienced an overstrain condition. Numerical modeling of the probe response is performed with good agreement with experimental results.

  20. Determining the photocurrent of spherical probes from one-sonde-shading electric field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenovski, Simeon; Smirnova, Ninel; Todorieva, Lyudmila; Lukarski, Hristo; Stanev, Georgi

    2018-01-01

    We propose a method for determining the saturation photoelectron current density of spherical probes, designed for measuring the electric field by the double-probe technique. Shading of only one of the probes causes specific changes in the electric field, and using the potential difference ΔV between the two probes created by the shading we obtain an analytical expression for the photocurrent density. We derive this expression in two different ways: directly, from the potential difference; and after calculating the resistance of the plasma layer around the probe. In both cases the value of the photocurrent is determined from the ion current. Data for the concentration and the plasma temperature is needed to determine the ion current. We considered two limiting forms of its collection: (1) SAL-sheath area limited case (thin layer); (2) OML-orbital motion limited case (thick layer). We validate the method using data from Intercosmos Bulgaria - 1300 satellite. The photocurrent density is calculated for two shading-of-the-probe instances. The values we obtain are significantly larger than the ones from laboratory measurements, but close to the photocurrent values deduced from other space experiments.

  1. Probing Strong-field General Relativity with Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Frans

    We are on the verge of a new era in astrophysics as a world-wide effort to observe the universe with gravitational waves takes hold---ground based laser interferometers (Hz to kHz), pulsar timing (micro to nano Hz), measurements of polarization of the cosmic microwave background (sub-nano Hz), and the planned NASA/ESA mission LISA (.1 mHz to .1 Hz). This project will study the theoretical nature of gravitational waves (GWs) emitted by two sources in the LISA band, namely supermassive-black-hole (SMBH) binary mergers, and extreme-mass-ratio-inspirals (EMRI's)---the merger of a stellar mass black hole, neutron star, or white dwarf with a SMBH. The primary goal will be to ascertain how well LISA, by observing these sources, could answer the following related questions about the fundamental nature of strong-field gravity: Does Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) describe the geometry of black holes in the universe? What constraints can GW observations of SMBH mergers and EMRIs place on alternative theories of gravity? If there are deviations from GR, are there statistics that could give indications of a deviation if sources are detected using a search strategy based solely on GR waveforms? The primary reasons for focusing on LISA sources to answer these questions are (a) binary SMBH mergers could be detected by LISA with exquisitely high signal-to- noise, allowing enough parameters of the system to be accurately extracted to perform consistency checks of the underlying theory, (b) EMRIs will spend numerous orbits close to the central black hole, and thus will be quite sensitive to even small near-horizon deviations from GR. One approach to develop the requisite knowledge and tools to answer these questions is to study a concrete, theoretically viable alternative to GR. We will focus on the dynamical variant of Chern-Simons modified gravity (CSMG), which is interesting for several reasons, chief among which are (1) that CSMG generically arises in both string

  2. Probing the electric field in organic double layer-system by optical second harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Eunju; Shibata, Yoshinori; Manaka, Takaaki [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Iwamoto, Mitsumasa, E-mail: iwamoto@ome.pe.titech.ac.j [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    Optical electric field induced second harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurements were employed to probe the electric field in the active layer of organic field effect transistors (OFETs) and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). The OFETs used were double-layered with an active layer of pentacene/poly (3-hexyl thiophene) P3HT on SiO{sub 2} gate insulator with Au source and drain electrodes. It was shown that SHG from the P3HT bottom layer could be selectively probed at a wavelength of 450 nm. Similarly, by using OLEDs comprised of a double layer of Tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminium (Alq{sub 3}) and N'-di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine ({alpha}-NPD) with a device structure of indium-zinc oxide (IZO)/{alpha}-NPD/Alq{sub 3}/Al, it was shown that EFISHG from the Alq{sub 3} layer could be selectively probed at a wavelength of 1000 nm by reflective laser beam irradiation from IZO-side. The results show that the spectroscopic nature of materials allows us to selectively probe the electric field distribution in each layer of multi-layer in organic devices.

  3. Near-field optical microscopy of localized excitations on rough surfaces: influence of a probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Starting from the general principles of near-field optical microscopy. I consider the influence of a probe when being used to image localized dipolar excitations and suggest a way of evaluating the perturbation thus introduced. Using the rigorous microscopic (electric) point-dipole description, I...

  4. Field Ion Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography of Metamorphic Magnetite Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K.; Martens, R. L.; Kelly, T. F.; Evans, N. D.; Miller, M. K.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetite has been analysed using Field Ion Microscopy (FIM) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT), highly attractive techniques for the nanoanalysis of geological materials despite the difficulties inherent in analyzing semiconducting and insulating materials. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Zeeman effect in sulfur monoxide: a tool to probe magnetic fields in star forming regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Coriani, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    abundant species in star forming regions, for probing the intensity of magnetic fields via the Zeeman effect. Methods. We investigated the Zeeman effect for several rotational transitions of SO in the (sub-)mm spectral regions by using a frequency-modulated, computer-controlled spectrometer...

  6. ELECTRIC FIELD MEASUREMENT IN ROD-DISCONTINUED PLANE AIR GAPS USING DISTRIBUTED CAPACITY PROBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khechekhouche

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present experimental carried out investigations aimed at elucidating the effect of earth discontinuity on the breakdown voltage of short rod-plane air gap (80 to160 mm under negative lightning impulses (-1.2/50ms.We also carried out investigations on electric field measurement on the surface of a discontinuous plane of a rod-plane air gap arrangement. For this purpose, we used a probe with distributed capacity, under negative lightning applied impulse voltage. The probe is incorporated on the same level of plane surface.The interface locally reinforces the electric field. The electric field increases at the interface may lead to a discharge between the high voltage rode and the interface. In the vicinity of the interface, we observe a kind of discontinuity in the evolution of the electric field intensity. This one becomes greater than the value obtained in the case of gaps with homogeneous plane earth.

  7. ELECTRIC FIELD MEASUREMENT IN ROD-DISCONTINUED PLANE AIR GAPS USING DISTRIBUTED CAPACITY PROBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khechekhouche

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present experimental carried out investigations aimed at elucidating the effect of earth discontinuity on the breakdown voltage of short rod-plane air gap (80 to 160 mm under negative lightning impulses (-1.2/50s. We also carried out investigations on electric field measurement on the surface of a discontinuous plane of a rod-plane air gap arrangement. For this purpose, we used a probe with distributed capacity, under negative lightning applied impulse voltage. The probe is incorporated on the same level of plane surface. The interface locally reinforces the electric field. The electric field increases at the interface may lead to a discharge between the high voltage rode and the interface. In the vicinity of the interface, we observe a kind of discontinuity in the evolution of the electric field intensity. This one becomes greater than the value obtained in the case of gaps with homogeneous plane earth.

  8. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1991-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion microscopy (FIM), field emission (FE), ion sources, and field desorption mass microscopy (FDMM). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The bibliography covers the period 1990. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references, listed alphabetically by authors, are subdivided into the categories listed in paragraph one above. An Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  9. Fibre-top atomic force microscope probe with optical near-field detection capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiribilli, B; Margheri, G; Baschieri, P; Menozzi, C; Chavan, D; Iannuzzi, D

    2011-04-01

    We present a fibre-top probe fabricated by carving a tipped cantilever on an optical fibre, with the tip machined in correspondence of the fibre core. When approached to an optical prism illuminated under total internal reflection conditions, the tip of the cantilever detects the optical tunnelling signal, while the light coupled from the opposite end of the fibre measures the deflection of the cantilever. Our results suggest that fibre-top technology can be used for the development of a new generation of hybrid probes that can combine atomic force microscopy with scanning near field optical microscopy. © 2010 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2010 Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. Waveguide analysis of heat-drawn and chemically etched probe tips for scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moar, Peter N; Love, John D; Ladouceur, François; Cahill, Laurence W

    2006-09-01

    We analyze two basic aspects of a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probe's operation: (i) spot-size evolution of the electric field along the probe with and without a metal layer, and (ii) a modal analysis of the SNOM probe, particularly in close proximity to the aperture. A slab waveguide model is utilized to minimize the analytical complexity, yet provides useful quantitative results--including losses associated with the metal coating--which can then be used as design rules.

  11. Sound intensity probe for ultrasonic field in water using light-emitting diodes and piezoelectric elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xi; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2017-12-01

    The sound intensity vector provides useful information on the state of an ultrasonic field in water, since sound intensity is a vector quantity expressing the direction and magnitude of the sound field. In the previous studies on sound intensity measurement in water, conventional piezoelectric sensors and metal cables were used, and the transmission distance was limited. A new configuration of a sound intensity probe suitable for ultrasonic measurement in water is proposed and constructed for trial in this study. The probe consists of light-emitting diodes and piezoelectric elements, and the output signals are transmitted through fiber optic cables as intensity-modulated light. Sound intensity measurements of a 26 kHz ultrasonic field in water are demonstrated. The difference in the intensity vector state between the water tank with and without sound-absorbing material on its walls was successfully observed.

  12. An esophageal probe for measuring three-dimensional electric fields during external cardiac defibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, David A; de Jongh Curry, Amy L

    2012-03-01

    External defibrillation is a common treatment for the cardiac arrhythmia atrial fibrillation. Electrode placement has been shown to affect defibrillation efficacy and required energy levels. We suggest investigating the relationship between esophageal electric fields (EEFs) and atrial defibrillation thresholds to determine the feasibility of creating patient-specific electrode placements using EEFs. This study presents the design and implementation of an esophageal probe (EP) that accurately measures three-dimensional electric fields. The root-mean-square error of the EP was 1.69% as determined by measurements performed in an electrolytic tank. The EP also performed well during in vivo testing in a pig. There was a strong positive relationship between EEF(2)s and applied energy during defibrillation strength shocks. The EEF measurements were also repeatable, with less than 4.24% difference between repeated shocks. This is the first description of a probe designed specifically for measuring electric fields in the esophagus.

  13. Consideration of magnetic field fluctuation measurements in a torus plasma with heavy ion beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, A.; Fujisawa, A.; Ohshima, S.; Nakano, H.

    2004-03-01

    The article discusses feasibility of magnetic fluctuation measurement with a heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) in an axisymmetric torus configuration. In the measurements, path integral fluctuation along the probing beam orbit should be considered as is similar to the density fluctuation measurements with HIBP. A calculation, based on an analytic formula, is performed to estimate the path integral effects for fluctuation patterns that have difference in profile, the correlation length, the radial wavelength, and the poloidal mode number. In addition, the large distance between the plasma and the detector is considered to lessen the path integral effect. As a result, it is found that local fluctuation of magnetic field can be properly detected with a heavy ion beam probe. (author)

  14. Tissue imaging using full field optical coherence microscopy with short multimode fiber probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Manabu; Eto, Kai; Goto, Tetsuhiro; Kurotani, Reiko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Nishidate, Izumi

    2018-03-01

    In achieving minimally invasive accessibility to deeply located regions the size of the imaging probes is important. We demonstrated full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCM) using an ultrathin forward-imaging short multimode fiber (SMMF) probe of 50 μm core diameter, 125 μm diameter, and 7.4 mm length for optical communications. The axial resolution was measured to be 2.14 μm and the lateral resolution was also evaluated to be below 4.38 μm using a test pattern (TP). The spatial mode and polarization characteristics of SMMF were evaluated. Inserting SMMF to in vivo rat brain, 3D images were measured and 2D information of nerve fibers was obtained. The feasibility of an SMMF as an ultrathin forward-imaging probe in FF-OCM has been demonstrated.

  15. Study of defects and radiation damage in solids by field-ion and atom-probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidman, D.N.

    1979-06-01

    A brief review is presented of: the basic physical principles of the field-ion and atom-probe microscopes; the many applications of these instruments to the study of defects and radiation damage in solids; and the application of the atom-probe field-ion microscope to the study of the behavior of implanted 3 He and 4 He in tungsten

  16. Field evaluation of a direct push deployed sensor probe for vertical soil water content profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vienken, Thomas; Reboulet, Ed; Leven, Carsten; Kreck, Manuel; Zschornack, Ludwig; Dietrich, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Reliable high-resolution information about vertical variations in soil water content, i.e. total porosity in the saturated zone, is essential for flow and transport predictions within the subsurface. However, porosity measurements are often associated with high efforts and high uncertainties, e.g. caused by soil disturbance during sampling or sensor installation procedures. In hydrogeological practice, commonly applied tools for the investigation of vertical soil water content distribution include gravimetric laboratory analyses of soil samples and neutron probe measurements. A yet less well established technique is the use of direct push-deployed sensor probes. Each of these methods is associated with inherent advantages and limitations due to their underlying measurement principles and operation modes. The presented study describes results of a joint field evaluation of the individual methods under different depositional and hydrogeological conditions with special focus on the performance on the direct push-deployed water content profiler. Therefore, direct push-profiling results from three different test sites are compared with results obtained from gravimetric analysis of soil cores and neutron probe measurements. In direct comparison, the applied direct push-based sensor probe proved to be a suitable alternative for vertical soil water content profiling to neutron probe technology, and, in addition, proved to be advantageous over gravimetric analysis in terms vertical resolution and time efficiency. Results of this study identify application-specific limitations of the methods and thereby highlight the need for careful data evaluation, even though neutron probe measurements and gravimetric analyses of soil samples are well established techniques (see Vienken et al. 2013). Reference: Vienken, T., Reboulet, E., Leven, C., Kreck, M., Zschornack, L., Dietrich, P., 2013. Field comparison of selected methods for vertical soil water content profiling. Journal of

  17. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, R.D.; Miller, M.K.; Russell, K.F.

    1994-10-01

    This bibliography, covering the period 1993, includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field emission (FE), and field ion microscopy (FIM). Technique-oriented studies and applications are included. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references are listed alphabetically by authors, an Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included

  18. ZEEMANS - a new facility to probe matter at high magnetic field through neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savici, A T; Granroth, G E; Broholm, C; Lee, Y S; Bird, M D

    2010-01-01

    We describe ZEEMANS, a new instrument proposed for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to probe matter at extremely high magnetic fields. The complexity of the high field magnet demands a versatile neutron scattering instrument, capable of performing diffraction (powder and single crystal), SANS, reflectometry, and inelastic spectrometry, with minimal modifications between configurations. In this paper we present a conceptual design for neutron scattering instrumentation to be built around the horizontal conical high field magnet. Monte Carlo simulations and analytical calculations indicate performance on a par with other SNS instrumentation despite limited access to the sample.

  19. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, R.D.; Miller, M.K.; Russell, K.F.

    1994-10-01

    This bibliography, covering the period 1993, includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field emission (FE), and field ion microscopy (FIM). Technique-oriented studies and applications are included. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references are listed alphabetically by authors, an Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  20. Nanospot soldering polystyrene nanoparticles with an optical fiber probe laser irradiating a metallic AFM probe based on the near-field enhancement effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jianlei; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Yang; Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Wenjun; Hou, Chaojian

    2015-02-04

    With the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology for the bottom-up nanofabrication of nanostructures formed from polystyrene nanoparticles, joining technology is an essential step in the manufacturing and assembly of nanodevices and nanostructures in order to provide mechanical integration and connection. To study the nanospot welding of polystyrene nanoparticles, we propose a new nanospot-soldering method using the near-field enhancement effect of a metallic atomic force microscope (AFM) probe tip that is irradiated by an optical fiber probe laser. On the basis of our theoretical analysis of the near-field enhancement effect, we set up an experimental system for nanospot soldering; this approach is carried out by using an optical fiber probe laser to irradiate the AFM probe tip to sinter the nanoparticles, providing a promising technical approach for the application of nanosoldering in nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  1. Ion trajectories in atom probe field ion microscopy and gas field ion sources

    CERN Document Server

    Castilho, C M C

    1999-01-01

    Trajectories of positive ions produced in a region close to a structured surface, modelled by spherical or spheroidal protrusions and kept at a positive electric potential with respect to a distant screen or detector are calculated. The results are discussed in comparison with similar practical situations produced by field ionization and field evaporation or desorption, such as those occurring in gas field ion sources, field ion microscopy and field desorption spectroscopy. (author)

  2. Causes of incident visual field loss in a general elderly population: the Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skenduli-Bala, Elisa; de Voogd, Simone; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; van Leeuwen, Redmer; Ikram, M. Kamran; Jonas, Jost B.; Bakker, Douwe; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.

    2005-01-01

    To determine the incidence and causes of visual field loss (VFL) in a general elderly population. Central visual fields of both eyes were examined with suprathreshold perimetry in 3761 persons aged 55 years or older and free of VFL at baseline from the population-based Rotterdam Study. Goldmann

  3. Investigation of space charge in low-density polyethylene using a field probe technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, M. Salah; Hansen, Bo Svarrer

    1988-01-01

    A test method that uses a capacitive field probe to investigate the space charge distribution in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) is described. Specimens of 7-mm thickness were stressed under 100 kV DC at room temperature and for different time periods. The results indicate that the LDPE insulation...... layer between electrodes is occupied by positive and negative homocharges. The dependence of space charge distribution on the stressing time is also evident...

  4. The use of probe characteristics in plasma in the presence of a magnetic field (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunet, A.; Geller, R.; Leroy, J.

    1960-01-01

    In this article we recall the principal methods of interpretation of probe characteristics in plasma in the presence of magnetic fields. Our purpose is to resume and to present the methods in such a form as to be immediately applicable in a particular case. This article is therefore principally useful to experimenters. Finally we expose our practical view points by comparing of experimental methods. (author) [fr

  5. Field-Dependent Measurement of GaAs Composition by Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Russo, Enrico; Blum, Ivan; Houard, Jonathan; Da Costa, Gérald; Blavette, Didier; Rigutti, Lorenzo

    2017-12-01

    The composition of GaAs measured by laser-assisted atom probe tomography may be inaccurate depending on the experimental conditions. In this work, we assess the role of the DC field and the impinging laser energy on such compositional bias. The DC field is found to have a major influence, while the laser energy has a weaker one within the range of parameters explored. The atomic fraction of Ga may vary from 0.55 at low-field conditions to 0.35 at high field. These results have been interpreted in terms of preferential evaporation of Ga at high field. The deficit of As is most likely explained by the formation of neutral As complexes either by direct ejection from the tip surface or upon the dissociation of large clusters. The study of multiple detection events supports this interpretation.

  6. Using Jupiter’s gravitational field to probe the Jovian convective dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Convective motion in the deep metallic hydrogen region of Jupiter is believed to generate its magnetic field, the strongest in the solar system. The amplitude, structure and depth of the convective motion are unknown. A promising way of probing the Jovian convective dynamo is to measure its effect on the external gravitational field, a task to be soon undertaken by the Juno spacecraft. We calculate the gravitational signature of non-axisymmetric convective motion in the Jovian metallic hydrogen region and show that with sufficiently accurate measurements it can reveal the nature of the deep convection. PMID:27005472

  7. Probes and Tests of Strong-Field Gravity with Observations in the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psaltis Dimitrios

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutron stars and black holes are the astrophysical systems with the strongest gravitational fields in the universe. In this article, I review the prospect of using observations of such compact objects to probe some of the most intriguing general relativistic predictions in the strong-field regime: the absence of stable circular orbits near a compact object and the presence of event horizons around black-hole singularities. I discuss the need for a theoretical framework, within which future experiments will provide detailed, quantitative tests of gravity theories. Finally, I summarize the constraints imposed by current observations of neutron stars on potential deviations from general relativity.

  8. Nanoscale magnetic field mapping with a single spin scanning probe magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rondin, L.; Tetienne, J.-P.; Spinicelli, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Jacques, V. [Laboratoire de Photonique Quantique et Moleculaire, Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan and CNRS UMR 8537, 94235 Cachan Cedex (France); Dal Savio, C.; Karrai, K. [Attocube systems AG, Koeniginstrasse 11A RGB, Munich 80539 (Germany); Dantelle, G. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Ecole Polytechnique and CNRS UMR 7643, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Thiaville, A.; Rohart, S. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud and CNRS UMR 8502, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2012-04-09

    We demonstrate quantitative magnetic field mapping with nanoscale resolution, by applying a lock-in technique on the electron spin resonance frequency of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect placed at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip. In addition, we report an all-optical magnetic imaging technique which is sensitive to large off-axis magnetic fields, thus extending the operation range of diamond-based magnetometry. Both techniques are illustrated by using a magnetic hard disk as a test sample. Owing to the non-perturbing and quantitative nature of the magnetic probe, this work should open up numerous perspectives in nanomagnetism and spintronics.

  9. Dynamics of valence-shell electrons and nuclei probed by strong-field holography and rescattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt, Samuel G.; Bhargava Ram, Niraghatam; Atala, Marcos; Shvetsov-Shilovski, Nikolay I; von Conta, Aaron; Baykusheva, Denitsa; Lein, Manfred; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Strong-field photoelectron holography and laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) are two powerful emerging methods for probing the ultrafast dynamics of molecules. However, both of them have remained restricted to static systems and to nuclear dynamics induced by strong-field ionization. Here we extend these promising methods to image purely electronic valence-shell dynamics in molecules using photoelectron holography. In the same experiment, we use LIED and photoelectron holography simultaneously, to observe coupled electronic-rotational dynamics taking place on similar timescales. These results offer perspectives for imaging ultrafast dynamics of molecules on femtosecond to attosecond timescales. PMID:28643771

  10. Multisensor Capacitance Probes for Simultaneously Monitoring Rice Field Soil-Water-Crop-Ambient Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Multisensor capacitance probes (MCPs) have traditionally been used for soil moisture monitoring and irrigation scheduling. This paper presents a new application of these probes, namely the simultaneous monitoring of ponded water level, soil moisture, and temperature profile, conditions which are particularly important for rice crops in temperate growing regions and for rice grown with prolonged periods of drying. WiFi-based loggers are used to concurrently collect the data from the MCPs and ultrasonic distance sensors (giving an independent reading of water depth). Models are fit to MCP water depth vs volumetric water content (VWC) characteristics from laboratory measurements, variability from probe-to-probe is assessed, and the methodology is verified using measurements from a rice field throughout a growing season. The root-mean-squared error of the water depth calculated from MCP VWC over the rice growing season was 6.6 mm. MCPs are used to simultaneously monitor ponded water depth, soil moisture content when ponded water is drained, and temperatures in root, water, crop and ambient zones. The insulation effect of ponded water against cold-temperature effects is demonstrated with low and high water levels. The developed approach offers advantages in gaining the full soil-plant-atmosphere continuum in a single robust sensor. PMID:29278397

  11. Campanile Near-Field Probes Fabricated by Nanoimprint Lithography on the Facet of an Optical Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calafiore, Giuseppe; Koshelev, Alexander; Darlington, Thomas P; Borys, Nicholas J; Melli, Mauro; Polyakov, Aleksandr; Cantarella, Giuseppe; Allen, Frances I; Lum, Paul; Wong, Ed; Sassolini, Simone; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Schuck, P James; Cabrini, Stefano; Munechika, Keiko

    2017-05-10

    One of the major challenges to the widespread adoption of plasmonic and nano-optical devices in real-life applications is the difficulty to mass-fabricate nano-optical antennas in parallel and reproducible fashion, and the capability to precisely place nanoantennas into devices with nanometer-scale precision. In this study, we present a solution to this challenge using the state-of-the-art ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) to fabricate functional optical transformers onto the core of an optical fiber in a single step, mimicking the 'campanile' near-field probes. Imprinted probes were fabricated using a custom-built imprinter tool with co-axial alignment capability with sub optical coupling between the fiber and the imprinted optical transformer. The imprinted optical transformer probe was used in an actual NSOM measurement performing hyperspectral photoluminescence mapping of standard fluorescent beads. The calibration scans confirmed that imprinted probes enable sub-diffraction limited imaging with a spatial resolution consistent with the gap size. This novel nano-fabrication approach promises a low-cost, high-throughput, and reproducible manufacturing of advanced nano-optical devices.

  12. Multisensor Capacitance Probes for Simultaneously Monitoring Rice Field Soil-Water- Crop-Ambient Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Brinkhoff

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multisensor capacitance probes (MCPs have traditionally been used for soil moisture monitoring and irrigation scheduling. This paper presents a new application of these probes, namely the simultaneous monitoring of ponded water level, soil moisture, and temperature profile, conditions which are particularly important for rice crops in temperate growing regions and for rice grown with prolonged periods of drying. WiFi-based loggers are used to concurrently collect the data from the MCPs and ultrasonic distance sensors (giving an independent reading of water depth. Models are fit to MCP water depth vs volumetric water content (VWC characteristics from laboratory measurements, variability from probe-to-probe is assessed, and the methodology is verified using measurements from a rice field throughout a growing season. The root-mean-squared error of the water depth calculated from MCP VWC over the rice growing season was 6.6 mm. MCPs are used to simultaneously monitor ponded water depth, soil moisture content when ponded water is drained, and temperatures in root, water, crop and ambient zones. The insulation effect of ponded water against cold-temperature effects is demonstrated with low and high water levels. The developed approach offers advantages in gaining the full soil-plant-atmosphere continuum in a single robust sensor.

  13. A comparison of the quality of image acquisition between the incident dark field and sidestream dark field video-microscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Gilbert-Kawai; J. Coppel (Jonny); V. Bountziouka (Vassiliki); C. Ince (Can); D. Martin (Daniel)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background__ The ‘Cytocam’ is a third generation video-microscope, which enables real time visualisation of the in vivo microcirculation. Based upon the principle of incident dark field (IDF) illumination, this hand held computer-controlled device was designed to address the

  14. A comparison of the quality of image acquisition between the incident dark field and sidestream dark field video-microscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert-Kawai, Edward; Coppel, Jonny; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Ince, Can; Martin, Daniel; Ahuja, V.; Aref-Adib, G.; Burnham, R.; Chisholm, A.; Clarke, K.; Coates, D.; Coates, M.; Cook, D.; Cox, M.; Dhillon, S.; Dougall, C.; Doyle, P.; Duncan, P.; Edsell, M.; Edwards, L.; Evans, L.; Gardiner, P.; Grocott, M.; Gunning, P.; Hart, N.; Harrington, J.; Harvey, J.; Holloway, C.; Howard, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Imray, C.; Jonas, M.; van der Kaaij, J.; Khosravi, M.; Kolfschoten, N.; Levett, D.; Luery, H.; Luks, A.; Martin, D.; McMorrow, R.; Meale, P.; Mitchell, K.; Montgomery, H.; Morgan, G.; Morgan, J.; Murray, A.; Mythen, M.; Newman, S.; O'Dwyer, M.; Pate, J.; Plant, T.; Pun, M.; Richards, P.; Richardson, A.; Rodway, G.; Simpson, J.; Stroud, C.; Stroud, M.; Stygal, J.; Symons, B.; Szawarski, P.; van Tulleken, A.; van Tulleken, C.; Vercueil, A.; Wandrag, L.; Wilson, M.; Windsor, J.; Basnyat, B.; Clarke, C.; Hornbein, T.; Milledge, J.; West, J.; Abraham, S.; Adams, T.; Anseeuw, W.; Astin, R.; Burdall, O.; Carroll, J.; Cobb, A.; Coppel, J.; Couppis, O.; Court, J.; Cumptsey, A.; Davies, T.; Diamond, N.; Geliot, T.; Gilbert-Kawai, E.; Gilbert-Kawai, G.; Gnaiger, E.; Haldane, C.; Hennis, P.; Horscroft, J.; Jack, S.; Jarvis, B.; Jenner, W.; Jones, G.; Kenth, J.; Kotwica, A.; Kumar, R. B. C.; Lacey, J.; Laner, V.; Mahomed, Z.; Moonie, J.; Mythen, P.; O'Brien, K.; Ruggles-Brice, I.; Salmon, K.; Sheperdigian, A.; Smedley, T.; Tomlinson, C.; Ward, S.; Wight, A.; Wilkinson, C.; Wythe, S.; Feelisch, M.; Hanson, M.; Moon, R.; Peters, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The 'Cytocam' is a third generation video-microscope, which enables real time visualisation of the in vivo microcirculation. Based upon the principle of incident dark field (IDF) illumination, this hand held computer-controlled device was designed to address the technical limitations of

  15. Determining the field emitter temperature during laser irradiation in the pulsed laser atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellogg, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Three methods are discussed for determining the field emitter temperature during laser irradiation in the recently developed Pulsed Laser Atom Probe. A procedure based on the reduction of the lattice evaporation field with increasing emitter temperature is found to be the most convenient and reliable method between 60 and 500 K. Calibration curves (plots of the evaporation field versus temperature) are presented for dc and pulsed field evaporation of W, Mo, and Rh. These results show directly the important influence of the evaporation rate on the temperature dependence of the evaporation field. The possibility of a temperature calibration based on the ionic charge state distribution of field evaporated lattice atoms is also discussed. The shift in the charge state distributions which occurs when the emitter temperature is increased and the applied field strength is decreased at a constant rate of evaporation is shown to be due to the changing field and not the changing temperature. Nevertheless, the emitter temperature can be deduced from the charge state distribution for a specified evaporation rate. Charge state distributions as a function of field strength and temperature are presented for the same three materials. Finally, a preliminary experiment is reported which shows that the emitter temperature can be determined from field ion microscope observations of single atom surface diffusion over low index crystal planes. This last calibration procedure is shown to be very useful at higher temperatures (>600 K) where the other two methods become unreliable

  16. Linux malware incident response an excerpt from malware forensic field guide for Linux systems

    CERN Document Server

    Malin, Cameron H; Aquilina, James M

    2013-01-01

    Linux Malware Incident Response is a ""first look"" at the Malware Forensics Field Guide for Linux Systems, exhibiting the first steps in investigating Linux-based incidents. The Syngress Digital Forensics Field Guides series includes companions for any digital and computer forensic investigator and analyst. Each book is a ""toolkit"" with checklists for specific tasks, case studies of difficult situations, and expert analyst tips. This compendium of tools for computer forensics analysts and investigators is presented in a succinct outline format with cross-references to suppleme

  17. Double tuning a single input probe for heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy at low field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadanki, Sasidhar; Colon, Raul D.; Moore, Jay; Waddell, Kevin W.

    2012-10-01

    Applications of PASADENA in biomedicine are continuing to emerge due to recent demonstrations that hyperpolarized metabolic substrates and the corresponding reaction products persist sufficiently long to be detected in vivo. Biomedical applications of PASADENA typically differ from their basic science counterparts in that the polarization endowed by addition of parahydrogen is usually transferred from nascent protons to coupled storage nuclei for subsequent detection on a higher field imaging instrument. These pre-imaging preparations usually take place at low field, but commercial spectrometers capable of heteronuclear pulsed NMR at frequencies in the range of 100 kHz to 1 MHz are scarce though, in comparison to single channel consoles in that field regime. Reported here is a probe circuit that can be used in conjunction with a phase and amplitude modulation scheme we have developed called PANORAMIC (Precession And Nutation for Observing Rotations At Multiple Intervals about the Carrier), that expands a single channel console capability to double or generally multiple resonance with minimal hardware modifications. The demands of this application are geared towards uniform preparation, and since the hyperpolarized molecules are being detected externally at high field, detection sensitivity is secondary to applied field uniformity over a large reaction volume to accommodate heterogeneous chemistry of gas molecules at a liquid interface. The probe circuit was therefore configured with a large (40 mL) Helmholtz sample coil for uniformity, and double-tuned to the Larmor precession frequencies of 13C/1H (128/510 kHz) within a custom solenoidal electromagnet at a static field of 12 mT. Traditional (on-resonant) as well as PANORAMIC NMR signals with signal to noise ratios of approximately 75 have been routinely acquired with this probe and spectrometer setup from 1024 repetitions on the high frequency channel. The proton excitation pulse width was 240 μs at 6.31 W

  18. CFHT's SkyProbe: True Atmospheric Attenuation Measurement in the Telescope Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuillandre, J.-C.; Magnier, E. A.; Isani, S.; Sabin, D.; Knight, W.; Kras, S.; Lai, K.

    Developed at the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), SkyProbe is a system that allows the direct measurement of the true attenuation by clouds. This measurement is performed approximately once per min, directly on the field viewed by the telescope. It has been possible to make this system relatively inexpensively due to low cost CCD cameras available on the amateur market. A crucial addition to this hardware is the recent availability of a full-sky photometry catalog at the appropriate depth: the Tycho catalog from the Hipparcos mission. A very important element in the SkyProbe data set creation is the automatic data analysis pipeline, Elixir, developed at CFHT for the improved operation of the CFHT wide-field imagers CFH12K and MegaCam. SkyProbe's FITS images are processed in real time, and the pipeline output (a zero point attenuation) provides the current sky transmission to the observers and aids immediate decision making. These measurements are also attached to the archived data, adding a key tool for future use by other astronomers. Specific features of the detector, such as intra pixel quantum efficiency variations, must be taken into consideration since the data are strongly undersampled.

  19. A versatile variable field module for Asylum Cypher scanning probe system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongxue; Comes, Ryan; Lu, Jiwei; Wolf, Stuart; Hodgson, Jim; Rutgers, Maarten

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become one of the most widely used techniques for measuring and manipulating various characteristics of materials at the nanoscale. However, there are very limited option for the characterization of field dependence properties. In this work, we demonstrate a versatile variable field module (VFM) with magnetic field up to 1800 Oe for the Asylum Research Cypher system. The magnetic field is changed by adjusting the distance between a rare earth magnet and the AFM probe. A built-in Hall sensor makes it possible to perform in-situ measurements of the field. Rotating the magnet makes it possible to do angular field dependent measurements. The capability of the VFM system is demonstrated by degaussing a floppy disk media with increasing magnetic field. The written bits are erased at about 800 Oe. Angular dependence measurements clearly show the evolution of magnetic domain structures. A completely reversible magnetic force microscopy (MFM) phase contrast is observed when the magnetic field is rotated by 180°. Further demonstration of successful magnetic switching of CoFe2O4 pillars in CoFe2O4-BiFeO3 nanocomposites will be presented and field dependent MFM and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) will be discussed. The work at University of Virginia was supported by DARPA under contract no. HR-0011-10-1-0072.

  20. Effects of a power and photon energy of incident light on near-field etching properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsui, T.; Saito, H.; Nishioka, K.; Leuschel, B.; Soppera, O.; Nobusada, K.

    2017-12-01

    We developed a near-field etching technique for realizing an ultra-flat surfaces of various materials and structures. To elucidate the near-field etching properties, we have investigated the effects of power and the photon energy of the incident light. First, we established theoretically that an optical near-field with photon energy lower than the absorption edge of the molecules can induce molecular vibrations. We used nanodiamonds to study the power dependence of the near-field etching properties. From the topological changes of the nanodiamonds, we confirmed the linear-dependence of the etching volume with the incident power. Furthermore, we studied the photon energy dependence using TiO2 nanostriped structures, which revealed that a lower photon energy results in a lower etching rate.

  1. Electric field measurements on Cluster: comparing the double-probe and electron drift techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Eriksson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The four Cluster satellites each carry two instruments designed for measuring the electric field: a double-probe instrument (EFW and an electron drift instrument (EDI. We compare data from the two instruments in a representative sample of plasma regions. The complementary merits and weaknesses of the two techniques are illustrated. EDI operations are confined to regions of magnetic fields above 30 nT and where wave activity and keV electron fluxes are not too high, while EFW can provide data everywhere, and can go far higher in sampling frequency than EDI. On the other hand, the EDI technique is immune to variations in the low energy plasma, while EFW sometimes detects significant nongeophysical electric fields, particularly in regions with drifting plasma, with ion energy (in eV below the spacecraft potential (in volts. We show that the polar cap is a particularly intricate region for the double-probe technique, where large nongeophysical fields regularly contaminate EFW measurments of the DC electric field. We present a model explaining this in terms of enhanced cold plasma wake effects appearing when the ion flow energy is higher than the thermal energy but below the spacecraft potential multiplied by the ion charge. We suggest that these conditions, which are typical of the polar wind and occur sporadically in other regions containing a significant low energy ion population, cause a large cold plasma wake behind the spacecraft, resulting in spurious electric fields in EFW data. This interpretation is supported by an analysis of the direction of the spurious electric field, and by showing that use of active potential control alleviates the situation.

  2. Intensive probing of clear air convective fields by radar and instrumented drone aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Clear air convective fields were probed in three summer experiments (1969, 1970, and 1971) on an S-band monopulse tracking radar at Wallops Island, Virginia, and a drone aircraft with a takeoff weight of 5.2 kg, wingspan of 2.5 m, and cruising glide speed of 10.3 m/sec. The drone was flown 23.2 km north of the radar and carried temperature, pressure/altitude, humidity, and vertical and airspeed velocity sensors. Extensive time-space convective field data were obtained by taking a large number of RHI and PPI pictures at short intervals of time. The rapidly changing overall convective field data obtained from the radar could be related to the meteorological information telemetered from the drone at a reasonably low cost by this combined technique.

  3. Electronic properites of electron-doped cuprate superconductors probed by high-field magnetotransport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helm, Toni

    2013-09-18

    In the present work the normal-state properties of the electron-doped cuprate superconductor Nd{sub 2-x}Ce{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (NCCO) are investigated for a broad doping range, covering almost the whole phase diagram of this material. Magnetotransport measurements in the world's highest non-destructive magnetic fields were used as a spectroscopic tool for probing the electronic structure of single-crystalline NCCO as a function of the carrier concentration x. Quantum and semiclassical oscillations in the magnetoresistance provided new insights into various properties of the Fermi surface and the nature of the ground state in the system. The detailed investigations of the field- and temperature-dependent transport and its dependence on the field orientation have revealed a close correlation between symmetry-breaking ordering instabilities and the superconducting state.

  4. Electronic properites of electron-doped cuprate superconductors probed by high-field magnetotransport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, Toni

    2013-01-01

    In the present work the normal-state properties of the electron-doped cuprate superconductor Nd 2-x Ce x CuO 4 (NCCO) are investigated for a broad doping range, covering almost the whole phase diagram of this material. Magnetotransport measurements in the world's highest non-destructive magnetic fields were used as a spectroscopic tool for probing the electronic structure of single-crystalline NCCO as a function of the carrier concentration x. Quantum and semiclassical oscillations in the magnetoresistance provided new insights into various properties of the Fermi surface and the nature of the ground state in the system. The detailed investigations of the field- and temperature-dependent transport and its dependence on the field orientation have revealed a close correlation between symmetry-breaking ordering instabilities and the superconducting state.

  5. Atom probe field ion microscope study of the range and diffusivity of helium in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, A.

    1978-08-01

    A time-of-flight (TOF) atom-probe field-ion microscope (FIM) specifically designed for the study of defects in metals is described. With this automated system 600 TOF min -1 can be recorded and analyzed. Performance tests of the instrument demonstrated that (1) the seven isotopes of molybdenum and the five isotopes of tungsten can be clearly resolved; and (2) the concentration and spatial distribution of all constitutents present at levels greater than 0.05 at. % in a W--25 at. % Re, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr (TZM), a low swelling stainless steel (LS1A) and a metallic glass (Metglas 2826) can be measured. The effect of the rate of field evaporation on the quantitative atom probe analysis of a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy and a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr alloy was investigated. As the field evaporation rate increased the measured Ti concentration was found to also increase. A simple qualitative model was proposed to explain the observation. The spatial distribution of titanium in a fast neutron irradiated Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy has been investigated. No evidence of Ti segregation to the voids was detected nor has any evidence of significant resolution of Ti from the TiC precipitates been detected. A small amount of segregation of carbon to a void was detected

  6. Design and fabrication of two probes for Near Field THz imaging .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Angelica; Paz, Gaudencio; Perez, Joel; Qureshi, Naser; Microwave photonics Team

    THz imaging has gained attention due to the potential applications in medicine, security, inspections on semiconductor devices, etc. Until now, systems devoted to Near Field THz imaging consist of two basic parts: generation of THz radiation and a sensing probe system. In this work we present two approaches to make a probe for near field THz imaging. The first one is a novel device capable of integrate in a single chip the THz source with the sensing system. The device is fabricated in a GaAs substrate, on one side a photoconductive gold antenna is printed using microfabrication techniques; on the opposite side a specifically designed bow tie sub-wavelength sized bow-tie aperture is placed centered to the gap of the antenna. According to our simulations, the aperture exhibits field enhancement at the metal tips when it is illuminated from the substrate side by the THz radiation emitted from the antenna. The second device is a tapered conical waveguide with micrometrical aperture size at the end. A commercial silicon lens is used to focus the THz radiation emitted from a photoconductive antenna on the aperture. Simulation in COMSOL is used to find the best taper angle where reflection and loss are reduced. PAPIIT 106316 and CONACYT Fronteras 344.

  7. Full-field parallel interferometry coherence probe microscope for high-speed optical metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safrani, A; Abdulhalim, I

    2015-06-01

    Parallel detection of several achromatic phase-shifted images is used to obtain a high-speed, high-resolution, full-field, optical coherence probe tomography system based on polarization interferometry. The high enface imaging speed, short coherence gate, and high lateral resolution provided by the system are exploited to determine microbump height uniformity in an integrated semiconductor chip at 50 frames per second. The technique is demonstrated using the Linnik microscope, although it can be implemented on any polarization-based interference microscopy system.

  8. A Meshless Algorithm to Model Field Evaporation in Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Nicolas; Vurpillot, François; Duguay, Sébastien; Blavette, Didier

    2015-12-01

    An alternative approach for simulating the field evaporation process in atom probe tomography is presented. The model uses the electrostatic Robin's equation to directly calculate charge distribution over the tip apex conducting surface, without the need for a supporting mesh. The partial ionization state of the surface atoms is at the core of the method. Indeed, each surface atom is considered as a point charge, which is representative of its evaporation probability. The computational efficiency is ensured by an adapted version of the Barnes-Hut N-body problem algorithm. Standard desorption maps for cubic structures are presented in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  9. Free-Free Transitions in the Presence of Laser Fields at Very Low Incident Electron Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, Chandana

    2010-01-01

    We study the free-free transition in electron-hydrogenic systems in ground state in presence of an external laser field at very loud incident energies. The laser field is treated classically while the collision dynamics is treated quantum mechanically. The laser field is chosen to be monochromatic, linearly polarized and homogeneous. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a nonperturbative manner by choosing a Volkov wave function for it. The scattering weave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of the electron exchange, short-range as well as of the long-range interactions to get the S and P wave phase shifts while for the higher angular momentum phase shifts the exchange approximation has only been considered. We calculate the laser assisted differential cross sections (LADCS) for the aforesaid free-free transition process for single photon absorption/emission. The laser intensity is chosen to be much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the LADCS as compared to the field free (FF) cross sections. Unlike the FF ones, the LADCS exhibit some oscillations having a distinct maximum at a low value of the scattering angle depending on the laser parameters as well as on the incident energies.

  10. Time-dependent scattering of incident light of various wavelengths in ferrofluids under external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jingyu; Song, Dongxing; Geng, Jiafeng; Jing, Dengwei

    2018-02-01

    Ferrofluids can exhibit the anisotropic thermodynamic properties under magnetic fields. The dynamic optical properties of ferrofluids in the presence of magnetic fields are of particular interest due to their potential application as various optical devices. Although time-dependent light scattering by ferrofluids have been extensively studied, the effect of wavelength of incident light have been rarely considered. Here, for the first time, we investigated both the time- and wavelength-dependent light scattering in water based ferrofluids containing Fe3O4 nanoparticles under an external magnetic field. The field-induced response behavior of the prepared ferrofluid samples was determined and verified first by thermal conductivity measurement and numerical simulation. Double-beam UV-Vis spectrophotometer was employed to record the temporal evolution of transmitted intensity of incident light of various wavelengths passing through the ferrofluid sample and propagating parallel to the applied field. As expected, the light intensity decreases to a certain value right after the field is turned on due to the thermal fluctuation induced disorder inside the flexible particle chains. Then the light intensity further decreases with time until the appearance of a minimum at time τ0 followed by an inversed increase before finally reaches equilibrium at a particular time. More importantly, the characteristic inversion time τ0 was found to follow a power law increase with the wavelength of incident light (τ0 ∼ λα, where α = 2.07). A quantitative explanation for the wavelength dependence of characteristic time was proposed based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The simulation results are in good agreement with our experimental observations. The time-dependent light scattering in ferrofluids under different incident wavelengths was rationalized by considering both the coarsening process of the particle chains and the occurrence of resonance within the

  11. Ester Carbonyl Vibration as a Sensitive Probe of Protein Local Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Ileana M.; Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Tucker, Matthew J.; Gai, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The ability to quantify the local electrostatic environment of proteins and protein/peptide assemblies is key to yielding a microscopic understanding of many biological interactions and processes. Herein, we show that the ester carbonyl stretching vibration of two non-natural amino acids, L-aspartic acid 4-methyl ester and L-glutamic acid 5-methyl ester, is a convenient and sensitive probe in this regard since its frequency correlates linearly with the local electrostatic field for both hydrogen-bonding and non-hydrogen-bonding environments. We expect that the resultant frequency-electric field map will find use in various applications. In addition, we show that, when situated in a non-hydrogen bonding environment, this probe can also be used to measure the local dielectric constant (ε). For example, applying it to amyloid fibrils formed by Aβ16-22 reveals that the interior of such β-sheet assemblies has a ε of ~5.6. PMID:24788907

  12. Ester carbonyl vibration as a sensitive probe of protein local electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Ileana M; Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Tucker, Matthew J; Gai, Feng

    2014-06-10

    The ability to quantify the local electrostatic environment of proteins and protein/peptide assemblies is key to gaining a microscopic understanding of many biological interactions and processes. Herein, we show that the ester carbonyl stretching vibration of two non-natural amino acids, L-aspartic acid 4-methyl ester and L-glutamic acid 5-methyl ester, is a convenient and sensitive probe in this regard, since its frequency correlates linearly with the local electrostatic field for both hydrogen-bonding and non-hydrogen-bonding environments. We expect that the resultant frequency-electric-field map will find use in various applications. Furthermore, we show that, when situated in a non-hydrogen-bonding environment, this probe can also be used to measure the local dielectric constant (ε). For example, its application to amyloid fibrils formed by Aβ(16-22) revealed that the interior of such β-sheet assemblies has an ε value of approximately 5.6. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. One-inch field of view imaging probe for breast cancer sentinel node location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Errico, Giovanni; Scafe, Raffaele; Soluri, Alessandro; Schiaratura, Alfiero; Maria Mangano, Anna; David, Vincenzo; Scopinaro, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    The already reported 1-in. 2 field of view mini gamma camera known since 1998 with the name of Imaging Probe (IP), has been used for sentinel node localization by a medical equipe that, though trained by the group of nuclear physicians of the University 'La Sapienza' who first conceived and used this detector, has used IP in its own Hospital to: (1) gain experience for future use during operations--a cooperative work on IP radio guided orthopaedic operations has already started working, and (2) to start with IP multicenter trials. In six patients with breast cancer, who underwent lymphoscintigraphy for sentinel node biopsy, sentinel node was checked and located with IP and non-imaging Neoprobe 2000 CdTe (Zn) probe, independent of location by means of large field of view Anger camera. Operators who used Neoprobe and IP were blinded to each other and not aware of the results of Anger camera imaging. Anger camera, as well as IP and neoprobe detected 7 nodes in 6 pts. Detection time was 2', 06'' SD 26'' with IP and 2', 18'' SD 47'' with neoprobe 2000. The most difficult to find node required 2 min and 56 s--inside sd--for IP detection and 3 min and 45 s with neoprobe. Subjective impression of being sure of having detected sentinel node was: absolutely sure on 7/7 nodes with IP and on 5/7 nodes with neoprobe

  14. Density Fluctuation Measurements in the MST Reversed Field Pinch Using a Heavy Ion Beam Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Connor, K. A.; Demers, D. R.; Schatz, J. G.; Schoch, P. M.

