WorldWideScience

Sample records for incident photon energies

  1. Effects of a power and photon energy of incident light on near-field etching properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsui, T.; Saito, H.; Nishioka, K.; Leuschel, B.; Soppera, O.; Nobusada, K.

    2017-12-01

    We developed a near-field etching technique for realizing an ultra-flat surfaces of various materials and structures. To elucidate the near-field etching properties, we have investigated the effects of power and the photon energy of the incident light. First, we established theoretically that an optical near-field with photon energy lower than the absorption edge of the molecules can induce molecular vibrations. We used nanodiamonds to study the power dependence of the near-field etching properties. From the topological changes of the nanodiamonds, we confirmed the linear-dependence of the etching volume with the incident power. Furthermore, we studied the photon energy dependence using TiO2 nanostriped structures, which revealed that a lower photon energy results in a lower etching rate.

  2. Coherent Pair Production by Photons in the 20-170 GeV Energy Range Incident on Crystals and Birefringence

    CERN Document Server

    Apyan, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballestrero, S.; Biino, C.; Birol, I.; Cenci, P.; Connell, S.H.; Eichblatt, S.; Fonseca, T.; Freund, A.; Gorini, B.; Groess, R.; Ispirian, K.; Ketel, T.J.; Kononets, Yu.V.; Lopez, A.; Mangiarotti, A.; van Rens, B.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Shieh, M.; Sona, P.; Strakhovenko, V.; Uggerhoj, E.; Uggerhj, Ulrik Ingerslev; Unel, G.; Velasco, M.; Vilakazi, Z.Z.; Wessely, O.; Kononets, Yu.V.

    2003-01-01

    The cross section for coherent pair production by linearly polarised photons in the 20-170 GeV energy range was measured for photon aligned incidence on ultra-high quality diamond and germanium crystals. The theoretical description of coherent bremsstrahlung and coherent pair production phenomena is an area of active theoretical debate and development. However, under our experimental conditions, the theory predicted the combined cross section and polarisation experimental observables very well indeed. In macroscopic terms, our experiment measured a birefringence effect in pair production in a crystal. This study of this effect also constituted a measurement of the energy dependent linear polarisation of photons produced by coherent bremsstrahlung in aligned crystals. New technologies for manipulating high energy photon beams can be realised based on an improved understanding of QED phenomena at these energies. In particular, this experiment demonstrates an efficient new polarimetry technique. The pair product...

  3. Integral particle reflection coefficient for oblique incidence of photons as universal function in the domain of initial energies up to 300 keV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubenov Vladan L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the results of calculations and analyses of the integral particle reflection coefficient of photons for oblique photon incidence on planar targets, in the domain of initial photon energies from 100 keV to 300 keV. The results are based on the Monte Carlo simulations of the photon reflection from water, concrete, aluminum, iron, and copper materials, performed by the MCNP code. It has been observed that the integral particle reflection coefficient as a function of the ratio of total cross-section of photons and effective atomic number of target material shows universal behavior for all the analyzed shielding materials in the selected energy domain. Analytical formulas for different angles of photon incidence have been proposed, which describe the reflection of photons for all the materials and energies analyzed.

  4. Variation of energy absorption and exposure buildup factors with incident photon energy and penetration depth for boro-tellurite (B2O3-TeO2) glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyed, M. I.; Elhouichet, H.

    2017-01-01

    The gamma ray energy absorption (EABF) and exposure buildup factors (EBF) of (100-x)TeO2-xB2O3 glass systems (where x=5, 10, 15, 20, 22.5 and 25 mol%) have been calculated in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to a penetration depth of 40 mfp (mean free path). The five parameters (G-P) fitting method has been used to estimate both EABF and EBF values. Variations of EABF and EBF with incident photon energy and penetration depth have been studied. It was found that EABF and EBF values were higher in the intermediate energy region, for all the glass systems. Furthermore, boro-tellurite glass with 5 mol% B2O3, was found to present the lowest EABF and EBF values, hence it is superior gamma-ray shielding material. The results indicate that the boro-tellurite glasses can be used as radiation shielding materials.

  5. High energy photon response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, F.M.; Yoder, R.C.; Endres, G.W.R.; Kathren, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the response of the Hanford 4-chip and 5-chip dosimeter to high energy photons. The dose response of the Hanford Multipurpose Personnel Diometer (HMPD) to photons with energies greater than 0.65 MeV has been evaluated relative to the dose produced by photons from a 60 Co. source. The penetrating dose determined with the HMPD is compared to the 1 cm depth dose in tissue measured with an extrapolation chamber. The results of the study indicate that the HMPD can be used to estimate the 1 cm depth dose in tissue from photons with energies between 0.65 MeV and 3.0 MeV to within an accuracy of 15%. However, the 1 cm depth dose is underestimated by 38% when the dosimeter is irradiated in a beam of very high energy photons produced by bombarding a tungsten target with 25 MeV electrons

  6. Number Albedo of Low-Energy Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubenov, V.; Simovic, R.; Markovic, S.

    2007-01-01

    Number albedo of water, aluminum and iron for incident photons in energy range from 20 keV to 100 keV is presented in this paper. Results are obtained through the Monte Carlo simulations of photon reflection by using the MCNP, FOTELP and PENELOPE computer codes. Calculated values are compared with the classical data published by B. P. Bulatov and his collaborators. Influence of the fluorescence yield to the photon number albedo of iron target is analyzed in detail. (author)

  7. High energy photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.; Zerwas, P.M.

    1994-07-01

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e + e - collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly γγ → W + W - , γγ → Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as γγ → γγ, Zγ and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W + W minus pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy γγ tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t bar t production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions

  8. Photon Scattering and Reflection in Diagnostic Energy Domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simovic, R.; Markovic, S.; Ljubenov, V.; Ilic, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    Dependence of reflected photons angular and energy distributions on the parameter c' - probability for large angle scattering, is treated in this paper. Simulation of photon reflection was performed by the FOTELP code for a normal incidence of photons into infinite slabs of common shielding materials. (author)

  9. Technical Note: On the impact of the incident electron beam energy on the primary dose component of flattening filter free photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Palmans, Hugo; Lechner, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    For commercially available linear accelerators (Linacs), the electron energies of flattening filter free (FFF) and flattened (FF) beams are either identical or the electron energy of the FFF beam is increased to match the percentage depth dose curve (PDD) of the FF beam (in reference geometry). This study focuses on the primary dose components of FFF beams for both kinds of settings, studied on the same Linac. The measurements were conducted on a VersaHD Linac (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for both FF and FFF beams with nominal energies of 6 and 10 MV. In the clinical setting of the VersaHD, the energy of FFFM (Matched) beams is set to match the PDDs of the FF beams. In contrast the incident electron beam of the FFFU beam was set to the same energy as for the FF beam. Half value layers (HVLs) and a dual parameter beam quality specifier (DPBQS) were determined. For the 6 MV FFFM beam, HVL and DPBQS values were very similar compared to those of the 6 MV FF beam, while for the 10 MV FFFM and FF beams, only %dd(10)x and HVL values were comparable (differences below 1.5%). This shows that matching the PDD at one depth does not guarantee other beam quality dependent parameters to be matched. For FFFU beams, all investigated beam quality specifiers were significantly different compared to those for FF beams of the same nominal accelerator potential. The DPBQS of the 6 MV FF and FFFM beams was equal within the measurement uncertainty and was comparable to published data of a machine with similar TPR20,10 and %dd(10)x. In contrast to that, the DPBQS's two parameters of the 10 MV FFFM beam were substantially higher compared to those for the 10 MV FF beam. PDD-matched FF and FFF beams of both nominal accelerator potentials were observed to have similar HVL values, indicating similarity of their primary dose components. Using the DPBQS revealed that the mean attenuation coefficient was found to be the same within the uncertainty of 0.8% for 6 MV FF and 6 MV FFFM beams, while for 10 MV

  10. Technical Note: On the impact of the incident electron beam energy on the primary dose component of flattening filter free photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Lechner, Wolfgang; Palmans, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For commercially available linear accelerators (Linacs), the electron energies of flattening filter free (FFF) and flattened (FF) beams are either identical or the electron energy of the FFF beam is increased to match the percentage depth dose curve (PDD) of the FF beam (in reference geometry). This study focuses on the primary dose components of FFF beams for both kinds of settings, studied on the same Linac. Methods: The measurements were conducted on a VersaHD Linac (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for both FF and FFF beams with nominal energies of 6 and 10 MV. In the clinical setting of the VersaHD, the energy of FFF M (Matched) beams is set to match the PDDs of the FF beams. In contrast the incident electron beam of the FFF U beam was set to the same energy as for the FF beam. Half value layers (HVLs) and a dual parameter beam quality specifier (DPBQS) were determined. Results: For the 6 MV FFF M beam, HVL and DPBQS values were very similar compared to those of the 6 MV FF beam, while for the 10 MV FFF M and FF beams, only %dd(10) x and HVL values were comparable (differences below 1.5%). This shows that matching the PDD at one depth does not guarantee other beam quality dependent parameters to be matched. For FFF U beams, all investigated beam quality specifiers were significantly different compared to those for FF beams of the same nominal accelerator potential. The DPBQS of the 6 MV FF and FFF M beams was equal within the measurement uncertainty and was comparable to published data of a machine with similar TPR 20,10 and %dd(10) x . In contrast to that, the DPBQS’s two parameters of the 10 MV FFF M beam were substantially higher compared to those for the 10 MV FF beam. Conclusions: PDD-matched FF and FFF beams of both nominal accelerator potentials were observed to have similar HVL values, indicating similarity of their primary dose components. Using the DPBQS revealed that the mean attenuation coefficient was found to be the same within the uncertainty of

  11. A study of the point-like interactions of the photon using energy-flows in photo- and hadro-production for incident energies between 65 and 170 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Atkinson, M.; Baake, M.; Bagdasarian, L. S.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brook, N.; Charity, T.; Clegg, A. B.; Coyle, P.; Danaher, S.; Danagulian, S.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Diekmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Eades, J.; Ellison, R. J.; Flower, P. S.; Foster, J. M.; Galbraith, W.; Galumian, P. I.; Gapp, C.; Gebert, F.; Hallewell, G.; Heinloth, K.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hickman, M. T.; Hoeger, C.; Holzkamp, A.; Holzkamp, S.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Ibbotson, M.; Jakob, H. P.; Joseph, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Kingler, J.; Koersgen, G.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; McCann, H.; McClatchey, R.; McManus, C.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J. A. G.; Morris, J. V.; Newton, D.; O'Connor, A.; Oedingen, R.; Oganesian, A. G.; Ottewell, P. J.; Paterson, C. N.; Paul, E.; Reid, D.; Rotscheidt, H.; Sharp, P. H.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Thacker, N. A.; Thompson, L.; Thompson, R. J.; Waterhouse, J.; Weigend, A. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    1990-03-01

    Energy-flow distributions for charged hadrons from interactions of photons, pions and kaons on hydrogen are presented as functions of Σ p {T/2} in the event plane. Data cover the range 0.0<Σ p {/T in 2}<10.0(GeV/c)2 and 0.0< x F <1.0 for beam momenta from 65 to 170 GeV/c. The comparisons between photon-and hadron-induced data show an excess of events with larger Σ p {/T in 2} for the photon-induced data. Using the hadron-induced data to parameterise the hadronic behaviour of the photon, the differences between cross sections are used to measure the contribution of the point-like photon interactions. Quantitative calculations of the point-like photon interactions using the Lund Monte-Carlo program LUCIFER, based on QCD, are in agreement with the data.

  12. Energy spectrum of Compton scattering of laser photons on relativistic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Hiroaki; Yoneda, Yasuharu

    1976-01-01

    The high energy photons in gamma-ray region are obtainable by the Compton scattering of laser photons on relativistic electrons. But the motion of the electrons in the storage ring is not necessarily uniform. In the study of the uneven effect, the energy distribution of scattered photons is derived from the assumed momentum distribution of incident electrons. It is generally impossible to derive the momentum distribution of incident electrons from the energy spectrum of scattered photons. The additional conditions which make this possible in a special case are considered. A calculational method is examined for deriving the energy spectrum of scattered photons from the assumed momentum distribution of incident electrons. (Mori, K.)

  13. Energy calibration of the photon tagging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Satoru; Niki, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Akira

    1989-07-01

    There is a photon tagging system at the 1.3 GeV Electron Synchrotron (ES), and the system is designed to produce a monochromatic photon beam with an energy resolution of ±5 MeV. To calibrate the energies of tagged photons produced by this system, electron beams of various energies from ES are injected directly into this system. As the result of this calibration, we conclude that the photon tagging system has the performance of designed values. (author)

  14. Photon Science for Renewable Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Zahid; Tamura, Lori; Padmore, Howard; Schoenlein, Bob; Bailey, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Our current fossil-fuel-based system is causing potentially catastrophic changes to our planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources of energy requires us to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Light-source facilities - the synchrotrons of today and the next-generation light sources of tomorrow - are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such, these photon-science facilities are uniquely positioned to jump-start a global revolution in renewable and carbonneutral energy technologies. In these pages, we outline and illustrate through examples from our nation's light sources possible scientific directions for addressing these profound yet urgent challenges.

  15. Photon upconversion towards applications in energy conversion and bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi-C.; Ding, Yuchen C.; Sagar, Dodderi M.; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-12-01

    The field of plasmonics can play an important role in developing novel devices for application in energy and healthcare. In this review article, we consider the progress made in design and fabrication of upconverting nanoparticles and metal nanostructures for precisely manipulating light photons, with a wavelength of several hundred nanometers, at nanometer length scales, and describe how to tailor their interactions with molecules and surfaces so that two or more lower energy photons can be used to generate a single higher energy photon in a process called photon upconversion. This review begins by introducing the current state-of-the-art in upconverting nanoparticle synthesis and achievements in color tuning and upconversion enhancement. Through understanding and tailoring physical processes, color tuning and strong upconversion enhancement have been demonstrated by coupling with surface plasmon polariton waves, especially for low intensity or diffuse infrared radiation. Since more than 30% of incident sunlight is not utilized in most photovoltaic cells, this photon upconversion is one of the promising approaches to break the so-called Shockley-Queisser thermodynamic limit for a single junction solar cell. Furthermore, since the low energy photons typically cover the biological window of optical transparency, this approach can also be particularly beneficial for novel biosensing and bioimaging techniques. Taken together, the recent research boosts the applications of photon upconversion using designed metal nanostructures and nanoparticles for green energy, bioimaging, and therapy.

  16. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Limao-Vieira, P. [Laboratorio de Colisoes Atomicas e Moleculares, Departamento de Fisica, CEFITEC, FCT-Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Williart, A.; Garcia, G. [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain); Huerga, C.; Tellez, M. [Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  17. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G.; Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C.; Blanco, F.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Williart, A.; Garcia, G.; Huerga, C.; Tellez, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  18. Data on incident solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekaekara, M. P.

    1974-01-01

    Instrumentation for solar irradiance monitoring, and radiation scales are discussed in a survey of incident solar energy data. The absolute accuracy and intrinsic reliability of the values of the solar constant and zero air mass solar spectrum proposed by the Institute of Environmental Sciences as an ASTM standard are evaluated. Extraterrestrial observations are used for deriving solar irradiance data at ground level for widely varying atmospheric parameters, with special reference to air pollution. The effects of diffuse sky radiance and those of varying slopes of the solar energy collecting surface are examined. Average values of solar energy available at different locations in the United States are included.

  19. Asymmetry ratio in pair production and the degree of linearly polarized photons at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Asai, J

    1999-01-01

    In order to initiate the experiments using linearly polarized tagged photons at intermediate energies, it is imperative to know and to monitor the degree of polarization. The relationship is re-examined between the linear polarization of photons and the asymmetry ratio in pair production by such photons. An improved method is proposed in which pairs are prohibited from entering the cone region around the incident photon beam. By restricting the directions of pairs, the asymmetry ratio is much improved. (author)

  20. High energy photons production in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.; Pinston, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Hard photon production, in nucleus-nucleus collisions, were studied at beam energies between 10 and 125 MeV. The main characteristics of the photon emission are deduced. They suggest that the neutron-proton collisions in the early stage of the reaction are the main source of high energy gamma-rays. An overview of the theoretical approaches is given and compared with experimental results. Theoretical attempts to include the contribution of charged pion exchange currents to photon production, in calculations of proton-nucleus-gamma and nucleus-nucleus-gamma reactions, showed suitable fitting with experimental data

  1. Energy flow in photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Dridi, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical investigations of energy flow in photonic crystal waveguides made of line defects and branching points are presented. It is shown that vortices of energy flow may occur, and the net energy flow along: the line defect is described via the effective propagation velocity...

  2. Simple parametrization of photon mass energy absorption ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    More interestingly, it has been observed in the present work that in this energy range, both the mass attenuation coefficients and the mass energy absorption coefficients for such samples vary only with respect to energy. Hence it was possible to represent the photon interaction properties of such samples by a mean value of ...

  3. High-Energy QCD Asymptotics of Photon--Photon Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2002-07-26

    The high-energy behavior of the total cross section for highly virtual photons, as predicted by the BFKL equation at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD, is discussed. The NLO BFKL predictions, improved by the BLM optimal scale setting, are in good agreement with recent OPAL and L3 data at CERN LEP2. NLO BFKL predictions for future linear colliders are presented.

  4. Continuous Energy Photon Transport Implementation in MCATK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Terry R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trahan, Travis John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sweezy, Jeremy Ed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nolen, Steven Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hughes, Henry Grady [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pritchett-Sheats, Lori A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Werner, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The Monte Carlo Application ToolKit (MCATK) code development team has implemented Monte Carlo photon transport into the MCATK software suite. The current particle transport capabilities in MCATK, which process the tracking and collision physics, have been extended to enable tracking of photons using the same continuous energy approximation. We describe the four photoatomic processes implemented, which are coherent scattering, incoherent scattering, pair-production, and photoelectric absorption. The accompanying background, implementation, and verification of these processes will be presented.

  5. Simple parametrization of photon mass energy absorption ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, we provide polynomial coefficients and a semi-empirical relation using which one can derive photon mass energy absorption coefficient of any H-, C-, N-,. O-based sample of biological interest containing any other elements in the atomic number range 2–40 and energy range 200–1500 keV.

  6. Simple parametrization of photon mass energy absorption ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E-mail: tku@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in; umeshtk@gmail.com. MS received 21 May 2008; ... Complex molecules such as carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, enzymes, vitamins and hormones perform a variety of ... where φ is the fluence of photon flux of energy E and µen/ρ is the mass energy absorption coefficient. Thus, in ...

  7. K-edge energy-based calibration method for photon counting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yongshuai; Ji, Xu; Zhang, Ran; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, potential applications of energy-resolved photon counting detectors (PCDs) in the x-ray medical imaging field have been actively investigated. Unlike conventional x-ray energy integration detectors, PCDs count the number of incident x-ray photons within certain energy windows. For PCDs, the interactions between x-ray photons and photoconductor generate electronic voltage pulse signals. The pulse height of each signal is proportional to the energy of the incident photons. By comparing the pulse height with the preset energy threshold values, x-ray photons with specific energies are recorded and sorted into different energy bins. To quantitatively understand the meaning of the energy threshold values, and thus to assign an absolute energy value to each energy bin, energy calibration is needed to establish the quantitative relationship between the threshold values and the corresponding effective photon energies. In practice, the energy calibration is not always easy, due to the lack of well-calibrated energy references for the working energy range of the PCDs. In this paper, a new method was developed to use the precise knowledge of the characteristic K-edge energy of materials to perform energy calibration. The proposed method was demonstrated using experimental data acquired from three K-edge materials (viz., iodine, gadolinium, and gold) on two different PCDs (Hydra and Flite, XCounter, Sweden). Finally, the proposed energy calibration method was further validated using a radioactive isotope (Am-241) with a known decay energy spectrum.

  8. Ionization of atoms by high energy photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Y.; Ioffe, A.F.

    1994-01-01

    Photoionization of atoms by high energy photons is considered. It is emphasized that in this frequency region the cross section and other characteristics of the process are strongly effected by electron shell polarization and rearrangement effects, including that due to inner vacancy Auger decay. In the effects of nuclear structure could be important and noticeable, i.e. of virtual or real excitation of the nucleus degrees of freedom and of the Quantum Electrodynamics vacuum. Ionization accompanied by secondary photon emission (Compton ionization) is analyzed in the considered domain of energies

  9. Complex photonic structures for energy efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiersma D. S.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Photonic structures are playing an increasingly important role in energy efficiency. In particular, they can help to control the flow of light and improve the optical properties of photovoltaic solar cells. We will explain the physics of light transport in such structures with a special focus on disordered materials.

  10. Dose characteristics of high-energy electrons, muons and photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britvich, G.I.; Krupnyj, G.I.; Peleshko, V.N.; Rastsvetalov, Ya.N.

    1980-01-01

    Differential distribution of energy release at different depth of tissue-equivalent phantoms (plexiglas, polystyrene, polyethylene) at the energy of incident electrons, muons of 0.2-40 GeV and photons with the mean energy of 3.6 GeV are measured. The error of experimental results does not exceed 7%. On the basis of the data obtained dose characteristics of electrons, muons and photons for standard geometry are estimated. For all types of irradiation the maximum value of specific equivalent dose, nremxcm 2 /part. is presented. It is shown that published values of specific equivalent dose of electron radiation are higher in all the investigated energy range from 0.2 to 40 GeV, and for muon radiation a good agreement with the present experiment is observed. The highly precise results obtained which cover the wide dynamic range according to the energy of incident particles can serve as the basis for reconsidering the existing recommendations for dose characteristics of electron radiation [ru

  11. Measurements of Pair Production Under Channelling Conditions by 70-180 GeV Photons Incident on Single Crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will use the WA69 set-up to deliver a tagged photon beam in the energy range from 15~GeV to 150~GeV with a total angular spread of about @M~0.5~mrad. The incident photon direction is known to about 35~@mrad through the direction of the emitting electron. The photon beam is incident on an about 1~mm thick Ge single crystal in order to investigate pair production in single crystals. Above a certain energy threshold photons incident along crystal axis will show strongly increased pair production yi - the so-called .us Channelling Pair Production (ChPP). The produced pairs are analyzed in the @W-spectrometer. The large spread in incident photon angles offers an excellent opportunity to investigate in one single experiment the pair production in an angular region around a crystal axes and thereby compare ChPP with coherent (CPP) and incoherent (ICPP) processes. The very abrupt onset of ChPP (around threshold) will be measured and give a crucial test of the theoretical calculations. The differential...

  12. Virtual photon interactions in high energy QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieseke, S.

    2001-07-01

    We study the interactions of virtual photons in the high energy limit of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The subject is discussed in terms of two closely linked applications: the calculation of the total cross section for γ * γ * -scattering and the description of DIS in the colour dipole model. We calculate virtual corrections in α s to the process γ * q → (qq)q and the tree level process γ * q → (qqg)q in the high energy limit. From this calculation we obtain one-loop corrections to the effective γ * -reggeon-qq-vertex in the helicity basis of the virtual photon and the qq-pair. The loop integrals for the virtual corrections have been performed and expressed in dimensional regularization in terms of logarithms and dilogarithms. We have convoluted the virtual one-loop matrix elements with tree level matrix elements and expressed the integrals over the phase space of the qq-pair explicitly in terms of a set of standard integrals. The real corrections have been calculated and, in case of the longitudinal polarization, expressed in factorized form. From these calculations, the impact factor of virtual photons will be determined, allowing for a first prediction of the total cross section for γ * γ * -scattering in the next-to-leading-log s approximation. The calculations in this thesis extend the photon wave function picture in the colour dipole model to next-to-leading order. For this purpose, the real corrections with a qqg final state are analyzed in transverse configuration space and interpreted as a first higher Fock component of the photon wave function. In addition, the matrix elements that have been calculated in this thesis are needed for the calculation of jet cross sections. (orig.)

  13. Photons from Pb-Pb collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, J; Hatsuda, T; Nayak, T K; Sinha, B; Alam, Jan-e; Sarkar, Sourav; Nayak, Tapan K.; Sinha, Bikash

    2001-01-01

    High energy photon emission rate from matter created in Pb+Pb collisions at CERN SPS energies is evaluated. The evolution of matter from the initial state up to freeze-out has been treated within the framework of (3+1) dimensional hydrodynamic expansion. We observe that the photon spectra measured by the WA98 experiment are well reproduced with hard QCD photons and photons from a thermal source with initial temperature ~200 MeV. The effects of the spectral changes of hadrons with temperature on the photon emission rate and on the equation of state are studied. Photon yield for Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies is also estimated.

  14. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying the technology instrumentation of photonics This volume discusses photonics technology and instrumentation. The topics discussed in this volume are: Communication Networks; Data Buffers; Defense and Security Applications; Detectors; Fiber Optics and Amplifiers; Green Photonics; Instrumentation and Metrology; Interferometers; Light-Harvesting Materials; Logic Devices; Optical Communications; Remote Sensing; Solar Energy; Solid-State Lighting; Wavelength Conversion Comprehensive and accessible coverage of the whole of modern photonics Emphas

  15. Photon energy-fluence correction factor in low energy brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Yoriyaz, Hélio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vijande, Javier; Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: pacrisguian@gmail.com [Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics and Instituto de Física Corpuscular (UV-CSIC), University of Valencia (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of photon energy-fluence in different media and to evaluate a proposal for energy-fluence correction factors for the conversion between dose-to-tissue (D{sub tis}) and dose-to-water (D{sub w}). State-of-the art Monte Carlo (MC) calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone) in two different codes, MCNP and PENELOPE, which in all cases include a realistic modeling of the {sup 125}I low-energy brachytherapy seed in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences using the large-cavity theory. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seed is proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases. (author)

  16. Hard photon as probes of intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemssen, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    Some recent results on the production of hard photons in intermediate energy heavy-ion reactions are reported. The topics covered are the use of hard photons as a means to study the energy dissipation mechanism in peripheral heavy ion reactions and the observation of second chance or thermal hard photons

  17. Change of energy of photons passing through rotating anisotropic elements

    CERN Document Server

    Bagini, V; Santarsiero, M; Frezza, F; Schettini, G; Schirripa-Spagnolo, G

    1994-01-01

    We discuss simple experiments where the concept of angular momentum of a photon can be put to use in order to explain the photon energy changes that are produced by the passage of light beams through rotating anisotropic elements. (author)

  18. A high energy photon detector system in compact form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Sadayuki; Sugano, Katsuhito; Yoshioka, Masakazu.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a high energy photon detector system in compact form for use in experiments of high energy physics is described, and the results of its characteristics calibrated using converted electron beams and a pair spectrometer are reported. This system consists of a total absorption lead glass Cerenkov counter, twenty hodoscope arrays for the vertical and the horizontal directions respectively, a lead plate for the conversion of γ-rays into electron-positron pairs, veto counters, photon hardener, and lead blocks for shieldings and collimation. The spatial resolution of the hodoscope is 15 mm for each direction, covering 301 x 301 mm 2 area. The energy resolution of the total absorption lead glass Cerenkov counter, whose volume is 30 x 30 x 30 cm 3 , is typically 18 % (FWHM) for the incident electron energy of 500 MeV, and it can be expressed with a relation of ΔE/E = 3.94 Esup(-1/2). (E in MeV). (auth.)

  19. PHOTON09. Proceedings of the international conference on the structure and interactions of the photon including the 18th international workshop on photon-photon collisions and the international workshop on high energy photon linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Olaf; Diehl, Markus; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Steinbrueck, Georg (eds.)

    2010-01-15

    The following topics were dealt with: Electroweak and new physics, photon-collider technology, low-energy photon experiments, prompt photons, photon structure, jets and heavy flavours, vacuum polarization and light-by-light scattering, small-x processes, diffraction, total cross sections, exclusive channels and resonances, photons in astroparticle physics. (HSI)

  20. PHOTON09. Proceedings of the international conference on the structure and interactions of the photon including the 18th international workshop on photon-photon collisions and the international workshop on high energy photon linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnke, Olaf; Diehl, Markus; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Steinbrueck, Georg

    2010-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Electroweak and new physics, photon-collider technology, low-energy photon experiments, prompt photons, photon structure, jets and heavy flavours, vacuum polarization and light-by-light scattering, small-x processes, diffraction, total cross sections, exclusive channels and resonances, photons in astroparticle physics. (HSI)

  1. Very high energy photons and neutrinos: Implications for UHECR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaisser Thomas K.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the environment of the acceleration processes for ultra-high energy cosmic rays, photons and neutrinos may be produced by interactions in the sources. If so, observations of gamma-rays or neutrinos could pinpoint the sources. This paper reviews some aspects of the search for photons and neutrinos from possible sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays.

  2. Photon energy scale determination and commissioning with radiative Z decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondu Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL is composed of 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. It has been designed to be fast, compact, and radiation hard, with fine granularity and excellent energy resolution. Obtaining the design resolution is a crucial challenge for the SM Higgs search in the two photon channel at the LHC, and more generally good photon calibration and knowledge of the photon energy scale is required for analyses with photons in the final state. The behavior of photons and electrons in the calorimeter is not identical, making the use of a dedicated standard candle for photons, complementary to the canonical highyield Z decay to electrons, highly desirable. The use of Z decays to a pair of muons, where one of the muons emits a Bremsstrahlung photon, can be such a standard candle. These events, which can be cleanly selected, are a source of high-purity, relatively high-pt photons. Their kinematics are well-constrained by the Z boson mass and the precision on the muon momenta, and can be used for numerous calibration and measurement purposes. This proceeding presents the event selection method and the results of the photon energy scale measurement via Z0 → μμγ events as well as their use in evaluating the efficiency of photon identification requirements, based on data recorded by the CMS experiment in 2010.

  3. Conversion of zero point energy into high-energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivlev, B. I. [Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Instituto de Fisica, Av. Manuel Nava No. 6, Zona Universitaria, 78290 San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico)

    2016-11-01

    An unusual phenomenon, observed in experiments is studied. X-ray laser bursts of keV energy are emitted from a metal where long-living states, resulting in population inversion, are totally unexpected. Anomalous electron-photon states are revealed to be formed inside the metal. These states are associated with narrow, 10{sup -11} cm, potential well created by the local reduction of zero point electromagnetic energy. In contrast to analogous van der Waals potential well, leading to attraction of two hydrogen atoms, the depth of the anomalous well is on the order of 1 MeV. The states in that well are long-living which results in population inversion and subsequent laser generation observed. The X-ray emission, occurring in transitions to lower levels, is due to the conversion of zero point electromagnetic energy. (Author)

  4. Towards a better understanding of hard photon emission in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alba, R.; Maiolino, C.; Agodi, C.; Del Zoppo, A.; Coniglione, R.; Milazzo, P.M.; Sapienza, P.; Bellia, G.; Bruno, M.; Colonna, M.; Colonna, N.; D' Agostino, M.; Fiandri, M.L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Gramegna, F.; Iori, I.; Loukachine, K.; Margagliotti, G.V.; Mastinu, P.F.; Migneco, E.; Moroni, A.; Piattelli, P.; Rui, R.; Santonocito, D.; Tonetto, F.; Vannini, G

    1999-07-26

    High energy photon spectra have been measured in several {sup 58}Ni induced reactions at 30A MeV incident energy. A two source analysis of the data has been performed using a two exponential parameterization of the associated gamma spectra. The relative intensity of the two components has been deduced as a function of the total mass of the interacting system and of the impact parameter. To attempt a characterization of the emission sources, correlations between photons and IMF's have been measured for the first time.

  5. Towards a better understanding of hard photon emission in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, R.; Maiolino, C.; Agodi, C.; Del Zoppo, A.; Coniglione, R.; Milazzo, P. M.; Sapienza, P.; Bellia, G.; Bruno, M.; Colonna, M.; Colonna, N.; D'Agostino, M.; Fiandri, M. L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Gramegna, F.; Iori, I.; Loukachine, K.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Mastinu, P. F.; Migneco, E.; Moroni, A.; Piattelli, P.; Rui, R.; Santonocito, D.; Tonetto, F.; Vannini, G.

    High energy photon spectra have been measured in several 58Ni induced reactions at 30A MeV incident energy. A two source analysis of the data has been performed using a two exponential parameterization of the associated gamma spectra. The relative intensity of the two components has been deduced as a function of the total mass of the interacting system and of the impact parameter. To attempt a characterization of the emission sources, correlations between photons and IMF's have been measured for the first time.

  6. Towards a better understanding of hard photon emission in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alba, R.; Maiolino, C.; Agodi, C.; Del Zoppo, A.; Coniglione, R.; Milazzo, P.M.; Sapienza, P.; Bellia, G.; Bruno, M.; Colonna, M.; Colonna, N.; D'Agostino, M.; Fiandri, M.L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Gramegna, F.; Iori, I.; Loukachine, K.; Margagliotti, G.V.; Mastinu, P.F.; Migneco, E.; Moroni, A.; Piattelli, P.; Rui, R.; Santonocito, D.; Tonetto, F.; Vannini, G.

    1999-01-01

    High energy photon spectra have been measured in several 58 Ni induced reactions at 30A MeV incident energy. A two source analysis of the data has been performed using a two exponential parameterization of the associated gamma spectra. The relative intensity of the two components has been deduced as a function of the total mass of the interacting system and of the impact parameter. To attempt a characterization of the emission sources, correlations between photons and IMF's have been measured for the first time

  7. Accuracy validation of incident photon fluence on DQE for various measurement conditions and X-ray units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Tomonobu; Kondo, Shimpei; Hayashi, Daiki; Koyama, Shuji

    2013-07-01

    Detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is widely used as a comprehensive metric for X-ray image evaluation in digital X-ray units. The incident photon fluence per air kerma (SNR²(in)) is necessary for calculating the DQE. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) reports the SNR²(in) under conditions of standard radiation quality, but this SNR²(in) might not be accurate as calculated from the X-ray spectra emitted by an actual X-ray tube. In this study, we evaluated the error range of the SNR²(in) presented by the IEC62220-1 report. We measured the X-ray spectra emitted by an X-ray tube under conditions of standard radiation quality of RQA5. The spectral photon fluence at each energy bin was multiplied by the photon energy and the mass energy absorption coefficient of air; then the air kerma spectrum was derived. The air kerma spectrum was integrated over the whole photon energy range to yield the total air kerma. The total photon number was then divided by the total air kerma. This value is the SNR²(in). These calculations were performed for various measurement parameters and X-ray units. The percent difference between the calculated value and the standard value of RQA5 was up to 2.9%. The error range was not negligibly small. Therefore, it is better to use the new SNR²(in) of 30694 (1/(mm(2) μGy)) than the current [Formula: see text] of 30174 (1/(mm(2) μGy)).

  8. Light Emission and Energy Transfer in Nanoscale Semiconductor Photonic Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolbas, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The overall objective of this experimental program is to control the light emission properties and energy transfer mechanisms in nanoscale semiconductor structures in order to realize new or improved photonic devices...

  9. Transfer Matrix for Obliquely Incident Electromagnetic Waves Propagating in One Dimension Plasma Photonic Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Bin

    2009-01-01

    Based on the electromagnetic theory and by using an analytical technique-the transfer matrix method, the obliquely incident electromagnetic waves propagating in one-dimension plasma photonic crystals is studied. The dispersion relations for both the P-polarization waves and S-polarization waves, depending on the plasma density, plasma thickness and period, are discussed. (basic plasma phenomena)

  10. A filter technique for optimising the photon energy response of a silicon pin diode dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsher, R.H.; Eisen, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Unless they are energy compensated, silicon PIN diodes used in electronic pocket dosemeters, have significant over-response below 200 keV. Siemens is using three diodes in parallel with individual filters to produce excellent energy and angular response. An algorithm based on the photon spectrum of a single diode could be used to flatten the energy response. The commercial practice is to use a single diode with a simple filter to flatten the energy response, despite the mediocre low energy photon. The filter technique with an opening has been used for energy compensating GM detectors and proportional counters and a new variation of it has been investigated which compensates the energy response of a silicon PIN diode and maintains an extended low energy response. It uses a composite filter of two or more materials with several openings whose individual area is in the range of 15% to 25% of the diode's active area. One opening is centred over the diode's active area and others are located at the periphery of the active area to preserve a good polar response to ±45 o . Monte Carlo radiation transport methods were used to simulate the coupled electron-photon transport through a Hamamatsu S2506-01 diode and to determine the energy response of the diode for a variety of filters. In current mode, the resultant dosemeter energy response relative to air dose was within -15% and +30% for 0 o incidence over the energy range from 15 keV to 1 MeV. In pulse mode, the resultant dosemeter energy response was within -25% and +50% for 0 o incidence over the energy range from 30 keV to 10 MeV. For ±45 o incidence, the energy response was within -25% and +40% from 40 keV to 10 MeV. Theoretical viability of the filter technique has been shown in this work (Author)

  11. Coupling the photon kinetics of soft photons with high energy photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, L. O.; Bingham, R.

    2017-10-01

    The description of electromagnetic fields based on the generalized photon kinetic theory, which takes advantage of the Wigner-Moyal description for the corresponding classical field theory, is capable of capturing collective plasma dynamics in the relativistic regime driven by broadband incoherent or partially coherent sources. We explore the possibility to extend this description to include the dynamics of hard photons in the plasma, whose interaction is dominated by single scattering processes. Examples of the modification of classical plasma instabilities due to the presence of hard photons is discussed. Work supported by the European Research Council (ERC-AdG-2015 InPairs Grant No. 695088).

  12. Partial cross sections of helium satellites at medium photon energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehlitz, R.; Sellin, I.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hemmers, O. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Still of current interest is the important role of single ionization with excitation compared to single ionization alone. The coupling between the electrons and the incoming photon is a single-particle operator. Thus, an excitation in addition to an ionization, leading to a so-called satellite line in a photoelectron spectrum, is entirely due to electron-electron interaction and probes the electron correlation in the ground and final state. Therefore the authors have undertaken the study of the intensity of helium satellites He{sup +}nl (n = 2 - 6) relative to the main photoline (n = 1) as a function of photon energy at photon energies well above threshold up to 900 eV. From these results they could calculate the partial cross-sections of the helium satellites. In order to test the consistency of their satellite-to-1s ratios with published double-to-single photoionization ratios, the authors calculated the double-to-single photoionization ratio from their measured ratios using the theoretical energy-distribution curves of Chang and Poe and Le Rouzo and Dal Cappello which proved to be valid for photon energies below 120 eV. These calculated double-to-single ionization ratios agree fairly well with recent ion measurements. In the lower photon energy range the authors ratios agree better with the ratios of Doerner et al. while for higher photon energies the agreement is better with the values of Levin et al.

  13. Partial cross sections of helium satellites at medium photon energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehlitz, R.; Sellin, I.A.; Hemmers, O.

    1997-01-01

    Still of current interest is the important role of single ionization with excitation compared to single ionization alone. The coupling between the electrons and the incoming photon is a single-particle operator. Thus, an excitation in addition to an ionization, leading to a so-called satellite line in a photoelectron spectrum, is entirely due to electron-electron interaction and probes the electron correlation in the ground and final state. Therefore the authors have undertaken the study of the intensity of helium satellites He + nl (n = 2 - 6) relative to the main photoline (n = 1) as a function of photon energy at photon energies well above threshold up to 900 eV. From these results they could calculate the partial cross-sections of the helium satellites. In order to test the consistency of their satellite-to-1s ratios with published double-to-single photoionization ratios, the authors calculated the double-to-single photoionization ratio from their measured ratios using the theoretical energy-distribution curves of Chang and Poe and Le Rouzo and Dal Cappello which proved to be valid for photon energies below 120 eV. These calculated double-to-single ionization ratios agree fairly well with recent ion measurements. In the lower photon energy range the authors ratios agree better with the ratios of Doerner et al. while for higher photon energies the agreement is better with the values of Levin et al

  14. Plastic scintillator response to low-energy photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, J. F.; Dempsey, J. F.; Kirov, A. S.; Monroe, J. I.; Binns, W. R.; Hedtjärn, H.

    1999-04-01

    The plastic scintillator (PS) is a promising dosimeter for brachytherapy and other low-energy photon applications because of its high sensitivity and approximate tissue equivalence. As part of our project to develop a new PS material which maximizes sensitivity and radiological equivalence to water, we have measured the response, (light output/unit air kerma), of PS to low-energy bremsstrahlung (20 to 57 keV average energies) x-rays as well as photons emitted by , , and sources, all of which were calibrated in terms of air kerma. The PS systems studied were a standard commercial PS, BC400 (Bicron Corporation, Newbury, OH), and our new sensitive and quench-resistant scintillator (polyvinyltoluene base and binary dye system) with and without 4% Cl loading intended to match the effective atomic number of water. For low-energy x-rays, was 20-57% relative to for photons. Chlorine loading clearly reduced the energy dependence of , which ranged from 46% to 85% relative to . However, even after using Monte Carlo photon-transport simulation to correct for the non-air equivalence of the PS, inherent dosimetric sensitivity still varied by 30% over the 20-400 keV energy range. Our work, one of the few measurements of PS response to low-energy photons, appears to confirm Birks' 1955 finding that ionization quenching reduces sensitivity to electrons below 125 keV. However, our results cannot be explained by Birks' widely used unimolecular quenching model.

  15. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Christine S.; Yock, Torunn I.; Nelson, Kerrie; Xu, Yang; Keating, Nancy L.; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study

  16. Incident energy dependence of pt correlations at relativistic energies

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, J; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bharadwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhatia, V S; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Daugherity, M; De Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Derevshchikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta, M R; Mazumdar; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; González, J E; Gos, H; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D P; Guertin, S M; Guo, Y; Sen-Gupta, A; Gutíerrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jedynak, M; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kowalik, K L; Krämer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krüger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lehocka, S; Le Vine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, L; Liu, Q J; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; López-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J N; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnik, Yu M; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnár, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Yu A; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevozchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M V; Potrebenikova, E V; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C A; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D M; Reid, J G; Reinnarth, J; Renault, G; Retière, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Savin, I; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shestermanov, K E; Shimansky, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sørensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E R; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T J; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Van Leeuwen, M; Van der Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N

    2005-01-01

    We present results for two-particle transverse momentum correlations, , as a function of event centrality for Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 20, 62, 130, and 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We observe correlations decreasing with centrality that are similar at all four incident energies. The correlations multiplied by the multiplicity density increase with incident energy and the centrality dependence may show evidence of processes such as thermalization, minijet production, or the saturation of transverse flow. The square root of the correlations divided by the event-wise average transverse momentum per event shows little or no beam energy dependence and generally agrees with previous measurements at the Super Proton Synchrotron.

  17. Continuous energy adjoint transport for photons in PHITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malins Alex

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adjoint Monte Carlo can be an effcient algorithm for solving photon transport problems where the size of the tally is relatively small compared to the source. Such problems are typical in environmental radioactivity calculations, where natural or fallout radionuclides spread over a large area contribute to the air dose rate at a particular location. Moreover photon transport with continuous energy representation is vital for accurately calculating radiation protection quantities. Here we describe the incorporation of an adjoint Monte Carlo capability for continuous energy photon transport into the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS. An adjoint cross section library for photon interactions was developed based on the JENDL- 4.0 library, by adding cross sections for adjoint incoherent scattering and pair production. PHITS reads in the library and implements the adjoint transport algorithm by Hoogenboom. Adjoint pseudo-photons are spawned within the forward tally volume and transported through space. Currently pseudo-photons can undergo coherent and incoherent scattering within the PHITS adjoint function. Photoelectric absorption is treated implicitly. The calculation result is recovered from the pseudo-photon flux calculated over the true source volume. A new adjoint tally function facilitates this conversion. This paper gives an overview of the new function and discusses potential future developments.

  18. Continuous energy adjoint transport for photons in PHITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malins, Alex; Machida, Masahiko; Niita, Koji

    2017-09-01

    Adjoint Monte Carlo can be an effcient algorithm for solving photon transport problems where the size of the tally is relatively small compared to the source. Such problems are typical in environmental radioactivity calculations, where natural or fallout radionuclides spread over a large area contribute to the air dose rate at a particular location. Moreover photon transport with continuous energy representation is vital for accurately calculating radiation protection quantities. Here we describe the incorporation of an adjoint Monte Carlo capability for continuous energy photon transport into the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS). An adjoint cross section library for photon interactions was developed based on the JENDL- 4.0 library, by adding cross sections for adjoint incoherent scattering and pair production. PHITS reads in the library and implements the adjoint transport algorithm by Hoogenboom. Adjoint pseudo-photons are spawned within the forward tally volume and transported through space. Currently pseudo-photons can undergo coherent and incoherent scattering within the PHITS adjoint function. Photoelectric absorption is treated implicitly. The calculation result is recovered from the pseudo-photon flux calculated over the true source volume. A new adjoint tally function facilitates this conversion. This paper gives an overview of the new function and discusses potential future developments.

  19. Electron and photon energy measurement calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Manzoni, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the energy measurement of electron and photon is paramount for many ATLAS physics analysis. The calibration of the energy measurement is performed in-situ using a large statistics of Z->ee events. The results obtained with the pp collisions data recorded in 2015 and 2016 at sqrt(s)= 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1 and 2.7 fb-1 respectively , as well as the corresponding uncertainties on the electron and photon energy scales, are presented.

  20. Electron and photon energy measurement calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00436885; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the energy measurement of electrons and photons is paramount for many ATLAS physics analyses. The calibration of the energy measurement is performed $in$-$situ$ using a large statistics of $Z \\rightarrow ee$ events. The results obtained with the $pp$ collisions data recorded in 2015 and 2016 at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb$^{-1}$ and 2.7 fb$^{-1}$ respectively, as well as the corresponding uncertainties on the electron and photon energy scales, are presented

  1. AlSb as a high-energy photon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, J.H.; Swierkowski, S.P.; Sherohman, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of using AlSb as a potential material for high-energy photon detection is examined by comparing the mobilities of the free carriers, the energy gap, the atomic number, and the carrier recombination time for AlSb, CdTe, Si, and Ge. It is concluded that at room temperature AlSb should be an intrinsically better high-energy photon detector than the three other materials. Simulated detector spectra for AlSb and CdTe are compared for ambient temperature detector performance

  2. Hard Photons:. a Probe of Dynamical Effects in Heavy Ion Collisions at Intermediate Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, R.; Agodi, C.; Maiolino, C.; Del Zoppo, A.; Colonna, M.; Bellia, G.; Coniglione, R.; Finocchiaro, P.; Loukachine, K.; Migneco, E.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Fiandri, M. L.; Vannini, G.; Colonna, N.; Gramegna, F.; Mastinu, P. F.; Iori, I.; Moroni, A.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Milazzo, P. M.; Rui, R.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal photons have been used as a clock to determine the time of IMF emission during the evolution of the nuclear reaction. The method has been applied to the reaction 58Ni + 197Au at 30 and 45 MeV/amu incident energy. The results put in evidence that the relative contribution of the two possible production mechanisms (dynamical and statistical) is quite different in the two cases. A comparison with theoretical calculations strongly supports the experimental findings.

  3. Electromagnetic energy flow lines as possible paths of photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidovic, M [Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar Kralja Aleksandra 73, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Sanz, A S; Miret-Artes, S [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Arsenovic, D; Bozic, M [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)], E-mail: milena@grf.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: asanz@imaff.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: arsenovic@phy.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: bozic@phy.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: s.miret@imaff.cfmac.csic.es

    2009-07-15

    Motivated by recent experiments where interference patterns behind a grating are obtained by accumulating single photon events, we provide here an electromagnetic energy flow-line description to explain the emergence of such patterns. We find and discuss an analogy between the equation describing these energy flow lines and the equation of Bohmian trajectories used to describe the motion of massive particles.

  4. Experimental search for solar hidden photons in the eV energy range using kinetic mixing with photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, T.; Ohta, R.; Horie, T.; Suzuki, J.; Minowa, M.; Inoue, Y.

    2013-01-01

    We have searched for solar hidden photons in the eV energy range using a dedicated hidden photon detector. The detector consisted of a parabolic mirror with a diameter of 500 mm and a focal length of 1007 mm installed in a vacuum chamber, and a photomultiplier tube at its focal point. The detector was attached to the Tokyo axion helioscope, Sumico which has a mechanism to track the sun. From the result of the measurement, we found no evidence for the existence of hidden photons and set a limit on the photon-hidden photon mixing parameter χ depending on the hidden photon mass m γ'

  5. Plastic scintillator response to low-energy photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, J.F.; Dempsey, J.F.; Kirov, A.S.; Monroe, J.I.; Binns, W.R.; Hedtjaern, H.

    1999-01-01

    The plastic scintillator (PS) is a promising dosimeter for brachytherapy and other low-energy photon applications because of its high sensitivity and approximate tissue equivalence. As part of our project to develop a new PS material which maximizes sensitivity and radiological equivalence to water, we have measured the response, ε (light output/unit air kerma), of PS to low-energy bremsstrahlung (20 to 57 keV average energies) x-rays as well as photons emitted by 99m Tc, 192 Ir, and 137 Cs sources, all of which were calibrated in terms of air kerma. The PS systems studied were a standard commercial PS, BC400 (Bicron Corporation, Newbury, OH), and our new sensitive and quench-resistant scintillator (polyvinyltoluene base and binary dye system) with and without 4% Cl loading intended to match the effective atomic number of water. For low-energy x-rays, ε was 20-57% relative to ε for 192 Ir photons. Chlorine loading clearly reduced the energy dependence of ε, which ranged from 46% to 85% relative to 192 Ir. However, even after using Monte Carlo photon-transport simulation to correct for the non-air equivalence of the PS, inherent dosimetric sensitivity still varied by 30% over the 20-400 keV energy range. Our work, one of the few measurements of PS response to low-energy photons, appears to confirm Birks' 1955 finding that ionization quenching reduces sensitivity to electrons below 125 keV. However, our results cannot be explained by Birks' widely used unimolecular quenching model. (author)

  6. Response of monitoring instruments to high-energy photon radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Haridas, G; Pradhan, S D; Nayak, A R; Bhagwat, A M

    2000-01-01

    Response of commercially available monitoring instruments to high-energy photon radiation was studied under the stored beam condition of a few milliamperes in the storage ring of the Synchrotron Radiation Source, INDUS-I, at Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), Indore. The storage ring has a circumference of 18.96 m, where electrons at 450 MeV are stored for a few hours, during which the emitted synchrotron radiation is exploited for scientific research and other applications. Radiation environment near storage ring has bremsstrahlung photons of various energies (maximum 450 MeV). A study has indicated underestimation of dose by conventional radiation monitoring instruments by a factor of 2-4. Response after transmission of photons through massive shield was also studied, which indicated spectral degradation and good response by the survey meters.

