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Sample records for incident nonmelanoma skin

  1. Non-melanoma skin cancer in Portuguese kidney transplant recipients - incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, André; Gouveia, Miguel; Cardoso, José Carlos; Xavier, Maria Manuel; Vieira, Ricardo; Alves, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is currently among the three leading causes of death after solid organ transplantation and its incidence is increasing. Non-melanoma skin cancer - squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma - is the most common malignancy found in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). The incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer in KTRs has not been extensively studied in Portugal. To determine the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer in KTRs from the largest Portuguese kidney transplant unit; and to study risk factors for non-melanoma skin cancer. Retrospective analysis of clinical records of KTRs referred for the first time for a dermatology consultation between 2004 and 2013. A case-control study was performed on KTRs with and without non-melanoma skin cancer. We included 288 KTRs with a median age at transplantation of 47 years, a male gender predominance (66%) and a median transplant duration of 3.67 years. One fourth (n=71) of KTRs developed 131 non-melanoma skin cancers, including 69 (53%) squamous cell carcinomas and 62 (47%) basal cell carcinomas (ratio squamous cell carcinoma: basal cell carcinoma 1.11), with a mean of 1.85 neoplasms per patient. Forty percent of invasive squamous cell carcinomas involved at least two clinical or histological high-risk features. The following factors were associated with a higher risk of non-melanoma skin cancer: an older age at transplantation and at the first consultation, a longer transplant duration and the presence of actinic keratosis. KTRs treated with azathioprine were 2.85 times more likely to develop non-melanoma skin cancer (p=0.01). Non-melanoma skin cancer was a common reason for dermatology consultation in Portuguese KTRs. It is imperative for KTRs to have access to specialized dermatology consultation for early referral and treatment of skin malignancies.

  2. Trends in the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer in Denmark 1978-2007: Rapid incidence increase among young Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch-Johansen, Fatima; Jensen, Allan; Mortensen, Lone

    2010-01-01

    assessed incidence trends of NMSC in Denmark from 1978 to 2007. Data for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) were obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Registry of Pathology. For both genders, age-specific incidence rates and overall incidence rates, age......Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer among Caucasian populations worldwide, and incidence rates are increasing. However, NMSC data are not routinely collected by cancer registries, but Denmark has extensive registration of NMSC in two nationwide population-based registries. We...

  3. Incidence and prevalence of non-melanoma skin cancer in Australia: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Eshini; Gnaneswaran, Neiraja; Staines, Carolyn; Win, Aung Ko; Sinclair, Rod

    2015-11-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is the most common cancer occurring in people with fair skin. Australia has been reported to have the highest incidence of NMSC in the world. Using a systematic search of the literature in EMBASE and Medline, we identified 21 studies that investigated the incidence or prevalence of NMSC in Australia. Studies published between 1948 and 2011 were identified and included in the analysis. There were six studies that were conducted on national level, two at state level and 13 at the regional level. Overall, the incidence of NMSC had steadily increased over calendar-years in Australia. The incidence of NMSC per 100,000 person-years was estimated to be 555 in 1985; 977 in 1990; 1109 in 1995; 1170 in 2002 and 2448 in 2011. The incidence was higher for men than women and higher for BCC than SCC. Incidence varied across the states of Australia, with the highest in Queensland. The prevalence of NMSC was estimated to be 2% in Australia in 2002. The incidence and prevalence of NMSC still need to be accurately established at both national and state levels to determine the costs and burden of the disease on the public health system in Australia. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  4. Histology of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Cornelia S L

    2014-01-01

    Incidence of skin tumors is increasing among elderly patients, and the multi-morbidities which occur in the elderly are a great challenge for dermatologists. Basis of every treatment of skin cancer patients is a reliable diagnosis. Therefore, histopathology serves as the gold standard in clinical dermatooncology and dermatologic surgery. This chapter provides a comprehensive review on the main types of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers, including precursor lesions.

  5. Skin cancer in the military: a systematic review of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer incidence, prevention, and screening among active duty and veteran personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemenschneider, Kelsie; Liu, Jesse; Powers, Jennifer G

    2017-12-29

    Occupational sun exposure is a well-studied risk factor for skin cancer development, but more work is needed to assess melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer risk among U.S. military personnel to improve education and screening efforts in this population. To conduct an extensive review of skin cancer risks for U.S. military personnel to inform preventative education, diagnosis, and treatment efforts to better protect these individuals from future skin cancer development. A systematic review of published studies on the subject of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer in military personnel was conducted. Nine studies describing skin cancer incidence in the United States military were identified, with four studies specific to melanoma. The study findings reveal an increased risk of melanoma associated with service in the military or prisoner of war status. Service in tropical environments was associated with an increased incidence of both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer among World War II soldiers. Two studies found that increased melanoma risk was also branch-dependent, with the highest rates among the United States Air Force (USAF) branch. Several of the reviewed studies implicated increased sun exposure during military service and lack of sufficient sun protection as the causes of higher rates of skin cancer among U.S. military and veteran populations as compared to the non-military population in the US. The reviewed articles have variable results; a prospective randomized controlled trial would be helpful to develop interventions that mitigate skin cancer risk in the U.S. military. This review identifies an abundance of evidence for an increased risk of skin cancer development among U.S. active duty and veteran populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Socioeconomic status and non-melanoma skin cancer: a nationwide cohort study of incidence and survival in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steding-Jessen, M; Birch-Johansen, F; Jensen, A

    2010-01-01

    The two main types of non-melanoma skin cancer differ with the pattern of exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR): basal cell carcinoma (BCC) appears to be more closely related to intermittent solar exposure and sunburn, while the risk for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a result of lifetime cum...

  7. Targeted Therapy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Spallone

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most prevalent cancer in light-skinned populations, and includes mainly Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCC, representing around 75% of NMSC and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC. The incidence of these tumors is continuously growing. It was found that the overall number of procedures for NMSC in US rose by 76%, from 1,158,298 in 1992 to 2,048,517 in 2006. Although mortality from NMSC tends to be very low, clearly the morbidity related to these skin cancers is very high. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Surgery was considered the gold standard therapy, however, advancements in the knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms of NMSCs led to the identification of key targets for drug intervention and to the consequent development of several targeted therapies. These represent the future in treatment of these common forms of cancer ensuring a high cure rate, preservation of the maximal amount of normal surrounding tissue and optimal cosmetic outcome. Here, we will review recent advancements in NMSC targeted therapies focusing on BCC and SCC.

  8. Targeted Therapy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

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    Spallone, Giulia; Botti, Elisabetta; Costanzo, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.costanzo@uniroma2.it [Department of Dermatology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via Montpellier 1, 00199, Rome (Italy)

    2011-05-03

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most prevalent cancer in light-skinned populations, and includes mainly Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCC), representing around 75% of NMSC and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC). The incidence of these tumors is continuously growing. It was found that the overall number of procedures for NMSC in US rose by 76%, from 1,158,298 in 1992 to 2,048,517 in 2006. Although mortality from NMSC tends to be very low, clearly the morbidity related to these skin cancers is very high. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Surgery was considered the gold standard therapy, however, advancements in the knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms of NMSCs led to the identification of key targets for drug intervention and to the consequent development of several targeted therapies. These represent the future in treatment of these common forms of cancer ensuring a high cure rate, preservation of the maximal amount of normal surrounding tissue and optimal cosmetic outcome. Here, we will review recent advancements in NMSC targeted therapies focusing on BCC and SCC.

  9. The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberg, Anna Lei; Sølvsten, Henrik; Lei, Ulrikke

    2016-01-01

    a significant challenge in terms of public health management and health care costs. However, high-quality epidemiological and treatment data on NMSC are sparse. STUDY POPULATION: The NMSC database includes patients with the following skin tumors: basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen......AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database was established in 2008. The aim of this database was to collect data on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) treatment and improve its treatment in Denmark. NMSC is the most common malignancy in the western countries and represents......'s disease, and keratoacanthoma diagnosed by the participating office-based dermatologists in Denmark. MAIN VARIABLES: Clinical and histological diagnoses, BCC subtype, localization, size, skin cancer history, skin phototype, and evidence of metastases and treatment modality are the main variables...

  10. Markedly reduced incidence of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer in a nonconcurrent cohort of 10,040 patients with vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, Andrea; Tabolli, Stefano; Didona, Biagio; Sobrino, Luciano; Russo, Nicoletta; Abeni, Damiano

    2014-12-01

    Genetic findings suggesting a lower susceptibility to melanoma in patients with vitiligo are supported by recent clinical studies. Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) has also been studied, but mainly in small samples, and with conflicting results. We sought to study the relative risk (RR) of melanoma and NMSC in patients with vitiligo compared with that in patients seen for vascular surgery. The frequency of melanoma and NMSC was compared between patients with vitiligo and patients seen for vascular surgery. Occurrence of skin cancer was compared by computing RR and modeled using multiple logistic regression. Overall, the crude RR for melanoma was 0.24 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.13-0.45) in patients with vitiligo compared with those with a nondermatologic condition (occurrence 1.1‰, 95% CI 0.5‰-2.0‰ in patients with vitiligo and occurrence 4.5‰, 95% CI 3.8‰-5.4‰ in the control cohort). The crude RR for NMSC was 0.19 (95% CI 0.14-0.17) and the occurrence was 3.8‰ (95% CI 2.7‰-5.2‰) among patients with vitiligo and 19.6‰ (95% CI 18.0‰-21.4‰) in control subjects. Patients with vitiligo who underwent phototherapy had a markedly higher risk of both cancers. In our large study, patients with vitiligo have a decreased risk of developing skin neoplasms, even considering that a larger proportion in this patient group is exposed to higher levels of ultraviolet radiation. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cytogenetics of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.

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    Carless, Melanie A; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers has revealed recurrent aberrations, the frequency of which is reflective of malignant potential. Highly aberrant karyotypes are seen in melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, Merkel cell carcinoma and cutaneous lymphomas with more stable karyotypes seen in basal cell carcinoma, keratoacanthoma, Bowen's disease and dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Some aberrations are common among a number of skin cancer types including rearrangements and numerical abnormalities of chromosome 1, -3p, +3q, partial or entire trisomy 6, trisomy 7, +8q, -9p, +9q, partial or entire loss of chromosome 10, -17p, +17q and partial or entire gain of chromosome 20. Combination of cytogenetic analysis with other molecular genetic techniques has enabled the identification of not only aberrant chromosomal regions, but also the genes that contribute to a malignant phenotype. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the pertinent cytogenetic aberrations associated with a variety of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers.

  12. Clinicopathological evaluation of nonmelanoma skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Adinarayan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, in combination, are referred to as nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs. NMSC is not as extensively studied in the Asian population as it is in the Caucasian population. Aim: This study sought to evaluate the clinical and histopathologic aspects of NMSC from cases of cutaneous malignancies. Materials and Methods: The present study is a descriptive analysis of NMSC specimens seen at Department of Pathology, SSIMS and RC, Davangere. Histologically diagnosed NMSC, i.e. BCC and SCC specimens from January 2005 to December 2009 were analyzed according to site distribution, risk factors and histological variants. Results: Of the various specimens received during the 5year study period, 60 were histologically categorized as skin malignancies, of which 31(51.6% cases were of NMSC. SCC was the most common NMSC constituting 26 (83.9% cases and 5 NMSC cases (16.1% were of BCC. The most common incidence was among the age group 60-80 years (80% for BCC and 40-60 years (50% for SCC. Head and neck was the most common site of presentation with predilection for face. Forty-six percent of SCC was histologically categorized as well differentiated, 42.3% as moderately differentiated and 11.5% as poorly differentiated. Most common histological variant of BCC was solid (nodular type. Conclusion: NMSC often associated with greater morbidity, necessitating increased efforts to assess risk factors in individuals, to encourage periodic self-examination and professional evaluation of skin and to optimize strategies for earlier diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Dermoscopy of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babino, G; Lallas, A; Longo, C; Moscarella, E; Alfano, R; Argenziano, G

    2015-10-01

    Skin cancer is a major health problem because of its high incidence in white populations, as well as its related potential morbidity and mortality. Dermoscopy is a noninvasive tool that allows the identification of specific morphological features in different skin tumors, improving significantly the early diagnosis of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). This tool has also gained increased interest in the management of NMSC therapy and in the post-treatment follow-up. In this article, we provide a review of the dermoscopic patterns and criteria for the diagnosis of melanoma and NMSC described until now in the literature.

  14. Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Risk of Non-Melanoma and Melanoma Skin Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzal, Shoaib; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bojesen, Stig E

    2013-01-01

    with increasing cumulative incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (trend P=2 × 10(-15) and P=3 × 10(-17)) and melanoma skin cancer (P=0.003 and P=0.001). Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios of non-melanoma skin cancer were 5.04 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.78-9.16) for 25-OH-vitD 50 vs. 60 years, 25-OH...

  15. Grenz ray-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frentz, G.

    1989-09-01

    In 28 patients, nonmelanoma skin cancers developed in areas previously exposed to grenz rays. In 17 patients who did not have psoriasis, no other relevant carcinogenic exposure could be incriminated. Women were more often affected than men. Most of the tumors were basal cell cancers, and most of the patients had multiple tumors. No threshold dose could be established. The distribution of the latency time among patients without psoriasis was strictly normal (median 18 years). These observations suggest that usual therapeutic doses of grenz rays, as a single agent, are capable of causing skin cancer, but only in those persons who are abnormally sensitive to x-rays. 9 references.

  16. The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberg, Anna Lei; Sølvsten, Henrik; Lei, Ulrikke; Vinding, Gabrielle Randskov; Stender, Ida Marie; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst; Vestergaard, Tine; Thormann, Henrik; Hædersdal, Merete; Dam, Tomas Norman; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database was established in 2008. The aim of this database was to collect data on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) treatment and improve its treatment in Denmark. NMSC is the most common malignancy in the western countries and represents a significant challenge in terms of public health management and health care costs. However, high-quality epidemiological and treatment data on NMSC are sparse. The NMSC database includes patients with the following skin tumors: basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, and keratoacanthoma diagnosed by the participating office-based dermatologists in Denmark. Clinical and histological diagnoses, BCC subtype, localization, size, skin cancer history, skin phototype, and evidence of metastases and treatment modality are the main variables in the NMSC database. Information on recurrence, cosmetic results, and complications are registered at two follow-up visits at 3 months (between 0 and 6 months) and 12 months (between 6 and 15 months) after treatment. In 2014, 11,522 patients with 17,575 tumors were registered in the database. Of tumors with a histological diagnosis, 13,571 were BCCs, 840 squamous cell carcinomas, 504 Bowen's disease, and 173 keratoakanthomas. The NMSC database encompasses detailed information on the type of tumor, a variety of prognostic factors, treatment modalities, and outcomes after treatment. The database has revealed that overall, the quality of care of NMSC in Danish dermatological clinics is high, and the database provides the necessary data for continuous quality assurance.

  17. Obesity as a risk factor for malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, K; Lindgren, T H; Koch, C A; Brodell, Robert T

    2016-09-01

    The dramatic increases in incidence of both obesity and many cancers including skin cancer emphasize the need to better understand the pathophysiology of both conditions and their connections. Melanoma is considered the fastest growing cancer and rates of non-melanoma skin cancer have also increased over the last decade. The molecular mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and skin cancer are not clearly understood but emerging evidence points to changes in the tumor microenvironment including aberrant cell signaling and genomic instability in the chronic inflammatory state many obese individuals experience. This article reviews the literature linking obesity to melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer.

  18. Heterogeneity in host risk factors for incident melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer in a cohort of US women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Abrar A; Zhang, Mingfeng; Han, Jiali

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are 3 types of skin cancer that have distinct biologic characteristics and prognoses. We evaluated phenotypic differences in the risk of these cancers in US women. We conducted a prospective study of 113 139 female nurses from 1984 to 2002. Over the 18 years of follow-up, there were 375 cases of melanoma, 495 cases of SCC, and 9423 cases of BCC. Women with melanoma were more likely to have a family history of melanoma (melanoma: RR 1.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36-2.76; SCC: RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.58-1.37; BCC: RR 1.49, 95% CI 1.38-1.62) and 6 or more moles on the left arm (melanoma: RR 3.66, 95% CI 2.15-6.24; SCC: RR 1.53, 95% CI 0.83-2.79; BCC: RR 1.48, 95% CI 1.28-1.72). Polytomous logistic regression analysis showed that age at diagnosis (P melanoma (P = 0.016), and number of moles on the left arm (P = 0.007) were significantly different across the 3 cancers. This prospective observational study demonstrated that known phenotypic factors for skin cancer have a differential impact on the risk of melanoma, SCC, and BCC.

  19. Non-invasive spectroscopic techniques in the diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakaki, E.; Sianoudis, IA; Zois, EN; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, AA; Dessinioti, C.; Stefanaki, E.; Stratigos, AJ; Antoniou, C.; Katsambas, A.; Christofidou, E.

    2017-11-01

    The number of non-melanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide and has become an important health and economic issue. Early detection and treatment of skin cancer can significantly improve patient outcome. Therefore there is an increase in the demand for proper management and effective non-invasive diagnostic modalities in order to avoid relapses or unnecessary treatments. Although the gold standard of diagnosis for non-melanoma skin cancers is biopsy followed by histopathology evaluation, optical non-invasive diagnostic tools have obtained increased attention. Emerging non-invasive or minimal invasive techniques with possible application in the diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancers include high-definition optical coherence tomography, fluorescence spectroscopy, oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry among others spectroscopic techniques. Our findings establish how those spectrometric techniques can be used to more rapidly and easily diagnose skin cancer in an accurate and automated manner in the clinic.

  20. Recurrence After Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chren, Mary-Margaret; Torres, Jeanette S.; Stuart, Sarah E.; Bertenthal, Daniel; Labrador, Remedios J.; Boscardin, W. John

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine long-term tumor recurrence rates after treatment of primary nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Data are currently insufficient to permit evidence-based choices among treatments for NMSC. Design Prospective study of an inception cohort observed for a median of 6.6 years after treatment. Setting Dermatology clinic at a Veterans Affairs hospital. Care was provided by dermatology resident or attending physicians. Patients Consecutive sample of all 495 patients with 616 primary NMSCs diagnosed in 1999 and 2000 and treated with electrodessication and curettage (ED&C), excision, or Mohs surgery. Follow-up was available for 608 tumors (99%). Main Outcome Measure Tumor recurrence, determined by medical record review, with validation by clinical examination. Results The mean age at diagnosis was 71 years; 97% were men. Overall, 127 tumors were treated with ED&C (20.9%); 309 with excision (50.8%); and 172 with Mohs surgery (28.3%). Over the course of the study, 21 tumors recurred (3.5% [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.2%–5.2%]): 2 after ED&C (1.6% [95% CI, 0.2%–5.6%]), 13 after excision (4.2% [95% CI, 2.2%–7.1%]), and 6 after Mohs surgery (3.5% [95% CI, 1.3%–7.4%]) Conclusions Recurrence of primary NMSC after treatment occurred in less than 5% of tumors. The recurrence rate after ED&C was lower than expected, and the recurrence rate after Mohs surgery was higher than expected. These findings may be related to the risk for recurrence in the treatment groups. PMID:21576572

  1. [Non-melanoma skin cancer during treatment with TNF inhibitors in psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lümig, P.P.M. van; Menting, S.P.; Reek, J.M.P.A. van den; Spuls, P.I.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Fransen, J.; Kievit, W.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate if there was a difference in time to the occurrence of first non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and in the incidence of NMSC between psoriasis patients and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients on TNF inhibitors. DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort study. METHOD: We compared

  2. Costs of illness for melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzen, Joan; Kjellberg, Jakob; Thorgaard, Camilla; Engholm, Gerda; Phillip, Anja; Storm, Hans H

    2013-11-01

    Incidences of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer are high and increasing in many countries including Denmark. The diseases are highly preventable. We have estimated the healthcare costs of these cancers by comparing costs for cohorts of patients and matched controls in a national register-based study in Denmark. All incident patients with a diagnosis of melanoma, basal cell carcinoma, or squamous cell carcinoma in the period 2004-2008 were included. Four control individuals for each case were matched in terms of sex, age, and area of residence. Healthcare costs and productivity loss for patients and controls were estimated using Danish health and social registries 3 years before and 3 years after diagnosis. The healthcare costs of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer were &OV0556;33.3 million in the 3-year period after diagnosis, with male patients inducing the highest costs for all three cancers and costs increasing with age. The diagnoses of basal cell carcinoma and melanoma had almost the same healthcare costs, but per patient average healthcare costs were higher for melanoma. The costs of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers, which can be prevented by sensible sun habits, exceed the costs of the preventive measures of the Danish SunSmart campaign manifold. Costs of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer are expected to increase in the future with populations aging in the western world. The analyses provide a strong argument for the societal rationale of skin cancer prevention in Denmark.

  3. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Matthey-Giè

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of lymph nodes in nonmelanoma skin cancer patients is currently still debated. Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, pigmented epithelioid melanocytoma (PEM, and other rare skin neoplasms have a well-known risk to spread to regional lymph nodes. The use of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB could be a promising procedure to assess this risk in clinically N0 patients. Metastatic SNs have been observed in 4.5–28% SCC (according to risk factors, in 9–42% MCC, and in 14–57% PEM. We observed overall 30.8% positive SNs in 13 consecutive patients operated for high-risk nonmelanoma skin cancer between 2002 and 2011 in our institution. These high rates support recommendation to implement SLNB for nonmelanoma skin cancer especially for SCC patients. Completion lymph node dissection following positive SNs is also a matter of discussion especially in PEM. It must be remembered that a definitive survival benefit of SLNB in melanoma patients has not been proven yet. However, because of its low morbidity when compared to empiric elective lymph node dissection or radiation therapy of lymphatic basins, SLNB has allowed sparing a lot of morbidity and could therefore be used in nonmelanoma skin cancer patients, even though a significant impact on survival has not been demonstrated.

  4. Study to determine whether intraoperative frozen section biopsy improves surgical treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer

    OpenAIRE

    NICOLETTI, GIOVANNI; BRENTA, FEDERICA; MALOVINI, ALBERTO; MUSUMARRA, GAETANO; SCEVOLA, SILVIA; FAGA, ANGELA

    2012-01-01

    Skin cancers are the most common types of cancer and their incidence has shown an increase of ∼4 to 8% per year over the last 40 years. The majority of skin cancers (∼97%) are non-melanoma skin cancers, mainly represented by basal cell (80%) and squamous cell carcinomas (20%). The use of intra-operative frozen section remains controversial in the surgical treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer, being commonly considered an optional tool, the reliability and effectiveness of which remain questi...

  5. Treatment Options for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... beds) over long periods of time. Having a fair complexion, which includes the following: Fair skin that freckles and burns easily, does not ... beds) over long periods of time. Having a fair complexion, which includes the following: Fair skin that ...

  6. [Ultrasound in the management of non-melanoma skin cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Ibáñez, C; Aguilar Bernier, M; de Troya Martín, M

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous ultrasound plays an important role in the study and management of non-melanoma skin cancer. Among other factors, this technique contributes to the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of these tumours, the establishment of their size and relation to neighbouring structures, the delimitation of surgical margins, and the detection of subclinical and recurrent lesions. The present article analyses the role of cutaneous ultrasound in the field of non-melanoma skin cancer (basal and squamous cell carcinomas, lymphomas and dermatofibrosarcoma) through a literature review. Copyright © 2015 Academia Española de Dermatología y Venereología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Viral oncogenesis and its role in nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tuttleton Arron, S

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, the contribution of viruses to cutaneous oncogenesis has steadily gained recognition. The archetype is human herpesvirus 8, which is well established as the causative agent in Kaposi sarcoma. Other viruses believed to play a role in nonmelanoma skin cancer include human papillomavirus and the recently described Merkel cell polyomavirus. We review the mechanisms by which these three viruses interact with the host cell, ultraviolet radiation and immunosuppression to result in carcinogenesis.

  8. Human papillomavirus and the incidence of nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancer using cervical conization as a surrogate marker: a nationwide population-based Danish cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen J; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Steiniche, Torben; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2015-04-01

    Human papillomavirus' (HPV's) role in skin cancer is controversial. To examine whether an individual is prone to develop a chronic oncogenic infection, we conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study of the risk of skin cancer after another HPV-related neoplasia-that is, cervical high-grade dysplasia or carcinoma-using cervical conization as a surrogate marker. Using Danish registries, we identified all women who underwent conization from 1978 to 2011 (n = 87,164) and followed them until first-time skin cancer diagnosis, death, emigration, or 31 December 2011, whichever came first. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and malignant melanoma (MM) according to national incidence rates. The 1-year absolute risks were 0.0012%, 0.045%, and 0.029% for SCC, BCC, and MM, respectively. Conization was clearly associated with increased incidence of SCC (SIR = 1.37; 95% CI: 1.13-1.65), but not MM (SIR = 1.00; 95% CI: 0.91-1.11). BCC risk was slightly increased (SIR = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.02-1.13). The association between conization and cutaneous SCC provides evidence for conization as a marker of underlying general susceptibility to oncogenic HPV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-melanoma skin cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy: a review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Durim Delishaj; Agata Rembielak; Bruno Manfredi; Stefano Ursino; Francesco Pasqualetti; Concetta Laliscia; Francesca Orlandi; Riccardo Morganti; Maria Grazia Fabrini; Fabiola Paiar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) has been increasing over the past 30 years. There are different treatment options and surgical excision is the most frequent treatment due to its low rates of recurrence. Radiotherapy is an effective alternative of surgery, and brachytherapy (BT) might be a better therapeutic option due to high radiation dose concentration to the tumor with rapid dose fall-off resulting in normal tissues sparing. The aim of this review was to evaluate...

  10. Combination Chemoprevention with Diclofenac, Calcipotriol and Difluoromethylornithine Inhibits Development of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: With increasing incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), focus on chemoprevention of this disease is growing. The aim of this study was to evaluate topical combination therapies as chemoprevention of UV radiation-induced tumors in a mouse model.......Background/Aim: With increasing incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), focus on chemoprevention of this disease is growing. The aim of this study was to evaluate topical combination therapies as chemoprevention of UV radiation-induced tumors in a mouse model....

  11. Non-Melanoma Skin Cancers of Pinna: Retrospective Assesment of 51 Cases

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    Sinem Çiloğlu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the demographic data, tumor types, relapse and recurrence rates of non-melanoma skin cancer cases of pinna. Methods: Pathological reports of our patients operated for non-melanoma skin cancer of head and neck region were scanned. Data of the patients with primary basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the pinna were retrospectively evaluated and age, gender, tumor location, tumor size, tumor type, tumor recurrence, lymph node involvement and metastasis of the patients were documented. Results: Out of the 535 patents who applied to our clinic for non-melanocytic skin cancer of head and neck region, 453 BCC and 179 SCC was excised. BCC/SCC ratio in the head and neck region was 3.5/1 tumors were resected from 51 patients who had pinna-located mass. BCC incidence in the pinna was 7%; SCC incidence was 14% in our patient population. Thirty three of the lesions (55.9% were BCC and 26 (44.1% were SCC. The BCC/SCC ratio in pinna was 1.3/1 and male/female ratio was determined as 16/1. Conclusion: We observed that non-melanoma skin cancer of pinna develops more frequently in male population and BCC is the most frequent tumor in this region.

  12. Updates on the Management of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer (NMSC

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    Artur Fahradyan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs are the most common malignancy worldwide, of which 99% are basal cell carcinomas (BCCs and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs of skin. NMSCs are generally considered a curable diseases, yet they currently pose an increasing global healthcare problem due to rising incidence. This has led to a shift in emphasis on prevention of NMSCs with development of various skin cancer prevention programs worldwide. This article aims to summarize the most recent changes and advances made in NMSC management with a focus on prevention, screening, diagnosis, and staging.

  13. Confocal microscopy patterns in nonmelanoma skin cancer and clinical applications.

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    González, S; Sánchez, V; González-Rodríguez, A; Parrado, C; Ullrich, M

    2014-06-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy is currently the most promising noninvasive diagnostic tool for studying cutaneous structures between the stratum corneum and the superficial reticular dermis. This tool gives real-time images parallel to the skin surface; the microscopic resolution is similar to that of conventional histology. Numerous studies have identified the main confocal features of various inflammatory skin diseases and tumors, demonstrating the good correlation of these features with certain dermatoscopic patterns and histologic findings. Confocal patterns and diagnostic algorithms have been shown to have high sensitivity and specificity in melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer. Possible present and future applications of this noninvasive technology are wide ranging and reach beyond its use in noninvasive diagnosis. This tool can also be used, for example, to evaluate dynamic skin processes that occur after UV exposure or to assess tumor response to noninvasive treatments such as photodynamic therapy. We explain the characteristic confocal features found in the main nonmelanoma skin tumors and discuss possible applications for this novel diagnostic technique in routine dermatology practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  14. Nonmelanoma skin cancer in the population of the city of Belgrade in the period 1999-2011

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    Videnović Goran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nonmelanoma skin cancers in the literature are mainly related to basal cell and squamous cell skin carcinoma. Objective. The aim of the study was to determine the trend in the incidence of histological types of nonmelanoma skin cancers in the population of the city of Belgrade from 1999 to 2011. Methods. From the Serbian National Cancer Registry we extracted all recorded cases of skin cancer in Belgrade from January 1st 1999 to December 31st 2011. Incidence rates were standardized by the method of direct standardization with the world population as the standard population. Trends and annual percentage change (APC of incidence rate were calculated by performing joinpoint regression analyses. Results. Incidence rate of nonmelanoma skin cancer showed significantly increasing trend between 1999 and 2006 with APC of 8.6% (95% CI: 5.6-11.7, basal cell carcinoma increased with APC of 8.4% (95% CI: 5.2-11.6 and squamous cell skin carcinoma with APC of 9.33% (95% CI: 5.7-13.1. The incidence increased with age for both men and women, especially after the age of 60. Conclusion. Our results showed a continuously increasing incidence trend of both basal cell and squamous cell skin carcinomas in the population of the city of Belgrade between 1999 and 2011. Adequate primary and secondary prevention would certainly be successful in reducing this type of cancer in the future.

  15. Study to determine whether intraoperative frozen section biopsy improves surgical treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Giovanni; Brenta, Federica; Malovini, Alberto; Musumarra, Gaetano; Scevola, Silvia; Faga, Angela

    2013-03-01

    Skin cancers are the most common types of cancer and their incidence has shown an increase of ∼4 to 8% per year over the last 40 years. The majority of skin cancers (∼97%) are non-melanoma skin cancers, mainly represented by basal cell (80%) and squamous cell carcinomas (20%). The use of intra-operative frozen section remains controversial in the surgical treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer, being commonly considered an optional tool, the reliability and effectiveness of which remain questionable. A large retrospective study was conducted to examine 670 surgical excisions of non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck in 481 patients over a period of nine years, between May, 2002 and December, 2011, at the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit of the University of Pavia, Salvatore Maugeri Research and Care Institute, Pavia, Italy. Results demonstrated the paradoxical ineffectiveness of an intra-operative frozen section biopsy in pursuing higher rates of radical excision in non-melanoma skin cancers. Nevertheless, a more detailed analysis on the use of frozen sections focusing on the various anatomical sites of the body demonstrated a reverse trend in the eyelids and canthi, where a higher success rate (87.50 vs. 69.77%) in the surgical treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers was obtained with the use of an intra-operative frozen section biopsy. Results of the present study suggested that intra-operative frozen section biopsy be routinely used in the surgical treatment of nonmelanoma skin tumors involving the eyelids and canthi.

  16. Combination chemoprevention with diclofenac, calcipotriol and difluoromethylornithine inhibits development of non-melanoma skin cancer in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: With increasing incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), focus on chemoprevention of this disease is growing. The aim of this study was to evaluate topical combination therapies as chemoprevention of UV radiation-induced tumors in a mouse model....

  17. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancer: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Shoaib; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bojesen, Stig E

    2013-03-01

    Sun exposure is a major risk factor for skin cancer and is also an important source of vitamin D. We tested the hypothesis that elevated plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-vitD) associates with increased risk of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancer in the general population. We measured plasma 25-OH-vitD in 10,060 white individuals from the Danish general population. During 28 years of follow-up, 590 individuals developed non-melanoma skin cancer and 78 developed melanoma skin cancer. Increasing 25-OH-vitD levels, by clinical categories or by seasonally adjusted tertiles, were associated with increasing cumulative incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (trend P=2 × 10(-15) and P=3 × 10(-17)) and melanoma skin cancer (P=0.003 and P=0.001). Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios of non-melanoma skin cancer were 5.04 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.78-9.16) for 25-OH-vitD ≥50 vs. melanoma skin cancer were 4.7 (0.96-23.3) for 25-OH-vitD ≥50 vs. melanoma skin cancer and 1.5% for melanoma skin cancer, in participants with age >60 years, 25-OH-vitD winter levels ≥50 nmol  l(-1), and performing outdoor exercise. In conclusion, we show that increasing levels of 25-OH-vitD are associated with increased risk of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancer.

  18. Lifetime prevalence of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancer in Australian recreational and competitive surfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climstein, Mike; Furness, James; Hing, Wayne; Walsh, Joe

    2016-07-01

    Surfing is one of the most popular outdoor aquatic activities in Australia with an estimated 2.7 million recreational surfers; however, Australia has long been recognized as having the highest incidence of melanoma in the world, and it is the most common type of cancer in young Australians. The aim of this study was to investigate the lifetime prevalence of non-melanoma [basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)] and melanoma skin cancers in Australian recreational and competitive surfers. Australian surfers were invited to complete an online surveillance survey to determine the lifetime prevalence of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. A total of 1348 surfers (56.9% recreational) participated in this study, of which 184 surfers reported a skin cancer (competitive n = 96, recreational n = 87). Of non-melanoma and melanoma cancers reported, BCC was the most common (6.8%), followed by melanoma (1.4%) and SCC (0.6%). The relative risk was higher (P skin cancers reported on the face (23.5%), back (16.4%) and arms (12.4%). There were significant trends (P skin cancers between competitive and recreational surfers, as well as significantly (P skin cancers reported in males (14.6%) than females (9.4%). Based upon these findings, individuals who surf are advised to regularly utilize sun protection strategies (avoid peak ultraviolet radiation (10 am-3 pm), rashvest, hat and sunscreen) and primary care physicians are recommended to regularly screen their patients who surf. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Canada Chapter 2: Primary Prevention of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Kirk; Searles, Gordon E; Vender, Ronald; Teoh, Hwee; Ashkenas, John

    2015-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal and squamous cell carcinoma (BCC and SCC), represents the most common malignancy. To provide guidance to Canadian health care practitioners regarding primary prevention of NMSC. Structured literature searches were conducted, using search terms including prevention, sunscreen, and sun prevention factor. All recommendations concern guidance that physicians should regularly discuss with their patients to help establish photoprotection habits. The GRADE system was used to assign strength to each recommendation. Ultraviolet exposure is the major modifiable risk factor for NMSC. Aspects of photoprotection, including effective sunscreen use and avoidance of both the midday sun and artificial tanning, are discussed. Several widespread misunderstandings that undermine responsible public health measures related to sun safety are addressed. Photoprotection represents both an individual priority and a public health imperative. By providing accurate information during routine patient visits, physicians reinforce the need for ongoing skin cancer prevention. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Tumor Suppressor Function of CYLD in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

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    K. C. Masoumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-related proteins posttranslationally modify substrates, and thereby alter the functions of their targets. The ubiquitination process is involved in various physiological responses, and dysregulation of components of the ubiquitin system has been linked to many diseases including skin cancer. The ubiquitin pathways activated among skin cancers are highly diverse and may reflect the various characteristics of the cancer type. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, the most common types of human skin cancer, are instances where the involvement of the deubiquitination enzyme CYLD has been recently highlighted. In basal cell carcinoma, the tumor suppressor protein CYLD is repressed at the transcriptional levels through hedgehog signaling pathway. Downregulation of CYLD in basal cell carcinoma was also shown to interfere with TrkC expression and signaling, thereby promoting cancer progression. By contrast, the level of CYLD is unchanged in squamous cell carcinoma, instead, catalytic inactivation of CYLD in the skin has been linked to the development of squamous cell carcinoma. This paper will focus on the current knowledge that links CYLD to nonmelanoma skin cancers and will explore recent insights regarding CYLD regulation of NF-κB and hedgehog signaling during the development and progression of these types of human tumors.

  1. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Serum Levels in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

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    Saverio Latteri

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA is a glycoprotein, which is present in the foetal colon, some benign conditions and different malignancies, particularly in colon adenocarcinoma. We focused this study on non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC. NMSC is a common malignancy and it is an important source of morbidity and death in the world. In this study we evaluated whether CEA level increases in NMSC. Patients and Methods: A total of 566 patients with non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC were enrolled; 286 patients with NMSC showed CEA levels above normal values, and 280 showed CEA levels below normal values. Patients with high levels of CEA underwent abdominal ultrasound, gastro endoscopy, colonoscopy, and abdominal CT scans. Results: We studied 566 patients, 286 were positive to CEA and 280 were negative. Of the 286 patients positive to CEA, 132 had basal cell carcinoma (64 patients had an associated cancer and 154 had squamous cell carcinoma (75 patients were affected by cancer. Of the 280 patients negative to CEA, 130 had basal cell carcinoma (12 were associated with cancer, and 150 had squamous cell carcinoma (18 were associated with cancer. The mean age of the 566 case control subjects were 65–81 years. Of the 10 subjects that were the positive control for CEA, two had cancer. Of the 556 subjects that were the negative control for CEA, three had cancer. Conclusions: In patients that present high serum levels of CEA, we give attention to adenocarcinoma tumour first. The pattern of association may be attributable to bias because the group with NMSC were frequently evaluated than those with no history of NMSC. Our results showed that out of 286 patients that were CEA-positive, 139 had cancer, and of the 280 that were CEA-negative, 30 had cancer. Therefore, 20% of patients do not follow the trend. Other markers should be investigated.

  2. Skin Cancer Risk (Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers/Melanoma) in Vitiligo Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    The relative genetic and immune protection against melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers in those with vitiligo is reassuring. The results of recent studies allow us to be cautiously optimistic when discussing the risk of skin cancer caused by therapeutic exposure to narrow-band ultraviolet B light. However, we should continue to recommend sun protection at all other times to avoid burning in vitiliginous skin and to decrease incidental ultraviolet exposure. It is also important to perform full skin checks regularly in light of the prolonged courses of phototherapy required to repigment vitiliginous skin and maintain repigmentation thereafter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diet and Skin Cancer: The Potential Role of Dietary Antioxidants in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Katta, Rajani; Brown, Danielle Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer among Americans. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure is the major risk factor for the development of NMSC. Dietary AOs may prevent free radical-mediated DNA damage and tumorigenesis secondary to UV radiation. Numerous laboratory studies have found that certain dietary AOs show significant promise in skin cancer prevention. These results have been substantiated by animal studies. In human studies, researchers have evaluated both oral AO...

  4. mTHPC Mediated, Systemic Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers : Case and Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, Rudolf K.; Terra, Jorrit B.; Witjes, Max J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Patients with multiple nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), like immunosuppressed or nevoid basal cell carcinomas, offer a therapeutic challenge. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using the systemic photosensitizer meta-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC) has the ability to treat

  5. Anatomy of the Skin and the Pathogenesis of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losquadro, William D

    2017-08-01

    Skin is composed of the epidermis, dermis, and adnexal structures. The epidermis is composed of 4 layers-the stratums basale, spinosum, granulosum, and corneum. The dermis is divided into a superficial papillary dermis and deeper reticular dermis. Collagen and elastin within the reticular dermis are responsible for skin tensile strength and elasticity, respectively. The 2 most common kinds of nonmelanoma skin cancers are basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma. Both are caused by a host of environmental and genetic factors, although UV light exposure is the single greatest predisposing factor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Photodynamic Therapy and Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liezel L. Griffin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most common malignancy among the Caucasian population. Photodynamic therapy (PDT is gaining popularity for the treatment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC, Bowen’s disease (BD and actinic keratosis (AK. A topical or systemic exogenous photosensitiser, results in selective uptake by malignant cells. Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX is produced then activated by the introduction of a light source. Daylight-mediated MAL (methyl aminolaevulinate PDT for AKs has the advantage of decreased pain and better patient tolerance. PDT is an effective treatment for superficial BCC, BD and both individual and field treatment of AKs. Excellent cosmesis can be achieved with high patient satisfaction. Variable results have been reported for nodular BCC, with improved outcomes following pretreatment and repeated PDT cycles. The more aggressive basisquamous, morphoeic infiltrating subtypes of BCC and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC are not suitable for PDT. Prevention of “field cancerization” in organ transplant recipients on long-term immunosuppression and patients with Gorlin syndrome (naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is a promising development. The optimisation of PDT techniques with improved photosensitiser delivery to target tissues, new generation photosensitisers and novel light sources may expand the future role of PDT in NMSC management.

  7. Risk of multiple primary cancers following melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracci, F; Fabrizi, V; D'Alò, D; La Rosa, F; Papini, M

    2012-11-01

    The relationship between cutaneous malignancies and successive primary cancers has been studied since several years, but it still remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the excess risk of multiple primary cancer among the population of Umbria, Italy, that survived a skin cancer. The data registered in the Umbrian Population Cancer Registry from 1994 to 2006 were collected, recorded, and analysed in accordance to the standard methods recommended for cancer registries. Among skin cancer patients, those with multiple cutaneous and non-cutaneous cancers were selected. Only sites with a frequency of more than five cases were considered. The expected number of cases was obtained from indirect standardization with regional incidence rates in several sites that incurred in the overall period. The significance of the observed/expected ratios and the corresponding 95% CI were based on the Poisson distribution. In men, a significant standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was found for melanoma (2.21), non-melanoma skin cancers (1.86), Hodgkin's (4.95) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (1.82), and tongue/mouth cancer (2.47). In women, melanoma, non-melanoma skin and breast cancer showed a significant high SIRs (4.13, 1.55 and 1.28 respectively). All other cancers showed a non-significant SIR. Considering all sites combined and all sites except skin cancers, the analysis showed a significant excess in men, whereas a significant risk was observed in women only when also skin cancers were considered. Data from the whole of Umbrian population revealed that skin cancer patients experience marked excess risk of further primary cancers. The main risk in both genders is skin melanoma and other skin cancers. The excess of lymphomas and tongue/mouth cancers is also significant in men, and breast cancer in women. These observations prompt us to include a screening for these cancers in the follow-up of our patients surviving a skin malignancy. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the

  8. [Skin cancer incidence in Zacatecas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo-Vega, José Luis; Castañeda-López, Rosalba; Dávila-Rangel, J Ignacio; Mireles-García, Fernando; Ríos-Martínez, Carlos; López-Saucedo, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most frequent cancer related to ultraviolet radiation. The aim was to estimate the incidence of skin cancer type, melanoma and non-melanoma in Zacatecas, Mexico. An epidemiological study was carried out during the period from 2008 to 2012. The data were obtained from the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE), Secretaría de Salud de Zacatecas (SSZ) and a private source, the Centro Médico Alameda. The incidence and the global prevalence were estimated. We studied 958 skin cancer cases, histopathologically confirmed. The cases were distributed as: 63.6 % basal cell carcinomas, 25.8 % squamous cell carcinomas, and 10.6 % melanoma. Significantly higher proportions were observed in women in the basal cell carcinomas (60.4 %) and squamous cell carcinomas (53.4 %). However, in the case of melanoma, the major proportion was observed in men (55.9 %). The more frequent skin cancer location was the face and for basal cell carcinoma was the nose (53 %); for squamous cell carcinomas were the lips (36 %), and for melanoma it was also the nose (40 %). The skin cancer incidence was estimated in 20 cases for each 100 000 inhabitants. Linear regression analysis showed that the skin cancer is increasing at an annual rate of 10.5 %. The anatomical location indicates that solar UV radiation is a risk factor, since the face is the zone with major exposure to solar radiation.

  9. Statin use and risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnspang, S.; Pottegård, A.; Friis, Søren

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence is conflicting regarding statin use and risk of basal cell (BCC) and squamous cell skin cancer (SCC). METHODS: Using Danish nationwide registries, we identified all patients with incident BCC/SCC during 2005-2009 and matched them to population controls. We computed odds ratios...

  10. Role of COX-2 activity and CRP levels in patients with non-melanoma skin cancer. -765G>C PTGS2 polymorphism and NMSC risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocoş, Relu; Schipor, Sorina; Nicolae, Ilinca; Thomescu, Cecilia; Raicu, Florina

    2012-07-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is one of the most common of all cancers and the incidence has increased in the last years as a result of many factors including increased tanning, life style and possible global climate change. Inflammation plays an important role in cancer development and is frequently evaluated by serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. PTGS2 -765C allele coding for COX-2 has been found to be associated with lower plasma levels of CRP. The objectives of this study are: evaluation of the association between PTGS2 -765G>C polymorphism and the occurrence of non-melanoma skin cancer, the relationship between this polymorphism and cyclooxygenase-2 activity in skin tissue, as well as the correlation with serum CRP levels in patients with non-melanoma skin cancer. We used PCR-RFLP technique to explore -765G>C PTGS2 gene polymorphism, colorimetric analysis for cyclooxygenase-2 activity in skin tissue and immunoturbidimetric assay for CRP serum levels in 174 patients with non-melanoma skin cancer [54 patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and 120 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)] and 80 healthy subjects. PTGS2 -765G>C polymorphism failed to show an association with non-melanoma skin cancer risk. We observed a significant increase in COX-2 activity in SCC and BCC patients compared to control tissue (0.58 ± 0.11 and 0.63 ± 0.09 U/mg protein, respectively vs. 0.16 ± 0.01 U/mg protein). BCC and SCC intra-group analysis showed lower COX-2 activity in C-allele carriers versus non-carriers (p C polymorphism failed to show an association with non-melanoma skin cancer risk. Regarding prognostic indicators, no consistent association emerged between PTGS2 -765G>C polymorphism and COX-2 activity or CRP levels.

  11. The barrier function of organotypic non-melanoma skin cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoschke, Christian; Ulrich, Martina; Sochorová, Michaela; Wolff, Christopher; Vávrová, Kateřina; Ma, Nan; Ulrich, Claas; Brandner, Johanna M; Schäfer-Korting, Monika

    2016-07-10

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most frequent human cancer with continuously rising incidences worldwide. Herein, we investigated the molecular basis for the impaired skin barrier function of organotypic NMSC models. We unraveled disturbed epidermal differentiation by reflectance confocal microscopy and histopathological evaluation. While the presence of claudin-4 and occludin were distinctly reduced, zonula occludens protein-1 was more wide-spread, and claudin-1 was heterogeneously distributed within the NMSC models compared with normal reconstructed human skin. Moreover, the cancer altered stratum corneum lipid packing and profile with decreased cholesterol content, increased phospholipid amount, and altered ceramide subclasses. These alterations contributed to increased surface pH and to 1.5 to 2.6-fold enhanced caffeine permeability of the NMSC models. Three topical applications of ingenol mebutate gel (0.015%) caused abundant epidermal cell necrosis, decreased Ki-67 indices, and increased lactate dehydrogenase activity. Taken together, our study provides new biological insights into the microenvironment of organotypic NMSC models, improves the understanding of the disease model by revealing causes for impaired skin barrier function in NMSC models at the molecular level, and fosters human cell-based approaches in preclinical drug evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Decreased risk of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer in patients with vitiligo: a survey among 1307 patients and their partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teulings, H. E.; Overkamp, M.; Ceylan, E.; Nieuweboer-Krobotova, L.; Bos, J. D.; Nijsten, T.; Wolkerstorfer, A. W.; Luiten, R. M.; van der Veen, J. P. W.

    2013-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common skin disease characterized by autoimmune melanocyte destruction. Recent genetic studies suggest a lower susceptibility to melanoma in patients with vitiligo; however, lifetime melanoma prevalence in patients with vitiligo has not previously been studied. Nonmelanoma skin cancer

  13. Risk factors for non-melanoma skin cancer in patients with essential thrombocythemia and polycythemia vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Montse; Guillem, Vicent; Pereira, Arturo; Ferrer-Marín, Francisca; Álvarez-Larrán, Alberto; Kerguelen, Ana; Estrada, Natàlia; Martínez-López, Joaquín; Angona, Anna; Amat, Paula; Navarro, Blanca; Besses, Carles; Hernández-Boluda, Juan-Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Population-based studies have reported an increased incidence of skin cancer in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) and polycythemia vera (PV). We have examined the risk factors for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in patients diagnosed with ET or PV during 1973-2012. A case-control study was performed to compare the clinical and treatment-related data of 51 ET/PV patients who had NMSC with that of 401 patients who did not. We also evaluated whether polymorphisms in 12 genes involved in DNA integrity predisposed to NMSC. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, risk factors for NMSC were older age (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.3-2.1, P factors independently associated with increased cumulative incidence of NMSC were age (5% increased risk per year; P risk; P = 0.022), and hydroxycarbamide exposure (22% increased risk; P = 0.065). No susceptibility gene variant was identified. These findings suggest that the risk to develop NMSC in ET/PV patients results from the combined effect of common risk factors (age, male sex) together with cytoreductive treatment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Non-melanoma skin cancer: what drives tumor development and progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukamp, Petra

    2005-10-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer, i.e. basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most frequent tumors and their number is still increasing worldwide. Furthermore, immunosuppression in organ transplant patients strongly contributes to the increase in skin cancer incidence--being 65-250 times more frequent than in the general population. Often these patients suffer from a second and third lesion and the severity of these tumors is linked to their number. SCCs in transplant recipients also appear to be more aggressive. They tend to grow rapidly, show a higher rate of local recurrences and metastasize in 5-8% of the patients (all reviewed in Ref. 2). This largely differs from BCCs which are more frequent in the general population--at a ratio of 4:1 as compared with SCCs--but the number is only increased by a factor of 10 in transplant recipients. This may suggest that 'dormant' SCC precursor cells/lesions are present at a high frequency in the population but they are well controlled by the immune system. BCC, on the other hand, may be less dependent on immune surveillance thereby underlining its different etiology. While for BCC development the genetic hallmark is abrogation of the ptch-sonic hedgehog pathway, little is known about the causal alterations of SCCs. However, the complexity of the genetic alterations (numerical and structural aberration profiles) in SCCs argues for several levels of genomic instability involved in the generation and progression of skin cancer.

  15. Clinical study of noninvasive in vivo melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers using multimodal spectral diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Liang; Nichols, Brandon; Migden, Michael R.; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Markey, Mia K.; Ross, Merrick I.; Tunnell, James W.

    2014-11-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the diagnostic capability of a multimodal spectral diagnosis (SD) for in vivo noninvasive disease diagnosis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. We acquired reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectra from 137 lesions in 76 patients using custom-built optical fiber-based clinical systems. Biopsies of lesions were classified using standard histopathology as malignant melanoma (MM), nonmelanoma pigmented lesion (PL), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), actinic keratosis (AK), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Spectral data were analyzed using principal component analysis. Using multiple diagnostically relevant principal components, we built leave-one-out logistic regression classifiers. Classification results were compared with histopathology of the lesion. Sensitivity/specificity for classifying MM versus PL (12 versus 17 lesions) was 100%;/100%;, for SCC and BCC versus AK (57 versus 14 lesions) was 95%;/71%, and for AK and SCC and BCC versus normal skin (71 versus 71 lesions) was 90%/85%. The best classification for nonmelanoma skin cancers required multiple modalities; however, the best melanoma classification occurred with Raman spectroscopy alone. The high diagnostic accuracy for classifying both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer lesions demonstrates the potential for SD as a clinical diagnostic device.

  16. Nonmelanoma skin cancer risk awareness in azathioprine-treated myasthenia gravis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGurgan, Iain J

    2015-10-01

    Increased rates of NMSC (nonmelanoma skin cancer) have recently been reported in people with MG (myasthenia gravis) receiving azathioprine treatment. Guidelines on azathioprine for patients with dermatological and gastrointestinal disorders stress the importance of NMSC risk awareness and prevention. The aim of this study is to assess whether MG patients are being informed of this risk.

  17. Total body topical 5-fluorouracil for extensive non-melanoma skin cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ruth, Serge; Jansman, Frank G. A.; Sanders, Cornelis J.

    Background Topical 5-fluorouracil 5% cream is one of the treatment modalities for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). There is a lack of suitable therapies to treat patients with extensive NMSC. In this paper we report two patients with extensive NMSC treated by total body application of topical

  18. Chronic diseases requiring hospitalization and risk of non-melanoma skin cancers-A population based study from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Ø; Olesen, Anne B; Dethlefsen, Claus

    2008-01-01

    We examined the associations between chronic diseases requiring hospitalization and the risk of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) in a population-based case-control study of 4,187 patients diagnosed with a first primary NMSC in 1995 in Denmark. From the National Patient Registry covering all Danish...... incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Although no overall association was found between basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and hospitalization for chronic diseases, an elevated IRR for BCC was found among patients with connective tissue disease (IRR 1.34 (95% CI: 0.99-1.82)), transplants...

  19. The burden of non-melanoma skin cancers in Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondicherry, Ashwini; Martin, Richard; Meredith, Ineke; Rolfe, Jack; Emanuel, Patrick; Elwood, Mark

    2018-01-19

    As the New Zealand Cancer Registry does not require mandatory reporting of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC), basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), the clinical burden of these diseases is unknown. A retrospective review of all patients with histopathology performed allowed us to estimate invasive BCC and SCC in the Auckland region in 2008 (population 1.44 million). During this period, a total of 21 236 NMSC were diagnosed among 13 996 patients, consisting of 5611 SCC lesions (26%) and 15 525 (74%) BCC. The Auckland incidence rates per 100 000 were 425 for SCC and 1177 for BCC. The overall rate of NMSC per 100 000 was 1906.5 (standardised to the census data of Australia 2001); 1385 for BCC and 522 for SCC. Using published data on incidence trends and population growth, we estimate that 29 000-33 000 NMSC would have been excised in Auckland in 2016, and 78 000-87 000 in New Zealand. Auckland has the highest reported incidence of invasive NMSC in the world. We believe that high-risk cutaneous SCC and complex BCC should be recorded. Our study provides information for clinicians and health economists on the scale of the problem. © 2018 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  20. Non-melanoma skin cancer: occupational risk from UV light and arsenic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdu, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) has a significant impact on public health and health care costs as a result of high morbidity and disfigurement due to the destruction of surrounding tissues. Although the mortality rates of these tumors are low, the high incidence rates determine a considerable number of deaths. NMSC is the most common type of skin cancer, representing about 1/3 of all malignancies diagnosed worldwide each year. The most common NMSC are basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Studies on humans and experimental animals indicate that ultraviolet (UV) light and arsenic play important roles in the development of these skin malignancies. Several epidemiological studies have investigated the risk of developing NMSC and the potential link between exposure to sunlight and arsenic in the agricultural and industrial occupational settings. To date, the published literature suggests that there is no apparent skin cancer risk as regards workplace exposure to artificial UV light or arsenic. Concerning UV light from sun exposure at the workplace, most published studies indicated an elevated risk for SCC, but are less conclusive for BCC. Many of these studies are limited by the methodology used in the evaluation of occupational exposure and the lack of adjustment for major confounders. Therefore, further epidemiological studies are required to focus on exposure assessment at the individual level as well as potential interactions with other occupational and non-occupational exposures and individual susceptibility. In doing so, we can better quantify the true risk of skin cancer in exposed workers and inform effective public health prevention programs.

  1. Human Papillomaviruses and Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer: Basic Virology and Clinical Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Nindl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPV infect cutaneous and mucosal epithelia and induce benign and malignant lesions. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC, encompassing basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, is the most frequent cancer in the Caucasian population, and the incidence has increased dramatically worldwide. Ultraviolet (UV radiation is a major risk factor for NMSC, and cutaneous HPV is also considered to play an active role during the pathogenesis of these cancers. The first evidence for the involvement of HPV in NMSC was reported in patients with Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV. HPV types detected in skin tumours of these patients are referred to as EV/cutaneous HPV types belonging to the beta- and gamma-papillomaviruses (PV. Epidemiological studies have shown a higher risk of several EV/cutaneous HPV types for NMSC. Furthermore, in vitro and animal models show transforming properties of some PV types. The anti-apoptotic activities, and the delay of DNA repair mechanism caused by some EV/cutaneous HPV E6 proteins in response to UV-induced mutations, may lead to the persistence of DNA-damaged keratinocytes. Thus, specific EV/cutaneous HPV types as co-factors in association with UV-radiation and the immune system seem to be involved in the early pathogenesis of cutaneous SCC.

  2. Assessment of Patients Who Underwent Nasal Reconstruction After Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Hakan; Bitik, Ozan; Kamburoğlu, Haldun Onuralp; Dadaci, Mehmet; Çaliş, Mert; Öcal, Engin

    2015-06-01

    Basal and squamous cell carcinomas are the most common malignant cutaneous lesions affecting the nose. With the rising incidence of skin cancers, plastic surgeons increasingly face nasal reconstruction challenges. Although multiple options exist, optimal results are obtained when "like is used to repair like". We aimed to introduce a simple algorithm for the reconstruction of nasal defects with local flaps, realizing that there is always more than one option for reconstruction. We retrospectively reviewed 163 patients who underwent nasal reconstruction after excision of non-melanoma skin cancer between March 2011 and April 2014. We analyzed the location of the defects and correlated them with the techniques used to reconstruct them. There were 66 males and 97 females (age, 21-98 years). Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed in 121 patients and squamous cell carcinoma in 42. After tumor excision, all the defects were immediately closed by either primary closure or local flap options such as Limberg, Miter, glabellar, bilobed, nasolabial, V-Y advancement, and forehead flaps. Obtaining tumor-free borders and a pleasing aesthetic result are major concerns in nasal reconstruction. Defect reconstruction and cosmesis are as important as rapid recovery and quick return to normal daily activities, and these should be considered before performing any procedure, particularly in elderly patients.

  3. Combined Treatments with Photodynamic Therapy for Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Silvia Rocío; Salazar, Nerea; Gracia-Cazaña, Tamara; Zamarrón, Alicia; González, Salvador; Juarranz, Ángeles; Gilaberte, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common form of cancer in the Caucasian population. Among NMSC types, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has the highest incidence and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is less common although it can metastasize, accounting for the majority of NMSC-related deaths. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and non-surgical modalities. Even though surgical approaches are most commonly used to treat these lesions, Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) has the advantage of being a non-invasive option, and capable of field treatment, providing optimum cosmetic outcomes. Numerous clinical research studies have shown the efficacy of PDT for treating pre-malignant and malignant NMSC. However, resistant or recurrent tumors appear and sometimes become more aggressive. In this sense, the enhancement of PDT effectiveness by combining it with other therapeutic modalities has become an interesting field in NMSC research. Depending on the characteristics and the type of tumor, PDT can be applied in combination with immunomodulatory (Imiquimod) and chemotherapeutic (5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, diclofenac, or ingenol mebutate) agents, inhibitors of some molecules implicated in the carcinogenic process (COX2 or MAPK), surgical techniques, or even radiotherapy. These new strategies open the way to a wider improvement of the prevention and eradication of skin cancer. PMID:26516853

  4. The relevance of piroxicam for the prevention and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer and its precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campione, Elena; Paternò, Evelin Jasmine; Candi, Eleonora; Falconi, Mattia; Costanza, Gaetana; Diluvio, Laura; Terrinoni, Alessandro; Bianchi, Luca; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Piroxicam (PXM), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is an enolic benzothiazine and a potent member of the oxicam series. The drug suppresses the synthesis of proinflammatory enzymes, such as cyclo-oxygenases-1 and -2 (COX-1 and 2), downregulates the production of prostaglandins (PGs) and tromboxanes, and inhibits polyamines production by blocking ornithine decarboxylase induction involved in nonmelanoma skin carcinogenesis. In addition, PXM is able to induce tumor cell apoptosis and suppresses metalloproteinase 2 activities. Skin carcinogenesis is a multistep process in which the accumulation of genetic events leads to a gradually dysplastic cellular expression, deregulation of cell growth, and carcinomatous progression. COX-1 upregulation plays a significant role in PG and vascular epidermal growth factor production supporting tumor growth. Increased level of PGs in premalignant and/or malignant cutaneous tumors is also favored by upregulation of COX-2 and downregulation of the tumor suppressor gene 15-hydroxy-prostaglandin dehydrogenase. Chemoprevention can be a hopeful approach to inhibit carcinoma occurrence before an invasive tumor develops. The chemopreventive effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on nonmelanoma skin cancers has been established. In this study, we highlighted the different modalities of action of PXM on the pathogenesis of nonmelanoma skin cancer, analyzing and evaluating binding modes and energies between COX-1 or COX-2 and PXM by protein-ligand molecular docking. Our clinical experience about the local use of PXM on actinic keratoses and field cancerization is also reported, confirming its efficacy as target therapy.

  5. Towards a more specific therapy: targeting nonmelanoma skin cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeimies, R M; Karrer, S

    2006-05-01

    Epithelial cancers of the skin, e.g. basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are the most common tumours in humans with increasing incidence. Hence the development of new therapeutic strategies is of utmost interest. For many years the most often used conventional therapies for these diseases were surgical procedures such as curettage and electrodesiccation, excision or, with so far the best outcome in terms of remission rates, micrographic surgery. Other ablative treatment modalities are cryotherapy, radiation therapy or the use of lasers (Er:YAG, CO(2)). All those above-mentioned treatments have in common that they are quite unspecific and do not target the tumour itself or its environment, thus leading to unwanted effects in the surrounding tissue such as scar formation or other cosmetically disfiguring events. Therefore, the development of novel, more pathogenesis-based therapies such as the use of retinoids, cyclooxygenase inhibitors, topical immunomodulators, inhibitors of the sonic-hedgehog signalling pathway or photodynamic therapy are challenging new approaches.

  6. Non-melanoma skin cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy: a review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durim Delishaj

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC has been increasing over the past 30 years. There are different treatment options and surgical excision is the most frequent treatment due to its low rates of recurrence. Radiotherapy is an effective alternative of surgery, and brachytherapy (BT might be a better therapeutic option due to high radiation dose concentration to the tumor with rapid dose fall-off resulting in normal tissues sparing. The aim of this review was to evaluate the local control, toxicity, and cosmetic outcomes in NMSC treated with high-dose-rate BT (HDR-BT. Material and methods: In May 2016, a systematic search of bibliographic database of PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Cochrane Library with a combination of key words of “skin cancer”, “high dose rate brachytherapy”, “squamous cell carcinoma”, “basal cell carcinoma”, and “non melanoma skin cancer“ was performed. In this systematic review, we included randomized trials, non-randomized trials, prospective and retrospective studies in patients affected by NMSC treated with HDR-BT. Results: Our searches generated a total of 85 results, and through a process of screening, 10 publications were selected for the review. Brachytherapy was well tolerated with acceptable toxicity and high local control rates (median: 97%. Cosmetic outcome was reported in seven study and consisted in an excellent and good cosmetic results in 94.8% of cases. Conclusions : Based on the review data, we can conclude that the treatment of NMSC with HDR-BT is effective with excellent and good cosmetics results, even in elderly patients. The hypofractionated course appears effective with very good local disease control. More data with large-scale randomized controlled trials are needed to assess the efficacy and safety of brachytherapy.