    2002-11-01

    Localized measurements of density fluctuations in the hot core of the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch have been made with a Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP). The density fluctuations are 10 - 20% in the region 0.25corruption, such as ion path effects and electronic noise. The HIBP on MST has 2 additional factors that are not common to most HIBPs. The small machine ports (2" injection port and 4.5" detection port) can result in vignetting of the beam and the constantly changing magnetic fields causes the beam's sample location to move. It is shown that such instrument effects can be accounted for and are small in selected data sets.

  15. Spin exchange between ion probes and localized moments in ferromagnets as the origin of transient fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagelberg, F.; Das, T.P.; Speidel, K.

    1993-01-01

    The transient field phenomenon has been ascribed to a polarization transfer between the electrons of the ionic projectiles and the surplus of majority spin electrons of the ferromagnetic host over the minority spin electrons. Earlier attempts to explain this crucial process failed to account for the order of magnitude of the experimentally observed transient field strengths. A recent model which proposes spin exchange scattering between bound projectile electrons and quasifree host electrons as the mechanism of polarization transfer arrives at the correct orders of magnitude but is in conflict with the weak velocity dependence of the experimental polarization, exhibiting a strongly decreasing behavior with increasing velocity. The new model presented here proposes spin exchange between the ionic shell and localized electrons of the ferromagnet as a more adequate approach to the problem. It is shown that calculations involving hydrogenlike ions explain the size of the experimentally observed polarization effects as well as their velocity dependence for various ion probes traversing thin iron foils

  16. Development of gamma probe technique for monitoring rooting pattern of pearl millet under field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittal, K.P.R.; Subbiah, B.V.

    1982-01-01

    For the root distribution studies, methods are not available to measure the growth in situ and in toto under field conditions without destroying the plants. A non-destructive method was developed for measuring the gamma activity in root using a probe that was administered through the stem. Five isotopes viz. 86 Rb, 134 Cs, 59 Fe, 65 Zn and 54 Mn tested, were found to represent almost similar rooting pattern for pearl millet from flowering to harvesting stages. Among these isotopes 59 Fe was found to be suitable for field use. This method also enabled to successfully monitor the root activity over time and avoided the sampling errors. Since laboratory processing of samples was eliminated, the process of measurement was hastened. (author)

  17. Li-ion battery ageing model parameter: SEI layer analysis using magnetic field probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmender Singh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With the growing usage of lithium-ion (Li-ion batteries in various applications from stationary applications to automotive industries, their ageing mechanism and its influencing factors have become a big concern today. Ageing may be defined as deterioration in the performance of the battery due to irreversible physical and chemical changes like internal resistance rise, electrolyte decompositions, electrodes cracking and solid electrolyte interphase (SEI modification/growth. The aim of this research article is to study and analyse the behaviour of SEI layer growth at the anode using a novel non-invasive magnetic field probing (MFP. A 3-d model based upon well-known John Newman’s pseudo 2-d approach has been developed in COMSOL Multiphysics®. It is observed that the magnetic field response (MFR is inversely related to SEI growth. Anode’s state of charge (SoC response with SEI layer and MFR is also studied.

  18. The double probe electric field experiment on Freja: description and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, G.T.; Blomberg, L.G.; Lindqvist, A.A.; Faelthammar, C.G.; Haerendel, G.; Mozer, F.S.; Pedersen, A.; Tanskanen, P.

    1993-10-01

    A description is given of the Freja double-probe electric field instrument. Its capability to perform high-resolution measurements of the aurora and its fine-structure as well as collect information on sub-auroral and low-latitude phenomena is illustrated by selected results from the first six months of operation. The instrument is highly flexible and possible to operate in a number of different modes. It is also equipped with a 4-Megabyte burst memory for high data sampling rate and temporary storage of data. It has been fully operational since October 1992, and delivers data from ∼22 hours/day including about 5-6 auroral crossings/day of the northern and southern auroral ionosphere. New and important information in the auroral fine structure and electrodynamics is obtained by means of burst resolution data (6144 samples/s) and normal resolution data (768 sample/s). Common burst data collection triggered by the electric field event detector has turned out to be very useful for the selection of scientifically interesting events. This is illustrated by high-resolution data of a pair of extremely intense and narrow electric field structures (1 V/m) which are associated with a total absence of precipitating particles, depletions of the thermal plasma and with an intense wave activity. The low inclination of the Freja orbit provides a new perspective for studying large-scale phenomena associated with east-west gradients as is exemplified by electric field data from a satellite crossing over north-south oriented auroral structures presumably resulting from rotational distortions of east-west aligned auroral arcs. The different plasma regimes encountered by Freja are continuously monitored by means of current sweeps applied to the probes and by the satellite potential

  19. Theory and analysis of a large field polarization imaging system with obliquely incident light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaotian; Jin, Weiqi; Li, Li; Wang, Xia; Qiu, Su; Liu, Jing

    2018-02-05

    Polarization imaging technology provides information about not only the irradiance of a target but also the polarization degree and angle of polarization, which indicates extensive application potential. However, polarization imaging theory is based on paraxial optics. When a beam of obliquely incident light passes an analyser, the direction of light propagation is not perpendicular to the surface of the analyser and the applicability of the traditional paraxial optical polarization imaging theory is challenged. This paper investigates a theoretical model of a polarization imaging system with obliquely incident light and establishes a polarization imaging transmission model with a large field of obliquely incident light. In an imaging experiment with an integrating sphere light source and rotatable polarizer, the polarization imaging transmission model is verified and analysed for two cases of natural light and linearly polarized light incidence. Although the results indicate that the theoretical model is consistent with the experimental results, the theoretical model distinctly differs from the traditional paraxial approximation model. The results prove the accuracy and necessity of the theoretical model and the theoretical guiding significance for theoretical and systematic research of large field polarization imaging.

  20. Study of defects and radiation damage in solids by field-ion and atom-probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidman, D.N.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to introduce the reader to the basic physical ideas involved in the field-ion and atom-probe field-ion microscope techniques, and to the applications of these techniques to the study of defects and radiation damage in solids. The final section discusses, in precise form, the application of the atom-probe field-ion microscope to the study of the behavior of implanted 3 He and 4 He atoms in tungsten. The paper is heavily referenced so that the reader can pursue his specific research interest in detail

  1. Study of defects, radiation damage and implanted gases in solids by field-ion and atom-probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidman, D.N.; Amano, J.; Wagner, A.

    1980-10-01

    The ability of the field-ion microscope to image individual atoms has been applied, at Cornell University, to the study of fundamental properties of point defects in irradiated or quenched metals. The capability of the atom probe field-ion microscope to determine the chemistry - that is, the mass-to-charge ratio - of a single ion has been used to investigate the behavior of different implanted species in metals. A brief review is presented of: (1) the basic physical principles of the field-ion and atom-probe microscopes; (2) the many applications of these instruments to the study of defects and radiation damage in solids; and (3) the application of the atom-probe field-ion microscope to the study of the behavior of implanted 3 He and 4 He atoms in tungsten. The paper is heavily referenced so that the reader can pursue his specific research interests in detail

  2. Plasma diagnostics by electron guns and electric field probes on ISEE-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, A.

    1982-01-01

    The use of electron guns to control the potential of a satellite with conductive surfaces is discussed with reference to the results of the ISEE-1 satellite experiment. The two electron guns carried by the satellite can emit electrons with energies up to 48 eV, and the emitted electron current has a maximum value of 0.5-1.0 mA. The satellite potential, with or without gun operation, can be measured with reference to one or two spherical electric field probes positioned on booms at a distance of 36 m from the satellite. The probes are biased with a negative current from a high-impedance source to be slightly positive (0.5-1.0 V) relative to the plasma, and the spacecraft is normally several volts more positive and can be further positively charged by operating the electron gun. Plasma diagnostics can be carried out by appropriate sweeps of gun currents and energy of emitted electrons to obtain information about density and characteristic energy of ambient electrons. 9 references

  3. Thermal ion imagers and Langmuir probes in the Swarm electric field instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, D. J.; Burchill, J. K.; Buchert, S. C.; Eriksson, A. I.; Gill, R.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Öhlen, L.; Smith, M.; Moffat, B.

    2017-02-01

    The European Space Agency's three Swarm satellites were launched on 22 November 2013 into nearly polar, circular orbits, eventually reaching altitudes of 460 km (Swarm A and C) and 510 km (Swarm B). Swarm's multiyear mission is to make precision, multipoint measurements of low-frequency magnetic and electric fields in Earth's ionosphere for the purpose of characterizing magnetic fields generated both inside and external to the Earth, along with the electric fields and other plasma parameters associated with electric current systems in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Electric fields perpendicular to the magnetic field B→ are determined through ion drift velocity v→i and magnetic field measurements via the relation E→⊥=-v→i×B→. Ion drift is derived from two-dimensional images of low-energy ion distribution functions provided by two Thermal Ion Imager (TII) sensors viewing in the horizontal and vertical planes; v→i is corrected for spacecraft potential as determined by two Langmuir probes (LPs) which also measure plasma density ne and electron temperature Te. The TII sensors use a microchannel-plate-intensified phosphor screen imaged by a charge-coupled device to generate high-resolution distribution images (66 × 40 pixels) at a rate of 16 s-1. Images are partially processed on board and further on the ground to generate calibrated data products at a rate of 2 s-1; these include v→i, E→⊥, and ion temperature Ti in addition to electron temperature Te and plasma density ne from the LPs.

  4. QMQSAR: utilization of a semiempirical probe potential in a field-based QSAR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Steve; Merz, Kenneth M; Lauri, Giorgio; Ianni, James C

    2005-01-15

    A semiempirical quantum mechanical approach is described for the creation of molecular field-based QSAR models from a set of aligned ligand structures. Each ligand is characterized by a set of probe interaction energy (PIE) values computed at various grid points located near the surface of the ligand. Single-point PM3 calculations afford these PIE values, which represents a pool of independent variables from which multilinear regression models of activity are built. The best n-variable fit is determined by constructing an initial regression using standard forward stepwise selection, followed by refinement using a simulated annealing technique. The resulting fit provides an easily interpreted 3D physical model of ligand binding affinity. Validation against three literature datasets demonstrates the ability of the semiempirical potential to model critical binding interactions in diverse systems.

  5. Probing the Intergalactic Magnetic Field with the Anisotropy of the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venters, T. M.; Pavlidou, V.

    2013-01-01

    The intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) may leave an imprint on the angular anisotropy of the extragalactic gamma-ray background through its effect on electromagnetic cascades triggered by interactions between very high energy photons and the extragalactic background light. A strong IGMF will deflect secondary particles produced in these cascades and will thus tend to isotropize lower energy cascade photons, thereby inducing a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the gamma-ray background. Here we present a simple, proof-of-concept calculation of the magnitude of this effect and demonstrate that current Fermi data already seem to prefer nonnegligible IGMF values. The anisotropy energy spectrum of the Fermi gamma-ray background could thus be used as a probe of the IGMF strength.

  6. Field programmable gate array based reconfigurable scanning probe/optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Derek B; Lawrence, A J; Dzegede, Zechariah K; Hiester, Justin C; Kim, Cliff; Sánchez, Erik J

    2011-10-01

    The increasing popularity of nanometrology and nanospectroscopy has pushed researchers to develop complex new analytical systems. This paper describes the development of a platform on which to build a microscopy tool that will allow for flexibility of customization to suit research needs. The novelty of the described system lies in its versatility of capabilities. So far, one version of this microscope has allowed for successful near-field and far-field fluorescence imaging with single molecule detection sensitivity. This system is easily adapted for reflection, polarization (Kerr magneto-optical (MO)), Raman, super-resolution techniques, and other novel scanning probe imaging and spectroscopic designs. While collecting a variety of forms of optical images, the system can simultaneously monitor topographic information of a sample with an integrated tuning fork based shear force system. The instrument has the ability to image at room temperature and atmospheric pressure or under liquid. The core of the design is a field programmable gate array (FPGA) data acquisition card and a single, low cost computer to control the microscope with analog control circuitry using off-the-shelf available components. A detailed description of electronics, mechanical requirements, and software algorithms as well as examples of some different forms of the microscope developed so far are discussed.

  7. Photo-excited charge collection spectroscopy probing the traps in field-effect transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Im, Seongil; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Solid state field-effect devices such as organic and inorganic-channel thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been expected to promote advances in display and sensor electronics. The operational stabilities of such TFTs are thus important, strongly depending on the nature and density of charge traps present at the channel/dielectric interface or in the thin-film channel itself. This book contains how to characterize these traps, starting from the device physics of field-effect transistor (FET). Unlike conventional analysis techniques which are away from well-resolving spectral results, newly-introduced photo-excited charge-collection spectroscopy (PECCS) utilizes the photo-induced threshold voltage response from any type of working transistor devices with organic-, inorganic-, and even nano-channels, directly probing on the traps. So, our technique PECCS has been discussed through more than ten refereed-journal papers in the fields of device electronics, applied physics, applied chemistry, nano-devices and materia...

  8. Optimization of Grazing Incidence Optics for Wide-Field X-Ray Survey Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roming, P. W. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Garmire, G. P.; Roush, W. B.

    1999-12-01

    Optimization of wide-field X-ray optics could greatly enhance X-ray surveys. Discussions of optimizing wide-field X-ray optics, with field-of-views less-than 1.1 degree-squared, have been made previously in the literature. However, very little has been published about the optimizing of wide-field X-ray optics with larger fields-of-view. We have been working on the design of a wide-field (3.1 degree-squared field-of-view), short focal length (190.5 cm), grazing incidence mirror shell set, with a desired rms image spot size of 15 arcsec. The baseline design incorporates Wolter I type mirror shells with polynomial perturbations applied to the grazing incidence surface. By optimizing the polynomial, the rms image spot size can be minimized for a large range of grazing angles. The overall minimization technique is to efficiently optimize the polynomial coefficients that directly influence the angular resolution, without stepping through the entire multidimensional coefficient space. The multidimensional minimization techniques that have been investigated include: the downhill simplex method; the coupling of genetic algorithms with full and fractional, including Plackett-Burman, factorial designs; and the coupling of genetic algorithms with Box-Behnken and central composite response surface designs. We have also examined the use of neural networks, coupled with genetic algorithms, as a method of multidimensional minimization. Investigations of backpropagation, probabilistic (PNN), general regression (GRNN), and group method of data handling (GMDH) neural networks have been made. We report our findings to date. This research is funded by NASA grant #NAG5-5093.

  9. Fabrication of Cantilevered Tip-on-Aperture Probe for Enhancing Resolution of Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won-Seok; Jeong, Mun Seok; Kim, Dae-Chul; Kim, Jeongyong

    2007-08-01

    The scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) system achieves a resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the conventional optical microscopy system by subwavelength aperture probe scanning. The problem is that the light throughput decreases very markedly with decreasing aperture diameter. Apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopes obtain a much better resolution by concentrating light field near the tip apex. However, far-field illumination by a focused laser beam generates a large background scattering signal. Both disadvantages are overcome using the tip-on-aperture (TOA) approach presented in previous works. In this study, the fabrication of a cantilevered tip for SNOM and scanning force microscopy (SFM) has been described. The nano-probes are batch-fabricated on a silicon wafer. The Si3N4 has excellent optical transparent characteristics, higher Young’s modulus and yield strength so that it should provide a better probe for SNOM and SFM. For this purpose, a Si3N4 thin film was deposited using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). To form the aperture and TOA in the probe, we applied focused ion beam (FIB) machining at the end of the sharpened tip. For verification of the efficiency of the micromachined TOA probes, numerical analysis using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) analysis and experimental measurement using an inverted microscope based the SNOM system were performed.

  10. Mapping an on-chip terahertz antenna by a scanning near-field probe and a fixed field-effect transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lü Li; Sun Jian-Dong; Wu Dong-Min; Cai Yong; Qin Hua; Lewis, Roger A.; Sun Yun-Fei

    2015-01-01

    In the terahertz (THz) regime, the active region for a solid-state detector usually needs to be implemented accurately in the near-field region of an on-chip antenna. Mapping of the near-field strength could allow for rapid verification and optimization of new antenna/detector designs. Here, we report a proof-of-concept experiment in which the field mapping is realized by a scanning metallic probe and a fixed AlGaN/GaN field-effect transistor. Experiment results agree well with the electromagnetic-wave simulations. The results also suggest a field-effect THz detector combined with a probe tip could serve as a high sensitivity THz near-field sensor. (paper)

  11. A velocity probe-based method for continuous detonation and shock measurement in near-field underwater explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kebin; Li, Xiaojie; Yan, Honghao; Wang, Xiaohong; Miao, Yusong

    2017-12-01

    A new velocity probe which permits recording the time history of detonation and shock waves has been developed by improving the commercial on principle and structure. A method based on the probe is then designed to measure the detonation velocity and near-field shock parameters in a single underwater explosion, by which the oblique shock wave front of cylindrical charges and the peak pressure attenuation curve of spherical explosive are obtained. A further derivation of detonation pressure, adiabatic exponent, and other shock parameters is conducted. The present method offers a novel and reliable parameter determination for near-field underwater explosion.

  12. Phase-Sensitive Control Of Molecular Dissociation Through Attosecond Pump/Strong-Field Mid-IR Probe Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-15

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0166 Phase-Sensitive Control Of Molecular Dissociation Through Attosecond Pump/Strong-Field Mid- IR Probe Spectroscopy Jeffery...Pump/Strong- Field Mid- IR Probe Spectroscopy 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0080 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S...sequentially controlling ionization and dissociation steps in the H2+ molecule using tightly synchronized few-fs EUV and few-cycle mid- IR pulses. We

  13. Near?Earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J. Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeVelectron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L ? 5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)?A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50?m...

  14. Kelvin-probe studies of n-conductive organic field-effect transistors during operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luettich, Franziska; Graaf, Harald; Borczyskowski, Christian von [Chemnitz University of Technology, Institute of Physics, Optical Spectroscopy and Molecular Physics, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Lehmann, Daniel; Zahn, Dietrich R.T. [Chemnitz University of Technology, Institute of Physics, Semiconductor Physics, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    We report on our investigations of the structural and electronic properties of n-conductive organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). For this purpose we employed the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin-probe force microscopy (KPFM) in dual frequency mode. This study facilitates the determination of the local potential in the channel of active OFETs. We studied the influence of insulator treatment on the electrical potential and field distribution within the channel using a self-assembled monolayer of N-octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS). For the investigated OFETs we used air-stable and electron conducting N,N{sup '}-bis(n-octyl)-dicyanoperylene-3,4:9,10-bis(dicarboximide) (PDI-8CN{sub 2}). It appears that the insulator treatment improves the performance even if the surface topography did not change. These results can lead to a better understanding of the charge transport and injection and pave the way towards the optimisation of the electronical properties of active organic devices (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Optical response of a quantum dot-metal nanoparticle hybrid interacting with a weak probe field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosionis, Spyridon G; Terzis, Andreas F; Sadeghi, Seyed M; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2013-01-30

    We study optical effects in a hybrid system composed of a semiconductor quantum dot and a spherical metal nanoparticle that interacts with a weak probe electromagnetic field. We use modified nonlinear density matrix equations for the description of the optical properties of the system and obtain a closed-form expression for the linear susceptibilities of the quantum dot, the metal nanoparticle, and the total system. We then investigate the dependence of the susceptibility on the interparticle distance as well as on the material parameters of the hybrid system. We find that the susceptibility of the quantum dot exhibits optical transparency for specific frequencies. In addition, we show that there is a range of frequencies of the applied field for which the susceptibility of the semiconductor quantum dot leads to gain. This suggests that in such a hybrid system quantum coherence can reverse the course of energy transfer, allowing flow of energy from the metallic nanoparticle to the quantum dot. We also explore the susceptibility of the metal nanoparticle and show that it is strongly influenced by the presence of the quantum dot.

  16. Plasmon-based photopolymerization: near-field probing, advanced photonic nanostructures and nanophotochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xuan; Plain, Jérôme; Jradi, Safi; Deeb, Claire; Bachelot, Renaud; Soppera, Olivier; Wei Sun, Xiao; Volkan Demir, Hilmi; Yang, Xuyong; Gray, Stephen K; Wiederrecht, Gary P

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid nanomaterials are targeted by a rapidly growing group of nanooptics researchers, due to the promise of optical behavior that is difficult or even impossible to create with nanostructures of homogeneous composition. Examples of important areas of interest include coherent coupling, Fano resonances, optical gain, solar energy conversion, photocatalysis, and nonlinear optical interactions. In addition to the coupling interactions, the strong dependence of optical resonances and damping on the size, shape, and composition of the building blocks provides promise that the coupling interactions of hybrid nanomaterials can be controlled and manipulated for a desired outcome. Great challenges remain in reliably synthesizing and characterizing hybrid nanomaterials for nanooptics. In this review, we describe the synthesis, characterization, and applications of hybrid nanomaterials created through plasmon-induced photopolymerization. The work is placed within the broader context of hybrid nanomaterials involving plasmonic metal nanoparticles and molecular materials placed within the length scale of the evanescent field from the metal surface. We specifically review three important applications of free radical photopolymerization to create hybrid nanoparticles: local field probing, photoinduced synthesis of advanced hybrid nanoparticles, and nanophotochemistry. (review)

  17. A proximal retarding field analyzer for scanning probe energy loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Karl; Murphy, Shane; Palmer, Richard E.

    2017-03-01

    A compact proximal retarding field analyzer for scanning probe energy loss spectroscopy measurements is described. Using the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip as a field emission (FE) electron source in conjunction with this analyzer, which is placed at a glancing angle to the surface plane, FE sample current and electron reflectivity imaging may be performed simultaneously. This is demonstrated in measurements of Ag nanostructures prepared on graphite by electron-beam lithography, where a material contrast of 13% is observed, with a lateral resolution of 25 nm, between the silver and graphite in electron reflectivity images. Topological contrast mechanisms such as edge enhancement and shadowing are also observed, giving rise to additional features in the electron reflectivity images. The same instrument configuration has been used to measure electron energy loss spectra on bare graphite, where the zero loss peak, π band plasmon loss peak and secondary electron peaks are observed. Using this simple and compact analyzer an STM, with sufficient open access to the tip-sample junction, may easily be augmented to provide simultaneous elemental and topographic mapping, supplementing STM image measurements with FE sample current and electron reflectivity images, as well as electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements, in the same instrument.

  18. Plane waves at or near grazing incidence in the parabolic approximation. [acoustic equations of motion for sound fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Myers, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    The parabolic approximation for the acoustic equations of motion is applied to the study of the sound field generated by a plane wave at or near grazing incidence to a finite impedance boundary. It is shown how this approximation accounts for effects neglected in the usual plane wave reflection analysis which, at grazing incidence, erroneously predicts complete cancellation of the incident field by the reflected field. Examples are presented which illustrate that the solution obtained by the parabolic approximation contains several of the physical phenomena known to occur in wave propagation near an absorbing boundary.

  19. Theoretical Investigation of Dynamic Properties of Magnetic Molecule Systems as Probed by NMR and Pulsed Fields Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousochatzakis, Ioannis [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-12-17

    The field of molecular magnetism[l-6] has become a subject of intense theoretical and experimental interest and has rapidly evolved during the last years. This inter-disciplinary field concerns magnetic systems at the molecular or "nanoscopic" level, whose realization has become feasible due to recent advances in the field of chemical synthesis. The present theoretical work provides a first step towards exploiting the possibilities that are offered by probing magnetic molecules using external magnetic fields with high sweep rates. These probes, apart for providing information specific to magnetic molecules, offer the possibility of conducting a detailed study of the relaxational behavior of interacting spin systems as a result of their coupling with a "heat bath" and in particular the excitations of the host lattice. Development of a broad theoretical framework for dealing with relaxational phenomena induced by dynamical magnetic fields is indeed a worthy goal.

  20. Direct probing of electron and hole trapping into nano-floating-gate in organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Ze-Qun; Wang, Shun; Chen, Jian-Mei; Gao, Xu; Dong, Bin, E-mail: wangsd@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: bdong@suda.edu.cn; Chi, Li-Feng, E-mail: wangsd@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: bdong@suda.edu.cn; Wang, Sui-Dong, E-mail: wangsd@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: bdong@suda.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2015-03-23

    Electron and hole trapping into the nano-floating-gate of a pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory is directly probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy. The probing is straightforward and non-destructive. The measured surface potential change can quantitatively profile the charge trapping, and the surface characterization results are in good accord with the corresponding device behavior. Both electrons and holes can be trapped into the nano-floating-gate, with a preference of electron trapping than hole trapping. The trapped charge quantity has an approximately linear relation with the programming/erasing gate bias, indicating that the charge trapping in the device is a field-controlled process.

  1. Direct probing of electron and hole trapping into nano-floating-gate in organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Ze-Qun; Wang, Shun; Chen, Jian-Mei; Gao, Xu; Dong, Bin; Chi, Li-Feng; Wang, Sui-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Electron and hole trapping into the nano-floating-gate of a pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory is directly probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy. The probing is straightforward and non-destructive. The measured surface potential change can quantitatively profile the charge trapping, and the surface characterization results are in good accord with the corresponding device behavior. Both electrons and holes can be trapped into the nano-floating-gate, with a preference of electron trapping than hole trapping. The trapped charge quantity has an approximately linear relation with the programming/erasing gate bias, indicating that the charge trapping in the device is a field-controlled process

  2. Microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization NMR probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Matsuki, Yoh; Woskov, Paul P; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    We present a calculation of the microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning (MAS) probe utilized in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The microwave magnetic field (B(1S)) profile was obtained from simulations performed with the High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software suite, using a model that includes the launching antenna, the outer Kel-F stator housing coated with Ag, the RF coil, and the 4mm diameter sapphire rotor containing the sample. The predicted average B(1S) field is 13μT/W(1/2), where S denotes the electron spin. For a routinely achievable input power of 5W the corresponding value is γ(S)B(1S)=0.84MHz. The calculations provide insights into the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including reflections from the RF coil and diffraction of the power transmitted through the coil. The variation of enhancement with rotor wall thickness was also successfully simulated. A second, simplified calculation was performed using a single pass model based on Gaussian beam propagation and Fresnel diffraction. This model provided additional physical insight and was in good agreement with the full HFSS simulation. These calculations indicate approaches to increasing the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including the use of a converging lens and fine adjustment of the spacing of the windings of the RF coil. The present results should prove useful in optimizing the coupling of microwave power to the sample in future DNP experiments. Finally, the results of the simulation were used to predict the cross effect DNP enhancement (ϵ) vs. ω(1S)/(2π) for a sample of (13)C-urea dissolved in a 60:40 glycerol/water mixture containing the polarizing agent TOTAPOL; very good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. OPEN CLUSTERS AS PROBES OF THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD. I. CLUSTER PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoq, Sadia; Clemens, D. P., E-mail: shoq@bu.edu, E-mail: clemens@bu.edu [Institute for Astrophysical Research, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Stars in open clusters are powerful probes of the intervening Galactic magnetic field via background starlight polarimetry because they provide constraints on the magnetic field distances. We use 2MASS photometric data for a sample of 31 clusters in the outer Galaxy for which near-IR polarimetric data were obtained to determine the cluster distances, ages, and reddenings via fitting theoretical isochrones to cluster color–magnitude diagrams. The fitting approach uses an objective χ{sup 2} minimization technique to derive the cluster properties and their uncertainties. We found the ages, distances, and reddenings for 24 of the clusters, and the distances and reddenings for 6 additional clusters that were either sparse or faint in the near-IR. The derived ranges of log(age), distance, and E(B−V) were 7.25–9.63, ∼670–6160 pc, and 0.02–1.46 mag, respectively. The distance uncertainties ranged from ∼8% to 20%. The derived parameters were compared to previous studies, and most cluster parameters agree within our uncertainties. To test the accuracy of the fitting technique, synthetic clusters with 50, 100, or 200 cluster members and a wide range of ages were fit. These tests recovered the input parameters within their uncertainties for more than 90% of the individual synthetic cluster parameters. These results indicate that the fitting technique likely provides reliable estimates of cluster properties. The distances derived will be used in an upcoming study of the Galactic magnetic field in the outer Galaxy.

  4. The Seismo-Generated Electric Field Probed by the Ionospheric Ion Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    (Tiger) Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2017-04-01

    The ion density, ion temperature, and the ion velocity probed by IPEI (ionospheric Plasma and Electrodynamics Instrument) onboard ROCSAT (i.e. FORMOSAT-1), and the global ionospheric map (GIM) of the total electron content (TEC) derived from measurements of ground-based GPS receivers are employed to study seismo-ionospheric precursors (SIPs) of the 31 March 2002 M6.8 Earthquake in Taiwan. The GIM TEC and ROCSAT/IPEI ion density significantly decrease specifically over the epicenter area 1-5 days before the earthquake, which suggests that the associated SIPs have observed. The ROCSAT/IPEI ion temperature reveals no significant changes before and after the earthquake, while the latitude-time-TEC plots extracted from the GIMs along the Taiwan longitude illustrate that the equatorial ionization anomaly significantly weakens and moves equatorward, which indicates that the daily dynamo electric field has been disturbed and cancelled by possible seismo-generated electric field on 2 days before (29 March) the earthquake. Here, for the first time a vector parameter of ion velocity is employed to study SIPs. It is found that ROCSAT/IPEI ion velocity becomes significantly downward, which confirms that a westward electric field of about 0.91mV/m generated during the earthquake preparation period being essential 1-5 days before the earthquake. Liu, J. Y., and C. K. Chao (2016), An observing system simulation experiment for FORMOSAT-5/AIP detecting seismo-ionospheric precursors, Terrestrial Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, DOI: 10.3319/TAO.2016.07.18.01(EOF5).

  5. A Split Ring Resonator Dielectric Probe for Near-Field Dielectric Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, Dmitry; Stevens, Chris J; Castles, Flynn; Grant, Patrick S

    2017-05-17

    A single split-ring resonator (SRR) probe for 2D surface mapping and imaging of relative dielectric permittivity for the characterisation of composite materials has been developed. The imaging principle, the analysis and the sensitivity of the SRR surface dielectric probe data is described. The surface dielectric properties of composite materials in the frequency range 1-3 GHz have been measured based on the magnetic resonance frequency of the transmission loss of the SRR dielectric probe when in contact with the surface. The SRR probe performance was analysed analytically and using full-wave simulation, and predictions showed close agreement with experiment for composite materials with spatially varying dielectric permittivity manufactured by 3D printing. The spatial and permittivity resolution of the SRR dielectric probe were controlled by the geometrical parameters of the SRR which provided flexibility to tune the SRR probe. The best accuracy of the dielectric permittivity measurements was within 5%.

  6. Synthetic White-light Imagery for the Wide-field Imager for Solar Probe Plus (WISPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liewer, P. C.; Thernisien, A. F.; Vourlidas, A.; Howard, R.; DeForest, C. E.; DeJong, E.; Desai, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Solar Probe Plus trajectory, approaching within 10 solar radii, will enable the white light imager, WISPR, to fly through corona features now only imaged remotely. The dependency of the Thomson scattering on the imaging geometry (distance and angle from the Sun) dictates that the outer WISPR telescope will be sensitive to the emission from plasma close to the spacecraft, in contrast to the situation for imaging from Earth orbit. Thus WISPR will be the first 'local' imager providing a crucial link between the large-scale corona and SPP's in-situ measurements. The high speed at perihelion will provide tomographic-like views of coronal structures at ≤1° resolution. As SPP approaches perihelion, WISPR, with a 95° radial by 58° transverse field of view, will resolve the fine-scale structure with high spatial resolution. To prepare for this unprecedented viewing of the structure of the inner corona, we are creating synthetic white light images and animations from the WISPR viewpoint using the white-light ray-tracing package developed at NRL (available through SolarSoft). We will present simulated observations of multi-strand models of coronal streamers and flux ropes of various size and make comparisons with views from Earth, Solar Orbiter and SPP. Analysis techniques for WISPR images will also be discussed.

  7. Focussed ion beam thin sample microanalysis using a field emission gun electron probe microanalyser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Field emission gun electron probe microanalysis (FEG-EPMA) in conjunction with wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry using a low acceleration voltage (V acc) allows elemental analysis with sub-micrometre lateral spatial resolution (SR). However, this degree of SR does not necessarily meet the requirements associated with increasingly miniaturised devices. Another challenge related to performing FEG-EPMA with a low V acc is that the accuracy of quantitative analyses is adversely affected, primarily because low energy X-ray lines such as the L- and M-lines must be employed and due to the potential of line interference. One promising means of obtaining high SR with FEG-EPMA is to use thin samples together with high V acc values. This mini-review covers the basic principles of thin-sample FEG-EPMA and describes an application of this technique to the analysis of optical fibres. Outstanding issues related to this technique that must be addressed are also discussed, which include the potential for electron beam damage during analysis of insulating materials and the development of methods to use thin samples for quantitative analysis.

  8. Versatile variable temperature and magnetic field scanning probe microscope for advanced material research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin-Oh; Choi, Seokhwan; Lee, Yeonghoon; Kim, Jinwoo; Son, Donghyeon; Lee, Jhinhwan

    2017-10-01

    We have built a variable temperature scanning probe microscope (SPM) that covers 4.6 K-180 K and up to 7 T whose SPM head fits in a 52 mm bore magnet. It features a temperature-controlled sample stage thermally well isolated from the SPM body in good thermal contact with the liquid helium bath. It has a 7-sample-holder storage carousel at liquid helium temperature for systematic studies using multiple samples and field emission targets intended for spin-polarized spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study on samples with various compositions and doping conditions. The system is equipped with a UHV sample preparation chamber and mounted on a two-stage vibration isolation system made of a heavy concrete block and a granite table on pneumatic vibration isolators. A quartz resonator (qPlus)-based non-contact atomic force microscope (AFM) sensor is used for simultaneous STM/AFM operation for research on samples with highly insulating properties such as strongly underdoped cuprates and strongly correlated electron systems.

  9. Determination of self generated magnetic field and the plasma density using Cotton Mouton polarimetry with two color probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi A.S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Self generated magnetic fields (SGMF in laser produced plasmas are conventionally determined by measuring the Faraday rotation angle of a linearly polarized laser probe beam passing through the plasma along with the interferogram for obtaining plasma density. In this paper, we propose a new method to obtain the plasma density and the SGMF distribution from two simultaneous measurements of Cotton Mouton polarimetry of two linearly polarized probe beams of different colors that pass through plasma in a direction normal to the planar target. It is shown that this technique allows us to determine the distribution of SGMF and the plasma density without doing interferometry of laser produced plasmas.

  10. Probing CP-violating Higgs and gauge-boson couplings in the Standard Model effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Felipe [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil); Fuks, Benjamin [Sorbonne Universites, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 06), UMR 7589, LPTHE, Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7589, LPTHE, Paris (France); Institut Universitaire de France, Paris (France); Sanz, Veronica [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); Sengupta, Dipan [Universite Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Grenoble (France); Michigan State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Lansing (United States)

    2017-10-15

    We study the phenomenological consequences of several CP-violating structures that could arise in the Standard Model effective field theory framework. Focusing on operators involving electroweak gauge and/or Higgs bosons, we derive constraints originating from Run I LHC data. We then study the capabilities of the present and future LHC runs at higher energies to further probe associated CP-violating phenomena and we demonstrate how differential information can play a key role. We consider both traditional four-lepton probes of CP-violation in the Higgs sector and novel new physics handles based on varied angular and non-angular observables. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation and field validation of Eddy-Current array probes for steam generator tube inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, C.V.; Pate, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    The objective of the Improved Eddy-Current ISI for Steam Generator Tubing program is to upgrade and validate eddy-current inspections, including probes, instrumentation, and data processing techniques for inservice inspection of new, used, and repaired steam generator tubes; to improve defect detection, classification, and characterization as affected by diameter and thickness variations, denting, probe wobble, tube sheet, tube supports, copper and sludge deposits, even when defect types and other variables occur in combination; to transfer this advanced technology to NRC's mobile NDE laboratory and staff. This report describes the design of specialized high-speed 16-coil eddy-current array probes. Both pancake and reflection coils are considered. Test results from inspections using the probes in working steam generators are given. Computer programs developed for probe calculations are also supplied

  12. A comparison of the quality of image acquisition between the incident dark field and sidestream dark field video-microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-Kawai, Edward; Coppel, Jonny; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Ince, Can; Martin, Daniel

    2016-01-21

    The 'Cytocam' is a third generation video-microscope, which enables real time visualisation of the in vivo microcirculation. Based upon the principle of incident dark field (IDF) illumination, this hand held computer-controlled device was designed to address the technical limitations of its predecessors, orthogonal polarization spectroscopy and sidestream dark field (SDF) imaging. In this manuscript, we aimed to compare the quality of sublingual microcirculatory image acquisition between the IDF and SDF devices. Using the microcirculatory image quality scoring (MIQS) system, (six categories scored as either 0 = optimal, 1 = acceptable, or 10 = unacceptable), two independent raters compared 30 films acquired using the Cytocam IDF video-microscope, to an equal number obtained with an SDF device. Blinded to the origin of the films, the raters were therefore able to score between 0 and 60 for each film analysed. The scores' distributions between the two techniques were compared. The median MIQS (95% CI) given to the SDF camera was 7 (1.5-12), as compared to 1 (0.5-1.0) for the IDF device (p microscope, as compared to the SDF video-microscope.

  13. Near-field examination of perovskite-based superlenses and superlens-enhanced probe-object coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehr, S.C.; Liu, Y.M.; Martin, L.W.; Yu, P.; Gajek, M.; Yang, S.-Y.; Yang, C.-H.; Wenzel, M.T.; Jacob, R.; von Ribbeck, H.-G.; Helm, M.; Zhang, X.; Eng, L.M.; Ramesh, R.

    2011-01-01

    A planar slab of negative-index material works as a superlens with sub-diffraction-limited resolution, as propagating waves are focused and, moreover, evanescent waves are reconstructed in the image plane. Here we demonstrate a superlens for electric evanescent fields with low losses using perovskites in the mid-infrared regime. The combination of near-field microscopy with a tunable free-electron laser allows us to address precisely the polariton modes, which are critical for super-resolution imaging. We spectrally study the lateral and vertical distributions of evanescent waves around the image plane of such a lens, and achieve imaging resolution of λ/14 at the superlensing wavelength. Interestingly, at certain distances between the probe and sample surface, we observe a maximum of these evanescent fields. Comparisons with numerical simulations indicate that this maximum originates from an enhanced coupling between probe and object, which might be applicable for multifunctional circuits, infrared spectroscopy and thermal sensors. PMID:21427720

  14. The design of a novel tip enhanced near-field scanning probe microscope for ultra-high resolution optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Derek Brant

    Traditional light microscopy suffers from the diffraction limit, which limits the spatial resolution to lambda/2. The current trend in optical microscopy is the development of techniques to bypass the diffraction limit. Resolutions below 40 nm will make it possible to probe biological systems by imaging the interactions between single molecules and cell membranes. These resolutions will allow for the development of improved drug delivery mechanisms by increasing our understanding of how chemical communication within a cell occurs. The materials sciences would also benefit from these high resolutions. Nanomaterials can be analyzed with Raman spectroscopy for molecular and atomic bond information, or with fluorescence response to determine bulk optical properties with tens of nanometer resolution. Near-field optical microscopy is one of the current techniques, which allows for imaging at resolutions beyond the diffraction limit. Using a combination of a shear force microscope (SFM) and an inverted optical microscope, spectroscopic resolutions below 20 nm have been demonstrated. One technique, in particular, has been named tip enhanced near-field optical microscopy (TENOM). The key to this technique is the use of solid metal probes, which are illuminated in the far field by the excitation wavelength of interest. These probes are custom-designed using finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling techniques, then fabricated with the use of a focused ion beam (FIB) microscope. The measure of the quality of probe design is based directly on the field enhancement obtainable. The greater the field enhancement of the probe, the more the ratio of near-field to far-field background contribution will increase. The elimination of the far-field signal by a decrease of illumination power will provide the best signal-to-noise ratio in the near-field images. Furthermore, a design that facilitates the delocalization of the near-field imaging from the far-field will be beneficial

  15. Field assessment of a model tuberculosis outbreak response plan for low-incidence areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascopella Lisa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For a regional project in four low-incidence states, we designed a customizable tuberculosis outbreak response plan. Prior to dissemination of the plan, a tuberculosis outbreak occurred, presenting an opportunity to perform a field assessment of the plan. The purpose of the assessment was to ensure that the plan included essential elements to help public health professionals recognize and respond to outbreaks. Methods We designed a semi-structured questionnaire and interviewed all key stakeholders involved in the response. We used common themes to assess validity of and identify gaps in the plan. A subset of participants provided structured feedback on the plan. Results We interviewed 11 public health and six community stakeholders. The assessment demonstrated that (1 almost all of the main response activities were reflected in the plan; (2 the plan added value by providing a definition of a tuberculosis outbreak and guidelines for communication and evaluation. These were areas that lacked written protocols during the actual outbreak response; and (3 basic education about tuberculosis and the interpretation and use of genotyping data were important needs. Stakeholders also suggested adding to the plan questions for evaluation and a section for specific steps to take when an outbreak is suspected. Conclusion An interactive field assessment of a programmatic tool revealed the value of a systematic outbreak response plan with a standard definition of a tuberculosis outbreak, guidelines for communication and evaluation, and response steps. The assessment highlighted the importance of education and training for tuberculosis in low-incidence areas.

  16. Reciprocal space XRD mapping with varied incident angle as a probe of structure variation within surface depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qiguang [Norfolk State University; Williams, Frances [Norfolk State University; Zhao, Xin [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Krishnan, Mahadevan [AASC, San Leandro, California

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we used a differential-depth X-Ray diffraction Reciprocal Spacing Mapping (XRD RSM) technique to investigate the crystal quality of a variety of SRF-relevant Nb film and bulk materials. By choosing different X-ray probing depths, the RSM study successfully revealed evolution the of materials microstructure after different materials processes, such as energetic condensation or surface polishing. The RSM data clearly measured the materials crystal quality at different thickness. Through a novel differential-depth RSM technique, this study found: I. for a heteroepitaxy Nb film Nb(100)/MgO(100), the film thickening process, via a cathodic arc-discharge Nb ion deposition, created a near-perfect single crystal Nb on the surfaces top-layer; II. for a mechanically polished single-crystal bulk Nb material, the microstructure on the top surface layer is more disordered than that in-grain.

  17. Comparison of the incidence, nature and cause of injuries sustained on dirt field and artificial turf field by amateur football players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kordi Ramin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data on the incidence, nature, severity and cause of match football injuries sustained on dirt field are scarce. The objectives of this study was to compare the incidence, nature, severity and cause of match injuries sustained on dirt field and artificial turf field by amateur male football players. Methods A prospective two-cohort design was employed. Participants were 252 male football players (mean age 27 years, range 18-43 in 14 teams who participated in a local championship carried on a dirt field and 216 male football players (mean age 28 years, range 17-40 in 12 teams who participated in a local championship carried on a artificial turf field in the same zone of the city. Injury definitions and recording procedures were compliant with the international consensus statement for epidemiological studies of injuries in football. Results The overall incidence of match injuries for men was 36.9 injuries/1000 player hours on dirt field and 19.5 on artificial turf (incidence rate ratio 1.88; 95% CI 1.19-3.05. Most common injured part on dirt field was ankle (26.7% and on artificial turf was knee (24.3%. The most common injury type in the dirt field was skin injuries (abrasion and laceration and in the artificial turf was sprain and ligament injury followed by haematoma/contusion/bruise. Most injuries were acute (artificial turf 89%, dirt field 91% and resulted from player-to-player contact (artificial turf 59.2%, dirt field 51.4%. Most injuries were slight and minimal in dirt field cohort but in artificial turf cohort the most injuries were mild. Conclusions There were differences in the incidence and type of football match injuries sustained on dirt field and artificial turf.

  18. Sub-wavelength imaging by depolarization in a reflection near-field optical microscope using an uncoated fiber probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Steen; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    We present a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope utilizing counter-directional light propagation in an uncoated fiber probe, cross-polarized detection and shear-force feedback. Topographical and near-field optical imaging with a scanning speed of up to 10 mu m/s and a lateral...... resolution better than 40 nm are demonstrated with a latex projection test sample. Determination of the optical resolution as well as correlation between topographical and near-field optical images are discussed. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V....

  19. Micron-scale mapping of megagauss magnetic fields using optical polarimetry to probe hot electron transport in petawatt-class laser-solid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Gourab; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Robinson, A P L; Blackman, D; Booth, N; Culfa, O; Dance, R J; Gizzi, L A; Gray, R J; Green, J S; Koester, P; Kumar, G Ravindra; Labate, L; Lad, Amit D; Lancaster, K L; Pasley, J; Woolsey, N C; Rajeev, P P

    2017-08-21

    The transport of hot, relativistic electrons produced by the interaction of an intense petawatt laser pulse with a solid has garnered interest due to its potential application in the development of innovative x-ray sources and ion-acceleration schemes. We report on spatially and temporally resolved measurements of megagauss magnetic fields at the rear of a 50-μm thick plastic target, irradiated by a multi-picosecond petawatt laser pulse at an incident intensity of ~10 20 W/cm 2 . The pump-probe polarimetric measurements with micron-scale spatial resolution reveal the dynamics of the magnetic fields generated by the hot electron distribution at the target rear. An annular magnetic field profile was observed ~5 ps after the interaction, indicating a relatively smooth hot electron distribution at the rear-side of the plastic target. This is contrary to previous time-integrated measurements, which infer that such targets will produce highly structured hot electron transport. We measured large-scale filamentation of the hot electron distribution at the target rear only at later time-scales of ~10 ps, resulting in a commensurate large-scale filamentation of the magnetic field profile. Three-dimensional hybrid simulations corroborate our experimental observations and demonstrate a beam-like hot electron transport at initial time-scales that may be attributed to the local resistivity profile at the target rear.