  7. Thermoluminescent analyses of mean photon energy of a field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalieri, T. A.; De Paiva, F.; Fonseca, G.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H., E-mail: tassio.cavalieri@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Nowadays a common method of dosimetry is utilize the thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) of LiF, where for pure gamma field is typically used the LiF or CaF{sub 2} TLDs and for mixed neutron and gamma field dosimetry is used the pair TLD-600/TLD-700. The difference between these three LiF TLDs is the amount of isotope {sup 6}Li in their composition. The isotope {sup 6}Li has a great cross section for thermal neutrons, making the TLD-600 sensitive to thermal neutrons beyond the radiation gamma. Whereas the TLD-700 is considered sensitive only for radiation gamma. Some studies showed an energetic dependence of these TLDs for gammas rays. So the goal of this work was study these energetic dependence of TLDs from the angular coefficient of their response versus dose calibration curves when they were irradiated in four fields with photons of different energies: 43 keV, 662 keV, 1.2 MeV, 3 MeV. In order to create the calibration curves TLD, it was performed three irradiations with distinct exposure times for each photon energy. These studies showed a different angular coefficient to each curve; demonstrate the energetic dependence of these TLDs. By simulation with Monte Carlo based code, MCNP-5, it was observed the deposited photon dose due to different photons energies. From these simulations, it was also possible to observe a difference of dose deposition in TLDs when they were exposed to the same dose provided from different photons energies. These work showed the previously study of photon energetic dependence of LiF TLDs. (Author)

  8. Regularity of high energy photon events from gamma ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haowei; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2018-01-01

    The effect of Quantum Gravity (QG) may bring a tiny light speed variation as v(E)=c(1‑E/ELV), where E is the photon energy and ELV is a Lorentz violation scale. A remarkable regularity was suggested in previous studies to look for the light speed variation from high energy photon events of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). We provide a general analysis on the data of 25 bright GRBs observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST). Such method allows a completed scan over all possibilities in a more clean and impartial way without any bias compared to previous intuitive analysis. The results show that with the increase in the intrinsic energies of photons, such regularity truly emerges and gradually becomes significant. For photons with intrinsic energies higher than 40 GeV, the regularity exists at a significance of 3–5 σ with ELV=3.6× 1017 GeV determined by the GRB data.

  9. Electron and photon energy calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Falke, Saskia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the energy measurement of electron and photon is needed for many ATLAS physics analysis. The calibration of the energy measurement is performed in-situ using a large statistics of Z->ee events. A pre-requisite of this calibration is a good understanding of the material in front of the calorimeter and of the inter-calibration of the different calorimeter layers. The Z->ee sample is also used to measure the energy resolution. The results obtained with the pp collisions data at sqrt(s)=13 TeV in 2016 (2015) corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 33.9 (3.1)fb-1 of sqrt(s)=13 TeV are presented as well as the corresponding uncertainties on the electron and photon energy scales.

  10. Determination of energy distribution for photon and neutron microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todo, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    This work was undertaken to provide basic physical data for use in both microdosimetry and dosimetry of high energy photons and also in the neutron radiation field. It is described the formalism to determine the initial electron energy spectra in water irradiated by photons with energies up to 1 GeV. Calculations were performed with a Monte Carlo computer code, PHOEL-3, which is also described. The code treats explicitly the production of electron-positron pairs, Compton scattering, photoelectric absorption, and the emission of Auger electrons following the occurrence of K-shell vacancies in oxygen. The tables give directly the information needed to specify the absolute single-collision kerma in water, which approximates tissue, at each photon energy. Results for continuous photon energy spectra can be obtained by using linear interpolation with the tables. The conditions under which first-collision kerma approximate absorbed dose are discussed. A formula is given for estimating bremsstrahlung energy loss, one of the principal differences between kerma and absorbed dose in practical case. A study has been carried out, on the use of cylindrical, energy-proportional pulse-height detector for determining microdosimetric quantities, as neutron fractional dose spectra, D (L), in function of linear energy transfer, TLE. In the present study the Hurst detector was used and this device satisfies the requirement of the Bragg-Gray principle. It is developed a Monte Carlo Method to obtain the D(L) spectrum from a measured pulse-height spectrum H(h), and the knowledge of the distribution of recoil-particle track lenght, P(T) in the sensitive volume of the detector. These developed programs to find P(T) and D(L) are presented. The distribution of D(L) in LET were obtained using a known distribution of P(T) and the measured H(h) spectrum from sup(252)Cf neutron source. All the results are discussed and the conclusions are presented. (author)

  11. Photon and energy propagation in Cd Se quantum dot systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Guilherme A.; Santos, Erasto J.; Monte, Adamo F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Full text. Photon propagation is a crucial process in a wide type of optical materials being responsible for the dynamics and excitation spreading. The addition of Cd Se quantum dots (QDs) into a polystyrene (PS) matrix introduces new properties in the polymeric matrix making this new system a good candidate for improvement in light- emitting devices. A confocal microscope was adapted to scan the spatial distribution of emitted luminescence from the sample surface. Energy transfer processes could be associated with the photon propagation provided by the measured luminescence spatial distribution. We proposed that this energy propagation is caused by the photons capture and emission between the dots and besides other mechanics such as electronic transfer, hopping and resonance. This dynamic process can be understood by the spatial migration of excited states. These facts demonstrate the great importance of the energy transfer, absorption and capture processes in a QD system for the improvement of optical electronic devices. It has been found that re-absorption by ground and excited states plays an important role for the energy propagation. The investigation have been done for a wide range of inter-dot distance in such a way that we could observe how the energy transfer behaves according to this distance. We observed that the photon migration length (PML) increases by increasing the QD concentration and reaches the highest value for a given QD concentration, i.e., for a specific inter-dot distance. However, above this concentration the PML starts to decrease. This behavior indicates that the inter-dots distance is crucial in order to get the highest energy flux inside the sample. Thus, by measuring the PML and its wavelength dependence it is possible to understand the whole dynamics in the QD/PS system. All the processes verified so far give us the possibility to classify the QD/PS system as a good candidate to be employed in an optical QD-based device

  12. Cadmium zinc telluride detector for low photon energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyung-Wook; Wang, Kai; Reznic, Alla; Karim, Karim S.

    2010-04-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) is a polycrystalline radiation detector that has been investigated over the years for a variety of applications including Constellation X-ray space mission [1] and direct-conversion medical imaging such as digital mammography [2]. Due to its high conversion gain and low electron-hole pair creation energy (~4.43 eV) [3], it has found use in high end, photon counting medical imaging applications including positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, its potential in low photon energy applications has not been fully explored. In this work, we explore the capacity of the CZT material to count low photon energies (6 keV - 20 keV). These energies are of direct relevance to applications in gamma ray breast brachytheraphy and mammography, X-ray protein crystallography, X-ray mammography and mammography tomosynthesis. We also present a design that integrates the CZT direct conversion detector with an inhouse fabricated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor (TFT) passive pixel sensor (PPS) array. A CZT photoconductor (2 cm x 2 cm size, 5-mm-thick) prepared by the traveling heat method (THM) from RedlenTM is characterized. The current-voltage characteristics reveal a resistivity of 3.3 x 1011 Ω•cm and a steady state dark current in the range of nA. Photocurrent transients under different biases and illumination pulses are studied to investigate photogeneration and the charge trapping process. It is found that charge trapping plays a more significant role in transient behavior at low biases and low frequency.

  13. LDRD project 151362 : low energy electron-photon transport.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Bondi, Robert James; Crawford, Martin James

    2013-09-01

    At sufficiently high energies, the wavelengths of electrons and photons are short enough to only interact with one atom at time, leading to the popular %E2%80%9Cindependent-atom approximation%E2%80%9D. We attempted to incorporate atomic structure in the generation of cross sections (which embody the modeled physics) to improve transport at lower energies. We document our successes and failures. This was a three-year LDRD project. The core team consisted of a radiation-transport expert, a solid-state physicist, and two DFT experts.

  14. High-energy diffraction microscopy at the advanced photon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienert, U.; Li, S. F.; Hefferan, C. M.; Lind, J.; Suter, R. M.; Bernier, J. V.; Barton, N. R.; Brandes, M. C.; Mills, M. J.; Miller, M. P.; Jakobsen, B.; Pantleon, W.

    2011-07-01

    The status of the High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (HEDM) program at the 1-ID beam line of the Advanced Photon Source is reported. HEDM applies high energy synchrotron radiation for the grain and sub-grain scale structural and mechanical characterization of polycrystalline bulk materials in situ during thermomechanical loading. Case studies demonstrate the mapping of grain boundary topology, the evaluation of stress tensors of individual grains during tensile deformation and comparison to a finite element modeling simulation, and the characterization of evolving dislocation structure. Complementary information is obtained by post mortem electron microscopy on the same sample volume previously investigated by HEDM.

  15. Search for high energy γ-rays emission in 28Si, 32Si+64Ni dissipative reactions at about 5 MeV/amu incident energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Anzalone, A.; Coniglione, R.; Zoppo, A. del; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Papa, M.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Wang, Q.; DeRosa, A.; Fioretto, E.; Inglima, G.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.

    1991-01-01

    Photons emitted in the 28 Si+ 64 Ni and 32 S+ 64 Ni reactions at 143 MeV and 156 MeV incident energy respectively, have been detected in coincidence with the ejected charged fragments. An array of 48 BaF 2 γ-rays detector and 6 solid state silicon detector telescopes have been used. Photon energy spectra measured in the energy range from 2 to 20 MeV in coincidence with ejectiles coming from deep inelastic reactions, are consistent with statistical emission from the reaction products. (orig.)

  16. Search for high energy. gamma. -rays emission in sup 28 Si, sup 32 Si+ sup 64 Ni dissipative reactions at about 5 MeV/amu incident energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Anzalone, A.; Coniglione, R.; Zoppo, A. del; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Papa, M.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Wang, Q. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud); Bellia, G.; Cavallaro, S.; Migneco, E.; Pappalardo, G.; Rizzo, F.; Russo, G. (Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud); Cardella, G.; Wang, G.S. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy)); DeRosa, A.; Fioretto, E.; Inglima, G.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M. (Naples-2 Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Naples (Italy))

    1991-11-01

    Photons emitted in the {sup 28}Si+{sup 64}Ni and {sup 32}S+{sup 64}Ni reactions at 143 MeV and 156 MeV incident energy respectively, have been detected in coincidence with the ejected charged fragments. An array of 48 BaF{sub 2} {gamma}-rays detector and 6 solid state silicon detector telescopes have been used. Photon energy spectra measured in the energy range from 2 to 20 MeV in coincidence with ejectiles coming from deep inelastic reactions, are consistent with statistical emission from the reaction products. (orig.).

  17. On the low-energy limit of one-loop photon-graviton amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastianelli, F.; Corradini, O.; Dávila, J.M.; Schubert, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present first results of a systematic study of the structure of the low-energy limit of the one-loop photon-graviton amplitudes induced by massive scalars and spinors. Our main objective is the search of KLT-type relations where effectively two photons merge into a graviton. We find such a relation at the graviton-photon-photon level. We also derive the diffeomorphism Ward identity for the 1PI one-graviton-N-photon amplitudes.

  18. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying thescience and technology of nanophotonics, its materials andstructures This volume presents nanophotonic structures and Materials.Nanophotonics is photonic science and technology that utilizeslight/matter interactions on the nanoscale where researchers arediscovering new phenomena and developing techniques that go wellbeyond what is possible with conventional photonics andelectronics.The topics discussed in this volume are: CavityPhotonics; Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates; Displays;E-paper; Graphene; Integrated Photonics; Liquid Cry

  19. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying Biomedical Photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy This volume discusses biomedical photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy, the basic physical principles underlying the technology and its applications. The topics discussed in this volume are: Biophotonics; Fluorescence and Phosphorescence; Medical Photonics; Microscopy; Nonlinear Optics; Ophthalmic Technology; Optical Tomography; Optofluidics; Photodynamic Therapy; Image Processing; Imaging Systems; Sensors; Single Molecule Detection; Futurology in Photonics. Comprehensive and accessible cov

  20. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    This book covers modern photonics accessibly and discusses the basic physical principles underlying all the applications and technology of photonicsThis volume covers the basic physical principles underlying the technology and all applications of photonics from statistical optics to quantum optics. The topics discussed in this volume are: Photons in perspective; Coherence and Statistical Optics; Complex Light and Singular Optics; Electrodynamics of Dielectric Media; Fast and slow Light; Holography; Multiphoton Processes; Optical Angular Momentum; Optical Forces, Trapping and Manipulation; Pol

  1. Energy calibration of tagged photons by the d (γ,π-pp) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yuncheng; Wang Tieshan; Nobuyuki Chiga; Yu Fujii; Kenta Futatsukawa; Osamu Hashimoto; Hiroki Kanda; Masashi Kaneta; Daisuke Kawama; Yue Ma; Kazushige Maeda; Tomofumi Maruta; Nayuta Maruyama; Akihiko Matsumura; Youhei Miyagi; Koji Miwa; Satoshi N Nakamura; Koutarou Shirotori; Hirokazu Tamura; Kyo Tsukada; Kentaro Hirose; Takatsugu Ishikawa; Hajime Shimizu; Koutaku Suzuki; Tadaaki Tamae; Hirohito Yamazaki

    2010-01-01

    The energy of tagged photons, which were provided from the internal photon tagging system of the Laboratory of Nuclear Science, Tohoku University, has been calibrated using the d (γ,π - pp) reaction. Charged pions and protons in the final state were detected with the Neutral Kaon Spectrometer (NKS2). Photon energies were obtained from the reaction of d (γ,π - pp). The derived photon energy was consistent with the design of the tagger system and the previous measurement using electron-positron pair production. The consistency demonstrates the performance of NKS2 and the capability of the photon energy calibration using d (γ,π - pp). (authors)

  2. Photon Strength and the Low-Energy Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedeking, M; Bernstein, L A; Krticka, M; Bleuel, D L; Allmond, J M; Basunia, M S; Burke, J T; Fallon, P; Firestone, R B; Goldblum, B L; Hatarik, R; Lake, P T; Lee, I Y; Lesher, S R; Paschalis, S; Petri, M; Phair, L; Scielzo, N D

    2012-02-22

    The ability of atomic nuclei to emit and absorb photons with energy E{sub {gamma}} is known as the photon strength function f(E{sub {gamma}}). It has direct relevance to astrophysical element formation via neutron capture processes due to its central role in nuclear reactions. Studies of f(E{sub {gamma}}) have benefited from a wealth of data collected in neutron capture and direct reactions but also from newly commissioned inelastic photon scattering facilities. The majority of these experimental methods, however, rely on the use of models because measured {gamma}-ray spectra are simultaneously sensitive to both the nuclear level density and f(E{sub {gamma}}). As excitation energy increases towards the particle separation energies, the level density increases rapidly, creating the quasi-continuum. Nuclear properties in this excitation energy region are best characterized using statistical quantities, such as f(E{sub {gamma}}). A point of contention in studies of the quasi-continuum has been an unexpected and unexplained increase in f(E{sub {gamma}}) at low {gamma}-ray energies (i.e. below E{sub {gamma}} {approx}3 MeV) in a subset of light-to-medium mass nuclei. Ideally, a new model-independent experimental technique is required to address questions regarding the existence and origin of this low-energy enhancement in f(E{sub {gamma}}). Here such a model-independent approach is presented for determining the shape of f(E{sub {gamma}}) over a wide range of energies. The method involves the use of coupled high-resolution particle and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to determine the emission of {gamma} rays from the quasi-continuum in a nucleus with defined excitation energy to individual discrete levels of known spins and parities. This method shares characteristics of two neutron capture-based techniques: the Average Resonance Capture (ARC) and the Two-Step Cascade analysis (TSC). The power of the new technique lies in the additional ability to positively identify primary

  3. Triplet-triplet annihilation photon-upconversion: towards solar energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Victor; Dzebo, Damir; Abrahamsson, Maria; Albinsson, Bo; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2014-06-14

    Solar power production and solar energy storage are important research areas for development of technologies that can facilitate a transition to a future society independent of fossil fuel based energy sources. Devices for direct conversion of solar photons suffer from poor efficiencies due to spectrum losses, which are caused by energy mismatch between the optical absorption of the devices and the broadband irradiation provided by the sun. In this context, photon-upconversion technologies are becoming increasingly interesting since they might offer an efficient way of converting low energy solar energy photons into higher energy photons, ideal for solar power production and solar energy storage. This perspective discusses recent progress in triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) photon-upconversion systems and devices for solar energy applications. Furthermore, challenges with evaluation of the efficiency of TTA-photon-upconversion systems are discussed and a general approach for evaluation and comparison of existing systems is suggested.

  4. The performance of photons rainbow-colored energy experimental lecture schools in the kids' science museum of photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshiya, Taiji; Sasaki, Kazuya; Nishikawa, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    The Kansai Photon Science Institute (KPSI) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been promoting various activities of public understanding of science and technology, to be focused on the photon science, which is characterized by activities on science lectures and science events based on science and experiment classrooms, by utilizing the science museum of the JAEA (The Kids' Science Museum of Photons). In this phase, the KPSI extends systematically trial activities of the science museum to be as an experimental apparatus for studying on science and technology, including the program for promoting activities on public understanding of science and technology at the region. (author)

  5. Search for ultra high energy primary photons at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colalillo Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pierre Auger Observatory, located in Argentina, provides an unprecedented integrated aperture in the search for primary photons with energy above 1017 eV over a large portion of the southern sky. Such photons can be detected in principle via the air showers they initiate at such energies, using the complement of Auger Observatory detectors. We discuss the results obtained in diffuse and directional searches for primary photons in the EeV energy range.

  6. Investigation of photon detection probability dependence of SPADnet-I digital photon counter as a function of angle of incidence, wavelength and polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Játékos, Balázs, E-mail: jatekosb@eik.bme.hu; Ujhelyi, Ferenc; Lőrincz, Emőke; Erdei, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    SPADnet-I is a prototype, fully digital, high spatial and temporal resolution silicon photon counter, based on standard CMOS imaging technology, developed by the SPADnet consortium. Being a novel device, the exact dependence of photon detection probability (PDP) of SPADnet-I was not known as a function of angle of incidence, wavelength and polarization of the incident light. Our targeted application area of this sensor is next generation PET detector modules, where they will be used along with LYSO:Ce scintillators. Hence, we performed an extended investigation of PDP in a wide range of angle of incidence (0° to 80°), concentrating onto a 60 nm broad wavelength interval around the characteristic emission peak (λ=420 nm) of the scintillator. In the case where the sensor was optically coupled to a scintillator, our experiments showed a notable dependence of PDP on angle, polarization and wavelength. The sensor has an average PDP of approximately 30% from 0° to 60° angle of incidence, where it starts to drop rapidly. The PDP turned out not to be polarization dependent below 30°. If the sensor is used without a scintillator (i.e. the light source is in air), the polarization dependence is much less expressed, it begins only from 50°.

  7. Search for Invisible Decays of Sub-GeV Dark Photons in Missing-Energy Events at the CERN SPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, D; Burtsev, V; Cooke, D; Crivelli, P; Depero, E; Dermenev, A V; Donskov, S V; Dubinin, F; Dusaev, R R; Emmenegger, S; Fabich, A; Frolov, V N; Gardikiotis, A; Gninenko, S N; Hösgen, M; Kachanov, V A; Karneyeu, A E; Ketzer, B; Kirpichnikov, D V; Kirsanov, M M; Kovalenko, S G; Kramarenko, V A; Kravchuk, L V; Krasnikov, N V; Kuleshov, S V; Lyubovitskij, V E; Lysan, V; Matveev, V A; Mikhailov, Yu V; Myalkovskiy, V V; Peshekhonov, V D; Peshekhonov, D V; Petuhov, O; Polyakov, V A; Radics, B; Rubbia, A; Samoylenko, V D; Tikhomirov, V O; Tlisov, D A; Toropin, A N; Trifonov, A Yu; Vasilishin, B; Vasquez Arenas, G; Ulloa, P; Zhukov, K; Zioutas, K

    2017-01-06

    We report on a direct search for sub-GeV dark photons (A^{'}), which might be produced in the reaction e^{-}Z→e^{-}ZA^{'} via kinetic mixing with photons by 100 GeV electrons incident on an active target in the NA64 experiment at the CERN SPS. The dark photons would decay invisibly into dark matter particles resulting in events with large missing energy. No evidence for such decays was found with 2.75×10^{9} electrons on target. We set new limits on the γ-A^{'} mixing strength and exclude the invisible A^{'} with a mass ≲100  MeV as an explanation of the muon g_{μ}-2 anomaly.

  8. Advanced Photonic Processes for Photovoltaic and Energy Storage Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sygletou, Maria; Petridis, Constantinos; Kymakis, Emmanuel; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2017-10-01

    Solar-energy harvesting through photovoltaic (PV) conversion is the most promising technology for long-term renewable energy production. At the same time, significant progress has been made in the development of energy-storage (ES) systems, which are essential components within the cycle of energy generation, transmission, and usage. Toward commercial applications, the enhancement of the performance and competitiveness of PV and ES systems requires the adoption of precise, but simple and low-cost manufacturing solutions, compatible with large-scale and high-throughput production lines. Photonic processes enable cost-efficient, noncontact, highly precise, and selective engineering of materials via photothermal, photochemical, or photophysical routes. Laser-based processes, in particular, provide access to a plethora of processing parameters that can be tuned with a remarkably high degree of precision to enable innovative processing routes that cannot be attained by conventional approaches. The focus here is on the application of advanced light-driven approaches for the fabrication, as well as the synthesis, of materials and components relevant to PV and ES systems. Besides presenting recent advances on recent achievements, the existing limitations are outlined and future possibilities and emerging prospects discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Free-Free Transitions in the Presence of Laser Fields and Debye Potential at Very Low Incident Electron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anand

    2012-01-01

    We study the free-free transition in electron-helium ion in the ground state and embedded in a Debye potential in the presence of an external laser field at very low incident electron energies. The laser field is treated classically while the collision dynamics is treated quantum mechanically. The laser field is chosen as monochromatic, linearly polarized and homogeneous. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing Volkov wave function for it. The scattering wave function for the incident electron on the target embedded in a Debye potential is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange. We calculate the laser-assisted differential and total cross sections for free-free transition for absorption/emission of a single photon or no photon exchange. The results will be presented at the conference.

  10. Dipole model for double meson production in two-photon interactions at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, V.P. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Caixa Postal 354, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Machado, M.V.T. [Universidade Federal do Pampa, Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas, Campus de Bage, Bage, RS (Brazil)

    2007-02-15

    In this work double vector meson production in two-photon interactions at high energies is investigated considering saturation physics. We extend the color dipole picture for this process and study the energy and virtuality dependence of the forward differential cross section. A comparison with previous results is presented, and the contribution of the different photon polarizations is estimated. (orig.)

  11. Ultra-Fast Low Energy Switching Using an InP Photonic Crystal H0 Nanocavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Yi; Palushani, Evarist; Heuck, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    Pump-probe measurements on InP photonic crystal H0 nanocavities show large-contrast ultrafast switching at low pulse energy. For large pulse energies, high-frequency carrier density oscillations are induced, leading to pulsesplitting....

  12. Study of Gamma Ray Exposure Buildup Factor for Some Ceramics with Photon Energy, Penetration Depth and Chemical Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejbir Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma ray exposure buildup factor for some ceramics such as boron nitride (BN, magnesium diboride (MgB2, silicon carbide (SiC, titanium carbide (TiC and ferrite (Fe3O4 has been computed using five parametric geometric progression (G.P. fitting method in the energy range of 0.015 to 15.0 MeV, up to the penetration of 40 mean free path (mfp. The variation of exposure buildup factors for all the selected ceramics with incident photon energy, penetration depth, and chemical composition has been studied.

  13. Photon spectrometry for the determination of the dose-rate constant of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Nath, Ravinder

    2007-01-01

    Accurate determination of dose-rate constant (Λ) for interstitial brachytherapy sources emitting low-energy photons (<50 keV) has remained a challenge in radiation dosimetry because of the lack of a suitable absolute dosimeter for accurate measurement of the dose rates near these sources. Indeed, a consensus value of Λ taken as the arithmetic mean of the dose-rate constants determined by different research groups and dosimetry techniques has to be used at present for each source model in order to minimize the uncertainties associated with individual determinations of Λ. Because the dosimetric properties of a source are fundamentally determined by the characteristics of the photons emitted by the source, a new technique based on photon spectrometry was developed in this work for the determination of dose-rate constant. The photon spectrometry technique utilized a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer to measure source-specific photon characteristics emitted by the low-energy sources and determine their dose-rate constants based on the measured photon-energy spectra and known dose-deposition properties of mono-energetic photons in water. This technique eliminates many of the difficulties arising from detector size, the energy dependence of detector sensitivity, and the use of non-water-equivalent solid phantoms in absolute dose rate measurements. It also circumvents the uncertainties that might be associated with the source modeling in Monte Carlo simulation techniques. It was shown that the estimated overall uncertainty of the photon spectrometry technique was less than 4%, which is significantly smaller than the reported 8-10% uncertainty associated with the current thermo-luminescent dosimetry technique. In addition, the photon spectrometry technique was found to be stable and quick in Λ determination after initial setup and calibration. A dose-rate constant can be determined in less than two hours for each source. These features make it ideal to determine

  14. Increasing quantum yield of sodium salicylate above 80 eV photon energy: Implications for photoemission cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindle, D. W.; Ferrett, T. A.; Heimann, P. A.; Shirley, D. A.

    1986-08-01

    The quantum yield of the visible scintillator sodium salicylate is found to increase in the incident photon-energy range 80-270 eV. Because of its use as a photon-flux monitor in recent gas-phase photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, previously reported partial cross sections for Hg (4f, 5p, and 5d subshells) and CH3I (I 4d subshell) in this energy range are corrected, and new values are reported. For Hg, the correction brings the experimental data into better overall agreement with theory. However, considerable uncertainty remains in the absolute scale derived from previous Hg photoabsorption measurements, and no single rescaling of the subshell cross sections could simultaneously bring all three into agreement with available theoretical calculations.

  15. Plasma Photonic Devices for High Energy Density Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, R.

    2005-01-01

    High power laser technologies are opening a variety of attractive fields of science and technology using high energy density plasmas such as plasma physics, laboratory astrophysics, material science, nuclear science including medical applications and laser fusion. The critical issues in the applications are attributed to the control of intense light and enormous density of charged particles including efficient generation of the particles such as MeV electrons and protons with a current density of TA/cm2. Now these application possibilities are limited only by the laser technology. These applications have been limited in the control of the high power laser technologies and their optics. However, if we have another device consisted of the 4th material, i.e. plasma, we will obtain a higher energy density condition and explore the application possibilities, which could be called high energy plasma device. One of the most attractive devices has been demonstrated in the fast ignition scheme of the laser fusion, which is cone-guiding of ultra-intense laser light in to high density regions1. This is one of the applications of the plasma device to control the ultra-intense laser light. The other role of the devices consisted of transient plasmas is control of enormous energy-density particles in a fashion analogous to light control with a conventional optical device. A plasma fibre (5?m/1mm), as one example of the devices, has guided and deflected the high-density MeV electrons generated by ultra-intense laser light 2. The electrons have been well collimated with either a lens-like plasma device or a fibre-like plasma, resulting in isochoric heating and creation of ultra-high pressures such as Giga bar with an order of 100J. Plasmas would be uniquely a device to easily control the higher energy density particles like a conventional optical device as well as the ultra-intense laser light, which could be called plasma photonic device. (Author)

  16. Free-Free Transitions in the Presence of Laser Fields at Very Low Incident Electron Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, Chandana

    2010-01-01

    We study the free-free transition in electron-hydrogenic systems in ground state in presence of an external laser field at very loud incident energies. The laser field is treated classically while the collision dynamics is treated quantum mechanically. The laser field is chosen to be monochromatic, linearly polarized and homogeneous. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a nonperturbative manner by choosing a Volkov wave function for it. The scattering weave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of the electron exchange, short-range as well as of the long-range interactions to get the S and P wave phase shifts while for the higher angular momentum phase shifts the exchange approximation has only been considered. We calculate the laser assisted differential cross sections (LADCS) for the aforesaid free-free transition process for single photon absorption/emission. The laser intensity is chosen to be much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the LADCS as compared to the field free (FF) cross sections. Unlike the FF ones, the LADCS exhibit some oscillations having a distinct maximum at a low value of the scattering angle depending on the laser parameters as well as on the incident energies.

  17. Development of an efficient scanning and purging magnet system for IMRT with narrow high energy photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Björn; Svensson, Roger; Holmberg, Rickard; Danared, Håkan; Brahme, Anders

    2009-12-01

    transmitted and photon generated electrons. The simulations show that its is possible to have a scan area on the patient of up to 43×40 cm2 for an incident electron energy of 50 MeV and 28×40 cm2 at 75 MeV, while at the same time adequately deflecting the transmitted electron beam.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations used to calculate the energy deposited in the coronary artery lumen as a function of iodine concentration and photon energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocine, Nora; Meignan, Michel; Masset, Hélène

    2018-04-01

    To better understand the risks of cumulative medical X-ray investigations and the possible causal role of contrast agent on the coronary artery wall, the correlation between iodinated contrast media and the increase of energy deposited in the coronary artery lumen as a function of iodine concentration and photon energy is investigated. The calculations of energy deposition have been performed using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation codes, namely PENetration and Energy LOss of Positrons and Electrons (PENELOPE) and Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). Exposure of a cylinder phantom, artery and a metal stent (AISI 316L) to several X-ray photon beams were simulated. For the energies used in cardiac imaging the energy deposited in the coronary artery lumen increases with the quantity of iodine. Monte Carlo calculations indicate a strong dependence of the energy enhancement factor (EEF) on photon energy and iodine concentration. The maximum value of EEF is equal to 25; this factor is showed for 83 keV and for 400 mg Iodine/mL. No significant impact of the stent is observed on the absorbed dose in the artery for incident X-ray beams with mean energies of 44, 48, 52 and 55 keV. A strong correlation was shown between the increase in the concentration of iodine and the energy deposited in the coronary artery lumen for the energies used in cardiac imaging and over the energy range between 44 and 55 keV. The data provided by this study could be useful for creating new medical imaging protocols to obtain better diagnostic information with a lower level of radiation exposure.

  19. Improved dose localization with dual energy photon irradiation in treatment of lateralized intracranial malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, G.; Gillin, M.T.; Murray, K.J.; Wilson, J.F.; Janjan, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    Dual energy photon irradiation (6 MV and 20 MV) was compared to conventional treatment planning with 6 MV photons in a lateralized intracranial malignancy. Dose volume analysis was performed of both the tumor plus a 2 cm margin (target volume, TV) and normal tissues (NT). Parallel opposed treatment using weightings of 1:1, 1.5:1, and 2:1 were compared for 6 MV photons alone or in combination with 20 MV photons. Uniform treatment of the TV was accomplished within the 60 Gy isodose. Significant differences were observed, however, in NT volumes receiving greater than or equal to 60 Gy and 45-59 Gy. Dual photon energy reduced treatment of NT volumes to greater than or equal to 60 Gy by 13% (177 cm3 vs 204 cm3 in 2:1 weighting) to 70% (147 cm3 vs 498 cm3 in 1:1 weighting) for comparable plans. Dose optimization was also performed for both 6 MV alone or in combination with 20 MV photons. Usual approaches to achieve dose lateralization with conventional isocentric techniques were applied including parallel opposed 6 MV photons ipsilaterally weighted 3.4:1 (POP), and a 110 degrees arc rotational field used to limit treatment to the eye (ARC). Dual energy photon optimized plans included a three beam parallel opposed plan (TOP) and a mixed photon ipsilateral (IPSI) approach. The technique using parallel opposed 20 MV photons and ipsilateral 6 MV photons (TOP) used beam weightings of 1.1 (contralateral 20 MVX): 1.6 (ipsilateral 6 MVX): 1 (ipsilateral 20 MVX) to achieve dose optimization. The ipsilateral approach with 6 MVX and 20 MVX (IPSI) used beam weightings of 1:1.4, respectively. All optimized plans demonstrated a 41% (120 cm3; POP) to 53% (95 cm3; TOP) improvement over parallel opposed 6 MV photons weighted 2:1 (204 cm3) in NT volume receiving greater than or equal to 60 Gy

  20. High energy high intensity coherent photon beam for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    What is proposed for the 20 TeV protons hitting a fixed target is to make a tertiary electron beam similar to that which is the basis of the tagged photon beam at Fermilab. Briefly, a zero degree neutral beam is formed by sweeping out the primary proton beam and any secondary charged particles. Then the photons, from the decay of π 0 in the neutral beam, are converted to e + e - pairs in a lead converter and a high quality electron beam is formed. This beam is brought to the target area where it is converted to a photon beam by Bremsstrahlung in a radiator

  1. Search for invisible decays of sub-GeV dark photons in missing-energy events at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, D.

    2017-01-05

    We report on a direct search for sub-GeV dark photons (A') which might be produced in the reaction e^- Z \\to e^- Z A' via kinetic mixing with photons by 100 GeV electrons incident on an active target in the NA64 experiment at the CERN SPS. The A's would decay invisibly into dark matter particles resulting in events with large missing energy. No evidence for such decays was found with 2.75\\cdot 10^{9} electrons on target. We set new limits on the \\gamma-A' mixing strength and exclude the invisible A' with a mass < 100 MeV as an explanation of the muon g_\\mu-2 anomaly.

  2. Relationships between energy fluence and energy incident on, emitted by or imparted to a body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, C A

    1979-11-01

    From knowledge of the energy and angular distribution of the fluence around a body, the energy incident on, emitted by or imparted to a body can be calculated. The calculation is easily performed if the quantity 'vectorial fluence' is used. Examples taken from the literature are used to illustrate the erroneous results obtained by integrating energy fluence over area instead of integrating the scalar product of vectorial energy fluence and vectorial area.

  3. Stringy Space-Time Foam and High-Energy Cosmic Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nick E

    2011-01-01

    In this review, I discuss briefly stringent tests of Lorentz-violating quantum space-time foam models inspired from String/Brane theories, provided by studies of high energy Photons from intense celestial sources, such as Active Galactic Nuclei or Gamma Ray Bursts. The theoretical models predict modifications to the radiation dispersion relations, which are quadratically suppressed by the string mass scale, and time delays in the arrival times of photons (assumed to be emitted more or less simultaneously from the source), which are proportional to the photon energy, so that the more energetic photons arrive later. Although the astrophysics at the source of these energetic photons is still not understood, and such non simultaneous arrivals, that have been observed recently, might well be due to non simultaneous emission as a result of conventional physics effects, nevertheless, rather surprisingly, the observed time delays can also fit excellently the stringy space-time foam scenarios, provided the space-time ...

  4. Molecular Desorption of a NEG St 707 Irradiated at Room Temperature with Synchrotron Radiation of 194 eV Critical Photon Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Le Pimpec, F; Laurent, Jean Michel

    2002-01-01

    Photon stimulated molecular desorption from a NEG St 707 (SAES Getters$^{TM}$) surface after conditioning and after saturation with isotopic carbon monoxide, 13C18O, has been studied on a dedicated beam line at the EPA ring at CERN. The synchrotron radiation of 194 eV critical energy and with an average photon intensity of ~1 10**17 photons.s**-1 was impinging on the sample at perpendicular incidence. It is found that the desorption yields h molecules/photon) of the characteristic gases in an UHV system (hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide) for a freshly activated NEG and for a NEG fully saturated with 13C18O are lower than that of 300 C baked stainless steel.

  5. Electromagnetic cascade in high-energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of high-energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high-energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when three-dimensional effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high-energy e-beam interacting with a counterstreaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  6. Electron and photon energy calibration with the ATLAS detector using LHC Run 1 data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Havránek, Miroslav; Hejbal, Jiří; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Němeček, Stanislav; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Vrba, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 10 (2014), "3071-1"-"3071-48" ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13009 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : photon * energy * calibration * detector * resolution * showers * electromagnetic * electron * transverse energy * CERN LHC Coll * calorimeter Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 5.084, year: 2014

  7. Measurement of the BESSY II electron beam energy by Compton-backscattering of laser photons

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, R; Thornagel, R; Brandt, G; Görgen, R; Ulm, G

    2002-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of all storage ring parameters is essential for the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) to operate the electron storage ring BESSY II as a primary source standard. One parameter entering the Schwinger equation for the calculation of the spectral photon flux of bending magnet radiation is the electron beam energy. So at BESSY II the electron beam energy is measured by two independent techniques one of which is described in this paper: the photons from a CO sub 2 -laser are scattered in a head-on collision with the stored electrons. From the spectrum of the backscattered photons that are detected by an energy-calibrated HPGe detector the electron beam energy can be determined. The experimental set-up at the BESSY II electron storage ring as well as the current experimental status are described for operation of the storage ring at the energies of 900 and 1700 MeV.

  8. Photon collider beam simulation with CAIN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the laser pulse and the beam–beam interaction, is presented in figure 1. Energy flow obtained from the simulation was scaled to the average beam power. After the. Compton scattering, most of the incident electron beam power is transfered to the photon beam. However, the high-energy photons are very well-collimated ...

  9. Theoretical and experimental study of an energy-reinforced braking radiation photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertin, Pierre-Yves

    1966-01-01

    This research thesis reports the theoretical study of a photon beam raised towards high energies, its experimental implementation, the definition of a gamma spectrometry method which aimed at checking various hypotheses used in the beam theoretical study. After a presentation of the theory of phenomena of electron braking radiation, of materialisation of photons into positon-negaton pair, and of issues related to multiple Coulomb diffusion, the author reports the study of the different solutions which allow a photon beam to be obtained. A braking radiation of mono-kinetic electron has been used. This braking radiation is reinforced by absorption of low energy protons in a column of lithium hydride. The author describes how the beam is built up, and the experimental approach. He describes how raw data are processed to get rid of the influence of the multiple Coulomb diffusion and of the braking radiation. Experimental results are compared with those obtained by convolution of photon spectra and differential cross section

  10. The lateral characteristics of several ultra-high energy photon and hadron families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buja, Z.; Gladysz, E.; Mazurkiewicz, J.; Mikocki, S.; Szarska, M.; Zawiejski, L.

    1980-01-01

    In a thick lead X-ray film emulsion chamber of the Experiment Pamir, 8 ultra-high energy photon and hadron families were detected. They are considered to be almost ''pure'' families. The compound lateral characteristics for photon families indicate an existence of two groups of particles which have different average transverse momenta. A quite well visible azimuthal asymmetry in the number and transverse momenta values of produced particles is observed. (author)

  11. Computation of the mass attenuation coefficient of polymeric materials at specific gamma photon energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirji, Rajeshwari; Lobo, Blaise

    2017-06-01

    The gamma ray mass attenuation coefficients of ten synthetic polymeric materials, namely, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Polyethylene terephthalate (PET), Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), Polypropylene (PP) and Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) have been calculated using second order polynomial equation and logarithmic interpolation formula at selected gamma photon energies, in the energy range starting from 14.4 keV up to 1332 keV. It is important to note that second order polynomial equation fits very well with NIST data for all the polymeric materials considered here, for gamma photon energies ranging from 300 keV up to 2000 keV. Third order polynomial fitting is best suited for lower gamma photon energies (from 10 keV up to 200 keV).

  12. 26th International Symposium on Lepton Photon Interactions at High Energies

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The XXVI International Symposium on Lepton Photon Interactions at High Energies will take place in San Francisco, California from June 24-29, 2013. The Conference follows the tradition of a long series of high energy physics conferences, the International Symposia on Lepton and Photon Interactions at High Energies. The program features plenary sessions covering topics of major interest to the particle physics community. A poster session will be organized where students and young postdocs may present their work. The conference is hosted by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and will take place at the UCSF Mission Bay Conference Center.

  13. Cosmological effects of scalar-photon couplings: dark energy and varying-α Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avgoustidis, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Martins, C.J.A.P.; Monteiro, A.M.R.V.L.; Vielzeuf, P.E. [Centro de Astrofísica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Luzzi, G., E-mail: tavgoust@gmail.com, E-mail: Carlos.Martins@astro.up.pt, E-mail: mmonteiro@fc.up.pt, E-mail: up110370652@alunos.fc.up.pt, E-mail: gluzzi@lal.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire de l' Accélérateur Linéaire, Université de Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Bâtiment 200, BP 34, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2014-06-01

    We study cosmological models involving scalar fields coupled to radiation and discuss their effect on the redshift evolution of the cosmic microwave background temperature, focusing on links with varying fundamental constants and dynamical dark energy. We quantify how allowing for the coupling of scalar fields to photons, and its important effect on luminosity distances, weakens current and future constraints on cosmological parameters. In particular, for evolving dark energy models, joint constraints on the dark energy equation of state combining BAO radial distance and SN luminosity distance determinations, will be strongly dominated by BAO. Thus, to fully exploit future SN data one must also independently constrain photon number non-conservation arising from the possible coupling of SN photons to the dark energy scalar field. We discuss how observational determinations of the background temperature at different redshifts can, in combination with distance measures data, set tight constraints on interactions between scalar fields and photons, thus breaking this degeneracy. We also discuss prospects for future improvements, particularly in the context of Euclid and the E-ELT and show that Euclid can, even on its own, provide useful dark energy constraints while allowing for photon number non-conservation.

  14. Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon beamstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoya, Kaoru; Chen, Pisin

    1989-03-01

    The final electron energy spectrum under multi-photon beamstrahlung process is derived analytically in the classical and the intermediate regimes. The maximum disruption angle from the low energy tail of the spectrum is also estimated. The results are then applied to the TLC and the CLIC parameters. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Physics of reflective optics for the soft gamma-ray photon energy range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Perea, Mónica; Descalle, Marie-Anne; Soufli, Regina

    2013-01-01

    Traditional multilayer reflective optics that have been used in the past for imaging at x-ray photon energies as high as 200 keV are governed by classical wave phenomena. However, their behavior at higher energies is unknown, because of the increasing effect of incoherent scattering and the disag...

  16. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, B P; Molloi, S

    2014-12-07

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for x-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm(2) in detection area. The angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded x-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of x-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic x-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the x-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory.

  17. Narrow-band photon beam via laser Compton scattering in an energy recovery linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Akagi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Narrow-bandwidth photon beams in the x-ray and γ-ray energy ranges are expected to be applied in various fields. An energy recovery linac (ERL-based laser Compton scattering (LCS source employing a laser enhancement cavity can produce a high-flux and narrow-bandwidth photon beam. We conducted the first experiment of an ERL-based LCS source in combination with a laser enhancement cavity. We obtained LCS photons with an energy of 6.95±0.01  keV by colliding an electron beam of 20 MeV with a laser of 1064 nm wavelength. The photon flux at the interaction point was evaluated to be (2.6±0.1×10^{7}  photons/s with an average beam current of 58  μA and an average laser power of 10 kW. The energy bandwidth was evaluated to be 0.4% (rms with an opening angle of 0.14 mrad. The technologies demonstrated in this experiment are applicable for future ERL-based LCS sources.

  18. Energy dependent response of plastic scintillation detectors to photon radiation of low to medium energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenau, Melanie; Radeck, Désirée; Bambynek, Markus; Sommer, Holger; Flühs, Dirk; Spaan, Bernhard; Eichmann, Marion

    2016-08-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors are promising candidates for the dosimetry of low- to medium-energy photons but quantitative knowledge of their energy response is a prerequisite for their correct use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the energy dependent response of small scintillation detectors (active volume plastic scintillator BC400. Different detectors made from BC400 were calibrated at a number of radiation qualities ranging from 10 to 280 kV and at a (60)Co beam. All calibrations were performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, the National Metrology Institute of Germany. The energy response in terms of air kerma, dose to water, and dose to the scintillator was determined. Conversion factors from air kerma to dose to water and to dose to the scintillator were derived from Monte Carlo simulations. In order to quantitatively describe the energy dependence, a semiempirical model known as unimolecular quenching or Birks' formula was fitted to the data and from this the response to secondary electrons generated within the scintillator material BC400 was derived. The detector energy response in terms of air kerma differs for different scintillator sizes and different detector casings. It is therefore necessary to take attenuation within the scintillator and in the casing into account when deriving the response in terms of dose to water from a calibration in terms of air kerma. The measured energy response in terms of dose to water for BC400 cannot be reproduced by the ratio of mean mass energy-absorption coefficients for polyvinyl toluene to water but shows evidence of quenching. The quenching parameter kB in Birks' formula was determined to be kB = (12.3 ± 0.9) mg MeV(-1) cm(-2). The energy response was quantified relative to the response to (60)Co which is the common radiation quality for the calibration of therapy dosemeters. The observed energy dependence could be well explained with the assumption of ionization quenching as described

  19. Does a deformation of special relativity imply energy dependent photon time delays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, J. M.; Cortés, J. L.; Relancio, J. J.

    2018-01-01

    Theoretical arguments in favor of energy dependent photon time delays from a modification of special relativity (SR) have met with recent gamma ray observations that put severe constraints on the scale of such deviations. We review the case of the generality of this theoretical prediction in the case of a deformation of SR and find that, at least in the simple model based on the analysis of photon worldlines which is commonly considered, there are many scenarios compatible with a relativity principle which do not contain a photon time delay. This will be the situation for any modified dispersion relation which reduces to E=\\vert p\\vert for photons, independently of the quantum structure of spacetime. This fact opens up the possibility of a phenomenologically consistent relativistic generalization of SR with a new mass scale many orders of magnitude below the Planck mass.

  20. No Photon Left Behind: Advanced Optics at ARPA-E for Buildings and Solar Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branz, Howard M.

    2015-04-01

    Key technology challenges in building efficiency and solar energy utilization require transformational optics, plasmonics and photonics technologies. We describe advanced optical technologies funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy. Buildings technologies include a passive daytime photonic cooler, infra-red computer vision mapping for energy audit, and dual-band electrochromic windows based on plasmonic absorption. Solar technologies include novel hybrid energy converters that combine high-efficiency photovoltaics with concentrating solar thermal collection and storage. Because the marginal cost of thermal energy storage is low, these systems enable generation of inexpensive and dispatchable solar energy that can be deployed when the sun doesn't shine. The solar technologies under development include nanoparticle plasmonic spectrum splitting, Rugate filter interference structures and photovoltaic cells that can operate efficiently at over 400° C.

  1. Study of dose distribution in high energy photon beam used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafaravavy, R.; Raoelina Andriambololona; Bridier, A.

    2007-01-01

    The dose distribution in a medium traversed by a photon beam depends on beam energy, field size and medium nature. Percent depth dose (PDD), Dose Profile (DP) and Opening Collimator Factor (OCF) curves will be established to study this distribution. So, the PDD curves are composed by tree parts: the build-up region, the maximal dose and the quasi-equilibrium region. The maximum dose depth and the dose in depth increase with increasing photon beam energy but the dose surface decreases. The PDD increases with increasing field size.

  2. Search for ultra-high energy photons and neutrinos using Telescope Array surface detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troitsky S.V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We search for ultra-high energy photons by analyzing geometrical properties of shower fronts of events registered by the Telescope Array surface detector. By making use of an event-by-event statistical method, we derive upper limits on the absolute flux of primary photons with energies above 1019eV, 1019.5eV and above 1020eV based on the three years data from Telescope Array surface detector (May 2008 – May 2011. We report the results of down-going neutrino search based on the analysis of very inclined events.

  3. Unified description of neutron-, proton- and photon-induced fission cross sections in intermediate energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukahori, Tokio; Iwamoto, Osamu; Chiba, Satoshi

    2003-01-01

    For an accelerator-driven nuclear waste transmutation system, it is very important to estimate sub-criticality of core system for feasibility and design study of the system. The fission cross section in the intermediate energy range has an important role. A program FISCAL has been developed to calculate neutron-, proton- and photon-induced fission cross sections in the energy region from several tens of MeV to 3 GeV. FISCAL adopts the systematics considering experimental data for Ag- 243 Am. It is found that unified description of neutron-, proton- and photon-induced fission cross sections is available. (author)

  4. Double electron ionization in Compton scattering of high energy photons by helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Y.; Mikhailov, A.I.

    1995-01-01

    The cross section for double-electron ionization of two-electron atoms and ions in Compton scattering of high energy photons is calculated. It is demonstrated that its dependence on the incoming photon frequency is the same as that for single-electron ionization. The ratio of open-quotes double-to-singleclose quotes ionization in Compton scattering was found to be energy independent and almost identical with the corresponding value for photoionization. For the He atom it is 1.68%. This surprising result deserves experimental verification

  5. Double electron ionization in Compton scattering of high energy photons by helium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M.Y.; Mikhailov, A.I. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    1995-08-01

    The cross section for double-electron ionization of two-electron atoms and ions in Compton scattering of high energy photons is calculated. It is demonstrated that its dependence on the incoming photon frequency is the same as that for single-electron ionization. The ratio of {open_quotes}double-to-single{close_quotes} ionization in Compton scattering was found to be energy independent and almost identical with the corresponding value for photoionization. For the He atom it is 1.68%. This surprising result deserves experimental verification.

  6. Results on the Coherent Interaction of High Energy Electrons and Photons in Oriented Single Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Apyan, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballestrero, S.; Biino, C.; Birol, I.; Cenci, P.; Connell, S.H.; Eichblatt, S.; Fonseca, T.; Freund, A.; Gorini, B.; Groess, R.; Ispirian, K.; Ketel, T.J.; Kononets, Yu.V.; Lopez, A.; Mangiarotti, A.; van Rens, B.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Shieh, M.; Sona, P.; Strakhovenko, V.; Uggerhoj, E.; Uggerhj, Ulrik Ingerslev; Unel, G.; Velasco, M.; Vilakazi, Z.Z.; Wessely, O.; Kononets, Yu.V.

    2005-01-01

    The CERN-NA-59 experiment examined a wide range of electromagnetic processes for multi-GeV electrons and photons interacting with oriented single crystals. The various types of crystals and their orientations were used for producing photon beams and for converting and measuring their polarisation. The radiation emitted by 178 GeV unpolarised electrons incident on a 1.5 cm thick Si crystal oriented in the Coherent Bremsstrahlung (CB) and the String-of-Strings (SOS) modes was used to obtain multi-GeV linearly polarised photon beams. A new crystal polarimetry technique was established for measuring the linear polarisation of the photon beam. The polarimeter is based on the dependence of the Coherent Pair Production (CPP) cross section in oriented single crystals on the direction of the photon polarisation with respect to the crystal plane. Both a 1 mm thick single crystal of Germanium and a 4 mm thick multi-tile set of synthetic Diamond crystals were used as analyzers of the linear polarisation. A birefringence ...