  7. Risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in myasthenia patients treated with azathioprine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, E G; Pottegård, A; Hallas, J

    2014-01-01

    The association between use of azathioprine and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in patients with myasthenia was evaluated in a nationwide setting. Treatment of autoimmune myasthenia frequently involves long-term exposure to immunosuppressants, including azathioprine. Use of azathioprine i...... increases the risk of NMSC in organ recipients and probably also in patients with other autoimmune disorders. No previous study has specifically investigated the risk of NMSC in myasthenia patients treated with azathioprine.......The association between use of azathioprine and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in patients with myasthenia was evaluated in a nationwide setting. Treatment of autoimmune myasthenia frequently involves long-term exposure to immunosuppressants, including azathioprine. Use of azathioprine...

  8. Predictors of recurrence after radiotherapy for non-melanoma skin cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, L.; Breen, D.; Zhang, L.; Balogh, J.; Czarnota, G.; Lee, J.; Tsao, M.N.; Barnes, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Predictive factors of recurrence were examined in 448 non-melanoma skin cancers (72% basal cell carcinoma, 28% squamous cell carcinoma) treated with radiotherapy. The overall recurrence rate was 15.8% at a median follow-up of 18.4 months. In multivariate analysis, significant factors for recurrence were age (p = 0.0197), tumour size 2 cm or greater (p = 0.0095), immunosuppression (p = 0.0082), and treatment modality (p = 0.0009).

  9. Topical Treatment with Diclofenac, Calcipotriol (Vitamin-D3 Analog) and Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) Does Not Prevent Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, H C; Burcharth, J; Rosenberg, J

    2013-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer is a common cancer type with increasing incidence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate topical application of diclofenac, calcipotriol, and difluoromethylornithine as chemoprevention in a mouse model of ultraviolet light-induced skin tumors, since these agents have...... been reported to have tumor inhibiting properties. One hundred twenty eight mice were treated with UVB radiation followed by chemoprevention or placebo. There were no significant effects of the treatments with respect to presence of skin tumors, number of tumors, tumor size, or survival...

  10. Fluorescence polarization of tetracycline derivatives as a technique for mapping nonmelanoma skin cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroslavsky, Anna N; Salomatina, Elena V; Neel, Victor; Anderson, Rox; Flotte, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer, often resulting in high morbidity. Low visual contrast of these tumors makes their delineation a challenging problem. Employing a linearly polarized monochromatic light source and a wide-field CCD camera, we have developed a technique for fluorescence polarization imaging of the nonmelanoma cancers stained using antibiotics from the tetracycline family. To determine the feasibility of the method, fluorescence polarization images of 86 thick, fresh cancer excisions were studied. We found that the level of endogenous fluorescence polarization was much lower than that of exogenous, and that the average values of fluorescence polarization of tetracycline derivatives were significantly higher in cancerous as compared to normal tissue. Out of 86 tumors [54 stained in demeclocycline (DMN) and 32 in tetracycline (TCN)], in 79 cases (51-DMN, 28-TCN) the location, size, and shape of the lesions were identified accurately. The results of this trial indicate that nonmelanoma skin tumors can be distinguished from healthy tissue based on the differences in exogenous fluorescence polarization of TCN and/or DMN. Therefore, the developed technique can provide an important new tool for image-guided cancer surgery.

  11. Non-melanoma skin cancer in renal transplant recipients: a study in a Brazilian reference center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalves CP

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Pereira Gonçalves, Beatriz Moritz Trope, Marcia Ramos-e-Silva Sector of Dermatology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Background: Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC after kidney transplantation is common and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Their incidence and risk factors in renal transplant recipients (RTRs vary depending on geographic location and there is a scarcity of literature describing the features of NMSC in Brazil. Methods: NMSC data were retrospectively reviewed in charts of RTRs at the Clementino Fraga Filho University Hospital from January 2004 to December 2005, with the objectives of: 1 evaluating the occurrence of NMSC in RTRs transplanted between 2004 and 2005 at a reference center in Brazil; 2 verifying the frequency of basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC in these patients according to sex, race, age, and tumor site; and 3 determining the time between transplantation and neoplasia. Results: We found 202 RTRs, with 165 suitable for the study. There were 19 NMSC in eleven patients (6.67%, at a mean time of 37.7 months after transplantation. The mean follow-up time was 72.7 months. The ratio of SCC:BCC was 1.1:1. White race and age ≥40 years were associated with a higher incidence of NMSC and they appeared predominantly in sun-exposed sites. Conclusion: Regular dermatological follow-up of RTRs can help to make earlier diagnoses, resulting in better quality of life and lower morbidity and mortality. Keywords: squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, Brazil 

  12. Non-melanoma skin cancer in mouse and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Michael; Münzel, Peter A; Braeuning, Albert

    2013-05-01

    As a frontier organ, skin is exposed to different environmental and/or occupational chemicals which cause cutaneous cancers in experimental animals. In mice, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthrancene (DMBA) and the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) are frequently used as skin model tumor initiator and promoter, respectively. The sequential administration of DMBA and TPA leads to the appearance of a large number of benign papillomas, of which some convert later into invasive squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). At the molecular level, initiation of carcinogenesis in mouse skin consists in the mutational activation of the Ha-ras oncoprotein. HA-RAS mutations are rare in human SCC, but HA-RAS-mutated tumors appear in melanoma patients treated with B-raf inhibitors, indicating that initiated, HA-RAS-mutated stem cells also reside in human skin. Similarly, UV-induced human SCC show footprint mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 which are also observed in UV-induced mouse SCC. Strong species differences exist with respect to phorbol ester-mediated tumor promotion. While certain mouse strains are very susceptible, other rodent species are much less sensitive. Likewise, humans appear to be much more resistant to phorbol ester-mediated skin toxicity. Papilloma formation as a result of a chemical insult is uncommon in men, questioning the relevance of this preneoplastic lesion for humans. However, skin tumorigenesis in the experimental situation and in humans appears to follow common molecular mechanisms, even though there are species differences in the morphological correlates to the preneoplastic state. Therefore, we recommend not simply labeling them as irrelevant for human risk assessment.

  13. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper ME

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Kasper,1,2 Ahmed A Chaudhary3 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Lynn Cancer Institute at Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, 2Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, FL, 3North Main Radiation Oncology, Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, RI, USA Abstract: Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and 226Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Keywords: electronic brachytherapy, superficial radiotherapy, skin surface brachytherapy, electron beam therapy, nonmelanoma skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma

  14. Diffuse reflectance imaging for non-melanoma skin cancer detection using laser feedback interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowla, Alireza; Taimre, Thomas; Lim, Yah L.; Bertling, Karl; Wilson, Stephen J.; Prow, Tarl W.; Soyer, H. P.; Rakić, Aleksandar D.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a compact, self-aligned, low-cost, and versatile infrared diffuse-reflectance laser imaging system using a laser feedback interferometry technique with possible applications in in vivo biological tissue imaging and skin cancer detection. We examine the proposed technique experimentally using a three-layer agar skin phantom. A cylindrical region with a scattering rate lower than that of the surrounding normal tissue was used as a model for a non-melanoma skin tumour. The same structure was implemented in a Monte Carlo computational model. The experimental results agree well with the Monte Carlo simulations validating the theoretical basis of the technique. Results prove the applicability of the proposed technique for biological tissue imaging, with the capability of depth sectioning and a penetration depth of well over 1.2 mm into the skin phantom.

  15. Photodynamic Therapy for Non-Melanoma Skin Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana K. Cohen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Non‐melanoma skin cancer (NMSC is traditionally treated with surgical excision. Nonsurgical methods such as cryotherapy and topical chemotherapeutics, amongst other treatments, are other options. Actinic keratosis (AKs are considered precancerous lesions that eventually may progress to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Photodynamic therapy (PDT offers an effective treatment for AKs, and is also effective for superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC. Nodular BCC and Bowen’s disease (SCC in situ have shown acceptable response rates with PDT, although recurrence rates are higher for these two NMSC subtypes. Methylaminolevulinate (MAL PDT is a more effective treatment option than 5‐aminolevulinic acid (ALA PDT for nodular BCC. Several studies have shown that PDT results in superior cosmetic outcomes compared to surgical treatment. PDT is overall well‐tolerated, with pain being the most common side effect.

  16. Role of radiotherapy in the management of organ transplant recipients diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veness, M. J.; Harris, D.

    2007-01-01

    Organ transplantation has had a major effect on the lives of thousands of patients worldwide. In Australia and New Zealand, over 13 000 patients have become organ transplant recipients (OTR). Following transplantation, patients require lifelong immunosuppression to prevent organ rejection. The loss of immune surveillance results in OTR experiencing a higher incidence of infection and malignancy in comparison with the general (immunocompetent) population. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common malignancy worldwide, arising most often on the sun-exposed head and neck. Organ transplant recipients experience a higher incidence of NMSC when compared with the general population and a higher incidence of squamous cell carcinoma compared with basal cell carcinoma. Organ transplant recipients also develop NMSC at a younger age and experience multiple new NMSC. Australians experience the highest incidence of NMSC in the world with a consequence that NMSC arising in OTR can lead to significant morbidity and even mortality. Radiation oncologists treating patients with skin cancer will almost certainly make recommendations in the setting of NMSC arising in OTR. The aim of this article is to discuss the role of radiotherapy in the management of OTR diagnosed with NMSC. The emphasis will be on the treatment of patients with a high-risk NMSC (e.g. squamous cell carcinoma, Merkel cell carcinoma, unfavourable basal cell carcinoma) because this reflects the most common clinical scenario in which a recommendation of radiotherapy, usually adjuvant, may be considered

  17. Analysis of superficial fluorescence patterns in nonmelanoma skin cancer during photodynamic therapy by a dosimetric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-García, I.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    In this work the superficial fluorescence patterns in different nonmelanoma skin cancers and their photodynamic treatment response are analysed by a fluorescence based dosimetric model. Results show differences of even more than 50% in the fluorescence patterns as photodynamic therapy progresses depending on the malignant tissue type. They demonstrate the great relevance of the biological media as an additional dosimetric factor and contribute to the development of a future customized therapy with the assistance of dosimetric tools to interpret the fluorescence images obtained during the treatment monitoring and the differential photodiagnosis.

  18. What is the microscopic tumor extent beyond clinically delineated gross tumor boundary in nonmelanoma skin cancers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Richard; Woo, Tony; Assaad, Dalal; Antonyshyn, Oleh; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; McKenzie, David; Fialkov, Jeffrey; Breen, Dale; Mamedov, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the microscopic tumor extension beyond clinically delineated gross tumor boundary in nonmelanoma skin cancers. Methods and Materials: A prospective, single arm, study. Preoperatively, a radiation oncologist outlined the boundary of a gross lesion, and drew 5-mm incremental marks in four directions from the delineated border. Under local anesthesia, the lesion was excised, and resection margins were assessed microscopically by frozen section. Once resection margins were clear, the microscopic tumor extent was calculated using the presurgical incremental markings as references. A potential relationship between the distance of microscopic tumor extension and other variables was analyzed. Results: A total of 71 lesions in 64 consecutive patients, selected for surgical excision with frozen-section-assisted assessment of resection margins, were accrued. The distance of microscopic tumor extension beyond a gross lesion varied from 1 mm to 15 mm, with a mean of 5.2 mm. A margin of 10 mm was required to provide a 95% chance of obtaining clear resection margins. The microscopic tumor extent was positively correlated with the size of gross lesion, but not with other variables. Conclusions: The distance of microscopic tumor extension beyond a gross nonmelanoma skin cancer was variable, with a mean of 5.2 mm. Such information is critical for the proper radiation planning of skin cancer therapy

  19. Diet in dermatology: Part I. Atopic dermatitis, acne, and nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronsnick, Tara; Murzaku, Era Caterina; Rao, Babar K

    2014-12-01

    Patients commonly inquire about dietary modifications as a means to prevent or manage skin disease. Answering these questions is often challenging, given the vast and conflicting evidence that exists on this topic. This 2-part continuing medical education article summarizes the evidence to date to enable physicians to answer patients' questions in an evidence-based manner. Part I includes atopic dermatitis, acne, and nonmelanoma skin cancer. The role of dietary supplementation, dietary exclusion, food allergy, maternal diet, and breastfeeding in the development and/or prevention of atopic dermatitis is summarized. The dermatoendocrinologic mechanism for the effects of glycemic index/glycemic load and milk on acne is described, as well as related clinical evidence for dietary modifications. Finally, evidence and recommendations for restriction or supplementation of dietary factors in the prevention of nonmelanoma skin cancer, including fat, vitamins A, C, D, and E, and selenium, are reported. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The relationship between occupational sun exposure and non-melanoma skin cancer: clinical basics, epidemiology, occupational disease evaluation, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartasch, Manigé; Diepgen, Thomas Ludwig; Schmitt, Jochen; Drexler, Hans

    2012-10-01

    The cumulative effect of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is responsible for the worldwide increase in non-melanoma skin cancer, a category that includes squamous cell carcinoma and its precursors (the actinic keratoses) as well as basal-cell carcinoma. Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in areas of the world with a light-skinned population. The occupational exposure to UV radiation is high in many outdoor occupations; recent studies suggest that persons working in such occupations are more likely to develop non-melanoma skin cancer. On the basis of a selective review of the literature, we present the current state of knowledge about occupational and non-occupational UV exposure and the findings of meta-analyses on the association of outdoor activity with non-melanoma skin cancer. We also give an overview of the current recommendations for prevention and for medicolegal assessment. Recent meta-analyses have consistently documented a significantly higher risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin among persons who work outdoors (odds ratio [OR] 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.40-2.22, pmelanoma skin cancer in persons with high occupational exposure to UV radiation should be reported as an occupational disease under § 9, paragraph 2 of the Seventh Book of the German Social Code (Sozialgesetzbuch, SGB VII). Preventive measures are urgently needed for persons with high occupational exposure to UV radiation.

  1. The relevance of piroxicam for the prevention and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer and its precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campione E

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Elena Campione,1 Evelin Jasmine Paternò,2 Eleonora Candi,3,4 Mattia Falconi,5 Gaetana Costanza,2 Laura Diluvio,1 Alessandro Terrinoni,4 Luca Bianchi,1 Augusto Orlandi2,6,7 1Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, 3Department of Experimental Medicine and Surgery, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 4Biochemistry Laboratory IDI-IRCCS, Faculty of Medicine, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 5Department of Biology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 6Institute of Anatomic Pathology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 7Tor Vergata University-Policlinic of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: Piroxicam (PXM, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is an enolic benzothiazine and a potent member of the oxicam series. The drug suppresses the synthesis of proinflammatory enzymes, such as cyclooxygenases-1 and -2 (COX-1 and 2, downregulates the production of prostaglandins (PGs and tromboxanes, and inhibits polyamines production by blocking ornithine decarboxylase induction involved in nonmelanoma skin carcinogenesis. In addition, PXM is able to induce tumor cell apoptosis and suppresses metalloproteinase 2 activities. Skin carcinogenesis is a multistep process in which the accumulation of genetic events leads to a gradually dysplastic cellular expression, deregulation of cell growth, and carcinomatous progression. COX-1 upregulation plays a significant role in PG and vascular epidermal growth factor production supporting tumor growth. Increased level of PGs in premalignant and/or malignant cutaneous tumors is also favored by upregulation of COX-2 and downregulation of the tumor suppressor gene 15-hydroxy-prostaglandin dehydrogenase. Chemoprevention can be a hopeful approach to inhibit carcinoma occurrence before an invasive tumor develops. The chemopreventive effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on nonmelanoma skin cancers has been established. In this study, we highlighted the different modalities of action

  2. Detection of human papillomavirus in nonmelanoma skin cancer lesions and healthy perilesional skin in kidney transplant recipients and immunocompetent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat-García, J; Morales Suárez-Varela, M; Vilata-Corell, J J; Marquina-Vila, A

    2014-04-01

    The influence of human papillomavirus (HPV) on the development of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is a topic of debate. HPV types from the beta genus (HPV-β) have been most frequently associated with the development of skin cancer. To analyze the prevalence and range of HPV types in NMSC lesions and healthy perilesional skin in immunodepressed and immunocompetent patients and to evaluate the influence of various clinical factors on the prevalence of HPV in skin cancer. Nested polymerase chain reaction and sequencing were used to detect HPV in 120 NMSC samples obtained by biopsy from 30 kidney transplant recipients and 30 immunocompetent patients. In all cases, a sample was taken from the tumor site and the surrounding healthy skin. Potential confounders were assessed and the data analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. HPV DNA was detected in 44 (73.3%) of the 60 samples from immunodepressed patients and in 32 (53.3%) of the 60 samples from immunocompetent patients (adjusted odds ratio, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.2-9.6). In both groups of patients, HPV was more common in healthy perilesional skin than in lesional skin. HPV-β was the most common type isolated. We found a wide range of HPV types (mostly HPV-β) in the skin of kidney transplant recipients and immunocompetent patients with skin cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in patients with atopic dermatitis treated with oral immunosuppressive drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garritsen, Floor M.; Van Der Schaft, Jorien; van den Reek, Juul M; Politiek, Klaziena; Van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; van Dijk, Marijke; Hijnen, Dirk J.; De Graaf, Marlies; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A.; de Jong, Elke M G J; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise A; De Bruin-Weller, Marjolein S.

    2017-01-01

    There is uncertainty about the risk of developing nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated with oral immunosuppressive drugs. A total of 557 patients with AD treated with these drugs in the

  4. Risk of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Treated with Oral Immunosuppressive Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garritsen, F.M.; Schaft, J. van der; Reek, J.M.P.A. van den; Politiek, K.; Os-Medendorp, H. van; Dijk, M.; Hijnen, D.J.; Graaf, M de; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C.A.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Schuttelaar, M.A.; Bruin-Weller, M.S. de

    2017-01-01

    There is uncertainty about the risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated with oral immunosuppressive drugs. A total of 557 patients with AD treated with these drugs in the

  5. Risk of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Treated with Oral Immunosuppressive Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garritsen, Floor M.; Van der Schaft, Jorien; Van den Reek, Juul M.; Politiek, Klaziena; Van Osmedendorp, Harmieke; Van Dijk, Marijke; Hijnen, Dirk J.; De Graaf, Marlies; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A.; De Jong, Elke M.; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise A.; De Bruin-Weller, Marjolein S.

    There is uncertainty about the risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated with oral immunosuppressive drugs. A total of 557 patients with AD treated with these drugs in the

  6. Update on the use of confocal microscopy in melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, S; Longo, C; Casari, A; Ciardo, S; Manfredini, M; Reggiani, C; Pellacani, G; Farnetani, F

    2015-10-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a new technique enabling the visualization of the skin at a quasi-histological resolution, allowing the identification of clues for the diagnosis of skin diseases. The aim of this analysis was to provide new insights into the role of RCM in the diagnosis of skin cancers. Data comes from the most recent literature, taking into account previous essential reported information in this field. The study eligibility criteria were: studies providing update information, focusing on RCM findings in melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC), without restrictions for age, sex, ethnicity. Duplicated studies and single case report were excluded from this study. A search concerning the role of RCM in melanoma and NMSC was performed on the Medline. RCM clues were analyzed for different skin cancers, in particular melanoma and NMSC, in association with clinical, dermoscopic and histopathologic findings. Diagnostic accuracy, sensibility and specificity of the technique were reviewed. Furthermore, some new findings have been described and recent applications have been discussed. The selection of articles was limited in order to provide an up-to-date revision. In conclusion, several RCM features were implemented for the diagnosis of melanoma and NMSC, leading to a confocal-based classification in most cases.

  7. Surface applicator calibration and commissioning of an electronic brachytherapy system for nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Yi; Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 and University of Wisconsin Cancer Center-Riverview, Riverview Hospital Association, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin 54494 (United States); Department of Human Oncology and Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 and University of Wisconsin Cancer Center-Riverview, Riverview Hospital Association, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin 54494 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The Xoft Axxent x-ray source has been used for treating nonmelanoma skin cancer since the surface applicators became clinically available in 2009. The authors report comprehensive calibration procedures for the electronic brachytherapy (eBx) system with the surface applicators. Methods: The Xoft miniature tube (model S700) generates 50 kVp low-energy x rays. The new surface applicators are available in four sizes of 10, 20, 35, and 50 mm in diameter. The authors' tests include measurements of dose rate, air-gap factor, output stability, depth dose verification, beam flatness and symmetry, and treatment planning with patient specific cutout factors. The TG-61 in-air method was used as a guideline for acquiring nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface. A soft x-ray parallel-plate chamber (PTW T34013) and electrometer was used for the output commissioning. GafChromic EBT films were used for testing the properties of the treatment fields with the skin applicators. Solid water slabs were used to verify the depth dose and cutout factors. Patients with basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma were treated with eBx using a calibrated Xoft system with the low-energy x-ray source and the skin applicators. Results: The average nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface for the 35 mm applicator is 1.35 Gy/min with {+-}5% variation for 16 sources. The dose-rate output and stability (within {+-}5% variation) were also measured for the remaining three applicators. For the same source, the output variation is within 2%. The effective source-surface distance was calculated based on the air-gap measurements for four applicator sizes. The field flatness and symmetry are well within 5%. Percentage depth dose in water was provided by factory measurements and can be verified using solid water slabs. Treatment duration was calculated based on the nominal dose rate, the prescription fraction size, the depth dose percentage, and the cutout factor. The output factor needs

  8. Photodynamic Therapy Activated by Intense Pulsed Light in the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Piccolo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA or methyl aminolevulinate (MAL has proven to be a highly effective conservative method for the treatment of actinic keratosis (AK, Bowen’s disease (BD, and superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC. PDT is traditionally performed in association with broad-spectrum continuous-wave light sources, such as red or blue light. Recently, intense pulsed light (IPL devices have been investigated as an alternative light source for PDT in the treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC. We herein report our observational findings in a cohort of patients with a diagnosis of AK, sBCC, and BD that is treated with MAL-PDT using IPL, as well as we review published data on the use of IPL-PDT in NMSC.

  9. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer in psoriatic patients treated with high-dose phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorino, Alessia; De Simone, Clara; Perino, Francesca; Caldarola, Giacomo; Peris, Ketty

    2016-10-01

    The carcinogenic effect of plus ultraviolet A (PUVA)-therapy in psoriatic patients has been widely demonstrated, while data on the safety of narrow band (311 nm) ultraviolet B (nb-UVB) are scarce. We investigated the occurrence of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in psoriatic patients treated with nb-UVB or PUVA-therapy. This retrospective study included patients affected by psoriasis, who had been treated with nb-UVB or PUVA-therapy. Clinical data and phenotypic risk factors were collected and a total body examination was performed at a routine appointment during the study period. We examined 92 patients (60 males and 32 females; mean age: 53.5 years, range: 20-83 years) treated with PUVA-therapy (42/92, 45%) or with nb-UVB (50/92, 55%) for 1-28 years (mean: 7.1 years). Among patients treated with PUVA, nine skin tumors (one melanoma, seven basal cell carcinoma (BCCs) and one squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)) were detected in 2/42 (4.7%) patients, while in the nb-UVB group, 14 skin tumors including two melanomas, four BCCs, and eight SCCs were diagnosed in 6/50 (12%) patients. A noteworthy number of NMSC were diagnosed in this Mediterranean population of patients exposed to high-dose UV treatment. A thorough risk-benefit evaluation should always be done before UV treatment and patients should be carefully monitored for skin cancer during and after treatment discontinuation.

  10. Comparison of different optical coherence tomography devices for diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, S; Kaestle, R; Sattler, E; Welzel, J

    2016-11-01

    To compare the diagnostic imaging ability of three different optical coherence tomography (OCT) devices in non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Thirty actinic keratoses (AKs) and 27 basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) of 29 patients were examined with three different OCT devices, VivoSight ® , Callisto ® and Skintell ® . Complete data sets were available for 16 BCCs and 10 AKs of 18 patients. All OCT devices were able to discriminate BCCs and AKs significantly from perilesional normal skin due to lower signal intensities as well as a thicker stratum corneum and epidermis in AKs. A significant decrease in the signal intensity and thickness of all skin layers was noted with Skintell ® in contrast to VivoSight ® and Callisto ® . OCT comparisons revealed only slight differences between VivoSight ® and Callisto ® . Regarding BCC tumor thickness VivoSight ® and Callisto ® correlated well, histology did not correlate with the three OCT devices, whereas Skintell ® showed no correlation with VivoSight ® , Callisto ® or histology. All tested OCT devices could identify BCCs and AKs objectively through standardized measurement of signal intensity and skin layer thickness. Due to their technical specifications (resolution, penetration depth), each of the OCT systems offers additional and special information on NMSC. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Risk of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and its Relationship to Uraemic Pruritus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chen Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC in pre-dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and explored associated risk factors. A population-based cohort of 1,515,858 Taiwanese CKD patients was included. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR for incident NMSC was determined. Compared with the general population, a 1.14-fold risk of NMSC was found in the CKD cohort. NMSC risk was significant in patients with pre-dialysis stage 5 CKD and anaemia (1.48-fold, and in those with uraemic pruritus after long-term antihistamine treatment (1.38-fold. A higher SIR for NMSC was found in younger patients with CKD (age < 70 years, 1.34-fold; age 20–39 years, 1.63-fold, stage 5 CKD with anaemia (age < 70 years, 2.09-fold, and uraemic pruritus (age <70 years, 2.22-fold. Pre-dialysis patients with CKD are at higher risk of NMSC, especially those with advanced-stage CKD, and those with uraemic pruritus.

  12. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers in hairy cell leukaemia: a SEER population analysis and the 30-year experience at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Justin M; Kishtagari, Ashwin; Hsu, Meier; Lacouture, Mario E; Postow, Michael A; Park, Jae H; Stein, Eytan M; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Devlin, Sean M; Tallman, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have examined melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) incidence rates after a diagnosis of hairy cell leukaemia (HCL). We assessed 267 HCL patients treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data for melanoma and NMSC incidence rates after HCL. Incidence data from MSKCC patients demonstrated a 10-year combined melanoma and NMSC skin cancer rate of 11.3%, melanoma 4.4% and NMSC 6.9%. Molecular analysis of skin cancers from MSKCC patients revealed activating RAS mutations in 3/9 patients, including one patient with melanoma. Of 4,750 SEER patients with HCL, 55 (1.2%) had a subsequent diagnosis of melanoma. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) did not show that melanoma was more common in HCL patients versus the general population (SIR 1.3, 95% CI 0.78–2.03). Analysis of SEER HCL patients diagnosed before and after 1990 (approximately before and after purine analogue therapy was introduced) showed no evidence of an increased incidence after 1990. A better understanding of any potential association between HCL and skin cancer is highly relevant given ongoing trials using BRAF inhibitors, such as vemurafenib, for relapsed HCL, as RAS-mutant skin cancers could be paradoxically activated in these patients. PMID:26115047

  13. Potential Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Homer S.; Rhodes, Lesley E.

    2016-01-01

    Considerable circumstantial evidence has accrued from both experimental animal and human clinical studies that support a role for omega-3 fatty acids (FA) in the prevention of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Direct evidence from animal studies has shown that omega-3 FA inhibit ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induced carcinogenic expression. In contrast, increasing levels of dietary omega-6 FA increase UVR carcinogenic expression, with respect to a shorter tumor latent period and increased tumor multiplicity. Both omega-6 and omega-3 FA are essential FA, necessary for normal growth and maintenance of health and although these two classes of FA exhibit only minor structural differences, these differences cause them to act significantly differently in the body. Omega-6 and omega-3 FA, metabolized through the lipoxygenase (LOX) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways, lead to differential metabolites that are influential in inflammatory and immune responses involved in carcinogenesis. Clinical studies have shown that omega-3 FA ingestion protects against UVR-induced genotoxicity, raises the UVR-mediated erythema threshold, reduces the level of pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in UVR-irradiated human skin, and appears to protect human skin from UVR-induced immune-suppression. Thus, there is considerable evidence that omega-3 FA supplementation might be beneficial in reducing the occurrence of NMSC, especially in those individuals who are at highest risk. PMID:26861407

  14. Non-melanoma Skin Cancers Reported at a Secondary Care Institution in Milas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şenay Ağırgöl

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We investigated demographic features, tumor location and histopathology as well as frequency of recurrence of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC in patients in Milas region. Methods: Medical files of 120 patients with the diagnosis of NMSC, who attended the dermatology department at Milas State Hospital between 2011 and 2014, were analyzed retrospectively. Statistical analysis was performed by evaluating demographic characteristics (age, gender, tumor initial age, alcohol consumption, smoking habits, occupation, Fitzpatrick skin type (FT, location of lesions, tumor histopathology and recurrence frequency. Results: The average age at admission was 65.2 years. Male/female ratio was equal and the number of females with basal cell carcinoma (BCC was higher than that of males, while squamous cell cancer was more common in men. 88.3% of the lesions involved the head and neck region. The most common location was the nose (19.7%, followed by eye and ear region. 70.8% of patients had FT 1 and 2 and 70% had light eye color. There were more than one lesion in five patients and recurrence was observed in 15 of the patients. The most common histopathologic type was nodular, followed by infiltrative and superficially spreading BCC. Almost all of our patients were active farmers. Conclusion: During the three-year follow-up period, NMSCs were reported to have a high rate of frequency and recurrence. We believe that skin cancers constitute an important health problem for this town and this can grow unless necessary measures are taken.

  15. Photodynamic therapy of nonmelanoma skin malignancies with topical delta-amino levulinic acid: diagnostic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang-Nordman, Ingrid; Svanberg, Katarina; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Berg, Roger; Svanberg, Sune

    1995-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using topical application of the Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) precursor (delta) -amino levulinic acid (ALA) in various malignant skin tumors is a new promising treatment modality. We have treated an extensive number of non-melanoma malignancies of the skin over the past three years with very satisfying initial results. For superficial, shallow lesions one treatment session is sufficient. In thicker lesions, such as nodular basal cell carcinomas, complete treatment response is achieved after two or three treatment sessions. In conjunction with the treatment procedure the tissue fluorescence and the superficial blood flow have been investigated during and after the treatment procedures. The PpIX build-up has been detected in vivo and the degree of tumor selectivity has been evaluated using laser-induced fluorescence. Also changes in the bloodflow in tumors compared to normal skin before, during, and after the treatment procedure has been followed using a laser- Doppler perfusion imaging system. Results from the measurements in basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), Mb. Bowen lesions (squamous cell carcinoma in situ) and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma lesions are presented.

  16. Ultraviolet Light and Skin Cancer in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Shannon C.; Bergfeld, Wilma F.

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide. Ultraviolet light exposure is the most important risk factor for cutaneous melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. Nonmelanoma skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Constitutive skin color and genetic factors, as well as immunological factors, play a role in the development of skin cancer. Ultraviolet light also causes sunburn and photoaging damage to the skin.

  17. Imaging of ex vivo nonmelanoma skin cancers in the optical and terahertz spectral regions optical and terahertz skin cancers imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Cecil S; Patel, Rakesh; Neel, Victor A; Giles, Robert H; Yaroslavsky, Anna N

    2014-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that polarization sensitive optical and terahertz imaging may be combined for accurate nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) delineation. Nine NMSC specimens were imaged. 513 μm and 440 nm wavelengths were used for terahertz and optical imaging, respectively. Histopathology was processed for evaluation. Terahertz reflectance of NMSC was quantified. Our results demonstrate that cross-polarized terahertz images correctly identified location of the tumours, whereas cross-polarized and polarization difference optical images accurately presented morphological features. Cross-polarized terahertz images exhibited lower reflectivity values in cancer as compared to normal tissue. Combination of optical and terahertz imaging shows promise for intraoperative delineation of NMSC. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Update on melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer. Annual Skin Cancer Conference 2011, Hamilton Island, Australia, 5–6 August 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalaudek, Iris; Whiteman, David; Rosendahl, Cliff; Menzies, Scott W; Green, Adèle C; Hersey, Peter; Argenziano, Giuseppe

    2011-12-01

    In this article, we will summarize some of the highlights of the third annual conference on skin cancer, with special emphasis on the the recent advances regarding melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment. Topics were particularly addressed to a newly developing medical branch in Australia, namely that of Primary Care Skin Cancer Practitioners, and focused on strategies to improve primary and secondary prevention and early detection of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer using dermoscopy. Controversies related to skin cancer screening programs and recent progresses for treating advanced melanoma were additionally discussed. Yet, besides its scientific goals, the conference aimed also to encourage research originating in primary care and relevant to primary care.

  19. The Protective Role of Vitamin D Signaling in Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bikle, Daniel D., E-mail: daniel.bikle@ucsf.edu; Jiang, Yan [Department of Medicine and Endocrine, Research Unit and Department of Dermatology, VA Medical Center, University of California San Francisco, 4150 Clement St (111N), San Francisco, CA 94121 (United States)

    2013-11-05

    Although the epidemiologic evidence that adequate vitamin D nutrition protects against non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is limited, recent evidence that the vitamin D receptor (VDR) is protective is compelling. The role of vitamin D signaling in limiting the proliferation while promoting the differentiation of keratinocytes, the major cell in the epidermis from which NMSC are derived, is well known. However, recent findings that mice lacking the VDR are predisposed to skin cancer has brought to the fore the question of how the VDR is protective. In this review we will look first at the role of vitamin D signaling in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. We will examine two pathways, β-catenin (CTNNB) and hedgehog (HH), that are regulated by vitamin D signaling and may contribute to the dysregulated proliferation and differentiation in the absence of VDR. We will then examine the failure of VDR deficient keratinocytes to repair DNA damaged by UVB. Finally we will examine the change in long non-coding RNA (LncRNA) expression in VDR null keratinocytes that in other cells is associated with malignant transformation, a potential newly appreciated mechanism by which vitamin D signaling is protective against NMSC.

  20. Non-melanoma skin cancer: new and future synthetic drug treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Teresa; Garbe, Claus

    2017-05-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) mainly comprise two different entities: basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); beneath these two entities, Merkel cell carcinoma, adnexal tumors, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, angiosarcoma, and cutaneous lymphoma belong to NMSC. These rare skin tumors are not the topic of this review. BCC and SCC are the most common cancers diagnosed in humans. The preferred treatment is surgery, which in most cases is curative. Although a high recurrence rate is seen, these cancers rarely metastasize. Therefore, systemic treatments were not a priority for these patients. It is long known that the abnormal activation of Hedgehog and epidermal growth factor receptor pathways were involved in BCC and SCC. In the last decade, metastatic disease became an important area of research, mostly because new therapies that targeted components of these two pathways became available. Areas covered: Here we cover the available therapeutic options for patients diagnosed with BCC and SCC, focus on systemic and targeted therapies. Expert opinion: BCC and SCC are common cancers, with good prognosis. More than the metastatic disease, advanced local disease and recurrent disease pose clinicians a great challenge. Albeit there are promising results with targeted therapies, resistance development has already been described.

  1. The Protective Role of Vitamin D Signaling in Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bikle, Daniel D.; Jiang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Although the epidemiologic evidence that adequate vitamin D nutrition protects against non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is limited, recent evidence that the vitamin D receptor (VDR) is protective is compelling. The role of vitamin D signaling in limiting the proliferation while promoting the differentiation of keratinocytes, the major cell in the epidermis from which NMSC are derived, is well known. However, recent findings that mice lacking the VDR are predisposed to skin cancer has brought to the fore the question of how the VDR is protective. In this review we will look first at the role of vitamin D signaling in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. We will examine two pathways, β-catenin (CTNNB) and hedgehog (HH), that are regulated by vitamin D signaling and may contribute to the dysregulated proliferation and differentiation in the absence of VDR. We will then examine the failure of VDR deficient keratinocytes to repair DNA damaged by UVB. Finally we will examine the change in long non-coding RNA (LncRNA) expression in VDR null keratinocytes that in other cells is associated with malignant transformation, a potential newly appreciated mechanism by which vitamin D signaling is protective against NMSC

  2. Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Canada Chapter 1: Introduction to the Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Lyn C; Barber, Kirk; Searles, Gordon E; Lynde, Charles W; Janiszewski, Peter; Ashkenas, John

    2015-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal and squamous cell carcinoma, represents the most common malignancy. The aim of this document is to provide guidance to Canadian health care practitioners on NMSC management. After conducting a literature review, the group developed recommendations for prevention, management, and treatment of basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and actinic keratoses. These tumour types are considered separately in the accompanying articles. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system was used to assign strength to each recommendation. This introduction describes the scope and structure of the guidelines and the methods used to develop them. The epidemiology of NMSC is reviewed, as are the pathophysiologic changes occurring with damage to the skin, which lead to the formation of actinic keratoses and invasive squamous or basal cell carcinomas. This introduction describes the need for primary prevention and offers an overview of treatment options that are discussed in later chapters of the guidelines. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Detection and Discrimination of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer by Multimodal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Popp

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC belongs to the most frequent human neoplasms. Its exposed location facilitates a fast ambulant treatment. However, in the clinical practice far more lesions are removed than necessary, due to the lack of an efficient pre-operational examination procedure: Standard imaging methods often do not provide a sufficient spatial resolution. The demand for an efficient in vivo imaging technique might be met in the near future by non-linear microscopy. As a first step towards this goal, the appearance of NMSC in various microspectroscopic modalities has to be defined and approaches have to be derived to distinguish healthy skin from NMSC using non-linear optical microscopy. Therefore, in this contribution the appearance of ex vivo NMSC in a combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS, second harmonic generation (SHG and two photon excited fluorescence (TPEF imaging—referred as multimodal imaging—is described. Analogous to H&E staining, an overview of the distinct appearances and features of basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma in the complementary modalities is derived, and is expected to boost in vivo studies of this promising technological approach.

  4. Incidence of and risk factors for skin cancer after heart transplant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brewer, Jerry D.; Colegio, Oscar R.; Phillips, P. Kim; Roenigk, Randall K.; Jacobs, M. Amanda; van de Beek, Diederik; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Kremers, Walter K.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.; Otley, Clark C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence, tumor burden, and risk factors for nonmelanoma and other skin cancer types in this heart transplant cohort. DESIGN: Retrospective review of patient medical records. SETTING: Tertiary care center. Patients All heart transplant recipients at Mayo Clinic from 1988

  5. Risk of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer in ulcerative colitis patients treated with thiopurines: a nationwide retrospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ali M; Almukhtar, Rawaa M; Loftus, Edward V; Lichtenstein, Gary R; Khan, Nabeel

    2014-11-01

    There are limited data on the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma skin cancer (MSC) among thiopurine-treated patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Our aim was to investigate the risk while on, by cumulative years, and after stopping thiopurine therapy. Nationwide data were obtained from the Veterans Affairs (VA) health-care system during 2001-2011. We performed a retrospective cohort study evaluating patients with UC. Cox regression was used to investigate the association between thiopurines use and time to NMSC while adjusting for demographics, ultraviolet radiation exposure, and VA visiting frequency. A matched nested case-control study was conducted to investigate the association between thiopurine use and MSC. We included 14,527 patients with UC in the analysis, with a median follow-up of 8.1 years. A total of 3,346 (23%) patients used thiopurines for a median duration of 1.6 years. We identified 421 NMSC and 45 MSC cases. The adjusted hazard ratios of developing NMSC while on and after stopping thiopurines were 2.1 (P<0.0001) and 0.7 (P=0.07), respectively, as compared with unexposed patients. The incidence rate of NMSC among those who never used thiopurines was 3.7 compared with 5.8, 7.9, 8.3, 7.8, and 13.6 per 1,000 person-years for the 1st, 2nd, 3th, 4th, and 5th year of thiopurine use, respectively. No statistically significant association was observed between thiopurine use and MSC, odds ratio 0.8 (P=0.6). In this predominantly white male nationwide cohort, there was a twofold increase in the risk of NMSC while on thiopurines. The incidence rate of NMSC significantly increased with subsequent years of cumulative exposure to thiopurines. Stopping thiopurines reduced the risk of NMSC to pre-exposure levels irrespective of the prior exposure duration.

  6. Risk of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Treated with Oral Immunosuppressive Drugs

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    Floor M. Garritsen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available There is uncertainty about the risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC, including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD treated with oral immunosuppressive drugs. A total of 557 patients with AD treated with these drugs in the University Medical Center Utrecht and Groningen, the Netherlands, were analysed. NMSC after oral immunosuppressive treatment was reported in 18 patients (3.2%. The standardized incidence ratio for developing SCC was 13.1 (95% confidence interval (95% CI 6.5–19.7. Patients developing NMSC were older at the start of therapy (p<0.001 and data lock (p<0.001 compared with patients without NMSC. No significant differences were found in sex, cumulative days of oral immunosuppressive drugs and follow-up between these groups (p=0.42, p=0.88, and p=0.34, respectively. In interpreting these results it is important to include other factors, such as lack of association between treatment duration and tumour development and the long interval between treatment discontinuation and tumour development in some patients.

  7. Decision tree analysis to stratify risk of de novo non-melanoma skin cancer following liver transplantation.

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    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Voigt, Michael D

    2018-03-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common de novo malignancy in liver transplant (LT) recipients; it behaves more aggressively and it increases mortality. We used decision tree analysis to develop a tool to stratify and quantify risk of NMSC in LT recipients. We performed Cox regression analysis to identify which predictive variables to enter into the decision tree analysis. Data were from the Organ Procurement Transplant Network (OPTN) STAR files of September 2016 (n = 102984). NMSC developed in 4556 of the 105984 recipients, a mean of 5.6 years after transplant. The 5/10/20-year rates of NMSC were 2.9/6.3/13.5%, respectively. Cox regression identified male gender, Caucasian race, age, body mass index (BMI) at LT, and sirolimus use as key predictive or protective factors for NMSC. These factors were entered into a decision tree analysis. The final tree stratified non-Caucasians as low risk (0.8%), and Caucasian males > 47 years, BMI risk (7.3% cumulative incidence of NMSC). The predictions in the derivation set were almost identical to those in the validation set (r 2  = 0.971, p risk groups at 5/10/20 year was 0.5/1.2/3.3, 2.1/4.8/11.7 and 5.6/11.6/23.1% (p risk of developing NMSC in the long-term after LT.

  8. Photosensitizing agents and the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer: a population-based case-control study.

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    Robinson, Sarah N; Zens, Michael S; Perry, Ann E; Spencer, Steven K; Duell, Eric J; Karagas, Margaret R

    2013-08-01

    It is well-known that UV light exposure and a sun-sensitive phenotype are risk factors for the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In this New Hampshire population-based case-control study, we collected data from 5,072 individuals, including histologically confirmed cases of BCC and SCC, and controls via a personal interview to investigate possible associations between photosensitizing medication use and NMSC. After adjustment for potentially confounding factors (e.g., lifetime number of painful sunburns), we found a modest increase in risk of SCC (odds ratio (OR)=1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.0-1.4) and BCC (OR=1.2, 95% CI=0.9-1.5), in particular early-onset BCC, (≤ 50 years of age) (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.1-2.1) associated with photosensitizing medication use. For SCC the association was strongest among those with tendency to sunburn rather than tan. We also specifically found associations with BCC, and especially early-onset BCC, and photosensitizing antimicrobials. In conclusion, certain commonly prescribed photosensitizing medications may enhance the risk of developing SCC, especially in individuals with a sun-sensitive phenotype, and may increase the risk of developing BCC and incidence of BCC at a younger age.

  9. RNA-seq reveals more consistent reference genes for gene expression studies in human non-melanoma skin cancers

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    Van L.T. Hoang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Identification of appropriate reference genes (RGs is critical to accurate data interpretation in quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR experiments. In this study, we have utilised next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq to analyse the transcriptome of a panel of non-melanoma skin cancer lesions, identifying genes that are consistently expressed across all samples. Genes encoding ribosomal proteins were amongst the most stable in this dataset. Validation of this RNA-seq data was examined using qPCR to confirm the suitability of a set of highly stable genes for use as qPCR RGs. These genes will provide a valuable resource for the normalisation of qPCR data for the analysis of non-melanoma skin cancer.

  10. Resistance of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer to Nonsurgical Treatments. Part II: Photodynamic Therapy, Vismodegib, Cetuximab, Intralesional Methotrexate, and Radiotherapy.

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    Gracia-Cazaña, T; Salazar, N; Zamarrón, A; Mascaraque, M; Lucena, S R; Juarranz, Á

    2016-11-01

    A wide range of treatments is now available for nonmelanoma skin cancer, including 5-fluorouracil, ingenol mebutate, imiquimod, diclofenac, photodynamic therapy, methotrexate, cetuximab, vismodegib, and radiotherapy. All are associated with high clinical and histologic response rates. However, some tumors do not respond due to resistance, which may be primary or acquired. Study of the resistance processes is a broad area of research that aims to increase our understanding of the nature of each tumor and the biologic features that make it resistant, as well as to facilitate the design of new therapies directed against these tumors. In this second article, having covered the topical treatments of nonmelanoma skin cancer, we review resistance to other nonsurgical treatments, such as monoclonal antibodies against basal and squamous cell carcinomas, intralesional chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, and radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic determinants of UV-susceptibility in non-melanoma skin cancer.

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    Marleen M Welsh

    Full Text Available A milieu of cytokines and signaling molecules are involved in the induction of UV-induced immune suppression and thus the etiology of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC. Targeting the UV-induced immunosuppression pathway, and using a large population based study of NMSC, we have investigated the risk associated with functional variants in 10 genes (IL10, IL4, IL4R, TNF, TNFR2, HTR2A, HRH2, IL12B, PTGS2, and HAL. The most prominent single genetic effect was observed for IL10. There was increasing risk for both basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC with increasing number of variant IL10 haplotypes (BCC: p(trend = 0.0048; SCC: p(trend = 0.031. Having two IL10 GC haplotypes was associated with increased odds ratios of BCC and SCC (OR(BCC = 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-1.9; OR(SCC = 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-1.9, and these associations were largely confined to women (OR(BCC = 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.4; SCC: OR(SCC = 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-3.0. To examine how combinations of these variants contribute to risk of BCC and SCC, we used multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR and classification and regression trees (CART. Results from both of these methods found that in men, a combination of skin type, burns, IL10, IL4R, and possibly TNFR2 were important in both BCC and SCC. In women, skin type, burns, and IL10 were the most critical risk factors in SCC, with risk of BCC involving these same factors plus genetic variants in HTR2A, IL12B and IL4R. These data suggest differential genetic susceptibility to UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer risk by gender.

  12. Chimeric Monoclonal Antibody Cetuximab Targeting Epidermal Growth Factor-Receptor in Advanced Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Uwe Wollina; Georgi Tchernev; Torello Lotti

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common malignancy in humans. Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibody cetuximab is an option in case of advanced tumor or metastasis. AIM: We present and update of the use of cetuximab in NMSC searching PUBMED 2011-2017. METHODS: The monoclonal antibody cetuximab against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been investigated for its use in NMSC during the years 2011 to 2017 by a PUBMED research using the following items: ...

  13. Vitamin D as a potential enhancer of aminolevulinate-based photodynamic therapy for nonmelanoma skin cancer

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    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Atanaskova, Natasha; Wilson, Clara

    2010-02-01

    Vitamin D3 (Vit D3) is a hormone essential for normal bone and cardiovascular health, and may participate in preventing nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC). Calcitriol (1,25 dihydroxyD3) is the active form of the hormone. We showed previously that calcitriol is a potent inducer of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in skin keratinocytes grown in organotypic cultures. Here, we investigated the ability of Vit D3 to enhance PpIX levels within skin tumors in vivo. Squamous tumors, generated by chemical carcinogenesis in mice, were pretreated for 3 days with topical calcitriol. Then 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) was applied topically, and PpIX levels were measured by noninvasive fluorimetry and in biopsied tissue. Calcitriol pretreatment resulted in a 3 to 4-fold elevation of PpIX in tumors, relative to no pretreatmen, providing significantly more photosensitizer available for tumor destruction. For deep tumors, topical calcitriol may not penetrate sufficiently. Therefore we explored whether systemic Vit D3, given short-term (3 days), might elevate PpIX within NMSC in a deep tumor model (subcutaneously-implanted A431 human squamous carcinoma cells). Defined amounts of calcitriol were injected into the mice for 3 d, followed by systemic 5-ALA, tissue biopsy, and confocal microscopic measurement of PpIX in frozen tissues. PpIX was clearly elevated after systemically delivered calcitriol. More work is needed, but if the amount of calcitriol required to elevate PpIX levels proves to be small, then the approach may ultimately prove attractive. Since most Americans are currently Vitamin D deficient, a small increase in calcitriol might be possible without risk of hypercalcemia.

  14. High plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and high risk of non-melanoma skin cancer: a Mendelian randomisation study of 97849 individuals.

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    Winsløw, U C; Nordestgaard, B G; Afzal, S

    2017-11-16

    High plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25 (OH)D) concentration has been associated observationally with high risk of non-melanoma skin cancer, while many studies suggest that vitamin D could have a protective effect on cancer. The true association between vitamin D and risk of skin cancer remains unclear. In this Mendelian randomisation study we tested the hypothesis that genetically high plasma 25(OH)D protects against non-melanoma skin cancer. We included 103084 individuals from the Danish general population, of whom 35 298 had plasma 25(OH)D measured and 97849 were genotyped for four genetic variants near the DHCR7 and CYP2R1 genes associated with 25(OH)D concentrations. We tested the association between plasma 25(OH)D levels and non-melanoma skin cancer observationally, and between genetically determined 25(OH)D levels and non-melanoma skin cancer through an instrumental variable approach. Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios of non-melanoma skin cancer were 3.27 (95%CI: 2.22;4.84) for plasma 25(OH)D≥50 nmol/L versus melanoma skin cancer, with a corresponding observational multivariable adjusted odds ratio of 1.13 (1.10-1.17). Genetically determined high 25(OH)D did not appear to protect against non-melanoma skin cancer, while high plasma 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with high risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in observational analysis. Thus, the observational association likely reflects confounding by sun exposure rather than causality. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of voriconazole on risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

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    Kuklinski, Lawrence F; Li, Shufeng; Karagas, Margaret R; Weng, Wen-Kai; Kwong, Bernice Y

    2017-10-01

    Voriconazole has previously been associated with increased risk for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in solid organ transplant recipients. Less is known about the risk in patients after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We evaluated the effect of voriconazole on the risk for nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including SCC and basal cell carcionoma, among those who have undergone allogeneic and autologous HCT. In all, 1220 individuals who had undergone allogeneic HCT and 1418 who had undergone autologous HCT were included in a retrospective cohort study. Multivariate analysis included voriconazole exposure and other known risk factors for NMSC. In multivariate analysis, voriconazole use increased the risk for NMSC (hazard ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-2.91) among those who had undergone allogeneic HCT, particularly for SCC (hazard ratio, 2.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.30-3.89). Voriconazole use did not appear to confer increased risk for NMSC among those who had undergone autologous HCT. This is a retrospective study. Voriconazole use represents an independent factor that may contribute to increased risk specifically for SCC in the allogeneic HCT population. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Concomitant Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy for High-Risk Nonmelanoma Skin Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

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    Smith Apisarnthanarax

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To report on the use and feasibility of a multimodality approach using concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with high-risk nonmelanoma skin carcinoma (NMSC of the head and neck. Methods. Records of patients with NMSC of the head and neck who received concomitant CRT at the University of North Carolina between 2001 and 2007 were reviewed. Results. Fifteen identified patients had at least one of the following high-risk factors: T4 disease (93%, unresectability (60%, regional nodal involvement (40%, and/or recurrence (47%. Ten patients were treated in the definitive setting and five in the postoperative setting. Platinum based chemotherapy was given in 14 (93% patients. Ten of fifteen (67% patients completed all planned chemotherapy treatments, and thirteen patients (87% completed at least 80% of planned chemotherapy. Mild radiation dermatitis occurred in all patients and reached grade 3 in 13% of patients. No patients experienced grade 4 or 5 toxicity. With a median followup of 31 months in surviving patients, the 2-year actuarial locoregional control and relapse-free survival were 79% and 49%, respectively. Conclusions. Definitive or postoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced or regionally metastasized NMSC of the head and neck appears feasible with acceptable toxicities and favorable locoregional control.

  17. Comparing the efficacy of photodynamic and sonodynamic therapy in non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Conor; Nesbitt, Heather; Nicholas, Dean; Kavanagh, Oisin N; McKenna, Kevin; Loan, Philip; Jack, Iain G; McHale, Anthony P; Callan, John F

    2016-07-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) involves the activation of a non-toxic sensitiser drug using low-intensity ultrasound to produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Given the low tissue attenuation of ultrasound, SDT provides a significant benefit over the more established photodynamic therapy (PDT) as it enables activation of sensitisers at a greater depth within human tissue. In this manuscript, we compare the efficacy of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) mediated PDT and SDT in a squamous cell carcinoma (A431) cell line as well as the ability of these treatments to reduce the size of A431 ectopic tumours in mice. Similarly, the relative cytotoxic ability of Rose Bengal mediated PDT and SDT was investigated in a B16-melanoma cell line and also in a B16 ectopic tumour model. The results reveal no statistically significant difference in efficacy between ALA mediated PDT or SDT in the non-melanoma model while Rose Bengal mediated SDT was significantly more efficacious than PDT in the melanoma model. This difference in efficacy was, at least in part, attributed to the dark pigmentation of the melanoma cells that effectively filtered the excitation light preventing it from activating the sensitiser while the use of ultrasound circumvented this problem. These results suggest SDT may provide a better outcome than PDT when treating highly pigmented cancerous skin lesions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations for optimal light delivery in photodynamic therapy of non-melanoma skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, R. M.; Wood, K.; Brown, C. T. A.; Ibbotson, S. H.; Moseley, H.

    2012-10-01

    The choice of light source is important for the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of non-melanoma skin cancer. We simulated the photodynamic dose (PDD) delivered to a tumour during PDT using theoretical radiation transfer simulations performed via our 3D Monte Carlo radiation transfer (MCRT) model for a range of light sources with light doses up to 75 J cm-2. The PDD delivered following superficial irradiation from (A) non-laser light sources, (B) monochromatic light, (C) alternate beam diameters and (D) re-positioning of the tumour within the tissue was computed. (A) The final PDD deposited to the tumour at a depth of 2 mm by the Paterson light source was 2.75, 2.50 and 1.04 times greater than the Waldmann 1200, Photocure and Aktilite, respectively. (B) Tumour necrosis occurred at a depth of 2.23 mm and increased to 3.81 mm for wavelengths 405 and 630 nm, respectively. (C) Increasing the beam diameter from 10 to 50 mm had very little effect on depth of necrosis. (D) As expected, necrosis depths were reduced when the tumour was re-positioned deeper into the tissue. These MCRT simulations show clearly the importance of choosing the correct light source to ensure optimal light delivery to achieve tumour necrosis.

  19. The role of new immunosuppressive drugs in nonmelanoma skin cancer in renal transplant recipients.

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    Bernat-García, J; Morales Suárez-Varela, M; Vilata-Corell, J J; Marquina-Vila, A; Pallardo, L; Crespo, J

    2014-12-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common malignancy in patients who have received a solid organ transplant. Multiple factors are involved in the onset of posttransplant NMSC. To analyze the relationship between new immunosuppressive drugs and the onset of NMSC in renal transplant recipients. This was a combined retrospective and prospective observational study in which we studied 289 patients who received a kidney transplant between January 1996 and December 2010 at Hospital Universitario Doctor Peset in Valencia, Spain. Seventy-three patients (25.2%) developed 162 NMSCs over a median follow-up of 72 months. There were no statistically significant differences in the onset of NMSC on comparing different induction therapy strategies involving monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. NMSCs occurred less frequently in patients treated with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors than in those treated with other immunosuppressive regimens, although the differences were not statistically significant. Three of 5 patients with recurrent NMSC who were switched from calcineurin inhibitors to mTOR inhibitors developed additional NMSCs despite the change. Induction therapy with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies in renal transplant recipients is not associated with an increased risk of NMSC. While mTOR inhibitors are associated with a lower risk of posttransplant NMSC, it remains to be determined whether a switch to these drugs is useful in the management of patients who develop multiple NMSCs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  20. Topical calcitriol prior to photodynamic therapy enhances treatment efficacy in non-melanoma skin cancer mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollakanti, Kishore; Anand, Sanjay; Maytin, Edward V.

    2015-03-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) such as basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most common form of human cancer worldwide, and their incidence is increasing. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), mediated by topically applied aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and subsequent exposure to light (either a laser or a noncoherent source), is being increasingly used for the treatment of dermatological disorders, including BCC and SCC. However, therapeutic responses of NMSCs to ALA-PDT are currently not superior to standard therapies, although the latter have undesirable side effects including scarring. In this study, we report that preconditioning of skin tumors with calcitriol (active form of Vitamin D; Vit D) prior to ALA-PDT, significantly improves the treatment outcome. In BCC and UVB-induced SCC mouse models, we identified an increase in tumor-specific accumulation of ALA induced photosensitizer (protoporphyrin IX, PpIX) due to Vit D preconditioning, of up to 6- fold in vivo. In addition, increased expression of differentiation (145 fold, p < 0.02) and proliferation (42 fold, p <0.005) markers were identified in BCC tumors, all leading to increased tumor destruction (18.3 fold, p < 0.03) with the combination approach, as compared to ALA-PDT alone. Histomorphological changes identified using hematoxylin and eosin staining, and results of TUNEL staining, together documented a beneficial effect of Vit D pretreatment upon tumor cell death. We conclude that this new combination approach with Vit D and ALA-PDT has great potential to achieve complete remission of NMSC tumors, with excellent cosmetic results and an overall beneficial impact upon patient care.

  1. Analysis of laser surgery in non-melanoma skin cancer for optimal tissue removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Salas-García, Irene; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2015-02-01

    Laser surgery is a commonly used technique for tissue ablation or the resection of malignant tumors. It presents advantages over conventional non-optical ablation techniques, like a scalpel or electrosurgery, such as the increased precision of the resected volume, minimization of scars and shorter recovery periods. Laser surgery is employed in medical branches such as ophthalmology or dermatology. The application of laser surgery requires the optimal adjustment of laser beam parameters, taking into account the particular patient and lesion. In this work we present a predictive tool for tissue resection in biological tissue after laser surgery, which allows an a priori knowledge of the tissue ablation volume, area and depth. The model employs a Monte Carlo 3D approach for optical propagation and a rate equation for plasma-induced ablation. The tool takes into account characteristics of the specific lesion to be ablated, mainly the geometric, optical and ablation properties. It also considers the parameters of the laser beam, such as the radius, spatial profile, pulse width, total delivered energy or wavelength. The predictive tool is applied to dermatology tumor resection, particularly to different types of non-melanoma skin cancer tumors: basocellular carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and infiltrative carcinoma. The ablation volume, area and depth are calculated for healthy skin and for each type of tumor as a function of the laser beam parameters. The tool could be used for laser surgery planning before the clinical application. The laser parameters could be adjusted for optimal resection volume, by personalizing the process to the particular patient and lesion.

  2. The occurrence of non-melanoma malignant skin lesions and non-cutaneous squamous-cell carcinoma among metastatic melanoma patients: an observational cohort study in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haojie; Pedersen, Lars; Nørgaard, Mette; Ulrichsen, Sinna P; Thygesen, Sandra K; Nelson, Jeanenne J

    2016-05-03

    Inhibitors of mutant BRAF are emerging as standard of care in patients with metastatic melanoma who carry relevant oncogenic mutations. However, BRAF inhibitors are found to induce cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cuSCC). Population-based background rates of cuSCC and non-cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (non-cuSCC) in the metastatic melanoma population may contextualize safety signals from randomized clinical trials or the clinics. However, these background rates are lacking. We conducted a historical cohort study to evaluate the background rates of new-onset non-melanoma skin lesions and non-cuSCC among 2,814 metastatic malignant melanoma patients diagnosed in 1997-2010, identified through the Danish Cancer Registry and the National Pathology Registry. Patients were excluded if they had a history of cancer before the metastatic melanoma diagnosis, other than skin cancers. We determined the incidence of non-melanoma malignant skin lesions and non-cuSCC that occurred post metastatic melanoma diagnosis, censoring patients at death, emigration, or December 31, 2011 (end of study period), whichever came first. The median age at metastatic melanoma diagnosis was 64 years. Over 40% of patients died within one year of metastatic diagnosis and ~70% died within 5 years. The percentages of patients with prior history or prevalent disease at metastatic melanoma diagnosis included: 8.6% with cuSCC or basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 3.9% with actinic keratosis (AK), and 0.7% with Bowen's disease. No patients had past or current non-cuSCC per study exclusion criterion. The incidence of non-melanoma skin lesions during the 6 months post-metastatic melanoma diagnosis was as follows: BCC, 1.8% (42.5 per 1000 person-years [PY]); AK, 0.8% (18.6 per 1000 PY); cuSCC, 0.1% (1.7 per 1000 PY); Bowen's disease, 0.04% (0.8 per 1000 PY); and keratoacanthoma (KA), 0%. Non-cuSCC was observed in 3 patients (0.1%; 2.5 per 1000 PY) at 3 sites: bronchi, heart and lung. CuSCC and non-cuSCC were

  3. Correlation Between Incisional Biopsy Histological Subtype and a Mohs Surgery Specimen for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Peralta, E C; Ocampo-Candiani, J; Vázquez-Martínez, O T; Gutiérrez-Villarreal, I M; Miranda-Maldonado, I; Garza-Rodríguez, V

    Histological diagnosis of a clinically suspected nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is recommended before treatment. For NMSC, concordance between the histological subtype of the preoperative biopsy and the excision specimen of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has been reported to range from 10% to 81%. No large study on the concordance between NMSC histology seen in a preoperative biopsy with the following tumour specimen from Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) has been performed in a Latin American population. The aim of this study was to analyse and compare the histological subtype of the incisional biopsies reviewed by the dermatopathologist with the histological subtype of the tumour specimen obtained during MMS interpreted by the dermatopathologist and the Mohs surgeon. A retrospective analysis of 320 NMSC was performed. The interobserver correlation was based on kappa values. The mean weighted kappa value between the preoperative NMSC biopsy and intraoperative histological subtype of the tumour specimen from MMS analysed by the Mohs surgeon and the dermatopathologist was 0.22 and 0.24, respectively. The correlation in the histologic subtype of the intraoperative tumour specimen from MMS that was interpreted by the dermatopathologist and Mohs surgeon was 0.58. Dermatologists need to be aware of the limited value of incisional biopsies to accurately diagnose the histological subtype of a NMSC. The concordance rate in the histological diagnosis of the tumour specimens that were obtained from MMS between the Mohs surgeon and the dermatopathologist is moderate. However, the correlation is low compared with incisional biopsy subtypes. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. The initial experience of electronic brachytherapy for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer

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    Bhatnagar Ajay

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Millions of people are diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC worldwide each year. While surgical approaches are the standard treatment, some patients are appropriate candidates for radiation therapy for NMSC. High dose rate (HDR brachytherapy using surface applicators has shown efficacy in the treatment of NMSC and shortens the radiation treatment schedule by using a condensed hypofractionated approach. An electronic brachytherapy (EBT system permits treatment of NMSC without the use of a radioactive isotope. Methods Data were collected retrospectively from patients treated from July 2009 through March 2010. Pre-treatment biopsy was performed to confirm a malignant cutaneous diagnosis. A CT scan was performed to assess lesion depth for treatment planning, and an appropriate size of surface applicator was selected to provide an acceptable margin. An HDR EBT system delivered a dose of 40.0 Gy in eight fractions twice weekly with 48 hours between fractions, prescribed to a depth of 3-7 mm. Treatment feasibility, acute safety, efficacy outcomes, and cosmetic results were assessed. Results Thirty-seven patients (mean age 72.5 years with 44 cutaneous malignancies were treated. Of 44 lesions treated, 39 (89% were T1, 1 (2% Tis, 1 (2% T2, and 3 (7% lesions were recurrent. Lesion locations included the nose for 16 lesions (36.4%, ear 5 (11%, scalp 5 (11%, face 14 (32%, and an extremity for 4 (9%. Median follow-up was 4.1 months. No severe toxicities occurred. Cosmesis ratings were good to excellent for 100% of the lesions at follow-up. Conclusions The early outcomes of EBT for the treatment of NMSC appear to show acceptable acute safety and favorable cosmetic outcomes. Using a hypofractionated approach, EBT provides a convenient treatment schedule.