  20. Imaging of radiation damage using complementary field ion microscopy and atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagan, Michal; Hanna, Luke R.; Xu, Alan; Roberts, Steve G.; Smith, George D.W.; Gault, Baptiste; Edmondson, Philip D.; Bagot, Paul A.J.; Moody, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation damage in tungsten and a tungsten–tantalum alloy, both of relevance to nuclear fusion research, has been characterized using a combination of field ion microscopy (FIM) imaging and atom probe tomography (APT). While APT provides 3D analytical imaging with sub-nanometer resolution, FIM is capable of imaging the arrangements of single atoms on a crystal lattice and has the potential to provide insights into radiation induced crystal damage, all the way down to its smallest manifestation – a single vacancy. This paper demonstrates the strength of combining these characterization techniques. In ion implanted tungsten, it was found that atomic scale lattice damage is best imaged using FIM. In certain cases, APT reveals an identifiable imprint in the data via the segregation of solute and impurities and trajectory aberrations. In a W–5 at%Ta alloy, a combined APT–FIM study was able to determine the atomic distribution of tantalum inside the tungsten matrix. An indirect method was implemented to identify tantalum atoms inside the tungsten matrix in FIM images. By tracing irregularities in the evaporation sequence of atoms imaged with FIM, this method enables the benefit of FIM's atomic resolution in chemical distinction between the two species. - Highlights: • Complementary FIM and APT was used to study nanoscale radiation damage in tungsten. • Trajectory aberrations in APT revealed extended lattice damage which FIM confirmed. • Nano scale features were detected indirectly with APT via segregation of impurities. • Induced damage at the scale of a single vacancy could only be detected via FIM. • 3DFIM characterized W–5Ta atomic distribution with improved detection efficiency.

  1. Ball lens based lensed patch cord probes for optical coherence tomography in the field of dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, J. B.; Kim, Y.; Lee, S. J.; Min, E. J.; Park, S. J.; Lee, B. H.

    2012-10-01

    A lensed patch cord probe has been made with a ball lens packaged in a metal cylinder. By simply placing a ball lens directly in front of a fiber patch cord, a compact and potentially disposable sampling probe for optical coherence tomography (OCT) could be implemented. To achieve a sufficiently long working distance and a good transverse resolution simultaneously, the proper ball lens diameter and the distance between the ball lens and the fiber patch cord were investigated. Experimentally, a working distance of up to 5.2 mm, 3 dB bandwidth of 2 mm, and transverse resolution of 16 μm were achieved. With the patch cord probe, a common path swept source OCT system was implemented and used to demonstrate the feasibility as the dedicated probe for dentistry.

  2. Free-Free Transitions in the Presence of Laser Fields and Debye Potential at Very Low Incident Electron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anand

    2012-01-01

    We study the free-free transition in electron-helium ion in the ground state and embedded in a Debye potential in the presence of an external laser field at very low incident electron energies. The laser field is treated classically while the collision dynamics is treated quantum mechanically. The laser field is chosen as monochromatic, linearly polarized and homogeneous. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing Volkov wave function for it. The scattering wave function for the incident electron on the target embedded in a Debye potential is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange. We calculate the laser-assisted differential and total cross sections for free-free transition for absorption/emission of a single photon or no photon exchange. The results will be presented at the conference.

  3. The FIELDS Instrument Suite for Solar Probe Plus Measuring the Coronal Plasma and Magnetic Field, Plasma Waves and Turbulence, and Radio Signatures of Solar Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, S. D.; Goetz, K.; Harvey, P. R.; Turin, P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Ergun, R. E.; MacDowall, R. J.; Pulupa, M.; Choi, M. K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission will make the first in situ measurements of the solar corona and the birthplace of the solar wind. The FIELDS instrument suite on SPP will make direct measurements of electric and magnetic fields, the properties of in situ plasma waves, electron density and temperature profiles, and interplanetary radio emissions, amongst other things. Here, we describe the scientific objectives targeted by the SPP/FIELDS instrument, the instrument design itself, and the instrument concept of operations and planned data products.

  4. ORIENTED FOR CAD UNIVERSAL MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF THE EDDY CURRENT PROBE. PART 1. THE RESULTING FIELD OF THE DRIVE WINDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Dedegkaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The work relates to the field of CAD methods and means of nondestructive electromagnetic testing of conductive flat products. The problem of constructing mathematical model of the drive winding eddy current probe linearly extended form is polygon in cross section. This allows you to create a universal mathematical model, which includes a model of a simpler shape in cross-section, as a special case. 

  5. Near-infrared fluorescent probes in cancer imaging and therapy: an emerging field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiaomin; Wang, Fuli; Qin, Weijun; Yang, Xiaojian; Yuan, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an attractive modality for early cancer detection with high sensitivity and multi-detection capability. Due to convenient modification by conjugating with moieties of interests, NIRF probes are ideal candidates for cancer targeted imaging. Additionally, the combinatory application of NIRF imaging and other imaging modalities that can delineate anatomical structures extends fluorometric determination of biomedical information. Moreover, nanoparticles loaded with NIRF dyes and anticancer agents contribute to the synergistic management of cancer, which integrates the advantage of imaging and therapeutic functions to achieve the ultimate goal of simultaneous diagnosis and treatment. Appropriate probe design with targeting moieties can retain the original properties of NIRF and pharmacokinetics. In recent years, great efforts have been made to develop new NIRF probes with better photostability and strong fluorescence emission, leading to the discovery of numerous novel NIRF probes with fine photophysical properties. Some of these probes exhibit tumoricidal activities upon light radiation, which holds great promise in photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and photoimmunotherapy. This review aims to provide a timely and concise update on emerging NIRF dyes and multifunctional agents. Their potential uses as agents for cancer specific imaging, lymph node mapping, and therapeutics are included. Recent advances of NIRF dyes in clinical use are also summarized. PMID:24648733

  6. Parametric resonances in the amplitude-modulated probe-field absorption spectrum of a two-level atom driven by a resonance amplitude- and phase-modulated pumping field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushilov, N.V.; Kholodkevich, E.D.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical expression is derived for the polarization induced by a weak probe field with periodically modulated amplitude in a two-level medium saturated by a strong amplitude-and phase-modulated resonance field. It is shown that the absorption spectrum of the probe field includes parametric resonances, the maxima corresponding to the condition δ= 2nΓ-Ω w and the minima to that of δ= (2n + 1)Γ- w , where δ is the probe-field detuning front the resonance frequency, Ω w is the modulation frequency of the probe-field amplitude, and Γ is the transition line width, n = 1, 2, 3, hor-ellipsis. At the specific modulation parameters, a substantial region of negative values (i.e., the region of amplification without the population inversion) exists in the absorption spectrum of the probe field

  7. Design and experimental verification of near-field Ka-band probe based on wideband OMJ with minimum higher-order spherical mode content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, L. J.; Giacomini, A.; Morbidini, R

    2012-01-01

    technology capable of maintaining the same high performance standards of traditional probes However, in typical Spherical Near Field (SNF) measurement scenarios, the applicable frequency range of the single probe can also be limited by the content of μ≠1 spherical modes in the probe pattern [6...... probe/AUT distance this assumption may lead to unacceptable errors in special cases. This paper describes the design and experimental verification of a Ka-band probe based on the inverted ridge technology. The probe is intended for high precision SNF measurements in special conditions that require less...... than -45dB higher order spherical mode content. This performance level has been accomplished through careful design of the probe and meticulous selection of the components used in the external balanced feeding scheme. The paper reports on the electrical and mechanical design considerations...

  8. Universal interrogation protocol with zero probe-field-induced frequency shift for quantum clocks and high-accuracy spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon-Willette, T.; Lefevre, R.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2017-08-01

    Optical clock interrogation protocols, based on laser-pulse spectroscopy, suffer from probe-induced frequency shifts and their variations induced by laser power. The original hyper-Ramsey probing scheme, which was proposed to alleviate those issues, does not fully eliminate the shift, especially when decoherence and relaxation by spontaneous emission or collisions are present. We propose to solve the fundamental problem of frequency shifts induced by the laser probe by deriving the exact canonical form of a multipulse generalized hyper-Ramsey resonance, including decoherence and relaxation. We present a universal interrogation protocol based on composite laser-pulse spectroscopy with phase modulation eliminating probe-induced frequency shifts at all orders in the presence of various dissipative processes. Unlike frequency shift extrapolation based methods, a universal interrogation protocol based on ±π /4 and ±3 π /4 phase-modulated resonances is proposed which does not compromise the stability of the optical clock while maintaining an ultrarobust error signal gradient in the presence of substantial uncompensated ac Stark shifts. Such a scheme can be implemented in two flavors: either by inverting clock state initialization or by pulse order reversal even without a perfect quantum state initialization. This universal interrogation protocol can be applied to atomic, molecular, and nuclear frequency metrology, mass spectrometry, and the field of precision spectroscopy. It might be designed using magic-wave-induced transitions, two-photon excitation, and magnetically induced spectroscopy or it might even be implemented with quantum logic gate circuit and qubit entanglement.

  9. Probing the dispersion properties of 1D nanophotonic waveguides with far-field Fourier optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Thomas, N.; Jágerská, J.; Houdré, R.

    2008-01-01

    We present an advanced Fourier space imaging technique to probe guided light in nanophotonic structures with an effective numerical aperture of 2.5. This superresolution technique allows us to successfully investigate the dispersive properties of 1D nanowaveguides such as photonic crystal W1...

  10. Fibre-top atomic force microscope probe with optical near-field detection capabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiribilli, B; Margheri, G; Baschieri, P; Menozzi, C; Chavan, D.C.; Iannuzzi, D.

    2011-01-01

    We present a fibre-top probe fabricated by carving a tipped cantilever on an optical fibre, with the tip machined in correspondence of the fibre core. When approached to an optical prism illuminated under total internal reflection conditions, the tip of the cantilever detects the optical tunnelling

  11. Spectropolarimetry of Giant stars: Probing the influence of magnetic field on evolved stars Spectropolarimetry of Giant stars: Probing the influence of magnetic field on evolved stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Jefferson; Castro, Matthieu; Petit, Pascal; do Nascimento, José-Dias, Jr.

    2015-08-01

    It is know that lithium is element easily destroyed in stellar interior, the existence of lithium rich stars means a great challenge in stellar evolution. In this context our observations ravels the serendipitous discovery of an unusually high lithium abundance star. This is a K0III HD 150050, which has strong deepening on lithium line (6707.8 Å) this means lithium abundance of 2.81 0.2 dex, therefore this star belong a rare group called super Li-Rich stars. A possible source of the non-standard episodes required to produce Li-rich stars were identified in magneto-thermohaline mixing accounted by models of extra-mixing induced by magnetic buoyancy. However to better understand this is necessary more observational data. In last three decades several studies has showed that late type red giant stars presents a remarkable modifications in these outer atmosphere layers when they become late type star in HR diagram. These changes are founded through X-ray, Ultraviolet, and Chromospheric activity analyses, and then we can establish the called “Dividing lines”. We made spectropalarimetric observations with ESPaDOnS@CFHT to achieve two main objectives: analyze the influence of magnetic field in the Li-rich giant stars, and understand how works the magnetic field in late type giants and supergiants across the “dividing line”.

  12. A finite element propagation model for extracting normal incidence impedance in nonprogressive acoustic wave fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Tanner, Sharon E.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1995-01-01

    A propagation model method for extracting the normal incidence impedance of an acoustic material installed as a finite length segment in a wall of a duct carrying a nonprogressive wave field is presented. The method recasts the determination of the unknown impedance as the minimization of the normalized wall pressure error function. A finite element propagation model is combined with a coarse/fine grid impedance plane search technique to extract the impedance of the material. Results are presented for three different materials for which the impedance is known. For each material, the input data required for the prediction scheme was computed from modal theory and then contaminated by random error. The finite element method reproduces the known impedance of each material almost exactly for random errors typical of those found in many measurement environments. Thus, the method developed here provides a means for determining the impedance of materials in a nonprogressirve wave environment such as that usually encountered in a commercial aircraft engine and most laboratory settings.

  13. Epidemiology of cutaneous leishmaniasis in central Amazonia: a comparison of sex-biased incidence among rural settlers and field biologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Letícia; Abad-Franch, Fernando; Ferraz, Gonçalo

    2014-08-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is more frequently reported in men than in women; this may be due to male-biased exposure to CL vectors, female-biased resistance against the disease or both. We sought to determine whether gender-specific exposure to vector habitats explains male-biased CL incidence in two human populations of central Amazonia. We compared the CL incidence in one population of field researchers (N = 166), with similar exposure for males and females, and one population of rural settlers (N = 646), where exposure is overall male-biased. We used a combination of questionnaires and clinical data to quantify CL cases, and modelled disease incidence in a Bayesian framework. There was a moderately higher incidence of CL among men than among women in both populations, but male bias decreased as exposure time increased. Disease incidence was overall higher among field researchers, suggesting that they are an important but understudied CL risk group. Our comparison of two contrasting populations provided epidemiological evidence that CL incidence can be male-biased even when exposure is comparable in both sexes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Enhancing MQMAS of low-gamma nuclei by using a high B(1) field balanced probe circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhehong; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Sideris, Paul J; Grey, Clare P

    2009-09-01

    A balanced probe circuit is used to generate high B(1) magnetic field for sensitivity enhancement of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) experiment applied to low-gamma quadrupolar nuclei. Electrical balancing of the sample coil can cut the peak voltage by a half, therefore improving the power handling when generating a two-fold higher B(1) field. Experimental results, illustrated here with (25)Mg data for two layered double hydroxides, show that the MQMAS efficiency increases more than linearly with the B(1) field strength. The multiplicative enhancements from high B(0) and B(1) fields and an optimized MQMAS pulse sequence provide the critically needed sensitivity for acquiring MQMAS spectra of low-gamma quadrupolar nuclei such as (25)Mg at natural abundance.

  15. Enhancing MQMAS of low-γ nuclei by using a high B1 field balanced probe circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhehong; Gor'kov, Peter L.; Brey, William W.; Sideris, Paul J.; Grey, Clare P.

    2009-09-01

    A balanced probe circuit is used to generate high B1 magnetic field for sensitivity enhancement of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) experiment applied to low-γ quadrupolar nuclei. Electrical balancing of the sample coil can cut the peak voltage by a half, therefore improving the power handling when generating a two-fold higher B1 field. Experimental results, illustrated here with 25Mg data for two layered double hydroxides, show that the MQMAS efficiency increases more than linearly with the B1 field strength. The multiplicative enhancements from high B0 and B1 fields and an optimized MQMAS pulse sequence provide the critically needed sensitivity for acquiring MQMAS spectra of low-γ quadrupolar nuclei such as 25Mg at natural abundance.

  16. Oxidation of hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces by scanning near-field optical lithography using uncoated and aluminum-coated fiber probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Steen; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Birkelund, Karen

    1997-01-01

    Optically induced oxidation of hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces using a scanning near-field optical microscope was achieved with both uncoated and aluminum-coated fiber probes. Line scans on amorphous silicon using uncoated fiber probes display a three-peak profile after etching in potassium...

  17. Field and laboratory calibration of neutron probes for soil moisture measurements on a deep loess chernozem soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaecke, B.; Schaecke, E.

    1979-01-01

    In the case of a varying profile structure it is necessary to use different calibration curves and adequate correction factors, respectively. The bulk density of the soil had the greatest influence on the calibration. An increase in bulk density by 0.2 g/cm 3 at a clay content of 18% resulted in an apparent increase in the values of moisture measurements by 1.5 to 2.0% of the volume of water. In naturally stratified soil the humus content of the chernozem horizon, being 3% higher than that of the underlying loess horizon, was found to influence the measuring results obtained by the probe. The calibration curves determined for chernozem and loess horizons in the laboratory agreed well with those obtained in the field. The measured values read from the probe and the gravimetrically determined values of the soil moisture were of great significance in all measured depths of the profile. (author)

  18. A numerical study of the random-incidence and diffuse-field sensitivity of laboratory standard microphones using BEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Henriquez, Vicente Cutanda; Jacobsen, Finn

    2006-01-01

    to the definition of the latter, a number of plane waves coming from random directions and having random phases impinge simultaneously upon the microphone. The random-incidence sensitivity can be estimated using measurements made in an anechoic chamber, while the diffuse-field sensitivity requires a reverberation......The difference between the random-incidence sensitivity of a microphone and the diffusefield sensitivity is that according to the definition of the former, plane waves coming from different angles of incidence impinge successively onto the microphone under free-field conditions, whereas according...... Element Method has been used to study different aspects of the two realizations, such as the influence of the number of plane waves impinging on the microphone, the required amount of spatial averaging, etc....

  19. Measurement of the sound power incident on the walls of a reverberation room with near field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Tiana Roig, Elisabet

    2010-01-01

    area; and it has always been regarded as impossible to measure the sound power that is incident on a wall directly. This paper examines a new method of determining this quantity from sound pressure measurements at positions on the wall using 'statistically optimised near field acoustic holography...

  20. Blue Whale Behavioral Response Study and Field Testing of the New Bioacoustic Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Testing of the New Bioacoustic Probe 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...close (~100- 400m ) range (Figure 3), but do show vertical response. An “avoidance dive” has been described based on blue whale response during close...Acoustics Program . The HARPs have provided valuable data on the spectral and sound level properties of individual ships (see publications list

  1. Development and field validation of advanced array probes for steam generator inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, C.V.; Pate, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The aging of the steam generators at the nation's nuclear power plants has led to the appearance of new forms of degradation in steam generator tubes and an increase in the frequency of forced outages due to major tube leak events. The eddy-current techniques currently being used for the inspection of steam generator tubing are no longer adequate to ensure that flaws will be detected before they lead to a shutdown of the plant. To meet the need for a fast and reliable method of inspection, ORNL has designed a 16-coil eddy-current array probe which combines an inspection speed similar to that of the bobbin coil with a sensitivity to cracks of any orientation similar to the rotating pancake coil. In addition, neural network and least square methods have been developed for the automatic analysis of the data acquired with the new probes. The probes and analysis software have been tested at two working steam generators where we have found an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of a factor of five an increase in the inspection speed of a factor of 75 over the rotating pancake coil which maintaining similar detection and characterization capabilities

  2. Concussion in field hockey: a retrospective analysis into the incidence rates, mechanisms, symptoms and recovery of concussive injuries sustained by elite field hockey players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Michael; Challis, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To identify the incidence and mechanisms of concussion in elite Field Hockey in different age groups and also the postconcussion symptoms and recovery times. Methods Data was collected retrospectively, for both training and matches, over a 12-month period from national level Field Hockey players across under-16, under-18, under-21, Development and Senior players. Mechanism of injury (including player role and field position), postconcussive symptoms and recovery times were recorded following a semistructured interview with each player. Additional information on training hours, matches and squad size were also recorded in order to calculate the incidence per 1000 match hours. Results Of the 28 recorded cases, only 11 could be included in the study. Women had the highest incidence of concussion, with the majority being in the under-21 age group. Overall incidence varied from 3/1000 match hours in training to 0.02/1000 match hours in matches, with an overall incidence of 0–0.02/1000 match hours across all age groups. The most common mechanism of injury was collision with another player, followed by impact from a stick or ball Midfield and attacking forwards sustained the highest incidence of concussion. None of the concussed athletes wore protective headgear (there were no cases of concussion in goal keepers) and all occurred in open play rather than a penalty corner (when protective headgear is often worn). Postconcussion headaches and difficulty concentrating were the most commonly reported postconcussion symptoms. Average recovery time and return-to-play was 2–4 weeks. Conclusions Due to the low numbers, only limited conclusions can be made, but it would appear that the risk of concussion in elite Field Hockey is low. As age and skill increases, the risk decreases. Postconcussion symptoms and average return-to-play times are similar to other sports. From this study, no conclusions can be made as to the role of protective headgear to reduce the risk

  3. Planck intermediate results XXXV. Probing the role of the magnetic field in the formation of structure in molecular clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.

    2016-01-01

    Within ten nearby (d molecular clouds we evaluate statistically the relative orientation between the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from the polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by Planck at 353 GHz, and the gas column density structures...... with increasing N-H, from mostly parallel or having no preferred orientation to mostly perpendicular. In simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in molecular clouds this trend in relative orientation is a signature of Alfvenic or sub-Alfvenic turbulence, implying that the magnetic field is significant...... for the gas dynamics at the scales probed by Planck. We compare the deduced magnetic field strength with estimates we obtain from other methods and discuss the implications of the Planck observations for the general picture of molecular cloud formation and evolution....

  4. Technical Note: Use of a beam width probe in an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer to monitor particle collection efficiency in the field

    OpenAIRE

    Salcedo, D.; Onasch, T. B.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Dzepina, K.; Huffman, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Weimer, S.; Drewnick, F.; Allan, J. D.; Delia, A. E.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Two Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (Q-AMS) were deployed in Mexico City, during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field study (MCMA-2003) from 29 March?4 May 2003 to investigate particle concentrations, sources, and processes. We report the use of a particle beam width probe (BWP) in the field to quantify potential losses of particles due to beam broadening inside the AMS caused by particle shape (nonsphericity) and particle size. Data from this probe show that no...

  5. Hyperfine fields in a Ag/Fe magnetic multilayer probed with low energy spin polarized {sup 8}Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeler, T.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Salman, Z. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Chow, K.H. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2J1 (Canada); Heinrich, B. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hossain, M.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kardasz, B. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kiefl, R.F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)]. E-mail: kiefl@triumf.ca; Kreitzman, S.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, V6T 2A3 (Canada); MacFarlane, W.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Mosendz, O. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Parolin, T.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Wang, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2006-03-31

    A beam of low energy Li8 has been used to probe the hyperfine field distribution in a magnetic multilayer composed of Au(4nm)/Ag(80nm)/Fe(2nm) grown on a GaAs substrate. The {beta}-NMR frequency spectrum is shown to be a strong function of the implantation energy reflecting the depth dependence of the local hyperfine fields. Correlating the spectra with TRIM.SP implantation profiles allows us to identify signals from the GaAs, Ag and Au layers. The frequency spectrum in Ag is a strong function of energy. A very narrow line, and corresponding distribution of hyperfine fields, is observed when the beam in centered well away from the Fe whereas a much broader distribution is observed when the Li stops close to the Fe. These results demonstrate that low energy {beta}-NMR can act as a sensitive probe of the induced magnetism in the otherwise non-magnetic Ag spacer layers.

  6. Te inclusion-induced electrical field perturbation in CdZnTe single crystals revealed by Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yaxu; Jie, Wanqi; Li, Linglong; Xu, Yadong; Yang, Yaodong; Ren, Jie; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Tao; Xu, Lingyan; He, Yihui; Xi, Shouzhi

    2016-09-01

    To understand the effects of tellurium (Te) inclusions on the device performance of CdZnTe radiation detectors, the perturbation of the electrical field in and around Te inclusions was studied in CdZnTe single crystals via Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Te inclusions were proved to act as lower potential centers with respect to surrounding CdZnTe matrix. Based on the KPFM results, the energy band diagram at the Te/CdZnTe interface was established, and the bias-dependent effects of Te inclusion on carrier transportation is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rotational symmetry breaking in the topological superconductor SrxBi2Se3 probed by upper-critical field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y; Nikitin, A M; Araizi, G K; Huang, Y K; Matsushita, Y; Naka, T; de Visser, A

    2016-06-28

    Recently it was demonstrated that Sr intercalation provides a new route to induce superconductivity in the topological insulator Bi2Se3. Topological superconductors are predicted to be unconventional with an odd-parity pairing symmetry. An adequate probe to test for unconventional superconductivity is the upper critical field, Bc2. For a standard BCS layered superconductor Bc2 shows an anisotropy when the magnetic field is applied parallel and perpendicular to the layers, but is isotropic when the field is rotated in the plane of the layers. Here we report measurements of the upper critical field of superconducting SrxBi2Se3 crystals (Tc = 3.0 K). Surprisingly, field-angle dependent magnetotransport measurements reveal a large anisotropy of Bc2 when the magnet field is rotated in the basal plane. The large two-fold anisotropy, while six-fold is anticipated, cannot be explained with the Ginzburg-Landau anisotropic effective mass model or flux flow induced by the Lorentz force. The rotational symmetry breaking of Bc2 indicates unconventional superconductivity with odd-parity spin-triplet Cooper pairs (Δ4-pairing) recently proposed for rhombohedral topological superconductors, or might have a structural nature, such as self-organized stripe ordering of Sr atoms.

  8. Screening of soil corrosivity by field testing: Results and design of an electrochemical soil corrosion probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars vendelbo; Bruun, Niels Kåre

    1996-01-01

    The corrosivity of different types of soil have been assessed by exposing carbon-steel plates at 50 different locations in Denmark for an extended period of time. The investigations included weight loss measurements and analysis of the chemical compositions of the corrosion products formed on the...... and hydrogen absorption rates. In addition, traditional carbon-steel 3-electrode arrangements allow for performance of any kind of electrochemical meaurement (EIS, polarisation curves, LPR-measurements, galvanostatic pulse etc.).......The corrosivity of different types of soil have been assessed by exposing carbon-steel plates at 50 different locations in Denmark for an extended period of time. The investigations included weight loss measurements and analysis of the chemical compositions of the corrosion products formed...... on the plates during exposure. An electrochemical soil corrosion probe has been designed and manufactured allowing for simultaneous measurements of several qauntities to predict corrosion. The probe consists of individual sections capable of measuring redox-potential, corrosion potential, soil resistivity...

  9. NMR in an electric field: A bulk probe of the hidden spin and orbital polarizations

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez-Ruiz, Jorge; Boutin, Samuel; Garate, Ion

    2017-01-01

    Recent theoretical work has established the presence of hidden spin and orbital textures in non-magnetic materials with inversion symmetry. Here, we propose that these textures can be detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements carried out in the presence of an electric field. In crystals with hidden polarizations, a uniform electric field produces a staggered magnetic field that points to opposite directions at atomic sites related by spatial inversion. As a result, the NMR res...

  10. Near-Earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R; Cattell, Cynthia A; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Turner, Drew L; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Funsten, Herbert O; Spence, Harlan E; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Fruehauff, Dennis; Chen, Lunjin; Thaller, Scott; Breneman, Aaron; Tang, Xiangwei

    2015-08-16

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeVelectron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L ∼ 5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ∼40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ∼3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front. Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt ( L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.

  11. Enhanced magnetic field probe array for improved excluded flux calculations on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, T., E-mail: troche@trialphaenergy.com; Thompson, M. C.; Mendoza, R.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Romero, J.; Douglass, J. [Tri Alpha Energy, P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    External flux conserving coils were installed onto the exterior of the C-2U [M. W. Binderbauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 056110 (2015)] confinement vessel to increase the flux confinement time of the system. The 0.5 in. stainless steel vessel wall has a skin time of ∼5 ms. The addition of the external copper coils effectively increases this time to ∼7 ms. This led to better-confined/longer-lived field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The fringing fields generated by the external coils have the side effect of rendering external field measurements invalid. Such measurements were key to the previous method of excluded flux calculation [M. C. Thompson et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D709 (2012)]. A new array of B-dot probes and Rogowski coils were installed to better determine the amount of flux leaked out of the system and ultimately provide a more robust measurement of plasma parameters related to pressure balance including the excluded flux radius. The B-dot probes are surface mountable chip inductors with inductance of 33 μH capable of measuring the DC magnetic field and transient field, due to resistive current decay in the wall/coils, when coupled with active integrators. The Rogowski coils measure the total change in current in each external coil (150 A/2 ms). Currents were also actively driven in the external coils. This renders the assumption of total flux conservation invalid which further complicates the analysis process. The ultimate solution to these issues and the record breaking resultant FRC lifetimes will be presented.

  12. Electric Field Modulation of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Photoluminescence: Insights Into the Design of Robust Voltage-Sensitive Cellular Imaging Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Clare E; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H; Oh, Eunkeu; Mäkinen, Antti J; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas J; Kushto, Gary; Wolak, Mason A; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Efros, Alexander L; Huston, Alan L; Delehanty, James B

    2015-10-14

    The intrinsic properties of quantum dots (QDs) and the growing ability to interface them controllably with living cells has far-reaching potential applications in probing cellular processes such as membrane action potential. We demonstrate that an electric field typical of those found in neuronal membranes results in suppression of the QD photoluminescence (PL) and, for the first time, that QD PL is able to track the action potential profile of a firing neuron with millisecond time resolution. This effect is shown to be connected with electric-field-driven QD ionization and consequent QD PL quenching, in contradiction with conventional wisdom that suppression of the QD PL is attributable to the quantum confined Stark effect.

  13. Interpretation of atom probe tomography data for the intermetallic TiAl+Nb by means of field evaporation simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Boll, Torben

    2013-01-01

    In this paper simulations of the field evaporation process during field ion microscopy (FIM) and atom probe tomography (APT) are presented and compared with experimental data. The Müller-Schottky-model [1] was extended to include the local atomic arrangement on the evaporation process of atoms. This arrangement was described by the sum of the next-neighbor-binding-energies, which differ for an atom of type A, depending on how many A-A, B-B or A-B bonds are present. Thus simulations of APT-data of intermetallic phases become feasible. In this study simulations of L10-TiAl with additions of Nb are compared with experimental data. Certain artifacts, which appear for experimental data are treated as well. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  14. A fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe using photonic crystal fiber for nanoscale thermometry based on fluorescence-lifetime measurement of quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takuro; Taguchi, Yoshihiro; Saiki, Toshiharu; Nagasaka, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel nanoscale temperature-measurement method using fluorescence in the near-field called fluorescence near-field optics thermal nanoscopy (Fluor-NOTN). Fluor-NOTN enables the temperature distributions of nanoscale materials to be measured in vivo/in situ. The proposed method measures temperature by detecting the temperature dependent fluorescence lifetimes of Cd/Se quantum dots (QDs). For a high-sensitivity temperature measurement, the auto-fluorescence generated from a fiber probe should be reduced. In order to decrease the noise, we have fabricated a novel near-field optical-fiber probe by fusion-splicing a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and a conventional single-mode fiber (SMF). The validity of the novel fiber probe was assessed experimentally by evaluating the auto-fluorescence spectra of the PCF. Due to the decrease of auto-fluorescence, a six- to ten-fold increase of S/N in the near-field fluorescence lifetime detection was achieved with the newly fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe. Additionally, the near-field fluorescence lifetime of the quantum dots was successfully measured by the fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe at room temperature, and was estimated to be 10.0 ns.

  15. A Fusion-Spliced Near-Field Optical Fiber Probe Using Photonic Crystal Fiber for Nanoscale Thermometry Based on Fluorescence-Lifetime Measurement of Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiharu Saiki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel nanoscale temperature-measurement method using fluorescence in the near-field called Fluorescence Near-field Optics Thermal Nanoscopy (Fluor-NOTN. Fluor-NOTN enables the temperature distributions of nanoscale materials to be measured in vivo/in situ. The proposed method measures temperature by detecting the temperature dependent fluorescence lifetimes of Cd/Se Quantum Dots (QDs. For a high-sensitivity temperature measurement, the auto-fluorescence generated from a fiber probe should be reduced. In order to decrease the noise, we have fabricated a novel near-field optical-fiber probe by fusion-splicing a photonic crystal fiber (PCF and a conventional single-mode fiber (SMF. The validity of the novel fiber probe was assessed experimentally by evaluating the auto-fluorescence spectra of the PCF. Due to the decrease of auto-fluorescence, a six- to ten-fold increase of S/N in the near-field fluorescence lifetime detection was achieved with the newly fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe. Additionally, the near-field fluorescence lifetime of the quantum dots was successfully measured by the fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe at room temperature, and was estimated to be 10.0 ns.

  16. Statistically optimized near field acoustic holography using an array of pressure-velocity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Jaud, Virginie

    2007-01-01

    of a measurement aperture that extends well beyond the source can be relaxed. Both NAH and SONAH are based on the assumption that all sources are on one side of the measurement plane whereas the other side is source free. An extension of the SONAH procedure based on measurement with a double layer array...... of pressure microphones has been suggested. The double layer technique makes it possible to distinguish between sources on the two sides of the array and thus suppress the influence of extraneous noise coming from the “wrong” side. It has also recently been demonstrated that there are significant advantages...... in NAH based on an array of acoustic particle velocity transducers (in a single layer) compared with NAH based on an array of pressure microphones. This investigation combines the two ideas and examines SONAH based on an array of pressure-velocity intensity probes through computer simulations as well...

  17. NMR in an electric field: A bulk probe of the hidden spin and orbital polarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Ruiz, Jorge; Boutin, Samuel; Garate, Ion

    2017-12-01

    Recent theoretical work has established the presence of hidden spin and orbital textures in nonmagnetic materials with inversion symmetry. Here, we propose that these textures can be detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements carried out in the presence of an electric field. In crystals with hidden polarizations, a uniform electric field produces a staggered magnetic field that points to opposite directions at atomic sites related by spatial inversion. As a result, the NMR resonance peak corresponding to inversion partner nuclei is split into two peaks. The magnitude of the splitting is proportional to the electric field and depends on the orientation of the electric field with respect to the crystallographic axes and the external magnetic field. As a case study, we present a theory of electric-field-induced splitting of NMR peaks for 77Se,125Te, and 209Bi in Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3 . In conducting samples with current densities of ≃106A/cm 2 , the splitting for Bi can reach 100 kHz , which is comparable to or larger than the intrinsic width of the NMR lines. In order to observe the effect experimentally, the peak splitting must also exceed the linewidth produced by the Oersted field. In Bi2Se3 , this requires narrow wires of radius ≲1 μ m . We also discuss other potentially more promising candidate materials, such as SrRuO3 and BaIr2Ge2 , whose crystal symmetry enables strategies to suppress the linewidth produced by the Oersted field.

  18. Three Dimensional Imaging of Helicon Wave Fields Via Magnetic Induction Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-13

    field Gauss bz radial magnetic field Gauss B0 magnetic field strength Tesla or Gauss c speed of light m/s cs acoustic velocity...eV ΦB magnetic flux Tesla -m2 λ0 mean free path or beam width m or cm λD Debye length m or cm λHelicon helicon wavelength m or cm...locations Turbo Pump Chamber Convectron vent valve Latched door Latched door Roughing Pump 0.5 meter 1.0 meter Cold Cathode Foreline Convectron

  19. Development and field application of a molecular probe for the primary pathogen of the coral disease white plague type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie L Richardson

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the current problems in the field of coral disease research is that of tracking coral pathogens in the natural environment.A promising method to do this is by use of pathogen-specific molecular probes. However,this approach has been little used to date.We constructed,and validated in the laboratory,a fluoro-chrome-labeled molecular probe specific to Aurantimonas coralicida ,the bacterial pathogen of the Caribbean coral disease white plague type II (WPII.We then used the probe to test field samples of diseased coral tissue for the presence of this pathogen.Probe design was based on a unique subset (25 nucleotidesof the complete16S rRNA gene sequence derived from a pure culture of the pathogen.The pathogen-specific probe was labeled with the fluorochrome GreenStar*™FITC (fluorescein isothiocyanate,GeneDetect Ltd,New Zealand.As a control, we used the universal eubacterial probe EUB 338,labeled with a different fluorochrome (TRITC,tetra-methyl-rhodamine isothiocyanate.Both probes were applied to laboratory samples of pure cultures of bacteria, and field samples collected from the surface of the disease line of corals exhibiting signs of white plague (types I and II,healthy controls,and corals with an uncharacterized disease ("patchy necrosis ".All samples were analyzed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH.We have determined that the probe is specific to our laboratory culture of the coral pathogen,and does not react with other bacterial species (the eubacterial probe does.The WPII pathogen was detected in association with diseased coral samples collected from coral colonies on reefs of the Bahamas (n=9 samplesexhibiting signs of both WPI and WPII.Diseased (and healthytissue samples (n=4from corals exhibiting signs of "patchy necrosis "were also assayed.In this case the results were negative, indicating that the same pathogen is not involved in the two diseases.Incorporation and use of pathogen-specific probes can significantly

  20. In situ geomechanics of crystalline and sedimentary rocks; Part IV, continued field testing of the modified U.S. Geological Survey 3-D borehole stress probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Thomas C.

    1983-01-01

    Two modified and calibrated U.S. Geological Survey 3-D borehole probes were successfully tested in the field at a site on South Table Mountain, near Golden, Colo. The probes were installed in separate core holes at depths of 84 and 99 cm in the latite cap rock and subsequently stress relieved with overcoring techniques. The determined stresses from both probes are very low and contain both tensile and compressive components. Magnitudes range from 1196 KPa in tension to 832 KPa in compression. The principal stress orientations are in fair agreement whereas the horizontal secondary principal stress directions are in good agreement; the maximum horizontal compressive stress is oriented N. 76? W.-S. 76? E. for one probe and N. 63? W.-S. 63? E. for the second probe. The greatest determined Young's modulus of the rock is in the N. 89? E. direction, only 15? from the maximum horizontal compressive stress direction.

  1. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields in Thunderstorms through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellart, P; Trinh, T N G; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Scholten, O; Ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Ebert, U; Koehn, C; Rutjes, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J M; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H A; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Moldon, J; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D J; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-04-24

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunderstorms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmospheric electric field, these patterns can be well reproduced by state-of-the-art simulation codes. This in turn provides a novel way to study atmospheric electric fields.

  2. Magnetic field dependence of spatial frequency encoding NMR as probed on an oligosaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitoux, D; Hu, Z; Plainchont, B; Merlet, D; Farjon, J; Bonnaffé, D; Giraud, N

    2015-10-01

    The magnetic field dependence of spatial frequency encoding NMR techniques is addressed through a detailed analysis of (1)H NMR spectra acquired under spatial frequency encoding on an oligomeric saccharide sample. In particular, the influence of the strength of the static magnetic field on spectral and spatial resolutions that are key features of this method is investigated. For this purpose, we report the acquisition of correlation experiments implementing broadband homodecoupling or J-edited spin evolutions, and we discuss the resolution enhancements that are provided by these techniques at two different magnetic fields. We show that performing these experiments at higher field improves the performance of high resolution NMR techniques based on a spatial frequency encoding. The significant resolution enhancements observed on the correlation spectra acquired at very high field make them valuable analytical tools that are suitable for the assignment of (1)H chemical shifts and scalar couplings in molecules with highly crowded spectrum such as carbohydrates. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Intensive probing of a clear air convective field by radar and instrumental drone aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An instrumented drone aircraft was used in conjunction with ultrasensitive radar to study the development of a convective field in the clear air. Radar data are presented which show an initial constant growth rate in the height of the convective field of 3.8 m/min, followed by a short period marked by condensation and rapid growth at a rate in excess of 6.1 m/min. Drone aircraft soundings show general features of a convective field including progressive lifting of the inversion at the top of the convection and a cooling of the air at the top of the field. Calculations of vertical heat flux as a function of time and altitude during the early stages of convection show a linear decrease in heat flux with altitude to near the top of the convective field and a negative heat flux at the top. Evidence is presented which supports previous observations that convective cells overshoot their neutral buoyancy level into a region where they are cool and moist compared to their surroundings. Furthermore, only that portion of the convective cell that has overshot its neutral buoyancy level is generally visible to the radar.

  4. Probing strong-field electron-nuclear dynamics of polyatomic molecules using proton motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markevitch, Alexei N.; Smith, Stanley M.; Levis, Robert J.; Romanov, Dmitri A.

    2007-01-01

    Proton ejection during Coulomb explosion is studied for several structure-related organic molecules (anthracene, anthraquinone, and octahydroanthracene) subjected to 800 nm, 60 fs laser pulses at intensities from 0.50 to 4.0x10 14 W cm -2 . The proton kinetic energy distributions are found to be markedly structure specific. The distributions are bimodal for anthracene and octahydroanthracene and trimodal for anthraquinone. Maximum (cutoff) energies of the distributions range from 50 eV for anthracene to 83 eV for anthraquinone. The low-energy mode (∼10 eV) is most pronounced in octahydroanthracene. The dependence of the characteristic features of the distributions on the laser intensity provides insights into molecular specificity of such strong-field phenomena as (i) nonadiabatic charge localization and (ii) field-mediated restructuring of polyatomic molecules polarized by a strong laser field

  5. Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy Investigation of the Role of Minority Carriers on the Switching Characteristics of Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Pecunia, Vincenzo; Jiang, Lang; Di, Chong-An; Gao, Xike; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-06-01

    A method based on scanning Kelvin probe microscopy is developed to probe the effects of minority carriers on the switching characteristics of organic field-effect transistors. The mobility of the minority carriers is extracted and the role they play in screening of the gate potential in the OFF state and in recombination of trapped majority carriers trapped after an ON state is understood. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Critical fields and growth rates of the Tayler instability as probed by a columnar gallium experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Ruediger, Guenther; Gellert, Marcus; Schultz, Manfred; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Stefani, Frank; Gundrum, Thomas; Seilmayer, Martin; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2012-01-01

    Many astrophysical phenomena (such as the slow rotation of neutron stars or the rigid rotation of the solar core) can be explained by the action of the Tayler instability of toroidal magnetic fields in the radiative zones of stars. In order to place the theory of this instability on a safe fundament it has been realized in a laboratory experiment measuring the critical field strength, the growth rates as well as the shape of the supercritical modes. A strong electrical current flows through a...

  7. Temporal B0 field variation effects on MRSI of the human prostate at 7 T and feasibility of correction using an internal field probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga de Castro, C S; Boer, V O; Luttje, M P; van der Velden, T A; Bhogal, A; van Vulpen, M; Luijten, P R; van der Heide, U A; Klomp, D W J

    2014-11-01

    Spectral degradations as a result of temporal field variations are observed in MRSI of the human prostate. Moving organs generate substantial temporal and spatial field fluctuations as a result of susceptibility mismatch with the surrounding tissue (i.e. periodic breathing, cardiac motion or random bowel motion). Nine patients with prostate cancer were scanned with an endorectal coil (ERC) on a 7-T MR scanner. Temporal B0 field variations were observed with fast dynamic B0 mapping in these patients. Simulations of dynamic B0 corrections were performed using zero- to second-order shim terms. In addition, the temporal B0 variations were applied to simulated MR spectra causing, on average, 15% underestimation of the choline/citrate ratio. Linewidth distortions and frequency shifts (up to 30 and 8 Hz, respectively) were observed. To demonstrate the concept of observing local field fluctuations in real time during MRSI data acquisition, a field probe (FP) tuned and matched for the (19)  F frequency was incorporated into the housing of the ERC. The data acquired with the FP were compared with the B0 field map data and used to correct the MRSI datasets retrospectively. The dynamic B0 mapping data showed variations of up to 30 Hz (0.1 ppm) over 72 s at 7 T. The simulated zero-order corrections, calculated as the root mean square, reduced the standard deviation (SD) of the dynamic variations by an average of 41%. When using second-order corrections, the reduction in the SD was, on average, 56%. The FP data showed the same variation range as the dynamic B0 data and the variation patterns corresponded. After retrospective correction, the MRSI data showed artifact reduction and improved spectral resolution. B0 variations can degrade the MRSI substantially. The simple incorporation of an FP into an ERC can improve prostate cancer MRSI without prior knowledge of the origin of the dynamic field distortions. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Ultrafast probing of magnetic field growth inside a laser-driven solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyon, C.; Pollock, B. B.; Turnbull, D. P.; Hazi, A.; Divol, L.; Farmer, W. A.; Haberberger, D.; Javedani, J.; Johnson, A. J.; Kemp, A.; Levy, M. C.; Grant Logan, B.; Mariscal, D. A.; Landen, O. L.; Patankar, S.; Ross, J. S.; Rubenchik, A. M.; Swadling, G. F.; Williams, G. J.; Fujioka, S.; Law, K. F. F.; Moody, J. D.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the detection of the time-dependent B-field amplitude and topology in a laser-driven solenoid. The B-field inferred from both proton deflectometry and Faraday rotation ramps up linearly in time reaching 210 ± 35 T at the end of a 0.75-ns laser drive with 1 TW at 351 nm. A lumped-element circuit model agrees well with the linear rise and suggests that the blow-off plasma screens the field between the plates leading to an increased plate capacitance that converts the laser-generated hot-electron current into a voltage source that drives current through the solenoid. ALE3D modeling shows that target disassembly and current diffusion may limit the B-field increase for longer laser drive. Scaling of these experimental results to a National Ignition Facility (NIF) hohlraum target size (˜0.2 cm3 ) indicates that it is possible to achieve several tens of Tesla.

  9. A sound field separation technique based on measurements with pressure-velocity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yong-Bin; Chen, Xin-Zhao; Jacobsen, Finn

    2009-01-01

    It has recently been shown that statistically optimized near field acoustic holography based on measurement with an array of pressure-velocity transducers makes it possible to distinguish between sources on the two sides of the array and thus suppress the influence of a disturbing source [F...

  10. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray probes of large scale structure and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigl, Guenter; Miniati, Francesco; Ensslin, Torsten A.

    2004-01-01

    We study signatures of a structured universe in the multi-pole moments, auto-correlation function, and cluster statistics of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays above 10 19 eV. We compare scenarios where the sources are distributed homogeneously or according to the baryon density distribution obtained from a cosmological large scale structure simulation. The influence of extragalactic magnetic fields is studied by comparing the case of negligible fields with fields expected to be produced along large scale shocks with a maximal strength consistent with observations. We confirm that strongly magnetized observers would predict considerable anisotropy on large scales, which is already in conflict with current data. In the best fit scenario only the sources are strongly magnetized, although deflection can still be considerable, of order 20 deg. up to 10 20 eV, and a pronounced GZK cutoff is predicted. We then discuss signatures for future large scale full-sky detectors such as the Pierre Auger and EUSO projects. Auto-correlations are sensitive to the source density only if magnetic fields do not significantly affect propagation. In contrast, for a weakly magnetized observer, degree scale auto-correlations below a certain level indicate magnetized discrete sources. It may be difficult even for next generation experiments to distinguish between structured and unstructured source distributions

  11. submitter Probing electric and magnetic fields with a Moiré deflectometer

    CERN Document Server

    Lansonneur, P; Demetrio, A; Müller, S R; Nedelec, P; Oberthaler, M K

    2017-01-01

    A new contact-free approach for measuring simultaneously electric and magnetic field is reported, which considers the use of a low energy ion source, a set of three transmission gratings and a position sensitive detector. Recently tested with antiprotons (Aghion et al., 2014) [1] at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator facility, this paper extends the proof of principle of a moiré deflectometer (Oberthaler et al., 1996) [2] for distinguishing electric from magnetic fields and opens the route to precision measurements when one is not limited by the ion source intensity. The apparatus presented, whose resolution is mainly limited by the shot noise is able to measure fields as low as 9 mVm−1 Hz−1/2 for electric component and 100 μG Hz−1/2 for the magnetic component. Scaled to 100 nm pitch for the gratings, accessible with current state-of-the-art technology [3], the moiré fieldmeter would be able to measure fields as low as 22 μVm−1 Hz−1/2 and 0.2 μG Hz−1/2.

  12. Spin-orbit interaction in chiral carbon nanotubes probed in pulsed magnetic fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jhang, S.H.; Marganska, M.; Skourski, Y.; Preusche, D.; Witkamp, B.; Grifoni, M.; Van der Zant, H.; Wosnitza, J.; Strunk, C.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetoconductance of an open carbon nanotube (CNT)-quantum wire was measured in pulsed magnetic fields. At low temperatures, we find a peculiar split magnetoconductance peak close to the chargeneutrality point. Our analysis of the data reveals that this splitting is intimately connected to the

  13. Orbital Effects of In-Plane Magnetic Fields Probed by Mesoscopic Conductance Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zumbuhl, D.; Miller, Jessica; M. Marcus, C.