  7. Search for ultra-high energy photons with AMIGA muon counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Nicolas Martin [Instituto de Tecnologias en Deteccion y Astroparticulas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie. (Germany); Collaboration: Pierre-Auger-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The study of the composition of ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CR) is one of the topical problems of astroparticle physics. The discovery of UHE photons, i.e. photons with energies around 1 EeV, in primary cosmic rays could be of particular interest for the field of astroparticle physics, and also for fundamental physics, since they are tracers of the highest-energy processes in the Universe. For the search for UHE photons at the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), several parameters have been proposed to distinguish between primary hadrons and photons. One of the most promising approaches to search for primary gamma rays is the study of the muon component in extensive air showers (EAS) produced in the interaction between the CR and the nuclei in the atmosphere. The number of muons in showers induced by gamma primaries is an order of magnitude lower than the hadronic primaries counterpart. The AMIGA extension of the PAO, consisting of an array of buried scintillators counters, allows the study of the muons produced during the EAS development. In this talk, the sensitivity of the muon counters to photon-initiated EAS and the possible discrimination procedures are discussed using dedicated EAS simulations with software package CORSIKA, including the detector response using the Offline package developed by the Pierre Auger Collaboration.

  8. Preliminary proposals for extending the ENDF format to allow incident charged particles and energy-angle correlation for emitted particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, R.E.; Stewart, L.; Hale, G.M.; Dunford, C.L.

    1984-04-01

    This rewrite of Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File, ENDF pertains to the latest version, ENDF/B-VI. Earlier versions provided representations for neutron cross sections and distributions, photon production from neutron reactions, a limited amount of charged-particle production from neutron reactions, photo-atomic interaction data, thermal neutron scattering data, and radionuclide production and decay data (including fission products). This version allows higher incident energies, adds more complete descriptions of the distributions of emitted particles, and provides for incident charged particles and photo-nuclear data by partitioning the ENDF library into sublibraries. Decay data, fission product yield data, thermal scattering data, and photo-atomic data have also been formally placed in sublibraries. In addition, this rewrite represents an extensive update to the Version V manual

  9. 18 CFR 1316.9 - Nuclear energy hazards and nuclear incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear energy hazards... Text of Conditions and Certifications § 1316.9 Nuclear energy hazards and nuclear incidents. When so... documents or actions: Nuclear Energy Hazards and Nuclear Incidents (Applicable only to contracts for goods...

  10. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  11. Low-energy-consumption hybrid lasers for silicon photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Ran, Qijiang; Mørk, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Physics and characteristics of a hybrid vertical-cavity laser that can be an on-chip Si light source with high speed and low energy consumption are discussed.......Physics and characteristics of a hybrid vertical-cavity laser that can be an on-chip Si light source with high speed and low energy consumption are discussed....

  12. Photon beam position monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  13. Photon energy conversion by near-zero permittivity nonlinear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luk, Ting S.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Campione, Salvatore

    2017-12-19

    Efficient harmonic light generation can be achieved with ultrathin films by coupling an incident pump wave to an epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) mode of the thin film. As an example, efficient third harmonic generation from an indium tin oxide nanofilm (.lamda./42 thick) on a glass substrate for a pump wavelength of 1.4 .mu.m was demonstrated. A conversion efficiency of 3.3.times.10.sup.-6 was achieved by exploiting the field enhancement properties of the ENZ mode with an enhancement factor of 200. This nanoscale frequency conversion method is applicable to other plasmonic materials and reststrahlen materials in proximity of the longitudinal optical phonon frequencies.

  14. Photon-photon colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  15. Review of kerma-area product and total energy incident on patients in radiography, mammography and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Hai; He, Wenjun; Huda, Walter; Mah, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    This study estimated the energy incident on patients in radiography, mammography and CT using data related to X-ray beam quantity and quality. The total X-ray beam quantity is the average Air Kerma multiplied by the X-ray beam area and expressed as the Kerma-Area Product (Gy cm -2 ). The X-ray beam quality primarily depends on the target material (and anode angle), X-ray voltage (and ripple) as well as X-ray beam filtration. For any X-ray spectra, dividing total energy (fluence x mean energy) by the X-ray beam Kerma-Area Product yields the energy per Kerma-Area Product value (ε/KAP). Published data on X-ray spectra characteristics and energy fluence per Air Kerma conversion factors were used to determine 1/KAP factors. In radiography, ε/KAP increased from 6 mJ Gy -1 cm -2 at the lowest X-ray tube voltage (50 kV) to 25 mJ Gy -1 cm -2 at the highest X-ray tube voltage (140 kV). 1/KAP values ranged between 1 and 5 mJ Gy -1 cm -2 in mammography and between 24 and 42 mJ Gy -1 cm -2 in CT. Changes in waveform ripple resulted in variations in ε/KAP of up to 15 %, similar to the effect of changes resulting in the choice of anode angle. For monoenergetic X-ray photons, there was a sigmoidal-type increase in ε/KAP from 2 mJ Gy -1 cm -2 at 20 keV to 42 mJ Gy -1 cm -2 at 80 keV. However, between 80 and 150 keV, the ε/KAP shows variations with changing photon energy of <10 %. Taking the average spectrum energy to consist of monoenergetic X rays generally overestimates the true value of ε/KAP. This study illustrated that the energy incident on a patient in any area of radiological imaging can be estimated from the total X-ray beam intensity (KAP) when X-ray beam quality is taken into account. Energy incident on the patient can be used to estimate the energy absorbed by the patient and the corresponding patient effective dose. (authors)

  16. Development of twin Ge detector for high energy photon measurement and its performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigetome, Yoshiaki; Harada, Hideo [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-03-01

    Prototype twin HPGe detector composed of two large HPGe crystals was developed to obtain better detection efficiency ({epsilon}) and P/T ratio, which was required for high energy photon spectroscopy. In this work, the performances of the twin HPGe detector were evaluated by computer simulation employing EGS4 code. (author)

  17. Demonstration of multilayer reflective optics at photon energies above 0.6 MeV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brejnholt, Nicolai F.; Soufli, Regina; Descalle, Marie-Anne

    2014-01-01

    Focusing optics operating in the soft gamma-ray photon energy range can advance a range of scientific and technological applications that benefit from the large improvements in sensitivity and resolution that true imaging provides. An enabling technology to this end is multilayer coatings. We show...

  18. Characterization of the Photon Energy Spectrum of a 6 MV Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Bojorquez, M.; Larraga, J. M.; Garcia, A.; Celis, M. A.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we study the influence of the purity of the materials used in experimental transmission measurements to obtain data to reconstruct the photon energy spectrum of a 6 MV Linac. We also evaluate the contribution to PDDs due to electron contamination in the reconstructed spectrum

  19. Photon and dilepton production in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-07

    May 7, 2015 ... The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high-energy heavy-ion collisions, obtained particularly at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the ...

  20. Workplace photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, P.H.; Bartlett, D.T.; Ambrosi, P.

    1999-01-01

    The knowledge of workplace radiation fields is essential for measures in radiation protection. Information about the energy and directional distribution of the incident photon radiation was obtained by several devices developed by the National Radiation Protection Board, United Kingdom, by the Statens Stralskyddsinstitut, Sweden, together with EURADOS and by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany. The devices are described and some results obtained at workplaces in nuclear industry, medicine and science in the photon energy range from 20 keV to 7 MeV are given. (author)

  1. Pair production by photons. Screening corrections for intermediate and high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeverboe, I.

    1978-01-01

    The screening correction to the total cross-section for coherent electron pair production by photons is evaluated for intermediate and high energies, by employing the Born-approximation recoil momentum distribution and accurate relativistic form factors. Results are given for all 3<=Z<=92. For each element the results are presented in terms of a seven-parameter formula which is based on a high-energy expansion of the screened cross-section. (author)

  2. Short-range energy budget simulator of single photon lidar demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtazin, Mark V.; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef; Pershin, Sergey M.; Lednev, Vasily N.

    2017-05-01

    The compact single photon lidar demonstrator dedicated for asteroid rendezvous missions has been designed and realized in our laboratory two years ago. The instrument provides crucial data on altitude and terrain profile for altitudes exceeding 5 km with a precision of less than 10 cm fulfilling the Rayleigh criterion. One of the calibration procedure of demonstrator is the positioning of receiver and transmitter optics related to detector and laser and the aligning of transmitter and receiver optical common paths. To improve this particular indoor calibration procedure the new simulator of single photon energy budget during short range operation has been created. The comparison of simulated and experimental data will be presented and discussed.

  3. Energy dependence of effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and photon interaction: Studies of some biological molecules in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2008-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption, Z(PEA,eff), and for photon interaction, Z(PI,eff), have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for biological molecules, such as fatty acids (lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic...... dependence of the mass attenuation coefficient, Z(PEA, eff), and the mass energy-absorption coefficient, Z(PI, eff), is shown graphically and in tabular form. Significant differences of 17%-38% between Z(PI, eff) and Z(PEA, eff) occur in the energy region 5-100 keV. The reasons for these differences...

  4. Dose conversion coefficients for high-energy photons, electrons, neutrons and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Yukio

    2005-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for photons, electrons and neutrons based on new ICRP recommendations were cited in the ICRP Publication 74, but the energy ranges of these data were limited and there are no data for high energy radiations produced in accelerator facilities. For the purpose of designing the high intensity proton accelerator facilities at JAERI, the dose evaluation code system of high energy radiations based on the HERMES code was developed and the dose conversion coefficients of effective dose were evaluated for photons, neutrons and protons up to 10 GeV, and electrons up to 100 GeV. The dose conversion coefficients of effective dose equivalent were also evaluated using quality factors to consider the consistency between radiation weighting factors and Q-L relationship. The effective dose conversion coefficients obtained in this work were in good agreement with those recently evaluated by using FLUKA code for photons and electrons with all energies, and neutrons and protons below 500 MeV. There were some discrepancy between two data owing to the difference of cross sections in the nuclear reaction models. The dose conversion coefficients of effective dose equivalents for high energy radiations based on Q-L relation in ICRP Publication 60 were evaluated only in this work. The previous comparison between effective dose and effective dose equivalent made it clear that the radiation weighting factors for high energy neutrons and protons were overestimated and the modification was required. (author)

  5. Temporal evolution of photon energy emitted from two-component advective flows: origin of time lag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Arka; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Ghosh, Himadri

    2017-12-01

    X-ray time lag of black hole candidates contains important information regarding the emission geometry. Recently, study of time lags from observational data revealed very intriguing properties. To investigate the real cause of this lag behavior with energy and spectral states, we study photon paths inside a two-component advective flow (TCAF) which appears to be a satisfactory model to explain the spectral and timing properties. We employ the Monte Carlo simulation technique to carry out the Comptonization process. We use a relativistic thick disk in Schwarzschild geometry as the CENtrifugal pressure supported BOundary Layer (CENBOL) which is the Compton cloud. In TCAF, this is the post-shock region of the advective component. Keplerian disk on the equatorial plane which is truncated at the inner edge i.e. at the outer boundary of the CENBOL, acts as the soft photon source. Ray-tracing code is employed to track the photons to a distantly located observer. We compute the cumulative time taken by a photon during Comptonization, reflection and following the curved geometry on the way to the observer. Time lags between various hard and soft bands have been calculated. We study the variation of time lags with accretion rates, CENBOL size and inclination angle. Time lags for different energy channels are plotted for different inclination angles. The general trend of variation of time lag with QPO frequency and energy as observed in satellite data is reproduced.

  6. Experimental investigations of the neutron contamination in high-energy photon fields at medical linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunckhorst, Elin

    2009-02-26

    The scope of this thesis was to develop a device for the detection of the photoneutron dose inside the high-energy photon field. The photoneutron contamination of a Siemens PRIMUS linear accelerator was investigated in detail in its 15 MV photon mode. The experimental examinations were performed with three ionisation chambers (a tissue equivalent chamber, a magnesium chamber and a {sup 10}B-coated magnesium chamber) and two types of thermoluminescence detectors (enriched with {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li, respectively). The detectors have different sensitivities to photons and neutrons and their combination allows the dose separation in a mixed neutron/photon field. The application of the ionisation chamber system, as well as the present TLD system for photoneutron detection in high-energy photon beams is a new approach. The TLD neutron sensitivity was found to be too low for a measurement inside the open photon field and the further investigation focused on the ionisation chambers. The three ionisation chambers were calibrated at different photon and neutron sources and a the borated magnesium chamber showed a very high response to thermal neutrons. For a cross check of the calibration, the three chambers were also used for dose separation of a boron neutron capture therapy beam where the exact determination of the thermal neutron dose is essential. Very accurate results were achieved for the thermal neutron dose component. At the linear accelerator the chamber system was reduced to a paired chamber system utilising the two magnesium chambers, since the fast neutron component was to small to be separated. The neutron calibration of the three chambers could not be applied, instead a conversion of measured thermal neutron signal by the borated chamber to Monte Carlo simulated total neutron dose was performed. Measurements for open fields in solid water and liquid water were performed with the paired chamber system. In larger depths the neutron dose could be determined

  7. Experimental investigations of the neutron contamination in high-energy photon fields at medical linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunckhorst, Elin

    2009-01-01

    The scope of this thesis was to develop a device for the detection of the photoneutron dose inside the high-energy photon field. The photoneutron contamination of a Siemens PRIMUS linear accelerator was investigated in detail in its 15 MV photon mode. The experimental examinations were performed with three ionisation chambers (a tissue equivalent chamber, a magnesium chamber and a 10 B-coated magnesium chamber) and two types of thermoluminescence detectors (enriched with 6 Li and 7 Li, respectively). The detectors have different sensitivities to photons and neutrons and their combination allows the dose separation in a mixed neutron/photon field. The application of the ionisation chamber system, as well as the present TLD system for photoneutron detection in high-energy photon beams is a new approach. The TLD neutron sensitivity was found to be too low for a measurement inside the open photon field and the further investigation focused on the ionisation chambers. The three ionisation chambers were calibrated at different photon and neutron sources and a the borated magnesium chamber showed a very high response to thermal neutrons. For a cross check of the calibration, the three chambers were also used for dose separation of a boron neutron capture therapy beam where the exact determination of the thermal neutron dose is essential. Very accurate results were achieved for the thermal neutron dose component. At the linear accelerator the chamber system was reduced to a paired chamber system utilising the two magnesium chambers, since the fast neutron component was to small to be separated. The neutron calibration of the three chambers could not be applied, instead a conversion of measured thermal neutron signal by the borated chamber to Monte Carlo simulated total neutron dose was performed. Measurements for open fields in solid water and liquid water were performed with the paired chamber system. In larger depths the neutron dose could be determined with an

  8. Soft photon theorem for high energy amplitudes in Yukawa and scalar theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Hualong

    2017-06-01

    We study the emission of soft photons coupling to high energy fixed angle scattering processes at first order in the electromagnetic coupling but to all loop orders in a class of theories without soft divergences, including massive and massless Yukawa and scalar theories. We adapt a method introduced by del Duca for quantum electrodynamics to show that subleading corrections to the soft photon theorem are sensitive to the structure of nonleading external jets of collinear lines. Our techniques are based on a power counting analysis of loop integrals and an application of jet Ward identities. We also apply Grammer and Yennie's decomposition to isolate separately gauge invariant contributions to the soft photon expansion. These are interpreted as infrared sensitive matrix elements coupling to a field strength tensor.

  9. Development and construction of the low-energy photon tagger NEPTUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenberg, K.

    2007-07-15

    Within the scope of this thesis a photon tagging system was designed and constructed at the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (S-DALINAC). The set-up consists of a deflecting magnet, an array of focal plane detectors, the data acquisition system and new beam-line components. The system provides tagged photons in an energy range from 6 MeV to 20 MeV with the emphasis on best possible resolution and intensity. The absolute energy resolution of photons at 10 MeV is better than 25 keV. With the current focal-plane detectors a maximum rate of tagged photons of 10{sup 4}/(keV.s) can be achieved. An upgrade to more than 10{sup 5}/(keV.s) with an alternative detector array is under investigation. The design values mentioned above are the requirements for planned experiments in the fields of nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure. The most important constraints which have to be considered arise from the special demands of ({gamma},n) reactions above but close to the particle threshold which generates slow neutrons with energies of a few hundreds of keV. The unambiguous assignment of slow neutrons to prompt electrons is done on-line in special buffered time-to-digital converters. With a design of the data acquisition for this scenario one also covers the requirements for experiments with prompt detection of the ejectiles such as in nuclear resonance fluorescence and ({gamma},n) far above the threshold. This photon tagging system enables to measure ({gamma},x) cross sections as a function of excitation energy and decay patterns after particle evaporation. It is an important extension to the high-flux activation experiments and the nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments below the threshold with untagged bremsstrahlung. (orig.)

  10. Beam hardening artefacts in computed tomography with photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting detectors: a simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2005-12-21

    Photon counting x-ray imaging provides efficient rejection of the electronics noise, no pulse height (Swank) noise, less noise due to optimal photon energy weighting and the possibility of energy resolved image acquisition. These advantages apply also to CT when projection data are acquired using a photon counting detector. However, photon counting detectors assign a weighting factor of 1 to all detected photons whereas the weighting factor of a charge integrating detector is proportional to the energy of the detected photon. Therefore, data collected by photon counting and charge integrating detectors represent the 'hardening' of the photon beam passed through the object differently. This affects the beam hardening artefacts in the reconstructed CT images. This work represents the first comparative evaluation of the effect of photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting photon detectors on beam hardening artefacts in CT. Beam hardening artefacts in CT images were evaluated for 20 cm and 14 cm diameter water cylinders with bone and low contrast inserts, at 120 kVp and 90 kVp x-ray tube voltages, respectively. It was shown that charge integrating results in 1.8% less beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts (i.e., CT numbers in the 'shadow' of the bone are less by 1.8% as compared to CT numbers over the periphery of the image), as compared to photon counting. However, optimal photon energy weighting, which provides highest SNR, results in 7.7% higher beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts as compared to photon counting. The magnitude of the 'cupping' artefacts was lower by 1% for charge integrating and higher by 6.1% for energy weighting acquisitions as compared to photon counting. Only the photon counting systems provide an accurate representation of the beam hardening effect due to its flat energy weighting. Because of their energy dependent weighting factors, the charge integrating and energy weighting systems do

  11. Identification of extragalactic sources of the highest energy EGRET photons by correlation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbunov, D.S.; Tkachev, I.I.; Troitsky, Sergey V.

    2005-01-01

    We found significant correlations between the arrival directions of the highest energy photons (E>10 GeV) observed by EGRET and positions of the BL Lac type objects (BL Lacs). The observed correlations imply that not less than three per cent of extragalactic photons at these energies originate from BL Lacs. Some of the correlating BL Lacs have no counterparts in the EGRET source catalog, i.e. do not coincide with strong emitters of gamma-rays at lower energy. The study of correlating BL Lacs suggests that they may form a subset which is statistically different from the total BL Lac catalog; we argue that they are prominent candidates for TeV gamma-ray sources. Our results demonstrate that the analysis of positional correlations is a powerful approach indispensable in cases when low statistics limits or even prohibits the standard case-by-case identification.

  12. Dose conversion coefficients for high-energy photons, electrons, neutrons and protons

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y; Sato, O; Tanaka, S I; Tsuda, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshizawa, N

    2003-01-01

    In the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 1990 Recommendations, radiation weighting factors were introduced in the place of quality factors, the tissue weighting factors were revised, and effective doses and equivalent doses of each tissues and organs were defined as the protection quantities. Dose conversion coefficients for photons, electrons and neutrons based on new ICRP recommendations were cited in the ICRP Publication 74, but the energy ranges of theses data were limited and there are no data for high energy radiations produced in accelerator facilities. For the purpose of designing the high intensity proton accelerator facilities at JAERI, the dose evaluation code system of high energy radiations based on the HERMES code was developed and the dose conversion coefficients of effective dose were evaluated for photons, neutrons and protons up to 10 GeV, and electrons up to 100 GeV. The dose conversion coefficients of effective dose equivalent were also evaluated using quality fact...

  13. Electron and photon energy calibration with the ATLAS detector using LHC Run 1 data

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horii, Yasuyuki; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Struebig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents the electron and photon energy calibration achieved with the ATLAS detector using about 25 fb$^{-1}$ of LHC proton--proton collision data taken at centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 and 8 TeV. The reconstruction of electron and photon energies is optimised using multivariate algorithms. The response of the calorimeter layers is equalised in data and simulation, and the longitudinal profile of the electromagnetic showers is exploited to estimate the passive material in front of the calorimeter and reoptimise the detector simulation. After all corrections, the $Z$ resonance is used to set the absolute energy scale. For electrons from $Z$ decays, the achieved calibration is typically accurate to 0.05% in most of the detector acceptance, rising to 0.2% in regions with large amounts of passive material. The remaining inaccuracy is less than 0.2-1% for electrons with a transverse energy of 10 GeV, and is on average 0.3% for photons. The detector resolution is determined with a relative in...

  14. The Dosepix detector—an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector for spectrometric measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Zang, A; Ballabriga, R; Bisello, F; Campbell, M; Celi, J C; Fauler, A; Fiederle, M; Jensch, M; Kochanski, N; Llopart, X; Michel, N; Mollenhauer, U; Ritter, I; Tennert, F; Wölfel, S; Wong, W; Michel, T

    2015-01-01

    The Dosepix detector is a hybrid photon-counting pixel detector based on ideas of the Medipix and Timepix detector family. 1 mm thick cadmium telluride and 300 μm thick silicon were used as sensor material. The pixel matrix of the Dosepix consists of 16 x 16 square pixels with 12 rows of (200 μm)2 and 4 rows of (55 μm)2 sensitive area for the silicon sensor layer and 16 rows of pixels with 220 μm pixel pitch for CdTe. Besides digital energy integration and photon-counting mode, a novel concept of energy binning is included in the pixel electronics, allowing energy-resolved measurements in 16 energy bins within one acquisition. The possibilities of this detector concept range from applications in personal dosimetry and energy-resolved imaging to quality assurance of medical X-ray sources by analysis of the emitted photon spectrum. In this contribution the Dosepix detector, its response to X-rays as well as spectrum measurements with Si and CdTe sensor layer are presented. Furthermore, a first evaluation wa...

  15. Photonic microstructures for energy-generating clear glass and net-zero energy buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, Mikhail; Alghamedi, Ramzy; Nur-E-Alam, Mohammad; Alameh, Kamal

    2016-08-01

    Transparent energy-harvesting windows are emerging as practical building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV), capable of generating electricity while simultaneously reducing heating and cooling demands. By incorporating spectrally-selective diffraction gratings as light deflecting structures of high visible transparency into lamination interlayers and using improved spectrally-selective thin-film coatings, most of the visible solar radiation can be transmitted through the glass windows with minimum attenuation. At the same time, the ultraviolet (UV) and a part of incident solar infrared (IR) radiation energy are converted and/or deflected geometrically towards the panel edge for collection by CuInSe2 solar cells. Experimental results show power conversion efficiencies in excess of 3.04% in 10 cm × 10 cm vertically-placed clear glass panels facing direct sunlight, and up to 2.08% in 50 cm × 50 cm installation-ready framed window systems. These results confirm the emergence of a new class of solar window system ready for industrial application.

  16. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Anton, M; Vorwerk, H; Zink, K

    2016-02-07

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range [Formula: see text] up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction [Formula: see text] depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of [Formula: see text] on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  17. Critical analysis of major incidents risks in civil nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    The differences existing between the PWR type reactors and the RBMK type reactors are explained as well as the risk associated to each type when it exists. The Ines scale, tool to give the level of an accident gravity comprises seven levels, the number seven is the most serious and corresponds to the Chernobyl accident; The number zero is of no consequence but must be mentioned as a matter of form. The incidents from 1 to 3 concern increasing incidents, affecting the nuclear power plant but not the external public. The accidents from 4 to 7 have a nature to affect the nuclear power plant and the environment. An efficient tool exists between nuclear operators it is made of the reports on incidents encountered by close reactors. Two others type reactors are coming, the high temperature type reactors and the fast neutrons reactors. different risks are evoked, terrorism, proliferation, transport and radioactive wastes. (N.C.)

  18. Photonic nanomanufacturing of high performance energy device on flexible substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yongchao; Wang, Shutong; Li, Ruozhou; Hou, Tingxiu; Chen, Min; Hu, Anming

    2017-02-01

    With the developing of wearable electronics and information society, integrated energy storage devices are urgently demanded to be integrated on flexible substrates. We successfully demonstrated using direct laser-reduction of the hydrated GO and chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) nanocomposite to fabricate in-plane micro-supercapacitors (MSCs) with fast ion diffusion on paper. The electrode conductivity of these flexible nanocomposites reaches up to 1.1 x 106 S m-1, which enhances superior rate capability of micro-supercapacitors, and large specific capacitances of 0.77 mF cm-2 (17.2 F cm-3 for volumetric capacitance) at 1 V s-1, and 0.46 mF cm-2 (10.2 F cm-3) at 100 V s-1. We also have demonstrated that pulsed laser irradiation rapidly converts the polyimide (PI) sheets into an electrically conductive porous carbon structure in ambient conditions. The specific capacitance of single layer surface supercapacitors can reach 20.4 mF/cm2 at 0.1 mA/cm2 discharge current density. Furthermore, we successfully fabricate the multi-layer supercapacitor with the PI substrate using 3D femtosecond laser direct writing, and the specific capacitances of three layers supercapacitors is 37.5 mF/cm2.

  19. Photonic Color Filters Integrated with Organic Solar Cells for Energy Harvesting

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Hui Joon

    2011-09-27

    Color filters are indispensable in most color display applications. In most cases, they are chemical pigment-based filters, which produce a particular color by absorbing its complementary color, and the absorbed energy is totally wasted. If the absorbed and wasted energy can be utilized, e.g., to generate electricity, innovative energy-efficient electronic media could be envisioned. Here we show photonic nanostructures incorporated with photovoltaics capable of producing desirable colors in the visible band and utilize the absorbed light to simultaneously generate electrical powers. In contrast to the traditional colorant-based filters, these devices offer great advantages for electro-optic applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Facility for the measurement of high-energy photons - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandit, Deepak; Pal, Surajit; Ray, A.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T.K.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.K.; Dey, A.; Gupta, D.; Bhattacharya, C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Banerjee, S.R.; Bhattacharya, Srijit; De, A.

    2009-01-01

    For the proper utilization of K500 Superconducting Cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata several large volume detector arrays are being developed mainly to detect the various reaction products (e.g charged particles, neutrons, high energy photons) emitted during heavy ion reactions. Specifically for the measurement of high-energy photons, we have designed and developed a Large Area Modular BaF 2 Detector Array (LAMBDA) having 162 elements in a planar geometry along with remotely controlled dedicated CAMAC front-end electronics and VME based data acquisition system. A 50-element Gamma Multiplicity Filter Detector Array has been also developed to get an estimation of angular momentum populated in each fusion event. Recently, a part of the LAMBDA array (49 detectors in a 7x7 matrix) has been employed for the measurement of high energy photons from the reactions 20 Ne + 93 Nb, 12 C, 27 Al at beam energies 145 and 160 MeV. Here, complete description of the detector system, its in-beam performance and future perspectives using upcoming K500 Superconducting Cyclotron will be discussed. (author)

  1. Features of possible polarized photon beams at high energy and corresponding physics programme or the proton structure function using real photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    In the range of electron energies available at Fermilab, 100 GeV less than or equal to E less than or equal to 500 GeV, coherent Bremsstrahlung in crystals, particularly diamond, gives a huge enhancement to the equivalent photon spectrum at large values of x where x = k/E. The photons in this enhancement are polarized. Requirements on electron beam energy spread, angular divergence and spot size imposed by the use of a diamond as a radiator are discussed. The physics program emphasizes hard processes and tests of QCD using polarization

  2. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Corde, Stéphanie; Yagi, Naoto; Abdul Aziz, Siti Aishah; Annabell, Nathan; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z) and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Compton scattering interactions. Gold nanoparticles are a novel radiosensitizing agent that can potentially be used to increase the effectiveness of current radiation therapy techniques and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, the optimum radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles is strongly dependent on photon energy, which theoretically is predicted to occur in the kilovoltage range of energy. In this research, synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays in the 30-100 keV range were used to investigate the energy dependence of radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and also to determine the photon energy that produces optimum effects. This investigation was conducted using cells in culture to measure dose enhancement. Bovine aortic endothelial cells with and without gold nanoparticles were irradiated with X-rays at energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 81, and 100 keV. Trypan blue exclusion assays were performed after irradiation to determine cell viability. Cell radiosensitivity enhancement was indicated by the dose enhancement factor which was found to be maximum at 40 keV with a value of 3.47. The dose enhancement factor obtained at other energy levels followed the same direction as the theoretical calculations based on the ratio of the mass energy absorption coefficients of gold and water. This experimental evidence shows that the radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles varies with photon energy as predicted from theoretical calculations. However, prediction based on theoretical assumptions is sometimes difficult due to the complexity of biological systems, so further study at the cellular level is required to fully characterize the effects

  3. Comparative Investigation of Ce3+ Doped Scintillators in a Wide Range of Photon Energies Covering X-ray CT, Nuclear Medicine and Megavoltage Radiation Therapy Portal Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valais, Ioannis G.; Michail, Christos M.; David, Stratos L.; Liaparinos, Panagiotis F.; Fountos, George P.; Paschalis, Theodoros V.; Kandarakis, Ioannis S.; Panayiotakis, George S.

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the performance of scintillators currently used in PET and animal PET systems, under conditions met in radiation therapy and PET/CT imaging. The results of this study will be useful in applications where both CT and PET photons as well as megavoltage cone beam CT (MV CBCT) photons could be detected using a common detector unit. To this aim crystal samples of GSO, LSO, LYSO, LuYAP and YAP scintillators, doped with cerium (Ce+3) were examined under a wide energy range of photon energies. Evaluation was performed by determining the absolute luminescence efficiency (emitted light flux over incident X-ray exposure) in the energy range employed in X-ray CT, in Nuclear Medicine (70 keV up to 662 keV) and in radiotherapy 6 MV (approx. 2.0 MeV mean energy)-18 MV (approx. 4.5 MeV mean energy). Measurements were performed using an experimental set-up based on a photomultiplier coupled to a light integration sphere. The emission spectrum under X-ray excitation was measured, using an optical grating monochromator, to determine the spectral compatibility to optical photon detectors incorporated in medical imaging systems. Maximum absolute luminescence efficiency values were observed at 70 keV for YAP:Ce and LuYAP:Ce and at 140 keV for LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce and GSO:Ce. Highest absolute efficiency between the scintillators examined was observed for LSO:Ce, followed by LYSO:Ce. The detector optical gain (DOG) exhibited a significant variation with the increase of energy between 70 keV to 2.0 MeV. All scintillators exhibited low compatibility when combined with GaAsP (G5645) photodetector.

  4. Invariant operator theory for the single-photon energy in time-varying media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong-Ryeol, Choi

    2010-01-01

    After the birth of quantum mechanics, the notion in physics that the frequency of light is the only factor that determines the energy of a single photon has played a fundamental role. However, under the assumption that the theory of Lewis–Riesenfeld invariants is applicable in quantum optics, it is shown in the present work that this widely accepted notion is valid only for light described by a time-independent Hamiltonian, i.e., for light in media satisfying the conditions, ε(i) = ε(0), μ(t) = μ(0), and σ(t) = 0 simultaneously. The use of the Lewis–Riesenfeld invariant operator method in quantum optics leads to a marvelous result: the energy of a single photon propagating through time-varying linear media exhibits nontrivial time dependence without a change of frequency. (general)

  5. A tunable low-energy photon source for high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harter, John W.; Monkman, Eric J.; Shai, Daniel E.; Nie Yuefeng; Uchida, Masaki; Burganov, Bulat; Chatterjee, Shouvik; King, Philip D. C.; Shen, Kyle M.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a tunable low-energy photon source consisting of a laser-driven xenon plasma lamp coupled to a Czerny-Turner monochromator. The combined tunability, brightness, and narrow spectral bandwidth make this light source useful in laboratory-based high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy experiments. The source supplies photons with energies up to ∼7 eV, delivering under typical conditions >10 12 ph/s within a 10 meV spectral bandwidth, which is comparable to helium plasma lamps and many synchrotron beamlines. We first describe the lamp and monochromator system and then characterize its output, with attention to those parameters which are of interest for photoemission experiments. Finally, we present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data using the light source and compare its performance to a conventional helium plasma lamp.

  6. Photon and proton induced fission on heavy nuclei at intermediate energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-II E.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of fission induced by intermediate energy protons or photons on actinides. The 660 MeV proton induced reactions are on 241Am, 238U, and 237Np targets and the Bremmstrahlung-photons with end-point energies at 50 MeV and 3500 MeV are on 232Th and 238U targets. The study was performed by means of the Monte Carlo simulation code CRISP. A multimodal fission extension was added to the code within an approach which accounts for the contribution of symmetric and asymmetric fission. This procedure allowed the investigation of fission cross sections, fissility, number of evaporated nucleons and fission-fragment charge distributions. The comparison with experimental data show a good agreement between calculations and experiments.

  7. Synthetic oligomer analysis using atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry at different photon energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmazières, Bernard [Global Bioenergies, 5 rue Henri Desbruyeres, 91030 Evry (France); Legros, Véronique [CNRS, UMR8587, Université d’Evry-Val-d’Essonne, Laboratoire Analyse et Modélisation pour la Biologie et l’Environnement, F-91025 Evry (France); Giuliani, Alexandre [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); UAR1008, CEPIA, INRA, Rue de la Geraudiere, F-44316 Nantes (France); Buchmann, William, E-mail: william.buchmann@univ-evry.fr [CNRS, UMR8587, Université d’Evry-Val-d’Essonne, Laboratoire Analyse et Modélisation pour la Biologie et l’Environnement, F-91025 Evry (France)

    2014-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Atmospheric pressure photoIonization mass spectra of synthetic oligomers were recorded in the negative mode by varying the photon energy using synchrotron radiation. Photon energy required for an efficient ionization of the polymer was correlated to ionization potential of the solvent (for example 9.4 eV for tetrahydrofuran). -- Highlights: •Atmospheric pressure photoionization was performed using synchrotron radiation. •Photoionization of oligomers in THF with 10% CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} produces intact [M + Cl]{sup −} ions. •The photon energy required corresponds to ionization potential of the solvent. •Polymer distributions depend on source parameters such T °C and applied voltages. •Liquid chromatography was coupled to MS using an APPI interface for polymer analysis. -- Abstract: Atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) followed by mass spectrometric detection was used to ionize a variety of polymers: polyethylene glycol, polymethyl methacrylate, polystyrene, and polysiloxane. In most cases, whatever the polymer or the solvent used (dichloromethane, tetrahydrofuran, hexane, acetone or toluene), only negative ion mode produced intact ions such as chlorinated adducts, with no or few fragmentations, in contrast to the positive ion mode that frequently led to important in-source fragmentations. In addition, it was shown that optimal detection of polymer distributions require a fine tuning of other source parameters such as temperature and ion transfer voltage. Series of mass spectra were recorded in the negative mode, in various solvents (dichloromethane, tetrahydrofuran, hexane, toluene, and acetone), by varying the photon energy from 8 eV up to 10.6 eV using synchrotron radiation. To these solvents, addition of a classical APPI dopant (toluene or acetone) was not necessary. Courtesy of the synchrotron radiation, it was demonstrated that the photon energy required for an efficient ionization of the polymer was correlated to the

  8. Center of mass energy and system-size dependence of photon production at forward rapidity at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    We present the multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of photons produced in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV. The photons are measured in the region -3.7 < {eta} < -2.3 using the photon multiplicity detector in the STAR experiment at RHIC. The number of photons produced per average number of participating nucleon pairs increases with the beam energy and is independent of the collision centrality. For collisions with similar average numbers of participating nucleons the photon multiplicities are observed to be similar for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at a given beam energy. The ratios of the number of charged particles to photons in the measured pseudorapidity range are found to be 1.4 {+-} 0.1 and 1.2 {+-} 0.1 for {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV, respectively. The energy dependence of this ratio could reflect varying contributions from baryons to charged particles, while mesons are the dominant contributors to photon production in the given kinematic region. The photon pseudorapidity distributions normalized by average number of participating nucleon pairs, when plotted as a function of {eta} - ybeam, are found to follow a longitudinal scaling independent of centrality and colliding ion species at both beam energies.

  9. Probing QCD dynamics in two-photon interactions at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, V P [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Machado, M V T [Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas, Universidade Federal do Pampa, Campus de Bage, Rua Carlos Barbosa. CEP 96400-970. Bage, RS (Brazil); Sauter, W K [High Energy Physics Phenomenology Group, GFPAE IF-UFRGS, Caixa Postal 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2007-07-15

    In this paper, the two-photon interactions at high energies are investigated considering different approaches for the QCD dynamics. In particular, we calculate the {gamma}*{gamma}* total cross section in different theoretical approaches and present a comparison among the predictions of the BFKL dynamics at leading and next-to-leading order with those from saturation physics. We analyse the possibility that the future linear colliders could discriminate between these different approaches.

  10. Disintegration of Ta and W nuclei by high-energy electrons and photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrofanova, A.V.; Noga, V.I.; Popov, A.I.; Ranyuk, Yu.N.; Telegin, Yu.N.

    1977-01-01

    The induced activity method is applied to measure the yields of 15 photonuclear reactions on the tantalum and tungsten nuclei in the 600-1300 MeV energy range of photons. The cross sections are calculated in the ''rectangular'' approximation of the bremsstrahlung spectrum. The data are analysed by the Rudstam semiempirical formula. For the reactions with tungsten nuclei the photo- to electro-yield ratios are measured

  11. Skin damage probabilities using fixation materials in high-energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, J.; Vestergaard, A.

    2000-01-01

    Patient fixation, such as thermoplastic masks, carbon-fibre support plates and polystyrene bead vacuum cradles, is used to reproduce patient positioning in radiotherapy. Consequently low-density materials may be introduced in high-energy photon beams. The aim of the this study was to measure the increase in skin dose when low-density materials are present and calculate the radiobiological consequences in terms of probabilities of early and late skin damage. An experimental thin-windowed plane-parallel ion chamber was used. Skin doses were measured using various overlaying low-density fixation materials. A fixed geometry of a 10 x 10 cm field, a SSD = 100 cm and photon energies of 4, 6 and 10 MV on Varian Clinac 2100C accelerators were used for all measurements. Radiobiological consequences of introducing these materials into the high-energy photon beams were evaluated in terms of early and late damage of the skin based on the measured surface doses and the LQ-model. The experimental ion chamber save results consistent with other studies. A relationship between skin dose and material thickness in mg/cm 2 was established and used to calculate skin doses in scenarios assuming radiotherapy treatment with opposed fields. Conventional radiotherapy may apply mid-point doses up to 60-66 Gy in daily 2-Gy fractions opposed fields. Using thermoplastic fixation and high-energy photons as low as 4 MV do increase the dose to the skin considerably. However, using thermoplastic materials with thickness less than 100 mg/cm 2 skin doses are comparable with those produced by variation in source to skin distance, field size or blocking trays within clinical treatment set-ups. The use of polystyrene cradles and carbon-fibre materials with thickness less than 100 mg/cm 2 should be avoided at 4 MV at doses above 54-60 Gy. (author)

  12. Hard photon and energetic proton emission in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, P.; Coniglione, R.; Migneco, E.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Le Faou, J. H.; Suomijarvi, T.; Frascaria, N.; Roynette, J. C.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Garron, J. P.; Gillibert, A.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Peghaire, A.; Chomaz, Ph.

    1998-02-01

    The emission of hard photons and pre-equilibrium protons has been investigated in exclusive clusive experiments performed with MEDEA detector. The observation of the γ-proton anticorrelation indicate that the dominant production mechanism is the first chance neutron-proton collisions. Very energetic protons, with energy more than twice the kinematical limit for nucleon-nucleon collisions, have been observed in several reactions.

  13. Electromagnetic properties of terbium gallium garnet at millikelvin temperatures and single photon energy

    OpenAIRE

    Kostylev, Nikita; Goryachev, Maxim; Bushev, Pavel; Tobar, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic properties of single crystal terbium gallium garnet (TGG) are characterised from room down to millikelvin temperatures using the whispering gallery mode method. Microwave spectroscopy is performed at low powers equivalent to a few photons in energy and conducted as functions of the magnetic field and temperature. A phase transition is detected close to the temperature of 3.5 K. This is observed for multiple whispering gallery modes causing an abrupt negative frequency shift an...

  14. Residual stress measurement with high energy x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winholtz, R. A.; Haeffner, D. R.; Green, R.E.L.; Varma, R.; Hammond, D.

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary measurements with high energy x-rays from the SRI CAT 1-ID beam line at the Advanced Photon show great promise for the measurement of stress and strain using diffraction. Comparisons are made with neutron measurements. Measurements of strains in a 2 mm thick 304 stainless steel weld show that excellent strain and spatial resolutions are possible. With 200 microm slits, strain resolutions of 1 x 10 -5 were achieved

  15. Polarimetry of coherent bremsstrahlung by analysis of the photon energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darbinyan, S.; Hakobyan, H.; Jones, R.; Sirunyan, A.; Vartapetian, H.

    2005-01-01

    A method of coherent bremsstrahlung (CB) polarimetry based on the analysis of the shape of the photon energy spectrum is presented. The influence of a number of uncertainty sources, including the choice of atomic form-factors, has been analyzed. For a CB source consisting of a diamond radiator and multi-GeV electrons, an absolute accuracy of polarimetry at the level of 0.01-0.02 is attainable

  16. Development of the National Bureau of Standards low-energy-photon-emission-rate radioactivity standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, J.M.R.; Mann, W.B.; Mullen, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    The National Bureau of Standards has recently developed point source low-energy-photon-emission-rate standards of 55 Fe, 85 Sr, 109 Cd and 125 I. The standardizations were performed using a defined solid angle, NaI(Tl) spectrometer that can be operated with gas fillings at atmospheric and reduced pressure. The corrections applicable to such a spectrometer have been discussed by W. B. Bambynek

  17. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C; Iwanczyk, Jan S; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and -66.33 mV, respectively. The detector's energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20-45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the detector. The proposed x-ray fluorescence technique

  18. Measurement of changes in linear accelerator photon energy through flatness variation using an ion chamber array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Song; Balter, Peter A.; Rose, Mark; Simon, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for determining changes in photon beam energy for a megavoltage linear accelerator. Methods: Energy changes were accomplished by adjusting the bending magnet current by up to ±15% in 5% increments away from the value used clinically. Two metrics for flatness, relative flatness in the central 80% of the field (Flat) and average maximum dose along the diagonals normalized by central axis dose (F DN ), were measured using a commercially available planner ionization chamber array. PDD was measured in water at depths of 5 and 10 cm in 3 × 3 cm 2 and 10 × 10 cm 2 fields using a cylindrical chamber. Results: PDD was more sensitive to changes in energy when the beam energy was increased than when it was decreased. For the 18-MV beam in particular, PDD was not sensitive to energy reductions below the nominal energy. The value of Flat was found to be more sensitive to decreases in energy than to increases, with little sensitivity to energy increases above the nominal energy for 18-MV beams. F DN was the only metric that was found to be sensitive to both increases and reductions of energy for both the 6- and 18-MV beams. Conclusions: Flatness based metrics were found to be more sensitive to energy changes than PDD, In particular, F DN was found to be the most sensitive metric to energy changes for photon beams of 6 and 18 MV. The ionization chamber array allows this metric to be conveniently measured as part of routine accelerator quality assurance.

  19. Free-Free Transitions of e-H System Inside a Dense Plasma Irradiated by a Laser Field at Very Low Incident Electron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, C.

    2012-01-01

    The free-free transition is studied for an electron-hydrogen in the ground state at low incident energies in the presence of an external homogenous, monochromatic, and linearly polarized laser-field inside a hot dense plasma.The effect of plasma screening is considered in the Debye-Huckel approximation. The calculations are performed in the soft photon limit, assuming that the plasma frequency is much higher than the laser frequency. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the initial and final channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the electron exchange. The laser-assisted differential and total cross sections are calculated for single-photon absorption /emission and no photon exchange in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. The calculations have been carried out for various values of Debye parameter, ranging from 0.005 to 0.12. A strong suppression is noted in the laser-assisted cross sections as compared to the field-free situation. A significant difference is noted for the singlet and triplet cross sections. The suppression is much more in the triplet states.

  20. Contribution of activation products to occupational exposure following treatment using high-energy photons in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, N.; Krestic-Vesovic, J.; Stojanovic, D.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Lazarevic, D.; Kovacevic, M.

    2011-01-01

    When high-energy photon beams are used for irradiation in radiotherapy, neutrons that are the result of photonuclear reactions create activation products that affect the occupational dose of radiotherapy staff. For the assessment of activation products in situ gamma spectroscopy was performed parallel to dose-rate measurements following irradiation, by using a high-energy photon beam from a linear accelerator Elekta Precise (Elekta, Stockholm (Sweden)) used in radiotherapy. The major identified activation products were the following radioisotopes: 2 '8Al, 24 Na, 56 Mn, 5 4 M n, 187 W, 64 Cu and 62 Cu. Based on the typical workload and dose-rate measurement, the assessed additional annual occupational dose ranged from 1.7 to 0.25 mSv. As the measured dose rate arising from the activation products rapidly decreases as a function of time, the assessed additional dose is negligible after 10 min following irradiation. To keep the occupational dose as low as reasonably achievable, it is recommended to delay entrance to the therapy room at least 2-4 min, when high-energy photons are used. This would reduce the effective dose by 30 %. (authors)

  1. Energy transfer in nanowire solar cells with photon-harvesting shells

    KAUST Repository

    Peters, C. H.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of a nanowire solar cell with photon-harvesting shells is presented. In this architecture, organic molecules which absorb strongly in the near infrared where silicon absorbs weakly are coupled to silicon nanowires (SiNWs). This enables an array of 7-μm -long nanowires with a diameter of 50 nm to absorb over 85% of the photons above the bandgap of silicon. The organic molecules are bonded to the surface of the SiNWs forming a thin shell. They absorb the low-energy photons and subsequently transfer the energy to the SiNWs via Förster resonant energy transfer, creating free electrons and holes within the SiNWs. The carriers are then separated at a radial p-n junction in a nanowire and extracted at the respective electrodes. The shortness of the nanowires is expected to lower the dark current due to the decrease in p-n junction surface area, which scales linearly with wire length. The theoretical power conversion efficiency is 15%. To demonstrate this concept, we measure a 60% increase in photocurrent from a planar silicon-on-insulator diode when a 5 nm layer of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2′ -ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene is applied to the surface of the silicon. This increase is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. © 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Specific absorbed fractions of energy at various ages from internal photon sources: 1, Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1987-04-01

    Specific absorbed fractions (PHI's) in various organs of the body (target organs) from sources of monoenergetic photons in various other organs (source organs) are tabulated. This volume outlines various methods used to compute the PHI-values and describes how the ''best'' estimates recommended by us are chosen. These PHI-values can be used in calculating the photon component of the dose-equivalent rate in a given target organ from a given radionuclide that is present in a given source organ. The International Commission on Radiological Protection recognizes that the endosteal, or bone surface, cells are the tissue at risk for bone cancer. We have applied the dosimetry methods that Spiers and co-workers developed for beta-emitting radionuclides deposited in bone to follow the transport of secondary electrons that were freed by photon interactions through the microscopic structure of the skeleton. With these methods we can estimate PHI in the endosteal cells and can better estimate PHI in the active marrow; the latter is overestimated with the methods at photon energies below 200 keV. 41 refs., 25 figs., 23 tabs.

  3. Specific absorbed fractions of energy at various ages from internal photon sources: 1, Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1987-04-01

    Specific absorbed fractions (PHI's) in various organs of the body (target organs) from sources of monoenergetic photons in various other organs (source organs) are tabulated. This volume outlines various methods used to compute the PHI-values and describes how the ''best'' estimates recommended by us are chosen. These PHI-values can be used in calculating the photon component of the dose-equivalent rate in a given target organ from a given radionuclide that is present in a given source organ. The International Commission on Radiological Protection recognizes that the endosteal, or bone surface, cells are the tissue at risk for bone cancer. We have applied the dosimetry methods that Spiers and co-workers developed for beta-emitting radionuclides deposited in bone to follow the transport of secondary electrons that were freed by photon interactions through the microscopic structure of the skeleton. With these methods we can estimate PHI in the endosteal cells and can better estimate PHI in the active marrow; the latter is overestimated with the methods at photon energies below 200 keV. 41 refs., 25 figs., 23 tabs

  4. Specific absorbed fractions of energy at various ages from internal photon sources: 7, Adult male

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1987-04-01

    Specific absorbed fractions (PHI's) in various organs of the body (target organs) from sources of monoenergetic photons in various other organs (source organs) are tabulated. In this volume PHI-values are tabulated for an adult male (70-kg Reference Man). These PHI-values can be used in calculating the photon component of the dose-equivalent rate in a given target organ from a given radionuclide that is present in a given source organ. The International Commission on Radiological Protection recognizes that the endosteal, or bone surface, cells are the tissue at risk for bone cancer. We have applied the dosimetry methods developed for beta-emitting radionuclides deposited in bone to follow the transport of secondary electrons that were freed by photon interactions through the microscopic structure of the skeleton. With these methods we can estimate PHI in the endosteal cells and can better estimate PHI in the active marrow; the latter is overestimated with other methods at photon energies below 200 keV. 12 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Incident energy dependence of scattering behavior of water molecules on Si (100) and graphite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, G.; Kotsubo, Y.; Yoshimoto, Y.; Kinefuchi, I.; Takagi, S.

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between water molecules and solid surfaces has a great impact on water vapor flows in nanostructures. We conduct molecular beam scattering experiments covering the incident energy range corresponding to the thermal energy at room temperature to investigate the scattering behavior of water molecules on silicon and graphite surfaces. The incident energy dependence of the scattering distributions exhibits opposite trends on these surfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the difference is caused by the inertia effect of the incident molecules and the surface corrugations.

  6. Probabilities of Bremsstrahlung Emission of Photons at Low-Energy Electron-Nuclear Collisions in a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koryagin, S. A.; Balandin, I. A.