  5. Non-melanoma skin cancer and risk of Alzheimer's disease and all-cause dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrun A J Schmidt

    Full Text Available Cancer patients may be at decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease. This hypothesis is best developed for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC, but supportive epidemiological data are sparse. We therefore conducted a nationwide cohort study of the association between NMSC and Alzheimer's disease (main outcome and all-cause dementia. Using Danish medical databases, we identified adults diagnosed with NMSC between 1 January 1980 and 30 November 2013 (n = 216,221 and a comparison cohort of five individuals matched to each NMSC patient by sex and birth year (n = 1,081,097. We followed individuals from the time of diagnosis, or corresponding date for matched comparators, until a dementia diagnosis, death, emigration, or 30 November 2013, whichever came first. We used stratified Cox regression adjusted for comorbidities to compute hazard ratios (HRs associating NMSC with dementia. We computed cumulative risks of dementia, treating death as a competing risk. NMSC was associated with a HR of 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92-0.98 for Alzheimer's disease and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.90-0.94 for all-cause dementia. HRs were similar for basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma, the two most common forms of NMSC. Estimates of risk reduction were more pronounced in the beginning of follow-up, reaching null after 5-10 years. At the end of follow-up (34 years, cumulative risk of Alzheimer's disease was 4.6% (95% CI: 4.4%-4.8% among patients with NMSC vs. 4.7% (95% CI: 4.6%-4.9% in the comparison cohort. In conclusion, NMSC was associated with 2%-10% reductions in relative risks of Alzheimer's disease and all-cause dementia. However, these small inverse associations may have been caused by ascertainment bias due to decreased awareness of NMSC tumors in persons with undiagnosed early cognitive impairment or by confounding from a more neuroprotective lifestyle among persons with NMSC.

  6. Trends in Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer (Basal Cell Carcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma) in Canada: A Descriptive Analysis of Available Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mariam; Kalia, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Despite its increased incidence and status as the most prevalent cancer in Canada, there is a paucity of epidemiological data on non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). To assess trends of keratinocyte carcinomas (KC) in Canada over 5 decades. Articles published from 1960 to 2015 on NMSC in Canada were identified through MEDLINE. Six articles met our search criteria. Overall, KC has increased. However, the rate of increase in the past decade has slowed down and decreased in younger age cohorts. Men had higher incidences of KC. In both sexes, the basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma ratio was ≥2.5:1. Keratinocyte carcinomas were most commonly located on the head and neck, and increasing rates are occurring on the trunk. The methods of registering skin cancer cases vary among different provinces. Keratinocyte carcinomas incidence is overall increasing; however, there may be evidence that the incidence is leveling off and decreasing in younger age cohorts. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Registration in the Danish Regional Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database: completeness of registration and accuracy of key variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Lamberg

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Anna L Lamberg1, Deirdre Cronin-Fenton2, Anne B Olesen11Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, C, DenmarkObjective: To validate a clinical database for nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC with the aim of monitoring and predicting the prognosis of NMSC treated by dermatologists in clinics in the central and north Denmark regions.Methods: We assessed the completeness of registration of patients and follow-up visits, and positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV, sensitivity, and specificity of registrations in the database. We used the Danish Pathology Registry (DPR (n = 288 and a review of randomly selected medical records (n = 67 from two clinics as gold standards.Results: The completeness of registration of patients was 62% and 76% with DPR and medical record review as gold standards, respectively. The completeness of registration of 1st and 2nd follow up visits was 85% and 69%, respectively. The PPV and NPV ranged from 85% to 99%, and the sensitivity and specificity from 67% to 100%.Conclusion: Overall, the accuracy of variables registered in the NMSC database was satisfactory but completeness of patient registration and follow-up visits were modest. The NMSC database is a potentially valuable tool for monitoring and facilitating improvement of NMSC treatment in dermatology clinics. However, there is still room for improvement of registration of both patients and their follow-up visits.Keywords: nonmelanoma skin cancer, validation, database, positive predictive value, completeness

  8. Discrimination of non-melanoma skin lesions from non-tumor human skin tissues in vivo using Raman spectroscopy and multivariate statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Fabricio L; Pacheco, Marcos T T; Bodanese, Benito; Pasqualucci, Carlos A; Zângaro, Renato A; Silveira, Landulfo

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to discriminate human non-melanoma skin lesions from non-tumor tissues in vivo. This work proposed the discrimination between non-melanoma (basal cell carcinoma, BCC; squamous cell carcinoma, SCC) and pre-cancerous lesions (actinic keratosis, AK) from benign lesions and normal (non-tumor group, NT) tissues, using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy with a Raman probe. Prior to surgery, the spectra of suspicious lesions were obtained in situ. The spectra of adjacent, clinically normal skin were also obtained. Lesions were resectioned and submitted for histopathology. The Raman spectra were measured using a Raman spectrometer (830 nm). Two types of discrimination models were developed to distinguish the different histopathological groups. The principal components analysis discriminant analysis (PCA/DA) and the partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS/DA) were based on Euclidean, quadratic and Mahalanobis distances. PCA and PLS spectral vectors showed spectral features of skin constituents, such as lipids (between 1,250 cm(-1) and 1,300 cm(-1) and at 1,450 cm(-1)) and proteins (between 870 cm(-1) and 940 cm(-1), 1,240 cm(-1) and 1,271 cm(-1), and at 1,000 cm(-1) and 1,450 cm(-1)). Despite the small spectral differences between malignant lesions and benign tissues, the algorithms discriminated the spectra of non-melanoma skin and pre-cancerous lesions from benign and normal tissues, with an overall accuracy of 82.8% and 91.9%, respectively. PCA and PLS could discriminate Raman spectra of skin tissues, opening the way for an in vivo optical diagnosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Assessment of Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging in the Diagnosis of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer and Benign Lesions Versus Normal Skin:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Nürnberg, Birgit Meincke

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical imaging technique that may be useful in diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). OBJECTIVES To describe OCT features in NMSC such as actinic keratosis (AK) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and in benign lesions and to assess...... the diagnostic accuracy of OCT in differentiating NMSC from benign lesions and normal skin. METHODS AND MATERIALS OCT and polarization-sensitive (PS) OCT from 104 patients were studied. Observer-blinded evaluation of OCT images from 64 BCCs, 1 baso-squamous carcinoma, 39 AKs, two malignant melanomas, nine benign...... lesions, and 105 OCT images from perilesional skin was performed; 50 OCT images of NMSC and 50 PS-OCT images of normal skin were evaluated twice. RESULTS Sensitivity was 79% to 94% and specificity 85% to 96% in differentiating normal skin from lesions. Important features were absence of well...

  10. Comprehensive measurement of UVB-induced non-melanoma skin cancer burden in mice using photographic images as a substitute for the caliper method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, Marc; Purohit, Nupur K; Shah, Girish M

    2017-01-01

    The vernier caliper has been used as a gold standard to measure the length, width and height of skin tumors to calculate their total area and volume. It is a simple method for collecting data on a few tumors at a time, but becomes tedious, time-consuming and stressful for the animals and the operator when used for measuring multiple tumors in a large number of animals in protocols such as UVB-induced non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in SKH-1 mice. Here, we show that photographic images of these mice taken within a few minutes under optimized conditions can be subjected to computerized analyses to determine tumor volume and area as accurately and precisely as the caliper method. Unlike the caliper method, the photographic method also records the incidence and multiplicity of tumors, thus permitting comprehensive measurement of tumor burden in the animal. The simplicity and ease of this method will permit more frequent monitoring of tumor burden in long protocols, resulting in the creation of additional data about dynamic changes in progression of cancer or the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. The photographic method can broadly substitute the caliper method for quantifying other skin pathologies.

  11. Ultraviolet damage, DNA repair and vitamin D in nonmelanoma skin cancer and in malignant melanoma: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichrath, Jörg; Rass, Knuth

    2014-01-01

    -induced tumorigenesis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer. An interesting new perspective in DNA damage and repair research lies in the participation of mammalian mismatch repair (MMR) in UV damage correction. As MMR enzyme hMSH2 displays a p53 target gene, is induced by UVB radiation and is involved in NER pathways, studies have now been initiated to elucidate the physiological and pathophysiological role of MMR in malignant melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer development. Interestingly, increasing evidence now demonstrates an important function of the vitamin D endocrine system (VDES) for prevention of BCC, SCC and melanoma, identifying the vitamin D receptor as a tumor suppressor in the skin.

  12. MC1R gene variants and non-melanoma skin cancer: A pooled-analysis from the M-SKIP project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Tagliabue; M.C. Fargnoli (Maria Concetta); S. Gandini (Sara); P. Maisonneuve (Patrick); F. Liu; M. Kayser; T.E.C. Nijsten (Tamar); J. Han; R. Kumar; N.A. Gruis (Nelleke); L. Ferrucci; W. Branicki (Wojciech); T. Dwyer; L. Blizzard; P. Helsing; P.J.M. Autier (Philippe); J.C. García-Borrón (José C); P.A. Kanetsky; M.T. Landi; J. Little; J. Newton-Bishop; F. Sera; S. Raimondi (Sara)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground:The melanocortin-1-receptor (MC1R) gene regulates human pigmentation and is highly polymorphic in populations of European origins. The aims of this study were to evaluate the association between MC1R variants and the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), and to investigate

  13. Does the nature of residual immune function explain the differential risk of non-melanoma skin cancer development in immunosuppressed organ transplant recipients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Ji-Won; Overgaard, Nana H; Burke, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving immunosuppression to prevent organ transplant rejection are at a greatly increased risk of developing nonmelanoma skin cancer. In recent years a correlation has been identified between the class of immunosuppressant that these patients receive and their subsequent cancer risk; ...

  14. Non-melanoma Skin Cancer - a Clinicopathological Study of Patients with Basal Cell Carcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoš, Vladimír; Kullová, Milada

    2017-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common malignancy in Caucasians. It mainly includes two major keratinocyte tumors - basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The objective of the study was to analyze and compare the clinicopathological differences between patients with BCC and SCC of the skin. A cohort of 541 patients with a total of 719 BCCs, and 126 patients with a total of 162 SCCs were retrospectively analyzed. While there was virtually the same proportion of men (49.91%) and women (50.09%) in BCC patients, SCCs occurred more frequently in men (68.2%) than in women (31.8%). The mean age of the individuals with BCC and SCC was 70.8 and 78.2 years, resp. The number of BCCs rises from 50 years of age and this increase showed a linear trend up to 80 years, subsequently followed by decline. SCC lesions occur more rapidly from 70 years of age followed by a sharp increase that exhibited an exponential relationship. BCCs and SCCs occurred predominantly on the head and neck region, comprising a total of 69.8% and 81.4% of the cases, resp. However, BCC lesions were seen more often on the face and SCC lesions were diagnosed more frequently on the extra-facial parts of the head. Further, BCCs occurred more frequently on the trunk, and particularly on the back, compared to SCCs. Although BCC and SCC are covered under common term NMSC, they manifest several clinicopathological differences. Despite sharing common etiologic determinants, at least from the onco-epidemiologic perspective, they should be considered separately.Key words: non-melanoma skin cancer - basal cell carcinoma - squamous cell carcinoma.

  15. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers in hairy cell leukaemia: a Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results population analysis and the 30-year experience at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Justin M; Kishtagari, Ashwin; Hsu, Meier; Lacouture, Mario E; Postow, Michael A; Park, Jae H; Stein, Eytan M; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Devlin, Sean M; Tallman, Martin S

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have examined melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) incidence rates after a diagnosis of hairy cell leukaemia (HCL). We assessed 267 HCL patients treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data for melanoma and NMSC incidence rates after HCL. Incidence data from MSKCC patients demonstrated a 10-year combined melanoma and NMSC skin cancer rate of 11·3%, melanoma 4·4% and NMSC 6·9%. Molecular analysis of skin cancers from MSKCC patients revealed activating RAS mutations in 3/9 patients, including one patient with melanoma. Of 4750 SEER patients with HCL, 55 (1·2%) had a subsequent diagnosis of melanoma. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) did not show that melanoma was more common in HCL patients versus the general population (SIR 1·3, 95% CI 0·78-2·03). Analysis of SEER HCL patients diagnosed before and after 1990 (approximately before and after purine analogue therapy was introduced) showed no evidence of an increased incidence after 1990. A better understanding of any potential association between HCL and skin cancer is highly relevant given ongoing trials using BRAF inhibitors, such as vemurafenib, for relapsed HCL, as RAS-mutant skin cancers could be paradoxically activated in these patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Relationships between skin cancers and blood groups--link between non-melanomas and ABO/Rh factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihan, Yasemin Benderli; Baykan, Halit; Kavuncuoglu, Erhan; Mutlu, Hasan; Kucukoglu, Mehmet Burhan; Ozyurt, Kemal; Oguz, Arzu

    2013-01-01

    This investigation focused on possible relationships between skin cancers and ABO/Rh blood groups. Between January 2005 and December 2012, medical data of 255 patients with skin cancers who were admitted to Kayseri Training and Research Hospital, Radiation Oncology and Plastic Surgery Outpatient Clinics were retrospectively analyzed. Blood groups of these patients were recorded. The control group consisted of 25701 healthy volunteers who were admitted to Kayseri Training and Research Hospital, Blood Donation Center between January 2010 and December 2011. The distribution of the blood groups of the patients with skin cancers was compared to the distribution of ABO/Rh blood groups of healthy controls. The association of the histopathological subtypes of skin cancer with the blood groups was also investigated. Of the patients, 50.2% had A type, 26.3% had O type, 16.1% had B type, and 7.5% had AB blood group with a positive Rh (+) in 77.3%. Of the controls, 44.3% had A type, 31.5% had 0 type, 16.1% had B type, and 8.1% had AB blood group with a positive Rh (+) in 87.8%. There was a statistically significant difference in the distribution of blood groups and Rh factors (A Rh (-) and 0 Rh positive) between the patients and controls. A total of 36.8% and 20.4% of the patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) had A Rh (+) and B Rh (+), respectively, while 39.2% and 27.6% of the controls had A Rh (+) and B Rh (+), respectively. A significant relationship was observed between the patients with BCC and controls in terms of A Rh (-) (p=0.001). Our study results demonstrated that there is a significant relationship between non-melanoma skin cancer and ABO/Rh factors.

  17. Decreased risk of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer in patients with vitiligo: a survey among 1307 patients and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulings, H E; Overkamp, M; Ceylan, E; Nieuweboer-Krobotova, L; Bos, J D; Nijsten, T; Wolkerstorfer, A W; Luiten, R M; van der Veen, J P W

    2013-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common skin disease characterized by autoimmune melanocyte destruction. Recent genetic studies suggest a lower susceptibility to melanoma in patients with vitiligo; however, lifetime melanoma prevalence in patients with vitiligo has not previously been studied. Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) prevalence has been studied, but only in small studies and with contradictory results. This retrospective, comparative cohort survey was designed to assess lifetime prevalences of melanoma and NMSC in patients with vitiligo compared with nonvitiligo controls. Patients with nonsegmental vitiligo, who visited our clinic between January 1995 and September 2010, and were aged 50 years or older at the time of the study, were invited to participate in a postal survey. The questions regarded demographics, vitiligo characteristics, phototherapy history, skin cancer risk factors and the number of skin cancers experienced during the patient's lifetime. Patients were asked to have their partner fill in a control questionnaire. All skin cancers were validated by a pathology report. In total 2635 invitations were sent and 1307 eligible questionnaires were returned (50%). Multivariate logistic regression models were used to quantify adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between vitiligo and lifetime prevalences of melanoma and NMSC.  Adjusted for confounders, patients with vitiligo had a threefold lower probability of developing melanoma (adjusted OR 0·32; 95% CI 0·12-0·88) and NMSC (adjusted OR 0·28; 95% CI 0·16-0·50). Subgroup analyses of patients treated with narrowband ultraviolet (UV) B, and psoralen and UVA did not show dose-related trends of increased age-adjusted lifetime prevalence of melanoma or NMSC. Our findings suggest that patients with vitiligo have a decreased risk of both melanoma and NMSC. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. Vitamin D and melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer risk and prognosis: a comprehensive review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caini, Saverio; Boniol, Mathieu; Tosti, Giulio; Magi, Serena; Medri, Matelda; Stanganelli, Ignazio; Palli, Domenico; Assedi, Melania; Marmol, Veronique Del; Gandini, Sara

    2014-10-01

    Vitamin D is formed mainly in the skin upon exposure to sunlight and can as well be taken orally with food or through supplements. While sun exposure is a known risk factor for skin cancer development, vitamin D exerts anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on melanocytes and keratinocytes in vitro. To clarify the role of vitamin D in skin carcinogenesis, we performed a review of the literature and meta-analysis to evaluate the association of vitamin D serum levels and dietary intake with cutaneous melanoma (CM) and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) risk and melanoma prognostic factors. Twenty papers were included for an overall 1420 CM and 2317 NMSC. The summary relative risks (SRRs) from random effects models for the association of highest versus lowest vitamin D serum levels was 1.46 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.60-3.53) and 1.64 (95% CI 1.02-2.65) for CM and NMSC, respectively. The SRR for the highest versus lowest quintile of vitamin D intake was 0.86 (95% CI 0.63-1.13) for CM and 1.03 (95% CI 0.95-1.13) for NMSC. Data were suggestive of an inverse association between vitamin D blood levels and CM thickness at diagnosis. Further research is needed to investigate the effect of vitamin D on skin cancer risk in populations with different exposure to sunlight and dietary habits, and to evaluate whether vitamin D supplementation is effective in improving CM survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Occupational exposure to ultraviolet radiation and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in a multinational European study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Surdu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies suggest that ambient sunlight plays an important role in the pathogenesis of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC. However, there is ongoing controversy regarding the relevance of occupational exposure to natural and artificial ultraviolet radiation (UV radiation. OBJECTIVES: We investigated potential associations between natural and artificial UV radiation exposure at work with NMSC in a case-control study conducted in Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia. METHODS: Occupational exposures were classified by expert assessment for 527 controls and 618 NMSC cases (515 basal cell carcinoma, BCC. Covariate information was collected via interview and multiple logistic regression models were used to assess associations between UV exposure and NMSC. RESULTS: Lifetime prevalence of occupational exposure in the participants was 13% for natural UV radiation and 7% for artificial UV radiation. Significant negative associations between occupational exposure to natural UV radiation and NMSC were detected for all who had ever been exposed (odds ratio (OR 0.47, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.27-0.80; similar results were detected using a semi-quantitative metric of cumulative exposure. The effects were modified by skin complexion, with significantly decreased risks of BCC among participants with light skin complexion. No associations were observed in relation to occupational artificial UV radiation exposure. CONCLUSIONS: The protective effect of occupational exposure to natural UV radiation was unexpected, but limited to light-skinned people, suggesting adequate sun-protection behaviors. Further investigations focusing on variations in the individual genetic susceptibility and potential interactions with environmental and other relevant factors are planned.

  20. Satisfaction of mountain guides with high sun protection as a tool to prevent non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizek, L; Krause, J; Biedermann, T; Zink, A

    2017-11-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is an occupational disease for outdoor workers in Germany since 2015. Sustainable prevention is demanded and sunscreen promoted as an effective tool. However, studies on the satisfaction of sunscreen users are rare. To evaluate the satisfaction of mountain guides using a high SPF sunscreen product as an appropriate prevention tool for mountain guides. Motivating mountain and ski guides in Germany to use very high protection sunscreen (SPF50+, Actinica Lotion) during a 4- to 8-h workday followed by the completion of a self-filled paper-based questionnaire about their experience and satisfaction with the product. Of 88 mountain and ski guides (61 men, 27 women) included in the study, 61.4% reported regular sunscreen use with the application of very high protection (SPF50+) in 18.6% of all cases. At the end of the workday, 78.6% found the product convenient and easy to include into their daily work and 79.3% felt sufficiently protected against the sun. Overall satisfaction with the use of high SPF products during work is high in mountain and ski guides and could be an effective tool in prevention campaigns. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  1. Melanoma and Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Associated with Angiotensin-Converting-Enzyme Inhibitors, Angiotensin-Receptor Blockers and Thiazides: A Matched Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Beatrice; Majewski, Sara; Kim, Ashley S; Kiguradze, Tina; Martinez-Escala, Estela M; Friedland, Rivka; Amin, Ahmad; Laumann, Anne E; Edwards, Beatrice J; Rademaker, Alfred W; Martini, Mary C; West, Dennis P

    2017-03-01

    Controversy exists about an association between angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs), and thiazides (TZs) and the risk of malignant melanoma (MM), and non-melanoma skin cancer-basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The aim of this study was to determine if an association exists for ACEI, ARB, or TZ exposure and skin cancers. This was a matched cohort study using a large electronic medical records repository, the Northwestern Medicine Enterprise Data Warehouse (NMEDW). The exposed population consisted of patients with a documented order for an ACEI, ARB, or TZ with no prior history of skin cancer. The control population consisted of matched patients without documented exposure to ACEI, ARB, or TZ and no previous skin cancer. Incident MM, BCC, or SCC diagnosis by ICD-9 codes was recorded. Odds ratios (ORs) were obtained by using logistic regression analyses. Among the 27,134 patients exposed to an ACEI, 87 MM, 533 BCC, and 182 SCC were detected. Among the 13,818 patients exposed to an ARB, 96 MM, 283 BCC, and 106 SCC were detected. Among the 15,166 patients exposed to a TZ, 99 MM, 262 BCC, and 130 SCC were detected. Significant associations using ORs from logistic regression were found for MM and TZs (OR 1.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-3.82); BCC and ARBs (OR 2.86; 95% CI 2.13-3.83), ACEIs (OR 2.23; 95% CI 1.78-2.81) and TZs (OR 2.11; 95% CI 1.60-2.79); SCC and ARBs (OR 2.22; 95% CI 1.37-3.61), ACEIs (OR 1.94; 95% CI 1.37-2.76), and TZs (OR 4.11; 95% CI 2.66-6.35). A safety signal for ACEIs, ARBs, and TZs and BCC and SCC, as well as for TZs and MM, was detected. An increased awareness and education, especially for those who are at high risk for skin cancer, are warranted for patients and healthcare providers. Further exploration of such associations for these commonly used drug classes is warranted.

  2. Laser induced autofluorescence for diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakaki, E.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Merlemis, N.; Kalatzis, I.; Sianoudis, I. A.; Batsi, O.; Christofidou, E.; Stratigos, A. J.; Katsambas, A. D.; Antoniou, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Non melanoma skin cancer is one of the most frequent malignant tumors among humans. A non-invasive technique, with high sensitivity and high specificity, would be the most suitable method for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or other malignancies diagnostics, instead of the well established biopsy and histopathology examination. In the last decades, a non-invasive, spectroscopic diagnostic method was introduced, the laser induced fluorescence (LIF), which could generate an image contrast between different states of skin tissue. The noninvasiveness consists in that this biophotonic method do not require tissue sample excision, what is necessary in histopathology characterization and biochemical analysis of the skin tissue samples, which is worldwide used as an evaluation gold standard. The object of this study is to establish the possibilities of a relatively portable system for laser induced skin autofluorescence to differentiate malignant from nonmalignant skin lesions. Unstained human skin samples, excised from humans undergoing biopsy examination, were irradiated with a Nd:YAG-3ω laser (λ=355 nm, 6 ns), used as an excitation source for the autofluorescence measurements. A portable fiber-based spectrometer was used to record fluorescence spectra of the sites of interest. The ex vivo results, obtained with this spectroscopic technique, were correlated with the histopathology results. After the analysis of the fluorescence spectra of almost 60 skin tissue areas, we developed an algorithm to distinguish different types of malignant lesions, including inflammatory areas. Optimization of the data analysis and potential use of LIF spectroscopy with 355 nm Nd:YAG laser excitation of tissue autofluorescence for clinical applications are discussed.

  3. Nonmelanoma skin cancer and risk of all-cause and cancer-related mortality: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Virginia; Armeson, Kent; Hampras, Shalaka; Ferris, Laura K; Visvanathan, Kala; Rollison, Dana; Alberg, Anthony J

    2017-05-01

    Some reports suggest that a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) may be associated with increased mortality. NMSCs have very low fatality rates, but the high prevalence of NMSC elevates the importance of the possibility of associated subsequent mortality from other causes. The variable methods and findings of existing studies leave the significance of these results uncertain. To provide clarity, we conducted a systematic review to characterize the evidence on the associations of NMSC with: (1) all-cause mortality, (2) cancer-specific mortality, and (3) cancer survival. Bibliographic databases were searched through February 2016. Cohort studies published in English were included if adequate data were provided to estimate mortality ratios in patients with-versus-without NMSC. Data were abstracted from the total of eight studies from independent data sources that met inclusion criteria (n = 3 for all-cause mortality, n = 2 for cancer-specific mortality, and n = 5 for cancer survival). For all-cause mortality, a significant increased risk was observed for patients with a history of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (mortality ratio estimates (MR) 1.25 and 1.30), whereas no increased risk was observed for patients with a history of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) (MRs 0.96 and 0.97). Based on one study, the association with cancer-specific mortality was stronger for SCC (MR 2.17) than BCC (MR 1.15). Across multiple types of cancer both SCC and BCC tended to be associated with poorer survival from second primary malignancies. Multiple studies support an association between NMSC and fatal outcomes; the associations tend to be more potent for SCC than BCC. Additional investigation is needed to more precisely characterize these associations and elucidate potential underlying mechanisms.

  4. Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Canada Chapter 4: Management of Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zloty, David; Guenther, Lyn C; Sapijaszko, Mariusz; Barber, Kirk; Claveau, Joël; Adamek, Tamara; Ashkenas, John

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignancy. Growth of BCCs leads to local destruction of neighbouring healthy skin and underlying tissue and can result in significant functional and cosmetic morbidity. To provide guidance to Canadian health care practitioners regarding management of BCCs. Literature searches and development of graded recommendations were carried out as discussed in the accompanying Introduction. Although BCCs rarely metastasize, they can be aggressive and disfiguring. This chapter describes the natural history and prognosis of BCCs. Risk stratification is based on clinical features, including the site and size of the tumour, its histologic subtype (nodular vs sclerosing), and its history of recurrence. Various options should be considered for BCC treatment, including cryosurgery, curettage, and topical or photodynamic approaches, as well as fixed-margin surgery and Mohs micrographic surgery. Stratification of recurrence risk for individual BCCs determines the most appropriate therapeutic course. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. RNASEL and MIR146A SNP-SNP interaction as a susceptibility factor for non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh F Farzan

    Full Text Available Immunity and inflammatory pathways are important in the genesis of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC. Functional genetic variation in immune modulators has the potential to affect disease etiology. We investigated associations between common variants in two key regulators, MIR146A and RNASEL, and their relation to NMSCs. Using a large population-based case-control study of basal cell (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, we investigated the impact of MIR146A SNP rs2910164 on cancer risk, and interaction with a SNP in one of its putative targets (RNASEL, rs486907. To examine associations between genotype and BCC and SCC, occurrence odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, accounting for multiple confounding factors. We did not observe an overall change in the odds ratios for SCC or BCC among individuals carrying either of the RNASEL or MIR146A variants compared with those who were wild type at these loci. However, there was a sex-specific association between BCC and MIR146A in women (ORGC = 0.73, [95%CI = 0.52-1.03]; ORCC = 0.29, [95% CI = 0.14-0.61], p-trend<0.001, and a reduction in risk, albeit not statistically significant, associated with RNASEL and SCC in men (ORAG = 0.88, [95%CI = 0.65-1.19]; ORAA = 0.68, [95%CI = 0.43-1.08], p-trend = 0.10. Most striking was the strong interaction between the two genes. Among individuals carrying variant alleles of both rs2910164 and rs486907, we observed inverse relationships with SCC (ORSCC = 0.56, [95%CI = 0.38-0.81], p-interaction = 0.012 and BCC (ORBCC = 0.57, [95%CI = 0.40-0.80], p-interaction = 0.005. Our results suggest that genetic variation in immune and inflammatory regulators may influence susceptibility to NMSC, and novel SNP-SNP interaction for a microRNA and its target. These data suggest that RNASEL, an enzyme involved in RNA turnover, is controlled by miR-146a and may be important in NMSC etiology.

  6. A Network Meta-Analysis of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer (NMSC) Treatments: Efficacy and Safety Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Renrong; Sun, Qian

    2017-11-01

    The mainstream treatments for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) include photodynamic therapy (PDT), surgery excision (SE), cryotherapy (CT), imiquimod (IM), radiotherapy (RT), 5-fluorouracil (FU), and vehicle (VE). Our network meta-analysis (NMA) was aimed at evaluating the efficacy and safety of these seven treatments and providing superior ones. After searching the trials from Embase and PubMed and screening with our criteria, we conducted the NMA with software R 3.2.3 and STATA 13.0. Complete lesion response (CLR), complete lesion clearance (CLC), cumulative recurrence probabilities (CRP), and adverse effects (AEs) were considered as outcomes and displayed as odds ratios (ORs) and 95% credible intervals (CrI). The surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) was calculated to rank each treatment on each index. The consistency of direct and indirect evidence was also assessed by node-splitting and heat plot methods. Data from 18 trials with 3706 patients were included. Both IM and SE were demonstrated significantly higher CLR rate than VE (OR = 9.12, 95% CrI = 1.92-47.5; OR = 26.1, 95% CrI = 1.92-347; respectively), while only IM was proved to be statistically better than VE in CLC rate (OR = 7.03, 95% CrI = 1.51-32.8). No significant difference was observed concerning CRP, and IM was more likely to induce AEs than VE (OR = 4.44, 95% CrI = 1.58-13.9). The SUCRA results indicated that SE was the treatment with best ranking in the entire three efficacy indexes and a relatively high safety. Taking efficacy and safety into account, our study recommended SE as the optimal regimen for NMSC with high efficacy considering CLR, CLC, and CRP and moderate AEs when compared with other interventions. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 3686-3695, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nonmelanoma huidkanker tijdens behandeling met TNF-blokkers bij psoriasis en reumatoïde artritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lümig, P. P. M.; Menting, S. P.; van den Reek, J. M. P. A.; Spuls, P. I.; van Riel, P. L. C. M.; van de Kerkhof, P. C. M.; Fransen, J.; Kievit, W.; de Jong, E. M. G. J.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate if there was a difference in time to the occurrence of first non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and in the incidence of NMSC between psoriasis patients and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients on TNF inhibitors. Prospective observational cohort study. We compared the time to first NMSC

  8. Quality of life in non-melanoma skin cancer--the skin cancer quality of life (SCQoL) questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Gabrielle Randskov; Christensen, Karl Bang; Esmann, Solveig

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Disease-specific quality of life (QoL) questionnaires are increasingly used to provide patient-reported out-come measures in both malignant and non-malignant disease. OBJECTIVE: To create, validate and test the psychometrics of the Skin Cancer Quality of Life (SCQoL), which was designed...... Theory (IRT) and internal consistency. Differential Item Functioning (DIF) was found for a single item, but the effect was small. CONCLUSION: The final 9-item SCQoL is unidimensional and consists of 3 domains covering function, emotions and control. Furthermore there is one single global item. The total...

  9. Anticancer drugs and the regulation of Hedgehog genes GLI1 and PTCH1, a comparative study in nonmelanoma skin cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe H; Bojesen, Sophie; Gehl, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most common cancer in humans, comprising mainly basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). BCC proliferation is highly dependent on the Hedgehog signaling pathway. We aimed to investigate a panel of anticancer drugs with known activity against skin...... of immortalized keratinocytes (HaCaT), BCC (UWBCC1 and BCC77015), and SCC (A431 and SCC25) cell lines. The impact of treatment on the regulation of Hedgehog pathway target genes (GLI1 and PTCH1), measured by real-time PCR, was compared between UWBCC1 and HaCaT. Varying cell line sensitivity profiles...... to the examined anticancer drugs were observed. Generally, 24-h drug exposure was sufficient to reduce cell viability. We found that 5-FU, MTX, and cisplatin significantly downregulated the expression of two genes controlled by the Hedgehog pathway (≤25-, 2.9-, and 12.5-fold, respectively, for GLI1 in UWBCC1...

  10. Risk of a second primary cancer after non-melanoma skin cancer in white men and women: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengju Song

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggest a positive association between history of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC and risk of subsequent cancer at other sites. The purpose of this study is to prospectively examine the risk of primary cancer according to personal history of NMSC.In two large US cohorts, the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS and the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, we prospectively investigated this association in self-identified white men and women. In the HPFS, we followed 46,237 men from June 1986 to June 2008 (833,496 person-years. In the NHS, we followed 107,339 women from June 1984 to June 2008 (2,116,178 person-years. We documented 29,447 incident cancer cases other than NMSC. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate relative risks (RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. A personal history of NMSC was significantly associated with a higher risk of other primary cancers excluding melanoma in men (RR=1.11; 95% CI 1.05-1.18, and in women (RR=1.20; 95% CI 1.15-1.25. Age-standardized absolute risk (AR was 176 in men and 182 in women per 100,000 person-years. For individual cancer sites, after the Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons (n=28, in men, a personal history of NMSC was significantly associated with an increased risk of melanoma (RR=1.99, AR=116 per 100,000 person-years. In women, a personal history of NMSC was significantly associated with an increased risk of breast (RR=1.19, AR=87 per 100,000 person-years, lung (RR=1.32, AR=22 per 100,000 person-years, and melanoma (RR=2.58, AR=79 per 100,000 person-years.This prospective study found a modestly increased risk of subsequent malignancies among individuals with a history of NMSC, specifically breast and lung cancer in women and melanoma in both men and women.

  11. An increased risk of non-melanoma skin cancer during TNF-inhibitor treatment in psoriasis patients compared to rheumatoid arthritis patients probably relates to disease-related factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lümig, P. P. M.; Menting, S. P.; van den Reek, J. M. P. A.; Spuls, P. I.; van Riel, P. L. C. M.; van de Kerkhof, P. C. M.; Fransen, J.; Kievit, W.; de Jong, E. M. G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Concerns exist about a risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in psoriasis patients and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with TNF-inhibitors. However, current data also show that in some psoriasis patients, NMSC is diagnosed relatively short after the start of TNF-inhibitors, which

  12. Lifestyle factors of smoking, BMI and alcohol on the risk of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer in adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi-Bee, J; Ellison, T; Bath-Hextall, F

    2012-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common cancer in humans and the most important risk factors are thought to be age, skin type, and exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Lifestyle factors may also play a part. To date no systematic review has been performed to collate evidence of the effects of smoking, alcohol or body mass index. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effects of smoking, alcohol and body mass index on the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer and its subtypes. Adults (18+ years old) of either sex from any ethnicitySmoking, alcohol, or body mass index (including other anthropometric measurements, such as weight, waist to hip ratio, and the percentage body fat)Non-melanoma skin cancer, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, or basal cell carcinomaComparative observational epidemiological studies SEARCH STRATEGY: We performed a comprehensive search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and CAB Abstracts from inception to October 2010. We also scanned reference lists to identify further eligible studies. Data from eligible studies were extracted and quality assessed using the Newcastle Ottawa Scale independently by two reviewers. The titles, abstracts and full text identified from the search were assessed independently by two reviewers against pre-specified inclusion/exclusion criteria. Disagreements were resolved through discussion with a third reviewer. For studies with similar exposures, a meta-analysis was performed using a random effects model and results were expressed as pooled odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity was assessed using I. Publication bias was assessed using funnel plots. Data were analysed using Review Manager. Thirty studies were included of which 22 used a case control design and the remaining used a cohort design. The overall quality of the studies was variable with a Newcastle Ottawa Scale median score of 6 out of 9 stars. No evidence of asymmetry was detected in the funnel plots

  13. The relevance of the vitamin D endocrine system (VDES) for tumorigenesis, prevention, and treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichrath, Jörg; Reichrath, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Solar UV (UV)-B-radiation exerts both beneficial and adverse effects on human health. On the one hand, it is the most important environmental risk factor for the development of non-melanoma skin cancer [NMSC; most importantly basal (BCC) and squamous (SCC) cell carcinomas], that represent the most common malignancies in Caucasian populations. On the other hand, the human body’s requirements of vitamin D are mainly achieved by UV-B-induced cutaneous photosynthesis. This dilemma represents a serious problem in many populations, for an association of vitamin D-deficiency and multiple independent diseases including various types of cancer has been convincingly demonstrated. In line with these findings, epidemiologic and laboratory investigations now indicate that vitamin D and its metabolites have a risk reducing effect for NMSC. Potential mechanisms of action include inhibition of the hedgehog signaling pathway (BCC) and modulation of p53-mediated DNA damage response (SCC). As a consequence of these new findings it can be concluded that UV-B-radiation exerts both beneficial and adverse effects on risk and prognosis of NMSC. It can be assumed that many independent factors, including frequency and dose of UV-B exposure, skin area exposed, and individual factors (such as skin type and genetic determinants of the skin`s vitamin D status and of signaling pathways that are involved in the tumorigenesis of NMSC) determine whether UV-B exposure promotes or inhibits tumorigenesis of NMSC. Moreover, these findings may help to explain many of the differential effects of UV-B radiation on risk of NMSC, including variation in the dose-dependent risk for development of SCC in situ (actinic keratosis, AK), invasive SCC, and BCC. In this review, we analyze the relevance of the vitamin D endocrine system (VDES) for tumorigenesis, prevention, and treatment of NMSC and give an overview of present concepts and future perspectives. PMID:24494041

  14. Telomere length and the risk of cutaneous melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer: a review of the literature and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caini, Saverio; Raimondi, Sara; Johansson, Harriet; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Zanna, Ines; Palli, Domenico; Gandini, Sara

    2015-12-01

    There is much evidence supporting the role of telomeres in cancer pathogenesis, however the studies that investigated the association between telomere length and skin cancer risk provided inconsistent results. To help clarify this issue, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of published papers on the association between peripheral leukocytes telomere length (PLTL) and the risk of cutaneous melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). We calculated summary relative risks (SRR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) using random effect models with maximum likelihood estimates, and explored causes of between-studies heterogeneity of risk estimates. We included 1629 cutaneous melanoma and 1439 NMSC from eight independent studies published until March 2015. The SRR of cutaneous melanoma for those in the lowest (vs. highest) category of PLTL distribution was 0.25 (95% CI 0.09-0.67). The results were less clear for NMSC, with two studies reporting no association and one study showing an increase in risk for those in the lowest (vs. highest) category of PLTL distribution. For both cutaneous melanoma and NMSC, the between-studies heterogeneity was large, mainly due to inclusion of hospital-based case-control studies. Our meta-analysis shows evidence of an association between short PLTL and reduced risk for cutaneous melanoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Histological Analysis Of Malignant Tumours Of Skin In University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The non-melanoma, skin cancer (squamous cells carcinoma) was the commonest epidermal malignancy and accounted for 148 (47.3%). Kaposi's ... The incidence of skin cancer can be prevented or reduced through public health education or early diagnosis of skin lesion and prompt medical treatment. Key words: Skin ...

  16. Effects of the German skin cancer screening programme on melanoma incidence and indicators of disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, F; Meier, F; Seidler, A; Schmitt, J

    2016-11-01

    In Germany a nationwide melanoma screening programme for adults aged ≥ 35 years was introduced in July 2008. Evidence on utilization and effects is limited. To examine the uptake and effects of the German nationwide screening programme. This analysis is based on pseudonymized outpatient routine data of a German health insurance company covering data of > 2 million individuals from Saxony for the years 2005-2012. Cases of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) were identified using an algorithm based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were applied to determine the utilization of the screening programme and effects on skin cancer incidence and disease severity as a proxy for prognosis. Overall, 38·0% of eligible persons (≥ 35 years) were screened at least once between July 2008 and December 2012. The annual participation rate was 12·4%. Out of 533 393 persons screened, melanoma and NMSC were diagnosed in 0·3% and 2·5%, respectively. The 6-month melanoma incidence per 100 000 insured persons decreased from 12·8 before screening introduction (January to June 2008) to 10·2 after introduction (July to December 2008). NMSC incidence increased from 173·8 to 175·5 per 100 000. The numbers of screening participants receiving interferon alpha and/or being diagnosed with lymph node and/or distant metastasis (8·6%, 5·9%, 1·5%, respectively) were lower than in nonparticipants (11·2%, 8·5%, 3·5%). These differences were not significant. The results suggest that the introduction of a generic skin cancer screening programme in Germany was not associated with significant changes in incidence. No firm conclusions regarding the effects of skin cancer screening on prognosis can be drawn. Longer follow-up and linkage with clinical registry data are necessary to clarify the effect of screening participation on incidence and prognosis. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. Talimogene Laherparepvec and Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Refractory Lymphomas or Advanced or Refractory Non-melanoma Skin Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Adnexal Carcinoma; Apocrine Carcinoma; Eccrine Porocarcinoma; Extraocular Cutaneous Sebaceous Carcinoma; Hidradenocarcinoma; Keratoacanthoma; Malignant Sweat Gland Neoplasm; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Microcystic Adnexal Carcinoma; NK-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable; Non-Melanomatous Lesion; Paget Disease; Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Primary Cutaneous Mucinous Carcinoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Sezary Syndrome; Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma; Skin Basal Cell Carcinoma; Skin Basosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Spiradenocarcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Origin; Stage III Skin Cancer; Stage IV Skin Cancer; Sweat Gland Carcinoma; Trichilemmocarcinoma; Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  18. High 15-F2t-Isoprostane Levels in Patients with a Previous History of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer: The Effects of Supplementary Antioxidant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betânia de Jesus e Silva de Almendra Freitas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Phase I of this study was aimed at comparing the profiles of oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with history of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC, previously treated with surgery, to the healthy subjects. Phase II aimed to evaluate the effects of supplementary antioxidant therapy on the levels of biomarkers in the case group. Materials and Methods. In Phase I, oxidative stress biomarkers were measured in blood samples obtained from 24 healthy subjects and 60 patients with history of NMSC previously treated with surgery. In Phase II, the 60 patients with history of NMSC were randomized into two subgroups, one receiving placebo (n=34 and the other (n=26 receiving vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc supplementation for 8 weeks, followed by reevaluation of biomarkers. Results. In Phase I, patients with history of NMSC showed increased plasma concentrations of all biomarkers, but only 15-F2t-isoprostane was significantly higher than in the healthy subjects. Risk of NMSC increased by 4% for each additional 1 pg/mL increase in 15-F2t-isoprostane. In Phase II, supplementation did not significantly reduce levels of oxidative stress biomarkers. Conclusion. Patients with history of NMSC had significantly high 15-F2t-isoprostane plasma levels; supplementation did not result in significant reduction of oxidative stress biomarkers. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (ID NCT02248584.

  19. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  20. Associations of non-melanoma skin cancer and melanoma, extra-cutaneous cancers and smoking in adults: a US population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, J I; Ratner, D

    2015-07-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma are common malignancies in the US and may be associated with other types of cancer. We sought to determine whether NMSC and melanoma are associated with extra-cutaneous cancers and identify modifiable risk factors for such an association. We analysed data from 447,801 adult participants in the 1997-2011 National Health Interview Surveys. Survey logistic regression models were constructed that accounted for the complex sample weights. History of NMSC, melanoma and 27 primary extra-cutaneous cancers was assessed. NMSC was associated with increased odds of one (multinomial survey logistic regression, unadjusted odds ratio [95% CI]: 2.43 [2.20-2.68]) or multiple (2.94 [2.21-3.92]) extra-cutaneous malignancies. Melanoma was also associated with increased odds of one (3.25 [2.70-3.90]) or multiple (6.11 [4.34-8.61]) extra-cutaneous malignancies. Extra-cutaneous cancers were more common in younger patients (ages 18-39 and 40-49 years) and Caucasians with NMSC or melanoma (P melanoma had even higher odds of extra-cutaneous malignancy at ages 18-39 and 40-49 years compared to smokers without NMSC or melanoma (P melanoma, prostate, soft tissue, throat/pharynx, thyroid and uterus. Melanoma was associated with malignancies of the bladder, breast, colon, kidney, lung, pancreas, prostate, soft tissue, throat/pharynx, thyroid and uterus. The prevalence of extra-cutaneous cancers increased between 1997 and 2011 in all subjects (4.51% and 5.73%, P melanoma. Patients with history of NMSC and melanoma have increased odds of developing extra-cutaneous cancers, especially those with younger age and smoking history. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  1. Skin cancer in Puerto Rico: a multiannual incidence comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Torre-Lugo, Eneida M; Figueroa, Luz D; Sánchez, Jorge L; Morales-Burgos, Adisbeth; Conde, Daniel

    2010-09-01

    The incidence of skin cancer continues to increase worldwide. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of skin cancer in Puerto Rico in a selected year (2005) and to compare these findings with those previously reported for Puerto Rico in 1974 and 1981 and with other countries. The data was collected from the pathology reports corresponding to the period of January to December 2005 of 21 participating Pathology Laboratories throughout Puerto Rico. The rate and distribution of the main types of skin cancer was calculated based on sex, age, anatomic location and laterality. The incidence of skin cancer in Puerto Rico for 2005 was 6,568 cases, which represent a rate of 167.9 per 100,000 inhabitants. The most common type of skin cancer was basal-cell carcinoma. Skin cancer was more common in males except for melanoma, which was more common in females. The incidence increases with age on all types of skin cancer. The head and neck area was the most frequent location, except for melanoma in women, which was more common on the legs. The incidence rate was 41.5/100,000 in 1974, 52.5/100,000 in 1981 and 167.9/100,000 in 2005, a 305% increase. We found an increasing incidence of skin cancer in Puerto Rico when compared with previous reported data. This analysis provides a comprehensive evaluation of the epidemiology of skin cancer in Puerto Rico.

  2. Demodex as a Delivery Vector for Topical Targeted Medications in the Skin for Early Melanoma and Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Stephen L

    2017-09-01

    The potential utilization of Demodex mites as delivery vectors for cytotoxic medications directed to early skin cancer is proposed. Potential benefits, proof of concept, and limitations are discussed. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  3. Estimativa do custo do tratamento do câncer de pele tipo não-melanoma no Estado de São Paulo - Brasil An estimate of the cost of treating non-melanoma skin cancer in the state of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo José Sant'Anna Pereira de Souza

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: O câncer de maior incidência no Brasil é o de pele não-melanoma, que afeta aproximadamente 0,06% da população. Não existem políticas públicas para sua prevenção e o impacto econômico do seu diagnóstico não tem sido avaliado. OBJETIVOS: Estimar os custos do diagnóstico e tratamento do câncer de pele não-melanoma no Estado de São Paulo entre 2000 a 2007 e compará-los com os do melanoma cutâneo no mesmo período. MÉTODOS: Foi utilizado como modelo de procedimento o projeto diretriz Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology, (National Comprehensive Cancer Network, adequado aos procedimentos da Fundação SOBECCan - Hospital do Câncer de Ribeirão Preto - SP. Os custos estimados baseiam-se nos valores do tratamento médico pagos pelos setores público e privado em 2007. RESULTADOS: Os valores médios de custo individual do tratamento anual do câncer de pele não-melanoma são muito mais baixos do que os estimados para o tratamento do melanoma cutâneo. Entretanto, observados os gastos totais no tratamento do câncer de pele não-melanoma, percebe-se que os 42.184 casos deste câncer em São Paulo, no período estudado, fazem com que o custo total do seu tratamento seja 14% superior ao dos 2.740 casos de melanoma cutâneo registrados no mesmo período para o SUS. Porém, para o sistema privado, o gasto total é, aproximadamente, 34% menor para o tratamento do câncer de pele não-melanoma. CONCLUSÃO: O elevado número de casos de câncer de pele não-melanoma no Brasil - com 114 mil novos casos previstos para 2010, sendo 95% diagnosticados em estágios precoces - representa um impacto financeiro ao sistema público e aos sistemas privados de saúde de cerca de R$ 37 milhões e R$ 26 milhões ao ano, respectivamenteBACKGROUND: The most common form of cancer in Brazil is non-melanoma skin cancer, which affects approximately 0.06% of the population. There are no public policies for its prevention and the economic

  4. Residential Radon Exposure and Skin Cancer Incidence in a Prospective Danish Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik; Loft, Steffen; Sørensen, Mette; Jensen, Allan; Andersen, Claus Erik; Ulbak, Kaare; Hertel, Ole; Pedersen, Camilla; Tjønneland, Anne; Krüger Kjær, Susanne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Background Although exposure to UV radiation is the major risk factor for skin cancer, theoretical models suggest that radon exposure can contribute to risk, and this is supported by ecological studies. We sought to confirm or refute an association between long-term exposure to residential radon and the risk for malignant melanoma (MM) and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) using a prospective cohort design and long-term residential radon exposure. Methods During 1993–1997, we recruited 57,053 Danish persons and collected baseline information. We traced and geocoded all residential addresses of the cohort members and calculated radon concentrations at each address lived in from 1 January 1971 until censor date. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate-ratios (IRR) and confidence intervals (CI) for the risk associated with radon exposure for NMSC and MM, and effect modification was assessed. Results Over a mean follow-up of 13.6 years of 51,445 subjects, there were 3,243 cases of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 317 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 329 cases of MM. The adjusted IRRs per 100 Bq/m3 increase in residential radon levels for BCC, SCC and MM were 1.14 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.27), 0.90 (95% CI: 0.70, 1.37) and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.77, 1.50), respectively. The association between radon exposure and BCC was stronger among those with higher socio-economic status and those living in apartments at enrollment. Conclusion and Impact Long-term residential radon exposure may contribute to development of basal cell carcinoma of the skin. We cannot exclude confounding from sunlight and cannot conclude on causality, as the relationship was stronger amongst persons living in apartments and non-existent amongst those living in single detached homes. PMID:26274607

  5. Incidence of skin and respiratory diseases among Danish hairdressing apprentices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss-Skiftesvik, Majken H.; Winther, Lone; Johnsen, Claus R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hairdressing is one of the professions with the highest risk of occupational skin and respiratory diseases. The incidence of these diseases in hairdressing apprentices has been studied only sparsely. Objective: To determine the incidence of skin and respiratory diseases in hairdressing.......8% of the hairdressing apprentices had left the trade, and 70.3% of these had left because of health complaints. The most frequently reported reasons for leaving were musculoskeletal pain (47.4%) and skin diseases (47.4%), followed by respiratory symptoms (23.7%). Conclusions: Hairdressing apprentices are at increased...

  6. Reduced incidence of skin cancer in patients with alopecia areata: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, Arash; Qureshi, Sarah; Joyce, Cara; Guo, Ye; Huang, Kathie P

    2016-04-01

    The risk of skin cancer in patients with alopecia areata (AA) is unknown. While the risk of skin cancer in chronic inflammatory alopecias may be elevated, AA shares many characteristics with vitiligo, an autoimmune illness associated with decreased risk of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. In this retrospective cohort study, we determined the risk of developing skin cancer among patients with AA in a validated cohort relative to matched controls at two tertiary care hospitals in Massachusetts. There was a significantly decreased risk of NMSC in AA patients than controls (OR=0.63, 95% CI=0.48-0.81). There was a trend towards a protective effect of AA associated with melanoma (OR=0.65, 95% CI=0.39-1.09). There was no difference in anatomic distribution of skin cancer between patients with AA and controls. Our study demonstrates a decreased risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer and a trend towards reduced risk of melanoma in patients with AA. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Ozone depletion, related UVB changes and increased skin cancer incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, R. P.

    1998-03-01

    Stratospheric ozone at middle latitudes shows a seasonal variation of about +/-20%, a quasi-biennial oscillation of 1-10% range and a long-term variation in which the level was almost steady up to about 1979 and declined thereafter to the present day by about 10%. These variations are expected to be reflected in solar UVB observed at the ground, but in an opposite direction. Thus UVB should have had a long-term increase of about 10-20%, which should cause an increase in skin cancer incidence of about 20-40%. Skin cancer incidence has increased all over the world, e.g. about 90% in USA during 1974-1990. It is popularly believed that this increase in skin cancer incidence is related to the recent ozone depletion. This seems to be incorrect, for two reasons. Firstly, the observed skin cancer increase is too large (90%) compared with the expected value (40%) from ozone depletion. Secondly, cancer does not develop immediately after exposure to solar UVB. The sunburns may occur within hours; but cancer development and detection may take years, even decades. Hence the observed skin cancer increase since 1974 (no data available for earlier periods) must have occurred due to exposure to solar UVB in the 1950s and 1960s, when there was no ozone depletion. Thus, the skin cancer increase must be attributed to harmful solar UVB levels existing even in the 1960s, accentuated later not by ozone depletion (which started only much later, by 1979) but by other causes, such as a longer human life span, better screening, increasing tendencies of sunbathing at beaches, etc., in affluent societies. On the other hand, the recent ozone depletion and the associated UVB increases will certainly take their toll; only that the effects will not be noticed now but years or decades from now. The concern for the future expressed in the Montreal Protocol for reducing ozone depletion by controlling CFC production is certainly justified, especially because increased UVB is harmful to animal and

  8. Seasonal variation of DNA damage and repair in patients with non-melanoma skin cancer and referents with and without psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, P; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Frentz, G

    1998-01-01

    Quadruples of skin cancer patients with and without psoriasis and referents with and without psoriasis (4 x 20 study persons) were identified and examined for DNA damage by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet-assay) and DNA-repair by UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in mononuclear...... blood cells (lymphocytes and monocytes). DNA damage (strand breaks and alkaline labile sites) as assessed by the comet assay and DNA repair as assessed by UDS were significantly associated with the season in which blood sampling took place. This variation might be explained by an increased exposure...... to solar radiation. When the comet tail moment data were stratified by sampling period, an interaction between psoriasis and skin cancer was detected, with patients with psoriasis and skin cancer exhibiting more DNA damage. Patients with psoriasis and skin cancer also had lower UDS compared to healthy...

  9. A Retrospective Case-Matched Cost Comparison of Surgical Treatment of Melanoma and Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer in the Outpatient Versus Operating Room Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ryan P; Butala, Niraj; Alam, Murad; Lawrence, Naomi

    2017-07-01

    To date, no study has used authentic billing data in a case-control matched fashion to examine the cost of treating skin cancer in different settings. To compare the cost of surgical treatment of skin cancer in the outpatient versus operating room setting using matched cases based on patient and skin cancer characteristics. ICD-9 diagnosis codes for skin cancers were used to find patients who had a malignant excision current procedural terminology code in the operating room setting during 2010 to 2014. Patient and skin cancer characteristics were used to match cases to those treated as an outpatient. A total of 36 cases (18 operating room and 18 outpatient) had the required information and characteristics to be matched and analyzed for cost. Health status was determined using the American Society of Anesthesiologists anesthesia grading scale. No statistically significant differences were found in the age (p > 0.9) or American Society of Anesthesiologists scores (p > 0.6) of the outpatient and operating room cases. The median cost for outpatient cases was $1,745. For operating room cases, the median cost was $11,323. This was a statistically significant difference (p skin cancer compared with the operating room.

  10. Minimal and maximal incidence rates of skin cancer in Caucasians estimated by use of sigmoidal UV dose-incidence curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzeniene, Asta; Grigalavicius, Mantas; Baturaite, Zivile; Moan, Johan

    2014-11-01

    Sigmoidal (S-shaped) dose-cancer incidence relationships are often observed in animal bioassays for carcinogenicity. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an established skin carcinogen. The aim of this study is to examine if S-shaped curves describe the relationship between solar UV doses and skin cancer incidences, and if such relationships can be used to estimate threshold levels of non-carcinogenic UV exposure, as well as maximal incidence rates. We studied the incidence rate-annual erythema-effective UV dose relationship for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and cutaneous melanoma (CM) among different Caucasian populations in Europe, Australia and New Zealand. Our analysis indicates that S-shaped associations describe the data well (P skin cancer was absent. Avoidance of UV radiation has a potential to reduce the incidence of skin cancer in fair-skinned population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Indoor tanning in businesses and homes and risk of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer in 2 US case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucci, Leah M; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Cartmel, Brenda; Lazovich, DeAnn; Mayne, Susan T

    2014-11-01

    Indoor tanning increases skin cancer risk. Beyond early research describing melanoma and sun lamps, few recent reports describe where individuals indoor tan and whether skin cancer risk varies by location (business, home-based). We sought to assess where individuals tanned indoors and skin cancer risk by tanning device location. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted in 2 US case-control studies of melanoma (1161 cases, 1083 controls, ages 25-59 years) and early-onset basal cell carcinoma (375 cases, 382 controls, agebasal cell carcinoma (odds ratio 1.69, 95% confidence interval 1.15-2.48) compared with non-users. Melanoma risk was also increased in the small number who reported tanning indoors only at home relative to non-users (odds ratio 4.14, 95% confidence interval 1.75-9.78); 67.6% used sun lamps. Self-reported tanning and potential recall bias are limitations. Business-only tanning, despite claims of "safe" tanning, was positively associated with a significant risk of melanoma and basal cell carcinoma. Home tanning was uncommon and mostly from sun lamps, which were rarely used by younger participants. Regardless of location, indoor tanning was associated with increased risk of skin cancer. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. In-vivo fluorescence dosimetry of aminolevulinate-based protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulation in human nonmelanoma skin cancers and precancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Christine B.; Lohser, Sara; Chang, Sung; Bailin, Philip A.; Maytin, Edward V.

    2009-06-01

    PDT is clinically useful for precancers (actinic keratoses; AK) of the skin, but the optimal duration for 5-ALA application is still controversial. For basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), cure rates remain inferior to surgical excision. Lack of knowledge about regional levels of PpIX levels within target tissues clearly contribute to these suboptimal results. To investigate PpIX levels achievable in human skin neoplasias in-vivo, a clinical study to monitor PpIX accumulation in vivo was performed. PpIX-fluorescence in patients undergoing ALA-PDT for facial AK was monitored via real-time in-vivo fluorescence dosimetry, with measurements q20 min following application of 5-ALA (Levulan Kerastick). PpIX accumulation followed linear kinetics in nearly all cases. The slopes varied widely, and did not correlate with clinical outcome in all patients. Some patients with a low accumulation of PpIX fluorescence had a good response to therapy, whereas others with high PpIX accumulation required repeat treatment (although not necessarily of the same lesion). PpIX accumulation rates did correlate to a certain degree with the overall amount of erythema. We conclude that unknown factors besides PpIX levels must be critical for the response to treatment. To assess the relationship between PpIX levels in various skin cancers, patients undergoing routine Mohs surgery for BCC or SCC were measured by in-vivo dosimetry at 2 h after 5-ALA application. Overall, a progressive increase in PpIX signal during malignant progression was observed, in the following rank order: Normal skin < AK < SCC ~ BCC.

  13. Increasing incidence of skin disorders in children? A comparison between 1987 and 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Suijlekom-Smit Lisette WA

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing proportion of skin diseases encountered in general practice represents a substantial part of morbidity in children. Only limited information is available about the frequency of specific skin diseases. We aimed to compare incidence rates of skin diseases in children in general practice between 1987 and 2001. Methods We used data on all children aged 0–17 years derived from two consecutive surveys performed in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001. Both surveys concerned a longitudinal registration of GP consultations over 12 months. Each disease episode was coded according to the International Classification of Primary Care. Incidence rates of separate skin diseases were calculated by dividing all new episodes for each distinct ICPC code by the average study population at risk. Data were stratified for socio-demographic characteristics. Results The incidence rate of all skin diseases combined in general practice decreased between 1987 and 2001. Among infants the incidence rate increased. Girls presented more skin diseases to the GP. In the southern part of the Netherlands children consulted their GP more often for skin diseases compared to the northern part. Children of non-Western immigrants presented relatively more skin diseases to the GP. In general practice incidence rates of specific skin diseases such as impetigo, dermatophytosis and atopic dermatitis increased in 2001, whereas warts, contact dermatitis and skin injuries decreased. Conclusion The overall incidence rate of all skin diseases combined in general practice decreased whereas the incidence rates of bacterial, mycotic and atopic skin diseases increased.

  14. An estimate of the cost of treating non-melanoma skin cancer in the state of São Paulo, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Reynaldo José Sant'Anna Pereira de; Mattedi, Adriana P; Corrêa, Marcelo P; Rezende, Marcelo L; Ferreira, Ana Cláudia Andrade

    2011-01-01

    FUNDAMENTOS: O câncer de maior incidência no Brasil é o de pele não-melanoma, que afeta aproximadamente 0,06% da população. Não existem políticas públicas para sua prevenção e o impacto econômico do seu diagnóstico não tem sido avaliado. OBJETIVOS: Estimar os custos do diagnóstico e tratamento do câncer de pele não-melanoma no Estado de São Paulo entre 2000 a 2007 e compará-los com os do melanoma cutâneo no mesmo período. MÉTODOS: Foi utilizado como modelo de procedimento o projeto diretriz C...

