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Sample records for incident electron energies

  1. Transmission of electrons through insulating PET foils: Dependence on charge deposition, tilt angle and incident energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keerthisinghe, D., E-mail: darshika.keerthisinghe@wmich.edu [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Dassanayake, B.S. [Department of Physics, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Wickramarachchi, S.J. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Stolterfoht, N. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Tanis, J.A. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Transmission of electrons through insulating polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nanocapillaries was observed as a function of charge deposition, angular and energy dependence. Two samples with capillary diameters 100 and 200 nm and pore densities 5 × 10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2} and 5 × 10{sup 7}/cm{sup 2}, respectively, were studied for incident electron energies of 300, 500 and 800 eV. Transmission and steady state of the electrons were attained after a time delay during which only a few electron counts were observed. The transmission through the capillaries depended on the tilt angle with both elastic and inelastic electrons going through. The guiding ability of electrons was found to increase with the incident energy in contrast to previous measurements in our laboratory for a similar PET foil.

  2. Free-Free Transitions in the Presence of Laser Fields at Very Low Incident Electron Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, Chandana

    2010-01-01

    We study the free-free transition in electron-hydrogenic systems in ground state in presence of an external laser field at very loud incident energies. The laser field is treated classically while the collision dynamics is treated quantum mechanically. The laser field is chosen to be monochromatic, linearly polarized and homogeneous. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a nonperturbative manner by choosing a Volkov wave function for it. The scattering weave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of the electron exchange, short-range as well as of the long-range interactions to get the S and P wave phase shifts while for the higher angular momentum phase shifts the exchange approximation has only been considered. We calculate the laser assisted differential cross sections (LADCS) for the aforesaid free-free transition process for single photon absorption/emission. The laser intensity is chosen to be much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the LADCS as compared to the field free (FF) cross sections. Unlike the FF ones, the LADCS exhibit some oscillations having a distinct maximum at a low value of the scattering angle depending on the laser parameters as well as on the incident energies.

  3. Second crossover energy of insulating materials using stationary electron beam under normal incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, E.I. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology of Russian Academy of Science, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: rau@phys.msu.ru; Fakhfakh, S. [LaMaCop, Faculte des Sciences, Route Soukra km 3, BP 802, CP 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Andrianov, M.V.; Evstafeva, E.N. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology of Russian Academy of Science, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation); Jbara, O. [UTAP/LASSI, EA 3802, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)], E-mail: omar.jbara@univ-reims.fr; Rondot, S.; Mouze, D. [UTAP/LASSI, EA 3802, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this paper is to give some aspects of charging effects on dielectric materials submitted to continuous electron beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). When the dielectric is irradiated continuously, the so-called total yield approach (TYA) used to predict the sign of the charge appeared on electron irradiated insulators fails because the charge accumulated in the dielectric interferes with the electrons emission processes. Based on previous experimental and theoretical works found in the literature, an analysis of the evolution of the electron yield curves {sigma} = f(E{sub 0}) of insulators during irradiation is given. The aim of this work is firstly to determine experimentally the second crossover energy E{sub 2C} under continuous electron irradiation (charging conditions) and secondly to demonstrate that the charge balance occurs at this beam energy and not at E{sub 2} the energy deduced from non-charging conditions (pulse primary electron beam experiments) as commonly asserted. It is however possible to apply the TYA by substituting the critical energy E{sub 2} for E{sub 2C}. The experimental procedure is based on simultaneous time dependent measurements of surface potential, leakage current and displacement current. The study underlines the difference between the landing energy of primary electrons E{sub L} at the steady state and the second crossover energy, E{sub 2C}, for charged samples. Some preliminary results are also obtained concerning the influence of the incident beam density on the energy E{sub 2C}. The samples used for this study are PMMA, polycrystalline silicone dioxide (p-SiO{sub 2}), polycrystalline alumina (p-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and soda lime glass (SLG)

  4. Second crossover energy of insulating materials using stationary electron beam under normal incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, E.I.; Fakhfakh, S.; Andrianov, M.V.; Evstafeva, E.N.; Jbara, O.; Rondot, S.; Mouze, D.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give some aspects of charging effects on dielectric materials submitted to continuous electron beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). When the dielectric is irradiated continuously, the so-called total yield approach (TYA) used to predict the sign of the charge appeared on electron irradiated insulators fails because the charge accumulated in the dielectric interferes with the electrons emission processes. Based on previous experimental and theoretical works found in the literature, an analysis of the evolution of the electron yield curves σ = f(E 0 ) of insulators during irradiation is given. The aim of this work is firstly to determine experimentally the second crossover energy E 2C under continuous electron irradiation (charging conditions) and secondly to demonstrate that the charge balance occurs at this beam energy and not at E 2 the energy deduced from non-charging conditions (pulse primary electron beam experiments) as commonly asserted. It is however possible to apply the TYA by substituting the critical energy E 2 for E 2C . The experimental procedure is based on simultaneous time dependent measurements of surface potential, leakage current and displacement current. The study underlines the difference between the landing energy of primary electrons E L at the steady state and the second crossover energy, E 2C , for charged samples. Some preliminary results are also obtained concerning the influence of the incident beam density on the energy E 2C . The samples used for this study are PMMA, polycrystalline silicone dioxide (p-SiO 2 ), polycrystalline alumina (p-Al 2 O 3 ) and soda lime glass (SLG)

  5. Incident energy and charge deposition dependences of electron transmission through a microsized tapered glass capillary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickramarachchi, S.J. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Ikeda, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Dassanayake, B.S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Keerthisinghe, D.; Tanis, J.A. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    An experimental study of electron transmission and guiding through a tapered glass capillary has been performed. Electrons were transmitted for tilt angles up to ∼6.5° and ∼9.5° (laboratory angles) for incident energies of 500 and 1000 eV, respectively. It is found that elastic and inelastic contributions give rise to distinguishable peaks in the transmitted profile. For 500 eV elastic transmission dominates the profile, while for 1000 eV both elastic and inelastic contributions are present. The transmission for both energies was studied as a function of the charge (time) deposition and found to be strongly dependent. Results suggest fundamental differences between 500 and 1000 eV incident electrons. For 500 eV the transmission slowly increases suggesting charge up of the capillary wall, reaching relative stability with infrequent breakdowns for all angles investigated. For 1000 eV for tilt angles near zero degrees the time dependent profile shows oscillations in the transmission, which never reached a stable condition, while for the larger angle investigated the transmission reached near equilibrium. Inelastic processes dominated the transmission for 1000 eV even at very small tilt angles, but was generally elastic (due to Coulomb deflection) for 500 eV even for the largest tilt angle measured.

  6. Free-Free Transitions in the Presence of Laser Fields and Debye Potential at Very Low Incident Electron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anand

    2012-01-01

    We study the free-free transition in electron-helium ion in the ground state and embedded in a Debye potential in the presence of an external laser field at very low incident electron energies. The laser field is treated classically while the collision dynamics is treated quantum mechanically. The laser field is chosen as monochromatic, linearly polarized and homogeneous. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing Volkov wave function for it. The scattering wave function for the incident electron on the target embedded in a Debye potential is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange. We calculate the laser-assisted differential and total cross sections for free-free transition for absorption/emission of a single photon or no photon exchange. The results will be presented at the conference.

  7. Dependence of secondary electron emission on the incident angle and the energy of primary electrons bombarding bowl-structured beryllium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Jun; Ohya, Kaoru.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the secondary electron emission from beryllium is combined with a model of bowl structure for surface roughness, for analyzing the difference between the electron emissions for normal and oblique incidences. At normal incidence, with increasing the roughness parameter H/W, the primary energy E pm at which the maximum electron yield occurs becomes higher, and at more than the E pm , the decrease in the yield is slower; where H and W are the depth and width of the bowl structure, respectively. The dispersion of incident angle to the microscopic surface causes a small increase in the yield at oblique incidence, whereas the blocking of primary electrons from bombarding the bottom of the structure causes an opposite trend. The strong anisotropy in the polar angular distribution with respect to the azimuthal angle is calculated at oblique incidence. (author)

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of electron depth distribution and backscattering for carbon films deposited on aluminium as a function of incidence angle and primary energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dapor, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Carbon films are deposited on various substrates (polymers, polyester fabrics, polyester yarns, metal alloys) both for experimental and technological motivations (medical devices, biocompatible coatings, food package and so on). Computational studies of the penetration of electron beams in supported thin film of carbon are very useful in order to compare the simulated results with analytical techniques data (obtained by scanning electron microscopy and/or Auger electron spectroscopy) and investigate the film characteristics. In the present paper, the few keV electron depth distribution and backscattering coefficient for the special case of film of carbon deposited on aluminium are investigated, by a Monte Carlo simulation, as a function of the incidence angle and primary electron energy. The simulated results can be used as a way to evaluate the carbon film thickness by a set of measurements of the backscattering coefficient

  9. Depth Resolution Dependence on Sample Thickness and Incident Energy in On-Axis Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction in Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodu, Etienne; Bouzy, Emmanuel

    2017-12-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction is an emerging technique aimed at producing orientation maps of the structure of materials with a nanometric lateral resolution. This study investigates experimentally the depth resolution of the on-axis configuration, via a twinned silicon bi-crystal sample specifically designed and fabricated. The measured depth resolution varies from 30 to 65 nm in the range 10-30 keV, with a close to linear dependence with incident energy and no dependence with the total sample thickness. The depth resolution is explained in terms of two mechanisms acting concomitantly: generation of Kikuchi diffraction all along the thickness of the sample, associated with continuous absorption on the way out. A model based on the electron mean free path is used to account for the dependence with incident energy of the depth resolution. In addition, based on the results in silicon, the use of the mean absorption coefficient is proposed to predict the depth resolution for any atomic number and incident energy.

  10. Free-Free Transitions of e-H System Inside a Dense Plasma Irradiated by a Laser Field at Very Low Incident Electron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, C.

    2012-01-01

    The free-free transition is studied for an electron-hydrogen in the ground state at low incident energies in the presence of an external homogenous, monochromatic, and linearly polarized laser-field inside a hot dense plasma.The effect of plasma screening is considered in the Debye-Huckel approximation. The calculations are performed in the soft photon limit, assuming that the plasma frequency is much higher than the laser frequency. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the initial and final channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the electron exchange. The laser-assisted differential and total cross sections are calculated for single-photon absorption /emission and no photon exchange in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. The calculations have been carried out for various values of Debye parameter, ranging from 0.005 to 0.12. A strong suppression is noted in the laser-assisted cross sections as compared to the field-free situation. A significant difference is noted for the singlet and triplet cross sections. The suppression is much more in the triplet states.

  11. Effects of Incident Electron Fluence and Energy on the Election Yield Curves and Emission Spectra of Dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Alec; Dennison, J. R.; Thomson, Clint

    2005-01-01

    We present an experimental study of evolution of electron emission yields and spectra as a result of internal charge build up due to electron dose. Reliable total, backscattered and secondary yield curves and electron emission spectra for un-charged insulators using a low fluence, pulsed electron beam (= or emission of charges from insulators.

  12. Free-Free Transitions of the e-H System Inside a Dense Plasma Irradiated by a Laser Field at Very Low Incident-Electron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, C.

    2012-01-01

    The free-free transition is studied for an electron-hydrogen atom in ground state when a low-energy electron (external) is injected into hydrogenic plasma in the presence of an external homogenous, monochromatic, and linearly polarized laser field. The effect of plasma screening is considered in the Debye-Huckel approximation. The calculations are performed in the soft photon limit. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the initial and final channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the electron exchange. The laser-assisted differential and total cross sections are calculated for single-photon absorption or emission and no-photon exchange in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. The calculations have been carried out for various values of Debye parameter, ranging from 0.005 to 0.12. A strong suppression is noted in the laser-assisted cross sections as compared to the field-free situation. A significant difference is noted for the singlet and triplet cross sections. The suppression is much more in the triplet states.

  13. Data on incident solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekaekara, M. P.

    1974-01-01

    Instrumentation for solar irradiance monitoring, and radiation scales are discussed in a survey of incident solar energy data. The absolute accuracy and intrinsic reliability of the values of the solar constant and zero air mass solar spectrum proposed by the Institute of Environmental Sciences as an ASTM standard are evaluated. Extraterrestrial observations are used for deriving solar irradiance data at ground level for widely varying atmospheric parameters, with special reference to air pollution. The effects of diffuse sky radiance and those of varying slopes of the solar energy collecting surface are examined. Average values of solar energy available at different locations in the United States are included.

  14. Technical Note: On the impact of the incident electron beam energy on the primary dose component of flattening filter free photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Palmans, Hugo; Lechner, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    For commercially available linear accelerators (Linacs), the electron energies of flattening filter free (FFF) and flattened (FF) beams are either identical or the electron energy of the FFF beam is increased to match the percentage depth dose curve (PDD) of the FF beam (in reference geometry). This study focuses on the primary dose components of FFF beams for both kinds of settings, studied on the same Linac. The measurements were conducted on a VersaHD Linac (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for both FF and FFF beams with nominal energies of 6 and 10 MV. In the clinical setting of the VersaHD, the energy of FFFM (Matched) beams is set to match the PDDs of the FF beams. In contrast the incident electron beam of the FFFU beam was set to the same energy as for the FF beam. Half value layers (HVLs) and a dual parameter beam quality specifier (DPBQS) were determined. For the 6 MV FFFM beam, HVL and DPBQS values were very similar compared to those of the 6 MV FF beam, while for the 10 MV FFFM and FF beams, only %dd(10)x and HVL values were comparable (differences below 1.5%). This shows that matching the PDD at one depth does not guarantee other beam quality dependent parameters to be matched. For FFFU beams, all investigated beam quality specifiers were significantly different compared to those for FF beams of the same nominal accelerator potential. The DPBQS of the 6 MV FF and FFFM beams was equal within the measurement uncertainty and was comparable to published data of a machine with similar TPR20,10 and %dd(10)x. In contrast to that, the DPBQS's two parameters of the 10 MV FFFM beam were substantially higher compared to those for the 10 MV FF beam. PDD-matched FF and FFF beams of both nominal accelerator potentials were observed to have similar HVL values, indicating similarity of their primary dose components. Using the DPBQS revealed that the mean attenuation coefficient was found to be the same within the uncertainty of 0.8% for 6 MV FF and 6 MV FFFM beams, while for 10 MV

  15. Technical Note: On the impact of the incident electron beam energy on the primary dose component of flattening filter free photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Lechner, Wolfgang; Palmans, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For commercially available linear accelerators (Linacs), the electron energies of flattening filter free (FFF) and flattened (FF) beams are either identical or the electron energy of the FFF beam is increased to match the percentage depth dose curve (PDD) of the FF beam (in reference geometry). This study focuses on the primary dose components of FFF beams for both kinds of settings, studied on the same Linac. Methods: The measurements were conducted on a VersaHD Linac (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for both FF and FFF beams with nominal energies of 6 and 10 MV. In the clinical setting of the VersaHD, the energy of FFF M (Matched) beams is set to match the PDDs of the FF beams. In contrast the incident electron beam of the FFF U beam was set to the same energy as for the FF beam. Half value layers (HVLs) and a dual parameter beam quality specifier (DPBQS) were determined. Results: For the 6 MV FFF M beam, HVL and DPBQS values were very similar compared to those of the 6 MV FF beam, while for the 10 MV FFF M and FF beams, only %dd(10) x and HVL values were comparable (differences below 1.5%). This shows that matching the PDD at one depth does not guarantee other beam quality dependent parameters to be matched. For FFF U beams, all investigated beam quality specifiers were significantly different compared to those for FF beams of the same nominal accelerator potential. The DPBQS of the 6 MV FF and FFF M beams was equal within the measurement uncertainty and was comparable to published data of a machine with similar TPR 20,10 and %dd(10) x . In contrast to that, the DPBQS’s two parameters of the 10 MV FFF M beam were substantially higher compared to those for the 10 MV FF beam. Conclusions: PDD-matched FF and FFF beams of both nominal accelerator potentials were observed to have similar HVL values, indicating similarity of their primary dose components. Using the DPBQS revealed that the mean attenuation coefficient was found to be the same within the uncertainty of

  16. Friction behaviour of TiAlN films around cubic/hexagonal transition: A 2D grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinot, Y. [Université de Haute Alsace, Laboratoire Physique et Mécanique Textiles (EA 4365), F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Pac, M.-J., E-mail: marie-jose.pac@uha.fr [Université de Haute Alsace, Laboratoire Physique et Mécanique Textiles (EA 4365), F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Henry, P. [Université de Haute Alsace, Laboratoire Physique et Mécanique Textiles (EA 4365), F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Rousselot, C. [Université de Franche-Comté, FEMTO-ST (UMR CNRS 6174), F-25211 Montbéliard (France); Odarchenko, Ya.I.; Ivanov, D.A. [Université de Haute Alsace, Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse (UMR 7361 CNRS), F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Ulhaq-Bouillet, C.; Ersen, O. [Université de Strasbourg, Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg (UMR CNRS 7504), F-67087 Strasbourg (France); Tuilier, M.-H. [Université de Haute Alsace, Laboratoire Physique et Mécanique Textiles (EA 4365), F-68093 Mulhouse (France)

    2015-02-27

    The properties at different scales of Ti{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}N films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering from TiAl sintered (S) targets produced by powder metallurgy are compared with those of a set of films previously deposited in the same conditions from mosaic targets (M) made of pure Ti and Al metals. For compositions close to the hcp/fcc transition (around x = 0.6), the friction behaviour, growth directions and organization of crystallized domains are found to be sensitive to the type of target used. The resistance to crack creation is higher for Ti{sub 0.54}Al{sub 0.46}N (S) and Ti{sub 0.38}Al{sub 0.62}N (S) than for Ti{sub 0.50}Al{sub 0.50}N (M) and Ti{sub 0.32}Al{sub 0.68}N (M). From the measurement of mechanical properties, toughness, and wear volumes and from the observation of wear tracks, it is found that films prepared from sintered targets exhibit a better wear resistance. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy in Transmission Electronic Microscopy are used to investigate the long- and short-range orders within the films. The morphology of Ti{sub 0.54}Al{sub 0.46}N (S) film can be considered as an array of crystalline domains having reciprocal-space vectors 111 and 200 directed along the meridian but with random in-plane orientation. Ti{sub 0.38}Al{sub 0.62}N (S) Al-rich film presents a random orientation of the crystalline domains whereas Ti{sub 0.32}Al{sub 0.68}N (M) deposited from composite targets exhibits a well-oriented fibrillar structure. The N K-edge Electron Energy Loss Near Edge Spectra are discussed with previous results of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy, which has evidenced different values of Al–N and Ti–N bond lengths, either octahedral (cubic-like) or tetrahedral (hexagonal-like) within Ti{sub 0.50}Al{sub 0.50}N (M) and Ti{sub 0.32}Al{sub 0.68}N (M) films. For similar compositions, films deposited from sintered alloys contain more nitrogen atoms in octahedral cubic

  17. Single-electron capture for 2-8 keV incident energy and direct scattering at 6 keV in He[sup 2+]-He collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Dagnac, R. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre de Physique Atomique)

    1992-06-14

    We studied the single-electron capture as well as the direct processes occurring when a He[sup 2+] ion is scattered by a He target. Doubly differential cross sections were measured for single-electron capture with a collision energy ranging from 2 to 8 keV and a scattering angle varying from 10' to 3[sup o]30' (laboratory frame). Single-electron capture into excited states of He[sup +] was found to be the dominant process, confirming a previous experimental study. Elastic scattering and ionization differential cross sections were measured for E = 6 keV. (Author).

  18. Radiation produced by electrons incident on molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehlman, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    The work described in this thesis deals with light intensity measurements of emission spectra (1850-9000 A) produced by a continuous or pulsed beam of monoenergetic electrons (0 - 2000 eV) incident on a variety of molecular gases like H 2 , D 2 , H 2 O, HCl, NH 3 and several hydrocarbons. The emission spectra are dominated by fluorescence from excited fragments produced via dissociative excitation, besides fluorescence from excited parent molecules themselves. The experimental results thus obtained are expressed in terms of emission cross sections and lifetimes

  19. Electron energies in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahan, G.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States) Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1991-07-10

    The modern era of electron-electron interactions began a decade ago. Plummer's group initiated a program of using angular resolved photoemission to examine the band structure of the simple metals. Beginning with aluminum, and carrying on to sodium and potassium, they always found that the occupied energy bands were much narrower than expected. For example, the compressed energy bands for metallic potassium suggest a band effective mass of m* = 1.33m{sub e}. This should be compared to the band mass found from optical conductivity m*/m{sub e} = 1.01 {plus minus} 0.01. The discrepancy between these results is startling. It was this great difference which started my group doing calculations. Our program was two-fold. On one hand, we reanalyzed the experimental data, in order to see if Plummer's result was an experimental artifact. On the other hand, we completely redid the electron-electron self-energy calculations for simple metals, using the most modern choices of local-field corrections and vertex corrections. Our results will be reported in these lectures. They can be summarized as following: Our calculations give the same effective masses as the older calculations, so the theory is relatively unchanged; Our analysis of the experiments suggests that the recent measurements of band narrowing are an experimental artifact. 38 refs., 9 figs.

  20. NaI(Tl) electron energy resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mengesha, W

    2002-01-01

    NaI(Tl) electron energy resolution eta sub e was measured using the Modified Compton Coincidence Technique (MCCT). The MCCT allowed detection of nearly monoenergetic internal electrons resulting from the scattering of incident 662 keV gamma rays within a primary NaI(Tl) detector. Scattered gamma rays were detected using a secondary HPGe detector in a coincidence mode. Measurements were carried out for electron energies ranging from 16 to 438 keV, by varying the scattering angle. Measured HPGe coincidence spectra were deconvolved to determine the scattered energy spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector. Subsequently, the NaI(Tl) electron energy spectra were determined by subtracting the energy of scattered spectra from the incident source energy (662 keV). Using chi-squared minimization, iterative deconvolution of the internal electron energy spectra from the measured NaI(Tl) spectra was then used to determine eta sub e at the electron energy of interest. eta sub e values determined using this technique represent va...

  1. Energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons produced under the impact of 5 keV electrons with thick Al, Ti, Ag, W and Pt targets are measured. The energy range of backscattered electrons is considered between EB = 50 eV and 5000. eV. The angle of incidence α and take-off angle θ are ...

  2. Energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons produced under the impact of 5 keV electrons with thick Al, Ti, Ag, W and Pt targets are measured. The energy range of backscattered electrons is considered between B = 50 eV and 5000 eV. The angle of incidence α and take-off angle are chosen to have ...

  3. eqpair: Electron energy distribution calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, Paolo S.

    2018-02-01

    eqpair computes the electron energy distribution resulting from a balance between heating and direct acceleration of particles, and cooling processes. Electron-positron pair balance, bremstrahlung, and Compton cooling, including external soft photon input, are among the processes considered, and the final electron distribution can be hybrid, thermal, or non-thermal.

  4. Incident energy dependence of pt correlations at relativistic energies

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, J; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bharadwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhatia, V S; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Daugherity, M; De Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Derevshchikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta, M R; Mazumdar; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; González, J E; Gos, H; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D P; Guertin, S M; Guo, Y; Sen-Gupta, A; Gutíerrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jedynak, M; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kowalik, K L; Krämer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krüger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lehocka, S; Le Vine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, L; Liu, Q J; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; López-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J N; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnik, Yu M; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnár, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Yu A; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevozchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M V; Potrebenikova, E V; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C A; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D M; Reid, J G; Reinnarth, J; Renault, G; Retière, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Savin, I; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shestermanov, K E; Shimansky, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sørensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E R; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T J; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Van Leeuwen, M; Van der Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N

    2005-01-01

    We present results for two-particle transverse momentum correlations, , as a function of event centrality for Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 20, 62, 130, and 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We observe correlations decreasing with centrality that are similar at all four incident energies. The correlations multiplied by the multiplicity density increase with incident energy and the centrality dependence may show evidence of processes such as thermalization, minijet production, or the saturation of transverse flow. The square root of the correlations divided by the event-wise average transverse momentum per event shows little or no beam energy dependence and generally agrees with previous measurements at the Super Proton Synchrotron.

  5. Experimental investigation about energy balance of electron emission from materials under electron impacts at low energy: application to silver, graphite and SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villemant, M.; Sarrailh, P.; Belhaj, M.; Garrigues, L.; Boniface, C.

    2017-12-01

    The energy balance measurement of electron emission at a wall submitted to electron impact at low incident energy is a topic of interest for miscellaneous technological applications. This article points out the experimental protocol, biases corrections and post-process needed to obtain reproducible and quantitative electron emission measurements. The measurements have been performed for incident electrons energy between 5 eV and 105 eV and for three samples materials: silver, graphite and SiO2. These measurements show that wall absorbs more energy at high incident electrons energy and that graphite absorbs more energy than silver, than SiO2. Results are presented for mono-energetic incident electron beam and for a Lambertian energy distribution. Analytical laws fitted from experimental results and applicable for modelling issue are proposed for a Lambertian distribution of incident electrons.

  6. Electron loss from fast partially stripped C and O ions incident on crystal targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, Hiroshi E-mail: kudo@bukko.bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Takeda, Ken-ichi; Suguri, Takuya; Iwazaki, Wataru; Sakurai, Chizuko; Arano, Isamu; Numazawa, Shuhei; Seki, Seiji

    2003-07-01

    We have measured energy spectra of electrons emitted in a backward direction of Si and Ge crystals while bombarded by 2.5 and 3.5 MeV/u C{sup 4+}, C{sup 6+}, O{sup 5+} and O{sup 8+}. Under <1 1 0> channeling incidence conditions, the loss electron yield from the partially stripped ions is appreciably reduced (by a factor of 0.5-0.6 for C{sup 4+}) relative to the non-channeling case. This reduction can be directly related to the reduced charge states of the channeled ions in the crystals. Furthermore, the evolution of the pre-equilibrium charge states of the incident ions has been deduced from a comparison of the effective nuclear charges for the loss electron yield, the low-energy electron yield, and the binary-encounter electron yield reported previously.

  7. Low energy electron scattering from fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.; Silva, Daniel G.M.; Coelho, Rafael F.; Duque, Humberto V.; Santos, Rodrigo R. dos; Ribeiro, Thiago M.

    2011-01-01

    no reported experimental electron scattering TCSs for C2H5OH in the energy range of this work. The study of resonant structure in ethanol using metastable excitation by electron impact was done with another apparatus, also assembled recently at UFJF, in which the incident electron beam has an energy which is adjustable over the range 5-200 eV. A crossed-beam geometry was used and with a suitable placed detector so that a high fraction of the target excited to metastable levels was detected. That experiment allow us observe directly the shapes and widths of resonances and for detecting broad resonances

  8. Low energy electron scattering from fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.; Silva, Daniel G.M.; Coelho, Rafael F.; Duque, Humberto V.; Santos, Rodrigo R. dos; Ribeiro, Thiago M. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Yates, Brent; Hong, Ling; Khakoo, Murtadha A. [California State University at Fullerton, CA (US). Physics Department; Bettega, Marcio H.F. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Costa, Romarly F. da [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas; Lima, Marco A.P. [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE/CNPEM), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    no reported experimental electron scattering TCSs for C2H5OH in the energy range of this work. The study of resonant structure in ethanol using metastable excitation by electron impact was done with another apparatus, also assembled recently at UFJF, in which the incident electron beam has an energy which is adjustable over the range 5-200 eV. A crossed-beam geometry was used and with a suitable placed detector so that a high fraction of the target excited to metastable levels was detected. That experiment allow us observe directly the shapes and widths of resonances and for detecting broad resonances

  9. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent ion-surface interaction at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A new spectroscopy based on the resonant coherently induced electron loss to the continuum in ion-surface scattering under grazing incidence is proposed. A series of peaks, corresponding to the energy differences determined by the resonant interaction with the rows of atoms in the surface, is predicted to appear in the energy distribution of electrons emitted from electronic states bound to the probe. Calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with a glancing angle of 0--2 mrad show a total yield close to 1

  10. Diffraction of high energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, A.

    1981-10-01

    The diffraction of electrons by a crystal is examined to study its structure. As the electron-substance interaction is strong, it must be treated in a dynamic manner. Using the N waves theory and physical optics the base equations giving the wave at the outlet are deduced for a perfect crystal and their equivalence is shown. The more complex case of an imperfect crystal is then envisaged in these two approaches. In both cases, only the diffraction of high energy electrons ( > 50 KeV) are considered since in the diffraction of slow electrons back scattering cannot be ignored. Taking into account an increasingly greater number of beams, through fast calculations computer techniques, enables images to be simulated in very varied conditions. The general use of the Fast Fourier Transform has given a clear cut practical advantage to the multi-layer method [fr

  11. Production of X-ray transition radiation with relativistic electrons propagating at grazing incidence

    CERN Document Server

    Couillaud, C

    2002-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the production of X-ray transition radiation when a relativistic electron crosses the interface between two media of different permittivities at the grazing incidence. The production yields are derived analytically when a thick interface is considered and are compared with those obtained when the electron crosses the interface at normal incidence. The production of X-ray photons having an energy between two photoabsorption edges or close to a photoabsorption edge is also investigated. The main features of the transition radiation produced are then exhibited and it is shown that the intensity can be increased by many orders of magnitude. We also show that, at grazing incidence, the backward transition radiation has an intensity close to the forward emission one, contrary to the normal incidence case. The production of quasi-monochromatic radiation is also presented. Finally, the production of X-ray transition radiation using a multilayer radiator is considered and compared in both ...

  12. Secondary Electron Emission from Solid Hydrogen and Deuterium Resulting from Incidence of keV Electrons and Hydrogen Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.

    1977-01-01

    The secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient δ was measured for solid hydrogen and deuterium resulting from the normal incidence of 0.5–3‐keV electrons and 4–10‐keV H+, H2+, H3+, and D3+ ions. The SEE coefficients for solid hydrogen are 60–70% of those for solid deuterium, and the coefficients....... The losses to molecular states will be largest for hydrogen, so that the SEE coefficients are smallest for solid hydrogen, as was observed. For the incidence of ions, the values of δ for the different molecular ions agree when the number of secondary electrons per incident atom is plotted versus the velocity...... or the stopping power of the incident particles. Measurements were also made for oblique incidence of H+ ions on solid deuterium for angles of incidence up to 75°. A correction could be made for the emission of secondary ions by also measuring the current calorimetrically. At largest energies, the angular...

  13. Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, H.; Cartwright, D. C.; Trajmar, S.

    1979-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine, for energy losses from 0 to 17.0 eV, have been taken at incident electron energies of 30, 50, and 90 eV and scattering angles from 5 to 140 deg. Features in the spectra above 11.5 eV energy loss agree well with the assignments recently made from optical spectroscopy. Excitations of many of the eleven repulsive valence excited electronic states are observed and their location correlates reasonably well with recent theoretical results. Several of these excitations have been observed for the first time and four features, for which there are no identifications, appear in the spectra.

  14. Low-energy electron potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobst, Johannes; Kautz, Jaap; Mytiliniou, Maria; Tromp, Rudolf M; van der Molen, Sense Jan

    2017-10-01

    In a lot of systems, charge transport is governed by local features rather than being a global property as suggested by extracting a single resistance value. Consequently, techniques that resolve local structure in the electronic potential are crucial for a detailed understanding of electronic transport in realistic devices. Recently, we have introduced a new potentiometry method based on low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) that utilizes characteristic features in the reflectivity spectra of layered materials [1]. Performing potentiometry experiments in LEEM has the advantage of being fast, offering a large field of view and the option to zoom in and out easily, and of being non-invasive compared to scanning-probe methods. However, not all materials show clear features in their reflectivity spectra. Here we, therefore, focus on a different version of low-energy electron potentiometry (LEEP) that uses the mirror mode transition, i.e. the drop in electron reflectivity around zero electron landing energy when they start to interact with the sample rather than being reflected in front of it. This transition is universal and sensitive to the local electrostatic surface potential (either workfunction or applied potential). It can consequently be used to perform LEEP experiments on a broader range of material compared to the method described in Ref[1]. We provide a detailed description of the experimental setup and demonstrate LEEP on workfunction-related intrinsic potential variations on the Si(111) surface and for a metal-semiconductor-metal junction with external bias applied. In the latter, we visualize the Schottky effect at the metal-semiconductor interface. Finally, we compare how robust the two LEEP techniques discussed above are against image distortions due to sample inhomogeneities or contamination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dependence of ECH deposition profile on the modeling of incident wave energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kritz, A.H.; Hsuan, H.; Matsuda, K.

    1986-06-01

    The ray tracing code, TORAY, is used to investigate the importance of modeling assumptions utilized in describing Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH). In particular, we examine the dependence of the ECH deposition profile on the antenna pattern. We demonstrate that different assumptions for representing the incident wave energy by a finite number of rays lead to significantly different results for the energy deposition profile

  16. Energy spectrum of Compton scattering of laser photons on relativistic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Hiroaki; Yoneda, Yasuharu

    1976-01-01

    The high energy photons in gamma-ray region are obtainable by the Compton scattering of laser photons on relativistic electrons. But the motion of the electrons in the storage ring is not necessarily uniform. In the study of the uneven effect, the energy distribution of scattered photons is derived from the assumed momentum distribution of incident electrons. It is generally impossible to derive the momentum distribution of incident electrons from the energy spectrum of scattered photons. The additional conditions which make this possible in a special case are considered. A calculational method is examined for deriving the energy spectrum of scattered photons from the assumed momentum distribution of incident electrons. (Mori, K.)

  17. Electron emission from materials at low excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urma, N.; Kijek, M.; Millar, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: An experimental system has been designed and developed with the purpose of measuring the total electron emission yield from materials at low energy excitation. In the first instance the reliability of the system was checked by measuring the total electron emission yield for a well defined surface (aluminium 99.45%). The obtained data was in the expected range given by the literature, and consequently the system will be used further for measuring the total electron yield for a range of materials with interest in the instrumentation industry. We intend to measure the total electron emission yield under electron bombardment as a function of incident electron energy up to 1200 eV, angle of incidence, state of the surface and environment to which the surface has been exposed. Dependence of emission on total electron irradiated dose is also of interest. For many practical application of the 'Secondary Electron Emission', the total electron yield is desired to be as large as possible. The above phenomenon has practical applicability in electron multiplier tube and Scanning electron microscopy - when by means of the variation of the yield of the emitted electrons one may produce visible images of small sample areas. The electron multiplier tube, is a device which utilises the above effect to detect and amplify both single particles and low currents streams of charged particles. The majority of electron tubes use electrons with low energy, hundreds of eV. Not a lot has been published in the literature about this regime and also about the emission when the impinging electrons have small energy, up to 1 KeV. The information obtained from the experimental measurements concerning the total electron emission yield is used to asses the investigated materials as a potential electron emitting surfaces or dynodes in an electron multiplier tube

  18. Low-energy electron scattering from methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundschu, C.T.; Gibson, J.C.; Buckman, S.J.; Brunger, M.J.; Gianturco, F.A.

    1997-01-01

    Absolute differential cross sections for elastic scattering and vibrational excitation (ν 2.4 , ν 1.3 ) of CH 4 have been measured at incident energies between 0.6 and 5.4 eV. These cross sections have also been extrapolated and integrated in order to derive integral and momentum transfer cross sections which are compared with the results of previous single-collision and electron swarm experiments. Elastic differential cross sections have also been calculated using a body-fixed (BF), single-centre expansion (SCE) for the close-coupled (CC) equations. There is excellent agreement between the present data and the most recent elastic scattering results of Boesten and Tanaka, but substantial discrepancies between these two data sets and several previous measurements. There is also excellent agreement at most energies between the present measured and calculated elastic cross sections. (author)

  19. Near-surface electron acceleration during intense laser-solid interaction in the grazing incidence regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryakov, D. A.; Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    When a relativistically intense p-polarized laser pulse is grazingly incident onto a planar solid-state target, a slightly superluminal field structure is formed near the target surface due to the incident and reflected waves superposition. This field structure can both extract the electrons from the target and accelerate them. It is theoretically shown that the acceleration is possible and stable for a wide range of electron initial conditions. Particle-in-cell simulations confirm that this mechanism can actually take place for realistic parameters. As a result, the electron bunches with a charge of tens of nC and GeV-level energy can be produced using a laser intensity 1021-1022 W/cm2. It is also shown that the presence of a preplasma can improve acceleration, which becomes possible because of more efficient electron injection into the accelerating field structure.

  20. Total electron scattering cross section of Fluorocarbons at intermediate electron energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palihawadana, Prasanga; Villela, Gilberto; Ariyasinghe, Wickramasinghe

    2008-10-01

    Total electron scattering cross sections (TCS) of Tetrafluoromethane (CF4), Trifluoromethane (CHF3), Hexafluoroethane (C2F6) and Octafluorocyclobutane (C4F8) have been measured using the linear transmission technique for impact energies 0.10 -- 4.00 keV. These TCS are compared to existing experimental and theoretical TCS in the literature. Based on the present measurements, an empirical formula is developed to predict the TCS of fluorocarbons as a function of incident electron energy.

  1. Energy electron analyzers raster electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dremova, N.N.; Raj, Eh.I.; Robinson, V.N.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrometers of back-scattered and secondary electrons used in a raster electron microscope designed to study multilayer structures and potential relief at the solid-state body surface, are described. Their possible applications are demonstrated using microelectronics devices as an example

  2. Electron energy deposition in a multilayered carbon--uranium--carbon configuration and in semi-infinite uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, G.J.; Miller, G.H.; Halbleib, J.A. Sr.