    2017-08-01

    We consider quantum-mechanical probabilities of bremsstrahlung of photons in the case of low-energy Coulomb collisions in a magnetic field, where the scattering center so perturbs the state of the incident electron that the motion of the latter becomes quasi-bound. Quantum formulas for the spectral power of bremsstrahlung radiation are obtained from the classical formulas by replacing the Fourier amplitudes of the particle velocity with matrix elements of the velocity operator for wave functions, which are normalized by the condition of a unit flux being incident on the nucleus (or an equivalent outgoing flux), with summation over finite Landau levels and quantized values of the impact parameter. Equivalent forms of the specified matrix elements, which are expressed in terms of the Coulomb field and annihilation/creation operators for the eigenfunctions of the operator of the squared impact parameter, are presented. The obtained presentations for the spectral power of bremsstrahlung radiation in the case of quasi-bound electron motion allow one to translate the results of calculating this value in the classical limit to the quantum case, which is typical of white dwarfs with the strongest magnetic fields.

  7. Photon counting and energy discriminating X-ray detectors. Benefits and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, David; Zscherpel, Uwe; Ewert, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Since a few years the direct detection of X-ray photons into electrical signals is possible by usage of highly absorbing photo conducting materials (e.g. CdTe) as detection layer of an underlying CMOS semiconductor X-ray detector. Even NDT energies up to 400 keV are possible today, as well. The image sharpness and absorption efficiency is improved by the replacement of the unsharp scintillation layer (as used at indirect detecting detectors) by a photo conducting layer of much higher thickness. If the read-out speed is high enough (ca. 50 - 100 ns dead time) single X-ray photons can be counted and their energy measured. Read-out noise and dark image correction can be avoided. By setting energy thresholds selected energy ranges of the X-ray spectrum can be detected or suppressed. This allows material discrimination by dual-energy techniques or the reduction of image contributions of scattered radiation, which results in an enhanced contrast sensitivity. To use these advantages in an effective way, a special calibration procedure has to be developed, which considers also time dependent processes in the detection layer. This contribution presents some of these new properties of direct detecting digital detector arrays (DDAs) and shows first results on testing fiber reinforced composites as well as first approaches to dual energy imaging.

  8. A Silicon-Strip Detector for Photon-Counting Spectral CT: Energy Resolution From 40 keV to 120 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejin; Bornefalk, Hans; Chen, Han; Danielsson, Mats; Karlsson, Staffan; Persson, Mats; Xu, Cheng; Huber, Ben

    2014-06-01

    We are developing a segmented silicon-strip detector for spectral computed tomography. The detector operates in photon-counting mode and allows pulse-height discrimination with 8 adjustable energy bins. In this work, we determine the energy resolution of a detector module using monoenergetic x-rays from 40 keV to 120 keV, provided at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble. For each incident x-ray energy, pulse height spectra at different input photon fluxes are obtained. We investigate changes of the energy resolution due to charge sharing between pixels and pulse pileup. The different incident energies are used to channel-wise calibrate the pulse-height response in terms of signal gain and offset and to probe the homogeneity of the detector module. The detector shows a linear pulse-height response in the energy range from 40 keV to 120 keV. The gain variation among the channels is below 4%, whereas the variation of the offsets is on the order of 1 keV. We find an absolute energy resolution ( σE) that degrades from 1.5 keV to 1.9 keV with increasing x-ray energy from 40 keV to 100 keV. With increasing input count rate, σE degrades by approximately 4 ·10-3 keV Mcps-1 mm2, which is, within error bars, the same for the different energies. The effect of charge sharing on the width of the response peak is found to be negligible.

  9. Investigating the high-energy QCD approaches for prompt-photon production at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, M.V.T. [Universidade Federal do Pampa, Campus de Bage, Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas, Bage, RS (Brazil); Mariotto, C.B. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Box 474, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil)

    2009-06-15

    We investigate the rapidity and transverse-momentum distributions of the prompt photon production at the CERN LHC energies considering the current perturbative QCD approaches for this scattering process. Namely, we compare the predictions from the usual NLO pQCD calculations to the color-dipole formalism, using distinct dipole cross sections. Special attention is paid to parton-saturation models at high energies, which are expected to be important at the forward rapidities in pp collisions ({radical}(s)=14 TeV) at the LHC. (orig.)

  10. Review of personal monitoring techniques for the measurement of absorbed dose from external beta and low energy photon radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul

    1986-01-01

    The techniques available at present for personal monitoring of doses from external beta and low energy photon radiation are reviewed. The performance of currently used dosimetry systems is compared with that recommended internationally, and developments for improving the actual performance...

  11. Energy Reflection from Gold Bombarded with keV Protons at Various Angles of Incidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.

    1976-01-01

    The calorimetric deuterium film method operating at liquid‐helium temperature was used for measuring the energy reflection coefficient γ for 1–10‐keV protons incident on gold at angles of incidence up to 75°. H+2 and H+3 ions were used to obtain the lowest velocities. The growth with angle...

  12. Molecular desorption of a nonevaporable getter St 707 irradiated at room temperature with synchrotron radiation of 194 eV critical photon energy

    CERN Document Server

    Le Pimpec, F; Laurent, Jean Michel

    2003-01-01

    Photon stimulated molecular desorption from a nonevaporable getter (NEG) St 707(R) (SAES Getters TM ) surface after conditioning and after saturation with isotopic carbon monoxide Ýcf. nomenclature in Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 74th edition, edited by D. R. Lide (CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1994)¿ /sup 13/C/sup 18/O, has been studied on a dedicated beamline at the EPA ring at CERN. The synchrotron radiation of 194 eV critical energy and with an average photon intensity of ~1 * 10/sup 17/ photons s/sup -1/ was impinging on the sample at perpendicular incidence. It is found that the desorption yields eta (molecules/photon) of the characteristic gases in an UHV system (hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide) for a freshly activated NEG and for a NEG fully saturated with /sup 13/C /sup 18/O are lower than that of 300 degrees C baked stainless steel. (22 refs). Fully activated NEG was studied and found to desorb less as compared to a 300 degree c baked stainless-steel surface. Furthermore, it ...

  13. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loginov, Andrey Borisovich [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation. Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-01-01

    We present results of a search for the anomalous production of events containing a high-transverse momentum charged lepton (ℓ, either e or μ) and photon (γ), accompanied by missing transverse energy (ET), and/or additional leptons and photons, and jets (X). We use the same kinematic selection criteria as in a previous CDF search, but with a substantially larger data set, 305 pb-1, a p$\\bar{p}$ collision energy of 1.96 TeV, and the upgraded CDF II detector. We find 42 ℓγET events versus a standard model expectation of 37.3 ± 5.4 events. The level of excess observed in Run I, 16 events with an expectation of 7.6 ± 0.7 events (corresponding to a 2.7 σ effect), is not supported by the new data. In the signature of ℓℓγ + X we observe 31 events versus an expectation of 23.0 ± 2.7 events. In this sample we find no events with an extra photon or ET and so find no events like the one eeγγ ET event observed in Run I.

  14. Interference, confinement and non Franck-Condon effects in photoionization of H{sub 2} molecules at high photon energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, J; MartIn, F [Departamento de Quimica, C-9, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fojon, O, E-mail: jorge@phys.au.d, E-mail: ofojon@fceia.unr.edu.a, E-mail: fernando.martin@uam.e [Institute de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR), Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina)

    2009-11-01

    We study in detail photoionization of H{sub 2} molecules by high energy photons. Bound and continuum states are accurately evaluated by using B-spline basis functions. The usual Franck-Condon behavior is not followed when the molecule is parallel to the polarization direction. The origin of this anomaly is related to interference effects. Moreover, it is shown that at these high photon energies, the nuclear asymmetry parameter exhibits a reminiscence of these interference patterns.

  15. Method of incident low-energy gamma-ray direction reconstruction in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheymits, M D; Leonov, A A; Zverev, V G; Galper, A M; Arkhangelskaya, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Yurkin, Yu T; Bakaldin, A V; Suchkov, S I; Topchiev, N P; Dalkarov, O D

    2016-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space-based telescope has as its main goals to measure cosmic γ-ray fluxes and the electron-positron cosmic-ray component produced, theoretically, in dark-matter-particles decay or annihilation processes, to search for discrete γ-ray sources and study them in detail, to examine the energy spectra of diffuse γ-rays — both galactic and extragalactic — and to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and γ-rays from the active Sun. Scientific goals of GAMMA-400 telescope require fine angular resolution. The telescope is of a pair-production type. In the converter-tracker, the incident gamma-ray photon converts into electron-positron pair in the tungsten layer and then the tracks are detected by silicon- strip position-sensitive detectors. Multiple scattering processes become a significant obstacle in the incident-gamma direction reconstruction for energies below several gigaelectronvolts. The method of utilising this process to improve the resolution is proposed in the presented work. (paper)

  16. 2D and 3D photonic crystal materials for photocatalysis and electrochemical energy storage and conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gillian; Armstrong, Eileen; McNulty, David; O’Hanlon, Sally; Geaney, Hugh; O’Dwyer, Colm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This perspective reviews recent advances in inverse opal structures, how they have been developed, studied and applied as catalysts, catalyst support materials, as electrode materials for batteries, water splitting applications, solar-to-fuel conversion and electrochromics, and finally as photonic photocatalysts and photoelectrocatalysts. Throughout, we detail some of the salient optical characteristics that underpin recent results and form the basis for light-matter interactions that span electrochemical energy conversion systems as well as photocatalytic systems. Strategies for using 2D as well as 3D structures, ordered macroporous materials such as inverse opals are summarized and recent work on plasmonic–photonic coupling in metal nanoparticle-infiltrated wide band gap inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemistry are provided. PMID:27877904

  17. 2D and 3D photonic crystal materials for photocatalysis and electrochemical energy storage and conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gillian; Armstrong, Eileen; McNulty, David; O'Hanlon, Sally; Geaney, Hugh; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2016-01-01

    This perspective reviews recent advances in inverse opal structures, how they have been developed, studied and applied as catalysts, catalyst support materials, as electrode materials for batteries, water splitting applications, solar-to-fuel conversion and electrochromics, and finally as photonic photocatalysts and photoelectrocatalysts. Throughout, we detail some of the salient optical characteristics that underpin recent results and form the basis for light-matter interactions that span electrochemical energy conversion systems as well as photocatalytic systems. Strategies for using 2D as well as 3D structures, ordered macroporous materials such as inverse opals are summarized and recent work on plasmonic-photonic coupling in metal nanoparticle-infiltrated wide band gap inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemistry are provided.

  18. Investigation of human teeth with respect to the photon interaction, energy absorption and buildup factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurudirek, Murat, E-mail: mkurudirek@gmail.co [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Topcuoglu, Sinan [Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Endodontic, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of human teeth have been calculated for total photon interaction (Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}},Ne{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}) and photon energy absorption (Z{sub PEA{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}},Z{sub RW{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}Ne{sub PEA{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}) in the energy region 1 keV-20 MeV. Besides, the energy absorption (EABF) and exposure (EBF) buildup factors have been calculated for these samples by using the geometric progression fitting approximation in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to 40 mfp (mean free path). Wherever possible the results were compared with experiment. Effective atomic numbers (Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}) of human teeth were calculated using different methods. Discrepancies were noted in Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}} between the direct and interpolation methods in the low and high energy regions where absorption processes dominate while good agreement was observed in intermediate energy region where Compton scattering dominates. Significant variations up to 22% were observed between Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}} and Z{sub PEA{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}} in the energy region 30-150 keV which is the used energy range in dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) X-ray machines. The Z{sub eff} values of human teeth were found to relatively vary within 1% if different laser treatments are applied. In this variation, the Er:YAG laser treated samples were found to be less effected than Nd:YAG laser treated ones when compared with control group. Relative differences between EABF and EBF were found to be significantly high in the energy region 60 keV-1 MeV even though they have similar variations with respect to the different parameters viz. photon energy, penetration depth.

  19. FOR N+ 56Fe REACTION AROUND INCIDENT ENERGIES OF

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cross section calculations have been carried out by some earlier scientists independent of energy surface imaginary potential. These have been characterized by a lot of disparity between authors and literature values. In this work, special attention was devoted to the increase in the accuracy of the calculation of nuclear ...

  20. Surface dose measurements under stretched, perforated thermoplast sheets and under protective wound dressings for high energy photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudenraus, J.; Christ, G.

    2000-01-01

    Patient fixation masks made of perforated thermoplast sheets are widely used in radiotherapy. These masks in particular serve to immobilize the head and neck region during radiation treatment. We placed samples made of differently stretched, perforated mask material on the surface of a white polystyrene (RW3) phantom and measured for high energy photon beams from Co-60 radiation up to 25 MV bremsstrahlung the dose increase resulting from the build-up under the hole and bridge areas. Depending on the energy of the incident beam and the thickness of the stretched mask material we observed a dose increase under the bridges at the phantom surface of 55% up to 140% compared to the dose without a layer of mask material. Under a hole the dose increase is almost half the value found under a bridge. However, deeper than 1 mm under the phantom surface this difference in dose increase under holes and bridges decreases to less than 10%. The mean dose increase under a perforated thermoplast sheet is lower than the dose increase under a homogeneous sheet made of the same material with the same mean thickness. Radiation induced skin lesions or an ulcerating tumour, respectively, may require a protective wound dressing under a patient fixation mask during radiation therapy. Choosing a thin hydrocolloid wound dressing the additional dose increase of the skin, compared to the dose increase due to the fixation mask, can be kept low. (orig.) [de

  1. Many-Body Theory of Proton-Generated Point Defects for Losses of Electron Energy and Photons in Quantum Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danhong; Iurov, Andrii; Gao, Fei; Gumbs, Godfrey; Cardimona, D. A.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of point defects on the loss of either energies of ballistic electron beams or incident photons are studied by using a many-body theory in a multi-quantum-well system. This theory includes the defect-induced vertex correction to a bare polarization function of electrons within the ladder approximation, and the intralayer and interlayer screening of defect-electron interactions is also taken into account in the random-phase approximation. The numerical results of defect effects on both energy-loss and optical-absorption spectra are presented and analyzed for various defect densities, numbers of quantum wells, and wave vectors. The diffusion-reaction equation is employed for calculating distributions of point defects in a layered structure. For completeness, the production rate for Frenkel-pair defects and their initial concentration are obtained based on atomic-level molecular-dynamics simulations. By combining the defect-effect, diffusion-reaction, and molecular-dynamics models with an available space-weather-forecast model, it will be possible in the future to enable specific designing for electronic and optoelectronic quantum devices that will be operated in space with radiation-hardening protection and, therefore, effectively extend the lifetime of these satellite onboard electronic and optoelectronic devices. Specifically, this theory can lead to a better characterization of quantum-well photodetectors not only for high quantum efficiency and low dark current density but also for radiation tolerance or mitigating the effects of the radiation.

  2. Quantitative material decomposition using spectral computed tomography with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seungwan; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-01-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (CT) techniques have been used to decompose materials and characterize tissues according to their physical and chemical compositions. However, these techniques are hampered by the limitations of conventional x-ray detectors operated in charge integrating mode. Energy-resolved photon-counting detectors provide spectral information from polychromatic x-rays using multiple energy thresholds. These detectors allow simultaneous acquisition of data in different energy ranges without spectral overlap, resulting in more efficient material decomposition and quantification for dual-energy CT. In this study, a pre-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique based on volume conservation was proposed for three-material decomposition. The technique was combined with iterative reconstruction algorithms by using a ray-driven projector in order to improve the quality of decomposition images and reduce radiation dose. A spectral CT system equipped with a CZT-based photon-counting detector was used to implement the proposed dual-energy CT technique. We obtained dual-energy images of calibration and three-material phantoms consisting of low atomic number materials from the optimal energy bins determined by Monte Carlo simulations. The material decomposition process was accomplished by both the proposed and post-reconstruction dual-energy CT techniques. Linear regression and normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE) analyses were performed to evaluate the quantitative accuracy of decomposition images. The calibration accuracy of the proposed dual-energy CT technique was higher than that of the post-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique, with fitted slopes of 0.97–1.01 and NRMSEs of 0.20–4.50% for all basis materials. In the three-material phantom study, the proposed dual-energy CT technique decreased the NRMSEs of measured volume fractions by factors of 0.17–0.28 compared to the post-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique. It was concluded that the

  3. Impact of a plasma channel on the emission of directed high-energy photons in laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Oliver; Wang, Tao; Toncian, Toma; Stark, David; D'Humieres, Emmanuel; Arefiev, Alexey

    2017-10-01

    Compact sources of directed high-energy photons are of great interest in current research. Common sources of high-energy photons include synchrotrons and other large and expensive accelerators. Laser-plasma interactions promise sources that are significantly smaller and cheaper than conventional ones. However, they come at the cost of producing either only small number of photons or very undirected ones. A recent study shows, that the use of a plasma channel is able to significantly mitigate these problems while producing a large number of high energy, well collimated photons. We provide an analysis on the physical processes, that lead to the formation of strong magnetic fields responsible for this improvement of emission. Furthermore, we investigate the channel properties in relation to a given laser pulse. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1632777. Simulations were performed with the EPOCH code using HPC resources provided by the TACC at the University of Texas.

  4. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman WN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wan Nordiana Rahman,1,2 Stéphanie Corde,3,4 Naoto Yagi,5 Siti Aishah Abdul Aziz,1 Nathan Annabell,2 Moshi Geso21School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia; 2Division of Medical Radiation, School of Medical Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Bundoora, VIC, 3Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, High Street, Randwick, 4Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia; 5Japanese Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, JapanAbstract: Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Compton scattering interactions. Gold nanoparticles are a novel radiosensitizing agent that can potentially be used to increase the effectiveness of current radiation therapy techniques and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, the optimum radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles is strongly dependent on photon energy, which theoretically is predicted to occur in the kilovoltage range of energy. In this research, synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays in the 30–100 keV range were used to investigate the energy dependence of radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and also to determine the photon energy that produces optimum effects. This investigation was conducted using cells in culture to measure dose enhancement. Bovine aortic endothelial cells with and without gold nanoparticles were irradiated with X-rays at energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 81, and 100 keV. Trypan blue exclusion assays were performed after irradiation to determine cell viability. Cell radiosensitivity enhancement was indicated by the dose enhancement factor which was found to be maximum at 40 keV with a value of 3

  5. Microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation with associated extremely low photon flux densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, A.; Jain, V. K.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation in extremely low flux density conditions. With wide deployment in mind, potential applications range from nuclear non-proliferation, to hospital radiation-safety. The daunting challenge is the low level of photon flux densities - emerging from a Scintillation Crystal (SC) on to a ~1 mm-square detector, which are a factor of 10000 or so lower than those acceptable to recently reported photonic chips (including `single-photon detection' chips), due to a combination of low Lux, small detector size, and short duration SC output pulses - on the order of 1 μs. These challenges are attempted to be overcome by the design of an innovative `System on a Chip' type microchip, with high detector sensitivity, and effective coupling from the SC to the photodetector. The microchip houses a tiny n+ diff p-epi photodiode (PD) as well as the associated analog amplification and other related circuitry, all fabricated in 0.5micron, 3-metal 2-poly CMOS technology. The amplification, together with pulse-shaping of the photocurrent-induced voltage signal, is achieved through a tandem of two capacitively coupled, double-cascode amplifiers. Included in the paper are theoretical estimates and experimental results.

  6. Reconstruction of 6 MV photon spectra from measured transmission including maximum energy estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C R; Peck, K K

    1997-11-01

    Photon spectra from a nominally 6 MV beam under standard clinical conditions and at higher and lower beam qualities have been derived from narrow-beam transmission measurements using a previously published three-parameter reconstruction model. Estimates of the maximum photon energy present in each spectrum were derived using a reduced number of model parameters. An estimate of the maximum contribution of background, or room, scatter to transmission measurements has been made for this study and is shown to be negligible in terms of the quality index and percentage depth-dose of the derived spectra. Percentage depth-dose data for standard beam conditions derived from the reconstructed spectrum were found to agree with direct measurements to within approximately 1% for depths of up to 25 cm in water. Quality indices expressed in terms of TPR10(20) for all spectra were found to agree with directly measured values to within 1%. The experimental procedure and reconstruction model are therefore shown to produce photon spectra whose derived quality indices and percentage depth-dose values agree with direct measurement to within expected experimental uncertainty.

  7. High Transverse Momentum Direct Photon Production at Fermilab Fixed-Target Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apanasevich, Leonard [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the production of high transverse momentum direct photons and π0 mesons by proton beams at 530 and 800 GeV/c and π- beams at 515 GeV/c incident on beryllium, copper, and liquid hydrogen targets. The data were collected by Fermilab experiment E706 during the 1990 and 1991-92 fixed target runs. The apparatus included a large, finely segmented lead and liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter and a charged particle spectrometer featuring silicon strip detectors in the target region and proportional wire chambers and drift tubes downstream of a large aperture analysis magnet. The inclusive cross sections are presented as functions of transverse momentum and rapidity. The measurements are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations and to results from previous experiments.

  8. Energy Level Tuning of Poly(phenylene-alt-dithienobenzothiadiazole)s for Low Photon Energy Loss Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuvel, Ruurd; van Franeker, Jacobus J; Janssen, René A J

    2017-03-01

    Six poly(phenylene- alt -dithienobenzothiadiazole)-based polymers have been synthesized for application in polymer-fullerene solar cells. Hydrogen, fluorine, or nitrile substitution on benzo-thiadiazole and alkoxy or ester substitution on the phenylene moiety are investigated to reduce the energy loss per converted photon. Power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) up to 6.6% have been obtained. The best performance is found for the polymer-fullerene combination with distinct phase separation and crystalline domains. This improves the maximum external quantum efficiency for charge formation and collection to 66%. The resulting higher photocurrent compensates for the relatively large energy loss per photon ( E loss = 0.97 eV) in achieving a high PCE. By contrast, the poly-mer that provides a reduced energy loss ( E loss = 0.49 eV) gives a lower photocurrent and a reduced PCE of 1.8% because the external quantum efficiency of 17% is limited by a suboptimal morphology and a reduced driving force for charge transfer.

  9. Photon Events with Missing Energy at $\\sqrt{s}$= 183 to 189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Azhinenko, I.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G.D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.Yu.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Benekos, N.C.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bigi, M.; Bilenky, Mikhail S.; Bizouard, M.A.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H.M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borgland, A.W.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R.A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M.V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Chabaud, V.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chierici, R.; Shlyapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Crepe-Renaudin, Sabine; Crosetti, G.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Duperrin, A.; Durand, J.D.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.P.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Harris, Elisabeth Falk; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayot, J.; Feindt, M.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Fichet, S.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Gerdyukov, L.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil Botella, Ines; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gouz, Yu.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Gris, P.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F.J.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J.J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T.L.; Heuser, J.M.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huber, M.; Huet, K.; Hughes, G.J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Khomenko, B.A.; Khovansky, N.N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N.J.; Klapp, O.; Klein, Hansjorg; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kuznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumshtein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kurowska, J.; Kurvinen, K.; Lamsa, J.W.; Lane, D.W.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Lefebure, V.; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loerstad, B.; Loken, J.G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J.R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Malmgren, T.G.M.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; McPherson, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W.A.; Mjornmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moller, Rasmus; Monig, Klaus; Monge, M.R.; Moraes, D.; Moreau, X.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Muller, U.; Munich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Muresan, R.; Murray, W.J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Navas, Sergio; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B.S.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Orazi, G.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Pavel, T.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H.T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Rames, J.; Ratoff, P.N.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, Nicola Giuseppe; Regler, M.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.B.; Resvanis, L.K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rohne, O.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Royon, C.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Schwemling, P.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Yu.; Segar, A.M.; Seibert, N.; Sekulin, R.; Shellard, R.C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A.N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G.R.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassoff, T.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanic, S.; Stanitzki, M.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, Jan; Tinti, N.; Tkachev, L.G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Van Dam, Piet; Van Den Boeck, W.; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.H.; Wilkinson, G.R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimine, N.I.; Zinchenko, A.; Zoller, P.; Zucchelli, G.C.; Zumerle, G.

    2000-01-01

    The production of single photons has been studiedin the reaction e+e- --> gamma+ invisible particles at centre-of-mass energies of 183~GeV and 189~GeV.A previously published analysis of events with multi-photonfinal states accompanied by missing energy has been updated with 189 GeV data.The data were collected with the DELPHI detector and correspondto integrated luminosities of about 51~pb^{-1}and 158~pb^{-1}at thetwo energies.The number of light neutrino families is measured to be2.86\\pm0.13(stat)\\pm0.14(syst)$. The absence ofan excess of events beyond that expected from Standard Modelprocesses is used to set limits on new physicsas described by supersymmetric and composite models.A limit on the gravitational scale is also determined.

  10. Generation of high-dimensional energy-time-entangled photon pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da; Zhang, Yiqi; Li, Xinghua; Zhang, Dan; Cheng, Lin; Li, Changbiao; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2017-11-01

    High-dimensional entangled photon pairs have many excellent properties compared to two-dimensional entangled two-photon states, such as greater information capacity, stronger nonlocality, and higher security. Traditionally, the degree of freedom that can produce high-dimensional entanglement mainly consists of angular momentum and energy time. In this paper, we propose a type of high-dimensional energy-time-entangled qudit, which is different from the traditional model with an extended propagation path. In addition, our method mainly focuses on the generation with multiple frequency modes, while two- and three-dimensional frequency-entangled qudits are examined as examples in detail through the linear or nonlinear optical response of the medium. The generation of high-dimensional energy-time-entangled states can be verified by coincidence counts in the damped Rabi oscillation regime, where the paired Stokes-anti-Stokes wave packet is determined by the structure of resonances in the third-order nonlinearity. Finally, we extend the dimension to N in the sequential-cascade mode. Our results have potential applications in quantum communication and quantum computation.

  11. ERICA: an energy resolving photon counting readout ASIC for X-ray in-line cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias-Montero, J.-G.; Sarraj, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Moore, T.; Casanova, R.; Martinez, R.; Puigdengoles, C.; Prats, X.; Kolstein, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present ERICA (Energy Resolving Inline X-ray Camera) a photon-counting readout ASIC, with 6 energy bins. The ASIC is composed of a matrix of 8 × 20 pixels controlled by a global digital controller and biased with 7 independent digital to analog converters (DACs) and a band-gap current reference. The pixel analog front-end includes a charge sensitive amplifier with 16 mV/ke- gain and dynamic range of 45 ke-. ERICA has programmable pulse width, an adjustable constant current feedback resistor, a linear test pulse generator, and six discriminators with 6-bit local threshold adjustment. The pixel digital back-end includes the digital controller, 8 counters of 8-bit depth, half-full buffer flag for any of the 8 counters, a 74-bit shadow/shift register, a 74-bit configuration latch, and charge sharing compensation processing to perform the energy classification and counting operations of every detected photon in 1 μ s. The pixel size is 330 μm × 330 μm and its average consumption is 150 μW. Implemented in TSMC 0.25 μm CMOS process, the ASIC pixel's equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 90 e- RMS connected to a 1 mm thickness matching CdTe detector biased at -300 V with a total leakage current of 20 nA.

  12. Proceedings of the LAMPF workshop on photon and neutral meson physics at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.W.; Crannell, H.; Peterson, R.J.

    1987-12-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Workshop on ''Photon and Neutral-Meson, Physics at Intermediate Energies,'' held at Los Alamos, New Mexico, January 7 to 9, 1987. The purpose of this workshop was to bring together scientists working in the areas of electromagnetic, heavy-ion, and light hadron physics to discuss both the physics that could be addressed and potential capabilities of new, large intermediate-energy photon detectors. Based on the papers contained in these proceedings, it appears clear that there are a number of important areas that could be addressed with a much higher resolution neutral meson detector. It is also clear that the technical capability for building a neutral meson detector for energies up to 4 GeV with solid angle of approximately 10 mrs and resolution of a few hundred keV now exists. It also appears entirely reasonable to construct such a detector to be easily transportable so that it would become a national facility, available for use at a number of different laboratories. From the many interesting papers presented and from the broad representation of physicists from laboratories in Asia, Canada, Europe, Japan, and the United States, there appears to be a strong case for proceeding with the construction of such a detector

  13. Resonance interaction energy between two entangled atoms in a photonic bandgap environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notararigo, Valentina; Passante, Roberto; Rizzuto, Lucia

    2018-03-26

    We consider the resonance interaction energy between two identical entangled atoms, where one is in the excited state and the other in the ground state. They interact with the quantum electromagnetic field in the vacuum state and are placed in a photonic-bandgap environment with a dispersion relation quadratic near the gap edge and linear for low frequencies, while the atomic transition frequency is assumed to be inside the photonic gap and near its lower edge. This problem is strictly related to the coherent resonant energy transfer between atoms in external environments. The analysis involves both an isotropic three-dimensional model and the one-dimensional case. The resonance interaction asymptotically decays faster with distance compared to the free-space case, specifically as 1/r 2 compared to the 1/r free-space dependence in the three-dimensional case, and as 1/r compared to the oscillatory dependence in free space for the one-dimensional case. Nonetheless, the interaction energy remains significant and much stronger than dispersion interactions between atoms. On the other hand, spontaneous emission is strongly suppressed by the environment and the correlated state is thus preserved by the spontaneous-decay decoherence effects. We conclude that our configuration is suitable for observing the elusive quantum resonance interaction between entangled atoms.

  14. Single photon and multiphoton events with missing energy in $e^{+} e^{-}$ collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2004-01-01

    Single- and multi-photon events with missing energy are selected in 619/pb of data collected by the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 189GeV and 209GeV. The cross sections of the process e^+e^- -> nu nu gamma (gamma) are found to be in agreement with the Standard Model expectations, and the number of light neutrino species is determined, including lower energy data, to be N_nu = 2.98 +/- 0.05 +/- 0.04. Selection results are also given in the form of tables which can be used to test future models involving single- and multi-photon signatures at LEP. These final states are also predicted by models with large extra dimensions and by several supersymmetric models. No evidence for such models is found. Among others, lower limits between 1.5TeV and 0.65TeV are set, at 95% confidence level, on the new scale of gravity for the number of extra dimensions between 2 and 8.

  15. Radiation-hard silicon photonics for high energy physics and beyond

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photonics (SiPh) is currently being investigated as a promising technology for future radiation hard optical links. The possibility of integrating SiPh devices with electronics and/or silicon particle sensors as well as an expected very high resistance against radiation damage make this technology particularly interesting for potential use close to the interaction points in future in high energy physics experiments and other radiation-sensitive applications. The presentation will summarize the outcomes of the research on radiation hard SiPh conducted within the ICE-DIP projected.

  16. Electromagnetic properties of terbium gallium garnet at millikelvin temperatures and low photon energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostylev, Nikita; Goryachev, Maxim; Bushev, Pavel; Tobar, Michael E.

    2017-07-01

    Electromagnetic properties of single crystal terbium gallium garnet are characterised from room down to millikelvin temperatures using the whispering gallery mode method. Microwave spectroscopy is performed at low powers equivalent to a few photons in energy and conducted as functions of the magnetic field and temperature. A phase transition is detected close to the temperature of 3.5 K. This is observed for multiple whispering gallery modes causing an abrupt negative frequency shift and a change in transmission due to extra losses in the new phase caused by a change in complex magnetic susceptibility.

  17. An investigation of the photon energy dependence of the EPR alanine dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstrand, Eva Stabell; Shortt, Ken R; Ross, Carl K; Hole, Eli Olaug

    2003-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) alanine dosimetry system is based on EPR measurements of radicals formed in alanine by ionizing radiation. The system has been studied to determine its energy dependence for photons in the 10-30 MV region relative to those of 60 Co and to find out if the system would be suitable for dosimetry comparisons. The irradiations were carried out at the National Research Council, Ottawa, Canada and the doses ranged from 8 to 54 Gy. The EPR measurements were performed at the University of Oslo, Norway. The ratio of the slope of the alanine reading versus dose-to-water curve for a certain linac photon beam quality and the corresponding slope for a reference 60 Co γ-radiation gives an experimental measure of the relative dose-to-water response of the EPR alanine dosimetry system. For calculating the linear regression coefficients of these alanine reading versus dose curves, the method of weighted least squares was used. This method is assumed to produce more accurate regression coefficients when applied to EPR dosimetry than the common method of standard least squares. The overall uncertainty on the ratio of slopes was between 0.5 and 0.6% for all three linac energies. The relative response for all the linac beams compared to cobalt was less than unity: by about 0.5% for the 20 and 30 MV points but by more than 1% for the 10 MV point. The given standard uncertainties negate concluding that there is any significant internal variation in the measured response as a function of beam quality between the three linac energies. Thus, we calculated the average dose response for all three energies and found that the alanine response is 0.8% (±0.5%) lower for high energy x-rays than for 60 Co γ-rays. This result indicates a small energy dependence in the alanine response for the high-energy photons relative to 60 Co which may be significant. This result is specific to our dosimetry system (alanine with 20% polyethylene binder pressed into a

  18. Dependence of ECH deposition profile on the modeling of incident wave energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kritz, A.H.; Hsuan, H.; Matsuda, K.

    1986-06-01

    The ray tracing code, TORAY, is used to investigate the importance of modeling assumptions utilized in describing Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH). In particular, we examine the dependence of the ECH deposition profile on the antenna pattern. We demonstrate that different assumptions for representing the incident wave energy by a finite number of rays lead to significantly different results for the energy deposition profile

  19. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The current status, both theoretical and experimental, of two photon collision physics is reviewed with special emphasis on recent experimental results from e + e - storage rings. After a complete presentation of the helicity amplitude formalism for the general process e + e - → Xe + e - , various approximations (transverse photon, Weisaecker Williams) are discussed. Beam polarisation effects and radiative corrections are also briefly considered. A number of specific processes, for which experimental results are now available, are then described. In each case existing theoretical prediction are confronted with experimental results. The processes described include single resonance production, lepton and hadron pair production, the structure functions of the photon, the production of high Psub(T) jets and the total photon photon cross section. In the last part of the review the current status of the subject is summarised and some comments are made on future prospects. These include both extrapolations of current research to higher energy machines (LEP, HERA) as well as a brief mention of both the technical realisation and the physics interest of the real γγ and eγ collisions which may be possible using linear electron colliders in the 1 TeV energy range

  20. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberger, H., E-mail: Hubertus.Bromberger@mpsd.mpg.de; Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C. [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Günther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Calegari, F. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Cavalleri, A. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Rd. Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-31

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  1. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C.; Hartsough, Neal E.; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C.

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm2/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a 57Co source. An output rate of 6×106 counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and energy

  2. Attenuation correction strategies for multi-energy photon emitters using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretorius, P.H.; King, M.A.; Pan, T.S.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the photopeak window projections from different energy photons can be combined into a single window for reconstruction or if it is better to not combine the projections due to differences in the attenuation maps required for each photon energy. The mathematical cardiac torso (MCAT) phantom was modified to simulate the uptake of Ga-67 in the human body. Four spherical hot tumors were placed in locations which challenged attenuation correction. An analytical 3D projector with attenuation and detector response included was used to generate projection sets. Data were reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction with Butterworth filtering in conjunction with one iteration of Chang attenuation correction, and with 5 and 10 iterations of ordered-subset maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization reconstruction. To serve as a standard for comparison, the projection sets obtained from the two energies were first reconstructed separately using their own attenuation maps. The emission data obtained from both energies were added and reconstructed using the following attenuation strategies: (1) the 93 keV attenuation map for attenuation correction, (2) the 185 keV attenuation map for attenuation correction, (3) using a weighted mean obtained from combining the 93 keV and 185 keV maps, and (4) an ordered subset approach which combines both energies. The central count ratio (CCR) and total count ratio (TCR) were used to compare the performance of the different strategies. Compared to the standard method, results indicate an over-estimation with strategy 1, an under-estimation with strategy 2 and comparable results with strategies 3 and 4. In all strategies, the CCR's of sphere 4 were under-estimated, although TCR's were comparable to that of the other locations. The weighted mean and ordered subset strategies for attenuation correction were of comparable accuracy to reconstruction of the windows separately

  3. Sensitivity comparison of two L-alanine doped blends to different photon energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Felipe; Vega Ramirez, Jose; Nicolucci, Patricia; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Blends of L-alanine (85% weight proportion) with KI (10%) and with PbI 2 (10%), these last two compounds acting as dopants, and with PVA (5%) acting as binder, were prepared in water at 80 C degrees. A blend of pure L-alanine (95%) with PVA (5%) was also prepared. The three blends were irradiated with photon beams of different energies (120 kV, 60 Co and 10 MV) with a unique dose of 30 Gy to compare their sensitivities for those three energies. EPR spectra of the three irradiated blends were recorded in a K-Band spectrometer (24 GHz) taking aliquots of about 4 mg for each blend. The energy sensitivity of a blend was defined as the peak-to-peak amplitude of its EPR spectrum central line. For the 60 Co energy (1.25 MeV) the blends presented practically the same sensitivity indicating that the presence of the dopants does not affect the sensitivity of L-alanine. For 10 MV X-rays there was an increment (around 20% - 30 %) in sensitivity for the two L-alanine doped blends compared with the pure L-alanine blend (not doped). In the case of 120 kV X-rays, the blends ala+KI and ala+PbI 2 showed an increment of 10 and 20 times, respectively, more sensitivity than the pure L-alanine blend. It is concluded that the dopants KI and PbI 2 produce a great enhance of the L-alanine sensitivity to low-energy photons. For the same dopant's content (10%) in the blend, PbI 2 showed a better performance. These results encourage us to try to enhance the sensitivity of L-alanine even more increasing the dopant's content in the blend. Application of these L-alanine doped blends in the dosimetry in diagnostic radiology could be possible. (author)

  4. High energy photon production in the 40Ar+51V reaction at 44 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapienza, P.; Coniglione, R.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Bellia, G.; Migneco, E.

    1994-01-01

    Hard-photons emission in heavy collisions at intermediate energy is used as a probe. The Bremsstrahlung generated by the n-p collisions occurring at the first stage of the reaction gives a satisfactory description of the data. The preliminary results on the γ-proton correlation strongly indicate that at least the most energetic photons and pre-equilibrium protons are produced by first chance n-p collisions. (D.L.). 17 refs., 3 figs

  5. High energy photon production in the {sup 40}Ar+{sup 51}V reaction at 44 MeV/u

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapienza, P.; Coniglione, R.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Bellia, G.; Migneco, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy)]|[Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Peghaire, A. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France)

    1994-04-01

    Hard-photons emission in heavy collisions at intermediate energy is used as a probe. The Bremsstrahlung generated by the n-p collisions occurring at the first stage of the reaction gives a satisfactory description of the data. The preliminary results on the {gamma}-proton correlation strongly indicate that at least the most energetic photons and pre-equilibrium protons are produced by first chance n-p collisions. (D.L.). 17 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Benchmark of PENELOPE code for low-energy photon transport: dose comparisons with MCNP4 and EGS4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Sung-Joon; Brezovich, Ivan A; Pareek, Prem; Naqvi, Shahid A

    2004-01-01

    The expanding clinical use of low-energy photon emitting 125 I and 103 Pd seeds in recent years has led to renewed interest in their dosimetric properties. Numerous papers pointed out that higher accuracy could be obtained in Monte Carlo simulations by utilizing newer libraries for the low-energy photon cross-sections, such as XCOM and EPDL97. The recently developed PENELOPE 2001 Monte Carlo code is user friendly and incorporates photon cross-section data from the EPDL97. The code has been verified for clinical dosimetry of high-energy electron and photon beams, but has not yet been tested at low energies. In the present work, we have benchmarked the PENELOPE code for 10-150 keV photons. We computed radial dose distributions from 0 to 10 cm in water at photon energies of 10-150 keV using both PENELOPE and MCNP4C with either DLC-146 or DLC-200 cross-section libraries, assuming a point source located at the centre of a 30 cm diameter and 20 cm length cylinder. Throughout the energy range of simulated photons (except for 10 keV), PENELOPE agreed within statistical uncertainties (at worst ±5%) with MCNP/DLC-146 in the entire region of 1-10 cm and with published EGS4 data up to 5 cm. The dose at 1 cm (or dose rate constant) of PENELOPE agreed with MCNP/DLC-146 and EGS4 data within approximately ±2% in the range of 20-150 keV, while MCNP/DLC-200 produced values up to 9% lower in the range of 20-100 keV than PENELOPE or the other codes. However, the differences among the four datasets became negligible above 100 keV

  7. Free-Free Transitions of the e-H System Inside a Dense Plasma Irradiated by a Laser Field at Very Low Incident-Electron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, C.

    2012-01-01

    The free-free transition is studied for an electron-hydrogen atom in ground state when a low-energy electron (external) is injected into hydrogenic plasma in the presence of an external homogenous, monochromatic, and linearly polarized laser field. The effect of plasma screening is considered in the Debye-Huckel approximation. The calculations are performed in the soft photon limit. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the initial and final channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the electron exchange. The laser-assisted differential and total cross sections are calculated for single-photon absorption or emission and no-photon exchange in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. The calculations have been carried out for various values of Debye parameter, ranging from 0.005 to 0.12. A strong suppression is noted in the laser-assisted cross sections as compared to the field-free situation. A significant difference is noted for the singlet and triplet cross sections. The suppression is much more in the triplet states.

  8. Usefulness of an energy-binned photon-counting x-ray detector for dental panoramic radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Tatsumasa; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Ogawa, Koichi; Fujiwara, Shuu

    2015-03-01

    A newly developed dental panoramic radiography system is equipped with a photon-counting semiconductor detector. This photon-counting detector acquires transparent X-ray beams by dividing them into several energy bands. We developed a method to identify dental materials in the patient's teeth by means of the X-ray energy analysis of panoramic radiographs. We tested various dental materials including gold alloy, dental amalgam, dental cement, and titanium. The results of this study suggest that X-ray energy scattergram analysis could be used to identify a range of dental materials in a patient's panoramic radiograph.

  9. Energy discrimination for positron emission tomography using the time information of the first detected photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, A. C.; Lemaire, W.; Lecoq, P.; Fontaine, R.; Pratte, J.-F.

    2018-01-01

    The advantages of Time-of-Flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET) have pushed the development of detectors with better time resolution. In particular, Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) have evolved tremendously in the past decade and arrays with a fully digital readout are the next logical step (dSiPM). New multi-timestamp methods use the precise time information of multiple photons to estimate the time of a PET event with greater accuracy, resulting in excellent time resolution. We propose a method which uses the same timestamps as the time estimator to perform energy discrimination, thus using data obtained within 5 ns of the beginning of the event. Having collected all the necessary information, the dSiPM could then be disabled for the remaining scintillation while dedicated electronics process the collected data. This would reduce afterpulsing as the SPAD would be turned off for several hundred nanoseconds, emptying the majority of traps. The proposed method uses a strategy based on subtraction and minimal electronics to reject energy below a selected threshold. This method achieves an error rate of less than 3% for photopeak discrimination (threshold at 400 keV) for dark count rates up to 100 cps/μm2, time-to-digital converter resolution up to 50 ps and a photon detection efficiency ranging from 10 to 70%.

  10. The Pierre Auger observatory's project of detecting photons and neutrinos at very high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertou, X.

    2001-11-01

    Cosmic radiations of ultra high energy (RCUHE, beyond 10 18 eV) are difficult to study because of their low flux on the earth surface: about 1 photon per year and per km 2 . The observatory Pierre Auger proposes to study RCUHE by designing 2 sites of 3000 km 2 (one in each hemisphere) allowing the observation of the shower initiated by cosmic radiation by using 4 fluorescence telescopes and a network of 1600 Cherenkov detectors. The identification of the primary particle is a very delicate point, the detection of neutrino or photon at these energies would bring valuable information for the understanding of potential sources of RCUHE. The first part of this work presents the project and its assets to perform its task. The second part is dedicated to the description of the Cherenkov detectors, of the trigger system, and of the centralized data acquisition system. The last part present the prototype installation that is under construction at Macargue in Argentina. (A.C.)

  11. The two-photon self-energy and other QED radiative corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zschocke, S.

    2001-07-01

    One of the main issues in current nuclear physics is the precise measurement of the Lamb shift of strongly bound electrons in quantum electrodynamic (QED) tests in strong fields in highly charged ions. The currently performed high-precision measurements require extreme accuracy in the theoretical calculation of Lamb shift. This requires consideration of all α and α 2 order QED corrections as well as of precisely all orders in Zα. In the past years most of these QED corrections have been calculated both in 1st order and in 2nd order interference theory. As yet however, it has not been possible to assess the contribution of the two-photon self-energy, which has therefore been the greatest uncertainty factor in predicting Lamb shift in hydrogen-like systems. This study examines the contribution of these processes to Lamb shift. It also provides the first ever derivation of renormalized terms of two-photon vacuum polarisation and self-energy vacuum polarisation. Until now it has only been possible to evaluate these contributions by way of an Uehling approximation [de

  12. Validating plastic scintillation detectors for photon dosimetry in the radiologic energy range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, François; Archambault, Louis; Plamondon, Mathieu; Després, Philippe; Therriault-Proulx, François; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Photon dosimetry in the kilovolt (kV) energy range represents a major challenge for diagnostic and interventional radiology and superficial therapy. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially good candidates for this task. This study proposes a simple way to obtain accurate correction factors to compensate for the response of PSDs to photon energies between 80 and 150 kVp. The performance of PSDs is also investigated to determine their potential usefulness in the diagnostic energy range. Methods: A 1-mm-diameter, 10-mm-long PSD was irradiated by a Therapax SXT 150 unit using five different beam qualities made of tube potentials ranging from 80 to 150 kVp and filtration thickness ranging from 0.8 to 0.2 mmAl + 1.0 mmCu. The light emitted by the detector was collected using an 8-m-long optical fiber and a polychromatic photodiode, which converted the scintillation photons to an electrical current. The PSD response was compared with the reference free air dose rate measured with a calibrated Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber. PSD measurements were corrected using spectra-weighted corrections, accounting for mass energy-absorption coefficient differences between the sensitive volumes of the ionization chamber and the PSD, as suggested by large cavity theory (LCT). Beam spectra were obtained from x-ray simulation software and validated experimentally using a CdTe spectrometer. Correction factors were also obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were compensated for beam hardening using the LCT correction method. These PDD measurements were compared with uncorrected PSD data, PDD measurements obtained using Gafchromic films, Monte Carlo simulations, and previous data. Results: For each beam quality used, the authors observed an increase of the energy response with effective energy when no correction was applied to the PSD response. Using the LCT correction, the PSD response was almost energy independent, with

  13. Validating plastic scintillation detectors for photon dosimetry in the radiologic energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessard, François; Archambault, Louis; Plamondon, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Photon dosimetry in the kilovolt (kV) energy range represents a major challenge for diagnostic and interventional radiology and superficial therapy. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially good candidates for this task. This study proposes a simple way to obtain accurate correction factors to compensate for the response of PSDs to photon energies between 80 and 150 kVp. The performance of PSDs is also investigated to determine their potential usefulness in the diagnostic energy range. Methods: A 1-mm-diameter, 10-mm-long PSD was irradiated by a Therapax SXT 150 unit using five different beam qualities made of tube potentials ranging from 80 to 150 kVp and filtration thickness ranging from 0.8 to 0.2 mmAl + 1.0 mmCu. The light emitted by the detector was collected using an 8-m-long optical fiber and a polychromatic photodiode, which converted the scintillation photons to an electrical current. The PSD response was compared with the reference free air dose rate measured with a calibrated Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber. PSD measurements were corrected using spectra-weighted corrections, accounting for mass energy-absorption coefficient differences between the sensitive volumes of the ionization chamber and the PSD, as suggested by large cavity theory (LCT). Beam spectra were obtained from x-ray simulation software and validated experimentally using a CdTe spectrometer. Correction factors were also obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were compensated for beam hardening using the LCT correction method. These PDD measurements were compared with uncorrected PSD data, PDD measurements obtained using Gafchromic films, Monte Carlo simulations, and previous data. Results: For each beam quality used, the authors observed an increase of the energy response with effective energy when no correction was applied to the PSD response. Using the LCT correction, the PSD response was almost energy independent, with

  14. Dual energy CT kidney stone differentiation in photon counting computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutjahr, R.; Polster, C.; Henning, A.; Kappler, S.; Leng, S.; McCollough, C. H.; Sedlmair, M. U.; Schmidt, B.; Krauss, B.; Flohr, T. G.

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluates the capabilities of a whole-body photon counting CT system to differentiate between four common kidney stone materials, namely uric acid (UA), calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), cystine (CYS), and apatite (APA) ex vivo. Two different x-ray spectra (120 kV and 140 kV) were applied and two acquisition modes were investigated. The macro-mode generates two energy threshold based image-volumes and two energy bin based image-volumes. In the chesspattern-mode four energy thresholds are applied. A virtual low energy image, as well as a virtual high energy image are derived from initial threshold-based images, while considering their statistically correlated nature. The energy bin based images of the macro-mode, as well as the virtual low and high energy image of the chesspattern-mode serve as input for our dual energy evaluation. The dual energy ratio of the individually segmented kidney stones were utilized to quantify the discriminability of the different materials. The dual energy ratios of the two acquisition modes showed high correlation for both applied spectra. Wilcoxon-rank sum tests and the evaluation of the area under the receiver operating characteristics curves suggest that the UA kidney stones are best differentiable from all other materials (AUC = 1.0), followed by CYS (AUC ≍ 0.9 compared against COM and APA). COM and APA, however, are hardly distinguishable (AUC between 0.63 and 0.76). The results hold true for the measurements of both spectra and both acquisition modes.

  15. Comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo calculations of multi-photon effects in bremsstrahlung emission by high-energy electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangiarotti, Alessio; Sona, Pietro; Ballestrero, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Approximate analytical calculations of multi-photon effects in the spectrum of total radiated energy by high-energy electrons crossing thin targets are compared to the results of Monte Carlo type simulations. The limits of validity of the analytical expressions found in the literature are establi...