  15. Individualized 3D scanning and printing for non-melanoma skin cancer brachytherapy: a financial study for its integration into clinical workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Meritxell; Sabater, Sebastià; Sintas, Andreu; Arguís, Monica; Hernández, Víctor; Árquez, Miguel; López, Iolanda; Rovirosa, Àngeles; Puig, Doménec

    2017-06-01

    Skin cancer is the most common tumor in the population. There are different therapeutic modalities. Brachytherapy is one of the techniques used, in which it is necessary to build customized moulds for some patients. Currently, these moulds are made by hand using rudimentary techniques. We present a new procedure based on 3D printing and the analysis of the clinical workflow. Moulds can be made either by hand or by automated 3D printing. For making moulds by hand, a patient's alginate negative is created and, from that, the gypsum cast and customized moulds are made by hand from the patient's negative template. The new process is based on 3D printing. The first step is to take a 3D scan of the surface of the patient and then, 3D modelling software is used to obtain an accurate anatomical reconstruction of the treatment area. We present the clinical workflow using 3D scanning and printing technology, comparing its costs with the usual custom handmade mould protocol. The time spent for the new process is 6.25 hours, in contrast to the time spent for the conventional process, which is 9.5 hours. We found a 34% reduction in time required to create a mould for brachytherapy treatment. The labor cost of the conventional process is 211.5 vs. 152.5 hours, so the reduction is 59 hours. There is also a 49.5% reduction in the financial costs, mostly due to lack of need of a computed tomography (CT) scan of the gypsum and the mould. 3D scanning and printing offers financial benefits and reduces the clinical workload. As the present project demonstrates, through the application of 3D printing technologies, the costs and time spent during the process in the clinical workload in brachytherapy treatment are reduced. Overall, 3D printing is a promising technique for brachytherapy that might be well received in the community.

  16. Reducing the Incidence of Cast-related Skin Complications in Children Treated With Cast Immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difazio, Rachel L; Harris, Marie; Feldman, Lanna; Mahan, Susan T

    2017-12-01

    Cast immobilization remains the mainstay of pediatric orthopaedic care, yet little is known about the incidence of cast-related skin complications in children treated with cast immobilization. The purposes of this quality improvement project were to: (1) establish a baseline rate of cast-related skin complications in children treated with cast immobilization, (2) identify trends in children who experienced cast-related skin complications, (3) design an intervention aimed at decreasing the rate of cast-related skin complications, and (4) determine the effectiveness of the intervention. A prospective interrupted time-series design was used to determine the incidence of cast-related skin complications overtime and compare the rates of skin complications before and after an intervention designed to decrease the incidence of cast-related heel complications. All consecutive patients who were treated with cast immobilization from September 2012 to September 2014 were included. A cast-related skin complications data collection tool was used to capture all cast-related skin complications. A high rate of heel events was noted in our preliminary analysis and an intervention was designed to decrease the rate of cast-related skin complications, including the addition of padding during casting and respective provider education. The estimated cast-related skin events rate for all patients was 8.9 per 1000 casts applied. The rate for the total preintervention sample was 13.6 per 1000 casts which decreased to 6.6 in the postintervention sample. When examining the heel-only group, the rate was 17.1 per 1000 lower extremity casts applied in the preintervention group and 6.8 in the postintervention group. Incorporating padding to the heel of lower extremity cast was an effective intervention in decreasing the incidence of cast-related skin complications in patients treated with cast immobilization. Level II.

  17. Estimating the economic costs of skin cancer in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Christopher M; Ling, Rod; Byrnes, Joshua; Crane, Melanie; Searles, Andrew; Perez, Donna; Shakeshaft, Anthony

    2015-09-23

    Skin cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. The increased incidence of skin cancer, combined with limited health care resources and tight budgetary conditions, has increased the importance of understanding the economic impact of skin cancer. This research estimates the economic cost of skin cancer in the Australian state of New South Wales. An incidence based approach is used to estimate lifetime costs of skin cancer. Both direct and indirect costs are considered - direct costs include resources associated with the management of skin cancer and indirect costs refer to productivity costs associated with morbidity and premature mortality. Diagnosis of skin cancer was determined according to ICD-10 codes using principal diagnosis. Linked administrative data and regression modelling are used to calculate costs; presented as Australian dollars for the year 2010. The human capital approach is used to value present and future productivity losses. The lifetime cost of the 150,000 incident cases of skin cancer diagnosed in NSW in 2010 is estimated at $536 million ($44,796 per melanoma and $2459 per non-melanoma). Direct costs accounted for 72 % of costs ($10,230 per melanoma and $2336 per non-melanoma) and indirect costs accounted for 28 % of costs ($34,567 per melanoma and $123 per non-melanoma). Direct costs are, on average, higher for females than males with indirect costs, on average, higher for males than females. This research provides new evidence on the economic cost of skin cancer and provides policy makers with information of the potential monetary savings that may arise from efforts to reduce the incidence of skin cancer.

  18. [Incidence of melanoma and changes in stage-specific incidence after implementation of skin cancer screening in Schleswig-Holstein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisemann, N; Waldmann, A; Katalinic, A

    2014-01-01

    A pilot project in skin cancer screening (SCREEN) was conducted in Schleswig-Holstein from July 2003 to June 2004. Although the impact of this screening on the stage-specific incidence of melanoma is of great importance for screening evaluation, it remains unknown. In theory, an effective skin cancer screening program should result in a medium-term incidence decrease of melanomas with a prognostically unfavorable stage. This is studied on a population-based level by using cancer registry data. Based on data from the Cancer Registry of Schleswig-Holstein for 1999-2009, stage-specific (T-category of the TNM-classification system) age-standardized incidence rates were calculated. After implementation of the SCREEN project, the incidence of prognostically favorable melanomas (in situ and T1) was higher than before, while the incidence of advanced melanomas (T2, T3, and for women also T4) decreased considerably. The classification of tumor stages changed during the project period, which may have contributed to an artificial decrease of the stages with a poor prognosis. Nevertheless, the results are in agreement with the observed decrease of melanoma mortality in the screening region.

  19. Incidence of and Risk Factors for Skin Cancer in Organ Transplant Recipients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Giorgia L; Blanc, Paul D; Boscardin, John; Lloyd, Amanda Abramson; Ahmed, Rehana L; Anthony, Tiffany; Bibee, Kristin; Breithaupt, Andrew; Cannon, Jennifer; Chen, Amy; Cheng, Joyce Y; Chiesa-Fuxench, Zelma; Colegio, Oscar R; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Del Guzzo, Christina A; Disse, Max; Dowd, Margaret; Eilers, Robert; Ortiz, Arisa Elena; Morris, Caroline; Golden, Spring K; Graves, Michael S; Griffin, John R; Hopkins, R Samuel; Huang, Conway C; Bae, Gordon Hyeonjin; Jambusaria, Anokhi; Jennings, Thomas A; Jiang, Shang I Brian; Karia, Pritesh S; Khetarpal, Shilpi; Kim, Changhyun; Klintmalm, Goran; Konicke, Kathryn; Koyfman, Shlomo A; Lam, Charlene; Lee, Peter; Leitenberger, Justin J; Loh, Tiffany; Lowenstein, Stefan; Madankumar, Reshmi; Moreau, Jacqueline F; Nijhawan, Rajiv I; Ochoa, Shari; Olasz, Edit B; Otchere, Elaine; Otley, Clark; Oulton, Jeremy; Patel, Parth H; Patel, Vishal Anil; Prabhu, Arpan V; Pugliano-Mauro, Melissa; Schmults, Chrysalyne D; Schram, Sarah; Shih, Allen F; Shin, Thuzar; Soon, Seaver; Soriano, Teresa; Srivastava, Divya; Stein, Jennifer A; Sternhell-Blackwell, Kara; Taylor, Stan; Vidimos, Allison; Wu, Peggy; Zajdel, Nicholas; Zelac, Daniel; Arron, Sarah T

    2017-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common malignancy occurring after organ transplantation. Although previous research has reported an increased risk of skin cancer in solid organ transplant recipients (OTRs), no study has estimated the posttransplant population-based incidence in the United States. To determine the incidence and evaluate the risk factors for posttransplant skin cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), melanoma (MM), and Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) in a cohort of US OTRs receiving a primary organ transplant in 2003 or 2008. This multicenter retrospective cohort study examined 10 649 adult recipients of a primary transplant performed at 26 centers across the United States in the Transplant Skin Cancer Network during 1 of 2 calendar years (either 2003 or 2008) identified through the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) database. Recipients of all organs except intestine were included, and the follow-up periods were 5 and 10 years. Incident skin cancer was determined through detailed medical record review. Data on predictors were obtained from the OPTN database. The incidence rates for posttransplant skin cancer overall and for SCC, MM, and MCC were calculated per 100 000 person-years. Potential risk factors for posttransplant skin cancer were tested using multivariate Cox regression analysis to yield adjusted hazard ratios (HR). Overall, 10 649 organ transplant recipients (mean [SD] age, 51 [12] years; 3873 women [36%] and 6776 men [64%]) contributed 59 923 years of follow-up. The incidence rates for posttransplant skin cancer was 1437 per 100 000 person-years. Specific subtype rates for SCC, MM, and MCC were 812, 75, and 2 per 100 000 person-years, respectively. Statistically significant risk factors for posttransplant skin cancer included pretransplant skin cancer (HR, 4.69; 95% CI, 3.26-6.73), male sex (HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.34-1.81), white race (HR, 9.04; 95% CI, 6.20-13.18), age at transplant 50 years or older (HR, 2

  20. Incidence of skin cancer among Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors; Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadamori, Naoki; Mine, Mariko; Hori, Makoto (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1990-09-01

    Among a total of 65,268 Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors recorded in the Scientific Data Center of Atomic Bomb Disaster, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 140 cases with skin cancer were collected from 31 hospitals in Nagasaki City from 1961 through 1987. Subsequently, these cases of skin cancer in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors were statistically analyzed in relation to the estimated distance from the hypocenter by age, sex, histology and latent period. The results were as follows: (1) A high correlation was observed between the incidence of skin cancer and the distance from the hypocenter. (2) The incidence of skin cancer in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors now appears to be increasing in relation to exposure distance. (3) Among 140 cases, basal cell epithelioma was observed in 67 cases (47.9%) and squamous cell carcinoma in 43 cases (30.7%). (author).

  1. Skin cancer in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, A; Thyssen, J P; Gislason, G H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that is commonly treated with ultraviolet phototherapy and systemic immunosuppressant drugs, which may confer a risk of skin cancer. Previous studies on the risk of skin cancer in patients with psoriasis have shown conflicting results....... OBJECTIVES: We investigated the risk of new-onset melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), respectively, in a large cohort of patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: Data on all Danish individuals aged ≥18 years between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2012 were linked at individual......-level in nationwide registers. Incidence rates per 10 000 person-years were calculated, and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated by Poisson regression models. RESULTS: The study comprised 5 559 420 individuals with a maximum follow-up time of 16 years. There were 75 410 patients with psoriasis, and 25 087...

  2. Skin Absorption of Ethylene Oxide Gas Following Exposures Relevant to HAZMAT Incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Linda; Gaskin, Sharyn; Pisaniello, Dino; Crea, Joseph; Logan, Michael; Baxter, Christina

    2017-06-01

    Ethylene oxide (EO) is a reactive gas used by numerous industries and medical facilities as a sterilant, a fumigant, and as a chemical intermediate in chemical manufacturing. Due to its common use, EO has been involved in a number of leaks and explosive incidents/accidents requiring HAZMAT response. However, the extent of skin absorption under short-term HAZMAT conditions has not been directly assessed. Such data would assist decision making by first responders regarding skin decontamination in EO HAZMAT incidents. An in vitro test protocol with human skin was used for EO exposures at 800 ppm and 3000 ppm. No evidence of dermal penetration was seen for 800 ppm EO during a 30-min challenge. For 3000 ppm, EO penetration was observed after 20 min and was greater under higher temperature/humidity conditions. Fabric (heavy cotton) on skin enhanced penetration 5-fold compared with naked skin. Off gassing from exposed fabric was rapid. The results show dermal uptake of EO vapour from exposure at 3000 ppm is small but clothing may contribute to further dermal absorption/penetration over time. For exposed, but asymptomatic, persons in EO HAZMAT incidents first responders should remove bulky clothing to prevent potential skin damage and further uptake. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  3. Non Melanoma Skin Cancer Pathogenesis Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didona, Dario; Paolino, Giovanni; Bottoni, Ugo; Cantisani, Carmen

    2018-01-02

    (1) Background: Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in humans. The process of skin carcinogenesis is still not fully understood. However, several studies have been conducted to better explain the mechanisms that lead to malignancy; (2) Methods: We reviewed the more recent literature about the pathogenesis of non-melanoma skin cancer focusing on basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis; (3) Results: Several papers reported genetic and molecular alterations leading to non-melanoma skin cancer. Plenty of risk factors are involved in non-melanoma skin cancer pathogenesis, including genetic and molecular alterations, immunosuppression, and ultraviolet radiation; (4) Conclusion: Although skin carcinogenesis is still not fully understood, several papers demonstrated that genetic and molecular alterations are involved in this process. In addition, plenty of non-melanoma skin cancer risk factors are now known, allowing for an effective prevention of non-melanoma skin cancer development. Compared to other papers on the same topic, our review focused on molecular and genetic factors and analyzed in detail several factors involved in non-melanoma skin cancer.

  4. Malignant melanoma and other cancers of the skin in Czech Republic (epidemiology, risk factors and prevention possibilities).

    OpenAIRE

    Pojezná, Eliška

    2009-01-01

    two basic types: non-melanoma skin cancer and melanoma. Skin tumors mean up to 5%. The increase in incidence is due to both a strong knowledge ofdevelopment issues and melanoma tumor detection and efforts to reduce its incidence. Also in the diagnosis of melanoma was diagnosis. Although in recent years to s tumor. I see a reduction in its incidence. Also in the diagnostic result in death, but are far from melanoma malignancy. This does not mean that they should vykousanou crayfish or crab. "i...

  5. ALThe incidence of sexually transmitted infections and contagious skin diseases in the Saratov region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnaider D.A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Clinical and epidemiological analysis of the incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STI and the most frequently reported infectious skin diseases in the Saratov region. To estimate the contribution of immigrants to the formation and number of episodes of infections with sexually transmission in the region. Materials and methods. Retrospective evaluation of the incidence and manifestations of the epidemiological process conducted by evaluating data obtained from the forms of state statistical reporting (№ 9 and № 34, annual report of Saratov regional dermatovenerologic dispensary (2009-2013. Results. We carried out a comparative analysis of the incidence of STI and the most common infectious skin diseases of the population of Saratov region and noted resistant dynamics to decrease. Conclusion. Population displacement within the country and the influx of immigrants from the former CIS countries, have a significant impact on the epidemiological situation in the Saratov region

  6. A terapia fotodinâmica com ácido 5-aminolevulínico como modalidade de tratamento para neoplasias cutâneas não-melanoma Topical 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy as a treatment modality for nonmelanoma skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lília Bernardini Antunes de Felício

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: A terapia fotodinâmica baseia-se na associação de fonte de luz e fotossensibilizador para destruir seletivamente as células. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos imediatos e tardios, a resposta clínica e os resultados estéticos da terapia fotodinâmica com ácido 5-aminolevulínico em neoplasias cutâneas não-melanoma. MÉTODOS: Trinta e quatro lesões, sendo 19 disceratoses de Bowen e 15 carcinomas basocelulares, foram submetidas à aplicação tópica e oclusiva do ácido 5-aminolevulínico a 20%, por seis horas, e posteriormente a sessão única de laser de diodo (630nm. RESULTADOS: Foram registrados: sensação de queimação durante as sessões; eritema, edema e erosões, nas primeiras 72 horas; cicatrização em média de quatro semanas; resultados estéticos variáveis de excelentes a bons. Aos três meses, a resposta clínica foi de 91,2%, sendo reduzida, aos 18 meses, para 73,3%, de modo similar tanto para disceratose de Bowen (72,2% quanto para carcinoma basocelular (75%. Foi evidenciada relação de tendência linear entre a redução da freqüência da resposta clínica e o aumento da dimensão das neoplasias cutâneas não-melanoma (pBACKGROUND: Photodynamic therapy is based on the association of a light source and photosensitizer in order to selectively destroy cells. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the short and long-term effects, clinical response, and cosmetic outcome of the photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolaevulinic acid for non-melanoma skin cancer. METHODS: TThirty-four non-melanoma skin cancer - 19 Bowen’s diseases and 15 basal cell carcinomas, were submitted to a single 6-hour topical and occlusive application of 20% 5-aminolaevulinic acid, and were later exposed to 630 nm diode laser single session. RESULTS: Burning sensation during the session; erythema, edema and erosions in the first 72 hours; healing process after 4 weeks on average and excellent or good cosmetic results were observed. After 3 months, tumor

  7. Skin contamination resulting from an uranyl nitrate burn. An incident study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesne, B.; Auriol, B.; Berard, P.; Chalabreysse, J.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe the circumstances of a burn incident on hand by a mixture of diluted nitric acid and uranyl nitrate. The burn is located on the left hand fingers. After important washings uranium remains on the fingers. During about ten days, the worker is examined and the therapy is going on till the total radioactivity disappearance. Urine collection of twenty four hours is prescribed during the treatment. The whole activity is kept on the burnt skin. The quick desquamation is the elimination way of the skin retention. 6 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Epidemiology of Skin Cancer: Role of Some Environmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Monfrecola

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The incidence rate of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer entities is dramatically increasing worldwide. Exposure to UVB radiation is known to induce basal and squamous cell skin cancer in a dose-dependent way and the depletion of stratospheric ozone has implications for increases in biologically damaging solar UVB radiation reaching the earth’s surface. In humans, arsenic is known to cause cancer of the skin, as well as cancer of the lung, bladder, liver, and kidney. Exposure to high levels of arsenic in drinking water has been recognized in some regions of the world. SCC and BCC (squamous and basal cell carcinoma have been reported to be associated with ingestion of arsenic alone or in combination with other risk factors. The impact of changes in ambient temperature will influence people’s behavior and the time they spend outdoors. Higher temperatures accompanying climate change may lead, among many other effects, to increasing incidence of skin cancer.

  9. Epidemiology of Skin Cancer: Role of Some Environmental Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella, E-mail: gafabbro@unina.it [Department of Systematic Pathology, Division of Dermatology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Triassi, Maria [Department of Preventive Medical Sciences, Division of Hygiene, University of Naples Federico II Naples (Italy); Mauriello, Maria Chiara [Department of Systematic Pathology, Division of Dermatology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Torre, Guglielma [Department of Preventive Medical Sciences, Division of Hygiene, University of Naples Federico II Naples (Italy); Annunziata, Maria Carmela; Vita, Valerio De; Pastore, Francesco; D’Arco, Vincenza; Monfrecola, Giuseppe [Department of Systematic Pathology, Division of Dermatology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy)

    2010-11-24

    The incidence rate of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer entities is dramatically increasing worldwide. Exposure to UVB radiation is known to induce basal and squamous cell skin cancer in a dose-dependent way and the depletion of stratospheric ozone has implications for increases in biologically damaging solar UVB radiation reaching the earth’s surface. In humans, arsenic is known to cause cancer of the skin, as well as cancer of the lung, bladder, liver, and kidney. Exposure to high levels of arsenic in drinking water has been recognized in some regions of the world. SCC and BCC (squamous and basal cell carcinoma) have been reported to be associated with ingestion of arsenic alone or in combination with other risk factors. The impact of changes in ambient temperature will influence people’s behavior and the time they spend outdoors. Higher temperatures accompanying climate change may lead, among many other effects, to increasing incidence of skin cancer.

  10. Epidemiology of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Ulrike; Eigentler, Thomas; Garbe, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) are now the most common types of cancer in white populations. Both tumor entities show an increasing incidence rate worldwide but a stable or decreasing mortality rate. NMSC is the most common cancer in white-skinned individuals with a worldwide increasing incidence. NMSC is an increasing problem for health care services worldwide which causes significant morbidity. The rising incidence rates of NMSC are probably caused by a combination of increased exposure to ultraviolet (UV) or sun light, increased outdoor activities, changes in clothing style, increased longevity, ozone depletion, genetics and in some cases, immune suppression. An intensive UV exposure in childhood and adolescence was causative for the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) whereas for the etiology of SCC a chronic UV exposure in the earlier decades was accused. Cutaneous melanoma is the most rapidly increasing cancer in white populations, in the last 3 decades incidence rates have risen up to 5-fold. In 2008 melanoma was on place 5 in women and on place 8 in men of the most common solid tumor entities in Germany. The frequency of its occurrence is closely associated with the constitutive color of the skin, and the geographical zone. Changes in outdoor activities and exposure to sunlight during the past 50 years are an important factor for the increasing incidence of melanoma. Mortality rates of melanoma show a stabilization in the USA, Australia and also in European countries. In contrast to SCC, melanoma risk seems to be associated with an intermittent exposure to sunlight. Prevention campaigns aim on reducing incidence and achieving earlier diagnosis, which resulted in an ongoing trend toward thin melanoma since the last two decades. However, the impact of primary prevention measures on incidence rates of melanoma is unlikely to be seen in the near future, rather increasing incidence rates to 40-50/100,000 inhabitants/year should be expected in

  11. Polyphenols: skin photoprotection and inhibition of photocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afaq, F; Katiyar, S K

    2011-12-01

    Polyphenols are a large family of naturally occurring plant products and are widely distributed in plant foods, such as, fruits, vegetables, nuts, flowers, bark and seeds, etc. These polyphenols contribute to the beneficial health effects of dietary products. Clinical and epidemiological studies suggest that exposure of the skin to environmental factors/pollutants, such as solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation induce harmful effects and leads to various skin diseases including the risk of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. The incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer, comprising of squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma, is a significant public health concern world-wide. Exposure of the skin to solar UV radiation results in inflammation, oxidative stress, DNA damage, dysregulation of cellular signaling pathways and immunosuppression thereby resulting in skin cancer. The regular intake of natural plant products, especially polyphenols, which are widely present in fruits, vegetables, dry legumes and beverages have gained considerable attention as protective agents against the adverse effects of UV radiation. In this article, we first discussed the impact of polyphenols on human health based on their structure-activity relationship and bioavailability. We then discussed in detail the photoprotective effects of some selected polyphenols on UV-induced skin inflammation, proliferation, immunosuppression, DNA damage and dysregulation of important cellular signaling pathways and their implications in skin cancer management. The selected polyphenols include: green tea polyphenols, pomegranate fruit extract, grape seed proanthocyanidins, resveratrol, silymarin, genistein and delphinidin. The new information on the mechanisms of action of these polyphenols supports their potential use in skin photoprotection and prevention of photocarcinogenesis in humans.

  12. Study of skin cancer incidence in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors, 1958-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadamori, Naoki; Otake, Masanori; Honda, Takeo.

    1993-03-01

    The effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on skin cancer incidence in a cohort of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors in the Nagasaki Extended Life Span Study (LSS-E85) sample have been investigated. Among 25,942 exposed survivors at risk whose DS86 dose estimates were available, 47 cases of skin cancer including malignant melanoma were confirmed in the Nagasaki Tumor Registry during the period from 1 April 1958 to 31 December 1985. The dose-response relationship of skin cancer based on an additive relative risk model showed linearity without threshold, not a linear-quadratic curve. The excess relative risk (ERR) of 2.2 per gray in the LSS-E85 sample was highly significant (95% confidence limits: 0.5 to 5.0). In addition, the ERR of 3.1 per gray in the Adult Health Study (AHS) sample was also significant (95% confidence limits: 0.6 to 20.3). When dose equivalents based on a relative biological effectiveness of neutrons of 10 were used, the ERR in the former sample decreased to 2.0 per sievert (95% confidence limits: 0.7-4.5), and the risk in the latter group also declined, to 2.7 per sievert (95% confidence limits: 0.6-17.8). The ERRs did not differ significantly between males and females in the LSS-E85 and AHS samples, but a highly significant increase was observed for the ERR of age at exposure and time trend since exposure. The ERR of skin cancer cases including and excluding 4 malignant melanoma cases for the LSS-E85 sample (there were no malignant melanoma cases in the AHS sample) showed almost the same linear dose response. This is the first report to demonstrate a highly significant dose-response relationship between A-bomb exposure and skin cancer incidence. (author)

  13. Skin cancer: an overview of epidemiology and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Randy

    2013-08-01

    To provide a general overview of malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer, with an emphasis on epidemiology, clinical presentation, and the multiple and varied risk factors associated with skin cancer. Peer-reviewed journal articles, government health reports, book chapters, and Web-based resources. Skin cancer is the most common carcinoma, affecting millions worldwide. Incidence is increasing yearly, making it a pre-eminent public health threat. Myriad factors increase the risk of skin cancer and may serve as important prognostic indicators for the disease. To provide nurses with a clearer understanding of the causative mechanisms of skin cancer and an improved awareness of the risk factors associated with the disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk-adjusted melanoma skin cancer incidence rates in Whites (United States).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ray Martell

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain a better population-based measure of risk for melanoma skin cancer. A method has been previously proposed for estimating cancer incidence rates for data collected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. Unlike conventionally reported incidence rates in the USA, this method uses the first primary cancer and adjusts for population-based cancer prevalence to obtain a better measure of cancer risk. The study involves SEER data for white men and women. Conventional melanoma incidence rates overestimate risk for men, increasingly so from 3.3% in the age group of 30-39 years to 11.3% in the age group of 80 years and older. Overestimation in risk for women ranged from 3.3% in the age group of 30-39 years to 8.9% in the age group of 80 years and older. Overestimation of risk was more pronounced when both in-situ and malignant melanomas were considered. Increasing trends in conventional rates were slightly greater than trends in risk-adjusted incidence rates (RAIRs). In 2007, the estimated number of cases with malignant melanoma among the white population based on conventional cancer incidence rates is 37 636 (64 125 including in-situ cases) for men and 28 935 (49 361 including in-situ cases) for women. The estimated number of cases in the USA based on RAIRS is 34 652 [(7.9%); 55 413 (13.6%) including in-situ cases] for male and 27 178 [(6.1%); 44 467 (9.9%) including in-situ cases] for women. We concluded that RAIRs are a better measure of melanoma skin cancer risk and should be used for estimating the number of cancer patients in the USA.

  15. Fatores de risco para câncer da pele não melanoma em Taubaté, SP: um estudo caso-controle Risk factors for nonmelanoma skin cancer in Taubaté, SP: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Regina Ferreira

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar fatores associados ao câncer da pele não melanoma em Taubaté-SP. MÉTODOS: Estudo caso-controle de base hospitalar com residentes em Taubaté atendidos entre 01/01/05 e 31/12/06. Os indivíduos foram combinados 1:1 conforme gênero e idade. Foram variáveis independentes: idade, gênero, fototipo, ascendência europeia, tempo de moradia, exposição solar, tempo (em anos, número de horas e horário de exposição solar ocupacional e não ocupacional, fotoproteção, histórico familiar e fotodano. Foi utilizada a regressão logística hierarquizada em três níveis. O ajuste do modelo foi realizado pelo teste de Hosmer-Lemeshow e sua acurácia foi verificada pela curva ROC. O nível de significância foi p < 0,05. RESULTADOS: Foram 132 casos e 132 controles. Compuseram o modelo final: fototipo com OR = 3,14 (IC 95% 1,79-5,49, horas de exposição solar ocupacional 1,76 (1,04-2,99 e não ocupacional 1,80 (0,98-3,29 e histórico familiar 2,10 (1,13-3,93.Teste de Hosmer-Lemeshow, p = 0,97. Acurácia 70% (IC 95% 63-76. CONCLUSÃO: Pele clara, histórico familiar e exposição solar ocupacional e não ocupacional se associaram ao câncer cutâneo não melanoma em Taubaté-SP.OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with non-melanoma skin cancer in the city of Taubaté, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Hospital-based case-control study with individuals residing in Taubaté, treated between January 2005 and December 2006. The subjects were matched 1:1 according to gender and age. Age, gender, phototype, European descent, time of residence, sun exposure, time (in years, number of hours and time of occupational and non-occupational sun exposure, photoprotection, family history and photodamage were independent variables. A hierarchical logistic regression was used at three levels. The model adjustment was performed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test and its accuracy was verified by ROC curve. The significance level was p < 0.05. RESULTS

  16. Skin cancer and melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moylan, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this chapter, the author discusses various types of non-melanoma malignant skin cancer, as well as malignant melanoma. Non-melanoma skin cancer, such as basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas, occasionally metastasize, but only late in the course of the disease. On the other hand, even relatively small primary melanomas tend to disseminate to regional lymph nodes and to distant sites. The author presents various treatment plans, including radiation therapy. Cutaneous melanomas have been considered relatively radioresistant. This is the rationale for the use of large fraction radiation therapy in the treatment of melanomas with the fraction sizes varying from 4--8 Gy

  17. Prevalence and Costs of Skin Cancer Treatment in the U.S., 2002–2006 and 2007–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Gery P.; Machlin, Steven R.; Ekwueme, Donatus U.; Yabroff, K. Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background Skin cancer, the most common cancer in the U.S., is a major public health problem. The incidence of nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancer is increasing; however, little is known about the economic burden of treatment. Purpose To examine trends in the treated prevalence and treatment costs of nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Methods This study used data on adults from the 2002–2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey full-year consolidated files and information from corresponding medical conditions and medical event files to estimate the treated prevalence and treatment cost of nonmelanoma skin cancer, melanoma skin cancer, and all other cancer sites. Analyses were conducted in January 2014. Results The average annual number of adults treated for skin cancer increased from 3.4 million in 2002–2006 to 4.9 million in 2007–2011 (p<0.001). During this period, the average annual total cost for skin cancer increased from $3.6 billion to $8.1 billion (p=0.001), representing an increase of 126.2%, while the average annual total cost for all other cancers increased by 25.1%. During 2007–2011, nearly 5 million adults were treated for skin cancer annually, with average treatment costs of $8.1 billion each year. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that the health and economic burden of skin cancer treatment is substantial and increasing. Such findings highlight the importance of skin cancer prevention efforts, which may result in future savings to the healthcare system. PMID:25442229

  18. Solar ultraviolet radiation in Syria measurements and relationship with skin cancer incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I; Baydon, S.A.; Dawood, S.

    1994-11-01

    Seasonal variations of solar UVB (285-320) and UVA (320-400) were measured in three sites in Syria (33-37 N sup O) for two years: 1992-1993. UVB measurements were performed using polysulphone films and Robertson-Berger meter, while UVA measurements were done by NVA intensity meter. Two sets of measurements were carried out : - Maximal daily doses three times a week (every other day) - Diurnal variations from sun-rise to sun-set every two hours twice a month (every fortnight). The biological consequences of ultraviolet radiation withreference to some epidemiological data of skin cancer incidence in Syria since 1980 were discussed .(author). 36 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs

  19. Incidence of moisture-associated skin damage in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls-Matarín, J; Del Cotillo-Fuente, M; Ribal-Prior, R; Pujol-Vila, M; Sandalinas-Mulero, I

    To determine the incidence of moisture-associated skin damage (MASD) in the nappy area, identify predisposing factors and know the preventive measures and nursing records. Descriptive longitudinal study (June 2014-April 2015) in a general ICU. Patients whose stay >48hours and without skin lesions were included. The skin was assessed daily until the appearance of MASD, discharge or a maximum of 14 days. Demographics, stay, MASD type, incontinence, number and consistency of stools, obesity, Braden scale and prevention were recorded. 145 patients (66.2% male) were studied, median age was 69 (P 25 =56.5, P 75 =76) and median length of stay was five days (P 25 =3, P 75 =11.25), 29.9% were obese. Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) was detected in 26.2% and intertriginous dermatitis (ITD) in 15.9%. MASD was recorded in 23.8%. The variables causing IAD to develop were faecal incontinence, number of stools, liquid stools, and stay. Those for ITD were obesity and score on the Braden scale. Multivariate analysis selected faecal incontinence (OR=5.4, CI95%: 1.1-26) and the number of stools (OR=1.1, CI95%:1.0-1.2) as independent variables for developing IAD and obesity (OR=2.8, CI95%:1.0-8.2) and Braden (OR=0.8, CI95%:0.7-1.0) for developing ITD. Prevention to 23.8% of obese and 42.9% of incontinent was performed. There is a high incidence in MASD. Faecal incontinence and higher number of stools are the risk factors for developing IAD. Obesity and a lower score on the Braden scale may affect susceptibility to ITD. Recording of MASD and its prevention in patients at risk is insufficient. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Skin cancer concerns particular to women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Al-Dujaili

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: The published findings on causation of melanoma skin cancer and non-melanoma skin cancer in females are outlined, as well as current detection methods and treatment options. Furthermore, a variety of preventative measures specific to women that can reduce the chance of being diagnosed with skin cancer are discussed.

  1. Skin cancer concerns particular to women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Al-Dujaili

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: The published findings on causation of melanoma skin cancer and non-melanoma skin cancer in females are outlined, as well as current detection methods and treatment options. Furthermore, a variety of preventative measures specific to women that can reduce the chance of being diagnosed with skin cancer are discussed.

  2. Photodynamic therapy in dermatology beyond non-melanoma cancer: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiang; Li, Yong; Hamblin, Michael R

    2017-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs a photosensitizer (PS) and visible light in the presence of oxygen, leading to production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species, which can damage the cellular organelles and cause cell death. In dermatology, PDT has usually taken the form of topical application of a precursor in the heme biosynthesis pathway, called 5-aminolevulinic acid (or its methyl ester), so that an active PS, protoporphyrin IX accumulates in the skin. As PDT enhances dermal remodeling and resolves chronic inflamation, it has been used to treat cutaneous disorders include actinic keratoses, acne, viral warts, skin rejuvenation, psoriasis, localized scleroderma, some non-melanoma skin cancers and port-wine stains. Efforts are still needed to mitigate the side effects (principally pain) and improve the overall procedure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Increased incidence of malignant melanoma of the skin in workers in a telecommunications industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, L; Theriault, G; Iturra, H; Provencher, S; Cyr, D; Case, B W

    1988-12-01

    In 1982 physicians at a hospital melanoma clinic in Montreal noticed that among their patients there had been seven men working in a single telecommunications company. This raised suspicions that working in that industry might be associated with development of malignant melanoma of the skin (MMS). A preliminary gross comparison with general population rates indicated that there was an increased risk in this working group. To estimate the risk of MMS more accurately, a standardised incidence ratio (SIR) was calculated based on the rates of MMS in the local population of the Greater Metropolitan Montreal Area for the years 1976-83. During that period, among workers in all plants for the company, 10 male cases of MMS were observed for an expected number of 3.7 (SIR = 2.7; 95% CI = 1.31-5.02). No cases were observed among female workers (expected = 1.3). The excess was significant among cases with a short latency (less than 20 years since beginning of employment). There was no apparent pattern of exposure based on job titles or departments.

  4. Hydrochlorothiazide use and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnspang, Sidsel; Gaist, David; Johannesdottir Schmidt, Sigrun Alba

    2018-01-01

    cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). METHODS: From the Danish Cancer Registry, we identified patients (cases) with NMSC during 2004-2012. Controls were matched 1:20 by age and sex. Cumulative hydrochlorothiazide use (1995-2012) was assessed from the Danish Prescription Registry......BACKGROUND: Hydrochlorothiazide, one of the most frequently used diuretic and antihypertensive drugs in the United States and Western Europe, is photosensitizing and has previously been linked to lip cancer. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between hydrochlorothiazide use and the risk of basal...

  5. Hydrochlorothiazide use and risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnspang, Sidsel; Gaist, David; Johannesdottir Schmidt, Sigrun Alba

    2018-01-01

    cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). METHODS: From the Danish Cancer Registry, we identified patients (cases) with NMSC during 2004-2012. Controls were matched 1:20 by age and sex. Cumulative hydrochlorothiazide use (1995-2012) was assessed from the Danish Prescription Registry...

  6. Variation in incidence of breast, lung and cervical cancer and malignant melanoma of skin by socioeconomic group in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomson Catherine S

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer incidence varies by socioeconomic group and these variations have been linked with environmental and lifestyle factors, differences in access to health care and health seeking behaviour. Socioeconomic variations in cancer incidence by region and age are less clearly understood but they are crucial for targeting prevention measures and health care commissioning. Methods Data were obtained from all eight English cancer registries for patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2003, for all invasive cases of female breast cancer (ICD-10 code C50, lung cancer (ICD-10 codes C33-C34, cervical cancer (ICD-10 code C53, and malignant melanoma of the skin (ICD-10 code C43. Socioeconomic status was assigned to each patient based on their postcode of residence at diagnosis, using the income domain of the Index of Multiple Deprivation 2004. We analysed the socioeconomic variations in the incidence of breast, lung and cervical cancer and malignant melanoma of the skin for England, and regionally and by age. Results Incidence was highest for the most deprived patients for lung cancer and cervical cancer, whilst the opposite was observed for malignant melanoma and breast cancer. The difference in incidence between the most and the least deprived groups was higher for lung cancer patients aged under 65 at diagnosis than those over 65 at diagnosis, which may indicate a cohort effect. There were regional differences in the socioeconomic gradients with the gap being widest for lung and cervical cancer in the North (North East, North West and Yorkshire and Humberside and for malignant melanoma in the East and South West. There were only modest variations in breast cancer incidence by region. If the incidence of lung and cervical cancer were decreased to that of the least deprived group it would prevent 36% of lung cancer cases in men, 38% of lung cancer cases in women and 28% of cervical cancer cases. Incidence of breast cancer and melanoma was

  7. Skin Cancer: ClinicoPathological Study of 204 Patients in Southern Governorates of Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlZou, Amer Bin; Thabit, Mazen Abood Bin; AlSakkaf, Khalid Abdulla; Basaleem, Huda Omer

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer is a group of heterogeneous malignancies, in general classified into nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma skin cancer (MSC). Incidences are high in many parts in the world with considerable geographical and racial variation. In the Yemen, there has been scarce information about skin cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the demographic characteristics and histological trend of skin cancer in Southern Governorates of Yemen. This retrospective study covered 204 cases of skin cancer at the Modern Histopathology Laboratory and Aden Cancer Registry and Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Aden, for the period 20062013. Data were classified regarding different demographic and tumor related variables and analyzed using CanReg4 for cancer registry and SPSS (version 21). The commonest encountered skin cancer was NMSC (93.1%). Generally, skin cancer appears slightly more frequently in females than males with a 1:1.06 male: female ratio, with a mean age of 62.9 years. Slightly higher than onethird (36.3%) were from Aden governorate. The head and neck proved to be the most common site in both males and females (58%). Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common histological type of skin cancer (50.5%). Skin cancer is a common cancer in patients living in southern governorates of Yemen. The pattern appears nearly similar to the international figures with a low incidence of MSC.

  8. Occupational exposure to the sun and risk of skin and lip cancer among male wage earners in Denmark: a population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenborg, Line; Jørgensen, Ane Dahl; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2010-01-01

    We examined the association between outdoor work and the risks of non-melanoma skin cancer, cutaneous malignant melanoma, and lip cancer in a population-based case-control study.......We examined the association between outdoor work and the risks of non-melanoma skin cancer, cutaneous malignant melanoma, and lip cancer in a population-based case-control study....

  9. Skin cancer (Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant melanoma): new cases, treatment practice, and health care costs in new brunswick, Canada, 2002-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Wilfred; Hayes, Robert; Hanson, Dana W; Zhang, Bin; Boudreau, Bonnie; Leonfellner, Suzanne

    2014-10-01

    In Canada, there is no formal process for registering nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC); thus, the epidemiology, treatment practices, and associated health costs are not well known. To investigate trends in new cases of skin cancer, treatment practices, and health care costs in New Brunswick, Canada. Data were extracted from the Provincial Cancer Registry and New Brunswick administrative health databases for 2002-2010. New cases: Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) was the most common skin cancer diagnosed, and incidence rates significantly increased between 1992 and 2010.Treatment practice: Dermatologists managed the majority (45%) of the overall skin cancer treatments.Health care costs: NMSC accounted for ∼80% of the health care costs for skin cancer and was dominated by BCC. Development of best practice treatment guidelines for NMSC in New Brunswick would improve future health care efficiencies, and standard protocols for registering new cases of NMSC in Canada would strengthen surveillance and reporting capacity.

  10. Skin Cancer Risk in Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplant Recipients Compared With Background Population and Renal Transplant Recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Silje Haukali; Gniadecki, Robert; Hædersdal, Merete

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: While a high risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer is well recognized in solid-organ transplant recipients, the risk of skin cancer in hematopoietic stem-cell transplant (HSCT) recipients has not been extensively studied. OBJECTIVE: To determine the risk of cutaneous cancer in HSCT recipients...... autologous) from 1999 through 2014, 4789 RTRs from 1976 through 2014, and 10 age- and sex-matched nontransplanted individuals for each of the groups from the background population. Person-years at risk were calculated from the time of study inclusion until first cutaneous cancer. To compare the risk of skin...... cancer between transplant recipients and background population, we used a stratified proportional hazard regression model for hazard ratio (HR) estimations. By use of the cumulative incidence, we estimated 5- and 10-year risks of skin cancers. All RTR and HSCT recipients were treated and followed up...

  11. Incidence of skin cancer in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors based on DS86 dosimetry system, 1958-1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadamori, Naoki (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Otake, Masanori; Honda, Takeo

    1992-03-01

    The incidence of skin cancer during the period 1958-1985 was examined in the population registered in the life span study extension (LSSE) and the adult health study (AHS). Among 25,942 A-bomb survivors in whom DS86 was available, skin cancer was confirmed in 47 A-bomb survivors. These A-bomb survivors consisted of 24 males and 23 females. According to DS86 dosimetry system, ten A-bomb survivors had been exposed to 0.50 Gy or more. The most common histology was basal cell epithelioma (n=25), followed by malignant melanoma (n=4) and basosquamous cell carcinoma and sweat gland carcinoma (one each). In the group of 0.50 Gy or more, the incidence of occurrence of skin cancer was 20.8/100,000 population per year (PY) for the LSSE population and 22.8/100,000 PY for the AHS population. In the group of 0.01-0.49 Gy, it was 6.8/100,000 PY for the LSSE population and 12.8/100,000 PY for the AHS population. It was significantly associated with higher exposure doses. The dose-response relationship was linear. (N.K.).

  12. Skin cancer associated with commonly prescribed drugs: tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNF-αIs), angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs), phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) and statins -weighing the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Beatrice; Orrell, Kelsey A; Vakharia, Paras P; West, Dennis P

    2018-02-01

    Skin cancers, including both malignant melanoma (MM) and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), are the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the US. The incidence of both MM and NMSC continues to rise. Areas covered: Current evidence for an association between four of the most commonly prescribed classes of drugs in the U.S. and risk for MM and NMSC is reported. Medline was searched (January 2000 to May 2017) for each drug in the classes and for 'basal cell carcinoma', 'squamous cell carcinoma', 'non-melanoma skin cancer', 'skin cancer' and 'melanoma'. Skin cancer risk information was reported for: tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNF-αIs), angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs), phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA)-reductase inhibitors (statins). Expert opinion: Since skin cancer risk is associated with all four classes of these commonly prescribed drugs that represent nearly 20% of the Top 100 drugs in the U.S., these important findings warrant enhanced education, especially for prescribers and those patients at high risk for skin cancer.

  13. Melanin distribution in human epidermis affords localized protection against DNA photodamage and concurs with skin cancer incidence difference in extreme phototypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajuyigbe, Damilola; Lwin, Su M; Diffey, Brian L; Baker, Richard; Tobin, Desmond J; Sarkany, Robert P E; Young, Antony R

    2018-02-02

    Epidermal DNA damage, especially to the basal layer, is an established cause of keratinocyte cancers (KCs). Large differences in KC incidence (20- to 60-fold) between white and black populations are largely attributable to epidermal melanin photoprotection in the latter. The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) is the most mutagenic DNA photolesion; however, most studies suggest that melanin photoprotection against CPD is modest and cannot explain the considerable skin color-based differences in KC incidence. Along with melanin quantity, solar-simulated radiation-induced CPD assessed immediately postexposure in the overall epidermis and within 3 epidermal zones was compared in black West Africans and fair Europeans. Melanin in black skin protected against CPD by 8.0-fold in the overall epidermis and by 59.0-, 16.5-, and 5.0-fold in the basal, middle, and upper epidermis, respectively. Protection was related to the distribution of melanin, which was most concentrated in the basal layer of black skin. These results may explain, at least in part, the considerable skin color differences in KC incidence. These data suggest that a DNA protection factor of at least 60 is necessary in sunscreens to reduce white skin KC incidence to a level that is comparable with that of black skin.-Fajuyigbe, D., Lwin, S. M., Diffey, B. L., Baker, R., Tobin, D. J., Sarkany, R. P. E., Young, A. R. Melanin distribution in human epidermis affords localized protection against DNA photodamage and concurs with skin cancer incidence difference in extreme phototypes.

  14. Decreasing Incidence of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections With a Seasonal Pattern at an Academic Medical Center, 2006-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ethan; Daum, Robert S; David, Michael Z

    2016-10-01

    Background.  The incidence of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in the United States increased sharply after 2000 with the emergence of USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus . We examined trends in SSTI incidence in 2006-2014 at the University of Chicago Medicine (UCM). Methods.  Data were obtained for patient encounters at UCM with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision -coded SSTI diagnosis between January 1, 2006 and March 31, 2014. Incidence density was calculated per 1000 encounters by quarter and year. Encounters were stratified by inpatient, outpatient clinic and emergency department (ED) encounters and by age group, gender, and race. Poisson regression was used to assess change over time. Results.  In 2006-2014, data were collected for 38 201 SSTI-associated encounters among 31 869 subjects. Among all patients treated at UCM, there was a decrease of 1% per year in the incidence of SSTIs during 2006-2013, with an overall decrease of 16%. There was a significant decrease in SSTI-related encounters among inpatients (rate ratio [RR] = 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], .96-.98), ED patients (RR = 0.98; 95% CI, .97-.98), adults (RR = 0.98; 95% CI, .97-.98), children (RR = 0.96; 95% CI, .95-.97), and African Americans (RR = 0.99; 95% CI, .98-.99). There was an annual seasonal trend, with the peak incidence occurring during the late summer. Conclusions.  The incidence of SSTIs at UCM decreased in children and adults with seasonal variation, peaking during the summer months. This suggests a reversal of the massive increase in SSTI incidence in the United States after 2000.

  15. P63 marker Expression in Usual Skin Cancers Compared With Non Tumoral Skin Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhamid Esmaili

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-melanoma skin cancers including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most common cancers in human. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of P63 marker in usual skin cancers compared with non-tomoral skin lesions. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, sampling was performed from archival blocks of Shahid Mohammadi hospital patients during 2010-2011. 60 samples (including 30 samples of non tumoral skin lesions and 30 samples of basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma were studied and evaluation of p63 gene expression was done with Immunohistochemistry method. T-test and Chi-square were used for analysis of data. Results: P63 gene were expressed in 4 cases (13.33 % of non tumoral lesions and all tumoral lesions (100 %. In tumoral lesions, 5 cases (16.66 % showed 1+ severity experssion, 11 cases (36.66% 2 + severity experssion and 14 cases (46.66 % 3+severity experssion. All 4 non tumoral lesions shoed 1+ severity experssion of P63gene. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that the incidence and severity of gene expression of P63 can be use for differentiation between basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma as well as non-tumoral skin lesions. 

  16. Cancer incidence among Nordic airline cabin crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkala, Eero; Helminen, Mika; Haldorsen, Tor; Hammar, Niklas; Kojo, Katja; Linnersjö, Anette; Rafnsson, Vilhjálmur; Tulinius, Hrafn; Tveten, Ulf; Auvinen, Anssi

    2012-12-15

    Airline cabin crew are occupationally exposed to cosmic radiation and jet lag with potential disruption of circadian rhythms. This study assesses the influence of work-related factors in cancer incidence of cabin crew members. A cohort of 8,507 female and 1,559 male airline cabin attendants from Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden was followed for cancer incidence for a mean follow-up time of 23.6 years through the national cancer registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were defined as ratios of observed and expected numbers of cases. A case-control study nested in the cohort (excluding Norway) was conducted to assess the relation between the estimated cumulative cosmic radiation dose and cumulative number of flights crossing six time zones (indicator of circadian disruption) and cancer risk. Analysis of breast cancer was adjusted for parity and age at first live birth. Among female cabin crew, a significantly increased incidence was observed for breast cancer [SIR 1.50, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.32-1.69], leukemia (1.89, 95% CI 1.03-3.17) and skin melanoma (1.85, 95% CI 1.41-2.38). Among men, significant excesses in skin melanoma (3.00, 95% CI 1.78-4.74), nonmelanoma skin cancer (2.47, 95% CI 1.18-4.53), Kaposi sarcoma (86.0, 95% CI 41.2-158) and alcohol-related cancers (combined SIR 3.12, 95% CI 1.95-4.72) were found. This large study with complete follow-up and comprehensive cancer incidence data shows an increased incidence of several cancers, but according to the case-control analysis, excesses appear not to be related to the cosmic radiation or circadian disruptions from crossing multiple time zones. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  17. Residential Radon Exposure and Skin Cancer Incidence in a Prospective Danish Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brauner, Elvira Vaclavik; Loft, Steffen; Sørensen, Mette

    2015-01-01

    exposure may contribute to development of basal cell carcinoma of the skin. We cannot exclude confounding from sunlight and cannot conclude on causality, as the relationship was stronger amongst persons living in apartments and nonexistent amongst those living in single detached homes....... modification was assessed. Results Over a mean follow-up of 13.6 years of 51,445 subjects, there were 3,243 cases of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 317 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 329 cases of MM. The adjusted IRRs per 100 Bq/m(3) increase in residential radon levels for BCC, SCC and MM were 1......Background Although exposure to UV radiation is the major risk factor for skin cancer, theoretical models suggest that radon exposure can contribute to risk, and this is supported by ecological studies. We sought to confirm or refute an association between long-term exposure to residential radon...

  18. Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Malignant disease involving the skin represents a significant work load to the general radiotherapist and can involve interesting diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. Primary skin cancer is also relatively common and there is a need to provide an efficient service in which the first treatment is successful in the majority of patients. The reward for careful attention to technique is very considerable both in terms of clinical cancer control and functional results. Squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and intra-epidermal carcinoma constitute the majority of the lesions dealt with clinically, but metastatic disease, lymphomas, and malignant melanomas are also referred regularly for opinions and may require radiotherapy. The general principle of the techniques of assessment and radiotherapeutic management to be described are equally applicable to any malignant skin tumour once the decision has been made to accept it for radiotherapy. Dosage and fractionation may have to be adjusted to allow for the nature of the disease process and the intent of the treatment

  19. Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part IV: Comparison of cancer incidence and mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ron, E.; Preston, D.L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Thompson, D.E.; Soda, Midori

    1994-01-01

    This report compares cancer incidence and mortality among atomic bomb survivors in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Life Span Study (LSS) cohort. Because the incidence data are derived from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, case ascertainment is limited to the time (1958-1987) and geographic restrictions (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) of the registries, whereas mortality data are available from 1950-1987 anywhere in Japan. With these conditions, there were 9,014 first primary incident cancer cases identified among LSS cohort members compared with 7,308 deaths for which cancer was listed as the underlying cause of death on death certificates. When deaths were limited to those occurring between 1958-1987 in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, there were 3,155 more incident cancer cases overall, and 1,262 more cancers of the digestive system. For cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, skin, breast, female and male genital organs, urinary system and thyroid, the incidence series was at least twice as large as the comparable mortality series. Although the incidence and mortality data are dissimilar in many ways, the overall conclusions regarding which solid cancers provide evidence of a significant dose response generally confirm the mortality findings. When either incidence or mortality data are evaluated, significant excess risks are observed for all solid cancers, stomach, colon, liver (when it is defined as primary liver cancer or liver cancer not otherwise specified on the death certificate), lung, breast, ovary and urinary bladder. No significant radiation effect is seen for cancers of the pharynx, rectum, gallbladder, pancreas, nose, larynx, uterus, prostate or kidney in either series. There is evidence of a significant excess of nonmelanoma skin cancer in the incidence data, but not in the mortality series. 19 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs

  20. UV-radiation and skin cancer dose effect curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, T.; Dahlback, A.; Larsen, S.H.

    1988-08-01

    Norwegian skin cancer data were used in an attempt to arrive at the dose effect relationship for UV-carcinogenesis. The Norwegian population is relatively homogenous with regard to skin type and live in a country where the annual effective UV-dose varies by approximately 40 percent. Four different regions of the country, each with a broadness of 1 o in latitude (approximately 111 km), were selected . The annual effective UV-doses for these regions were calculated assuming normal ozone conditions throughout the year. The incidence of malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (mainly basal cell carcinoma) in these regions were considered and compared to the annual UV-doses. For both these types of cancer a quadratic dose effect curve seems to be valid. Depletions of the ozone layer results in larger UV-doses which in turn may yield more skin cancer. The dose effect curves suggest that the incidence rate will increase by an ''amplification factor'' of approximately 2

  1. Effect of early skin-to-skin contact following normal delivery on incidence of hypothermia in neonates more than 1800 g: randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimbalkar, S M; Patel, V K; Patel, D V; Nimbalkar, A S; Sethi, A; Phatak, A

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the impact of early skin-to-skin contact (SSC) provided for first 24 h on incidence of hypothermia in stable newborns weighing 1800 g or more during first 48 h of life. Stable newborns (term and late preterm: Mean gestational age 37.7 (1.35) weeks, range 34-40 weeks) having birth weight 1800 g or more (Mean weight 2605.6 (419.8) grams) were enrolled after approval from Institutional Human Research Ethics Committee (CTRI/2013/06/003790) and randomized into early SSC (intervention group) and conventional care (control group). Initial care in the delivery room for few minutes immediately after birth in both the groups was given under radiant warmer. In the intervention group, newborns were provided SSC by their mother started between 30 min and 1 h after birth for first 24 h with minimal interruption and were provided conventional care other than SSC for next 24 h of life. In the control group, newborns were kept with their mother and received conventional care other than SSC for first 48 h. Temperature and heart rate of newborns were recorded at 30 min, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 24 and at 48 h of life in both the groups. Independent Samples t-Test and relative risk were used to analyze the data. Both groups had 50 neonates each with similar baseline characteristics. Heart rates were in normal range in both the groups. The intervention group provided an average (s.d.) of 16.98 (0.28) h of SSC over the first 24 h period. The mean temperature was significantly high in the SSC group at all time intervals starting from 1 to 48 h (Ptemperature<36.5 °C) during first 48 h of life. Of them, 11 newborns had single episode, 4 newborns had two episodes and one newborn had three episodes of hypothermia. Of these 22 hypothermic episodes, 20 occurred in the first 6 h of life and 2 episodes occurred at 48 h of life. Moderate hypothermia was seen in two newborns, whereas rest had mild hypothermia. The relative risk of developing

  2. Incidence of pigmented skin tumors in a population of wild Montseny brook newt (Calotriton arnoldi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Silvestre, Albert; Amat, Fèlix; Bargalló, Ferran; Carranza, Salvador

    2011-04-01

    We report the presence of pigmented skin tumors in three populations of the endangered amphibian Montseny brook newt, Calotriton arnoldi, one of the European amphibian species with the smallest distribution range (40 km(2) in the Montseny Natural Park, Catalonia, Spain). Examination of one of the tumors by light microscopy was consistent with chromatophoroma and was most suggestive of a melanophoroma. Tumors were not found in juveniles. In adults, only two of three populations were affected. The proportions of males and females affected were not significantly different, but there was a positive correlation between body size and presence of tumors in both sexes. The etiology of chromatophoromas remains unknown but, in our study, they do not appear to have been caused by water quality or Ultraviolet B.

  3. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations and incident cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, T; Husemoen, L L N; Thyssen, J P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) could have opposing effects on cancer risk, as mutations are associated with both 10% higher serum vitamin D levels, which may protect against cancer, and with impaired skin barrier function, which may lead to higher cancer...... susceptibility. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association of the FLG genotype and cancer types in four population-based cohorts. METHODS: A total of 13,376 individuals were genotyped for FLG mutations. Information on cancer was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry. Persons with a history of cancer...... at baseline were excluded from prospective analyses. RESULTS: There were 1339 incident cancers (median follow-up 11·4 years). The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for FLG mutation carriers vs. wild types were: for any cancer (HR 0·95, 95% CI 0·78-1·16), any cancer excluding nonmelanoma...

  4. The incidence and features of systemic reactions to skin prick tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellaturay, Priya; Nasser, Shuaib; Ewan, Pamela

    2015-09-01

    Skin prick testing (SPT) has been regarded as a safe procedure with few systemic reactions. To evaluate the rate of systemic reactions and their associations after SPT in the largest population to date. In this study reactions were recorded prospectively in a specialist UK allergy clinic for 6 years (2007-2013). An estimated 31,000 patients underwent SPT. Twenty-four patients (age range 7 months to 56 years, mean 23.5 years, 17 female patients, 12 with asthma) had systemic reactions. The rate of systemic reactions to SPT was 0.077%. The likely allergens causing the reaction were foods (18; peanut, 7; walnut, 1; Brazil nut, 2; pistachio, 1; lupin, 1; cow's milk, 2; shrimp, 1; spinach, 1; legume, 1; soy, 1), aeroallergens (4; rabbit, 1; rat, 1; ragwort, 1; grass pollen, 1), wasp venom (1), and Tazocin (1). The causative SPT wheal was larger than 8 mm in 75%. The reaction to Tazocin was severe, with anaphylaxis occurring minutes after SPT. Reactions were treated immediately in the clinic and did not require further medical care. In this largest single-center study, the rate of systemic reactions after SPT was 77 per 100,000 patients. It is the first study to identify foods as a common and important cause (75%), with nuts posing the highest risk. This study reports the first systemic reaction to venom SPT and the first anaphylactic reaction after drug SPT. There was an association with a history of severe reactions and large skin test reaction. There are risks, albeit small, when undertaking SPT. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Interval cancers after skin cancer screening: incidence, tumour characteristics and risk factors for cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, J; Waldmann, A; Geller, A C; Weinstock, M A; Eisemann, N; Noftz, M; Bertram, S; Nolte, S; Volkmer, B; Greinert, R; Breitbart, E; Katalinic, A

    2017-01-17

    The rate of interval cancers is an established indicator for the performance of a cancer-screening programme. We examined the incidence, tumour characteristics and risk factors of melanoma interval cancers that occurred in participants of the SCREEN project, which was carried out 2003/2004 in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. Data from 350 306 SCREEN participants, who had been screened negative for melanoma, were linked to data of the state cancer registry. Melanoma interval cancers were defined as melanomas diagnosed within 4-24 months after SCREEN examination. Results were compared with melanomas of the pre-SCREEN era (1999-2002), extracted from the cancer registry. The overall relative incidence of melanoma interval cancers in terms of observed/expected ratio was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.82-1.05; in situ: 1.61 (1.32-1.95), invasive: 0.71 (0.60-0.84)). Compared with melanomas of the pre-SCREEN era, the interval melanomas were thinner and had a slightly greater proportion of lentigo maligna melanomas whereas nodular melanomas were less frequent. The results indicate a moderate performance of the SCREEN intervention with an excess of in situ melanomas. In part, the findings might be due to specifics of the SCREEN project, in particular a short-term follow-up of patients at high risk for melanoma.