    1977-10-01

    Absolute measurements of electron energy deposition profiles are reported here for electrons incident on the multilayer configuration of carbon-uranium-carbon. These measurements were for normally incident source electrons at an energy of 1.0 MeV. To complement these measurements, electron energy deposition profiles were also obtained for electrons incident on semi-infinite uranium as a function of energy and angle of incidence. The results are compared with the predictions of a coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport model. In general, the agreement between theory and experiment is good. This work was in support of the Reactor Safety Research Equation-of-State Program

  3. Low-energy electron transmission through high aspect ratio Al O nanocapillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milosavljević, A.R.; Jureta, J.; Víkor, G.

    2009-01-01

    Electron transmission through insulating AlO nanocapillaries of different diameters (40 and 270 nm) and 15 μm length has been investigated for low-energy electrons (2-120 V). The total intensity of transmitted current weakly depends on the incident electron energy and tilt angle defined with resp......Electron transmission through insulating AlO nanocapillaries of different diameters (40 and 270 nm) and 15 μm length has been investigated for low-energy electrons (2-120 V). The total intensity of transmitted current weakly depends on the incident electron energy and tilt angle defined...

  4. Power Electronics, Energy Harvesting and Renewable Energies Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The research in the Power Electronics, Energy Harvesting and Renewable Energies Laboratory (PEHREL) is mainly focused on investigation, modeling, simulation, design,...

  5. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  6. GEANT4 simulation of electron energy deposition in extended media

    CERN Document Server

    Kadri, O; Gharbi, F; Trabelsi, A

    2007-01-01

    The present work demonstrates that GEANT4 yields a consistent description of electron transport processes in semi-infinite homogeneous and heterogeneous extended media. This comparison covers the e− energy deposition profiles in a range of elements from aluminum to tantalum through molybdenum at source energies from 0.3 to 1.0 MeV and at incident angles from 0° to 60°. The good agreement between simulation results and data confirms that the Monte Carlo used code is capable of accurate electron beam energy deposition calculation even under such conditions.

  7. Very low energy scanning electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Hovorka, Miloš; Konvalina, Ivo; Mikmeková, Šárka; Müllerová, Ilona

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 645, č. 1 (2011), s. 46-54 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE08012 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * low energy electrons * cathode lens * very low energy STEM * grain contrast Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011

  8. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., ∼0.9 for 53 MeV B 4+ and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces

  9. Reactions induced by low energy electrons in cryogenic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, A.D.; Sanche, L.

    2003-01-01

    We review recent research on reactions (including dissociation) initiated by low-energy electron bombardment of monolayer and multilayer molecular solids at cryogenic temperatures. With incident electrons of energies below 20 eV, dissociation is observed by the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of anions from target films and is attributed to the processes of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and to dipolar dissociation. It is shown that DEA to condensed molecules is sensitive to environmental factors such as the identity of co-adsorbed species and film morphology. The effects of image-charge induced polarization on cross-sections for DEA to CH3Cl are also discussed. Taking as examples, the electron-induced production of CO within multilayer films of methanol and acetone, it is shown that the detection of electronic excited states by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy can be used to monitor electron beam damage. In particular, the incident energy dependence of the CO indicates that below 19 eV, dissociation proceeds via the decay of transient negative ions (TNI) into electronically excited dissociative states. The electron induced dissociation of biomolecular targets is also considered, taking as examples the ribose analog tetrahydrofuran and DNA bases adenine and thymine, cytosine and guanine. The ESD of anions from such films also show dissociation via the formation of TNI. In multilayer molecular solids, fragment species resulting from dissociation, may react with neighboring molecules, as is demonstrated in anion ESD measurements from films containing O 2 and various hydrocarbon molecules. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements reported for electron irradiated monolayers of H 2 O and CF 4 on a Si - H passivated surface further show that DEA is an important initial step in the electron-induced chemisorption of fragment species

  10. Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, U. M.; Lee, K. B.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    The use of renewable energy sources are increased because of the depletion of natural resources and the increasing pollution level from energy production. The wind energy and the solar energy are most widely used among the renewable energy sources. Power electronics is needed in almost all kinds...... of renewable energy system. It controls the renewable source and interfaces with the load effectively, which can be grid-connected or van work in stand-alone mode. In this presentation, overview of wind and photovoltaic energy systems are introduced. Next, the power electronic circuits behind the most common...

  11. Tests of a grazing-incidence ring resonator free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, D.H.; Laucks, M.L.; Lowrey, A.R.; Adamski, J.L.; Pistoresi, D.J.; Shoffstall, D.R.; Bentz, M.P.; Burns, R.H.; Guha, J.; Sun, K.; Tomita, W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the Boeing free-electron laser (FEL) optical cavity that has been changed from a simple concentric cavity using two spherical mirrors to a larger grazing-incidence ring resonator. The new resonator consists of two mirror telescopes located at each end of the wiggler with a round-trip path length of approximately 133 m. Each telescope is a grazing-incidence hyperboloid followed by a normal-incidence paraboloid. Initial tests showed that poorly positioned ring focus and unreliable pointing alignment resulted in reduced and structured FEL output. (First lasing operation occurred on March 23 and 24, 1990.) Later efforts concentrated on improving the resonator alignment techniques and lowering the single-pass losses. FEL performance and reliability have significantly improved due to better ring alignment. The alignment procedure and recent lasing results are described. The effect the electron beam has on lasing is also discussed. Measurements are presented showing how FEL temporal output and wavelength are sensitive to electron beam energy variations

  12. Attainment of Electron Beam Suitable for Medium Energy Electron Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seletskiy, Sergei M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling of charged particle beams is a well-established technique at electron energies of up to 300 keV. However, up to the present time the advance of electron cooling to the MeV-range energies has remained a purely theoretical possibility. The electron cooling project at Fermilab has recently demonstrated the ¯rst cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring, and therefore, has proved the validity of the idea of relativistic electron cool- ing. The Recycler Electron Cooler (REC) is the key component of the Teva- tron Run II luminosity upgrade project. Its performance depends critically on the quality of electron beam. A stable electron beam of 4.3 MeV car- rying 0.5 A of DC current is required. The beam suitable for the Recycler Electron Cooler must have an angular spread not exceeding 200 ¹rad. The full-scale prototype of the REC was designed, built and tested at Fermilab in the Wideband laboratory to study the feasibility of attaining the high-quality electron beam. In this thesis I describe various aspects of development of the Fermilab electron cooling system, and the techniques used to obtain the electron beam suitable for the cooling process. In particular I emphasize those aspects of the work for which I was principally responsible.

  13. Dose characteristics of high-energy electrons, muons and photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britvich, G.I.; Krupnyj, G.I.; Peleshko, V.N.; Rastsvetalov, Ya.N.

    1980-01-01

    Differential distribution of energy release at different depth of tissue-equivalent phantoms (plexiglas, polystyrene, polyethylene) at the energy of incident electrons, muons of 0.2-40 GeV and photons with the mean energy of 3.6 GeV are measured. The error of experimental results does not exceed 7%. On the basis of the data obtained dose characteristics of electrons, muons and photons for standard geometry are estimated. For all types of irradiation the maximum value of specific equivalent dose, nremxcm 2 /part. is presented. It is shown that published values of specific equivalent dose of electron radiation are higher in all the investigated energy range from 0.2 to 40 GeV, and for muon radiation a good agreement with the present experiment is observed. The highly precise results obtained which cover the wide dynamic range according to the energy of incident particles can serve as the basis for reconsidering the existing recommendations for dose characteristics of electron radiation [ru

  14. Electron correlation energy in confined two-electron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.L. [Chemistry Program, Centre College, 600 West Walnut Street, Danville, KY 40422 (United States); Montgomery, H.E., E-mail: ed.montgomery@centre.ed [Chemistry Program, Centre College, 600 West Walnut Street, Danville, KY 40422 (United States); Sen, K.D. [School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046 (India); Thompson, D.C. [Chemistry Systems and High Performance Computing, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharamaceuticals Inc., 900 Ridgebury Road, Ridgefield, CT 06877 (United States)

    2010-09-27

    Radial, angular and total correlation energies are calculated for four two-electron systems with atomic numbers Z=0-3 confined within an impenetrable sphere of radius R. We report accurate results for the non-relativistic, restricted Hartree-Fock and radial limit energies over a range of confinement radii from 0.05-10a{sub 0}. At small R, the correlation energies approach limiting values that are independent of Z while at intermediate R, systems with Z{>=}1 exhibit a characteristic maximum in the correlation energy resulting from an increase in the angular correlation energy which is offset by a decrease in the radial correlation energy.

  15. Electron capture and energy-gain spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taulbjerg, K.

    1989-01-01

    The applicability of translation energy spectroscopy as a tool to determine individual reaction cross sections in atomic collisions is analyzed with special emphasis on the electron capture process in highly charged ion collisions. A condition is derived to separate between higher collision energies where translation energy spectroscopy is problem free and lower energies where strong overlap of individual spectra features prohibits an analysis of the total translation energy spectrum by means of a simple deconvolution procedure. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Energy Saving and Efficient Energy Use By Power Electronic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Wang, Huai; Davari, Pooya

    2017-01-01

    energy in different applications. This chapter will give an overview of challenges and possibilities in terms of energy saving and also energy efficient use. This includes a discussion on high efficiency power electronics devices and the systems they are used for energy loss reduction. The key enabling......In the development of the modern society, one of the key factors is to save energy in order to become more independent of other energy resources. Two important approaches can be taken—one is to change behavior and thereby save energy—the second one is to develop new technology which is able to save...... technologies are power electronics, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) as well as systems to carry the electrical energy through power transmission, conversion and distribution. A couple of examples will be given to demonstrate the energy saving possibilities by power electronics systems...

  17. Power electronics for renewable energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2009-01-01

    sources from the conventional, fossil (and short term) based energy sources to renewable energy resources. Another is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss some of the most emerging renewable energy sources...

  18. Ultrafast Electron Dynamics in Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponseca, Carlito S; Chábera, Pavel; Uhlig, Jens; Persson, Petter; Sundström, Villy

    2017-08-23

    Electrons are the workhorses of solar energy conversion. Conversion of the energy of light to electricity in photovoltaics, or to energy-rich molecules (solar fuel) through photocatalytic processes, invariably starts with photoinduced generation of energy-rich electrons. The harvesting of these electrons in practical devices rests on a series of electron transfer processes whose dynamics and efficiencies determine the function of materials and devices. To capture the energy of a photogenerated electron-hole pair in a solar cell material, charges of opposite sign have to be separated against electrostatic attractions, prevented from recombining and being transported through the active material to electrodes where they can be extracted. In photocatalytic solar fuel production, these electron processes are coupled to chemical reactions leading to storage of the energy of light in chemical bonds. With the focus on the ultrafast time scale, we here discuss the light-induced electron processes underlying the function of several molecular and hybrid materials currently under development for solar energy applications in dye or quantum dot-sensitized solar cells, polymer-fullerene polymer solar cells, organometal halide perovskite solar cells, and finally some photocatalytic systems.

  19. High energy electron multibeam diffraction and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, Alain.

    1980-04-01

    The different theories of dynamical scattering of electrons are firstly reviewed with special reference to their basis and the validity of the different approximations. Then after a short description of the different experimental set ups, structural analysis and the investigation of the optical potential by means of high energy electrons will be surveyed

  20. Electron energy-distribution functions in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitchford, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical calculation of the electron energy distribution functions in the regime of drift tube experiments is discussed. The discussion is limited to constant applied fields and values of E/N (ratio of electric field strength to neutral density) low enough that electron growth due to ionization can be neglected

  1. Relationships between energy fluence and energy incident on, emitted by or imparted to a body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, C A

    1979-11-01

    From knowledge of the energy and angular distribution of the fluence around a body, the energy incident on, emitted by or imparted to a body can be calculated. The calculation is easily performed if the quantity 'vectorial fluence' is used. Examples taken from the literature are used to illustrate the erroneous results obtained by integrating energy fluence over area instead of integrating the scalar product of vectorial energy fluence and vectorial area.

  2. Single electron detachment of carbon group and oxygen group elements incident on helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yongyi; Li Guangwu; Gao Yinghui; Yang Enbo; Gao Mei; Lu Fuquan; Zhang Xuemei

    2006-01-01

    The absolute single electron detachment (SED) cross sections of carbon group elements C - , Si - , Ge - in the energy range of 0.05-0.29 a.u. (5 keV-30 keV) and oxygen group elements O - and S - 0.08-0.27 a.u. (5 keV-30 keV), incident on helium are measured with growth rate method. In our energy region, the SED cross sections of C - , Si - , S - and Ge - increase with the projectiles velocity, at the same time, O - cross sections reach a conspicuous maximum at 0.18 a.u. Some abnormal behavior occurs in measurement of SED cross sections for the oxygen group collision with helium. Our results have been compared with a previous work

  3. Low Energy Electron Cooler for NICA Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, A P

    2017-01-01

    BINP has developed an electron cooler to increase the ion accumulation efficiency in the NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility) heavy ion booster (JINR, Dubna). Adjustment of the cooler magnetic system provides highly homogeneous magnetic field in the cooling section B trans/B long ≤ 4∙10-5 which is vital for efficient electron cooling. First experiments with an electron beam performed at BINP demonstrated the target DC current of 500 mA and electron energy 6 keV.

  4. Stability of electron energy in the Fermilab electron cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemyakin, A.; Carlson, K.; Prost, L.R.; Saewert, G.; /Fermilab

    2009-02-01

    A powerful electron beam (4.3 MeV, 0.1 A DC) generated by an electrostatic accelerator has been used at Fermilab for three years to cool antiprotons in the Recycler ring. For electron cooling to be effective, the electron energy should not deviate from its optimum value by more than 500V. The main tool for studying the energy stability is the electron beam position in a high-dispersion area. The energy ripple (frequencies above 0.2 Hz) was found to be less than 150 eV rms; the main cause of the ripple is the fluctuations of the chain current. In addition, the energy can drift to up to several keV that is traced to two main sources. One of them is a drift of the charging current, and another is a temperature dependence of generating voltmeter readings. The paper describes the efforts to reach the required level of stability as well as the setup, diagnostics, results of measurements, and operational experience.

  5. Stability of electron energy in the Fermilab electron cooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shemyakin, A.; Carlson, K.; Prost, L.R.; Saewert, G.

    2009-01-01

    A powerful electron beam (4.3 MeV, 0.1 A DC) generated by an electrostatic accelerator has been used at Fermilab for three years to cool antiprotons in the Recycler ring. For electron cooling to be effective, the electron energy should not deviate from its optimum value by more than 500V. The main tool for studying the energy stability is the electron beam position in a high-dispersion area. The energy ripple (frequencies above 0.2 Hz) was found to be less than 150 eV rms; the main cause of the ripple is the fluctuations of the chain current. In addition, the energy can drift to up to several keV that is traced to two main sources. One of them is a drift of the charging current, and another is a temperature dependence of generating voltmeter readings. The paper describes the efforts to reach the required level of stability as well as the setup, diagnostics, results of measurements, and operational experience

  6. Electron scattering from sodium at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J.; McCarthy, I.E.

    1986-10-01

    A comprehensive comparison is made between theoretical calculations and experimental data for intermediate energy (≥ 10 eV) electron scattering from sodium vapour. The theoretical predictions of coupled-channels calculations (including one, two or four channels) do not agree with experimental values of the differential cross sections for elastic scattering or the resonant 3s to 3p excitation. Increasingly-more-sophisticated calculations, incorporating electron correlations in the target states, and also including core-excited states in the close-coupling expansion, are done at a few selected energies in an attempt to isolate the cause of the discrepancies between theory and experiment. It is found that these more-sophisticated calculations give essentially the same results as the two- and four-channel calculations using Hartree-Fock wavefunctions. Comparison of the sodium high-energy elastic differential cross sections with those of neon suggests that the sodium differential cross section experiments may suffer from systematic errors. There is also disagreement, at the higher energies, between theoretical values for the scattering parameters and those that are derived from laser-excited superelastic scattering and electron photon coincidence experiments. When allowance is made for the finite acceptance angle of the electron spectrometers used in the experiments by convoluting the theory with a function representing the distribution of electrons entering the electron spectrometer it is found that the magnitudes of the differences between theory and experiment are reduced

  7. Simulations of High-Energy Electron Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, Alexei V; Bruhwiler, David L; Eidelman, Yury I; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Malitsky, Nikolay; Meshkov, Igor; Sidorin, Anatoly O; Smirnov, Alexander V; Troubnikov, Grigory

    2005-01-01

    High-energy electron cooling of RHIC presents many unique features and challenges. An accurate estimate of the cooling times requires a detailed calculation of the cooling process, which takes place simultaneously with various diffusive mechanisms in RHIC. In addition, many unexplored effects of high-energy cooling in a collider complicate the task of getting very accurate estimates of cooling times. To address these high-energy cooling issues, a detailed study of cooling dynamics based on computer codes is underway at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper, we present an update on code development and its application to the high-energy cooling dynamics studies for RHIC.

  8. SIMULATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV,A.V.; BEN-ZVI,I.; EIDELMAN, YU.; LITVINENKO, V.; MALITSKY, N.

    2005-05-16

    High-energy electron cooling of RHIC presents many unique features and challenges. An accurate estimate of the cooling times requires a detailed calculation of the cooling process, which takes place simultaneously with various diffusive mechanisms in RHIC. In addition, many unexplored effects of high-energy cooling in a collider complicate the task of getting very accurate estimates of cooling times. To address these high-energy cooling issues, a detailed study of cooling dynamics based on computer codes is underway at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper, we present an update on code development and its application to the high-energy cooling dynamics studies for RHIC.

  9. SIMULATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BEN-ZVI, I.; EIDELMAN, YU.; LITVINENKO, V.; MALITSKY, N.

    2005-01-01

    High-energy electron cooling of RHIC presents many unique features and challenges. An accurate estimate of the cooling times requires a detailed calculation of the cooling process, which takes place simultaneously with various diffusive mechanisms in RHIC. In addition, many unexplored effects of high-energy cooling in a collider complicate the task of getting very accurate estimates of cooling times. To address these high-energy cooling issues, a detailed study of cooling dynamics based on computer codes is underway at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper, we present an update on code development and its application to the high-energy cooling dynamics studies for RHIC

  10. Electronic market places in the energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mons, L.

    2001-12-01

    Electronic market places in the energy domain occurred at the end of the 90's in the US and have started to develop in Europe in the year 2000. About 60 platforms are registered today and this development can be explained by the advantages raised by such an infrastructure: simplification of purchase procedures, reduction of delays in the purchase decision, reduction of administrative costs etc.. However, today none of these electronic market places is profitable and several have closed down. On the other hand, this tool will certainly become necessary in the future and all energy actors are developing projects in this way. This study analyzes the electronic market places phenomenon in the energy domain using 10 market places examples with their key-factors of success. It draws out a complete status of the initiatives developed today and presents some scenarios of evolution. (J.S.)

  11. Energy and electron transfers in photosensitive chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuizhu; Zeng, Fang; Zhu, Hongping; Tong, Zhen

    2005-02-23

    Novel photosensitive chitosan was synthesized. The modified chitosan contains photoactive anthracene chromophore moieties. Because of the presence of anthracene chromophores, the polymer absorbs light in the UV-vis spectral region. Electronically excited polymeric chromophores could participate in energy and electron transfer processes to the suitable acceptor molecules. The photosensitive chitosan developed herein could could act as an efficient photosensitizer and lead to the application of the environmentally friendly photocatalytic system for an efficient degradation of a wide range of pollutants.

  12. Methods for measurement of electron emission yield under low energy electron-irradiation by collector method and Kelvin probe method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tondu, Thomas; Belhaj, Mohamed; Inguimbert, Virginie [Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France and Fondation STAE, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234-31432, Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2010-09-15

    Secondary electron emission yield of gold under electron impact at normal incidence below 50 eV was investigated by the classical collector method and by the Kelvin probe method. The authors show that biasing a collector to ensure secondary electron collection while keeping the target grounded can lead to primary electron beam perturbations. Thus reliable secondary electron emission yield at low primary electron energy cannot be obtained with a biased collector. The authors present two collector-free methods based on current measurement and on electron pulse surface potential buildup (Kelvin probe method). These methods are consistent, but at very low energy, measurements become sensitive to the earth magnetic field (below 10 eV). For gold, the authors can extrapolate total emission yield at 0 eV to 0.5, while a total electron emission yield of 1 is obtained at 40{+-}1 eV.

  13. Methods for measurement of electron emission yield under low energy electron-irradiation by collector method and Kelvin probe method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondu, Thomas; Belhaj, Mohamed; Inguimbert, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    Secondary electron emission yield of gold under electron impact at normal incidence below 50 eV was investigated by the classical collector method and by the Kelvin probe method. The authors show that biasing a collector to ensure secondary electron collection while keeping the target grounded can lead to primary electron beam perturbations. Thus reliable secondary electron emission yield at low primary electron energy cannot be obtained with a biased collector. The authors present two collector-free methods based on current measurement and on electron pulse surface potential buildup (Kelvin probe method). These methods are consistent, but at very low energy, measurements become sensitive to the earth magnetic field (below 10 eV). For gold, the authors can extrapolate total emission yield at 0 eV to 0.5, while a total electron emission yield of 1 is obtained at 40±1 eV.

  14. Low energy electron beam processing of YBCO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chromik, Š., E-mail: stefan.chromik@savba.sk [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Camerlingo, C. [CNR-SPIN, Istituto Superconduttori, Materiali Innovativi e Dispositivi, via Campi Flegrei 34, 80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Sojková, M.; Štrbík, V.; Talacko, M. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Malka, I.; Bar, I.; Bareli, G. [Department of Physics, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, 84105 Beer Sheva (Israel); Jung, G. [Department of Physics, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, 84105 Beer Sheva (Israel); Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Improvement of superconducting properties of irradiated bridges under certain conditions. • 30 keV irradiation influence CuO{sub 2} planes as well as oxygen chains. • Direct confirmation of changes in oxygen chains using micro-Raman spectroscopy. • Possibility of electron writing. - Abstract: Effects of low energy 30 keV electron irradiation of superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} thin films have been investigated by means of transport and micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements. The critical temperature and the critical current of 200 nm thick films initially increase with increasing fluency of the electron irradiation, reach the maximum at fluency 3 − 4 × 10{sup 20} electrons/cm{sup 2}, and then decrease with further fluency increase. In much thinner films (75 nm), the critical temperature increases while the critical current decreases after low energy electron irradiation with fluencies below 10{sup 20} electrons/cm{sup 2}. The Raman investigations suggest that critical temperature increase in irradiated films is due to healing of broken Cu−O chains that results in increased carrier’s concentration in superconducting CuO{sub 2} planes. Changes in the critical current are controlled by changes in the density of oxygen vacancies acting as effective pinning centers for flux vortices. The effects of low energy electron irradiation of YBCO turned out to result from a subtle balance of many processes involving oxygen removal, both by thermal activation and kick-off processes, and ordering of chains environment by incident electrons.

  15. High energy electron irradiation of flowable materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offermann, B.P.

    1975-01-01

    In order to efficiently irradiate a flowable material with high energy electrons, a hollow body is disposed in a container for the material and the material is caused to flow in the form of a thin layer across a surface of the body from or to the interior of the container while the material flowing across the body surface is irradiated. (U.S.)

  16. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  17. Electron clouds in high energy hadron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Fedor

    2013-08-29

    The formation of electron clouds in accelerators operating with positrons and positively charge ions is a well-known problem. Depending on the parameters of the beam the electron cloud manifests itself differently. In this thesis the electron cloud phenomenon is studied for the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) conditions, and for the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS-100 as a part of the FAIR complex in Darmstadt, Germany. Under the FAIR conditions the extensive use of slow extraction will be made. After the acceleration the beam will be debunched and continuously extracted to the experimental area. During this process, residual gas electrons can accumulate in the electric field of the beam. If this accumulation is not prevented, then at some point the beam can become unstable. Under the SPS and LHC conditions the beam is always bunched. The accumulation of electron cloud happens due to secondary electron emission. At the time when this thesis was being written the electron cloud was known to limit the maximum intensity of the two machines. During the operation with 25 ns bunch spacing, the electron cloud was causing significant beam quality deterioration. At moderate intensities below the instability threshold the electron cloud was responsible for the bunch energy loss. In the framework of this thesis it was found that the instability thresholds of the coasting beams with similar space charge tune shifts, emittances and energies are identical. First of their kind simulations of the effect of Coulomb collisions on electron cloud density in coasting beams were performed. It was found that for any hadron coasting beam one can choose vacuum conditions that will limit the accumulation of the electron cloud below the instability threshold. We call such conditions the ''good'' vacuum regime. In application to SIS-100 the design pressure 10{sup -12} mbar corresponds to the good vacuum regime. The transition to the bad vacuum

  18. Risk factors for radiotherapy incidents and impact of an online electronic reporting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, David W.; Cheetham, Lynn; Marvelde, Luc te; Bressel, Mathias; Kron, Tomas; Gill, Suki; Tai, Keen Hun; Ball, David; Rose, William; Silva, Linas; Foroudi, Farshad

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To ascertain the rate, type, significance, trends and the potential risk factors associated with radiotherapy incidents in a large academic department. Materials and methods: Data for all radiotherapy activities from July 2001 to January 2011 were reviewed from radiotherapy incident reporting forms. Patient and treatment data were obtained from the radiotherapy record and verification database (MOSAIQ) and the patient database (HOSPRO). Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine variables associated with radiotherapy incidents. Results: In that time, 65,376 courses of radiotherapy were delivered with a reported incident rate of 2.64 per 100 courses. The rate of incidents per course increased (1.96 per 100 courses to 3.52 per 100 courses, p < 0.001) whereas the proportion of reported incidents resulting in >5% deviation in dose (10.50 to 2.75%, p < 0.001) had decreased after the introduction of an online electronic reporting system. The following variables were associated with an increased rate of incidents: afternoon treatment time, paediatric patients, males, inpatients, palliative plans, head-and-neck, skin, sarcoma and haematological malignancies. In general, complex plans were associated with higher incidence rates. Conclusion: Radiotherapy incidents were infrequent and most did not result in significant dose deviation. A number of risk factors were identified and these could be used to highlight high-risk cases in the future. Introduction of an online electronic reporting system resulted in a significant increase in the number of incidents being reported

  19. Low Energy Electron Scattering from Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, M. C. A.; Silva, D. G. M.; Bettega, M. H. F.; da Costa, R. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; Khakoo, M. A.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2012-11-01

    In order to understand and optimize processes occurring during the ignition of plasma and its consequences in post-discharge for an internal combustion engine, especially considering the spark plug, we have produced in this work some basic information necessary to modeling spark ignition in alcohol- fuelled engines. Total cross sections of electron scattering by methanol and ethanol molecules in the energy range from 60 to 500 eV are reported, using the linear transmission method based on the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Aditionally to that, measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for elastic low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering were also discussed, for impact energies of 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 50, and 100 eV and for scattering angles of 5°-130°. The measurements were obtained using the relative flow method with an aperture source, and calculations using two different implementations of the Schwinger multichannel method, one that takes all electrons into account and is adapted for parallel computers, and another that uses pseudopotentials and considers only the valence electrons.

  20. Electron-ion recombination at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, L.H.

    1993-01-01

    The work is based on results obtained with a merged-beams experiment. A beam of electronics with a well characterized density and energy distribution was merged with a fast, monoenergetic ion beam. Results have been obtained for radiative recombination and dielectronic recombination at low relative energies (0 to ∼70eV). The obtained energy resolution was improved by about a factor of 30. High vacuum technology was used to suppress interactions with electrons from the environments. The velocity distribution of the electron beam was determined. State-selective dielectronic-recombination measurements were performable. Recombination processes were studied. The theoretical background for radiative recombination and Kramers' theory are reviewed. The quantum mechanical result and its relation to the semiclassical theory is discussed. Radiative recombination was also measured with several different non-bare ions, and the applicability of the semiclassical theory to non-bare ions was investigated. The use of an effective charge is discussed. For dielectronic recombination, the standard theoretical approach in the isolated resonance and independent-processes approximation is debated. The applicability of this method was tested. The theory was able to reproduce most of the experimental data except when the recombination process was sensitive to couplings between different electronic configurations. The influence of external perturbing electrostatic fields is discussed. (AB) (31 refs.)

  1. Energy Saving and Efficient Energy Use By Power Electronic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Wang, Huai; Davari, Pooya

    2017-01-01

    , such as in the applications of adjustable speed drives and solid-state lighting systems. Power electronics gives also a high flexibility when renewable power production is introduced to electrical energy systems. Future research opportunities and challenges will finally be discussed....

  2. Reprint of Low-energy electron potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobst, Johannes; Kautz, Jaap; Mytiliniou, Maria; Tromp, Rudolf M; van der Molen, Sense Jan

    2017-12-01

    In a lot of systems, charge transport is governed by local features rather than being a global property as suggested by extracting a single resistance value. Consequently, techniques that resolve local structure in the electronic potential are crucial for a detailed understanding of electronic transport in realistic devices. Recently, we have introduced a new potentiometry method based on low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) that utilizes characteristic features in the reflectivity spectra of layered materials [1]. Performing potentiometry experiments in LEEM has the advantage of being fast, offering a large field of view and the option to zoom in and out easily, and of being non-invasive compared to scanning-probe methods. However, not all materials show clear features in their reflectivity spectra. Here we, therefore, focus on a different version of low-energy electron potentiometry (LEEP) that uses the mirror mode transition, i.e. the drop in electron reflectivity around zero electron landing energy when they start to interact with the sample rather than being reflected in front of it. This transition is universal and sensitive to the local electrostatic surface potential (either workfunction or applied potential). It can consequently be used to perform LEEP experiments on a broader range of material compared to the method described in Ref[1]. We provide a detailed description of the experimental setup and demonstrate LEEP on workfunction-related intrinsic potential variations on the Si(111) surface and for a metal-semiconductor-metal junction with external bias applied. In the latter, we visualize the Schottky effect at the metal-semiconductor interface. Finally, we compare how robust the two LEEP techniques discussed above are against image distortions due to sample inhomogeneities or contamination. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Imaging properties and energy aberrations of a double-pass cylindrical-mirror electron energy analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, N.E.; Powell, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    The imaging properties and energy aberrations of a commercial double-pass cylindrical-mirror analyzer have been characterized using an extension of the method recently reported by Seah and Mathieu. The electron beam from the coaxial electron gun was rastered across a test surface and the intensity of either elastically scattered electrons or of electrons at other selected energies was stored in a computer as a function of beam position on the specimen and other experimental parameters. The intensity data were later plotted to provide an ''image'' of the detected intensity. Images of this type are presented for electron energies of 100, 500, and 1000 eV and for the application of small offset voltages (typically between -1 and +5 V) between the analyzer and the gun cathode with the instrument operated in conditions appropriate for XPS or AES. Small offset voltages ( or approx. =5 V) lead to image shapes similar to those for the elastic peak but with 20%--40% increased widths. Deflection of the incident beam by up to 2 mm from the axis caused variations of up to +-0.15 eV in the measured positions of the elastic peak. Our observations can be interpreted qualitatively in terms of the known relationship between detected signal and combinations of position of electron emission from the specimen, angle of emission, and electron energy. The images obtained with elastically and inelastically scattered electrons provide a convenient and quantitative means of assessing instrument performance and of defining the specimen area being analyzed for the particular combination of instrument operating conditions and the energy width of AES or XPS features from the specimen

  4. An analysis of electronic health record-related patient safety incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palojoki, Sari; Mäkelä, Matti; Lehtonen, Lasse; Saranto, Kaija

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse electronic health record-related patient safety incidents in the patient safety incident reporting database in fully digital hospitals in Finland. We compare Finnish data to similar international data and discuss their content with regard to the literature. We analysed the types of electronic health record-related patient safety incidents that occurred at 23 hospitals during a 2-year period. A procedure of taxonomy mapping served to allow comparisons. This study represents a rare examination of patient safety risks in a fully digital environment. The proportion of electronic health record-related incidents was markedly higher in our study than in previous studies with similar data. Human-computer interaction problems were the most frequently reported. The results show the possibility of error arising from the complex interaction between clinicians and computers.

  5. A condensed matter electron momentum spectrometer with parallel detection in energy and momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storer, P.; Caprari, R.S.; Clark, S.A.C.; Vos, M.; Weigold, E.

    1994-03-01

    An electron momentum spectrometer has been constructed which measures electron binding energies and momenta by fully determining the kinematics of the incident, scattered and ejected electrons resulting from (e,2e) ionizing collisions in a thin solid foil. The spectrometer operates with incident beam energies of 20-30 keV in an asymmetric, non-coplanar scattering geometry. Bethe ridge kinematics are used. The technique uses transmission through the target foil, but it is most sensitive to the surface from which the 1.2 keV electrons emerge, to a depth of about 5 nm. Scattered and ejected electron energies and azimuthal angles are detected in parallel using position sensitive detection, yielding true coincidence count rates of 6 Hz from a 5.5 nm thick evaporated carbon target and an incident beam current of around 100 nA. The energy resolution is approximately 1.3 eV and momentum resolution approximately 0.15 a 0 -1 . The energy resolution could readily be improved by monochromating the incident electron beam. 28 refs., 15 figs

  6. A comparative study of total electron scattering cross sections of plasma processing gasses at intermediate electron energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palihawadana, Prasanga; Villela, Gilberto; Ariyasinghe, Wickramasinghe

    2008-11-01

    A comparison is made between the total electron cross sections (TCS) of Tetrafluoromethane (CF4), Trifluoromethane (CHF3), Hexafluoroethane (C2F6), and Octafluorocyclobutane (C4F8) available in the literature and those recently measured in this laboratory using the linear transmission technique. The present measurements are about 0-20% higher than those in the literature. An empirical formula developed to predict the TCS of plasma processing gases, as a function of incident electron energy, will be presented.

  7. Low Energy Electron Scattering from Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.

    2012-06-01

    We report an investigation of processes that occur during the ignition of the plasma and its consequences in post-discharge time for an internal combustion engine, in order to find the appropriate parameters to be used in cars that operate with lean mixtures air-fuel. The relevance of this theme has attracted much attention, and has been one of the subjects of collaboration between experimental and theoretical groups in the USA and Brazil. We have produced some basic information necessary to modeling spark ignition in alcohol- fuelled engines. Total cross sections of electron scattering by methanol and ethanol molecules were obtained, using the linear transmission method based on the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering were also obtained, for scattering angles of 5 --130 . The measurements were taken using the relative flow method with an aperture source, and calculations using two different implementations of the Schwinger multichannel method, one that takes all electrons into account and is adapted for parallel computers, and another that uses pseudopotentials and considers only the valence electrons. Additionally to these, computer simulation studies of electronic discharge in mixtures of ethanol were performed, using a Zero-Dimensional Plasma Kinetic solver. Previous reported models for combustion of ethanol and cross sections data for momentum transfer of electron collisions with ethanol were used. The time evolutions of the main species densities are reported and the ignition time delay discussed.

  8. Silicon passivation study under low energy electron irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluzel, R.

    2010-01-01

    Backside illuminated thinned CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) imaging system is a technology developed to increase the signal to noise ratio and the sensibility of such sensors. This configuration is adapted to the electrons detection from the energy range of [1 - 12 keV]. The impinging electron creates by multiplication several hundreds of secondary electrons close to the surface. A P ++ highly-doped passivation layer of the rear face is required to reduce the secondary electron surface recombination rate. Thanks to the potential barrier induced by the P ++ layer, the passivation layer increases the collected charges number and so the sensor collection gain. The goal of this study is to develop some experimental methods in order to determine the effect of six different passivation processes on the collection gain. Beforehand, the energy profile deposited by an incident electron is studied with the combination of Monte-Carlo simulations and some analytical calculations. The final collection gain model shows that the mirror effect from the passivation layer is a key factor at high energies whereas the passivation layer has to be as thin as possible at low energies. A first experimental setup which consists in irradiating P ++ /N large diodes allows to study the passivation process impacts on the surface recombinations. Thanks to a second setup based on a single event upset directly on thinned CMOS sensor, passivation techniques are discriminated in term of mirror effect and the implied spreading charges. The doping atoms activation laser annealing is turn out to be a multiplication gain inhomogeneity source impacting directly the matrix uniformity. (author)

  9. Electronic emission produced by light projectiles at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    Two aspects of the electronic emission produced by light projectiles of intermediate energies have been studied experimentally. In the first place, measurements of angular distributions in the range from θ = 0 deg -50 deg induced by collisions of 50-200 keV H + incident on He have been realized. It was found that the double differential cross section of electron emission presents a structure focussed in the forward direction and which extends up to relatively large angles. Secondly, the dependence of the double differential cross section on the projectile charge was studied using H + and He 3 2+ projectiles of 50 and 100 keV/amu incident on He. Strong deviations from a constant scaling factor were found for increasing projectile charge. The double differential cross sections and the single differential cross sections as a function of the emission angle, and the ratios of the emissions induced by He 3 2+ and H + at equal incident projectile velocities are compared with the 'Continuum Distorted Wave-Eikonal Initial State' (CDW-EIS) approximation and the 'Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo' (CTMC) method. Both approximations, in which the potential of the projectile exercises a relevant role, reproduce the general aspects of the experimental results. An electron analyzer and the corresponding projectile beam line has been designed and installed; it is characterized by a series of properties which are particularly appropriate for the study of double differential electronic emission in gaseous as well as solid targets. The design permits to assure the conditions to obtain a well localized gaseous target and avoid instrumental distortions of the measured distributions. (Author) [es

  10. Structure, electronic properties and electron energy loss spectra of transition metal nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutsokeras, L.E.; Matenoglou, G.M.; Patsalas, P., E-mail: ppats@cc.uoi.gr

    2013-01-01

    We present a thorough and critical study of the electronic properties of the mononitrides of the group IV–V–VI metals (TiN, ZrN, HfN, NbN, TaN, MoN, and WN) grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD). The microstructure and density of the films have been studied by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Reflectivity (XRR), while their optical properties were investigated by spectral reflectivity at vertical incidence and in-situ reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (R-EELS). We report the R-EELS spectra for all the binary TMN and we identify their features (metal-d plasmon and N-p + metal-d loss) based on previous ab-initio band structure calculations. The spectral positions of p + d loss peak are rationally grouped according to the electron configuration (i.e. of the respective quantum numbers) of the constituent metal. The assigned and reported R-EELS spectra can be used as a reference database for the colloquial in-situ surface analysis performed in most laboratories. - Highlights: ► Identification of the effect of ionization potential to the structure of PLD nitride films. ► Report of low energy electron loss spectra of NbN, MoN, HfN, TaN, WN. ► Correlation of the Np+Med loss peak with the metal’s valence electron configuration.