  16. Measurement of the energy dependence of the total photon-proton cross section at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences; Univ. Coll. London (United Kingdom); Krakow Univ. of Technology (Poland). Faculty of Physics, Mathematics and Applied Computer Science; Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (PL). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] (and others)

    2010-10-15

    The energy dependence of the photon-proton total cross section, {sigma}{sub tot}{sup {gamma}}{sup p}, was determined from e{sup +}p scattering data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three values of the center-of-mass energy, W, of the {gamma}p system in the range 194

  17. Color graphics display of low-high energy electron-photon transport using EGS4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloepping, R.J.; Huntzinger, C.J.; Benson, E.; Nelson, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    Visual presentations are widely accepted and are a dynamic tool in education. The technique of visual presentations of Monte Carlo simulated interaction and transport using the EGS4 code system via SLAC Unified Graphics, connected to an IBM-5080 high resolution color monitor, has been previously demonstrated. EGS was originally developed by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the High Energy Physics Laboratory (HEPL) at Stanford University as an analytical tool for engineering and physics. The EGS4 version released in 1985 is capable of simulating radiation transport from several TeV down to 1 KeV (photons) and 10 KeV (electrons and positrons). EGS can not only transport monoenergetic particles, but also particles generated from an energy distribution. This paper demonstrates the graphics capability as a teaching tool. The EGS code has been thoroughly verified by comparison with experiment and theory

  18. Guidelines for the calibration of low energy photon sources at beta-ray brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    With the development of improved methods of implanting brachytherapy sources in a precise manner for treating prostate cancer and other disease processes, there has been a tremendous growth in the use of low energy photon sources, such as 125 I and 103 Pd brachytherapy seeds. Low energy photon sources have the advantage of easier shielding and also lowering the dose to normal tissue. However, the dose distributions around these sources are affected by the details in construction of the source and its encapsulation more than other sources used for brachytherapy treatments, such as 192 Ir. With increasing number of new low energy photon sources on the market, care should be taken with regard to its traceability to primary standards. It cannot be assumed that a calibration factor for an ionization chamber that is valid for one type of low energy photon source, automatically is valid for another source even if both would use the same isotope. Moreover, the method used to calculate the dose must also take into account the structure of the source and the encapsulation. The dose calculation algorithm that is valid for one type of low energy source may not be valid for another source even if in both cases the same radionuclide is used. Simple ''point source'' approximations, i.e. where the source is modeled as a point, should be avoided, as such methods do not account for any details in the source construction. In this document, the dose calculation formalism adopted for low energy photon sources is that recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) as outlined by Task Group-43 (TG-43). This method accounts for the source and capsule geometry. The AAPM recommends brachytherapy photon sources to be specified in terms of 'Air Kerma Strength' that is also used in the formalism mentioned above. On the other hand, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) recommends that the specification be done in terms of Reference Air

  19. Cost-effectiveness and incidence of renewable energy promotion in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehringer, Christoph [Oldenburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Economics; Landis, Florian [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland); Tovar Reanos, Miguel Angel [Zentrum fuer Europaeische Wirtschaftsforschung GmbH (ZEW), Mannheim (Germany)

    2017-08-01

    Over the last decade Germany has boosted renewable energy in power production by means of massive subsidies. The flip side are very high electricity prices which raises concerns that the transition cost towards a renewable energy system will be mainly borne by poor households. In this paper, we combine computable general equilibrium and microsimulation analysis to investigate the cost-effectiveness and incidence of Germany's renewable energy promotion. We find that the regressive effects of renewable energy promotion could be ameliorated by alternative subsidy financing mechanisms which achieve the same level of electricity generation from renewable energy sources.

  20. Theoretical photoionization spectra in the UV photon energy range for a Mg-like Al+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae-Soung; Kim, Young Soon

    2008-01-01

    In the present work, we report the photoionization cross sections of the Al + ion calculated for the photon energy range 20-26 eV and 30-50 eV. We have expanded our previous calculation (2007 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 76 014302) with an optimized admixture of the initial ground state 3s 21 S and exited states 3s3p 1,3 P, 3s3d 1,3 D and 3s4s 1,3 S, and obtained significantly improved predictions for the main background and autoionizing resonance structures of the reported experimental spectra. The absolute measurements of the photoionization cross sections of the Al + ion in these energy ranges have been performed by West et al (2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 052719), and they reported that the prominent peaks around 21 eV were attributed to the effects of the significant influence of the small fraction of the fourth-order radiation with energies around 84 eV from the synchrotron source. In our previous work, the main shape for these cross sections was calculated assuming an admixture of initial 3s 21 S and 3s3p 3 P states, only with a rough overall estimate for the experimental spectra in the photon energy range 20-26 eV, and without these peaks around 21 eV. The report of the experimental assignment attributes these peaks to the excitation of a 2p electron from the core. However, our present results with the new admixture reveal similar peaks without considering the possibility of the core excitation

  1. Development and evaluation of a surgical gamma probe capable of wide ranges of photon energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Nagayama, S.; Nasu, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Yasuda, S.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Currently intraoperative sentinel lymph node detection with Tc-99m labeled colloids is widely used. F-18 FDG. is also widely used for detection of lymph node metastasis. Considering the current clinical practice, it would be useful to develop a probe system which can measure both low and high energy photons. Therefore, we developed a probe system capable of high and low energy photons efficiently. The purpose of this paper is to present the specification of the system and the results of the basic experiments. Material and Methods: The gamma probe system developed consists of a NaI(Tl) detector 9mm in diameter, a data acquisition unit, central processing unit and data display unit. Two different kinds of tungsten collimators were constructed for Tc-99m: One is a straight bore of 40mm in length, 9mm in diameter and 3.5mm in wall thickness. The distance between the tip of the collimator and the detector is variable from 0 to 20mm. The other is a one with tapered tip, the diameter decreasing from 8mm to 3mm within 5mm distance. The distance between the tip of the collimator and the surface of the detector is variable from 5mm to 20mm. Two different types of tungsten collimator for F-18 were constructed: One is a straight bore type of 9mm in diameter, 33mm in length and 10mm in thickness. The other is one with tapering tip; 3mm in the tip diameter, 9mm in diameter at the 5mm from the tip, 23mm in length and 10mm in thickness. The counting rate performance of the system was studied with Tc-99m and F-18. The response curve of each collimator in water was obtained. Minimum differentiation of two point sources was determined in each collimator. The side penetration of 511keV photon was checked in the detector system for F-18. Results: There was linear relationship between activities and counts up to 35kcps for both nuclides.. The sensitivity in water was rapidly decreased with the straight bore collimator: 70% at the depth of 20mm. With the tapering collimator the

  2. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  3. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of α/sub s/ and Λ/sup ms/ from the γ*γ → π 0 form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from γγ → H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub γγ/ from exclusive channels at low W/sub γγ/, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z 0 and W +- beams from e → eZ 0 and e → nu W will become important. 44 references

  4. Dual energy CT with photon counting and dual source systems: comparative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atak, Haluk; Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2015-12-07

    Recently, new dual energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) systems-dual source CT (DSCT) and photon counting CT (PCCT) have been introduced. Although these systems have the same clinical targets, they have major differences as they use dual and single kVp acquisitions and different x-ray detection and energy resolution concepts. The purpose of this study was theoretical and experimental comparisons of DSCT and PCCT. The DSCT Siemens Somatom Flash was modeled for simulation study. The PCCT had the same configuration as DSCT except it used a photon counting detector. The soft tissue phantoms with 20, 30, and 38 cm diameters included iodine, CaCO3, adipose, and water samples. The dose (air kerma) was 14 mGy for all studies. The low and high energy CT data were simulated at 80 kVp and 140 kVp for DSCT, and in 20-58 keV and 59-120 keV energy ranges for PCCT, respectively. The experiments used Somatom Flash DSCT system and PCCT system based on photon counting CdZnTe detector with 2  ×  256 pixel configuration and 1  ×  1 mm(2) pixels size. In simulated general CT images, PCCT provided higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) than DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The PCCT with K-edge filter provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter, and DSCT with 0.4 mm Sn filter provided higher CNR than the DSCT with a 0.8 mm Sn filter. In simulated DE subtracted images, CNR of the DSCT was comparable to the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, DE PCCT with Ho a K-edge filter provided 30-40% higher CNR than the DE DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The experimental PCCT provided higher CNR in general imaging compared to the DSCT. In experimental DE subtracted images, the DSCT provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, experimental CNR with DE PCCT with K-edge filter was 15% higher than in DE DSCT, which is less than 30-40% increase predicted by the simulation study. It is concluded that ideal PCCT can provide substantial advantages over ideal

  5. The mean energy loss by neutrino with magnetic moment in strong magnetic field with consideration of positronium contribution to photon dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosichkin, A. F.

    2017-11-01

    The process of radiative decay of the neutrino with a magnetic moment in a strong magnetic field with consideration of positronium influence on photon dispersion has been studied. Positronium contribution to the photon polarization operator induces significant modifications of the photon dispersion law and neutrino radiative decay amplitude. It has been shown that the mean energy loss of a neutrino with magnetic a moment significantly increases, when the positronium contribution to photon dispersion is taken into account.

  6. Next-Generation Photon Sources for Grand Challenges in Science and Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-05-01

    The next generation of sustainable energy technologies will revolve around transformational new materials and chemical processes that convert energy efficiently among photons, electrons, and chemical bonds. New materials that tap sunlight, store electricity, or make fuel from splitting water or recycling carbon dioxide will need to be much smarter and more functional than today's commodity-based energy materials. To control and catalyze chemical reactions or to convert a solar photon to an electron requires coordination of multiple steps, each carried out by customized materials and interfaces with designed nanoscale structures. Such advanced materials are not found in nature the way we find fossil fuels; they must be designed and fabricated to exacting standards, using principles revealed by basic science. Success in this endeavor requires probing, and ultimately controlling, the interactions among photons, electrons, and chemical bonds on their natural length and time scales. Control science - the application of knowledge at the frontier of science to control phenomena and create new functionality - realized through the next generation of ultraviolet and X-ray photon sources, has the potential to be transformational for the life sciences and information technology, as well as for sustainable energy. Current synchrotron-based light sources have revolutionized macromolecular crystallography. The insights thus obtained are largely in the domain of static structure. The opportunity is for next generation light sources to extend these insights to the control of dynamic phenomena through ultrafast pump-probe experiments, time-resolved coherent imaging, and high-resolution spectroscopic imaging. Similarly, control of spin and charge degrees of freedom in complex functional materials has the potential not only to reveal the fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity, but also to lay the foundation for future generations of information science. This

  7. Monte Carlo Modeling of Dual and Triple Photon Energy Absorptiometry Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Kamali-Asl

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osteoporosis is a bone disease in which there is a reduction in the amount of bone mineral content leading to an increase in the risk of bone fractures. The affected individuals not only have to go through lots of pain and suffering but this disease also results in high economic costs to the society due to a large number of fractures.  A timely and accurate diagnosis of this disease makes it possible to start a treatment and thus preventing bone fractures as a result of osteoporosis. Radiographic methods are particularly well suited for in vivo determination of bone mineral density (BMD due to the relatively high x-ray absorption properties of bone mineral compared to other tissues. Materials and Methods: Monte Carlo simulation has been conducted to explore the possibilities of triple photon energy absorptiometry (TPA in the measurement of bone mineral content. The purpose of this technique is to correctly measure the bone mineral density in the presence of fatty and soft tissues. The same simulations have been done for a dual photon energy absorptiometry (DPA system and an extended DPA system. Results: Using DPA with three components improves the accuracy of the obtained result while the simulation results show that TPA system is not accurate enough to be considered as an adequate method for the measurement of bone mineral density. Discussion: The reason for the improvement in the accuracy is the consideration of fatty tissue in TPA method while having attenuation coefficient as a function of energy makes TPA an inadequate method. Conclusion: Using TPA method is not a perfect solution to overcome the problem of non uniformity in the distribution of fatty tissue.

  8. The mechanism of producing energy-polarization entangled photon pairs in the cavity-quantum electrodynamics scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chang-Gan; Xin, Xia; Liu, Yu-Min; Yu, Zhong-Yuan; Yao, Wen-Jie; Wang, Dong-Lin; Cao, Gui

    2012-04-01

    We investigate theoretically two photon entanglement processes in a photonic-crystal cavity embedding a quantum dot in the strong-coupling regime. The model proposed by Johne et al. (Johne R, Gippius N A, Pavlovic G, Solnyshkov D D, Shelykh I A and Malpuech G 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 240404), and by Robert et al. (Robert J, Gippius N A and Malpuech G 2009 Phys. Rev. B 79 155317) is modified by considering irreversible dissipation and incoherent continuous pumping for the quantum dot, which is necessary to connect the realistic experiment. The dynamics of the system is analysed by employing the Born—Markov master equation, through which the spectra for the system are computed as a function of various parameters. By means of this analysis the photon-reabsorption process in the strong-coupling regime is first observed and analysed from the perspective of radiation spectrum and the optimal parameters for observing energy-entangled photon pairs are identified.

  9. Searches for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.N.; Nief, J.Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J.M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I.C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J.A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A.O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D.E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S.J.; Halley, A.W.; Knowles, I.G.; Lynch, J.G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R.M.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E.B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A.M.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E.P.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lutjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Richter, Robert, 1; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, Richard Dante; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, Ph.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Lutz, A.M.; Nikolic, Irina; Schune, M.H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Bryant, L.M.; Chambers, J.T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Wright, A.E.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C.A.J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W.M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J.M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-01-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles in channels with one or more photons and missing energy have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of 11.1 \\pb\\ at $\\sqrt{s} = 161 ~\\, \\rm GeV$, 1.1 \\pb\\ at 170 \\gev\\ and 9.5 \\pb\\ at 172 GeV. The \\eenunu\\ cross se ction is measured. The data are in good agreement with predictions based on the Standard Model, and are used to set upper limits on the cross sections for anomalous photon production. These limits are compared to two different SUSY models and used to set limits on the neutralino mass. A limit of 71 \\gevsq\\ at 95\\% C.L. is set on the mass of the lightest neutralin o ($\\tau_{\\chi_{1}^{0}} \\leq $ 3 ns) for the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking and LNZ models.

  10. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek, S.; Svensson, R.; Jonsson, C.; Brahme, A.

    2006-11-01

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in 11C and 15O but also 13N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of 12C, 16O and 14N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated 12C, 16O and 14N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery verification by means of PET imaging seems to be

  11. Electron and photon energy reconstruction in the electromagnetic calorimeter of ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2075753; Mandelli, Luciano

    2007-01-01

    The Atlas LAr electromagnetic calorimeter is designed to provide a precise measurement of electrons and photons energies, in order to meet the requirements coming from the LHC physics program. This request of precision makes important to understand the behavior of the detector in all its aspect. Of fundamental importance to achieve the best possible performances is the calibration of the EM calorimeter, and this is the topic of this thesis. With detailed Monte Carlo simulations of single electrons and photons in the Atlas detector, we find a method to calibrate the electromagnetic calorimeter, based only on the informations that come from it. All the informations needed to develop a calibration method come from the simulations made with the technique of the Calibration Hits, that allows to know the en- ergy deposited in all the materials inside the detector volume, and not only in the active layer of each subdetector as possible in the standard simulations. This technique required a big effort for the develop...

  12. Slow-light-enhanced energy efficiency for graphene microheaters on silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Siqi; Zhu, Xiaolong; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N Asger; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2017-02-09

    Slow light has been widely utilized to obtain enhanced nonlinearities, enhanced spontaneous emissions and increased phase shifts owing to its ability to promote light-matter interactions. By incorporating a graphene on a slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguide, here we experimentally demonstrate an energy-efficient graphene microheater with a tuning efficiency of 1.07 nmmW -1 and power consumption per free spectral range of 3.99 mW. The rise and decay times (10-90%) are only 750 and 525 ns, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the fastest reported response times for microheaters in silicon photonics. The corresponding figure of merit of the device is 2.543 nW s, one order of magnitude better than results reported in previous studies. The influence of the length and shape of the graphene heater to the tuning efficiency is further investigated, providing valuable guidelines for enhancing the tuning efficiency of the graphene microheater.

  13. Comparison of the NPL water calorimeter with other dosimetric techniques for high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosser, K.E.; Williams, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    At present, the primary standard of absorbed dose to water at NPL in high energy photon beams is a graphite calorimeter. However the quantity of interest in radiation dosimetry is absorbed dose to water. Therefore, a new absorbed dose to water standard based on water calorimetry is being developed at NPL. The calorimeter operates at 4 deg. C, with temperature control being provided by a combination of liquid and air cooling. The sealed glass inner vessel of the calorimeter has been designed to minimise the effect of non-water materials on the measurement of absorbed dose. Measurements of absorbed dose to water made in 6, 10 and 19 MV photon beams agreed within the measurement uncertainties with those determined using the primary standard graphite calorimeter. Also the absorbed dose to water measured using the water calorimeter agrees with that based on the air kerma standards for 60 Co γ-radiation within the uncertainties. The development of the water calorimeter will lead to a very robust dosimetry system at NPL, where the absorbed dose to water can be determined using three independent techniques. (author)

  14. Soft X-ray irradiation of methanol ice: Formation of products as a function of photon energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Juang, K.-J.; Yih, T.-S.; Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.

    2013-01-01

    Pure methanol ices have been irradiated with monochromatic soft X-rays of 300 and 550 eV close to the 1s resonance edges of C and O, respectively, and with a broadband spectrum (250-1200 eV). The infrared (IR) spectra of the irradiated ices show several new products of astrophysical interest such as CH 2 OH, H 2 CO, CH 4 , HCOOH, HCOCH 2 OH, CH 3 COOH, CH 3 OCH 3 , HCOOCH 3 , and (CH 2 OH) 2 , as well as HCO, CO, and CO 2 . The effect of X-rays is the result of the combined interactions of photons and electrons with the ice. A significant contribution to the formation and growth of new species in the CH 3 OH ice irradiated with X-rays is given by secondary electrons, whose energy distribution depends on the energy of X-ray photons. Within a single experiment, the abundances of the new products increase with the absorbed energy. Monochromatic experiments show that product abundances also increase with the photon energy. However, the abundances per unit energy of newly formed species show a marked decrease in the broadband experiment as compared to irradiations with monochromatic photons, suggesting a possible regulatory role of the energy deposition rate. The number of new molecules produced per absorbed eV in the X-ray experiments has been compared to those obtained with electron and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiments.

  15. Energy Approach to Nuclei and Atoms in a Strong Laser Field: Stark Effect and Multi-photon Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O. Yu.; Svinarenko, A. A.; Lovett, L.

    2010-01-01

    A consistent energy approach to nuclei and atoms in a strong electromagnetic (laser) field is presented. The photon emission and absorption lines are described by the moments of different orders, which are calculated with the use of the Gell-Mann and Low S-matrix adiabatic formalism. In relativistic version the Gell-Mann and Low formulae expresses an imaginary part of the energy shift ImE through the scattering matrix, including interaction of quantum system as with laser field as with a field of photon vacuum.

  16. 85: Representation of the lack of electronic equilibrium in high energy photon beams using modified scatter tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, J.C.; Drouard, J.; Simonian, M.

    1987-01-01

    The lack of electronic equilibrium in high energy photon beams is significant in the build-up region, at the edge of the beams and at the edge of inhomogeneous structures. The authors propose to use the algorithms based on separation of primary and scatter and to include in the scatter tables a component representing the lack of electronic equilibrium for small depths and small field size. The value and limits of this approach are discussed and illustrated by several examples corresponding to different photon energies in the range 1 to 25 MV. Good agreement between calculations and measurements is obtained in most situations. 6 refs.; 5 figs

  17. Systematics of threshold incident energy for deep sub-barrier fusion hindrance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Hagino, Kouichi; Iwamoto, Akira

    2007-01-01

    We systematically evaluate the potential energy at the touching configuration for heavy-ion reactions using various potential models. We point out that the energy at the touching point, especially that estimated with the Krappe-Nix-Sierk (KNS) potential, strongly correlates with the threshold incident energy for steep falloff of fusion cross sections observed recently for several systems at extremely low energies. This clearly indicates that the steep fall-off phenomenon can be attributed to the dynamics after the target and projectile touch with each other, e.g., the tunneling process and the nuclear saturation property in the overlap region

  18. Multilayer optics for monochromatic high-resolution X-ray imaging diagnostic in a broad photon energy range from 2 keV to 22 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troussel, Ph.; Dennetiere, D.; Maroni, R.; Høghøj, P.; Hedacq, S.; Cibik, L.; Krumrey, M.

    2014-01-01

    The “Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives” (CEA) studies and designs advanced X-ray diagnostics to probe dense plasmas produced at the future Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility. Mainly for X-ray imaging with high spatial resolution, different types of multilayer mirrors were developed to provide broadband X-ray reflectance at grazing incidence. These coatings are deposited on two toroidal mirror substrates that are then mounted into a Wolter-type geometry (working at a grazing angle of 0.45°) to realize an X-ray microscope. Non-periodic (depth graded) W/Si multilayer can be used in the broad photon energy range from 2 keV to 22 keV. A third flat mirror can be added for the spectral selection of the microscope. This mirror is coated with a Mo/Si multilayer for which the d-spacing varies in the longitudinal direction to satisfy the Bragg condition within the angular acceptance of the microscope and also to compensate the angular dispersion due to the field of the microscope. We present a study of such a so-called Göbel mirror which was optimized for photon energy of 10.35 keV. The three mirrors were coated using magnetron sputtering technology by Xenocs SA. The reflectance in the entire photon energy range was determined in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin

  19. Multilayer optics for monochromatic high-resolution X-ray imaging diagnostic in a broad photon energy range from 2 keV to 22 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troussel, Ph., E-mail: philippe.troussel@cea.fr [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Dennetiere, D. [Synchrotron Soleil, L’orme des Merisiers, 91190 Saint-Aubin (France); Maroni, R. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Høghøj, P.; Hedacq, S. [Xenocs SA, 19, rue François Blumet, F-38360 Sassenage (France); Cibik, L.; Krumrey, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-12-11

    The “Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives” (CEA) studies and designs advanced X-ray diagnostics to probe dense plasmas produced at the future Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility. Mainly for X-ray imaging with high spatial resolution, different types of multilayer mirrors were developed to provide broadband X-ray reflectance at grazing incidence. These coatings are deposited on two toroidal mirror substrates that are then mounted into a Wolter-type geometry (working at a grazing angle of 0.45°) to realize an X-ray microscope. Non-periodic (depth graded) W/Si multilayer can be used in the broad photon energy range from 2 keV to 22 keV. A third flat mirror can be added for the spectral selection of the microscope. This mirror is coated with a Mo/Si multilayer for which the d-spacing varies in the longitudinal direction to satisfy the Bragg condition within the angular acceptance of the microscope and also to compensate the angular dispersion due to the field of the microscope. We present a study of such a so-called Göbel mirror which was optimized for photon energy of 10.35 keV. The three mirrors were coated using magnetron sputtering technology by Xenocs SA. The reflectance in the entire photon energy range was determined in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin.

  20. Multilayer optics for monochromatic high-resolution X-ray imaging diagnostic in a broad photon energy range from 2 keV to 22 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troussel, Ph.; Dennetiere, D.; Maroni, R.; Høghøj, P.; Hedacq, S.; Cibik, L.; Krumrey, M.

    2014-12-01

    The "Commissariat à l'énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives" (CEA) studies and designs advanced X-ray diagnostics to probe dense plasmas produced at the future Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility. Mainly for X-ray imaging with high spatial resolution, different types of multilayer mirrors were developed to provide broadband X-ray reflectance at grazing incidence. These coatings are deposited on two toroidal mirror substrates that are then mounted into a Wolter-type geometry (working at a grazing angle of 0.45°) to realize an X-ray microscope. Non-periodic (depth graded) W/Si multilayer can be used in the broad photon energy range from 2 keV to 22 keV. A third flat mirror can be added for the spectral selection of the microscope. This mirror is coated with a Mo/Si multilayer for which the d-spacing varies in the longitudinal direction to satisfy the Bragg condition within the angular acceptance of the microscope and also to compensate the angular dispersion due to the field of the microscope. We present a study of such a so-called Göbel mirror which was optimized for photon energy of 10.35 keV. The three mirrors were coated using magnetron sputtering technology by Xenocs SA. The reflectance in the entire photon energy range was determined in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin.

  1. The $\\eta_c$(2980) formation in two-photon collisions at LEP energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crawley, B; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Hansen, J; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, Borut P; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Rames, J; Ramler, L; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zinchenko, A I; Zupan, M

    2003-01-01

    eta_c(2980) production in gammagamma interactions has been detected via its decays into K0_sK+-pi-+, K+K-K+K- and K+K-pi+pi- in the data taken with the DELPHI detector at LEP1 and LEP2 energies. The two-photon radiative width averaged over all observed decay channels is Gamma_gammagamma = 13.9+-2.0(stat.)+-1.4(syst.)+-2.7(BR)keV. No direct decay channel eta_c -> pi+pi-pi+pi- has been observed. An upper limit Gamma_gammagamma<5.5keV at 95% confidence level has been evaluated for this decay mode.

  2. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y., E-mail: cycjty@sophie.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Fuji, Hino, Tokyo 191-8502 (Japan); Fujiwara, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M. [Nuclear Professional School, the University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Tomita, H. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshihara, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-09-11

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  3. A multichannel single-photon sensitive detector for high-energy physics: the megapixel EBCCD

    CERN Document Server

    Benussi, L; Frekers, D; Frenkel, A; Giannini, G; Golovkin, S V; Kozarenko, E N; Kreslo, I E; Liberti, B; Martellotti, G; Medvedkov, A M; Mondardini, M R; Penso, G; Polizzi, A; Santacesaria, R; Santini, G; Spinetti, M; Vilain, P; Votano, L; Wilquet, G; Winter, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    We present a study of the characteristics of a hybrid image intensifier tube based on a thinned backside Electron Bombarded CCD (EBCCD) with better performance in spatial resolution, single photoelectron detection and gain stability than the conventional intensified systems based on a Micro Channel Plate followed by a CCD. Single photon detection sensitivity has been studied and a procedure to correct the gain non-uniformity of the EBCCD has been developed. The EBCCD, operating at 14 kV, has an average gain of approx 3000 electrons/photoelectron and a noise of the order of 100 electron/pixel. These characteristics make the EBCCD a very attractive device for many applications in high-energy physics, astrophysics and biomedicine. A possible application in a neutrino oscillation experiment is presented.

  4. Inhomogeneities in high energy photon beams used in radiotherapy. Experimental and theoretical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappas, K.

    1986-01-01

    This work is dedicated to the influence of the human body inhomogeneities on the dose distribution for high energy photons beams used in Radiotherapy. It consists in an experimental part and a theoretical analysis leading to original models of calculation. We study essentially, - the beam quality of the machines used and its influence on some basic dosimetric quantities and on the response of an ionization chamber. - The dose perturbation due to off-axis heterogeneous volumes at off-axis points of measurement; a model is suggested to take into account the perturbation of the multiple scatter. The perturbation of the dose in the transition region, between water equivalent medium and heterogeneous medium (air) is also investigated. The last part is devoted to computer applications of the proposed correction methods and to a comparison between the different computerized treatment planning systems which take into account of inhomogeneities [fr

  5. Feasibility study of radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter postal dose intercomparison for high energy photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rah, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Siyong; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Chung, Jin-Beom; Shin, Dong-Oh; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2009-01-01

    A radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter (GRD) system has recently become commercially available. In this study we evaluated whether the GRD would be suitable for external dosimetric audit program in radiotherapy. For this purpose, we introduced a methodology of the absorbed dose determination with the GRD by establishing calibration coefficient and various correction factors (non-linearity dose response, fading, energy dependence and angular dependence). A feasibility test of the GRD postal dose intercomparison was also performed for eight high photon beams by considering four radiotherapy centers in Korea. In the accuracy evaluation of the GRD dosimetry established in this study, we obtained within 1.5% agreements with the ionization chamber dosimetry for the 60 Co beam. It was also observed that, in the feasibility study, all the relative deviations were smaller than 3%. Based on these results, we believe that the new GRD system has considerable potential to be used for a postal dose audit program

  6. Field test analysis of concentrator photovoltaic system focusing on average photon energy and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husna, Husyira Al; Ota, Yasuyuki; Minemoto, Takashi; Nishioka, Kensuke

    2015-08-01

    The concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) system is unique and different from the common flat-plate PV system. It uses a multi-junction solar cell and a Fresnel lens to concentrate direct solar radiation onto the cell while tracking the sun throughout the day. The cell efficiency could reach over 40% under high concentration ratio. In this study, we analyzed a one year set of environmental condition data of the University of Miyazaki, Japan, where the CPV system was installed. Performance ratio (PR) was discussed to describe the system’s performance. Meanwhile, the average photon energy (APE) was used to describe the spectrum distribution at the site where the CPV system was installed. A circuit simulator network was used to simulate the CPV system electrical characteristics under various environmental conditions. As for the result, we found that the PR of the CPV systems depends on the APE level rather than the cell temperature.

  7. Photon energy-modulated radiotherapy: Monte Carlo simulation and treatment planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Min; Kim, Jung-in; Heon Choi, Chang; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Il Han; Ye, Sung-Joon [Interdiciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744, Korea and Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Interdiciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Interdiciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Interdiciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Intelligent Convergence Systems, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of photon energy-modulated radiotherapy during beam-on time. Methods: A cylindrical device made of aluminum was conceptually proposed as an energy modulator. The frame of the device was connected with 20 tubes through which mercury could be injected or drained to adjust the thickness of mercury along the beam axis. In Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, a flattening filter of 6 or 10 MV linac was replaced with the device. The thickness of mercury inside the device varied from 0 to 40 mm at the field sizes of 5 x 5 cm{sup 2} (FS5), 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} (FS10), and 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} (FS20). At least 5 billion histories were followed for each simulation to create phase space files at 100 cm source to surface distance (SSD). In-water beam data were acquired by additional MC simulations using the above phase space files. A treatment planning system (TPS) was commissioned to generate a virtual machine using the MC-generated beam data. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for six clinical cases were generated using conventional 6 MV, 6 MV flattening filter free, and energy-modulated photon beams of the virtual machine. Results: As increasing the thickness of mercury, Percentage depth doses (PDD) of modulated 6 and 10 MV after the depth of dose maximum were continuously increased. The amount of PDD increase at the depth of 10 and 20 cm for modulated 6 MV was 4.8% and 5.2% at FS5, 3.9% and 5.0% at FS10 and 3.2%-4.9% at FS20 as increasing the thickness of mercury from 0 to 20 mm. The same for modulated 10 MV was 4.5% and 5.0% at FS5, 3.8% and 4.7% at FS10 and 4.1% and 4.8% at FS20 as increasing the thickness of mercury from 0 to 25 mm. The outputs of modulated 6 MV with 20 mm mercury and of modulated 10 MV with 25 mm mercury were reduced into 30%, and 56% of conventional linac, respectively. The energy-modulated IMRT plans had less integral doses than 6 MV IMRT or 6 MV flattening filter free plans for tumors located in the

  8. The photon energy dependence of the alanine/EPR dosimetry system, an experimental investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstrand, E.S.; Hole, E.O.; Shortt, K.R.; Ross, C.K.

    2002-01-01

    The energy dependence of a dosimetry system based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of alanine has been studied to determine its suitability for use in dose verification for radiotherapy. A few experiments with high-energy photon irradiation of alanine have been reported in the literature. However, the reported results disagree whether the ratio of dose in alanine to dose in water is independent of the radiation energy or whether there is a small dependence for photon energies of relevance to radiotherapy. The concentration of free radicals in alanine is proportional to the absorbed dose in alanine over a wide dose range covering three decades. The relative number of radicals may be determined by examining the EPR spectrum, and hence it is possible to determine the dose with a system that has been calibrated using a known dose of 60 Co radiation. In the present work, irradiations of alanine dosimeters were performed at the National Research Council (NRC), in Ottawa, Canada. The radiation qualities investigated were 10, 20 and 30 MV x-rays using the NRC linac. For each radiation quality, 30 dosimeters were irradiated in a water phantom with a level of absorbed dose to water ranging from 10 to 50 Gy. For reference purposes, irradiations using the NRC 60 Co source were performed on more or less the same day as the irradiations at each specific linac quality. In all beams, the dose to water was measured using a graphite-walled NE2571 ionisation chamber that was originally calibrated by comparison with a sealed-water calorimeter. The alanine dosimeters were evaluated at the EPR laboratory at the University of Oslo, Norway, using an X-band Bruker ESP300E spectrometer with a rectangular double resonator. One of the resonators contained a Mn 2+ /MgO sample that was read after each dosimeter reading, in order to provide independence from short-term sensitivity fluctuations in the spectrometer. All dosimeters irradiated at one specific linac quality were

  9. Dosimetry quality audit of high energy photon beams in greek radiotherapy centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourdakis, Constantine J.; Boziari, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Dosimetry quality audits and intercomparisons in radiotherapy centers is a useful tool in order to enhance the confidence for an accurate therapy and to explore and dissolve discrepancies in dose delivery. This is the first national comprehensive study that has been carried out in Greece. During 2002 - 2006 the Greek Atomic Energy Commission performed a dosimetry quality audit of high energy external photon beams in all (23) Greek radiotherapy centers, where 31 linacs and 13 Co-60 teletherapy units were assessed in terms of their mechanical performance characteristics and relative and absolute dosimetry. Materials and Methods: The quality audit in dosimetry of external photon beams took place by means of on-site visits, where certain parameters of the photon beams were measured, calculated and assessed according to a specific protocol and the IAEA TRS 398 dosimetry code of practice. In each radiotherapy unit (Linac or Co-60), certain functional parameters were measured and the results were compared to tolerance values and limits. Doses in water under reference and non reference conditions were measured and compared to the stated values. Also, the treatment planning systems (TPS) were evaluated with respect to irradiation time calculations. Results: The results of the mechanical tests, dosimetry measurements and TPS evaluation have been presented in this work and discussed in detail. This study showed that Co-60 units had worse performance mechanical characteristics than linacs. 28% of all irradiation units (23% of linacs and 42% of Co-60 units) exceeded the acceptance limit at least in one mechanical parameter. Dosimetry accuracy was much worse in Co60 units than in linacs. 61% of the Co60 units exhibited deviations outside ±3% and 31% outside ±5%. The relevant percentages for the linacs were 24% and 7% respectively. The results were grouped for each hospital and the sources of errors (functional and human) have been investigated and

  10. Dosimetry quality audit of high energy photon beams in greek radiotherapy centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourdakis, Constantine J; Boziari, A

    2008-04-01

    Dosimetry quality audits and intercomparisons in radiotherapy centers is a useful tool in order to enhance the confidence for an accurate therapy and to explore and dissolve discrepancies in dose delivery. This is the first national comprehensive study that has been carried out in Greece. During 2002--2006 the Greek Atomic Energy Commission performed a dosimetry quality audit of high energy external photon beams in all (23) Greek radiotherapy centers, where 31 linacs and 13 Co-60 teletherapy units were assessed in terms of their mechanical performance characteristics and relative and absolute dosimetry. The quality audit in dosimetry of external photon beams took place by means of on-site visits, where certain parameters of the photon beams were measured, calculated and assessed according to a specific protocol and the IAEA TRS 398 dosimetry code of practice. In each radiotherapy unit (Linac or Co-60), certain functional parameters were measured and the results were compared to tolerance values and limits. Doses in water under reference and non reference conditions were measured and compared to the stated values. Also, the treatment planning systems (TPS) were evaluated with respect to irradiation time calculations. The results of the mechanical tests, dosimetry measurements and TPS evaluation have been presented in this work and discussed in detail. This study showed that Co-60 units had worse performance mechanical characteristics than linacs. 28% of all irradiation units (23% of linacs and 42% of Co-60 units) exceeded the acceptance limit at least in one mechanical parameter. Dosimetry accuracy was much worse in Co60 units than in linacs. 61% of the Co60 units exhibited deviations outside +/-3% and 31% outside +/-5%. The relevant percentages for the linacs were 24% and 7% respectively. The results were grouped for each hospital and the sources of errors (functional and human) have been investigated and discussed in details. This quality audit proved to be a

  11. Electric-Field-Induced Energy Tuning of On-Demand Entangled-Photon Emission from Self-Assembled Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Zallo, Eugenio; Höfer, Bianca; Chen, Yan; Keil, Robert; Zopf, Michael; Böttner, Stefan; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2017-01-11

    We explore a method to achieve electrical control over the energy of on-demand entangled-photon emission from self-assembled quantum dots (QDs). The device used in our work consists of an electrically tunable diode-like membrane integrated onto a piezoactuator, which is capable of exerting a uniaxial stress on QDs. We theoretically reveal that, through application of the quantum-confined Stark effect to QDs by a vertical electric field, the critical uniaxial stress used to eliminate the fine structure splitting of QDs can be linearly tuned. This feature allows experimental realization of a triggered source of energy-tunable entangled-photon emission. Our demonstration represents an important step toward realization of a solid-state quantum repeater using indistinguishable entangled photons in Bell state measurements.

  12. Dosimetry of small circular beams of high energy photons for stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy: the use of small ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazal, A.; Gaboriauid, G.; Zefkili, S.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Boutaudon, S.; Pontvert, D.

    1999-01-01

    The irradiation of small targets in the brain in a singe fraction (radiosurgery) or with a fractionated approach (stereotactic radiosurgery) with small beams of photons requires specific conditions to measure and to model the dosimetric data needed for treatment planning. In this work we present the method and materials adopted in our institution since 1988 to perform the dosimetry of high energy (6-23) circular photon beams with diameters ranging from 10 to 40 mm at the isocenter of linear accelerators, and its evolution as new dosimetric material became commercially available. in circular ionization chambers of small dimensions. We want to answer the following questions: Which are the minimal basic data needed to model small circular beams of high energy photons? Can we extrapolate or convert data from conventional data of larger beams? Which are the detectors well adapted for these kind of measurements and for which range of beam sizes?

  13. Search for anomalous production of photonic events with missing energy in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Feld, L; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J I; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rembser, C; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    Photonic events with large missing energy have been observed in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130, 136, 161 and 172 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. Results are presented based on search topologies designed to select events with a single photon and missing transverse energy or events with a pair of acoplanar photons. In both search topologies, cross-section measurements are performed within the kinematic acceptance of the selection. These results are compared with the expectations from the Standard Model processes e+e- -> nu nu(bar) gamma (gamma) (single-photon) and e+e- -> \

  14. A closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy for photons and electrons in the Compton energy range in Cartesian geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Volnei; Vilhena, Marco Tullio; Fernandes, Julio Cesar Lombaldo

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we report on a closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy, in one and two dimensional Cartesian geometry for photons and electrons, in the Compton energy range. For the one-dimensional case we use the LTS N method, assuming the Klein-Nishina scattering kernel for the determination of the angular radiation intensity for photons. We apply the two-dimensional LTS N nodal solution for the averaged angular radiation evaluation for the two-dimensional case, using the Klein-Nishina kernel for photons and the Compton kernel for electrons. From the angular radiation intensity we construct a closed-form solution for the build-up factor and evaluate the absorbed energy. We present numerical simulations and comparisons against results from the literature. (author)

  15. A closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy for photons and electrons in the Compton energy range in Cartesian geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Volnei; Vilhena, Marco Tullio, E-mail: borges@ufrgs.b, E-mail: vilhena@pq.cnpq.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (PROMEC/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Fernandes, Julio Cesar Lombaldo, E-mail: julio.lombaldo@ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (DMPA/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica Pura e Aplicada. Programa de Pos Graduacao em Matematica Aplicada

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we report on a closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy, in one and two dimensional Cartesian geometry for photons and electrons, in the Compton energy range. For the one-dimensional case we use the LTS{sub N} method, assuming the Klein-Nishina scattering kernel for the determination of the angular radiation intensity for photons. We apply the two-dimensional LTS{sub N} nodal solution for the averaged angular radiation evaluation for the two-dimensional case, using the Klein-Nishina kernel for photons and the Compton kernel for electrons. From the angular radiation intensity we construct a closed-form solution for the build-up factor and evaluate the absorbed energy. We present numerical simulations and comparisons against results from the literature. (author)

  16. Photoproduction of π+π-π0 on hydrogen with linearly polarized photons of energy 20-70 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasalle, J.C.; Patrick, G.N.; Storr, K.M.; Atkinson, M.; Axon, T.J.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Brookes, G.R.; Bunn, J.J.; Bussey, P.J.; Clegg, A.B.; Dainton, J.B.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Dieckmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Ellison, R.J.; Flower, P.; Flynn, P.J.; Galbraith, W.; Heinloth, K.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hughes-Jones, R.E.; Hutton, J.S.; Ibbotson, M.; Jakob, H.P.; Jung, M.; Kemp, M.A.R.; Kumar, B.R.; Laberrigue, J.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lane, J.B.; Levy, J.M.; Liebenau, V.; McClatchey, R.H.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J.A.G.; Morris, J.V.; Newton, D.; Paterson, C.; Paul, E.; Raine, C.; Reidenbach, M.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schloesser, A.; Sharp, P.H.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Smith, K.M.; Thompson, R.J.; Vaissiere, C. de la; Waite, A.P.; Worsell, M.F.; Yiou, T.P.

    1984-01-01

    Results on photoproduction of π + π - π 0 in the photon energy range 20-70 GeV are presented. For the ω meson, the production cross-section is found to be 1010 +- 15 (statistical) +- 290 (systematic) nb and is constant over the incident photon energy range. Spin-density matrix elements are evaluated for ω meson production. The PHI meson is observed with a total photoproduction cross section (corrected for branching ratio to π + π - π 0 ) of 610 +- 35 +- 170 nb. A third resonance, at 1.67 GeV, is seen in the mass spectrum and its interpretation is discussed. The production of a braod π + π - π 0 continuum, mainly via rhoπ, and peaking at 1.2 GeV, contributes with a cross section of about 2.5 μb. The spin-parity content is analysed by the moments of the π + π - π 0 decay angular distribution in the helicity frame and by maximum likelihood fits to the π + π - π 0 Dalitz plot. It is found that production of Jsup(P) = 1 - states accounts for less than half of the total mass spectrum above 900 MeV. There is a broad enhancement in the 1 + wave around 1.15 GeV indicating photoproduction of the H(1190) meson. (orig.)

  17. 200-MeV bremsstrahlung tagged photon beams at Sendai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, K.; Chiba, M.; Inoue, M.; Kanda, H.; Kimura, R.; Kino, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Konno, O.; Maeda, K.; Miyase, H.; Miyamoto, A.; Ohtsuki, T.; Saito, A.; Suda, T.; Takahashi, K.; Tamae, T.; Terasaki, Y.; Terasawa, T.; Tsubota, H.; Tsuruta, T.; Utoyama, M.; Yuuki, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamazaki, H.

    2006-01-01

    A new beam line for photonuclear reaction experiments using tagged photons has been constructed to take advantage of the completion of the 1.2-GeV STretcher Booster (STB) ring at the Laboratory of Nuclear Science (LNS), Tohoku University. A photon tagging system was installed at the end of the new beam line. It provides bremsstrahlung tagged photon beams in an energy range from 0.2E 0 to 0.8E 0 MeV at the incident electron energy E 0 with an energy resolution of ΔE/E∼10 -2 . The tagged photon intensity I= 6 photons/s is available for typical photonuclear reaction experiments. We introduce the basic parameters of the tagged photons by showing the commissioning data

  18. Transmission of electrons through insulating PET foils: Dependence on charge deposition, tilt angle and incident energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keerthisinghe, D., E-mail: darshika.keerthisinghe@wmich.edu [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Dassanayake, B.S. [Department of Physics, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Wickramarachchi, S.J. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Stolterfoht, N. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Tanis, J.A. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Transmission of electrons through insulating polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nanocapillaries was observed as a function of charge deposition, angular and energy dependence. Two samples with capillary diameters 100 and 200 nm and pore densities 5 × 10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2} and 5 × 10{sup 7}/cm{sup 2}, respectively, were studied for incident electron energies of 300, 500 and 800 eV. Transmission and steady state of the electrons were attained after a time delay during which only a few electron counts were observed. The transmission through the capillaries depended on the tilt angle with both elastic and inelastic electrons going through. The guiding ability of electrons was found to increase with the incident energy in contrast to previous measurements in our laboratory for a similar PET foil.

  19. Incident Energy Dependence of pt Correlations at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Badyal, S. K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B. I; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhatia, V. S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M. M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A. K.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M. S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R. Kh

    2005-10-01

    We present results for two-particle transverse momentum correlations, Δpt,iΔt,j, as a function of event centrality for Au+Au collisions at √(sNN) = 20, 62, 130, and 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We observe correlations decreasing with centrality that are similar at all four incident energies. The correlations multiplied by the multiplicity density increase with incident energy and the centrality dependence may show evidence of processes such as thermalization, jet production, or the saturation of transverse flow. The square root of the correlations divided by the event-wise average transverse momentum per event shows little or no beam energy dependence and generally agrees with previous measurements at the Super Proton Synchrotron.

  20. Clinical application of intensity and energy modulated radiotherapy with photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiangkui Mu

    2005-01-01

    In modern, advanced radiotherapy (e.g. intensity modulated photon radiotherapy, IMXT) the delivery time for each fraction becomes prolonged to 10-20 minutes compared with the conventional, commonly 2-5 minutes. The biological effect of this prolongation is not fully known. The large number of beam directions in IMXT commonly leads to a large integral dose in the patient. Electrons would reduce the integral dose but are not suitable for treating deep-seated tumour, due to their limited penetration in tissues. By combining electron and photon beams, the dose distributions may be improved compared with either used alone. One obstacle for using electron beams in clinical routine is that there is no available treatment planning systems that optimise electron beam treatments in a similar way as for IMXT. Protons have an even more pronounced dose fall-off, larger penetration depth and less penumbra widening than electrons and are therefore more suitable for advanced radiotherapy. However, proton facilities optimised for advanced radiotherapy are not commonly available. In some instances electron beams may be an acceptable surrogate. The first part of this study is an experimental in vitro study where the situation in a tumour during fractionated radiotherapy is simulated. The effect of the prolonged fraction time is compared with the predictions by radiobiological models. The second part is a treatment planning study to analyse the mixing of electron and photon beams for at complex target volume in comparison with IMXT. In the next step a research version of an electron beam optimiser was used for the improvement of treatment plans. The aim was to develop a method for translating crude energy and intensity matrices for optimised electrons into a deliverable treatment plan without destroying the dose distribution. In the final part, different methods of treating the spinal canal in medulloblastoma were explored in a treatment planning study that was evaluated with

  1. Optical and energy dependent response of the alanine gel solution produced at IPEN to clinical photons and electrons beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Cleber F.

    2011-01-01

    The DL-Alanine (C 3 H 7 NO 2 ) is an amino acid tissue equivalent traditionally used as standard dosimetric material in EPR dosimetry. Recently, it has been studied to be applied in gel dosimetry, considering that the addition of Alanine in the Fricke gel solution improves the production of ferric ions radiation induced. The spectrophotometric evaluation technique can be used comparing the two spectrum wavelengths bands: 457 nm band that corresponds to ferrous ions and 588 nm band that corresponds to ferric ions concentration to evaluate the dosimetric properties of this material. The performance of the Alanine gel solution developed at IPEN has been firstly studied using the spectrophotometric technique aiming to apply this material to 3D clinical doses evaluations using MRI technique. In this work, the optical and the energy dependent response of this solution submitted to clinical photons and electrons beams were studied. Different batches of gel solutions were prepared and maintained at low temperature during 12 h to solidification. Before irradiation, the samples were maintained during 1 h at room temperature. The photons and electrons irradiations were carried out using a Varian 2100C Medical Linear Accelerator of the Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital das Clinicas of the University of Sao Paulo with absorbed doses between 1 and 40 Gy; radiation field of 10 x 10 cm 2 ; photon energies of 6 MeV and 15 MeV; and electron with energies between 6 and 15 MeV. The obtained results indicate that signal response dependence for clinical photons and electrons beams, to the same doses, for Alanine gel dosimeter is better than 3.6 % (1σ), and the energy dependence response, to the same doses, is better 3% (1σ) for both beams. These results indicate that the same calibration factor can be used and the optical response is energy independent in the studied dose range and clinical photons and electrons beams energies. (author)

  2. Energy dependence of ion-induced sputtering yields from monoatomic solids at normal incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Yasunori; Tawara, Hiro.

    1995-03-01

    The yields of the ion-induced sputtering from monoatomic solids at normal incidence for various ion-target combinations are presented graphically as a function of the incident ion energy. In order to fill the lack of the experimental data, the sputtering yields are also calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT for some ion-target combinations. Each graph shows available experimental data points and the ACAT data, together with the sputtering yields calculated by the present empirical formula, whose parameters are determined by the best-fit to available data. (author)

  3. Measurements of the Influence of Thermoplastic Mask in High Energy Photon Beams: Gel Dosimeter or Ionizing Chamber?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, M. V.; Petchevist, C. D.; de Almeida, A.

    2009-12-01

    The influence of the immobilization mask material on the absorbed dose distribution in patients exposed to radiotherapy treatment with photon beams has been investigated for photons from a 60Co source and a 6 MV Linac. Absorbed dose values have been inferred at different depths and in the build-up region. Dose measurements were obtained using Fricke Xylenol Gel dosimeter and the cylindrical PTW Freiburg TM 31016-0.016 cc ionizing micro chamber; their discrepancies are discussed. The affinities of FXG and PTW ICMicro for measurements with high energy photons and the difference in the effective atomic numbers due to their compositions are most likely the most important factors that contribute to the measured dose in the build-up region. The measured values show that the use of the mask material contributes to increase the absorbed doses near the surface of the tissue. The result also shows that the build-up effect for 60Co is significantly smaller than that for 6 MV photons; however, the variations noted in the final doses of the radiotherapic treatments with photons of high energy do not represent alterations in the total doses received by the patients submitted to the radiotherapy.

  4. The design and dosimetric evaluation of tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards as phantoms for high energy photons and electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, M. F. Mohd; Abdullah, R.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Hashim, R.; Bauk, S.; Hamid, P. N. K. Abd

    2018-01-01

    A set of phantom with an external dimension of 30 cm x 30 cm was constructed from tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards similar to the solid water phantoms. The dosimetric characteristics of the particleboard phantoms were evaluated at high energy photons and electrons by measuring the beam output at 6 MV photons and 6 MeV electrons based on the IAEA TRS 398:2000 protocol. The tissue-phantom ratio (TPR20,10) was measured at 6 and 10 MV photons. The beam output calibration of the particleboards was in good agreement to water and solid water phantoms at 6 MV photons with percentage difference of 1.7 and 6.2% respectively. The beam output calibration of the tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards at 6 MeV electrons on the other hand were in excellent agreement to water with percentage difference of 0.3. The percentage depth dose of tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards were in agreement to water and solid water within 4.5% when measured using ionization chamber and EBT2 film. The electron beam parameters of R50, R80 and R90 at 6 MeV electrons also were in good agreement to water and solid water phantoms. The overall results had indicated the suitability of tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards as water substitute phantom materials for high energy photons and electrons.