  6. Non-coding RNAs in skin cancers: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani B. Kaushik, MD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancers are the most common form of cancer in humans. They can largely be categorized into Melanoma and Non-melanoma skin cancers. The latter mainly includes Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC and Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC, and have a higher incidence than melanomas. There has been a recent emergence of interest in the role of non-coding RNA's in pathogenesis of skin cancers. The transcripts which lack any protein coding capacity are called non-coding RNA. These non-coding RNA are further classified based on their length; small non-coding RNA (200 nucleotides. ncRNA They are involved at multiple transcriptional, post transcriptional and epigenetic levels, modulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, senescence and apoptosis. Their expression pattern has also been linked to metastases, drug resistance and long term prognosis. They have both diagnostic and prognostic significance for skin cancers, and can also be a target for future therapies for cutaneous malignancies. More research is needed to further utilize their potential as therapeutic targets. Keywords: Skin cancer, Non-coding RNA's, miRNA, Cell proliferation, Invasion, Metastasis

  7. Nonmelanoma cutaneous cancers involving the skull base: outcomes of aggressive multimodal management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Shaan M; Ramakrishna, Rohan; Weber, Randal S; Kupferman, Michael E; Gidley, Paul W; Hanna, Ehab Y; DeMonte, Franco

    2015-09-01

    A relative paucity of information exists regarding outcomes from craniofacial resection for advanced nonmelanoma skin cancers involving the skull base. In light of advances in surgical technique and adjuvant therapy protocols, the authors reviewed their surgical experience to determine disease control rates, overall survival (OS), morbidity, and mortality. A retrospective review of 24 patients with nonmelanoma cutaneous cancers with skull base involvement treated with craniofacial resection at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center from 1994 to 2012 was performed. Of these patients, 19 (79%) had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 4 (17%) had basosquamous carcinoma (BSCC), and 1 patient (4%) had adenocarcinoma. Factors as assessed were prior treatment, TNM staging, tumor involvement, extent of intracranial extension, margin status, postoperative complications, recurrence, disease status at last follow-up, and long-term survival. The majority of tumors were T4 (67%) according to the TNM classification; perineural extension was noted in 58%, cavernous sinus involvement in 25%, and dural involvement in 29%. Postoperative complications occurred in 4 patients (17%) including 1 death. Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated for OS and progression-free survival (PFS). Median OS was 43.2 months with an 82% 1-year OS and 37% 5-year OS; the median PFS was 91.2 months. Margin status was positively associated with median OS in SCC (91 months [for negative margins] vs 57 months, p = 0.8) and in BSCC (23.7 vs 3.2 months, p management with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy can positively impact locoregional control and OS. With improvements in technique and adjuvant therapy protocols, treatment can still be considered in situations of perineural disease and cavernous sinus involvement and as a salvage option for patients in whom prior treatment has failed. As patients with advanced NMSCs often have few options, craniofacial resection, as part of a coordinated multimodal

  8. Disease management for chronic skin cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van der Geer-Rutten (Simone)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is a rapidly rising problem. In this thesis we show that an enormous gap exists between the official first primary figures available at cancer registries and the actual burden in a dermatology practice. NMSC needs to be regarded as a chronic

  9. Incidence of melanoma in organ transplant recipients in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Mimi; Sander, Megan; Ravani, Pietro; Mydlarski, P Régine

    2016-10-01

    Many studies have documented the increased risk of non-melanoma skin cancers in organ transplant recipients (OTRs). However, the incidence of melanoma is less well defined. To date, there have been no studies on the incidence of melanoma in Canadian OTRs. Herein, we determine the incidence and clinical features of melanoma in a cohort of OTRs in Southern Alberta, Canada. We used the Southern Alberta Transplant database to identify kidney and liver transplant recipients between the years 2000 and 2012. This population was cross-referenced with the Alberta Cancer Registry for a diagnosis of melanoma. The clinical features of all cases were obtained, and the standardized incidence rate was calculated. We identified 993 OTR patients, representing 5955 person-years. Only one patient developed a melanoma post-transplant, and this was a nodular melanoma. The age-standardized incidence rate was 11 per 100 000 (0.6 per 5955), compared to 13.4 per 100 000 in the general Alberta population (incidence rate ratio of 1.29, with 95% confidence interval of 0.17 to 9.82). This is the first Canadian study to investigate the association between organ transplantation and melanoma. Our study did not identify an increased risk of developing a de novo melanoma post-transplant. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Incidence and determinants of nevirapine and efavirenz-related skin rashes in West Africans: nevirapine's epitaph?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Stephen Sarfo

    Full Text Available Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI associated rash is common and frequently leads to discontinuation of NNRTIs. This study assessed the risk of developing rashes and discontinuing NNRTIs and associated factors in a large clinic in central Ghana. In this retrospective cohort study, clinical data were obtained in patients starting efavirenz or nevirapine between 2004-2010. Factors associated with rashes were explored using a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model. Of 3,999 patients who started NNRTI-based ART, 281 (7.0% experienced at least one episode of NNRTI-related rash with an incidence of 2.63 events/100 person-years, occurring in 10.2% and 5.6% of patients taking nevirapine and efavirenz respectively. Most rashes (94% were grade 1 or 2 and were reported a median of 2 months following initiation of ART. In multivariate analysis developing a rash was associated with nevirapine use (aHR 1.67, 95% CI 1.28-2.10, female gender (aHR of 1.39, 95% CI 1.01-1.92 and lower baseline CD4 counts (aHR 0.88, 95% CI 0.82-0.95 per 50 cells/mm³ increment. Patients with nevirapine-associated rash were 11 times more likely to discontinue treatment as patients with efavirenz-associated rash. In contrast to findings in other studies, NNRTI-associated rashes in Ghanaians appear more common in patients with lower baseline CD4 counts. Given the increased frequency of rashes with nevirapine and subsequent discontinuations in many patients, along with other treatment-limiting toxicities, this provides further impetus for the replacement of nevirapine by efavirenz as the first-line NNRTI treatment of choice in Africa.

  11. Sirolimus use and cancer incidence among US kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, E L; Gustafson, S K; Kasiske, B L; Israni, A K; Snyder, J J; Hess, G P; Engels, E A; Segev, D L

    2015-01-01

    Sirolimus has anti-carcinogenic properties and can be included in maintenance immunosuppressive therapy following kidney transplantation. We investigated sirolimus effects on cancer incidence among kidney recipients. The US transplant registry was linked with 15 population-based cancer registries and national pharmacy claims. Recipients contributed sirolimus-exposed time when sirolimus claims were filled, and unexposed time when other immunosuppressant claims were filled without sirolimus. Cox regression was used to estimate associations with overall and specific cancer incidence, excluding nonmelanoma skin cancers (not captured in cancer registries). We included 32,604 kidney transplants (5687 sirolimus-exposed). Overall, cancer incidence was suggestively lower during sirolimus use (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.70-1.11). Prostate cancer incidence was higher during sirolimus use (HR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.15-3.02). Incidence of other cancers was similar or lower with sirolimus use, with a 26% decrease overall (HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.57-0.96, excluding prostate cancer). Results were similar after adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics. This modest association does not provide strong evidence that sirolimus prevents posttransplant cancer, but it may be advantageous among kidney recipients with high cancer risk. Increased prostate cancer diagnoses may result from sirolimus effects on screen detection. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  12. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products evaluated by skin autofluorescence and incident frailty in older adults from the Bordeaux Three-City cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilleron, Sophie; Rajaobelina, Kalina; Tabue Teguo, Maturin; Dartigues, Jean-François; Helmer, Catherine; Delcourt, Cécile; Rigalleau, Vincent; Féart, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed the cross-sectional and prospective relationships between the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGE), assessed by skin autofluorescence (AF) and frailty and its components. A total of 423 participants of the Bordeaux sample of the Three-City study 75 years of age or older in 2009-2010 were included in the cross-sectional analysis. Among them, 255 initially non-frail participants were re-examined 4 years later. Skin AF (arbitrary units (AU)) was measured using the AGE Reader. Frailty was defined using Fried's criteria. Associations were assessed with logistic regression models. Mean skin AF at baseline was 2.81 ±0.68 AU and 16.8% participants were frail. Adjusted for sociodemographic and health characteristics, skin AF was associated neither with prevalent frailty as a whole (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.2; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.8-1.9) nor with any of its components. Among 255 non-frail participants, 32 became frail over 4 years. In multivariate analyses, skin AF was not associated with incident frailty as a whole (OR = 1.0; 0.5-2.0) but with a doubled risk of incident exhaustion (OR = 2.0; 1.2-3.6) and low energy expenditure (OR = 2.0; 1.1-3.7). No association was observed with other criteria. In French older community-dwellers aged 75 years and over, the accumulation of AGEs evaluated by skin AF was not associated with prevalent or incident frailty but with the 4-year risk of exhaustion and low energy expenditure. Further studies with larger samples are needed to confirm our results.

  13. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products evaluated by skin autofluorescence and incident frailty in older adults from the Bordeaux Three-City cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Pilleron

    Full Text Available We analyzed the cross-sectional and prospective relationships between the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGE, assessed by skin autofluorescence (AF and frailty and its components.A total of 423 participants of the Bordeaux sample of the Three-City study 75 years of age or older in 2009-2010 were included in the cross-sectional analysis. Among them, 255 initially non-frail participants were re-examined 4 years later. Skin AF (arbitrary units (AU was measured using the AGE Reader. Frailty was defined using Fried's criteria. Associations were assessed with logistic regression models.Mean skin AF at baseline was 2.81 ±0.68 AU and 16.8% participants were frail. Adjusted for sociodemographic and health characteristics, skin AF was associated neither with prevalent frailty as a whole (Odds Ratio (OR = 1.2; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.8-1.9 nor with any of its components. Among 255 non-frail participants, 32 became frail over 4 years. In multivariate analyses, skin AF was not associated with incident frailty as a whole (OR = 1.0; 0.5-2.0 but with a doubled risk of incident exhaustion (OR = 2.0; 1.2-3.6 and low energy expenditure (OR = 2.0; 1.1-3.7. No association was observed with other criteria.In French older community-dwellers aged 75 years and over, the accumulation of AGEs evaluated by skin AF was not associated with prevalent or incident frailty but with the 4-year risk of exhaustion and low energy expenditure. Further studies with larger samples are needed to confirm our results.

  14. Cancer incidence in ethnic German migrants from the Former Soviet Union in comparison to the host population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Stegmaier, Christa; Becher, Heiko

    2014-02-01

    To investigate cancer incidence patterns among ethnic German migrants (Aussiedler) from the Former Soviet Union, a large migrant group in Germany, in comparison to autochthonous Saarland population over a 20 year observation period. Data were obtained from a cohort of Aussiedler residing in the federal state of Saarland (n=18,619). Cancer incidence and vital status were ascertained through record linkage with the Saarland Cancer Registry and local population registries. During the follow up period from 1990 to 2009 we observed 638 incident diagnoses of malignant neoplasms (except non-melanoma skin cancer). The overall standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was 0.98 (95% confidence interval 0.92, 1.04). However, site-specific SIRs revealed great variation. Stomach cancer incidence was significantly higher among Aussiedler. Lung cancer was elevated for males, but lower among females. Additionally, diagnoses for colorectal cancer among males were significantly lower. Age-standardized rates (ASRs) over time show not all cancer rates of Aussiedler attenuate as expected to Saarland rates. For example, lung and prostate cancer incidence rates show increasing disparity from Saarland rates and female breast cancer incidence develops in parallel. Furthermore, ASR for overall cancer incidence of Aussiedler shows a yearly decrease (p=0.06) whereas Saarland rates remain stable. Aussiedler incidence rates reflect incidence pattern observed in their countries of origin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Skin cancer risk factors in childhood: findings of a survey conducted within Italian areas with a different incidence of melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazzotti, Valerio; Cercato, Maria Cecilia; Terrenato, Irene; Santi, Pieluigi; Falcini, Fabio; Assennato, Giorgio; Gattei, Elena; Catricalà, Caterina; Natali, Pier Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    to evaluate the association between phenotype and sun sensitivity factors, sun protection behavior, ethnicity and the area of residence in school-aged children. a cross-sectional study in the framework of a survey of children using a self-administered questionnaire to be filled in by parents. 56390 children attending primary schools located in the Italian provinces of Brindisi, Rome, Forlì and Genova, in the period between 1998-2002. Odds Ratios (ORs) and their relative 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI) are to be computed through univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. "FOTO positive" phenotype, a proxy variable of the fair phenotype, was directly and significantly associated with the tendency to sunburn (OR 4.75; 95% CI 4.54-4.96), the use of sunscreens (OR 1.79; 95% CI 1.63-1.97), the number of grandparents born in the northern areas (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.45-1.83, for four northern grandparents versus none), the presence of freckles on the face (OR 1.62; 95% CI 1.53-1.72) and of naevi on the left forearm (OR 1.20; 95% CI 1.15-1.26). A positive association was also found for the residence in the northern areas using the area of Brindisi as the reference category, (Rome: OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.95-1.10; Forlì: OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.96-1.15; Genova: OR 1.16; 95% CI 1.08-1.26); the ORs increase with latitude, as does the incidence rate of melanoma in Italy. An inverse association was observed with the male sex (OR 0.92; 95% CI 0.88-0.96), the increase of school-class level (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.60-0.69, for the highest versus the lowest school-class level) and the ability to tan (OR 0.40; 95% CI 0.36-0.43). these findings confirmed that the fairness phenotype is associated with other skin cancer risk factors in children and pointed out that the high-risk phenotype has a geographical distribution consistent with the pattern of melanoma incidence in the Italian areas covered by the study.

  16. Impact of Age and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 on DNA Damage Responses in UV-Irradiated Human Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Kemp

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC necessitates a thorough understanding of its primary risk factors, which include exposure to ultraviolet (UV wavelengths of sunlight and age. Whereas UV radiation (UVR has long been known to generate photoproducts in genomic DNA that promote genetic mutations that drive skin carcinogenesis, the mechanism by which age contributes to disease pathogenesis is less understood and has not been sufficiently studied. In this review, we highlight studies that have considered age as a variable in examining DNA damage responses in UV-irradiated skin and then discuss emerging evidence that the reduced production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 by senescent fibroblasts in the dermis of geriatric skin creates an environment that negatively impacts how epidermal keratinocytes respond to UVR-induced DNA damage. In particular, recent data suggest that two principle components of the cellular response to DNA damage, including nucleotide excision repair and DNA damage checkpoint signaling, are both partially defective in keratinocytes with inactive IGF-1 receptors. Overcoming these tumor-promoting conditions in aged skin may therefore provide a way to lower aging-associated skin cancer risk, and thus we will consider how dermal wounding and related clinical interventions may work to rejuvenate the skin, re-activate IGF-1 signaling, and prevent the initiation of NMSC.

  17. Skin cancer as a marker of sun exposure associates with myocardial infarction, hip fracture and death from any cause

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Jacobsen, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F

    2013-01-01

    Sun exposure is the single most important risk factor for skin cancer, but sun exposure may also have beneficial effects on health. We tested the hypothesis that individuals with skin cancer (non-melanoma skin cancer and cutaneous malignant melanoma) have less myocardial infarction, hip fracture...... and death from any cause, compared with general population controls....

  18. Ultraviolet light exposure, skin cancer risk and vitamin D production

    Science.gov (United States)

    RIVAS, MIGUEL; ROJAS, ELISA; ARAYA, MARÍA C.; CALAF, GLORIA M.

    2015-01-01

    The danger of overexposure to solar ultraviolet radiation has been widely reviewed since the 1980s due to the depletion of the ozone layer. However, the benefits of mild exposure of the skin to ultraviolet (UV) light have not been widely investigated. Numerous reports have demonstrated that an association exists between low light exposure to the sun, non-melanoma skin cancer and a lack of vitamin D synthesis. As vitamin D synthesis in the body depends on skin exposure to UVB radiation from the sun (wavelength, 290–320 nm), experimental measurements for this type of solar radiation are important. The present study analyzed data obtained from a laboratory investigating UV radiation from the sun at the University of Tarapacá (Arica, Chile), where systematic experimental UVB measurements had been performed using a calibrated biometer instrument since 2006. These data were compared with skin cancer data from the local population. The results demonstrated that the incidence of skin cancer systematically increased from 7.4 to 18.7 in men and from 10.0 to 21.7 in women between 2000 and 2006 in Arica, respectively; this increase may be due to multiple factors, including the lack of adequate levels of vitamin D in risk groups such as post-menopausal women and senior age. This marked increase may also be due to the high levels of UV radiation measured in this region throughout the year. However, it is not certain that the local population has adequate vitamin D levels, nor that their skin has been predominantly exposed to artificial light that does not allow adequate vitamin D synthesis. Thus, the current study presents the association between skin type IV, the time to induce solar erythema and the time required to produce 1,000 international units of vitamin D. PMID:26622830

  19. Incidence of surgical site infection with pre-operative skin preparation using 10% polyvidone-iodine and 0.5% chlorhexidine-alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ana Luzia; Simões, Maria de Lourdes Pessole Biondo

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the incidence of surgical site infection when the preoperative skin preparation was performed with 10% povidone-iodine and 0.5% chlorhexidine-alcohol. We conducted a randomized, longitudinal study based on variables obtained from patients undergoing clean and potentially contaminated operations. Those involved were divided into two groups. In group 1 (G1) we included 102 patients with skin prepared with povidone-iodine, and in group 2 (G2), 103, whose skin was prepared with chlorhexidine. In the third, seventh and 30th postoperative days we evaluated the surgical site, searching for signs of infection. Data related to clinical profile, such as diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcoholism, haematological data (Hb, VG and leukocytes), age and gender, and the related variables, such as number of days of preoperative hospitalization, shaving, topography of incision, antibiotic prophylaxis and resident participation in the operation were not predisposing factors for surgical site infection. Two patients in G1 and eight in G2 undergoing clean operations had some type of infection (p = 0.1789), five in G1 and three in G2 undergoing potentially contaminated operations had some type of infection (p = 0.7205). The incidence of surgical site infection in operations classified as clean and as potentially contaminated for which skin preparation was done with 10% povidone-iodine and 0.5% chlorhexidine-alcohol was similar.

  20. The Role of Phytonutrients in Skin Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A. Evans

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Photodamage is known to occur in skin with exposure to sunlight, specifically ultraviolet (UV radiation. Such damage includes inflammation, oxidative stress, breakdown of the extracellular matrix, and development of cancer in the skin. Sun exposure is considered to be one of the most important risk factors for both nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Many phytonutrients have shown promise as photoprotectants in clinical, animal and cell culture studies. In part, the actions of these phytonutrients are thought to be through their actions as antioxidants. In regard to skin health, phytonutrients of interest include vitamin E, certain flavonoids, and the carotenoids, b-carotene, lycopene and lutein.

  1. Relationships of skin depths and temperatures when varying pulse repetition frequencies from 2.0-microm laser light incident on pig skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, David; Johnson, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Human perception of 2.0-microm infrared laser irradiation has become significant in such disparate fields as law enforcement, neuroscience, and pain research. Several recent studies have found damage thresholds for single-pulse and continuous wave irradiations at this wavelength. However, the only publication using multiple-pulse irradiations was investigating the cornea rather than skin. Literature has claimed that the 2.0-microm light characteristic thermal diffusion time was as long as 300-ms. Irradiating the skin with 2.0-microm lasers to produce sensation should follow published recommendations to use pulses on the order of 10 to 100 ms, which approach the theoretical thermal diffusion time. Therefore, investigation of the heating of skin for a variety of laser pulse combinations was undertaken. Temperatures of ex vivo pig skin were measured at the surface and at three depths from pulse sequences of six different duty factors. Differences were found in temperature rise per unit exposure that did not follow a linear relation to duty factor. The differences can be explained by significant heat conduction during the pulses. Therefore, the common heat modeling assumption of thermal confinement during a pulse may need to be experimentally verified if the pulse approaches the theoretical thermal confinement time.

  2. Delivering value in dermatology: insights from skin cancer detection in routine clinical visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enamandram, Monica; Duncan, Lyn M; Kimball, Alexandra B

    2015-02-01

    There are increasing demands to demonstrate and report on outcomes in dermatology. Skin cancer diagnosis through skin examination has been well studied, and is promising as a value-delivering intervention. This study seeks to identify the rate of skin cancer diagnosis during routine visits to a large tertiary dermatology clinic. Medical records of patients presenting for routine dermatologic care at Massachusetts General Hospital between March 28 and September 28, 2012, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients given a diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) confirmed on biopsy specimen were identified. Billing data were used to identify the total number of patients evaluated during the study period. NMSC was diagnosed in 1266 skin biopsy specimens from 1047 (7.0%) of the 14,829 patients who presented for routine care. In all, 55% of patients with NMSC were men (mean age 70 years). Chief symptoms of patients with NMSC included general dermatologic concerns (37%), routine cancer screening (43%), and specific lesion(s) of concern (19%). Retrospective design and restriction to a single institution may limit the generalizability of our findings. The incidence of NMSC in routine dermatology is high; these findings validate the value of care provided by dermatologists and highlight the likely increasing need for their diagnostic skills as the population ages in the United States. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Optical coherence tomography for imaging of skin and skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging technology based on light reflection. It provides real-time images with up to 2-mm penetration into the skin and a resolution of approximately 10 μm. It is routinely used in ophthalmology. The normal skin and its appendages have been studied......, as have many diseases. The method can provide accurate measures of epidermal and nail changes in normal tissue. Skin cancer and other tumors, as well as inflammatory diseases, have been studied and good agreement found between OCT images and histopathological architecture. OCT also allows noninvasive...... monitoring of morphologic changes in skin diseases and may have a particular role in the monitoring of medical treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer. The technology is however still evolving and continued technological development will necessitate an ongoing evaluation of its diagnostic accuracy. Several...

  4. Genus beta human papillomaviruses and incidence of basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas of skin: population based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagas, Margaret R; Waterboer, Tim; Li, Zhongze; Nelson, Heather H; Michael, Kristina M; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; Perry, Ann E; Spencer, Steven K; Daling, Janet; Green, Adele C; Pawlita, Michael

    2010-07-08

    To investigate the association between genus beta human papillomaviruses and the incidence of non-melanocytic skin cancer in the general population. Population based case-control study. New Hampshire, USA. 2366 skin cancer cases and controls from the general population aged 25 to 74 years (663 squamous cell carcinoma, 898 basal cell carcinoma, 805 controls), with plasma samples tested for L1 antibodies to 16 genus beta human papillomaviruses by multiplex serology. Odds ratios for squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma associated with seropositivity to beta human papillomaviruses. Squamous cell carcinoma, but not basal cell carcinoma, cases had a higher prevalence of each of the individual beta human papillomaviruses assayed compared with controls. The odds ratios for squamous cell carcinoma increased with the number of beta types positive (odds ratio for one type positive 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.74 to 1.33); two to three types positive 1.44 (1.03 to 2.01); four to eight types positive 1.51 (1.03 to 2.20); more than eight types positive 1.71 (1.12 to 2.62); P for trend (categorical)human papillomavirus infection and the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin in the general population, as well as potential enhancement of risk by immunosuppression.

  5. Skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Michiko

    1992-01-01

    This chapter reviews the development of skin cancer associated with radiation, focusing on the knowledge of A-bomb radiation-induced skin cancer. Since the discovery of X radiation in 1895, acute and chronic radiation dermatitis has been the first matter of concern. Then, in 1902, skin cancer found among radiological personnel has posed a social problem. In earlier study determining the relationship between skin cancer and A-bomb radiation, there is no increase in the incidence of either skin cancer or precancerous condition during the first 20 years after A-bombing. More recent studies have showed that there is a significant correlation between the incidence of skin cancer and distance from the hypocenter; and the incidence of skin cancer is found to be remarkably increased since 1975 in the group exposed at ≤2,000 m. Excess relative risk is 2.2 at one Gy dose. The incidence of skin cancer is also found to be extremely increased with aging. Relative risk is high in younger A-bomb survivors at the time of exposure. Histologically, basal cell carcinoma is more senstitive to ionizing radiation than squamous cell carcinoma. (N.K.)

  6. [Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and premalignant skin lesions--how to treat?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Sari; Jeskanen, Leila; Ylitalo, Leea

    2014-01-01

    Increasing exposure to UV radiation is considered the most important etiologic factor of nonmelanoma skin cancers. Consequently, exposed areas such as the scalp and face, are the primary areas for developing non-melanoma skin cancers. Once a patient has presented with one tumor, additional lesions are common. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical picture and biopsy or excision for histopathological analysis. Various non-surgical treatment options have been established. Superficial basal cell carcinoma, superficial carcinoma in situ and all actinic keratoses are preferentially treated non-surgically. Most other basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas should be surgically removed.

  7. OCT imaging of skin cancer and other dermatological diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides clinicians and researchers with micrometer-resolution, in vivo, cross-sectional images of human skin up to several millimeter depth. This review of OCT imaging applied within dermatology covers the application of OCT to normal skin, and reports on a lar...... number of applications in the fields of non-melanoma skin cancer, malignant melanomas, psoriasis and dermatitis, infestations, bullous skin diseases, tattoos, nails, haemangiomas, and other skin diseases. (© 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)...

  8. Effect of Rain-Shelter Cultivation of Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Gernischet on the Phenolic Profile of Berry Skins and the Incidence of Grape Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng-Fei Xu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Rain-shelter cultivation is an effective cultural method to prevent rainfall damage during grape harvest and widely applied in the Chinese rainy regions. In this study we investigated the effect of rain-shelter cultivation on grape diseases and phenolic composition in the skins of Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Gernischet grape berries through the comparison with open-field cultivation at two vintages (2010 and 2011. The results showed that rain-shelter cultivation reduced the incidence of grape diseases significantly and delayed the maturation of Cabernet Gernischet fruits. With regards to most of the phenolic compounds identified in this study, their content in grape samples under rain-shelter cultivation was decreased compared to those under open-field cultivation. However, rain-shelter cultivation stimulated the accumulation of dihydroquercetin-3-O-rhamnoside in grape skins during grape maturation. These were related with micrometeorological alterations in vineyards by using plastic covering under rain-shelter cultivation. It suggests the rain-shelter cultivation makes possible the cultivation of “Cabernet Gernischet” grapes in an organic production system, for providing a decrease in the incidence of diseases and the dependence on chemical pesticides in the grape and wine industry.

  9. Effect of rain-shelter cultivation of Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Gernischet on the phenolic profile of berry skins and the incidence of grape diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jiang-Fei; Ning, Peng-Fei; Xu, Teng-Fei; Zhang, Zhen-Wen

    2012-12-27

    Rain-shelter cultivation is an effective cultural method to prevent rainfall damage during grape harvest and widely applied in the Chinese rainy regions. In this study we investigated the effect of rain-shelter cultivation on grape diseases and phenolic composition in the skins of Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Gernischet grape berries through the comparison with open-field cultivation at two vintages (2010 and 2011). The results showed that rain-shelter cultivation reduced the incidence of grape diseases significantly and delayed the maturation of Cabernet Gernischet fruits. With regards to most of the phenolic compounds identified in this study, their content in grape samples under rain-shelter cultivation was decreased compared to those under open-field cultivation. However, rain-shelter cultivation stimulated the accumulation of dihydroquercetin-3-O-rhamnoside in grape skins during grape maturation. These were related with micrometeorological alterations in vineyards by using plastic covering under rain-shelter cultivation. It suggests the rain-shelter cultivation makes possible the cultivation of "Cabernet Gernischet" grapes in an organic production system, for providing a decrease in the incidence of diseases and the dependence on chemical pesticides in the grape and wine industry.

  10. Incidence, management, and course of cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algaba, Alicia; Guerra, Iván; Marín-Jiménez, Ignacio; Quintanilla, Elvira; López-Serrano, Pilar; García-Sánchez, María Concepción; Casis, Begoña; Taxonera, Carlos; Moral, Ignacio; Chaparro, María; Martín-Rodríguez, Daniel; Martín-Arranz, María Dolores; Manceñido, Noemí; Menchén, Luis; López-Sanromán, Antonio; Castaño, Ángel; Bermejo, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] are at increased risk for developing some types of neoplasia. Our aims were to determin the risk for cancer in patients with IBD and to describe the relationship with immunosuppressive therapies and clinical management after tumor diagnosis. Retrospective, multicenter, observational, 5-year follow-up, cohort study. Relative risk [RR] of cancer in the IBD cohort and the background population, therapeutic strategies, and cancer evolution were analyzed. A total of 145 cancers were diagnosed in 133 of 9100 patients with IBD (global cumulative incidence 1.6% vs 2.4% in local population; RR = 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.57-0.78). Patients with IBD had a significantly increased RR of non-melanoma skin cancer [RR = 3.85; 2.53-5.80] and small bowel cancer [RR = 3.70; 1.23-11.13]. After cancer diagnosis, IBD treatment was maintained in 13 of 27 [48.1%] patients on thiopurines, in 2 of 3 on methotrexate [66.6%], none on anti-TNF-α monotherapy [n = 6] and 4 of 12 [33.3%] patients on combined therapy. Rate of death and cancer remission during follow-up did not differ [p > 0.05] between patients who maintained the treatment compared with patients who withdrew [5% vs 8% and 95% vs 74%, respectively]. An association between thiopurines [p = 0.20] or anti-TNF-α drugs [p = 0.77] and cancer was not found. Patients with IBD have an increased risk for non-melanoma skin cancer and small bowel cancer. Immunosuppresive therapy is not related to a higher overall risk for cancer or worse tumor evolution in patients who maintain these drugs after cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Photodynamic Therapy Using Indolines-Fused-Triazoles Induces Mitochondrial Apoptosis in Human Non-Melanoma BCC Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wan-Ping; Kuo, Kung-Kai; Senadi, Gopal Chandru; Chang, Long-Sen; Wang, Jeh-Jeng

    2017-10-01

    Cancer is one of the most dreadful diseases in humans and among them non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is an increasing problem in the world, that occurs more frequently in people with fair skin. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a non-invasive treatment is widely used for the prevention and treatment of BCC cells. We previously reported an efficient synthesis of novel indolines-fused-triazoles and studied their photophysical studies. This study delineated the signaling pathways involved in the PDT effect of triazoles on BCC cells under UVA irradiation. Cell survival was evaluated by the MTT assay. The uptake of 1j in BCC cells was determined by using its fluorescence properties. Intracellular ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ mt ) were measured using DCFH-DA probe and DiOC 6 dye, respectively. Cytochrome c release was determined using immunofluorescent staining. Our data disclosed that treatment of BCC cells with 1j -UVA resulted in increased ROS generation, loss of mmp (ΔΨ mt ), decreased levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, increased levels of Bax and Bad, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3/PARP degradation to identify apoptotic cell death. The present study suggest that 1j -PDT may serve as a potential ancillary modality for the treatment of NMSC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Chlorine and hydrogen cyanide gas interactions with human skin: in vitro studies to inform skin permeation and decontamination in HAZMAT incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Sharyn; Pisaniello, Dino; Edwards, John W; Bromwich, David; Reed, Sue; Logan, Michael; Baxter, Christina

    2013-11-15

    Accidental or intentional toxic gas releases may result in significant public health and psychological consequences. Management of exposed individuals during HAZMAT incidents should be risk-based and supported by a suitable scientific evidence base. There appear to be large evidence gaps in relation to dermal absorption of gases, as well as management advice for potentially exposed individuals. Chlorine and hydrogen cyanide are two common HAZMAT gases and this paper addresses the need for experimental data tailored to HAZMAT scenarios and first responders. In addition to time variations of gas concentration, the modifying effects of clothing, temperature, and oil-based sunscreen on epidermal absorption and penetration are assessed. Results for chlorine show little penetration up to 500 ppm but with small enhancing effects due to heavy cotton and oil-based sunscreen. Hydrogen cyanide up to 800 ppm shows minor penetration consistent with previous studies, with little variability in the presence of sunscreen and clothing. Practical guidelines to support the decision-making of emergency responders with regard to personal decontamination have been derived. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A molecular systems approach to modelling human skin pigmentation: identifying underlying pathways and critical components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Arathi; Sambarey, Awanti; Sharma, Neha; Mahadevan, Usha; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2015-04-29

    Ultraviolet radiations (UV) serve as an environmental stress for human skin, and result in melanogenesis, with the pigment melanin having protective effects against UV induced damage. This involves a dynamic and complex regulation of various biological processes that results in the expression of melanin in the outer most layers of the epidermis, where it can exert its protective effect. A comprehensive understanding of the underlying cross talk among different signalling molecules and cell types is only possible through a systems perspective. Increasing incidences of both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers necessitate the need to better comprehend UV mediated effects on skin pigmentation at a systems level, so as to ultimately evolve knowledge-based strategies for efficient protection and prevention of skin diseases. A network model for UV-mediated skin pigmentation in the epidermis was constructed and subjected to shortest path analysis. Virtual knock-outs were carried out to identify essential signalling components. We describe a network model for UV-mediated skin pigmentation in the epidermis. The model consists of 265 components (nodes) and 429 directed interactions among them, capturing the manner in which one component influences the other and channels information. Through shortest path analysis, we identify novel signalling pathways relevant to pigmentation. Virtual knock-outs or perturbations of specific nodes in the network have led to the identification of alternate modes of signalling as well as enabled determining essential nodes in the process. The model presented provides a comprehensive picture of UV mediated signalling manifesting in human skin pigmentation. A systems perspective helps provide a holistic purview of interconnections and complexity in the processes leading to pigmentation. The model described here is extensive yet amenable to expansion as new data is gathered. Through this study, we provide a list of important proteins essential

  14. Sirolimus effects on cancer incidence after kidney transplantation: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Siddiqui, Kulsoom; Engels, Eric A

    2015-09-01

    Sirolimus, an immunosuppressant option for kidney transplant recipients, may reduce cancer risk by interrupting the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. However, studies of sirolimus and cancer incidence in kidney recipients have not been definitive, and have had limited ability to examine specific cancer types. The literature was systematically reviewed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies of kidney recipients that compared sirolimus users to sirolimus nonusers. Meta-analytic methods were used to obtain pooled estimates of the association between sirolimus use and incidence of total cancer and specific cancer types. Estimates were stratified by study type (RCT vs. observational) and use of cyclosporine (an immunosuppressant that affects DNA repair). Twenty RCTs and two observational studies were eligible for meta-analysis, including 39,039 kidney recipients overall. Sirolimus use was associated with lower overall cancer incidence (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.56-0.90), driven by a reduction in incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC, IRR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.32-0.76). The protective effect of sirolimus on NMSC risk was most notable in studies comparing sirolimus against cyclosporine (IRR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.04-0.84). After excluding NMSCs, there was no overall association between sirolimus and incidence of other cancers (IRR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.69-1.63). However, sirolimus use had associations with lower kidney cancer incidence (IRR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.20-0.81), and higher prostate cancer incidence (IRR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.17-2.91). Among kidney recipients, sirolimus users have lower NMSC risk, which may be partly due to removal of cyclosporine. Sirolimus may also reduce kidney cancer risk but did not appear protective for other cancers, and it may actually increase prostate cancer risk. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Expression of Podoplanin in Non-melanoma Skin Cancers and Actinic Keratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowska-Zdrojowy, Marta; Szepietowski, Jacek C; Matusiak, Łukasz; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have indicated that expression of podoplanin changes during the neoplastic processes, we therefore aimed at assessing its expression in cancer and stromal cells of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and actinic keratosis (AK). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 134 patients (38 BCC, 57 SCC, 20 AK and from 19 healthy volunteers) were analyzed. Podoplanin-immunoreactivity was detected in 32.1%/44.7%, 70%/20% and 87.7%/79% for BCC, AK and SCC tumour/stroma cells, respectively. Mean podoplanin expression in tumour cells was 1.2±1.8, 1.4±1.1 and 5.6±3.9 for BCC, AK and SCC, respectively. Mean podoplanin expression in stromal cells was 1.5±2.3, 0.65±1.57 and 3.2±2.4 for BCC, AK and SCC, respectively. Podoplanin expression was significantly higher in SCC stromal cells compared to the rest of the analyzed groups (p<0.001), suggesting a potential role of podoplanin in the development and progression of this malignancy. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. Consensus for nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment: basal cell carcinoma, including a cost analysis of treatment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauvar, Arielle N B; Cronin, Terrence; Roenigk, Randall; Hruza, George; Bennett, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in the US population affecting approximately 2.8 million people per year. Basal cell carcinomas are usually slow-growing and rarely metastasize, but they do cause localized tissue destruction, compromised function, and cosmetic disfigurement. To provide clinicians with guidelines for the management of BCC based on evidence from a comprehensive literature review, and consensus among the authors. An extensive review of the medical literature was conducted to evaluate the optimal treatment methods for cutaneous BCC, taking into consideration cure rates, recurrence rates, aesthetic and functional outcomes, and cost-effectiveness of the procedures. Surgical approaches provide the best outcomes for BCCs. Mohs micrographic surgery provides the highest cure rates while maximizing tissue preservation, maintenance of function, and cosmesis. Mohs micrographic surgery is an efficient and cost-effective procedure and remains the treatment of choice for high-risk BCCs and for those in cosmetically sensitive locations. Nonsurgical modalities may be used for low-risk BCCs when surgery is contraindicated or impractical, but the cure rates are lower.

  17. Surgical treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer of the head and neck: expanding reconstructive options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Eerden, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    De behandelingstechniek Mohs’ micrografische chirurgie (MMC) heeft de voorkeur bij agressieve tumoren op neus en oogleden, terwijl voor tumoren op voorhoofd en wang conventionele excisie (CE) een goed alternatief vormt. Dit concludeert Paul van der Eerden. Hij bespreekt tevens innovatieve en minder

  18. Hip fracture history and risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer: a Danish population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamberg AL

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Anna Lei Lamberg1,2, Anne Braae Olesen1,2, Annette Østergaard Jensen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, 2Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, DenmarkBackground: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with osteoporotic fractures, such as hip fracture. Sun exposure, the natural source of vitamin D, is the main risk factor for basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. In this study, we examined the association between a history of hip fracture and risk of BCC and SCC.Methods: We conducted a population-based case-controlled study using data on BCC and SCC cases registered in the Danish Cancer Registry from 1990–2005. For each case, we selected five population controls matched by age and gender. We used conditional logistic regression to compute odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI, while adjusting for chronic diseases and socioeconomic status.Results: A history of hip fracture was associated with a decreased risk of BCC (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.85–0.94, which was most pronounced in cases of tumors on the trunk, extremities, or at multiple sites. We found no association for SCC (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.98–1.17.Conclusion: Our study showed an inverse association between history of hip fracture and risk of BCC, but not of SCC. Sun exposure, resulting in vitamin D synthesis, may explain the link between the two diseases.Keywords: hip fracture, vitamin D, sunlight, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma

  19. Risk of skin cancer in patients on chronic haemodialysis: a nationwide, population-based study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C-C; Tang, C-H; Wang, C-Y; Huang, S-Y; Sue, Y-M

    2016-12-01

    Patients on chronic haemodialysis (HD) have a higher incidence of cancer. However, the risk of skin cancer in this population has rarely been investigated. To investigate the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and cutaneous melanoma in patients on chronic HD and to explore the associated risk factors. We performed retrospective cohort and nested case-control studies using records in the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database between 1999 and 2013. The HD cohort included 79 668 incident patients on HD, for whom the standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for incident NMSC and cutaneous melanoma were determined. In the nested case-control study, patients on HD with NMSC were matched to those without skin cancers. The impact of various factors on the development of NMSC was determined by conditional logistic regression analysis. Among the 79 668 patients on HD, 248 cases of NMSC and 22 cases of cutaneous melanoma occurred after a mean 4·95 years of follow-up. The SIRs for NMSC and cutaneous melanoma in patients on HD were 1·58 (95% confidence interval 1·39-1·79) and 1·44 (95% confidence interval 0·91-2·19), respectively. Of the patients on HD, a higher risk of NMSC was found in men (1·5-fold), South Taiwan residents (twofold) and patients with uraemic pruritus after long-term antihistamine treatment (1·53-fold). However, the incidence of NMSC was not increased in patients with uraemic pruritus receiving ultraviolet B phototherapy. Patients on chronic HD are at higher risk of NMSC. Uraemic pruritus further increases the risk of NMSC, which might be prevented by ultraviolet B phototherapy. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. Skin Cancer Epidemics in the Elderly as An Emerging Issue in Geriatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcovich, Simone; Colloca, Giuseppe; Sollena, Pietro; Andrea, Bellieni; Balducci, Lodovico; Cho, William C; Bernabei, Roberto; Peris, Ketty

    2017-10-01

    Skin cancer is a worldwide, emerging clinical need in the elderly white population, with a steady increase in incidence rates, morbidity and related medical costs. Skin cancer is a heterogeneous group of cancers comprising cutaneous melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC), which predominantly affect elderly patients, aged older than 65 years. Melanoma has distinct clinical presentations in the elderly patient and represents a challenging question in terms of clinical management. NMSC includes the basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and presents a wide disease spectrum in the elderly population, ranging from low-risk to high-risk tumours, advanced and inoperable disease. Treatment decisions for NMSC are preferentially based on tumour characteristics, patient's chronological age and physician's preferences and operational settings. Several treatment options are available for NMSC, from surgery to non-invasive/medical therapies, but patient-based factors, such as geriatric comorbidities and patient's life expectancy, do not frequently modulate treatment goals. In melanoma, age-related variations in clinical management are significant and may frequently lead to under-treatment, limiting access to advanced surgical and medical treatments. Clinical decision-making in the care of elderly skin cancer patient should ideally implement a geriatric assessment, prioritizing patient-based factors and efficiently differentiating fit from frail cancer patients. Current clinical practice guidelines for NMSC and melanoma only partially address geriatric aspects of cancer care, such as frailty, limited life-expectancy, geriatric comorbidities and treatment compliance. We review the recent evidence on the scope and problem of skin cancer in the elderly population as well as age-related variations in its clinical management, highlighting the potential role of a geriatric approach in optimizing dermato-oncological care.

  1. Solar ultraviolet irradiance and cancer incidence and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, William B

    2014-01-01

    The solar ultraviolet-B (UVB)/vitamin D/cancer hypothesis was proposed by the brothers Cedric and Frank Garland in 1980. In 2002, the list was increased to 15 types of cancer using data in the 1999 version of the atlas of cancer mortality rates in the United States. Ecological studies of cancer incidence and/or mortality rates with respect to indices of solar UVB doses have also been reported for Australia, China, France, Japan, and Spain with largely similar findings. In addition, several studies using nonmelanoma skin cancer as the index of solar UVB dose have found reduced internal cancer incidence and/or mortality rates, especially in sunny countries. A study of cancer incidence with respect to 54 categories of occupation in five Nordic countries, using lip cancer less lung cancer as the UVB index, found this index inversely correlated with 14 types of internal cancers for males and four for females. Observational studies with respect to UVB doses and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations also support the hypothesis. Hill's criteria for causality in a biological system to assess whether solar UVB and vitamin D can be considered causal in reducing risk of cancer. The primary criteria for this analysis include strength of association, consistent findings in different populations, biological gradient, plausibility (e.g., mechanisms), and experimental verification (e.g., randomized controlled trials). The totality of evidence is judged to satisfy the criteria very well for breast and colorectal cancer, and moderately well for several other types of cancer.

  2. Risk of skin cancer in patients with diabetes mellitus: A nationwide retrospective cohort study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hui-Wen; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Tsai, Kuo-Wang; Huang, Wei-Chun; Tang, Pei-Ling; Lam, Hing-Chung

    2016-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that certain types of cancers are more common in people with diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to investigate the risk of skin cancer in patients with DM in Taiwan. In this retrospective cohort study using data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Research Database, the risk of developing overall skin cancer, including nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma, was compared by Poisson regression analysis and Cox regression analysis between the DM and non-DM cohorts. The DM cohort with newly diagnosed DM (n = 41,898) and a non-DM cohort were one-to-one matched by age, sex, index date, and comorbidities (coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and obesity). Compared with non-DM cohort statistically, for the people with DM aged ≥60 years, the incidence rates of overall skin cancer and NMSC were significantly higher (overall: DM/non-DM: number [n] = 99/76, incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.44, P = 0.02; NMSC: DM/non-DM: n = 94/66, IRR = 1.57, P = 0.005). By Cox regression analysis, the risk of developing overall skin cancer or NMSC was significantly higher after adjusting for sex, comorbidities, and overall diseases with immunosuppression status (overall: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.46, P = 0.01; NMSC: AHR = 1.6, P = 0.003). Other significant risk factors were older males for skin cancer (overall: AHR = 1.68, P = 0.001; NMSC: AHR = 1.59, P = 0.004; melanoma: AHR = 3.25, P = 0.04), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for NMSC (AHR = 1.44, P = 0.04), and coronary artery disease for melanoma (AHR = 4.22, P = 0.01). The risk of developing melanoma was lower in the DM cohort than in the non-DM cohort, but without significance (AHR = 0.56, P = 0.28; DM/non-DM: n = 5/10). The incidence rate and risk of developing overall skin cancer, including NMSC, was significantly higher in older adults with DM. Other significant risk factors for older adults

  3. Epidemiological profile of patients with malignant skin tumors at the plastic surgery secondary service in the countryside of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Simoneti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-melanoma skin tumor is the one with highest prevalence and incidence in Brazil, comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC and basal cell carcinoma (CBC. The main risk factor for the development of these tumors is chronic exposure to sunlight, justifying the most affected age group and anatomical locations. Treatment aims to excise the lesion with minimal deformity. Surgical excision with safe margins is the main therapeutic option; others depend on the number of lesions, location, histological type, general health and medical comorbidity. Objectives: To describe the epidemiological profile of patients with skin tumors; to identify the prevalence of non-melanoma; and to evaluate surgical margin. Methods: Observational, longitudinal and retrospective study of patients undergoing resection of suspicious lesions in secondary service. Results: We identified 140 lesions in 67 patients, 59% were male and 71.6% over 60 years of age. The most affected regions were head and neck (72.1%; 69.1% were CBC, 29.2% CBC, and 1.6% melanoma; 80.4% informed free margins, 7.3% indicated affected margins; the mean age of these patients was 75.2 years and the mean number of concomitant injuries was 8.7. The association was significant between female gender and presence of lesions <5 mm. Conclusions: The prevalence of lesions in elderly men (over 60 years is in accordance with the pattern described in literature. Free margins, which were obtained in most of the cases in this study, indicate therapeutic efficacy of the simple surgical excision. Marcroscopic margins adopted in the preoperative marking favor effectiveness, reserving Möhs surgery for recurrence or margin involvement. öhs para recidivas ou comprometimento de margem.

  4. [ASSOCIATION OF SKIN PHOTOTYPE AND UV EXPOSURE WITH EXPRESSION OF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drvar, D Ledić; Lipozenčić, J; Mokos, Z Bukvić; Ilić, I; Knežević, F

    2015-01-01

    An increase in the incidence of cancer, in particular skin cancer, has been observed in the last few decades. Skin cancer represents a significant public health problem in Croatia and worldwide. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is a malignant tumor arising in epidermal keratinocytes. Together with basal cell carcinoma it belongs to non-melanoma skin cancers, which are the most common cancers in humans. The lifetime risk of cSCC development in Caucasian population is nowadays estimated to about 15%, which makes it double compared to 20 years ago. The most probable causes are increased ultraviolet light (UV) exposure (exposure to artificial UV sources in suntan parlors, spending more time outdoors, changes in fashion, as well as ozone holes), and longer life expectancy. In its etiopathogenesis, important risk factors include genetic factors, fair-skin phototype, UV exposure, chronic degenerative and inflammatory conditions, chemical factors, oncogenic viruses, immunosuppression, ionizing radiation, as well as habitual risk factors. Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family is involved in the control of multiple signal pathways. Their dysregulation is associated with development of many cancers such as breast carcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, carcinoma of pancreas, head and neck carcinoma, as well as glioblastoma. The objective of our investigation was to establish if there is association of the skin phototype and UV exposure with the expression of HER receptors, Ki67 and p53 in patients with cSCC. Study group included 101 cSCC patients. Inclusion criteria were age >50, both sexes, histopathologically confirmed cSCC, no previous therapy, specimens sufficient for immunohistochemistry, and complete clinical data collected by a questionnaire. Material obtained by excisional biopsy was completely histopathologically evaluated and additional tissue slices were immunohistochemically analyzed. Statistical analysis of the sample

  5. Skin cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumaste, P V; Penn, L A; Cymerman, R M; Kirchhoff, T; Polsky, D; McLellan, B

    2015-06-01

    Women with BRCA1/2 mutations have an elevated risk of breast and ovarian cancer. These patients and their clinicians are often concerned about their risk for other cancers, including skin cancer. Research evaluating the association between BRCA1/2 mutations and skin cancer is limited and has produced inconsistent results. Herein, we review the current literature on the risk of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. No studies have shown a statistically significant risk of melanoma in BRCA1 families. BRCA2 mutations have been linked to melanoma in large breast and ovarian cancer families, though a statistically significant elevated risk was reported in only one study. Five additional studies have shown some association between BRCA2 mutations and melanoma, while four studies did not find any association. With respect to nonmelanoma skin cancers, studies have produced conflicting results. Given the current state of medical knowledge, there is insufficient evidence to warrant increased skin cancer surveillance of patients with a confirmed BRCA1/2 mutation or a family history of a BRCA1/2 mutation, in the absence of standard risk factors. Nonetheless, suspected BRCA1/2 mutation carriers should be counselled about skin cancer risks and may benefit from yearly full skin examinations. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. Low-fat diet and skin cancer risk: the women's health initiative randomized controlled dietary modification trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Christina S; Stefanick, Marcia L; Shikany, James M; Larson, Joseph; Linos, Eleni; Sims, Stacy T; Marshall, James; Van Horn, Linda; Zeitouni, Nathalie; Tang, Jean Y

    2013-09-01

    Large cohort studies have reported no relationship between dietary fat and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), although a low-fat diet intervention reduced NMSC risk in a small clinical trial. In animal studies, skin tumor development has been reduced by low-fat diet. We evaluated the effect of a low-fat dietary pattern on NMSC and melanoma in the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification trial. Postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 years (n = 48,835) were randomly assigned to the low-fat dietary pattern intervention (n = 19,541) or comparison group (n = 29,294). The intervention goals included decreasing fat intake to 20% or less of calories, increasing vegetable and fruit intake, and increasing grain intake. Self-reported incident NMSC (n = 4,907) and physician-adjudicated incident melanoma (n = 279) were ascertained every 6 months. Over 8.1 years of follow-up, the low-fat diet intervention did not affect overall incidence of NMSC [HR 0.98; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.92-1.04] or melanoma (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.82-1.32). In subgroup analyses of melanoma risk, baseline fat intake interacted significantly with group assignment (Pinteraction = 0.006). Among women with higher baseline fat intake, the dietary intervention significantly increased risk (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.06-2.07), whereas, among women with lower baseline fat intake, the intervention tended to reduce melanoma risk (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.50-1.02). In this large randomized trial, a low-fat dietary pattern did not affect overall incidence of NMSC or melanoma. A low-fat diet does not reduce incidence of NMSC, but an interaction between baseline fat intake and dietary intervention on melanoma risk warrants further investigation.

  7. Basal cell carcinoma in skin of color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Jesleen; Hadjicharalambous, Elena; Mehregan, Darius

    2012-04-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer most commonly affects Caucasians, and only rarely affects darker-skinned individuals. However, skin cancer in these groups is associated with greater morbidity and mortality. Ultraviolet radiation is the major etiologic factor in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and likely plays a pivotal role in the development of other forms of skin cancer. Yet it is commonly thought among patients as well as physicians that darker pigmentation inherently affords complete protection from skin cancer development. This low index of suspicion results in delayed diagnoses and poorer outcomes. This review follows a detailed computer search that cross-matched the diagnosis of BCC with skin color type in a large commercial dermatopathology facility. The reported skin types, all Fitzpatrick skin types IV, V, and VI, and histories were confirmed. A predominance of pigmented BCCs was found in sun-exposed areas of these older individuals. Although less common in darker-skinned ethnic groups, BCC does occur and can pose significant morbidity. Thus, it is essential that dermatologists are familiar with the epidemiology and clinical presentation of all cutaneous malignancies in darker skin so that these patients are fully aware of risks as well as prevention of the disease.

  8. Basal cell carcinoma-treatments for the commonest skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berking, Carola; Hauschild, Axel; Kölbl, Oliver; Mast, Gerson; Gutzmer, Ralf

    2014-05-30

    With an incidence of 70 to over 800 new cases per 100 000 persons per year, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a very common disease, accounting for about 80% of all cases of non-melanoma skin cancer. It very rarely metastasizes. A variety of treatments are available for the different subtypes and stages of BCC. This review is based on pertinent literature retrieved by a selective search in the Medline database, as well as the American Cancer Society guidelines on BCC and the German guidelines on BCC and skin cancer prevention. The gold standard of treatment is surgical excision with histological control of excision margins, which has a 5-year recurrence rate of less than 3% on the face. For superficial BCC, approved medications such as imiquimod (total remission rate, 82-90%) and topical 5-fluorouracil (80%) are available, as is photodynamic therapy (71-87%). Other ablative methods (laser, cryosurgery) are applicable in some cases. Radiotherapy is an alternative treatment for invasive, inoperable BCC, with 5-year tumor control rates of 89-96%. Recently, drugs that inhibit an intracellular signaling pathway have become available for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic BCC. Phase I and II clinical trials revealed that vismodegib was associated with objective response rates of 30-55% and tumor control rates of 80-90%. This drug was approved on the basis of a non-randomized trial with no control arm. It has side effects ranging from muscle cramps (71%) and hair loss (65%) to taste disturbances (55%) and birth defects. The established, standard treatments are generally highly effective. Vismodegib is a newly approved treatment option for locally advanced BCC that is not amenable to either surgery or radiotherapy.

  9. Cancer incidence predictions in the North of Portugal: keeping population-based cancer registration up to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Clara; Antunes, Luís; Lunet, Nuno; Bento, Maria José

    2016-09-01

    Decision making towards cancer prevention and control requires monitoring of trends in cancer incidence and accurate estimation of its burden in different settings. We aimed to estimate the number of incident cases in northern Portugal for 2015 and 2020 (all cancers except nonmelanoma skin and for the 15 most frequent tumours). Cancer cases diagnosed in 1994-2009 were collected by the North Region Cancer Registry of Portugal (RORENO) and corresponding population figures were obtained from Statistics Portugal. JoinPoint regression was used to analyse incidence trends. Population projections until 2020 were derived by RORENO. Predictions were performed using the Poisson regression models proposed by Dyba and Hakulinen. The number of incident cases is expected to increase by 18.7% in 2015 and by 37.6% in 2020, with lower increments among men than among women. For most cancers considered, the number of cases will keep rising up to 2020, although decreasing trends of age-standardized rates are expected for some tumours. Cervix was the only cancer with a decreasing number of incident cases in the entire period. Thyroid and lung cancers were among those with the steepest increases in the number of incident cases expected for 2020, especially among women. In 2020, the top five cancers are expected to account for 82 and 62% of all cases diagnosed in men and women, respectively. This study contributes to a broader understanding of cancer burden in the north of Portugal and provides the basis for keeping population-based incidence estimates up to date.

  10. Incidence of malignant diseases in humans injected with radium-224.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekolla, Elke Anna; Walsh, Linda; Spiess, Heinz

    2010-09-01

    The "Spiess study" follows the health of 899 persons who received multiple injections of the short-lived alpha-particle emitter (224)Ra mainly between 1945 and 1955 for the treatment of tuberculosis, ankylosing spondylitis and some other diseases. In December 2007, 124 persons were still alive. The most striking health effect, observed shortly after (224)Ra injections, was a temporal wave of 57 malignant bone tumors. During the two most recent decades of observation, a significant excess of non-skeletal malignant diseases has become evident. Expected numbers of cases were computed from the age, gender and calendar year distribution of person years at risk and incidence rates from the German Saarland Cancer Registry. Poisson statistics were applied to test for statistical significance of the standardized incidence ratios. Up to the end of December 2007, the total number of observed malignant non-skeletal diseases was 270 (248 specified cases of non-skeletal solid cancers and 22 other malignant diseases, among these 16 malignant neoplasms of lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue, six without specification of site) compared to 192 expected cases. Accounting for a 5-year minimum latent period and excluding 13 cases of non-melanoma skin cancer, 231 non-skeletal solid cancers were observed compared to 151 expected cases. Significantly increased cancer rates were observed for breast (32 compared to 9.7), soft and connective tissue (11 compared to 1.0), thyroid (7 compared to 1.0), liver (10 compared to 2.4), kidney (13 compared to 5.0), pancreas (9 compared to 4.1), bladder (16 compared to 8.0), and female genital organs (15 compared to 7.8).

  11. Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... left temple. He has spoken out about the importance of regular screening for skin cancer. Photo: Frontpage / ... melanin, which is responsible for skin and hair color. Melanoma can spread very rapidly, and the incidence ...

  12. Skin carcinoma and occupational risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares Fernandez, Tomasa Maria; Correa Lozano, Zoila; Ibarra Fernandez de la Vega, Enrique Jose; Bonet Gorbea Mariano

    2014-01-01

    To identify the relative contribution of different occupational risk factors associated with the occurrence of skin cancer in the provinces of Havana City and Havana, Cuba , in 2006-2007. It was designed a case-control study of hospital base that included 112 cases of non-melanoma skin cancer and 448 witnesses, following the inclusion-exclusion criteria preset. We considered the totality of patients diagnosed with basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell histological study of skin biopsy or surgical excision. Risk factors with possible association with the disease were studied, such as sun exposure, ionizing and non-ionizing radiations and a wide range of chemical and biological substances potentially carcinogenic

  13. Incidência do carcinoma de células escamosas da pele na cidade de Tubarão (SC - Brasil nos anos de 2000, 2003 e 2006 Incidence of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin in the city of Tubarao (SC - Brazil in the years 2000, 2003, and 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Holthausen Nunes

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: Observa-se tendência mundial de aumento na incidência do carcinoma de células escamosas da pele, porém na região sul do estado de Santa Catarina (SC não há dados sobre a incidência desse tipo de câncer. OBJETIVOS: Estabelecer dados epidemiológicos do carcinoma de células escamosas da pele em Tubarão (Santa Catarina. MÉTODOS: Laudos anatomopatológicos positivos para o carcinoma de células escamosas da pele dos laboratórios de Tubarão foram revisados quanto às variáveis: ano, idade, gênero, localização, subtipo histológico, maior diâmetro da lesão e comprometimento das margens. A incidência anual foi calculada utilizando o número de neoplasias encontradas e a população anual estimada para os anos de 2000, 2003 e 2006. RESULTADOS: Foi encontrada uma incidência de carcinoma de células escamosas da pele por 100.000 habitantes de 50,86 para o ano de 2000, de 71,16 para 2003 e de 94,39 para 2006. Não houve predomínio de gênero, a face foi o local de acometimento mais frequente em ambos os gêneros e o subtipo histológico mais comum foi o bem diferenciado. CONCLUSÃO: A incidência do carcinoma de células escamosas da pele encontrada superou a estimativa da literatura consultada. Houve aumento na sua incidência; as variáveis idade, localização e tipo histológico foram concordantes com a literatura, porém a distribuição quanto ao gênero se mostrou diferente.BACKGROUND: A worldwide increasing trend in the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin has been observed but there are no studies regarding the incidence of this cancer in the Southern region of the State of Santa Catarina. OBJECTIVES: To establish epidemiological data regarding squamous cell carcinoma of the skin in Tubarao (state of Santa Catarina. METHODS: Anatomopathological reports, positive for squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, found in laboratories of the city of Tubarao, were analyzed regarding year, age, gender, site

  14. Skin autofluorescence is elevated in acute myocardial infarction and is associated with the one-year incidence of major adverse cardiac events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Douwe J.; van Haelst, P. L.; Graaff, R.; Gans, R. O.; Zijlstra, F.; Smit, A. J.

    Background. ST-elevation myocardial infarction Back, (STEMI) is associated with increased inflammation and oxidative stress, enhancing the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Thew , encompass characteristic fluorescence: pattern, which can be non-invasively measured as skin

  15. Raman active components of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xu; Moy, Austin J; Nguyen, Hieu T M; Zhang, Jason; Fox, Matthew C; Sebastian, Katherine R; Reichenberg, Jason S; Markey, Mia K; Tunnell, James W

    2017-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) has shown great potential in noninvasive cancer screening. Statistically based algorithms, such as principal component analysis, are commonly employed to provide tissue classification; however, they are difficult to relate to the chemical and morphological basis of the spectroscopic features and underlying disease. As a result, we propose the first Raman biophysical model applied to in vivo skin cancer screening data. We expand upon previous models by utilizing in situ skin constituents as the building blocks, and validate the model using previous clinical screening data collected from a Raman optical fiber probe. We built an 830nm confocal Raman microscope integrated with a confocal laser-scanning microscope. Raman imaging was performed on skin sections spanning various disease states, and multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis was used to resolve the Raman spectra of individual in situ skin constituents. The basis spectra of the most relevant skin constituents were combined linearly to fit in vivo human skin spectra. Our results suggest collagen, elastin, keratin, cell nucleus, triolein, ceramide, melanin and water are the most important model components. We make available for download (see supplemental information) a database of Raman spectra for these eight components for others to use as a reference. Our model reveals the biochemical and structural makeup of normal, nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancers, and precancers and paves the way for future development of this approach to noninvasive skin cancer diagnosis.

  16. [The role of sonic hedgehog pathway in skin carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiak, Aleksandra; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, Anna; Narbutt, Joanna

    2010-08-01

    Non melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) involving basal (BCC)--and squamosus cell carcinomas (SCC) and are the most frequent skin cancers in Caucasians. Ultraviolet radiation is the main environmental risk factor for NMSC development. The aim of this paper is to review the latest opinions concerning the role of sonic hedgehog pathway in non-melanoma skin cancers development. Experimental data indicate that sonic hedgehog pathway might be involved in skin carcinogenesis. Under physiological conditions sonic hedgehog pathway is responsible for normal embryogenesis, regeneration of damaged tissues and for regulation of cell proliferation. It was revealed that UVR caused inactivated mutation in PATCHED gene encoding Ptch1 protein. These events lead to deregulation of sonic hedgehog pathway trough activation of Smo protein and Gli transcriptional factors what stimulates cell proliferation and in consequence NMSC development. Literature data indicate that understanding of molecular background of skin cancers might be a reason for introduction of new therapeutic approaches including sonic hedgehog pathway inhibitors.

  17. Forensic reconstruction of two military combat related shooting incidents using an anatomically correct synthetic skull with a surrogate skin/soft tissue layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Peter; Carr, Debra; Harrison, Karl; McGuire, Ruth; Hepper, Alan; Flynn, Daniel; Delaney, Russ J; Gibb, Iain

    2018-03-07

    Six synthetic head models wearing ballistic protective helmets were used to recreate two military combat-related shooting incidents (three per incident, designated 'Incident 1' and 'Incident 2'). Data on the events including engagement distances, weapon and ammunition types was collated by the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory. The models were shot with 7.62 × 39 mm ammunition downloaded to mean impact velocities of 581 m/s (SD 3.5 m/s) and 418 m/s (SD 8 m/s), respectively, to simulate the engagement distances. The damage to the models was assessed using CT imaging and dissection by a forensic pathologist experienced in reviewing military gunshot wounds. The helmets were examined by an MoD engineer experienced in ballistic incident analysis. Damage to the helmets was consistent with that seen in real incidents. Fracture patterns and CT imaging on two of the models for Incident 1 (a frontal impact) were congruent with the actual incident being modelled. The results for Incident 2 (a temporoparietal impact) produced realistic simulations of tangential gunshot injury but were less representative of the scenario being modelled. Other aspects of the wounds produced also exhibited differences. Further work is ongoing to develop the models for greater ballistic injury fidelity.

  18. Patients highly value routine follow-up of skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Themstrup, Lotte; Jemec, Gregor E; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    : This study included an open sample of patients attending routine follow-up at the outpatient Departments of Plastic Surgery and Dermatology, Roskilde Hospital. A total of 218 follow-up patients diagnosed with cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM), non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) or actinic keratosis (AK......INTRODUCTION: Skin cancer follow-up is a substantial burden to outpatient clinics. Few studies have investigated patients' views on skin cancer follow-up and cutaneous melanoma. The objective was to investigate patients' perceived benefits and the impact of follow-up. MATERIAL AND METHODS...

  19. Incidence and risk factors of skin rashes and hepatotoxicity in HIV-infected patients receiving nevirapine-containing combination antiretroviral therapy in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tzu Tseng

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Abnormal liver function at baseline was significantly associated with skin rashes, while a higher CD4 count and the concurrent use of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole were associated with hepatotoxicity after the initiation of nevirapine-containing cART in HIV-infected Taiwanese patients.