  11. Reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy of aluminum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiříček, Petr; Bartoš, Igor; Zemek, Josef; Werner, W. S. M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 604, 11-12 (2010), s. 1006-1009 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0601; GA MŠk MEB060809 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Al(111) * polycrystalline Al * electron energy loss spectroscopy * photoelectron diffraction * PHD * REELS Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.010, year: 2010

  12. Energy Transformation in Molecular Electronic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasha, Michael

    1999-05-17

    This laboratory has developed many new ideas and methods in the electronic spectroscopy of molecules. This report covers the contract period 1993-1995. A number of the projects were completed in 1996, and those papers are included in the report. The DOE contract was terminated at the end of 1995 owing to a reorganizational change eliminating nationally the projects under the Office of Health and Environmental Research, U. S. Department of Energy.

  13. 18 CFR 1316.9 - Nuclear energy hazards and nuclear incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear energy hazards... Text of Conditions and Certifications § 1316.9 Nuclear energy hazards and nuclear incidents. When so... documents or actions: Nuclear Energy Hazards and Nuclear Incidents (Applicable only to contracts for goods...

  14. Magnetic field effects on runaway electron energy deposition in plasma facing materials and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemer, K.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports magnetic field effects on runaway electron energy deposition in plasma facing materials and components is investigated using the Integrated TIGER Series. The Integrated TIGER Series is a set of time-independent coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes which perform photon and electron transport, with or without macroscopic electric and magnetic fields. A three-dimensional computational model of 100 MeV electrons incident on a graphite block was used to simulate runawayelectrons striking a plasma facing component at the edge of a tokamak. Results show that more energy from runaway electrons will be deposited in a material that is in the presence of a magnetic field than in a material that is in the presence of no field. For low angle incident runaway electrons in a strong magnetic field, the majority of the increased energy deposition is near the material surface with a higher energy density. Electrons which would have been reflected with no field, orbit the magnetic field lines and are redeposited in the material surface, resulting in a substantial increase in surface energy deposition. Based on previous studies, the higher energy deposition and energy density will result in higher temperatures which are expected to cause more damage to a plasma facing component

  15. Towards hot electron mediated charge exchange in hyperthermal energy ion-surface interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ray, M. P.; Lake, R. E.; Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar

    2010-01-01

    electrons useful for driving chemical reactions at surfaces. Using the binary collision approximation and a nonadiabatic model that takes into account the time-varying nature of the ion–surface interaction, the energy loss of the ions is reproduced. The energy loss for Na + ions incident on the devices......We have made Na + and He + ions incident on the surface of solid state tunnel junctions and measured the energy loss due to atomic displacement and electronic excitations. Each tunnel junction consists of an ultrathin film metal–oxide–semiconductor device which can be biased to create a band of hot...... shows that the primary energy loss mechanism is the atomic displacement of Au atoms in the thin film of the metal–oxide–semiconductor device. We propose that neutral particle detection of the scattered flux from a biased device could be a route to hot electron mediated charge exchange....

  16. Geant4 physics processes for microdosimetry simulation: Very low energy electromagnetic models for electrons in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, A.; Raine, M.; Sauvestre, J.-E.; Gaillardin, M.; Paillet, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Energy-Loss Function (ELF) of silicon is used to calculate differential and total inelastic cross-sections of incident electrons. The model is validated in the 50 eV–50 keV incident energy range by comparing the inelastic cross-sections, stopping powers, and ranges to experimental and calculated data from the literature. It is applicable down to 16.7 eV. The cross sections are then used to simulate low-energy electron tracks in silicon with Geant4, using a similar implementation as the Geant4-DNA extension; this new Geant4 extension is called MuElec. Generation of low-energy electrons is clearly seen. The obtained ranges are consistent with experimental data.

  17. Low-energy collisions between electrons and BeD+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyonzima, S.; Pop, N.; Iacob, F.; Larson, Å; Orel, A. E.; Mezei, J. Zs; Chakrabarti, K.; Laporta, V.; Hassouni, K.; Benredjem, D.; Bultel, A.; Tennyson, J.; Reiter, D.; Schneider, I. F.

    2018-02-01

    Multichannel quantum defect theory is applied in the treatment of the dissociative recombination and vibrational excitation processes for the BeD+ ion in the 24 vibrational levels of its ground electronic state ({{X}}{}1{{{Σ }}}+,{v}{{i}}+=0\\ldots 23). Three electronic symmetries of BeD** states ({}2{{\\Pi }}, {}2{{{Σ }}}+, and {}2{{Δ }}) are considered in the calculation of cross sections and the corresponding rate coefficients. The incident electron energy range is 10‑5–2.7 eV and the electron temperature range is 100–5000 K. The vibrational dependence of these collisional processes is highlighted. The resulting data are useful in magnetic confinement fusion edge plasma modeling and spectroscopy, in devices with beryllium based main chamber materials, such as ITER and JET, and operating with the deuterium–tritium fuel mix. An extensive rate coefficients database is presented in graphical form and also by analytic fit functions whose parameters are tabulated in the supplementary material.

  18. Hot-electron-based solar energy conversion with metal-semiconductor nanodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Hyosun; Lee, Changhwan; Hwang, Euyheon; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Energy dissipation at metal surfaces or interfaces between a metal and a dielectric generally results from elementary excitations, including phonons and electronic excitation, once external energy is deposited to the surface/interface during exothermic chemical processes or an electromagnetic wave incident. In this paper, we outline recent research activities to develop energy conversion devices based on hot electrons. We found that photon energy can be directly converted to hot electrons and that hot electrons flow through the interface of metal-semiconductor nanodiodes where a Schottky barrier is formed and the energy barrier is much lower than the work function of the metal. The detection of hot electron flow can be successfully measured using the photocurrent; we measured the photoyield of photoemission with incident photons-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE). We also show that surface plasmons (i.e. the collective oscillation of conduction band electrons induced by interaction with an electromagnetic field) are excited on a rough metal surface and subsequently decay into secondary electrons, which gives rise to enhancement of the IPCE. Furthermore, the unique optical behavior of surface plasmons can be coupled with dye molecules, suggesting the possibility for producing additional channels for hot electron generation.

  19. Pharmaceutical sales of pseudoephedrine: the impact of electronic tracking systems on methamphetamine crime incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Lorraine; McGuffog, Ingrid; Ferris, Jason; Chamlin, Mitchell B

    2017-03-01

    Electronic tracking systems (ETS) are used extensively in pharmacies across the United States and Australia to control suspicious sales of pseudoephedrine. This study measures the impact of one ETS-Project STOP-on the capacity of police to reduce production, supply and possession of methamphetamine. Using official police data of incidents of production, supply and possession from January 1996 to December 2011 (n = 192 data points/months over 16 years), we used a quasi-experimental, time-series approach. The State of Queensland, Australia. No individual participants are included in the study. The unit of analysis is reported police incidents. The study examines the impact of the ETS on production (n = 5938 incidents), drug supply and trafficking (n = 20 094 incidents) and drug possession or use (n = 118 926) of methamphetamine. Introduction of the ETS in November 2005 was associated with an insignificant decrease (P = 0.15) in the production of methamphetamine. The intervention was associated with a statistically significant increase in supply incidents (P = 0.0001). There was no statistically significant effect on the incidence of possession (P = 0.59). Electronic tracking systems can reduce the capacity of people to produce methamphetamine domestically, but seem unlikely to affect other aspects of the methamphetamine problem such as possession, distribution and importation. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  20. eV-TEM: Transmission electron microscopy in a low energy cathode lens instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geelen, Daniël, E-mail: geelen@physics.leidenuniv.nl [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Thete, Aniket [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Schaff, Oliver; Kaiser, Alexander [SPECS GmbH, Voltastrasse 5, D-13355 Berlin (Germany); Molen, Sense Jan van der [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Tromp, Rudolf [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We are developing a transmission electron microscope that operates at extremely low electron energies, 0–40 eV. We call this technique eV-TEM. Its feasibility is based on the fact that at very low electron energies the number of energy loss pathways decreases. Hence, the electron inelastic mean free path increases dramatically. eV-TEM will enable us to study elastic and inelastic interactions of electrons with thin samples. With the recent development of aberration correction in cathode lens instruments, a spatial resolution of a few nm appears within range, even for these very low electron energies. Such resolution will be highly relevant to study biological samples such as proteins and cell membranes. The low electron energies minimize adverse effects due to radiation damage. - Highlights: • We present a new way of performing low energy transmission electron microscopy in an aberration corrected LEEM/PEEM instrument. • We show a proof of principle where we measure transmitted electrons through a suspended graphene monolayer with a preliminary setup. • We present an improved setup design that provides better control of the incident electron beam.

  1. Damage thresholds for blaze diffraction gratings and grazing incidence optics at an X-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzywinski, Jacek; Conley, Raymond; Moeller, Stefan; Gwalt, Grzegorz; Siewert, Frank; Waberski, Christoph; Zeschke, Thomas; Cocco, Daniele

    2018-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is upgrading its machine to high repetition rate and to extended ranges. Novel coatings, with limited surface oxidation, which are able to work at the carbon edge, are required. In addition, high-resolution soft X-ray monochromators become necessary. One of the big challenges is to design the mirror geometry and the grating profile to have high reflectivity (or efficiency) and at the same time survive the high peak energy of the free-electron laser pulses. For these reasons the experimental damage threshold, at 900 eV, of two platinum-coated gratings with different blazed angles has been investigated. The gratings were tested at 1° grazing incidence. To validate a model for which the damage threshold on the blaze grating can be estimated by calculating the damage threshold of a mirror with an angle of incidence identical to the angle of incidence on the grating plus the blaze angle, tests on Pt-coated substrates have also been performed. The results confirmed the prediction. Uncoated silicon, platinum and SiB 3 (both deposited on a silicon substrate) were also investigated. In general, the measured damage threshold at grazing incidence is higher than that calculated under the assumption that there is no energy transport from the volume where the photons are absorbed. However, it was found that, for the case of the SiB 3 coating, the grazing incidence condition did not increase the damage threshold, indicating that the energy transport away from the extinction volume is negligible.

  2. Critical analysis of major incidents risks in civil nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    The differences existing between the PWR type reactors and the RBMK type reactors are explained as well as the risk associated to each type when it exists. The Ines scale, tool to give the level of an accident gravity comprises seven levels, the number seven is the most serious and corresponds to the Chernobyl accident; The number zero is of no consequence but must be mentioned as a matter of form. The incidents from 1 to 3 concern increasing incidents, affecting the nuclear power plant but not the external public. The accidents from 4 to 7 have a nature to affect the nuclear power plant and the environment. An efficient tool exists between nuclear operators it is made of the reports on incidents encountered by close reactors. Two others type reactors are coming, the high temperature type reactors and the fast neutrons reactors. different risks are evoked, terrorism, proliferation, transport and radioactive wastes. (N.C.)

  3. Correlation of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and electronic medical record alerts with incidence among surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Lee, Nathaniel; Duane, Therese M; Gu, Zirui; Nguyen, Natalie; Potter, Teresa; Rensing, Edna; Sampson, Renata; Burrows, Mandy; Banas, Colin; Hartigan, Sarah; Grover, Amelia

    2016-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism events are potentially preventable adverse events. We investigated the effect of interruptions and delays in pharmacologic prophylaxis on venous thromboembolism incidence. Additionally, we evaluated the utility of electronic medical record alerts for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. Venous thromboembolisms were identified in surgical patients retrospectively through Core Measure Venous ThromboEmbolism-6-6 and Patient Safety Indicator 12 between November 2013 and March 2015. Venous thromboembolism pharmacologic prophylaxis and prescriber response to electronic medical record alerts were recorded prospectively. Prophylaxis was categorized as continuous, delayed, interrupted, other, and none. Among 10,318 surgical admissions, there were 131 venous thromboembolisms; 23.7% of the venous thromboembolisms occurred with optimal continuous prophylaxis. Prophylaxis, length of stay, age, and transfer from another hospital were associated with increased venous thromboembolism incidence. Compared with continuous prophylaxis, interruptions were associated with 3 times greater odds of venous thromboembolism. Delays were associated with 2 times greater odds of venous thromboembolism. Electronic medical record alerts occurred in 45.7% of the encounters and were associated with a 2-fold increased venous thromboembolism incidence. Focus groups revealed procedures as the main contributor to interruptions, and workflow disruption as the main limitation of the electronic medical record alerts. Multidisciplinary strategies to decrease delays and interruptions in venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and optimization of electronic medical record tools for prophylaxis may help decrease rates of preventable venous thromboembolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Charging and discharging characteristics of dielectric materials exposed to low- and mid-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, P.; Kitterer, B.; Treadaway, M.

    1982-01-01

    Charging and discharging characteristics of dielectric samples exposed to 1-25 keV and 25-100 keV electrons in a laboratory environment are reported. The materials examined comprised OSR, Mylar, Kapton, perforated Kapton, and Alphaquartz, serving as models for materials employed on spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit. The tests were performed in a vacuum chamber with electron guns whose beams were rastered over the entire surface of the planar samples. The specimens were examined in low-impedance-grounded, high-impedance-grounded, and isolated configurations. The worst-case and average peak discharge currents were observed to be independent of the incident electron energy, the time-dependent changes in the worst case discharge peak current were independent of the energy, and predischarge surface potentials are negligibly dependent on incident monoenergetic electrons.

  5. Charge storage in silicon films by very low energy electron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanet, J.M.; Poirier, R.

    1974-01-01

    Charge accumulation in silica films by low energy electron bombardment occurs in the working of some devices involving electron scanning for information storage. A characterization of the charge arising in SiO 2 targets exposed to an electron flux (about 5eV energy) was developed. The method used shows that a fraction of the incident electrons is trapped at the vacuum-silica interface, whereas the other part passes through the silica film to reach the silicon substrate. Traps on the silica surface are characterized by their density, capture cross section and the situation of the energy levels they occupy in the forbidden band of the insulator. Furthermore the appearance of a space charge either positive near the Si - SiO 2 interface, or negative near the air - SiO 2 interface is revealed from capacitance-voltage measurement after electron bombardment [fr

  6. Triple Hybrid Energy Harvesting Interface Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluşan, H.; Chamanian, S.; Pathirana, W. M. P. R.; Zorlu, Ö.; Muhtaroğlu, A.; Külah, H.

    2016-11-01

    This study presents a novel triple hybrid system that combines simultaneously generated power from thermoelectric (TE), vibration-based electromagnetic (EM) and piezoelectric (PZT) harvesters for a relatively high power supply capability. In the proposed solution each harvesting source utilizes a distinct power management circuit that generates a DC voltage suitable for combining the three parallel supplies. The circuits are designed and implemented in 180 nm standard CMOS technology, and are terminated with a schottky diode to avoid reverse current flow. The harvested AC signal from the EM harvester is rectified with a self-powered AC-DC doubler, which utilizes active diode structures to minimize the forward- bias voltage drop. The PZT interface electronics utilizes a negative voltage converter as the first stage, followed by synchronous power extraction and DC-to-DC conversion through internal switches, and an external inductor. The ultra-low voltage DC power harvested by the TE generator is stepped up through a charge-pump driven by an LC oscillator with fully- integrated center-tapped differential inductors. Test results indicate that hybrid energy harvesting circuit provides more than 1 V output for load resistances higher than 100 kΩ (10 μW) where the stand-alone harvesting circuits are not able to reach 1 V output. This is the first hybrid harvester circuit that simultaneously extracts energy from three independent sources, and delivers a single DC output.

  7. Study and realization of an electron gun at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camus, P.

    1977-01-01

    This work presents the theoretical concepts and experimental design of an electron gun. This gun is working in the weak energy range and the focus position is independant of electron energy measurements and analysis methods of the electron beam are described [fr

  8. Incident energy dependence of scattering behavior of water molecules on Si (100) and graphite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, G.; Kotsubo, Y.; Yoshimoto, Y.; Kinefuchi, I.; Takagi, S.

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between water molecules and solid surfaces has a great impact on water vapor flows in nanostructures. We conduct molecular beam scattering experiments covering the incident energy range corresponding to the thermal energy at room temperature to investigate the scattering behavior of water molecules on silicon and graphite surfaces. The incident energy dependence of the scattering distributions exhibits opposite trends on these surfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the difference is caused by the inertia effect of the incident molecules and the surface corrugations.

  9. Electron emission yield for low energy electrons: Monte Carlo simulation and experimental comparison for Al, Ag, and Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierron, J.; Inguimbert, C.; Belhaj, M.; Gineste, T.; Puech, J.; Raine, M.

    2017-06-01

    The electron emission under electron impact between 10 eV and 2 keV is investigated with a Monte Carlo (MC) code in aluminum, silver, and silicon. The code is based on the complex dielectric function theory to describe the inelastic scattering and uses the Mott's model of partial waves to describe the elastic scattering. It takes into account both volume and surface plasmon excitations. The simulation results are compared with the experimental measurements of electron emission yields (EEY) and energy spectra of low energy electrons performed in ultrahigh vacuum on Ar-etched bulk samples. Our MC simulations at low energy are found to be in fairly good agreement with our experimental measurements. The peaks corresponding to the surface plasmon, the volume plasmon and its multiples and to the Auger transitions appear clearly on the energy loss spectra of aluminum, silver, and silicon. The simulated EEY are also in fairly good agreement with our measurements and with data from the literature. The EEY at normal incidence is studied for secondary and backscattered electrons. A focus is made for the EEY below 50 eV where a fairly good agreement is found with Bronstein and Fraiman's measurements on vacuum evaporated samples. Below 2 keV, for silver and aluminum, the total EEY is given for different angles of incidence θ. Some discrepancies are observed between our experimental measurements and our MC simulations for high angles of incidence. These discrepancies can be attributed to the modeling of surface plasmon excitations, surface oxidation, or roughness that occur during the Ar-etching process.

  10. Mapping unoccupied electronic states of freestanding graphene by angle-resolved low-energy electron transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Wicki Flavio; Longchamp Jean-Nicolas; Latychevskaia Tatiana; Escher Conrad; Fink Hans-Werner

    2016-01-01

    We report angle-resolved electron transmission measurements through freestanding graphene sheets in the energy range of 18 to 30 eV above the Fermi level. The measurements are carried out in a low-energy electron point source microscope, which allows simultaneously probing the transmission for a large angular range. The characteristics of low-energy electron transmission through graphene depend on its electronic structure above the vacuum level. The experimental technique described here allow...

  11. Ionization By Impact Electrons in Solids: Electron Mean Free Path Fitted Over A Wide Energy Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziaja, B; London, R A; Hajdu, J

    2005-06-09

    We propose a simple formula for fitting the electron mean free paths in solids both at high and at low electron energies. The free-electron-gas approximation used for predicting electron mean free paths is no longer valid at low energies (E < 50 eV), as the band structure effects become significant at those energies. Therefore we include the results of the band structure calculations in our fit. Finally, we apply the fit to 9 elements and 2 compounds.

  12. Electronic energy distribution function at high electron swarm energies in neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.L.; Fletcher, J.

    1995-01-01

    Electron swarms moving through a gas under the influence of an applied electric field have been extensively investigated. Swarms at high energies, as measured by the ratio of the applied field to the gas number density, E/N, which are predominant in many applications have, in general, been neglected. Discharges at E/N in the range 300 0 < 133 Pa using a differentially pumped vacuum system in which the swarm electrons are extracted from the discharge and energy analysed in both a parallel plate retarded potential analyser and a cylindrical electrostatic analyser. Both pre-breakdown and post-breakdown discharges have been studied. Initial results indicate that as the discharge traverses breakdown no sudden change in the nature of the discharge occurs and that the discharge can be described by both a Monte Carlo simulation and by a Boltzmann treatment given by Phelps et al. (1987). 18 refs., 8 figs

  13. Usefulness of primary care electronic networks to assess the incidence of chlamydia, diagnosed by general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Sande Marianne AB

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydia is the most common curable sexually transmitted infection (STI in the Netherlands. The majority of chlamydia diagnoses are made by general practitioners (GPs. Baseline data from primary care will facilitate the future evaluation of the ongoing large population-based screening in the Netherlands. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of electronic medical records for monitoring the incidence of chlamydia cases diagnosed in primary care in the Netherlands. Methods In the electronic records of two regional and two national networks, we identified chlamydia diagnoses by means of ICPC codes (International Classification of Primary Care, laboratory results in free text and the prescription of antibiotics. The year of study was 2007 for the two regional networks and one national network, for the other national network the year of study was 2005. We calculated the incidence of diagnosed chlamydia cases per sex, age group and degree of urbanization. Results A large diversity was observed in the way chlamydia episodes were coded in the four different GP networks and how easily information concerning chlamydia diagnoses could be extracted. The overall incidence ranged from 103.2/100,000 to 590.2/100,000. Differences were partly related to differences between patient populations. Nevertheless, we observed similar trends in the incidence of chlamydia diagnoses in all networks and findings were in line with earlier reports. Conclusions Electronic patient records, originally intended for individual patient care in general practice, can be an additional source of data for monitoring chlamydia incidence in primary care and can be of use in assessing the future impact of population-based chlamydia screening programs. To increase the usefulness of data we recommend more efforts to standardize registration by (specific ICPC code and laboratory results across the existing GP networks.

  14. Electronic configurations and energies in some thermodynamically correlated laves compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, G.M.

    1979-04-01

    The known electronic configurations of simple elements in Laves compounds are correlated with those of the more complex systems to determine their electronic configurations and gaseous state promotion energies

  15. Dynamics of Low-Energy Electron Induced Reactions in Condensed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Michael; Soe, Chanmyaemyae; Chamberlain, Kristal; Shyur, Yomay; Arumainayagam, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    We present insights into the dynamics of low-energy electron-induced reactions in thin films of methanol (CH3 OH). Low-energy electrons in matter can initiate chemical reactions though electron impact ionization of a molecule, electron impact excitation of a molecule, or through dissociation of a transient negative ion formed by electron attachment to a molecule. Our studies focus on the dynamics by which low-energy electron interaction with condensed methanol initiates chemical reactions which lead to the formation of methoxymethanol (CH3 O CH2 OH) and ethylene glycol (HO CH2 CH2 OH). The results of our post-irradiation temperature programmed desorption experiments indicate that both products can form from irradiating methanol with electrons at subionization energies. In addition, we find evidence that dissociative electron attachment plays a role in the formation of methoxymethanol but not in ethylene glycol.

  16. Energy Reflection from Gold Bombarded with keV Protons at Various Angles of Incidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.

    1976-01-01

    The calorimetric deuterium film method operating at liquid‐helium temperature was used for measuring the energy reflection coefficient γ for 1–10‐keV protons incident on gold at angles of incidence up to 75°. H+2 and H+3 ions were used to obtain the lowest velocities. The growth with angle...

  17. Differential elastic electron scattering cross sections for CCl4 by 1.5-100 eV energy electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limão-Vieira, P.; Horie, M.; Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Buckman, S. J.; Tanaka, H.

    2011-12-01

    We report absolute elastic differential, integral and momentum transfer cross sections for electron interactions with CCl4. The incident electron energy range is 1.5-100 eV, and the scattered electron angular range for the differential measurements varies from 15°-130°. The absolute scale of the differential cross section was set using the relative flow technique with helium as the reference species. Comparison with previous total cross sections shows good agreement. Atomic-like behaviour in this scattering system is shown here for the first time, and is further investigated by comparing the CCl4 elastic cross sections to recent results on the halomethanes and atomic chlorine at higher impact energies [H. Kato, T. Asahina, H. Masui, M. Hoshino, H. Tanaka, H. Cho, O. Ingólfsson, F. Blanco, G. Garcia, S. J. Buckman, and M. J. Brunger, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074309 (2010)], 10.1063/1.3319761.

  18. Sterilization of foods with low-energy electrons ('soft-electrons')

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Toru; Takahashi, Yoko; Todoriki, Setsuko

    1998-06-01

    Electrons with an energy of 300 keV or lower were defined as 'Soft-electrons', which showed several advantages over conventional irradiation with gamma-rays or high-energy electrons in decontamination of grains and spices. Energies of electrons necessary to reduce microbial loads to levels lower than 10 CFU/g were 60 keV for brown rice, 75 keV for wheat, 100 keV for white pepper, coriander and basil, 130 keV for buckwheat, 160 keV for rough rice, and 210 keV for black pepper. Electrons with such energies did not significantly influence the quality.

  19. Electron polarimetry at low energies in Hall C at JLab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaskell, D.

    2013-01-01

    Although the majority of Jefferson Lab experiments require multi-GeV electron beams, there have been a few opportunities to make electron beam polarization measurements at rather low energies. This proceedings will discuss some of the practical difficulties encountered in performing electron polarimetry via Mo/ller scattering at energies on the order of a few hundred MeV. Prospects for Compton polarimetry at very low energies will also be discussed. While Mo/ller scattering is likely the preferred method for electron polarimetry at energies below 500 MeV, there are certain aspects of the polarimeter and experiment design that must be carefully considered

  20. Low-energy electron beams through ultra-thin foils, applications for electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Aken, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis has discussed two electron microscopy applications that make use of ultra-thin foils: the tunnel junction emitter and the low-energy foil corrector. Both applications have in common that the electron beam is sent through the thin foil at low energy. Part of the electrons will scatter in

  1. A magnetic electron energy analyser for fast data acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, X.; Walker, C.G.H. [Department of Electronics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); El-Gomati, M.M., E-mail: mmg@ohm.york.ac.uk [Department of Electronics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-21

    A new approach to the acquisition of Auger electron spectra is introduced. Electrons emitted from a sample illuminated by a primary electron beam are dispersed by a magnetic field which immerses both sample and electron energy analyser. The analyser is broadly based on the 180{sup o} magnetic spectrometer, but can acquire spectra with good energy resolution for electrons with a significant component of velocity parallel to the magnetic field. An Active Pixel Sensor is used to acquire the electron spectrum without the use of a microchannel plate as in most currently used analysers. An example spectrum of an elastic peak is given.

  2. Tantalum surface oxidation: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment, and electron polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yongling [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Bo, Maolin [Yangtze Normal University, College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Chongqing 408100 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Liu, Yonghui [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Sun, Chang Q. [NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Huang, Yongli, E-mail: huangyongli@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Graphical abstract: The bond, electron and energy relaxation result in core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Highlights: • Increasing the oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. • Electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to sp-hydrated oxygen, creating dipole moment that decreases the work function. • Oxygen chemisorption modified valence density-of-state (DOS) for Ta with four excessive DOS features: O−Ta bonding, O{sup 2−} lone pairs, Ta+ electron holes, and the lone-pair polarized Ta dipoles. • The bond, electron and energy relaxation between surface undercoordinated atoms are responsible for core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Abstract: A combination of photoelectron spectrometric analysis and density functional theory calculations has enabled reconciliation of the bond-energy-electron relaxation for the Ta(100, 110, 111) surfaces chemisorbed with oxygen at different coverages. Results show that increasing oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. Valence electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to oxygen to create four excessive DOS features in terms of O−Ta bonding, lone pairs of oxygen, Ta{sup +} electron holes, and polarized Ta dipoles. Oxidation proceeds in the following dynamics: oxygen gets electrons from two neighboring Ta atoms left behind Ta{sup +}; the sp{sup 3}-orbital hybridization takes place with additional two electron lone pairs, the lone pairs polarize the other two Ta neighbors becoming dipoles. X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis results in the 4f binding energy of an isolated Ta atom and its shift upon bond formation and oxidation. Exercises provide not only a promising numerical approach for the quantitative information about the bond and electronic behavior but also consistent

  3. Electron fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors calculated with EGS3 for electrons and positrons with energies from 100 keV to 20 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, D.W.O.

    1983-01-01

    At NRC the general purpose Monte-Carlo electron-photon transport code EGS3 is being applied to a variety of radiation dosimetry problems. To test its accuracy at low energies a detailed set of depth-dose curves for electrons and photons has been generated and compared to previous calculations. It was found that by changing the default step-size algorithm in EGS3, significant changes were obtained for incident electron beam cases. It was found that restricting the step-size to a 4% energy loss was appropriate below incident electron beam energies of 10 MeV. With this change, the calculated depth-dose curves were found to be in reasonable agreement with other calculations right down to incident electron energies of 100 keV although small (less than or equal to 10%) but persistent discrepancies with the NBS code ETRAN were obtained. EGS3 predicts higher initial dose and shorter range than ETRAN. These discrepancies are typical of a wide range of energies as is the better agreement with the results of Nahum. Data is presented for the electron fluence to maximal dose equivalent in a 30 cm thick slab of ICRU 4-element tissue irradiated by broad parallel beams of electrons incident normal to the surface. On their own, these values only give an indication of the dose equivalent expected from a spectrum of electrons since one needs to fold the spectrum maximal dose equivalent value. Calculations have also been done for incident positron beams. Despite the large statistical uncertainties, maximal dose equivalent although their values are 5 to 10% lower in a band around 10 MeV

  4. Intermediate energy electron impact excitation of composite vibrational modes in phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Lopes, M. C. A.; Nixon, K. L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física ‘Gleb Wataghin,’ Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André, São Paulo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, C.P. 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Silva, G. B. da [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-05-21

    We report differential cross section results from an experimental investigation into the electron impact excitation of a number of the low-lying composite (unresolved) vibrational modes in phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). The measurements were carried out at incident electron energies in the range 15–40 eV and for scattered-electron angles in the range 10–90°. The energy resolution of those measurements was typically ∼80 meV. Calculations, using the GAMESS code, were also undertaken with a B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level model chemistry, in order to enable us to assign vibrational modes to the features observed in our energy loss spectra. To the best of our knowledge, the present cross sections are the first to be reported for vibrational excitation of the C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH molecule by electron impact.

  5. Soft X-ray bremsstrahlung and fluorescent line production in the atmosphere by low energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraushaar, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of low energy quasi-trapped or precipitating electrons which impact on the counter windows of soft X-ray detectors are discussed. The errors caused by X-rays produced in the residual atmosphere above a rocket-borne detector because of the resemblance to X-rays of cosmic origin are examined. The design and development of counter windows which make it possible to identify the atmospherically produced X-rays are described. Curves are presented to show the following: (1) preliminary low energy electron data from Atmospheric Explorer C, (2) X-ray flux in electron-excited nitrogen and oxygen, (3) typical proportional counter response to low energy cosmic rays, and (4) proportional counter response to X-radiation produced by electrons incident upon a gas of oxygen to nitrogen number of 0.4.

  6. Low Energy Scanned Electron-Beam Dose Distribution in Thin Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Hjortenberg, P. E.; Pedersen, Walther Batsberg

    1975-01-01

    Thin radiochromic dye film dosimeters, calibrated by means of calorimetry, make possible the determination of absorbed-dose distributions due to low-energy scanned electron beam penetrations in moderately thin coatings and laminar media. For electrons of a few hundred keV, calibrated dosimeters...... of about 30–60 μm thickness may be used in stacks or interleaved between layers of materials of interest and supply a sufficient number of experimental data points throughout the depth of penetration of electrons to provide a depth-dose curve. Depth doses may be resolved in various polymer layers...... on different backings (wood, aluminum, and iron) for scanned electron beams (Emax = 400 keV) having a broad energy spectrum and diffuse incidence, such as those used in radiation curing of coatings, textiles, plastics, etc. Theoretical calculations of such distributions of energy depositions are relatively...

  7. FOR N+ 56Fe REACTION AROUND INCIDENT ENERGIES OF

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cross section calculations have been carried out by some earlier scientists independent of energy surface imaginary potential. These have been characterized by a lot of disparity between authors and literature values. In this work, special attention was devoted to the increase in the accuracy of the calculation of nuclear ...

  8. Power electronic converter systems for direct drive renewable energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents power electronic conversion systems for wind and marine energy generation applications, in particular, direct drive generator energy conversion systems. Various topologies are presented and system design optimization and reliability are briefly discussed.......This chapter presents power electronic conversion systems for wind and marine energy generation applications, in particular, direct drive generator energy conversion systems. Various topologies are presented and system design optimization and reliability are briefly discussed....

  9. An investigation into electron scattering from pyrazine at intermediate and high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, A. G.; Fuss, M. C. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gorfinkiel, J. D. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Almeida, D.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Limão-Vieira, P. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Brunger, M. J. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); García, G., E-mail: g.garcia@iff.csic.es [Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2013-11-14

    Total electron scattering cross sections for pyrazine in the energy range 10–500 eV have been measured with a new magnetically confined electron transmission-beam apparatus. Theoretical differential and integral elastic, as well as integral inelastic, cross sections have been calculated by means of a screening-corrected form of the independent-atom representation (IAM-SCAR) from 10 to 1000 eV incident electron energies. The present experimental and theoretical total cross sections show a good level of agreement, to within 10%, in the overlapping energy range. Consistency of these results with previous calculations (i.e., the R-matrix and Schwinger Multichannel methods) and elastic scattering measurements at lower energies, below 10 eV, is also discussed.

  10. ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers in the format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series, and within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme. This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 will composed of four Terms throughout the year: Winter Term: Introduction to electronics in HEP (January-February, 6 lectures) Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics (March, 6 lectures) Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) Winter Term: Electronics applications in HEP experiments (November-December, 10 lectures) Lectures within each Term will take place on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 10:00 to 12:30. The...

  11. Electrospun Fibers for Energy, Electronic, & Environmental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Nicholas M.

    Electrospinning is an established method for creating polymer and bio-polymer fibers of dimensions ranging from ˜10 nanometers to microns. The process typically involves applying a high voltage between a solution source (usually at the end of a capillary or syringe) and a substrate on which the nanofibers are deposited. The high electric field distorts the shape of the liquid droplet, creating a Taylor cone. Additional applied voltage ejects a liquid jet of the polymer solution in the Taylor cone toward the counter electrode. The formation of fibers is generated by the rapid electrostatic elongation and solvent evaporation of this viscoelastic jet, which typically generates an entangled non-woven mesh of fibers with a high surface area to volume ratio. Electrospinning is an attractive alternative to other processes for creating nano-scale fibers and high surface area to volume ratio surfaces due to its low start up cost, overall simplicity, wide range of processable materials, and the ability to generate a moderate amount of fibers in one step. It has also been demonstrated that coaxial electrospinning is possible, wherein the nanofiber has two distinct phases, one being the core and another being the sheath. This method is advantageous because properties of two materials can be combined into one fiber, while maintaining two distinct material phases. Materials that are inherently electrospinable could be made into fibers using this technique as well. The most common applications areas for electrospun fibers are in filtration and biomedical areas, with a comparatively small amount of work done in energy, environmental, and sensor applications. Furthermore, the use of biologically materials in electrospun fibers is an avenue of research that needs more exploration, given the unique properties these materials can exhibit. The research aim of this thesis is to explore the use of electrospun fibers for energy, electrical and environmental applications. For energy

  12. An extension of the Eisberg-Resnick treatment for electron energies in many-electron atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, M. A. B.; Bennett, I.

    1989-03-01

    Eisberg and Resnick present a simple argument for the energy of an electron in a multielectron atom using the concept of shielding from electrons in inner shells. The results of such a treatment are unfortunately confined so as to be out of range of experimental values. Here, the effect of electrons in outer shells is included, and, in the nonrelativistic region, energies are obtained for electrons in the first and second shells in reasonable agreement with experiment.

  13. Characteristic energy range of electron scattering due to plasmaspheric hiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Reeves, G. D.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the characteristic energy range of electron flux decay due to the interaction with plasmaspheric hiss in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. The Van Allen Probes have measured the energetic electron flux decay profiles in the Earth's outer radiation belt during a quiet period following the geomagnetic storm that occurred on 7 November 2015. The observed energy of significant electron decay increases with decreasing L shell and is well correlated with the energy band corresponding to the first adiabatic invariant μ = 4-200 MeV/G. The electron diffusion coefficients due to hiss scattering are calculated at L = 2-6, and the modeled energy band of effective pitch angle scattering is also well correlated with the constant μ lines and is consistent with the observed energy range of electron decay. Using the previously developed statistical plasmaspheric hiss model during modestly disturbed periods, we perform a 2-D Fokker-Planck simulation of the electron phase space density evolution at L = 3.5 and demonstrate that plasmaspheric hiss causes the significant decay of 100 keV-1 MeV electrons with the largest decay rate occurring at around 340 keV, forming anisotropic pitch angle distributions at lower energies and more flattened distributions at higher energies. Our study provides reasonable estimates of the electron populations that can be most significantly affected by plasmaspheric hiss and the consequent electron decay profiles.