  5. Anisotropy in angular distributions of 238U fission fragments by photons, produced in high energy electron interaction with Si monocrystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasilov, V.I.; Lapin, N.N.

    1981-01-01

    An enhancement is detected under the angle of 90 deg in the fission fragment yield from 238 U nuclei produced by photons emitted by high-energy electrons passing through a silicon monocrystal. The results enable one to select the most optimal conditions to obtain maximal yields of nuclear particles [ru

  6. UV Filtering of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: The Effects of Varying the UV Cut-Off upon Cell Performance and Incident Photon-to-Electron Conversion Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Carnie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With current technology, UV filters are essential to ensure long-term dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC stability. Blocking photons, however, will have an obvious effect on device performance and upon its incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE. Filters have been applied to DSC devices with a range of cut-off wavelengths in order to assess how different levels of filtering affect the performance and IPCE of devices made with three different dyes, namely N719, Z907, and N749. It is shown that dyes that extend their IPCE further into the NIR region suffer lesser relative efficiency losses due to UV filtering than dyes with narrower action spectra. Furthermore, the results are encouraging to those working towards the industrialisation of DSC technology. From the results presented it can be estimated that filtering at a level intended to prevent direct band gap excitation of the TiO2 semiconductor should cause a relative drop in cell efficiency of no more than 10% in forward illuminated devices and no more than 2% in reverse illuminated devices.

  7. Overdose Problem Associated with Treatment Planning Software for High Energy Photons in Response of Panama's Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attalla, E.M.; Lotayef, M.M.; Khalil, E.M.; El-Hosiny, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify dose distribution errors by comparing actual dose measurements with the calculated values done by the software. To evaluate the outcome of radiation overexposure related to Panama's accident and in response to ensure that the treatment planning systems (T.P.S.) are being operated in accordance with the appropriate quality assurance programme, we studied the central axis and pripheral depth dose data using complex field shaped with blocks to quantify dose distribution errors. Material and Methods: Multi data T.P.S. software versions 2.35 and 2.40 and Helax T.P.S. software version 5.1 B were assesed. The calculated data of the software treatment planning systems were verified by comparing these data with the actual dose measurements for open and blocked high energy photon fields (Co-60, 6MV and 18MV photons). Results: Close calculated and measured results were obtained for the 2-D (Multi data) and 3-D treatment planning (TMS Helax). These results were correct within 1 to 2% for open fields and 0.5 to 2.5% for peripheral blocked fields. Discrepancies between calculated and measured data ranged between 13. to 36% along the central axis of complex blocked fields when normalisation point was selected at the Dmax, when the normalisation point was selected near or under the blocks, the variation between the calculated and the measured data was up to 500% difference. Conclusions: The present results emphasize the importance of the proper selection of the normalization point in the radiation field, as this facilitates detection of aberrant dose distribution (over exposure or under exposure)

  8. Overdose problem associated with treatment planning software for high energy photons in response of Panama's accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attalla, Ehab M; Lotayef, Mohamed M; Khalil, Ehab M; El-Hosiny, Hesham A; Nazmy, Mohamed S

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify dose distribution errors by comparing actual dose measurements with the calculated values done by the software. To evaluate the outcome of radiation overexposure related to Panama's accident and in response to ensure that the treatment planning systems (T.P.S.) are being operated in accordance with the appropriate quality assurance programme, we studied the central axis and pripheral depth dose data using complex field shaped with blocks to quantify dose distribution errors. Multidata T.P.S. software versions 2.35 and 2.40 and Helax T.P.S. software version 5.1 B were assesed. The calculated data of the software treatment planning systems were verified by comparing these data with the actual dose measurements for open and blocked high energy photon fields (Co-60, 6MV & 18MV photons). Close calculated and measured results were obtained for the 2-D (Multidata) and 3-D treatment planning (TMS Helax). These results were correct within 1 to 2% for open fields and 0.5 to 2.5% for peripheral blocked fields. Discrepancies between calculated and measured data ranged between 13. to 36% along the central axis of complex blocked fields when normalisation point was selected at the Dmax, when the normalisation point was selected near or under the blocks, the variation between the calculated and the measured data was up to 500% difference. The present results emphasize the importance of the proper selection of the normalization point in the radiation field, as this facilitates detection of aberrant dose distribution (over exposure or under exposure).

  9. Comparative determination of absorbed doses for high-energy photon beam with different cylindrical chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Xinghong; Chen Lixin; Jin Guanghua

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the difference between the IAEA code of practice TRS-277 and TRS-398 in the determination of the absorbed dose to water for high-energy photon beams using several cylindrical chambers. Methods: For 6 different types of cylindrical chambers,the calibration factors N D,W,Q0 in terms of absorbed dose to water were calculated from the air exposure calibration factors N x , and were compared with the N D,W,Q0 measured in European standard laboratory. Accurate measurements were performed in Varian 6 MV photon beam using 6 cylindrical chambers according to TRS-277 and TRS-398. The beam quality correction factors k Q,Q0 as well as the water absorbed doses were compared. Results: For the set of chambers, the difference between N D,W,Q0 computed from N x and N D,W,Q0 obtained in European standard laboratory was 0.13%∼ 1.30%. The difference of beam quality correction factors for TRS-277 and TRS-398 was 0.09%∼0.45%. The distinction of the water absorbed doses obtained according to the two different protocols was 0.27%∼1.40%, and was primarily due to their different calibration factors. Conclusions: The discrepancy in absorbed doses determined according to two protocols using different cylindrical chambers is clinically acceptable. However, TRS-398 allows a more convenient localization of chambers,provides a more simple formulation, and offers the reduced uncertainty in the dosimetry of radiotherapy beams. (authors)

  10. Virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolynec, E.; Martins, M.N.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental results of an isochromat of the virtual photon spectrum, obtained by measuring the number of ground-state protons emitted by the 16.28 MeV isobaric analogue state in 90 Zr as a function of electron incident energy in the range 17-105 MeV, are compared with the values predicted by a calculation of the E1 DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei. It is found that the calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei for E2 and M1 multipoles are also assessed. (author) [pt

  11. Polychromatic photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Ole

    2002-01-01

    A review is given of the space-time wave mechanics of single photons, a subject with an almost century long history. The Landau-Peierls photon wave function, which is related nonlocally to the electromagnetic field is first described, and thereafter the so-called energy wave function, based...... on the positive-frequency Riemann-Silberstein vectors, is discussed. Recent attempts to understand the birth process of a photon emerging from a single atom are summarized. The polychromatic photon concept is introduced, and it is indicated how the wave mechanics of polychromatic photons can be upgraded to wave...... in a hyperfine spin transition shows an exponential falloff with the distance from the atomic nucleus. The length parameter in this falloff is the Bohr radius....

  12. US lessons for energy industry restructuring: based on natural gas and California electricity incidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.

    2004-01-01

    During the regulation and deregulation processes, the US experienced, besides temporary price spikes, several unhappy incidences; natural gas shortage in mid-1970s, gas bubble in 1980s, California power crisis, and high natural gas price in 2000-2001. This paper focuses on the US natural gas and California electricity industries, especially on the above-mentioned four incidences. Through analyzing their causes and effects, this paper tries to deduce some lessons, which would be helpful to prevent and/or overcome other probable incidences in the US as well as in other countries in a process of deregulation or planning to introduce competition in their energy industries. Main lessons deduced are encouragement of investment, minimization of political consideration, transmission of price signal to all the market players, outlet for any market interference, diversification of trading options, and minimum ambiguity on responsibility between regulators as well as watching on general market situation and correcting its flaws in timely manner

  13. US lessons for energy industry restructuring: based on natural gas and California electricity incidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wonwoo Lee

    2004-01-01

    During the regulation and deregulation processes, the US experienced, besides temporary price spikes, several unhappy incidences; natural gas shortage in mid-1970s, gas bubble in 1980s, California power crisis, and high natural gas price in 2000-2001. This paper focuses on the US natural gas and California electricity industries, especially on the above-mentioned four incidences. Through analyzing their causes and effects, this paper tries to deduce some lessons, which would be helpful to prevent and/or overcome other probable incidences in the US as well as in other countries in a process of deregulation or planning to introduce competition in their energy industries. Main lessons deduced are encouragement of investment, minimization of political consideration, transmission of price signal to all the market players, outlet for any market interference, diversification of trading options, and minimum ambiguity on responsibility between regulators as well as watching on general market situation and correcting its flaws in timely manner. (Author)

  14. Analysis of incident-energy dependence of delayed neutron yields in actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, Mohamad Nasrun bin Mohd, E-mail: monasr211@gmail.com; Metorima, Kouhei, E-mail: kohei.m2420@hotmail.co.jp; Ohsawa, Takaaki, E-mail: ohsawa@mvg.biglobe.ne.jp; Hashimoto, Kengo, E-mail: kengoh@pp.iij4u.or.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kindai University, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka, 577-8502 (Japan)

    2015-04-29

    The changes of delayed neutron yields (ν{sub d}) of Actinides have been analyzed for incident energy up to 20MeV using realized data of precursor after prompt neutron emission, from semi-empirical model, and delayed neutron emission probability data (P{sub n}) to carry out a summation method. The evaluated nuclear data of the delayed neutron yields of actinide nuclides are still uncertain at the present and the cause of the energy dependence has not been fully understood. In this study, the fission yields of precursor were calculated considering the change of the fission fragment mass yield based on the superposition of fives Gaussian distribution; and the change of the prompt neutrons number associated with the incident energy dependence. Thus, the incident energy dependent behavior of delayed neutron was analyzed.The total number of delayed neutron is expressed as ν{sub d}=∑Y{sub i} • P{sub ni} in the summation method, where Y{sub i} is the mass yields of precursor i and P{sub ni} is the delayed neutron emission probability of precursor i. The value of Y{sub i} is derived from calculation of post neutron emission mass distribution using 5 Gaussian equations with the consideration of large distribution of the fission fragments. The prompt neutron emission ν{sub p} increases at higher incident-energy but there are two different models; one model says that the fission fragment mass dependence that prompt neutron emission increases uniformly regardless of the fission fragments mass; and the other says that the major increases occur at heavy fission fragments area. In this study, the changes of delayed neutron yields by the two models have been investigated.

  15. Experimental Observations of Nuclear Activity in Deuterated Materials Subjected to a Low-Energy Photon Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Benyo, Theresa L.; Pines, Vladimir; Pines, Marianna; Forsley, Lawrence P.; Westmeyer, Paul A.; Chait, Arnon; Becks, Michael D.; Martin, Richard E.; Hendricks, Robert C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Exposure of highly deuterated materials to a low-energy (nom. 2 MeV) photon beam resulted in nuclear activity of both the parent metals of hafnium and erbium and a witness material (molybdenum) mixed with the reactants. Gamma spectral analysis of all deuterated materials, ErD2.8+C36D74+Mo and HfD2+C36D74+Mo, showed that nuclear processes had occurred as shown by unique gamma signatures. For the deuterated erbium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of erbium ((163)Er and (171)Er) and of molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo) and by beta decay, technetium (99mTc and 101Tc). For the deuterated hafnium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of hafnium (180mHf and 181Hf) and molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo), and by beta decay, technetium ((99m)Tc and (101)Tc). In contrast, when either the hydrogenated or non-gas-loaded erbium or hafnium materials were exposed to the gamma flux, the gamma spectra revealed no new isotopes. Neutron activation materials showed evidence of thermal and epithermal neutrons. CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors showed evidence of fast neutrons with energies between 1.4 and 2.5 MeV and several instances of triple tracks, indicating (is) greater than 10 MeV neutrons. Further study is required to determine the mechanism causing the nuclear activity.

  16. Flash-Bang Detector to Model the Attenuation of High-Energy Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagsanjan, N., III; Kelley, N. A.; Smith, D. M.; Sample, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    It has been known for years that lightning and thunderstorms produce gamma rays and x-rays. Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are extremely bright bursts of gamma rays originating from thunderstorms. X-ray stepped leaders are bursts of x-rays coming from the lightning channel. It is known that the attenuation of these high-energy photons is a function of distance, losing energy and intensity at larger distances. To complement gamma-ray detectors on the ground it would be useful to measure the distance to the flash. Knowing the distance would allow for the true source fluence of gamma rays or x-rays to be modeled. A flash-bang detector, which uses a micro-controller, a photodiode, a microphone and temperature sensor will be able to detect the times at which lightning and thunder occurs. Knowing the speed of sound as function of temperature and the time difference between the flash and the thunder, the range to the lightning can be calculated. We will present the design of our detector as well as some preliminary laboratory test results.

  17. Dose to tissue medium or water cavities as surrogate for the dose to cell nuclei at brachytherapy photon energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enger, Shirin A.; Ahnesjö, Anders; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-07-01

    It has been suggested that modern dose calculation algorithms should be able to report absorbed dose both as dose to the local medium, Dm,m, and as dose to a water cavity embedded in the medium, Dw,m, using conversion factors from cavity theory. Assuming that the cell nucleus with its DNA content is the most important target for biological response, the aim of this study is to investigate, by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, the relationship of the dose to a cell nucleus in a medium, Dn,m, to Dm,m and Dw,m, for different combinations of cell nucleus compositions and tissue media for different photon energies used in brachytherapy. As Dn,m is very impractical to calculate directly for routine treatment planning, while Dm,m and Dw,m are much easier to obtain, the questions arise which one of these quantities is the best surrogate for Dn,m and which cavity theory assumptions should one use for its estimate. The Geant4.9.4 MC code was used to calculate Dm,m, Dw,m and Dn,m for photon energies from 20 (representing the lower energy end of brachytherapy for 103Pd or125I) to 300 keV (close to the mean energy of 192Ir) and for the tissue media adipose, breast, prostate and muscle. To simulate the cell and its nucleus, concentric spherical cavities were placed inside a cubic phantom (10 × 10 × 10 mm3). The diameter of the simulated nuclei was set to 14 µm. For each tissue medium, three different setups were simulated; (a) Dn,m was calculated with nuclei embedded in tissues (MC-Dn,m). Four different published elemental compositions of cell nuclei were used. (b) Dw,m was calculated with MC (MC-Dw,m) and compared with large cavity theory calculated Dw,m (LCT-Dw,m), and small cavity theory calculated Dw,m (SCT-Dw,m). (c) Dm,m was calculated with MC (MC-Dm,m). MC-Dw,m is a good substitute for MC-Dn,m for all photon energies and for all simulated nucleus compositions and tissue types. SCT-Dw,m can be used for most energies in brachytherapy, while LCT-Dw,m should only be

  18. Low-energy direct photon production in p p and alpha alpha collisions at the cern intersecting storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Young-il

    1986-01-01

    High transverse momentum (p(,T)) direct photons have given us some of our best evidence for low order perturbative QCD proces- ses in hadron collisions. It is also important to examine hadronic collisions with a weakly interacting probe in the low p(,T) region, where hadron interactions involve very complicated phenomena. A previous experiment at SQRT.(s) = 12 GeV has observed an excess of low p(,T) direct photons. The present experiment has studied direct soft photons in pp interactions at SQRT.(s) = 63 GeV and alpha-alpha interactions at SQRT.(s(,NN)) = 31.5 GeV at the CERN ISR. Comparisons of photon production with respect to track production in pp minimum bias events with that in pp events with high transverse energy (E(,T)) and with alpha-alpha minimum bias events are investigated. For alpha-alpha minimum bias data, within experimental errors there was no excess of photons with respect to tracks, compared with pp minimum bias data. But for pp high E(,T) data, we observed an interesting effect: as p(,T) i...

  19. Search for large extra dimensions in the exclusive photon + missing energy channel in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazoflores, Jose A. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2006-01-01

    A search was conducted for evidence of large extra dimensions (LED) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory's Tevatron using the D0 detector. The Tevatron is a p$\\bar{p}$ collider at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Events with particles escaping into extra dimensions will have large missing energy. The search was carried out using data from a total luminosity of 197 ± 13 pb-1 with an observable high transverse momentum photon and a large transverse missing energy. The 70 observed events are consistent with photons produced by standard known reactions plus other background processes produced by cosmic muons. The mass limits on the fundamental mass scale at 95% confidence level for large extra dimensions of 2, 4, 6 and 8 are 500 GeV, 581 GeV, 630 GeV, and 668 GeV respectively.

  20. Search for supersymmetry in events with photons and missing transverse energy in pp collisions at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Strauss, Josef; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Poyraz, Deniz; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Schöfbeck, Robert; Sharma, Archana; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tongguang; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Susa, Tatjana; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Mohammed, Yasser; Salama, Elsayed; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Miné, Philippe; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Khvedelidze, Arsen; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Flügge, Günter; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Filipovic, Nicolas; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bahinipati, Seema; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Kole, Gouranga; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Behnamian, Hadi; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Nardo, Guglielmo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Lee, Haneol; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Alexakhin, Vadim; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Chtchipounov, Leonid; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Sulimov, Valentin; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Rusinov, Vladimir; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Rusakov, Sergey V; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Fartoukh, Stephane; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kieseler, Jan; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Starodumov, Andrei; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Penning, Bjoern; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Berry, Edmund; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Jesus, Orduna; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Spencer, Eric; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Si, Weinan; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cremonesi, Matteo; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Shchutska, Lesya; Sperka, David; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bein, Samuel; Diamond, Brendan; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Santra, Arka; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Bruner, Christopher; Castle, James; Forthomme, Laurent; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bartek, Rachel; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Malta Rodrigues, Alan; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Kumar, Ajay; Low, Jia Fu; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mei, Kelvin; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Shi, Xin; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Juska, Evaldas; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-06-10

    The results of a search for new physics in final states with photons and missing transverse energy are reported. The study is based on a sample of proton-proton collisions collected at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV with the CMS detector in 2015, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.3 fb$^{-1}$. Final states with two photons and significant missing transverse energy are used to search for supersymmetric particles in models of supersymmetry (SUSY) with general gauge-mediated (GGM) supersymmetry breaking. No excess is observed with respect to the standard model expectation, and the results are used to set limits on gluino pair production and squark pair production in the GGM SUSY framework. Gluino masses below 1.65 TeV and squark masses below 1.37 TeV are excluded at a 95% confidence level.

  1. Constructing Interfacial Energy Transfer for Photon Up- and Down-Conversion from Lanthanides in a Core-Shell Nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Tao, Lili; Chai, Yang; Lau, Shu Ping; Zhang, Qinyuan; Tsang, Yuen Hong

    2016-09-26

    We report a new mechanistic strategy for controlling and modifying the photon emission of lanthanides in a core-shell nanostructure by using interfacial energy transfer. By taking advantage of this mechanism with Gd(3+) as the energy donor, we have realized efficient up- and down-converted emissions from a series of lanthanide emitters (Eu(3+) , Tb(3+) , Dy(3+) , and Sm(3+) ) in these core-shell nanoparticles, which do not need a migratory host sublattice. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the Gd(3+) -mediated interfacial energy transfer, in contrast to energy migration, is the leading process contributing to the photon emission of lanthanide dopants for the NaGdF4 @NaGdF4 core-shell system. Our finding suggests a new direction for research into better control of energy transfer at the nanometer length scale, which would help to stimulate new concepts for designing and improving photon emission of the lanthanide-based luminescent materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Observation of higher-order diffraction features in self-assembled photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, Rajesh V.; Vijaya, R.

    2007-01-01

    The optical response of high quality three dimensionally (3D) ordered photonic crystals is analyzed in the high energy region. By tuning the reflectance with the angle of incidence of light, the peaks in the reflection spectrum that correspond to the first, second, and third order photonic stop bands and the van Hove singular point in the photon density of states are clearly distinguished. The high energy features have been observed for photonic crystals made from colloids of different diameters, having different index contrast and fabricated by two different self-assembly routes. The observation of van Hove singularity at near-normal incidence of light and its presence even in low index-contrast photonic crystals provide conclusive evidence that these high energy features are due to the perfect periodic ordering present in the photonic crystals with less defects and disorder

  3. Photon and dilepton production in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-07

    May 7, 2015 ... tion [34]. As the hadrons have large positive flow as we observed, the photons produced by the interaction with these hadrons result in large flow. Figures 10a and 10b corre- spond to the two ways of incorporating the hard photon contribution, namely, a pQCD parametrization and a fit to PHENIX p + p data, ...

  4. Activation energy of etching for CR-39 as a function of linear energy transfer of the incident particles

    CERN Document Server

    Awad, E M

    1999-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the effect of the radiation damage caused by the incident particles on the activation energy of etching for CR-39 samples. The damage produced by the incident particle is expressed in terms of the linear energy transfer (LET). CR-39 samples from American Acrylic were irradiated to three different LET particles. These are N (LET sub 2 sub 0 sub 0 = 20 KeV/mu m) as a light particle, Fe (LET sub 2 sub 0 sub 0 = 110 KeV/mu m) as a medium particle and fission fragments (ff) from a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf source as heavy particles. In general the bulk etch rate was calculated using the weight difference method and the track etch rate was determined using the track geometry at various temperatures (50-90 deg. C) and concentrations (4-9 N) of the NaOH etchant. The average activation energy E sub b related to the bulk etch rate v sub b was calculated from 1n v sub b vs. 1/T. The average activation energy E sub t related to the track etch rate v sub t was estimated from 1n v sub t vs. 1/T. It...

  5. A Study of the use of a Crystal as a `Quarter-Wave Plate' to Produce High Energy Circularly Polarized Photons

    CERN Multimedia

    Kononets, I

    2002-01-01

    %NA59 %title\\\\ \\\\We present a proposal to study the use of a crystal as a `quarter-wave plate' to produce high energy circularly polarized photons, starting from unpolarized electrons. The intention is to generate linearly polarized photons by letting electrons pass a crystalline target, where they interact coherently with the lattice nuclei. The photon polarization is subsequently turned into circular polarization after passing another crystal, which acts as a `quarter-wave plate'.

  6. A Monte Carlo method for calculating the energy response of plastic scintillators to polarized photons below 100 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, T.; Kanai, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kiss, M.; Kurita, K.; Pearce, M.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Ueno, M.; Umeki, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Arimoto, M.; Axelsson, M.; Marini Bettolo, C.; Bogaert, G.; Chen, P.; Craig, W.; Fukazawa, Y.; Gunji, S.

    2009-01-01

    The energy response of plastic scintillators (Eljen Technology EJ-204) to polarized soft gamma-ray photons below 100 keV has been studied, primarily for the balloon-borne polarimeter, PoGOLite. The response calculation includes quenching effects due to low-energy recoil electrons and the position dependence of the light collection efficiency in a 20 cm long scintillator rod. The broadening of the pulse-height spectrum, presumably caused by light transportation processes inside the scintillator, as well as the generation and multiplication of photoelectrons in the photomultiplier tube, were studied experimentally and have also been taken into account. A Monte Carlo simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was used to model photon interactions in the scintillators. When using the polarized Compton/Rayleigh scattering processes previously corrected by the authors, scintillator spectra and angular distributions of scattered polarized photons could clearly be reproduced, in agreement with the results obtained at a synchrotron beam test conducted at the KEK Photon Factory. Our simulation successfully reproduces the modulation factor, defined as the ratio of the amplitude to the mean of the distribution of the azimuthal scattering angles, within ∼5% (relative). Although primarily developed for the PoGOLite mission, the method presented here is also relevant for other missions aiming to measure polarization from astronomical objects using plastic scintillator scatterers.

  7. A Monte Carlo method for calculating the energy response of plastic scintillators to polarized photons below 100 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, T.; Kanai, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kiss, M.; Kurita, K.; Pearce, M.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Ueno, M.; Umeki, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Arimoto, M.; Axelsson, M.; Marini Bettolo, C.; Bogaert, G.; Chen, P.; Craig, W.; Fukazawa, Y.; Gunji, S.; Kamae, T.; Katsuta, J.; Kawai, N.; Kishimoto, S.; Klamra, W.; Larsson, S.; Madejski, G.; Ng, J. S. T.; Ryde, F.; Rydström, S.; Takahashi, T.; Thurston, T. S.; Varner, G.

    2009-03-01

    The energy response of plastic scintillators (Eljen Technology EJ-204) to polarized soft gamma-ray photons below 100 keV has been studied, primarily for the balloon-borne polarimeter, PoGOLite. The response calculation includes quenching effects due to low-energy recoil electrons and the position dependence of the light collection efficiency in a 20 cm long scintillator rod. The broadening of the pulse-height spectrum, presumably caused by light transportation processes inside the scintillator, as well as the generation and multiplication of photoelectrons in the photomultiplier tube, were studied experimentally and have also been taken into account. A Monte Carlo simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was used to model photon interactions in the scintillators. When using the polarized Compton/Rayleigh scattering processes previously corrected by the authors, scintillator spectra and angular distributions of scattered polarized photons could clearly be reproduced, in agreement with the results obtained at a synchrotron beam test conducted at the KEK Photon Factory. Our simulation successfully reproduces the modulation factor, defined as the ratio of the amplitude to the mean of the distribution of the azimuthal scattering angles, within ˜5% (relative). Although primarily developed for the PoGOLite mission, the method presented here is also relevant for other missions aiming to measure polarization from astronomical objects using plastic scintillator scatterers.

  8. Development of wide-band, time and energy resolving, optical photon detectors with application to imaging astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.J.; Cabrera, B.; Romani, R.W.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Nam, S.W.; Clarke, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    Superconducting transition edge sensors (TESs) are showing promise for the wide-band spectroscopy of individual photons from the mid-infrared (IR), through the optical, and into the near ultraviolet (UV). Our TES sensors are ∼20 μm square, 40 nm thick tungsten (W) films with a transition temperature of about 80 mK. We typically attain an energy resolution of 0.15 eV FWHM over the optical range with relative timing resolution of 100 ns. Single photon events with sub-microsecond risetimes and few microsecond falltimes have been achieved allowing count rates in excess of 30 kHz per pixel. Additionally, tungsten is approximately 50% absorptive in the optical (dropping to 10% in the IR) giving these devices an intrinsically high quantum efficiency. These combined traits make our detectors attractive for fast spectrophotometers and photon-starved applications such as wide-band, time and energy resolved astronomical observations. We present recent results from our work toward the fabrication and testing of the first TES optical photon imaging arrays

  9. Photofragmentation spectra of halogenated methanes in the VUV photon energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartoni, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.cartoni@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie del Farmaco, Sapienza Università di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, Roma 00185 (Italy); Bolognesi, Paola; Fainelli, Ettore; Avaldi, Lorenzo [CNR-IMIP, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo (Rm) 00015 (Italy)

    2014-05-14

    In this paper an investigation of the photofragmentation of dihalomethanes CH{sub 2}X{sub 2} (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and chlorinated methanes (CH{sub n}Cl{sub 4−n} with n = 0–3) with VUV helium, neon, and argon discharge lamps is reported and the role played by the different halogen atoms is discussed. Halogenated methanes are a class of molecules used in several fields of chemistry and the study of their physical and chemical proprieties is of fundamental interest. In particular their photodissociation and photoionization are of great importance since the decomposition of these compounds in the atmosphere strongly affects the environment. The results of the present work show that the halogen-loss is the predominant fragmentation channel for these molecules in the VUV photon energy range and confirm their role as reservoir of chlorine, bromine, and iodine atoms in the atmosphere. Moreover, the results highlight the peculiar feature of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} as a source of both fluorine and hydrogen atoms and the characteristic formation of I{sub 2}{sup +} and CH{sub 2}{sup +} ions from the photofragmentation of the CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} molecule.

  10. Preclinical evaluation of intraoperative low-energy photon radiotherapy using sphericalapplicators in locally advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François eBuge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy is standard care for locally advanced prostatecancer (stage pT3R1. Intraoperative low-energy photon radiotherapy offers several advantages overexternal beam radiotherapy, and several systems are now available for its delivery, using sphericalapplicators which require only limited shielding. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibilityof this technique for the prostate bed.Materials & Methods: Applicators were assessed using MRI image data and cadavericdissection. In cadavers, targeted tissues, defined as a urethral section, both neurovascular bundlesections, the bladder neck and the beds of the seminal vesicles, were marked with metallic surgicalclips. Distances between clips and applicator were measured using CT. A dosimetric study of theapplication of 12 Gy at 5mm depth was performed using CT images of prostatectomized cadavers.Results: Using MRI images from 34 prostate cancer patients, we showed that the ideal applicatordiameter ranges from 45 to 70 mm. Using applicators of different sizes to encompass the prostate bedin nine cadavers, we showed that the distance between target tissues and applicator was less than 2mm for all target tissues except the upper extremity of the seminal vesicles (19 mm. Dosimetric studyshowed a good dose distribution in all target tissues in contact with the applicator, with a lowprobability of rectum and bladder complication.Conclusions: Intraoperative radiotherapy of the prostate bed is feasible, with good coverage oftargeted tissues. Clinical study of safety and efficacy is now required.

  11. Effect of photon-beam energy on VMAT and IMRT treatment plan quality and dosimetric accuracy for advanced prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasler, Marlies; Wirtz, Holger; Lutterbach, Johannes [Lake Constance Radiation Oncology Center Singen-Friedrichshafen, Singen (Germany); Georg, Dietmar [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2011-12-15

    The goal of the research was to evaluate treatment plan quality and dosimetric accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans using 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beams for prostate cancer including lymph nodes. In this retrospective study, VMAT and IMRT plans were generated with the Pinnacle {sup copyright} treatment planning system (TPS) (V9.0) for 10 prostate cancer cases. Each plan consisted of two target volumes: PTV{sub B} included the prostate bed, PTV{sub PC+LN} contained PTV{sub B} and lymph nodes. For plan evaluation statistics, the homogeneity index, conformity index, mean doses, and near-max doses to organs at risk (OAR) were analyzed. Treatment time and number of monitor units were assessed to compare delivery efficiency. Dosimetric plan verification was performed with a 2D ionization chamber array placed in a full scatter phantom. Results: No differences were found for target and OAR parameters in low and high energy photon beam plans for both VMAT and IMRT. A slightly higher low dose volume was detected for 6 MV VMAT plans (normal tissue: D{sub mean} = 16.47 Gy) compared to 10 and 15 MV VMAT plans (D{sub mean} = 15.90 Gy and 15.74 Gy, respectively), similar to the findings in IMRT. In VMAT, > 96% of detector points passed the 3%/ 3 mm {gamma} criterion; marginally better accuracy was found in IMRT (> 97%). Conclusion: For static and rotational IMRT, 15 MV photons did not show advantages over 6 and 10 MV high energy photon beams in large volume pelvic plans. For the investigated TPS and linac combination, 10 MV photon beams can be used as the general purpose energy for intensity modulation.

  12. Search for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at sqrt(s)=161 GeV and 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-02-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles in channels with one or more photons and missing energy have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of 11.1 pb-1 at sqrt(s)=161 GeV, 1.1 pb-1 at 170 GeV and 9.5 pb-1 at 172 GeV. The e+e--->νν¯γ(γ) cross section is measured. The data are in good agreement with predictions based on the Standard Model, and are used to set upper limits on the cross sections for anomalous photon production. These limits are compared to two different SUSY models and used to set limits on the neutralino mass. A limit of 71 GeV/c2 at 95% C.L. is set on the mass of the lightest neutralino (τχ10<= 3 ns) for the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking and LNZ models. © 1998

  13. Mass attenuation and mass energy absorption coefficients for 10 keV to 10 MeV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffre, H.; Pages, L.

    1968-01-01

    In this report are given the elements allowing the definition of the values of mass attenuation coefficients and mass energy absorption coefficients for some elements and mixtures, necessary for the study of tissue equivalent materials, for photons in the energy range 10 keV to 10 MeV. After a short reminding of the definitions of the two coefficients, follows, in table form, a compilation of these coefficients, as a function of energy, for simple elements, for certain mineral compounds, organic compounds, gases and particularly of soft tissues. (author) [fr

  14. Influence of the Integral Quality Monitor transmission detector on high energy photon beams. A multi-centre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casar, Bozidar [Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Pasler, Marlies [Lake Constance Radiation Oncology Center, Singen and Friedrichshafen (Germany); Wegener, Sonja [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; and others

    2017-10-01

    The influence of the Integral Quality Monitor (IQM) transmission detector on photon beam properties was evaluated in a preclinical phase, using data from nine participating centres: (i) the change of beam quality (beam hardening), (ii) the influence on surface dose, and (iii) the attenuation of the IQM detector. For 6 different nominal photon energies (4 standard, 2 FFF) and square field sizes from 1 x 1 cm{sup 2} to 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}, the effect of IQM on beam quality was assessed from the PDD{sub 20,10} values obtained from the percentage dose depth (PDD) curves, measured with and without IQM in the beam path. The change in surface dose with/without IQM was assessed for all available energies and field sizes from 4 x 4 cm{sup 2} to 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}. The transmission factor was calculated by means of measured absorbed dose at 10 cm depth for all available energies and field sizes. (i) A small (0.11-0.53%) yet statistically significant beam hardening effect was observed, depending on photon beam energy. (ii) The increase in surface dose correlated with field size (p < 0.01) for all photon energies except for 18 MV. The change in surface dose was smaller than 3.3% in all cases except for the 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} field and 10 MV FFF beam, where it reached 8.1%. (iii) For standard beams, transmission of the IQM showed a weak dependence on the field size, and a pronounced dependence on the beam energy (0.9412 for 6 MV to 0.9578 for 18 MV and 0.9440 for 6 MV FFF; 0.9533 for 10 MV FFF). The effects of the IQM detector on photon beam properties were found to be small yet statistically significant. The magnitudes of changes which were found justify treating IQM either as tray factors within the treatment planning system (TPS) for a particular energy or alternatively as modified outputs for specific beam energy of linear accelerators, which eases the introduction of the IQM into clinical practice.

  15. Comparison of the effects of high-energy photon beam irradiation (10 and 18 MV) on 2 types of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashii, Haruko; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Okawa, Ayako; Shida, Koichi; Isobe, Tomonori; Hanmura, Masahiro; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Sakae, Takeji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2013-03-01

    Radiation therapy for cancer may be required for patients with implantable cardiac devices. However, the influence of secondary neutrons or scattered irradiation from high-energy photons (≥10 MV) on implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) is unclear. This study was performed to examine this issue in 2 ICD models. ICDs were positioned around a water phantom under conditions simulating clinical radiation therapy. The ICDs were not irradiated directly. A control ICD was positioned 140 cm from the irradiation isocenter. Fractional irradiation was performed with 18-MV and 10-MV photon beams to give cumulative in-field doses of 600 Gy and 1600 Gy, respectively. Errors were checked after each fraction. Soft errors were defined as severe (change to safety back-up mode), moderate (memory interference, no changes in device parameters), and minor (slight memory change, undetectable by computer). Hard errors were not observed. For the older ICD model, the incidences of severe, moderate, and minor soft errors at 18 MV were 0.75, 0.5, and 0.83/50 Gy at the isocenter. The corresponding data for 10 MV were 0.094, 0.063, and 0 /50 Gy. For the newer ICD model at 18 MV, these data were 0.083, 2.3, and 5.8 /50 Gy. Moderate and minor errors occurred at 18 MV in control ICDs placed 140 cm from the isocenter. The error incidences were 0, 1, and 0 /600 Gy at the isocenter for the newer model, and 0, 1, and 6 /600Gy for the older model. At 10 MV, no errors occurred in control ICDs. ICD errors occurred more frequently at 18 MV irradiation, which suggests that the errors were mainly caused by secondary neutrons. Soft errors of ICDs were observed with high energy photon beams, but most were not critical in the newer model. These errors may occur even when the device is far from the irradiation field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Absorbed-dose beam quality conversion factors for cylindrical chambers in high energy photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuntjens, J P; Ross, C K; Shortt, K R; Rogers, D W

    2000-12-01

    Recent working groups of the AAPM [Almond et al., Med. Phys. 26, 1847 (1999)] and the IAEA (Andreo et al., Draft V.7 of "An International Code of Practice for Dosimetry based on Standards of Absorbed Dose to Water," IAEA, 2000) have described guidelines to base reference dosimetry of high energy photon beams on absorbed dose to water standards. In these protocols use is made of the absorbed-dose beam quality conversion factor, kQ which scales an absorbed-dose calibration factor at the reference quality 60Co to a quality Q, and which is calculated based on state-of-the-art ion chamber theory and data. In this paper we present the measurement and analysis of beam quality conversion factors kQ for cylindrical chambers in high-energy photon beams. At least three chambers of six different types were calibrated against the Canadian primary standard for absorbed dose based on a sealed water calorimeter at 60Co [TPR10(20)=0.572, %dd(10)x=58.4], 10 MV [TPR10(20)=0.682, %dd(10)x=69.6), 20 MV (TPR10(20)=0.758, %dd(10)x= 80.5] and 30 MV [TPR10(20) = 0.794, %dd(10)x= 88.4]. The uncertainty on the calorimetric determination of kQ for a single chamber is typically 0.36% and the overall 1sigma uncertainty on a set of chambers of the same type is typically 0.45%. The maximum deviation between a measured kQ and the TG-51 protocol value is 0.8%. The overall rms deviation between measurement and the TG-51 values, based on 20 chambers at the three energies, is 0.41%. When the effect of a 1 mm PMMA waterproofing sleeve is taken into account in the calculations, the maximum deviation is 1.1% and the overall rms deviation between measurement and calculation 0.48%. When the beam is specified using TPR10(20), and measurements are compared with kQ values calculated using the version of TG-21 with corrected formalism and data, differences are up to 1.6% when no sleeve corrections are taken into account. For the NE2571 and the NE2611A chamber types, for which the most literature data are

  17. Inclusive photoproduction of PHI, Ksup(*)(890) and Ksup(*)(1420) in the photon energy range 20 to 70 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, M.; Davenport, M.; Flower, P.; Hutton, J.S.; Kumar, B.R.; Morris, J.A.G.; Morris, J.V.; Sharp, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    Inclusive photoproduction of PHI, Ksup(*0)(890), anti Ksup(*0)(890) and Ksup(*0)(1420), anti Ksup(*0)(1420) has been studied in γp collisions with photons of energy 20 to 70 GeV and in the range 0.1<=chisub(F)<=0.95 [0.4<=chisub(F)<=0.8 for the anti Ksup(*)(1420)], chisub(F) being the Feynman variable of the vector/tensor meson. The cross-sections for these processes, averaged over the photon energy range and integrated over chisub(F) are given. The inclusive PHI production in the forward direction can be described quantitatively by a triple-Regge model calculation. The remaining PHI production and the total Ksup(*0)(890) and anti Ksup(*0)(890) production are consistent with a quark fusion picture. (orig.)

  18. Radiobiological Characterization of Two Photon-Beam Energies 6 and 15 MV used in Radiotherapy From Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltayeb, A.E.H.

    2009-02-01

    The main objective of this study is to perform radiobiological characterization of two different photon beam energies, 6 MV and 15 MV, from linear accelerator used in radiotherapy, with special regard to late effects of radiation. Two end-points, namely cell survival and micronucleus induction were used for the characterization. Chinese hamster V 79 lung fibroblast cell line to prepare cell culture and to perform the innervate experiments. chromosomes number was counted and found to be 22 chromosomes per cell, this result is in complete agreement with expected 11 pairs of chromosomes representing the genome of this species. Cells were kept in confluent growth for two days and then exposed to two photon beam energies, 6 and 15 MV respectively. Different dose rates were used for the two beam energies, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 7.0 Gy. Cells were counted immediately after irradiation and re seeded, the seeded number of cells was calculated to the dose rate used. Another set of unirradiated cells treated the same as the experimental set was used as a control group. The plating efficiency (PE) was calculated for the control group, then cells were incubated at 37 o C for 6 days to construct the survival curve, five samples were counted per dose and the mean was calculated. The two survival curves are similar for photon beam energies (6 and 15 MV) and the surviving fraction was decreased with dose rate. The two curves showed similar values of α and β parameters, this result is expected for the same radiation type (X-ray). For the micronuclei assay three samples for each dose were seeded and incubated at 37 o C for 24 hours then Cytochalasin-B was added to block cells in cytokinesis phase of the mitosis. The micronuclei number was counted and plotted with dose. A significant positive correlation was found between dose and micronuclei frequency (P=0.00), moreover, the micronuclei frequency is relatively higher with 15 MV compared with 6 MV energy. This indicates the

  19. Directional Photonic Wire Mediated by Homo-Förster Resonance Energy Transfer on a DNA Origami Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli, Francesca; Barth, Anders; Bae, Wooli; Neukirchinger, Fabian; Crevenna, Alvaro H; Lamb, Don C; Liedl, Tim

    2017-11-28

    Elaborating efficient strategies and deepening the understanding of light transport at the nanoscale is of great importance for future designs of artificial light-harvesting assemblies and dye-based photonic circuits. In this work, we focus on studying the phenomenon of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) among fluorophores of the same kind (homo-FRET) and its implications for energy cascades containing two or three different dye molecules. Utilizing the spatial programmability of DNA origami, we arranged a chain of cyanine 3 (Cy3) dyes flanked at one end with a dye of lower excitation energy, cyanine 5 (Cy5), with or without an additional dye of higher excitation energy, Alexa488, at the other end. We characterized the response of our fluorophore assemblies with bulk and single-molecule spectroscopy and support our measurements by Monte Carlo modeling of energy transfer within the system. We find that, depending on the arrangement of the fluorophores, homo-FRET between the Cy3 dyes can lead to an overall enhanced energy transfer to the acceptor fluorophore. Furthermore, we systematically analyzed the homo-FRET system by addressing the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy. Finally, we built a homo-FRET-mediated photonic wire capable of transferring energy through the homo-FRET system from the blue donor dye (Alexa488) to the red acceptor fluorophore (Cy5) across a total distance of 16 nm.

  20. Implications on clinical scenario of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization in regards to photon energy, nanoparticle size, concentration and location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechtman, E; Mashouf, S; Pignol, J P [Department of Medical Biophysics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N3M5 (Canada); Chattopadhyay, N; Cai, Z; Reilly, R, E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, 144 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3M2 (Canada)

    2011-08-07

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) radiosensitization represents a novel approach to enhance the effectiveness of ionizing radiation. Its efficiency varies widely with photon source energy and AuNP size, concentration, and intracellular localization. In this Monte Carlo study we explored the effects of those parameters to define the optimal clinical use of AuNPs. Photon sources included {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I brachytherapy seeds; {sup 169}Yb, {sup 192}Ir high dose rate sources, and external beam sources 300 kVp and 6 MV. AuNP sizes were 1.9, 5, 30, and 100 nm. We observed a 10{sup 3} increase in the rate of photoelectric absorption using {sup 125}I compared to 6 MV. For a {sup 125}I source, to double the dose requires concentrations of 5.33-6.26 mg g{sup -1} of Au or 7.10 x 10{sup 4} 30 nm AuNPs per tumor cell. For 6 MV, concentrations of 1560-1760 mg g{sup -1} or 2.17 x 10{sup 7} 30 nm AuNPs per cell are needed, which is not clinically achievable. Examining the proportion of energy transferred to escaping particles or internally absorbed in the nanoparticle suggests two clinical strategies: the first uses photon energies below the k-edge and takes advantage of the extremely localized Auger cascade. It requires small AuNPs conjugated to tumor targeted moieties and nuclear localizing sequences. The second, using photon sources above the k-edge, requires a higher gold concentration in the tumor region. In this approach, energy deposited by photoelectrons is the main contribution to radiosensitization; AuNP size and cellular localization are less relevant.

  1. Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle Azimuthal Correlations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelev, B.I.; Benedosso, F.; Braidot, E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304840874; Mischke, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325781435; Peitzmann, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833959; Russcher, M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304847844

    2010-01-01

    Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon (γdir ) and π0 are measured in p+p and Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy √sNN=200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between γdir and π0. Assuming no associated charged particles

  2. Interplay of short-range correlations and nuclear symmetry energy in hard-photon production from heavy-ion reactions at Fermi energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Gao-Chan; Li, Bao-An

    2017-12-01

    Within an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model for nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, we investigate the interplay of the nucleon-nucleon short-range correlations (SRCs) and nuclear symmetry energy Esym(ρ ) on hard-photon spectra in collisions of several Ca isotopes on 112Sn and 124Sn targets at a beam energy of 45 MeV/nucleon. It is found that over the whole spectra of hard photons studied, effects of the SRCs overwhelm those owing to the Esym(ρ ) . The energetic photons come mostly from the high-momentum tails (HMTs) of single-nucleon momentum distributions in the target and projectile. Within the neutron-proton dominance model of SRCs based on the consideration that the tensor force acts mostly in the isosinglet and spin-triplet nucleon-nucleon interaction channel, there are equal numbers of neutrons and protons, thus a zero isospin asymmetry in the HMTs. Therefore, experimental measurements of the energetic photons from heavy-ion collisions at Fermi energies have the great potential to help us better understand the nature of SRCs without any appreciable influence by the uncertain Esym(ρ ) . These measurements will be complementary to but also have some advantages over the ongoing and planned experiments using hadronic messengers from reactions induced by high-energy electrons or protons. Because the underlying physics of SRCs and Esym(ρ ) are closely correlated, a better understanding of the SRCs will, in turn, help constrain the nuclear symmetry energy more precisely in a broad density range.

  3. A comparative analysis of OTF, NPS, and DQE in energy integrating and photon counting digital x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: One of the benefits of photon counting (PC) detectors over energy integrating (EI) detectors is the absence of many additive noise sources, such as electronic noise and secondary quantum noise. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that thresholding voltage gains to detect individual x rays actually generates an unexpected source of white noise in photon counters. Methods: To distinguish the two detector types, their point spread function (PSF) is interpreted differently. The PSF of the energy integrating detector is treated as a weighting function for counting x rays, while the PSF of the photon counting detector is interpreted as a probability. Although this model ignores some subtleties of real imaging systems, such as scatter and the energy-dependent amplification of secondary quanta in indirect-converting detectors, it is useful for demonstrating fundamental differences between the two detector types. From first principles, the optical transfer function (OTF) is calculated as the continuous Fourier transform of the PSF, the noise power spectra (NPS) is determined by the discrete space Fourier transform (DSFT) of the autocovariance of signal intensity, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is found from combined knowledge of the OTF and NPS. To illustrate the calculation of the transfer functions, the PSF is modeled as the convolution of a Gaussian with the product of rect functions. The Gaussian reflects the blurring of the x-ray converter, while the rect functions model the sampling of the detector. Results: The transfer functions are first calculated assuming outside noise sources such as electronic noise and secondary quantum noise are negligible. It is demonstrated that while OTF is the same for two detector types possessing an equivalent PSF, a frequency-independent (i.e., ''white'') difference in their NPS exists such that NPS PC ≥NPS EI and hence DQE PC ≤DQE EI . The necessary and sufficient condition for equality is that the PSF

  4. 1979 international symposium on lepton and photon interactions at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, T.B.W.; Abarbanel, H.D.I.

    1979-01-01

    This symposium on Leptons and Photons is ninth in the series of biannual meetings which began at Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1963. Abstracts of individual items from the symposium were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  5. Specific absorbed fractions of energy at various ages from internal photon sources: 3, Five-year-old

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1987-04-01

    Specific absorbed fractions (PHI's) in various organs of the body (target organs) from sources of monoenergetic photons in various other organs (source organs) are tabulated. In this volume PHI-values are tabulated for a five-year-old or 19-kg person. These PHI-values can be used in calculating the photon component of the dose-equivalent rate in a given target organ from a given radionuclide that is present in a given source organ. The International Commission on Radiological Protection recognizes that the endosteal, or bone surface, cells are the tissue at risk for bone cancer. We have applied the dosimetry methods developed for beta-emitting radionuclides deposited in bone to follow the transport of secondary electrons that were freed by photon interactions through the microscopic structure of the skeleton. With these methods we can estimate PHI in the endosteal cells and can better estimate PHI in the active marrow; the latter is overestimated with other methods at photon energies below 200 keV. 12 refs., 2 tabs

  6. Diamond detector in absorbed dose measurements in high-energy linear accelerator photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, John Pichy; Al Amri, Iqbal; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2016-03-08

    Diamond detectors (DD) are preferred in small field dosimetry of radiation beams because of small dose profile penumbras, better spatial resolution, and tissue-equivalent properties. We investigated a commercially available 'microdiamond' detector in realizing absorbed dose from first principles. A microdiamond detector, type TM 60019 with tandem electrometer is used to measure absorbed doses in water, nylon, and PMMA phantoms. With sensitive volume 0.004 mm3, radius 1.1mm, thickness 1 x10(-3) mm, the nominal response is 1 nC/Gy. It is assumed that the diamond detector could collect total electric charge (nC) developed during irradiation at 0 V bias. We found that dose rate effect is less than 0.7% for changing dose rate by 500 MU/min. The reproducibility in obtaining readings with diamond detector is found to be ± 0.17% (1 SD) (n = 11). The measured absorbed doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photons arrived at using mass energy absorption coefficients and stop-ping power ratios compared well with Nd, water calibrated ion chamber measured absorbed doses within 3% in water, PMMA, and nylon media. The calibration factor obtained for diamond detector confirmed response variation is due to sensitivity due to difference in manufacturing process. For electron beams, we had to apply ratio of electron densities of water to carbon. Our results qualify diamond dosimeter as a transfer standard, based on long-term stability and reproducibility. Based on micro-dimensions, we recommend these detectors for pretreatment dose verifications in small field irradiations like stereotactic treatments with image guidance.

  7. Investigation of 234U(n,f) as a Function of Incident Neutron Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Adili, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Pomp, S.

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the reaction 234U(n,f) have been performed at incident neutron energies from 0.2 MeV to 5 MeV at the 7 MV Van De Graaf accelerator at IRMM. A twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber was used for fission-fragment detection. Parallel digital and analogue data acquisitions were applied in order to compare the two techniques. First results on the angular anisotropy and preliminary mass distributions are presented along with a first comparison between the two techniques.

  8. Theoretical model application to the evaluation of fission neutron data up to 20 MeV incidence energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruben, A.; Maerten, H.; Seeliger, D.