    2003-01-01

    We use the high sensitivity to magnetic flux of mesoscopic conductance fluctuations in large quantum dots to investigate changes in the two-dimensional electron dispersion caused by an in-plane magnetic field. In particular, changes in effective mass and the breaking of momentum reversal symmetry...

  14. Characteristics of short distance field of a source radiating at electronic frequencies in a ionospheric plasma. Applications to density and electron temperature measurement by mutual impedance probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debrie, R.

    1983-06-01

    Realization of a new type of radio-frequency probe, the mutual-impedance probe (or the quadrupole probe) is developed. Theoretical results obtained with a cold plasma description of the ionized medium with static magnetic field. Transfer impedance between two dipoles in an homogeneous hot and isotope plasma is then calculated. In equatorial ionosphere, measurements made by the H.F. quadrupole probe, in the Veronique rocket, during the Cisaspe experiment, have been interpreted with this hot plasma theory. The influence of a plasma drift with respect to the emitter dipole is analyzed. The influence of a static magnetic field in hot and homogeneous plasma, on the frequency response curve of the mutual impedance is studied. For, in ionospheric plasmas of auroral and polar zones, the earth magnetic field is no more negligible and gives to the plasma dielectric, strongly anisotropic, properties well described by the microscopic theory in hot magnetoplasma. The space time fast evolution of characteristics of plasma encountered in space experiments has been shown up with a new method of measurement the self-oscillating quadrupole probe. The work synthesis is put in a concrete form on the polar satellite Aureol-3 the first results of which are presented. This satellite allows a precise study of ionosphere auroral zones. At last, it is shown that methods developed for electron density and temperature measurements can be transposed in low frequency. In this case, measurements with quadrupole probe allow to get the ion average mass by lower hybrid frequency excitation [fr

  15. Computational study of jet interaction flow field with and without incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asif, M.; Zahir, S.; Khan, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to study the interaction of a side jet with the incoming supersonic flow and hypersonic flow. Qualitatively same Cp trends have been obtained as found experimentally. Also in aerodynamic coefficients side jet interaction results in additional pitching moment which is because of the high pressure region in upstream of the jet and a low pressure region in the downstream of the jet. Also jet interaction results in the rise in the lift coefficient. Whereas in the incidence case, simulation has been performed for the hypersonic flows over a biconic body with supersonic lateral jet at Mach 9.7 and incidence of 0 o to incidence of -12 o and 12 o . The results obtained were compared with the experimental and CFD code CFL3D results. PAK-3D over predicts the surface pressure as compared to the CFL3D and experimental results, whereas the qualitative trends are the same. Finally the integrated aerodynamic force coefficients were compared with CFL3D predicted results. (author)

  16. Adapting an optical nanoantenna for high E-field probing applications to a waveguided optical waveguide (WOW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindorf, Lars; Glückstad, Jesper

    2013-03-01

    In the current work we intend to use the optical nano-antenna to include various functionalities for the recently demonstrated waveguided optical waveguide (WOW) by Palima et al. (Optics Express 2012). Specifically, we intend to study a WOW with an optical nano-antenna which can block the guiding light wavelength while admitting other wavelengths of light which address certain functionalities, e.g. drug release, in the WOW. In particular, we study a bow-tie optical nano-antenna to circular dielectric waveguides in aqueous environments. It is shown with finite element computer simulations that the nanoantenna can be made to operate in a bandstop mode around its resonant wavelength where there is a very high evanescent strong electrical probing field close to the antennas, and additionally the fluorescence or Raman excitations will be be unpolluted by stray light from the WOW due to the band-stop characteristic. We give geometrical parameters necessary for realizing functioning nanoantennas.

  17. Adapting an optical nanoantenna for high E-field probing applications to a waveguided optical waveguide (WOW)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars Henning; Glückstad, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    In the current work we intend to use the optical nano-antenna to include various functionalities for the recently demonstrated waveguided optical waveguide (WOW) by Palima et al. (Optics Express 2012). Specifically, we intend to study a WOW with an optical nano-antenna which can block the guiding...... light wavelength while admitting other wavelengths of light which address certain functionalities, e.g. drug release, in the WOW. In particular, we study a bow-tie optical nano-antenna to circular dielectric waveguides in aqueous environments. It is shown with finite element computer simulations...... that the nanoantenna can be made to operate in a bandstop mode around its resonant wavelength where there is a very high evanescent strong electrical probing field close to the antennas, and additionally the fluorescence or Raman excitations will be be unpolluted by stray light from the WOW due to the band...

  18. Atom-probe field-ion microscopy investigation of CMSX-4 Ni-base superalloy laser beam welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Miller, M.K.

    1996-01-01

    CMSX-4 superalloy laser beam welds were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM). The weld microstructure consisted of fine (10- to 50-nm) irregularly shaped γ' precipitates (0.65 to 0.75 volume fraction) within the γ matrix. APFIM compositions of the γ and γ' phases were found to be different from those in the base metal. Concentration profiles across the γ and γ' phases showed extensive variations of Cr, Co and Al concentrations as a function of distance within the γ phase. Calculated lattice misfits near the γ/γ' interface in the welds are positive values compared to the negative values for base metal. (orig.)

  19. Dependence of optical properties of monoclinic MnWO{sub 4} on the electric field of incident light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Lugang [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Micro-nano Measurement-Manipulation and Physics (Ministry of Education), Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu Famin, E-mail: fmliu@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Micro-nano Measurement-Manipulation and Physics (Ministry of Education), Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang Dian; Zhong Wenwu [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Micro-nano Measurement-Manipulation and Physics (Ministry of Education), Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2012-09-01

    Considering the electric field of incident light along four particular directions [100], [110], [011], and [010], the optical properties of monoclinic MnWO{sub 4} were investigated by the first-principle methods. The calculated electronic structures show that the O 2p states and Mn 3d states dominate the top of the valence bands, while the W 5d and Mn 3d states play a key role in the bottom of the conduction bands. The dielectric function and other optical properties, including absorption coefficient, reflectivity spectra, and energy-loss spectra, were calculated and analyzed. The results predicted the maximum static dielectric function when the electric field of incident light was along the [100] direction; meanwhile the absorption edge was calculated to be consistent with the energy band gap and the values and positions of peaks in absorption coefficient are related with the electric field of light. Otherwise, it is found that the appearance of peaks in the energy-loss spectra is also dependent on the electric field and simultaneously corresponds to the edge of absorption spectra and the peaks' position of reflectivity spectra.

  20. Probing quantum Hall states with single-electron transistors at high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Martin; Yankowitz, Matthew; Forsythe, Carlos; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Dean, Cory

    The sequence of fractional quantum Hall states in graphene is not yet fully understood, largely due to disorder-induced limitations of conventional transport studies. Measurements of magnetotransport in other 2D crystals are further complicated by the difficulties in making ohmic contact to the materials. On the other hand, bulk electronic compressibility can provide clear signatures of the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, does not require ohmic contact, and can be localized to regions of low disorder. The single-electron transistor (SET) is a suitable tool for such experiments due to its small size and high charge sensitivity, which allow electric fields penetrating the 2D electron system to be detected locally and with high fidelity. Here we report studies of exfoliated 2D van der Waals materials fully encapsulated in flakes of hexagonal boron nitride. SETs are fabricated lithographically on top of the encapsulation, yielding a structure which lends itself to experiments at high electric and magnetic fields. We demonstrate the method on monolayer graphene, where we observe fractional quantum Hall states at all filling factors ν = n / 3 up to n = 17 and extract their associated energy gaps for magnetic fields up to 31 tesla.

  1. Effective Field Theories for heavy probes in a hot QCD plasma and in the early universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escobedo Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many interesting problems in heavy-ion collisions and in cosmology that involve the interaction of a heavy particle with a medium. An example is the dissociation of heavy quarkonium seen in heavy-ion collisions. This was believed to be due to the screening of chromoelectric fields that prevents the heavy quarks from binding, however in the last years several perturbative and lattice computations have pointed out to the possibility that dissociation is due to the finite lifetime of a quarkonium state inside the medium. Regarding cosmology, the study of the behavior of heavy Majorana neutrinos in a hot medium is important to understand if this model can explain the origin of dark matter and the baryon asymmetry. A very convenient way of studying these problems is with the use of non-relativistic effective field theories (EFTs, this allows to make the computations in a more systematic way by defining a more suitable power counting and making it more difficult to miss necessary resummations. In this proceedings I will review the most important results obtained by applying the EFT formalism to the study of quarkonium suppression and Majorana neutrinos, I will also discuss how combining an EFT called potential non-relativistic QCD (pNRQCD with concepts coming from the field of open quantum systems it is possible to understand how the population of the different quarkonium states evolve with time inside a thermal medium.

  2. Probing α -RuCl3 Beyond Magnetic Order: Effects of Temperature and Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Stephen M.; Riedl, Kira; Kaib, David; Coldea, Radu; Valentí, Roser

    2018-02-01

    Recent studies have brought α -RuCl3 to the forefront of experimental searches for materials realizing Kitaev spin-liquid physics. This material exhibits strongly anisotropic exchange interactions afforded by the spin-orbit coupling of the 4 d Ru centers. We investigate the dynamical response at finite temperature and magnetic field for a realistic model of the magnetic interactions in α -RuCl3 . These regimes are thought to host unconventional paramagnetic states that emerge from the suppression of magnetic order. Using exact diagonalization calculations of the quantum model complemented by semiclassical analysis, we find a very rich evolution of the spin dynamics as the applied field suppresses the zigzag order and stabilizes a quantum paramagnetic state that is adiabatically connected to the fully polarized state at high fields. At finite temperature, we observe large redistributions of spectral weight that can be attributed to the anisotropic frustration of the model. These results are compared to recent experiments and provide a road map for further studies of these regimes.

  3. Probing dynamic behavior of electric fields and band diagrams in complex semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkulets, Yury; Shalish, Ilan

    2018-01-01

    Modern bandgap engineered electronic devices are typically made of multi-semiconductor multi-layer heterostructures that pose a major challenge to silicon-era characterization methods. As a result, contemporary bandgap engineering relies mostly on simulated band structures that are hardly ever verified experimentally. Here, we present a method that experimentally evaluates bandgap, band offsets, and electric fields, in complex multi-semiconductor layered structures, and it does so simultaneously in all the layers. The method uses a modest optical photocurrent spectroscopy setup at ambient conditions. The results are analyzed using a simple model for electro-absorption. As an example, we apply the method to a typical GaN high electron mobility transistor structure. Measurements under various external electric fields allow us to experimentally construct band diagrams, not only at equilibrium but also under any other working conditions of the device. The electric fields are then used to obtain the charge carrier density and mobility in the quantum well as a function of the gate voltage over the entire range of operating conditions of the device. The principles exemplified here may serve as guidelines for the development of methods for simultaneous characterization of all the layers in complex, multi-semiconductor structures.

  4. X-ray near-field holography. Beyond idealized assumptions of the probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    The work at hand considers the imperfect, often neglected, aspects of X-ray nearfield phase-contrast propagation imaging, or in short: X-ray near-field holography (NFH). NFH is a X-ray microscopy technique able to yield high resolution, yet low dose imaging of a wide range of specimen. Derived from wave optical theory, propagation-based imaging methods rely on assumptions for the illuminating wave field. These are for example the assumptions of a perfect plane wave or spherical wave emanating from a point source or monochromaticity. Violation of the point source assumption implies for example at the same time the occurrence of a distorted wave front and a finite degree of coherence, both crucial for NFH. With the advances in X-ray focusing, instrumentation and X-ray wave guiding, NFH has become of high interest, since the barriers for practical implementation have been overcome. The idea of holography originates from electron microscopy to overcome the lack of high-quality electron lenses. With holography the need for optics between the specimen and detector is circumvented. The drawback, however, is that the measurement obtained at the detector is not a direct image of the specimen under survey but a ''propagated version'' of it, the so-called hologram. The problem with the optics is replaced by another problem, also referred to as the phase problem. The phase problem is caused by the fact that only the intensities of a wave field can be measured but not the phase information. The phase information is crucial for obtaining the image of the specimen and thus needs to be reconstructed. In recent years the methodology, sometimes also mythology, has been developed to reconstruct the specimen from the measured hologram. For a long time, the standard approach to deal with deviations from the ideal assumptions in real world holography experiments has been to simply ignore these. The prime example for this is the method of the standard flat-field

  5. The incidence of breast cancer following mantle field radiation therapy as a function of dose and technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinger, Alfred; Wasserman, Todd H.; Klein, Eric E.; Miller, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Tracy; Piephoff, James V.; Kucik, Nancy A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: There is an increased incidence of breast cancer following mantle field radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease (HD). We reviewed the experience at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (MIR) for radiation factors related to the development of breast cancer after mantle field radiation therapy for HD. Methods: The radiation therapy records of 152 women treated with mantle field irradiation for HD at MIR between 1966-1985 were reviewed for the development of breast cancer and treatment-related factors. All patients had a minimum of 5 years of follow-up. The treatment era (1966-1974 vs. 1975-1985), stage of HD, mediastinal dose, axillary dose, maximum dose from the anterior field (anterior d max dose), the anterior-posterior:posterior-anterior (AP:PA) ratio, age at the time of treatment, length of follow-up, and history of splenectomy were analyzed as possible contributing factors for the development of breast cancer. The observed number of breast cancers was compared to the expected number based on age-adjusted incidences from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. Results: Ten breast cancers occurred in the population. Eight involved an upper outer quadrant. In a multivariate analysis, the development of breast cancer was significantly associated with axillary dose. Patients in the early treatment era were at an increased risk for the development of breast cancer due to high anterior d max and breast doses from weighting the fields anteriorly on a low energy linear accelerator. The use of current radiation therapy techniques was not related to an increased risk of breast cancer with a median follow-up of 13 years. Conclusions: A high dose to the axilla and the anterior d max point is significantly associated with the development of breast cancer after mantle field irradiation for HD. Efforts to protect the breast from high doses will likely lessen the increased risk of breast cancer in women treated with radiation therapy for HD

  6. Astronomers Use X-Rays To Probe Gravitational Field Of A Neutron Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    With NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have detected features that may be the first direct evidence of the effect of gravity on radiation from a neutron star. This finding, if confirmed, could enable scientists to measure the gravitational field of neutron stars and determine whether they contain exotic forms of matter not seen on Earth. A team led by George Pavlov of Penn State University in University Park observed 1E 1207.4-5209, a neutron star in the center of a supernova remnant about 7,000 light years from Earth. The results were presented on June 6, 2002, at the American Astronomical Society in Albuquerque, NM. Pavlov's group found two dips, or absorption features, in the spectrum of X-rays from the star. If these dips are due to the absorption of X-rays near the star by helium ions in a strong magnetic field, they indicate that the gravitational field reduces the energies of X-rays escaping from near the surface of a neutron star. "This interpretation is consistent with the data," said Pavlov, "but the features may be a blend of many other features. More precise measurements, preferably with Chandra's grating spectrometer, are needed." "These absorption features may be the first evidence of the effect of gravity on radiation near the surface of an isolated neutron star," said Pavlov. "This is particularly important because it would allow us to set limits on the type of matter that comprises this star." Neutron stars are formed when a massive star runs out of fuel and its core collapses. A supernova explosion occurs and the collapsed core is compressed to a hot object about 12 miles in diameter, with a thin atmosphere of hydrogen and possibly heavier ions in a gravitational field 100 billion times as strong as Earth's. These objects, which have a density of more than 1 billion tons per teaspoonful, are called neutron stars because they have been thought to be composed mostly of neutrons. Although neutron stars have been studied extensively for

  7. Miniaturized compact water-cooled pitot-pressure probe for flow-field surveys in hypersonic wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, George C.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the design of pitot probes for flowfield surveys in hypersonic wind tunnels is reported. The results show that a pitot-pressure probe can be miniaturized for minimum interference effects by locating the transducer in the probe support body and water-cooling it so that the pressure-settling time and transducer temperature are compatible with hypersonic tunnel operation and flow conditions. Flowfield surveys around a two-to-one elliptical cone model in a 20-inch Mach 6 wind tunnel using such a probe show that probe interference effects are essentially eliminated.

  8. Negative Differential Velocity in Artificial Crystals Probed by High Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, A.

    Progress in the synthesis and engineering of semiconductor materials has led to improved device performances and functionalities. In particular, in the last decade, there has been considerable interest in the physics and applications of highly-mismatched alloys in which small and highly-electronegative isovalent N-atoms are incorporated onto the anion sublattice of a III-V compound semiconductor.1 The most studied material is the GaAs1-xNx alloy. Our magnetotunnelling studies have shown that a small percentage of N (x alloy composition observed in other semiconductor compounds, such as InyGa1-yAs. The incorporation of N in GaAs gives rise to a qualitatively different type of alloy phenomenon: N-impurities and N-clusters tend to localize the extended Bloch states of GaAs at resonant energies in the conduction band (CB), thus fragmenting the energy-wavevector dispersion relations. The possibility of tailoring the electronic properties of III-V compounds by N-incorporation has stimulated proposals for innovative devices in optoelectronics and high frequency (terahertz, THz) electronics.7 However, to date, the implementation of dilute nitrides in these technologies presents several challenges, including a degradation of the electron mobility. Also, despite a rapidly expanding body of work on the electronic properties of GaAs1-xNx, the range of N-concentrations over which this alloy behaves as a good conductor is not yet well established. Our magnetotransport experiments have revealed how the incorporation of N in GaAs affects the electrical conductivity. Our studies in n-type GaAs1-xNx epilayers revealed a large increase of the resistivity, ρ, for x > 0.2%, which we have attributed to the emergence of defect states with deep (~ 0.3 eV) energy levels. Electron trapping onto these states was not observed at low x (x = 0.2%). In this ultra-dilute alloy regime and at low electric fields (F 1 kV/cm), electrons gain sufficient energy to approach the energy of the resonant N

  9. Field Line Resonance conjugate studies in the dayside inner magnetosphere using SAMBA antarctic magnetometers and THEMIS mission probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, V. A.; Stepanova, M. V.; Zesta, E.; Boudouridis, A.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    To test the robustness of the automated Field Line Resonance (FLR) technique described by [Boudouridis and Zesta 2007], and commonly used for the estimation of the plasma density in the inner magnetosphere, conjugate studies between the SAMBA magnetometer array and the THEMIS satellite were performed. An excellent conjunction, with a duration of nearly 40 minutes, between Escudero (ESC) and O'Higgins (OHI) antarctic fluxgate magnetometers from SAMBA and three probes from THEMIS was found on June 16, 2007. It is shown that the amplitude ratio method for the estimation of the frequency of resonance is more reliable than the phase difference method. For the amplitude ratio method we found time intervals in which we have the same resonance frequency in both ground and space measurements. We also compared this estimation with the in-situ ion number density measurements from the THEMIS satellites. It was found that the plasma density obtained from the FLR frequency is more fluctuating than the ion number density observed by THEMIS ESA and SST instruments. The time intervals for wich the plasma density and the number density are strongly correlated are much shorter than the intervals of high correlation between ground and space field line resonance frequencies. We investigate if the difference can be attributed to the orbital and/or ion composition effects.

  10. Potential of Probing the Lunar Regolith using Rover-Mounted Ground Penetrating Radar: Moses Lake Dune Field Analog Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horz, F.; Heggy, E.; Fong, T.; Kring, D.; Deans, M.; Anglade, A.; Mahiouz, K.; Bualat, M.; Lee, P.; Bluethmann, W.

    2009-01-01

    Probing radars have been widely recognized by the science community to be an efficient tool to explore lunar subsurface providing a unique capability to address several scientific and operational issues. A wideband (200 to 1200 MHz) Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) mounted on a surface rover can provide high vertical resolution and probing depth from few tens of centimeters to few tens of meters depending on the sounding frequency and the ground conductivity. This in term can provide a better understand regolith thickness, elemental iron concentration (including ilmenite), volatile presence, structural anomalies and fracturing. All those objectives are of important significance for understanding the local geology and potential sustainable resources for future landing sites in particular exploring the thickness, structural heterogeneity and potential volatiles presence in the lunar regolith. While the operation and data collection of GPR is a straightforward case for most terrestrial surveys, it is a challenging task for remote planetary study especially on robotic platforms due to the complexity of remote operation in rough terrains and the data collection constrains imposed by the mechanical motion of the rover and limitation in data transfer. Nevertheless, Rover mounted GPR can be of great support to perform systematic subsurface surveys for a given landing site as it can provide scientific and operational support in exploring subsurface resources and sample collections which can increase the efficiency of the EVA activities for potential human crews as part of the NASA Constellation Program. In this study we attempt to explore the operational challenges and their impact on the EVA scientific return for operating a rover mounted GPR in support of potential human activity on the moon. In this first field study, we mainly focused on the ability of GPR to support subsurface sample collection and explore shallow subsurface volatiles.

  11. Probing scalar effective field theories with the soft limits of scattering amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, Antonio [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham,University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Stefanyszyn, David [Van Swinderen Institute for Particle Physics and Gravity, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4, Groningen, 9747 AG The (Netherlands); Wilson, Toby [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham,University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-04

    We investigate the soft behaviour of scalar effective field theories (EFTs) when there is a number of distinct derivative power counting parameters, ρ{sub 1}<ρ{sub 2}<…<ρ{sub Q}. We clarify the notion of an enhanced soft limit and use these to extend the scope of on-shell recursion techniques for scalar EFTs. As an example, we perform a detailed study of theories with two power counting parameters, ρ{sub 1}=1 and ρ{sub 2}=2, that include the shift symmetric generalised galileons. We demonstrate that the minimally enhanced soft limit uniquely picks out the Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) symmetry, including DBI galileons. For the exceptional soft limit we uniquely pick out the special galileon within the class of theories under investigation. We study the DBI galileon amplitudes more closely, verifying the validity of the recursion techniques in generating the six point amplitude, and explicitly demonstrating the invariance of all amplitudes under DBI galileon duality.

  12. Relationships between Fusarium population structure, soil nutrient status and disease incidence in field-grown asparagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yergeau, E.; Sommerville, D.W.; Maheux, E.; Vujanovic, V.; Hamel, C.; Whalen, J.K.; St-Arnaud, M.

    2006-01-01

    Fusarium species cause important diseases in many crops. Lack of knowledge on how Fusarium species and strains interact with their environment hampers growth management strategies to control root diseases. A field experiment involving asparagus as host plant and three phosphorus fertilization levels

  13. The effect of external magnetic field on mark size in heat-assisted probe recording on CoNi/Pt multilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Li; Bain, James A.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Abelmann, Leon; Onoue, T.

    A method of heat-assisted magnetic recording potentially suitable for probe-based storage systems is characterized. In this work, field-emission current from a scanning tunneling microscope tip isused as the heating source. Pulse voltages of 2-7 V were applied to a CoNi/Pt multilayered film. During

  14. A model for mark size dependence on field emission voltage in heat-assisted magnetic probe recording on CoNi/Pt multilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Li; Bain, James A.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Abelmann, Leon; Onoue, T.

    2004-01-01

    A method of heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) potentially suitable for probe-based storage systems is characterized. In this work, field emission current from a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip is used as the heating source. Pulse voltages of 2-7 V with a duration of 500 ns were applied

  15. THE ORNL ATOM PROBE

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, M.

    1986-01-01

    The ORNL Atom Probe is a microanalytical tool for studies in materials science. The instrument is a combination of a customized version of the vacuum system of the VG FIM-100 atom probe, an ORNL-designed microcomputer-controlled digital timing system, and a double curved CEMA Imaging Atom Probe detector. The atom probe combines four instruments into one - namely a field ion microscope, an energy compensated time-of-flight mass spectrometer, an imaging atom probe, and a pulsed laser atom probe.

  16. Ligand-field symmetry effects in Fe(ii) polypyridyl compounds probed by transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Hong, Kiryong; Jamula, Lindsey; Gullikson, Eric M.; Kim, Tae Kyu; de Groot, Frank M. F.; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Huse, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast excited-state evolution in polypyridyl FeII complexes are of fundamental interest for understanding the origins of the sub-ps spin-state changes that occur upon photoexcitation of this class of compounds as well as for the potential impact such ultrafast dynamics have on incorporation of these compounds in solar energy conversion schemes or switchable optical storage technologies. We have demonstrated that ground-state and, more importantly, ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption methods can offer unique insights into the interplay between electronic and geometric structure that underpin the photo-induced dynamics of this class of compounds. The present contribution examines in greater detail how the symmetry of the ligand field surrounding the metal ion can be probed using these x-ray techniques. In particular, we show that steady-state K-edge spectroscopy of the nearest-neighbour nitrogen atoms reveals the characteristic chemical environment of the respective ligands and suggests an interesting target for future charge-transfer femtosecond and attosecond spectroscopy in the x-ray water window.

  17. Optical method for distance and displacement measurements of the probe-sample separation in a scanning near-field optical microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaria, L.; Siller, H. R.; Garcia-Ortiz, C. E.; Cortes, R.; Coello, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present an alternative optical method to determine the probe-sample separation distance in a scanning near-field optical microscope. The experimental method is based in a Lloyd’s mirror interferometer and offers a measurement precision deviation of ∼100 nm using digital image processing and numerical analysis. The technique can also be strategically combined with the characterization of piezoelectric actuators and stability evaluation of the optical system. It also opens the possibility for the development of an automatic approximation control system valid for probe-sample distances from 5 to 500 μm.

  18. Optical method for distance and displacement measurements of the probe-sample separation in a scanning near-field optical microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamaria, L.; Siller, H. R. [Tecnológico de Monterrey, Eugenio Garza Sada 2501 Sur, Monterrey, N.L., 64849 (Mexico); Garcia-Ortiz, C. E., E-mail: cegarcia@cicese.mx [CONACYT Research Fellow – CICESE, Unidad Monterrey, Alianza Centro 504, Apodaca, NL, 66629 (Mexico); Cortes, R.; Coello, V. [CICESE, Unidad Monterrey, PIIT, Alianza Centro 504, Apodaca, NL, 66629 (Mexico)

    2016-04-15

    In this work, we present an alternative optical method to determine the probe-sample separation distance in a scanning near-field optical microscope. The experimental method is based in a Lloyd’s mirror interferometer and offers a measurement precision deviation of ∼100 nm using digital image processing and numerical analysis. The technique can also be strategically combined with the characterization of piezoelectric actuators and stability evaluation of the optical system. It also opens the possibility for the development of an automatic approximation control system valid for probe-sample distances from 5 to 500 μm.

  19. Incidence of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'-Infected Plants Among Citrandarins as Rootstock and Scion Under Field Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boava, Leonardo Pires; Sagawa, Cíntia Helena Duarte; Cristofani-Yaly, Mariângela; Machado, Marcos Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB), caused by the bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter' spp., is currently one of the most serious diseases of citrus plants and has caused substantial economic losses. Thus far, there is no source of genetic resistance to HLB in the genus Citrus or its relatives. However, several studies have reported Poncirus trifoliata and some of its hybrids to be more tolerant to the disease. The main objective of this study was to report differences in the incidence of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' infection in citrandarin plants, hybrids from Sunki mandarin (Citrus sunki (Hayata) hort. ex Tanaka), and trifoliate orange Rubidoux (P. trifoliata (L.) Raf.)), after conducting an extensive survey under field conditions. These hybrid plants were established for approximately 7 years in an area with a high incidence of 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected plants. We selected two experimental areas (area A and area B), located approximately 10 m apart. Area A consists of Pera sweet orange (C. sinensis (L.) Osb.) grafted onto 56 different citrandarin rootstocks. Area B consists of citrandarin scions grafted onto Rangpur lime (C. limonia Osb.) rootstock. Bacteria in the leaves and roots were detected using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The incidence of 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected plants was 92% in area A and 14% in area B. Because infected plants occurred in both areas, we examined whether the P. trifoliata hybrid rootstock influenced HLB development and also determined the distribution of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in Citrus tree tissues. Although this survey does not present evidence regarding the resistance of P. trifoliata and its hybrids in relation to bacteria or psyllids, future investigation, mainly using the most promising hybrids for response to 'Ca. L. asiaticus', will help us to understand the probable mechanism of defense or identifying compounds in P. trifoliata and its hybrids that are very important as strategy to combat HLB. Details of these results are

  20. A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic for amplitude, polarization, and wavenumber measurements of ion cyclotron range-of frequency fields on ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoukov, R.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-01-01

    A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic has been installed on an ASDEX Upgrade tokamak to characterize ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) wave generation and interaction with magnetized plasma. The diagnostic consists of a field-aligned array of B-dot probes, oriented to measure fast and slow ICRF wave fields and their field-aligned wavenumber (k // ) spectrum on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. A thorough description of the diagnostic and the supporting electronics is provided. In order to compare the measured dominant wavenumber of the local ICRF fields with the expected spectrum of the launched ICRF waves, in-air near-field measurements were performed on the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antenna to reconstruct the dominant launched toroidal wavenumbers (k tor ). Measurements during a strap current phasing scan in tokamak discharges reveal an upshift in k // as strap phasing is moved away from the dipole configuration. This result is the opposite of the k tor trend expected from in-air near-field measurements; however, the near-field based reconstruction routine does not account for the effect of induced radiofrequency (RF) currents in the passive antenna structures. The measured exponential increase in the local ICRF wave field amplitude is in agreement with the upshifted k // , as strap phasing moves away from the dipole configuration. An examination of discharges heated with two ICRF antennas simultaneously reveals the existence of beat waves at 1 kHz, as expected from the difference of the two antennas’ operating frequencies. Beats are observed on both the fast and the slow wave probes suggesting that the two waves are coupled outside the active antennas. Although the new diagnostic shows consistent trends between the amplitude and the phase measurements in response to changes applied by the ICRF antennas, the disagreement with the in-air near-field measurements remains. An electromagnetic model is currently under development to address this issue

  1. SOUND TRANSMISSION LOSS OF A DOUBLE-LEAF PARTITION WITH MICRO-PERFORATED PLATE INSERTION UNDER DIFFUSE FIELD INCIDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Putra

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In noise control applications, a double-leaf partition has been applied widely as a lightweight structure for noise insulation, such as in car doors, train bodies, and aircraft fuselages. Unfortunately, the insulation performance deteriorates significantly at mass-air-mass resonance due to coupling between the panels and the air in the gap. This paper investigates the effect of a micro-perforated panel (MPP, inserted in the conventional double-panel partition, on sound transmission loss at troublesome resonant frequencies. It is found that the transmission loss improves at this resonance if the MPP is located at a distance of less than half that of the air gap. A mathematical model is derived for the diffuse field incidence of acoustic loading.

  2. Response of the 'patient dose calibrator' chamber for incident positions and sizes of X-ray fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Cassio M.; Abrantes, Marcos Eugenio S.; Ferreira, Flavia C. Bastos; Lacerda, Marco A. de Souza; Alonso, Thessa C.; Silva, Teogenes A. da; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio C.

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of patient doses is an important tool for optimizing radiodiagnostic medical procedures with conventional X-ray equipment and for improving the quality of the radiographic image. The Patient Dose Calibrator (PDC) chamber is a dosimetric instrument that is used in the evaluation of the air kerma-area product (P KA ) quantity aiming the reduction of patient doses. The objective this work was to study the P KA variation caused by different field incident positions and sizes of the X-ray beam on the PDC chamber. Results showed that the PDC chamber has repeatability lower than 0.6%, beam position dependence of 3% and linearity response within ± 6%; these characteristics are to be taken into account during evaluation of the radiological protection conditions of conventional x-ray equipment. (author)

  3. Wireless Communication with Nanoplasmonic Data Carriers: Macroscale Propagation of Nanophotonic Plasmon Polaritons Probed by Near-Field Nanoimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Moshik; Abulafia, Yossi; Lev, Dmitry; Lewis, Aaron; Shavit, Reuven; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2017-09-13

    The ability to control the energy flow of light at the nanoscale is fundamental to modern communication and big-data technologies, as well as quantum information processing schemes. However, since photons are diffraction-limited, efforts of confining them to dimensions of integrated electronics have so far proven elusive. A promising way to facilitate nanoscale manipulation of light is through plasmon polaritons-coupled excitations of photons and charge carriers. These tightly confined hybrid waves can facilitate compression of optical functionalities to the nanoscale but suffer from huge propagation losses that limit their use to mostly subwavelength scale applications. With only weak evidence of macroscale plasmon polaritons, propagation has recently been reported theoretically and indirectly, no experiments so far have directly resolved long-range propagating optical plasmons in real space. Here, we launch and detect nanoscale optical signals, for record distances in a wireless link based on novel plasmonic nanotransceivers. We use a combination of scanning probe microscopies to provide high resolution real space images of the optical near fields and investigate their long-range propagation principles. We design our nanotransceivers based on a high-performance nanoantenna, Plantenna, hybridized with channel plasmon waveguides with a cross-section of 20 nm × 20 nm, and observe propagation for distances up to 1000 times greater than the plasmon wavelength. We experimentally show that our approach hugely outperforms both waveguide and wireless nanophotonic links. This successful alliance between Plantenna and plasmon waveguides paves the way for new generations of optical interconnects and expedites long-range interaction between quantum emitters and photomolecular devices.

  4. Development and application of VISAR probe with higher signal-collecting efficiency and adjusted depth of field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jianheng; Sun Chengwei; Ma Ruchao

    2001-01-01

    The new design of optical fiber VISAR probes has been described. It consists of optical fibers and two lenses, and has simpler structure and lower cost than others. If the size of the image near the end face of collecting fiber is larger than the diameter of the core fiber, the distance between the probe and the target can be decreased. Requirement for the precision in the design is lower in this way, and is easier to build up. At the same time, the signal-collecting efficiency is improved in some degree. During the process of designing the probe, the technique for manufacturing the lens of plexiglass is developed. The lens of plexiglass is used to replace the lens of glass, which can reduce the cost of the probe. The factors affecting the collecting efficiency are analyzed

  5. Developing the technique of measurements of magnetic field in the CMS steel yoke elements with flux-loops and Hall probes

    CERN Document Server

    Klioukhine, V I; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Grillet, J P; Hervé, A; Loveless, R; Smith, R P

    2004-01-01

    CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6 m diameter by 12.5 m long free bore, enclosed inside a 10000- ton return yoke. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel a set of flux-loops and Hall probe sensors will be installed on several of the steel pieces. Fast discharges of the solenoid during system commissioning tests will be used to induce voltages in the flux-loops that can be integrated to measure the flux in the steel at full excitation of the solenoid. The Hall probes will give supplementary information on axial component of magnetic field and will permit to estimate the remanent field in steel after the fast discharge. An experimental R&D program has been done, using the test flux-loop, two Hall probes, and small steel plugs between the...

  6. Calibration, field-testing, and error analysis of a gamma-ray probe for in situ measurement of dry bulk density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertuzzi, P.; Bruckler, L.; Gabilly, Y.; Gaudu, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a new gamma-ray probe for measuring dry bulk density in the field. This equipment can be used with three different tube spacings (15, 20 and 30 cm). Calibration procedures and local error analyses are proposed for two cases: (1) for the case where the access tubes are parallel, calibration equations are given for three tube spacings. The linear correlation coefficient obtained in the laboratory is satisfactory (0.999), and a local error analysis shows that the standard deviation in the measured dry bulk density is small (+/- 0.02 g/cm 3 ); (2) when the access tubes are not parallel, a new calibration procedure is presented that accounts for and corrects measurement bias due to the deviating probe spacing. The standard deviation associated with the measured dry bulk density is greater (+/- 0.05 g/cm 3 ), but the measurements themselves are regarded as unbiased. After comparisons of core samplings and gamma-ray probe measurements, a field validation of the gamma-ray measurements is presented. Field validation was carried out on a variety of soils (clay, clay loam, loam, and silty clay loam), using gravimetric water contents that varied from 0.11 0.27 and dry bulk densities ranging from 1.30-1.80 g°cm -3 . Finally, an example of dry bulk density field variability is shown, and the spatial variability is analyzed in regard to the measurement errors

  7. Wire Probe Antenna (WPT) and Electric Field Detector (EFD0 of Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) aboard ARASE: Specifications and Evaluation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, S.; Kasaba, Y.; Ishisaka, K.; Kasahara, Y.; Imachi, T.; Yagitani, S.; Kojima, H.; Kurita, S.; Shoji, M.; Hori, T.; Shinbori, A.; Teramoto, M.; Miyoshi, Y.; Nakagawa, T.; Takahashi, N.; Nishimura, Y.; Matsuoka, A.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kumamoto, A.; Nomura, R.

    2017-12-01

    This paper summarizes the specifications and the evaluation results of Wire Probe Antenna (WPT) and Electric Field Detector (EFD), which are the key parts of Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) aboard the Arase satellite, in their initial operations and the beginning phase of the full observations. WPT consists of the two dipole antennas as electric field sensors with 32m tip-to-tip length, with a sphere probe (6 cm diameter) attached at each end of wires (length: 15-m). They are extended orthogonally in the spin plane which is roughly perpendicular to the Sun. It enables the PWE to measure the E-field from DC to 10 MHz. This system is almost compatible to the WPT of the Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI) aboard BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter, except the material of the spherical probe (ERG: Aluminium alloy, MMO: Titanium-alloy). This paper shows the extended length evaluated by the Lorentz force (spacecraft velocity x B-field) and the antenna impedance as the basic information of the E-field measurement capability of the PWE E-field receivers, with the evaluation for the possible degradation of the probe surface coated by TiAlN as BepiColombo. EFD is the 2-channel low frequency electric receiver as a part of EWO (EFD/WFC/OFA), for the measurement of 2ch electric field in the spin-plane with the sampling rate of 512 Hz (dynamic range: +-200 mV/m, +-3 V/m) and the 4ch spacecraft potential with the sampling rate of 128 Hz (dynamic range: +-100 V), respectively, with the bias control capability fed to the WPT probes. The electric field in DC - 232Hz provides the capability to detect (1) the fundamental information of the plasma dynamics and accelerations and (2) the characteristics of MHD and ion waves with their Poynting vectors with the data measured by MGF and PWE/WFC-B connected to PWE/SCM. The spacecraft potential provides the electron density information with UHR frequency. This paper also introduces the data sets and their calibration status.

  8. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  9. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  10. Dependence on the incident light power of the internal electric fields in a GaAs p-i-n solar cell according to bright photoreflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hyun-Jun; Mun, Young Hee; Kim, Jong Su; Lee, Sang Jun

    2016-07-01

    Bright photoreflectance (BPR) spectroscopy at room temperature is used to examine the internal electric fields in a GaAs p-i-n solar cell for their dependence on the incident light power. Electric fields are observed at 30 µW and 100 µW of incident light. With increasing power, the strengths of the two electric fields are reduced due to the photovoltage effect. The electric field observed at 30 µW is assigned to the p-i interface, which is close to the surface. The other electric field is due to the i-n interface because the incident light penetrates deeper as the light power is increased. The electric field strength of 35.6 kV/cm at the p-i interface is lower than that of 42.9 kV/cm at the i-n interface at 500 µW of light power because the photovoltage effect is proportional to the number of photo-generated carriers, which is reduced as the distance from the surface increases. When the incident light power is similar to the excitation beam power, the electric fields at the p-i interface are saturated.

  11. Probing the ground state and zero-field cooled exchange bias by magnetoresistance measurement in Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 41}Sn{sub 9} ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiyun [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Department of Physics, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Tu, Ruikang [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Department of Physics, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215000 (China); Fang, Xiaoting [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Department of Physics, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Gu, Quanchao [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Department of Physics, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215000 (China); Zhou, Yanying [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Department of Physics, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Cui, Rongjing [Department of Chemistry, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Han, Zhida, E-mail: han@cslg.edu.cn [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Department of Physics, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Zhang, Lei; Fang, Yong [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Department of Physics, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Qian, Bin, E-mail: njqb@cslg.edu.cn [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Department of Physics, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Zhang, Chengliang [School of Science, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Jiang, Xuefan [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Department of Physics, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Recently, a new type of exchange bias (EB) after zero-field cooling has attracted considerable interest mainly in bulk magnetic competing systems. Here, we use a detailed magnetotransport investigation to probe the ground state and zero-field cooled EB (ZEB) in Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 41}Sn{sub 9} ribbon. Both ZEB and field cooled EB were detected in magnetoresistance results consistent with magnetic measurement. A pure spin-glass ground state is proposed based on parabolic shape of low-field magnetoresistance combined with AC magnetization, memory effect. The appearance of ZEB is attributed to the field-induced nucleation and growth of ferromagnetic domains in the spin glass matrix forming unidirectional anisotropy at the interface. - Highlights: • Magnetoresistance was first used to probe the ground state and ZEB in Ni-Mn-based alloys. • A pure spin-glass ground state is proposed in Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 41}Sn{sub 9} ribbon. • Field-induced nucleation and growth of ferromagnetic domains in SG results in ZEB.

  12. Graphene quantum dot (GQD)-induced photovoltaic and photoelectric memory elements in a pentacene/GQD field effect transistor as a probe of functional interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngjun; Cho, Seongeun; Kim, Hyeran; Seo, Soonjoo; Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Jouhahn; Ko, Hyungduk; Chang, Mincheol; Park, Byoungnam

    2017-09-01

    Electric field-induced charge trapping and exciton dissociation were demonstrated at a penatcene/grapheme quantum dot (GQD) interface using a bottom contact bi-layer field effect transistor (FET) as an electrical nano-probe. Large threshold voltage shift in a pentacene/GQD FET in the dark arises from field-induced carrier trapping in the GQD layer or GQD-induced trap states at the pentacene/GQD interface. As the gate electric field increases, hysteresis characterized by the threshold voltage shift depending on the direction of the gate voltage scan becomes stronger due to carrier trapping associated with the presence of a GQD layer. Upon illumination, exciton dissociation and gate electric field-induced charge trapping simultaneously contribute to increase the threshold voltage window, which can potentially be exploited for photoelectric memory and/or photovoltaic devices through interface engineering.

  13. Probing star formation and feedback in dwarf galaxies. Integral field view of the blue compact galaxy Tololo 1937-423

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairós, L. M.; González-Pérez, J. N.

    2017-12-01

    Context. Blue compact galaxies (BCG) are gas-rich, low-mass, small systems that form stars at unusually high rates. This makes them excellent laboratories for investigating the process of star-formation (SF) at galactic scales and the effects of massive stellar feedback on the interstellar (and intergalactic) medium. Aims: We analyzed the BCG Tololo 1937-423 using optical integral field spectroscopy to probe its morphology, stellar content, nebular excitation and ionization properties, and the kinematics of its warm ionized gas. Methods: Tololo 1937-423 was observed with the Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. We took data in the wavelength range 4150-7400 Å, covering a field of view of 27″× 27″ on the sky with a spatial sampling of 0.̋67. From these data we built maps in the continuum and brighter emission lines, diagnostic line ratio maps, and velocity dispersion fields. We also generated the integrated spectrum of the main H II regions and young stellar clusters to determine reliable physical parameters and oxygen abundances. Results: We found that Tololo 1937-423 is currently undergoing an extended starburst. In the Hα maps we identified nine major clumps, aligned mostly northeast-southwest, and stretching to galactocentric distances ≥2 kpc. The galaxy presents a single continuum peak that is not cospatial with any knot in emission lines, indicating at least two relatively recent episodes of SF. The inhomogeneous dust distribution reachs its maximum (E(B-V) 0.97) roughly at the position of the continuum peak. We found shocked regions in the galaxy outer regions and at the edges of the SF knots. The oxygen abundance, 12 + log(O/H) 8.20 ± 0.1, is similar in all the SF regions, suggesting a chemically homogeneous ionized interstellar medium over spatial scales of several kpc. The ionized gas kinematics displays an overall regular rotation around a northwest-southeast axis, with a maximum velocity of 70 ± 7 km s-1. Conclusions

  14. Optimizing the fabrication of aluminum-coated fiber probes and their application to optical near-field lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, S; Holme, NCR; Ramanujam, PS

    1998-01-01

    We report on routine fabrication of fiber probes suitable for metal coating. We have investigated how aperture sizes ranging from 75 to 300 nm can be produced using an appropriate set of pulling parameters in a combined heating/pulling process. The quality of the metal coating has been investigated...... in terms of roughness and the presence of leaking holes in the coating. We report on how the quality of the coating depends on parameters such as deposition rate and background pressure during evaporation. We have used aluminum-coated fiber probes in lithographical studies of different materials, like side...

  15. Rotational symmetry breaking in the topological superconductor SrxBi2Se3 probed by upper-critical field experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Y.; Nikitin, A.M.; Araizi, G.K.; Huang, Y.K.; Matsushita, Y.; Naka, T.; de Visser, A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that Sr intercalation provides a new route to induce superconductivity in the topological insulator Bi2Se3. Topological superconductors are predicted to be unconventional with an odd-parity pairing symmetry. An adequate probe to test for unconventional superconductivity

  16. Designing an array for performing Near-field Acoustic Holography with a small number of p-u probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Comesaña, Daniel; Wen, Junjie; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2016-01-01

    , such approaches usually require that a large number of transducers is spatially distributed over the area of interest. This paper describes some practical considerations for the design and optimization of a compact sensor array for performing NAH with a small number of sound intensity p-u probes. Two sensor...

  17. Microneurosurgical water probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogády, P; Wurm, G

    2005-04-01

    When constructing the micro-neurosurgical water ball probe, the authors have simply combined the properties of a ball probe with an irrigational function and the supportive role of water current to form a new irrigating ball dissector. The micro-instrument has an outlet mechanism with which the surgeon can regulate the flow of physiological solution into the operational field. Its point has the properties of a ball probe, and the overall bayonet shape facilitates surgical interventions in deep tissues under microscopic control. The water probe therefore enables the surgeon to perform precise mechanical preparation supported by a regulated current of water and a targeted irrigation in the operational field. The physiological solution in the pressure infusion cuff is under minimal pressure and directly connected to the probe. Due to the fact that one device can be used for various purposes the water ball probe represents an advantageous alternative to conventional micro-neurosurgical preparation.

  18. Quantitative determination of lateral concentration and depth profile of histidine-tagged recombinant proteins probed by grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Alexander; Abuillan, Wasim; Deichmann, Christina; Rossetti, Fernanda F; Köhler, Almut; Konovalov, Oleg V; Wedlich, Doris; Tanaka, Motomu

    2013-05-02

    We have demonstrated that the complementary combination of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXF) with specular X-ray reflectivity (XRR) can be used to quantitatively determine the density profiles of Ni(2)(+) ions complexed with chelator headgroups as well as S atoms in recombinant proteins anchored to lipid monolayers at the air/water interface. First, we prepared phospholipid monolayers incorporating chelator lipid anchors at different molar fractions at the air/water interface. The fine-structures perpendicular to the global plane of monolayers were characterized by XRR in the presence of Ni(2)(+) ions, yielding the thickness, roughness, and electron density of the stratified lipid monolayers. X-ray fluorescence intensities from Ni Kα core levels recorded at the incidence angles below and above the critical angle of total reflection allow for the determination of the position and lateral density of Ni(2)(+) ions associated with chelator headgroups with a high spatial accuracy (±5 Å). The coupling of histidine-tagged Xenopus cadherin 11 (Xcad-11) can also be identified by changes in the fines-structures using XRR. Although fluorescence intensities from S Kα level were much weaker than Ni Kα signals, we could detect the location of S atoms in recombinant Xcad-11 proteins.