  14. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zschornack, G., E-mail: g.zschornack@hzdr.de [Department of Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, 01328 Dresden (Germany); König, J.; Schmidt, M.; Thorn, A. [DREEBIT GmbH, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  15. Low energy electron imaging using Medipix 2 detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikharulidze, I.; van Gastel, Raoul; Schramm, S.; Abrahams, J.P.; Poelsema, Bene; Tromp, R.M.; van der Molen, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM) and Photo-Emission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) predominantly use a combination of microchannel plate (MCP), phosphor screen and optical camera to record images formed by 10–20 keV electrons. We have tested the performance of a LEEM/PEEM instrument with a Medipix2

  16. Scattering of polarized low-energy electrons by ferromagnetic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helman, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    A source of spin polarized electrons with remarkable characteristics based on negative electron affinity (NEA) GaAs has recently been developed. It constitutes a unique tool to investigate spin dependent interactions in electron scattering processes. The characteristics and working principles of the source are briefly described. Some theoretical aspects of the scattering of polarized low-energy electrons by ferromagnetic metals are discussed. Finally, the results of the first polarized low-energy electron diffraction experiment using the NEA GaAs source are reviewed; they give information about the surface magnetization of ferromagnetic Ni (110). (Author) [pt

  17. Energy and angular distributions of electrons ejected from CH

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Relative cross sections, differential in energy and angle, for electrons ejected from CH4 and C3H8 molecules under 16.0 keV electron impact have been measured. Electrons were analyzed by a 45° parallel plate electrostatic analyzer at emission angles varying from 60° to 135° with energies from 50 eV to 1000 eV.

  18. Low-energy electron microdosimetry of CS-137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.

    1980-09-01

    The mass of tissue irradiated by an internal emitter depends upon the distribution of the radionuclide within the organism and the type of radiation emitted. The range (95% absorption) of low-energy electron effectively defines the sensitive volume in which the energy of the emitted electron is deposited. Accordingly, in the case of Auger electron microdosimetry of internal emitters the correct definition of the sensitive volume is of paramount importance. The amount of energy delivered by the monoenergetic electrons emitted by the decay system 137 Cs → sup(137m)Ba to spherical volumes of water-like tissue media of radii equivalent to the estimated ranges of those electrons in water is calculated and discussed as far as the variations of the estimated ranges of electrons as a function of the initial energy of emission are concerned. Although there are still many uncertainties on the actual ranges of low-energy electrons, one can state confidently that the ranges of the Auger electrons of the decay system 137 Cs → 137 sup(m) Ba → 137 Ba can be considered to be in the same order of magnitude of the diameter of a cell. The energy deposition in spherical volumes of water-like tissue media, considered equivalent to the sensitive volumes for the Auger electrons of the decay system 137 Cs → 137 sub(m) Ba → 137 Ba, range for several orders of magnitude from 10 2 to about 10 10 times higher than the energy deposition in similar media by the internal conversion electrons of this decay system. If equivalent variations of energy deposition per unit mass occur when the masses considered are cellular, and subcellular structures, then the effects into the sensitive volume should be taken into biological consideration as far as the microdosimetry of low-energy electrons (approximately equal to 10 keV) is considered, whenever there is internal localization of Auger emitters. (Author) [pt

  19. Electron cooling for low-energy RHIC program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Pendzick, A.; Satogata, T.

    2009-08-31

    Electron cooling was proposed to increase luminosity of the RHIC collider for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon. Providing collisions at such energies, termed RHIC 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of critical point on the QCD phase diagram. The electron cooling system should deliver electron beam of required good quality over energies of 0.9-5 MeV. Several approaches to provide such cooling were considered. The baseline approach was chosen and design work started. Here we describe the main features of the cooling system and its expected performance. We have started design work on a low-energy RHIC electron cooler which will operate with kinetic electron energy range 0.86-2.8 (4.9) MeV. Several approaches to an electron cooling system in this energy range are being investigated. At present, our preferred scheme is to transfer the Fermilab Pelletron to BNL after Tevatron shutdown, and to use it for DC non-magnetized cooling in RHIC. Such electron cooling system can significantly increase RHIC luminosities at low-energy operation.

  20. Performance of the electron energy-loss spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Huebner, R.H.

    1977-01-01

    Performance characteristics of the electron energy-loss spectrometer incorporating a new high-resolution hemispherical monochromator are reported. The apparatus achieved an energy-resolution of 25 meV in the elastic scattering mode, and angular distributions of elastically scattered electrons were in excellent agreement with previous workers. Preliminary energy-loss spectra for several atmospheric gases demonstrate the excellent versatility and stable operation of the improved system. 12 references

  1. SU-D-BRCD-06: Measurement of Elekta Electron Energy Spectra Using a Small Magnetic Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogstrom, K; McLaughlin, D; Gibbons, J; Shikhaliev, P; Clarke, T; Henderson, A; Taylor, D; Shagin, P; Liang, E

    2012-06-01

    To demonstrate how a small magnetic spectrometer can measure the energy spectra of seven electron beams on an Elekta Infinity tuned to match beams on a previously commissioned machine. Energyspectra were determined from measurements of intensity profiles on 6″-long computed radiographic (CR) strips after deflecting a narrow incident beam using a small (28 lbs.), permanent magnetic spectrometer. CR plateexposures (energy spectra using the transformation from position (x) on the CR plate to energy (E) based on the Lorentz force law. The effective magnetic field and its effective edge, parameters in the transformation, were obtained by fitting a plot of most probable incident energy (determined from practical range) to the peak position. The calibration curve (E vs. x) fit gave 0.423 Tesla for the effective magnetic field. Most resulting energy spectra were characterized by a single, asymmetric peak with peak position and FWHM increasing monotonically with beam energy. Only the 9-MeV spectrum was atypical, possibly indicating suboptimal beam tuning. These results compared well with energy spectra independently determined by adjusting each spectrum until the EGSnrc Monte Carlo calculated percent depth-dose curve agreed well with the corresponding measured curve. Results indicate that this spectrometer and methodology could be useful for measuring energy spectra of clinical electron beams at isocenter. Future work will (1) remove the small effect of the detector response function (due to pinhole size and incident angular spread) from the energy spectra, (2) extract the energy spectra exiting the accelerator from current results, (3) use the spectrometer to compare energy spectra of matched beams among our clinical sites, and (4) modify the spectrometer to utilize radiochromic film. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. Comparison of six electronic healthcare databases in Europe using standardized protocols: a descriptive study on the incidence of cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afonso, A.S.; Groot, M.C.H. de; Ham, R. van den; Bruin, M.L. de; Huerta Alvarez, C.; Gil, M.; Hesse, U.; Ronn, P.F.; Souverein, P.C.; Alvarez, Y.; Slattery, J.; Rottenkolber, M.; Dijk, L. van; Schlienger, R.; Reynolds, R.; Klungel, O.H.; Grimaldi-Bensouda, L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are several national cancer registries available across Europe, but information on cancer incidence from routine electronic healthcare record (EHR) databases (DBs), such as General Practitioners (GPs) and comparisons across different databases are rather scarce. It is important to

  3. Comparison of six electronic healthcare databases in Europe using standardized protocols: A descriptive study on the incidence of cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afonso, Ana S.; De Groot, Mark C.H.; Van Den Ham, Rianne; Bruin, Marie L.; Alvarez, Consuelo Huerta; Gil, Miguel; Hesse, Ulrik; Rønn, Pernille F.; Souverein, Patrick C.; Alvarez, Yolanda; Slattery, Jim; Rottenkolber, Marietta; Van Dijk, Liset; Schlienger, Raymond G.; Reynolds, Robert; Klungel, Olaf H.; Grimaldi-Bensouda, Lamiae

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are several national cancer registries available across Europe, but information on cancer incidence from routine electronic healthcare record (EHR) databases (DBs), such as General Practitioners (GPs) and comparisons across different databases are rather scarce. It is important to

  4. Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Xu, Chunkai; Zhang, Panke; Li, Zhean; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-08-01

    We report a novel scanning probe electron energy spectrometer (SPEES) which combines a double toroidal analyzer with a scanning tunneling microscope to achieve both topography imaging and electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface in situ. The spatial resolution of spectroscopy mapping is determined to be better than 0.7 ± 0.2 μm at a tip sample distance of 7 μm. Meanwhile, the size of the field emission electron beam spot on the surface is also measured, and is about 3.6 ± 0.8 μm in diameter. This unambiguously demonstrates that the spatial resolution of SPEES technique can be much better than the size of the incident electron beam.

  5. Electronically droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers

    KAUST Repository

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud Al

    2012-01-01

    A report is presented on free falling droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers. The harvester incorporates a multimorph clamped-free cantilever which is composed of five layers of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric thick films. During the impact, the droplet kinetic energy is transferred into the form of mechanical stress forcing the piezoelectric structure to vibrate. Experimental results show energy of 0.3 μJ per droplet. The scenario of moderate falling drop intensity, i.e. 230 drops per second, yields a total energy of 400 μJ. © 2012 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  6. Energy dissipation in plasma treated Nb and Secondary Electron Emission for modeling of multipactor discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samolov, Ana; Popovic, Svetozar; Vuskovic, Leposava; Basovic, Milos; Cuckov, Filip; Raitses, Yevgeny; Kaganovich, Igor

    2013-09-01

    Electron-induced Secondary Electron Emission (SEE) is important in many gas discharge applications such as Hall thrusters, surface and multipactor discharges. Often they present the inhibiting phenomena in designing and operating of these systems, examples being the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities. The multipactor discharges depend on the resonant field configuration and on the SEE from the cavity surface. SEE is proportional to the energy dissipated by the primary electrons near the surface. Our analysis of energy spectra of secondary electrons indicates that the fraction of dissipated energy of primary electrons in solid reaches the maximum at the primary energies that produce the maximum yield. The better understanding of this mechanism is crucial for successful modeling of the multipactor discharge and design of vacuum electronic devices. We have developed an experimental set up to measure energy distribution of SEE from Nb coupons under different incident angles, since Nb is used for manufacturing of SRF accelerating cavities. Samples are placed in carousel target manifolds which are manipulated by robotic arm providing multiple degrees of freedom of a whole target system. Work supported by JSA/DOE contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  7. Trends in Power Electronics and Control of Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Iov, Florin; Kerekes, Tamas

    2010-01-01

    by means of power electronics are changing the future electrical infrastructure but also contributes steadily more to non-carbon based electricity production. Most focus is on the power electronics technologies used. In the case of photovoltaics transformer-less systems are discussed as they have...... term) based energy sources to renewable energy sources. Another is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss trends of the most emerging renewable energy sources, wind energy and photovoltaics, which......The electrical energy consumption continues to grow and more applications will be based on electricity in the next decades. We can expect that more 60 % of all energy consumption will be converted and used as electricity. It is a demand that production, distribution and use of electrical energy...

  8. Applications of Electronstatic Lenses to Electron Gun and Energy Analyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sise, O.

    2004-01-01

    Focal properties and geometries are given for several types of electrostatic lens systems commonly needed in electron impact studies. One type is an electron gun which focuses electrons over a wide range of energy onto a fixed point, such as target, and the other type is an analyzer system which focuses scattered electrons of variable energy onto a fixed position, such as the entrance plane of an analyzer. There are many different types and geometries of these lenses for controlling and focusing of the electron beams. In this presentation we discussed the criteria used for the design of the electrostatic lenses associated with the electron gun and energy analyzers and determined the fundamental relationships between the operation and behaviour of multi-element electrostatic lenses, containing five, six and seven elements. The focusing of the electron beam was achieved by applying suitable voltages to the series of these lens elements, Design of the lens system for electron gun was based on our requirements that the beam at the target had a small spot size and zero beam angle, that is, afocal mode. For energy analyzer systems we considered the entrance of the hemispherical analyzer which determines the energy of the electron beam and discussed the focusing condition of this lens systems

  9. CAMAC high energy physics electronics hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolpakov, I.F.

    1977-01-01

    CAMAC hardware for high energy physics large spectrometers and control systems is reviewed as is the development of CAMAC modules at the High Energy Laboratory, JINR (Dubna). The total number of crates used at the Laboratory is 179. The number of CAMAC modules of 120 different types exceeds 1700. The principles of organization and the structure of developed CAMAC systems are described. (author)

  10. Power Electronics and Control of Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Ciobotaru, Mihai; Sera, Dezso

    2007-01-01

    sources from the conventional, fossil (and short term) based energy sources to renewable energy resources. Another is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss some of the most emerging renewable energy sources...

  11. Absolute Calibration of Image Plate for electrons at energy between 100 keV and 4 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Back, N L; Eder, D C; Ping, Y; Song, P M; Throop, A

    2007-12-10

    The authors measured the absolute response of image plate (Fuji BAS SR2040) for electrons at energies between 100 keV to 4 MeV using an electron spectrometer. The electron source was produced from a short pulse laser irradiated on the solid density targets. This paper presents the calibration results of image plate Photon Stimulated Luminescence PSL per electrons at this energy range. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX results are also presented for three representative incident angles onto the image plates and corresponding electron energies depositions at these angles. These provide a complete set of tools that allows extraction of the absolute calibration to other spectrometer setting at this electron energy range.

  12. Energy degradation of fast electrons in hydrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yueming; Mccray, Richard

    1991-01-01

    An equation is derived for calculating the energy distribution of fast electrons in a partially ionized gas and a method is provided to solve for the electron degradation spectrum and the energy deposition in different forms (ionization, excitation, or heating). As an example, the energy degradation of fast electrons in a gas of pure hydrogen is calculated, considering excitations to the lowest 10 atomic levels. The Bethe approximation and the continuous slowing-down approximation are discussed and it is concluded that these approximations are accurate to the order of 20 percent for electrons with initial energy of greater than about keV. The method and results can be used to determine heating, excitations, and ionizations by high-energy photoelectrons or cosmic-ray particles in various astrophysical circumstances, such as the interstellar medium, supernova envelopes, and QSO emission-line clouds.

  13. Cost-effectiveness and incidence of renewable energy promotion in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehringer, Christoph [Oldenburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Economics; Landis, Florian [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland); Tovar Reanos, Miguel Angel [Zentrum fuer Europaeische Wirtschaftsforschung GmbH (ZEW), Mannheim (Germany)

    2017-08-01

    Over the last decade Germany has boosted renewable energy in power production by means of massive subsidies. The flip side are very high electricity prices which raises concerns that the transition cost towards a renewable energy system will be mainly borne by poor households. In this paper, we combine computable general equilibrium and microsimulation analysis to investigate the cost-effectiveness and incidence of Germany's renewable energy promotion. We find that the regressive effects of renewable energy promotion could be ameliorated by alternative subsidy financing mechanisms which achieve the same level of electricity generation from renewable energy sources.

  14. Nonequilibrium electron energy-loss kinetics in metal clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Guillon, C; Fatti, N D; Vallee, F

    2003-01-01

    Ultrafast energy exchanges of a non-Fermi electron gas with the lattice are investigated in silver clusters with sizes ranging from 4 to 26 nm using a femtosecond pump-probe technique. The results yield evidence for a cluster-size-dependent slowing down of the short-time energy losses of the electron gas when it is strongly athermal. A constant rate is eventually reached after a few hundred femtoseconds, consistent with the electron gas internal thermalization kinetics, this behaviour reflecting evolution from an individual to a collective electron-lattice type of coupling. The timescale of this transient regime is reduced in small nanoparticles, in agreement with speeding up of the electron-electron interactions with size reduction. The experimental results are in quantitative agreement with numerical simulations of the electron kinetics.

  15. Thermalisation of high energy electrons and positrons in water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, A.; Blanco, F.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Thorn, P. A.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Garcia, G.

    2008-07-01

    In this study we describe a method to simulate single electron tracks of electrons in molecular gases, particularly in water vapour, from relatively high energies, where Born (Inokuti 1971) approximation is supposed to be valid, down to thermal energies paying special attention to the low energy secondary electrons which are abundantly generated along the energy degradation procedure. Experimental electron scattering cross sections (Munoz et al. 2007) and energy loss spectra (Thorn et al. 2007) have been determined, where possible, to be used as input parameters of the simulating program. These experimental data have been complemented with optical potential calculation (Blanco and Garcia 2003) providing a complete set of interaction probability functions for each type of collision which could take place in the considered energy range: elastic, ionization, electronic excitation, vibrational and rotational excitation. From the simulated track structure (Munoz et al. 2005) information about energy deposition and radiation damage at the molecular level can be derived. A similar procedure is proposed to the study of single positron tracks in gases. Due to the lack of experimental data for positron interaction with molecules, especially for those related to energy loss and excitation cross sections, some distribution probability data have been derived from those of electron scattering by introducing positron characteristics as positroniun formation. Preliminary results for argon are presented discussing also the utility of the model to biomedical applications based on positron emitters.

  16. HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING BASED ON REALISTIC SIX-DIMENSIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV,A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The high-energy electron cooling system for RHIC-II is unique compared to standard coolers. It requires bunched electron beam. Electron bunches are produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL), and cooling is planned without longitudinal magnetic field. To address unique features of the RHIC cooler, a generalized treatment of cooling force was introduced in BETACOOE code which allows us to calculate friction force for an arbitrary distribution of electrons. Simulations for RHIC cooler based on electron distribution from ERL are presented.

  17. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 1018 cm-3 in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a

  18. Secondary electron emission yield in the limit of low electron energy

    CERN Document Server

    Andronov, A.N.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Startsev, E.A.; Raitses, Y.; Demidov, V.I.

    2013-04-22

    Secondary electron emission (SEE) from solids plays an important role in many areas of science and technology.1 In recent years, there has been renewed interest in the experimental and theoretical studies of SEE. A recent study proposed that the reflectivity of very low energy electrons from solid surface approaches unity in the limit of zero electron energy2,3,4, If this was indeed the case, this effect would have profound implications on the formation of electron clouds in particle accelerators,2-4 plasma measurements with electrostatic Langmuir probes, and operation of Hall plasma thrusters for spacecraft propulsion5,6. It appears that, the proposed high electron reflectivity at low electron energies contradicts to numerous previous experimental studies of the secondary electron emission7. The goal of this note is to discuss possible causes of these contradictions.

  19. Tests of an electron monitor for routine quality control measurements of electron energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, E.B.; Reinstein, L.E.; Meek, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    The depth dose for electrons is sensitive to energy and the AAPM Task Group 24 has recommended that tests be performed at monthly intervals to assure electron beam energy constancy by verifying the depth for the 80% dose to within ±3 mm. Typically, this is accomplished by using a two-depth dose ratio technique. Recently, a new device, the Geske monitor, has been introduced that is designed for verifying energy constancy in a single reading. The monitor consists of nine parallel plate detectors that alternate with 5-mm-thick absorbers made of an aluminum alloy. An evaluation of the clinical usefulness of this monitor for the electron beams available on a Varian Clinac 20 has been undertaken with respect to energy discrimination. Beam energy changes of 3 mm of the 80% dose give rise to measurable output changes ranging from 1.7% for 20-MeV electron beams to 15% for 6-MeV electron beams

  20. Scattering of high energy electrons on deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossetete, B.

    1964-12-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain information on the neutron form factor from the study of the scattering of electrons on deuterium. The first part is dedicated to the theoretical study of the elastic and inelastic scattering. We introduce different form factors: Sachs form factor, the Pauli and Dirac form factors, they appear in the analytic expression of the scattering cross-section. We show how the deuteron form factors can be deduced from neutron's and proton's form factors. In the case of the inelastic scattering we show how the cross section can be broken into components associated to partial waves and we obtain different formulas for the inelastic cross-section based on the Breit formula or the Durand formalism. The second part is dedicated to the experiment setting of electron scattering on deuterium. The elastic scattering experiment has been made on solid or liquid CD 2 targets while inelastic scattering has been studied on a liquid target. We have used an electron beam produced by the Orsay linear accelerator and the scattered electrons have been analysed by a magnetic spectrometer and a Cerenkov detector. The results give a very low value (slightly positive)for the charge form factor of the neutron and a magnetic form factor for the neutron slightly below that of the proton [fr

  1. Scanning transmission low-energy electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Konvalina, Ivo; Unčovský, M.; Frank, Luděk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2011), 2:1-6 ISSN 0018-8646 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : TEM * STEM * SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2011

  2. Secondary electrons monitor for continuous electron energy measurements in UHF linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimek, Zbigniew; Bulka, Sylwester; Mirkowski, Jacek; Roman, Karol

    2001-01-01

    Continuous energy measurements have now became obligatory in accelerator facilities devoted to radiation sterilization process. This is one of several accelerator parameters like dose rate, beam current, bean scan parameters, conveyer speed which must be recorded as it is a required condition of accelerator validation procedure. Electron energy measurements are rather simple in direct DC accelerator, where the applied DC voltage is directly related to electron energy. High frequency linacs are not offering such opportunity in electron energy measurements. The analyzing electromagnet is applied in some accelerators but that method can be used only in off line mode before or after irradiation process. The typical solution is to apply the non direct method related to control and measurements certain accelerator parameters like beam current and microwave energy pulse power. The continuous evaluation of electron energy can be performed on the base of calculation and result comparison with calibration curve

  3. Power Electronics Control of Wind Energy in Distributed Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Ciobotaru, Mihai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2008-01-01

    emerging renewable energy sources, wind energy, which by means of power electronics are changing from being a minor energy source to be acting as an important power source in the energy system. Power electronics is the enabling technology and the presentation will cover the development in wind turbine......The global electrical energy consumption is still rising and there is an urgent demand to increase the power capacity. It is expected that the power capacity has to be doubled within 20 years. The production, distribution and use of energy should be as efficient as possible and incentives to save...... energy at the end-user should also be set up. Deregulation of energy has in the past lowered the investment in larger power plants, which means the need for new electrical power sources will be high in the near future. Two major technologies will play important roles to solve the future problems. One...

  4. Design, development and characterization of tetrode type electron gun system for generation of low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deore, A.V.; Bhoraskar, V.N.; Dhole, S.D.

    2011-01-01

    A tetrode type electron gun system for the generation of low energy electrons was designed, developed and characterized. An electron gun having four electrodes namely cathode, focusing electrode, control electrode and anode has been designed for the irradiation experiments. This electron gun is capable to provide electrons of energy over the range of 1 keV to 20 keV, with current maximum upto 100 μA. The electron gun and a faraday cup are mounted in the evacuated cylindrical chamber. The samples are fixed on the faraday cup and irradiated with low energy electrons at a pressure around 10 -6 mbar. In this electron gun system, at any electron energy over the entire range, the electron beam diameter can be varied from 5 to 120 mm on the Faraday cup mounted at a distance of 200 mm from the anode in the chamber. Also, the circular shape of the beam spot was maintained, even though the beam current and beam diameter are varied. The uniformity of the electron beam over the entire beam area was measured with a multi electrode assembly and found to be well within 15%. This system is being used for the synthesis and diffusion of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles in polymeric materials. (author)

  5. Simulations and measurements in scanning electron microscopes at low electron energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christopher G H; Frank, Luděk; Müllerová, Ilona

    2016-11-01

    The advent of new imaging technologies in Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) using low energy (0-2 keV) electrons has brought about new ways to study materials at the nanoscale. It also brings new challenges in terms of understanding electron transport at these energies. In addition, reduction in energy has brought new contrast mechanisms producing images that are sometimes difficult to interpret. This is increasing the push for simulation tools, in particular for low impact energies of electrons. The use of Monte Carlo calculations to simulate the transport of electrons in materials has been undertaken by many authors for several decades. However, inaccuracies associated with the Monte Carlo technique start to grow as the energy is reduced. This is not simply associated with inaccuracies in the knowledge of the scattering cross-sections, but is fundamental to the Monte Carlo technique itself. This is because effects due to the wave nature of the electron and the energy band structure of the target above the vacuum energy level become important and these are properties which are difficult to handle using the Monte Carlo method. In this review we briefly describe the new techniques of scanning low energy electron microscopy and then outline the problems and challenges of trying to understand and quantify the signals that are obtained. The effects of charging and spin polarised measurement are also briefly explored. SCANNING 38:802-818, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Treatment of foods with 'soft-electrons' (low-energy electrons)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Toru [Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Todoriki, Setsuko [National Food Research Institute (NFRI), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    Electrons with energies of 300 keV or lower were defined as soft-electrons'. Soft-electrons can eradicate microorganisms residing on the surface of grains, pulses, spices, dehydrated vegetables, tea leaves and seeds, and reduce their microbial loads to levels lower than 10 CFU/g with little quality deterioration. Soft-electrons can inactivate insect pests infesting grains and pulses and inhibit sprouting of potatoes. (author)

  7. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    such couplings provide important insight into the strength of interaction between photo-active pigments in protein-pigment complexes. Recently, attention has been payed to how the environment modifies or even controls the electronic couplings. To enable such theoretical predictions, a fully polarizable embedding......-order multipole moments. We use this extended model to systematically examine three different ways of obtaining EET couplings in a heterogeneous medium ranging from use of the exact transition density to a point-dipole approximation. Several interesting observations are made including that explicit use...... of transition densities in the calculation of the electronic couplings - also when including the explicit environment contribution - can be replaced by a much simpler transition point charge description without comprising the quality of the model predictions....

  8. Electron energy spectrum in core-shell elliptic quantum wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Holovatsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron energy spectrum in core-shell elliptic quantum wire and elliptic semiconductor nanotubes are investigated within the effective mass approximation. The solution of Schrodinger equation based on the Mathieu functions is obtained in elliptic coordinates. The dependencies of the electron size quantization spectrum on the size and shape of the core-shell nanowire and nanotube are calculated. It is shown that the ellipticity of a quantum wire leads to break of degeneration of quasiparticle energy spectrum. The dependences of the energy of odd and even electron states on the ratio between semiaxes are of a nonmonotonous character. The anticrosing effects are observed at the dependencies of electron energy spectrum on the transversal size of the core-shell nanowire.

  9. Development of total-skin electron therapy at two energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, R.S.; Heck, R.J.; Fessenden, P.; Karzmark, C.J.; Rust, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    Total-Skin Electron Therapy (TSET) modalities have been developed at two energies on a Varian Clinac 1800. The physical criteria for the beams were determined mainly from the requirement of continuing the Stanford treatment technique, which was 12 Total-Skin Electron Therapy portals combined in six pairs. The penetration of the lower energy mode matches that previously obtained at Stanford on the Varian Clinac 10, (about 4 mm for the 80% isodose contour in the 12-field treatment). The penetration of the higher energy mode is about 8 mm at the 80% contour. The Total-Skin Electron Therapy modes necessarily use electrons produced by the two standard electron-beam modes of lowest energy, nominally 6 and 9 MeV. Measurements to verify the beam specifications were carried out with diodes, a variety of ionization chambers, and a specially constructed circular phantom for film dosimetry. Initially, the penetration of the Total-Skin Electron Therapy beams was too large to match our criteria, so two methods of reducing it were explored: (a) the energies of the electron beams produced by the machine were reduced (which also reduced the energies of the corresponding standard electron modes) and (b) a large polymethylmethacrylate degrader (2.4 m X 1.2 m) 1 cm thick was placed just in front of the patient plane. Acceptable Total-Skin Electron Therapy beams could be produced by either method and the latter was finally used. The use of the standard dose monitoring system for the Total-Skin Electron Therapy modes considerably simplifies the daily treatment delivery as well as the implementation. However, the need for reasonable dose rates at the treatment plane (3.5 meters beyond the isocenter) requires dose rates of 24 Gy/min at the isocenter. Nevertheless, it is possible to use the internal dose monitor provided the problems associated with high dose rates are addressed

  10. A study of energy correction for the electron beam data in the BGO ECAL of the DAMPE

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhiying; Wei, Yifeng; Wang, Chi; Zhang, Yunlong; Wen, Sicheng; Wang, Xiaolian; Xu, Zizong; Huang, Guangshun

    2015-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is an orbital experiment aiming at searching for dark matter indirectly by measuring the spectra of photons, electrons and positrons originating from deep space. The BGO electromagnetic calorimeter is one of the key sub-detectors of the DAMPE, which is designed for high energy measurement with a large dynamic range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. In this paper, some methods for energy correction are discussed and tried, in order to reconstruct the primary energy of the incident electrons. Different methods are chosen for the appropriate energy ranges. The results of Geant4 simulation and beam test data (at CERN) are presented.

  11. Method of incident low-energy gamma-ray direction reconstruction in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheymits, M D; Leonov, A A; Zverev, V G; Galper, A M; Arkhangelskaya, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Yurkin, Yu T; Bakaldin, A V; Suchkov, S I; Topchiev, N P; Dalkarov, O D

    2016-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space-based telescope has as its main goals to measure cosmic γ-ray fluxes and the electron-positron cosmic-ray component produced, theoretically, in dark-matter-particles decay or annihilation processes, to search for discrete γ-ray sources and study them in detail, to examine the energy spectra of diffuse γ-rays — both galactic and extragalactic — and to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and γ-rays from the active Sun. Scientific goals of GAMMA-400 telescope require fine angular resolution. The telescope is of a pair-production type. In the converter-tracker, the incident gamma-ray photon converts into electron-positron pair in the tungsten layer and then the tracks are detected by silicon- strip position-sensitive detectors. Multiple scattering processes become a significant obstacle in the incident-gamma direction reconstruction for energies below several gigaelectronvolts. The method of utilising this process to improve the resolution is proposed in the presented work. (paper)

  12. Treatment of basal cell epithelioma with high energy electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Y. (Hyogo-ken Cancer Center, Kobe (Japan)); Kumano, M.; Kumano, K.

    1981-11-01

    Thirty patients with basal cell epithelioma received high energy electron beam therapy. They were irradiated with a dose ranging from 4,800 rad (24 fractions, 35 days) to 12,000 rad (40 fractions, 57 days). Tumors disappeared in all cases. These were no disease-related deaths; in one patient there was recurrence after 2 years. We conclude that radiotherapy with high energy electron beam is very effective in the treatment of basal cell epithelioma.

  13. International Conference on Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suresh, L; Dash, Subhransu; Panigrahi, Bijaya

    2015-01-01

    The book is a collection of high-quality peer-reviewed research papers presented in Proceedings of International Conference on Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Systems (ICPERES 2014) held at Rajalakshmi Engineering College, Chennai, India. These research papers provide the latest developments in the broad area of Power Electronics and Renewable Energy. The book discusses wide variety of industrial, engineering and scientific applications of the emerging techniques. It presents invited papers from the inventors/originators of new applications and advanced technologies.

  14. Electronic structures of elements according to ionization energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadeh, Dariush H

    2017-11-28

    The electronic structures of elements in the periodic table were analyzed using available experimental ionization energies. Two new parameters were defined to carry out the study. The first parameter-apparent nuclear charge (ANC)-quantified the overall charge of the nucleus and inner electrons observed by an outer electron during the ionization process. This parameter was utilized to define a second parameter, which presented the shielding ability of an electron against the nuclear charge. This second parameter-electron shielding effect (ESE)-provided an insight into the electronic structure of atoms. This article avoids any sort of approximation, interpolation or extrapolation. First experimental ionization energies were used to obtain the two aforementioned parameters. The second parameter (ESE) was then graphed against the electron number of each element, and was used to read the corresponding electronic structure. The ESE showed spikes/peaks at the end of each electronic shell, providing insight into when an electronic shell closes and a new one starts. The electronic structures of elements in the periodic table were mapped using this methodology. These graphs did not show complete agreement with the previously known "Aufbau" filling rule. A new filling rule was suggested based on the present observations. Finally, a new way to organize elements in the periodic table is suggested. Two earlier topics of effective nuclear charge, and shielding factor were also briefly discussed and compared numerically to demonstrate the capability of the new approach.

  15. Beam-Based Calibration of the Electron Energy in the Fermilab Electron Cooler

    CERN Document Server

    Seletsky, Sergey

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling of 8.9 GeV antiprotons in the Fermilab's Recycler ring requires precise matching of electron and antiproton velocities. While the final match can be done by optimization of the cooling process, for the very first cooling one should rely on the knowledge of absolute values of electron and antiproton energies. The upper limit for the energy uncertainty of both beams is determined by the Recycler's momentum aperture and is equal to 0.3%. The paper discusses a method of the electron energy calibration that is based on the measurement of the electron's Larmor wavelength in the field of the cooling section solenoid. The method was tested in an 18 m long cooling section prototype with 3.5 MeV electrons. An accuracy of 0.3% was demonstrated.

  16. Generation of Low-Energy High-Current Electron Beams in Plasma-Anode Electron Guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozur, G. E.; Proskurovsky, D. I.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is a review of studies on the generation of low-energy high-current electron beams in electron guns with a plasma anode and an explosive-emission cathode. The problems related to the initiation of explosive electron emission under plasma and the formation and transport of high-current electron beams in plasma-filled systems are discussed consecutively. Considerable attention is given to the nonstationary effects that occur in the space charge layers of plasma. Emphasis is also placed on the problem of providing a uniform energy density distribution over the beam cross section, which is of critical importance in using electron beams of this type for surface treatment of materials. Examples of facilities based on low-energy high-current electron beam sources are presented and their applications in materials science and practice are discussed.

  17. Systematics of threshold incident energy for deep sub-barrier fusion hindrance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Hagino, Kouichi; Iwamoto, Akira

    2007-01-01

    We systematically evaluate the potential energy at the touching configuration for heavy-ion reactions using various potential models. We point out that the energy at the touching point, especially that estimated with the Krappe-Nix-Sierk (KNS) potential, strongly correlates with the threshold incident energy for steep falloff of fusion cross sections observed recently for several systems at extremely low energies. This clearly indicates that the steep fall-off phenomenon can be attributed to the dynamics after the target and projectile touch with each other, e.g., the tunneling process and the nuclear saturation property in the overlap region

  18. Evaluation of Miscellaneous and Electronic Device Energy Use in Hospitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Douglas R.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; Lai, Judy; Brown, Richard E.; Singer, Brett C.

    2012-09-01

    Miscellaneous and electronic loads (MELs) consume about one-thirdof the primary energy used in US buildings, and their energy use is increasing faster than other end-uses. In healthcare facilities, 30percent of the annual electricity was used by MELs in 2008. This paper presents methods and challenges for estimating medical MELs energy consumption along with estimates of energy use in a hospital by combining device-level metered data with inventories and usage information. An important finding is that common, small devices consume large amounts of energy in aggregate and should not be ignored when trying to address hospital energy use.

  19. Charge-coupled device area detector for low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horacek, Miroslav

    2003-01-01

    A fast position-sensitive detector was designed for the angle- and energy-selective detection of signal electrons in the scanning low energy electron microscope (SLEEM), based on a thinned back-side directly electron-bombarded charged-coupled device (CCD) sensor (EBCCD). The principle of the SLEEM operation and the motivation for the development of the detector are explained. The electronics of the detector is described as well as the methods used for the measurement of the electron-bombarded gain and of the dark signal. The EBCCD gain of 565 for electron energy 5 keV and dynamic range 59 dB for short integration time up to 10 ms at room temperature were obtained. The energy dependence of EBCCD gain and the detection efficiency are presented for electron energy between 2 and 5 keV, and the integration time dependence of the output signals under dark conditions is given for integration time from 1 to 500 ms

  20. Ion induced high energy electron emission from copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruano, G.; Ferron, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of secondary electron emission from Cu induced by low energy bombardment (1-5 keV) of noble gas (He + , Ne + and Ar + ) and Li + ions. We identify different potential and kinetic mechanisms and find the presence of high energetic secondary electrons for a couple of ion-target combinations. In order to understand the presence of these fast electrons we need to consider the Fermi shuttle mechanism and the different ion neutralization efficiencies.

  1. Energy and angular distributions of electrons ejected from CH and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Relative cross sections, differential in energy and angle, for electrons ejected from CH4 and C3H8 molecules under 16.0 keV electron impact have been measured. Electrons were analyzed by a 45Ж parallel plate electrostatic analyzer at emission angles varying from 60Ж to 135Ж with en- ergies from 50 eV to ...

  2. Charge-coupled device area detector for low energy electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Miroslav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 7 (2003), s. 3379 - 3384 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/00/P001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : low energy electrons * charged-coupled device * detector Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.343, year: 2003

  3. Utilization of low-energy electron accelerators in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    There are more than 20 electron accelerators in Korea. Most of those are installed in factories for heat-resistant cables, heat-shrinkable cables, radial tires, foams, tube/ films, curing, etc. Four low-energy electron accelerators are in operation for research purposes such as polymer modification, purification of flue gas, waste water treatment, modification of semiconductor characteristics, etc. (author)

  4. Electronic structure analysis and vertical ionization energies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Electronic structure analysis and vertical ionization energies of thiophene and ethynylthiophenes. RAMAN K SINGH and MANOJ K MISHRA*. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai 400 076 e-mail: mmishra@iitb.ac.in. Abstract. Results from different decouplings of the electron propagator ...

  5. Computation of the average energy for LXY electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau, A.

    1996-01-01

    The application of an atomic rearrangement model in which we only consider the three shells K, L and M, to compute the counting efficiency for electron capture nuclides, requires a fine averaged energy value for LMN electrons. In this report, we illustrate the procedure with two example, ''125 I and ''109 Cd. (Author) 4 refs

  6. Effects of a power and photon energy of incident light on near-field etching properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsui, T.; Saito, H.; Nishioka, K.; Leuschel, B.; Soppera, O.; Nobusada, K.

    2017-12-01

    We developed a near-field etching technique for realizing an ultra-flat surfaces of various materials and structures. To elucidate the near-field etching properties, we have investigated the effects of power and the photon energy of the incident light. First, we established theoretically that an optical near-field with photon energy lower than the absorption edge of the molecules can induce molecular vibrations. We used nanodiamonds to study the power dependence of the near-field etching properties. From the topological changes of the nanodiamonds, we confirmed the linear-dependence of the etching volume with the incident power. Furthermore, we studied the photon energy dependence using TiO2 nanostriped structures, which revealed that a lower photon energy results in a lower etching rate.