  20. The effect of long-term feeding of skin barrier-fortified diets on the owner-assessed incidence of atopic dermatitis symptoms in Labrador retrievers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beeck, Frank Looringh; Watson, Adrian; Bos, Margriet; Biourge, Vincent; Willemse, Ton

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of feeding a skin barrier function-augmenting diet early in dogs' lives on the appearance of clinical signs associated with canine atopic dermatitis. Pregnant bitches (starting 5 weeks after mating) and their subsequent litters (up to 1 year of age) were fed either

  1. Porphyrin biodistribution in UV-exposed murine skin after methyl- and hexyl-aminolevulinate incubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Lerche, Catharina M; Philipsen, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) with methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) is a well-established treatment for precancerous skin lesions and non-melanoma skin cancer. Treatment outcomes are less effective for thick than for superficial lesions, which are presumed to be due to insufficient Pp......IX biodistribution in tumour tissue. Hexyl-aminolevulinate (HAL) is a more lipophilic photosensitizer precursor than MAL and may penetrate the skin to a greater depth and more homogeneously. We compared HAL- and MAL-induced PpIX accumulation in specific skin compartments using concentrations of 2%, 6% and 20% HAL...... and MAL on long-term UV-irradiated mouse skin. Furthermore, 20% HAL and 20% MAL were applied to non-irradiated skin. Porphyrin fluorescence was measured by fluorescence microscopy in selected skin regions: the epidermis, superficial dermis, deep dermis and sebaceous gland epithelium down to a depth of 1...

  2. An ultraviolet-radiation-independent pathway to melanoma carcinogenesis in the red hair/fair skin background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Devarati; Luo, Xi; Morgan, Ann; Wang, Jin; Hoang, Mai P; Lo, Jennifer; Guerrero, Candace R; Lennerz, Jochen K; Mihm, Martin C; Wargo, Jennifer A; Robinson, Kathleen C; Devi, Suprabha P; Vanover, Jillian C; D'Orazio, John A; McMahon, Martin; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Haigis, Kevin M; Haber, Daniel A; Wang, Yinsheng; Fisher, David E

    2012-11-15

    People with pale skin, red hair, freckles and an inability to tan--the 'red hair/fair skin' phenotype--are at highest risk of developing melanoma, compared to all other pigmentation types. Genetically, this phenotype is frequently the product of inactivating polymorphisms in the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene. MC1R encodes a cyclic AMP-stimulating G-protein-coupled receptor that controls pigment production. Minimal receptor activity, as in red hair/fair skin polymorphisms, produces the red/yellow pheomelanin pigment, whereas increasing MC1R activity stimulates the production of black/brown eumelanin. Pheomelanin has weak shielding capacity against ultraviolet radiation relative to eumelanin, and has been shown to amplify ultraviolet-A-induced reactive oxygen species. Several observations, however, complicate the assumption that melanoma risk is completely ultraviolet-radiation-dependent. For example, unlike non-melanoma skin cancers, melanoma is not restricted to sun-exposed skin and ultraviolet radiation signature mutations are infrequently oncogenic drivers. Although linkage of melanoma risk to ultraviolet radiation exposure is beyond doubt, ultraviolet-radiation-independent events are likely to have a significant role. Here we introduce a conditional, melanocyte-targeted allele of the most common melanoma oncoprotein, BRAF(V600E), into mice carrying an inactivating mutation in the Mc1r gene (these mice have a phenotype analogous to red hair/fair skin humans). We observed a high incidence of invasive melanomas without providing additional gene aberrations or ultraviolet radiation exposure. To investigate the mechanism of ultraviolet-radiation-independent carcinogenesis, we introduced an albino allele, which ablates all pigment production on the Mc1r(e/e) background. Selective absence of pheomelanin synthesis was protective against melanoma development. In addition, normal Mc1r(e/e) mouse skin was found to have significantly greater oxidative DNA and lipid

  3. Impact of residential UV exposure in childhood versus adulthood on skin cancer risk in Caucasian, postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransohoff, Katherine J; Ally, Mina S; Stefanick, Marcia L; Keiser, Elizabeth; Spaunhurst, Katrina; Kapphahn, Kristopher; Pagoto, Sherry; Messina, Catherine; Hedlin, Haley; Manson, JoAnn E; Tang, Jean Y

    2016-06-01

    Sun exposure is a major risk factor for skin cancer; however, the relative contribution of ultraviolet (UV) exposure during childhood versus adulthood on skin cancer risk remains unclear. Our goal was to determine the impact of residential UV, measured by AVerage daily total GLObal solar radiation (AVGLO), exposure during childhood (birth, 15 years) versus adulthood (35, 50 years, and present) on incident non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and malignant melanoma (MM) in postmenopausal women. Women were followed with yearly surveys throughout the duration of their participation in the Women's Health Initiative Observational study, a multicenter study from 1993 to 2005. A total of 56,557 women had data on all observations and were included in the baseline characteristics. The main exposure, residential UV (as measured by AVGLO), was measured by geographic residence during childhood and adulthood. Outcome was risk of incident NMSC and MM. Over 11.9 years (median follow-up), there were 9,195 (16.3 %) cases of NMSC and 518 (0.92 %) cases of MM. Compared with the reference group (women with low childhood and low adulthood UV), women with low childhood and high adulthood UV had a 21 % increased risk of NMSC (odds ratio 1.21, 95 % confidence interval 1.12, 1.31). Women with high childhood and high adulthood UV had a 19 % increased risk of NMSC (odds ratio 1.19, 95 % confidence interval 1.11, 1.27). Surprisingly, women with high childhood UV and low adulthood UV did not have a significant increase in NMSC risk compared with the reference group (odds ratio 1.08, 95 % confidence interval 0.91, 1.28) in multivariable models. Residential UV exposure in childhood or adulthood was not associated with increased melanoma risk. This study reveals an increase in NMSC risk associated with adulthood residential UV exposure, with no effect for childhood UV exposure.

  4. Ultraviolet Radiation and Kaposi Sarcoma Incidence in a Nationwide US Cohort of HIV-Infected Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, Elizabeth K; Engels, Eric A; Freedman, D Michal; Norval, Mary; Pfeiffer, Ruth M

    2017-05-01

    Although ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is established as both an inducer of herpes simplex virus reactivation and as the primary risk factor for many common skin cancers, its relationship with human herpes virus 8 (HHV8) infection or risk of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is unknown. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for the association between ambient UVR, history of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC; as a biomarker of personal cumulative UVR dose), and incidence of first primary KS in a nationwide US cohort of white and African American male veterans infected with HIV between 1986 and 1996 (prior to the widespread availability of treatment) using Cox regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. Based on discharge records, there were 422 newly diagnosed KS cases among 17 597 HIV-infected veterans. Cohort members with prior NMSC had a statistically significantly increased risk of KS (HR = 8.64, 95% CI = 6.23 to 11.96) in the total population. Risk of KS was higher for quartile 4 vs 1 among the total population (HR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.02 to 2.16, P trend UVR quartile [coded 1 to 4] = .02) and among whites (HR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.11 to 2.78, P trend = .009), but not among African Americans (HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 0.71 to 2.15, P trend = .23). KS risk was elevated among HIV-infected men with NMSC diagnosis and in those living in locations with high ambient UVR at time of HIV diagnosis. Our novel findings suggesting that UVR exposure may increase KS risk warrant further investigation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Risk factors for keratinocyte skin cancer in patients diagnosed with melanoma, a large retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Pablo; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; García-Casado, Zaida; Requena, Celia; Landi, Maria Teresa; Kumar, Rajiv; Nagore, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma survivors are at an increased risk of developing other malignancies, including keratinocyte skin cancer (KSC). While it is known that many risk factors for melanoma also impact risk of KSC in the general population, no previous study has investigated risk factors for KSC development in melanoma patients. We assessed associations of personal and clinical characteristics, including skin phenotype and variations in the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene, with KSC risk in melanoma patients. We used prospective follow-up information on 1200 patients treated for melanoma at the Instituto Valenciano de Oncología, Spain, between 2000 and 2011. We computed hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of clinical, personal and genetic characteristics with risk of KSC, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), or basal cell carcinoma (BCC) from Cox proportional hazard models. Five-year cumulative incidence based on competing risk models of SCC, BCC or KSC overall was computed using multivariate subdistribution hazard models. To assess predictive performance of the models, we computed areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUCs, discriminatory power) using cross-validation. Median follow-up was 57.2 months; a KSC was detected in 163 patients (13.6%). In multivariable Cox models, age, sex, sunburns, chronic sun exposure, past personal history of non-melanoma skin cancer or other non-cutaneous neoplasia, and the MC1R variants p.D294H and p.R163Q were significantly associated with KSC risk. A cumulative incidence model including age, sex, personal history of KSC, and of other non-cutaneous neoplasia had an AUC of 0.76 (95% CI: 0.71-0.80). When p.D294H and p.R163Q variants were added to the model, the AUC increased to 0.81 (95% CI: 0.77-0.84) (p-value for difference skin characteristics, and sun exposure, p.R163Q and p.D294H MC1R variants significantly increased KSC risk among melanoma patients. Our findings may help identify patients

  6. Total-body photography in skin cancer screening: the clinical utility of standardized imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Alexandra; Meyerle, Jon H

    2017-05-01

    Early detection of skin cancer is essential to reducing morbidity and mortality from both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. Total-body skin examinations (TBSEs) may improve early detection of malignant melanomas (MMs) but are controversial due to the poor quality of data available to establish a mortality benefit from skin cancer screening. Total-body photography (TBP) promises to provide a way forward by lowering the costs of dermatologic screening while simultaneously leveraging technology to increase patient access to dermatologic care. Standardized TBP also offers the ability for dermatologists to work synergistically with modern computer technology involving algorithms capable of analyzing high-quality images to flag concerning lesions that may require closer evaluation. On a population level, inexpensive TBP has the potential to increase access to skin cancer screening and it has several specific applications in a military population. The utility of standardized TBP is reviewed in the context of skin cancer screening and teledermatology.

  7. Cancer Incidence among Patients with Anorexia Nervosa from Sweden, Denmark and Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellemkjaer, Lene; Papadopoulos, Fotios C.; Pukkala, Eero; Ekbom, Anders; Gissler, Mika; Christensen, Jane; Olsen, Jørgen H.

    2015-01-01

    A diet with restricted energy content reduces the occurrence of cancer in animal experiments. It is not known if the underlying mechanism also exists in human beings. To determine whether cancer incidence is reduced among patients with anorexia nervosa who tend to have a low intake of energy, we carried out a retrospective cohort study of 22 654 women and 1678 men diagnosed with anorexia nervosa at ages 10-50 years during 1968-2010 according to National Hospital Registers in Sweden, Denmark and Finland. The comparison group consisted of randomly selected persons from population registers who were similar to the anorexia nervosa patients in respect to sex, year of birth and place of residence. Patients and population comparisons were followed for cancer by linkage to Cancer Registries. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were estimated using Poisson models. In total, 366 cases of cancer (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) were seen among women with anorexia nervosa, and the IRR for all cancer sites was 0.97 (95% CI = 0.87-1.08) adjusted for age, parity and age at first child. There were 76 breast cancers corresponding to an adjusted IRR of 0.61 (95% CI = 0.49-0.77). Significantly increased IRRs were observed for esophageal, lung, and liver cancer. Among men with anorexia nervosa, there were 23 cases of cancer (age-adjusted IRR = 1.08; 95% CI = 0.71-1.66). There seems to be no general reduction in cancer occurrence among patients with anorexia nervosa, giving little support to the energy restriction hypothesis. PMID:26000630

  8. Cancer Incidence among Patients with Anorexia Nervosa from Sweden, Denmark and Finland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Mellemkjaer

    Full Text Available A diet with restricted energy content reduces the occurrence of cancer in animal experiments. It is not known if the underlying mechanism also exists in human beings. To determine whether cancer incidence is reduced among patients with anorexia nervosa who tend to have a low intake of energy, we carried out a retrospective cohort study of 22 654 women and 1678 men diagnosed with anorexia nervosa at ages 10-50 years during 1968-2010 according to National Hospital Registers in Sweden, Denmark and Finland. The comparison group consisted of randomly selected persons from population registers who were similar to the anorexia nervosa patients in respect to sex, year of birth and place of residence. Patients and population comparisons were followed for cancer by linkage to Cancer Registries. Incidence rate ratios (IRR were estimated using Poisson models. In total, 366 cases of cancer (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer were seen among women with anorexia nervosa, and the IRR for all cancer sites was 0.97 (95% CI = 0.87-1.08 adjusted for age, parity and age at first child. There were 76 breast cancers corresponding to an adjusted IRR of 0.61 (95% CI = 0.49-0.77. Significantly increased IRRs were observed for esophageal, lung, and liver cancer. Among men with anorexia nervosa, there were 23 cases of cancer (age-adjusted IRR = 1.08; 95% CI = 0.71-1.66. There seems to be no general reduction in cancer occurrence among patients with anorexia nervosa, giving little support to the energy restriction hypothesis.

  9. Cancer Incidence among Patients with Anorexia Nervosa from Sweden, Denmark and Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellemkjaer, Lene; Papadopoulos, Fotios C; Pukkala, Eero; Ekbom, Anders; Gissler, Mika; Christensen, Jane; Olsen, Jørgen H

    2015-01-01

    A diet with restricted energy content reduces the occurrence of cancer in animal experiments. It is not known if the underlying mechanism also exists in human beings. To determine whether cancer incidence is reduced among patients with anorexia nervosa who tend to have a low intake of energy, we carried out a retrospective cohort study of 22 654 women and 1678 men diagnosed with anorexia nervosa at ages 10-50 years during 1968-2010 according to National Hospital Registers in Sweden, Denmark and Finland. The comparison group consisted of randomly selected persons from population registers who were similar to the anorexia nervosa patients in respect to sex, year of birth and place of residence. Patients and population comparisons were followed for cancer by linkage to Cancer Registries. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were estimated using Poisson models. In total, 366 cases of cancer (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) were seen among women with anorexia nervosa, and the IRR for all cancer sites was 0.97 (95% CI = 0.87-1.08) adjusted for age, parity and age at first child. There were 76 breast cancers corresponding to an adjusted IRR of 0.61 (95% CI = 0.49-0.77). Significantly increased IRRs were observed for esophageal, lung, and liver cancer. Among men with anorexia nervosa, there were 23 cases of cancer (age-adjusted IRR = 1.08; 95% CI = 0.71-1.66). There seems to be no general reduction in cancer occurrence among patients with anorexia nervosa, giving little support to the energy restriction hypothesis.

  10. Lâminas de irrigação e coberturas do solo sobre a incidência da mancha fisiológica e produtividade do mamão "Golden" Irrigation dosages and soil coverings in the incidence of skin freckles and yield components of papaya ‘Golden’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroldo Gomes Filho

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Nesse experimento, avaliou-se o efeito de diferentes lâminas de irrigação e coberturas do solo sobre aspectos qualitativos e de produção do mamão cv. "Golden" no período de dezembro de 2003 a novembro de 2004. Utilizou-se delineamento em blocos casualizados, com três repetições, em esquema fatorial. Os resultados encontrados demonstram uma alta correlação entre a época de colheita com a incidência da mancha fisiológica e as variáveis de produção. Com relação à mancha fisiológica do mamão (MFM, confirmou-se o aspecto sazonal de incidência, sendo que a cv. "Golden" apresentou a maior incidência do distúrbio no mês de setembro. Com relação às coberturas de solo, a cobertura morta se mostrou promissora para os fatores em estudo, ao contrário da cobertura verde com a leguminosa Arachis pintoe, pois a mesma, provavelmente, competiu por água e nutrientes com o mamoeiro, acarretando, assim, redução na sua produtividade.In this experiment the effect of different irrigation rates and soil coverings on qualitative aspects as well as yield components of the papaya cv. ‘Golden’ during the period December 2003 to November 2004 were evaluated. A randomized complete block design was used with three replications in a factorial scheme. The results demonstrate high correlation involving the factors harvest season, incidence of skin freckles and yield components. With relation to skin freckles a seasonal incidence was confirmed, showing that for cv. ‘Golden’, the major incidence of the disturbance was verified in September. The mulching treatment was promising for the factors studied, in contrast to the green covering using the leguminosae Arachis pintoe, due to competition with the papaya trees for water and nutrients, causing a reduction in the yield components.

  11. Does hormone replacement therapy and use of oral contraceptives increase the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch-Johansen, Fatima; Jensen, Allan; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to examine whether use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives (OC) affect the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in women.......We aimed to examine whether use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives (OC) affect the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in women....

  12. Fractionated aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy provides additional evidence for the use of PDT for non-melanoma skin cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, E. R. M.; de Vijlder, H. C.; Sterenborg, H. J. C. M.; Neumann, H. A. M.; Robinson, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    ?Background Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an accepted treatment for superficial basal cel carcinoma (sBCC) and Bowens disease. In Rotterdam, extensive preclinical research has lead to an optimized twofold illumination scheme for aminolevulinic acid-PDT (ALA-PDT). Objective To provide additional

  13. Incomplete excision of non-melanoma skin cancer of the head and neck: can we predict failure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerkegaard, Ulrik Knap; Stolle, Lars Bjørn

    2014-01-01

    Background Reported incomplete excision rates vary widely. This study described a single center's treatment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the head and neck and investigated possible causes of incomplete excision. Methods All excised BCCs and SCCs in 2011 were...

  14. A Novel Mechanism for the Pathogenesis of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Resulting from Early Exposure to Ultraviolet Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    marrow samples by number of GFP positive or GFP/ TomatoRed double positive cells, there are fewer GFP positive and GFP/ TomatoRed double positive cells...cells naturally fluoresce “red”. When analyzing the blood samples by percent positive cells, 0.1% of cells are GFP positive or GFP/ TomatoRed double...Double Positive 30 Figure 9. Fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) shows no K14-GFP expressing cells and slight expression of GFP/ TomatoRed double

  15. Prediction of cancer incidence in Tyrol/Austria for year of diagnosis 2020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberaigner, Willi; Geiger-Gritsch, Sabine

    2014-10-01

    Prediction of the number of incident cancer cases is very relevant for health planning purposes and allocation of resources. The shift towards elder age groups in central European populations in the next decades is likely to contribute to an increase in cancer incidence for many cancer sites. In Tyrol, cancer incidence data have been registered on a high level of completeness for more than 20 years. We therefore aimed to compute well-founded predictions of cancer incidence for Tyrol for the year 2020 for all frequent cancer sites and for all cancer sites combined. After defining a prediction base range for every cancer site, we extrapolated the age-specific time trends in the prediction base range following a linear model for increasing and a log-linear model for decreasing time trends. The extrapolated time trends were evaluated for the year 2020 applying population figures supplied by Statistics Austria. Compared with the number of annual incident cases for the year 2009 for all cancer sites combined except non-melanoma skin cancer, we predicted an increase of 235 (15 %) and 362 (21 %) for females and males, respectively. For both sexes, more than 90 % of the increase is attributable to the shift toward older age groups in the next decade. The biggest increase in absolute numbers is seen for females in breast cancer (92, 21 %), lung cancer (64, 52 %), colorectal cancer (40, 24 %), melanoma (38, 30 %) and the haematopoietic system (37, 35 %) and for males in prostate cancer (105, 25 %), colorectal cancer (91, 45 %), the haematopoietic system (71, 55 %), bladder cancer (69, 100 %) and melanoma (64, 52 %). The increase in the number of incident cancer cases of 15 % in females and 21 % in males in the next decade is very relevant for planning purposes. However, external factors cause uncertainty in the prediction of some cancer sites (mainly prostate cancer and colorectal cancer) and the prediction intervals are still broad. Therefore

  16. A CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL STUDY AND MANAGEMENT OF SKIN MALIGNANCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Jagadev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer globally accounting for at least 40% of cases. It is especially common among people with light skin. Non-melanoma skin cancers, about 80% are basal cell cancers and 20% squamous cell cancers. Basal cell and squamous cell cancers rarely result in death. Australia and New Zealand have the highest rates of melanoma in the world. The aim of the study is to study the prevalence, clinicopathological presentation and management of skin malignancies. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a prospective study conducted for a period of 2 years and analysed 30 cases of malignant skin tumours proven on histopathology with respect to prevalence, age, sex distribution, common site of occurrence and treatment modalities adopted. RESULTS In the present study, 47% of squamous cell carcinoma occurred between 50-59 years of age, more common in males with site predilection of lower limbs. Basal cell carcinoma was more common in the age group, 60-69 years (55.6% and more common in females (66.7%. The commonest site of occurrence of basal cell carcinoma was in the lower eyelid. Malignant melanoma was more common in the age group 50-59 years (75% and more common in females (75%. The commonest site of occurrence of melanoma was lower extremity. All the cases were treated with surgery. CONCLUSION Non-melanoma skin malignancies like squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma are more common than melanoma and have good prognosis. The mean age of occurrence of the tumours was around 60 years of age and responded well with surgical resection.

  17. Sagging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Sagging Skin Treatment Options Learn more about the ...

  18. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Yuanqin [Cancer Institute, The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Yao, Hua [Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J. [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Luo, Jia [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY (United States); Gao, Ning [Department of Pharmacognos, College of Pharmacy, 3rd Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Shi, Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Zhang, Zhuo, E-mail: zhuo.zhang@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries.

  19. Parents' perceptions of skin cancer threat and children's physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Alexander D; Aalborg, Jenny; Asdigian, Nancy L; Morelli, Joseph G; Mokrohisky, Stefan T; Dellavalle, Robert P; Berwick, Marianne; Box, Neil F; Crane, Lori A

    2012-01-01

    Sun exposure is a major risk factor for skin cancer, but without physical activity, children are at risk of childhood obesity. The objective of this study was to explore relationships between parental perceptions of skin cancer threat, sun protection behaviors, physical activity, and body mass index (BMI) in children. This is a cross-sectional analysis nested within the Colorado Kids Sun Care Program sun safety intervention trial. In summer 2007, parent telephone interviews provided data on demographics, perceptions of skin cancer threat, sun protection behaviors, and physical activity. Physical examinations provided data on phenotype, freckling, and BMI. Data from 999 Colorado children born in 1998 were included in analysis. We used analysis of variance, Spearman's rho (ρ) correlation, and multivariable linear regression analysis to evaluate relationships with total amount of outdoor physical activity. After controlling for sex, race/ethnicity, skin color, and sun protection, regression analysis showed that each unit increase in perceived severity of nonmelanoma skin cancer was associated with a 30% increase in hours of outdoor physical activity (P = .005). Hours of outdoor physical activity were not related to perceived severity of melanoma or perceived susceptibility to skin cancer. BMI-for-age was not significantly correlated with perceptions of skin cancer threat, use of sun protection, or level of physical activity. The promotion of sun safety is not likely to inhibit physical activity. Skin cancer prevention programs should continue to promote midday sun avoidance and sun protection during outdoor activities.

  20. Randomized controlled trial of acitretin versus placebo in patients at high-risk for basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin (North Central Cancer Treatment Group Study 969251).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadakia, Kunal C; Barton, Debra L; Loprinzi, Charles L; Sloan, Jeff A; Otley, Clark C; Diekmann, Brent B; Novotny, Paul J; Alberts, Steven R; Limburg, Paul J; Pittelkow, Mark R

    2012-04-15

    Chemoprevention with systemic retinoids has demonstrated promise in decreasing the incidence of new primary nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) in immunocompromised post-transplantation recipients. There is limited evidence for the use of systemic retinoids in the nontransplantation patient. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of acitretin as a chemopreventive agent in nontransplantation patients at high-risk for NMSC. The study was designed as a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. To test the possible skin cancer-preventing effect of a 2-year treatment with acitretin, 70 nontransplantation patients aged ≥18 years who had a history of ≥2 NMSCs within 5 years of trial onset were randomized to receive either placebo or acitretin 25 mg orally 5 days per week. The primary outcome measure was the rate of new NMSC development. Seventy patients were randomized to receive either acitretin alone (N = 35) or placebo (N = 35). During the 2-year treatment period, the patients who received acitretin did not have a statistically significant reduction in the rate of new primary NMSCs (odds ratio, 0.41; 95% confidence interval, 0.15-1.13; 54% vs 74%; P = .13). However, using the incidence of new NMSC, the time to new NMSC, and total NMSC counts, an umbrella test indicated a significant trend that favored the use of acitretin (chi-square statistic, 3.94; P = .047). The patients who received acitretin reported significantly more mucositis and skin toxicities compared with the patients who received placebo. Although there was not a statistically significant benefit observed with the use of acitretin, this may have been the result of low statistical power. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  1. Association of atopy and tentative diagnosis of skin cancer - results from occupational skin cancer screenings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, I; Mohr, P; Zander, N; Fölster-Holst, R; Augustin, M

    2017-12-01

    The relationship between atopic conditions and carcinoma of the skin has been described inconsistently. Population-based data providing information on atopic diseases as well as on skin cancer are sparse. To determine the correlation between atopy and prevalence of precanceroses, non-melanoma skin cancer and malignant melanoma (MM), while taking into account known risk factors for skin cancer. Data from occupational skin cancer screenings were analysed in a cross-sectional study. Dermatologists performed whole body examinations and collected medical histories. Subjects comprised all employees (16-70 years) examined from 2006 to 2014. 'Atopy' was defined by clinical screening diagnosis and/or by participant-reported, pre-existing atopic dermatitis, allergic asthma or other specified allergies confirmed by a physician. Tentative screening diagnoses of skin cancer related to actinic keratosis, basal cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma. The study cohort comprised 90 265 employees (mean age 43 ± 11 years, 58.5% male), 30.7% of whom were ever diagnosed with an atopic disease. Persons with atopic conditions recorded in their medical history and at the time of screening had a significantly lower prevalence of actinic keratosis (AK), basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and MM. After controlling for age, sex and relevant risk factors (skin type, childhood sun burns), atopy remained significantly protective against BCC (OR 0.77) and MM (OR 0.53). Design limitations of the study include that all findings of skin cancer were based on clinical examination only and must therefore be considered tentative diagnoses. Furthermore, owing to the cross-sectional study design, causal pathways cannot be proven. However, analyses of data from such a large and general population-based cohort afford valuable insights into the relationship between atopic diseases and skin cancer. They provide the grounds for prospective cohort studies to evaluate and dissect the underlying mechanism. © 2017

  2. Skin Biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyhrquist, N; Salava, A; Auvinen, P; Lauerma, A

    2016-05-01

    The cutaneous microbiome has been investigated broadly in recent years and some traditional perspectives are beginning to change. A diverse microbiome exists on human skin and has a potential to influence pathogenic microbes and modulate the course of skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis. In addition to the known dysfunctions in barrier function of the skin and immunologic disturbances, evidence is rising that frequent skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis, might be connected to a dysbiosis of the microbial community and changes in the skin microbiome. As a future perspective, examining the skin microbiome could be seen as a potential new diagnostic and therapeutic target in inflammatory skin disorders.

  3. Selective in situ protein expression profiles correlate with distinct phenotypes of basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelkovics, E; Kiszner, G; Meggyeshazi, N; Korom, I; Varga, E; Nemeth, I; Molnar, J; Marczinovits, I; Krenacs, T

    2013-07-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common malignancy that shows increasing incidence due to our cumulative exposure to ultraviolet irradiation. Its major subtypes, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) differ in pathobiology, phenotype and clinical behavior, which must be reflected at the molecular level. In this study, protein expression profiles of BCC and SCC were tested in tissue microarrays and correlated with that of actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease, seborrheic keratosis and normal epidermis by detecting 22 proteins involved in cell interactions, growth, cell cycle regulation or apoptosis. The significantly more reduced collagen XVII, CD44v6, pan-Desmoglein levels and more evident E-Cadherin delocalization in BCC compared to SCC correlated with the de novo dermal invasion of BCC against the progressive invasion from in situ lesions in SCC development. EGFR was also expressed at a significantly higher level in SCC than in BCC. The upregulated cell communication protein connexin43 in BCC could contribute to the protection of BCC from metastatic invasion. Elevated cell replication in BCC was underlined by the increased topoisomerase IIα and reduced p21(waf1) and p27(kip1) positive cells fractions compared to SCC. Compared to differentiated keratinocytes, caspase-8 and -9 were equally upregulated in skin carcinoma subtypes for either mediating apoptosis induction or immune escape of tumor cells. Hierarchical cluster analysis grouped SCC and actinic keratosis cases exclusively together in support of their common origin and malignant phenotype. BCC cases were also clustered fully together. Differentially expressed proteins reflect the distinct pathobiology of skin carcinoma subtypes and can serve as surrogate markers in doubtful cases.

  4. Skin photoprotection by natural polyphenols: Anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and DNA repair mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Joi A.; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory studies have implicated solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation in various skin diseases including premature aging of the skin and melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. Chronic UV radiation exposure-induced skin diseases or skin disorders are caused by the excessive induction of inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage, etc.. The use of chemopreventive agents, such as plant polyphenols, to inhibit these events in UV-exposed skin is gaining attention. Chemoprevention refers to the use of agents that can inhibit, reverse, or retard the process of these harmful events in the UV-exposed skin. A wide variety of polyphenols or phytochemicals, most of which are dietary supplements, have been reported to possess substantial skin photoprotective effects. This review article summarizes the photoprotective effects of some selected polyphenols, such as green tea polyphenols, grape seed proanthocyanidins, resveratrol, silymarin and genistein, on UV-induced skin inflammation, oxidative stress, and DNA damage, etc., with a focus on mechanisms underlying the photoprotective effects of these polyphenols. The laboratory studies conducted in animal models, suggest that these polyphenols have the ability to protect the skin from the adverse effects of UV radiation, including the risk of skin cancers. It is suggested that polyphenols may favorably supplement sunscreens protection, and may be useful for skin diseases associated with solar UV radiation-induced inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage. PMID:19898857

  5. Skin photoprotection by natural polyphenols: anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Joi A; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2010-03-01

    Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory studies have implicated solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation in various skin diseases including, premature aging of the skin and melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. Chronic UV radiation exposure-induced skin diseases or skin disorders are caused by the excessive induction of inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage, etc. The use of chemopreventive agents, such as plant polyphenols, to inhibit these events in UV-exposed skin is gaining attention. Chemoprevention refers to the use of agents that can inhibit, reverse or retard the process of these harmful events in the UV-exposed skin. A wide variety of polyphenols or phytochemicals, most of which are dietary supplements, have been reported to possess substantial skin photoprotective effects. This review article summarizes the photoprotective effects of some selected polyphenols, such as green tea polyphenols, grape seed proanthocyanidins, resveratrol, silymarin and genistein, on UV-induced skin inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage, etc., with a focus on mechanisms underlying the photoprotective effects of these polyphenols. The laboratory studies conducted in animal models suggest that these polyphenols have the ability to protect the skin from the adverse effects of UV radiation, including the risk of skin cancers. It is suggested that polyphenols may favorably supplement sunscreens protection, and may be useful for skin diseases associated with solar UV radiation-induced inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage.

  6. Personal History of Prostate Cancer and Increased Risk of Incident Melanoma in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Qing; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Ma, Jing; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Han, Jiali

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Steroid hormones, particularly androgens, play a major role in prostatic carcinogenesis. Personal history of severe acne, a surrogate for higher androgen activity, has been associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa), and one recent study indicated that severe teenage acne was a novel risk factor for melanoma. These findings suggest a possible relationship between PCa and risk of melanoma. We prospectively evaluated this association among US men. Methods A total of 42,372 participants in the Health Professionals' Follow-Up Study (HPFS; 1986 to 2010) were included. Biennially self-reported PCa diagnosis was confirmed using pathology reports. Diagnosis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) was self-reported biennially, and diagnosis of melanoma was pathologically confirmed. We sought to confirm the association in 18,603 participants from the Physicians' Health Study (PHS; 1982 to 1998). Results We identified 539 melanomas in the HPFS. Personal history of PCa was associated with an increased risk of melanoma (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.83; 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.54). Although we also detected a marginally increased risk of NMSC associated with PCa (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.995 to 1.16), the difference in the magnitude of the association between melanoma and NMSC was significant (P for heterogeneity = .002). We did not find an altered risk of melanoma associated with personal history of other cancers. The association between PCa and risk of incident melanoma was confirmed in the PHS (HR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.12 to 4.21). Conclusion Personal history of PCa is associated with an increased risk of melanoma, which may not be entirely a result of greater medical scrutiny. PMID:24190118

  7. Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abscess Cellulitis Taking Care of Your Skin Abscess Impetigo Ringworm Cellulitis Should I Pop My Pimple? Tips for Taking Care of Your Skin Impetigo Paronychia Pityriasis Rosea Abscess View more Partner Message ...

  8. Skin Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out of ... person has smoked. Many products claim to revitalize aging skin or reduce wrinkles, but the Food and ...

  9. Skin graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused a large amount of skin loss Burns Cosmetic reasons or reconstructive surgeries where there has been skin damage or skin ... anesthesia are: Reactions to medicines Problems with breathing Risks for this surgery are: Bleeding Chronic pain (rarely) Infection Loss of ...

  10. Skin optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert, M. J.; Jacques, S. L.; Sterenborg, H. J.; Star, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative dosimetry in the treatment of skin disorders with (laser) light requires information on propagation of light in the skin related to the optical properties of the individual skin layers. This involves the solution of the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer in a model

  11. Phytochemicals in Skin Cancer Prevention and Treatment: An Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau Yee Ng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Skin is the largest human organ, our protection against various environmental assaults and noxious agents. Accumulation of these stress events may lead to the formation of skin cancers, including both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. Although modern targeted therapies have ameliorated the management of cutaneous malignancies, a safer, more affordable, and more effective strategy for chemoprevention and treatment is clearly needed for the improvement of skin cancer care. Phytochemicals are biologically active compounds derived from plants and herbal products. These agents appear to be beneficial in the battle against cancer as they exert anti-carcinogenic effects and are widely available, highly tolerated, and cost-effective. Evidence has indicated that the anti-carcinogenic properties of phytochemicals are due to their anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, and anti-angiogenic effects. In this review, we discuss the preventive potential, therapeutic effects, bioavailability, and structure–activity relationship of these selected phytochemicals for the management of skin cancers. The knowledge compiled here will provide clues for future investigations on novel oncostatic phytochemicals and additional anti-skin cancer mechanisms.

  12. Skin in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Sujata

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Screening for cutaneous disorders was undertaken in 1,175 pregnant women attending ante-natal clinic. Skin disease or STD being encountered in 114 (9.7%. Pruritus was present in 7.1 percent and was mostly due to candidiadis. The physiological skin changes were frequently observed. Candidiasis was by far the commonest infection with a 2.9 percent incidence. Syphilis was the commonest STD followed by Donovanosis and condyloma acuminata. Specific pregnancy dermatoses were seen in 1.5 percent and included prurigo gestationis, pruritic urticarial papules and plaques (PUPPP and pruritus gravidarum.

  13. Skin in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Raj Sujata; Khopkar Uday; Kapasi Akila; Wadhwa S

    1992-01-01

    Screening for cutaneous disorders was undertaken in 1,175 pregnant women attending ante-natal clinic. Skin disease or STD being encountered in 114 (9.7%). Pruritus was present in 7.1 percent and was mostly due to candidiadis. The physiological skin changes were frequently observed. Candidiasis was by far the commonest infection with a 2.9 percent incidence. Syphilis was the commonest STD followed by Donovanosis and condyloma acuminata. Specific pregnancy dermatoses were seen in 1.5 per...

  14. What Do Germans Want to Know About Skin Cancer? A Nationwide Google Search Analysis From 2013 to 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Stefanie; Schuster, Barbara; Rüth, Melvin; Biedermann, Tilo; Zink, Alexander

    2018-05-02

    Experts worldwide agree that skin cancer is a global health issue, but only a few studies have reported on world populations' interest in skin cancer. Internet search data can reflect the interest of a population in different topics and thereby identify what the population wants to know. Our aim was to assess the interest of the German population in nonmelanoma skin cancer and melanoma. Google AdWords Keyword Planner was used to identify search terms related to nonmelanoma skin cancer and melanoma in Germany from November 2013 to October 2017. The identified search terms were assessed descriptively using SPSS version 24.0. In addition, the search terms were qualitatively categorized. A total of 646 skin cancer-related search terms were identified with 19,849,230 Google searches in the period under review. The search terms with the highest search volume were "skin cancer" (n=2,388,500, 12.03%), "white skin cancer" (n=2,056,900, 10.36%), "basalioma" (n=907,000, 4.57%), and "melanoma" (n=717,800, 3.62%). The most searched localizations of nonmelanoma skin cancer were "nose" (n=93,370, 38.99%) and "face" (n=53,270, 22.24%), and the most searched of melanoma were "nails" (n=46,270, 70.61%) and "eye" (n=10,480, 15.99%). The skin cancer‒related category with the highest search volume was "forms of skin cancer" (n=10,162,540, 23.28%) followed by "skin alterations" (n=4,962,020, 11.36%). Our study provides insight into terms and fields of interest related to skin cancer relevant to the German population. Furthermore, temporal trends and courses are shown. This information could aid in the development and implementation of effective and sustainable awareness campaigns by developing information sources targeted to the population's broad interest or by implementing new Internet campaigns. ©Stefanie Seidl, Barbara Schuster, Melvin Rüth, Tilo Biedermann, Alexander Zink. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 02.05.2018.

  15. A review of nicotinamide: treatment of skin diseases and potential side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Heidi M

    2014-12-01

    Nicotinamide, also known as niacinamide, is the amide form of vitamin B3. It is a precursor of essential coenzymes for numerous reactions in the body including adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Nicotinic acid, also known as niacin, is converted into nicotinamide in the body. The use of topical nicotinamide in the treatment of acne vulgaris; melasma; atopic dermatitis; rosacea; and oral nicotinamide in preventing nonmelanoma skin cancer is discussed. The possible side effects and consequences of excessive nicotinamide exposure are reviewed, including suggestions nicotinamide might have a role in the development of diabetes, Parkinson's disease, and liver damage. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a serious case, you might need medical help. Impetigo —A skin infection caused by bacteria. Usually the ... and form a thick crust. You can treat impetigo with antibiotics. Melanoma © 2008 Logical Images, Inc. Melanoma — ...

  17. The role of skin self-examination at the Swiss skin cancer day

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badertscher, N.; Meier, M.; Rosemann, T.; Braun, R.; Cozzio, A.; Tag, B.; Wensing, M.; Tandjung, R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The rising incidence of melanoma - Switzerland has the highest incidence in Europe - is a major public health challenge. Swiss dermatologist introduced the "Swiss Skin Cancer Day" (SSCD) in 2006, which provides skin cancer screening at no costs. The aim of the study was to describe the

  18. Sun exposure and skin cancer, and the puzzle of cutaneous melanoma: A perspective on Fears et al. Mathematical models of age and ultraviolet effects on the incidence of skin cancer among whites in the United States. American Journal of Epidemiology 1977; 105: 420-427.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Bruce K; Cust, Anne E

    2017-06-01

    Sunlight has been known as an important cause of skin cancer since around the turn of the 20th Century. A 1977 landmark paper of US scientists Fears, Scotto, and Schneiderman advanced a novel hypothesis whereby cutaneous melanoma was primarily caused by intermittent sun exposure (i.e. periodic, brief episodes of exposure to high-intensity ultraviolet radiation) while the keratinocyte cancers, squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma, were primarily caused by progressive accumulation of sun exposure. With respect to cutaneous melanoma, this became known as the intermittent exposure hypothesis. The hypothesis stemmed from analysis of measured ambient ultraviolet radiation and age-specific incidence rates of melanoma and keratinocyte cancers collected as an extension to the US Third National Cancer Survey in several US States. In this perspective paper, we put this novel hypothesis into the context of knowledge at the time, and describe subsequent epidemiological and molecular research into melanoma that elaborated the intermittent exposure hypothesis and ultimately replaced it with a dual pathway hypothesis. Our present understanding is of two distinct biological pathways by which cutaneous melanoma might develop; a nevus prone pathway initiated by early sun exposure and promoted by intermittent sun exposure or possibly host factors; and a chronic sun exposure pathway in sun sensitive people who progressively accumulate sun exposure to the sites of future melanomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Opportunistic screening for skin cancer using a mobile unit in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vazquez Vinicius L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skin cancer is the most common malignancy in the white population worldwide. In Brazil, the National Cancer Institute (INCA estimates that in 2010 there will be 119,780 and 5,930 new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer and melanoma, respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a mobile unit in the diagnosis and treatment of skin cancer in several poor regions of Brazil. Methods The diagnosis of skin cancer was accomplished through active medical screening in the prevention Mobile Unit (MU of Barretos Cancer Hospital (BCH. The study population consisted of patients examined in the MU between 2004 and 2007, and their suspicious lesions were subjected to histopathological evaluation. Data were collected prospectively from standardized forms and analyzed. Results During the screening, 17,857 consultations were carried out. A total of 2012 (11.2% cases of skin cancer were diagnosed. The predominant histological type reported was basal cell carcinoma (n = 1,642 or 81.6%, followed by squamous cell carcinoma (n = 303 or 15.1%, Bowen's disease (n = 25 or 1.2%, malignant melanoma (n = 23 or 1.1%, basosquamous cell carcinoma (n = 3 or 0.1%, miscellaneous lesions (12 or 0.6%, and metatypical carcinoma (n = 4 or 0.2%. Only 0.6% of lesions were stage III. There were no stage IV non-melanoma skin lesions, as well as no melanomas stages III and IV, found. Conclusions It was observed that the MU can be a useful tool for early skin cancer diagnosis and treatment. This program probably is important, especially in developing countries with inadequate public health systems and social inequality.

  20. Laser-assisted delivery of synergistic combination chemotherapy in in vivo skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenande, Emily; Tam, Joshua; Bhayana, Brijesh; Schlosser, Steven Kyle; Ishak, Emily; Farinelli, William A; Chlopik, Agata; Hoang, Mai P; Pinkhasov, Omar R; Caravan, Peter; Rox Anderson, R; Haedersdal, Merete

    2018-04-10

    The effectiveness of topical drugs for treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer is greatly reduced by insufficient penetration to deep skin layers. Ablative fractional lasers (AFLs) are known to enhance topical drug uptake by generating narrow microchannels through the skin, but information on AFL-drug delivery in in vivo conditions is limited. In this study, we examined pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and toxicity of two synergistic chemotherapy agents, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), following AFL-assisted delivery alone or in combination in in vivo porcine skin. Detected at 0-120 h using mass spectrometry techniques, we demonstrated that fractional CO 2 laser pretreatment (196 microchannels/cm 2 , 852 μm ablation depth) leads to rapid drug uptake in 1500 μm deep skin layers, with a sixfold enhancement in peak cisplatin concentrations versus non-laser-treated controls (5 h, P = 0.005). Similarly, maximum 5-FU deposition was measured within an hour of AFL-delivery, and exceeded peak deposition in non-laser-exposed skin that had undergone topical drug exposure for 5 days. Overall, this accelerated and deeper cutaneous drug uptake resulted in significantly increased inflammatory and histopathological effects. Based on clinical scores and transepidermal water loss measurement, AFL intensified local toxic responses to drugs delivered alone and in combination, while systemic drug exposure remained undetectable. Quantitative histopathologic analyses correspondingly revealed significantly reduced epidermal proliferation and greater cellular apoptosis after AFL-drug delivery; particularly after combined cisplatin + 5-FU exposure. In sum, by overcoming the primary limitation of topical drug penetration and providing accelerated, enhanced and deeper delivery, AFL-assisted combination chemotherapy may represent a promising treatment strategy for non-melanoma skin cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultraviolet responses of Gorlin syndrome primary skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brellier, F; Valin, A; Chevallier-Lagente, O; Gorry, P; Avril, M-F; Magnaldo, T

    2008-08-01

    Gorlin syndrome, or naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with mutations in the PTCH1 gene, which encodes the receptor of SONIC HEDGEHOG. In addition to developmental abnormalities, patients with NBCCS are prone to basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most frequent type of nonmelanoma skin cancer in humans. As ultraviolet (UV) exposure plays a prominent role in the development of sporadic BCC, we aimed to determine whether primary NBCCS skin cells exhibit differential responses to UV exposure compared with wild-type (WT) skin cells. Primary fibroblast and keratinocyte strains were isolated from nonlesional skin biopsies of 10 patients with characteristic NBCCS traits. After identification of PTCH1 mutations, capacities of NBCCS cells to repair UV-induced DNA lesions and to survive after UV irradiation, as well as p53 responses, were compared with those of WT skin cells. The c1763insG PTCH1 mutation is described for the first time. DNA repair and cell survival analyses following UV irradiation revealed no obvious differences between responses of NBCCS and WT fibroblasts and keratinocytes. However, p53 accumulation after UV irradiation was abnormally persistent in all NBCCS primary keratinocyte strains compared with WT keratinocytes. Our observations that NBCCS cells harbour normal DNA repair and survival capacities following UV irradiation better explain that BCC proneness of patients with NBCCS does not solely concern body areas exposed to sunlight and suggest rather that it might be due to cell cycle alterations.

  2. Sun Exposure, Tanning Beds, and Herbs That Cure: An Examination of Skin Cancer on Pinterest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lu; Park, Sung-Eun

    2017-10-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer affecting the U.S. Pinterest.com, a virtual bookmarking social media site, has the potential to disseminate skin cancer-related information among young women, the group with the fastest increase in skin cancer diagnosis. This article presents a quantitative content analysis of pins about skin cancer on Pinterest guided by agenda-setting theory and the health belief model. Overall, sun exposure and tanning beds were most frequently discussed as the causes of skin cancer, and alternative therapies such as herbal medicine were discussed more than traditional biomedical treatment or prevention. Highly repinned pins tend to include more information than regular pins. Different types of skin cancer (melanoma, squamous-cell carcinoma, and basal-cell carcinoma) received the same amount of coverage; however, pins about nonmelanoma skin cancer (such as squamous-cell carcinoma and basal-cell carcinoma) were often information-poor. They were less likely to include information on the causes, prevention, and the biomedical treatment of skin cancer and were less likely to include health belief constructs associated with the promotion of skin cancer prevention and treatment.

  3. Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Screening Health Professional Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Genetics ...

  4. Ablative fractional laser alters biodistribution of ingenol mebutate in the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlendsson, A M; Taudorf, E H; Eriksson, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Topically applied ingenol mebutate (IngMeb) is approved for field-treatment of actinic keratosis and is currently being investigated for treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Ablative fractional lasers (AFXLs) generate microscopic ablation zones (MAZs) in the skin, which may help induce...... a deep penetration needed for effective treatment of NMSC. Using Franz diffusion cells, uptake and bio-distribution were investigated over 21 h in intact (n = 9) and AFXL-exposed porcine skin (n = 58). A 2940-nm fractional Er:YAG laser generated intraepidermal (11.2 mJ/MAZ; 66 μm deep, 177 μm wide...... accumulated in SC and epidermis. Uptake depended entirely on laser density; increasing coverage from 0 % to 0.5 %, 1 %, 2.5 %, 5 %, and 10.5 % enhanced dermal uptake 1.6-, 2.1-, 3.1-, 3.4-, and 3.9-fold, respectively (p

  5. Skin abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can help identify the cause of the infection. Treatment You can apply moist heat (such as warm compresses) to help the abscess ... if you develop new symptoms during or after treatment of a skin abscess. Prevention ... the skin around minor wounds clean and dry to prevent infection. Call your provider if you ...

  6. Analysis of solid cancer incidence risk among the population exposed in the East Urals Radioactive Trace over 1957–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Silkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Assessment of solid cancer incidence risk in the Chelyabinsk subcohort of the East Urals Radioactive Trace over the 53-year period of follow-up with use of the individualized doses accumulated in the soft tissues calculated on the basis of the new dosimetric system TRDS-2016. Materials and methods: The thermal explosion of the storage tank of the «Mayak» production Association radioactive waste in September, 1957 led to the formation of the East Urals Radioactive Trace and radiation exposure of the population living on the territory of the trace. Members of the created cohort received chronic external and internal radiation exposure. The mean dose to the soft tissues over the entire follow-up period amounted to 30 mGy, maximum – 960 mGy. The number of the study cohort is 21 394 persons. Over 53 years (from 1957 to 2009 1426 cases of solid cancer excluding 73 hemoblastoses and 101 cases of  non-melanoma skin cancer are registered in the cohort on the catchment area. Person-years at risk amount to 437 719. Individualized doses for the cohort members were evaluated on the basis of the improved dosimetric system developed by the specialists of the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine. The analysis was carriedout by means of the Poisson regression method with the use of the software AMFIT. Confidence intervals were calculated using the maximum likelihood estimation. Results: Risk analysis of solid cancer incidence in Chelyabinsk subcohort of the East Urals Radioactive Trace has been carried out for the first time. A significant increase in solid cancer incidence risk with increasing the dose was obtained for the cohort members who were followed-up for 53 years. The excess relative risk per dose is 0.049/100mGy (90% of DI: 0.003; 0.010 according to the linear model. No significant effect modification of the excess relative risk value due to non-radiation factors was revealed. The results of the study demonstrate that the value

  7. Cancer incidence in cohorts of workers in the rubber manufacturing industry first employed since 1975 in the UK and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniol, M; Koechlin, A; Sorahan, T; Jakobsson, K; Boyle, P

    2017-06-01

    Increased cancer risks have been reported among workers in the rubber manufacturing industry employed before the 1960s, but it is unclear for workers hired subsequently. The present study focused on cancer incidence among rubber workers first employed after 1975 in Sweden and the UK. Two cohorts of rubber workers employed for at least 1 year were analysed. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), based on country-specific and period-specific incidence rates, were analysed for all cancers combined (except non-melanoma skin), bladder, lung, stomach cancer, leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Exploratory analyses were conducted for other cancers with a minimum of 10 cases in both genders combined. 16 026 individuals (12 441 men; 3585 women) contributed to 397 975 person-years of observation, with 846 cancers observed overall (437 in the UK, 409 in Sweden). No statistically significant increased risk was observed for any site of cancer. A reduced risk was evident for all cancers combined (SIR=0.83, 95% CI (0.74 to 0.92)), lung cancer (SIR=0.74, 95% CI (0.59 to 0.93)), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (SIR=0.67, 95% CI (0.45 to 1.00)) and prostate cancer (SIR=0.77, 95% CI (0.64 to 0.92)). For stomach cancer and multiple myeloma, SIRs were 0.93 (95% CI (0.61 to 1.43)) and 0.92 (95% CI 0.44 to 1.91), respectively. No increased risk of bladder cancer was observed (SIR=0.88, 95% CI (0.61 to 1.28)). No significantly increased risk of cancer incidence was observed in the combined cohort of rubber workers first employed since 1975. Continued surveillance of the present cohorts is required to confirm absence of long-term risk and confirmatory findings from other cohorts would be important. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. [Validation of a questionnaire to quantify the risk for skin cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Sánchez, Martha Alejandra; Peralta-Pedrero, María Luisa; Domínguez-Gómez, María Antonieta

    2014-01-01

    Currently, strategies are needed to identify the population at risk for skin cancer in order to implement prevention and for early diagnosis. There are no validated Spanish language instruments to measure skin cancer risk. To design and validate a self-applied questionnaire to quantify the risk of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer in a Mexican population. A self-applied questionnaire was designed to measure risk factors for skin cancer. Face and content validity was assessed by five experts in skin cancer. The value of each item was weighted according to the relative risk of the risk factors. The questionnaire was applied to extreme groups in order to measure the construct validity. Reliability was evaluated using test-retest method two weeks after the first application. The questionnaire was applied to patients with (n = 147) and without (n = 249) skin cancer from the Dermatologic Center "Dr. Ladislao de la Pascua". The total score of the questionnaire was different in both groups (U = 2,104.5, p = 0.0001) and ROC curve determined that five points or more equals high risk for skin cancer (area 0.964; 95% CI: 0.946-0.981; p = 0.0001). The reliability of the instrument was 0.971 (95% CI: 0.943-0.986; p = 0.0001). This is the first Spanish language questionnaire valid to measure risk of skin cancer, whose application at the population level would be useful to identify high-risk individuals who need preventative interventions.

  9. Farmers sun exposure, skin protection and public health campaigns: An Australian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Smit-Kroner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-melanoma skin cancer is a common and costly cancer in agricultural populations. Prevention and early detection are an effective way to decrease the burden of disease and associated costs. To examine sun exposure and skin protection practices in agricultural workers and farmers a thematic review of the literature between 1983 and 2014 was undertaken. Comparison between studies was complicated by differences in study design, definitions of skin protection, and analytic methods used. Farmers are the most exposed to harmful ultraviolet (UV radiation of all outdoor workers and the level of reported skin protection by farmers is suboptimal. Years of public health campaigns have failed to adequately address farmers' specific needs. Increased rates of skin cancer and subsequent higher costs are expected. Estimates of sun exposure and skin protection practice indicate that protective clothing is the most promising avenue to improve on farmers' skin protection. Early detection needs to be part of public health campaigns. This review explores the quantitative data about Australian farmers and their skin protective behaviours. We investigate what the documented measurable effect of the public health campaign Slip!Slop!Slap! has had on agricultural workers and farmers and make recommendations for future focus.

  10. ACE and ACE2 expression in normal and malignant skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej; Swiatko, Katarzyna; Pula, Bartosz; Zamirska, Aleksandra; Olbromski, Mateusz; Bieniek, Andrzej; Szepietowski, Jacek; Rys, Janusz; Dziegiel, Piotr; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzenna

    2013-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known mainly as a regulator of cardiovascular homeostasis. However, it has also been shown to mediate processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and carcinogenesis. Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC) - including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) - are among the most common cancers. The aim of the present study was to determine the immunohistochemical expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), and Ki-67 antigen in archival samples of normal skin, actinic keratosis, and malignant skin lesions. Cytoplasmic-nuclear ACE immunoreactivity was observed in 99% of examined cases of both normal skin and cancers. Significantly higher ACE immunoreactivity occurred in normal skin, as compared with BCC and SCC (p < 0.01, p < 0.0001, respectively). Additionally, ACE immunoreactivity was also significantly higher in BCC, compared with SCC (p < 0.05). ACE2 immunoreactivity was noted in basal epidermal layers and in sebaceous gland cells in normal skin, though not in NMSC. These novel observations suggest that ACE and skin RAS may be involved in the pathogenesis of malignant skin lesions.

  11. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R, Taylor SC, Lim HW. Skin cancer and photoprotection in people of color: a review and recommendations ... 4): 663 - 672.e3 19 World Health Organization, Solar ultraviolet radiation: Global burden of disease from solar ...

  12. Skin Dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Registration General information Housing & travel Education Exhibit hall Mobile app 2019 Annual Meeting Derm Exam Prep Course ... SkinPAC State societies Scope of practice Truth in advertising NP/PA laws Action center Public and patients ...

  13. Cryotherapy - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryosurgery - skin; Warts - freezing; Warts - cryotherapy; Actinic keratosis - cryotherapy; Solar keratosis - cryotherapy ... Cryotherapy is done using a cotton swab that has been dipped into liquid nitrogen or a probe ...

  14. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, neck, hands, and arms. ...

  15. Skin Pigment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This Article Medical Dictionary Also of Interest (Quiz) Impetigo and Ecthyma (News) Don't Get Caught Without ... Professional version Also of Interest Test your knowledge Impetigo is a bacterial skin infection. The infection leads ...

  16. Skin - clammy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causes of clammy skin include: Anxiety attack Heart attack Heat exhaustion Internal bleeding Low blood oxygen levels Medicine reaction Sepsis (body-wide infection) Severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) Severe pain Shock (low blood pressure)

  17. Skin Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tape it closed with small strips of clear, sticky tape. If you get stitches, your doctor will ... of Your Skin Melanoma Eczema Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow Impetigo Pityriasis Rosea View more Partner Message ...

  18. Skin Lesion Analysis towards Melanoma Detection Using Deep Learning Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuexiang Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Skin lesions are a severe disease globally. Early detection of melanoma in dermoscopy images significantly increases the survival rate. However, the accurate recognition of melanoma is extremely challenging due to the following reasons: low contrast between lesions and skin, visual similarity between melanoma and non-melanoma lesions, etc. Hence, reliable automatic detection of skin tumors is very useful to increase the accuracy and efficiency of pathologists. In this paper, we proposed two deep learning methods to address three main tasks emerging in the area of skin lesion image processing, i.e., lesion segmentation (task 1, lesion dermoscopic feature extraction (task 2 and lesion classification (task 3. A deep learning framework consisting of two fully convolutional residual networks (FCRN is proposed to simultaneously produce the segmentation result and the coarse classification result. A lesion index calculation unit (LICU is developed to refine the coarse classification results by calculating the distance heat-map. A straight-forward CNN is proposed for the dermoscopic feature extraction task. The proposed deep learning frameworks were evaluated on the ISIC 2017 dataset. Experimental results show the promising accuracies of our frameworks, i.e., 0.753 for task 1, 0.848 for task 2 and 0.912 for task 3 were achieved.

  19. Skin Lesion Analysis towards Melanoma Detection Using Deep Learning Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuexiang; Shen, Linlin

    2018-02-11

    Skin lesions are a severe disease globally. Early detection of melanoma in dermoscopy images significantly increases the survival rate. However, the accurate recognition of melanoma is extremely challenging due to the following reasons: low contrast between lesions and skin, visual similarity between melanoma and non-melanoma lesions, etc. Hence, reliable automatic detection of skin tumors is very useful to increase the accuracy and efficiency of pathologists. In this paper, we proposed two deep learning methods to address three main tasks emerging in the area of skin lesion image processing, i.e., lesion segmentation (task 1), lesion dermoscopic feature extraction (task 2) and lesion classification (task 3). A deep learning framework consisting of two fully convolutional residual networks (FCRN) is proposed to simultaneously produce the segmentation result and the coarse classification result. A lesion index calculation unit (LICU) is developed to refine the coarse classification results by calculating the distance heat-map. A straight-forward CNN is proposed for the dermoscopic feature extraction task. The proposed deep learning frameworks were evaluated on the ISIC 2017 dataset. Experimental results show the promising accuracies of our frameworks, i.e., 0.753 for task 1, 0.848 for task 2 and 0.912 for task 3 were achieved.

  20. Algorithm for comprehensive care for patients with non melanoma skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria Bárzaga, Hector Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Sequence of actions, roles of doctors and paramedical staff, preventive and therapeutic methods, diagnostic and clinical monitoring mode: an algorithm for the comprehensive care of patients with non-melanoma skin cancer including presents. Consensus on the theoretical and practical basis of the algorithm was established by the Delphi expert method variant and health personnel involved were trained in its implementation. Algorithm for making national and international specialized literature on the subject was reviewed; a critical analysis of the methods specified in Cuba for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease was made, and weaknesses were determined in the process of medical care for these patients in the Clinical Surgical Teaching Military Hospital D r. Octavio de la Concepción and Pedraja a nd health areas. The results obtained with the implementation of the algorithm demonstrated its effectiveness in comprehensive care for patients with non-melanoma skin cancer, because the prevention, early diagnosis, appropriate physical examination, the correct treatment ensured notification, monitoring periodic clinical and referral of complicated patients, the occurrence of rare complications. (author)

  1. Wheelchair incidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drongelen AW van; Roszek B; Hilbers-Modderman ESM; Kallewaard M; Wassenaar C; LGM

    2002-01-01

    This RIVM study was performed to gain insight into wheelchair-related incidents with powered and manual wheelchairs reported to the USA FDA, the British MDA and the Dutch Center for Quality and Usability Research of Technical Aids (KBOH). The data in the databases do not indicate that incidents with

  2. SKIN MANIFESTATIONS IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    OpenAIRE

    Adepu Sumitra Devi; Banoth Mohan Lal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Skin changes of diabetes mellitus (DM) appear subsequent to the progression of the disease, they can be the sign that appear first in some cases and in others they may present years after the primary disease. AIMS To study the skin manifestations in diabetic patients and to know the incidence of skin manifestations of diabetes mellitus. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study was undertaken at our hospital, MGM Hospital, Warangal, Telangana for a period of one year from ...

  3. Burden and Chemoprevention of Skin Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Hollestein (Loes)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractThe incidence of skin cancer is increasing in the Netherlands since 1989, the first year of the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR). In 2010 more than 43,000 patients were newly diagnosed with skin cancer in the Netherlands. During a life time at least 1 in 5 persons living in

  4. Skin cancer: From smearing to cutting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.W.J. Kelleners-Smeets (Nicole); M.W. Bekkenk (Marcel); E.R.M. de Haas (Ellen)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe most common skin cancers are basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Conventional excision is still the current treatment of choice for these malignant tumours. Given the many subtypes and high incidence, the treatment of these skin tumours is not only a matter

  5. Skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehrle, G.

    1975-01-01

    A general survey of skin decontamination is given. The success of every decontamination treatments depends mainly on the speed, but also on the care, with which the action is taken. The best way to remove the skin contaminants is thorough washing under lukewarm running water with mild soap and a soft brush. This washing is to be repeated several times for a period of several minutes. If results are not satisfactory, light duty detergents and wetting agents available commercially may also be used. Some solutions which have proved useful are mentioned. The decontamination solutions are best used in the order given. When one has no satisfactory decontamination effect, the next one is to be used. If necessary, these agents must be used several times in the stated order as long as this does not involve too much strain for the skin. All the decontamination measures mentioned refer, of course, to intact healthy skin. After decontamination has been completed, the skin should be treated with a protective cream

  6. Deciphering the role of nuclear and cytoplasmic IKKα in skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alameda, Josefa P.; Gaspar, Miriam; Ramírez, Ángel; Navarro, Manuel; Page, Angustias; Suárez-Cabrera, Cristian; Fernández, M. Guadalupe; Mérida, Jose R.; Paramio, Jesús M.; García-Fernández, Rosa A.; Fernández-Aceñero, M. Jesús; Casanova, M. Llanos

    2016-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC) are the most common human malignancies. IKKα is an essential protein for skin development and is also involved in the genesis and progression of NMSC, through mechanisms not fully understood. While different studies show that IKKα protects against skin cancer, others indicate that it promotes NMSC. To resolve this controversy we have generated two models of transgenic mice expressing the IKKα protein in the nucleus (N-IKKα mice) or the cytoplasm (C-IKKα mice) of keratinocytes. Chemical skin carcinogenesis experiments show that tumors developed by both types of transgenic mice exhibit histological and molecular characteristics that make them more prone to progression and invasion than those developed by Control mice. However, the mechanisms through which IKKα promotes skin tumors are different depending on its subcellular localization; while IKKα of cytoplasmic localization increases EGFR, MMP-9 and VEGF-A activities in tumors, nuclear IKKα causes tumor progression through regulation of c-Myc, Maspin and Integrin-α6 expression. Additionally, we have found that N-IKKα skin tumors mimic the characteristics associated to aggressive human skin tumors with high risk to metastasize. Our results show that IKKα has different non-overlapping roles in the nucleus or cytoplasm of keratinocytes, and provide new targets for intervention in human NMSC progression. PMID:27121058

  7. Is skin penetration a determining factor in skin sensitization ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary:Background. It is widely accepted that substances that cannot penetrate through the skin will not be sensitisers. Thresholds based on relevant physicochemical parameters such as a LogKow > 1 and a MW 1 is a true requirement for sensitisation.Methods. A large dataset of substances that had been evaluated for their skin sensitisation potential, together with measured LogKow values was compiled from the REACH database. The incidence of skin sensitisers relative to non-skin sensitisers below and above the LogKow = 1 threshold was evaluated. Results. 1482 substances with associated skin sensitisation outcomes and measured LogKow values were identified. 305 substances had a measured LogKow self-evident truth borne out from the widespread misconception that the ability to efficiently penetrate the stratum corneum is a key determinant of skin sensitisation potential and potency. Using the REACH data extracted to test out the validity of common assumptions in the skin sensitization AOP. Builds on trying to develop a proof of concept IATA

  8. [Skin defect coverage with micro skin graft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüş, Nazim; Kaya, Yalçin; Karakaya, Sadik; Camci, Cemalettin

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study is to coverage of the large skin defect with microskin graft. The wound coverage of the large skin defect may be difficult with auto skin graft. In these patients, split thickness skin graft may be used in a bloc shape or expanded skin graft shape and a stamp skin graft shape or expanded stamp skin graft shape. On the other hand, split thickness skin graft may be used as a micrograft shape after the mincing process, which reduces of the graft size in a few millimeters. In this study, 6 patients with skin defect was admitted in our clinic, and their skin defect was treated with micro skin graft. Expansion ratio was 1:15. Epithelialization on the wound surface was completed in 4 to 6 weeks and cobblestone appearance was observed after the wound coverage. Skin defect coverage with micrograft is an effective technique like the other skin graft coverage methods.