  19. Anisotropic excitation of surface plasmon polaritons on a metal film by a scattering-type scanning near-field microscope with a non-rotationally-symmetric probe tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walla Frederik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons on gold films with the metallized probe tip of a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM. The emission of the polaritons from the tip, illuminated by near-infrared laser radiation, was found to be anisotropic and not circularly symmetric as expected on the basis of literature data. We furthermore identified an additional excitation channel via light that was reflected off the tip and excited the plasmon polaritons at the edge of the metal film. Our results, while obtained for a non-rotationally-symmetric type of probe tip and thus specific for this situation, indicate that when an s-SNOM is employed for the investigation of plasmonic structures, the unintentional excitation of surface waves and anisotropic surface wave propagation must be considered in order to correctly interpret the signatures of plasmon polariton generation and propagation.

  20. Quantum state-resolved probing of strong-field-ionized xenon atoms using femtosecond high-order harmonic transient absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Zhi-Heng; Khalil, Munira; Correa, Raoul E; Santra, Robin; Buth, Christian; Leone, Stephen R

    2007-04-06

    Femtosecond high-order harmonic transient absorption spectroscopy is used to resolve the complete |j,m quantum state distribution of Xe+ produced by optical strong-field ionization of Xe atoms at 800 nm. Probing at the Xe N4/5 edge yields a population distribution rhoj,|m| of rho3/2,1/2ratiorho1/2,1/2ratiorho3/2,3/2=75+/-6 :12+/-3 :13+/-6%. The result is compared to a tunnel ionization calculation with the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling, revealing nonadiabatic ionization behavior. The sub-50-fs time resolution paves the way for tabletop extreme ultraviolet absorption probing of ultrafast dynamics.

  1. Exploring the role of need for cognition, field independence and locus of control on the incidence of lucid dreams during a 12 week induction study

    OpenAIRE

    Saunders, David; Clegg, Helen; Roe, Chris A; Smith, G D

    2017-01-01

    This article reports an investigation of two proposed theories, the predispositional and experiential, regarding the association of personality variables to lucid dreaming incidence during a 12-week lucid dreaming induction programme. The study found no differences between those who did and did not report lucid dreams during the programme on baseline measures of Field Independence, Locus of Control or Need for Cognition. There was an observed significant change towards a Field Independent ori...

  2. Design of a triple resonance magic angle sample spinning probe for high field solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rachel W.; Paulson, Eric K.; Zilm, Kurt W.

    2003-06-01

    Standard design and construction practices used in building nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probes for the study of solid state samples become difficult if not entirely impractical to implement as the 1H resonance frequency approaches the self resonance frequency of commercial capacitors. We describe an approach that utilizes short variable transmission line segments as tunable reactances. Such an approach effectively controls stray reactances and provides a higher Q alternative to ceramic chip capacitors. The particular probe described is built to accommodate a 2.5 mm magic angle spinning rotor system, and is triply tuned to 13C, 15N, and 1H frequencies for use at 18.8 T (200, 80, and 800 MHz, respectively). Isolation of the three radio frequency (rf) channels is achieved using both a rejection trap and a transmission line notch filter. The compact geometry of this design allows three channels with high power handling capability to fit in a medium bore (63 mm) magnet. Extended time variable temperature operation is integral to the mechanical design, enabling the temperature control necessary for investigation of biological macromolecules. Accurate measurement of the air temperature near the sample rotor is achieved using a fiber optic thermometer, which does not interfere with the rf electronics. We also demonstrate that acceptable line shapes are only readily achieved using zero magnetic susceptibility wire in construction of the sample coil. Computer simulation of the circuit aided in the physical design of the probe. Representative data illustrating the efficiency, rf homogeneity, and signal to noise factor of the probe are presented.

  3. Influence of static and dynamic dipolar fields in bulk YIG/thin film NiFe systems probed via spin rectification effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soh, Wee Tee, E-mail: a0046479@u.nus.edu [Center for Superconducting and Magnetic Materials, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117551 (Singapore); Tay, Z.J. [Center for Superconducting and Magnetic Materials, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117551 (Singapore); Yakovlev, N.L. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Peng, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Ong, C.K. [Center for Superconducting and Magnetic Materials, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117551 (Singapore); Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, 5A Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117411 (Singapore)

    2017-03-15

    The characteristics of the static and dynamic components of the dipolar fields originating from a bulk polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet (YIG) substrate are probed by depositing a NiFe (Permalloy) layer on it, which acts as a detector. By measuring dc voltages generated via spin rectification effect (SRE) within the NiFe layer under microwave excitation, we characterize the influence of dipolar fields from bulk YIG on the NiFe layer. It is found that the dynamic YIG dipolar fields modify the self-SRE of NiFe, driving its own rectification voltages within the NiFe layer, an effect we term as non-local SRE. This non-local SRE only occurs near the simultaneous resonance of both YIG and NiFe. On the other hand, the static dipolar field from YIG manifests itself as a negative anisotropy in the NiFe layer which shifts the latter’s ferromagnetic resonance frequency. - Highlights: • We demonstrate the quantification of both the static and dynamic components of the dipolar fields due to a YIG slab. • The detection and characterisation of such dipolar fields are important in many magnetic applications such as magnonics. • The dipolar fields can pose potential pitfalls if not properly considered in certain spin-electronics systems.

  4. Shear force distance control in a scanning near-field optical microscope: in resonance excitation of the fiber probe versus out of resonance excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapshin, D.A.; Letokhov, V.S.; Shubeita, G.T.; Sekatskii, S.K.; Dietler, G.

    2004-01-01

    The experimental results of the direct measurement of the absolute value of interaction force between the fiber probe of a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) operated in shear force mode and a sample, which were performed using combined SNOM-atomic force microscope setup, are discussed for the out-of-resonance fiber probe excitation mode. We demonstrate that the value of the tapping component of the total force for this mode at typical dither amplitudes is of the order of 10 nN and thus is quite comparable with the value of this force for in resonance fiber probe excitation mode. It is also shown that for all modes this force component is essentially smaller than the usually neglected static attraction force, which is of the order of 200 nN. The true contact nature of the tip-sample interaction during the out of resonance mode is proven. From this, we conclude that such a detection mode is very promising for operation in liquids, where other modes encounter great difficulties

  5. Design and Calibration Tests of an Active Sound Intensity Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kletschkowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an active sound intensity probe that can be used for sound source localization in standing wave fields. The probe consists of a sound hard tube that is terminated by a loudspeaker and an integrated pair of microphones. The microphones are used to decompose the standing wave field inside the tube into its incident and reflected part. The latter is cancelled by an adaptive controller that calculates proper driving signals for the loudspeaker. If the open end of the actively controlled tube is placed close to a vibrating surface, the radiated sound intensity can be determined by measuring the cross spectral density between the two microphones. A one-dimensional free field can be realized effectively, as first experiments performed on a simplified test bed have shown. Further tests proved that a prototype of the novel sound intensity probe can be calibrated.

  6. Wire Probe Antenna (WPT) and Electric Field Detector (EFD) of Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) aboard the Arase satellite: specifications and initial evaluation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaba, Yasumasa; Ishisaka, Keigo; Kasahara, Yoshiya; Imachi, Tomohiko; Yagitani, Satoshi; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Matsuda, Shoya; Shoji, Masafumi; Kurita, Satoshi; Hori, Tomoaki; Shinbori, Atsuki; Teramoto, Mariko; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Nakagawa, Tomoko; Takahashi, Naoko; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Matsuoka, Ayako; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Nomura, Reiko

    2017-12-01

    This paper summarizes the specifications and initial evaluation results of Wire Probe Antenna (WPT) and Electric Field Detector (EFD), the key components for the electric field measurement of the Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) aboard the Arase (ERG) satellite. WPT consists of two pairs of dipole antennas with 31-m tip-to-tip length. Each antenna element has a spherical probe (60 mm diameter) at each end of the wire (15 m length). They are extended orthogonally in the spin plane of the spacecraft, which is roughly perpendicular to the Sun and enables to measure the electric field in the frequency range of DC to 10 MHz. This system is almost identical to the WPT of Plasma Wave Investigation aboard the BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter, except for the material of the spherical probe (ERG: Al alloy, MMO: Ti alloy). EFD is a part of the EWO (EFD/WFC/OFA) receiver and measures the 2-ch electric field at a sampling rate of 512 Hz (dynamic range: ± 200 mV/m) and the 4-ch spacecraft potential at a sampling rate of 128 Hz (dynamic range: ± 100 V and ± 3 V/m), with the bias control capability of WPT. The electric field waveform provides (1) fundamental information about the plasma dynamics and accelerations and (2) the characteristics of MHD and ion waves in various magnetospheric statuses with the magnetic field measured by MGF and PWE-MSC. The spacecraft potential provides information on thermal electron plasma variations and structure combined with the electron density obtained from the upper hybrid resonance frequency provided by PWE-HFA. EFD has two data modes. The continuous (medium-mode) data are provided as (1) 2-ch waveforms at 64 Hz (in apoapsis mode, L > 4) or 256 Hz (in periapsis mode, L < 4), (2) 1-ch spectrum within 1-232 Hz with 1-s resolution, and (3) 4-ch spacecraft potential at 8 Hz. The burst (high-mode) data are intermittently obtained as (4) 2-ch waveforms at 512 Hz and (5) 4-ch spacecraft potential at 128 Hz and downloaded with the WFC

  7. Probing the longitudinal electric field of Bessel beams using second-harmonic generation from nano-objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turquet, Léo; Kakko, Joona-Pekko; Karvonen, Lasse; Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko; Lipsanen, Harri; Kauranen, Martti; Bautista, Godofredo

    2017-08-01

    Non-diffractive Bessel beams are receiving significant interest in optical microscopy due to their remarkably large depth of field. For example, studies have shown the superiority of Bessel beams over Gaussian beams for volumetric imaging of three-dimensionally thick or extended samples. However, the vectorial aspects of the focal fields of Bessel beams are generally obscured when traditional methods are used to characterize their three-dimensional point-spread function in space, which contains contributions from all optical field components. Here, we show experimentally the three-dimensional spatial distribution and enhanced depth of field of the longitudinal electric field components of a focused linearly-polarized Bessel beam. This is done through second-harmonic generation from well-defined vertically-aligned gallium-arsenide nanowires, whose second-order response is primarily driven by the longitudinal fields at the beam focus.

  8. Nanoscale x-ray magnetic circular dichroism probing of electric-field-induced magnetic switching in multiferroic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T.; Scholl, A.; Zavaliche, F.; Zheng, H.; Barry, M.; Doran, A.; Lee, K.; Cruz, M. P.; Ramesh, R.

    2007-03-01

    The magnetic structure as well as its response to an external electric field were studied in ferrimagnetic CoFe2O4 nanopillars embedded in an epitaxial ferroelectric BiFeO3 film using photoemission electron microscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Magnetic switching was observed in both Co and Fe magnetic sublattices after application of an electric field. About 50% of the CoFe2O4 nanopillars were measured to switch their magnetization with the electric field, implying an elastic-mediated electric-field-induced magnetic anisotropy change.

  9. Near-Field Imaging of Free Carriers in ZnO Nanowires with a Scanning Probe Tip Made of Heavily Doped Germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakat, Emilie; Giliberti, Valeria; Bollani, Monica; Notargiacomo, Andrea; Pea, Marialilia; Finazzi, Marco; Pellegrini, Giovanni; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Melli, Mauro; Sassolini, Simone; Cabrini, Stefano; Biagioni, Paolo; Ortolani, Michele; Baldassarre, Leonetta

    2017-11-01

    A novel scanning probe tip made of heavily doped semiconductor is fabricated and used instead of standard gold-coated tips in infrared scattering-type near-field microscopy. Midinfrared near-field microscopy experiments are conducted on ZnO nanowires with a lateral resolution better than 100 nm, using tips made of heavily electron-doped germanium with a plasma frequency in the midinfrared (plasma wavelength of 9.5 μ m ). Nanowires embedded in a dielectric matrix are imaged at two wavelengths, 11.3 and 8.0 μ m , above and below the plasma wavelength of the tips. An opposite sign of the imaging contrasts between the nanowire and the dielectric matrix is observed at the two infrared wavelengths, indicating a clear role of the free-electron plasma in the heavily doped germanium tip in building the imaging contrast. Electromagnetic simulations with a multispherical dipole model accounting for the finite size of the tip are well consistent with the experiments. By comparison of the simulated and measured imaging contrasts, an estimate for the local free-carrier density in the investigated ZnO nanowires in the low 1019 cm-3 range is retrieved. The results are benchmarked against the scattering intensity and phase maps obtained on the same sample with a gold-coated probe tip in pseudoheterodyne detection mode.

  10. Using ACE Observations of Interplanetary Particles and Magnetic Fields as Possible Contributors to Variations Observed at Van Allen Probes during Major events in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Manweiler, J. W.; Gerrard, A. J.; Gkioulidou, M.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Patterson, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Observations from ACE EPAM including energy spectra of protons, helium, and oxygen will be prepared for coordinated use in estimating the direct and indirect access of energetic particles to inner and outer geomagnetic trapping zones. Complete temporal coverage from ACE at 12 seconds, 5 minutes, 17 minutes, hourly and daily cadences will be used to catalog interplanetary events arriving at Earth including interplanetary magnetic field sector boundaries, interplanetary shocks, and interplanetary coronal mass ejections, ICMEs. The first 6 months of 2013 have included both highly disturbed times, March 17 and May 22, and extended quiet periods of little or no variations. Among the specific questions that ACE and Van Allen Probes coordinated observations may aid in resolving are: 1. How much, if any, direct capture of interplanetary energetic particles occurs and what conditions account for it? 2. How much influence do interplanetary field and particle variations have on energization and/or loss of geomagnetically trapped populations? The poster will also present important links and describe methods and important details of access to numerically expressed ACE EPAM and Van Allen Probes RBSPICE observations that can be flexibly and easily accessed via the internet for student and senior researcher use.

  11. A Gradient-Field Pulsed Eddy Current Probe for Evaluation of Hidden Material Degradation in Conductive Structures Based on Lift-Off Invariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Jing, Haoqing; Zainal Abidin, Ilham Mukriz; Yan, Bei

    2017-04-25

    Coated conductive structures are widely adopted in such engineering fields as aerospace, nuclear energy, etc. The hostile and corrosive environment leaves in-service coated conductive structures vulnerable to Hidden Material Degradation (HMD) occurring under the protection coating. It is highly demanded that HMD can be non-intrusively assessed using non-destructive evaluation techniques. In light of the advantages of Gradient-field Pulsed Eddy Current technique (GPEC) over other non-destructive evaluation methods in corrosion evaluation, in this paper the GPEC probe for quantitative evaluation of HMD is intensively investigated. Closed-form expressions of GPEC responses to HMD are formulated via analytical modeling. The Lift-off Invariance (LOI) in GPEC signals, which makes the HMD evaluation immune to the variation in thickness of the protection coating, is introduced and analyzed through simulations involving HMD with variable depths and conductivities. A fast inverse method employing magnitude and time of the LOI point in GPEC signals for simultaneously evaluating the conductivity and thickness of HMD region is proposed, and subsequently verified by finite element modeling and experiments. It has been found from the results that along with the proposed inverse method the GPEC probe is applicable to evaluation of HMD in coated conductive structures without much loss in accuracy.

  12. Optical design for CETUS: a wide-field 1.5m aperture UV payload being studied for a NASA probe class mission study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Robert; Robert Woodruff, Goddard Space Flight Center, Kendrick Optical Consulting

    2018-01-01

    We are developing a NASA Headquarters selected Probe-class mission concept called the Cosmic Evolution Through UV Spectroscopy (CETUS) mission, which includes a 1.5-m aperture diameter large field-of-view (FOV) telescope optimized for UV imaging, multi-object spectroscopy, and point-source spectroscopy. The optical system includes a Three Mirror Anastigmatic (TMA) telescope that simultaneously feeds three separate scientific instruments: the near-UV (NUV) Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) with a next-generation Micro-Shutter Array (MSA); the two-channel camera covering the far-UV (FUV) and NUV spectrum; and the point-source spectrograph covering the FUV and NUV region with selectable R~ 40,000 echelle modes and R~ 2,000 first order modes. The optical system includes fine guidance sensors, wavefront sensing, and spectral and flat-field in-flight calibration sources. This paper will describe the current optical design of CETUS.

  13. Designing an array for performing Near-field Acoustic Holography with a small number of p-u probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Comesaña, Daniel; Wen, Junjie; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2016-01-01

    Near-field acoustic holography (NAH) enables the reconstruction of an entire three-dimensional wave field using data acquired near the sources of sound. An array of sensors can be used in combination with NAH techniques for tackling both time-stationary and transient noise problems. However...

  14. Anisotropy of the structure factor of magnetic fluids under a field probed by small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazeau, F.; Bacri, J.-C.; Perzynski, R.; Dubois, E.; Boue, F.; Cebers, A.

    2002-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering is used to measure the two-dimensional diffraction pattern of a monophasic magnetic colloid, under an applied magnetic field. This dipolar system presents in zero field a fluidlike structure. It is well characterized by an interaction parameter K T 0 proportional to the second virial coefficient, which is here positive, expressing a repulsion of characteristic length κ 0 -1 . Under the field a strong anisotropy is observed at the lowest q vectors. The length κ 0 -1 remains isotropic, but the interaction parameter K T becomes anisotropic due to the long-range dipolar interaction. However, the system remains stable, the interaction being repulsive in all directions. Thus No.No.we do not observe any chaining of the nanoparticles under magnetic field. On the contrary, the revealed structure of our anisotropic colloid is a lowering of the concentration fluctuations along the field while the fluidlike structure, observed without field, is roughly preserved perpendicularly to the field. It expresses a strong anisotropy of the Brownian motion of the nanoparticles in the solution under applied field

  15. Anisotropy of the structure factor of magnetic fluids under a field probed by small-angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazeau, F; Dubois, E; Bacri, J C; Boué, F; Cebers, A; Perzynski, R

    2002-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering is used to measure the two-dimensional diffraction pattern of a monophasic magnetic colloid, under an applied magnetic field. This dipolar system presents in zero field a fluidlike structure. It is well characterized by an interaction parameter K(0)(T) proportional to the second virial coefficient, which is here positive, expressing a repulsion of characteristic length kappa-10. Under the field a strong anisotropy is observed at the lowest q vectors. The length kappa-10 remains isotropic, but the interaction parameter K(T) becomes anisotropic due to the long-range dipolar interaction. However, the system remains stable, the interaction being repulsive in all directions. Thus we do not observe any chaining of the nanoparticles under magnetic field. On the contrary, the revealed structure of our anisotropic colloid is a lowering of the concentration fluctuations along the field while the fluidlike structure, observed without field, is roughly preserved perpendicularly to the field. It expresses a strong anisotropy of the Brownian motion of the nanoparticles in the solution under applied field.

  16. Probing the Magnetic Field Structure in Sgr A* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, Roman; McKinney, Jonathan C. [Department of Physics and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Johnson, Michael D.; Doeleman, Sheperd S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-03-10

    Magnetic fields are believed to drive accretion and relativistic jets in black hole accretion systems, but the magnetic field structure that controls these phenomena remains uncertain. We perform general relativistic (GR) polarized radiative transfer of time-dependent three-dimensional GR magnetohydrodynamical simulations to model thermal synchrotron emission from the Galactic Center source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We compare our results to new polarimetry measurements by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and show how polarization in the visibility (Fourier) domain distinguishes and constrains accretion flow models with different magnetic field structures. These include models with small-scale fields in disks driven by the magnetorotational instability as well as models with large-scale ordered fields in magnetically arrested disks. We also consider different electron temperature and jet mass-loading prescriptions that control the brightness of the disk, funnel-wall jet, and Blandford–Znajek-driven funnel jet. Our comparisons between the simulations and observations favor models with ordered magnetic fields near the black hole event horizon in Sgr A*, though both disk- and jet-dominated emission can satisfactorily explain most of the current EHT data. We also discuss how the black hole shadow can be filled-in by jet emission or mimicked by the absence of funnel jet emission. We show that stronger model constraints should be possible with upcoming circular polarization and higher frequency (349 GHz) measurements.

  17. Probing the Magnetic Field Structure in Sgr A* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, Roman; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Johnson, Michael D.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields are believed to drive accretion and relativistic jets in black hole accretion systems, but the magnetic field structure that controls these phenomena remains uncertain. We perform general relativistic (GR) polarized radiative transfer of time-dependent three-dimensional GR magnetohydrodynamical simulations to model thermal synchrotron emission from the Galactic Center source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We compare our results to new polarimetry measurements by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and show how polarization in the visibility (Fourier) domain distinguishes and constrains accretion flow models with different magnetic field structures. These include models with small-scale fields in disks driven by the magnetorotational instability as well as models with large-scale ordered fields in magnetically arrested disks. We also consider different electron temperature and jet mass-loading prescriptions that control the brightness of the disk, funnel-wall jet, and Blandford–Znajek-driven funnel jet. Our comparisons between the simulations and observations favor models with ordered magnetic fields near the black hole event horizon in Sgr A*, though both disk- and jet-dominated emission can satisfactorily explain most of the current EHT data. We also discuss how the black hole shadow can be filled-in by jet emission or mimicked by the absence of funnel jet emission. We show that stronger model constraints should be possible with upcoming circular polarization and higher frequency (349 GHz) measurements.

  18. Probing Twisted Magnetic Field Using Microwave Observations in an M Class Solar Flare on 11 February, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Myshyakov, I. I.

    2018-02-01

    This work demonstrates the possibility of magnetic-field topology investigations using microwave polarimetric observations. We study a solar flare of GOES M1.7 class that occurred on 11 February, 2014. This flare revealed a clear signature of spatial inversion of the radio-emission polarization sign. We show that the observed polarization pattern can be explained by nonthermal gyrosynchrotron emission from the twisted magnetic structure. Using observations of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, Nobeyama Radio Observatory, Radio Solar Telescope Network, and Solar Dynamics Observatory, we have determined the parameters of nonthermal electrons and thermal plasma and identified the magnetic structure where the flare energy release occurred. To reconstruct the coronal magnetic field, we use nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) and potential magnetic-field approaches. Radio emission of nonthermal electrons is simulated by the GX Simulator code using the extrapolated magnetic field and the parameters of nonthermal electrons and thermal plasma inferred from the observations; the model radio maps and spectra are compared with observations. We have found that the potential-magnetic-field approach fails to explain the observed circular polarization pattern; on the other hand, the Stokes-V map is successfully explained by assuming nonthermal electrons to be distributed along the twisted magnetic structure determined by the NLFFF extrapolation approach. Thus, we show that the radio-polarization maps can be used for diagnosing the topology of the flare magnetic structures where nonthermal electrons are injected.

  19. A versatile LabVIEW and field-programmable gate array-based scanning probe microscope for in operando electronic device characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Andrew J; Page, Michael R; Jacob, Jan; Young, Justin R; Lewis, Jim; Wenzel, Lothar; Bhallamudi, Vidya P; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Pelekhov, Denis V; Hammel, P Chris

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the complex properties of electronic and spintronic devices at the micro- and nano-scale is a topic of intense current interest as it becomes increasingly important for scientific progress and technological applications. In operando characterization of such devices by scanning probe techniques is particularly well-suited for the microscopic study of these properties. We have developed a scanning probe microscope (SPM) which is capable of both standard force imaging (atomic, magnetic, electrostatic) and simultaneous electrical transport measurements. We utilize flexible and inexpensive FPGA (field-programmable gate array) hardware and a custom software framework developed in National Instrument's LabVIEW environment to perform the various aspects of microscope operation and device measurement. The FPGA-based approach enables sensitive, real-time cantilever frequency-shift detection. Using this system, we demonstrate electrostatic force microscopy of an electrically biased graphene field-effect transistor device. The combination of SPM and electrical transport also enables imaging of the transport response to a localized perturbation provided by the scanned cantilever tip. Facilitated by the broad presence of LabVIEW in the experimental sciences and the openness of our software solution, our system permits a wide variety of combined scanning and transport measurements by providing standardized interfaces and flexible access to all aspects of a measurement (input and output signals, and processed data). Our system also enables precise control of timing (synchronization of scanning and transport operations) and implementation of sophisticated feedback protocols, and thus should be broadly interesting and useful to practitioners in the field.

  20. Investigation of Electron Transport Across Vertically Grown CNTs Using Combination of Proximity Field Emission Microscopy and Scanning Probe Image Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolekar, Sadhu; Patole, Shashikant P.; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Dharmadhikari, Chandrakant V.

    2018-02-01

    Field emission from nanostructured films is known to be dominated by only small number of localized spots which varies with the voltage, electric field and heat treatment. It is important to develop processing methods which will produce stable and uniform emitting sites. In this paper we report a novel approach which involves analysis of Proximity Field Emission Microscopic (PFEM) images using Scanning Probe Image Processing technique. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitters have been deposited on tungsten foil by water assisted chemical vapor deposition. Prior to the field electron emission studies, these films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). AFM images of the samples show bristle like structure, the size of bristle varying from 80 to 300 nm. The topography images were found to exhibit strong correlation with current images. Current-Voltage (I-V) measurements both from Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Conducting-AFM mode suggest that electron transport mechanism in imaging vertically grown CNTs is ballistic rather than usual tunneling or field emission with a junction resistance of 10 kΩ. It was found that I-V curves for field emission mode in PFEM geometry vary initially with number of I-V cycles until reproducible I-V curves are obtained. Even for reasonably stable I-V behavior the number of spots was found to increase with the voltage leading to a modified Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) behavior. A plot of ln(I/V3) versus 1/V was found to be linear. Current versus time data exhibit large fluctuation with the power spectral density obeying 1/f2 law. It is suggested that an analogue of F-N equation of the form ln(I/Vα) versus 1/V may be used for the analysis of field emission data, where α may depend on nanostructure configuration and can be determined from the dependence of emitting spots on the voltage.

  1. Investigation of Electron Transport Across Vertically Grown CNTs Using Combination of Proximity Field Emission Microscopy and Scanning Probe Image Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolekar, Sadhu; Patole, Shashikant P.; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Dharmadhikari, Chandrakant V.

    2018-03-01

    Field emission from nanostructured films is known to be dominated by only small number of localized spots which varies with the voltage, electric field and heat treatment. It is important to develop processing methods which will produce stable and uniform emitting sites. In this paper we report a novel approach which involves analysis of Proximity Field Emission Microscopic (PFEM) images using Scanning Probe Image Processing technique. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitters have been deposited on tungsten foil by water assisted chemical vapor deposition. Prior to the field electron emission studies, these films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). AFM images of the samples show bristle like structure, the size of bristle varying from 80 to 300 nm. The topography images were found to exhibit strong correlation with current images. Current-Voltage (I-V) measurements both from Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Conducting-AFM mode suggest that electron transport mechanism in imaging vertically grown CNTs is ballistic rather than usual tunneling or field emission with a junction resistance of 10 kΩ. It was found that I-V curves for field emission mode in PFEM geometry vary initially with number of I-V cycles until reproducible I-V curves are obtained. Even for reasonably stable I-V behavior the number of spots was found to increase with the voltage leading to a modified Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) behavior. A plot of ln(I/V3) versus 1/V was found to be linear. Current versus time data exhibit large fluctuation with the power spectral density obeying 1/f2 law. It is suggested that an analogue of F-N equation of the form ln(I/Vα) versus 1/V may be used for the analysis of field emission data, where α may depend on nanostructure configuration and can be determined from the dependence of emitting spots on the voltage.

  2. Investigation of Electron Transport Across Vertically Grown CNTs Using Combination of Proximity Field Emission Microscopy and Scanning Probe Image Processing Techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Kolekar, Sadhu

    2018-02-26

    Field emission from nanostructured films is known to be dominated by only small number of localized spots which varies with the voltage, electric field and heat treatment. It is important to develop processing methods which will produce stable and uniform emitting sites. In this paper we report a novel approach which involves analysis of Proximity Field Emission Microscopic (PFEM) images using Scanning Probe Image Processing technique. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitters have been deposited on tungsten foil by water assisted chemical vapor deposition. Prior to the field electron emission studies, these films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). AFM images of the samples show bristle like structure, the size of bristle varying from 80 to 300 nm. The topography images were found to exhibit strong correlation with current images. Current–Voltage (I–V) measurements both from Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Conducting-AFM mode suggest that electron transport mechanism in imaging vertically grown CNTs is ballistic rather than usual tunneling or field emission with a junction resistance of ~10 kΩ. It was found that I–V curves for field emission mode in PFEM geometry vary initially with number of I–V cycles until reproducible I–V curves are obtained. Even for reasonably stable I–V behavior the number of spots was found to increase with the voltage leading to a modified Fowler–Nordheim (F–N) behavior. A plot of ln(I/V3) versus 1/V was found to be linear. Current versus time data exhibit large fluctuation with the power spectral density obeying 1/f2 law. It is suggested that an analogue of F–N equation of the form ln(I/Vα) versus 1/V may be used for the analysis of field emission data, where α may depend on nanostructure configuration and can be determined from the dependence of emitting spots on the voltage.Graphical Abstract

  3. Incidence, mechanisms, and severity of match-related collegiate women's soccer injuries on FieldTurf and natural grass surfaces: a 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Michael C

    2013-10-01

    Numerous injuries have been attributed to playing on artificial turf. Over the past 2 decades, however, newer generations of synthetic turf have been developed to duplicate the playing characteristics of natural grass. Although synthetic turf has been determined to be safer than natural grass in some studies, few long-term studies have been conducted comparing match-related collegiate soccer injuries between the 2 playing surfaces. Collegiate female soccer athletes do not experience any difference in the incidence, mechanisms, and severity of match-related injuries on FieldTurf and on natural grass. Cohort study: Level of evidence, 2. Female soccer athletes from 13 universities were evaluated over 5 competitive seasons for injury incidence, injury category, time of injury, injury time loss, player position, injury mechanism and situation, primary type of injury, injury grade and anatomic location, field location at the time of injury, injury severity, head and lower extremity trauma, cleat design, turf age, and environmental factors. In sum, 797 collegiate games were evaluated for match-related soccer injuries sustained on FieldTurf or natural grass during 5 seasons. Overall, 355 team games (44.5%) were played on FieldTurf versus 442 team games (55.5%) on natural grass. A total of 693 injuries were documented, with 272 (39.2%) occurring during play on FieldTurf and 421 (60.8%) on natural grass. Multivariate analysis per 10 team games indicated a significant playing surface effect: F₂,₆₉₀ = 6.435, P = .002, n-β = .904. A significantly lower total injury incidence rate (IIR) of 7.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.2-8.1) versus 9.5 (95% CI, 9.3-9.7) (P = .0001) and lower rate of substantial injuries, 0.7 (95% CI, 0.5-1.0) versus 1.5 (95% CI, 1.2-1.9) (P = .001), were documented on FieldTurf versus natural grass, respectively. Analyses also indicated significantly less trauma on FieldTurf when comparing injury time loss, player position, injury grade

  4. Developing the Technique of Measurements of Magnetic Field in the CMS Steel Yoke Elements With Flux-Loops and Hall Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V.I.; Cure, B.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Grillet, J.P.; Herve, Alain; Loveless, R.; Smith, R.P.

    2011-01-01

    Compact muon solenoid (CMS) is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN large hadron collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6 m diameter by 12.5 m long free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in theCMSdetector, including the large ferromagnetic parts of the yoke, is required. To measure the field in and around ferromagnetic parts, a set of flux-loops and Hall probe sensors will be installed on several of the steel pieces. Fast discharges of the solenoid during system commissioning tests will be used to induce voltages in the flux-loops that can be integrated to measure the flux in the steel at full excitation of the solenoid. The Hall sensors will give supplementary information on the axial magnetic field and permit estimation of the remanent field in the steel after the fast discharge. An experimental R&D program has been u...

  5. Hyperfine field distribution in the Heusler compound Co2FeAl probed by 59Co nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurmehl, Sabine; Kohlhepp, Juergen T; Swagten, Henk J M; Koopmans, Bert

    2008-01-01

    The Heusler compound Co 2 FeAl is reported to occur in various structures ranging from the completely ordered L2 1 to the completely disordered A2 structure type. In this work, we use spin echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to probe the local structure of Co 2 FeAl bulk samples. The study of Co 2 FeAl bulk samples provides the unique possibility to verify the intrinsic generic structural properties. The 59 Co NMR measurements reveal a distribution of Fe and Al not only in the first neighbouring shells of the 59 Co nuclei but also in more distant shells. The analysis of 59 Co NMR main resonance lines with an underlying sub-structure confirms that the local structure of the as-cast Co 2 FeAl bulk samples consists of a B2 type structure with contributions of the L2 1 type structure of about 10%. The observed sub-lines, which are attributed to a distribution of Fe and Al atoms in more distant shells, were previously not resolved in NMR spectra of Co 2 FeAl thin films, pointing to better long range order in bulk material than in thin films. We also show that the individual contributions of the structure types can be influenced by annealing

  6. Dual-MWCNT Probe Thermal Sensor Assembly and Evaluation Based on Nanorobotic Manipulation inside a Field-Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a thermal sensor composed of two multiwalled carbon nano-tubes (MWCNTs inside a field-emission-scanning electron microscope. The sensor was assembled using a nanorobotic manipulation system, which was used to construct a probe tip in order to detect the local environment of a single cell. An atomic force microscopy (AFM cantilever was used as a substrate; the cantilever was composed of Si3N4 and both sides were covered with a gold layer. MWCNTs were individually assembled on both sides of the AFM cantilever by employing nanorobotic manipulation. Another AFM cantilever was subsequently used as an end effector to manipulate the MWCNTs to touch each other. Electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID was then used to bond the two MWCNTs. The MWCNT probe thermal sensor was evaluated inside a thermostated container in the temperature range from 25°C to 60°C. The experimental results show the positive characteristics of the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR.

  7. Theoretical study of cylindrical energy analyzers for MeV range heavy ion beam probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, A.; Hamada, Y.

    1993-07-01

    A cylindrical energy analyzer with drift spaces is shown to have a second order focusing for beam incident angle when the deflection angle is properly chosen. The analyzer has a possibility to be applied to MeV range heavy ion beam probes, and will be also available for accurate particle energy measurements in many other fields. (author)

  8. Description of a neutron field perturbed by a probe using coupled Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zazula, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    This work concerns calculation of a neutron response, caused by a neutron field perturbed by materials surrounding the source or the detector. Solution of a problem is obtained using coupling of the Monte Carlo radiation transport computation for the perturbed region and the discrete ordinates transport computation for the unperturbed system. (author). 62 refs

  9. Near-field probing of Mie resonances in single TiO.sub.2./sub. microspheres at terahertz frequencies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mitrofanov, O.; Dominec, Filip; Kužel, Petr; Reno, J.L.; Brener, I.; Chung, U.-C.; Elissalde, C.; Maglione, M.; Mounaix, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 19 (2014), s. 23034-23042 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-25639S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 607521 - NOTEDEV Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : metamaterials * near-field microscopy * resonators * terahertz imaging Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014

  10. Free-Free Transitions of e-H System Inside a Dense Plasma Irradiated by a Laser Field at Very Low Incident Electron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, C.

    2012-01-01

    The free-free transition is studied for an electron-hydrogen in the ground state at low incident energies in the presence of an external homogenous, monochromatic, and linearly polarized laser-field inside a hot dense plasma.The effect of plasma screening is considered in the Debye-Huckel approximation. The calculations are performed in the soft photon limit, assuming that the plasma frequency is much higher than the laser frequency. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the initial and final channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the electron exchange. The laser-assisted differential and total cross sections are calculated for single-photon absorption /emission and no photon exchange in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. The calculations have been carried out for various values of Debye parameter, ranging from 0.005 to 0.12. A strong suppression is noted in the laser-assisted cross sections as compared to the field-free situation. A significant difference is noted for the singlet and triplet cross sections. The suppression is much more in the triplet states.

  11. Van Allen Probes Observations of Magnetic Field Dipolarization and Its Associated O+ Flux Variations in the Inner Magnetosphere at L 6.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nose, M.; Keika, K.; Kletzing, C. A.; Spence, H. E.; Smith, C. W.; MacDowall, R. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Larsen, B. A.; Mitchell, D. G.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic field dipolarization in the inner magnetosphere and its associated ion flux variations, using the magnetic field and energetic ion flux data acquired by the Van Allen Probes. From a study of 74 events that appeared at L= 4.5-6.6 between 1 October 2012 and 31 October 2013, we reveal the following characteristics of the dipolarization in the inner magnetosphere: (1) its time scale is approximately 5 min; (2) it is accompanied by strong magnetic fluctuations that have a dominant frequency close to the O+ gyrofrequency; (3) ion fluxes at 20-50 keV are simultaneously enhanced with larger magnitudes for O+ than for H+; (4) after a few minutes of the dipolarization, the flux enhancement at 0.1-5 keV appears with a clear energy-dispersion signature only for O+; and (5) the energy-dispersed O+ flux enhancement appears in directions parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field. From these characteristics, we discuss possible mechanisms that can provide selective acceleration to O+ ions at > 20 keV. We conclude that O+ ions at L= 5.4-6.6 undergo nonadiabatic local acceleration caused by oscillating electric field associated with the magnetic fluctuations and/or adiabatic convective transport from the plasma sheet to the inner magnetosphere by the impulsive electric field. At L= 4.5-5.4, however, only the former acceleration is plausible. We also conclude that the field-aligned energy-dispersed O+ ions at 0.1-5 keV originate from the ionosphere and are extracted nearly simultaneously to the onset of the dipolarization.

  12. Direct probing of charge carrier behavior in multilayered organic light-emitting diode devices by time-resolved electric-field-induced sum-frequency generation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamae, Takayuki; Takada, Noriyuki; Ohata, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Tetsuo

    2017-10-01

    Time-resolved electric-field-induced sum-frequency generation (EFI-SFG) spectroscopy was employed to study the charge behavior of multilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Through application of the square wave pulse bias to the OLEDs, compensation for the polarization charges in the electron transport layer and the generation of 4,4‧-bis[N-(1-naphthyl-N-phenylamino)-biphenyl] (α-NPD) cations were observed. When the pulse voltage was turned off, the α-NPD cations immediately disappeared, confirming that charge recombination occurs at the interfaces. We therefore concluded that time-resolved EFI-SFG is useful for directly probing the carrier behavior in OLEDs in addition to identifying the origin of the charge carriers present in OLEDs.

  13. Relativistic Current Dynamics Investigations By Proton Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghesi, M.; Quinn, K.; Wilson, P. A.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Ramakrishna, B.; Romagnani, L.; Sarri, G.; Lancia, L.; Fuchs, J.; Pipahl, A.; Toncian, T.; Willi, O.; Carroll, D. C.; Gallegos, P.; Quinn, M. N.; Yuan, X. H.; McKenna, P.; Clarke, R. J.; Evans, R. G.; Neely, D.; Notley, M.; Macchi, A.; Lyseikina, T. V.; Nazarov, W.

    2009-07-01

    The proton probing technique has been used to investigate the incidence of a mid-1019 W cm-2 pulse with metallic wire and laminar foam targets. Electric fields ˜1010 Vṡm-1 are measured on the surface of the 125 μm-diameter wire in the wake of the laser interaction as it charges and discharges within a 20 ps temporal window, whilst the employment of a novel experimental technique permits the observation of the propagation of a charging front at ˜c away from the point of interaction. In the foam shots, meanwhile, the behaviour of the hot electrons generated by the interaction pulse is probed inside the target. Evidence of electric inhibition effects and filamentation is found.

  14. Technical Note: Use of a beam width probe in an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer to monitor particle collection efficiency in the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Salcedo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Two Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (Q-AMS were deployed in Mexico City, during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field study (MCMA-2003 from 29 March–4 May 2003 to investigate particle concentrations, sources, and processes. We report the use of a particle beam width probe (BWP in the field to quantify potential losses of particles due to beam broadening inside the AMS caused by particle shape (nonsphericity and particle size. Data from this probe show that no significant mass of particles was lost due to excessive beam broadening; i.e. the shape- and size-related collection efficiency (Es of the AMS during this campaign was approximately one. Comparison of the BWP data from MCMA-2003 with other campaigns shows that the same conclusion holds for several other urban, rural and remotes sites. This means that the aerodynamic lens in the AMS is capable of efficiently focusing ambient particles into a well defined beam and onto the AMS vaporizer for particles sampled in a wide variety of environments. All the species measured by the AMS during MCMA-2003 have similar attenuation profiles which suggests that the particles that dominate the mass concentration were internally mixed most of the time. Only for the smaller particles (especially below 300 nm, organic and inorganic species show different attenuation versus particle size which is likely due to partial external mixing of these components. Changes observed in the focusing of the particle beam in time can be attributed, in part, to changes in particle shape (i.e. due to relative humidity and size of the particles sampled. However, the relationships between composition, atmospheric conditions, and particle shape and size appear to be very complex and are not yet completely understood.

  15. Particle-in-cell simulations of the impact of retarding field analyser probe head geometry on ion saturation current measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pánek, Radomír; Pitts, R. A.; Gunn, J. P.; Erents, S. K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, suppl.C (2004), C150-C156 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology /21./. Praha, 14.06.2004-17.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP202/03/P062 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : retarding field analyser, magnetic pre-sheath, plasma flow, tunnel effect Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.292, year: 2004

  16. Effective Responder Communication Improves Efficiency and Psychological Outcomes in a Mass Decontamination Field Experiment: Implications for Public Behaviour in the Event of a Chemical Incident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Amlôt, Richard; Rubin, G. James; Williams, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The risk of incidents involving mass decontamination in response to a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear release has increased in recent years, due to technological advances, and the willingness of terrorists to use unconventional weapons. Planning for such incidents has focused on the technical issues involved, rather than on psychosocial concerns. This paper presents a novel experimental study, examining the effect of three different responder communication strategies on public experiences and behaviour during a mass decontamination field experiment. Specifically, the research examined the impact of social identity processes on the relationship between effective responder communication, and relevant outcome variables (e.g. public compliance, public anxiety, and co-operative public behaviour). All participants (n = 111) were asked to visualise that they had been involved in an incident involving mass decontamination, before undergoing the decontamination process, and receiving one of three different communication strategies: 1) ‘Theory-based communication’: Health-focused explanations about decontamination, and sufficient practical information; 2) ‘Standard practice communication’: No health-focused explanations about decontamination, sufficient practical information; 3) ‘Brief communication’: No health-focused explanations about decontamination, insufficient practical information. Four types of data were collected: timings of the decontamination process; observational data; and quantitative and qualitative self-report data. The communication strategy which resulted in the most efficient progression of participants through the decontamination process, as well as the fewest observations of non-compliance and confusion, was that which included both health-focused explanations about decontamination and sufficient practical information. Further, this strategy resulted in increased perceptions of responder legitimacy and increased

  17. Probing the fundamental limit of niobium in high radiofrequency fields by dual mode excitation in superconducting radiofrequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari

    2011-07-01

    We have studied thermal breakdown in several multicell superconducting radiofrequency cavity by simultaneous excitation of two TM{sub 010} passband modes. Unlike measurements done in the past, which indicated a clear thermal nature of the breakdown, our measurements present a more complex picture with interplay of both thermal and magnetic effects. JLab LG-1 that we studied was limited at 40.5 MV/m, corresponding to B{sub peak} = 173 mT, in 8{pi}/9 mode. Dual mode measurements on this quench indicate that this quench is not purely magnetic, and so we conclude that this field is not the fundamental limit in SRF cavities.

  18. Limitations on the use of scanning probe microscopy for the measurement of field emission from copper surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Y.

    2004-02-25

    High electric-field breakdown in cm-wave x-band radio frequency (rf) accelerating structures is an important phenomenon limiting attainable accelerating gradients. Linear collider development requires an accelerating gradient of, at least, 70MeV/m (150MV/m surface electric field). The observed breakdown sequence usually consists of field emission (FE) from an electrically-conducting surface feature which heats the point of emission, thereby releasing gas from the surface and nearby bulk. The ionized gas makes a plasma that regeneratively heats the metal and releases more gas and electrons (via secondary emission) until a flashover occurs. The FE, however, occurs at a much lower surface electric field in experiments than predicted by theory. Experimental measurements of FE from macroscopic surface areas require the use of a geometrical field-enhancement factor, {beta}, to fit best the data to a Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) emission model with reasonable physical parameters. A newer, microscopic interpretation of the results proposes the existence of quasi-filamentary electrically-conducting channels between the metal bulk and the surface. These channels connect to emitting features near or on the surface, acting as microscopically field-enhanced electron emission sources. Analysis of emitter behavior suggesting that the macroscopic emission should primarily be due to classical geometrical-enhancement is, at least in some cases, due to the presence of these conducting nano-structures in the surface region. We describe an accelerator materials-related study of high electric field breakdown from polished copper (and other) surfaces, in dry-nitrogen gas ambient, using an atomic force microscope (AFM) modified to make F-N FE measurements. In early periods of this work, the results showed that the instrument might be capable of making F-N measurements on small surface areas of mechanically-polished and natively-oxidized high-quality copper surfaces to the GV/m level. The

  19. Dose dependent translocations of fluorescent probes of PIP2 hydrolysis in cells exposed to nanosecond pulsed electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Tarango, Melissa; Roth, Caleb C.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-03-01

    Previously, it was demonstrated that small nanometer-sized pores (nanopores) are preferentially formed after exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF). We have reported that nanoporation of the plasma membrane directly affects the phospholipids of the cell membrane, ultimately culminating in phosphatidylinositol4,5- bisphosphate (PIP2) intracellular signaling. PIP2, located within the internal layer of the plasma membrane, plays a critical role as a regulator of ion transport proteins, a source of second messenger compounds, and an anchor for cytoskeletal elements. In this proceeding, we present data that demonstrates that nsPEFs initiate electric field dose-dependent PIP2 hydrolysis and/or depletion from the plasma membrane through the observation of the accumulation of inositol1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in the cytoplasm and the increase of diacylglycerol (DAG) on the inner surface of the plasma membrane. The phosphoinositide signaling cascade presented here involves activation of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC), which are responsible for a multitude of biological effects after nsPEF exposure. These results expand our current knowledge of nsPEF induced physiological effects, and serve as a basis for development of novel tools for drug independent stimulation or modulation of different cellular functions.

  20. Probing the ionization wave packet and recollision dynamics with an elliptically polarized strong laser field in the nondipole regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, J.; Willenberg, B.; Daněk, J.; Mayer, B. W.; Phillips, C. R.; Gallmann, L.; Klaiber, M.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.; Keller, U.