  7. Electron energy and electron trajectories in an inverse free-electron laser accelerator based on a novel electrostatic wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikrah, M.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    We expand here a theory of a high-gradient laser-excited electron accelerator based on an inverse free-electron laser (inverse-FEL), but with innovations in the structure and design. The electrostatic wiggler used in our scheme, namely termed the Paul wiggler, is generated by segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltages {{V}\\text{osc}}(t) over {{90}\\circ} segments. The inverse-FEL interaction can be described by the equations that govern the electron motion in the combined fields of both the laser pulse and Paul wiggler field. A numerical study of electron energy and electron trajectories has been made using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The results indicate that the electron attains a considerable energy at short distances in this device. It is found that if the electron has got sufficient suitable wiggler amplitude intensities, it can not only gain higher energy in longer distances, but also can retain it even after the passing of the laser pulse. In addition, the results reveal that the electron energy gains different peaks for different initial axial velocities, so that a suitable small initial axial velocity of e-beam produces substantially high energy gain. With regard to the transverse confinement of the electron beam in a Paul wiggler, there is no applied axial guide magnetic field in this device.

  8. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Harkay

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  9. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkay, K.C.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  10. Variation of kinetic energy release with temperature and electron energy for unimolecular ionic transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabia, M.A.; Fahmy, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The kinetic energy released during seven unimolecular ionic transitions, generated from benzyl alcohol and benzyl amine have been studied as a function of ion source temperature and ionizing electron energy. Only, the kinetic energy released during H CN elimination from fragment [C 7 H 8 N]+ ion of benzyl amine displays a temperature dependence. For only two transitions, generated from benzyl alcohol, the kinetic energy released show a significant ionizing electron energy dependence. These results may reveal the role of the internal energy of reacting ions in producing the kinetic energy released some transitions produced from benzyl alcohol

  11. Estimation of the characteristic energy of electron precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. del Pozo

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Data from simultaneous observations (on 13 February 1996, 9 November 1998, and 12 February 1999 with the IRIS, DASI and EISCAT systems are employed in the study of the energy distribution of the electron precipitation during substorm activity. The estimation of the characteristic energy of the electron precipitation over the common field of view of IRIS and DASI is discussed. In particular, we look closely at the physical basis of the correspondence between the characteristic energy, the flux-averaged energy, as defined below, and the logarithm of the ratio of the green-light intensity to the square of absorption. This study expands and corrects results presented in the paper by Kosch et al. (2001. It is noticed, moreover, that acceleration associated with diffusion processes in the magnetosphere long before precipitation may be controlling the shape of the energy spectrum. We propose and test a "mixed" distribution for the energy-flux spectrum, exponential at the lower energies and Maxwellian or modified power-law at the higher energies, with a threshold energy separating these two regimes. The energy-flux spectrum at Tromsø, in the 1–320 keV range, is derived from EISCAT electron density profiles in the 70–140 km altitude range and is applied in the "calibration" of the optical intensity and absorption distributions, in order to extrapolate the flux and characteristic energy maps.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation; particle acceleration

  12. Electron Spin Resonance studies of defects formed in SiO2 by high energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooryhee, Eric

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the defects formed in silica by high energy ions. Defect formation processes are not yet well understood at energies higher than 1 MeV/amu, whereas they can be interpreted in terms of collision cascades at low energies. There are numerous applications in astrophysics (cosmic rays), earth sciences (fission track dating), and for technological problems (storage of radioactive waste material, fusion reactors). We have used Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) together with other techniques (optical spectroscopy, channeling, small angle X-ray scattering) to characterize defects formed by electronic excitations and to study the influence of the energy, the atomic number and the fluence of ions. We have irradiated silica and alumina targets at GANIL and at UNILAC Darmstadt. ESR studies have shown that high energy ions form paramagnetic vacancies (E' centers) and interstitials (peroxy radicals). Their ESR signatures exhibit specific characteristics when compared to those observed after gamma-ray or electron irradiation, which can be related to the very high density of deposited energy, and to the specific environment within clusters of defects. The production rate of defects varies with the atomic number of the incident ion, for a given energy deposit. The proportion of peroxy radicals increases with stopping power. When fluence increases above the overlapping threshold, a transfer from E' centers to peroxy radicals is observed, similar to that observed after thermal annealing. These results demonstrate the nonlinear effects of energy losses and the role of a phase in which primary defects reorganize in the wake of the incident ion ('thermal spike' concept). Optical spectroscopy experiments allowed us to show that high energy ions also form diamagnetic oxygen vacancies. However, the total defect concentration observed is too low to account for the preferential chemical etching of ion tracks. Local bond straining induced by the ion could

  13. FNAL R and D in medium energy electron cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaitsev, S; Crawford, A C; Kroc, T; MacLachlan, J; Saewert, G; Schmidt, C W; Shemyakin, A; Warner, A

    2000-01-01

    The first stage of the Fermilab Electron Cooling R and D program is now complete: a technology necessary to generate hundreds of milliamps of electron beam current at MeV energies has been demonstrated. Conceptual design studies show that with an electron beam current of 200 mA and with a cooling section of 20 m electron cooling in the 8.9 GeV/c Fermilab Recycler ring can provide antiproton stacking rates suitable for the Tevatron upgrades beyond Run II luminosity goals. A novel electron beam transport scheme with a weak magnetic field at the cathode and in the cooling section, and with discrete focusing elements in between will be used. A prototype of such an electron cooling system is now being built at Fermilab as part of the continuing R and D program. This paper describes the status of the electron cooling R and D program at Fermilab.

  14. Very low energy scanning electron microscopy in nanotechnology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Mika, Filip; Mikmeková, Eliška; Mikmeková, Šárka; Pokorná, Zuzana; Frank, Luděk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, 8/9 (2012), s. 695-716 ISSN 1475-7435 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE08012; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * very low energy electrons * cathode lens * grain contrast * strain contrast * imaging of participates * dopant contrast * very low energy STEM * graphene Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.087, year: 2012

  15. Ultra-low-energy wide electron exposure unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonago, Akinobu; Oono, Yukihiko; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Kishimoto, Junichi; Wakamoto, Ikuo

    2001-01-01

    Heat and ultraviolet ray processes are used in surface dryness of paint, surface treatment of construction materials and surface sterilization of food containers. A process using a low-energy wide-area electron beam (EB) has been developed that features high speed and low drive cost. EB processing is not widespread in general industry, however, due to high equipment cost and difficult maintenance. We developed an ultra-low-energy wide-area electron beam exposure unit, the Mitsubishi Wide Electron Exposure Unit (MIWEL) to solve these problems. (author)

  16. Toward Defect Engineering Strategies to Optimize Energy and Electronic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstratia N. Sgourou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The technological requirement to optimize materials for energy and electronic materials has led to the use of defect engineering strategies. These strategies take advantage of the impact of composition, disorder, structure, and mechanical strain on the material properties. In the present review, we highlight key strategies presently employed or considered to tune the properties of energy and electronic materials. We consider examples from electronic materials (silicon and germanium, photocatalysis (titanium oxide, solid oxide fuel cells (cerium oxide, and nuclear materials (nanocomposites.

  17. Energy Dependence of Near-relativistic Electron Spectrum at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In view of the renewed interest in the study of energetic par- ticles in the outer radiation belt of the earth, we feel it will be helpful in looking for the energy dependence of the electron energy spectrum at geo- stationary orbit. This may give us some insight into how we can safeguard geostationary satellites from ...

  18. Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA) technique us- ing an energy-dispersive X-ray detector with an ultra-thin window, designated as low-Z particle. EPMA, has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA allows the quantitative determination of concentrations of low-Z elements such ...

  19. On the Emission of Electrons from Solid H_2 and D_2 by Bombardment with 1-3 keV Electrons up to Very Large Angles of Incidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1982-01-01

    -65°. Only at large angles and low energies were the results different for H2 and D2, those for H2 being the lower ones. The angular variation of the SEE coefficient δ may be written as δ(θ)=δ(0)(cos θ)3/2 up to an angle of 65-75°. For H2 the SEE coefficient is around 0.65 times that the D2 except......Electron emission, i.e. electron reflection (ER) and secondary electron emission (SEE), was studied for solid H2 and D2 for oblique incidence of 1-3 keV electrons up to an angle of incidence θ of 83°. The ER coefficient η was small at low angles, and rose rapidly with increasing θ above 60...... at the largest angles. The results agree well with the existing qualitative tendencies described in the literature. The variation with the angle of incidence shows a fair agreement with an estimate based on data for the angular distribution of electrons ejected from ionized hydrogen molecules. In addition...

  20. Electron energy distribution in a weakly ionized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesari, C.

    1967-03-01

    The aim of this work is to determine from both the theoretical and experimental points of view the type of distribution function for the electronic energies existing in a positive-column type cold laboratory plasma having an ionization rate of between 10 -6 and 10 -7 . The theoretical analysis, based on the imperfect Lorentz model and taking into account inelastic collisions is developed from the Boltzmann equation. The experimental method which we have employed for making an electrostatic analysis of the electronic energies makes use of a Langmuir probe used in conjunction with a transistorized electronic device. A comparison between the experimental and theoretical results yields information concerning the mechanisms governing electronic energy transfer on a microscopic scale. (author) [fr

  1. Periodicity-Free Unfolding Method of Electronic Energy Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, Taichi; Nishi, Hirofumi; Kato, Yasuyuki; Matsushita, Yu-ichiro

    2017-12-01

    We propose a novel periodicity-free unfolding method of electronic energy spectra. Our new method solves the serious problem that a calculated electronic band structure strongly depends on the choice of the simulation cell, i.e., primitive cell or supercell. The present method projects the electronic states onto the free-electron states, giving rise to plane-wave unfolded spectra. Using the method, the energy spectra can be calculated as a quantity independent of the choice of the simulation cell. We examine the unfolded energy spectra in detail for the following three models and clarify the validity of our method: a one-dimensional two-chain model, monolayer graphene, and twisted bilayer graphene. We also discuss the relation between our present method and the spectra observed in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments.

  2. Household energy consumption and consumer electronics: The case of television

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosbie, Tracey

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic rise in the number of consumer electronics in households. These new technologies and the services that support them enable new highly energy intensive behaviours. Using in-depth interview data collected from 20 households in 2006, this paper explores these energy intensive behaviours, using the example of the use of televisions. In doing so, it illustrates how the design and marketing of consumer electronics, and the services which support them, actively encourage energy intensive behaviours and how householders are reconfiguring their homes and lifestyles to fit these behaviours. This latter point is significant because, as householders change their homes and daily lives to fit energy intensive consuming behaviours, it will become increasingly difficult to encourage people to reduce their household energy consumption. This paper concludes with the implications of the research findings for policies designed to reduce household energy consumption

  3. Intermediate energy cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Ellis-Gibbings, L.; García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Nixon, K. L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); School of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WV1 1LY (United Kingdom); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-07

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) and integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine, at incident electron energies in the range 15–50 eV. The scattered electron angular range for the DCS measurements was 15°–90°. The measurements at the DCS-level are the first to be reported for vibrational-excitation in pyrimidine via electron impact, while for the ICS we extend the results from the only previous condensed-phase study [P. L. Levesque, M. Michaud, and L. Sanche, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094701 (2005)], for electron energies ⩽12 eV, to higher energies. Interestingly, the trend in the magnitude of the lower energy condensed-phase ICSs is much smaller when compared to the corresponding gas phase results. As there is no evidence for the existence of any shape-resonances, in the available pyrimidine total cross sections [Baek et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 032702 (2013); Fuss et al., ibid. 88, 042702 (2013)], between 10 and 20 eV, this mismatch in absolute magnitude between the condensed-phase and gas-phase ICSs might be indicative for collective-behaviour effects in the condensed-phase results.

  4. Low energy electron attachment to the uracil molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanel, G.; Gstir, B.; Denifl, S.; Scheier, P.; Maerk, T.D.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.

    2002-01-01

    Using a recently constructed high resolution crossed beam apparatus involving a hemispherical electron monochromator, electron attachment to the uracil molecule C 4 H 4 N 2 O 2 was studied. The electron energy range investigated was in the region between 0 and 12 eV. What will happen when slow electrons are colliding with the cellular RNA compound uracil was the objective of this investigation. The following anion fragments were detected: (C 4 H 3 N 2 O 2 ) - , OCN - , (H 2 C 3 NO) - , CN - , O - . The most important result was that within the detection efficiency any traces of the parent anion were observed. The most intense fragment anion appeared on a mass to charge ratio 111 amu., it corresponds to a uracil molecule missing one hydrogen. Another observation was whereas the parent minus H anion is observed at zero electron energy, all other fragments appear in other range. (nevyjel)

  5. Sterilization of experimental animal feeds with high energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takekawa, Tetsuya; Shakudo, Taketomi; Furuta, Masakazu; Tada, Mikiro

    2005-01-01

    Penetration range and depth-dose distribution of 10 MeV electrons within commercial packages of experimental animal feeds were examined with a high power electron accelerator for verification of the application of high energy electron beam irradiation to sterilize experimental animal feeds. Optimum packaging sizes were proposed based on the experimental results. The change of the vitamins and the efficacy of the sterilization by the irradiation were also studied. It is confirmed that the sterilization of experimental animal feeds by 10 MeV electron beam has been completely practical. (author)

  6. Low-energy elastic electron interactions with pyrimidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palihawadana, Prasanga; Sullivan, James; Buckman, Stephen; Brunger, Michael; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, F.

    2011-01-01

    We present results of measurements and calculations of elastic electron scattering from pyrimidine in the energy range 3-50 eV. Absolute differential and integral elastic cross sections have been measured using a crossed electron-molecule beam spectrometer and the relative flow technique. The measured cross sections are compared with results of calculations using the well-known Schwinger variational technique and an independent-atom model. Agreement between the measured differential cross sections and the results of the Schwinger calculations is good at lower energies but less satisfactory at higher energies where inelastic channels that should be open are kept closed in the calculations.

  7. Electron and photon energy measurement calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Manzoni, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the energy measurement of electron and photon is paramount for many ATLAS physics analysis. The calibration of the energy measurement is performed in-situ using a large statistics of Z->ee events. The results obtained with the pp collisions data recorded in 2015 and 2016 at sqrt(s)= 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1 and 2.7 fb-1 respectively , as well as the corresponding uncertainties on the electron and photon energy scales, are presented.

  8. Electron and photon energy measurement calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00436885; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the energy measurement of electrons and photons is paramount for many ATLAS physics analyses. The calibration of the energy measurement is performed $in$-$situ$ using a large statistics of $Z \\rightarrow ee$ events. The results obtained with the $pp$ collisions data recorded in 2015 and 2016 at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb$^{-1}$ and 2.7 fb$^{-1}$ respectively, as well as the corresponding uncertainties on the electron and photon energy scales, are presented

  9. Energy of auroral electrons and Z mode generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Wong, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    The present consideration of Z-mode radiation generation, in light of observational results indicating that the O mode and second-harmonic X-mode emissions can prevail over the X-mode fundamental radiation when suprathermal electron energy is low, gives attention to whether the thermal effect on the Z-mode dispersion can be equally important, and whether the Z-mode can compete for the available free-energy source. It is found that, under suitable circumstances, the growth rate of the Z-mode can be substantial even for low suprathermal auroral electron energies. Growth is generally maximized for propagation perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  10. Electron Identification and Energy Measurement with Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Nobuko; Komatsu, Masahiro

    Charged particles undergo the Multiple Coulomb Scattering (MCS) when passing through a material. Their momentum can be estimated from the distribution of the scattering angle directly. Angle of electrons (or positrons) largely changes because of the energy loss in bremsstrahlung, and they are distinguished from other charged particles by making use of its feature. Electron energy is generally measured by counting of electromagnetic shower (e.m. shower) tracks in Emulsion Cloud Chamber (ECC), so enough absorber material is needed to develop the shower. In the range from sub-GeV to a few GeV, electrons don't develop noticeable showers. In order to estimate the energy of electrons in this range with a limited material, we established the new method which is based on the scattering angle considering the energy loss in bremsstrahlung. From the Monte Carlo simulation (MC) data, which is generated by electron beam (0.5 GeV, 1 GeV, 2 GeV) exposure to ECC, we derived the correlation between energy and scattering angle in each emulsion layer. We fixed the function and some parameters which 1 GeV MC sample would return 1 GeV as the center value, and then applied to 0.5 GeV and 2 GeV sample and confirmed the energy resolution about 50% within two radiation length.

  11. A method of dopant electron energy spectrum parameterization for calculation of single-electron nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorokhov, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    Solitary dopants in semiconductors and dielectrics that possess stable electron structures and interesting physical properties may be used as building blocks of quantum computers and sensor systems that operate based on new physical principles. This study proposes a phenomenological method of parameterization for a single-particle energy spectrum of dopant valence electrons in crystalline semiconductors and dielectrics that takes electron-electron interactions into account. It is proposed to take electron-electron interactions in the framework of the outer electron shell model into account. The proposed method is applied to construct the procedure for the determination of the effective dopant outer shell capacity and the method for calculation of the tunneling current in a single-electron device with one or several active dopants-charge centers.

  12. Temporal and spatial distribution of high energy electrons at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, I.; Garrett, H. B.; Ratliff, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Measurements of the high energy, omni-directional electron environment by the Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) were used to study the high energy electron environment in the Jovian magnetosphere, especially in the region between 8 to 18 Rj (1 Rj = 1 Jovian radius = 71,400 km). 10-minute averages of the EPD data collected between Jupiter orbit insertion (JOI) in 1995 and the orbit number 33 (I33) in 2002 form an extensive dataset, which has been extremely useful to observe temporal and spatial variability of the Jovian high energy electron environment. The count rates of the EPD electron channels (0.174, 0.304, 0.527, 1.5, 2.0, and 11 MeV) were grouped into 0.5 Rj or 0.5 L bins and analyzed statistically. The results indicate that: (1) a log-normal Gaussian distribution well describes the statistics of the high energy electron environment (for example, electron differential fluxes) in the Jovian magnetosphere, in the region studied here; (2) the high energy electron environments inferred by the Galileo EPD measurements are in a close agreement with the data obtained using the Divine model, which was developed more than 30 years ago from Pioneer 10, 11 and Voyager 1, 2 data; (3) the data are better organized when plotted against magnetic radial parameter L than Rj; (4) the standard deviations of the 0.174, 0.304, 0.527 MeV channel count rates are larger than those of the 1.5, 2.0, 11 MeV count rates in 12 Rj. These observations are very helpful to understand short- and long-term, and local variability of the Jovian high energy electron environment, and are discussed in detail.

  13. Electron energy and charge albedos - calorimetric measurement vs Monte Carlo theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, G.J.; Ruggles, L.E.; Miller, G.H.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    A new calorimetric method has been employed to obtain saturated electron energy albedos for Be, C, Al, Ti, Mo, Ta, U, and UO 2 over the range of incident energies from 0.1 to 1.0 MeV. The technique was so designed to permit the simultaneous measurement of saturated charge albedos. In the cases of C, Al, Ta, and U the measurements were extended down to about 0.025 MeV. The angle of incidence was varied from 0 0 (normal) to 75 0 in steps of 15 0 , with selected measurements at 82.5 0 in Be and C. In each case, state-of-the-art predictions were obtained from a Monte Carlo model. The generally good agreement between theory and experiment over this extensive parameter space represents a strong validation of both the theoretical model and the new experimental method. Nevertheless, certain discrepancies at low incident energies, especially in high-atomic-number materials, and at all energies in the case of the U energy albedos are not completely understood

  14. Power electronics - key technology for renewable energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Iov, Florin; Kerekes, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    are changing and challenging the future electrical infrastructure but also contributes steadily more to non-carbon based electricity production. Most focus in the paper is on the power electronics technologies used. In the case of photovoltaics transformer-less systems are discussed as they have the potential...... as efficient as possible. Further, the emerging climate changes is arguing to find sustainable future solutions. Of many options, two major technologies will play important roles to solve parts of those future problems. One is to change the electrical power production from conventional, fossil based energy...... sources to renewable energy sources. Another is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss trends of the most emerging renewable energy sources, wind energy and photovoltaics, which by means of power electronics...

  15. Power electronics for renewable energy systems, transportation and industrial applications

    CERN Document Server

    Malinowski, Mariusz; Al-Haddad, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Power Electronics for Renewable Energy, Transportation, and Industrial Applications combines state-of-the-art global expertise to present the latest research on power electronics and its application in transportation, renewable energy, and different industrial applications. This timely book aims to facilitate the implementation of cutting-edge techniques to design problems offering innovative solutions to the growing power demands in small- and large-size industries. Application areas in the book range from smart homes and electric and plug-in hybrid electrical vehicles (PHEVs), to smart distribution and intelligence operation centers where significant energy efficiency improvements can be achieved through the appropriate use and design of power electronics and energy storage devices.

  16. Modeling power electronics and interfacing energy conversion systems

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, Marcelo Godoy

    2017-01-01

    Discusses the application of mathematical and engineering tools for modeling, simulation and control oriented for energy systems, power electronics and renewable energy. This book builds on the background knowledge of electrical circuits, control of dc/dc converters and inverters, energy conversion and power electronics. The book shows readers how to apply computational methods for multi-domain simulation of energy systems and power electronics engineering problems. Each chapter has a brief introduction on the theoretical background, a description of the problems to be solved, and objectives to be achieved. Block diagrams, electrical circuits, mathematical analysis or computer code are covered. Each chapter concludes with discussions on what should be learned, suggestions for further studies and even some experimental work.

  17. Incident Energy Dependence of pt Correlations at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Badyal, S. K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B. I; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhatia, V. S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M. M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A. K.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M. S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R. Kh

    2005-10-01

    We present results for two-particle transverse momentum correlations, Δpt,iΔt,j, as a function of event centrality for Au+Au collisions at √(sNN) = 20, 62, 130, and 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We observe correlations decreasing with centrality that are similar at all four incident energies. The correlations multiplied by the multiplicity density increase with incident energy and the centrality dependence may show evidence of processes such as thermalization, jet production, or the saturation of transverse flow. The square root of the correlations divided by the event-wise average transverse momentum per event shows little or no beam energy dependence and generally agrees with previous measurements at the Super Proton Synchrotron.

  18. On the possibility of obtaining high-energy polarized electrons on Yerevan synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melikyan, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A possibility of producing high-energy polarized electrons on the Yerevan synchrotron is discussed. A review of a number of low-energy polarized electron sources and of some of experiments with high-energy polarized electrons is given

  19. Low-energy electron collisions with proline and pyrrolidine: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Freitas, Thiago Corrêa; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2018-02-01

    We present a comparative study on the calculated cross sections obtained for the elastic collisions of low-energy electrons with the amino acid proline (C5H9NO2) and its building block pyrrolidine (C4H9N). We employed the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with pseudopotentials to compute integral, differential, and momentum transfer cross sections in the static-exchange plus polarization approximation, for energies up to 15 eV. We report three shape resonances for proline at around 1.7 eV, 6.8 eV, and 10 eV and two shape resonances for pyrrolidine centered at 7 eV and 10.2 eV. The present resonance energies are compared with available experimental data on vertical attachment energies and dissociative electron attachment, where a good agreement is found. From the comparison of the present results with available calculated cross sections for the simplest carboxylic acid, formic acid (HCOOH), and from electronic structure calculations, we found that the first resonance of proline, at 1.7 eV, is due the presence of the carboxylic group, whereas the other two structures, at 6.8 eV and 10 eV, clearly arise from the pyrrolidine ring. A comparison between the differential cross sections for proline and pyrrolidine at some selected energies of the incident electron is also reported in this paper.

  20. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng, E-mail: dssu@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory of Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wenhua Road 72, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  1. Energy dependence of ion-induced sputtering yields from monoatomic solids at normal incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Yasunori; Tawara, Hiro.

    1995-03-01

    The yields of the ion-induced sputtering from monoatomic solids at normal incidence for various ion-target combinations are presented graphically as a function of the incident ion energy. In order to fill the lack of the experimental data, the sputtering yields are also calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT for some ion-target combinations. Each graph shows available experimental data points and the ACAT data, together with the sputtering yields calculated by the present empirical formula, whose parameters are determined by the best-fit to available data. (author)

  2. Dissipation and energy balance in electronic dynamics of Na clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincendon, Marc; Suraud, Eric; Reinhard, Paul-Gerhard

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the impact of dissipation on the energy balance in the electron dynamics of metal clusters excited by strong electro-magnetic pulses. The dynamics is described theoretically by Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TDDFT) at the level of Local Density Approximation (LDA) augmented by a self interaction correction term and a quantum collision term in Relaxation-Time Approximation (RTA). We evaluate the separate contributions to the total excitation energy, namely energy exported by electron emission, potential energy due to changing charge state, intrinsic kinetic and potential energy, and collective flow energy. The balance of these energies is studied as function of the laser parameters (frequency, intensity, pulse length) and as function of system size and charge. We also look at collisions with a highly charged ion and here at the dependence on the impact parameter (close versus distant collisions). Dissipation turns out to be small where direct electron emission prevails namely for laser frequencies above any ionization threshold and for slow electron extraction in distant collisions. Dissipation is large for fast collisions and at low laser frequencies, particularly at resonances. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Dynamics of Systems at the Nanoscale", edited by Andrey Solov'yov and Andrei Korol.

  3. Electron beam directed energy device and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2007-10-16

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for an electron beam directed energy device. The device consists of an electron gun with one or more electron beams. The device includes one or more accelerating plates with holes aligned for beam passage. The plates may be flat or preferably shaped to direct each electron beam to exit the electron gun at a predetermined orientation. In one preferred application, the device is located in outer space with individual beams that are directed to focus at a distant target to be used to impact and destroy missiles. The aimings of the separate beams are designed to overcome Coulomb repulsion. A method is also presented for directing the beams to a target considering the variable terrestrial magnetic field. In another preferred application, the electron beam is directed into the ground to produce a subsurface x-ray source to locate and/or destroy buried or otherwise hidden objects including explosive devices.

  4. Technical Training: ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2005: Learning for the LHC! ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics - Spring Term ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme, in an extended format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series. This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 is composed of four Terms: the Winter Term, Introduction to electronics in HEP, already took place; the next three Terms will run throughout the year: Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics (March, 6 lectures) - now open for registration Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) Autumn Term: Ele...

  5. Design for Reliability of Power Electronics in Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Yang, Yongheng; Wang, Huai

    2014-01-01

    Power electronics is the enabling technology for maximizing the power captured from renewable electrical generation, e.g., the wind and solar technology, and also for an efficient integration into the grid. Therefore, it is important that the power electronics are reliable and do not have too many...... electronics technology as well as to know how the power electronics technology is loaded in terms of temperature and other stressors relevant, to reliability. Hence, this chapter will show the basics of power electronics technology for renewable energy systems, describe the mission profile of the technology...... failures during operation which otherwise will increase cost for operation, maintenance and reputation. Typically, power electronics in renewable electrical generation has to be designed for 20–30 years of operation, and in order to do that, it is crucial to know about the mission profile of the power...

  6. Low-Energy Electron Induced Reactions in Condensed Methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Michael; Boamah, Mavis; Chamberlain, Kristal; Myae Soe, Chanmaye; Bass, Andrew; Sanche, Leon; Arumainayagam, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the dynamics of low-energy electron-induced reactions in condensed thin films of methanol (CH3OH) through electron stimulated desorption (ESD) and post-irradiation temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments. ESD experiments indicate that the anions which desorb from the methanol thin film during electron irradiation are predominantly formed through the dissociation of temporary negative ions formed by electron capture by methanol molecules, a process known as dissociative electron attachment (DEA). However, based on investigation of reaction products remaining in the methanol thin film post-irradiation through TPD experiments, DEA is not the obvious primary mechanism by which methoxymethanol (CH3OCH2OH) and ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2OH) are formed. Evidence indicates formation of these molecules may be driven by both DEA and electron impact excitation.

  7. Charge Catastrophe and Dielectric Breakdown During Exposure of Organic Thin Films to Low-Energy Electron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thete, A.; Geelen, D.; van der Molen, S. J.; Tromp, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    The effects of exposure to ionizing radiation are central in many areas of science and technology, including medicine and biology. Absorption of UV and soft-x-ray photons releases photoelectrons, followed by a cascade of lower energy secondary electrons with energies down to 0 eV. While these low energy electrons give rise to most chemical and physical changes, their interactions with soft materials are not well studied or understood. Here, we use a low energy electron microscope to expose thin organic resist films to electrons in the range 0-50 eV, and to analyze the energy distribution of electrons returned to the vacuum. We observe surface charging that depends strongly and nonlinearly on electron energy and electron beam current, abruptly switching sign during exposure. Charging can even be sufficiently severe to induce dielectric breakdown across the film. We provide a simple but comprehensive theoretical description of these phenomena, identifying the presence of a cusp catastrophe to explain the sudden switching phenomena seen in the experiments. Surprisingly, the films undergo changes at all incident electron energies, starting at ˜0 eV .

  8. An electronic health record driven algorithm to identify incident antidepressant medication users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, William V; Pathak, Jyotishman; Kremers, Hilal Maradit; Yawn, Barbara P; Brue, Scott M; Stoppel, Cynthia J; Croarkin, Paul E; St Sauver, Jennifer; Frye, Mark A; Rocca, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    We validated an algorithm designed to identify new or prevalent users of antidepressant medications via population-based drug prescription records. We obtained population-based drug prescription records for the entire Olmsted County, Minnesota, population from 2011 to 2012 (N=149,629) using the existing electronic medical records linkage infrastructure of the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP). We selected electronically a random sample of 200 new antidepressant users stratified by age and sex. The algorithm required the exclusion of antidepressant use in the 6 months preceding the date of the first qualifying antidepressant prescription (index date). Medical records were manually reviewed and adjudicated to calculate the positive predictive value (PPV). We also manually reviewed the records of a random sample of 200 antihistamine users who did not meet the case definition of new antidepressant user to estimate the negative predictive value (NPV). 161 of the 198 subjects electronically identified as new antidepressant users were confirmed by manual record review (PPV 81.3%). Restricting the definition of new users to subjects who were prescribed typical starting doses of each agent for treating major depression in non-geriatric adults resulted in an increase in the PPV (90.9%). Extending the time windows with no antidepressant use preceding the index date resulted in only modest increases in PPV. The manual abstraction of medical records of 200 antihistamine users yielded an NPV of 98.5%. Our study confirms that REP prescription records can be used to identify prevalent and incident users of antidepressants in the Olmsted County, Minnesota, population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Energy and temperature fluctuations in the single electron box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Tineke L van den; Brange, Fredrik; Samuelsson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In mesoscopic and nanoscale systems at low temperatures, charge carriers are typically not in thermal equilibrium with the surrounding lattice. The resulting, non-equilibrium dynamics of electrons has only begun to be explored. Experimentally the time-dependence of the electron temperature (deviating from the lattice temperature) has been investigated in small metallic islands. Motivated by these experiments, we investigate theoretically the electronic energy and temperature fluctuations in a metallic island in the Coulomb blockade regime, tunnel coupled to an electronic reservoir, i.e. a single electron box. We show that electronic quantum tunnelling between the island and the reservoir, in the absence of any net charge or energy transport, induces fluctuations of the island electron temperature. The full distribution of the energy transfer as well as the island temperature is derived within the framework of full counting statistics. In particular, the low-frequency temperature fluctuations are analysed, fully accounting for charging effects and non-zero reservoir temperature. The experimental requirements for measuring the predicted temperature fluctuations are discussed. (paper)

  10. The Role of Low-Energy Electrons in Astrochemistry: A Tale of Two Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumainayagam, Chris; Cambell, Jyoti; Leon Sanche, Michael Boyer, and Petra Swiderek.

    2016-06-01

    In the interstellar medium, UV photolysis of ice mantles encasing dust grains is thought to be the mechanism that drives the synthesis of “complex” molecules. The source of this reaction-initiating UV light is assumed to be local because externally-sourced UV radiation cannot pass through the ice-containing dark, dense molecular clouds. Externally sourced cosmic rays (Emax ~ 1020 eV), in addition to producing UV light within these clouds, also produce large numbers of low-energy (≤ 20 eV) secondary electrons. The goal of our studies is to understand the low-energy electron-induced processes that occur when high-energy cosmic rays interact with interstellar ices. Using electron stimulated desorption (ESD), post-irradiation temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), we have investigated the radiolysis initiated by electrons in condensed methanol and ammonia at ~ 90 K under ultrahigh vacuum (1×10-9 Torr) conditions. We have identified fifteen low-energy (≤ 20 eV) electron-induced methanol radiolysis products, many of which have been previously identified as being formed by methanol UV photolysis in the interstellar medium. We have also found evidence for the electron-induced formation from ammonia of hydrazine (N2H4), diazene (N2H2), cyclotriazane/triazene (N3H3) and triazane (N3H5). We have investigated the reaction yields’ dependence on film thickness, irradiation time, incident current, electron energy, and metal substrate. These results provide a basis from which we can begin to understand the mechanisms by which methanol and ammonia can form more complex species in cosmic ices. Studies such as ours may ultimately help us better understand the initial stages of the genesis of life.

  11. High-energy electron irradiation of NdFeB permanent magnets: Dependence of radiation damage on the electron energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizen, Teruhiko [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)]. E-mail: bizen@spring8.or.jp; Asano, Yoshihiro [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Marechal, Xavier-Marie [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Seike, Takamitsu [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Aoki, Tsuyoshi [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fukami, Kenji [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hosoda, Naoyasu [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yonehara, Hiroto [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takagi, Tetsuya [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hara, Toru [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Tanaka, Takashi [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kitamura, Hideo [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2007-05-11

    High-energy electron-beam bombardment of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-type permanent magnets induces radiation damage characterized by a drop in the magnetic field. Experiments carried out at the SPring-8 booster synchrotron, with 4, 6, and 8 GeV electrons, show that the drop in magnetic field is energy dependent. Electromagnetic shower simulations suggest that most of the radiation damage happens in a small region around the irradiation axis, and that the contribution of neutrons with large scattering angles or with low energies to the magnetic field change is small.

  12. Permanent-magnet energy spectrometer for electron beams from radiotherapy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, David J.; Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Matthews, Kenneth L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Hogstrom, Kenneth R., E-mail: hogstrom@lsu.edu; Carver, Robert L.; Gibbons, John P. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809-3482 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Clarke, Taylor; Henderson, Alexander; Liang, Edison P. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Rice University, 6100 Main MS-61, Houston, Texas 77005-1827 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to adapt a lightweight, permanent magnet electron energy spectrometer for the measurement of energy spectra of therapeutic electron beams. Methods: An irradiation geometry and measurement technique were developed for an approximately 0.54-T, permanent dipole magnet spectrometer to produce suitable latent images on computed radiography (CR) phosphor strips. Dual-pinhole electron collimators created a 0.318-cm diameter, approximately parallel beam incident on the spectrometer and an appropriate dose rate at the image plane (CR strip location). X-ray background in the latent image, reduced by a 7.62-cm thick lead block between the pinhole collimators, was removed using a fitting technique. Theoretical energy-dependent detector response functions (DRFs) were used in an iterative technique to transform CR strip net mean dose profiles into energy spectra on central axis at the entrance to the spectrometer. These spectra were transformed to spectra at 95-cm source to collimator distance (SCD) by correcting for the energy dependence of electron scatter. The spectrometer was calibrated by comparing peak mean positions in the net mean dose profiles, initially to peak mean energies determined from the practical range of central-axis percent depth-dose (%DD) curves, and then to peak mean energies that accounted for how the collimation modified the energy spectra (recalibration). The utility of the spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra for the seven electron beams (7–20 MeV) of an Elekta Infinity radiotherapy accelerator. Results: Plots of DRF illustrated their dependence on energy and position in the imaging plane. Approximately 15 iterations solved for the energy spectra at the spectrometer entrance from the measured net mean dose profiles. Transforming those spectra into ones at 95-cm SCD increased the low energy tail of the spectra, while correspondingly decreasing the peaks and shifting them to slightly lower

  13. Permanent-magnet energy spectrometer for electron beams from radiotherapy accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, David J; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Carver, Robert L; Gibbons, John P; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Matthews, Kenneth L; Clarke, Taylor; Henderson, Alexander; Liang, Edison P

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to adapt a lightweight, permanent magnet electron energy spectrometer for the measurement of energy spectra of therapeutic electron beams. An irradiation geometry and measurement technique were developed for an approximately 0.54-T, permanent dipole magnet spectrometer to produce suitable latent images on computed radiography (CR) phosphor strips. Dual-pinhole electron collimators created a 0.318-cm diameter, approximately parallel beam incident on the spectrometer and an appropriate dose rate at the image plane (CR strip location). X-ray background in the latent image, reduced by a 7.62-cm thick lead block between the pinhole collimators, was removed using a fitting technique. Theoretical energy-dependent detector response functions (DRFs) were used in an iterative technique to transform CR strip net mean dose profiles into energy spectra on central axis at the entrance to the spectrometer. These spectra were transformed to spectra at 95-cm source to collimator distance (SCD) by correcting for the energy dependence of electron scatter. The spectrometer was calibrated by comparing peak mean positions in the net mean dose profiles, initially to peak mean energies determined from the practical range of central-axis percent depth-dose (%DD) curves, and then to peak mean energies that accounted for how the collimation modified the energy spectra (recalibration). The utility of the spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra for the seven electron beams (7-20 MeV) of an Elekta Infinity radiotherapy accelerator. Plots of DRF illustrated their dependence on energy and position in the imaging plane. Approximately 15 iterations solved for the energy spectra at the spectrometer entrance from the measured net mean dose profiles. Transforming those spectra into ones at 95-cm SCD increased the low energy tail of the spectra, while correspondingly decreasing the peaks and shifting them to slightly lower energies. Energy calibration

  14. US lessons for energy industry restructuring: based on natural gas and California electricity incidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.