  9. Occupational skin cancer and precancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fifinela Raissa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Occupational skin cancer and precancerous lesions are skin disorders caused by exposure to chemical carcinogens such as polycyclic hydrocarbons and arsenic, or radiation, such as ultraviolet light and ionizing light in the workplace. Annual increase in skin cancer incidence is believed to be related to various factors such as frequent intense sunlight exposure (i.e. at work, recreational activities, and sun-tanning habit, ozone depletion, an increase in number of geriatric population, and an increase of public awareness in skin cancer. The most common occupational skin cancers are basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Examples of occupational precancerous lesion of the skin are actinic keratosis and Bowen’s disease. Particular diagnostic criteria to diagnose occupational diseases has been developed. Early detection of occupational skin cancer and precancerous lesion is necessary. An effective prevention program consists of primary prevention such as prevention of hazardous material exposure, secondary prevention such as early detection of disease for early intervention, and tertiary prevention such as minimizing long-term impact of the disease.

  10. minSKIN Does a multifaceted intervention improve the competence in the diagnosis of skin cancer by general practitioners? Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandjung Ryan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Switzerland, skin cancer is one of the most common neoplasms. Melanoma is the most aggressive one and can be lethal if not detected and removed on time. Nonmelanoma skin cancer is more frequent as melanoma; it is seldom lethal but can disfigure patients in advanced stages. General practitioners (GPs are often faced with suspicious skin lesions of their patients. Methods/Design Design: Randomised controlled trial (RCT. Population: 60 GPs, randomised into intervention group and control group. Intervention: GPs get a Lumio loupe, a digital camera and continuous feedback based on pictures of skin lesions they send to the Dermatologist. Primary outcome: Competence in the diagnosis of skin cancer by GPs, measured as the percentage of correctly classified pictures of skin lesions. Measurements: At baseline, and prior to any intervention (T0, GPs will be asked to rate 36 pictures of skin lesions according to their likelihood of malignancy on a visual analogue scale (VAS. After a full day training course with both groups (T1 and after one year of continuous feedback (T2 with the intervention group, we will repeat the picture scoring session with both groups, using new pictures. Discussion We want to determine whether a multifaceted intervention (including technical equipment and a continuous feedback on skin lesions leads to an improved competence in the diagnosis of skin cancer by GPs. This study addresses the hypothesis that an additional feedback loop, based on pictures performed in daily practice by GPs is superior to a simple educational intervention regarding diagnostic competence. We expect an improvement of the competence in skin cancer diagnosis by GPs in both groups after the full day training course. Beside this immediate effect, we also expect a long term effect in the intervention group because of the continuous problem based feedback. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN29854485

  11. minSKIN does a multifaceted intervention improve the competence in the diagnosis of skin cancer by general practitioners? Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badertscher, Nina; Rosemann, Thomas; Tandjung, Ryan; Braun, Ralph P

    2011-06-30

    In Switzerland, skin cancer is one of the most common neoplasms. Melanoma is the most aggressive one and can be lethal if not detected and removed on time. Nonmelanoma skin cancer is more frequent as melanoma; it is seldom lethal but can disfigure patients in advanced stages. General practitioners (GPs) are often faced with suspicious skin lesions of their patients. Randomised controlled trial (RCT). 60 GPs, randomised into intervention group and control group. GPs get a Lumio loupe, a digital camera and continuous feedback based on pictures of skin lesions they send to the Dermatologist. Competence in the diagnosis of skin cancer by GPs, measured as the percentage of correctly classified pictures of skin lesions. At baseline, and prior to any intervention (T0), GPs will be asked to rate 36 pictures of skin lesions according to their likelihood of malignancy on a visual analogue scale (VAS). After a full day training course with both groups (T1) and after one year of continuous feedback (T2) with the intervention group, we will repeat the picture scoring session with both groups, using new pictures. We want to determine whether a multifaceted intervention (including technical equipment and a continuous feedback on skin lesions) leads to an improved competence in the diagnosis of skin cancer by GPs. This study addresses the hypothesis that an additional feedback loop, based on pictures performed in daily practice by GPs is superior to a simple educational intervention regarding diagnostic competence. We expect an improvement of the competence in skin cancer diagnosis by GPs in both groups after the full day training course. Beside this immediate effect, we also expect a long term effect in the intervention group because of the continuous problem based feedback. ISRCTN29854485.

  12. Cancer incidence in Canada: trends and projections (1983-2032

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Xie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this monograph, we present historical and projected cancer incidence frequencies and rates for Canada, excluding non-melanoma skin cancers (i.e. basal and squamous carcinomas, in 1983 to 2032. The information is intended to help in planning strategy and allocating resources and infrastructure for future cancer control and health care. Projected changes in cancer incidence rates: From 2003-2007 to 2028-2032, the agestandardized incidence rates (ASIRs for all cancers combined are predicted to decrease in Canadian males by 5%, from 464.8 to 443.2 per 100 000 population, and increase in Canadian females by 4%, from 358.3 to 371.0 per 100 000. The overall decrease in cancer rates in males will be driven by the decrease in lung cancer rates in men aged 65Endnote * or older and in prostate cancer rates in men aged 75 or older. The overall increase in cancer rates in females reflects the predicted rise in lung cancer rates in women aged 65 or older. The increase also represents the expected increase in cancers of the uterus, thyroid, breast (in females under 45, leukemia, pancreas, kidney and melanoma. The largest changes in ASIRs projected over the 25-year forecasting horizon are increases in thyroid cancer (55% in males and 65% in females and liver cancer in males (43% and decreases in larynx cancer (47% in males and 59% in females, lung cancer in males (34% and stomach cancer (30% in males and 24% in females. The incidence rate of lung cancer in females is projected to continue to rise by 2% from 2003-2007 to 2008-2012 and then start to decrease in the last 20 projection years, by 18%. Breast cancer incidence is expected to change the least (an increase of less than 1% of all cancers in females. The predicted changes in the rates for colorectal cancer are below the medians in all cancers, with a decrease of 6% for both males and females during the entire projection period. The rates for prostate cancer are projected to be stable, based on an

  13. Incidents analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, P.

    1996-01-01

    We undertook a study programme at the end of 1991. To start with, we performed some exploratory studies aimed at learning some preliminary lessons on this type of analysis: Assessment of the interest of probabilistic incident analysis; possibility of using PSA scenarios; skills and resources required. At the same time, EPN created a working group whose assignment was to define a new approach for analysis of incidents on NPPs. This working group gave thought to both aspects of Operating Feedback that EPN wished to improve: Analysis of significant incidents; analysis of potential consequences. We took part in the work of this group, and for the second aspects, we proposed a method based on an adaptation of the event-tree method in order to establish a link between existing PSA models and actual incidents. Since PSA provides an exhaustive database of accident scenarios applicable to the two most common types of units in France, they are obviously of interest for this sort of analysis. With this method we performed some incident analyses, and at the same time explores some methods employed abroad, particularly ASP (Accident Sequence Precursor, a method used by the NRC). Early in 1994 EDF began a systematic analysis programme. The first, transient phase will set up methods and an organizational structure. 7 figs

  14. Burden and Chemoprevention of Skin Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hollestein, Loes

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractThe incidence of skin cancer is increasing in the Netherlands since 1989, the first year of the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR). In 2010 more than 43,000 patients were newly diagnosed with skin cancer in the Netherlands. During a life time at least 1 in 5 persons living in the Netherlands will develop skin cancer. The most common skin cancer is basal cell carcinoma (BCC), followed by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and melanoma. BCC and SCC combined are often referred to as no...

  15. Transcriptome Analysis Identifies the Dysregulation of Ultraviolet Target Genes in Human Skin Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Shen

    Full Text Available Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR is a major risk factor for both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. In addition to its mutagenic effect, UVR can also induce substantial transcriptional instability in skin cells affecting thousands of genes, including many cancer genes, suggesting that transcriptional instability may be another important etiological factor in skin photocarcinogenesis. In this study, we performed detailed transcriptomic profiling studies to characterize the kinetic changes in global gene expression in human keratinocytes exposed to different UVR conditions. We identified a subset of UV-responsive genes as UV signature genes (UVSGs based on 1 conserved UV-responsiveness of this subset of genes among different keratinocyte lines; and 2 UV-induced persistent changes in their mRNA levels long after exposure. Interestingly, 11 of the UVSGs were shown to be critical to skin cancer cell proliferation and survival. Through computational Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, we demonstrated that a significant portion of the UVSGs were dysregulated in human skin squamous cell carcinomas, but not in other human malignancies. This highlights the potential and specificity of the UVSGs in clinical diagnosis of UV damage and stratification of skin cancer risk.

  16. Skin Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... UVB Skin of Color Tanning Teacher Resources Related: What Is Skin Cancer? | Window Film | Healthy Lifestyle | True Stories Skin Cancer Information Actinic Keratosis Atypical Moles Basal Cell Carcinoma Melanoma Merkel Cell Carcinoma Squamous Cell Carcinoma Skin Cancer ...

  17. Aspectos epidemiológicos del cáncer no melanoma de piel en un servicio de dermatología de la ciudad de Santa Fe - Argentina 2007 Epidemiologic aspects to the skin cancer non melanoma in a dermatologic office of the Santa Fe city - Argentine 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B L M Lukaszuk

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes: la incidencia del cáncer no melanoma de piel (CNMP, principalmente en países tropicales ha aumentado en grandes proporciones. La identificación de lesiones sospechosas y aquellas relacionadas directamente con el cáncer de piel es efectuada en ocasiones por colegas de muchas especialidades médicas. Objetivos: estudiar las características de la frecuencia del CNMP en relación con ciertos factores de riesgo en el Hospital José María Cullen, de la ciudad de Santa Fe, capital de la provincia del mismo nombre, Argentina. Materiales y métodos: estudio retrospectivo, no experimental, descriptivo y de corte transversal. La muestra quedó conformada por 61 pacientes de ambos sexos y de 1 a 83 años. Se confeccionó una historia clínica completa de los pacientes candidatos a la toma de biopsia, que luego fue analizada por el Servicio de Anatomía Patológica. Se realizó un análisis descriptivo utilizando el programa SPSS 11.5, mediante el cual se usó la prueba de Chi cuadrado y tablas de contingencia para relacionar las variables y comparar los datos. Se estableció una asociación estadísticamente significativa cuando se halló un valor de pBackground: The incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC, mainly in tropical countries has increased in large proportions. The identification of suspicious lesions and those directly related to the skin cancer is made by colleagues of many medical specialities. Objectives: Study the characteristics of the frequency of NMSC and their relation with certain risk factors in the Hospital José María Cullen, city of Santa Fe, capital of the province of the same name, Argentina. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective, not experimental, descriptive and transversal cut study. The sample was composed by 61 patients of both sexs and from 1 to 83 years old. A complete clinical history of patients with suspected lesions were developed. After the biopsy collection, the Department of

  18. Skin tears: care and management of the older adult at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Regina F; Davidson, Martha W; Thompson, Bonnie J; Kelechi, Teresa J

    2013-02-01

    Skin tears experienced by older adults require special skills to promote healing. Home healthcare providers are in key positions to manage skin tears and prevent further skin trauma. Several guidelines, risk assessments, classifications, and products exist to manage high-risk patients. Frequent evaluation of the effectiveness of the treatment and prevention strategies in an overall skin care protocol for home care patients is critical to reduce skin tear incidence and promote prompt healing when skin tears are present.

  19. Clinical implementation of 3D printing in the construction of patient specific bolus for electron beam radiotherapy for non-melanoma skin cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canters, R.A.M.; Lips, I.M.; Wendling, M.; Kusters, M.; Zeeland, M. van; Gerritsen, R.M.; Poortmans, P.; Verhoef, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Creating an individualized tissue equivalent material build-up (i.e. bolus) for electron beam radiation therapy is complex and highly labour-intensive. We implemented a new clinical workflow in which 3D printing technology is used to create the bolus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A

  20. Topical combination of diclofenac, calcipotriol, and difluoromethylornithine has beneficial effects comparable to 5-fluorouracil for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    of UVB induced NMSC in a mouse model. Ninety-six SKH-1 mice were randomized to one placebo group and two treatment groups (diclofenac+calcitriol+difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and 5-FU). After UVB radiation for 20 weeks, the mice with tumours were treated topically for the following 17 weeks. Both...... treatments significantly reduced the number of tumours, number of mice with tumours as well as tumour area size compared with placebo. As the clinical use of 5-FU may induce more adverse effects, a combination of diclofenac+calcitriol+DFMO could be a promising alternative. Human studies are warranted...

  1. Skin cancer prevention in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, C; Foley, P

    2009-11-01

    Australia has one of the highest skin cancer incidence and mortality rates in the world. The reason for these high rates is due in part to the high ambient UV radiation levels, combined with a predominantly susceptible fair-skinned population. To address this problem, since 1980 Australians have been exposed to social marketing campaigns to raise awareness of skin cancer prevention. These campaigns have used mass media alongside interventions in schools, workplaces, and in community and leisure settings to motivate sun protective behaviour. As a result of these interventions it can be demonstrated that social marketing campaigns can be a very effective method to not only motivate behaviour change, reduce sunburn, and increase awareness but more importantly, reduce melanoma rates and bring positive economic returns to government. However long term investment in this area is required otherwise any population gains in behaviour are very likely to be quickly eroded.

  2. Foliar application of calcium chloride and borax affects the fruit skin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of foliar application of calcium chloride and borax calcium on fruit skin strength and cracking incidence in litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) fruit was investigated at 25 days interval and also the evaluation of fruit skin calcium and boron contents, skin strength, ion leakage from skin discs and fruit cracking in four ...

  3. Mastectomy skin necrosis after microsurgical breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Christina R; Koolen, Pieter G; Anderson, Katarina E; Paul, Marek A; Tobias, Adam M; Lin, Samuel J; Lee, Bernard T

    2015-10-01

    Mastectomy skin necrosis represents a significant clinical morbidity after immediate breast reconstruction. In addition to aesthetic deformity, necrosis of the native mastectomy skin may require debridement, additional reconstruction, or prolonged wound care and potentially delay oncologic treatment. This study aims to evaluate patient and procedural characteristics to identify predictors of mastectomy skin necrosis after microsurgical breast reconstruction. A retrospective review was performed of all immediate microsurgical breast reconstructions performed at a single academic center. Patient records were queried for age, diabetes, active smoking, previous breast surgery, preoperative radiation, preoperative chemotherapy, body mass index, mastectomy type, mastectomy weight, flap type, autologous flap type, and postoperative mastectomy skin flap necrosis. There were 746 immediate autologous microsurgical flaps performed by three plastic surgeons at our institution during the study period. The incidence of mastectomy skin flap necrosis was 13.4%. Univariate analysis revealed a significantly higher incidence of mastectomy skin necrosis in patients with higher mastectomy weight (P mastectomy type. Multivariate analysis demonstrated statistically significant associations between mastectomy skin necrosis and both increasing mastectomy weight (odds ratio 1.348 per quartile increase, P = 0.009) and diabetes (odds ratio 2.356, P = 0.011). Increasing mastectomy weight and coexisting diabetes are significantly associated with postoperative mastectomy skin necrosis after microsurgical reconstruction. These characteristics should be considered during patient counseling, procedure selection, operative planning, and intraoperative tissue viability assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Skin manifestations of athletes competing in the summer olympics: what a sports medicine physician should know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Jacqueline F; Adams, Brian B; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2012-05-01

    Olympic athletes are vulnerable to traumatic, environmental and infectious skin manifestations. Although dermatological complaints are frequent among Olympians, there is a scarcity of literature that reviews sports-related dermatoses among Olympic athletes. A comprehensive review of PREMEDLINE and MEDLINE searches of all available literature through to January 2011 was conducted, focusing on sports-related dermatological presentations as well as the key words 'Olympic athletes' and 'skin diseases'. Common skin conditions can be harmful and even prohibitive for competition. Common aetiologies of dermatological conditions related to sports include: skin infections with dermatophytes such as tinea pedis and tinea corporis, bacteria such as pitted keratolysis, and folliculitis and viruses such as herpes gladiatorum. Frictional dermatoses occur commonly and include athlete's nodules, jogger's itch, frictional blisters, callosities and talon noir. Trauma can cause haematomas such as auricular haematomas. Due to long training hours in the sun, many endurance athletes experience high levels of UV radiation and a higher risk for both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer. Pre-existing dermatoses can also be aggravated with practice and competition; in particular, atopic eczema and physical urticarias. Infrequent dermatoses are susceptible to misdiagnosis, delay in treatment and needless biopsies. This review highlights the diagnosis and management of sports-related dermatoses by the following general categories of Olympic sport: endurance, resistance, team sport, and performing arts.

  5. Association Between HLA Type and Skin Cancer in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cegielska, A; Dębska-Ślizień, A; Moszkowska, G; Imko-Walczuk, B; Rutkowski, B

    2016-06-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are more susceptible to various diseases, among them cancers. Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC) represent the most common malignancies in OTRs in Europe. Due to the significantly higher morbidity, aggressive and rapid progression, and poor prognosis of NMSC in the OTR population, these patients require a special oncological approach. Intensive attention should therefore be paid to factors predisposing OTRs to the development of cancer. The aim of this study was to establish the role of genetic factors in the pathogenesis of skin cancer in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). This single-center study was performed in 39 KTRs with posttransplant NMSC. The frequency of particular types of HLA Class I (HLA-A and HLA-B) and Class II (HLA-DR) in each group were compared to establish the association between the HLA type and risk of skin cancer after renal transplantation. HLA-DR15 were more commonly detected in patients with MNSC than in the control group of KTRs (P = .014) There was also a positive correlation between HLA-B18 and skin squamous cell carcinoma. The antigen was more often recorded in KTRs with squamous cell carcinoma than in KTRs without NMSC (P = .03) and in the general population (P = .002). Patients who are positive for HLA-BR15 and HLA-B18 should be under special dermatologic surveillance due to the potentially high risk of skin cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Skin cancer margin analysis within minutes with full-field OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalimier, Eugénie; Ogrich, Lauren; Morales, Diego; Cusack, Carrie Ann; Abdelmalek, Mark; Boccara, Claude; Durkin, John

    2017-02-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer. Treatment consists of surgical removal of the skin cancer. Traditional excision involves the removal of the visible skin cancer with a significant margin of normal skin. On cosmetically sensitive areas, Mohs micrographic tissue is the standard of care. Mohs uses intraoperative microscopic margin assessment which minimizes the surgical defect and can help reduce the recurrence rate by a factor of 3. The current Mohs technique relies on frozen section tissue slide preparation which significantly lengthens operative time and requires on-site trained histotechnicians. Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FFOCT) is a novel optical imaging technique which provides a quick and efficient method to visualize cancerous areas in minutes, without any preparation or destruction of the tissue. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of FFOCT for the analysis of skin cancer margins during Mohs surgery. Over 150 images of Mohs specimens were acquired intraoperatively with FFOCT before frozen section analysis. The imaging procedure took less than 5 minutes for each specimen. No artifacts on histological preparation were found arising from FFOCT manipulation; however frozen section artifact was readily seen on FFOCT. An atlas was established with FFOCT images and corresponding histological slides to reveal FFOCT reading criteria of normal and cancerous structures. Blind analysis showed high concordance between FFOCT and histology. FFOCT can potentially reduce recurrence rates while maintaining short surgery times, optimize clinical workflow, and decrease healthcare costs. For the patient, this translates into smaller infection risk, decreased stress, and better comfort.

  7. Synthetic analysis of associations between IL-10 polymorphisms and skin cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongbo; Yang, Jiaoli; Yu, Zhenzhen; Shen, Hui; Huang, Xinlin; Zhang, Mi; Long, Teng; Cailing, A; Wang, Wenhui

    2018-01-23

    The current study was designed to quantitatively summarize the evidence for the strength of the associations between common IL-10 functional polymorphisms and skin cancer risk. Relevant publications concerning the associations between common IL-10 functional polymorphisms(-1082G>A, -819C>T and -592C>A) and skin cancer were retrieved by a comprehensive electronic literature search in PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO, Embase, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM). The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were utilized to assess the strength of the relationship. A total of 26 studies including 4090 cases and 4133 controls (-1082G>A, 10 studies with 1809 cases and 1830 controls; -819C>T, 7 studies with 862 cases and 957 controls; -592C>A, 9 studies with 1419 cases and 1346 controls) were enrolled in the meta-analysis. Overall, the results revealed a borderline decreased risk of skin cancer in heterozygote model (OR = 0.82, 95CI = 0.67-1.00, p = 0.05). The subgroup analysis also presented similar association for non-melanoma skin cancer in heterozygote model (OR = 0.67, 95CI = 0.50-0.91, p = 0.01). Moreover, the further analysis based on the histological type of non-melanoma skin cancer indicated a significantly decreased risk of BCC in allele model (OR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.50-0.91, p = 0.02) and dominant model (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.48-0.98, p = 0.04). However, neither overall analysis nor subgroup analysis based on cancer subtype revealed a significant association of -1082G>A or -592C>A polymorphisms with skin cancer. The present study suggested a potential association between IL-10 -819C>T polymorphism and decreased risk of skin cancer, but a lack of association for -1082G>A and -592C>A polymorphisms. Further invalidation is urgently needed.

  8. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Screening Health Professional Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Genetics ...

  9. Climate change and skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balato, N; Ayala, F; Megna, M; Balato, A; Patruno, C

    2013-02-01

    Global climate appears to be changing at an unprecedented rate. Climate change can be caused by several factors that include variations in solar radiation received by earth, oceanic processes (such as oceanic circulation), plate tectonics, and volcanic eruptions, as well as human-induced alterations of the natural world. Many human activities, such as the use of fossil fuel and the consequent accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, land consumption, deforestation, industrial processes, as well as some agriculture practices are contributing to global climate change. Indeed, many authors have reported on the current trend towards global warming (average surface temperature has augmented by 0.6 °C over the past 100 years), decreased precipitation, atmospheric humidity changes, and global rise in extreme climatic events. The magnitude and cause of these changes and their impact on human activity have become important matters of debate worldwide, representing climate change as one of the greatest challenges of the modern age. Although many articles have been written based on observations and various predictive models of how climate change could affect social, economic and health systems, only few studies exist about the effects of this change on skin physiology and diseases. However, the skin is the most exposed organ to environment; therefore, cutaneous diseases are inclined to have a high sensitivity to climate. For example, global warming, deforestation and changes in precipitation have been linked to variations in the geographical distribution of vectors of some infectious diseases (leishmaniasis, lyme disease, etc) by changing their spread, whereas warm and humid environment can also encourage the colonization of the skin by bacteria and fungi. The present review focuses on the wide and complex relationship between climate change and dermatology, showing the numerous factors that are contributing to modify the incidence and the clinical pattern of many

  10. Rising incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Dorte; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen; Dahlstrøm, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive, skin cancer of obscure histogenesis, the incidence of which is rising. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment. Our aim was to evaluate the staging, investigation, treatment, and follow-up of MCC in eastern Denmark, and to investi......Abstract Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive, skin cancer of obscure histogenesis, the incidence of which is rising. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment. Our aim was to evaluate the staging, investigation, treatment, and follow-up of MCC in eastern Denmark...

  11. Skin Cancer and UV Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarbuk Anita

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of skin cancer is increasing by epidemic proportions. Basal cell cancer remains the most common skin neoplasm, and simple excision is generally curative. On the other hand, aggressive local growth and metastasis are common features of malignant melanoma, which accounts for 75% of all deaths associated with skin cancer. The primary cause of skin cancer is long exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-R crossed with the amount of skin pigmentation and family genetics. It is believed that in childhood and adolescence, 80% of UV-R gets absorbed while in the remaining, 20 % gets absorbed later in the lifetime. This suggests that proper and early photoprotection may reduce the risk of subsequent occurrence of skin cancer. Reducing the exposure time to sunlight, using sunscreens and protective textiles are the three ways of UV protection. Most people think that all the clothing will protect them, but it does not provide full sun screening properties. Literature sources claim that only 1/3 of the spring and summer collections tested give off proper UV protection. This is very important during the summer months, when UV index is the highest. Fabric UV protection ability highly depends on large number of factors such as type of fiber, fabric surface, construction, porosity, density, moisture content, type and concentration of dyestuff, fluorescent whitening agents, UV-B protective agents (UV absorbers, as well as nanoparticles, if applied. For all of these reasons, in the present paper, the results of UV protecting ability according to AS/NZS 4399:1996 will be discussed to show that standard clothing materials are not always adequate to prevent effect of UV-R to the human skin; and to suggest the possibilities for its improvement for this purpose enhancing light conversion and scattering. Additionally, the discrepancy in UV protection was investigated in distilled water as well as Adriatic Sea water.

  12. Incidence of scabies in Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    LAPEERE, H.; NAEYAERT, J.-M.; De WEERT, J.; De MAESENEER, J.; BROCHEZ, L.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A prospective survey on scabies in Ghent, Belgium was performed in 2004. Sixty-four individual cases were reported, corresponding to a crude incidence rate of 28/100 000 inhabitants. The incidence was higher in the elderly (51/100 000 in persons aged >75 years) and a higher incidence was also found in immigrants (88/100 000). More than 40% of the registered scabies patients had symptoms for more than 4 weeks at the time of presentation. In 54% of the consultations, the patient had already consulted a physician for his/her skin problem. Of this group, 44% had not yet received any scabicidal treatment, indicating that scabies was not yet diagnosed or that an inappropriate treatment was prescribed. The observations suggest that the diagnosis and/or treatment of scabies in this region can still be improved. PMID:17506916

  13. Neuromodulators for Aging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Neuromodulators for Aging Skin Treatment Options Learn more ...

  14. Skin color - patchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003224.htm Skin color - patchy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Patchy skin color is areas where the skin color is irregular. ...

  15. Cancer incidence in Gipuzkoa, Spain (1998-2002, and time trends from 1986 Incidencia del cáncer en Guipúzcoa (1998-2002 y tendencias desde 1986

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Larrañaga

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the cancer incidence in Gipuzkoa (Spain from 1998 to 2002 and describe time trends since 1986. Methods: The annual incidence of cancer in Gipuzkoa from 1998 to 2002 was estimated as a rate per 100,000 inhabitants. Incidence trends for the period 1986-2002 were studied for all cancers and for the main cancer sites using Poisson regression and Joinpoint regression for prostate tumours. Results: On average, one in 3 men and one in 5 women would probably be diagnosed with cancer at some time during their life (0-74 years. Among men, prostate surpassed lung as the most frequent cancer site. Among women, breast cancer represented approximately 30% of all cases of cancer (excluding non-melanoma skin cancers. There was an annual increase in the incidence of cancer of 1.5% (95% CI, 1.1-1.8 in men and 0.9% (95% CI, 0.5-1.3 in women. The incidence of prostate cancer in men increased over the study period, and especially between 1996 and 1999, with an annual increase of 34.7% (95% CI, 5.9-71.5. The incidence of lung cancer in women presented an annual increase of 5.2% (95% CI, 3.4-7.1. In contrast, the incidence of stomach cancer decreased during the study period. Conclusions: Cancer incidence in Gipuzkoa increased during the study period. This increase was particularly marked in lung cancer and skin melanoma, for which preventive strategies are fundamental.Objetivos: Conocer la incidencia de cáncer en Guipúzcoa entre 1998 y 2002, y su evolución desde 1986. Métodos: Se realizan estimaciones de incidencia anual del cáncer en el período 1998-2002, para Guipúzcoa, en tasas por 100.000 habitantes. Se analiza su evolución entre 1986 y 2002 en el conjunto de localizaciones y en las más frecuentes, mediante el modelo de regresión de Poisson y el modelo de regresión Joinpoint en tumores de próstata. Resultados: Uno de cada 3 varones y una de cada 5 mujeres de Guipúzcoa tienen la probabilidad de desarrollar cáncer a lo largo de

  16. Cancer incidence in indigenous people in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the USA: a comparative population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Suzanne P; Antoni, Sébastien; Colquhoun, Amy; Healy, Bonnie; Ellison-Loschmann, Lis; Potter, John D; Garvey, Gail; Bray, Freddie

    2015-11-01

    Indigenous people have disproportionally worse health and lower life expectancy than their non-indigenous counterparts in high-income countries. Cancer data for indigenous people are scarce and incidence has not previously been collectively reported in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the USA. We aimed to investigate and compare, for the first time, the cancer burden in indigenous populations in these countries. We derived incidence data from population-based cancer registries in three states of Australia (Queensland, Western Australia, and the Northern Territory), New Zealand, the province of Alberta in Canada, and the Contract Health Service Delivery Areas of the USA. Summary rates for First Nations and Inuit in Alberta, Canada, were provided directly by Alberta Health Services. We compared age-standardised rates by registry, sex, cancer site, and ethnicity for all incident cancer cases, excluding non-melanoma skin cancers, diagnosed between 2002 and 2006. Standardised rate ratios (SRRs) and 95% CIs were computed to compare the indigenous and non-indigenous populations of each jurisdiction, except for the Alaska Native population, which was compared with the white population from the USA. We included 24 815 cases of cancer in indigenous people and 5 685 264 in non-indigenous people from all jurisdictions, not including Alberta, Canada. The overall cancer burden in indigenous populations was substantially lower in the USA except in Alaska, similar or slightly lower in Australia and Canada, and higher in New Zealand compared with their non-indigenous counterparts. Among the most commonly occurring cancers in indigenous men were lung, prostate, and colorectal cancer. In most jurisdictions, breast cancer was the most common cancer in women followed by lung and colorectal cancer. The incidence of lung cancer was higher in indigenous men in all Australian regions, in Alberta, and in US Alaska Natives than in their non-indigenous counterparts. For breast cancer

  17. Skin self-exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer - self-exam; Melanoma - self-exam; Basal cell cancer - self-exam; Squamous cell - self-exam; Skin mole - self-exam ... Cancer Institute. What You Need To Know About Melanoma and Other Skin Cancers: How To Check Your Skin. (NIH Publication No. ...

  18. Estrogens and aging skin

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity...

  19. Systematic skin cancer screening in Northern Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbart, Eckhard W; Waldmann, Annika; Nolte, Sandra; Capellaro, Marcus; Greinert, Ruediger; Volkmer, Beate; Katalinic, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of skin cancer is increasing worldwide. For decades, opportunistic melanoma screening has been carried out to respond to this burden. However, despite potential positive effects such as reduced morbidity and mortality, there is still a lack of evidence for feasibility and effectiveness of organized skin cancer screening. The main aim of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of systematic skin cancer screening. In 2003, the Association of Dermatological Prevention was contracted to implement the population-based SCREEN project (Skin Cancer Research to Provide Evidence for Effectiveness of Screening in Northern Germany) in the German state of Schleswig-Holstein. A two-step program addressing malignant melanoma and nonmelanocytic skin cancer was implemented. Citizens (aged ≥ 20 years) with statutory health insurance were eligible for a standardized whole-body examination during the 12-month study period. Cancer registry and mortality data were used to assess first effects. Of 1.88 million eligible citizens, 360,288 participated in SCREEN. The overall population-based participation rate was 19%. A total of 3103 malignant skin tumors were found. On the population level, invasive melanoma incidence increased by 34% during SCREEN. Five years after SCREEN a substantial decrease in melanoma mortality was seen (men: observed 0.79/100,000 and expected 2.00/100,000; women: observed 0.66/100,000 and expected 1.30/100,000). Because of political reasons (resistance as well as lack of support from major German health care stakeholders), it was not possible to conduct a randomized controlled trial. The project showed that large-scale systematic skin cancer screening is feasible and has the potential to reduce skin cancer burden, including mortality. Based on the results of SCREEN, a national statutory skin cancer early detection program was implemented in Germany in 2008. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  20. Fluorescence--remission sensoring of skin tumours: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, Uwe; Nelskamp, Cornelia; Scheibe, Armin; Fassler, Dieter; Schmidt, Wolf-Dieter

    2007-11-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is one of the most common malignancies in men. Objective evaluation by digital dermoscopy, as for pigmented lesions, does not provide sufficient data to discriminate between benign and malignant lesions. Therefore, other techniques have to be developed. Hospitalized patients of an academic teaching hospital were evaluated. Because the simultaneous measurement of fluorescence and remission of skin is impossible, a principle of subsequent measurement of remission and fluorescence had been developed by our group. This was combined with dermoscopic imaging. VIS-NIR remission spectroscopy was performed using the laboratory device TIDAS. Fluorescence spectroscopy was realized using a SKINSKAN. Fluorescence emission was detected by a highly sensitive PMT-detector. Based on this evaluation, we developed an optimized measuring device (FRIS, fluorescence-remission-imaging sensor) combining sensors for fluorescence, remission and digital imaging with a white light ring illumination, a drilled mirror and fibre optics. FRIS consists of an industrial personal computer with a touch screen combining three UV-VIS spectrometer modules and a white light source for remission measurements and referencing. Furthermore, included are a CCD coloured camera module and an LED white light ring-illumination. Fluorescence emission is realized by a UV-LED with a peak wavelength of 370 nm. System control uses Window frames and a specifically developed software Skinrem3.exe . Using this technology, we performed a pilot study in 19 patients with 30 NMSC-suspicious lesions including: actinic keratosis (n=10), basal cell carcinoma (BCC; n=16) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; n=4 with two in situ carcinomas). Reproducibility measured or FRIS by relative standard deviation of repeated spectroscopic measurements was 2 AU indicates BCC. To substantiate the diagnostic potency of this technology, further studies are needed. A combination of fluorescence and remission

  1. Urostomy - stoma and skin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it well before you attach the pouch. Avoid skin care products that contain alcohol. These can make your skin ... the pouch to your skin. Use fewer special skin care products. This will make problems with your skin less ...

  2. Prevalence of use of skin lightening agents amongst University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of skin lightening 'bleaching' agents has adverse effects on the skin. Cosmetic manufacturers in the country in advertising their products have exploited beautification with the use of these “bleaching” agents. The resultant increase in the use of these agents is likely to lead to a concomitant rise in the incidence of ...

  3. Skin problems in lower limb amputees : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbelt, HEJ; Dijkstra, PU; Jonkman, MF; Geertzen, JHB

    Purpose. Skin problems of the stump in lower limb amputees are relative common in daily rehabilitation practice, possibly impeding prosthetic use. This impediment may have great impact in daily life. Our objective was to review literature systematically concerning incidence and prevalence of skin

  4. Regional comparison of cancer incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obralic, N.; Gavrankapetanovic, F.; Dizdarevic, Z.; Duric, O.; Sisic, F.; Selak, I.; Balta, S.; Nakas, B.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Due to specific war and post-war situation in Balkan region, differences in the number, type, development, biological course, treatment of malignant tumours and its outcome are possible. In order to perceive the situation realistically, it is necessary to gather continuously exact data about malignant tumours and compare them with the data from other European and world countries.The aim of the study was to collect and analyse the data on cancer incidence in the region of Sarajevo city, which represents a symbol of difficult times in the recent past, and to compare it to the incidence in the neighbouring countries. Patients and methods. Data on all newly diagnosed cancer cases, permanent residents of Sarajevo Canton, in the years 1999 and 2000 were collected. Crude incidence rate has been calculated according to the years observed, gender and localizations of the disease The data were compared to the cancer registries of Slovenia and Croatia and were observed in the light of specific local situation. Results. The crude cancer incidence of all sites but skin was the highest in both years and by both genders in Croatia. The incidence of the most common tumours (lung and breast cancer) was similar in all three countries. The differences in the incidence between both genders in the Sarajevo canton were registered in laryngeal and urinary bladder cancer, as well as in bone and cartilage sarcoma. Cervical cancer had extremely high incidence and was high up on the incidence list in the Sarajevo canton, which correlates with the data in developing countries. The incidence of other tumours in the post-war period is reaching expected numbers. Conclusions. It is difficult to identify whether the war and post-war stress, irregular and insufficient nutrition during and after the siege of the city of Sarajevo or some other factor influenced the cancer incidence among exposed population. The prevalence of smoking in the whole region is extremely high, in Bosnia and

  5. A systematic literature review of the economic implications of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degener, F.; Ivanescu, C.; Casamayor, M.; Postma, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: During the years, acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) have seen an increase in incidence in many parts of the western world. Additionally, the treatment of ABSSSIs, generally consisting of surgical debridement or drainage and empiric antibiotics in the hospital,

  6. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways. PMID:28277539

  7. Incidence and characteristics of chemical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Lee, Sang-Gil; Kim, Hwan-Cheol

    2017-05-01

    Chemical burns can lead to serious health outcomes. Previous studies about chemical burns have been performed based on burn center data so these studies have provided limited information about the incidence of chemical burns at the national level. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of chemical burns using nationwide databases. A cohort representing the Korean population, which was established using a national health insurance database, and a nationwide workers' compensation database were used to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of chemical burns. Characteristics of the affected body region, depth of burns, industry, task, and causative agents were analyzed from two databases. The incidence of chemical burns was calculated according to employment status. The most common regions involving chemical burns with hospital visits were the skin followed by the eyes. For skin lesions, the hands and wrists were the most commonly affected regions. Second degree burns were the most common in terms of depth of skin lesions. The hospital visit incidence was 1.96 per 10,000 person-year in the general population. The compensated chemical burns incidence was 0.17 per 10,000 person-year. Employees and the self-employed showed a significantly increased risk of chemical burns undergoing hospital visits compared to their dependents. Chemical burns on the skin and eyes are almost equally prevalent. The working environment was associated with increased risk of chemical burns. Our results may aid in estimating the size of the problem and prioritizing prevention of chemical burns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  8. Oily skin: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Thais H; Maibach, Howard I

    2012-01-01

    Oily skin (seborrhea) is a common cosmetic problem that occurs when oversized sebaceous glands produce excessive amounts of sebum giving the appearance of shiny and greasy skin. This paper overviews the main concepts of sebaceous gland anatomy and physiology, including the biosynthesis, storage and release of sebum, as well as its relationship to skin hydration and water barrier function. We also address how skin oiliness may vary according to diet, age, gender, ethnicity and hot humid climates. The deeper understanding of this skin type provides the opportunity to better guide patients regarding skin care and also assist in the development of sebosuppressive agents. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Etiology and incidence of chronic ulcers in Blantyre, Malawi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegelaar, Jim E.; Stroïnk, Aimee C.; Steketee, Willemyn H.; Faber, William R.; van der Wal, Allard C.; Komolafe, Isaac O. O.; Dzamalala, Charles; Chibwana, Cecilia; Wendte, Johannes F.; Zijlstra, Eduard E.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little information is available on the incidence and etiology of chronic ulcers in the tropics. Therefore, the incidence and etiology of chronic skin ulcers were assessed in out-patients at the Department of Dermatology and in in-patients at the Departments of Dermatology, Surgery,

  10. Skin-Derived Vitamin D-3 Protects against Basal Cell Carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, Maarten F.; Roelink, Henk

    2017-01-01

    UVR in sunlight causes mutations that drive basal cell carcinomas. However, the incidence of these tumors plateaus with prolonged exposure, but the incidence of other skin cancers increases. Makarova et al. now show that vitamin D-3 produced in the skin by UVR protects against its oncogenic effects

  11. Sun protection for preventing basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Guillermo; Nova, John; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Andrea Esperanza; Medina, Roger David; Solorzano-Restrepo, Carolina; Gonzalez, Jenny; Olmos, Miguel; Godfrey, Kathie; Arevalo-Rodriguez, Ingrid

    2016-07-25

    'Keratinocyte cancer' is now the preferred term for the most commonly identified skin cancers basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), which were previously commonly categorised as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC). Keratinocyte cancer (KC) represents about 95% of malignant skin tumours. Lifestyle changes have led to increased exposure to the sun, which has, in turn, led to a significant increase of new cases of KC, with a worldwide annual incidence of between 3% and 8%. The successful use of preventive measures could mean a significant reduction in the resources used by health systems, compared with the high cost of the treatment of these conditions. At present, there is no information about the quality of the evidence for the use of these sun protection strategies with an assessment of their benefits and risks. To assess the effects of sun protection strategies (i.e. sunscreen and barrier methods) for preventing keratinocyte cancer (that is, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) of the skin) in the general population. We searched the following databases up to May 2016: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS. We also searched five trial registries and the bibliographies of included studies for further references to relevant trials. We included randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of preventive strategies for keratinocyte cancer, such as physical barriers and sunscreens, in the general population (children and adults), which may provide information about benefits and adverse events related to the use of solar protection measures. We did not include trials focused on educational strategies to prevent KC or preventive strategies in high-risk groups. Our prespecified primary outcomes were BCC or cSCC confirmed clinically or by histopathology at any follow-up and adverse events. Two review authors independently selected studies for eligibility using

  12. Lyme borreliosis and skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease is a multisystem illness which is caused by the strains of spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and transmitted by the tick, Ixodes. Though very commonly reported from the temperate regions of the world, the incidence has increased worldwide due to increasing travel and changing habitats of the vector. Few cases have been reported from the Indian subcontinent too. Skin manifestations are the earliest to occur, and diagnosing these lesions followed by appropriate treatment, can prevent complications of the disease, which are mainly neurological. The three main dermatological manifestations are erythema chronicum migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Many other dermatological conditions including morphea, lichen sclerosus and lately B cell lymphoma, have been attributed to the disease. Immunofluorescence and polymerase reaction tests have been developed to overcome the problems for diagnosis. Culture methods are also used for diagnosis. Treatment with Doxycycline is the mainstay of management, though prevention is of utmost importance. Vaccines against the condition are still not very successful. Hence, the importance of recognising the cutaneous manifestations early, to prevent systemic complications which can occur if left untreated, can be understood. This review highlights the cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis and its management.

  13. Overview on Topical 5-ALA Photodynamic Therapy Use for Non Melanoma Skin Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Cantisani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet radiation (UV contributes to a variety of skin diseases including inflammation, degenerative aging, and cancer. Historically, humans have been exposed to UV radiation mainly through occupational exposure; recreational UV exposure, however, has increased dramatically in recent years, because of outdoor leisure activities and to purposely tan for cosmetic purposes. Both UVB and UVA radiation have been shown to cause DNA damage and immunosuppression, the important forms of biological damage that lead to NMSC. Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most common malignancy, whose public health significance is often unrecognized which continues to grow at an alarming rate, becoming an occupational disease. Available treatments alternative to surgery include photodynamic therapy, electrochemotherapy, cryotherapy, ablative lasers, 5-fluorouracil, imiquimod, ingenol mebutate, and diclofenac. Among these, photodynamic therapy is a noninvasive technique with excellent cosmetic outcome and good curative results, when used in initial stages of skin cancers for superficial lesions. It is administered under numerous and significantly varied regimens and there are a wide range of cure rates reported, permitting treatment of large and multiple lesions with excellent cosmetic results. This is an overview of photodynamic applications especially for the treatment of NMSC, with a short focus on daylight modality.

  14. Molecular classification of basal cell carcinoma of skin by gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Byul A; Lim, Hyoseob; Kwon, So Mee; Jo, Yuna; Park, Myong Chul; Lee, Il Jae; Woo, Hyun Goo

    2015-12-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are more common kinds of skin cancer. Although these tumors share common pathological and clinical features, their similarity and heterogeneity at molecular levels are not fully elaborated yet. Here, by performing comparative analysis of gene expression profiling of BCC, SCC, and normal skin tissues, we could classify the BCC into three subtypes of classical, SCC-like, and normal-like BCCs. Functional enrichment and pathway analyses revealed the molecular characteristics of each subtype. The classical BCC showed the enriched expression and transcription signature with the activation of Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways, which were well known key features of BCC. By contrast, the SCC-like BCC was enriched with immune-response genes and oxidative stress-related genes. Network analysis revealed the PLAU/PLAUR as a key regulator of SCC-like BCC. The normal-like BCC showed prominent activation of metabolic processes particularly the fatty acid metabolism. The existence of these molecular subtypes could be validated in an independent dataset, which demonstrated the three subgroups of BCC with distinct functional enrichment. In conclusion, we suggest a novel molecular classification of BCC providing insights on the heterogeneous progression of BCC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Sunscreens: topical and systemic approaches for protection of human skin against harmful effects of solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    This review deals with topical and systemic approaches for protection of human skin against the harmful effects of solar radiation. Two concerns about the deleterious effects of sun exposure involve: (1) acute effects (e.g., sunburn and drug-induced phototoxicity) and (2) potential long-term risks of repeated sun exposures leading to development of solar elastosis, keratoses, induction of both nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancer, and alteration of immune responses and functions. Action spectra of normal and abnormal reactions of human skin to acute and chronic effects of solar radiation are presented with a view to helping the physician prescribe the appropriate sunscreens. Factors that influence acute effects of sunburn are reviewed. Various artificial methods effective in minimizing or preventing harmful effects of solar radiation, both in normal individuals and in patients with photosensitivity-related problems, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the commercially available chemical sunscreens and their properties. Sun protection factor (SPF) values of several brand-name formulations determined with a solar simulator under indoor conditions (laboratory) and with solar radiation under natural, field conditions are presented. Factors responsible for variations of SPF values observed under indoor and outdoor conditions are reviewed. Systemic photoprotective agents and their limitations are outlined. The photobiology of melanin pigmentation (the tanning reaction) is briefly discussed, with emphasis on the dangers of using quick-tanning lotions for stimulation of the tanning reaction

  16. Patients highly value routine follow-up of skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themstrup, Lotte; Jemec, Gregor E; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen

    2013-10-01

    Skin cancer follow-up is a substantial burden to outpatient clinics. Few studies have investigated patients' views on skin cancer follow-up and cutaneous melanoma. The objective was to investigate patients' perceived benefits and the impact of follow-up. This study included an open sample of patients attending routine follow-up at the outpatient Departments of Plastic Surgery and Dermatology, Roskilde Hospital. A total of 218 follow-up patients diagnosed with cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM), non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) or actinic keratosis (AK) completed a structured interview. A total of 97% patients found follow-up useful. Continuity and consistency were important. One third of patients felt some degree of pre follow-up anxiety. The number of anxious MM patients was significantly greater than that of NMSC patients. No significant difference was found between the number of anxious MM and AK patients. Female gender, cohabitation and age younger than 50 years were associated with increased levels of anxiety. No relation was found between the number of anxious patients or the level of anxiety and the duration of the follow-up period. The majority of patients who attended found that the follow-up had been useful. Certain demographic characteristics were associated with higher levels of anxiety and may be addressed by supportive efforts targeting these groups.

  17. Responsiveness of the Spanish Version of the “Skin Cancer Index”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. de Troya-Martín

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Skin Cancer Index (SCI is a specific questionnaire measuring health related quality of life (HRQL in patients with cervicofacial non-melanoma skin cancer (CFNMSC. The original scale has recently been adapted and validated into Spanish. Objectives. Evaluate the responsiveness of the Spanish version of SCI. Methods. Patients with CFNMSC candidate for surgical treatment were administered the questionnaire at time of diagnostic (t0, 7 days after surgery (t1, and 5 months after surgery (t2. The scale and subscales scores (C1: social/appearance, C2: emotional were then evaluated. Differences between t0-t1, t1-t2, and t0-t2 were determined and a gender-and-age segmented analysis was performed. Results. 88 patients, 54.8% male, mean age 62.5 years, completed the study. Differences between t0-t1 and t1-t2 scores were statistically significant (p<0.05. The lowest values were found at time of diagnosis and postsurgery. Women and patients under 65 years showed the lowest values at the three times. Limitations. Concrete geographic and cultural area. Clinical and histological variables are not analysed. Conclusions. Our results confirm responsiveness of the Spanish version of the SCI. Further development of the instrument in Spanish-speaking countries and populations will make it possible to extend worldwide research and knowledge horizons on skin cancer.

  18. Skin tumour surgery in primary care: do general practitioners need to improve their surgical skills?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijsingen, M.C.J. van; Vossen, R.; Huystee, B.E.W.L. van; Gorgels, W.J.; Gerritsen, M.J.P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Due to a rapid increase in the incidence of skin cancer, it seems inevitable that general practitioners (GPs) will play a larger role in skin cancer care. OBJECTIVES: To assess surgical procedures used by GPs in skin tumour management. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of 1,898

  19. Decreased risk of prostate cancer after skin cancer diagnosis: A protective role of ultraviolet radiation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. de Vries (Esther); I. Soerjomataram (Isabelle); S. Houterman (Saskia); M.W.J. Louwman (Marieke); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractUltraviolet radiation causes skin cancer but may protect against prostate cancer. The authors hypothesized that skin cancer patients had a lower prostate cancer incidence than the general population. In the southeastern part of the Netherlands, a population-based cohort of male skin

  20. Skin Stem Cells in Skin Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollapour Sisakht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Preclinical and clinical research has shown that stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many diseases. This article describes skin stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications. Evidence Acquisition Compared with conventional methods, cell therapy reduces the surgical burden for patients because it is simple and less time-consuming. Skin cell therapy has been developed for variety of diseases. By isolation of the skin stem cell from the niche, in vitro expansion and transplantation of cells offers a surprising healing capacity profile. Results Stem cells located in skin cells have shown interesting properties such as plasticity, transdifferentiation, and specificity. Mesenchymal cells of the dermis, hypodermis, and other sources are currently being investigated to promote regeneration. Conclusions Because skin stem cells are highly accessible from autologous sources and their immunological profile is unique, they are ideal for therapeutic approaches. Optimization of administrative routes requires more investigation own to the lack of a standard protocol.

  1. A Survey of the Potential Effects of Increasing UV-B Radiation on the Biosphere. Revision

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin, L

    1998-01-01

    ..., and an increase in UV-B radiation at the surface of the Earth. An increase in UV-B on average would increase the incidence rate of non-melanoma skin cancer worldwide, with an unproved but likely increase in melanoma skin cancer...

  2. Skin cancer and solar UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gruijl, F R

    1999-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation in sunlight is the most prominent and ubiquitous physical carcinogen in our natural environment. It is highly genotoxic but does not penetrate the body any deeper than the skin. Like all organisms regularly exposed to sunlight, the human skin is extremely well adapted to continuous UV stress. Well-pigmented skin is clearly better protected than white Caucasian skin. The sun-seeking habits of white Caucasians in developed countries are likely to have contributed strongly to the increase in skin cancer observed over the last century. Skin cancer is by far the most common type of cancer in the U.S.A. and Australia, which appears to be the result of an 'unnatural displacement' of people with sun-sensitive skin to sub-tropical regions. Although campaigns have been successful in informing people about the risks of sun exposure, general attitudes and behaviour do not yet appear to have changed to the extent that trends in skin cancer morbidity and the corresponding burden on public healthcare will be reversed. The relationship between skin cancer and regular sun exposure was suspected by physicians in the late 19th century, and subsequently substantiated in animal experiments in the early part of the 20th century. UV radiation was found to be highly genotoxic, and DNA repair proved to be crucial in fending off detrimental effects such as mutagenesis and cell death. In fact, around 1940 it was shown that the wavelength dependence of mutagenicity paralleled the UV absorption by DNA. In the 1970s research on UV carcinogenesis received a new impetus from the arising concern about a possible future depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer: the resulting increases in ambient UV loads were expected to raise skin cancer incidences. Epidemiological studies in the last decades of the 20th century have greatly refined our knowledge on the aetiology of skin cancers. Analyses of gene mutations in skin carcinomas have identified UV radiation as the cause

  3. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Store In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ... video. UPDATED: February 7, 2018 Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ...

  4. Skin Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... beds) over long periods of time. Having a fair complexion, which includes the following: Fair skin that freckles and burns easily, does not ... beds) over long periods of time. Having a fair complexion, which includes the following: Fair skin that ...

  5. Stages of Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... beds) over long periods of time. Having a fair complexion, which includes the following: Fair skin that freckles and burns easily, does not ... beds) over long periods of time. Having a fair complexion, which includes the following: Fair skin that ...

  6. Healthy Skin Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... keep your skin in good health. Eating a balanced diet will help you maintain a healthy weight and ... for your skin and your overall health. A balanced diet: Emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free ...

  7. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ...

  8. Radiation therapy -- skin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000735.htm Radiation therapy - skin care To use the sharing features on ... should treat your skin with care while receiving radiation therapy. Causes External radiation therapy uses high-powered x- ...

  9. Allergic Skin Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 28 days to go away, even with treatment. Nickel, perfumes, dyes, rubber (latex) products and cosmetics also ... or swollen skin, you may have a skin allergy. • Urticaria (hives) are red, itchy, raised areas of ...

  10. Allergy testing - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not well controlled with medicine Hives and angioedema Food allergies Skin rashes ( dermatitis ), in which the skin becomes ... prick test may also be used to diagnose food allergies. Intradermal tests are not used to test for ...

  11. Allergy Skin Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hay fever (allergic rhinitis) Allergic asthma Dermatitis (eczema) Food allergies Penicillin allergy Bee venom allergy Latex allergy Skin ... and dust mites. Skin testing may help diagnose food allergies. But because food allergies can be complex, you ...

  12. Epidemiologic study of skin cancer in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadamori, Naoki; Mine, Mariko (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-01-01

    Data from 140 A-bomb survivors with skin cancer were analyzed with the purpose of elucidating the relationship between atomic bombing and skin cancer. The incidence of skin cancer was significantly correlated with the distance from the hypocenter (p<0.01), regardless of sex. Basal cell epithelioma was the most predominant, followed by squamous cell carcinoma. Histology of skin cancer seemed independent of the distance. Since 1965, the incidence of skin cancer has been increased with aging in A-bomb survivors exposed at le2500 m from the hypocenter. It has been significantly higher since 1975 in the le2500 m group than in the ge3000 m group. (N.K.).

  13. Skin Conditions during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... during pregnancy. For most skin changes, however, health care providers are not sure of the exact cause. Why do dark spots and patches appear on the skin during pregnancy? Dark spots and patches are caused by an increase in the body’s melanin—a natural substance that gives color to the skin and ...

  14. Microbiome and skin diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.; Kleerebezem, M.; Timmerman, H.M.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review: This article reviews recent findings on the skin microbiome. It provides an update on the current understanding of the role of microbiota in healthy skin and in inflammatory and allergic skin diseases. Recent findings: Advances in computing and high-throughput sequencing

  15. Teores de Ca e variáveis meteorológicas: relações com a incidência da mancha fisiológica do mamão no Norte Fluminense Ca concetration and meteorological variables: relationships with skin freckles in papaya (Carica papaya L. fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliemar Campostrini

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available No Brasil e no mundo, o mamoeiro (Carica papaya L. tem apresentado um distúrbio fisiológico no fruto denominado de Mancha Fisiológica do Mamão (MFM. Na literatura, pouco se conhece sobre as causas desta anomalia que afeta sensivelmente a comercialização dos frutos da espécie. Com o objetivo de se buscar informações relacionadas às causas da MFM, foi realizado um estudo, durante um ano, em um plantio comercial localizado em São Franscisco do Itabapoana (RJ, no norte fluminense. Foram feitas relações entre algumas variáveis do clima (temperatura, déficit de pressão de vapor, precipitação pluvial e radiação solar global e os teores de Ca na planta [limbo, pecíolo, pedúnculo, epicarpo não-exposto (face do fruto próxima ao tronco e epicarpo exposto (face do fruto oposta ao tronco] com a incidência da MFM. Observou-se que a maior incidência de MFM foi durante setembro/2000. Em janeiro/2001, a incidência da MFM foi praticamente nula. A amplitude térmica, nos três meses que antecederam a setembro/2000, foi a variável do clima que mais se relacionou com a incidência da MFM. Em setembro, os teores de Ca em todas as partes do fruto (pedúnculo, epicarpo exposto e não-exposto estudadas foram maiores. Na época que antecedeu o mês de setembro, as relações Ca/K e Ca/Mg foram estatisticamente maiores no epicarpo exposto e não-exposto e, nesta época, a relação Ca/P foi estatisticamente maior no pedúnculo e no epicarpo não-exposto. Os efeitos da amplitude térmica sobre a incidência da MFM são discutidos e a hipótese de que os teores baixos de Ca no fruto poderiam causar desestabilização na parede celular, o que facilitaria o extravasamento do látex e provocaria a MFM, deve ser reavaliada.In Brazil and other parts of the world, papaya fruit suffer with a physiological disruption, known as skin freckles (SF. There is very little information available concerning the causes of this disruption that seriously affects the

  16. Family history of skin cancer is associated with early-onset basal cell carcinoma independent of MC1R genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Nicholas L; Cartmel, Brenda; Leffell, David J; Bale, Allen E; Mayne, Susan T; Ferrucci, Leah M

    2015-12-01

    As a marker of genetic susceptibility and shared lifestyle characteristics, family history of cancer is often used to evaluate an individual's risk for developing a particular malignancy. With comprehensive data on pigment characteristics, lifestyle factors, and melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene sequence, we sought to clarify the role of family history of skin cancer in early-onset basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Early onset BCC cases (n=376) and controls with benign skin conditions (n=383) under age 40 were identified through Yale dermatopathology. Self-report data on family history of skin cancer (melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer), including age of onset in relatives, was available from a structured interview. Participants also provided saliva samples for sequencing of MC1R. A family history of skin cancer was associated with an increased risk of early-onset BCC (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.80-3.45). In multivariate models, family history remained a strong risk factor for early-onset BCC after adjustment for pigment characteristics, UV exposure, and MC1R genotype (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.74-3.35). Risk for BCC varied based upon the type and age of onset of skin cancer among affected relatives; individuals with a first-degree relative diagnosed with skin cancer prior to age 50 were at highest risk for BCC (OR 4.79, 95% CI 2.90-7.90). Even after taking into account potential confounding effects of MC1R genotype and various lifestyle factors that close relatives may share, family history of skin cancer remained strongly associated with early-onset BCC. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Computer-Aided Decision Support for Melanoma Detection Applied on Melanocytic and Nonmelanocytic Skin Lesions: A Comparison of Two Systems Based on Automatic Analysis of Dermoscopic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajsa Møllersen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercially available clinical decision support systems (CDSSs for skin cancer have been designed for the detection of melanoma only. Correct use of the systems requires expert knowledge, hampering their utility for nonexperts. Furthermore, there are no systems to detect other common skin cancer types, that is, nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC. As early diagnosis of skin cancer is essential, there is a need for a CDSS that is applicable to all types of skin lesions and is suitable for nonexperts. Nevus Doctor (ND is a CDSS being developed by the authors. We here investigate ND’s ability to detect both melanoma and NMSC and the opportunities for improvement. An independent test set of dermoscopic images of 870 skin lesions, including 44 melanomas and 101 NMSCs, were analysed by ND. Its sensitivity to melanoma and NMSC was compared to that of Mole Expert (ME, a commercially available CDSS, using the same set of lesions. ND and ME had similar sensitivity to melanoma. For ND at 95% melanoma sensitivity, the NMSC sensitivity was 100%, and the specificity was 12%. The melanomas misclassified by ND at 95% sensitivity were correctly classified by ME, and vice versa. ND is able to detect NMSC without sacrificing melanoma sensitivity.

  18. Skin Infections in the Grappling Arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Jones

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article covers the incidence, symptoms, and treatment of skin infections common among grapplers. The purpose is to educate grapplers, coaches, and parents about the risk of skin infections, identification of infections, and steps to treat and prevent outbreaks. The information in this article is drawn from primary and medical reference literature. It is concluded that prevention is key and the appropriate measures should be taken to prevent the spread of infections. Grapplers of all styles should adhere to the guidelines set forth by the NCAA Wrestling Handbook when determining eligibility for practice or competition.

  19. Skin barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    barrier integrity, factors influencing the penetration of the skin, influence of wet work, and guidance for prevention and saving the barrier. Distinguished researchers have contributed to this book, providing a comprehensive and thorough overview of the skin barrier function. Researchers in the field...... on the subject. It covers new basic research on skin markers, including results on filaggrin and on methods for the assessment of the barrier function. Biological variation and aspects of skin barrier function restoration are discussed as well. Further sections are dedicated to clinical implications of skin...

  20. Effects of air pollution on the skin: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Poonam; Nandar, Shashi Kumar; Kathuria, Sushruta; Ramesh, V

    2017-01-01

    The increase in air pollution over the years has had major effects on the human skin. Various air pollutants such as ultraviolet radiation, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, oxides, particulate matter, ozone and cigarette smoke affect the skin as it is the outermost barrier. Air pollutants damage the skin by inducing oxidative stress. Although human skin acts as a biological shield against pro-oxidative chemicals and physical air pollutants, prolonged or repetitive exposure to high levels of these pollutants may have profound negative effects on the skin. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation has been associated with extrinsic skin aging and skin cancers. Cigarette smoke contributes to premature aging and an increase in the incidence of psoriasis, acne and skin cancers. It is also implicated in allergic skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis and eczema. Polyaromatic hydrocarbons are associated with extrinsic skin aging, pigmentation, cancers and acneiform eruptions. Volatile organic compounds have been associated with atopic dermatitis. Given the increasing levels of air pollution and its detrimental effects on the skin, it is advisable to use strategies to decrease air pollution.