    2018-01-01

    We explore ionization and rescattering in strong mid-infrared laser fields in the nondipole regime over the full range of polarization ellipticity. In three-dimensional photoelectron momentum distributions (3D PMDs) measured with velocity map imaging spectroscopy, we observe the appearance of a sharp ridge structure along the major polarization axis. Within a certain range of ellipticity, the electrons in this ridge are clearly separated from the two lobes that commonly appear in the PMD with elliptically polarized laser fields. In contrast to the well-known lobes of direct electrons, the sharp ridge is created by Coulomb focusing of the softly recolliding electrons. These ridge electrons are directly related to a counterintuitive shift of the PMD peak opposite to the laser beam propagation direction when the dipole approximation breaks down. The ellipticity-dependent 3D PMDs give access to different ionization and recollision dynamics with appropriate filters in the momentum space. For example, we can extract information about the spread of the initial wave packet and the Coulomb momentum transfer of the rescattering electrons.

  1. Exciton quenching in emitter blends for organic light emitting devices probed by electric field-dependent time-resolved luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, J; Mezyk, J; Meinardi, F; Tubino, R; Cocchi, M; Virgili, D

    2008-03-28

    We investigate quenching mechanisms of excited states in emitter layers for organic light emitting diodes (LEDs). An extensive study of a strong electric field-induced modulation (over 50%) of the time-resolved luminescence in a diamine derivative (TPD): polycarbonate blend films doped with an organic complex of europium are presented as a typical example of an important class of emitters for organic monochromatic LEDs. Using this method allowed us to identify the quenched species as the excited ligand precursors of the emissive europium ion states. Manipulating the electrode materials and their electrical bias, the electric field-enhanced dissociation, and interaction with injected charge could be separated and found as principal quenching mechanisms. We show the first one to follow the three-dimensional Onsager theory of geminate recombination, and the second one raised by their interaction with the TPD-transported holes. The interaction rate constant is found to be underlain by the three-dimensional diffusion of excited ligand singlets, combining the exciton diffusion coefficient and long-range (Forster type) energy transfer parameters. The dynamic parameters of the hole-precursor excitons interactions, extracted from the experimental data, allow us to establish the criteria for identifying useful ligands and matrices in the optimized design of electrophosphorescent, linelike emitting molecules, and device structure for organic LEDs.

  2. Field ion microscopy and 3-D atom probe analysis of Al3Zr particles in 7050 Al alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha, G.; Cerezo, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: For high strength 7xxx series Al alloys, Zr is an important trace alloy element which is often added to optimise properties, having effects such as refining grain size, inhibiting recrystallization, and improving stress corrosion cracking resistance and quench sensitivity. In addition, it has been reported recently that Zr addition also has a significant influence on early stage ageing behaviour of a 7xxx series Al alloy. Zr equilibrium solubility in solid Al is extremely low. After solution or ageing treatment, most Zr is present as small spherical Ai 3 Zr dispersoids approximately 20 nm in diameter, distributed at grain boundaries as well as within the Al matrix. The crystallographic nature of intermetallic phase Al 3 Zr has been well studied in the literatures. So far, no direct measurement of the chemistry of the Al 3 Zr particles in 7xxx series Al alloys has been published. It is unclear if there is significant Zn, Mg or Cu included in the particles. In this research, 3DAP has been employed for the first time to investigate ionisation behaviour of Al 3 Zr particles and determine the chemistry of the particles in 7050 Al alloy. Using field ion microscopy, the local evaporation radius of the Al 3 Zr particle has been measured to be equivalent to 36 nm for a 10 kV tip, less than the equivalent tip radius for the Al matrix of ∼68 nm. Using the matrix Al evaporation field (19 V/nm) as a reference, this allows the evaporation field of Al 3 Zr to be calculated as 35 V/nm, the same as the field calculated for evaporation of Al as Al 2+ (35 V/nm), and that of Zr as Zr 3+ (35 V/nm). This result is consistent with Al 2+ and Zr 3+ being the main species observed in the mass spectrum during analysis of Al 3 Zr particles. Using 3DAP, the chemical compositions of Al 3 Zr particles are determined to be 64.8∼67.7 at% Al, 23.6∼24.8 at% Zr, 6.9∼9.1 at% Zn, 0.4∼0.7 at% Cu, 0.5∼1.2 at% Mg, with a (Al+Zn)/Zr ratio close to 3. Choice of specimen temperature of

  3. On the sensitivity of probe-corrected spherical near-field antenna measurements with high-order probes using double phi-step theta-scanning scheme against various measurement uncertainties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the relatively recently introduced double phi-step theta-scanning scheme and the probe correction technique associated with it is examined against the traditional phi-scanning scheme and the first-order probe correction. The important result of this paper is that the double phi......-step theta-scanning scheme is shown to be clearly less sensitive to the probe misalignment errors compared to the phi-scanning scheme. The two methods show similar sensitivity to noise and channel balance error....

  4. Probing the origin of elliptical high-order harmonic generation from aligned molecules in linearly polarized laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2010-01-01

    A recent experiment [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 073902 (2009)] has demonstrated that elliptically polarized high-order harmonic generation can be produced from linearly polarized driving fields for aligned molecular systems. In order to reveal the underlying physical mechanisms of elliptical harmonics, we present fully ab initio and high-precision calculations and analyses of the amplitude, phase, and polarization state of the harmonic radiation from molecular hydrogen ions with arbitrary orientation. We find that high ellipticity arises from molecular orbital symmetry and two-center interference effects. Our ab initio exploration and findings lead to a general rule that the ellipticity becomes high for molecular orbitals represented by a symmetric combination of atomic orbitals, whereas it becomes low for molecular orbitals represented by an antisymmetric combination. This finding also applies to the general case of aligned linear molecules.

  5. EXCITATION TEMPERATURE OF THE WARM NEUTRAL MEDIUM AS A NEW PROBE OF THE Lyα RADIATION FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Claire E.; Lindner, Robert R.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Pingel, Nickolas M.; Lawrence, Allen; Babler, Brian L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Goss, W. M.; Jencson, Jacob [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dickey, John [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Hennebelle, Patrick, E-mail: cmurray@astro.wisc.edu [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp—CNRS—Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-02-01

    We use the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to conduct a high-sensitivity survey of neutral hydrogen (H I) absorption in the Milky Way. In combination with corresponding H I emission spectra obtained mostly with the Arecibo Observatory, we detect a widespread warm neutral medium component with excitation temperature 〈T{sub s}〉=7200{sub −1200}{sup +1800} K (68% confidence). This temperature lies above theoretical predictions based on collisional excitation alone, implying that Lyα scattering, the most probable additional source of excitation, is more important in the interstellar medium (ISM) than previously assumed. Our results demonstrate that H I absorption can be used to constrain the Lyα radiation field, a critical quantity for studying the energy balance in the ISM and intergalactic medium yet notoriously difficult to model because of its complicated radiative transfer, in and around galaxies nearby and at high redshift.

  6. Magnetic field and magnetic isotope effects in organic photochemical reactions. A novel probe of reaction mechanisms and a method for enrichment of magnetic isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turro, N.J.; Kraeutler, B.

    1980-01-01

    A brief qualitative description of the theory of intersystem crossing (ISC) in radical pairs is presented. It provides a simple unified theoretical basis for understanding chemically induced nuclear polarization (CIDNP), the magnetic spin isotope effect, and magnetic field effects on chemical reactions. Examples are given in which the magnetic spin isotope effect is employed to separate 13 C (a magnetic isotope) from 12 C (a nonmagnetic isotope) more efficiently than any mechanism involving a conventional mass isotope effect, and to separate selectively 17 O (a magnetic isotope) from 16 O and 18 O (nonmagnetic isotope), which is impossible via a conventional mass isotope effect. Examples are also provided for which the magnetic field effect is utilized to control the efficiency of cage reactions of radical pairs. The observation of magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the photolysis of dibenzyl ketone in micellar solution is not an isolated finding. Numerous other ketones (phenyl adamantyl ketone, phenyl benzyl ketone, etc.) have been found to exhibit analogous behavior. The ideas discussed may be employed in principle, to design chemical reactions that will separate magnetic isotopes from their nonmagnetic colleagues. The key features are the requirement of a singlet-triplet crossing along the reaction coordinate, the availability of a hyperfine hole at the molecular geometry corresponding to the hole, and sufficient time for the representative point to find the hole when it arrives in the region of phase space corresponding to the hole. Magnetic field and magnetic isotope effects provide a complement to CIDNP for probing mechanisms of radical reactions

  7. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  8. Heuristic approximations for sound fields produced by spherical waves incident on locally and non-locally reacting planar surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai Ming; Tao, Hongdan

    2014-01-01

    The classic Weyl-van der Pol (WVDP) formula is a well-known asymptotic solution for accurately predicting sound fields above a locally reacting ground surface. However, the form of the WVDP formula is inadequate for predicting sound fields in the vicinity of non-locally reacting surfaces; a correction term is often required in the formula to provide accurate numerical solutions. Even with this correction, there is a singularity in the diffraction wave term when the source is located directly above or below the receiver. This paper explores a heuristic method to remove this singularity and suggests an analytical form comparable to the WVDP formula. This improved formula offers a physically interpretable solution and allows for accurate predictions of the total sound field above locally and non-locally reacting surfaces for all geometrical configurations.

  9. Microminiature Hall probes based on n-InSb(Sn)/i-GaAs heterostructure for pulsed magnetic field applications up to 52 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironov, O.A.; Myronov, M.; Durov, S.; Drachenko, O.; Leotin, J

    2004-04-30

    Microminiature Hall probes with sensitive area down to 33x115 {mu}m and based on n-InSb/i-GaAs optimized Sn-doped MBE-grown heterostructures are reported. The 'metallurgical' thicknesses of the n-InSb epilayers lie in the range d{sup m}=1.1-10.5 {mu}m giving room-temperature mobilities of (9-15)x10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/Vs with carrier densities of (0.96-2.56)x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. Characterization of the devices was performed by magnetotransport measurements in quasi-static and pulsed magnetic fields. In the temperature range 1.1-300 K and in magnetic fields up to 12 T (static) and up to 52 T (pulsed, {tau}=120 mS), transport measurements yield remarkable linearity of the Hall voltage up to 52 T and sensitivity, as well as demonstrating the high-temperature stability of the Hall voltage, the offset voltage and the device resistivity. No significant effect of the high current up to 150 mA on either the sensitivity or the resistivity is observed.

  10. Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Field Evaporation Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert; Vurpillot, François; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-04-17

    Oxide-supported metal nanoparticles are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis. The increasingly detailed design of such catalysts necessitates three-dimensional characterization with high spatial resolution and elemental selectivity. Laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT) is uniquely suited to the task but faces challenges with the evaporation of metal/insulator systems. Correlation of APT with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), for Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO, reveals preferential evaporation of the MgO and an inaccurate assessment of nanoparticle composition. Finite element field evaporation modeling is used to illustrate the evolution of the evaporation front. Nanoparticle composition is most accurately predicted when the MgO is treated as having a locally variable evaporation field, indicating the importance of considering laser-oxide interactions and the evaporation of various molecular oxide ions. These results demonstrate the viability of APT for analysis of oxide-supported metal nanoparticles, highlighting the need for developing a theoretical framework for the evaporation of heterogeneous materials.

  11. Optimization of s-Polarization Sensitivity in Apertureless Near-Field Optical Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuika Saito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a general belief in apertureless near-field microscopy that the so-called p-polarization configuration, where the incident light is polarized parallel to the axis of the probe, is advantageous to its counterpart, the s-polarization configuration, where the incident light is polarized perpendicular to the probe axis. While this is true for most samples under common near-field experimental conditions, there are samples which respond better to the s-polarization configuration due to their orientations. Indeed, there have been several reports that have discussed such samples. This leads us to an important requirement that the near-field experimental setup should be equipped with proper sensitivity for measurements with s-polarization configuration. This requires not only creation of effective s-polarized illumination at the near-field probe, but also proper enhancement of s-polarized light by the probe. In this paper, we have examined the s-polarization enhancement sensitivity of near-field probes by measuring and evaluating the near-field Rayleigh scattering images constructed by a variety of probes. We found that the s-polarization enhancement sensitivity strongly depends on the sharpness of the apex of near-field probes. We have discussed the efficient value of probe sharpness by considering a balance between the enhancement and the spatial resolution, both of which are essential requirements of apertureless near-field microscopy.

  12. Towards a unified theory for immunogenetic systems. I. Probing the serologic field--a meta-serologic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, J

    1977-01-01

    A serologic field (SEF) is produced by the in vitro studies of antibody-antigen interactions and usually includes serologic information processing (SIF). SIF can be regarded as the process whereby essentially "meaningless" raw data or experimental observables emanating from an input reality are structuralized and hence falsified into a "meaningful" pattern, Gestalt or output image. According to this "black box model", different "fact categories" (FC) can be identified in SEF. Traditional serology generally confounds its FC whereby fact category mistakes (FCM) are produced. Some FCM are structurally similar to the description of "mice" as four-letter animals or as a four-legged word--i.e. facts about "thing-properties" (animals, legs) are confounded with facts about "language-properties" (letters, words). In SEF, antibody and antigen molecules (thing-properties) are similarly endowed with "empty symbols" (language-properties). Due to such FCM, radically new meanings are assigned to experimental observables if the serologic language and/or theory is changed. The present meta-serologic approach consists of the design of a meta-serologic symbol language (SL-2) which includes the contemporary (simple-complex) conceptual framework (language and theory) as a limiting case. Consequently, some truly radical and revolutionary Gestalt switches will be generated when a specified SEF is mapped onto SL-2.

  13. WIDE-FIELD VLBI OBSERVATIONS OF M31: A UNIQUE PROBE OF THE IONIZED INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM OF A NEARBY GALAXY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, John S.; Argo, Megan K.; Trott, Cathryn M.; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Miller-Jones, James; Tingay, Steven J.; Deller, Adam; Middelberg, Enno

    2013-01-01

    The Very Long Baseline Array was used at 1.6 GHz to observe a target field 50' in diameter including the core of M31. Novel very long baseline interferometry correlation techniques were used to observe 200 sources simultaneously, of which 16 were detected. We classify all 16 as background active galactic nuclei based on their X-ray properties and arcsecond- and mas-scale morphology. The detected sources were then analyzed for evidence of scatter-broadening due to the ionized interstellar medium (ISM) of M31. The detection of a compact background source only 0.25 kpc projected distance from M31* places a constraint on the extent of any extreme scattering region associated with the center of M31. However, the two sources closest to the core show evidence of scatter broadening consistent with that which would be seen for a compact source if it were observed through the inner disk of our Galaxy, at the inclination of M31. We interpret this as a detection of the ionized ISM of M31 along two lines of sight. With the increases in bandwidth and sensitivity envisaged for future long-baseline interferometers, this should prove to be a remarkably powerful technique for understanding the ionized ISM in external galaxies.

  14. The microscopic NMR probe in chiral magnets. Zero field-, field-modulated- and Skyrmion- states in FeGe and MnSi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baenitz, Michael; Yasuoka, Hiroshi; Majumder, Mayukh; Khuntia, Panchanan; Schmidt, Marcus [MPI for the Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany); Witt, Sebastian; Krellner, Cornelius [Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Cubic FeGe is a prototype B20 chiral magnet (T{sub c} = 280 K) which allows to study chiral correlations directly ''on-site'' via the{sup 57}Fe nucleus because of its S=1/2 nuclear spin interacting only with the electron spin moment. NMR provides the static and dynamic staggered local magnetization M{sub Q} through the hyperfine field (H{sub hf}) and the spin lattice relaxation rate (SLRR = 1/T{sub 1}). Measurements were performed on randomly oriented {sup 57}Fe enriched FeGe single crystals between 2-300 K. Helical-, conical- and field-polarized-states could be clearly identified and spin dynamics of each phase was investigated. MnSi single crystals and {sup 29}Si enriched MnSi polycrystals were studied by {sup 29}Si-NMR (S=1/2) in the ordered state (T{sub c} = 29 K) and above. The T- and H- dependence of H{sub hf} and SLRR was investigated in great detail for both FeGe and MnSi.The {sup 29}Si-NMR lines in MnSi are narrow and H{sub hf}-values obtained are smaller than in FeGe. Our results are in general accordance with the extended SCR theory for itinerant helical magnets, although the theory does not include the symmetry breaking in the B20 structure and the multi-band nature. For FeGe correlations are complex due to its more localized magnetism.

  15. A field demonstration of the efficacy of bioremediation to treat oiled shorelines following the Sea Empress incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swannell, R.P.J.; Mitchell, D.; Lethbridge, G.

    1999-01-01

    Bioremediation was investigated as a method of treating a mixture of Forties Crude Oil and Heavy Fuel Oil stranded on Bullwell Bay, Milford Haven, UK after the grounding of the Sea Empress in 1996. A randomised block design in triplicate was used to test the efficacy of two bioremediation treatments: a weekly application of mineral nutrient dissolved in sea water and a single application of a slow-release fertiliser. Each treatment supplied an equivalent amount of nitrogen and phosphorus. Concentrations of residual hydrocarbon normalised to the biomarker 17α(H),21β(H)-hopane showed that after two months the oil was significantly (p<0.001) more biodegraded in the treated plots than in the controls. On average, the oil in the nutrient amended plots was 37% more degraded than that found in the controls. There was no evidence that the bioremediation treatment increased the toxicity of the oiled sediment. The results confirm that bioremediation can be used to treat a mixture of crude and heavy fuel oil on a pebble beach. In particular, the data suggest that the application of a slow-release fertiliser alone may be a cost-effective method of treating low-energy, contaminated shorelines after a spill incident. (Author)

  16. The Incidence of Alternaria Species Associated with Infected Sesamum indicum L. Seeds from Fields of the Punjab, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayyar, Brian Gagosh; Woodward, Steve; Mur, Luis A. J.; Akram, Abida; Arshad, Muhammad; Saqlan Naqvi, S. M.; Akhund, Shaista

    2017-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum) is an important oil seed crop of Asia. Yields can be negatively impacted by various factors, including disease, particularly those caused by fungi which create problems in both production and storage. Foliar diseases of sesame such as Alternaria leaf blight may cause significant yield losses, with reductions in plant health and seed quality. The work reported here determined the incidence of Alternaria species infecting sesame seeds grown in the Punjab, Pakistan. A total of 428 Alternaria isolates were obtained from 105 seed samples and grouped into 36 distinct taxonomic groups based on growth pattern and morphological characters. Isolation frequency and relative density of surface sterilized and non-surface sterilized seeds showed that three isolates (A13, A47 and A215) were the most common morphological groups present. These isolates were further identified using sequencing of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and the Alternaria major allergen gene (Alt a 1). Whilst ITS of rDNA did not resolve the isolates into Alternaria species, the Alt a 1 sequences exhibited > 99% homology with Alternaria alternata (KP123850.1) in GenBank accessions. The pathogenicity and virulence of these isolates of Alternaria alternata was confirmed in inoculations of sesame plants resulting in typical symptoms of leaf blight disease. This work confirms the identity of a major source of sesame leaf blight in Pakistan which will aid in formulating effective disease management strategies. PMID:29238277

  17. The Incidence of Alternaria Species Associated with Infected Sesamum indicum L. Seeds from Fields of the Punjab, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Gagosh Nayyar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sesame (Sesamum indicum is an important oil seed crop of Asia. Yields can be negatively impacted by various factors, including disease, particularly those caused by fungi which create problems in both production and storage. Foliar diseases of sesame such as Alternaria leaf blight may cause significant yield losses, with reductions in plant health and seed quality. The work reported here determined the incidence of Alternaria species infecting sesame seeds grown in the Punjab, Pakistan. A total of 428 Alternaria isolates were obtained from 105 seed samples and grouped into 36 distinct taxonomic groups based on growth pattern and morphological characters. Isolation frequency and relative density of surface sterilized and non-surface sterilized seeds showed that three isolates (A13, A47 and A215 were the most common morphological groups present. These isolates were further identified using sequencing of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS region of ribosomal DNA (rDNA and the Alternaria major allergen gene (Alt a 1. Whilst ITS of rDNA did not resolve the isolates into Alternaria species, the Alt a 1 sequences exhibited > 99% homology with Alternaria alternata (KP123850.1 in GenBank accessions. The pathogenicity and virulence of these isolates of Alternaria alternata was confirmed in inoculations of sesame plants resulting in typical symptoms of leaf blight disease. This work confirms the identity of a major source of sesame leaf blight in Pakistan which will aid in formulating effective disease management strategies.

  18. Soybean cyst nematode culture collections and field populations from North Carolina and Missouri reveal high incidences of infection by viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Casey L; Koenning, Stephen R; Davis, Eric L; Opperman, Charles H; Lommel, Steven A; Mitchum, Melissa G; Sit, Tim L

    2017-01-01

    Five viruses were previously discovered infecting soybean cyst nematodes (SCN; Heterodera glycines) from greenhouse cultures maintained in Illinois. In this study, the five viruses [ScNV, ScPV, ScRV, ScTV, and SbCNV-5] were detected within SCN greenhouse and field populations from North Carolina (NC) and Missouri (MO). The prevalence and titers of viruses in SCN from 43 greenhouse cultures and 25 field populations were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Viral titers within SCN greenhouse cultures were similar throughout juvenile development, and the presence of viral anti-genomic RNAs within egg, second-stage juvenile (J2), and pooled J3 and J4 stages suggests active viral replication within the nematode. Viruses were found at similar or lower levels within field populations of SCN compared with greenhouse cultures of North Carolina populations. Five greenhouse cultures harbored all five known viruses whereas in most populations a mixture of fewer viruses was detected. In contrast, three greenhouse cultures of similar descent to one another did not possess any detectable viruses and primarily differed in location of the cultures (NC versus MO). Several of these SCN viruses were also detected in Heterodera trifolii (clover cyst) and Heterodera schachtii (beet cyst), but not the other cyst, root-knot, or reniform nematode species tested. Viruses were not detected within soybean host plant tissue. If nematode infection with viruses is truly more common than first considered, the potential influence on nematode biology, pathogenicity, ecology, and control warrants continued investigation.

  19. Avaliação no campo de um TDR segmentado para estimativa da umidade do solo Field evaluation of a TDR multilevel probe for soil moisture measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio Cichota

    2004-04-01

    ção da umidade do solo, o que, na prática, pode inviabilizar o uso deste tipo de TDR segmentado no campo.The time domain reflectometry (TDR technique has become a popular way of measuring soil water content and the use of multilevel probes increases its applicability. The few existent studies about multilevel probes in the field suggest their use could be problematic. An experiment with 48 five-segment probes was conducted in a transect in a Red-yellow Oxisol during two periods in 2000 and 2001, collecting data of soil water content by tensiometry simultaneously with the respective TDR measurement. Detailed soil water retention curves were obtained to allow use of tensiometer observations as a standard. Analysis showed that TDR response pattern was different between periods contrary to soil water content. It was not possible to obtain a calibration curve that could be used for all probes. Adjustments per probe or layer showed very small determination indexes. Calibration curves fitted to the data per segment showed high variability, with coefficient of determination between close to zero and above 0.98, and no trends were found in these variations. Calibration curves from the first period were not correlated to those from the second. Generally variations were smaller and determination cofficientes higher for the first period. Spatial dependence appeared to exist between calibration curves at some depths, but it could not be modeled. No correlation was found between calibration and some soil attributes. These analyses were difficult due to the large variability found for the relation between TDR response and soil water content, suggesting this kind of TDR probe is unsuitable for field applications.

  20. The Influence of Sensitivity Field of Dual Transducer Probes on Accuracy of Discontinuity Sizing and Evaluation in Terms of Testing of Forgings According to EN 10228-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaczmarek R.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of research on the impact of sensitivity distribution of double transducer probes, which are often used in non-destructive ultrasonic testing of components such as forgings. Distribution of sensitivity measured in two orientations, parallel and perpendicular to the plane of separation of a double transducer probe has been tested and analyzed. A significant influence of orientation of a probe on echo envelope of an artificial point discontinuity has been studied. It has revealed great differences in length and shape of an echo envelope, depending on a type of probe and orientation of a probe separation plane to the moving direction. Eventually, the analysis of practical consequences of dual transducer probes usage for characterization of a type, dimensioning and evaluation of internal discontinuities, in accordance to the methodology specified in EN 10228, has been conducted.

  1. Reverse sample genome probing, a new technique for identification of bacteria in environmental samples by DNA hybridization, and its application to the identification of sulfate-reducing bacteria in oil field samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voordouw, G.; Voordouw, J.K.; Karkhoff-Schweizer, R.R.; Fedorak, P.M.; Westlake, D.W.S.

    1991-01-01

    A novel method for identification of bacteria in environmental samples by DNA hybridization is presented. It is based on the fact that, even within a genus, the genomes of different bacteria may have little overall sequence homology. This allows the use of the labeled genomic DNA of a given bacterium (referred to as a standard) to probe for its presence and that of bacteria with highly homologous genomes in total DNA obtained from an environmental sample. Alternatively, total DNA extracted from the sample can be labeled and used to probe filters on which denatured chromosomal DNA from relevant bacterial standards has been spotted. The latter technique is referred to as reverse sample genome probing, since it is the reverse of the usual practice of deriving probes from reference bacteria for analyzing a DNA sample. Reverse sample genome probing allows identification of bacteria in a sample in a single step once a master filter with suitable standards has been developed. Application of reverse sample genome probing to the identification of sulfate-reducing bacteria in 31 samples obtained primarily from oil fields in the province of Alberta has indicated that there are at least 20 genotypically different sulfate-reducing bacteria in these samples

  2. Reverse sample genome probing, a new technique for identification of bacteria in environmental samples by DNA hybridization, and its application to the identification of sulfate-reducing bacteria in oil field samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voordouw, G.; Voordouw, J.K.; Karkhoff-Schweizer, R.R. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Fedorak, P.M.; Westlake, D.W.S. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1991-11-01

    A novel method for identification of bacteria in environmental samples by DNA hybridization is presented. It is based on the fact that, even within a genus, the genomes of different bacteria may have little overall sequence homology. This allows the use of the labeled genomic DNA of a given bacterium (referred to as a standard) to probe for its presence and that of bacteria with highly homologous genomes in total DNA obtained from an environmental sample. Alternatively, total DNA extracted from the sample can be labeled and used to probe filters on which denatured chromosomal DNA from relevant bacterial standards has been spotted. The latter technique is referred to as reverse sample genome probing, since it is the reverse of the usual practice of deriving probes from reference bacteria for analyzing a DNA sample. Reverse sample genome probing allows identification of bacteria in a sample in a single step once a master filter with suitable standards has been developed. Application of reverse sample genome probing to the identification of sulfate-reducing bacteria in 31 samples obtained primarily from oil fields in the province of Alberta has indicated that there are at least 20 genotypically different sulfate-reducing bacteria in these samples.

  3. Free-Free Transitions of the e-H System Inside a Dense Plasma Irradiated by a Laser Field at Very Low Incident-Electron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, C.

    2012-01-01

    The free-free transition is studied for an electron-hydrogen atom in ground state when a low-energy electron (external) is injected into hydrogenic plasma in the presence of an external homogenous, monochromatic, and linearly polarized laser field. The effect of plasma screening is considered in the Debye-Huckel approximation. The calculations are performed in the soft photon limit. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the initial and final channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the electron exchange. The laser-assisted differential and total cross sections are calculated for single-photon absorption or emission and no-photon exchange in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. The calculations have been carried out for various values of Debye parameter, ranging from 0.005 to 0.12. A strong suppression is noted in the laser-assisted cross sections as compared to the field-free situation. A significant difference is noted for the singlet and triplet cross sections. The suppression is much more in the triplet states.

  4. Soybean cyst nematode culture collections and field populations from North Carolina and Missouri reveal high incidences of infection by viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey L Ruark

    Full Text Available Five viruses were previously discovered infecting soybean cyst nematodes (SCN; Heterodera glycines from greenhouse cultures maintained in Illinois. In this study, the five viruses [ScNV, ScPV, ScRV, ScTV, and SbCNV-5] were detected within SCN greenhouse and field populations from North Carolina (NC and Missouri (MO. The prevalence and titers of viruses in SCN from 43 greenhouse cultures and 25 field populations were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Viral titers within SCN greenhouse cultures were similar throughout juvenile development, and the presence of viral anti-genomic RNAs within egg, second-stage juvenile (J2, and pooled J3 and J4 stages suggests active viral replication within the nematode. Viruses were found at similar or lower levels within field populations of SCN compared with greenhouse cultures of North Carolina populations. Five greenhouse cultures harbored all five known viruses whereas in most populations a mixture of fewer viruses was detected. In contrast, three greenhouse cultures of similar descent to one another did not possess any detectable viruses and primarily differed in location of the cultures (NC versus MO. Several of these SCN viruses were also detected in Heterodera trifolii (clover cyst and Heterodera schachtii (beet cyst, but not the other cyst, root-knot, or reniform nematode species tested. Viruses were not detected within soybean host plant tissue. If nematode infection with viruses is truly more common than first considered, the potential influence on nematode biology, pathogenicity, ecology, and control warrants continued investigation.

  5. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning.......A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...

  6. High-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a probe of crystal-field and covalency effects in actinide compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butorin, Sergei M.; Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Vegelius, Johan R.; Meyer, Daniel; Shuh, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Applying the high-energy resolution fluorescence-detection (HERFD) mode of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), we were able to probe, for the first time to our knowledge, the crystalline electric field (CEF) splittings of the 5f shell directly in the HERFD-XAS spectra of actinides. Using ThO2 as an example, data measured at the Th 3d edge were interpreted within the framework of the Anderson impurity model. Because the charge-transfer satellites were also resolved in the HERFD-XAS spectra, the analysis of these satellites revealed that ThO2 is not an ionic compound as previously believed. The Th 6d occupancy in the ground state was estimated to be twice that of the Th 5f states. We demonstrate that HERFD-XAS allows for characterization of the CEF interaction and degree of covalency in the ground state of actinide compounds as it is extensively done for 3d transition metal systems. PMID:27370799

  7. Polymer dynamics near the surface and in the bulk of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) probed by zero-field muon-spin-relaxation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Iain; Salman, Zaher; Giblin, Sean R; Han, Yun Yu; Leach, Gary W; Morenzoni, Elvezio; Prokscha, Thomas; Suter, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    The results of many experiments on polymers such as polystyrene indicate that the polymer chains near a free surface exhibit enhanced dynamics when compared with the bulk. We have investigated whether this is the case for poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) by using zero-field muon-spin-relaxation spectroscopy to characterize a local probe, the F-Mu(+)-F state, which forms when spin-polarized positive muons are implanted in PTFE. Low-energy muons (implantation energies from 2.0 to 23.0 keV) were used to study the F-Mu(+)-F state between ∼ 23 and 191 nm from the free surface of PTFE. Measurements were also made with surface muons (4.1 MeV) where the mean implantation depth is on the order of ∼ 0.6 mm. The relaxation rate of the F-Mu(+)-F state up to ∼ 150 K was found to be significantly higher for muons implanted at 2.0 keV than for higher implantation energies, which suggests that the polymer chains in a region on the order of a few tens of nanometers from the free surface are more mobile than those in the bulk.

  8. Extraction of Dysprosium Ions with DTPA Functionalized Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles Probed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence and TEM/High-Angle Annular Dark Field Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Fernando Menegatti de; Almeida, Sabrina da Nobrega; Uezu, Noemi Saori; Ramirez, Carlos Alberto Ospina; Santos, Antonio Domingues Dos; Toma, Henrique Eisi

    2018-06-01

    The extraction of dysprosium (Dy3+) ions from aqueous solution was carried out successfully, using magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles functionalized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (MagNP@DTPA). The process was monitored by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, as a function of concentration, proceeding according to a Langmuir isotherm with an equilibrium constant of 2.57 × 10-3 g(MagNP) L-1 and a saturation limit of 63.2 mgDy/gMagNP. The presence of paramagnetic Dy3+ ions attached to the superparamagnetic nanoparticles led to an overall decrease of magnetization. By imaging the nanoparticles surface using scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with high resolution elemental analysis, it was possible to probe the binding of the Dy3+ ions to DTPA, and to show their distribution in a region of negative magnetic field gradients. This finding is coherent with the observed decrease of magnetization, associated with the antiferromagnetic coupling between the lanthanide ions and the Fe3O4 core.

  9. Incidence and Identification of Root-Knot Nematode in Plastic-House Fields of Central Area of Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung Rai Ko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate occurrence of root-knot nematode (RKN in plastic house of central area of Korea, 132 soil samples were collected in cucumber, water melon, tomato, red pepper and strawberry fields from 2013 to 2015. Among 132 soil samples, 65 soil samples (49% were infested with RKN and mean density of RKN was 178 second-stage juveniles per 100 cm³ soil (min. 1 ~ max. 3,947. The frequency of RKN by regional was the highest in Chuncheon with 80%, followed by Cheonan (68%, Nonsan (36%, Buyeo (33% and Yesan (30%. The frequency of RKN by crops was the highest in tomato with 83%, followed by cucumber (61%, strawberry (41%, red pepper (30%, watermelon (26%. To identify the species of RKN, fifteen populations were selected for representative populations. As a phylogenetic analysis of 15 populations, southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita, peanut root-knot nematode (M. arenaria and northern root-knot nematode (M. hapla were identified with 47%, 20% and 33% ratio, respectively. In crops, M. incognita, M. arenaria and M. hapla were detected in tomato, M. incognita and M. arenaria were detected in cucumber and watermelon, and M. hapla was detected in strawberry and lettuce. Thus, there should be a continuous management to major species of each crops to prevent dispersal of RKN damages.

  10. Exploiting the return on experience of incidents in the field of industrial radiography; L'exploitation du retour d'experience des incidents dans le domaine de la radiographie industrielle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataille, C.; Crouail, P. [Centre d' Etude sur I' Evaluation de la Protection dans le domaine Nucleaire (CEPN), 28 rue de la Redoute, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Gauron, C. [Institut National de Recherche et de Securite (INRS), 30 rue Olivier Noyer, 75014 Paris (France); Abela, G. [EDF, DIN DQSNR, 1 Place Pleyel, 93282 St Denis Cedex (France); Martin, E. [COFREND, 1 rue Gaston Boissier, 75724 PARIS Cedex 15 (France)

    2008-07-01

    After a presentation of the RELIR network (a French system of return on experience on radiological incidents), the aim of which is to collect typical incidents in different activity sectors (industry, medicine, veterinary, research, teaching, transports) in order to report them during professional training sessions, the authors briefly present some new files which have been recently produced. They deal with incidents due to a failing marking-out, intentional marking overstepping during non destructive testing, incomplete evacuation of the exclusion zone during non destructive testing and irradiation of an operator during a gamma-graphic shot, incident during a training session

  11. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  12. High spatial resolution Kelvin probe force microscopy with coaxial probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Keith A; Westervelt, Robert M; Satzinger, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a widely used technique to measure the local contact potential difference (CPD) between an AFM probe and the sample surface via the electrostatic force. The spatial resolution of KPFM is intrinsically limited by the long range of the electrostatic interaction, which includes contributions from the macroscopic cantilever and the conical tip. Here, we present coaxial AFM probes in which the cantilever and cone are shielded by a conducting shell, confining the tip–sample electrostatic interaction to a small region near the end of the tip. We have developed a technique to measure the true CPD despite the presence of the shell electrode. We find that the behavior of these probes agrees with an electrostatic model of the force, and we observe a factor of five improvement in spatial resolution relative to unshielded probes. Our discussion centers on KPFM, but the field confinement offered by these probes may improve any variant of electrostatic force microscopy. (paper)

  13. Kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect with Projected Fields: A Novel Probe of the Baryon Distribution with Planck, WMAP, and WISE Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J Colin; Ferraro, Simone; Battaglia, Nick; Liu, Jia; Spergel, David N

    2016-07-29

    The kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (KSZ) effect-the Doppler boosting of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons due to Compton scattering off free electrons with nonzero bulk velocity-probes the abundance and the distribution of baryons in the Universe. All KSZ measurements to date have explicitly required spectroscopic redshifts. Here, we implement a novel estimator for the KSZ-large-scale structure cross-correlation based on projected fields: it does not require redshift estimates for individual objects, allowing KSZ measurements from large-scale imaging surveys. We apply this estimator to cleaned CMB temperature maps constructed from Planck and WMAP data and a galaxy sample from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We measure the KSZ effect at 3.8σ-4.5σ significance, depending on the use of additional WISE galaxy bias constraints. We verify that our measurements are robust to possible dust emission from the WISE galaxies. Assuming the standard Λ cold dark matter cosmology, we directly constrain (f_{b}/0.158)(f_{free}/1.0)=1.48±0.19 (statistical error only) at redshift z≈0.4, where f_{b} is the fraction of matter in baryonic form and f_{free} is the free electron fraction. This is the tightest KSZ-derived constraint reported to date on these parameters. Astronomers have long known that baryons do not trace dark matter on ∼ kiloparsec scales and there has been strong evidence that galaxies are baryon poor. The consistency between the f_{b} value found here and the values inferred from analyses of the primordial CMB and big bang nucleosynthesis verifies that baryons approximately trace the dark matter distribution down to ∼ megaparsec scales. While our projected-field estimator is already competitive with other KSZ approaches when applied to current data sets (because we are able to use the full-sky WISE photometric survey), it will yield enormous signal-to-noise ratios when applied to upcoming high-resolution, multifrequency CMB surveys.

  14. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Comparison of 3D cellular imaging techniques based on scanned electron probes: Serial block face SEM vs. Axial bright-field STEM tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, E L; Rao, A; Zhang, G; Hoyne, J D; Calco, G N; Kuo, B C; He, Q; Prince, A A; Pokrovskaya, I D; Storrie, B; Sousa, A A; Aronova, M A; Leapman, R D

    2018-02-01

    Microscopies based on focused electron probes allow the cell biologist to image the 3D ultrastructure of eukaryotic cells and tissues extending over large volumes, thus providing new insight into the relationship between cellular architecture and function of organelles. Here we compare two such techniques: electron tomography in conjunction with axial bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF-STEM), and serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM). The advantages and limitations of each technique are illustrated by their application to determining the 3D ultrastructure of human blood platelets, by considering specimen geometry, specimen preparation, beam damage and image processing methods. Many features of the complex membranes composing the platelet organelles can be determined from both approaches, although STEM tomography offers a higher ∼3 nm isotropic pixel size, compared with ∼5 nm for SBF-SEM in the plane of the block face and ∼30 nm in the perpendicular direction. In this regard, we demonstrate that STEM tomography is advantageous for visualizing the platelet canalicular system, which consists of an interconnected network of narrow (∼50-100 nm) membranous cisternae. In contrast, SBF-SEM enables visualization of complete platelets, each of which extends ∼2 µm in minimum dimension, whereas BF-STEM tomography can typically only visualize approximately half of the platelet volume due to a rapid non-linear loss of signal in specimens of thickness greater than ∼1.5 µm. We also show that the limitations of each approach can be ameliorated by combining 3D and 2D measurements using a stereological approach. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Pollution Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  17. Probe specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    Specificity and complementarity of hadron and electron probes must be systematically developed to answer three questions currently asked in intermediate energy nuclear physics: what is nucleus structure at short distances, what is nature of short range correlations, what is three body force nature [fr

  18. Fluctuations measured by flush mounted versus proud divertor Langmuir probes - why are they different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, O. E.; Kuang, A. Q.; Brunner, D.; Labombard, B.; Kube, R.

    2017-10-01

    A flush-mounted, toroidally-elongated, and field-aligned divertor `rail' Langmuir probe array was installed in Alcator C-Mod in 2015. This geometry is heat flux tolerant and effectively mitigates sheath expansion effects down to incident field line angles of 0.5 degree. Further complications have arisen that cannot be explained by sheath-expansion. In particular, the `rail' probe geometry measures significantly higher plasma fluctuation levels in the common flux region compared to traditional proud probes, whereas they are similar in the private flux zone. In some instances, the amplitudes of ion saturation current fluctuations normalized to the mean are a factor of 2 higher; probability distribution functions correspondingly record large amplitude events that are not seen by the proud probes. This discrepancy also appears to depend on divertor plasma regime. For example, fluctuations become similar near the strikepoint when the electron temperature is low. To ensure that these discrepancies were not due to perturbations caused by the voltage bias or currents collected by the probes, the two Langmuir probe systems were left to `float' and the fluctuation statistics analyzed. Yet, even in this non-perturbative situation, there exist clear differences in the fluctuation characteristics. The raises two questions: how does the probe geometry affect plasma fluctuations measurements and what are the true plasma fluctuations experienced by the divertor surface? Supported by USDoE awards DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  19. Probes for investigating the effect of magnetic field, field orientation, temperature and strain on the critical current density of anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes in a split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunwong, P.; Higgins, J. S.; Hampshire, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present the designs of probes for making critical current density (J c ) measurements on anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes as a function of field, field orientation, temperature and strain in our 40 mm bore, split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet. Emphasis is placed on the design of three components: the vapour-cooled current leads, the variable temperature enclosure, and the springboard-shaped bending beam sample holder. The vapour-cooled brass critical-current leads used superconducting tapes and in operation ran hot with a duty cycle (D) of ∼0.2. This work provides formulae for optimising cryogenic consumption and calculating cryogenic boil-off, associated with current leads used to make J c measurements, made by uniformly ramping the current up to a maximum current (I max ) and then reducing the current very quickly to zero. They include consideration of the effects of duty cycle, static helium boil-off from the magnet and Dewar (b ′ ), and the maximum safe temperature for the critical-current leads (T max ). Our optimized critical-current leads have a boil-off that is about 30% less than leads optimized for magnet operation at the same maximum current. Numerical calculations show that the optimum cross-sectional area (A) for each current lead can be parameterized by LI max /A=[1.46D −0.18 L 0.4 (T max −300) 0.25D −0.09 +750(b ′ /I max )D 10 −3 I max −2.87b ′ ]× 10 6 A m −1 where L is the current lead's length and the current lead is operated in liquid helium. An optimum A of 132 mm 2 is obtained when I max = 1000 A, T max = 400 K, D = 0.2, b ′ = 0.3 l h −1 and L = 1.0 m. The optimized helium consumption was found to be 0.7 l h −1 . When the static boil-off is small, optimized leads have a boil-off that can be roughly parameterized by: b/I max  ≈ (1.35 × 10 −3 )D 0.41 l h ‑1  A −1 . A split-current-lead design is employed to minimize the rotation of the probes during the high current measurements in

  20. Influence of a Weak Field of Pulsed DC Electricity on the Behavior and Incidence of Injury in Adult Steelhead and Pacific Lamprey, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesa, Matthew

    2009-02-13

    electrofishing operations typically use high voltage and amperage settings and a variety of waveforms, pulse widths (PW), and pulse frequencies (PF), depending on conditions and target species. For example, when backpack electrofishing for trout in a small stream, one might use settings such as 500 V pulsed DC, a PW of 1 ms, and a PF of 60 Hz. In contrast, the electrical barrier proposed by SRI will produce electrical conditions significantly lower than those used in electrofishing, particularly for PW and PF (e.g., PW ranging from 300-1,000 {micro}s and PF from 2-3 Hz). Further, voltage gradients (in V/cm) are predicted to be lower in the electric barrier than those produced during typical electrofishing. Although the relatively weak, pulsed DC electric fields to be produced by the barrier may be effective at deterring pinnipeds, little, if anything, is known about the effects of such low intensity electrical fields on fish behavior. For this research, we evaluated the effects of weak, pulsed DC electric currents on the behavior of adult steelhead and Pacific lamprey and the incidence of injury in steelhead only. In a series of laboratory experiments, we: (1) documented the rate of passage of fish over miniature, prototype electric barriers when they were on and off; (2) determined some electric thresholds beyond which fish would not pass over the barrier; and (3) assessed the incidence and severity of injury in steelhead exposed to relatively severe electrical conditions. The results of this study should be useful for making decisions about whether to install electrical barriers in the lower Columbia River, or elsewhere, to reduce predation on upstream migrating salmonids and other fishes by marine pinnipeds.

  1. Incident Infection and Resistance Mutation Analysis of Dried Blood Spots Collected in a Field Study of HIV Risk Groups, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xierong; Smith, Amanda J; Forrest, David W; Cardenas, Gabriel A; Beck, Dano W; LaLota, Marlene; Metsch, Lisa R; Sionean, Catlainn; Owen, S Michele; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    To assess the utility of cost-effective dried blood spot (DBS) field sampling for incidence and drug resistance surveillance of persons at high risk for HIV infection. We evaluated DBS collected in 2007-2010 in non-clinical settings by finger-stick from HIV-positive heterosexuals at increased risk of HIV infection (n = 124), men who have sex with men (MSM, n = 110), and persons who inject drugs (PWID, n = 58). Relative proportions of recent-infection findings among risk groups were assessed at avidity index (AI) cutoffs of ≤25%, ≤30%, and ≤35%, corresponding to an infection mean duration of recency (MDR) of 220.6, 250.4, and 278.3 days, respectively. Drug resistance mutation prevalence was compared among the risk groups and avidity indices. HIV antibody avidity testing of all self-reported ARV-naïve persons (n = 186) resulted in 9.7%, 11.3% and 14.0% with findings within the 221, 250, and 278-day MDRs, respectively. The proportion of ARV-naïve MSM, heterosexuals, and PWID reporting only one risk category who had findings below the suggested 30% AI was 23.1%, 6.9% and 3.6% (pinfection results than did heterosexuals and PWID. The disproportionately higher recent-infection findings for MSM as compared to PWID and heterosexuals increased as the MDR window increased. Unreported ARV use might explain greater recent-infection findings and drug resistance in this MSM population. DBS demonstrated utility in expanded HIV testing; however, optimal field handling is key to accurate recent-infection estimates.

  2. Probing gravitation with pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Radio pulsars are fascinating and extremely useful objects. Despite our on-going difficulties in understanding the details of their emission physics, they can be used as precise cosmic clocks in a wide-range of experiments - in particular for probing gravitational physics. While the reader should consult the contributions to these proceedings to learn more about this exciting field of discovering, exploiting and understanding pulsars, we will concentrate here on on the usage of pulsars as gravity labs.