    2004-01-01

    During the regulation and deregulation processes, the US experienced, besides temporary price spikes, several unhappy incidences; natural gas shortage in mid-1970s, gas bubble in 1980s, California power crisis, and high natural gas price in 2000-2001. This paper focuses on the US natural gas and California electricity industries, especially on the above-mentioned four incidences. Through analyzing their causes and effects, this paper tries to deduce some lessons, which would be helpful to prevent and/or overcome other probable incidences in the US as well as in other countries in a process of deregulation or planning to introduce competition in their energy industries. Main lessons deduced are encouragement of investment, minimization of political consideration, transmission of price signal to all the market players, outlet for any market interference, diversification of trading options, and minimum ambiguity on responsibility between regulators as well as watching on general market situation and correcting its flaws in timely manner

  15. US lessons for energy industry restructuring: based on natural gas and California electricity incidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wonwoo Lee

    2004-01-01

    During the regulation and deregulation processes, the US experienced, besides temporary price spikes, several unhappy incidences; natural gas shortage in mid-1970s, gas bubble in 1980s, California power crisis, and high natural gas price in 2000-2001. This paper focuses on the US natural gas and California electricity industries, especially on the above-mentioned four incidences. Through analyzing their causes and effects, this paper tries to deduce some lessons, which would be helpful to prevent and/or overcome other probable incidences in the US as well as in other countries in a process of deregulation or planning to introduce competition in their energy industries. Main lessons deduced are encouragement of investment, minimization of political consideration, transmission of price signal to all the market players, outlet for any market interference, diversification of trading options, and minimum ambiguity on responsibility between regulators as well as watching on general market situation and correcting its flaws in timely manner. (Author)

  16. Analysis of incident-energy dependence of delayed neutron yields in actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, Mohamad Nasrun bin Mohd, E-mail: monasr211@gmail.com; Metorima, Kouhei, E-mail: kohei.m2420@hotmail.co.jp; Ohsawa, Takaaki, E-mail: ohsawa@mvg.biglobe.ne.jp; Hashimoto, Kengo, E-mail: kengoh@pp.iij4u.or.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kindai University, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka, 577-8502 (Japan)

    2015-04-29

    The changes of delayed neutron yields (ν{sub d}) of Actinides have been analyzed for incident energy up to 20MeV using realized data of precursor after prompt neutron emission, from semi-empirical model, and delayed neutron emission probability data (P{sub n}) to carry out a summation method. The evaluated nuclear data of the delayed neutron yields of actinide nuclides are still uncertain at the present and the cause of the energy dependence has not been fully understood. In this study, the fission yields of precursor were calculated considering the change of the fission fragment mass yield based on the superposition of fives Gaussian distribution; and the change of the prompt neutrons number associated with the incident energy dependence. Thus, the incident energy dependent behavior of delayed neutron was analyzed.The total number of delayed neutron is expressed as ν{sub d}=∑Y{sub i} • P{sub ni} in the summation method, where Y{sub i} is the mass yields of precursor i and P{sub ni} is the delayed neutron emission probability of precursor i. The value of Y{sub i} is derived from calculation of post neutron emission mass distribution using 5 Gaussian equations with the consideration of large distribution of the fission fragments. The prompt neutron emission ν{sub p} increases at higher incident-energy but there are two different models; one model says that the fission fragment mass dependence that prompt neutron emission increases uniformly regardless of the fission fragments mass; and the other says that the major increases occur at heavy fission fragments area. In this study, the changes of delayed neutron yields by the two models have been investigated.

  17. Proposal to detect an emission of unusual super-high energy electrons in electron storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-peng Qian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to an extended Lorentz–Einstein mass formula taken into the uncertainty principle, it is predicted that the electron beams passing accelerating electric field should with a small probability generate abnormal super-high energy electrons which are much higher than the beam energy. Author’s preliminary experiment result at electron storage ring has hinted these signs, so suggests to more strictly detect this unusual phenomenon, and thus to test the extended mass formula as well as a more perfect special relativity.

  18. Power Electronics and Reliability in Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Ma, Ke; Zhou, Dao

    2012-01-01

    Power Electronics are needed in almost all kind of renewable energy systems. It is used both for controlling the renewable source and also for interfacing to the load, which can be grid-connected or working in stand-alone mode. More and more efforts are put into making renewable energy systems...... better in terms of reliability in order to ensure a high availability of the power sources, in this case the knowledge of mission profile of a certain application is crucial for the reliability evaluation/design of power electronics. In this paper an overview on the power electronic circuits behind...... the most common converter configurations for wind turbine and photovoltaic is done. Next different aspects of improving the system reliability are mapped. Further on examples of how to control the chip temperature in different power electronic configurations as well as operation modes for wind power...

  19. Interaction of low-energy electrons and positrons with condensed matter: Stopping powers and inelastic mean free paths from optical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    An ''optical-data model'' is described for evaluating energy loss per unit pathlength and inelastic mean free path for low-energy electrons and positrons (approx lt 10 keV) from optical data on the medium of interest. Exchange between the incident electron and electrons in the medium is included. Results from the optical-data model are compared with previous theoretical calculations. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Tesla energy space for Mie–Schwinger continuous electron

    OpenAIRE

    Bulyzhenkov, I.

    2013-01-01

    Tesla reading of electricity through invisible energy ether between visible bodies corresponds to the found radial solution for a continuous source. The Mie–Schwinger distributed electron extends over the very structure of its Coulomb radial field. The electric charge is not a basic concept of Maxwell-Tesla electrodynamics but is the field energy distribution under the unified, non-dual approach to matter-energy in the nonempty world space. Electric self-energy of such a unified nonlocal carrier ...

  1. Power electronics - The key technology for Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Ma, Ke; Yang, Yongheng

    2014-01-01

    The energy paradigms in many countries (e.g. Germany and Denmark) have experienced a significant change from fossil-based resources to clean renewables (e.g. wind turbines and photovoltaics) in the past few decades. The scenario of highly penetrated renewables is going to be further enhanced...... solutions, can pave the way for renewable energies. In light of this, some of the most emerging renewable energies, e.g. wind energy and photovoltaic, which by means of power electronics are changing character as a major part in the electricity generation, are explored in this paper. Issues like technology...

  2. Stochasticity of the energy absorption in the electron cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez T, C.; Hernandez A, O.

    1998-01-01

    The energy absorption mechanism in cyclotron resonance of the electrons is a present problem, since it could be considered from the stochastic point of view or this related with a non-homogeneous but periodical of plasma spatial structure. In this work using the Bogoliubov average method for a multi periodical system in presence of resonances, the drift equations were obtained in presence of a RF field for the case of electron cyclotron resonance until first order terms with respect to inverse of its cyclotron frequency. The absorbed energy equation is obtained on part of electrons in a simple model and by drift method. It is showed the stochastic character of the energy absorption. (Author)

  3. Data Acquisition System for Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chi; Yu Xiaoqi; Yang Tao

    2005-01-01

    A Data Acquisition System (DAQ) for electron energy loss coincident spectrometers (EELCS) has been developed. The system is composed of a Multiplex Time-Digital Converter (TDC) that measures the flying time of positive and negative ions and a one-dimension position-sensitive detector that records the energy loss of scattering electrons. The experimental data are buffered in a first-in-first-out (FIFO) memory module, then transferred from the FIFO memory to PC by the USB interface. The DAQ system can record the flying time of several ions in one collision, and allows of different data collection modes. The system has been demonstrated at the Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers at the Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics, USTC. A detail description of the whole system is given and experimental results shown

  4. Elastic scattering of low energy electrons by hydrogen molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, L.C.G.; Mu-Tao, L.; Botelho, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    The coherent version of the Renormalized Multiple-Centre Potential Model (RMPM) has been extended to treat the elastic scattering of low energy electrons by H2 molecule. The intramolecular Multiple Scattering (MS) effect has also been included. The comparison against the experimental data shows that the inclusion of the MS improves significantly with experiment. The extension of the present method to study electron-polyatomic molecule interaction is also discussed. (author) [pt

  5. Low-energy electron-helium scattering in a Nd–YAG laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajana, I.; Makhoute, A.; Khalil, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser assisted electron helium excitation is studied at low incident energies. • The inclusion of the second-order Born contributions is significant at low incident energies. • The target distortion induced by the laser field should be taken into account. • The effect of the second term of the Born series is reduced as the energy increases. - Abstract: We study the electron-impact excitation of atomic helium, in the presence of a linearly polarized Nd–YAG laser field, accompanied by the transfer of ℓ photons, for low collision energy of 25 eV and laser intensity of 5.3 × 10 11 W cm −2 . The second-order Born approximation has been used to calculate the differential cross sections. Detailed calculations of the scattering amplitudes are performed by using the Sturmian basis expansion. A detailed analysis is made of the excitation of the 1 1 S → 2 1 S and 1 1 S → 2 1 P transitions. We discuss the behavior and the variation of the cross sections corresponding to the excitation process for various geometrical configurations

  6. Superconductor digital electronics: Scalability and energy efficiency issues (Review Article)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolpygo, Sergey K.

    2016-05-01

    Superconductor digital electronics using Josephson junctions as ultrafast switches and magnetic-flux encoding of information was proposed over 30 years ago as a sub-terahertz clock frequency alternative to semiconductor electronics based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistors. Recently, interest in developing superconductor electronics has been renewed due to a search for energy saving solutions in applications related to high-performance computing. The current state of superconductor electronics and fabrication processes are reviewed in order to evaluate whether this electronics is scalable to a very large scale integration (VLSI) required to achieve computation complexities comparable to CMOS processors. A fully planarized process at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, perhaps the most advanced process developed so far for superconductor electronics, is used as an example. The process has nine superconducting layers: eight Nb wiring layers with the minimum feature size of 350 nm, and a thin superconducting layer for making compact high-kinetic-inductance bias inductors. All circuit layers are fully planarized using chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) of SiO2 interlayer dielectric. The physical limitations imposed on the circuit density by Josephson junctions, circuit inductors, shunt and bias resistors, etc., are discussed. Energy dissipation in superconducting circuits is also reviewed in order to estimate whether this technology, which requires cryogenic refrigeration, can be energy efficient. Fabrication process development required for increasing the density of superconductor digital circuits by a factor of ten and achieving densities above 107 Josephson junctions per cm2 is described.

  7. Dose controlled low energy electron irradiator for biomolecular films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S V K; Tare, Satej T; Upalekar, Yogesh V; Tsering, Thupten

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a multi target, Low Energy Electron (LEE), precise dose controlled irradiator for biomolecular films. Up to seven samples can be irradiated one after another at any preset electron energy and dose under UHV conditions without venting the chamber. In addition, one more sample goes through all the steps except irradiation, which can be used as control for comparison with the irradiated samples. All the samples are protected against stray electron irradiation by biasing them at -20 V during the entire period, except during irradiation. Ethernet based communication electronics hardware, LEE beam control electronics and computer interface were developed in house. The user Graphical User Interface to control the irradiation and dose measurement was developed using National Instruments Lab Windows CVI. The working and reliability of the dose controlled irradiator has been fully tested over the electron energy range of 0.5 to 500 eV by studying LEE induced single strand breaks to ΦX174 RF1 dsDNA.

  8. Electronic transport of molecular nanowires by considering of electron hopping energy between the second neighbors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Rabani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the electronic conductance of molecular nanowires by considering the electron hopping between the first and second neighbors with the help Green’s function method at the tight-binding approach. We investigate three types of structures including linear uniform and periodic chains as well as poly(p-phenylene molecule which are embedded between two semi-infinite metallic leads. The results show that in the second neighbor approximation, the resonance, anti-resonance and Fano phenomena occur in the conductance spectra of these structures. Moreover, a new gap is observed at edge of the lead energy band wich its width depends on the value of the electron hopping energy between the second neighbors. In the systems including intrinsic gap, this hopping energy shifts the gap in the energy spectra.

  9. Energy spectra variations of high energy electrons in magnetic storms observed by ARASE and HIMAWARI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, T.; Higashio, N.; Mitani, T.; Nagatsuma, T.; Yoshizumi, M.

    2017-12-01

    The ARASE spacecraft was launched in December 20, 2016 to investigate mechanisms for acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts during space storms. The six particle instruments with wide energy range (a few eV to 10MeV) are onboard the ARASE spacecraft. Especially, two particle instruments, HEP and XEP observe high energy electron with energy range from 70keV to over 10Mev. Those instruments observed several geomagnetic storms caused by coronal hole high speed streams or coronal mass ejections from March in 2017. The relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt were disappeared/increased and their energy spectra were changed dynamically in some storms observed by XEP/HEP onboard the ARASE spacecraft. In the same time, SEDA-e with energy range 200keV-4.5MeV for electron on board the HIMAWARI-8, Japanese weather satellite on GEO, observed increase of relativistic electron in different local time. We will report on energy spectra variations of high energy electrons including calibrations of differential flux between XEP and HEP and discuss comparisons with energy spectra between ARAE and HIMAWARI that observed each storm in different local time.

  10. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Mikmeková, Eliška; Lejeune, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 407, JUN 15 (2017), s. 105-108 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Low-energy electrons * Electron beam induced release * Graphene * Ultimate cleaning of surfaces Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Nano-processes (applications on nano-scale) Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  11. Electron energy loss spectrometers the technology of high performance

    CERN Document Server

    Ibach, Harald

    1991-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy has become an indispensable tool in surface analysis Although the basic physics of this technique is well understood, instrument design has previously largely been left to intuition This book is the first to provide a comprehensive treatment of the electron optics involved in the production of intense monochromatic beams and the detection of scattered electrons It includes a full three-dimensional analysis of the electron optical properties of electron emission systems, monochromators and lens systems, placing particular emphasis on the procedures for matching the various components The description is kept mathematically simple and focuses on practical aspects, with many hints for writing computer codes to calculate and optimize electrostatic lens elements

  12. Wettability Modification of Nanomaterials by Low-Energy Electron Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torchinsky I

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Controllable modification of surface free energy and related properties (wettability, hygroscopicity, agglomeration, etc. of powders allows both understanding of fine physical mechanism acting on nanoparticle surfaces and improvement of their key characteristics in a number of nanotechnology applications. In this work, we report on the method we developed for electron-induced surface energy and modification of basic, related properties of powders of quite different physical origins such as diamond and ZnO. The applied technique has afforded gradual tuning of the surface free energy, resulting in a wide range of wettability modulation. In ZnO nanomaterial, the wettability has been strongly modified, while for the diamond particles identical electron treatment leads to a weak variation of the same property. Detailed investigation into electron-modified wettability properties has been performed by the use of capillary rise method using a few probing liquids. Basic thermodynamic approaches have been applied to calculations of components of solid–liquid interaction energy. We show that defect-free, low-energy electron treatment technique strongly varies elementary interface interactions and may be used for the development of new technology in the field of nanomaterials.

  13. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  14. Electron correlations in narrow energy bands: modified polar model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Didukh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The electron correlations in narrow energy bands are examined within the framework of the modified form of polar model. This model permits to analyze the effect of strong Coulomb correlation, inter-atomic exchange and correlated hopping of electrons and explain some peculiarities of the properties of narrow-band materials, namely the metal-insulator transition with an increase of temperature, nonlinear concentration dependence of Curie temperature and peculiarities of transport properties of electronic subsystem. Using a variant of generalized Hartree-Fock approximation, the single-electron Green's function and quasi-particle energy spectrum of the model are calculated. Metal-insulator transition with the change of temperature is investigated in a system with correlated hopping. Processes of ferromagnetic ordering stabilization in the system with various forms of electronic DOS are studied. The static conductivity and effective spin-dependent masses of current carriers are calculated as a function of electron concentration at various DOS forms. The correlated hopping is shown to cause the electron-hole asymmetry of transport and ferromagnetic properties of narrow band materials.

  15. Electron and photon energy calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Falke, Saskia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the energy measurement of electron and photon is needed for many ATLAS physics analysis. The calibration of the energy measurement is performed in-situ using a large statistics of Z->ee events. A pre-requisite of this calibration is a good understanding of the material in front of the calorimeter and of the inter-calibration of the different calorimeter layers. The Z->ee sample is also used to measure the energy resolution. The results obtained with the pp collisions data at sqrt(s)=13 TeV in 2016 (2015) corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 33.9 (3.1)fb-1 of sqrt(s)=13 TeV are presented as well as the corresponding uncertainties on the electron and photon energy scales.

  16. High energy primary electron spectrum observed by the emulsion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, J.; Fujii, M.; Aizu, H.; Hiraiwa, N.; Taira, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Niu, K.; Koss, T. A.; Lord, J. J.; Golden, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A detector of the emulsion chamber type is used to measure the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons. Two large emulsion chambers, each having an area of 40 by 50 sq cm, are exposed for about 25.5 hr at an average pressure altitude of 3.9 mbar. About 500 high-energy cascades (no less than about 600 GeV) are detected by searching for dark spots on the X-ray films. A power-law energy dependence formula is derived for the spectrum of primary cosmic-ray electrons in the energy region over 100 GeV. The results are in good agreement with the transition curves obtained previously by theoretical and Monte Carlo calculations.

  17. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, 13083-859 São Paulo (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, 09210-580 São Paulo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, 13083-859 São Paulo (Brazil); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2015-12-14

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°–90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule.

  18. Magnetic properties and core electron binding energies of liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, N.; Cabral, Benedito J. C.

    2018-01-01

    The magnetic properties and the core and inner valence electron binding energies of liquid water are investigated. The adopted methodology relies on the combination of molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the Becke and Lee-Yang-Parr functionals for exchange and correlation, respectively, and includes an empirical correction (BLYP-D3) functional and classical molecular dynamics with the TIP4P/2005-F model were carried out. The Keal-Tozer functional was applied for predicting magnetic shielding and spin-spin coupling constants. Core and inner valence electron binding energies in liquid water were calculated with symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction. The relationship between the magnetic shielding constant σ(17O), the role played by the oxygen atom as a proton acceptor and donor, and the tetrahedral organisation of liquid water are investigated. The results indicate that the deshielding of the oxygen atom in water is very dependent on the order parameter (q) describing the tetrahedral organisation of the hydrogen bond network. The strong sensitivity of magnetic properties on changes of the electronic density in the nuclei environment is illustrated by a correlation between σ(17O) and the energy gap between the 1a1[O1s] (core) and the 2a1 (inner valence) orbitals of water. Although several studies discussed the eventual connection between magnetic properties and core electron binding energies, such a correlation could not be clearly established. Here, we demonstrate that for liquid water this correlation exists although involving the gap between electron binding energies of core and inner valence orbitals.

  19. From electron energy-loss spectroscopy to multi-dimensional and multi-signal electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliex, Christian

    2011-01-01

    This review intends to illustrate how electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques in the electron microscope column have evolved over the past 60 years. Beginning as a physicist tool to measure basic excitations in solid thin foils, EELS techniques have gradually become essential for analytical purposes, nowadays pushed to the identification of individual atoms and their bonding states. The intimate combination of highly performing techniques with quite efficient computational tools for data processing and ab initio modeling has opened the way to a broad range of novel imaging modes with potential impact on many different fields. The combination of Angström-level spatial resolution with an energy resolution down to a few tenths of an electron volt in the core-loss spectral domain has paved the way to atomic-resolved elemental and bonding maps across interfaces and nanostructures. In the low-energy range, improved energy resolution has been quite efficient in recording surface plasmon maps and from them electromagnetic maps across the visible electron microscopy (EM) domain, thus bringing a new view to nanophotonics studies. Recently, spectrum imaging of the emitted photons under the primary electron beam and the spectacular introduction of time-resolved techniques down to the femtosecond time domain, have become innovative keys for the development and use of a brand new multi-dimensional and multi-signal electron microscopy.

  20. Where is electronic energy stored in adenosine triphosphate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Alya A; Matta, Chérif F

    2009-04-09

    The gas-phase electronic energy of the hydrolysis of methyl triphosphate, a model of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), is partitioned into local (atomic and group) contributions. A modified definition of Lipmann's "group transfer potential" is proposed on the basis of the partitioning of the total electronic energy into atomic contributions within the framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). The group transfer potential is defined here as the sum of the atomic energies forming the group in ATP minus the sum of the energies of the same atoms in inorganic phosphate. It is found that the transfer potential of the terminal phosphate group in ATP is significantly reduced, from +241.7 to +73.1 kcal/mol, as a result of complexation with magnesium. This is accompanied by a concomitant change in the energy of reaction from -168.6 to -24.9 kcal/mol. Regions within ATP where the electronic energy changes the most upon hydrolysis are identified. The study is conducted at the DFT/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory.

  1. Microsecond Electron Beam Source with Electron Energy Up to 400 Kev and Plasma Anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullin, É. N.; Basov, G. F.; Shershnev, S.

    2017-12-01

    A new high-power source of electrons with plasma anode for producing high-current microsecond electron beams with electron energy up to 400 keV has been developed, manufactured, and put in operation. To increase the cross section and pulse current duration of the beam, a multipoint explosive emission cathode is used in the electron beam source, and the beam is formed in an applied external guiding magnetic field. The Marx generator with vacuum insulation is used as a high-voltage source. Electron beams with electron energy up to 300-400 keV, current of 5-15 kA, duration of 1.5-3 μs, energy up to 4 kJ, and cross section up to 150 cm2 have been produced. The operating modes of the electron beam source are realized in which the applied voltage is influenced weakly on the current. The possibility of source application for melting of metal surfaces is demonstrated.

  2. Activation energy of etching for CR-39 as a function of linear energy transfer of the incident particles

    CERN Document Server

    Awad, E M

    1999-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the effect of the radiation damage caused by the incident particles on the activation energy of etching for CR-39 samples. The damage produced by the incident particle is expressed in terms of the linear energy transfer (LET). CR-39 samples from American Acrylic were irradiated to three different LET particles. These are N (LET sub 2 sub 0 sub 0 = 20 KeV/mu m) as a light particle, Fe (LET sub 2 sub 0 sub 0 = 110 KeV/mu m) as a medium particle and fission fragments (ff) from a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf source as heavy particles. In general the bulk etch rate was calculated using the weight difference method and the track etch rate was determined using the track geometry at various temperatures (50-90 deg. C) and concentrations (4-9 N) of the NaOH etchant. The average activation energy E sub b related to the bulk etch rate v sub b was calculated from 1n v sub b vs. 1/T. The average activation energy E sub t related to the track etch rate v sub t was estimated from 1n v sub t vs. 1/T. It...

  3. Evaluation of high-energy brachytherapy source electronic disequilibrium and dose from emitted electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Facundo; Granero, Domingo; Pérez-Calatayud, José; Melhus, Christopher S; Rivard, Mark J

    2009-09-01

    The region of electronic disequilibrium near photon-emitting brachytherapy sources of high-energy radionuclides (60Co, 137CS, 192Ir, and 169Yb) and contributions to total dose from emitted electrons were studied using the GEANT4 and PENELOPE Monte Carlo codes. Hypothetical sources with active and capsule materials mimicking those of actual sources but with spherical shape were examined. Dose contributions due to source photons, x rays, and bremsstrahlung; source beta-, Auger electrons, and internal conversion electrons; and water collisional kerma were scored. To determine if conclusions obtained for electronic equilibrium conditions and electron dose contribution to total dose for the representative spherical sources could be applied to actual sources, the 192Ir mHDR-v2 source model (Nucletron B.V., Veenendaal, The Netherlands) was simulated for comparison to spherical source results and to published data. Electronic equilibrium within 1% is reached for 60Co, 137CS, 192Ir, and 169Yb at distances greater than 7, 3.5, 2, and 1 mm from the source center, respectively, in agreement with other published studies. At 1 mm from the source center, the electron contributions to total dose are 1.9% and 9.4% for 60Co and 192Ir, respectively. Electron emissions become important (i.e., > 0.5%) within 3.3 mm of 60Co and 1.7 mm of 192Ir sources, yet are negligible over all distances for 137Cs and 169Yb. Electronic equilibrium conditions along the transversal source axis for the mHDR-v2 source are comparable to those of the spherical sources while electron dose to total dose contribution are quite different. Electronic equilibrium conditions obtained for spherical sources could be generalized to actual sources while electron contribution to total dose depends strongly on source dimensions, material composition, and electron spectra.

  4. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  5. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-11-16

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  6. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, L., E-mail: ludek@isibrno.cz [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Mikmeková, E. [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lejeune, M. [LPMC – Faculte des Sciences d’Amiens, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex 2 (France)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Using proper irradiation parameters, adsorbed hydrocarbons are released from surfaces. • Slow electrons remove hydrocarbons instead of depositing carbon. • Prolonged irradiation with very slow electrons does not create defects in graphene. - Abstract: Electron-beam-induced deposition of various materials from suitable precursors has represented an established branch of nanotechnology for more than a decade. A specific alternative is carbon deposition on the basis of hydrocarbons as precursors that has been applied to grow various nanostructures including masks for subsequent technological steps. Our area of study was unintentional electron-beam-induced carbon deposition from spontaneously adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. This process traditionally constitutes a challenge for scanning electron microscopy practice preventing one from performing any true surface studies outside an ultrahigh vacuum and without in-situ cleaning of samples, and also jeopardising other electron-optical devices such as electron beam lithographs. Here we show that when reducing the energy of irradiating electrons sufficiently, the e-beam-induced deposition can be converted to e-beam-induced release causing desorption of hydrocarbons and ultimate cleaning of surfaces in both an ultrahigh and a standard high vacuum. Using series of experiments with graphene samples, we demonstrate fundamental features of e-beam-induced desorption and present results of checks for possible radiation damage using Raman spectroscopy that led to optimisation of the electron energy for damage-free cleaning. The method of preventing carbon contamination described here paves the way for greatly enhanced surface sensitivity of imaging and substantially reduced demands on vacuum systems for nanotechnological applications.

  7. Electron Energy Level Statistics in Graphene Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Katsnellson, M. I.; Katsnelson, M.I.

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental observations of size quantization of electron energy levels in graphene quantum dots [7] we investigate the level statistics in the simplest tight-binding model for different dot shapes by computer simulation. The results are in a reasonable agreement with the

  8. Energy Dependence of Near-relativistic Electron Spectrum at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... This may give us some insight into how we can safeguard geostationary satellites from functional anomalies of the deep dielectric charging type, which are caused by charge accumulation and subsequent discharge of relativistic electrons. In this study we examine whether there is any energy dependence ...

  9. High Energy Electron Dosimetry by Alanine/ESR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Sung Sil

    1989-01-01

    Dosimetry based on electron spin resonance(ESR) analysis of radiation induced free radicals in amino acids is relevant to biological dosimetry applications. Alanine detectors are without walls and are tissue equivalent. Therefore, alanine ESR dosimetry looks promising for use in the therapy level. The dose range of the alanine/ESR dosimetry system can be extended down to l Gy. In a water phantom the absorbed dose of electrons generated by a medical linear accelerator of different initial energies (6-21 MeV) and therapeutic dose levels(1-60 Gy) was measured. Furthermore, depth dose measurements carried out with alanine dosimeters were compared with ionization chamber measurements. As the results, the measured absorbed doses for shallow depth of initial electron energies above 15 MeV were higher by 2-5% than those calculated by nominal energy CE factors. This seems to be caused by low energy scattered beams generated from the scattering foil and electron cones of beam projecting device in medical linear accelerator

  10. Electron emission in collisions of intermediate energy ions with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibotti, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this work, is the analysis of the processes of electronic emission produced in the collisions of small ions (H + , He ++ ) of intermediate energy (50 a 200 KeV/amu) with light gaseous targets. (A.C.A.G.) [pt

  11. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results suggest that the SEM-EDX is one of the potential tools for rapid detection of metals, namely, As and Cd in himematsutake. Key words: Arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX), coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), himematsutake.

  12. Preliminary investigations on high energy electron beam tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baertling, Yves; Hoppe, Dietrich; Hampel, Uwe

    2010-12-15

    In computed tomography (CT) cross-sectional images of the attenuation distribution within a slice are created by scanning radiographic projections of an object with a rotating X-ray source detector compound and subsequent reconstruction of the images from these projection data on a computer. CT can be made very fast by employing a scanned electron beam instead of a mechanically moving X-ray source. Now this principle was extended towards high-energy electron beam tomography with an electrostatic accelerator. Therefore a dedicated experimental campaign was planned and carried out at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Novosibirsk. There we investigated the capabilities of BINP's accelerators as an electron beam generating and scanning unit of a potential high-energy electron beam tomography device. The setup based on a 1 MeV ELV-6 (BINP) electron accelerator and a single detector. Besides tomographic measurements with different phantoms, further experiments were carried out concerning the focal spot size and repeat accuracy of the electron beam as well as the detector's response time and signal to noise ratio. (orig.)

  13. Renewable Energy Systems in the Power Electronics Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Zhe; Teodorescu, Remus

    2005-01-01

    , magnetics, electrical machines, power systems, analogue and digital control, materials, power converters, electronics, materials, thermal design and EMC. However, those fields may not be enough in order to give the students enough skills. It is also necessary to learn about systems and for the moment one...... of the most important area is renewable energy systems. This paper will discuss the basic courses for the power electronics curriculum. It will also discuss how to teach power electronic systems efficiently through a projectoriented and problem-based learning approach with Aalborg University in Denmark...... as a full-scale example. Different project examples will be given as well as important laboratories for adjustable speed drives and renewable energy systems which are used at the university are described....

  14. Penetration of an electron beam into material and energy dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kral, V.; Pelzbauer, Z.

    1986-01-01

    The contribution is concerned with penetration of an electron beam having energy between 5 and 25 keV into the polymer and with energy dissipation inside the interaction volume of the polymer. The experimentally observed shape on the interaction volume has been theoretically substantiated, the range has been calculated, and a comparison with Gruen's empirical relation has been carried out. It is shown that with increasing accelerating voltage the centre of the core of the interaction volume is shifted more deeply under the sample surface and the dissipated energy decreases. Extension of the neck of the interaction volume caused by back scattering is discussed. (author)

  15. Radiation effect of low energy electron beam on plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Hidefumi; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu

    2000-01-01

    Radiation effect of low energy electron beam (EB) on the growth of maize, barley and soybean was investigated. Seeds of maize, barley and soybean were irradiated in the dose range of 2 to 20 kGy using EB with different energy from 150 to 250 keV. Growth promotion was observed for irradiated seeds of maize and soybean at the dose up to 10 kGy. Especially, significant promotion of root growth was observed for irradiated barley and soybean. It was also found for soybean that phytoalexin induction activity was clearly enhanced by low energy EB irradiation. (author)

  16. Radiated energy calculation in free electron lasers without inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganesyan, K.B.

    2017-01-01

    The equations of particle motion in the free electron lasers without inversion are derived using the Hamiltonian formalism. In small signal regime the uncoupled one dimensional phase equation is derived in the form of pendulum equation. For the practical estimations the same equation along with the equation of particle energy change are solved using perturbation theory and the expressions for gain in FEL regime and particle angle dependence of energy at the exit of first undulator are obtained. Results for gain, particle phase and energy change depending on beam parameters and device are presented

  17. Studies of space charge effects on operating electron beam ion trap at low electron beam energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xuelong; Fei, Zejie; Xiao, Jun; Lu, Di; Hutton, Roger [The Key Lab of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Ministry of Education (China); Shanghai EBIT Laboratory, Modern Physics Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zou, Yaming, E-mail: zouym@fudan.edu.cn [The Key Lab of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Ministry of Education (China); Shanghai EBIT Laboratory, Modern Physics Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2013-08-21

    An electron beam ion trap (EBIT) is a powerful machine for disentangling studies of atomic processes in plasmas. To assist studies on edge plasma spectroscopic diagnostics, a very low energy EBIT, SH-PermEBIT, has been set up at the Shanghai EBIT lab. Large amounts of simulation works were done to study the factors which hinder the EBIT from operation at very low electron beam energies. Under the guide line of the simulation results, we finally managed to successfully reach 60 eV for the lower end of the electron beam energy with a beam transmission above 57%. In this presentation, simulation studies of the space charge effect, which is one of the most important causes of beam loss, was made based on Tricomp (Field precision)

  18. Secondary Electrons as an Energy Source for Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmach, Kamil B; Neveu, Marc; Vick-Majors, Trista J; Mickol, Rebecca L; Chou, Luoth; Webster, Kevin D; Tilley, Matt; Zacchei, Federica; Escudero, Cristina; Flores Martinez, Claudio L; Labrado, Amanda; Fernández, Enrique J G

    2018-01-01

    Life on Earth is found in a wide range of environments as long as the basic requirements of a liquid solvent, a nutrient source, and free energy are met. Previous hypotheses have speculated how extraterrestrial microbial life may function, among them that particle radiation might power living cells indirectly through radiolytic products. On Earth, so-called electrophilic organisms can harness electron flow from an extracellular cathode to build biomolecules. Here, we describe two hypothetical mechanisms, termed "direct electrophy" and "indirect electrophy" or "fluorosynthesis," by which organisms could harness extracellular free electrons to synthesize organic matter, thus expanding the ensemble of potential habitats in which extraterrestrial organisms might be found in the Solar System and beyond. The first mechanism involves the direct flow of secondary electrons from particle radiation to a microbial cell to power the organism. The second involves the indirect utilization of impinging secondary electrons and a fluorescing molecule, either biotic or abiotic in origin, to drive photosynthesis. Both mechanisms involve the attenuation of an incoming particle's energy to create low-energy secondary electrons. The validity of the hypotheses is assessed through simple calculations showing the biomass density attainable from the energy supplied. Also discussed are potential survival strategies that could be used by organisms living in possible habitats with a plentiful supply of secondary electrons, such as near the surface of an icy moon. While we acknowledge that the only definitive test for the hypothesis is to collect specimens, we also describe experiments or terrestrial observations that could support or nullify the hypotheses. Key Words: Radiation-Electrophiles-Subsurface life. Astrobiology 18, 73-85.

  19. Secondary Electrons as an Energy Source for Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmach, Kamil B.; Neveu, Marc; Vick-Majors, Trista J.; Mickol, Rebecca L.; Chou, Luoth; Webster, Kevin D.; Tilley, Matt; Zacchei, Federica; Escudero, Cristina; Flores Martinez, Claudio L.; Labrado, Amanda; Fernández, Enrique J. G.

    2018-01-01

    Life on Earth is found in a wide range of environments as long as the basic requirements of a liquid solvent, a nutrient source, and free energy are met. Previous hypotheses have speculated how extraterrestrial microbial life may function, among them that particle radiation might power living cells indirectly through radiolytic products. On Earth, so-called electrophilic organisms can harness electron flow from an extracellular cathode to build biomolecules. Here, we describe two hypothetical mechanisms, termed "direct electrophy" and "indirect electrophy" or "fluorosynthesis," by which organisms could harness extracellular free electrons to synthesize organic matter, thus expanding the ensemble of potential habitats in which extraterrestrial organisms might be found in the Solar System and beyond. The first mechanism involves the direct flow of secondary electrons from particle radiation to a microbial cell to power the organism. The second involves the indirect utilization of impinging secondary electrons and a fluorescing molecule, either biotic or abiotic in origin, to drive photosynthesis. Both mechanisms involve the attenuation of an incoming particle's energy to create low-energy secondary electrons. The validity of the hypotheses is assessed through simple calculations showing the biomass density attainable from the energy supplied. Also discussed are potential survival strategies that could be used by organisms living in possible habitats with a plentiful supply of secondary electrons, such as near the surface of an icy moon. While we acknowledge that the only definitive test for the hypothesis is to collect specimens, we also describe experiments or terrestrial observations that could support or nullify the hypotheses.

  20. Efficiency of the channel electron multiplier for low energy Pb-205 ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krcmar, M.; Ljubicic, A.; Logan, B.A.; Isabelle, D.B.; Vernois, J.

    1994-01-01

    We have made the first measurement of the half - life of the 2.3 Kev level of Pb - 205. This result can be used to improve our knowledge of the structure of the 2.3 KeV level which is expected to be dominantly populated in the inverse beta - decay TI - 205 (v, e) Pb - 205, a reaction which can be used to investigate the solar neutrino flux. A MULLARD B419BL/ 01 channel electron multiplier (CEM) was used as windowless detector for low energy conversion electrons ( < = 1.8 KeV ) from the 2.3 Kev level and recoiling Pb -205 nuclei ( < = 95.5 KeV ), produced in the alpha - decay of Po- 209. The pressure in the vacuum chamber was about 10 sup-6 torr and the total counting rate was approximately 10 s sup-1. Using coincidences between pulses from the silicon detector which measured alpha - particles produced in the Po-209 decay and pulses from the CEM, the gain ratio of the CEM for Pb - 205 ions and conversion electrons was measured. From the values obtained for average secondary electron coefficients, for electrons and Pb - 205 ions, it was possible to deduce the absolute efficiency of the CEM as a function of the incident Pb - 205 energy. 1 fig.; 6 refs.; (Author)

  1. Precision measurements of high-energy conversion electron lines and determination of neutron binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braumandl, F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper first discusses the energy accuracy of the BILL conversion electron spectrometer at the Grenoble high flux reactor. With an improved temperature stabilisation of the magnets, an energy accuracy of ΔE/E -5 can be reached. After this, highly exact measurements of high-energy conversion electron lines of the 200 Hg, 114 Cd, 165 Dy, 168 Er, 239 U nuclei and the 13 C, 28 Al 3 H and 92 Zr photoelectron lines were carried out. Energy calibration of the spectrometer was carried out in the 1.5 MeV to 6.5 MeV range with intensive high-energy transitions of the 200 Hg nucleus. Systematic calibration errors could be investigated by means of combinations between the calibration lines. A calibration for absolute energies was obtained by comparing low-energy gamma transitions of 200 Hg with the 411.8 keV gold standard. (orig.) [de

  2. Controlled cooling of an electronic system for reduced energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2018-01-30

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided. The control includes automatically determining at least one adjusted control setting for at least one adjustable cooling component of a cooling system cooling the electronic system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on power being consumed by the cooling system and temperature of a heat sink to which heat extracted by the cooling system is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on one or more experimentally obtained models relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the one or more adjustable cooling components of the cooling system.