    1990-01-01

    A complex statistical theory of fission neutron emission combined with a phenomenological fission model has been used to calculate fission neutron data for 238 U. Obtained neutron multiplicities and energy spectra as well as average fragment energies for incidence energies from threshold to 20 MeV (including multiple-chance fission) are compared with traditional data representations. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  9. The bremsstrahlung tagged photon beam in Hall B at JLab

    CERN Document Server

    Sober, D I; Longhi, A; Matthews, S K; O'Brien, J T; Berman, B L; Briscoe, W J; Cole, P L; Connelly, J P; Dodge, W R; Murphy, L Y; Philips, S A; Dugger, M K; Lawrence, D; Ritchie, B G; Smith, E S; Lambert, J M; Anciant, E; Audit, G; Auger, T; Marchand, C; Klusman, M; Napolitano, J; Khandaker, M A; Salgado, C W; Sarty, A J

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and commissioning of the photon tagging beamline installed in experimental Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). This system can tag photon energies over a range from 20% to 95% of the incident electron energy, and is capable of operation with beam energies up to 6.1 GeV. A single dipole magnet is combined with a hodoscope containing two planar arrays of plastic scintillators to detect energy-degraded electrons from a thin bremsstrahlung radiator. The first layer of 384 partially overlapping small scintillators provides photon energy resolution, while the second layer of 61 larger scintillators provides the timing resolution necessary to form a coincidence with the corresponding nuclear interaction triggered by the tagged photon. The definitions of overlap channels in the first counter plane and of geometric correlation between the two planes are determined using digitized time information from the individual counters. Auxiliary beamline devices are briefl...

  10. Microdosimetric study on influence of low energy photons on relative biological effectiveness under therapeutic conditions using 6 MV linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kase, Yuki; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Fujita, Yukio; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Itami, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Microdosimetry has been developed for the evaluation of radiation quality, and single-event dose-mean lineal energy y D is well-used to represent the radiation quality. In this study, the changes of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values under the therapeutic conditions using a 6 MV linac were investigated with a microdosimetric method. Methods: The y D values under the various irradiation conditions for x-rays from a 6 MV linac were measured with a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) at an extremely low dose rate of a few tens of μGy/min by decreasing the gun grid voltage of the linac. According to the microdosimetric kinetic model (MK model), the RBE MK values for cell killing of the human salivary gland (HSG) tumor cells can be derived if the y D values are obtained from TEPC measurements. The Monte Carlo code GEANT4 was also used to calculate the photon energy distributions and to investigate the changes of the y D values under the various conditions. Results: The changes of the y D values were less than approximately 10% when the field size and the depth in a phantom varied. However, in the measurements perpendicular to a central beam axis, large changes were observed between the y D values inside the field and those outside the field. The maximum increase of approximately 50% in the y D value outside the field was obtained compared with those inside the field. The GEANT4 calculations showed that there existed a large relative number of low energy photons outside of the field as compared with inside of the field. The percentages of the photon fluences below 200 keV outside the field were approximately 40% against approximately 8% inside the field. By using the MK model, the field size and the depth dependence of the RBE MK values were less than approximately 2% inside the field. However, the RBE MK values outside the field were 6.6% higher than those inside the field. Conclusions: The increase of the RBE MK values by 6

  11. A Correction of Random Incidence Absorption Coefficients for the Angular Distribution of Acoustic Energy under Measurement Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2009-01-01

    Most acoustic measurements are based on an assumption of ideal conditions. One such ideal condition is a diffuse and reverberant field. In practice, a perfectly diffuse sound field cannot be achieved in a reverberation chamber. Uneven incident energy density under measurement conditions can cause...... discrepancies between the measured value and the theoretical random incidence absorption coefficient. Therefore the angular distribution of the incident acoustic energy onto an absorber sample should be taken into account. The angular distribution of the incident energy density was simulated using the beam...... tracing method for various room shapes and source positions. The averaged angular distribution is found to be similar to a Gaussian distribution. As a result, an angle-weighted absorption coefficient was proposed by considering the angular energy distribution to improve the agreement between...

  12. The relevance of the vertex bremsstrahlung photon detection in the electron-neutrino (antineutrino) electron scattering experiments at low energy

    CERN Document Server

    Broggini, C; Moretti, M

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the size of the electron-antineutrino electron into electron-antineutrino electron cross section reduction due to the rejection of the events with a vertex bremsstrahlung photon above a certain energy in the final state. In particular we analyze the effect in experiments designed to detect the low energy electron-antineutrino and electron-neutrino from a nuclear reactor and from the Sun. We find that such reduction has to be considered in a relatively high statistic reactor experiment, while it is negligible for pp and 7Be solar neutrino detection.

  13. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer measured by spatial photon migration in CdSe-ZnS quantum dots colloidal systems as a function of concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, G.; Monte, A. F. G.; Reis, A. F.; Messias, D. N. [Laboratório de Espectroscopia Óptica, Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG 38400-902 (Brazil)

    2014-11-17

    The study of the spatial photon migration as a function of the concentration brings into attention the problem of the energy transfer in quantum dot embedded systems. By measuring the photon propagation and its spatial dependence, it is possible to understand the whole dynamics in a quantum dot system, and also improve their concentration dependence to maximize energy propagation due to radiative and non-radiative processes. In this work, a confocal microscope was adapted to scan the spatial distribution of photoluminescence from CdSe-ZnS core-shell quantum dots in colloidal solutions. The energy migration between the quantum dots was monitored by the direct measurement of the photon diffusion length, according to the diffusion theory. We observed that the photon migration length decreases by increasing the quantum dot concentration, this kind of behavior has been regarded as a signature of Förster resonance energy transfer in the system.

  14. Laser-Driven Very High Energy Electron/Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Conjunction with a Robotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new external-beam radiation therapy system using very-high-energy (VHE electron/photon beams generated by a centimeter-scale laser plasma accelerator built in a robotic system. Most types of external-beam radiation therapy are delivered using a machine called a medical linear accelerator driven by radio frequency (RF power amplifiers, producing electron beams with an energy range of 6–20 MeV, in conjunction with modern radiation therapy technologies for effective shaping of three-dimensional dose distributions and spatially accurate dose delivery with imaging verification. However, the limited penetration depth and low quality of the transverse penumbra at such electron beams delivered from the present RF linear accelerators prevent the implementation of advanced modalities in current cancer treatments. These drawbacks can be overcome if the electron energy is increased to above 50 MeV. To overcome the disadvantages of the present RF-based medical accelerators, harnessing recent advancement of laser-driven plasma accelerators capable of producing 1-GeV electron beams in a 1-cm gas cell, we propose a new embodiment of the external-beam radiation therapy robotic system delivering very high-energy electron/photon beams with an energy of 50–250 MeV; it is more compact, less expensive, and has a simpler operation and higher performance in comparison with the current radiation therapy system.

  15. Fission and fragmentation of silver and bromine nuclei by 1-6 GeV energy photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro Filho, J. de D.

    1983-01-01

    Fission and fragmentation of silver and bromine nuclei induced by bremsstrahlung photons in the maximum energy range of 1-6 GeV are studied. A special technique of nuclear emulsion for the highly ionizing nuclear fragment detection is used in the discrimination between nuclear fission and fragmentation events. Films of Ilford-KO nuclear emulsion (approximatelly 10 20 atoms/cm 2 of Ag, Br) which had been exposed to bremsstrahlung beams in 'Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron' (DESY, Hamburg) with total doses of approximatelly 10 11 equivalent photons are used. Through a detailed analysis of range, angular and angle between fragment distributions, and empirical relations which permit to estimate nuclear fragment energy, range and velocity, the discrimination between fission and fragmentation events is made. Results related to fragment range distribution, angular distribution, distribution of angle between fragments, distribution of ratio between ranges, velocity distributions, forward/backward ratio, fission and fragmentation cross sections, nuclear fissionability and ternary fission frequency are presented and discussed. The results show that the mean photofragmentation cross section in the internal 1-6 GeV (0,09+-0,02mb) is significant when compared to the photofission (0,29+-0,05mb). It is also shown that the mean photofission cross section between 1 and 6 GeV is great by a factor of approximatelly 10 when compared to the foreseen by the cascade-evaporation nuclear model for monoenergetic photons of 0,6 GeV. (L.C.) [pt

  16. Effect of Photon Beam Energy, Gold Nanoparticle Size and Concentration on the Dose Enhancement in Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahideh Gharehaghaji

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gold nanoparticles have been used as radiation dose enhancing materials in recent investigations. In the current study, dose enhancement effect of gold nanoparticles on tumor cells was evaluated using Monte Carlo (MC simulation. Methods: We used MCNPX code for MC modeling in the current study. A water phantom and a tumor region with a size of 1×1×1 cm3 loaded with gold nanoparticles were simulated. The macroscopic dose enhancement factor was calculated for gold nanoparticles with sizes of 30, 50, and 100 nm. Also, we simulated different photon beams including mono-energetic beams (50-120 keV, a Cobalt-60 beam, 6 & 18 MV photon beams of a conventional linear accelerator. Results: We found a dose enhancement factor (DEF of from 1.4 to 3.7 for monoenergetic kilovoltage beams, while the DEFs for megavoltage beams were negligible and less than 3% for all GNP sizes and concentrations. The optimum energy for higher DEF was found to be the 90 keV monoenergetic beam. The effect of GNP size was not considerable, but the GNP concentration had a substantial impact on achieved DEF in GNP-based radiation therapy. Conclusion: The results were in close agreement with some previous studies considering the effect of photon energy and GNP concentration on observed DEF. Application of GNP-based radiation therapy using kilovoltage beams is recommended.

  17. Liquid argon as an electron/photon detector in the energy range of 50 MeV to 2 GeV: a Monte Carlo investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, M.S.; Denis, G.; Hall, M.; Karpovsky, A.; Wilson, R.; Gabriel, T.A.; Bishop, B.L.

    1980-12-01

    Monte Carlo techniques which have been used to study the characteristics of a proposed electron/photon detector based on the total absorption of electromagnetic showers in liquid argon have been investigated. The energy range studied was 50 MeV to 2 GeV. Results are presented on the energy and angular resolution predicted for the device, along with the detailed predictions of the transverse and longitudinal shower distributions. Comparisons are made with other photon detectors, and possible applications are discussed

  18. Incident energy and charge deposition dependences of electron transmission through a microsized tapered glass capillary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickramarachchi, S.J. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Ikeda, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Dassanayake, B.S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Keerthisinghe, D.; Tanis, J.A. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    An experimental study of electron transmission and guiding through a tapered glass capillary has been performed. Electrons were transmitted for tilt angles up to ∼6.5° and ∼9.5° (laboratory angles) for incident energies of 500 and 1000 eV, respectively. It is found that elastic and inelastic contributions give rise to distinguishable peaks in the transmitted profile. For 500 eV elastic transmission dominates the profile, while for 1000 eV both elastic and inelastic contributions are present. The transmission for both energies was studied as a function of the charge (time) deposition and found to be strongly dependent. Results suggest fundamental differences between 500 and 1000 eV incident electrons. For 500 eV the transmission slowly increases suggesting charge up of the capillary wall, reaching relative stability with infrequent breakdowns for all angles investigated. For 1000 eV for tilt angles near zero degrees the time dependent profile shows oscillations in the transmission, which never reached a stable condition, while for the larger angle investigated the transmission reached near equilibrium. Inelastic processes dominated the transmission for 1000 eV even at very small tilt angles, but was generally elastic (due to Coulomb deflection) for 500 eV even for the largest tilt angle measured.

  19. The production of photons with large transverse momentum in proton-proton interaction at high energy in the center of mass, at the ISR of CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedinger, Michel.

    1977-01-01

    The production of photons with large transverse momentun emitted in pp interactions at high energy, at the ISR of CERN, is studied. The inclusive distributions of photons were measured in the interval 0.7 2 sigma sub(γ)/dpdΩ=Aexp(Bpsub(t)+Cpsub(t) 2 ). The π 0 cross sections were deduced from these photon cross sections. At psub(t)( 2 at 3GeV /c), than the approximately exp(-6psub(t)) decrease, as well as an increase with the energy √s. A fit of the π 0 cross-sections, compatible with a power-law behaviour is given [fr

  20. Development of a high energy resolution magnetic bolometer for the determination of photon emission intensities by gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M.

    2007-12-01

    In this research thesis, a first chapter describes the metrological difficulties for the determination of radionuclide photon emission intensities. Then, it discusses the understanding and the required tools for the computing of a magnetic bolometer signal with respect to the different operation parameters and to the sensor geometry. The author describes the implementation of the experimental device and its validation with a first sensor. The new sensor is then optimised for the measurement of photon emission intensities with a good efficiency and a theoretical energy resolution less than 100 eV up to 200 keV. The sensor's detection efficiency and operation have been characterized with a 133 Ba source. The author finally presents the obtained results

  1. A study of Rhizophora spp wood phantom for dosimetric purposes using high-energy photon and electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banjade, D.P. E-mail: dpbl4007@stud.usm.my; Tajuddin, A.A.; Shukri, A

    2001-09-01

    Previous scattering and depth-dose investigations involving use of the Malaysian hardwood Rhizophora spp have shown this medium to produce good agreement with measurements made in water. Present study extends the comparison, now including measurements of percentage depth-dose made for photons at 6 MV and 5 and 12 MeV electron beams. For the 6 MV photon and 5 MeV electron beams, discrepancies between percentage depth-dose for Rhizophora spp and water, at all depths, are found to be within 2.6 and 2.4% respectively. At 12 MeV electron energies, measured percentage depth-doses in Rhizophora spp beyond 3.5 cm depth are found to be in significant discord with those for water. The absorbed dose in water measured in Rhizophora spp at d{sub max} for all three beams produces discrepancies of no more than 1.1% when compared with measurements made in water.

  2. Second crossover energy of insulating materials using stationary electron beam under normal incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, E.I. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology of Russian Academy of Science, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: rau@phys.msu.ru; Fakhfakh, S. [LaMaCop, Faculte des Sciences, Route Soukra km 3, BP 802, CP 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Andrianov, M.V.; Evstafeva, E.N. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology of Russian Academy of Science, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation); Jbara, O. [UTAP/LASSI, EA 3802, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)], E-mail: omar.jbara@univ-reims.fr; Rondot, S.; Mouze, D. [UTAP/LASSI, EA 3802, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this paper is to give some aspects of charging effects on dielectric materials submitted to continuous electron beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). When the dielectric is irradiated continuously, the so-called total yield approach (TYA) used to predict the sign of the charge appeared on electron irradiated insulators fails because the charge accumulated in the dielectric interferes with the electrons emission processes. Based on previous experimental and theoretical works found in the literature, an analysis of the evolution of the electron yield curves {sigma} = f(E{sub 0}) of insulators during irradiation is given. The aim of this work is firstly to determine experimentally the second crossover energy E{sub 2C} under continuous electron irradiation (charging conditions) and secondly to demonstrate that the charge balance occurs at this beam energy and not at E{sub 2} the energy deduced from non-charging conditions (pulse primary electron beam experiments) as commonly asserted. It is however possible to apply the TYA by substituting the critical energy E{sub 2} for E{sub 2C}. The experimental procedure is based on simultaneous time dependent measurements of surface potential, leakage current and displacement current. The study underlines the difference between the landing energy of primary electrons E{sub L} at the steady state and the second crossover energy, E{sub 2C}, for charged samples. Some preliminary results are also obtained concerning the influence of the incident beam density on the energy E{sub 2C}. The samples used for this study are PMMA, polycrystalline silicone dioxide (p-SiO{sub 2}), polycrystalline alumina (p-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and soda lime glass (SLG)

  3. Second crossover energy of insulating materials using stationary electron beam under normal incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, E.I.; Fakhfakh, S.; Andrianov, M.V.; Evstafeva, E.N.; Jbara, O.; Rondot, S.; Mouze, D.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give some aspects of charging effects on dielectric materials submitted to continuous electron beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). When the dielectric is irradiated continuously, the so-called total yield approach (TYA) used to predict the sign of the charge appeared on electron irradiated insulators fails because the charge accumulated in the dielectric interferes with the electrons emission processes. Based on previous experimental and theoretical works found in the literature, an analysis of the evolution of the electron yield curves σ = f(E 0 ) of insulators during irradiation is given. The aim of this work is firstly to determine experimentally the second crossover energy E 2C under continuous electron irradiation (charging conditions) and secondly to demonstrate that the charge balance occurs at this beam energy and not at E 2 the energy deduced from non-charging conditions (pulse primary electron beam experiments) as commonly asserted. It is however possible to apply the TYA by substituting the critical energy E 2 for E 2C . The experimental procedure is based on simultaneous time dependent measurements of surface potential, leakage current and displacement current. The study underlines the difference between the landing energy of primary electrons E L at the steady state and the second crossover energy, E 2C , for charged samples. Some preliminary results are also obtained concerning the influence of the incident beam density on the energy E 2C . The samples used for this study are PMMA, polycrystalline silicone dioxide (p-SiO 2 ), polycrystalline alumina (p-Al 2 O 3 ) and soda lime glass (SLG)

  4. The energy dependence of photon-flux and efficiency in the NRF measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agar, Osman [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Karamanoglu Mehmetbey University, Department of Physics, 70100 Karaman (Turkey); Gayer, Udo; Merter, Laura; Pai, Haridas; Pietralla, Norbert; Ries, Philipp; Romig, Christopher; Werner, Volker; Schillling, Marcel; Zweidinger, Markus [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The calibration of the detector efficiency and the photon-flux distribution play an important role during the analysis of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements. The nucleus {sup 11}B is a frequently used calibration target with well-known photo-excitation cross sections. The product of photon flux and efficiency is determined exploiting γ-ray transitions of the {sup 11}B monitoring target. Photon-flux calibrations from numerous measurements at the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (S-DALINAC) are carried out up to the neutron separation threshold, in order to obtain a system check of influences of absorbers on the flux, and to check against different GEANT models as well as parametrizations of the Schiff formula.

  5. Electron and Photon ID

    CERN Document Server

    Hryn'ova, Tetiana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The identification of prompt photons and the rejection of background coming mostly from photons from hadron decays relies on the high granularity of the ATLAS calorimeter. The electron identification used in ATLAS for run 2 is based on a likelihood discrimination to separate isolated electron candidates from candidates originating from photon conversions, hadron misidentification and heavy flavor decays. In addition, isolation variables are used as further handles to separate signal and background. Several methods are used to measure with data the efficiency of the photon identification requirements, to cover a broad energy spectrum. At low energy, photons from radiative Z decays are used. In the medium energy range, similarities between electrons and photon showers are exploited using Z->ee decays. At high energy, inclusive photon samples are used. The measurement of the efficiencies of the electron identification and isolation cuts are performed with the data using tag and probe techniques with large statis...

  6. Enhancement of IUdR Radiosensitization by Low-Energy Photons Results from Increased and Persistent DNA Damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Bayart

    Full Text Available Low-energy X-rays induce Auger cascades by photoelectric absorption in iodine present in the DNA of cells labeled with 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (IUdR. This photoactivation therapy results in enhanced cellular sensitivity to radiation which reaches its maximum with 50 keV photons. Synchrotron core facilities are the only way to generate such monochromatic beams. However, these structures are not adapted for the routine treatment of patients. In this study, we generated two beams emitting photon energy means of 42 and 50 keV respectively, from a conventional 225 kV X-ray source. Viability assays performed after pre-exposure to 10 μM of IUdR for 48h suggest that complex lethal damage is generated after low energy photons irradiation compared to 137Cs irradiation (662KeV. To further decipher the molecular mechanisms leading to IUdR-mediated radiosensitization, we analyzed the content of DNA damage-induced foci in two glioblastoma cell lines and showed that the decrease in survival under these conditions was correlated with an increase in the content of DNA damage-induced foci in cell lines. Moreover, the follow-up of repair kinetics of the induced double-strand breaks showed the maximum delay in cells labeled with IUdR and exposed to X-ray irradiation. Thus, there appears to be a direct relationship between the reduction of radiation survival parameters and the production of DNA damage with impaired repair of these breaks. These results further support the clinical potential use of a halogenated pyrimidine analog combined with low-energy X-ray therapy.

  7. A new cross-detection method for improved energy-resolving photon counting under pulse pile-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daehee; Lim, Kyung Taek; Park, Kyungjin; Lee, Changyeop; Cho, Gyuseong

    2017-09-01

    In recent, photon counting detectors (PCDs) have been replacing the energy-integrating detectors in many medical imaging applications due to the formers' high resolution, low noise, and high efficiency. Under a high flux X-ray exposure, however, a superimposition of pulses, i.e., pulse pile-up, frequently occurs due to the finite output pulse width, causing distortions in the energy spectrum as a consequence. Therefore, pulse pile-up is considered as a major constraint in using PCDs for high flux X-ray applications. In this study, a new photon counting method is proposed to minimize degradations in PCD performance due to pulse pile-up. The proposed circuit was incorporated into a pixel with a size of 200 × 200 μm2. It was fabricated by using a 1-poly 6-metal 0 . 18 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process and had a power consumption of 7 . 8 μW / pixel. From the result, it was shown that the maximum count rate of the proposed circuit was increased by a factor of 4.7 when compared to that of the conventional circuit at the same pulse width of 700 ns. This implies that the energy spectrum obtained by the proposed circuit is 4.7 times more resistant to distortions than the conventional energy-resolving circuit does under higher X-ray fluxes.

  8. Dietary Energy Density and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Incidence in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Terryl J; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Shah, Roma; Flanders, W Dana; Wang, Ying; McCullough, Marjorie L

    2016-10-01

    Dietary energy density (ED) is a measure of diet quality that estimates the amount of energy per unit of food (kilocalories per gram) consumed. Low-ED diets are generally high in fiber and fruits and vegetables and low in fat. Dietary ED has been positively associated with body mass index (BMI) and other risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. We evaluated the associations of total dietary ED and energy-dense (high-ED) foods with postmenopausal breast cancer incidence. Analyses included 56,795 postmenopausal women from the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort with no previous history of breast or other cancers and who provided information on diet, lifestyle, and medical history in 1999. Multivariable-adjusted breast cancer incidence rate ratios (RRs and 95% CIs) were estimated for quintiles of total dietary ED and for the consumption of high-ED foods in Cox proportional hazards regression models. During a median follow-up of 11.7 y, 2509 invasive breast cancer cases were identified, including 1857 estrogen receptor-positive and 277 estrogen receptor-negative tumors. Median dietary ED was 1.5 kcal/g (IQR: 1.3-1.7 kcal/g). After adjusting for age, race, education, reproductive characteristics, and family history, high compared with low dietary ED was associated with a statistically significantly higher risk of breast cancer (RR for fifth quintile compared with first quintile: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.36; P-trend = 0.03). The association between the amount of high-ED foods consumed and breast cancer risk was not statistically significant. We observed no differences by estrogen receptor status or effect modification by BMI, age, or physical activity. These results suggest a modest positive association between total dietary ED and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Single-photon light detection with transition-edge sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajteri, M.; Taralli, E.; Portesi, C.; Monticone, E.

    2008-01-01

    Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) are micro calorimeters that measure the energy of incident single-photons by the resistance increase of a superconducting film biased within the superconducting-to-normal transition. TES are able to detect single photons from x-ray to IR with an intrinsic energy resolution and photon-number discrimination capability. Metrological, astronomical and quantum communication applications are the fields where these properties can be particularly important. In this work, we report about characterization of different TESs based on Ti films. Single-photons have been detected from 200 nm to 800 nm working at T c ∼ 100 m K. Using a pulsed laser at 690 nm we have demonstrated the capability to resolve up to five photons.

  10. Photon routing in cavity QED: Beyond the fundamental limit of photon blockade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblum, Serge; Dayan, Barak [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Parkins, Scott [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2011-09-15

    The most simple and seemingly straightforward application of the photon blockade effect, in which the transport of one photon prevents the transport of others, would be to separate two incoming indistinguishable photons to different output ports. We show that time-energy uncertainty relations inherently prevent this ideal situation when the blockade is implemented by a two-level system. The fundamental nature of this limit is revealed in the fact that photon blockade in the strong coupling regime of cavity QED, resulting from the nonlinearity of the Jaynes-Cummings energy level structure, exhibits efficiency and temporal behavior identical to those of photon blockade in the bad cavity regime, where the underlying nonlinearity is that of the atom itself. We demonstrate that this limit can be exceeded, yet not avoided, by exploiting time-energy entanglement between the incident photons. Finally, we show how this limit can be circumvented completely by using a three-level atom coupled to a single-sided cavity, enabling an ideal and robust photon routing mechanism.

  11. Slow-light-enhanced energy efficiency for graphene microheaters on silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Siqi; Zhu, Xiaolong; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2017-01-01

    in silicon photonics. The corresponding figure of merit of the device is 2.543 nW s, one order of magnitude better than results reported in previous studies. The influence of the length and shape of the graphene heater to the tuning efficiency is further investigated, providing valuable guidelines...

  12. Dose optimization for dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography based on an energy-resolved photon-counting detector: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Seungwan; Kang, Sooncheol; Eom, Jisoo

    2017-01-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) has been used to decompose breast images and improve diagnostic accuracy for tumor detection. However, this technique causes an increase of radiation dose and an inaccuracy in material decomposition due to the limitations of conventional X-ray detectors. In this study, we simulated the dual-energy CEDM with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector (ERPCD) for reducing radiation dose and improving the quantitative accuracy of material decomposition images. The ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM was compared to the conventional dual-energy CEDM in terms of radiation dose and quantitative accuracy. The correlation between radiation dose and image quality was also evaluated for optimizing the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM technique. The results showed that the material decomposition errors of the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM were 0.56–0.67 times lower than those of the conventional dual-energy CEDM. The imaging performance of the proposed technique was optimized at the radiation dose of 1.09 mGy, which is a half of the MGD for a single view mammogram. It can be concluded that the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM with an optimal exposure level is able to improve the quality of material decomposition images as well as reduce radiation dose. - Highlights: • Dual-energy mammography based on a photon-counting detector was simulated. • Radiation dose and image quality were evaluated for optimizing the proposed technique. • The proposed technique reduced radiation dose as well as improved image quality. • The proposed technique was optimized at the radiation dose of 1.09 mGy.

  13. Green photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas. (review article)

  14. Evolution of the Prompt Dipole γ-RAY Emission with Incident Energy in Fusion Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierroutsakou, D.; Martin, B.; Inglima, G.; Boiano, A.; de Rosa, A.; di Pietro, M.; La Commara, M.; Mordente, R.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.; Trotta, M.; Vardaci, E.; Glodariu, T.; Mazzocco, M.; Signorini, C.; Stroe, L.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; di Toro, M.; Maiolino, C.; Pellegriti, N.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Cardella, G.; de Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Pirrone, S.; Baran, V.

    2005-12-01

    We studied the prompt dipole γ-ray emission, associated with entrance channel charge asymmetry effects, as a function of incident energy in the 32,36S + 100,96Mo (Elab=6 MeV/nucleon) and 36,40Ar + 96,92Zr fusion reactions (Elab= 16 and 15 MeV/nucleon, respectively). With the above reaction pairs the 132Ce compound nucleus was formed, from entrance channels having different charge asymmetries, at an excitation energy of 117 and 304 MeV with identical spin distribution. By studying the differential γ-ray multiplicity spectra related to the above fusion reactions, it was shown that at the higher compound nucleus excitation energy the Giant Dipole Resonance γ-ray intensity increases by ~14% for the more charge asymmetric system while at the lower one no difference between the data was seen within the experimental uncertainties. Calculations based on a collective bremsstrahlung analysis of the reaction dynamics are presented and compared with the experimental findings.

  15. Photon harvesting, coloring and polarizing in photovoltaic cell integrated color filters: efficient energy routing strategies for power-saving displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Long; Chen, Qin; Song, Shichao; Yu, Yan; Jin, Lin; Hu, Xin

    2015-07-03

    We describe the integral electro-optical strategies that combine the functionalities of photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation and color filtering as well as polarizing to realize more efficient energy routing in display technology. Unlike the conventional pigment-based filters and polarizers, which absorb substantial amounts of unwanted spectral components and dissipate them in the form of heat, we propose converting the energy of those photons into electricity by constructing PV cell-integrated color filters based on a selectively transmitting aluminum (Al) rear electrode perforated with nanoholes (NHs). Combining with a dielectric-metal-dielectric (DMD) front electrode, the devices were optimized to enable efficient cavity-enhanced photon recycling in the PV functional layers. We perform a comprehensive theoretical and numerical analysis to explore the extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through the Al NHs and identify basic design rules for achieving structural coloring or polarizing in our PV color filters. We show that the addition of thin photoactive polymer layers on the symmetrically configured Al NH electrode narrows the bandwidth of the EOT-assisted high-pass light filtering due to the strongly damped anti-symmetric coupling of the surface modes excited on the front and rear surface of the Al NHs, which facilitates the whole visible coloring with relatively high purity for the devices. By engineering the cut-off characteristics of the plasmonic waveguide mode supported by the circular or ellipsoidal Al NHs, beyond the photon recycling capacity, PV color filters and PV polarizing color filters that allow polarization-insensitive and strong polarization-anisotropic color filtering were demonstrated. The findings presented here may shed some light on expanding the utilization of PV electricity generation across new-generation energy-saving electrical display devices.

  16. Photon harvesting, coloring and polarizing in photovoltaic cell integrated color filters: efficient energy routing strategies for power-saving displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Long; Chen, Qin; Song, Shichao; Yu, Yan; Jin, Lin; Hu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    We describe the integral electro-optical strategies that combine the functionalities of photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation and color filtering as well as polarizing to realize more efficient energy routing in display technology. Unlike the conventional pigment-based filters and polarizers, which absorb substantial amounts of unwanted spectral components and dissipate them in the form of heat, we propose converting the energy of those photons into electricity by constructing PV cell-integrated color filters based on a selectively transmitting aluminum (Al) rear electrode perforated with nanoholes (NHs). Combining with a dielectric-metal-dielectric (DMD) front electrode, the devices were optimized to enable efficient cavity-enhanced photon recycling in the PV functional layers. We perform a comprehensive theoretical and numerical analysis to explore the extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through the Al NHs and identify basic design rules for achieving structural coloring or polarizing in our PV color filters. We show that the addition of thin photoactive polymer layers on the symmetrically configured Al NH electrode narrows the bandwidth of the EOT-assisted high-pass light filtering due to the strongly damped anti-symmetric coupling of the surface modes excited on the front and rear surface of the Al NHs, which facilitates the whole visible coloring with relatively high purity for the devices. By engineering the cut-off characteristics of the plasmonic waveguide mode supported by the circular or ellipsoidal Al NHs, beyond the photon recycling capacity, PV color filters and PV polarizing color filters that allow polarization-insensitive and strong polarization-anisotropic color filtering were demonstrated. The findings presented here may shed some light on expanding the utilization of PV electricity generation across new-generation energy-saving electrical display devices. (paper)

  17. Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratoryprovides this nation's (in fact, this hemisphere's) brightest storage...

  18. Quantum photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pearsall, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    This textbook employs a pedagogical approach that facilitates access to the fundamentals of Quantum Photonics. It contains an introductory description of the quantum properties of photons through the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, introducing stimulated and spontaneous emission of photons at the quantum level. Schrödinger’s equation is used to describe the behavior of electrons in a one-dimensional potential. Tunneling through a barrier is used to introduce the concept of non­locality of an electron at the quantum level, which is closely-related to quantum confinement tunneling, resonant tunneling, and the origin of energy bands in both periodic (crystalline) and aperiodic (non-crystalline) materials. Introducing the concepts of reciprocal space, Brillouin zones, and Bloch’s theorem, the determination of electronic band structure using the pseudopotential method is presented, allowing direct computation of the band structures of most group IV, group III-V, and group II-VI semiconducto...

  19. Optimization of whole-body simulator for photon emitters in the energy range 100 to 3000 KeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Bernardo M.; Rosales, Geovana O.

    1996-01-01

    The calibration of the detection system for the in vivo determination of uniformly distributed radionuclides emitting photons in the energy range of 100 to 300 KeV requires the use of phantoms with dimensions close to the human body, in which known amounts of radionuclides are added. After the measurement of those phantoms, the calibration curves, channel x energy and energy x efficiency, are constructed. This type of phantom has been continuously optimized at the IRD-CNEN whole body counter with the objective of approximating its characteristics as close as possible to the standard man proposed in the ICRP 23. Furthermore, it has been tried to obtain a safe structure in terms of leakage and also of low cost. (author)

  20. A rare gas optics-free absolute photon flux and energy analyzer for solar and planetary observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Darrell L.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a prototype spectrometer for space applications requiring long term absolute EUV photon flux measurements. In this recently developed spectrometer, the energy spectrum of the incoming photons is transformed directly into an electron energy spectrum by taking advantage of the photoelectric effect in one of several rare gases at low pressures. Using an electron energy spectrometer, followed by an electron multiplier detector, pulses due to individual electrons are counted. The overall efficiency of this process can be made essentially independent of gain drifts in the signal path, and the secular degradation of optical components which is often a problem in other techniques is avoided. A very important feature of this approach is its freedom from the problem of overlapping spectral orders that plagues grating EUV spectrometers. An instrument with these features has not been flown before, but is essential to further advances in our understanding of solar EUV flux dynamics, and the coupled dynamics of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres. The detailed characteristics of this optics-free spectrometer are presented in the publications section.

  1. Contribution to the study of the elastic scattering of photons on nucleons at low and intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiasu, I.

    1978-01-01

    The elastic γ-nucleon scattering represents an indirect powerful method for the nucleon structure investigation. Some theoretical aspects of this problem are treated in the presented thesis. After a general introduction into the subject and a short review of the up-to-date literature, the first chapter contains kinematics and dynamical preliminaries of reaction γ+N→γ+N. In chapter II, the low energy theorems are discussed and extended up to six power in the photon laboratory energies, ω; the six structure dependent constants which appear in the differential cross section in this order are defined and computed, and an extraction for the proton electromagnetic polarizabilities α,β from the experimental data is performed. A new dispersive analysis of the γ+N→γ+N process at photon laboratory energies lower than 450 Mev is introduced and used for numerical calculation in chapter III; some improvements are obtained in the comparison with the experimental data, with respect to other previous calculations. In the last chapter, two different sum rules for the difference (α-β) are established and numerically computed - these theoretical predictions agree with the values extracted from experience; based on the analyticity properties of the invariant amplitudes, an inequality is written down connecting an integral over the differential cross section of the process and the static properties of the nucleon (mass, charge, anomalous magnetic moment). (author)

  2. Characterization and attenuation study on tannin-added Rhizophora spp. particleboard at high energy photon and electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abd; Tajuddin, Abd Aziz; Abdullah, Reduan; Hashim, Rokiah; Bauk, Sabar; Isa, Norriza Mohd; Isa, Muhammad Jamal Md

    2017-01-01

    The effective atomic number of tannin-added Rhizophora spp. particleboards was determined based on elemental composition using Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDXA). The value of mass attenuation coefficients were measured using 137Cs and 60Co gamma energies. The attenuation properties of PDD curves and beam profile of tannin-added Rhizophora spp. particleboards were investigated using Gafchromic EBT2 film at 6 MV photon and 6 MeV electrons and compared to the value in water and solid water phantoms. The results showed that tannin-added Rhizophora spp. particleboards having effective atomic number close to the value of water. The mass attenuation coefficients were near to the value of water with χ2 values of 0.018 and 0.357 to 137Cs and 60Co gamma energies respectively. The PDD of tannin-added Rhizophora spp. particleboards at 6 MV photons showed good agreement within 3.21 and 5.91% to that in solid water phantoms and water respectively. The PDD at 6 MeV electrons showed a good agreement within 3.32 and 3.12% to that in solid water phantoms and water respectively. The depth of R50 and R90 in tannin-added Rhizophora spp. also showed a good agreement to that in water and solid water pahtoms. Lower surface dose was observed in tannin-added Rhizophora spp. particleboards at electron beams in comparison to solid water phantoms and water.

  3. The effect of partially used high energy photon on intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Nam Joon; Seok, Jin Yong; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Choi, Ji Hun; Park, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    A selection of proper energy in treatment planning is very important because of having different dose distribution in body as photon energy. In generally, the low energy photon has been used in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck (H and N) cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of partially used high energy photon at posterior oblique fields on IMRT plan for H and N cancer. The study was carried out on 10 patients (nasopharyngeal cancer 5, tonsilar cancer 5) treated with IMRT in Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. CT images were acquired 3 mm of thickness in the same condition and the treatment plan was performed by Eclipse (Ver.7.1, Varian, Palo Alto, USA). Two plans were generated under same planing objectives, dose volume constraints, and eight fields setting: (1) The low energy plan (LEP) created using 6 MV beam alone, (2) the partially used high energy plan (PHEP) created partially using 15 MV beam at two posterior oblique fields with deeper penetration depths, while 6 MV beam was used at the rest of fields. The plans for LEP and PHEP were compared in terms of coverage, conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for planning target volume (PTV). For organs at risk (OARs), D{sub mean} and D{sub 50%} were analyzed on both parotid glands and D{sub max}, D{sub 1%} for spinal cord were analyzed. Integral dose (ID) and total monitor unit (MU) were compared as addition parameters. For the comparing dose to normal tissue of posterior neck, the posterior-normal tissue volume (P-NTV) was set on the patients respectively. The D{sub mean}, V{sub 20Gy} and V{sub 25Gy} for P-NTV were evaluated by using dose volume histogram (DVH). The dose distributions were similar with regard to coverage, CI and HI for PTV between the LEP and PHEP. No evident difference was observed in the spinal cord. However, the D{sub mean}, D{sub 50%} for both parotid gland were slightly reduced by 0.6%, 0.7% in PHEP. The ID was reduced by 1

  4. Excitation photon energy dependence of photo-induced phase transition in (EDO-TTF)2PF6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, S.; Onda, K.; Shimizu, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Okimoto, Y.; Shao, X. F.; Nakano, Y.; Yamochi, H.; Saito, G.; Koshihara, S.

    2009-02-01

    The conducting charge transfer complex (EDO-TTF)2PF6 has two types of charge transfer bands in the low temperature insulator phase: CT1 at 0.56 eV and CT2 at 1.38 eV. We excited these bands independently with a tunable ultrashort pulse laser and studied the difference of the photo-induced phases by measuring change in reflectivity spectrum over a wide photon energy range. As a result, we found that both the photo-induced phases by CT1 and CT2 excitation are the same except for their photo-conversion efficiencies

  5. Development of an imaging system for patient set-up monitoring during radiotherapeutic treatment with high energy photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herk, M. van.

    1985-01-01

    A prototype image detector has been designed and built for patient moniorting during radiotherapy treatment with high energy photon beams. A matrix of DC operated ionisation chambers was used to detect the transmitted radiation through a patient. The detector was developed in order to replace the current method, in which film radiography is used. Various detector configurations have been tested, and some results will be presented. Image enhancement was achieved by computer processing of the data. Theoretical possibilities of the detector system have been studied. (Auth.)

  6. The Pierre Auger observatory's project of detecting photons and neutrinos at very high energies; L'observatoire Pierre Auger vers la detection de photons et neutrinos a ultra haute energies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertou, X

    2001-11-01

    Cosmic radiations of ultra high energy (RCUHE, beyond 10{sup 18} eV) are difficult to study because of their low flux on the earth surface: about 1 photon per year and per km{sup 2}. The observatory Pierre Auger proposes to study RCUHE by designing 2 sites of 3000 km{sup 2} (one in each hemisphere) allowing the observation of the shower initiated by cosmic radiation by using 4 fluorescence telescopes and a network of 1600 Cherenkov detectors. The identification of the primary particle is a very delicate point, the detection of neutrino or photon at these energies would bring valuable information for the understanding of potential sources of RCUHE. The first part of this work presents the project and its assets to perform its task. The second part is dedicated to the description of the Cherenkov detectors, of the trigger system, and of the centralized data acquisition system. The last part present the prototype installation that is under construction at Macargue in Argentina. (A.C.)

  7. Low-energy photon scattering and photoactivation experiments: selected recent results from the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kneiss, U

    2002-01-01

    Photon scattering off bound nuclear states (nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF)) and photoactivation of long-lived isomers are complementary to one another and share the principal advantage of a well-known reaction mechanism. The experimental progress achieved during the last years allows nowadays experiments of tremendously increased sensitivity opening new fields of applications. In the present lecture recent results are summarized from experiments performed at the well-established Bremsstrahlung photon scattering and photoactivation facilities of the 4.3 MV Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator. Three current topics are discussed in details: The systematics of E1 two-phonon excitations of the type (2 sup + x 3 sup -) in nuclei near shell closures; the first observation of a population inversion of nuclear states, the precondition for a possible gamma-laser, by feeding from higher-lying photo-excited states (NRF experiments on sup 1 sup 0 sup 3 Rh); and the photoactivation of long-lived isomers. Here first resu...

  8. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray, Neutrino, and Photon Propagation and the Multi-Messenger Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Andrew; De Castro, Alexandra; Castillo-Ruiz, Edith

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of UHECR nuclei for A = 1(protons) to A = 56(iron) from cosmological sources through extragalactic space is discussed in the first lecture. This is followed in the second and third lectures by a consideration of the generation and propagation of secondary particles produced via the UHECR loss interactions. In the second lecture we focus on the generation of the diffuse cosmogenic UHE-neutrino flux. In the third lecture we investigate the arriving flux of UHE-photon flux at Earth. In the final lecture the results of the previous lectures are put together in order to provide new insights into UHECR sources. The first of these providing a means with which to investigate the local population of UHECR sources through the measurement of the UHECR spectrum and their photon fraction at Earth. The second of these providing contraints on the UHECR source radiation fields through the possible observation at Earth of UHECR nuclei.

  9. A Polarized High-Energy Photon Beam for Production of Exotic Mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senderovich, Igor [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This work describes design, prototyping and testing of various components of the Jefferson Lab Hall D photon beamline. These include coherent bremsstrahlung radiators to be used in this facility for generating the photon beam, a fine resolution hodoscope for the facility's tagging spectrometer, and a photon beam position sensor for stabilizing the beam on a collimator. The principal instrumentation project was the hodoscope: its design, implementation and beam testing will be thoroughly described. Studies of the coherent bremsstrahlung radiators involved X-ray characterization of diamond crystals to identify the appropriate line of manufactured radiators and the proper techniques for thinning them to the desired specification of the beamline. The photon beam position sensor project involved completion of a designed detector and its beam test. The results of these shorter studies will also be presented. The second part of this work discusses a Monte Carlo study of a possible photo-production and decay channel in the GlueX experiment that will be housed in the Hall D facility. Specifically, the γ p → Xp → b1 π → ω π+1 π-1 channel was studied including its Amplitude Analysis. This exercise attempted to generate a possible physics signal, complete with internal angular momentum states, and be able to reconstruct the signal in the detector and find the proper set of JPC quantum numbers through an amplitude fit. Derivation of the proper set of amplitudes in the helicity basis is described, followed by a discussion of the implementation, generation of the data sets, reconstruction techniques, the amplitude fit and results of this study.

  10. Critical analysis of major incidents risks in civil nuclear energy; Analyse critique des risques d'incidents majeurs dans l'energie nucleaire civile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    The differences existing between the PWR type reactors and the RBMK type reactors are explained as well as the risk associated to each type when it exists. The Ines scale, tool to give the level of an accident gravity comprises seven levels, the number seven is the most serious and corresponds to the Chernobyl accident; The number zero is of no consequence but must be mentioned as a matter of form. The incidents from 1 to 3 concern increasing incidents, affecting the nuclear power plant but not the external public. The accidents from 4 to 7 have a nature to affect the nuclear power plant and the environment. An efficient tool exists between nuclear operators it is made of the reports on incidents encountered by close reactors. Two others type reactors are coming, the high temperature type reactors and the fast neutrons reactors. different risks are evoked, terrorism, proliferation, transport and radioactive wastes. (N.C.)

  11. Dose optimization for dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography based on an energy-resolved photon-counting detector: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Seungwan; Kang, Sooncheol; Eom, Jisoo

    2017-03-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) has been used to decompose breast images and improve diagnostic accuracy for tumor detection. However, this technique causes an increase of radiation dose and an inaccuracy in material decomposition due to the limitations of conventional X-ray detectors. In this study, we simulated the dual-energy CEDM with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector (ERPCD) for reducing radiation dose and improving the quantitative accuracy of material decomposition images. The ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM was compared to the conventional dual-energy CEDM in terms of radiation dose and quantitative accuracy. The correlation between radiation dose and image quality was also evaluated for optimizing the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM technique. The results showed that the material decomposition errors of the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM were 0.56-0.67 times lower than those of the conventional dual-energy CEDM. The imaging performance of the proposed technique was optimized at the radiation dose of 1.09 mGy, which is a half of the MGD for a single view mammogram. It can be concluded that the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM with an optimal exposure level is able to improve the quality of material decomposition images as well as reduce radiation dose.

  12. A code to determine the energy distribution, the incident energy and the flux of a beam of light ions into a stack of foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonzogni, A.A.; Romo, A.S.M.A.; Frosch, W.R.; Nassiff, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The stacked-foil technique is one of the most used methods to obtain excitation functions of nuclear reactions using light ions as projectiles. The purpose of this program is the calculation of the energy of the beam in the stack, as well as to obtain the incident energy and the flux of the beam by using monitor excitation functions. (orig.)

  13. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: Determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae, E-mail: chkwon@kangwon.ac.kr, E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr; Kwon, Chan Ho, E-mail: chkwon@kangwon.ac.kr, E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Molecular Science and Fusion Technology, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-07

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73 570 ± 6 cm{sup −1} (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state ({sup 2}A{sub 2}), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C{sub 2v} symmetry through the C-N axis.

  14. Development of a Schottky CdTe Medipix3RX hybrid photon counting detector with spatial and energy resolving capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimenez, E.N., E-mail: Eva.Gimenez@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Campus, Oxforshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Astromskas, V. [University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Horswell, I.; Omar, D.; Spiers, J.; Tartoni, N. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Campus, Oxforshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-11

    A multichip CdTe-Medipix3RX detector system was developed in order to bring the advantages of photon-counting detectors to applications in the hard X-ray range of energies. The detector head consisted of 2×2 Medipix3RX ASICs bump-bonded to a 28 mm×28 mm e{sup −} collection Schottky contact CdTe sensor. Schottky CdTe sensors undergo performance degrading polarization which increases with temperature, flux and the longer the HV is applied. Keeping the temperature stable and periodically refreshing the high voltage bias supply was used to minimize the polarization and achieve a stable and reproducible detector response. This leads to good quality images and successful results on the energy resolving capabilities of the system. - Highlights: • A high atomic number (CdTe sensor based) photon-counting detector was developed. • Polarization effects affected the image were minimized by regularly refreshing the bias voltage and stabilizing the temperature. • Good spatial resolution and image quality was achieved following this procedure.

  15. Fast x-ray detector system with simultaneous measurement of timing and energy for a single photon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, T.; Okubo, S.; Hara, H.; Hiraki, T.; Kitao, S.; Miyamoto, Y.; Okai, K.; Ozaki, R.; Sasao, N.; Seto, M.; Uetake, S.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yoda, Y.; Yoshimi, A.; Yoshimura, K.

    2017-06-01

    We developed a fast X-ray detector system for nuclear resonant scattering (NRS) experiments. Our system employs silicon avalanche photo-diode (Si-APD) as a fast X-ray sensor. The system is able to acquire both timing and energy of a single X-ray photon simultaneously in a high rate condition, 106 counts per second for one Si-APD. The performance of the system was investigated in SPring-8, a synchrotron radiation facility in Japan. Good time resolution of 120 ps (FWHM) was achieved with a slight tail distribution in the time spectrum by a level of 10-9 at 1 ns apart from the peak. Using this system, we successfully observed the NRS from the 26.27-keV level of mercury-201, which has a half-life of 630(50) ps. We also demonstrated the reduction of background events caused by radioactive decays in a radioactive sample by discriminating photon energy.

  16. Comparison of the NMIJ and the ARPANSA standards for absorbed dose to water in high-energy photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, M; Morishita, Y; Kato, M; Tanaka, T; Kurosawa, T; Takata, N; Saito, N; Ramanathan, G; Harty, P D; Oliver, C; Wright, T; Butler, D J

    2015-04-01

    The authors report the results of an indirect comparison of the standards of absorbed dose to water in high-energy photon beams from a clinical linac and (60)Co radiation beam performed between the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). Three ionisation chambers were calibrated by the NMIJ in April and June 2013 and by the ARPANSA in May 2013. The average ratios of the calibration coefficients for the three ionisation chambers obtained by the NMIJ to those obtained by the ARPANSA were 0.9994, 1.0040 and 1.0045 for 6-, 10- and 15-MV (18 MV at the ARPANSA) high-energy photon beams, respectively. The relative standard uncertainty of the value was 7.2 × 10(-3). The ratio for (60)Co radiation was 0.9986(66), which is consistent with the results published in the key comparison of BIPM.RI(I)-K4. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Aberrated surface soliton formation in a nonlinear 1D and 2D photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A; Lysak, Tatiana M; Trykin, Evgenii M

    2018-01-01

    We discuss a novel type of surface soliton-aberrated surface soliton-appearance in a nonlinear one dimensional photonic crystal and a possibility of this surface soliton formation in two dimensional photonic crystal. An aberrated surface soliton possesses a nonlinear distribution of the wavefront. We show that, in one dimensional photonic crystal, the surface soliton is formed at the photonic crystal boundary with the ambient medium. Essentially, that it occupies several layers at the photonic crystal boundary and penetrates into the ambient medium at a distance also equal to several layers, so that one can infer about light energy localization at the lateral surface of the photonic crystal. In the one dimensional case, the surface soliton is formed from an earlier formed soliton that falls along the photonic crystal layers at an angle which differs slightly from the normal to the photonic crystal face. In the two dimensional case, the soliton can appear if an incident Gaussian beam falls on the photonic crystal face. The influence of laser radiation parameters, optical properties of photonic crystal layers and ambient medium on the one dimensional surface soliton formation is investigated. We also discuss the influence of two dimensional photonic crystal configuration on light energy localization near the photonic crystal surface. It is important that aberrated surface solitons can be created at relatively low laser pulse intensity and for close values of alternating layers dielectric permittivity which allows their experimental observation.