  3. Wheelchair incidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drongelen AW van; Roszek B; Hilbers-Modderman ESM; Kallewaard M; Wassenaar C; LGM

    2002-01-01

    This RIVM study was performed to gain insight into wheelchair-related incidents with powered and manual wheelchairs reported to the USA FDA, the British MDA and the Dutch Center for Quality and Usability Research of Technical Aids (KBOH). The data in the databases do not indicate that incidents with

  4. Ultra-reduced phases in Apollo 16 regolith: Combined field emission electron probe microanalysis and atom probe tomography of submicron Fe-Si grains in Apollo 16 sample 61500

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopon, Phillip; Spicuzza, Michael J.; Kelly, Thomas F.; Reinhard, David; Prosa, Ty J.; Fournelle, John

    2017-09-01

    The lunar regolith contains a variety of chemically reduced phases of interest to planetary scientists and the most common, metallic iron, is generally ascribed to space weathering processes (Lucey et al. ). Reports of silicon metal and iron silicides, phases indicative of extremely reducing conditions, in lunar samples are rare (Anand et al. ; Spicuzza et al. ). Additional examples of Fe-silicides have been identified in a survey of particles from Apollo 16 sample 61501,22. Herein is demonstrated the utility of low keV electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), using the Fe Ll X-ray line, to analyze these submicron phases, and the necessity of accounting for carbon contamination. We document four Fe-Si and Si0 minerals in lunar regolith return material. The new Fe-Si samples have a composition close to (Fe,Ni)3Si, whereas those associated with Si0 are close to FeSi2 and Fe3Si7. Atom probe tomography of (Fe,Ni)3Si shows trace levels of C (60 ppma and nanodomains enriched in C, Ni, P, Cr, and Sr). These reduced minerals require orders of magnitude lower oxygen fugacity and more reducing conditions than required to form Fe0. Documenting the similarities and differences in these samples is important to constrain their formation processes. These phases potentially formed at high temperatures resulting from a meteorite impact. Whether carbon played a role in achieving the lower oxygen fugacities—and there is evidence of nearby carbonaceous chondritic material—it remains to be proven that carbon was the necessary component for the unique existence of these Si0 and iron silicide minerals.

  5. Comparison of the FFT/matrix inversion and system matrix techniques for higher-order probe correction in spherical near-field antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Sergey; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2011-01-01

    correction of general high-order probes, including non-symmetric dual-polarized antennas with independent ports. The investigation was carried out by processing with each technique the same measurement data for a challenging case with an antenna under test significantly offset from the center of rotation...

  6. Design and operation of a high-heat flux, flush-mounted ‘rail’ Langmuir probe array on Alcator C-Mod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Q. Kuang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A poloidal array of toroidally-extended, flush-mounted ‘rail’ Langmuir probes was recently installed on Alcator C-Mod's vertical target plate divertor. The aim was to investigate if a Langmuir probe array could be designed to survive reactor-level heat fluxes and have the ability to make measurements that could be reliably interpreted under reactor-level plasma densities, neutral densities and magnetic fields. Langmuir probes are typically built to have incident field-line angles >10° to avoid interpretation issues associated with sheath expansion. However, at the high parallel heat fluxes experienced in reactor-relevant conditions such a probe would quickly overheat and melt. To mitigate both the issues of extreme heat flux and sheath expansion, each probe was designed to be flush with the divertor surface, toroidally-extended and field-aligned, giving it a ‘rail’ geometry. The flush mounted probes have proven to be exceptionally robust surviving the 2015–2016 campaign – a first for a C-Mod probe system. Examination of the probe current-voltage (I-V characteristics reveals that they are immune to sheath expansion at incident field angles down to ∼0.5°. Comparison of the flush probes to traditional proud probes shows that both measure the same electron pressure across the divertor plate. However, there are significant and systematic differences in the density, temperature and floating potential. This suggests that there is important physics, perhaps unique to conditions in a vertical-target plate divertor with small field-line attack angles, that affects the I-V characteristics and is not currently included in probe data analyses. Finally, the probe response is examined in the ‘death-ray’ regime, just near detachment. Previous work using proud probes has suggested that the ‘death-ray’ is an artefact of the probe bias. However, on flush mounted probes the ‘death-ray’ manifests itself under different conditions, which

  7. Methodology for Calculating Latency of GPS Probe Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Stanley E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wang, Zhongxiang [University of Maryland; Hamedi, Masoud [University of Maryland

    2017-10-01

    Crowdsourced GPS probe data, such as travel time on changeable-message signs and incident detection, have been gaining popularity in recent years as a source for real-time traffic information to driver operations and transportation systems management and operations. Efforts have been made to evaluate the quality of such data from different perspectives. Although such crowdsourced data are already in widespread use in many states, particularly the high traffic areas on the Eastern seaboard, concerns about latency - the time between traffic being perturbed as a result of an incident and reflection of the disturbance in the outsourced data feed - have escalated in importance. Latency is critical for the accuracy of real-time operations, emergency response, and traveler information systems. This paper offers a methodology for measuring probe data latency regarding a selected reference source. Although Bluetooth reidentification data are used as the reference source, the methodology can be applied to any other ground truth data source of choice. The core of the methodology is an algorithm for maximum pattern matching that works with three fitness objectives. To test the methodology, sample field reference data were collected on multiple freeway segments for a 2-week period by using portable Bluetooth sensors as ground truth. Equivalent GPS probe data were obtained from a private vendor, and their latency was evaluated. Latency at different times of the day, impact of road segmentation scheme on latency, and sensitivity of the latency to both speed-slowdown and recovery-from-slowdown episodes are also discussed.

  8. Nanoscale thermal probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Yue

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem.

  9. Inexpensive Ultrasound Demonstrations as Analogs of Radio Diffraction in the field : Huygens Probe Bistatic experiment on Titan and the Sea Interferometer (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    The wave nature of electromagnetic radiation can be exploited in a number of astronomical and remote sensing methods, but is often challenging to visualize in the classroom. One approach with conveniently-inexpensive components is to use sound as an analog. Readily-available ultrasonic transducers at 40 kHz can be driven with a 555 oscillator and received intensity detected with an op-amp and visualized with a digital voltmeter, a lightbulb, or even acoustically. The wavelength of 9mm is convenient for tabletop experiments, with a relevant example being Lloyds Mirror, the interference of a direct wave from a source just above a surface with the reflected wave. As a distant receiver moves in angle through this interference pattern, a series of peaks and nulls in recorded intensity can be interpreted as the height of the transmitter and the reflectivity (i.e. with some assumptions, the roughness) of the reflecting surface. This $10 experiment will be demonstrated at the poster. Such an observation was (serendipitously) made in 2005 after the landing of the Huygens probe on the surface of Titan, where the radio signal measured by Cassini as it set on the horizon as seen from the probe underwent sharp dips in strength that were inverted into a precise measurement of the post-impact probe height. A similar technique in reverse was applied a half century earlier in early Australian radio astronomy to measure the position and width of astrophysical sources from a single clifftop antenna. Ultrasound can be convenient to emulate other radio work, exploiting Doppler effects and (for pulsed sources, like those used in rangers for amateur robotics) propagation time rather than diffraction. Some experiments on tracking Frisbees as an analog for measuring planetary winds by tracking descent probes, and on bistatic delay/Doppler scatterometry as in the CYGNSS GPS-based experiment to measure hurricane winds via sea state, will also be discussed. Huygens probe on the surface of

  10. Incidents analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, P.

    1996-01-01

    We undertook a study programme at the end of 1991. To start with, we performed some exploratory studies aimed at learning some preliminary lessons on this type of analysis: Assessment of the interest of probabilistic incident analysis; possibility of using PSA scenarios; skills and resources required. At the same time, EPN created a working group whose assignment was to define a new approach for analysis of incidents on NPPs. This working group gave thought to both aspects of Operating Feedback that EPN wished to improve: Analysis of significant incidents; analysis of potential consequences. We took part in the work of this group, and for the second aspects, we proposed a method based on an adaptation of the event-tree method in order to establish a link between existing PSA models and actual incidents. Since PSA provides an exhaustive database of accident scenarios applicable to the two most common types of units in France, they are obviously of interest for this sort of analysis. With this method we performed some incident analyses, and at the same time explores some methods employed abroad, particularly ASP (Accident Sequence Precursor, a method used by the NRC). Early in 1994 EDF began a systematic analysis programme. The first, transient phase will set up methods and an organizational structure. 7 figs

  11. Probing into the effects of a magnetic field on the electrode processes of iron in sulphuric acid solutions with dichromate based on the fundamental electrochemistry kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Zhanpeng; Huang Delun; Yang Wu

    2005-01-01

    The effects of an applied magnetic field on the electrode processes of iron in sulphuric acid solutions with dichromate have been investigated by electrochemical measurements. Open circuit potentials, cathodic and anodic polarisation curves, values of polarisation resistance were measured in the presence or absence of a 0.4 T horizontal magnetic field (HMF). A potentiostatic polarisation plus magnetic field perturbation technique was used to study the effect of the magnetic field on open circuit corrosion. Cathodic reaction rates at open circuit potentials for iron in sulphuric acid solutions containing dichromate ions are controlled by both the electron-transfer process and the diffusion process. A magnetic field made the open circuit potential move in the positive direction, and changes of the open circuit potentials due to the magnetic field increase with increasing dichromate concentration. When iron was potentiostatically polarised at open circuit potentials in the absence of a magnetic field, a cathodic current was observed after a magnetic field was imposed. Such cathodic currents induced by the magnetic field increases with increasing dichromate concentration. The positive shifts of open circuit potential, the decrease of polarisation resistance, and the occurrence of cathodic currents induced by the magnetic field are caused by the accelerating effect of magnetic field on the cathodic diffusion process. Measured current densities showed lower, equal, or higher values in the presence of the magnetic field than those in the absence of a magnetic field at certain anodic potentials. This effect of the magnetic field is related to the contribution of the cathodic and anodic reactions to the measured current and the types of rate-determining steps for each reaction at certain potentials. The applied magnetic field significantly decreased the polarisation resistance. The experimental results in this paper are formulated based on the fundamental electrochemistry

  12. Soil moisture calibration of TDR multilevel probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrarens Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Time domain reflectometry (TDR probes are increasingly used for field estimation of soil water content. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the multilevel TDR probe under field conditions. For this purpose, eight such TDR probes were installed in small plots that were seeded with beans and sorghum. Data collection from the probes was such that soil moisture readings were automated and logged using a standalone field unit. Neutron probe measurements were used to calibrate the TDR probes. Soil-probe contact and soil compaction were critical to the accuracy of the TDR, especially when a number of TDR probes are combined for a single calibration curve. If each probe is calibrated individually, approximate measurement errors were between 0.005 and 0.015 m³ m-3. However, measurement errors doubled to approximately 0.025 to 0.03 m³ m-3, when TDR probes were combined to yield a single calibration curve.

  13. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, B.B.; Ballard, S.

    1994-08-23

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration is disclosed. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow. 4 figs.

  14. A three dimensional probe positioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Furno, I.; Dorf, L.; Lapenta, G.

    2008-01-01

    In order to sort out the physics that is important in many plasma experiments, data in three dimensions (3D) are becoming necessary. Access to the usual cylindrical vacuum vessel is typically restricted to radially or axially insertable probes that can pivot. The space that can be explored usually has significant restrictions either because probe travel must be along a travel path, or a 'wobbly' probe positioner requires one to map between a moveable coordinate system and a preferred laboratory coordinate system. This could for example introduce errors in measurements of vector quantities such as magnetic field or flow. We describe the design and implementation of a 3D probe positioner that slides in two dimensions on a double O-ring seal and radially inserts along the third dimension. The net result is that a 3D space can be explored in a laboratory Cartesian reference frame.

  15. Probing magnetochirality

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tion encountered by the light differs depending on whether it travels parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field. It is a very small ... principles, and also in biochemistry as one possible explanation for the homochirality of life. Keywords. .... of electric dipole transition moments which are parity-odd polar vectors, and magnetic.

  16. Atom probe microanalysis: Principles and applications to materials problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.; Smith, G.D.W.

    1987-01-01

    A historical background and general introduction to field emission and field-ionization, field-ion microscopy, and the atom probe is given. Physical principles of field ion microscopy are explained, followed by interpretation of images. Types of atom probes are discussed, as well as the instrumentation used in atomic probe microanalysis. Methods of atom probe analysis and data representation are covered, along with factors affecting performance and statistical analysis of atom probe data. Finally, some case studies and special types of analyses are presented

  17. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  18. Database architecture and query structures for probe data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This report summarizes findings and implementations of probe vehicle data collection based on Bluetooth MAC address matching technology. Probe vehicle travel time data are studied in the following field deployment case studies: analysis of traffic ch...

  19. Ultrafast X-ray diffraction probe of terahertz field-driven soft mode dynamics in SrTiO 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozina, M.; Driel, T.van; Chollet, M.; Sato, T.; Glownia, J.M.; Wandel, S.; /SLAC; Radovic, M.; /PSI, SLS /PSI, Villigen; Staub, U.; /PSI, Villigen; Hoffmann, M.C.; /SLAC

    2017-09-01

    We use ultrafast X-ray pulses to characterize the lattice response of SrTiO3 when driven by strong terahertz fields. We observe transient changes in the diffraction intensity with a delayed onset with respect to the driving field. Fourier analysis reveals two frequency components corresponding to the two lowest energy zone-center optical modes in SrTiO3. The lower frequency mode exhibits clear softening as the temperature is decreased while the higher frequency mode shows slight temperature dependence.

  20. Probing the surface microstructure of layer-by-layer self-assembly chitosan/poly(L-glutamic acid) multilayers: A grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Nie; Yang, Chunming, E-mail: yangchunming@sinap.ac.cn; Wang, Yuzhu; Zhao, Binyu; Bian, Fenggang; Li, Xiuhong; Wang, Jie, E-mail: wangjie@sinap.ac.cn

    2016-01-01

    This study characterized the surface structure of layer-by-layer self-assembly chitosan/poly(L-glutamic acid) multilayers through grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A weakly long-period ordered structure along the in-plane direction was firstly observed in the polyelectrolyte multilayer by the GISAXS technique. This structure can be attributed to the specific domains on the film surface. In the domain, nanodroplets that were formed by polyelectrolyte molecules were orderly arranged along the free surface of the films. This ordered structure gradually disappeared with the increasing bilayer number because of the complex merging behavior of nanodroplets into large islands. Furthermore, resonant diffuse scattering became evident in the GISAXS patterns as the number of bilayers in the polyelectrolyte multilayer was increased. Notably, the lateral cutoff length of resonant diffuse scattering for these polyelectrolyte films was comparable with the long-period value of the ordered nanodroplets in the polyelectrolyte multilayer. Therefore, the nanodroplets could be considered as a basic transmission unit for structure propagation from the inner interface to the film surface. It suggests that the surface structure with length scale larger than the size of nanodroplets was partially complicated from the interface structure near the substrate, but surface structure smaller than the cutoff length was mainly depended on the conformation of nanodroplets. - Highlights: • The growth of ordered nanodroplets in PEMs was characterized by the GISAXS technique. • The basic transmission units for structure propagation within PEMs were nanodroplets. • High-performance of wave-guiding devices prepared by PEMs was predicted.

  1. Probing plasmonic nanostructures by photons and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Harald; Kneipp, Janina

    2015-01-01

    We discuss recent developments for studying plasmonic metal nanostructures. Exploiting photons and electrons opens up new capabilities to probe the complete plasmon spectrum including bright and dark modes and related local optical fields at subnanometer spatial resolution. This comprehensive...

  2. From ligand fields to molecular orbitals: probing the local valence electronic structure of Ni(2+) in aqueous solution with resonant inelastic X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Josefsson, Ida; Schreck, Simon; Quevedo, Wilson; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; de Groot, Frank M F; Odelius, Michael; Wernet, Philippe; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2013-12-27

    Bonding of the Ni(2+)(aq) complex is investigated with an unprecedented combination of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements and ab initio calculations at the Ni L absorption edge. The spectra directly reflect the relative energies of the ligand-field and charge-transfer valence-excited states. They give element-specific access with atomic resolution to the ground-state electronic structure of the complex and allow quantification of ligand-field strength and 3d-3d electron correlation interactions in the Ni(2+)(aq) complex. The experimentally determined ligand-field strength is 10Dq = 1.1 eV. This and the Racah parameters characterizing 3d-3d Coulomb interactions B = 0.13 eV and C = 0.42 eV as readily derived from the measured energies match very well with the results from UV-vis spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate how L-edge RIXS can be used to complement existing spectroscopic tools for the investigation of bonding in 3d transition-metal coordination compounds in solution. The ab initio RASPT2 calculation is successfully used to simulate the L-edge RIXS spectra.

  3. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    to perform real-time measurements with little or no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is now considered an invaluable analytical tool, finding application in several fields including medicine, defense and process control. When combined with fiber optics technology, Raman spectroscopy allows......The design and development of an all-in-fiber probe for Raman spectroscopy are presented in this Thesis. Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique able to probe a sample based on the inelastic scattering of monochromatic light. Due to its high specificity and reliability and to the possibility...... for the realization of flexible and minimally-invasive devices, able to reach remote or hardly accessible samples, and to perform in-situ analyses in hazardous environments. The work behind this Thesis focuses on the proof-of-principle demonstration of a truly in-fiber Raman probe, where all parts are realized...

  4. IVVS probe mechanical concept design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.rossi@enea.it; Neri, Carlo; De Collibus, Mario Ferri; Mugnaini, Giampiero; Pollastrone, Fabio; Crescenzi, Fabio

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ENEA designed, developed and tested a laser based In Vessel Viewing System (IVVS). • IVVS mechanical design has been revised from 2011 to 2013 to meet ITER requirements. • Main improvements are piezoceramic actuators and a step focus system. • Successful qualification activities validated the concept design for ITER environment. - Abstract: ENEA has been deeply involved in the design, development and testing of a laser based In Vessel Viewing System (IVVS) required for the inspection of ITER plasma-facing components. The IVVS probe shall be deployed into the vacuum vessel, providing high resolution images and metrology measurements to detect damages and possible erosion. ENEA already designed and manufactured an IVVS probe prototype based on a rad-hard concept and driven by commercial micro-step motors, which demonstrated satisfying viewing and metrology performances at room conditions. The probe sends a laser beam through a reflective rotating prism. By rotating the axes of the prism, the probe can scan all the environment points except those present in a shadow cone and the backscattered light signal is then processed to measure the intensity level (viewing) and the distance from the probe (metrology). During the last years, in order to meet all the ITER environmental conditions, such as high vacuum, gamma radiation lifetime dose up to 5 MGy, cumulative neutron fluence of about 2.3 × 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2}, temperature of 120 °C and magnetic field of 8 T, the probe mechanical design was significantly revised introducing a new actuating system based on piezo-ceramic actuators and improved with a new step focus system. The optical and mechanical schemes have been then modified and refined to meet also the geometrical constraints. The paper describes the mechanical concept design solutions adopted in order to fulfill IVVS probe functional performance requirements considering ITER working environment and geometrical constraints.

  5. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  6. Calibration of NS value of magnetic probe on EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jiuyu; Shen Biao; Liu Guangjun; Sun Youwen; Qian Jinping; Li Shi; Xiao Bingjia; Chen Dalong; Shi Tonghui

    2014-01-01

    Based on the basic principle of measuring magnetic field by magnetic probe, a solenoid calibration system is constructed by a long solenoid, alternating current power, standard probe and data acquisition system in order to get the accurate magnetic field data. The NS value of magnetic probe on EAST is calibrated accurately by the solenoid calibration system and the data of the calibration is analysed. The obtained results are what we expected and provide the prerequisite for accurate magnetic field measurement in tokamak. (authors)

  7. The Galaxy Evolution Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jason; Galaxy Evolution Probe Team

    2018-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Probe (GEP) is a concept for a far-infrared observatory to survey large regions of sky for star-forming galaxies from z = 0 to beyond z = 3. Our knowledge of galaxy formation is incomplete and requires uniform surveys over a large range of redshifts and environments to accurately describe mass assembly, star formation, supermassive black hole growth, interactions between these processes, and what led to their decline from z ~ 2 to the present day. Infrared observations are sensitive to dusty, star-forming galaxies, which have bright polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features and warm dust continuum in the rest-frame mid infrared and cooler thermal dust emission in the far infrared. Unlike previous far-infrared continuum surveys, the GEP will measure photometric redshifts commensurate with galaxy detections from PAH emission and Si absorption features, without the need for obtaining spectroscopic redshifts of faint counterparts at other wavelengths.The GEP design includes a 2 m diameter telescope actively cooled to 4 K and two instruments: (1) An imager covering 10 to 300 um with 25 spectral resolution R ~ 8 bands (with lower R at the longest wavelengths) to detect star-forming galaxies and measure their redshifts photometrically. (2) A 23 – 190 um, R ~ 250 dispersive spectrometer for redshift confirmation and identification of obscured AGN using atomic fine-structure lines. Lines including [Ne V], [O IV], [O III], [O I], and [C II] will probe gas physical conditions, radiation field hardness, and metallicity. Notionally, the GEP will have a two-year mission: galaxy surveys with photometric redshifts in the first year and a second year devoted to follow-up spectroscopy. A comprehensive picture of star formation in galaxies over the last 10 billion years will be assembled from cosmologically relevant volumes, spanning environments from field galaxies and groups, to protoclusters, to dense galaxy clusters.Commissioned by NASA, the

  8. Proton hopping and long-range transport in the protic ionic liquid [Im][TFSI], probed by pulsed-field gradient NMR and quasi-elastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoarfrost, Megan L; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Segalman, Rachel A; Reimer, Jeffrey A

    2012-07-19

    The management of proton conductivity in the protic ionic liquid imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Im][TFSI]) is investigated via the use of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and pulsed-field gradient NMR. The introduction of excess neutral imidazole to [Im][TFSI] leads to enhanced conductivity. We find that proton dynamics in [Im][TFSI] with excess imidazole are characterized by proton hopping that is encompassed in the slower of two translational processes, as identified by QENS. This relatively slow process contributes to long-range diffusion more than the faster process. NMR diffusion measurements show that proton hopping decreases with increasing temperature, but significant proton hopping persists even at the maximum experimental temperature of 120 °C. This, in combination with minimal ion aggregation, leads to high proton conductivity and a high proton transference number over a wide temperature range.

  9. DNA double-strand break measurement in mammalian cells by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis: an approach using restriction enzymes and gene probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loebrich, M.; Ikpeme, S.; Kiefer, J.

    1994-01-01

    DNA samples prepared from human SP 3 cells, which had not been exposed to various doses of X-ray, were treated with NotI restriction endonuclease before being run in a contour-clamped homogeneous electrophoresis system. The restriction enzyme cuts the DNA at defined positions delivering DNA sizes which can be resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In order to investigate only one of the DNA fragments, a human lactoferrin cDNA, pHL-41, was hybridized to the DNA separated by PFGE. As a result, only the DNA fragment which contains the hybridized gene was detected resulting in a one-band pattern. The decrease of this band was found to be exponential with increasing radiation dose. From the slope, a double-strand break induction rate of (6.3±0.7) x 10 -3 /Mbp/Gy was deduced for 80 kV X-rays. (Author)

  10. The TORE SUPRA fast reciprocating RF probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C.E. Jr.; Harris, J.H.; Haste, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    A fast reciprocating ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) probe was installed and operated on TORE SUPRA during 1992/1993. The body of the probe was originally used on the ATF experiment at ORNL. The probe was adapted for use on TORE SUPRA, and mounted on one of the two fast reciprocating probe mounts. The probe consists of two orthogonal single-turn wire loops, mounted so that one loop senses toroidal RF magnetic fields and the other senses poloidal RF magnetic fields. The probe began operation in June, 1993. The probe active area is approximately 5 cm long by 2 cm, and the reciprocating mount has a slow stroke (5 cm/sec) of 30 cm by 2 cm, and the reciprocating mount has a slow stroke (5 cm/sec) of 30 cm and a fast stroke (1.5 m/sec) of about 10 cm. The probe was operated at distances from the plasma edge ranging from 30 cm to -5 cm (i.e., inside the last closed flux surface). The probe design, electronics, calibration, data acquisition and data processing are discussed. First data from the probe are presented as a function of ICRF power, distance from the plasma, loop orientation, and other plasma parameters. Initial data shows parametric instabilities do not play an important role for ICRF in the TORE SUPRA edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasmas. Additionally it is observed that the probe signal has little or no dependence on position in the SOL/plasma edge

  11. Study of probe-sample distance for biomedical spectra measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fiber-based optical spectroscopy has been widely used for biomedical applications. However, the effect of probe-sample distance on the collection efficiency has not been well investigated. Method In this paper, we presented a theoretical model to maximize the illumination and collection efficiency in designing fiber optic probes for biomedical spectra measurement. This model was in general applicable to probes with single or multiple fibers at an arbitrary incident angle. In order to demonstrate the theory, a fluorescence spectrometer was used to measure the fluorescence of human finger skin at various probe-sample distances. The fluorescence spectrum and the total fluorescence intensity were recorded. Results The theoretical results show that for single fiber probes, contact measurement always provides the best results. While for multi-fiber probes, there is an optimal probe distance. When a 400- μm excitation fiber is used to deliver the light to the skin and another six 400- μm fibers surrounding the excitation fiber are used to collect the fluorescence signal, the experimental results show that human finger skin has very strong fluorescence between 475 nm and 700 nm under 450 nm excitation. The fluorescence intensity is heavily dependent on the probe-sample distance and there is an optimal probe distance. Conclusions We investigated a number of probe-sample configurations and found that contact measurement could be the primary choice for single-fiber probes, but was very inefficient for multi-fiber probes. There was an optimal probe-sample distance for multi-fiber probes. By carefully choosing the probe-sample distance, the collection efficiency could be enhanced by 5-10 times. Our experiments demonstrated that the experimental results of the probe-sample distance dependence of collection efficiency in multi-fiber probes were in general agreement with our theory.

  12. Characteristics of langmuir probe in low temperature, weakly magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Liqi; Liu Wandong; Xie Jinlin; Yu Zhi; Lan Tao; Ouyang Liang; Wang Yi; Zhao Kai

    2003-01-01

    The systematic Langmuir probe measurements for a weakly magnetized plasma have been carried out in the Linear Magnetized Plasma Device for different magnetic fields. By comparing the ion current density of probes with different sizes, the sheath thickness can be evaluated. It is found that while the ratio of cylindrical probe's dimension to ion Larmor radius is not more than 2, the model of probe for non-magnetized plasma is still applicable

  13. Laboratory and field tests on photo-electric probes and ultrasonic Doppler flow switch for remote control of turbidity and flowrate of a water-sand mixture flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, M.; Saccani, C.

    2017-08-01

    The paper describes the experimental apparatus and field tests carried on to remotely control through non-invasive and non-intrusive instruments turbidity and flowrate of a water-sand mixture flow conveyed by a pipeline. The mixture flow was produced by an innovative plant for seabed management. The turbidity was monitored by thru-beam infra-red photo-electric sensors, while flowrate was monitored by an ultrasonic Doppler flow switch. In a first phase, a couple of photo-electric sensors and a mechanical flow switch were preliminary tested in laboratory to verify installations concerns and measurement repeatability and precision. After preliminary test completion, photo-electric sensors and mechanical flow switch were installed in the real scale plant. Since the mechanical flow switch did not reach high reliability, an ultrasonic Doppler flow switch was identified and tested as alternative. Then, two couple of photo-electric sensors and ultrasonic Doppler flow switch were installed and tested on two pipelines of the plant. Turbidity and minimum flow signals produced by the instruments were integrated in the PLC logic for the automatic management of the plant. The paper also shows how ultrasonic Doppler flow switch measurement repeatability was negatively affected by the presence of the other ultrasonic Doppler flow switch working in a close pipeline and installed inside a steel casing.

  14. Probing the nanoscale phase separation and photophysics properties of low-bandgap polymer:fullerene blend film by near-field spectroscopic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Azimi, Hamed; Mack, Hans-Georg; Morana, Mauro; Egelhaaf, Hans-Joachim; Meixner, Alfred J; Zhang, Dai

    2011-10-04

    The effect of the additive 1,8-octanedithiol (ODT) on the nanometer-scale morphology and local photophysical properties of low-bandgap polymer blends of poly[2,6-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-cyclopenta[2,1-b;3,4-b'] dithiophene)- alt-4,7(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PCPDTBT) and [6,6]-phenyl C(61) -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is investigated. Phase separations of the PCPDTBT:PCBM blend film induced by ODT are visualized by the morphological changes from fibril-shaped features to spherical bumps, by the dramatically increased photoluminescence emission from PCPDTBT that was originally largely quenched, and by the fluctuations of spectral features at different locations of the sample surface. The correlations between the morphology and the local photophysical properties of the blend film with/without ODT at both the micrometer and nanometer scales are revealed by confocal and high-resolution near-field spectroscopic mapping techniques. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Probing the Interaction of Human Serum Albumin with Norfloxacin in the Presence of High-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields: Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Circular Dichroism Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshidkhan Chamani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes an investigation by fluorescence quenching, circular dichroism and UV-visible spectroscopy of the interaction between norfloxacin (NRF and human serum albumin (HSA in the presence of electromagnetic fields (EMFs. The results obtained from this study indicated that NRF had a strong ability to quench HSA at λex = 280 nm. In addition, a slight blue shift occurred, which suggested that the microenvironment of the protein became more hydrophobic after addition of NRF. The interaction between the NRF and HSA, whether in the absence or presence of an EMF, was considered to be a static quenching mechanism. Moreover, synchronous fluorescence demonstrated that the microenvironment around Trp became modified. Data of HSA-NRF in the presence of EMFs between 1 Hz–1 MHz confirmed the results of quenching and blue shifts. Corresponding Stern-Volmer plots were also drawn and the resultant Ksv and kq values were compared. Moreover, the binding parameters, including the number of binding sites, the binding constant and the distance, r, between donor and acceptor, were calculated based on Förster’s non-radiative energy transfer theory. According to far and near UV-CD, the formation of the complex caused changes of the secondary and tertiary structures of HSA. The obtained results are significant for patients who are subjected to high-frequency radiation as this was found to reduce the affinity of NRF to HSA.

  16. The Incidence ofAlternariaSpecies Associated with InfectedSesamum indicumL. Seeds from Fields of the Punjab, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayyar, Brian Gagosh; Woodward, Steve; Mur, Luis A J; Akram, Abida; Arshad, Muhammad; Saqlan Naqvi, S M; Akhund, Shaista

    2017-12-01

    Sesame ( Sesamum indicum ) is an important oil seed crop of Asia. Yields can be negatively impacted by various factors, including disease, particularly those caused by fungi which create problems in both production and storage. Foliar diseases of sesame such as Alternaria leaf blight may cause significant yield losses, with reductions in plant health and seed quality. The work reported here determined the incidence of Alternaria species infecting sesame seeds grown in the Punjab, Pakistan. A total of 428 Alternaria isolates were obtained from 105 seed samples and grouped into 36 distinct taxonomic groups based on growth pattern and morphological characters. Isolation frequency and relative density of surface sterilized and non-surface sterilized seeds showed that three isolates (A13, A47 and A215) were the most common morphological groups present. These isolates were further identified using sequencing of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and the Alternaria major allergen gene ( Alt a 1 ). Whilst ITS of rDNA did not resolve the isolates into Alternaria species, the Alt a 1 sequences exhibited > 99% homology with Alternaria alternata (KP123850.1) in GenBank accessions. The pathogenicity and virulence of these isolates of Alternaria alternata was confirmed in inoculations of sesame plants resulting in typical symptoms of leaf blight disease. This work confirms the identity of a major source of sesame leaf blight in Pakistan which will aid in formulating effective disease management strategies.

  17. Distance probes of dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A. G.; Padmanabhan, N.; Aldering, G.; Allen, S. W.; Baltay, C.; Cahn, R. N.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Dalal, N.; Dawson, K. S.; Denney, K. D.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Finley, D. A.; Freedman, W. L.; Ho, S.; Holz, D. E.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S. M.; Kessler, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Linder, E. V.; Martini, P.; Nugent, P. E.; Perlmutter, S.; Peterson, B. M.; Riess, A. G.; Rubin, D.; Sako, M.; Suntzeff, N. V.; Suzuki, N.; Thomas, R. C.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Woosley, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    This document presents the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). We summarize the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  18. Electrical resistivity probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  19. Near-field Optical Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, A.G.T.

    1997-01-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is one of the most recent scanning probe techniques. In this technique, an optical probe is brought in the vicinity of the sample surface, in the near-field zone. The microscope can either work in illumination mode, in which the probe consists of a

  20. Train of high-power femtosecond pulses: Probe wave in a gas of prepared atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradyan, Gevorg; Muradyan, Atom Zh.

    2009-09-01

    We present a method for generating a regular train of ultrashort optical pulses in a prepared two-level medium. The train develops from incident monochromatic probe radiation traveling in a medium of atoms, which are in a quantum mechanical superposition of dressed internal states. In the frame of linear theory for the probe radiation, the energy of individual pulses is an exponentially growing function of atom density and of interaction cross section. Pulse repetition rate is determined by the pump field’s generalized Rabi frequency and can be around 1 THz and greater. We also show that the terms, extra to the dipole approximation, endow the gas by a new property: nonsaturating dependence of refractive index on dressing monochromatic field intensity. Contribution of these nonsaturating terms can be compatible with the main dipole approximation term contribution in the wavelength region of about ten micrometers (the range of CO2 laser) or larger.

  1. Frequency-domain modelling of gain in pump-probe experiment by an inhomogeneous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minkyung; Oh, Sang Soon; Hess, Ortwin; Rho, Junsuk

    2018-02-01

    Introduction of a gain medium in lossy plasmonic metamaterials reduces and compensates losses or even amplifies an incident light often with nonlinear optical effect. Here, optical gain in a pump-probe experimental setup is effectively calculated in the frequency-domain by approximating a gain material as an inhomogeneous medium. Spatially varying local field amplitudes of the pump and probe beams are included in the model to reproduce the inhomogeneous gain effect, in which population inversion occurs most strongly near the surface and decays along the propagation direction. We demonstrate that transmission spectra calculated by this method agree well with finite-difference time-domain simulation results. This simplified approach of gain modelling offers an easy and reliable way to analyze wave propagation in a gain medium without nonlinear time-domain calculation.

  2. Plasma diagnostics by means of electric probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colunga S, S.

    1991-04-01

    In this work a summary of the classical theoretical models to interpret the characteristic curve of a Langmuir electric probe placed in a plasma without magnetic field and with the one is made. The methodology for the electron temperature calculation and the density of the plasma in both cases is given, starting from the characteristic curve of the probe, as well as the approaches for the correct application of this diagnostic method of the plasma. (Author)

  3. The effects of extreme low frequency pulsed electromagnetic field on bone mineral density and incidence of fractures in patients with end - stage renal disease on dialysis - three year follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakočević-Hrnjak Aleksandra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. A variety of physical therapy options has been developed for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders including those characterized with low bone mineral density (BMD. Extreme low frequency pulsed electromagnetic field (ELF-PEMF can accelerate bone formation. Patients with end stage of renal disease (ESRD are predisposed to high incidence of fractures due to bone disorder with multifactorial pathogenesis. Vitamin D, calcium supplements, antiresorptive and anabolic drugs in those patients have changed pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics and have minimal or limited effects. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of long-term ELF-PEMF therapy applied in concordance with physical exercise on bone mass, incidence of new bone fractures and parathyroid hormone concentrations in ESRD patients on dialysis. Methods. In this 3-year prospective clinical trial, 151 patients with ESRD on dialysis program were subjected to treatment with ELF-PEMF (18 Hz, 2 mT applied during 40 min after 10 consecutive dialysis procedures, 4 times through one year (120 treatments in total during three years together with kinesitherapy (study group or only with kinesitherapy (control group on the voluntary basis. Results. Total of 124 patients have completed the study. In the study group (n = 54, regardless of sex, significant improvements of BMD, T-score and Z-score on both lumbar spine and femoral neck were achieved after 3-year treatment with ELF-PEMF. In the control group (n = 70, significant decreases of BMD, T-score and Z-score as well as the higher incidence of new bone fractures were recorded. Conclusion. ELF-PEMF could be a convenient and safe non-pharmacological therapeutic strategy for fracture prevention in nephrology practices.

  4. High temperature probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  5. Periodontal probing systems: a review of available equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Srinivas Sulugodu; Mehta, Dhoom Singh; Sandesh, Nagarajappa; Baliga, Vidya; Amarnath, Janardhan

    2011-03-01

    The periodontal pocket, one of the definitive signs of periodontal disease, is the most common parameter to be assessed by dental clinicians. Periodontal probes have been the instruments most commonly used to locate and measure these pockets. Regular use of periodontal probes in routine dental practice facilitates and increases the accuracy of the process of diagnosing the condition, formulating the treatment, and predicting the outcome of therapy. Advances in the field of periodontal probing have led to the development of probes that may help reduce errors in determining this parameter used to define the state of active periodontal disease. One such advance is the emergence of probes that purportedly assess periodontal disease activity noninvasively. The selection of periodontal probe depends on the type of dental practice: a general dental practitioner would require first- or second-generation probes, while third- through fifth-generation probes generally are used in academic and research institutions as well as specialty practices.

  6. Quantum Hydrodynamical Formulation of Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Probing Strong-Field Multiphoton Processes: Application to the Study of High-Order Harmonic Generation of He and Ne in Intense Laser Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A. K.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2002-05-01

    We extend the quantum hydrodynamical (QFD) formulation of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to the study of multiphoton processes of many-electron atomic systems in intense laser fields (A. K. Roy and S. I. Chu, Phys. Rev. A (in press).). The QFD-TDDFT formulation results in a single generalized nonlinear Schrodinger equation (GNLSE) and includes the many-body effects through a local time-dependent exchange-correlation (xc) potential. The GNLSE is solved by the time- dependent generalized pseudospectral method (X. M. Tong and S.I. Chu, Chem. Phys. 217) (1997) 119. (X. Chu and S. I. Chu, Phys. Rev. A 63) (2001) 023411.. The procedure is applied to the study of multiphoton ionization (MPI) and high harmonic generation (HHG) of He and Ne in intense laser fields. Four different xc energy functionals are used in the study with an aim to explore the roles of exchange and correlation ovn MPI/HHG processes in details ^1.

  7. Influence of a weak field of pulsed DC electricity on the behavior and incidence of injury in adult Steelhead and Pacific Lamprey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Copeland, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    Predation by pinnipeds, such as California sea lions Zalophus californianus, Pacific harbor seals Phoca vitulina, and Stellar sea lions Eumetopias jubatus on adult Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp in the lower Columbia River has become a serious concern for fishery managers trying to conserve and restore runs of threatened and endangered fish. As a result, Smith-Root, Incorporated (SRI; Vancouver, Washington), manufacturers of electrofishing and closely-related equipment, proposed a project to evaluate the potential of an electrical barrier to deter marine mammals and reduce the amount of predation on adult salmonids (SRI 2007). The objectives of their work were to develop, deploy, and evaluate a passive, integrated sonar and electric barrier that would selectively inhibit the upstream movements of marine mammals and reduce predation, but would not injure pinnipeds or impact anadromous fish migrations. However, before such a device could be deployed in the field, concerns by regional fishery managers about the potential effects of such a device on the migratory behavior of Pacific salmon, steelhead O. mykiss, Pacific lampreys Entoshpenus tridentata, and white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus, needed to be addressed. In this report, we describe the results of laboratory research designed to evaluate the effects of prototype electric barriers on adult steelhead and Pacific lampreys.

  8. 1. Safety in operation: The challenges and the fields of action. 2. Incident and accident management in PWR plants ''The French approach''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debes, M.

    1992-01-01

    The French standardization pressurized water reactor facilities currently consist of 51 standardized units, 34 of 900 MW and 17 of 1300 MW. For EDF, safety and quality in operation constitute a unique challenge: An economic challenge: the nuclear facilities account for 75% of the power generated in France and ensure the competitiveness of its price, both for domestic consumers and on the international markets, an environmental challenge: both to limit actual and potential radioactive releases associated with operation of the nuclear facilities, and to avoid releases of combustion gases associated with the use of fossil fuels, a public relations challenge: to improve the image and the confidence of the public associated with nuclear generation. Safety in operation dependence primarily on the quality of the design and construction of the nuclear units. But it also depends on technical, human and organizational factors specific to the operation of the units, which play an essential role in maintaining and increasing operating safety. After a brief review of the safety results of the facilities and of the main themes which contribute to safety in operation, a description is given of the principal fields involved and of the main current orientations

  9. Near-field probing of photonic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flück, E.; Hammer, Manfred; Vos, Willem L.; van Hulst, N.F.; Kuipers, L.

    2004-01-01

    Photonic crystals form an exciting new class of optical materials that can greatly affect optical propagation and light emission. As the relevant length scale is smaller than the wavelength of light, sub-wavelength detection forms an important ingredient to obtain full insight in the physical

  10. Probe-based recording technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naberhuis, Steve

    2002-01-01

    The invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) prompted researchers to contemplate whether such technology could be used as the basis for the storage and retrieval of information. With magnetic data storage technology facing limits in storage density due to the thermal instability of magnetic bits, the super-paramagnetic limit, the heir-apparent for information storage at higher densities appeared to be variants of the STM or similar probe-based storage techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM). Among these other techniques that could provide replacement technology for magnetic storage, near-field optical scanning optical microscopy (NSOM or SNOM) has also been investigated. Another alternative probe-based storage technology called atomic resolution storage (ARS) is also currently under development. An overview of these various technologies is herein presented, with an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages inherent in each particularly with respect to reduced device dimensions. The role of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) is emphasized

  11. Can quantum probes satisfy the weak equivalence principle?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seveso, Luigi, E-mail: luigi.seveso@unimi.it [Quantum Technology Lab, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Paris, Matteo G.A. [Quantum Technology Lab, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    We address the question whether quantum probes in a gravitational field can be considered as test particles obeying the weak equivalence principle (WEP). A formulation of the WEP is proposed which applies also in the quantum regime, while maintaining the physical content of its classical counterpart. Such formulation requires the introduction of a gravitational field not to modify the Fisher information about the mass of a freely-falling probe, extractable through measurements of its position. We discover that, while in a uniform field quantum probes satisfy our formulation of the WEP exactly, gravity gradients can encode nontrivial information about the particle’s mass in its wavefunction, leading to violations of the WEP. - Highlights: • Can quantum probes under gravity be approximated as test-bodies? • A formulation of the weak equivalence principle for quantum probes is proposed. • Quantum probes are found to violate it as a matter of principle.

  12. Transient Astrophysics Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan; Transient Astrophysics Probe Team

    2018-01-01

    The Transient Astrophysics Probe (TAP) is a wide-field multi-wavelength transient mission proposed for flight starting in the late 2020s. The mission instruments include unique “Lobster-eye” imaging soft X-ray optics that allow a ~1600 deg2 FoV; a high sensitivity, 1 deg2 FoV soft X-ray telescope; a 1 deg2 FoV Infrared telescope with bandpass 0.6-3 micron; and a set of 8 NaI gamma-ray detectors. TAP’s most exciting capability will be the observation of tens per year of X-ray and IR counterparts of GWs involving stellar mass black holes and neutron stars detected by LIGO/Virgo/KAGRA/LIGO-India, and possibly several per year X-ray counterparts of GWs from supermassive black holes, detected by LISA and Pulsar Timing Arrays. TAP will also discover hundreds of X-ray transients related to compact objects, including tidal disruption events, supernova shock breakouts, and Gamma-Ray Bursts from the epoch of reionization.

  13. Probe tests microweld strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Probe is developed to test strength of soldered, brazed or microwelded joints. It consists of a spring which may be adjusted to the desired test pressure by means of a threaded probe head, and an indicator lamp. Device may be used for electronic equipment testing.

  14. Development and application of DNA molecular probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Vizzini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of DNA probes started from 1950's for diagnostic purposes and it is still growing. DNA probes are applied in several fields such as food, medical, veterinary, environment and security, with the aim of prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The use of DNA probes permits microorganism identification, including pathogen detection, and their quantification when used in specific systems. Various techniques obtained success by the utilization of specific DNA probes, that allowed the obtainment of rapid and specific results. From PCR, qPCR and blotting techniques that were first used in well equipped laboratories to biosensors such as fiber optic, surface plasmon resonance (SPR, electrochemical, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM biosensors that use different transduction systems. This review describes i the design and production of primers and probes, and their utilization from the traditional techniques to the new emerging techniques like biosensors used in current applications; ii the possibility to use labelled-free probes and probes labelled with an enzyme/fluorophore, etc.; iii the different sensitivity obtained by using specific systems; and iv the advantage obtained by using biosensors.

  15. Neutrons as a probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizumi, Masashi

    1993-01-01

    As an introduction to the symposium a brief overview will be given about the features of neutrons as a probe. First it will be pointed out that the utilization of neutrons as a probe for investigating the structural and dynamical properties of condensed matters is a benign gift eventuated from the release of atomic energy initiated by Enrico Fermi exactly half century ago. Features of neutrons as a probe are discussed in accordance with the four basic physical properties of neutrons as an elementary particle; (1) no electric charge (the interaction with matter is nuclear), (2) the mass of neutron is 1 amu, (3) spin is 1/2 and (4) neutrons have magnetic dipole moment. Overview will be given on the uniqueness of neutrons as a probe and on the variety in the way they are used in the wide research area from the pure science to the industrial applications. (author)

  16. Modeling Atom Probe Tomography: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vurpillot, F., E-mail: francois.vurpillot@univ-rouen.fr [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Université de Rouen, Saint Etienne du Rouvray 76801 (France); Oberdorfer, C. [Institut für Materialwissenschaft, Lehrstuhl für Materialphysik, Universität Stuttgart, Heisenbergstr. 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Improving both the precision and the accuracy of Atom Probe Tomography reconstruction requires a correct understanding of the imaging process. In this aim, numerical modeling approaches have been developed for 15 years. The injected ingredients of these modeling tools are related to the basic physic of the field evaporation mechanism. The interplay between the sample nature and structure of the analyzed sample and the reconstructed image artefacts have pushed to gradually improve and make the model more and more sophisticated. This paper reviews the evolution of the modeling approach in Atom Probe Tomography and presents some future potential directions in order to improve the method. - Highlights: • The basics of field evaporation. • The main aspects of Atom Probe Tomography modeling. • The intrinsic limitations of the current method and future potential directions to improve the understanding of tip to image ion projection.

  17. Noninvasive ultrasonic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, S.R.; Galer, D.R.; Leard, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    An ultrasonic probe is described for insonifying the ascending aorta of a supine or reclining human patient from a location within the suprasternal notch of the patient. The probe comprises: a transducer head and an elongated handle; housing propagates ultrasonic energy and for intercept-frequency-shifted, reflected radiant energy; the handle has a proximate portion and a distal portion and a non-circular cross-sectional configuration with at least one longitudinal edge which furnishes a gripping surface; this facilitates tactile positioning of the probe; the transducer head is integral with the handle of the probe at the exposed end of the proximate portion; the transducer head has a generally arcuate cross-sectional configuration and a generally trapezoidal profile; the transducer head is oriented at right angles to the proximate portion of the handle and has an exposed, patient contacting end in which the transducer means are located; this facilitates the orientation of the transducer means housed in the head relative to the ascending aorta of the patient; and the distal end portion of the elongated probe handle is integral with and immovably oriented at a severe angle relative to the proximate end of that handle, and lies in the same plane as the proximate end of the handle; the transducer head of the probe is placed with facility within the suprasternal notch of the patient by an operator positioned behind the head of the patient

  18. User's Manual for ProbeCorder (Version 1.0) Data Collection Software

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zeidler, James

    1997-01-01

    ProbeCorder is a pen-based software tool designed to maximize the logostocal efficiency of subsurface soil testing by automating the routine collection, integration, and storage of probe data in the field...