  3. Energy-weighted dynamical scattering simulations of electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Elena; Singh, Saransh; Callahan, Patrick G; Hourahine, Ben; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Graef, Marc De

    2018-04-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) has been gaining momentum as a high resolution alternative to electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), adding to the existing electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The image simulation of any of these measurement techniques requires an energy dependent diffraction model for which, in turn, knowledge of electron energies and diffraction distances distributions is required. We identify the sample-detector geometry and the effect of inelastic events on the diffracting electron beam as the important factors to be considered when predicting these distributions. However, tractable models taking into account inelastic scattering explicitly are lacking. In this study, we expand the Monte Carlo (MC) energy-weighting dynamical simulations models used for EBSD [1] and ECP [2] to the TKD case. We show that the foil thickness in TKD can be used as a means of energy filtering and compare band sharpness in the different modalities. The current model is shown to correctly predict TKD patterns and, through the dictionary indexing approach, to produce higher quality indexed TKD maps than conventional Hough transform approach, especially close to grain boundaries. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Power Electronics as Efficient Interface of Renewable Energy Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Zhe; Kjær, Søren Bækhøj

    2004-01-01

    renewable energy conversion system, will play an important part in our future energy supply. But other sources like microturbines, photovoltaics and fuel cell systems may also be serious contributor to the power supply. Characteristically, power electronics will be an efficient and important interface...... to the grid and this paper will first briefly discuss three different alternative/ renewable energy sources. Next, various configurations of the wind turbine technology are presented, as this technology seems to be most developed and cost-effective. Finally, the developments and requirements from the grid......The global electrical energy consumption is steadily rising and consequently there is a demand to increase the power generation capacity. A significant percentage of the required capacity increase can be based on renewable energy sources. Wind turbine technology, as the most cost effective...

  5. Power Electronics as Efficient Interface of Renewable Energy Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Zhe; Kjær, Søren Bækhøj

    2004-01-01

    to the grid and this paper will first briefly discuss three different alternative/ renewable energy sources. Next, various configurations of the wind turbine technology are presented, as this technology seems to be most developed and cost-effective. Finally, the developments and requirements from the grid......The global electrical energy consumption is steadily rising and consequently there is a demand to increase the power generation capacity. A significant percentage of the required capacity increase can be based on renewable energy sources. Wind turbine technology, as the most cost effective...... renewable energy conversion system, will play an important part in our future energy supply. But other sources like microturbines, photovoltaics and fuel cell systems may also be serious contributor to the power supply. Characteristically, power electronics will be an efficient and important interface...

  6. Inner-shell excitation in heavy ion collisions up to intermediate incident energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reus, T. de.

    1987-04-01

    Electronic excitations in collisions of very heavy ions with a total nuclear charge Z greater than 1/α ≅ 137 at bombarding energies reaching from 3.6 MeV/n up to 100 MeV/n are the subject of this thesis. The dynamical behaviour of the electron-positron-field is described within a semiclassical model, which is reviewed and extended to include electronic interactions via a mean field. A detailed comparison with experimental data of K-vacancy formation, δ-electron and positron emission shows an improved agreement compared with former calculations. Structures in spectra of positrons emitted in sub- and supercritical collision are discussed in two respects: Firstly as a signal of the vacuum decay in supercritical electromagnetic fields which evolve in the vicinity of long living giant nuclear molecules. Secondly as an atomic effect, which might be related to an instaneous formation of molecular 1sσ- and 2p 1/2 σ- levels. However, beyond this speculation the emission spectra of electrons and positrons in deep inelastic reactions have proven to be a powerful tool for measuring nuclear reaction or delay times in the order of 10 -21 s. This property was transfered to the domain of intermediate energy collisions. In first order perturbation theory we derived a scaling law, exhibiting how nuclear stopping times could be extracted from the emission spectra of high energetic δ-electrons. Quantitative calculations within a coupled channel code have been carried out for the system Pb+Pb, yielding cross sections of up to 20 nb for the emission of electrons with a kinetic energy of 50 MeV in 60 MeV/n-collisions. (orig./HSI)

  7. High-energy electron impact apparatus utilizing a simple diode electron gun assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.B.; Pidwerbekki, D.

    1992-01-01

    An electron impact facility based on a ribbon filament cathode, simple diode gun, and thin aluminium foil window is described. The facility is designed for the study of gas phase electron impact phenomena at pressures up to one atmosphere in a variety of gases. Of particular interest is the simple design of the electron gun for generating electron beams having energies up to 100 keV and currents up to 5 mA. The beam is magnetically collimated and directed through a thin aluminium foil which is used as the vacuum-gas interface to an impact chamber. Maximum power delivered to the impact region depends on the thickness of the foil window. Using an 8.4 μm thick aluminium foil, approximately 150 W can be delivered to the impact chamber. Thermal heating of the foil by the electron beam is the limiting factor restricting higher effective power transmission. (Author)

  8. Measuring the electron beam energy in a magnetic bunch compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-09-01

    Within this thesis, work was carried out in and around the first bunch compressor chicane of the FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) linear accelerator in which two distinct systems were developed for the measurement of an electron beams' position with sub-5 μm precision over a 10 cm range. One of these two systems utilized RF techniques to measure the difference between the arrival-times of two broadband electrical pulses generated by the passage of the electron beam adjacent to a pickup antenna. The other system measured the arrival-times of the pulses from the pickup with an optical technique dependent on the delivery of laser pulses which are synchronized to the RF reference of the machine. The relative advantages and disadvantages of these two techniques are explored and compared to other available approaches to measure the same beam property, including a time-of-flight measurement with two beam arrival-time monitors and a synchrotron light monitor with two photomultiplier tubes. The electron beam position measurement is required as part of a measurement of the electron beam energy and could be used in an intra-bunch-train beam-based feedback system that would stabilize the amplitude of the accelerating field. By stabilizing the accelerating field amplitude, the arrival-time of the electron beam can be made more stable. By stabilizing the electron beam arrival-time relative to a stable reference, diagnostic, seeding, and beam-manipulation lasers can be synchronized to the beam. (orig.)

  9. High-resolution monochromated electron energy-loss spectroscopy of organic photovoltaic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jessica A; Scheltens, Frank J; Drummy, Lawrence F; Durstock, Michael F; Hage, Fredrik S; Ramasse, Quentin M; McComb, David W

    2017-09-01

    Advances in electron monochromator technology are providing opportunities for high energy resolution (10 - 200meV) electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to be performed in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The energy-loss near-edge structure in core-loss spectroscopy is often limited by core-hole lifetimes rather than the energy spread of the incident illumination. However, in the valence-loss region, the reduced width of the zero loss peak makes it possible to resolve clearly and unambiguously spectral features at very low energy-losses (photovoltaics (OPVs): poly(3-hexlythiophene) (P3HT), [6,6] phenyl-C 61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), and fullerene (C 60 ). Data was collected on two different monochromated instruments - a Nion UltraSTEM 100 MC 'HERMES' and a FEI Titan 3 60-300 Image-Corrected S/TEM - using energy resolutions (as defined by the zero loss peak full-width at half-maximum) of 35meV and 175meV, respectively. The data was acquired to allow deconvolution of plural scattering, and Kramers-Kronig analysis was utilized to extract the complex dielectric functions. The real and imaginary parts of the complex dielectric functions obtained from the two instruments were compared to evaluate if the enhanced resolution in the Nion provides new opto-electronic information for these organic materials. The differences between the spectra are discussed, and the implications for STEM-EELS studies of advanced materials are considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Energy transfer from lower energy to higher-energy electrons mediated by whistler waves in the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyar, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    We study the problem of energy exchange between waves and particles, which leads to energization of the latter, in an unstable plasma typical of the radiation belts. The ongoing Van Allen Probes space mission brought this problem among the most discussed in space physics. A free energy which is present in an unstable plasma provides the indispensable condition for energy transfer from lower energy particles to higher-energy particles via resonant wave-particle interaction. This process is studied in detail by the example of electron interactions with whistler mode wave packets originated from lightning-induced emission. We emphasize that in an unstable plasma, the energy source for electron energization is the energy of other particles, rather than the wave energy as is often assumed. The way by which the energy is transferred from lower energy to higher-energy particles includes two processes that operate concurrently, in the same space-time domain, or sequentially, in different space-time domains, in which a given wave packet is located. In the first process, one group of resonant particles gives the energy to the wave. The second process consists in wave absorption by another group of resonant particles, whose energy therefore increases. We argue that this mechanism represents an efficient means of electron energization in the radiation belts.

  11. Application of low energy electron beam to precoated steel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshiishi, Kenji

    1989-01-01

    Recently in the fields of home electric appliances, machinery and equipment and interior building materials, the needs for the precoated steel plates having the design and function of high class increase rapidly. In order to cope with such needs, the authors have advanced the examination on the application of electron beam hardening technology to precoated steel plates, and developed the precoated steel plates of high grade and high design 'Super Tecstar EB Series' by utilizing low energy electron beam. The features of this process are (1) hardening can be done at room temperature in a short time-thermally weak films can be adhered, (2) high energy irradiation-the hardening of thick enamel coating and the adhesion of colored films are feasible, (3) the use of monomers of low molecular weight-by high crosslinking, the performance of high sharpness, high hardness, anti-contamination property and so on can be given. The application to precoated steel plate production process is the coating and curing of electron beam hardening type paints, the coating of films with electron beam hardening type adhesives, and the reforming of surface polymer layers by impregnating monomers and causing graft polymerization with electron beam irradiation. The outline of the Super Tecstar EB Series is described. (K.I.)

  12. Modern electron microscopy resolved in space, energy and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, F.

    2011-06-01

    Recent pioneering experiments combining ultrafast lasers with electron-based technology demonstrated the possibility to obtain real-time information about chemical bonds and their dynamics during reactions and phase transformation. These techniques have been successfully applied to several states of matter including gases, liquids, solids and biological samples showing a unique versatility thanks to the high sensitivity of electrons to tiny amounts of material and their low radiation damage. A very powerful tool, the time-resolved Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), is capable of delivering information on the structure of ordered and disordered matter through diffraction and imaging, with a spatial resolution down to the atomic limit (10-10 m); the same apparatus can distinguish dynamical phenomena happening on the time-scales between fs and ms, with a dynamic range of 12 orders of magnitude. At the same time, spectroscopic information can be obtained from the loss of kinetic energy of electrons interacting with specimens in the range of interband transitions and plasmons in solids, or charge transfers in molecules, all the way up to the atomic core levels with the same time-resolution. In this contribution, we focus on the recent advances in fs Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (FEELS), discussing the main results and their implications for future studies.

  13. Inverse planning of energy-modulated electron beams in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentry, John R.; Steeves, Richard; Paliwal, Bhudatt A.

    2006-01-01

    The use of megavoltage electron beams often poses a clinical challenge in that the planning target volume (PTV) is anterior to other radiosensitive structures and has variable depth. To ensure that skin as well as the deepest extent of the PTV receives the prescribed dose entails prescribing to a point beyond the depth of peak dose for a single electron energy. This causes dose inhomogeneities and heightened potential for tissue fibrosis, scarring, and possible soft tissue necrosis. Use of bolus on the skin improves the entrant dose at the cost of decreasing the therapeutic depth that can be treated. Selection of a higher energy to improve dose homogeneity results in increased dose to structures beyond the PTV, as well as enlargement of the volume receiving heightened dose. Measured electron data from a linear accelerator was used as input to create an inverse planning tool employing energy and intensity modulation using bolus (e-IMRT TM ). Using tools readily available in a radiotherapy department, the applications of energy and intensity modulation on the central axis makes it possible to remove hot spots of 115% or more over the depths clinically encountered. The e-IMRT TM algorithm enables the development of patient-specific dose distributions with user-defined positions of peak dose, range, and reduced dose to points beyond the prescription point

  14. Low energy electron beams for industrial and environmental applications

    CERN Document Server

    Skarda, Vlad

    2017-01-01

    EuCARD-2 Workshop, 8-9 December 2016, Warsaw, Poland. Organizers: Science and Technology Facilities Council, UK CERN - The European Organization for Nuclear Research, Switzerland, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Poland, Fraunhofer Institute for Electron Beam and Plasma Technology, Germany, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland. An article presents short information about EuCARD-2 Workshop “Low energy electron beams for industrial and environmental applications”, which was held in December 2016 in Warsaw. Objectives, main topics and expected output of meeting are described. List of organizers is included.

  15. Radiation degradation of marine polysaccharides by low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Fumio; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Kume, Tamikazu

    2003-01-01

    The radiation degradations of marine polysaccharides by both gamma Co-60 and electron beam irradiations are investigated. Polysaccharides and oligosaccharides can be produced by degradation of corresponding polysaccharides including marine polysaccharides such as alginates, chitin chitosan and carrageenan. The viscosity of alginate, chitosan and carrageenan solution decreases markedly with increase of the low energy electron beam irradiation time and the beam current. Furthermore, the viscosity is reduced sharply in short time for polysaccharide solution with low concentration, for instance carrageenan solution of 1%. (author)

  16. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  17. Introduction to the theory of low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingerland, A.; Tomasek, M.

    1975-01-01

    An elementary introduction to the basic principles of the theory of low-energy electron diffraction is presented. General scattering theory is used to classify the hitherto known approaches to the problem (optical potential and one-electron approximation; formal scattering theory: Born expansion and multiple scattering; translational symmetry: Ewald construction; classification of LEED theories by means of the T matrix; pseudokinematical theory for crystal with clean surface and with an adsorbed monomolecular layer; dynamical theory; inclusion of inelastic collisions; discussion of a simple example by means of the band-structure approach)

  18. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy imaging of surface plasmons at the nanometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliex, Christian; Kociak, Mathieu; Stéphan, Odile

    2016-03-01

    Since their first realization, electron microscopes have demonstrated their unique ability to map with highest spatial resolution (sub-atomic in most recent instruments) the position of atoms as a consequence of the strong scattering of the incident high energy electrons by the nuclei of the material under investigation. When interacting with the electron clouds either on atomic orbitals or delocalized over the specimen, the associated energy transfer, measured and analyzed as an energy loss (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) gives access to analytical properties (atom identification, electron states symmetry and localization). In the moderate energy-loss domain (corresponding to an optical spectral domain from the infrared (IR) to the rather far ultra violet (UV), EELS spectra exhibit characteristic collective excitations of the rather-free electron gas, known as plasmons. Boundary conditions, such as surfaces and/or interfaces between metallic and dielectric media, generate localized surface charge oscillations, surface plasmons (SP), which are associated with confined electric fields. This domain of research has been extraordinarily revived over the past few years as a consequence of the burst of interest for structures and devices guiding, enhancing and controlling light at the sub-wavelength scale. The present review focuses on the study of these surface plasmons with an electron microscopy-based approach which associates spectroscopy and mapping at the level of a single and well-defined nano-object, typically at the nanometer scale i.e. much improved with respect to standard, and even near-field, optical techniques. After calling to mind some early studies, we will briefly mention a few basic aspects of the required instrumentation and associated theoretical tools to interpret the very rich data sets recorded with the latest generation of (Scanning)TEM microscopes. The following paragraphs will review in more detail the results obtained on simple planar and

  19. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy imaging of surface plasmons at the nanometer scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colliex, Christian; Kociak, Mathieu; Stéphan, Odile

    2016-01-01

    Since their first realization, electron microscopes have demonstrated their unique ability to map with highest spatial resolution (sub-atomic in most recent instruments) the position of atoms as a consequence of the strong scattering of the incident high energy electrons by the nuclei of the material under investigation. When interacting with the electron clouds either on atomic orbitals or delocalized over the specimen, the associated energy transfer, measured and analyzed as an energy loss (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) gives access to analytical properties (atom identification, electron states symmetry and localization). In the moderate energy-loss domain (corresponding to an optical spectral domain from the infrared (IR) to the rather far ultra violet (UV), EELS spectra exhibit characteristic collective excitations of the rather-free electron gas, known as plasmons. Boundary conditions, such as surfaces and/or interfaces between metallic and dielectric media, generate localized surface charge oscillations, surface plasmons (SP), which are associated with confined electric fields. This domain of research has been extraordinarily revived over the past few years as a consequence of the burst of interest for structures and devices guiding, enhancing and controlling light at the sub-wavelength scale. The present review focuses on the study of these surface plasmons with an electron microscopy-based approach which associates spectroscopy and mapping at the level of a single and well-defined nano-object, typically at the nanometer scale i.e. much improved with respect to standard, and even near-field, optical techniques. After calling to mind some early studies, we will briefly mention a few basic aspects of the required instrumentation and associated theoretical tools to interpret the very rich data sets recorded with the latest generation of (Scanning)TEM microscopes. The following paragraphs will review in more detail the results obtained on simple planar and

  20. Low energy intense electron beams with extra-low energy spread

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, A.V.; Calabrese, R.; Ciullo, G.; Dikansky, N.S.; Guidi, V.; Kot, N.C.; Kudelainen, V.I.; Lamanna, G.; Lebedev, V.A.; Logachov, P.V.; Tecchio, L.; Yang, B.

    1994-01-01

    Maximum achievable intensity for low energy electron beams is a feature that is not very often compatible with low energy spread. We show that a proper choice of the source and the acceleration optics allows one to match them together. In this scheme, a GaAs photocathode excited by a single-mode infrared laser and adiabatic acceleration in fully magnetised optics enables the production of a low-energy-spread electron beam with relatively high intensity. The technological problems associated with the method are discussed together with its limitations. (orig.)

  1. Electron energy distribution function, effective electron temperature, and dust charge in the temporal afterglow of a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denysenko, I. B.; Azarenkov, N. A. [School of Physics and Technology, V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Svobody sq. 4, 61022 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Kersten, H. [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Leibnizstr. 19, Kiel D-24098 (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Analytical expressions describing the variation of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an afterglow of a plasma are obtained. Especially, the case when the electron energy loss is mainly due to momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is considered. The study is carried out for different EEDFs in the steady state, including Maxwellian and Druyvesteyn distributions. The analytical results are not only obtained for the case when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy but also for the case when the collisions are a power function of electron energy. Using analytical expressions for the EEDF, the effective electron temperature and charge of the dust particles, which are assumed to be present in plasma, are calculated for different afterglow durations. An analytical expression for the rate describing collection of electrons by dust particles for the case when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy is also derived. The EEDF profile and, as a result, the effective electron temperature and dust charge are sufficiently different in the cases when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy and when the rate is a power function of electron energy.

  2. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of coupled plasmonic systems: beyond the standard electron perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, G. D.; Flauraud, V.; Alexander, D. T. L.; Brugger, J.; Martin, O. J. F.; Butet, J.

    2016-09-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) has become an experimental method of choice for the investigation of localized surface plasmon resonances, allowing the simultaneous mapping of the associated field distributions and their resonant energies with a nanoscale spatial resolution. The experimental observations have been well-supported by numerical models based on the computation of the Lorentz force acting on the impinging electrons by the scattered field. However, in this framework, the influence of the intrinsic properties of the plasmonic nanostructures studied with the electron energy-loss (EEL) measurements is somehow hidden in the global response. To overcome this limitation, we propose to go beyond this standard, and well-established, electron perspective and instead to interpret the EELS data using directly the intrinsic properties of the nanostructures, without regard to the force acting on the electron. The proposed method is particularly well-suited for the description of coupled plasmonic systems, because the role played by each individual nanoparticle in the observed EEL spectrum can be clearly disentangled, enabling a more subtle understanding of the underlying physical processes. As examples, we consider different plasmonic geometries in order to emphasize the benefits of this new conceptual approach for interpreting experimental EELS data. In particular, we use it to describe results from samples made by traditional thin film patterning and by arranging colloidal nanostructures.

  3. Energy analyzer for Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy backscattering ion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, S.S.; Gorelik, V.A.; Gutenko, V.T.; Protopopov, O.D.; Trubitsin, A.A.; Shuvalova, Z.A.; Yakushev, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Energy analyzer for electron Auger spectroscopy and low-energy backscattering ion spectroscopy is described. Analyzer presents one-cascade variant of cylindrical mirror with second-order focusing. Energy relative resolution is continuously adjusted within 0.2-1.2% limits. Signal/noise relation by Cu Auger-line at 1 muA current of exciting beam changes upper limit of range 150-450

  4. Investigation of 234U(n,f) as a Function of Incident Neutron Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Adili, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Pomp, S.

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the reaction 234U(n,f) have been performed at incident neutron energies from 0.2 MeV to 5 MeV at the 7 MV Van De Graaf accelerator at IRMM. A twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber was used for fission-fragment detection. Parallel digital and analogue data acquisitions were applied in order to compare the two techniques. First results on the angular anisotropy and preliminary mass distributions are presented along with a first comparison between the two techniques.

  5. Anisotropic plasmons, excitons, and electron energy loss spectroscopy of phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Barun; Kumar, Piyush; Thakur, Anmol; Chauhan, Yogesh Singh; Bhowmick, Somnath; Agarwal, Amit

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we explore the anisotropic electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) in monolayer phosphorene based on ab initio time-dependent density-functional-theory calculations. Similarly to black phosphorus, the EELS of undoped monolayer phosphorene is characterized by anisotropic excitonic peaks for energies in the vicinity of the band gap and by interband plasmon peaks for higher energies. On doping, an additional intraband plasmon peak also appears for energies within the band gap. Similarly to other two-dimensional systems, the intraband plasmon peak disperses as ωpl∝√{q } in both the zigzag and armchair directions in the long-wavelength limit and deviates for larger wave vectors. The anisotropy of the long-wavelength plasmon intraband dispersion is found to be inversely proportional to the square root of the ratio of the effective masses: ωpl(q y ̂) /ωpl(q x ̂) =√{mx/my } .

  6. Theoretical model application to the evaluation of fission neutron data up to 20 MeV incidence energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruben, A.; Maerten, H.; Seeliger, D.

    1990-01-01

    A complex statistical theory of fission neutron emission combined with a phenomenological fission model has been used to calculate fission neutron data for 238 U. Obtained neutron multiplicities and energy spectra as well as average fragment energies for incidence energies from threshold to 20 MeV (including multiple-chance fission) are compared with traditional data representations. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  7. Radiation emission and its influence on the motion of multi-GeV electrons and positrons incident on a single diamond crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Kirsebom, K; Uggerhøj, Erik; Elsener, K; Ballestrero, S; Sona, P; Connell, S H; Sellschop, J P Friedel; Vilakazi, Z Z

    2001-01-01

    A few years ago the CERN NA-43 collaboration installed an upgraded detector system which allows a detailed analysis of the particle motion before, during and after penetration of a crystal. Also, essentially perfect diamond crystals were produced by the collaborators from Schonland Research Centre. These facts have led to new and very detailed investigations of QED-processes in strong crystalline fields. Along axial directions the radiation emission is enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude. For incidence on a 0.7 mm thick diamond crystal of well-aligned 149 GeV electrons, 35% give rise to a high energy photon peak at approximately=120 GeV. For 243 GeV electrons and approximately=200 GeV photons, this number decreases to 25%-which may be an indication of quantum suppression. Different measurements of the photon multiplicities show that in most cases positrons and electrons emit equal number of photons. The dramatic radiation emission leads to a strong reduction in transverse energy and all electrons in...

  8. EELOSS: the program for calculation of electron energy loss data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1980-10-01

    A computer code EELOSS has been developed to obtain the electron energy loss data required for shielding and dosimetry of beta- and gamma-rays in nuclear plants. With this code, the following data are obtainable for any energy from 0.01 to 15 MeV in any medium (metal, insulator, gas, compound, or mixture) composed of any choice of 69 elements with atomic number 1 -- 94: a) Collision stopping power, b) Restricted collision stopping power, c) Radiative stopping power, and d) Bremsstrahlung production cross section. The availability of bremsstrahlung production cross section data obtained by the EELOSS code is demonstrated by the comparison of calculated gamma-ray spectrum with measured one in Pb layer, where electron-photon cascade is included implicitly. As a result, it is concluded that the uncertainty in the bremsstrahlung production cross sections is negligible in the practical shielding calculations of gamma rays of energy less than 15 MeV, since the bremsstrahlung production cross sections increase with the gamma-ray energy and the uncertainty for them decreases with increasing the gamma-ray energy. Furthermore, the accuracy of output data of the EELOSS code is evaluated in comparison with experimental data, and satisfactory agreements are observed concerning the stopping power. (J.P.N.)

  9. Narrow beam dosimetry for high-energy hadrons and electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Pelliccioni, M; Ulrici, Luisa

    2001-01-01

    Organ doses and effective dose were calculated with the latest version of the Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA in the case of an anthropomorphic mathematical model exposed to monoenergetic narrow beams of protons, pions and electrons in the energy range 10°— 400 GeV. The target organs considered were right eye, thyroid, thymus, lung and breast. Simple scaling laws to the calculated values are given. The present data and formula should prove useful for dosimetric estimations in case of accidental exposures to high-energy beams.

  10. LDRD project 151362 : low energy electron-photon transport.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Bondi, Robert James; Crawford, Martin James

    2013-09-01

    At sufficiently high energies, the wavelengths of electrons and photons are short enough to only interact with one atom at time, leading to the popular %E2%80%9Cindependent-atom approximation%E2%80%9D. We attempted to incorporate atomic structure in the generation of cross sections (which embody the modeled physics) to improve transport at lower energies. We document our successes and failures. This was a three-year LDRD project. The core team consisted of a radiation-transport expert, a solid-state physicist, and two DFT experts.

  11. Pulse energy control through dual loop electronic feedback

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, Cobus

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available University of Stellenbosch WWW.LASER-RESEARCH.CO.ZA University of Stellenbosch Pulse Energy Control Through Dual Loop Electronic Feedback Cobus Jacobs, Steven Kriel Christoph Bollig, Thomas Jones Cobus Jacobs et al. Overview head2righthead2right...What is Laser Pulse Energy Control? head2righthead2rightWhy do we need it? head2righthead2rightHow do we get it? head2righthead2rightSimulation head2righthead2rightExperimental Setup head2righthead2rightResults Cobus Jacobs et al. head2righthead2right...

  12. Exchange energy of inhomogenous electron gas near a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglio, L.; Tosi, M.P.; March, N.H.

    1980-12-01

    Using the first-order density matrix of an infinite-barrier model of a metal surface, the exchange energy density can be evaluated exactly as a function of distance z from the barrier. This result is compared with the local approximation -3/4e 2 (3/π)sup(1/3) rhosup(4/3)(z) where rho is the electron density in the model. The local approximation is demonstrated to be quantitatively accurate at all z. The integrated surface exchange energy is given to within 3% by the local theory. (author)

  13. Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems - Status and Trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Ma, Ke; Yang, Yongheng

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, the energy paradigms in many countries are experiencing significant change from fossil-based resources to cleaner renewables. It is expected that the scenario of highly penetrated renewables is going to be further enhanced. This requires that the production, distribution...... electronics in generation, transmission/distribution and end-user application, together with advanced controls, can pave the way for renewable energy resources. In view of this, some of the most promising renewable candidates like wind power and photovoltaic, which are becoming a significant part...

  14. Construction of an energy selector for slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatel, S.

    1968-01-01

    After a presentation of the principles on which are built mono-kinetic electron selectors and the difficulties peculiar to low energies, a review of the equipment built by other authors is given. The apparatus described here uses a cylindrical condenser with an angle of π/2. It can be fitted to a mass spectrometer. The measurements carried out with an analyzer identical to the selector show the separating power to be between 0.12 and 0. 14 V for energies of between 6 and 42 V. (author) [fr

  15. LEETECH facility as a flexible source of low energy electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Attie, D; Bezshyyko, O; Burmistrov, L; Chaus, A; Colas, P; Fedorchuk, O; Golinka-Bezshyyko, L; Kadenko, I; Krylov, V; Kubytskyi, V; Lopez, R; Monard, H; Rodin, V; Titov, M; Tomassini, D; Variola, A

    2016-01-01

    A new versatile facility LEETECH for detector R&D, tests and calibration is designed and constructed. It uses electrons produced by the photoinjector PHIL at LAL, Orsay and provides a powerful tool for wide range R&D studies of different detector concepts delivering "mono-chromatic" samples of low energy electrons with adjustable energy and intensity. Among other innovative instrumentation techniques, LEETECH will be used for testing various gaseous tracking detectors and studying new Micromegas/InGrid concept which has very promising characteristics of spatial resolution and can be a good candidate for particle tracking and identification. In this paper the importance and expected characteristics of such facility based on detailed simulation studies are addressed.

  16. Recommended Auger-electron kinetic energies for 42 elemental solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    An analysis is presented of Auger-electron kinetic energies (KEs) from four data sources for 65 Auger transitions in 45 elemental solids. For each data source, a single instrument had been used to measure KEs for many elements. In order to compare KEs from two sources, it was necessary to recalibrate the energy scales of each instrument using recommended reference data. Mean KEs are given for most of the Auger transitions for which there were at least two independent measurements and for which differences from the mean KEs were considered acceptably small. In several cases, comparisons were made to published KE data to resolve discrepancies. We are able to recommend mean KEs for 59 Auger transitions from 42 elemental solids and to provide estimates of the uncertainties of these KEs. This compilation should be useful for the determination of chemical shifts of Auger peaks in Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  17. General theory for environmental effects on (vertical) electronic excitation energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Tobias

    2016-10-21

    Almost 70 years ago, the first theoretical model for environmental effects on electronic excitation energies has been derived. Since then, several different interpretations and refined models have been proposed for the perichromic shift of a chromophore due to its surrounding medium. Some of these models are contradictory. Here, the contributing terms are derived within the framework of long-range perturbation theory with the least approximations so far. The derivation is based on a state-specific interpretation of the interaction energies and all terms can be identified with individual properties of either the chromophore or the surroundings, respectively. Further, the much debated contribution due to transition moments coupled to the environment can be verified in the form of a non-resonant excitonic coupling to the dynamic polarizabilities in the environment. These general insights should clarify discussions and interpretations of environmental effects on electronic excitations and should foster the development of new models for the computation of these effects.

  18. A Correction of Random Incidence Absorption Coefficients for the Angular Distribution of Acoustic Energy under Measurement Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2009-01-01

    Most acoustic measurements are based on an assumption of ideal conditions. One such ideal condition is a diffuse and reverberant field. In practice, a perfectly diffuse sound field cannot be achieved in a reverberation chamber. Uneven incident energy density under measurement conditions can cause...... discrepancies between the measured value and the theoretical random incidence absorption coefficient. Therefore the angular distribution of the incident acoustic energy onto an absorber sample should be taken into account. The angular distribution of the incident energy density was simulated using the beam...... tracing method for various room shapes and source positions. The averaged angular distribution is found to be similar to a Gaussian distribution. As a result, an angle-weighted absorption coefficient was proposed by considering the angular energy distribution to improve the agreement between...

  19. Imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy using single nanosecond electron pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picher, Matthieu; Bücker, Kerstin; LaGrange, Thomas; Banhart, Florian

    2018-03-13

    We implement a parametric study with single electron pulses having a 7 ns duration to find the optimal conditions for imaging, diffraction, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the single-shot approach. Photoelectron pulses are generated by illuminating a flat tantalum cathode with 213 nm nanosecond laser pulses in a 200 kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) with thermionic gun and Wehnelt electrode. For the first time, an EEL spectrometer is used to measure the energy distribution of single nanosecond electron pulses which is crucial for understanding the ideal imaging conditions of the single-shot approach. By varying the laser power, the Wehnelt bias, and the condenser lens settings, the optimum TEM operation conditions for the single-shot approach are revealed. Due to space charge and the Boersch effect, the energy width of the pulses under maximized emission conditions is far too high for imaging or spectroscopy. However, by using the Wehnelt electrode as an energy filter, the energy width of the pulses can be reduced to 2 eV, though at the expense of intensity. The first EEL spectra taken with nanosecond electron pulses are shown in this study. With 7 ns pulses, an image resolution of 25 nm is attained. It is shown how the spherical and chromatic aberrations of the objective lens as well as shot noise limit the resolution. We summarize by giving perspectives for improving the single-shot time-resolved approach by using aberration correction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Electron Beam Energy Compensation by Controlling RF Pulse Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Kii, T; Kusukame, K; Masuda, K; Nakai, Y; Ohgaki, H; Yamazaki, T; Yoshikawa, K; Zen, H

    2005-01-01

    We have studied on improvement of electron beam macropulse properties from a thermionic RF gun. Though a thermionic RF gun has many salient features, there is a serious problem that back-bombardment effect worsens quality of the beam. To reduce beam energy degradation by this effect, we tried to feed non-flat RF power into the gun. As a result, we successfully obtained about 1.5 times longer macropulse and two times larger total charge per macropulse. On the other hand, we calculated transient evolution of RF power considering non-constant beam loading. The beam loading is evaluated from time evolution of cathode temperature, by use of one dimensional heat conduction model and electron trajectories' calculations by a particle simulation code. Then we found good agreement between the experimental and calculation results. Furthermore, with the same way, we studied the electron beam output dependence on the cathode radius.

  1. Theoretical characterization of electron energy distribution function in RF plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitelli, M.; Capriati, G.; Dilonardo, M.; Gorse, C.; Longo, S.

    1993-01-01

    Different methods for the modeling of low-temperature plasmas of both technological and fundamental interest are discussed. The main concept of all these models is the electron energy distribution function (eedf) which is necessary to calculate the rate coefficients for any chemical reaction involving electrons. Results of eedf calculations in homogeneous SF 6 and SiH 4 plasmas are discussed based on solution of the time-dependent Boltzmann equation. The space-dependent eedf in an RF discharge in He is calculated taking into account the sheath oscillations by a Monte Carlo model assuming the plasma heating mechanism and the electric field determined by using a fluid model. The need to take into account the ambipolar diffusion of electrons in RF discharge modeling is stressed. A self-consistent model based on coupling the equations of the fluid model and the chemical kinetics ones is presented. (orig.)

  2. Scattering of low energy electrons from N2 and CO molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polley, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The relative total cross sections for e - -N 2 and e - -CO scattering are determined for incident energies between 9.50 and 25.00 eV. The experiments are performed using a crossed beams configuration. The gas molecules are introduced into the interaction region as a modulated supersonic molecular beam. The energy of the electron beam is defined and analyzed by a pair of trochoidal velocity selectors, which provide 50 MeV resolution. Modulation of the supersonic molecular beam allows the use of phase-sensitive detection to determine the decrease in the transmitted electron current due to the scattering of electrons by the target molecules, which is proportional to the total scattering cross section. Numerous structural features in the e - -N 2 and e - -CO spectra are observed that are due to the formation of temporary negative ions, or electron-molecule resonances. These features range in width from 50 MeV for the prominent window resonance at 11.48 eV in the e - -N 2 spectrum, to 4 or more volts for the shape resonances that peak at 19.5 eV in the e - -CO spectrum and 22.5 eV in the e - -N 2 spectrum. The results of these experiments are interpreted with a modified grandparent model

  3. Nanobiotechnology in energy, environment and electronics methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Present Challenges and Future Solutions via Nanotechnology for Electronics, Environment and Energy; Claudio NicoliniPart A: MethodsInfluence of Chromosome Translocation on Yeast Life Span: Implications for Long-Term Industrial Biofermentation; Jason Sims, Dmitri Nikitin, and Carlo V. BruschiPulsed Power Nanotechnologies for Disintegration and Breaking Up of Refractory Precious Metals Ores; Valentin A. Chanturiya and Igor Zh. BuninModeling of Software Sensors in Bioprocess; Luca Belmonte and Claudio NicoliniN

  4. Parity nonconservation in polarized electron scattering at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1979-10-01

    Recent observations of parity violation in inelastic scattering of electrons at high energy is discussed with reference to the process e(polarized) + D(unpolarized) ..-->.. e + X. The kinetics of this process, the idealized case of scattering from free quark targets, experimental techniques and results, and relations to atomic physics of parity violation in bismuth and thallium atoms with a model independent analysis. 17 references. (JFP)

  5. Parity nonconservation in polarized electron scattering at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1979-10-01

    Recent observations of parity violation in inelastic scattering of electrons at high energy is discussed with reference to the process e(polarized) + D(unpolarized) → e + X. The kinetics of this process, the idealized case of scattering from free quark targets, experimental techniques and results, and relations to atomic physics of parity violation in bismuth and thallium atoms with a model independent analysis. 17 references

  6. Practical Use of Scanning Low Energy Electron Microscope (SLEEM)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Mikmeková, Eliška; Mikmeková, Šárka; Konvalina, Ivo; Frank, Luděk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, S3 (2016), s. 1650-1651 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : scanning low energy * SLEEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  7. Experimental electron binding energies for thulium in different matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Inoyatov, A. K.; Kovalík, Alojz; Filosofov, D. V.; Ryšavý, Miloš; Perevoshchikov, L. L.; Yushkevich, Yu. V.; Zbořil, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 202, JUL (2015), s. 46-55 ISSN 0368-2048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14004; GA ČR(CZ) GAP203/12/1896 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Tm-169 * (169)yb * atomic environment * electron binding energy * chemical shift * natural atomic level width Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.561, year: 2015

  8. Nanocellulose as Material Building Block for Energy and Flexible Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liangbing

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, I will discuss the fabrications, properties and device applications of functional nanostructured paper based on nanocellulose. Nanostructures with tunable optical, electrical, ionic and mechanical properties will be discussed. Lab-scale demonstration devices, including low-cost Na-ion batteries, microbial fuel cells, solar cells, transparent transistors, actuators and touch screens will be briefly mentioned. These studies show that nanocellulose is a promising green material for electronics and energy devices.