  1. Ocorre alta incidência de células da pele na primeira e terceira gotas do líquido cefalospinal em raquianestesia Ocurre una alta incidencia de células de la piel en la primera y tercera gotas del líquido cefaloespinal en la raquianestesia There is high incidence of skin cells in the first and third drops of cerebrospinal fluid in spinal anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Humberto Curado Taveira

    2013-04-01

    ídeo en 39 pacientes adultos sometidos a la raquianestesia con una aguja 25G Quincke, siendo confeccionadas cuatro láminas: de la primera gota, de la tercera gota, de la aguja y una cuarta lámina control con una gota de suero fisiológico. Las láminas fueron examinadas de forma aleatoria por el patólogo. RESULTADOS: Se identificaron células epiteliales escamosas en 35 (89,7% de las muestras de la primera gota, en 34 (87,2% de la tercera gota y en 24 (61,5% de las agujas espinales. La tercera gota tuvo como promedio un mayor número de células que la primera gota (p = 0,046. Las células epiteliales nucleadas fueron encontradas en una (2,56% de las muestras de la primera gota, en cuatro (10,25% de la tercera gota y en una (2,56% de las agujas espinales. La tercera gota presentó como promedio, un mayor número de células nucleadas que la primera gota sin diferencias estadísticas (p = 0,257. CONCLUSIONES: Encontramos un alto porcentaje de células epiteliales que refluyen en la primera (89,7% y en la tercera (87,2% gotas del líquido cefalorraquídeo y en las agujas utilizadas (61,5%. Y aunque hayamos usado agujas de pequeño calibre, desechables y con un mandril bien adaptado, se encontraron células de la piel.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Skin fragments during lumbar punctures may develop intraspinal epidermoid tumors. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of epithelial cells that reflow along with the first and third drops of CSF of patients undergoing spinal anesthesia. METHODS: Samples of the first and third drops of cerebrospinal fluid were collected from 39 adult patients undergoing spinal anesthesia with a 25G Quincke needle. Four microscope slides were prepared: one for the first drop, one for third drop, one for the needle, and one with a drop of saline for control. A pathologist examined the slides randomly. RESULTS: Squamous epithelial cells were identified in 35 (89.7% samples from the first drop, 34 (87.2% from the third drop, and 24 (61

  2. Skin Friction Measurements Using Luminescent Oil Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husen, Nicholas M.

    As aircraft are designed to a greater extent on computers, the need for accurate and fast CFD algorithms has never been greater. The development of CFD algorithms requires experimental data against which CFD output can be validated and from which insight about flow physics can be acquired. Skin friction, in particular, is an important quantity to predict with CFD, and experimental skin friction data sets aid not only with the validation of the CFD predictions, but also in tuning the CFD models to predict specific flow fields. However, a practical experimental technique for collecting spatially and temporally resolved skin friction data on complex models does not yet exist. This dissertation develops and demonstrates a new luminescent oil film skin friction meter which can produce spatially-resolved quantitative steady and unsteady skin friction data on models with complex curvature. The skin friction acting on the surface of a thin film of oil can be approximated by the expression tauw =mu ouh/h, where mu o is the dynamic viscosity of the oil, uh is the velocity of the surface of the oil film, and h is the thickness of the oil film. The new skin friction meter determines skin friction by measuring h and uh. The oil film thickness h is determined by ratioing the intensity of the fluorescent emissions from the oil film with the intensity of the incident light which is scattered from the surface of the model. When properly calibrated, that ratio provides an absolute oil film thickness value. This oil film thickness meter is therefore referred as the Ratioed-Image Film-Thickness (RIFT) Meter. The oil film velocity uh is determined by monitoring the evolution of tagged molecules within the oil film: Photochromic molecules are dissolved into the fluorescent oil and a pattern is written into the oil film using an ultraviolet laser. The evolution of the pattern is recorded, and standard cross-correlation techniques are applied to the resulting sequence of images. This

  3. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals.

  4. Skin absorption through atopic dermatitis skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, A-S; Kezic, S; Jakasa, I

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have skin barrier impairment in both lesional and non-lesional skin. They are typically exposed to emollients daily and topical anti-inflammatory medicaments intermittently, hereby increasing the risk of developing contact allergy and systemic exposed to chemicals...... ingredients found in these topical preparations. We systematically searched for studies that investigated skin absorption of various penetrants, including medicaments, in atopic dermatitis patients, but also animals with experimentally induced dermatitis. We identified 40 articles, i.e. 11 human studies...... examining model penetrants, 26 human studies examining atopic dermatitis drugs and 3 animal studies. We conclude that atopic dermatitis patients have nearly two-fold increased skin absorption when compared to healthy controls. There is a need for well-designed epidemiological and dermato...

  5. Rising incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Dorte; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen; Dahlstrøm, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive, skin cancer of obscure histogenesis, the incidence of which is rising. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment. Our aim was to evaluate the staging, investigation, treatment, and follow-up of MCC in eastern Denmark......, and to investigate the incidence. We suggest guidelines for treatment. First we reviewed the medical records of 51 patients diagnosed with MCC from 1995 until 2006 in eastern Denmark. The nation-wide incidence of MCC was extracted from the Danish Cancer Registry for the calculations for the period 1986-2003. We...... reviwed published papers about MCC based on a MEDLINE search. Fourteen of the 51 patients developed recurrence, and 37 (73%) died during the study period. Mean follow-up was 13 months (range 1-122). A total of 153 patients were identified in the Danish Cancer Registry, and showed that incidence rates had...

  6. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer brochure Is it true that only people with light skin get skin cancer? No. Anyone can get skin cancer. It's more common among people with a light (fair) skin tone, but skin cancer can affect anyone. ...

  7. Declawing Ostrich (Struthio camelus domesticus) Chicks to Minimize Skin Damage During Rearing.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Chris; Meyer, A.; Cloete, S.W.P.; Van Schalkwyk, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Leather is one of the main products derived from ostrich farming. Current rearing practices lead to a high incidence of skin damage, which decreases the value of ostrich skins. In the emu and poultry industry, declawing is commonly practiced to reduce skin damage and injuries. We consequently investigated declawing of ostrich chicks as a potential management practice to minimize skin lesions that result from claw injuries. A group of 140 day-old ostriches was declawed and a second group of 13...

  8. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity exacerbates ultraviolet B radiation-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression and cell survival signals in ultraviolet B-irradiated mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Som D.; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity has been implicated in several inflammatory diseases and in different types of cancer. Chronic inflammation induced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been implicated in various skin diseases, including melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. As the relationship between obesity and susceptibility to UV radiation-caused inflammation is not clearly understood, we assessed the role of obesity on UVB-induced inflammation, and mediators of this inflammatory response, using the genetically obese (leptin-deficient) mouse model. Leptin-deficient obese (ob/ob) mice and wild-type counterparts (C57/BL6 mice) were exposed to UVB radiation (120 mJ/cm 2 ) on alternate days for 1 month. The mice were then euthanized and skin samples collected for analysis of biomarkers of inflammatory responses using immunohistochemistry, western blotting, ELISA and real-time PCR. Here, we report that the levels of inflammatory responses were higher in the UVB-exposed skin of the ob/ob obese mice than those in the UVB-exposed skin of the wild-type non-obese mice. The levels of UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression, prostaglandin-E 2 production, proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell survival signals (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and p-Akt-Ser 473 ) were higher in the skin of the ob/ob obese mice than the those in skin of their wild-type non-obese counterparts. Compared with the wild-type non-obese mice, the leptin-deficient obese mice also exhibited greater activation of NF-κB/p65 and fewer apoptotic cells in the UVB-irradiated skin. Our study suggests for the first time that obesity in mice is associated with greater susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammatory responses and, therefore, obesity may increase susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammation-associated skin diseases, including the risk of skin cancer.

  9. Increased IKKα expression in the basal layer of the epidermis of transgenic mice enhances the malignant potential of skin tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa P Alameda

    Full Text Available Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in humans. In this study we demonstrate that elevated IKKα expression in murine epidermis increases the malignancy potential of skin tumors. We describe the generation of transgenic mice overexpressing IKKα in the basal, proliferative layer of the epidermis and in the outer root sheath of hair follicles. The epidermis of K5-IKKα transgenic animals shows several alterations such as hyperproliferation, mislocalized expression of integrin-α6 and downregulation of the tumor suppressor maspin. Treatment of the back skin of mice with the mitogenic agent 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate causes in transgenic mice the appearance of different preneoplastic changes such as epidermal atypia with loss of cell polarity and altered epidermal tissue architecture, while in wild type littermates this treatment only leads to the development of benign epidermal hyperplasia. Moreover, in skin carcinogenesis assays, transgenic mice carrying active Ha-ras (K5-IKKα-Tg.AC mice develop invasive tumors, instead of the benign papillomas arising in wild type-Tg-AC mice also bearing an active Ha-ras. Therefore we provide evidence for a tumor promoter role of IKKα in skin cancer, similarly to what occurs in other neoplasias, including hepatocarcinomas and breast, prostate and colorectal cancer. The altered expression of cyclin D1, maspin and integrin-α6 in skin of transgenic mice provides, at least in part, the molecular bases for the increased malignant potential found in the K5-IKKα skin tumors.

  10. Treatment of advanced, recurrent, resistant to previous treatments basal and squamous cell skin carcinomas with a synergistic formulation of interferons. Open, prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez-Saura Pedro

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggressive non-melanoma skin cancer (deeply infiltrating, recurrent, and morphea form lesions are therapeutically challenging because they require considerable tissue loss and may demand radical disfiguring surgery. Interferons (IFN may provide a non-surgical approach to the management of these tumors. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of a formulation containing IFNs-α and -γ in synergistic proportions on patients with recurrent, advanced basal cell (BCC or squamous cell skin carcinomas (SCSC. Methods Patients with extensive, recurrent, resistant to other procedures BCC or SCSC received the IFN formulation peri- and intralesionally, three times per week for 3 weeks. They had been previously treated with surgery and/or radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Thirteen weeks after the end of treatment, the original lesion sites were examined for histological evidence of remaining tumor. Results Sixteen elder (median 70 years-old patients were included. They beared 12 BCC and 4 SCSC ranging from 1.5 to 12.5 cm in the longest dimension. At the end of treatment 47% CR (complete tumor elimination, 40% PR (>30% tumor reduction, and 13% stable disease were obtained. None of the patients relapsed during the treatment period. The median duration of the response was 38 months. Only one patient with complete response had relapsed until today. Principal adverse reactions were influenza-like symptoms well known to occur with interferon therapy, which were well tolerated. Conclusion The peri- and intralesional combination of IFNs-α and -γ was safe and showed effect for the treatment of advanced, recurrent and resistant to previous treatments of BCC and SCSC in elder patients. This is the first report of such treatment in patients with advance non-melanoma skin cancer. The encouraging result justifies further confirmatory trials. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials RPCEC00000052.

  11. Treatment of advanced, recurrent, resistant to previous treatments basal and squamous cell skin carcinomas with a synergistic formulation of interferons. Open, prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anasagasti-Angulo, Lorenzo; Garcia-Vega, Yanelda; Barcelona-Perez, Silvia; Lopez-Saura, Pedro; Bello-Rivero, Iraldo

    2009-01-01

    Aggressive non-melanoma skin cancer (deeply infiltrating, recurrent, and morphea form lesions) are therapeutically challenging because they require considerable tissue loss and may demand radical disfiguring surgery. Interferons (IFN) may provide a non-surgical approach to the management of these tumors. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of a formulation containing IFNs-α and -γ in synergistic proportions on patients with recurrent, advanced basal cell (BCC) or squamous cell skin carcinomas (SCSC). Patients with extensive, recurrent, resistant to other procedures BCC or SCSC received the IFN formulation peri- and intralesionally, three times per week for 3 weeks. They had been previously treated with surgery and/or radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Thirteen weeks after the end of treatment, the original lesion sites were examined for histological evidence of remaining tumor. Sixteen elder (median 70 years-old) patients were included. They beared 12 BCC and 4 SCSC ranging from 1.5 to 12.5 cm in the longest dimension. At the end of treatment 47% CR (complete tumor elimination), 40% PR (>30% tumor reduction), and 13% stable disease were obtained. None of the patients relapsed during the treatment period. The median duration of the response was 38 months. Only one patient with complete response had relapsed until today. Principal adverse reactions were influenza-like symptoms well known to occur with interferon therapy, which were well tolerated. The peri- and intralesional combination of IFNs-α and -γ was safe and showed effect for the treatment of advanced, recurrent and resistant to previous treatments of BCC and SCSC in elder patients. This is the first report of such treatment in patients with advance non-melanoma skin cancer. The encouraging result justifies further confirmatory trials. Current Controlled Trials RPCEC00000052

  12. 0.2% chlorhexidine acetate as skin disinfectant prevents skin lesions in extremely preterm infants: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Lisanne M A; Tostmann, Alma; Hopman, Joost; Liem, Kian D

    2018-03-01

    The skin disinfectant '0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% alcohol' (0.5% CHG-70% alc) may cause skin lesions in extremely preterm infants (gestational age chlorhexidine gluconate solution in acetate (0.2% CHG-acetate) was introduced as skin disinfectant for extremely preterm infants in our neonatal intensive care units. We aimed to compare the incidence of skin lesions and central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) among extremely preterm infants when using 0.5% CHG-70% alc and 0.2% CHG-acetate. Retrospective pre-post comparison cohort study. All electronic patient records of extremely preterm infants born between January 2011-March 2013 ('0.5% CHG-70% alc' cohort) and April 2013-October 2015 ('0.2% CHG-acetate' cohort) were reviewed. The incidence of skin lesions and CLABSI. Skin lesions were defined as the presence of erythema, blisters, excoriation, oedema or induration. CLABSI was defined according to the definition of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The incidence of skin lesions was 22% (95% CI 11% to 37%) in the '0.5% CHG-70% alc' cohort (n=41) and 5% (95% CI 1% to 15%; p=0.02) in the '0.2% CHG-acetate' cohort (n=41). The incidence of CLABSI was the same in both groups (28%; 95% CI 14% to 46% in '0.5% CHG-70% alc' vs 27%; 95% CI 14% to 44% in '0.2% CHG-acetate'; p=0.98). Using 0.2% CHG-acetate as skin disinfectant in extremely preterm infants resulted in statistically significant reduction of skin lesions, without increasing the risk of CLABSI as compared with 0.5% CHG-70% alc. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Skin tribology: Science friction?

    OpenAIRE

    Heide, E. van der; Zeng, X.; Masen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The application of tribological knowledge is not just restricted to optimizing mechanical and chemical engineering problems. In fact, effective solutions to friction and wear related questions can be found in our everyday life. An important part is related to skin tribology, as the human skin is frequently one of the interacting surfaces in relative motion. People seem to solve these problems related to skin friction based upon a trial-and-error strategy and based upon on our sense for touch....

  14. Pattern of HPV infection in basal cell carcinoma and in perilesional skin biopsies from immunocompetent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Regalbuto, Elisa; Pierucci, Federica; Arvia, Rosaria; Mazzoli, Sandra; Gori, Alessia; de Giorgi, Vincenzo

    2012-12-17

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) such as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is not yet fully understood. We analysed the prevalence and spectrum of cutaneous beta-HPV types and mucosal/genital HPV types in paired biopsies (tumour and corresponding perilesional skin) obtained from 50 BCC immunocompetent patients. A small group of SCC patients (n=9) was also included. We also evaluated some previously postulated risk factors for HPV infection in NMSC patients. All biopsies were negative for mucosal/genital HPV types. Overall, beta-HPV DNA was detected more often in SCC compared to BCC patients (78% vs 55% of total samples). The frequency of infection increased with the patient's age [OR=4.88 (95% CI 1.29-18.39)]. There was no significant correlation between beta-HPV positivity and sex, skin type and UV exposure. The prevalence of beta-HPV species 1 types was significantly higher than those belonging to other beta-HPV species in biopsies from BCC (p=0.022) but not from SCC subjects (p=0.091). There was no significant difference in the overall prevalence of beta-HPV infection and the number of viral types between tumour lesions and perilesional skin. BCC samples were significantly more likely to be infected with beta-HPV species 1 types compared to perilesional skin (p=0.036) and showed a higher frequency of mixed infections (p=0.028). These findings demonstrate that beta-HPV types belonging to species 1 are the most common HPV types detected in the skin of BCC patients. Moreover beta-1-HPV types and mixed infections are significantly more frequent in tumour samples than in healthy perilesional skin. Our results suggest that beta-1-HPVs as well as co-infection with more than one viral type could be important in NMSC and in particular in BCC.Further studies aimed to compare the biological activity of viral types in tumours and in healthy skin (viral replication and expression

  15. Pattern of HPV infection in basal cell carcinoma and in perilesional skin biopsies from immunocompetent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakrzewska Krystyna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between human papillomavirus (HPV infection and non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs such as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC and basal cell carcinoma (BCC is not yet fully understood. We analysed the prevalence and spectrum of cutaneous beta-HPV types and mucosal/genital HPV types in paired biopsies (tumour and corresponding perilesional skin obtained from 50 BCC immunocompetent patients. A small group of SCC patients (n=9 was also included. We also evaluated some previously postulated risk factors for HPV infection in NMSC patients. Results All biopsies were negative for mucosal/genital HPV types. Overall, beta-HPV DNA was detected more often in SCC compared to BCC patients (78% vs 55% of total samples. The frequency of infection increased with the patient’s age [OR=4.88 (95% CI 1.29-18.39]. There was no significant correlation between beta-HPV positivity and sex, skin type and UV exposure. The prevalence of beta-HPV species 1 types was significantly higher than those belonging to other beta-HPV species in biopsies from BCC (p=0.022 but not from SCC subjects (p=0.091. There was no significant difference in the overall prevalence of beta-HPV infection and the number of viral types between tumour lesions and perilesional skin. BCC samples were significantly more likely to be infected with beta-HPV species 1 types compared to perilesional skin (p=0.036 and showed a higher frequency of mixed infections (p=0.028. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that beta-HPV types belonging to species 1 are the most common HPV types detected in the skin of BCC patients. Moreover beta-1-HPV types and mixed infections are significantly more frequent in tumour samples than in healthy perilesional skin. Our results suggest that beta-1-HPVs as well as co-infection with more than one viral type could be important in NMSC and in particular in BCC. Further studies aimed to compare the biological activity of viral types in tumours and in

  16. Relapses in radiotherapy on non melanoma skin carcinoma in Shumen area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikov, P.; Mircheva, J.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the frequency of the relapses in skin carcinomas depending on the type of the treatment. The study has been carried out for the Shumen region as a part of the National study, co-ordinated by the National Oncological Hospital, Sofia. A total of 128 cases of non-melanoma skin carcinomas are included in the study, registered in 1993 and followed up for 10 years. The information source is the oncological files and therapeutic records , stored in the cancer register. For each patient a special questionnaire is filled. The study presents information about the clinical and morphological diagnoses, the stage of the disease and the treatment applied - surgery, cryotherapy, radiotherapy - short-focus X-ray therapy, brachytherapy, percutaneous radiotherapy. The main data are for the persistency or relapse of the tumor after the particular radiotherapy and about the other therapies applied. It is also important whether metastases in the lymph nodes or visceral metastases have occurred and what type of treatment has been applied

  17. Effect of Vitamin D and Calcium Supplementation on Cancer Incidence in Older Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappe, Joan; Watson, Patrice; Travers-Gustafson, Dianne; Recker, Robert; Garland, Cedric; Gorham, Edward; Baggerly, Keith; McDonnell, Sharon L

    2017-03-28

    Evidence suggests that low vitamin D status may increase the risk of cancer. To determine if dietary supplementation with vitamin D3 and calcium reduces the risk of cancer among older women. A 4-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled, population-based randomized clinical trial in 31 rural counties (June 24, 2009, to August 26, 2015-the final date of follow-up). A total of 2303 healthy postmenopausal women 55 years or older were randomized, 1156 to the treatment group and 1147 to the placebo group. Duration of treatment was 4 years. The treatment group (vitamin D3 + calcium group) received 2000 IU/d of vitamin D3 and 1500 mg/d of calcium; the placebo group received identical placebos. The primary outcome was the incidence of all-type cancer (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancers), which was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and proportional hazards modeling. Among 2303 randomized women (mean age, 65.2 years [SD, 7.0]; mean baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level, 32.8 ng/mL [SD, 10.5]), 2064 (90%) completed the study. At year 1, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were 43.9 ng/mL in the vitamin D3 + calcium group and 31.6 ng/mL in the placebo group. A new diagnosis of cancer was confirmed in 109 participants, 45 (3.89%) in the vitamin D3 + calcium group and 64 (5.58%) in the placebo group (difference, 1.69% [95% CI, -0.06% to 3.46%]; P = .06). Kaplan-Meier incidence over 4 years was 0.042 (95% CI, 0.032 to 0.056) in the vitamin D3 + calcium group and 0.060 (95% CI, 0.048 to 0.076) in the placebo group; P = .06. In unadjusted Cox proportional hazards regression, the hazard ratio was 0.70 (95% CI, 0.47 to 1.02). Adverse events potentially related to the study included renal calculi (16 participants in the vitamin D3 + calcium group and 10 in the placebo group), and elevated serum calcium levels (6 in the vitamin D3 + calcium group and 2 in the placebo group). Among healthy postmenopausal older women with a mean baseline serum 25

  18. MCFRS Incidents by Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset contains the monthly summary data indicating incident occurred in each fire station response area. The summary data is the incident count broken down by...

  19. Police Incident Reports Written

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — This table contains incident reports filed with the Chapel Hill Police Department. Multiple incidents may have been reported at the same time. The most serious...

  20. Incident Information Management Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Pejovic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Flaws of\tcurrent incident information management at CMS and CERN\tare discussed. A new data\tmodel for future incident database is\tproposed and briefly described. Recently developed draft version of GIS-­‐based tool for incident tracking is presented.

  1. Skin tribology: Science friction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, E. van der; Zeng, X.; Masen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The application of tribological knowledge is not just restricted to optimizing mechanical and chemical engineering problems. In fact, effective solutions to friction and wear related questions can be found in our everyday life. An important part is related to skin tribology, as the human skin is

  2. Skin, Hair, and Nails

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells in skin, people couldn't feel warmth, cold, or other sensations. For instance, goosebumps form when the erector pili muscles contract to make hairs on the skin stand up straight when someone is cold, excited, or frightened — the blood vessels keep the ...

  3. Deformable skinning on bones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bent Dalgaard; Petersen, Kim Steen; Jakobsen, Bjarke

    2001-01-01

    Applying skin to a model is a relatively simple task to implement. Nonetheless it seems that no good resource exists that describes both the concepts and math necessary to understand and implement skinning. The intention of this article is an attempt to give a thoroughly description of the theore...

  4. Bionanomaterials for skin regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Leonida, Mihaela D

    2016-01-01

    This book gives a concise overview of bionanomaterials with applications for skin regeneration. The advantages and challenges of nanoscale materials are covered in detail, giving a basic view of the skin structure and conditions that require transdermal or topical applications. Medical applications, such as wound healing, care for burns, skin disease, and cosmetic care, such as aging of the skin and photodamage, and how they benefit from bionanomaterials, are described in detail. A final chapter is devoted to the ethical and social issues related to the use of bionanomaterials for skin regeneration. This is an ideal book for researchers in materials science, medical scientists specialized in dermatology, and cosmetic chemists working in formulations. It can also serve as a reference for nanotechnologists, dermatologists, microbiologists, engineers, and polymer chemists, as well as students studying in these fields.

  5. Immunolocalization of glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 in non melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakry, Ola Ahmed; Samaka, Rehab Monir; Shoeib, Mohamed Abdel Moneim; Megahed, Doaa Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    Glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI)1 is involved in controlling cell proliferation and angiogenesis. The aim of this work was to explore its possible role in non-melanoma skin cancer pathogenesis through its immunohistochemical (IHC) expression in skin biopsies of these diseases and correlating this expression with the clinico-pathological parameters of the studied cases. Seventy-six cutaneous specimens were studied; 30 cases with basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 30 cases with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 16 normal skin samples, from age- and gender-matched subjects, as a control group. GLI1 was expressed in all BCC cases and in 60% of SCC cases. All SCC cases showed cytoplasmic, while 70% of BCC cases showed nucleocytoplasmic immunoreactivity. It was over expressed in BCC and SCC compared to normal skin (p = 0.01 and 0.0006, respectively). Higher Histo (H) score in BCC cases was significantly associated with female gender (p = 0.04), multiple lesions, desmoplastic stromal reaction and stromal angiogenesis (p < 0.001 for all). Higher H score in SCC cases was significantly associated with scalp location, nodular type, recurrent lesions, high tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.004 for all), inflammatory stromal reaction (p = 0.01), lymph node involvement and absence of calcification (p = 0.001 for both). In conclusion, GLI1 may play a role in BCC pathogenesis through its role in cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis. Its upregulation and cytoplasmic localization in SCC may suggest that its role in tumor pathogenesis is through mechanisms other than Hedgehog pathway activation. Further studies are needed to clarify the exact molecular basis of its oncogenic action.

  6. Photoprotection in ethnic skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S. Al-Jamal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Although cutaneous photodamage is partially mitigated by darker skin pigmentation, sun-induced aging, dyspigmentation, sunburns, and skin cancers are reported worldwide in all skin types and races. The severity of photodamage varies from individual to individual, and is predominantly based upon genetic differences altering the body's response or susceptibility to sun damage. In addition, non-Caucasian patients are less likely to perform skin self-examinations, attend dermatologic follow-ups, and seven times less likely to apply sunscreen than Caucasian patients. Therefore, the remainder of this article will discuss the categories of photoprotective agent [environmental, biologic, physical, and UV filters, i.e., sunscreens] as well as the topics of photoaging, dyspigmentation, photocarcinogenesis, and the controversy surrounding vitamin D deficiency from photoprotection in the context of ethnic skin.

  7. Risk factors for skin cancer among Finnish airline cabin crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojo, Katja; Helminen, Mika; Pukkala, Eero; Auvinen, Anssi

    2013-07-01

    Increased incidence of skin cancers among airline cabin crew has been reported in several studies. We evaluated whether the difference in risk factor prevalence between Finnish airline cabin crew and the general population could explain the increased incidence of skin cancers among cabin crew, and the possible contribution of estimated occupational cosmic radiation exposure. A self-administered questionnaire survey on occupational, host, and ultraviolet radiation exposure factors was conducted among female cabin crew members and females presenting the general population. The impact of occupational cosmic radiation dose was estimated in a separate nested case-control analysis among the participating cabin crew (with 9 melanoma and 35 basal cell carcinoma cases). No considerable difference in the prevalence of risk factors of skin cancer was found between the cabin crew (N = 702) and the general population subjects (N = 1007) participating the study. The mean risk score based on all the conventional skin cancer risk factors was 1.43 for cabin crew and 1.44 for general population (P = 0.24). Among the cabin crew, the estimated cumulative cosmic radiation dose was not related to the increased skin cancer risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57-1.00]. The highest plausible risk of skin cancer for estimated cosmic radiation dose was estimated as 9% per 10 mSv. The skin cancer cases had higher host characteristics scores than the non-cases among cabin crew (adjusted OR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.01-2.04). Our results indicate no difference between the female cabin crew and the general female population in the prevalence of factors generally associated with incidence of skin cancer. Exposure to cosmic radiation did not explain the excess of skin cancer among the studied cabin crew in this study.

  8. Photoprotective effects of two natural products on ultraviolet B-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in SKH-1 mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Adriana; Daicoviciu, Doina; Clichici, Simona; Mocan, Teodora; Muresan, Adriana; Postescu, Ion Dan

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) is the major cause of nonmelanoma skin cancer in humans. Photochemoprevention with natural products represents a simple but very effective strategy for the management of cutaneous neoplasia. We studied the photoprotective activity of Calluna vulgaris and red grape seed (Vitis vinifera L, Burgund Mare variety [BM]) extracts in vivo in an SKH-1 hairless mice skin model. Fifty 8-week-old female SKH-1 hairless mice were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 10 each): controls, UVB-irradiated, C. vulgaris plus UVB-irradiated, BM plus UVB-irradiated, and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) plus UVB-irradiated. A dose of 4 mg/mouse per cm² of skin area for both extracts was topically applied to the mice 30 minutes before a single-dose (240 mJ/cm²) UVB exposure. EGCG dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 6.6; 0.067 M) was administered at 2 mg/mouse per cm². Glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, and caspase 3 activity were determined in skin homogenates 24 hours after irradiation. A single dose of UVB increased GSH levels and glutathione peroxidase activity in the exposed skin. C. vulgaris and BM pretreatment significantly decreased GSH formation and glutathione peroxidase activity (P treatments with C. vulgaris and particularly BM extracts (P < .002) significantly reduced caspase 3 activity, indicating that the cells were protected against apoptosis. These results suggest that C. vulgaris and BM extracts might be chemopreventive candidates for reducing UV-induced risk for skin cancer.

  9. Discrimination between basal cell carcinoma and hair follicles in skin tissue sections by Raman micro-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraona-Puy, M.; Ghita, A.; Zoladek, A.; Perkins, W.; Varma, S.; Leach, I. H.; Koloydenko, A. A.; Williams, H.; Notingher, I.

    2011-05-01

    Skin cancer is the most common human malignancy and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represents approximately 80% of the non-melanoma cases. Current methods of treatment require histopathological evaluation of the tissues by qualified personnel. However, this method is subjective and in some cases BCC can be confused with other structures in healthy skin, including hair follicles. In this preliminary study, we investigated the potential of Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) to discriminate between hair follicles and BCC in skin tissue sections excised during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). Imaging and diagnosis of skin sections was automatically generated using ' a priori'-built spectral model based on LDA. This model had 90 ± 9% sensitivity and 85 ± 9% specificity for discrimination of BCC from dermis and epidermis. The model used selected Raman bands corresponding to the largest spectral differences between the Raman spectra of BCC and the normal skin regions, associated mainly with nucleic acids and collagen type I. Raman spectra corresponding to the epidermis regions of the hair follicles were found to be closer to those of healthy epidermis rather than BCC. Comparison between Raman spectral images and the gold standard haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology diagnosis showed good agreement. Some hair follicle regions were misclassified as BCC; regions corresponded mainly to the outermost layer of hair follicle (basal cells) which are expected to have higher nucleic acid concentration. This preliminary study shows the ability of RMS to distinguish between BCC and other tissue structures associated to healthy skin which can be confused with BCC due to their similar morphology.

  10. Dry skin - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pat skin dry then apply your moisturizer. Avoid skin care products and soaps that contain alcohol, fragrances, dyes, or other chemicals. Take short, warm baths or showers. Limit your ... gentle skin cleansers or soap with added moisturizers. Only use ...

  11. Understanding the Acute Skin Injury Mechanism Caused by Player-Surface Contact During Soccer

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Eijnde, Wilbert A.J.; Peppelman, Malou; Lamers, Edwin A.D.; van de Kerkhof, Peter C.M.; van Erp, Piet E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Superficial skin injuries are considered minor, and their incidence is probably underestimated. Insight into the incidence and mechanism of acute skin injury can be helpful in developing suitable preventive measures and safer playing surfaces for soccer and other field sports. Purpose: To gain insight into the incidence and severity of skin injuries related to soccer and to describe the skin injury mechanism due to player-surface contact. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The prevention model by van Mechelen et al (1992) combined with the injury causation model of Bahr and Krosshaug (2005) were used as a framework for the survey to describe the skin injury incidence and mechanism caused by player-surface contact. Results: The reviewed literature showed that common injury reporting methods are mainly based on time lost from participation or the need for medical attention. Because skin abrasions seldom lead to absence or medical attention, they are often not reported. When reported, the incidence of abrasion/laceration injuries varies from 0.8 to 6.1 injuries per 1000 player-hours. Wound assessment techniques such as the Skin Damage Area and Severity Index can be a valuable tool to obtain a more accurate estimation of the incidence and severity of acute skin injuries. Conclusion: The use of protective equipment, a skin lubricant, or wet surface conditions has a positive effect on preventing abrasion-type injuries from artificial turf surfaces. The literature also shows that essential biomechanical information of the sliding event is lacking, such as how energy is transferred to the area of contact. From a clinical and histological perspective, there are strong indications that a sliding-induced skin lesion is caused by mechanical rather than thermal injury to the skin. PMID:26535330

  12. Care and management of a stoma: maintaining peristomal skin health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyles, Anna; Hunt, Sharon

    2016-09-22

    It is estimated that around one in 500 people in the UK are living with a stoma, with approximately 21 000 operations that result in stoma formation being performed each year ( Colostomy Association, 2016 ). These people face a unique set of challenges in maintaining the integrity of their peristomal skin. This article explores the normal structure and function of skin and how the care and management of a stoma presents challenges for maintaining peristomal skin health. Particular focus is paid to the incidence of skin problems for those living with a stoma, whether it is temporary or permanent, and the factors that contribute to skin breakdown in this population. Wider factors such as the central role of the clinical nurse specialist and the impact of product usage on positive outcomes and health economics are also considered.

  13. Trends in the incidence of malignant melanoma in Denmark 1978-2007. Incidence on the island of Bornholm compared with the whole country incidence in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejøe, Jennifer Berg; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof Tadeusz; Klit, Anders

    2011-01-01

    In Denmark, malignant melanoma is among the most rapidly increasing cancer types. Malignant melanoma accounts for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths. Sunshine is the main cause of the increase seen in melanoma incidence. Within Denmark, Bornholm is the area that receives most sunshine...

  14. Skin Picking Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Cetinay Aydin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Skin picking disorder is not a dermatological disorder and it is a table characterized with picking skin excessively and repetitively, leading to damage in skin tissue. Unlike normal picking behaviour, psychogenic skin picking is repetitive and it can lead to severe damage in the skin and even complications which constitute vital danger. While some patients define frequent but short lasting picking attacks, others define rarer attacks which last a few hours. Skin picking disorder, which is not included in the classification systems up to DSM-5 as a separate diagnosis category, is included as an independent diagnosis in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Associated Disorders category in DSM-5. In case reports, open label studies and double blind studies selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are shown to be effective in the treatment of skin picking disorder. Mostly, cognitive-behaviourial techniques are used and have been proven to be useful in psychotherapy. Habit reversal is one of the behaviourial techniques which are frequently applied, give positive results in which well-being state can be maintained. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 401-428

  15. The skin aging exposome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutmann, Jean; Bouloc, Anne; Sore, Gabrielle; Bernard, Bruno A; Passeron, Thierry

    2017-03-01

    The term "exposome" describes the totality of exposures to which an individual is subjected from conception to death. It includes both external and internal factors as well as the human body's response to these factors. Current exposome research aims to understand the effects all factors have on specific organs, yet today, the exposome of human skin has not received major attention and a corresponding definition is lacking. This review was compiled with the collaboration of European scientists, specialized in either environmental medicine or skin biology. A comprehensive review of the existing literature was performed using PubMed. The search was restricted to exposome factors and skin aging. Key review papers and all relevant, epidemiological, in vitro, ex vivo and clinical studies were analyzed to determine the key elements of the exposome influencing skin aging. Here we propose a definition of the skin aging exposome. It is based on a summary of the existing scientific evidence for the role of exposome factors in skin aging. We also identify future research needs which concern knowledge about the interaction of distinct exposomal factors with each other and the resulting net effects on skin aging and suggest some protective measures. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Eyelid skin cancer: еpidemiology, prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Brovkina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on 3597 patients with primary malignant tumors of the visual organ were submitted to the Moscow City Cancer Register of the Moscow Healthcare Department in 2006–2015. Rate of eyelid skin cancer is 75.62 %. Calculated incidence is 3.4 per 100,000 population. The peak of the disease is at 70–80 years of age. The disease was diagnosed in people of age 46–85 years, it was 66.65 % more frequent in women than in men. Basal cell carcinoma comprised 91.14 % of all cases. In 65.7 % of cases the tumor was diagnosed at stage Т1 and Т2, and at stage Т1, when patient can be cured, only in 34 % of cases. Objective. Study of incidence of malignant eyelid tumors of epithelial genesis, their prognostic characteristics using data from Moscow City Ophthalmic Oncology Center and Ophthalmic Oncology Department of the Branch # 1 “Ophthalmology Clinic” of the S.P. Botkin City Clinical Hospital of the Moscow Healthcare Department.

  17. An elastic second skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sakamoto, Fernanda H.; Gilchrest, Barbara A.; Anderson, R. Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings.

  18. Permanent disability pension due to skin diseases in Denmark 2003-2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, K.S.; Jemec, G.B.E.

    2011-01-01

    in the understanding of how skin diseases affect patients and in arguments for continued specialist services. An approach to explore the societal impact of skin diseases is to investigate the incidence of permanent disability pensions granted due to skin diseases. The present study evaluated the number of permanent...... disability pensions granted due to skin diseases in Denmark during the 2003-2008 period and related them to previous findings. In view of the high prevalence of skin diseases in the society, and particularly their role in occupational medicine, only a low number of disability pensions are granted. This may...

  19. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stage III Melanoma Treatment: Stage IV Finding the Right Doctor Glossary of Terms Resources Resources Global Resources Cancer Centers Online Resources The Melanoma Book Clinical Trials Download a Skin Self-Exam Card ...

  20. Aging changes in skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Aging changes in skin URL of this page: //medlineplus. ...

  1. Allergy Skin Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medications: Know your options Allergy skin tests About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  2. Bacterial Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other immune disorders, or hepatitis People who are undergoing chemotherapy or treatment with other drugs that suppress the immune system Skin that is inflamed or damaged by sunburn, scratching, or other trauma is more likely to become infected. In fact, ...

  3. Occupational skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahler, V; Aalto-Korte, K; Alfonso, J H

    2017-01-01

    in Science and Technology (COST) Action TD 1206 (StanDerm) (www.standerm.eu). RESULTS: Besides a national health service or a statutory health insurance, most European member states implemented a second insurance scheme specifically geared at occupational diseases [insurance against occupational risks......BACKGROUND: Work-related skin diseases (WSD) are caused or worsened by a professional activity. Occupational skin diseases (OSD) need to fulfil additional legal criteria which differ from country to country. OSD range amongst the five most frequently notified occupational diseases (musculoskeletal...... diseases, neurologic diseases, lung diseases, diseases of the sensory organs, skin diseases) in Europe. OBJECTIVE: To retrieve information and compare the current state of national frameworks and pathways to manage patients with occupational skin disease with regard to prevention, diagnosis, treatment...

  4. [Currently available skin substitutes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravcová, Darina; Koller, Ján

    2014-01-01

    The current trend of burn wound care has shifted to more holistic approach of improvement in the long-term form and function of the healed burn wounds and quality of life. Autologous split or full-thickness skin graft are the best definitive burn wound coverage, but it is constrained by the limited available sources, especially in major burns. Donor site morbidities in term of additional wounds and scarring are also of concern of the autograft application. This has demanded the emergence of various skin substitutes in the management of acute burn injury as well as post burn reconstructions. This paper reviews currently available skin substitutes, produced in not for-profit skin banks as well as commercially available. They are divided according to type of material included, as biological, biosynthetic and synthetic and named respectively.

  5. Dry Skin (Xerosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Registration General information Housing & travel Education Exhibit hall Mobile app 2019 Annual Meeting Derm Exam Prep Course ... SkinPAC State societies Scope of practice Truth in advertising NP/PA laws Action center Public and patients ...

  6. Caring for Tattooed Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Registration General information Housing & travel Education Exhibit hall Mobile app 2019 Annual Meeting Derm Exam Prep Course ... SkinPAC State societies Scope of practice Truth in advertising NP/PA laws Action center Public and patients ...

  7. Fungal Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abbreviations Weights & Measures ENGLISH View Professional English Deutsch Japanese Espaniol Find information on medical topics, symptoms, drugs, ... touching the infected area. Diagnosis Skin scrapings or cultures Doctors may suspect a fungal infection when they ...

  8. An elastic second skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Gilchrest, Barbara A; Anderson, R Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (appearance in a 5-point severity scale. The XPL platform may offer advanced solutions to compromised skin barrier function, pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings.

  9. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Doctor Glossary of Terms Resources Resources Global Resources Cancer Centers Online Resources The Melanoma Book Clinical Trials Download a Skin Self-Exam Card Download a Patient Navigation Card ...

  10. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Who We Are Be On Our PAGE MIF Staff Programs & Services Scientific Advisory Board Advisory Board Patrons & ... Cancer Centers Online Resources The Melanoma Book Clinical Trials Download a Skin Self-Exam Card Download a ...

  11. Skin or nail culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucosal culture; Culture - skin; Culture - mucosal; Nail culture; Culture - fingernail; Fingernail culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria, ...

  12. Renal-skin syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Has, Cristina; He, Yinghong

    2017-07-01

    Renal-skin syndroms are a group of genetic disorders with renal and cutaneous manifestations that target molecular components present in both organs. Inherited renal-skin syndromes are mainly associated with defects of cell-matrix adhesion. We provide a non-exhaustive overview of the main molecular players at cell-matrix adhesions in mouse models and in human genetic disorders affecting kidney and skin. Renal and urinary tract involvement is described in all four major epidermolysis bullosa types and, in particular, in junctional subtypes and in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Here, we describe in detail those subtypes for which reno-urinary involvement is a constant and primary feature. Furthermore, complex multiorgan disorders with a predisposition to malignancies or attributable to metabolic defects that involve both kidney and skin are briefly summarized.

  13. Biocatalytic Polymer Skin Adhesives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LeJeune, Keith

    2001-01-01

    .... Preliminary results also suggest that the incorporation of enzymes within such polymers reduces immunogenic and allergenic responses that are often observed when applying protein-based materials on skin tissue...

  14. Skin lesion of blastomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infection. It is most often found in: Africa Canada, around the Great Lakes South central and north ... is diagnosed by identifying the fungus in a culture taken from a skin lesion. This usually requires ...

  15. Spiritual and religious aspects of skin and skin disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenefelt PD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Philip D Shenefelt,1 Debrah A Shenefelt2 1Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, 2Congregation Or Ahavah, Lutz, FL, USA Abstract: Skin and skin disorders have had spiritual aspects since ancient times. Skin, hair, and nails are visible to self and others, and touchable by self and others. The skin is a major sensory organ. Skin also expresses emotions detectable by others through pallor, coldness, "goose bumps", redness, warmth, or sweating. Spiritual and religious significances of skin are revealed through how much of the skin has been and continues to be covered with what types of coverings, scalp and beard hair cutting, shaving and styling, skin, nail, and hair coloring and decorating, tattooing, and intentional scarring of skin. Persons with visible skin disorders have often been stigmatized or even treated as outcasts. Shamans and other spiritual and religious healers have brought about healing of skin disorders through spiritual means. Spiritual and religious interactions with various skin disorders such as psoriasis, leprosy, and vitiligo are discussed. Religious aspects of skin and skin diseases are evaluated for several major religions, with a special focus on Judaism, both conventional and kabbalistic. Keywords: skin, skin disorders, spiritual, religious

  16. ReciPlySkin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic Larsen, Olga; Andersen, Mikkel; Munk-Andersen, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    The report presents process that enbabled the production of the ReciPlySkin structure exhibited at the Circular Economy Exhibition at KADK during the Autumn 2017. The concept, design, detailed design and production are presented in this report.......The report presents process that enbabled the production of the ReciPlySkin structure exhibited at the Circular Economy Exhibition at KADK during the Autumn 2017. The concept, design, detailed design and production are presented in this report....

  17. Adnexal Tumours Of Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parate Sanjay N

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A total 120 cases of epidermal appendage tumours of skin were analysed and classified according to the classification provided by WHO’. Epidermal appendage tumours accounted for 12.87% of all skin tumours, of which 29.17% were benign and 70.83% were malignant. Most of the tumours (75.83% were in the head and face region. The most common tumour was basal cell epithelioma (55%.

  18. Mantoux Tuberculin Skin Test

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-11-22

    Learn how to evaluate people for latent TB infection with the Mantoux tuberculin skin test. This podcast includes sections on administering and reading the Mantoux tuberculin skin test, the standard method for detecting latent TB infection since the 1930s.  Created: 11/22/2006 by National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 12/12/2006.

  19. The critical review of methodologies and approaches to assess the inherent skin sensitization potential (skin allergies) of chemicals. Part III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Giménez-Arnau, Elena; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    For those chemicals identified in point 2 above, to collect and critically analyse clinical and statistical evidence on the incidence and morbidity (clinical picture) of skin contact allergy (contact dermatitis) cases in the EU before (at least 3 years) and after the limits were set, so as to allow...... an assessment of the possible effect of the limits in the reduction/prevention of the incidence and morbidity of contact dermatitis....

  20. The critical review of methodologies and approaches to assess the inherent skin sensitization potential (skin allergies) of chemicals. Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Giménez-Arnau, Elena; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre; Menné, Torkil; Boman, Anders; Schnuch, Axel

    2012-04-01

    For those chemicals identified in point 2 above, to collect and critically analyse clinical and statistical evidence on the incidence and morbidity (clinical picture) of skin contact allergy (contact dermatitis) cases in the EU before (at least 3 years) and after the limits were set, so as to allow an assessment of the possible effect of the limits in the reduction/prevention of the incidence and morbidity of contact dermatitis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Histological and immunohistochemical study of cutaneous angiogenesis process in experimental third-degree skin burns treated with allograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Popescu, Florina Carmen; Mogoşanu, G D; Pârvănescu, H; Streba, Liliana; Mogoantă, L

    2012-01-01

    Skin burns are a rather high incidence lesions which, depending on their depth and extension, can severely affect not only the skin but the entire organism. Third-degree skin burns extended on over 20% of the body surface often require skin graft. Skin allograft is a therapeutic alternative when autograft cannot be used. We investigated the allograft influence on the angiogenesis process in third-degree skin burns, using an experimental model. We noticed that the allograft induces a stronger inflammatory reaction associated with intense angiogenesis process by about 10-15% compared to control group.

  2. Incidence of cancer in first-degree relatives of basal cell carcinoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. van Rossum (Michelle); D. Wopereis; T. Hoyer; I. Soerjomataram (Isabelle); J. Schalkwijk; P.C.M. van de Kerkhof; L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThere is evidence to suggest that genetic factors play an important role in the development of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), and that skin neoplasms might be a sign for a genetic predisposition to cancer. We investigated whether the incidence of visceral and skin malignancies among

  3. Incidence and trends of cutaneous malignancies in the Netherlands, 1989-2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Holterhues (Cynthia); E. de Vries (Esther); M.W.J. Louwman (Marieke); S. Koljenović (Senada); T.E.C. Nijsten (Tamar)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractEpidemiology of rare cutaneous malignancies in the general population is poorly documented. This descriptive study aimed to estimate the incidence and trends of all skin malignancies between 1989 and 2005. Data on skin tumors were extracted from the Netherlands Cancer registry (except

  4. The biological basis for dose limitation to the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Ionizing radiation may cause deterministic effects and cancer. It has been the policy to base dose limits for radiation protection of the skin on the prevention of deterministic effects (1). In the case of cancer in general, dose limitation for radiation protection is based on limiting excess cancer mortality to low levels of radiation. Since skin cancers are seldom lethal, the general radiation protection standards will protect against an increase in excess mortality from skin cancer. However, with the dose limits selected to prevent deterministic effects, there is a significant probability of an excess incidence of skin cancer occurring as a result of exposure during a working lifetime. The induction of skin cancer by radiation is influenced significantly by subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from sunlight. This finding raises not only interesting questions about the mechanisms involved, but also about the differences in risk of skin cancer in different populations. The amount and distribution of melanin in the skin determines the degree of the effect of UVR. This paper discusses the mechanisms of the induction of both deterministic and stochastic effects in skin exposed to radiation in relation to radiation protection. (author)

  5. Efectos de una intervención educativa en los conocimientos y comportamientos relacionados con la fotoprotección durante la práctica de la actividad física en los estudiantes de un colegio público de Bogotá D.C., Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Charry Angel, Carlos Edifrey

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Skin cancer melanoma and non-melanoma incidence rate is a worldwide health problem. In recent years, increased incidence statistics of skin cancer is attributed to factors such as, lifestyles, ageing population, environmental changes, and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure, among others. Moreover, increased physical activity without elements of photoprotection is driven by the lack of knowledge of the risks associated to UVR exposure, which is recognized as the major risk fac...

  6. Determinants of regional differences in the incidence of impetigo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Razmjou, R.G.; Willemsen, S.P.; Koning, S.; Oranje, A.P.; Schellevis, F.; Wouden, J.C. van der

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Impetigo is a common contagious skin infection, mostly seen in children and caused by Staphylococcus aureus and/or group A B-hemolytic Streptococcus. Two surveys performed in general practice showed a strong geographical gradient in the incidence rates among children in the

  7. [Environmental pollution and skin aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierkötter, A

    2011-08-01

    Extrinsic skin aging is the skin aging process induced by environmental factors. The most prominent environmental factor leading to extrinsic skin aging is the sun; therefore extrinsic skin aging is also known as photoaging. However, numerous studies in recent years have shown that smoking leads to extrinsic skin aging. Further, very recently it has been shown, that environmental pollution by traffic is also associated with the occurrence of signs of extrinsic skin aging. Thus, in preventive skin aging strategies the long-term exposure towards air pollution by traffic must also be considered.

  8. Acute incidents during anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incidents can occur during induction, maintenance and emergence from anaesthesia. The following acute critical incidents are discussed in this article: • Anaphylaxis. • Aspiration ..... Already used in South Africa and Malawi, a scale-up of the technique is under way in Tanzania, Rwanda and Ghana. The report found that.

  9. Characterization of ERAS, a putative novel human oncogene, in skin and breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña Avalos, B.L. de la

    2014-07-01

    Most human tumors have mutations in genes of the RAS small GTPase protein family. RAS works as a molecular switch for signaling pathways that modulate many aspects of cell behavior, including proliferation, differentiation, motility and death. Oncogenic mutations in RAS prevent GTP hydrolysis, locking RAS in a permanently active state, being the most common mutations in HRAS, KRAS and NRAS. The human RAS family consists of at least 36 different genes, many of which have been scarcely studied. One of these relatively unknown genes is ERAS (ES cell-expressed RAS), which is a constitutively active RAS protein, localized in chromosome X and expressed only in embryonic cells, being undetectable in adult tissues. New high throughput technologies have made it possible to screen complete cancer genomes for identification of mutations associated to cancer. Using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system, ERAS was identified as a putative novel oncogene in non-melanoma skin and breast cancers. The major aim of this project is to determine the general characteristics of ERAS as a putative novel human oncogene in skin and breast cells. Forced expression of ERAS results in drastic changes in cell shape, proliferation and motility. When ERAS is overexpressed in skin and breast human cells it is mainly localized in the cytoplasmic membrane. ERAS activates the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K) pathway but not the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. ERAS-expressing cells suffer spontaneous morphologic and phenotypic EMT-like changes, including cytoskeleton reorganization, vimentin and N-cadherin up-regulation and down-regulation of E-cadherin, which can be associated with increased malignancy, and invasive and metastatic potential. Our results suggest that inappropriate expression of ERAS lead to transformation of human cells. (Author)

  10. Inhibition of Akt enhances the chemopreventive effects of topical rapamycin in mouse skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Sally E; Janda, Jaroslav; Criswell, Jane; Blohm-Mangone, Karen; Olson, Erik R.; Liu, Zhonglin; Barber, Christie; Rusche, Jadrian J.; Petricoin, Emmanuel; Calvert, Valerie; Einspahr, Janine G.; Dickinson, Jesse; Stratton, Steven P.; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Saboda, Kathylynn; Hu, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang; Alberts, David S.; Bowden, G. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The PI3Kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway has important roles in cancer development for multiple tumor types, including UV-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. Immunosuppressed populations are at increased risk of aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Individuals who are treated with rapamycin, (sirolimus, a classical mTOR inhibitor) have significantly decreased rates of developing new cutaneous SCCs compared to those that receive traditional immunosuppression. However, systemic rapamycin use can lead to significant adverse events. Here we explored the use of topical rapamycin as a chemopreventive agent in the context of solar simulated light (SSL)-induced skin carcinogenesis. In SKH-1 mice, topical rapamycin treatment decreased tumor yields when applied after completion of 15 weeks of SSL exposure compared to controls. However, applying rapamycin during SSL exposure for 15 weeks, and continuing for 10 weeks after UV treatment, increased tumor yields. We also examined whether a combinatorial approach might result in more significant tumor suppression by rapamycin. We validated that rapamycin causes increased Akt (S473) phosphorylation in the epidermis after SSL, and show for the first time that this dysregulation can be inhibited in vivo by a selective PDK1/Akt inhibitor, PHT-427. Combining rapamycin with PHT-427 on tumor prone skin additively caused a significant reduction of tumor multiplicity compared to vehicle controls. Our findings indicate that patients taking rapamycin should avoid sun exposure, and that combining topical mTOR inhibitors and Akt inhibitors may be a viable chemoprevention option for individuals at high risk for cutaneous SCC.

  11. [Screening for and early detection of skin melanoma in the Netherlands].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roekel, E.H. van; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Bonenkamp, H.

    2012-01-01

    During the past few decades, the incidence of skin melanoma has increased greatly in the Netherlands. At the same time, the mortality from skin melanoma has increased, especially amongst older men. Because of the strong association between disease stage and prognosis, screening and an increase in

  12. Protective Vaccination against Papillomavirus-Induced Skin Tumors under Immunocompetent and Immunosuppressive Conditions: A Preclinical Study Using a Natural Outbred Animal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinzón, Sabrina E.; Braspenning-Wesch, Ilona; Müller, Martin; Geissler, Edward K.; Nindl, Ingo; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2014-01-01

    Certain cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which are ubiquitous and acquired early during childhood, can cause a variety of skin tumors and are likely involved in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer, especially in immunosuppressed patients. Hence, the burden of these clinical manifestations demands for a prophylactic approach. To evaluate whether protective efficacy of a vaccine is potentially translatable to patients, we used the rodent Mastomys coucha that is naturally infected with Mastomys natalensis papillomavirus (MnPV). This skin type papillomavirus induces not only benign skin tumours, such as papillomas and keratoacanthomas, but also squamous cell carcinomas, thereby allowing a straightforward read-out for successful vaccination in a small immunocompetent laboratory animal. Here, we examined the efficacy of a virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccine on either previously or newly established infections. VLPs raise a strong and long-lasting neutralizing antibody response that confers protection even under systemic long-term cyclosporine A treatment. Remarkably, the vaccine completely prevents the appearance of benign as well as malignant skin tumors. Protection involves the maintenance of a low viral load in the skin by an antibody-dependent prevention of virus spread. Our results provide first evidence that VLPs elicit an effective immune response in the skin under immunocompetent and immunosuppressed conditions in an outbred animal model, irrespective of the infection status at the time of vaccination. These findings provide the basis for the clinical development of potent vaccination strategies against cutaneous HPV infections and HPV-induced tumors, especially in patients awaiting organ transplantation. PMID:24586150

  13. Radiological incidents in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobzova, L.; Novotny, J.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries a reporting system of radiological incidents to national regulatory body exists and providers of radiotherapy treatment are obliged to report all major and/or in some countries all incidents occurring in institution. State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) is providing a systematic guidance for radiotherapy departments from 1997 by requiring inclusion of radiation safety problems into Quality assurance manual, which is the basic document for obtaining a license of SONS for handling with sources of ionizing radiation. For that purpose SONS also issued the recommendation 'Introduction of QA system for important sources in radiotherapy-radiological incidents' in which the radiological incidents are defined and the basic guidance for their classification (category A, B, C, D), investigation and reporting are given. At regular periods the SONS in co-operation with radiotherapy centers is making a survey of all radiological incidents occurring in institutions and it is presenting obtained information in synoptic communication (2003 Motolske dny, 2005 Novy Jicin). This presentation is another summary report of radiological incidents that occurred in our radiotherapy institutions during last 3 years. Emphasis is given not only to survey and statistics, but also to analysis of reasons of the radiological incidents and to their detection and prevention. Analyses of incidents in radiotherapy have led to a much broader understanding of incident causation. Information about the error should be shared as early as possible during or after investigation by all radiotherapy centers. Learning from incidents, errors and near misses should be a part of improvement of the QA system in institutions. Generally, it is recommended that all radiotherapy facilities should participate in the reporting, analyzing and learning system to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge throughout the whole country to prevent errors in radiotherapy.(authors)

  14. [Effect of heijiang pill on radiation skin ulcer in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Yang, Yang; Xu, Yong-Mei

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between single dosage of 60Co radiation and the degree of radiation-induced skin ulcers, and to evaluate the curative effect of Heijiang Pill (HJP) on skin ulcer induced by various dosages of radiation in rats. Sixty-six Wistar female rats were randomly divided into three groups, the blank control group (n = 6) and the two radiation groups, each 30 rats, with their right hind leg exposed respectively to 60 Gy and 40 Gy of 60 Co radiation. The time of emergence and degree of skin ulcer were recorded. Then rats in the two radiation groups were subdivided into the HJP group, the Ethacridine group and the model group, 10 in each group, they received corresponding treatment after ulceration, and the incidence, pathology, cure rate and cure time of skin ulcer were observed in the 90 days of observation. The incidence of skin ulcer was higher and occurred earlier in rats radiated with 60 Gy than that with 40 Gy (P ulcer healing rate in rats treated with HJP was higher than that treated with Ethacridine (P cure time in the HJP group was shorter (P ulcers. HJP can effectively cure radiation skin ulcer, and the effect is especially significant on the ulcer induced by low dose radiation.

  15. Applying laser speckle images to skin science: skin lesion differentiation by polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tim K.; Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Sotoodian, Bahman; Kalai, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Skin cancer is a worldwide health problem. It is the most common cancer in the countries with a large white population; furthermore, the incidence of malignant melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, has been increasing steadily over the last three decades. There is an urgent need to develop in-vivo, noninvasive diagnostic tools for the disease. This paper attempts to response to the challenge by introducing a simple and fast method based on polarization and laser speckle. The degree of maintaining polarization estimates the fraction of linearly maintaining polarization in the backscattered speckle field. Clinical experiments of 214 skin lesions including malignant melanomas, squamous cell carcinomas, basal cell carcinomas, nevi, and seborrheic keratoses demonstrated that such a parameter can potentially diagnose different skin lesion types. ROC analyses showed that malignant melanoma and seborrheic keratosis could be differentiated by both the blue and red lasers with the area under the curve (AUC) = 0.8 and 0.7, respectively. Also malignant melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma could be separated by the blue laser (AUC = 0.9), while nevus and seborrheic keratosis could be identified using the red laser (AUC = 0.7). These experiments demonstrated that polarization could be a potential in-vivo diagnostic indicator for skin diseases.

  16. Spiritual and religious aspects of skin and skin disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenefelt, Philip D; Shenefelt, Debrah A

    2014-01-01

    Skin and skin disorders have had spiritual aspects since ancient times. Skin, hair, and nails are visible to self and others, and touchable by self and others. The skin is a major sensory organ. Skin also expresses emotions detectable by others through pallor, coldness, “goose bumps”, redness, warmth, or sweating. Spiritual and religious significances of skin are revealed through how much of the skin has been and continues to be covered with what types of coverings, scalp and beard hair cutting, shaving and styling, skin, nail, and hair coloring and decorating, tattooing, and intentional scarring of skin. Persons with visible skin disorders have often been stigmatized or even treated as outcasts. Shamans and other spiritual and religious healers have brought about healing of skin disorders through spiritual means. Spiritual and religious interactions with various skin disorders such as psoriasis, leprosy, and vitiligo are discussed. Religious aspects of skin and skin diseases are evaluated for several major religions, with a special focus on Judaism, both conventional and kabbalistic. PMID:25120377

  17. Skin conditions: common skin rashes in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Ramiro; Nguyen, Tam

    2013-04-01

    Infants exhibit many skin rashes. Erythema toxicum neonatorum presents as erythematous macules, papules, and pustules on the face, trunk, and extremities; it typically resolves spontaneously within 1 week. Neonatal acne presents as comedones or erythematous papules on the face, scalp, chest, and back. Infantile acne is similar but starts after the neonatal period. Both conditions typically resolve spontaneously; failure to resolve within 1 year warrants evaluation for androgen excess. Neonatal cephalic pustulosis is an acne variant caused by hypersensitivity to Malassezia furfur. It is typically self-limited, but severe cases are managed with topical ketoconazole. Miliaria and milia are caused by sweat retention and present as tiny vesicles or papules; they resolve spontaneously. Contact diaper dermatitis is managed by keeping the diaper area clean and with open air exposure. Diaper dermatitis due to Candida albicans is managed with topical antifungals. Seborrheic dermatitis causes scaling on the scalp. Management involves shampooing and removing scales with a soft brush after applying mineral oil or petrolatum; severe cases are managed with tar or ketoconazole shampoo. Atopic dermatitis is related to food allergy in approximately one-third of children. Food allergy can be confirmed with oral food challenges or skin prick tests. Management includes elimination of irritants and triggers and use of low-potency topical steroids. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  18. Smoking and skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-01-01

    suggest that tobacco smoking is a contributing factor in systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, palmoplantar pustulosis, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, hidradenitis suppurativa, and genital warts. In contrast, smoking may confer some protective effects and mitigate other skin diseases, notably......Tobacco smoking is a serious and preventable health hazard that can cause or exacerbate a number of diseases and shorten life expectancy, but the role of smoking as an etiologic factor in the development of skin disease is largely unknown. Although epidemiological evidence is sparse, findings...... pemphigus vulgaris, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous ulcers, and Behçet's disease. Various degenerative dermatologic conditions are also impacted by smoking, such as skin wrinkling and dysregulated wound healing, which can result in post-surgical complications and delayed or even arrested healing of chronic...

  19. Smoking and skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a serious and preventable health hazard that can cause or exacerbate a number of diseases and shorten life expectancy, but the role of smoking as an etiologic factor in the development of skin disease is largely unknown. Although epidemiological evidence is sparse, findings...... suggest that tobacco smoking is a contributing factor in systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, palmoplantar pustulosis, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, hidradenitis suppurativa, and genital warts. In contrast, smoking may confer some protective effects and mitigate other skin diseases, notably...... pemphigus vulgaris, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous ulcers, and Behçet's disease. Various degenerative dermatologic conditions are also impacted by smoking, such as skin wrinkling and dysregulated wound healing, which can result in post-surgical complications and delayed or even arrested healing of chronic...

  20. Environment and the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suskind, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    The skin is an important organ of defense adaptation and a portal of entry for xenobiotics. It is vulnerable to physical, chemical, and biologic agents and capable of expressing responses to these agents in a variety of pathologic patterns. These patterns are characterized by morphologic and functional features which are elicited by careful examination and test procedures. Cutaneous cancer may result from exposure to nonionizing as well as ionizing radiation, to specific identifiable chemical hazards, and may be enhanced by trauma. Cutaneous hazards of chemical sources are largely found in the workplace and among consumer products, including drugs and toilet goods. Environmental skin diseases and injuries are preventable. Prior to use assessment for safety and for possible risks from exposure to an agent, product, or process is of primary importance in the prevention and control of environmental skin disease and injury