  18. The photon collider at TESLA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badelek, B.; Bloechinger, C.; Blümlein, J.; Boos, E.; Brinkman, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Bussey, P.; Carimalo, C.; Chýla, Jiří; Ciftci, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 30 (2004), s. 5097-5186 ISSN 0217-751X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : photon collider * linear collider * gamma-gamma * photon-photon * photon electron * Compton scattering Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.054, year: 2004

  19. Photonic crystal light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Shawn-Yu [Albuquerque, NM; Bur, James A [Corrales, NM

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  20. Non-Poissonian photon statistics from macroscopic photon cutting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Mathijs; Meijerink, Andries; Rabouw, Freddy T

    2017-05-24

    In optical materials energy is usually extracted only from the lowest excited state, resulting in fundamental energy-efficiency limits such as the Shockley-Queisser limit for single-junction solar cells. Photon-cutting materials provide a way around such limits by absorbing high-energy photons and 'cutting' them into multiple low-energy excitations that can subsequently be extracted. The occurrence of photon cutting or quantum cutting has been demonstrated in a variety of materials, including semiconductor quantum dots, lanthanides and organic dyes. Here we show that photon cutting results in bunched photon emission on the timescale of the excited-state lifetime, even when observing a macroscopic number of optical centres. Our theoretical derivation matches well with experimental data on NaLaF 4 :Pr 3+ , a material that can cut deep-ultraviolet photons into two visible photons. This signature of photon cutting can be used to identify and characterize new photon-cutting materials unambiguously.

  1. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haissinski, J.

    1986-06-01

    The discussions presented in this paper deal with the following points: distinctive features of gamma-gamma collisions; related processes; photon-photon elastic scattering in the continuum and γγ →gg; total cross section; γγ → V 1 V 2 (V=vector meson); radiative width measurements and light meson spectroscopy; exclusive channels at large /t/; jets and inclusive particle distribution in γγ collisions; and, the photon structure function F γ 2

  2. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e#betta# scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by #betta##betta# collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F 2 /sup #betta#/(x,Q 2 ) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved

  3. Study of topological properties of point-shaped photon interactions by means of energy flows in hadronic final states at large transverse momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gapp, C.

    1990-03-01

    The pointlike γ-parton interactions in γ-proton reactions are evaluated in terms of energy-flows. Only charged particles in the forward hemisphere of the overall CM-system (i.e. χ F >> 0) are used. The pointlike processes should exhibit '2-jetlike' structures. To disentangle the pointlike component from hadronlike photon interactions hadron and photon induced interactions have been studied. The experiment was carried out by the WA69 collaboration using the facilities of the CERN-Ω spectrometer. Both datasets were recorded with identical detector setups in order to minimize systematic effects. A tagged photon beam with energies between 65 and 175 GeV and mixed hadron beams (π + /K + , π - /K - ) at fixed energies of 80 and 140 GeV were used. For high transverse momenta the pointlike interactions are calculable in QCD at lowest order (α.α s ). Since energy-flows depend on all final state particles a collective measure for the hardness of an event has been introduced (Σip 2 perpendicular to in eventplane ). Only the energy-flows from photoproduction give evidence for the presence of 2-jetlike processes. The hadron induced distributions are scaled in order to emulate the behaviour of a hadronlike photon. The difference between the photon and scaled hadroninduced distributions is compared to a Monte Carlo calculation of the pointlike processes. (orig.) [de

  4. Photon pair production by e+e- annihilation and search for supersymmetric photinos at energies greater than 40 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Althoff, M.; Braunschweig, W.; Kirschfink, F.J.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Martyn, H.U.; Rosskamp, R.; Schmitz, D.; Siebke, H.; Wallraff, W.; Fohrmann, R.; Hilger, E.; Kracht, T.; Krasemann, H.L.; Leu, P.; Lohrmann, E.; Pandoulas, D.; Poelz, G.; Poesnecker, K.U.; Wiik, B.H.; Duchovni, E.; Eisenberg, Y.; Karshon, U.; Mikenberg, G.; Mir, R.; Revel, D.; Ronat, E.; Shapira, A.; Winik, M.; Baranko, G.; Caldwell, A.; Cherney, M.; Izen, J.M.; Merikides, M.; Ritz, S.; Rudolph, G.; Strom, D.; Takashima, M.; Venkataramania, H.; Wicklung, E.; Sau Lan Wu; Zobernig, G.

    1984-01-01

    The cross section for the process e + e - ->γγ has been measured for c.m. energies 39.5 61 GeV and Λsub(-)>56 GeV (95% confidence level) have been determined. A search for two photon final states with missing energy provided lower limits on the masses of the photino and selectron. (orig.)

  5. Characterisation of mixed neutron-photon workplace fields at nuclear facilities by spectrometry (energy and direction) within the EVIDOS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Bartlett, D.; Bolognese-Milsztajn, T.; Boschung, M.; Coeck, M.; Curzio, G.; D'Errico, F.; Fiechtner, A.; Lacoste, V.; Lindborg, L.; Reginatto, M.; Schuhmacher, H.; Tanner, R.; Vanhavere, F.

    2007-01-01

    Within the EC project EVIDOS, 17 different mixed neutron-photon workplace fields at nuclear facilities (boiling water reactor, pressurised water reactor, research reactor, fuel processing, storage of spent fuel) were characterised using conventional Bonner sphere spectrometry and newly developed direction spectrometers. The results of the analysis, using Bayesian parameter estimation methods and different unfolding codes, some of them especially adapted to simultaneously unfold energy and direction distributions of the neutron fluence, showed that neutron spectra differed strongly at the different places, both in energy and direction distribution. The implication of the results for the determination of reference values for radiation protection quantities (ambient dose equivalent, personal dose equivalent and effective dose) and the related uncertainties are discussed. (authors)

  6. Theoretical photoionization spectra in the UV photon energy range for a Mg-like Al{sup +} ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae-Soung [e-Business Department, Kyonggi Institute of Technology, Siheung, Jungwang-Dong 2121-3, Kyonggi-Do 429-792 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Soon [Department of Physics, Myongji University, San 38-2 Namdong, Cheoin-gu, Yongin, Kyonggi-Do 449-728 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: dskim@kinst.ac.kr

    2008-08-28

    In the present work, we report the photoionization cross sections of the Al{sup +} ion calculated for the photon energy range 20-26 eV and 30-50 eV. We have expanded our previous calculation (2007 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 76 014302) with an optimized admixture of the initial ground state 3s{sup 21}S and exited states 3s3p{sup 1,3}P, 3s3d{sup 1,3}D and 3s4s{sup 1,3}S, and obtained significantly improved predictions for the main background and autoionizing resonance structures of the reported experimental spectra. The absolute measurements of the photoionization cross sections of the Al{sup +} ion in these energy ranges have been performed by West et al (2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 052719), and they reported that the prominent peaks around 21 eV were attributed to the effects of the significant influence of the small fraction of the fourth-order radiation with energies around 84 eV from the synchrotron source. In our previous work, the main shape for these cross sections was calculated assuming an admixture of initial 3s{sup 21}S and 3s3p{sup 3}P states, only with a rough overall estimate for the experimental spectra in the photon energy range 20-26 eV, and without these peaks around 21 eV. The report of the experimental assignment attributes these peaks to the excitation of a 2p electron from the core. However, our present results with the new admixture reveal similar peaks without considering the possibility of the core excitation.

  7. Studies into tau reconstruction, missing transverse energy and photon induced processes with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu, Robindra P.

    2011-09-15

    The ATLAS experiment is currently recording data from proton-proton collisions delivered by CERN's Large Hadron Collider. As more data is amassed, studies of both Standard Model processes and searches for new physics beyond will intensify. This dissertation presents a three-part study providing new methods to help facilitate these efforts. The first part presents a novel {tau}-reconstruction algorithm for ATLAS inspired by the ideas of particle flow calorimetry. The algorithm is distinguished from traditional {tau}-reconstruction approaches in ATLAS, insofar that it seeks to recognize decay topologies consistent with a (hadronically) decaying {tau}-lepton using resolved energy flow objects in the calorimeters. This procedure allows for an early classification of {tau}-candidates according to their decay mode and the use of decay mode specific discrimination against fakes. A detailed discussion of the algorithm is provided along with early performance results derived from simulated data. The second part presents a Monte Carlo simulation tool which by way of a pseudorapidity-dependent parametrization of the jet energy resolution, provides a probabilistic estimate for the magnitude of instrumental contributions to missing transverse energy arising from jet fluctuations. The principles of the method are outlined and it is shown how the method can be used to populate tails of simulated missing transverse energy distributions suffering from low statistics. The third part explores the prospect of detecting photon-induced leptonic final states in early data. Such processes are distinguished from the more copious hadronic interactions at the LHC by cleaner final states void of hadronic debris, however the soft character of the final state leptons poses challenges to both trigger and offline selections. New trigger items enabling the online selection of such final states are presented, along with a study into the feasibility of detecting the two-photon exchange process

  8. Prompt photon production in photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Krzysztof

    2010-03-15

    This thesis presents measurement of the production of prompt photons in photoproduction with the H1 experiment at HERA. The analysis is based on the data taken in the years 2004-2007, with a total integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1}. The main difficulty of the measurement comes from the high background of neutral mesons decaying into photons. It is accounted for with the help of multivariate analysis. Prompt photon cross sections are measured with the low negative four-momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2} < 1GeV{sup 2} and in the inelasticity range 0.1 < y < 0.7 for photons with a transverse energy 6 < E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} < 15GeV and in the pseudorapidity range.1.0 < {eta}{sup {gamma}} < 2.4 as a function of photons transverse energy and its pseudorapidity. Cross sections for prompt photon events with an additional hadronic jet are measured as a function of the transverse energy and pseudorapidity of the jet and of the momentum fractions x{sub {gamma}} and x{sub p} of the incident photon and proton carried by the constituents participating in the hard scattering process. Additionally, the transverse correlation between the photon and the jet is studied. The results are compared with predictions of a next-to-leading order calculation and a calculation based on the k{sub T} factorisation approach. Neither of calculations is able to describe all the aspects of the measurement. (orig.)

  9. Automated low energy photon absorption equipment for measuring internal moisture and density distributions of wood samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiitta, M.; Olkkonen, H.; Lappalainen, T.; Kanko, T.

    1993-01-01

    Automated equipment for measuring the moisture and density distributions of wood samples was developed. Using a narrow beam of gamma rays, the equipment scans the wood samples, which are placed on the moving belt. The moisture measurement is based on the 241 Am photon absorption technique (59.5 keV), where the difference of the linear absorption coefficients of the moist and dry wood is measured. The method requires no knowledge of the thickness of the specimen. The density estimation method is based on the measurement of the linear attenuation coefficient of wood. Comprehensive software including image processing was developed for treatment of the numerical values of the measurements. (author)

  10. Photonic crystals: towards nanoscale photonic devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lourtioz, J.-M

    2005-01-01

    .... From this point of view, the emergence of photonic bandgap materials and photonic crystals at the end of the 1980s can be seen as a revenge to the benefit this time of optics and electromagnetism. In the same way as the periodicity of solid state crystals determines the energy bands and the conduction properties of electrons, the periodical structur...

  11. Total kinetic energy release in 239Pu(n ,f ) post-neutron emission from 0.5 to 50 MeV incident neutron energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Duke, D. L.; Geppert-Kleinrath, V.; Manning, B.; Meharchand, R.; Mosby, S.; Shields, D.

    2016-09-01

    The average total kinetic energy (T K E ¯) in 239Pu(n ,f ) has been measured for incident neutron energies between 0.5 and 50 MeV. The experiment was performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) using the neutron time-of-flight technique, and the kinetic energy of fission fragments post-neutron emission was measured in a double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber. This represents the first experimental study of the energy dependence of T K E ¯ in 239Pu above neutron energies of 6 MeV.

  12. Monte Carlo benchmark calculations of energy deposition by electron/photon showers up to 1 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehlhorn, T.A.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Over the past several years the TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes has been applied to a variety of problems involving nuclear and space radiations, electron accelerators, and radioactive sources. In particular, they have been used at Sandia to simulate the interaction of electron beams, generated by pulsed-power accelerators, with various target materials for weapons effect simulation, and electron beam fusion. These codes are based on the ETRAN system which was developed for an energy range from about 10 keV up to a few tens of MeV. In this paper we will discuss the modifications that were made to the TIGER series of codes in order to extend their applicability to energies of interest to the high energy physics community (up to 1 GeV). We report the results of a series of benchmark calculations of the energy deposition by high energy electron beams in various materials using the modified codes. These results are then compared with the published results of various experimental measurements and other computational models

  13. Probing WWγ and WWγγ couplings with high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S.Y.; Schrempp, F.

    1991-12-01

    We examine the potential of a future 500 GeV linear e + e - collider for probing anomalous WW γ and WW γγ couplings in the so-called γ(γ)model, corresponding to colliding γe and γγ beams from Compton backscattering of laser light. We consider in detail the 'minimal' set (k γ , λ γ ) of CP conserving anomalous couplings and present first results for the CP violating 'partner' couplings (anti K γ , anti l γ ) as well. The reactions under consideration are γe → Wν, γγ → W + W - and, as a reference, also e + e - → W + W - . We discuss the impact of both circular polarization of laser photons and polarized e(anti e) beams. Photon 'beams' due to classical Bremsstrahlung are also studied for comparison. We analyze in detail, how changes of the assumed machine parameters, cuts and systematic errors affect the sensitivity to the anomalous couplings. (orig.)

  14. Two-temperature accretion disks with electron-positron pairs - Effects of Comptonized external soft photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Masaaki; Takahara, Fumio

    1990-01-01

    The present account of the effects of soft photons from external sources on two-temperature accretion disks in electron-positron pair equilibrium solves the energy-balance equation for a given radial distribution of the input rate of soft photons, taking into account their bremsstrahlung and Comptonization. Critical rate behavior is investigated as a function of the ratio of the energy flux of incident soft photons and the energy-generation rate. As in a previous study, the existence of a critical accretion rate is established.

  15. Hard photons in heavy ion collisions: direct or statistical?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, N.; Bock, R.; Emling, H.; Freifelder, R.; Gobbi, A.; Grosse, E.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Kulessa, R.; Matulewicz, T.; Rami, F.; Simon, R.S.; Stelzer, H.; Wessels, J.; Maurenzig, P.R.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A.A.; Kuehn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.

    1987-10-01

    Photons with energies from 2 to 60 MeV have been measured in coincidence with binary fragments in the reaction 92 Mo + 92 Mo at an incident energy of 19.5 A MeV. The rapid change of the γ-ray spectrum and multiplicity with the fragment total kinetic energy in the exit channel indicates that the γ-rays are emitted statistically by the highly excited fragments. Temperatures as high as 6 MeV are inferred. (orig.)

  16. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Energy transfer and visible-infrared quantum cutting photoluminescence modification in Tm-Yb codoped YPO(4) inverse opal photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siqin; Qiu, Jianbei; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Dacheng; Yang, Zhengwen

    2015-08-01

    YPO4:  Tm, Yb inverse opal photonic crystals were successfully synthesized by the colloidal crystal templates method, and the visible-infrared quantum cutting (QC) photoluminescence properties of YPO4:  Tm, Yb inverse opal photonic crystals were investigated. We obtained tetragonal phase YPO4 in all the samples when the samples sintered at 950°C for 5 h. The visible emission intensity of Tm3+ decreased significantly when the photonic bandgap was located at 650 nm under 480 nm excitation. On the contrary, the QC emission intensity of Yb3+ was enhanced as compared with the no photonic bandgap sample. When the photonic bandgap was located at 480 nm, the Yb3+ and Tm3+ light-emitting intensity weakened at the same time. We demonstrated that the energy transfer between Tm3+ and Yb3+ is enhanced by the suppression of the red emission of Tm3+. Additionally, the mechanisms for the influence of the photonic bandgap on the energy transfer process of the Tm3+, Yb3+ codoped YPO4 inverse opal are discussed.

  18. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System (CAIRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briscoe, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System (CAIRS) is a comprehensive data base containing more than 50,000 investigation reports of injury/illness, property damage and vehicle accident cases representing safety data from 1975 to the present for more than 150 DOE contractor organizations. A special feature is that the text of each accident report is translated using a controlled dictionary and rigid sentence structure called Factor Relationship and Sequence of Events (FRASE) that enhances the ability to retrieve specific types of information and to perform detailed analyses. DOE summary and individual contractor reports are prepared quarterly and annually. In addition, ''Safety Performance Profile'' reports for individual organizations are prepared to provide advance information to appraisal teams, and special topical reports are prepared for areas of concern such as an increase in the number of security injuries or environmental releases. The data base is open to all DOE and Contractor registered users with no access restrictions other than that required by the Privacy Act

  19. ChromAIX2: A large area, high count-rate energy-resolving photon counting ASIC for a Spectral CT Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Roger; Herrmann, Christoph; Livne, Amir

    2017-08-01

    Spectral CT based on energy-resolving photon counting detectors is expected to deliver additional diagnostic value at a lower dose than current state-of-the-art CT [1]. The capability of simultaneously providing a number of spectrally distinct measurements not only allows distinguishing between photo-electric and Compton interactions but also discriminating contrast agents that exhibit a K-edge discontinuity in the absorption spectrum, referred to as K-edge Imaging [2]. Such detectors are based on direct converting sensors (e.g. CdTe or CdZnTe) and high-rate photon counting electronics. To support the development of Spectral CT and show the feasibility of obtaining rates exceeding 10 Mcps/pixel (Poissonian observed count-rate), the ChromAIX ASIC has been previously reported showing 13.5 Mcps/pixel (150 Mcps/mm2 incident) [3]. The ChromAIX has been improved to offer the possibility of a large area coverage detector, and increased overall performance. The new ASIC is called ChromAIX2, and delivers count-rates exceeding 15 Mcps/pixel with an rms-noise performance of approximately 260 e-. It has an isotropic pixel pitch of 500 μm in an array of 22×32 pixels and is tile-able on three of its sides. The pixel topology consists of a two stage amplifier (CSA and Shaper) and a number of test features allowing to thoroughly characterize the ASIC without a sensor. A total of 5 independent thresholds are also available within each pixel, allowing to acquire 5 spectrally distinct measurements simultaneously. The ASIC also incorporates a baseline restorer to eliminate excess currents induced by the sensor (e.g. dark current and low frequency drifts) which would otherwise cause an energy estimation error. In this paper we report on the inherent electrical performance of the ChromAXI2 as well as measurements obtained with CZT (CdZnTe)/CdTe sensors and X-rays and radioactive sources.

  20. Calculation of nuclear data for incident energies to 200 MeV with the FKK-GNASH code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.

    1993-02-01

    We describe how the FKK-GNASH code system has been extended to calculate nucleon-induced reactions up to 200 MeV, and used to predict (p,xn) and (p,xp) cross sections on 208 Pb at incident energies of 25, 45, 80 and 160 MeV, for an intermediate energy code intercomparison. Details of the reaction mechanisms calculated by FKK-GNASH are given, and the calculational procedure is described

  1. Simultaneous Tc-99m/Tl-201 imaging using energy-based estimation of the spatial distributions of contaminant photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, S.C.; Tow, D.E.; English, R.J.; Syravanh, C.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Chan, K.H.; Kijewski, M.F.; Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA

    1995-01-01

    The advantages of simultaneous acquisition of TC-99m and Tl-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT images can be fully realized only if the effects of the Tc-99m agent can be accurately removed from the Tl-201 image. The authors and others have previously reported simultaneous dual-isotope techniques for cardiac studies which make use of a third energy-window to estimate the Tc-99m scatter to be subtracted from the Tl-201 window. The authors have recently demonstrated, however, using a Monte Carlo program which simulates all details of the photon transport, that lead x-rays produced in the collimator may also contribute significantly to contamination in the Tl-201 window. The spatial distribution of the Tc-99m scattered photons differs from that of the lead x-rays. Therefore, the authors modified their correction technique so that, at each projection angle, the contaminant image to be subtracted from the image in the Tl-201 window was estimated as a linear combination of a scatter-window (90--110 keV) image, blurred by a 2D Gaussian filter, and the Tc-99m photopeak image, blurred by a different Gaussian filter. For simulated data which included 'liver' activity and non-uniform 'lung' attenuation, the improved dual-window subtraction technique provided a more accurate estimate of the true Tl-201 image, with less image noise, than did the single-window correction

  2. Generation of multiple excitons in Ag2S quantum dots: Single high-energy versus multiple-photon excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2014-02-20

    We explored biexciton generation via carrier multiplication (or multiple-exciton generation) by high-energy photons and by multiple-photon absorption in Ag2S quantum dots (QDs) using femtosecond broad-band transient absorption spectroscopy. Irrespective of the size of the QDs and how the multiple excitons are generated in the Ag2S QDs, two distinct characteristic time constants of 9.6-10.2 and 135-175 ps are obtained for the nonradiative Auger recombination of the multiple excitons, indicating the existence of two binding excitons, namely, tightly bound and weakly bound excitons. More importantly, the lifetimes of multiple excitons in Ag 2S QDs were about 1 and 2 orders of magnitude longer than those of comparable size PbS QDs and single-walled carbon nanotubes, respectively. This result is significant because it suggests that by utilizing an appropriate electron acceptor, there is a higher possibility to extract multiple electron-hole pairs in Ag2S QDs, which should improve the performance of QD-based solar cell devices. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  3. K$^{-}$ over K$^{+}$ multiplicity ratio for kaons produced in DIS with a large fraction of the virtual-photon energy

    CERN Document Server

    Akhunzyanov, R.; The COMPASS collaboration; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N.V.; Anosov, V.; Antoshkin, A.; Augsten, K.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C.D.R.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, M.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Birsa, R.; Bodlak, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtsev, V.E.; Capozza, L.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Chumakov, A.G.; Chung, S.-U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Dreisbach, Ch.; Dünnweber, W.; Dusaev, R.R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; jr., M.Finger; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giarra, J.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grasso, A.; Gridin, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Guskov, A.; Hahne, D.; Hamar, G.; von Harrach, D.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Jörg, P.; Kabuß, E.; Kerbizi, A.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.M.; Kral, Z.; Krämer, M.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Kuznetsov, I.I.; Kveton, A.; Lednev, A.A.; Levchenko, E.A.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Lyubovitskij, V.E.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Mamon, S.A.; Marchand, C.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Moretti, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pesaro, G.; Pešek, M.; Pešková, M.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmieden, H.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Smolik, J.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Subrt, O.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thiel, A.; Tomsa, J.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Vasilishin, B.I.; Vauth, A.; Veit, B.M.; Veloso, J.; Vidon, A.; Virius, M.; Wallner, S.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.

    2018-01-01

    The K$^{-}$ over K$^{+}$ multiplicity ratio is measured in deep-inelastic scattering, for the first time for kaons carrying a large fraction $z$ of the virtual-photon energy. The data were obtained by the COMPASS collaboration using a 160 GeV muon beam and an isoscalar $^6$LiD target. The regime of deep-inelastic scattering is ensured by requiring $Q^2>1$ (GeV/$c)^2$ for the photon virtuality and $W>5$ GeV/$c^2$ for the invariant mass of the produced hadronic system. Kaons are identified in the momentum range from 12 GeV/$c$ to 40 GeV/$c$, thereby restricting the range in Bjorken-$x$ to $0.010.75$. For very large values of $z$, $i.e.$ $z>0.8$, the results contradict expectations obtained using the formalism of (next-to-)leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics. This may imply that cross-section factorisation or/and universality of (kaon) fragmentation functions do not hold. Our studies suggest that within this formalism an additional correction may be required, which takes into account th...

  4. SU-E-T-120: Minimum Absorbed Dose Limit for Gafchromic EBT2 Film Response after Exposure to Low-Energy Photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massillon-Jl, G; Domingo-Muñoz, I; Díaz-Aguirre, P

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the accuracy of the absorbed dose measured with Gafchromic EBT2 film in low-energy photon radiation fieldsMethods: Six EBT2 film (lot # F06110901) pieces (1cm 2 ) per dose were exposed to x-rays of 50 kV, 80 kV, 120 kV and 60Co gamma rays from a Leksell Gamma Knife at dose values from 50 mGy to 100 Gy. The x-ray beams were calibrated following the AAPMTG-61 protocol using ionization chambers calibrated at NIST or Wisconsin University depending on the beam quality, while the 60Co gamma was calibrated in water using MD-V2-55 film. Each film piece was scanned once using a HP Scanjet 7650 document flatbed scanner in transmission mode, 48-bit color at 300 dpi spatial-resolution. The data analysis was made through the ImageJ. The measured light intensity for the red channel with its associate standard deviation was used to evaluate the netOD and its standard combined uncertainty. The absorbed dose as a function of the netOD was fitted using the logistic model and the relative combined uncertainties were evaluated for each energy photon beam. EBT2 film response curve depends on the low-energy photons and the degree of energy-dependence is a function of absorbed dose. The absorbed dose relative combined uncertainty as a function of the absorbed dose indicates that the minimum absorbed dose limit is also energy dependent. Lower is the energy photon; more accurate is the measurement at low dose value. This can be explain by the fact that comparing to high energy photons, low energy photons can produce locally enough ionization density to create more color centre in the same film area. Minimum absorbed dose limit of Gafchromic EBT2 films were found to be energy dependent. The response curve depends on the low-energy photons and the degree of energy-dependence is a function of absorbed dose This work is partially supported by DGAPA-UNAM grant IN102610 and Conacyt Mexico grant 127409. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. Production of positive pions from polarized protons by linearly polarized photons in the energy region 300--420 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Get' man, V.A.; Gorbenko, V.G.; Grushin, V.F.; Derkach, A.Y.; Zhebrovskii, Y.V.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Kolesnikov, L.Y.; Luchanin, A.A.; Rubashkin, A.L.; Sanin, V.M.; Sorokin, P.V.; Sporov, E.A.; Telegin, Y.N.; Shalatskii, S.V.

    1980-10-01

    A technique for measurement of the polarization observables ..sigma.., P, and T for the reaction ..gamma..p..-->..n..pi../sup +/ in a doubly polarized experiment (polarized proton target + linearly polarized photon beam) is described. Measurements of the angular distributions of these observables in the range of pion emission angles 30--150/sup 0/ are presented for four photon energies from 300 to 420 MeV. Inclusion of the new experimental data in an energy-independent multipole analysis of photoproduction from protons permits a more reliable selection of solutions to be made.

  6. Photon radiation in e+e-→hadrons at low energies with carlomat3.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegerlehner, Fred; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin; Kolodziej, Karol

    2017-01-01

    We present a sample of results for the cross sections of several processes of low energetic e + e - annihilation into final states containing pions accompanied by one or two photons, or a light lepton pair. The results, which have been obtained with a new version of a multipurpose Monte Carlo program carlomat, labelled 3.1, demonstrate new capabilities of the program which, among others, include a possibility of taking into account either the initial or final state radiation separately, or both at a time, and a possibility of inclusion of the electromagnetic charged pion form factor for processes with charged pion pairs. We also discuss some problems related to the U(1) electromagnetic gauge invariance.

  7. Radiation-hard Silicon Photonics for Future High Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2089774; Troska, Jan

    Collisions of proton beams in the Large Hadron Collider at CERN produce very high radiation levels in the innermost parts of the particle detectors and enormous amounts of measurement data. Thousands of radiation-hard optical links based on directly-modulated laser diodes are thus installed in the particle detectors to transmit the measurement data to the processing electronics. The radiation levels in the innermost regions of future particle detectors will be much higher than they are now. Alternative solutions to laser-based radiation-hard optical links have to be found since the performance of laser diodes decreases beyond the operation margin of the system when irradiated to sufficiently high radiation levels. Silicon Photonics (SiPh) is currently being investigated as a promising alternative technology. First tests have indeed shown that SiPh Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZMs) are relatively insensitive to a high neutron fluence. However, they showed a strong degradation when exposed to ionizing radiation. ...

  8. Simulation of Photon energy Spectra Using MISC, SOURCES, MCNP and GADRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Lucas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shores, Erik F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Myers, Steven C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Felsher, Paul D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garner, Scott E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Solomon, Clell J. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14

    The detector response functions included in the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) are a valuable resource for simulating radioactive source emission spectra. Application of these response functions to the results of three-dimensional transport calculations is a useful modeling capability. Using a 26.2 kg shell of depleted uranium (DU) as a simple test problem, this work illustrates a method for manipulating current tally results from MCNP into the GAM file format necessary for a practical link to GADRAS detector response functions. MISC (MCNP Intrinsic Source Constructor) and SOURCES 4C were used to develop photon and neutron source terms for subsequent MCNP transport, and the resultant spectrum is shown to be in good agreement with that from GADRAS. A 1 kg DU sphere was also modeled with the method described here and showed similarly encouraging results.

  9. Simulation of Photon energy Spectra Using MISC, SOURCES, MCNP and GADRAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, Lucas P.; Shores, Erik F.; Myers, Steven C.; Felsher, Paul D.; Garner, Scott E.; Solomon, Clell J. Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The detector response functions included in the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) are a valuable resource for simulating radioactive source emission spectra. Application of these response functions to the results of three-dimensional transport calculations is a useful modeling capability. Using a 26.2 kg shell of depleted uranium (DU) as a simple test problem, this work illustrates a method for manipulating current tally results from MCNP into the GAM file format necessary for a practical link to GADRAS detector response functions. MISC (MCNP Intrinsic Source Constructor) and SOURCES 4C were used to develop photon and neutron source terms for subsequent MCNP transport, and the resultant spectrum is shown to be in good agreement with that from GADRAS. A 1 kg DU sphere was also modeled with the method described here and showed similarly encouraging results.

  10. Ion energy distributions from photon- and electron-stimulated desorption. II. The quasiclassical final state and reneutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, William L.; Pal, Sipra; Jutila, Ronald E.

    1987-09-01

    Franck-Condon overlap integrals are calculated to fit ion energy distributions (IED's) resulting from photon- or electron-stimulated desorption. The WKB or quasiclassical trajectory approximation is used to compute the final-state wave function. The final-state potential consists of a repulsive exponential and an image term. The calculated IED's compare well with those found previously using the reflection or classical trajectory approximation. Both methods agree well with a wide range of experimental IED's all of which are mildly asymmetric Gaussian functions of the ion energy. It is shown how these two approximations are related through the classical limit of the final-state wave function. In addition, the quasiclassical wave function is generalized to include an optical potential giving rise in a natural way to the reneutralization reduction factor. The Gaussian asymmetry in the IED's is usually to the high-energy side reflecting a ``normal'' exponential repulsion. However, in a few anomalous cases the Gaussian is skewed to the low-energy side of the IED peak. This anomaly cannot be explained by expected influences on the initial-state wave function such as anharmonicities. On the other hand, the reneutralization factor, when it predominates, provides a natural explanation for this effect. In addition, this reneutralization factor can cause significant shifts in the IED peak, away from the Franck-Condon peak.

  11. Photon Production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lafaye, Remi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    We review the last results on photon production at LHC by the ATLAS and CMS experiments obtained in proton-proton collisions with a center of mass energy of 7 TeV. We discuss the impact of prompt photon and photon-jet differential cross-sections, on the parton distribution function of the proton. Di-photon differential cross-sections are also presented as a function of the di-photon invariant mass, transverse momentum, azimuthal separation, and cos theta*.

  12. Total bremsstrahlung spectra of thick lead compounds produced by {sup 90}Sr beta emitter in photon energy region of 10–100 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Suhansar Jit [Department of Physics, B.B.S.B Polytechnic, Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab (India); Singh, Tajinder, E-mail: tajindersingh2k9@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Mata Gujri College, Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab (India); Singh, Doordarshi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, B.B.S.B Engineering College, Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab (India); Singh, Amrit [Department of Physics, Baba Ajay Singh Khalsa College, Gurdas Nangal, Gurdaspur, Punjab (India); Dhaliwal, A.S. [Department of Physics, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering & Technology, Longowal (Sangrur), Punjab (India)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Total bremsstrahlung spectra in thick targets of Pb compounds by {sup 90}Sr in energy range 10–100 keV. • Experimental results show better agreement with the model which includes PB in SA up to 30 keV. • At higher photon energy region 30–100 keV the model which describes OB is more accurate. • Experimental results show positive deviations from the entire models at higher energy end spectrum. - Abstract: The total bremsstrahlung spectra in the thick targets of lead acetate trihydrate (Pb(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}·3H{sub 2}O), lead nitrate Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and lead chloride (PbCl{sub 2}) produced by {sup 90}Sr beta particles have been investigated in the photon energy region of 10–100 keV. The experimental bremsstrahlung spectra have been compared with the theoretical models Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe Heitler theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe Heitler theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung and modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe Heitler theory which includes polarization bremsstrahlung in the stripped atom approximation. The experimental results show better agreement with theoretical model that includes polarization bremsstrahlung in stripped approximation in the photon energy region below 30 keV. However, at higher photon energy region 30–100 keV, the theoretical model which describes ordinary bremsstrahlung is more accurate to describe the experimental bremsstrahlung spectra. The experimental results show positive deviations from the entire theoretical models at higher energy end of the spectrum. The results indicate that polarization bremsstrahlung plays important role in the formation of total bremsstrahlung spectra in lead compounds produced by continuous beta particles at low photon energy region of 10–30 keV.

  13. SU-E-T-332: Dosimetric Impact of Photon Energy and Treatment Technique When Knowledge Based Auto-Planning Is Implemented in Radiotherapy of Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z; Kennedy, A [Sarah Cannon, Nashville, TN (United States); Larsen, E; Grow, A; Hayes, C; Balamucki, C [North Florida Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Salmon, H; Thompson, M [Lake City Cancer Center, Lake City, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric impact of the combination of photon energy and treatment technique on radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer when knowledge based planning was used. Methods: A total of 16 patients with localized prostate cancer were retrospectively retrieved from database and used for this study. For each patient, four types of treatment plans with different combinations of photon energy (6X and 10X) and treatment techniques (7-field IMRT and 2-arc VMAT) were created using a prostate DVH estimation model in RapidPlan™ and Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical System). For any beam arrangement, DVH objectives and weighting priorities were generated based on the geometric relationship between the OAR and PTV. Photon optimization algorithm was used for plan optimization and AAA algorithm was used for final dose calculation. Plans were evaluated in terms of the pre-defined dosimetric endpoints for PTV, rectum, bladder, penile bulb, and femur heads. A Student’s paired t-test was used for statistical analysis and p > 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: For PTV, V95 was statistically similar among all four types of plans, though the mean dose of 10X plans was higher than that of 6X plans. VMAT plans showed higher heterogeneity index than IMRT plans. No statistically significant difference in dosimetry metrics was observed for rectum, bladder, and penile bulb among plan types. For left and right femur, VMAT plans had a higher mean dose than IMRT plans regardless of photon energy, whereas the maximum dose was similar. Conclusion: Overall, the dosimetric endpoints were similar regardless of photon energy and treatment techniques when knowledge based auto planning was used. Given the similarity in dosimetry metrics of rectum, bladder, and penile bulb, the genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities should be comparable among the selections of photon energy and treatment techniques.

  14. Do high-energy neutrinos travel faster than photons in a discrete space-time?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Shesheng, E-mail: xue@icra.it [ICRANeT, Piazzale della Repubblica, 10-65122, Pescara, Physics Department, University of Rome ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy)

    2011-12-06

    The recent OPERA measurement of high-energy neutrino velocity, once independently verified, implies new physics in the neutrino sector. We revisit the theoretical inconsistency of the fundamental high-energy cutoff attributing to quantum gravity with the parity-violating gauge symmetry of local quantum field theory describing neutrinos. This inconsistency suggests high-dimension operators of neutrino interactions. Based on these studies, we try to view the OPERA result, high-energy neutrino oscillations and indicate to observe the restoration of parity conservation by measuring the asymmetry of high-energy neutrinos colliding with left- and right-handed polarized electrons.

  15. pi0 photoproduction on the proton for photon energies from 0.675 to 2.875-GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Dugger; Barry Ritchie; Jacques Ball; Patrick Collins; Evgueni Pasyuk; Richard Arndt; William Briscoe; Igor Strakovski; Ron Workman; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Eric Anciant; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; Gerard Audit; Harutyun Avakian; H. Bagdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; Marco Battaglieri; Kevin Beard; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Barry Berman; Nicola Bianchi; Angela Biselli; Billy Bonner; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Bryan Carnahan; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Alan Coleman; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Hall Crannell; John Cummings; Enzo De Sanctis; Raffaella De Vita; Pavel Degtiarenko; Haluk Denizli; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Kalvir Dhuga; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; Steven Dytman; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Latifa Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; Paul Eugenio; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; John Ficenec; Tony Forest; Herbert Funsten; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Cynthia Hadjidakis; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; D. Heddle; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; J. Hu; Marco Huertas; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; Kui Kim; Kinney Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Alexei Klimenko; Mike Klusman; Mikhail Kossov; Zebulun Krahn; Laird Kramer; Valery Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Viacheslav Kuznetsov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Tsung-shung Lee; Ana Lima; Kenneth Livingston; K. Lukashin; Joseph Manak; Claude Marchand; Leonard Maximon; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; Valeria Muccifora; James Mueller; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O' Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; K Park; Craig Paterson; Sasha Philips; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; David Rowntree; Philip Rubin; Franck Sabatie; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Aziz Shafi; Youri Sharabian; J. Shaw; Sebastio Simionatto; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; M. Spraker; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Simon Taylor; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; R. Thompson; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Luminita Todor; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Xue kai Wang; Lawrence Weinstein; Henry Weller; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; M.H. Wood; A. Yegneswaran; Jae-Chul Yun; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang

    2007-07-23

    Differential cross sections for the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p \\pi^0$ have been measured with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and a tagged photon beam with energies from 0.675 to 2.875 GeV. The results reported here possess greater accuracy in the absolute normalization than previous measurements. They disagree with recent CB-ELSA measurements for the process at forward scattering angles. Agreement with the SAID and MAID fits is found below 1 GeV. The present set of cross sections has been incorporated into the SAID database, and exploratory fits have been extended to 3 GeV. Resonance couplings have been extracted and compared to previous determinations.

  16. Fission of intermediate mass nuclei by bremsstrahlung photons in the energy range 0.8-1.8 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, D.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    The fission of intermediate mass nuclei in the Al-Ta internal induced by bremsstrahlung photons of maximum energies between 0,8 to 1,8 GeV is studied. Thin targets of Nd and Sm and dense targets of Al,Ti,Co,Zr,Nb,Ag,In and Ta are utilized, and all the aspects related with the fission fragment absorption by the targets themselves are considered. The samples are exposed in th 2,5 GeV Electron Synchrotron at Bonn University. Muscovite mica, CR-39 and makrofol are used as fission fragments detectors. Fission cross sections and nuclear fissionabilities of the studied elements are estimated. (L.C.) [pt

  17. Photon Events with Missing Energy in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S.U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M.J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Houlden, M.A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Johansson, P.D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Kerzel, U.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.T.; Kjaer, N.J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McNulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monig, Klaus; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J.P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, Jan; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Van Dam, Piet; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2005-01-01

    The production of single- and multi-photon events has been studied in the reaction e+e- -> gamma (gamma) + invisible particles. The data collected with the DELPHI detector during the years 1999 and 2000 at centre-of-mass energies between 191 GeV and 209 GeV was combined with earlier data to search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model. The measured number of light neutrino families was consistent with three and the absence of an excess of events beyond that predicted by the Standard Model processes was used to set limits on new physics. Both model-independent searches and searches for new processes predicted by supersymmetric and extra-dimensional models have been made. Limits on new non-standard model interactions between neutrinos and electrons were also determined.

  18. Determination of environmental actinide nuclides and 210Pb (210Po) by low-energy photon spectrometry with alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakanoue, Masanobu; Yamamoto, M.; Komura, Kazuhisa

    1987-01-01

    Low-energy photon spectrometry with alpha spectrometry was used to determine the environmental concentrations of low-level actinides and other nuclides, especially 210 Pb and 210 Po. The isotopic ratio of 2 40 Pu/ 239 Pu was successfully determined by measuring L x -ray/α-ray counting ratio. A reliable method was developed for the determination of extremely low-level 237 Np global fallout in environmental samples. The non-destructive determination by Ge-LEPS for natural 210 Pb in various samples (tobacco leaves, commercially available tobacco, etc.) was also carried out with the determination of 210 Po by alpha spectrometry using 209 Po as a yield tracer. (author) 6 refs.; 5 tabs

  19. Inclusive photoproduction of rho and ω in the photon energy range 20 to 70 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, M.; Laberrigue, J.; Levy, J.M.; La Vaissiere, C. de; Yiou, T.P.; Lassalle, J.C.; Patrick, G.N.; Storr, K.M.; Axon, T.J.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Brookes, G.R.; Bunn, J.J.; Bussey, P.J.; Clegg, A.B.; Dainton, J.B.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Diekmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Ellison, R.J.; Flower, P.; Hughes-Jones, R.E.; Hutton, J.S.; Ibbotson, M.; Jakob, H.P.; Jung, M.; Kemp, M.A.R.; Kumar, B.R.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lane, J.B.; Liebenau, V.; McClatchey, R.H.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J.A.G.; Morris, J.V.; Newton, D.; Paterson, C.; Paul, E.; Raine, C.; Reidenbach, M.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schloesser, A.; Sharp, P.H.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Smith, K.M.; Thompson, R.J.; Waite, A.P.; Worsell, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Inclusive production of rho 0 , ω, and rhosup(+-) at low transverse momentum has been measured in γp collisions with photons of energy 20 to 70 GeV. The vector mesons have been studied as functions of the Feynman variable chisub(F), varying between -0.2 and 0.95, i.e. excluding the 'elastic' peaks of rho 0 and ω photoproduction. For chisub(F) 0 ) approx.= sigma (ω) approx.= 1/2[sigma(p + ) + sigma(p - )]. For chisub(F) > 0.6, it is observed that sigma(p 0 ) > sigma(ω) >=1/2[sigma(rho + )+sigma(rho - )] and the differences increase with increasing chisub(F). Over the rhosub(F) range -0.2 0 and ω production. (orig.)

  20. Measurement of total and partial photon proton cross sections at 180 GeV center of mass energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1994-03-01

    Photon proton cross sections for elastic light vector meson production, σ el γp , inelastic diffractive production, σ d γp , non-diffractive procution, σ nd γp , as well as the total cross section, σ γp tot , have been measured at an average γp center of mass energy of 180 GeV with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The resulting values are σ el γp =18±7 μb, σ d γp =33±8 μb, σ nd γp =91±11 μb, and σ γp tot =143±17 μb, where the errors include statistical and systematic errors added in quadrature. (orig.)

  1. Dependency of energy and spatial distributions of photons on edge of object in brain SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deloar, H.M.; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Kim, Kyeong-Min; Aoi, Toshiyuki; Iida, Hidehiro [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan). Research Inst.

    2003-04-01

    Accurate {mu} maps are important for quantitative image reconstruction in SPECT. The Compton scatter energy window (CSW) technique has been proposed to define the outline of objects. In this technique, a lower energy window image is acquired in addition to the main photo-peak energy window. The image of the lower energy window is used to estimate the edge of the scanned object to produce a constant attenuation map. The aim of this study was to investigate the dependency of CSW on the spatial and energy distribution of radioisotope to predict the edges of objects. Two particular cases of brain study were considered, namely uniform distribution and non-uniform distribution using Monte Carlo simulation and experiments with uniform cylindrical phantom and hotspot phantom. The phantoms were filled with water and a radioactive solution of {sup 99m}Tc. For each phantom, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% thresholds of the mean profile were applied to estimate E{sub wt}, the energy window for minimum difference between the estimated and true edge of objects. The E{sub wt}'s were 100-120 keV with a 40% threshold and 92-114 keV with a 30% threshold for uniform and hotspot phantoms, respectively. Edge of the objects with CSW technique varies with energy window and thresholds. Careful setting of the energy window is required to use the CSW technique. (author)

  2. Neutron emission cross sections on 93Nb at 20 MeV incident energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinkowski, A.; Kielan, D.

    1991-01-01

    Over the last years fully quantum-mechanical theories of nuclear reactions have been developed that provide, at least in principle, parameter-free methods of calculating double-differential continuum cross sections. The DWBA-based theory of direct processes to the continuum was derived by Tamura et al. The statistical theory of Feshback, Kerman and Koonin (FKK) introduced two reaction types in parallel as complementary mechanisms contributing to the preequilibrium decay. The multistep compound mechanism (MSC) results in symmetric angular distributions of the emitted particles, whereas the multistep direct mechanism (MSD) gives rise to the forward-peaked angular distributions. The theories of the MSC reactions differ in that the FKK theory incorporates the ''never come back'' hypothesis, which allowed the formulation of an applicable model that was successfully used in practical calculations. On the other hand the FKK theory of the MSD reactions differs conceptually from the theory of Tamura et al. and from the more general theory developed most recently by Nishioka et al. The latter theories were shown to be founded upon a postulated chaos located in the residual nucleus. In contrast, the theory of FKK assumes a chaotic interaction of the continuum particle to be emitted with the residual nucleus. The continuum or leading-particle statistics of the FKK theory results in the simple, convolution like, MSD cross section formula, which facilitates numerical calculations. Nevertheless two-step statistical DWBA calculations have been also performed. This paper extends the application of the FKK theory to the 93 Nb(n,xn) reaction at 20 MeV incident energy. (author). 14 refs, 1 fig

  3. Energy measurement of prompt fission neutrons in 239Pu(n,f) for incident neutron energies from 1 to 200 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatillon, A; Granier, Th; Laurent, B; Taïeb, J; Noda, S; Haight, R C; Devlin, M; Nelson, R O; O’Donnell, J M

    2010-01-01

    Prompt fission neutron spectra in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu have been measured for incident neutron energies from 1 to 200 MeV at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Preliminary results are discussed and compared to theoretical model calculation.

  4. Calculation of Nuclear Particles Production at High-Energy Photon Beams from a Linac Operating at 6, 10 and 15 MV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, Renato; Bettega, Daniela; Calzolari, Paola; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2017-05-01

    Production of photonuclear particles in a tissue-equivalent medium has been calculated for linacs at 6, 10 and 15 MV from Varian TrueBeam. Based on the knowledge of bremsstrahlung fluence spectra and linac photon beam parameters, numerical integration was performed on the cross sections for photoparticle production of the constituent elements of tissue (2H,12C,13C,16O,17O,18O,14N,15N). At 15 MV, at the depth of photon maximum dose, the total absorbed dose due to neutrons, protons, alphas and residual nuclei from photon reactions in tissue (5.5E-05 Gy per Gy of photons) is comparable to that due to neutrons from accelerator head. Results reasonably agree with data reported in the literature using Monte Carlo models simulating linac head components. This work suggests a simple method to estimate the dose contributed by the photon-induced nuclear particles for high-energy photon beams produced by linacs in use, as it might be relevant for late stochastic effects. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Search for new physics with long-lived particles decaying to photons and missing energy in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s}=7 $ TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Gonzalez, J. Suarez; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Suarez, R. Gonzalez; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Marcken, G. Vander; Velde, C. Vander; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Martins, M. Correa; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santoro, A.; Jorge, L. Soares; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Moreno, B. Gomez; Oliveros, A. F. Osorio; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Kamel, A. Ellithi; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Weber, M.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Ahmad, W. Haj; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Martin, M. Aldaya; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Costanza, F.; Dammann, D.; Pardos, C. Diez; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Gunnellini, P.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Olzem, J.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Cipriano, P. M. Ribeiro; Riedl, C.; Ron, E.; Rosin, M.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Blobel, V.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Hermanns, T.; Höing, R. S.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Mura, B.; Nowak, F.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Pardo, P. Lobelle; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Röcker, S.; Scheurer, A.; Schilling, F. -P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mehta, P.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Mehdiabadi, S. Paktinat; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D’Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; de Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Buontempo, S.; Montoya, C. A. Carrillo; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellan, P.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Nespolo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Taroni, S.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D’Agnolo, R. T.; Dell’Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Fanelli, C.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Sigamani, M.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; De Remigis, P.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Pereira, A. Vilela; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Cossutti, F.; Ricca, G. Della; Gobbo, B.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Heo, S. G.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Son, T.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Cho, Y.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Kwon, E.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Bilinskas, M. J.; Grigelionis, I.; Janulis, M.; Juodagalvis, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; La Cruz, I. Heredia-de; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Villalba, R. Magaña; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Moreno, S. Carrillo; Valencia, F. Vazquez; Ibarguen, H. A. Salazar; Linares, E. Casimiro; Pineda, A. Morelos; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Ansari, M. H.; Asghar, M. I.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Gokieli, R.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Parracho, P. G. Ferreira; Gallinaro, M.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Golutvin, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Volodko, A.; Zarubin, A.; Evstyukhin, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Erofeeva, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Kossov, M.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Popov, A.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Maestre, J. Alcaraz; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Llatas, M. Chamizo; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Peris, A. Delgado; Vázquez, D. Domínguez; Bedoya, C. Fernandez; Ramos, J. P. Fernández; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Lopez, O. Gonzalez; Lopez, S. Goy; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Pelayo, J. Puerta; Olmeda, A. Quintario; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Menendez, J. Fernandez; Folgueras, S.; Caballero, I. Gonzalez; Iglesias, L. Lloret; Gomez, J. Piedra; Cifuentes, J. A. Brochero; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Campderros, J. Duarte; Felcini, M.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Sanchez, J. Gonzalez; Graziano, A.; Jorda, C.; Virto, A. Lopez; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Rivero, C. Martinez; Matorras, F.; Sanchez, F. J. Munoz; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Sanudo, M. Sobron; Vila, I.; Cortabitarte, R. Vilar; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Perez, J. A. Coarasa; D’Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; De Roeck, A.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Frisch, B.; Funk, W.; Georgiou, G.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Garrido, R. Gomez-Reino; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegner, B.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, Y. -J.; Lenzi, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orimoto, T.; Orsini, L.; Cortezon, E. Palencia; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Antunes, J. Rodrigues; Rolandi, G.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; del Arbol, P. Martinez Ruiz; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Rikova, M. Ivova; Mejias, B. Millan; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, Z. K.; Lu, Y. J.; Mekterovic, D.; Singh, A. P.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. 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    2012-11-01

    A search is performed for long-lived neutral particles decaying into a photon and invisible particles. An example of such a signature is the decay of the lightest neutralino with nonzero lifetime into a gravitino and a photon in gauge-mediated supersymmetry, with the neutralino as the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle and the gravitino as the lightest. The search uses events containing photons, missing transverse energy, and jets. The impact parameter of the photon relative to the beam-beam collision point can be reconstructed using converted photons. The method is sensitive to lifetimes of the order of 0.1 to 1 ns. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.23 inverse femtobarns in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV, recorded in the first part of 2011 by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Cross-section limits are presented on pair production for such particles, each of which decays into a photon and invisible particles. The observed 95% confidence level limits vary between 0.11 and 0.21 pb, depending on the neutral particle lifetime.

  6. Impact of Non-Uniformity in Light Collection on the Energy Resolution of the PANDA Electromagnetic Calorimeter at Photon Energies Below 1 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Stefan; Brinkmann, Kai-Thomas; Drexle