  19. Primary Blast Injury Criteria for Animal/Human TBI Models using Field Validated Shock Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    exposure to shock wave. We used experimental measures to probe the response of the body to blast loading via implantation of intracranial pressure (ICP...Representative pressure profiles measured by incident ( loading ), intracranial and carotid artery sensors (response) implanted in a rat exposed to 130 kPa...if these changes can be used as convenient markers of injury which can be used in the field and inform affected personnel immediately upon the

  20. MCFRS Incidents by Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset contains the monthly summary data indicating incident occurred in each fire station response area. The summary data is the incident count broken down by...

  1. Police Incident Reports Written

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — This table contains incident reports filed with the Chapel Hill Police Department. Multiple incidents may have been reported at the same time. The most serious...

  2. Evolution of the MIDTAL microarray: the adaption and testing of oligonucleotide 18S and 28S rDNA probes and evaluation of subsequent microarray generations with Prymnesium spp. cultures and field samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Gary R; Touzet, Nicolas; Fleming, Gerard T A; Raine, Robin

    2015-07-01

    The toxic microalgal species Prymnesium parvum and Prymnesium polylepis are responsible for numerous fish kills causing economic stress on the aquaculture industry and, through the consumption of contaminated shellfish, can potentially impact on human health. Monitoring of toxic phytoplankton is traditionally carried out by light microscopy. However, molecular methods of identification and quantification are becoming more common place. This study documents the optimisation of the novel Microarrays for the Detection of Toxic Algae (MIDTAL) microarray from its initial stages to the final commercial version now available from Microbia Environnement (France). Existing oligonucleotide probes used in whole-cell fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) for Prymnesium species from higher group probes to species-level probes were adapted and tested on the first-generation microarray. The combination and interaction of numerous other probes specific for a whole range of phytoplankton taxa also spotted on the chip surface caused high cross reactivity, resulting in false-positive results on the microarray. The probe sequences were extended for the subsequent second-generation microarray, and further adaptations of the hybridisation protocol and incubation temperatures significantly reduced false-positive readings from the first to the second-generation chip, thereby increasing the specificity of the MIDTAL microarray. Additional refinement of the subsequent third-generation microarray protocols with the addition of a poly-T amino linker to the 5' end of each probe further enhanced the microarray performance but also highlighted the importance of optimising RNA labelling efficiency when testing with natural seawater samples from Killary Harbour, Ireland.

  3. Tandem Oligonucleotide Probe Annealing and Elongation To Discriminate Viral Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, Maria; Uhd, Jesper; Miotke, Laura

    2017-01-01

    opportunities in transcriptome analysis, virology, and other fields. Herein, we report for the first time a "click" chemistry approach to oligonucleotide probe elongation as a novel approach to specifically detect a viral sequence. We hybridized a library of short, terminally labeled probes to Ebola virus RNA...

  4. Capacitance and effective area of flush monopole probes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Morris, Marvin E.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Lehr, Jane Marie; Higgins, Matthew B.

    2004-08-01

    Approximate formulas are constructed and numerical simulations are carried out for electric field derivative probes that have the form of flush mounted monopoles. Effects such as rounded edges are included. A method is introduced to make results from two-dimensional conformal mapping analyses accurately apply to the three-dimensional axisymmetric probe geometry

  5. Metastable atom probe for measuring electron beam density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, J. M.; Zorn, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Metastable atom probe was developed for measuring current density in electron beam as function of two arbitrary coordinates, with spatial resolution better than 0.5 mm. Probe shows effects of space charge, magnetic fields, and other factors which influence electron current density, but operates with such low beam densities that introduced perturbation is very small.

  6. Higher Cell Probe Lower Bounds for Evaluating Polynomials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the cell probe complexity of evaluating an $n$-degree polynomial $P$ over a finite field $F$ of size at least $n^{1+Omega(1)}$. More specifically, we show that any static data structure for evaluating $P(x)$, where $x in F$, must use $Omega(lg |F|/lg(Sw/nlg|F|))$ cell probes...

  7. High impact ionization rate in silicon by sub-picosecond THz electric field pulses (Conference Presentation)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Hirori, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    near the antenna tips is measured. Using the NIR probing technique, we observed that the density of carriers increases by over 8 orders of magnitude in a time duration of approximately 500 fs with an incident THz pulse of peak electric field strength 700 kV/cm. This shows that a single impact......Summary form only given. Metallic antenna arrays fabricated on high resistivity silicon are used to localize and enhance the incident THz field resulting in high electric field pulses with peak electric field strength reaching several MV/cm on the silicon surface near the antenna tips. In such high...... electric field strengths high density of carriers are generated in silicon through impact ionization process. The high density of generated carriers induces a change of refractive index in silicon. By measuring the change of reflectivity of tightly focused 800 nm light, the local density of free carriers...

  8. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  9. Methods for measurement of electron emission yield under low energy electron-irradiation by collector method and Kelvin probe method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tondu, Thomas; Belhaj, Mohamed; Inguimbert, Virginie [Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France and Fondation STAE, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234-31432, Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2010-09-15

    Secondary electron emission yield of gold under electron impact at normal incidence below 50 eV was investigated by the classical collector method and by the Kelvin probe method. The authors show that biasing a collector to ensure secondary electron collection while keeping the target grounded can lead to primary electron beam perturbations. Thus reliable secondary electron emission yield at low primary electron energy cannot be obtained with a biased collector. The authors present two collector-free methods based on current measurement and on electron pulse surface potential buildup (Kelvin probe method). These methods are consistent, but at very low energy, measurements become sensitive to the earth magnetic field (below 10 eV). For gold, the authors can extrapolate total emission yield at 0 eV to 0.5, while a total electron emission yield of 1 is obtained at 40{+-}1 eV.

  10. Methods for measurement of electron emission yield under low energy electron-irradiation by collector method and Kelvin probe method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondu, Thomas; Belhaj, Mohamed; Inguimbert, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    Secondary electron emission yield of gold under electron impact at normal incidence below 50 eV was investigated by the classical collector method and by the Kelvin probe method. The authors show that biasing a collector to ensure secondary electron collection while keeping the target grounded can lead to primary electron beam perturbations. Thus reliable secondary electron emission yield at low primary electron energy cannot be obtained with a biased collector. The authors present two collector-free methods based on current measurement and on electron pulse surface potential buildup (Kelvin probe method). These methods are consistent, but at very low energy, measurements become sensitive to the earth magnetic field (below 10 eV). For gold, the authors can extrapolate total emission yield at 0 eV to 0.5, while a total electron emission yield of 1 is obtained at 40±1 eV.

  11. Incident Information Management Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Pejovic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Flaws of\tcurrent incident information management at CMS and CERN\tare discussed. A new data\tmodel for future incident database is\tproposed and briefly described. Recently developed draft version of GIS-­‐based tool for incident tracking is presented.

  12. Convective heat flow probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  13. Electric field measurements in a NLC/PMSE region during the MASS/ECOMA campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shimogawa

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present results of electric field measurements made during the MASS rocket campaign in Andøya, Norway into noctilucent clouds (NLC and polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE on 3 August 2007. The instrument used high input-impedance preamps to measure vertical and horizontal electric fields. No large-amplitude geophysical electric fields were detected in the cloud layers, but significant levels of electric field fluctuations were measured. Within the cloud layer, the probe potentials relative to the rocket skin were driven negative by incident heavy charged aerosols. The amplitude of spikes caused by probe shadowing were also larger in the NLC/PMSE region. We describe a method for calculating positive ion conductivities using these shadowing spike amplitudes and the density of heavy charged aerosols.

  14. Multispectral imaging probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  15. Chemical Probes of Histone Lysine Methyltransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that histone methyltransferases (HMTs, also known as protein methyltransferases (PMTs)) play an important role in diverse biological processes and human diseases by regulating gene expression and the chromatin state. Therefore, HMTs have been increasingly recognized by the biomedical community as a class of potential therapeutic targets. High quality chemical probes of HMTs, as tools for deciphering their physiological functions and roles in human diseases and testing therapeutic hypotheses, are critical for advancing this promising field. In this review, we focus on the discovery, characterization, and biological applications of chemical probes for HMTs. PMID:25423077

  16. Versatile robotic probe calibration for position tracking in ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eirik Bø, Lars; Fagertun Hofstad, Erlend; Lindseth, Frank; Hernes, Toril A. N.

    2015-05-01

    Within the field of ultrasound-guided procedures, there are a number of methods for ultrasound probe calibration. While these methods are usually developed for a specific probe, they are in principle easily adapted to other probes. In practice, however, the adaptation often proves tedious and this is impractical in a research setting, where new probes are tested regularly. Therefore, we developed a method which can be applied to a large variety of probes without adaptation. The method used a robot arm to move a plastic sphere submerged in water through the ultrasound image plane, providing a slow and precise movement. The sphere was then segmented from the recorded ultrasound images using a MATLAB programme and the calibration matrix was computed based on this segmentation in combination with tracking information. The method was tested on three very different probes demonstrating both great versatility and high accuracy.

  17. A note on measurement of sound pressure with intensity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter; Jacobsen, Finn

    2004-01-01

    be improved under a variety of realistic sound field conditions by applying a different weighting of the two pressure signals from the probe. The improved intensity probe can measure the sound pressure more accurately at high frequencies than an ordinary sound intensity probe or an ordinary sound level meter......The effect of scattering and diffraction on measurement of sound pressure with "two-microphone" sound intensity probes is examined using an axisymmetric boundary element model of the probe. Whereas it has been shown a few years ago that the sound intensity estimated with a two-microphone probe...... is reliable up to 10 kHz when using 0.5 in. microphones in the usual face-to-face arrangement separated by a 12 mm spacer, the sound pressure measured with the same instrument will typically be underestimated at high frequencies. It is shown in this paper that the estimate of the sound pressure can...

  18. In Situ Atom Probe Deintercalation of Lithium-Manganese-Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Björn; Maier, Johannes; Arlt, Jonas; Nowak, Carsten

    2017-04-01

    Atom probe tomography is routinely used for the characterization of materials microstructures, usually assuming that the microstructure is unaltered by the analysis. When analyzing ionic conductors, however, gradients in the chemical potential and the electric field penetrating dielectric atom probe specimens can cause significant ionic mobility. Although ionic mobility is undesirable when aiming for materials characterization, it offers a strategy to manipulate materials directly in situ in the atom probe. Here, we present experimental results on the analysis of the ionic conductor lithium-manganese-oxide with different atom probe techniques. We demonstrate that, at a temperature of 30 K, characterization of the materials microstructure is possible without measurable Li mobility. Also, we show that at 298 K the material can be deintercalated, in situ in the atom probe, without changing the manganese-oxide host structure. Combining in situ atom probe deintercalation and subsequent conventional characterization, we demonstrate a new methodological approach to study ionic conductors even in early stages of deintercalation.

  19. A novel calibration algorithm for five-hole pressure probe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    state measurements of three components of velocity, inflow angles, static and total pressures simultaneously for a point in a flow field. Various calibration algorithms for five-hole probes are studied in this paper as reported in the literature.

  20. Variables for probing neutrino oscillation at super-Kamiokande and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We propose several new variables, insensitive to the absolute flux of the incident solar or supernova neutrino beam, which probe the shape of the observed spectrum at super-Kamiokande and Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiments and can sensitively signal neutrino oscillations. One class of such variables involve ...

  1. Probing the Solar Interior

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 3. Probing the Solar Interior Hearing the Heartbeats of the Sun. Ashok Ambastha. General ... Author Affiliations. Ashok Ambastha1. Joint In-Charge Udaipur Solar Observatory Physical Research laboratory P.O. Box No. 198 Udaipur 313 001, India ...

  2. Probing the Solar Interior

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 3. Probing the Solar Interior Hearing the Heartbeats of the Sun. Ashok Ambastha. General Article Volume 3 Issue 3 March 1998 pp 18-31. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Terahertz scanning probe microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klapwijk, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides aterahertz scanning probe microscope setup comprising (i) a terahertz radiation source configured to generate terahertz radiation; (ii) a terahertz lens configured to receive at least part of the terahertz radiation from the terahertz radiation source; (iii) a cantilever unit

  4. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  5. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  6. Thermal conductivity probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navickas, J.

    1969-01-01

    Low-mass probe accurately measures the thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam /and other thermal insulating materials/ while exposed to either hydrogen of helium permeation in temperature ranges from ambient to cryogenic. The thermal conductivity of a specimen is determined from an experimentally determined increase in temperature.

  7. First simultaneous measurements of Reynolds stress with ball-pen and Langmuir probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Ondrej; Adamek, Jiri; Seidl, Jakub; Devitre, Alexis; Sos, Miroslav; Vondracek, Petr; Bilkova, Petra; Hron, Martin

    2017-06-01

    A new multi-pin probe head was installed and tested at the COMPASS tokamak. The probe head consists of several ball-pen and Langmuir probes in similar geometric configurations, which enables fast, simultaneous measurements of the radial and poloidal electric field components from differences of plasma or floating potentials using appropriately positioned ball-pen or Langmuir probes, respectively. The fast measurements of the radial electric field are compared with other methods of measuring selected frequency components of the radial electric field. The radial profiles of the Reynolds stress calculated from correlations of electric field fluctuations obtained by either probe type are compared along with their spectral composition. Lower Reynolds stress values are found for Langmuir probes in comparison to ball-pen probes due to negative contributions from higher frequency fluctuations possibly associated with electron temperature fluctuations.

  8. First simultaneous measurements of Reynolds stress with ball-pen and Langmuir probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Ondrej; Adamek, Jiri; Seidl, Jakub; Devitre, Alexis; Sos, Miroslav; Vondracek, Petr; Bilkova, Petra; Hron, Martin

    2017-06-01

    A new multi-pin probe head was installed and tested at the COMPASS tokamak. The probe head consists of several ball-pen and Langmuir probes in similar geometric configurations, which enables fast, simultaneous measurements of the radial and poloidal electric field components from differences of plasma or floating potentials using appropriately positioned ball-pen or Langmuir probes, respectively. The fast measurements of the radial electric field are compared with other methods of measuring selected frequency components of the radial electric field. The radial profiles of the Reynolds stress calculated from correlations of electric field fluctuations obtained by either probe type are compared along with their spectral composition. Lower Reynolds stress values are found for Langmuir probes in comparison to ball-pen probes due to negative contributions from higher frequency fluctuations possibly associated with electron temperature fluctuations.

  9. Atom Probe Tomography Studies of RF Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Norem, Jim; Sebastian, Jason; Seidman, David N

    2005-01-01

    We are constructing a facility which combines an atom probe field ion microscope with a multi-element, in-situ deposition and surface modification capability. This system is dedicated to rf studies and the initial goal will be to understand the properties of evaporative coatings: field emission, bonding interdiffusion etc, to suppress breakdown and dark currents in normal cavities. We also hope to use this system to look more generally at interactions of surface structure and high rf fields. We will present preliminary data on structures relevant to normal and superconducting rf systems.

  10. Probing the string winding sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldazabal, Gerardo; Mayo, Martín [G. Física CAB-CNEA and CONICET, Centro Atómico Bariloche,Av. Bustillo 9500, Bariloche (Argentina); Instituto Balseiro, Centro Atómico Bariloche,Av. Bustillo 9500, Bariloche (Argentina); Nuñez, Carmen [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (CONICET-UBA),C.C. 67 - Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física, FCEN, Universidad de Buenos Aires,C.C. 67 - Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2017-03-17

    We probe a slice of the massive winding sector of bosonic string theory from toroidal compactifications of Double Field Theory (DFT). This string subsector corresponds to states containing one left and one right moving oscillators. We perform a generalized Kaluza Klein compactification of DFT on generic 2n-dimensional toroidal constant backgrounds and show that, up to third order in fluctuations, the theory coincides with the corresponding effective theory of the bosonic string compactified on n-dimensional toroidal constant backgrounds, obtained from three-point amplitudes. The comparison between both theories is facilitated by noticing that generalized diffeomorphisms in DFT allow to fix generalized harmonic gauge conditions that help in identifying the physical degrees of freedom. These conditions manifest as conformal anomaly cancellation requirements on the string theory side. The explicit expression for the gauge invariant effective action containing the physical massless sector (gravity+antisymmetric+gauge+ scalar fields) coupled to towers of generalized Kaluza Klein massive states (corresponding to compact momentum and winding modes) is found. The action acquires a very compact form when written in terms of fields carrying O(n,n) indices, and is explicitly T-duality invariant. The global algebra associated to the generalized Kaluza Klein compactification is discussed.

  11. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  12. Optical characterication of probes for photon scanning tunnelling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    The photon scanning tunnelling microscope is a well-established member of the family of scanning near-field optical microscopes used for optical imaging at the sub-wavelength scale. The quality of the probes, typically pointed uncoated optical fibres, used is however difficult to evaluate...... in a direct manner and has most often been inferred from the apparent quality of recorded optical images. Complicated near-field optical imaging characteristics, together with the possibility of topographically induced artefacts, however, has increased demands for a more reliable probe characterization...... technique. Here we present experimental results obtained for optical characterization of two different probes by imaging of a well-specified near-field intensity distribution at various spatial frequencies. In particular, we observe that a sharply pointed dielectric probe can be highly suitable for imaging...

  13. Heavy ion beam probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickok, R L

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included.

  14. Heavy ion beam probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickok, R.L.

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included

  15. Acute incidents during anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incidents can occur during induction, maintenance and emergence from anaesthesia. The following acute critical incidents are discussed in this article: • Anaphylaxis. • Aspiration ..... Already used in South Africa and Malawi, a scale-up of the technique is under way in Tanzania, Rwanda and Ghana. The report found that.

  16. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  17. Novel Eddycurrent Probe Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    oVCut MVc AVu inc F C -- -(1)(-jlOOO AZC (23)0 --2--M F1 (23) If the Thevenin source voltages, V0, are adjusted so that Vinc is the same for both the...as small as 1.2 cm. The differential probe assembly was spring loaded about a pivot post (see Figure 12) so it could scan noncircular or eccentric

  18. Induced current heating probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatcher, G.; Ferguson, B.G.; Winstanley, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    An induced current heating probe is of thimble form and has an outer conducting sheath and a water flooded flux-generating unit formed from a stack of ferrite rings coaxially disposed in the sheath. The energising coil is made of solid wire which connects at one end with a coaxial water current tube and at the other end with the sheath. The stack of ferrite rings may include non-magnetic insulating rings which help to shape the flux. (author)

  19. Atom probe crystallography

    OpenAIRE

    Gault, Baptiste; Moody, Michael P.; Cairney, Julie M.; Ringer, Simon P.

    2012-01-01

    This review addresses new developments in the emerging area of “atom probe crystallography”, a materials characterization tool with the unique capacity to reveal both composition and crystallographic structure at the atomic scale. This information is crucial for the manipulation of microstructure for the design of both structural and functional materials with optimized mechanical, electric, optoelectronic, magnetic, or superconducting properties that will find application in, for example, nan...

  20. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  1. Radiological incidents in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobzova, L.; Novotny, J.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries a reporting system of radiological incidents to national regulatory body exists and providers of radiotherapy treatment are obliged to report all major and/or in some countries all incidents occurring in institution. State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) is providing a systematic guidance for radiotherapy departments from 1997 by requiring inclusion of radiation safety problems into Quality assurance manual, which is the basic document for obtaining a license of SONS for handling with sources of ionizing radiation. For that purpose SONS also issued the recommendation 'Introduction of QA system for important sources in radiotherapy-radiological incidents' in which the radiological incidents are defined and the basic guidance for their classification (category A, B, C, D), investigation and reporting are given. At regular periods the SONS in co-operation with radiotherapy centers is making a survey of all radiological incidents occurring in institutions and it is presenting obtained information in synoptic communication (2003 Motolske dny, 2005 Novy Jicin). This presentation is another summary report of radiological incidents that occurred in our radiotherapy institutions during last 3 years. Emphasis is given not only to survey and statistics, but also to analysis of reasons of the radiological incidents and to their detection and prevention. Analyses of incidents in radiotherapy have led to a much broader understanding of incident causation. Information about the error should be shared as early as possible during or after investigation by all radiotherapy centers. Learning from incidents, errors and near misses should be a part of improvement of the QA system in institutions. Generally, it is recommended that all radiotherapy facilities should participate in the reporting, analyzing and learning system to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge throughout the whole country to prevent errors in radiotherapy.(authors)

  2. HAADF-STEM atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens: Towards quantitative correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, W; Hernandez-Maldonado, D; Moyon, F; Cuvilly, F; Vaudolon, C; Shinde, D; Vurpillot, F

    2015-12-01

    The geometry of atom probe tomography tips strongly differs from standard scanning transmission electron microscopy foils. Whereas the later are rather flat and thin (atom probe tomography specimens. Based on simulations (electron probe propagation and image simulations), the possibility to apply quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy to of atom probe tomography specimens has been tested. The influence of electron probe convergence and the benefice of deconvolution of electron probe point spread function electron have been established. Atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens is for the first time reported in this present work. It is demonstrated that, based on single projections of high angle annular dark field imaging, significant quantitative information can be used as additional input for refining the data obtained by correlative analysis of the specimen in APT, therefore opening new perspectives in the field of atomic scale tomography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  4. The Probing Radio Signal Polarization Effect on Separation Efficiency of Surface Target Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Pinchuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was a quantitative analysis of the level of interference with radar monitoring characteristics of surface targets, caused by the scattered electromagnetic field, arising due to the interaction between radio waves and sea surface, which is a study aspect a radiooceanography encompasses. Backscatter signal, arising from the interaction of radio waves and sea surface, extends in a direction opposite the probing radar signal of spread marine and coastal radar stations.With radar sounding of sea surface at high incidence angles of radio waves, a basic physical mechanism to form the received signal is resonant (Bragg scattering, and at small incidence angles of radio waves it is quasi-specular reflection. Consequently, the energy of electromagnetic radiation, backscattered by the sea surface, depends on the type of wave polarization: for horizontal polarization it is less than for vertical one.The paper presents a mathematical model, which describes dependence of interference level caused by interaction between radio waves and sea surface, on the radio wave polarization for the case when the same polarization is used to sent-out and receive a radio wave.To determine the noise reduction to be achievable with radar monitoring the surface targets by selecting the polarization of the probing radar signal, a signal/noise ratio is analyzed for its different polarizations.It is shown that in order to reduce the noise level caused by the interaction between radio waves and sea surface, it is possible to use the differences in the level of scattered radio signals of different polarization: with horizontally-polarized radar operation at incidence angles of 75°- 85° a signal/noise ratio is by 20-35 dB higher than that of vertically- polarized one.

  5. Probing the Higgs vacuum with general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Philip D.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the structure of the Higgs vacuum can be revealed in gravitational experiments which probe the Schwarzschild geometry to only one order in MG/r beyond that needed for the classical tests of general relativity. The possibility that deviations from the conventional geometry are at least theoretically conceivable is explored. The deviations obtained provide a diagnostic test for searching for the existence of macroscopic scalar fields and open up the possiblity for further exploring the Higgs mechanism.

  6. Near-field study with a photon scanning tunneling microscope: Comparison between dielectric nanostructure and metallic nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Mahmoud Youcef; Bassou, Ghaouti; Salomon, Laurant; Chekroun, Z.; Djamai, Nesrine

    2007-01-01

    Scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) integrates standard optical methods with scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques allowing to collect optical information with resolution well beyond the diffraction limit. We study the influence on image formation of several parameters in scanning near-field microscopy. The numerical calculations have been carried out using the differential method. We investigate a 2D-PSTM configuration with a dielectric rectangular object. We will focus on the collection type SNOM in a constant height scanning mode. Various oscillation patterns are observed from both sides of the nanostructure, which we interpret as interference between the diffracted waves scattered by the nanostructure (with the components of the wave vector parallel to the surface) and the evanescent incident wave above the surface. Using an optical near-field analysis and by calculating the electric field intensity distribution, we investigate the probe-sample distance effect. It is found that the distribution of the intensity related to the electric field is depending on sample-probe distance. We noticed the loss of details in the image and the presence of dramatic oscillations. Also, both of the polarization state of the illuminating light effect and the angle of incidence are investigated. We conclude that a differential method provides physical insight into the main features of the different images

  7. Near-field study with a photon scanning tunneling microscope: Comparison between dielectric nanostructure and metallic nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Mahmoud Youcef [Laboratoire d' elaboration et caracterisation des materiaux, Groupe de Microscopie et Microanalyse, Universite Djilali Liabes de Sidi Bel-Abbes, Faculte des sciences (Algeria)], E-mail: mahmoudhamoud@yahoo.com; Bassou, Ghaouti [Laboratoire d' elaboration et caracterisation des materiaux, Groupe de Microscopie et Microanalyse, Universite Djilali Liabes de Sidi Bel-Abbes, Faculte des sciences (Algeria); Laboratoire de Physique (LPUB), CNRS UMR 5027, Groupe d' Optique de Champ Proche, Faculte des Sciences Mirande, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, BP 47 870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Salomon, Laurant [Laboratoire de Physique (LPUB), CNRS UMR 5027, Groupe d' Optique de Champ Proche, Faculte des Sciences Mirande, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, BP 47 870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Chekroun, Z. [Laboratoire d' elaboration et caracterisation des materiaux, Groupe de Microscopie et Microanalyse, Universite Djilali Liabes de Sidi Bel-Abbes, Faculte des sciences (Algeria); Djamai, Nesrine [Laboratoire de telecommunications et de traitement numerique du signal (LTTNS), Universite Djilali Liabes de Sidi Bel-Abbes, Faculte des sciences de l' ingenieur, Departement d' electronique (Algeria)

    2007-08-25

    Scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) integrates standard optical methods with scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques allowing to collect optical information with resolution well beyond the diffraction limit. We study the influence on image formation of several parameters in scanning near-field microscopy. The numerical calculations have been carried out using the differential method. We investigate a 2D-PSTM configuration with a dielectric rectangular object. We will focus on the collection type SNOM in a constant height scanning mode. Various oscillation patterns are observed from both sides of the nanostructure, which we interpret as interference between the diffracted waves scattered by the nanostructure (with the components of the wave vector parallel to the surface) and the evanescent incident wave above the surface. Using an optical near-field analysis and by calculating the electric field intensity distribution, we investigate the probe-sample distance effect. It is found that the distribution of the intensity related to the electric field is depending on sample-probe distance. We noticed the loss of details in the image and the presence of dramatic oscillations. Also, both of the polarization state of the illuminating light effect and the angle of incidence are investigated. We conclude that a differential method provides physical insight into the main features of the different images.

  8. Development of Mackintosh Probe Extractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Noor Khazanah A.; Kaamin, Masiri; Suwandi, Amir Khan; Sahat, Suhaila; Jahaya Kesot, Mohd

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic probing is a continuous soil investigation technique, which is one of the simplest soil penetration test. It basically consist of repeatedly driving a metal tipped probe into the ground using a drop weight of fixed mass and travel. Testing was carried out continuously from ground level to the final penetration depth. Once the soil investigation work done, it is difficult to pull out the probe rod from the ground, due to strong soil structure grip against probe cone and prevent the probe rod out from the ground. Thus, in this case, a tool named Extracting Probe was created to assist in the process of retracting the probe rod from the ground. In addition, Extracting Probe also can reduce the time to extract the probe rod from the ground compare with the conventional method. At the same time, it also can reduce manpower cost because only one worker involve to handle this tool compare with conventional method used two or more workers. From experiment that have been done we found that the time difference between conventional tools and extracting probe is significant, average time difference is 155 minutes. In addition the extracting probe can reduce manpower usage, and also labour cost for operating the tool. With all these advantages makes this tool has the potential to be marketed.

  9. Response of an electrostatic probe for a right cylindrical spacer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rerup, T; Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1994-01-01

    During the last decade many experimental studies of surface charge phenomena have been undertaken employing right cylindrical spacers. Measurement of the surface charge was performed using small electrostatic field probes to scan across the dielectric surface. Charges are electrostatically induced...... on the sensor plate by the ambient surface charge, and hence as the probe is moved parallel to the surface the potential of the sensor plate changes. The probe sensor-plate potential is thus the parameter of interest as this parameter can be related in a quantitative manner to the surface charge density....... In the present study, the influence of the spacer geometry upon the λ-function is examined. This knowledge allows the response of the probe with reference to detection sensitivity and spatial selectivity to be considered. Such probe characteristics enable general conclusions to be reached about...

  10. Mobile Probing Kit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Sørensen, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Mobile Probing Kit is a low tech and low cost methodology for obtaining inspiration and insights into user needs, requirements and ideas in the early phases of a system's development process. The methodology is developed to identify user needs, requirements and ideas among knowledge workers...... characterized as being highly nomadic and thus potential users of mobile and ubiquitous technologies. The methodology has been applied in the 1ST MAGNET Beyond project in order to obtain user needs and requirements in the process of developing pilot services. We report on the initial findings from applying...... this methodology in the early phases of this large scale research and development process....

  11. Plasma Wave Measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Hospodarsky, George B.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C. A.; Bounds, S. R.; Santolik, O.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    The twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft were launched on August 30, 2012 to study the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation includes a plasma wave instrument (Waves) that simultaneously measures three orthogonal components of the wave magnetic field from ~10 Hz to 12 kHz and, with the support of the Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) instrument sensors, three components of the wave electric field from ~10 H...

  12. Critical incident stress management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J J; Childs, J; Gonsalves, K

    2000-10-01

    Recent studies have indicated implementation of the CISM Program has impacted and reduced the cost of workers' compensation claims for stress related conditions and the number of lost work days (Ott, 1997; Western Management Consultants, 1996). Occupational health professionals need to be ready to develop and implement a comprehensive critical incident stress management process in anticipation of a major event. The ability to organize, lead, or administer critical incident stress debriefings for affected employees is a key role for the occupational health professional. Familiarity with these concepts and the ability to identify a critical incident enhances value to the business by mitigating the stress and impact to the workplace. Critical Incident Stress Management Systems have the potential for decreasing stress and restoring employees to normal life function--a win/win situation for both the employees and the organization.

  13. Marine Animal Incident Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Large whale stranding, death, ship strike and entanglement incidents are all recorded to monitor the health of each population and track anthropogenic factors that...

  14. Police Incident Blotter (Archive)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Police Blotter Archive contains crime incident data after it has been validated and processed to meet Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) standards, published on a...

  15. Prediction of Safety Incidents

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Safety incidents, including injuries, property damage and mission failures, cost NASA and contractors thousands of dollars in direct and indirect costs. This project...

  16. 2011 Japanese Nuclear Incident

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s RadNet system monitored the environmental radiation levels in the United States and parts of the Pacific following the Japanese Nuclear Incident. Learn about EPA’s response and view historical laboratory data and news releases.

  17. Evaluation of Flat Surface Temperature Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beges, G.; Rudman, M.; Drnovsek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is elaboration of elements related to metrological analysis in the field of surface temperature measurement. Surface temperature measurements are applicable in many fields. As examples, safety testing of electrical appliances and a pharmaceutical production line represent case studies for surface temperature measurements. In both cases correctness of the result of the surface temperature has an influence on final product safety and quality and thus conformity with specifications. This paper deals with the differences of flat surface temperature probes in measuring the surface temperature. For the purpose of safety testing of electrical appliances, surface temperature measurements are very important for safety of the user. General requirements are presented in European standards, which support requirements in European directives, e.g., European Low Voltage Directive 2006/95/EC and pharmaceutical requirements, which are introduced in official state legislation. This paper introduces a comparison of temperature measurements of an attached thermocouple on the measured surface and measurement with flat surface temperature probes. As a heat generator, a so called temperature artifact is used. It consists of an aluminum plate with an incorporated electrical heating element with very good temperature stability in the central part. The probes and thermocouple were applied with different forces to the surface in horizontal and vertical positions. The reference temperature was measured by a J-type fine-wire (0.2 mm) thermocouple. Two probes were homemade according to requirements in the European standard EN 60335-2-9/A12, one with a fine-wire (0.2 mm) thermocouple and one with 0.5mm of thermocouple wire diameter. Additional commercially available probes were compared. Differences between probes due to thermal conditions caused by application of the probe were found. Therefore, it can happen that measurements are performed with improper equipment or

  18. Optical Probes for Neurobiological Sensing and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric H; Chin, Gregory; Rong, Guoxin; Poskanzer, Kira E; Clark, Heather A

    2018-04-13

    Fluorescent nanosensors and molecular probes are next-generation tools for imaging chemical signaling inside and between cells. Electrophysiology has long been considered the gold standard in elucidating neural dynamics with high temporal resolution and precision, particularly on the single-cell level. However, electrode-based techniques face challenges in illuminating the specific chemicals involved in neural cell activation with adequate spatial information. Measuring chemical dynamics is of fundamental importance to better understand synergistic interactions between neurons as well as interactions between neurons and non-neuronal cells. Over the past decade, significant technological advances in optical probes and imaging methods have enabled entirely new possibilities for studying neural cells and circuits at the chemical level. These optical imaging modalities have shown promise for combining chemical, temporal, and spatial information. This potential makes them ideal candidates to unravel the complex neural interactions at multiple scales in the brain, which could be complemented by traditional electrophysiological methods to obtain a full spatiotemporal picture of neurochemical dynamics. Despite the potential, only a handful of probe candidates have been utilized to provide detailed chemical information in the brain. To date, most live imaging and chemical mapping studies rely on fluorescent molecular indicators to report intracellular calcium (Ca 2+ ) dynamics, which correlates with neuronal activity. Methodological advances for monitoring a full array of chemicals in the brain with improved spatial, temporal, and chemical resolution will thus enable mapping of neurochemical circuits with finer precision. On the basis of numerous studies in this exciting field, we review the current efforts to develop and apply a palette of optical probes and nanosensors for chemical sensing in the brain. There is a strong impetus to further develop technologies capable of

  19. Information Security Incident Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Persanov

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The present report highlights the points of information security incident management in an enterprise. Some aspects of the incident and event classification are given. The author presents his view of the process scheme over the monitoring and processing information security events. Also, the report determines a few critical points of the listed process and gives the practical recommendations over its development and optimization.

  20. Probing the crystallography of ordered Phases by coupling of orientation microscopy with atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, S; Nandwana, P; Rojhirunsakool, T; Tiley, J; Banerjee, R

    2015-01-01

    The determination of atomic scale structural and compositional information using atom probe tomography is currently limited to elemental solids and dilute alloys. In the present article, a unique coupling of orientation microscopy and atom probe tomography successfully facilitates the crystallographic study of non-dilute alloy systems, with high evaporation fields. This reproducible methodology affords a new perspective to the conventional atom probe tomography of ordered precipitate strengthened superalloys. The high accuracy in crystallographic site-specific sample preparation results in high spatial resolution in APT, which has been demonstrated in Co-base superalloys. The practical applications of this technique can be extended to accurately characterize the nature of buried order/disorder interfaces at the atomic scale, as well as the site occupancies associated with different solute atoms in multi-component superalloys. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Atom probe tomography of lithium-doped network glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiwe, Gerd-Hendrik; Balogh, Zoltan; Schmitz, Guido

    2014-06-01

    Li-doped silicate and borate glasses are electronically insulating, but provide considerable ionic conductivity. Under measurement conditions of laser-assisted atom probe tomography, mobile Li ions are redistributed in response to high electric fields. In consequence, the direct interpretation of measured composition profiles is prevented. It is demonstrated that composition profiles are nevertheless well understood by a complex model taking into account the electronic structure of dielectric materials, ionic mobility and field screening. Quantitative data on band bending and field penetration during measurement are derived which are important in understanding laser-assisted atom probe tomography of dielectric materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. High-resolution Kelvin probe microscopy in corrosion science: Scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) versus classical scanning Kelvin probe (SKP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohwerder, Michael; Turcu, Florin

    2007-01-01

    With the introduction of a Kelvin probe mode to atomic force microscopy, the so called scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), the Kelvin probe technique finds application in a steadily increasing number of different fields, from corrosion science to microelectronics and biosciences. For many of these applications, high resolution is required as the relevant information lies in the sub-microscopic distribution of work functions or potentials, which explains the increasing interest in SKPFM. However, compared to the standard scanning Kelvin probe (SKP) technique SKPFM is prone to much more artefacts, which are often not taken into account in the interpretation of the results, as is also the case with the real physical nature of the measured data. A critical discussion of possible artefacts and on the interpretation of the data is presented in this paper, with the main focus on application in corrosion science

  3. The magnetic-distortion probe: velocimetry in conducting fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Sophie; Verhille, Gautier; Plihon, Nicolas; Pinton, Jean-François

    2011-09-01

    A new type of velocimeter, capable of local velocity measurements in conducting fluids, is introduced. The principle of the "magnetic-distortion probe" is based on the measurement of the induced magnetic field by the flow of a conducting fluid in the vicinity of a localized magnetic field. The new velocimeter has no moving parts, and can be enclosed in a sealed cap, easing the implementation in harsh environments, such as liquid metals. The proposed method allows one to probe both the continuous part and fluctuations of the velocity, the temporal and spatial resolution being linked to the actual geometric configuration of the probe. A prototype probe has been tested in a gallinstan pipe flow and in a fully turbulent flow of liquid gallium generated by the counter rotation of two coaxial impellers in a cylinder. The signals have been compared to a reference potential probe and show very good agreement both for time-averaged velocities and turbulent fluctuations. The prototype is shown to detect motion from a few cm s(-1) to a few m s(-1). Moreover, the use of the magnetic-distortion probe with large-scale applied magnetic field is discussed. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  4. Solar Probe ANalyzer for Ions - Laboratory Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livi, R.; Larson, D. E.; Kasper, J. C.; Korreck, K. E.; Whittlesey, P. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Parker Solar Probe (PSP) mission is a heliospheric satellite that will orbit the Sun closer than any prior mission to date with a perihelion of 35 solar radii (RS) and an aphelion of 10 RS. PSP includes the Solar Wind Electrons Alphas and Protons (SWEAP) instrument suite, which in turn consists of four instruments: the Solar Probe Cup (SPC) and three Solar Probe ANalyzers (SPAN) for ions and electrons. Together, this suite will take local measurements of particles and electromagnetic fields within the Sun's corona. SPAN-Ai has completed flight calibration and spacecraft integration and is set to be launched in July of 2018. The main mode of operation consists of an electrostatic analyzer (ESA) at its aperture followed by a Time-of-Flight section to measure the energy and mass per charge (m/q) of the ambient ions. SPAN-Ai's main objective is to measure solar wind ions within an energy range of 5 eV - 20 keV, a mass/q between 1-60 [amu/q] and a field of view of 2400x1200. Here we will show flight calibration results and performance.

  5. Automated Incident Detection Using Real-Time Floating Car Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Houbraken

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of a live Automated Incident Detection (AID system using only Floating Car Data (FCD in one of the first large-scale FCD AID field trials. AID systems detect traffic events and alert upcoming drivers to improve traffic safety without human monitoring. These automated systems traditionally rely on traffic monitoring sensors embedded in the road. FCD allows for finer spatial granularity of traffic monitoring. However, low penetration rates of FCD probe vehicles and the data latency have historically hindered FCD AID deployment. We use a live country-wide FCD system monitoring an estimated 5.93% of all vehicles. An FCD AID system is presented and compared to the installed AID system (using loop sensor data on 2 different highways in Netherlands. Our results show the FCD AID can adequately monitor changing traffic conditions and follow the AID benchmark. The presented FCD AID is integrated with the road operator systems as part of an innovation project, making this, to the best of our knowledge, the first full chain technical feasibility trial of an FCD-only AID system. Additionally, FCD allows for AID on roads without installed sensors, allowing road safety improvements at low cost.

  6. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Khlopov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  7. Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, Brett; Furukawa, Brian; Tanner, Nichole T

    2014-12-01

    Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is a minimally invasive diagnostic technique that allows real-time sampling of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes and central pulmonary lesions. Its utility in diagnosing both malignant and nonmalignant diseases has led to an increased uptake and use by pulmonologists over the past decade. Because of the robust evidence supporting its safety and diagnostic yield, EBUS is now the first guideline recommended test for staging in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It has also a role in providing tissue for molecular analysis, thereby guiding in the selection of agents in the new era of personalized chemotherapies in the treatment of NSCLC. The following review highlights the evidence for EBUS in diagnosing mediastinal pathology and addresses technique, training, and competency and future directions for this technology. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Modeling Atom Probe Tomography: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurpillot, F; Oberdorfer, C

    2015-12-01

    Improving both the precision and the accuracy of Atom Probe Tomography reconstruction requires a correct understanding of the imaging process. In this aim, numerical modeling approaches have been developed for 15 years. The injected ingredients of these modeling tools are related to the basic physic of the field evaporation mechanism. The interplay between the sample nature and structure of the analyzed sample and the reconstructed image artefacts have pushed to gradually improve and make the model more and more sophisticated. This paper reviews the evolution of the modeling approach in Atom Probe Tomography and presents some future potential directions in order to improve the method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiation incidents in dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovelock, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Most dental practitioners act as their own radiographer and radiologist, unlike their medical colleagues. Virtually all dental surgeons have a dental X-ray machine for intraoral radiography available to them and 40% of dental practices have equipment for dental panoramic tomography. Because of the low energy of X-ray equipment used in dentistry, radiation incidents tend to be less serious than those associated with other aspects of patient care. Details of 47 known incidents are given. The advent of the 1985 and 1988 Ionising Radiation Regulations has made dental surgeons more aware of the hazards of radiation. These regulations, and general health and safety legislation, have led to a few dental surgeons facing legal action. Because of the publicity associated with these court cases, it is expected that there will be a decrease in radiation incidents arising from the practice of dentistry. (author)

  10. Solar Power System Design for the Solar Probe+ Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Kinnison, James; Fraeman, Martin; Roufberg, Lew; Vernon, Steve; Wirzburger, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Solar Probe+ is an ambitious mission proposed to the solar corona, designed to make a perihelion approach of 9 solar radii from the surface of the sun. The high temperature, high solar flux environment makes this mission a significant challenge for power system design. This paper summarizes the power system conceptual design for the solar probe mission. Power supplies considered included nuclear, solar thermoelectric generation, solar dynamic generation using Stirling engines, and solar photovoltaic generation. The solar probe mission ranges from a starting distance from the sun of 1 AU, to a minimum distance of about 9.5 solar radii, or 0.044 AU, from the center of the sun. During the mission, the solar intensity ranges from one to about 510 times AM0. This requires power systems that can operate over nearly three orders of magnitude of incident intensity.

  11. Note: A unibody NIR transmission probe for in situ liquid detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huijie; Wang, Yang; Ma, Xiangyun; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Da; Chen, Wenliang; Xu, Kexin; Li, Qifeng

    2018-03-01

    The transmission probe is widely used for in situ spectroscopic detection in various fields. Conventional transmission probes are always assembled from parts, which require accurate assembly and good sealing. In this paper, a universal and reliable near-infrared (NIR) transmission probe is proposed, which is simply made up of a unibody fused silica rod. The proposed NIR transmission probe has been successfully used to measure the alcohol by volume of the Chinese spirit for quality control. This unibody NIR transmission probe has great potential for the detection of corrosive substances, owing to the good chemical resistance.

  12. Non-inductive current probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christen Kjeldahl

    1977-01-01

    The current probe described is a low-cost, shunt resistor for monitoring current pulses in e.g., pulsed lasers. Rise time is......The current probe described is a low-cost, shunt resistor for monitoring current pulses in e.g., pulsed lasers. Rise time is...

  13. Gene probes: principles and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aquino de Muro, Marilena; Rapley, Ralph

    2002-01-01

    ... of labeled DNA has allowed genes to be mapped to single chromosomes and in many cases to a single chromosome band, promoting significant advance in human genome mapping. Gene Probes: Principles and Protocols presents the principles for gene probe design, labeling, detection, target format, and hybridization conditions together with detailed protocols, accom...

  14. Incidents in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, L.F.; Wienhold, W.

    1976-09-01

    With reference to the incident list of the Ministry for the period 1971-74, Prof. Bechert has expressed a lot of questions and statements in a letter to the Government. The letter is quoted in full. Inadequate conclusions drawn by Prof. Bechert in connection with quotations from daily newspapers and other documents are put right. (HP) [de

  15. Lightning incidents in Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myagmar Doljinsuren

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is one of the first studies that has been conducted in Mongolia on the distribution of lightning incidents. The study covers a 10-year period from 2004 to 2013. The country records a human death rate of 15.4 deaths per 10 million people per year, which is much higher than that of many countries with similar isokeraunic level. The reason may be the low-grown vegetation observed in most rural areas of Mongolia, a surface topography, typical to steppe climate. We suggest modifications to Gomes–Kadir equation for such countries, as it predicts a much lower annual death rate for Mongolia. The lightning incidents spread over the period from May to August with the peak of the number of incidents occurring in July. The worst lightning affected region in the country is the central part. Compared with impacts of other convective disasters such as squalls, thunderstorms and hail, lightning stands as the second highest in the number of incidents, human deaths and animal deaths. Economic losses due to lightning is only about 1% of the total losses due to the four extreme weather phenomena. However, unless precautionary measures are not promoted among the public, this figure of losses may significantly increase with time as the country is undergoing rapid industrialization at present.

  16. Fire Incident Reporting Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    the result of an incident that requires (or should require) treatment by a practitioner of medicine , a registered emergency medical technician, or a...UNANNOUNCED AIRCRAFT EMERGENCYS ~~PRIOR TO TAKE OFF OR AFTERLADN 5 FUEL OPERATIONS REQUIRING 1AREING G A FIRE10 ARRESTING GEAR’BARRIER FR . ENGAGEMENTS AND

  17. Nanobits: customizable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Shaik, Hassan Uddin; Sardan Sukas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    We present here a proof-of-principle study of scanning probe tips defined by planar nanolithography and integrated with AFM probes using nanomanipulation. The so-called 'nanobits' are 2-4 mu m long and 120-150 nm thin flakes of Si3N4 or SiO2, fabricated by electron beam lithography and standard...... or dislocation of the tips of the nanobit after several scans. This approach allows an unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of scanning probe tips to the surface topology or to the specific application....... silicon processing. Using a microgripper they were detached from an array and fixed to a standard pyramidal AFM probe or alternatively inserted into a tipless cantilever equipped with a narrow slit. The nanobit-enhanced probes were used for imaging of deep trenches, without visible deformation, wear...

  18. Water cooled static pressure probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  19. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  20. Mobile Probes in Mobile Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Blomhøj, Ulla; Duvaa, Uffe

    In this paper experiences from using mobile probes in educational design of a mobile learning application is presented. The probing process stems from the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. In the project, the mobile phone was not only acting...... as an agent for acquiring empirical data (as the situation in hitherto mobile probe settings) but was also the technological medium for which data should say something about (mobile learning). Consequently, not only the content of the data but also the ways in which data was delivered and handled, provided...... a valuable dimension for investigating mobile use. The data was collected at the same time as design activities took place and the collective data was analysed based on user experience goals and cognitive processes from interaction design and mobile learning. The mobile probe increased the knowledge base...