  9. Simulation of energy deposit distribution in water for 10 and 25 MeV electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrell Carbonell, Maria de los Angeles.

    1977-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method was applied to transport simulation of electron beams from the exit window of a linear accelerator till the absorption by a water phantom. The distribution of energy deposit is calculated for ideal apparatus and experimental conditions. Calculations are made for a distance window-water surface of one meter, for 10 and 25 MeV monoenergetic incident electrons, and for different fields (15x15 cm 2 to 4x4 cm 2 ). Comparisons with experimental measurements obtained in comparable conditions with a Sagittaire accelerator (C.G.R.-MeV), show a good agreement concerning radial distribution and depth distribution around isodose 100%. However a certain disagreement appears in the end of depth penetration [fr

  10. Low energy electron scattering from atoms: Search for nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Felfli, Z.; Sokolovski, D.

    2011-05-01

    Manipulating the structure and the dynamics of metallic nanoparticles, attractive due to their optical, electronic and magnetic properties, including applications in catalysis, requires a fundamental understanding of the dynamic processes at the atomic level. The fundamental mechanism of catalysis at the atomic scale has already been proposed and demonstrated in Au, Pd and Au-Pd catalysis of H2O2 through the scrutiny of low energy electron elastic total cross sections (TCSs). The use of mixed precious metal catalysts can produce even higher activities compared to Au alone. Here the interplay between negative ion resonances and Ramsauer-Townsend minima that characterize low energy electron TCSs for Au is identified as the fundamental signature of nanoscale catalysts. Calculated electron elastic TCSs for Ag, Pt, Pd, Ru and Y atoms are presented as illustrations. The recent complex angular momentum methodology is used for the calculations. It is concluded that these atoms are suitable candidates for nanocatalysts individually or in combinations. Supported by U.S. DOE, AFOSR and CAU CFNM, NSF-CREST.

  11. Monte Carlo dose calculation improvements for low energy electron beams using eMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, Michael K; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Born, Ernst J; Manser, Peter; Neuenschwander, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm in Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and is able to predict dose distributions for high energy electron beams with high accuracy. However, there are limitations for low energy electron beams. This work aims to improve the accuracy of the dose calculation using eMC for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams of Varian linear accelerators. Improvements implemented into the eMC include (1) improved determination of the initial electron energy spectrum by increased resolution of mono-energetic depth dose curves used during beam configuration; (2) inclusion of all the scrapers of the applicator in the beam model; (3) reduction of the maximum size of the sphere to be selected within the macro MC transport when the energy of the incident electron is below certain thresholds. The impact of these changes in eMC is investigated by comparing calculated dose distributions for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams at source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 and 110 cm with applicators ranging from 6 x 6 to 25 x 25 cm 2 of a Varian Clinac 2300C/D with the corresponding measurements. Dose differences between calculated and measured absolute depth dose curves are reduced from 6% to less than 1.5% for both energies and all applicators considered at SSD of 100 cm. Using the original eMC implementation, absolute dose profiles at depths of 1 cm, d max and R50 in water lead to dose differences of up to 8% for applicators larger than 15 x 15 cm 2 at SSD 100 cm. Those differences are now reduced to less than 2% for all dose profiles investigated when the improved version of eMC is used. At SSD of 110 cm the dose difference for the original eMC version is even more pronounced and can be larger than 10%. Those differences are reduced to within 2% or 2 mm with the improved version of eMC. In this work several enhancements were made in the eMC algorithm leading to significant improvements in the accuracy of the dose calculation

  12. Monte Carlo dose calculation improvements for low energy electron beams using eMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Michael K; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Neuenschwander, Hans; Born, Ernst J; Manser, Peter

    2010-08-21

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm in Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and is able to predict dose distributions for high energy electron beams with high accuracy. However, there are limitations for low energy electron beams. This work aims to improve the accuracy of the dose calculation using eMC for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams of Varian linear accelerators. Improvements implemented into the eMC include (1) improved determination of the initial electron energy spectrum by increased resolution of mono-energetic depth dose curves used during beam configuration; (2) inclusion of all the scrapers of the applicator in the beam model; (3) reduction of the maximum size of the sphere to be selected within the macro MC transport when the energy of the incident electron is below certain thresholds. The impact of these changes in eMC is investigated by comparing calculated dose distributions for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams at source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 and 110 cm with applicators ranging from 6 x 6 to 25 x 25 cm(2) of a Varian Clinac 2300C/D with the corresponding measurements. Dose differences between calculated and measured absolute depth dose curves are reduced from 6% to less than 1.5% for both energies and all applicators considered at SSD of 100 cm. Using the original eMC implementation, absolute dose profiles at depths of 1 cm, d(max) and R50 in water lead to dose differences of up to 8% for applicators larger than 15 x 15 cm(2) at SSD 100 cm. Those differences are now reduced to less than 2% for all dose profiles investigated when the improved version of eMC is used. At SSD of 110 cm the dose difference for the original eMC version is even more pronounced and can be larger than 10%. Those differences are reduced to within 2% or 2 mm with the improved version of eMC. In this work several enhancements were made in the eMC algorithm leading to significant improvements in the accuracy of the dose

  13. A generalized electron energy probability function for inductively coupled plasmas under conditions of nonlocal electron kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchtouris, S.; Kokkoris, G.

    2018-01-01

    A generalized equation for the electron energy probability function (EEPF) of inductively coupled Ar plasmas is proposed under conditions of nonlocal electron kinetics and diffusive cooling. The proposed equation describes the local EEPF in a discharge and the independent variable is the kinetic energy of electrons. The EEPF consists of a bulk and a depleted tail part and incorporates the effect of the plasma potential, Vp, and pressure. Due to diffusive cooling, the break point of the EEPF is eVp. The pressure alters the shape of the bulk and the slope of the tail part. The parameters of the proposed EEPF are extracted by fitting to measure EEPFs (at one point in the reactor) at different pressures. By coupling the proposed EEPF with a hybrid plasma model, measurements in the gaseous electronics conference reference reactor concerning (a) the electron density and temperature and the plasma potential, either spatially resolved or at different pressure (10-50 mTorr) and power, and (b) the ion current density of the electrode, are well reproduced. The effect of the choice of the EEPF on the results is investigated by a comparison to an EEPF coming from the Boltzmann equation (local electron kinetics approach) and to a Maxwellian EEPF. The accuracy of the results and the fact that the proposed EEPF is predefined renders its use a reliable alternative with a low computational cost compared to stochastic electron kinetic models at low pressure conditions, which can be extended to other gases and/or different electron heating mechanisms.

  14. Electron-beam broadening in amorphous carbon films in low-energy scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drees, H; Müller, E; Dries, M; Gerthsen, D

    2018-02-01

    Resolution in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is ultimately limited by the diameter of the electron beam. The electron beam diameter is not only determined by the properties of the condenser lens system but also by electron scattering in the specimen which leads to electron-beam broadening and degradation of the resolution with increasing specimen thickness. In this work we introduce a new method to measure electron-beam broadening which is based on STEM imaging with a multi-segmented STEM detector. We focus on STEM at low electron energies between 10 and 30 keV and use an amorphous carbon film with known thickness as test object. The experimental results are compared with calculated beam diameters using different analytical models and Monte-Carlo simulations. We find excellent agreement of the experimental data with the recently published model by Gauvin and Rudinsky [1] for small t/λ el (thickness to elastic mean free path) values which are considered in our study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Electron energy distributions in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sang-Heon; Yang, Yang; Chabert, Pascal; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Optimizing and controlling electron energy distributions (EEDs) is a continuing goal in plasma materials processing as EEDs determine the rate coefficients for electron impact processes. There are many strategies to customize EEDs in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), for example, pulsing and choice of frequency, to produce the desired plasma properties. Recent experiments have shown that EEDs in low pressure ICPs can be manipulated through the use of static magnetic fields of sufficient magnitudes to magnetize the electrons and confine them to the electromagnetic skin depth. The EED is then a function of the local magnetic field as opposed to having non-local properties in the absence of the magnetic field. In this paper, EEDs in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma (mICP) sustained in Ar are discussed with results from a two-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model. Results are compared with experimental measurements. We found that the character of the EED transitions from non-local to local with application of the static magnetic field. The reduction in cross-field mobility increases local electron heating in the skin depth and decreases the transport of these hot electrons to larger radii. The tail of the EED is therefore enhanced in the skin depth and depressed at large radii. Plasmas densities are non-monotonic with increasing pressure with the external magnetic field due to transitions between local and non-local kinetics

  16. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy on fullerenes and fullerene compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, J.

    1996-03-01

    A few years ago, a new form of pure carbon, the fullerenes, has been discovered, which shows many fascinating properties. Within this work the spatial and electronic structure of some selected fullerene compounds have been investigated by electron-energy-loss spectroscopy in transmission. Phase pure samples of alkali intercalated fullerides A x C 60 (A=Na, K, Cs) have been prepared using vacuum distillation. Measruements of K 3 C 60 show a dispersion of the charge carrier plasmon close to zero. This can be explained by calculations, which take into account both band structure and local-field (inhomogeneity) effects. The importance of the molecular structure can also be seen from the A 4 C 60 compounds, where the non-metallic properties are explained by a splitting of the t 1u and t 1g derived bands that is caused by electron-correlation and Jahn-Teller effects. First measurements of the electronic structure of Na x C 60 (x>6) are presented and reveal a complete transfer from the sodium atoms but an incomplete transfer onto the C 60 molecules. This behaviour can be explained by taking into account additional electronic states that are situated between the sodium atoms in the octahedral sites and are predicted by calculations using local density approximation. The crystal structure of the higher fullerenes C 76 and C 84 is found to be face-centered cubic

  17. Spin polarization effects in low-energy elastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beerlage, M.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This work describes experiments on the role of spin polarization in elastic electron scattering. Chapter I introduces the topic and in chapter II elastic scattering of 10-50 eV electrons from Ar and Kr in the angular range between 40 0 and 110 0 is studied. Noble gases have been chosen as targets in view of their relative theoretical simplicity. Below 25 eV scattered intensities measured by various authors exhibit severe disagreements. However, in the entire energy range, the spin polarization results can reasonably well be used to point out the shortcomings of the available theoretical data. The main topic of chapter III is the first attempt to determine the magnitude of a polarization phenomenon - in elastic electron scattering from the optically active camphor molecule - of which the existence has recently been predicted qualitatively from the absence of parity symmetry in such molecules. Besides these studies on gaseous targets the author has initiated a scattering experiment on crystal surfaces, using spin polarized electrons. Within the framework of this project a large new experimental arrangement has been built up. It consists of a spin polarized electron source and a LEED scattering chamber. Design, construction and test results, showing the usefulness of the set-up, are described in the last chapter. (Auth.)

  18. Simulating electron energy loss spectroscopy with the MNPBEM toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenester, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Within the MNPBEM toolbox, we show how to simulate electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of plasmonic nanoparticles using a boundary element method approach. The methodology underlying our approach closely follows the concepts developed by García de Abajo and coworkers (Garcia de Abajo, 2010). We introduce two classes eelsret and eelsstat that allow in combination with our recently developed MNPBEM toolbox for a simple, robust, and efficient computation of EEL spectra and maps. The classes are accompanied by a number of demo programs for EELS simulation of metallic nanospheres, nanodisks, and nanotriangles, and for electron trajectories passing by or penetrating through the metallic nanoparticles. We also discuss how to compute electric fields induced by the electron beam and cathodoluminescence. Catalogue identifier: AEKJ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKJ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 38886 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1222650 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Computer: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Operating system: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). RAM:≥1 GB Classification: 18. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEKJ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 183 (2012) 370 External routines: MESH2D available at www.mathworks.com Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Simulation of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for plasmonic nanoparticles. Solution method: Boundary element method using electromagnetic potentials. Reasons for new version: The new version of the toolbox includes two additional classes for the simulation of electron energy

  19. Beam Energy Scaling of Ion-Induced Electron Yield from K+ Ions Impact on Stainless Steel Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kireeff-Covo, Michel; Barnard, John J; Bieniosek, Frank; Celata, C M; Cohen, Ronald; Friedman, Alex; Grote, D P; Kwan, Joe W; Lund, Steven M; Molvik, Arthur; Seidl, Peter; Vay, Jean-Luc; Vujic, Jasmina L; Westenskow, Glen

    2005-01-01

    The cost of accelerators for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF) can be reduced by using the smallest possible clearance between the beam and the wall from the beamline. This increases beam loss to the walls, generating ion-induced electrons that could be trapped by beam space charge potential into an "electron cloud," which can cause degradation or loss of the ion beam. In order to understand the physical mechanism of production of ion-induced electrons we have measured impact of K+ ions with energies up to 400 KeV on stainless steel surfaces near grazing incidence, using the ion source test stand (STS-500) at LLNL. The electron yield will be discussed and compared with experimental measurements from 1 MeV K+ ions in the High-Current Experiment at LBNL.*

  20. Measuring the electron beam energy in a magnetic bunch compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-09-15

    Within this thesis, work was carried out in and around the first bunch compressor chicane of the FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) linear accelerator in which two distinct systems were developed for the measurement of an electron beams' position with sub-5 {mu}m precision over a 10 cm range. One of these two systems utilized RF techniques to measure the difference between the arrival-times of two broadband electrical pulses generated by the passage of the electron beam adjacent to a pickup antenna. The other system measured the arrival-times of the pulses from the pickup with an optical technique dependent on the delivery of laser pulses which are synchronized to the RF reference of the machine. The relative advantages and disadvantages of these two techniques are explored and compared to other available approaches to measure the same beam property, including a time-of-flight measurement with two beam arrival-time monitors and a synchrotron light monitor with two photomultiplier tubes. The electron beam position measurement is required as part of a measurement of the electron beam energy and could be used in an intra-bunch-train beam-based feedback system that would stabilize the amplitude of the accelerating field. By stabilizing the accelerating field amplitude, the arrival-time of the electron beam can be made more stable. By stabilizing the electron beam arrival-time relative to a stable reference, diagnostic, seeding, and beam-manipulation lasers can be synchronized to the beam. (orig.)

  1. Resolving runaway electron distributions in space, time, and energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Cooper, C. M.; Aleynikov, P.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lvovskiy, A.; Pace, D. C.; Brennan, D. P.; Hollmann, E. M.; Liu, C.; Moyer, R. A.; Shiraki, D.

    2018-05-01

    Areas of agreement and disagreement with present-day models of runaway electron (RE) evolution are revealed by measuring MeV-level bremsstrahlung radiation from runaway electrons (REs) with a pinhole camera. Spatially resolved measurements localize the RE beam, reveal energy-dependent RE transport, and can be used to perform full two-dimensional (energy and pitch-angle) inversions of the RE phase-space distribution. Energy-resolved measurements find qualitative agreement with modeling on the role of collisional and synchrotron damping in modifying the RE distribution shape. Measurements are consistent with predictions of phase-space attractors that accumulate REs, with non-monotonic features observed in the distribution. Temporally resolved measurements find qualitative agreement with modeling on the impact of collisional and synchrotron damping in varying the RE growth and decay rate. Anomalous RE loss is observed and found to be largest at low energy. Possible roles for kinetic instability or spatial transport to resolve these anomalies are discussed.

  2. Power electronics for renewable and distributed energy systems a sourcebook of topologies, control and integration

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Sudipta; Kramer, William E

    2013-01-01

    While most books approach power electronics and renewable energy as two separate subjects, Power Electronics for Renewable and Distributed Energy Systems takes an integrative approach; discussing power electronic converters topologies, controls and integration that are specific to the renewable and distributed energy system applications. An overview of power electronic technologies is followed by the introduction of various renewable and distributed energy resources that includes photovoltaics, wind, small hydroelectric, fuel cells, microturbines and variable speed generation. Energy storage s

  3. Low Energy Electrons as Probing Tool for Astrochemical Reaction Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrik Bredehöft, Jan; Swiderek, Petra; Hamann, Thorben

    The complexity of molecules found in space varies widely. On one end of the scale of molecular complexity is the hydrogen molecule H2 . Its formation from H atoms is if not understood than at least thoroughly investigated[1]. On the other side of said spectrum the precursors to biopolymers can be found, such as amino acids[2,3], sugars[4], lipids, cofactors[5], etc, and the kerogen-like organic polymer material in carbonaceous meteorites called "black stuff" [6]. These have also received broad attention in the last decades. Sitting in the middle between these two extremes are simple molecules that are observed by radio astronomy throughout the Universe. These are molecules like methane (CH4 ), methanol (CH3 OH), formaldehyde (CH2 O), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and many many others. So far more than 40 such species have been identified.[7] They are often used in laboratory experiments to create larger complex molecules on the surface of simulated interstellar dust grains.[2,8] The mechanisms of formation of these observed starting materials for prebiotic chemistry is however not always clear. Also the exact mechanisms of formation of larger molecules in photochemical experiments are largely unclear. This is mostly due to the very complex chemistry going on which involves many different radicals and ions. The creation of radicals and ions can be studied in detail in laboratory simulations. They can be created in a setup mimicking interstellar grain chemistry using slow electrons. There is no free electron radiation in space. What can be found though is a lot of radiation of different sorts. There is electromagnetic radiation (UV light, X-Rays, rays, etc.) and there is particulate radiation as well in the form of high energy ions. This radiation can provide energy that drives chemical reactions in the ice mantles of interstellar dust grains. And while the multitude of different kinds of radiation might be a little confusing, they all have one thing in common: Upon

  4. Radiation processing of natural polymers using low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu

    2004-01-01

    Radiation processing is widely used in Japan and the economic scale of radiation application amounted to about 71 b$ (ratio relative to GDP: 1.7%) in total. It consisted of 60 b$ (85%) in industry, 10 b$ (14%) in medicine and 1 b$ (1%) in agriculture. Irradiation using gamma-ray from 60 Co and electron beam is commercially used for the sterilization and modification of materials. Utilization of natural polymers by radiation has been investigated for recycling the natural resources and reducing the environmental pollution. Polysaccharides such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin were easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities, i.e. anti-bacterial activity, elicitor activity, plant growth promotion, suppression of environmental stress on plants. Radiation degraded chitosan was effective to enhance the growth of plants in tissue culture. Low energy electron beam (EB) irradiation has a variety of applications and good safety. A self-shielded low energy electron accelerator system needs an initial investment much lower than a 60 Co facility. It was demonstrated that the liquid sample irradiation system using low energy EB was effective not only for the preparation of degraded polysaccharides but also for radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex (RVNRL). Some carbohydrate derivatives, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), carboxymethyl-starch and carboxymethyl-chitin/chitosan, can be crosslinked under certain radiation condition and produced the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use. Treatment of soybean seeds by low energy EB enhanced the growth and the number of rhizobia on the root. (author)

  5. Sturmian theory of electron energy distributions in low energy ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikov, S.Yu. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, 401 Nielsen Physics Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: serge@charcoal.phys.utk.edu; Macek, J.H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, 401 Nielsen Physics Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    The energy and angular distributions of electrons ejected from targets and projectiles in the collisions of slow H and H{sup -} with He targets has been calculated exactly in a model that treats electron interactions with neutral targets via zero-range interactions. These calculations employ two-center Sturmian functions for collisions at non-zero impact parameters. The computed distributions are compared with recent measurements for He targets. Total ionization cross sections are also computed and compared with experiment over a broad energy range for proton, alpha particle and neutral hydrogen impact on helium atoms. The calculations are in generally good agreement with experiment.

  6. Dietary Energy Density and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Incidence in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Terryl J; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Shah, Roma; Flanders, W Dana; Wang, Ying; McCullough, Marjorie L

    2016-10-01

    Dietary energy density (ED) is a measure of diet quality that estimates the amount of energy per unit of food (kilocalories per gram) consumed. Low-ED diets are generally high in fiber and fruits and vegetables and low in fat. Dietary ED has been positively associated with body mass index (BMI) and other risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. We evaluated the associations of total dietary ED and energy-dense (high-ED) foods with postmenopausal breast cancer incidence. Analyses included 56,795 postmenopausal women from the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort with no previous history of breast or other cancers and who provided information on diet, lifestyle, and medical history in 1999. Multivariable-adjusted breast cancer incidence rate ratios (RRs and 95% CIs) were estimated for quintiles of total dietary ED and for the consumption of high-ED foods in Cox proportional hazards regression models. During a median follow-up of 11.7 y, 2509 invasive breast cancer cases were identified, including 1857 estrogen receptor-positive and 277 estrogen receptor-negative tumors. Median dietary ED was 1.5 kcal/g (IQR: 1.3-1.7 kcal/g). After adjusting for age, race, education, reproductive characteristics, and family history, high compared with low dietary ED was associated with a statistically significantly higher risk of breast cancer (RR for fifth quintile compared with first quintile: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.36; P-trend = 0.03). The association between the amount of high-ED foods consumed and breast cancer risk was not statistically significant. We observed no differences by estrogen receptor status or effect modification by BMI, age, or physical activity. These results suggest a modest positive association between total dietary ED and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. Electronic energy transfer through non-adiabatic vibrational-electronic resonance. I. Theory for a dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivek; Peters, William K; Jonas, David M

    2017-10-21

    Non-adiabatic vibrational-electronic resonance in the excited electronic states of natural photosynthetic antennas drastically alters the adiabatic framework, in which electronic energy transfer has been conventionally studied, and suggests the possibility of exploiting non-adiabatic dynamics for directed energy transfer. Here, a generalized dimer model incorporates asymmetries between pigments, coupling to the environment, and the doubly excited state relevant for nonlinear spectroscopy. For this generalized dimer model, the vibrational tuning vector that drives energy transfer is derived and connected to decoherence between singly excited states. A correlation vector is connected to decoherence between the ground state and the doubly excited state. Optical decoherence between the ground and singly excited states involves linear combinations of the correlation and tuning vectors. Excitonic coupling modifies the tuning vector. The correlation and tuning vectors are not always orthogonal, and both can be asymmetric under pigment exchange, which affects energy transfer. For equal pigment vibrational frequencies, the nonadiabatic tuning vector becomes an anti-correlated delocalized linear combination of intramolecular vibrations of the two pigments, and the nonadiabatic energy transfer dynamics become separable. With exchange symmetry, the correlation and tuning vectors become delocalized intramolecular vibrations that are symmetric and antisymmetric under pigment exchange. Diabatic criteria for vibrational-excitonic resonance demonstrate that anti-correlated vibrations increase the range and speed of vibronically resonant energy transfer (the Golden Rule rate is a factor of 2 faster). A partial trace analysis shows that vibronic decoherence for a vibrational-excitonic resonance between two excitons is slower than their purely excitonic decoherence.

  8. Electron flux models for different energies at geostationary orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, R. J.; Balikhin, M. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walker, S. N.; Billings, S. A.; Ganushkina, N.

    2016-10-01

    Forecast models were derived for energetic electrons at all energy ranges sampled by the third-generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). These models were based on Multi-Input Single-Output Nonlinear Autoregressive Moving Average with Exogenous inputs methodologies. The model inputs include the solar wind velocity, density and pressure, the fraction of time that the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was southward, the IMF contribution of a solar wind-magnetosphere coupling function proposed by Boynton et al. (2011b), and the Dst index. As such, this study has deduced five new 1 h resolution models for the low-energy electrons measured by GOES (30-50 keV, 50-100 keV, 100-200 keV, 200-350 keV, and 350-600 keV) and extended the existing >800 keV and >2 MeV Geostationary Earth Orbit electron fluxes models to forecast at a 1 h resolution. All of these models were shown to provide accurate forecasts, with prediction efficiencies ranging between 66.9% and 82.3%.

  9. The relevance of the vertex bremsstrahlung photon detection in the electron-neutrino (antineutrino) electron scattering experiments at low energy

    CERN Document Server

    Broggini, C; Moretti, M

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the size of the electron-antineutrino electron into electron-antineutrino electron cross section reduction due to the rejection of the events with a vertex bremsstrahlung photon above a certain energy in the final state. In particular we analyze the effect in experiments designed to detect the low energy electron-antineutrino and electron-neutrino from a nuclear reactor and from the Sun. We find that such reduction has to be considered in a relatively high statistic reactor experiment, while it is negligible for pp and 7Be solar neutrino detection.

  10. Ultrafast electronic energy relaxation in a conjugated dendrimer leading to inter-branch energy redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondarse-Alvarez, D; Kömürlü, S; Roitberg, A E; Pierdominici-Sottile, G; Tretiak, S; Fernandez-Alberti, S; Kleiman, V D

    2016-09-14

    Dendrimers are arrays of coupled chromophores, where the energy of each unit depends on its structure and conformation. The light harvesting and energy funneling properties are strongly dependent on their highly branched conjugated architecture. Herein, the photoexcitation and subsequent ultrafast electronic energy relaxation and redistribution of a first generation dendrimer (1) are analyzed combining theoretical and experimental studies. Dendrimer 1 consists of three linear phenylene-ethynylene (PE) units, or branches, attached in the meta position to a central group opening up the possibility of inter-branch energy transfer. Excited state dynamics are explored using both time-resolved spectroscopy and non-adiabatic excited state molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate a subpicosecond loss of anisotropy due to an initial excitation into several states with different spatial localizations, followed by exciton self-trapping on different units. This exciton hops between branches. The absence of an energy gradient leads to an ultrafast energy redistribution among isoenergetic chromophore units. At long times we observe similar probabilities for each branch to retain significant contributions of the transition density of the lowest electronic excited-state. The observed unpolarized emission is attributed to the contraction of the electronic wavefunction onto a single branch with frequent interbranch hops, and not to its delocalization over the whole dendrimer.

  11. Electronic structure and electron energy-loss spectroscopy of ZrO2 zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, L. K.; Vast, Nathalie; Baranek, Philippe; Cheynet, Marie-Claude; Reining, Lucia

    2004-12-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of zirconia are calculated within density functional theory, and their evolution is analyzed as the crystal-field symmetry changes from tetrahedral [cubic (c-ZrO2) and tetragonal (t-ZrO2) phases] to octahedral (hypothetical rutile ZrO2 ), to a mixing of these symmetries (monoclinic phase, m-ZrO2 ). We find that the theoretical bulk modulus in c-ZrO2 is 30% larger than the experimental value, showing that the introduction of yttria in zirconia has a significant effect. Electronic structure fingerprints which characterize each phase from their electronic spectra are identified. We have carried out electron energy-loss spectroscopy experiments at low momentum transfer and compared these results to the theoretical spectra calculated within the random phase approximation. We show a dependence of the valence and 4p ( N2,3 edge) plasmons on the crystal structure, the dependence of the latter being brought into the spectra by local-field effects. Last, we attribute low energy excitations observed in EELS of m-ZrO2 to defect states 2eV above the top of the intrinsic valence band, and the EELS fundamental band gap value is reconciled with the 5.2 or 5.8eV gaps determined by vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy.

  12. Cost analysis of low energy electron accelerator for film curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochi, Masafumi

    2003-01-01

    Low energy electron accelerators are recognized as one of the advanced curing means of converting processes for films and papers. In the last three years the price of the accelerator equipment has been greatly reduced. The targeted application areas are mainly processes of curing inks, coatings, and adhesives to make packaging materials. The operating cost analyses were made for electron beam (EB) processes over the conventional ones without EB. Then three new proposals for cost reduction of EB processes are introduced. Also being developed are new EB chemistries such as coatings, laminating adhesives and inks. EB processes give instantaneous cure and EB chemistries are basically non solvent causing less VOC emission to the environment. These developments of both equipment and chemistries might have a potential to change conventional packaging film industries. (author)

  13. On selection rules and inelastic electron scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuroh, K.

    1986-12-01

    Correlation effects are included in the Bethe-Born theory for the generalized oscillator strength of inelastic scattering of electrons on atoms. The formulation is such as to allow for the calculation of relative line strengths of multiplets. It is used to analyze line strengths of the 4d → 4f transition in La 3+ and Ce 4+ within LS-coupling. The analysis indicates that only singlet states of the intermediate 4d 9 4f configuration are allowed. Calculated line strengths are compared with a recent core electron energy loss spectra of metallic La and tetravalent CeO 2 and there is an overall qualitative agreement between theory and experiment. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  14. Maximum wind energy extraction strategies using power electronic converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quincy Qing

    2003-10-01

    This thesis focuses on maximum wind energy extraction strategies for achieving the highest energy output of variable speed wind turbine power generation systems. Power electronic converters and controls provide the basic platform to accomplish the research of this thesis in both hardware and software aspects. In order to send wind energy to a utility grid, a variable speed wind turbine requires a power electronic converter to convert a variable voltage variable frequency source into a fixed voltage fixed frequency supply. Generic single-phase and three-phase converter topologies, converter control methods for wind power generation, as well as the developed direct drive generator, are introduced in the thesis for establishing variable-speed wind energy conversion systems. Variable speed wind power generation system modeling and simulation are essential methods both for understanding the system behavior and for developing advanced system control strategies. Wind generation system components, including wind turbine, 1-phase IGBT inverter, 3-phase IGBT inverter, synchronous generator, and rectifier, are modeled in this thesis using MATLAB/SIMULINK. The simulation results have been verified by a commercial simulation software package, PSIM, and confirmed by field test results. Since the dynamic time constants for these individual models are much different, a creative approach has also been developed in this thesis to combine these models for entire wind power generation system simulation. An advanced maximum wind energy extraction strategy relies not only on proper system hardware design, but also on sophisticated software control algorithms. Based on literature review and computer simulation on wind turbine control algorithms, an intelligent maximum wind energy extraction control algorithm is proposed in this thesis. This algorithm has a unique on-line adaptation and optimization capability, which is able to achieve maximum wind energy conversion efficiency through

  15. Evolution of the Prompt Dipole γ-RAY Emission with Incident Energy in Fusion Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierroutsakou, D.; Martin, B.; Inglima, G.; Boiano, A.; de Rosa, A.; di Pietro, M.; La Commara, M.; Mordente, R.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.; Trotta, M.; Vardaci, E.; Glodariu, T.; Mazzocco, M.; Signorini, C.; Stroe, L.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; di Toro, M.; Maiolino, C.; Pellegriti, N.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Cardella, G.; de Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Pirrone, S.; Baran, V.

    2005-12-01

    We studied the prompt dipole γ-ray emission, associated with entrance channel charge asymmetry effects, as a function of incident energy in the 32,36S + 100,96Mo (Elab=6 MeV/nucleon) and 36,40Ar + 96,92Zr fusion reactions (Elab= 16 and 15 MeV/nucleon, respectively). With the above reaction pairs the 132Ce compound nucleus was formed, from entrance channels having different charge asymmetries, at an excitation energy of 117 and 304 MeV with identical spin distribution. By studying the differential γ-ray multiplicity spectra related to the above fusion reactions, it was shown that at the higher compound nucleus excitation energy the Giant Dipole Resonance γ-ray intensity increases by ~14% for the more charge asymmetric system while at the lower one no difference between the data was seen within the experimental uncertainties. Calculations based on a collective bremsstrahlung analysis of the reaction dynamics are presented and compared with the experimental findings.

  16. The energy distribution of electrons in radio jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouros, Alexandros; Kylafis, Nikolaos D.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Black-hole and neutron-star X-ray binaries exhibit compact radio jets, when they are in the so called quiescent, hard, or hard intermediate states. The radio spectrum in these states is flat to slightly inverted, I.e., the spectral index of the observed flux density is in the range 0 ≲ α ≲ 0.5. It is widely accepted that the energy distribution of the electrons, in the rest frame of the jet, is a power law with index in the range 3 ≲ p ≲ 5. Aims: Contrary to what our thinking was decades ago, now we know that the jets originate in the hot, inner flow around black holes and neutron stars. So it is worth investigating the radio spectrum that is emitted by a thermal jet as a function of direction. Methods: As an example, we consider a parabolic jet and, with the assumption of flux freezing, we compute the emitted spectrum in all directions, from radio to near infrared, using either a thermal distribution of electrons or a power-law one. Results: We have found that parabolic jets with a thermal distribution of electrons give also flat to slightly inverted spectra. In particular, for directions along the jet (θ = 0), both distributions of electron energies give α = 0 ± 0.01. The index α increases as the viewing angle θ increases and for directions perpendicular to the jet (θ = π/ 2), the thermal distribution gives α = 0.40 ± 0.05, while the power-law distribution gives α = 0.20 ± 0.05. The break frequency νb, which marks the transition from partially optically thick to optically thin synchrotron emission, is comparable for the power-law and the thermal distributions. Conclusions: Contrary to common belief, it is not necessary to invoke a power-law energy distribution of the electrons in a jet to explain its flat to slightly inverted radio spectrum. A relativistic Maxwellian produces similar radio spectra. Thus, the jet may be the widely invoked "corona" around black holes in X-ray binaries.

  17. Interpretation of diffuse low-energy electron diffraction intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldin, D.K.; Pendry, J.B.; Van Hove, M.A.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the diffuse low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) that occurs between sharp LEED beams can be used to determine the local bonding configuration near disordered surface atoms. Two approaches to the calculation of diffuse LEED intensities are presented for the case of lattice-gas disorder of an adsorbate on a crystalline substrate. The capabilities of this technique are most similar to those of near-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure, but avoid the restrictions due to the use of photons

  18. Low power electronic interface for electrostatic energy harvesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan, Tra Nguyen; Azadmehr, Mehdi; Le, Cuong Phu; Halvorsen, Einar

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents design and simulation of a power electronic interface circuit for MEMS electrostatic energy harvesters. The designed circuit is applicable to highly miniaturized electrostatic harvesters with small transducer capacitances below 10 pF. It is based on comb- drive harvesters with two anti-phase capacitors that are connected as charge pumps and uses a flyback-path scheme. Controlled activation and deactivation of sub-circuits, some by help of clocking, were exploited to reduce power consumption down to 1.03 μW. Net power generation can be achieved with as low initial voltage as 3.0 V. (paper)

  19. Measurement of the Electron Structure Function at LEP energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, U; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W-D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Asman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, P; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K-H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A; Berat, C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Besancon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Bruckman, P; Brunet, J M; Buschbeck, B; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, Ph; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D; Cuevas, J; D'Hondt, J; da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; De Boer, W; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; de Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Eigen, G; Ekelof, T; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Foeth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; Garcia, C; Gavillet, Ph; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S-O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kouznetsov, O; Krumstein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; Lopez, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Marechal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J-C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martinez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; Mc Nulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W; Mjoernmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Moenig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Mueller, U; Muenich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, F; Nawrocki, K; Nemecek, S; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Olshevski, A; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, Th D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdniakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Radojicic, D; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P; Richard, F; Ridky, J; Rivero, M; Rodriguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovsky, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Sekulin, R; Siebel, M; Sisakian, A; Slominski, W; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassov, T; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Szwed, J; Tabarelli, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tome, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O; Zalewska, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2010-01-01

    The hadronic part of the Electron Structure Function (ESF) has been measured for the first time, using e+e- data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies sqrt(s) = 91.2-209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function. The ESF data are compared to predictions of phenomenological models based on the photon structure function. It is shown that the quasi-real photon virtuality contribution is significant. The presented data can serve as a cross-check of the photon structure function analyses and help in refining existing parametrizations.

  20. Two-electron photoionization cross sections at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Krivec, R.; Mandelzweig, V.B.

    2003-01-01

    Double and single electron photoionization cross sections and their ratios at high and ultra-relativistic energies are calculated for H - , He and helium-like ions in ground and excited states including triplet states. The ratios contain shake-off and quasi-free terms. A high precision non-variational wave function is used. The quasi-free mechanism increases the ratios impressively: for He we get 0.0762 instead of 0.0164 in the non-relativistic case. Ratios are inversely proportional to Z 2 , with a factor increasing from 0.094 in the nonrelativistic to 0.595 in the ultra-relativistic limit. (author)

  1. Grazing incidence reflectivity and total electron yield effects in soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alders, D; Hibma, T; Sawatzky, G.A; Cheung, K.C.; van Dorssen, G.E.; Roper, M.D.; Padmore, H.A.; van der Laan, G.; Vogel, J; Sacchi, M.

    1997-01-01

    We report on a study of grazing incidence absorption and reflection spectra of NiO in the region of the Ni 2p edge. The aim is to evaluate the distortion of the near edge spectrum by the critical angle behavior of individual components within the spectrum. This can be used to improve the separation

  2. Electron energy loss spectroscopy microanalysis and imaging in the transmission electron microscope: example of biological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diociaiuti, Marco

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports original results obtained in our laboratory over the past few years in the application of both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopy imaging (ESI) to biological samples, performed in two transmission electron microscopes (TEM) equipped with high-resolution electron filters and spectrometers: a Gatan model 607 single magnetic sector double focusing EEL serial spectrometer attached to a Philips 430 TEM and a Zeiss EM902 Energy Filtering TEM. The primary interest was on the possibility offered by the combined application of these spectroscopic techniques with those offered by the TEM. In particular, the electron beam focusing available in a TEM allowed us to perform EELS and ESI on very small sample volumes, where high-resolution imaging and electron diffraction techniques can provide important structural information. I show that ESI was able to improve TEM performance, due to the reduced chromatic aberration and the possibility of avoiding the sample staining procedure. Finally, the analysis of the oscillating extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) beyond the ionization edges characterizing the EELS spectra allowed me, in a manner very similar to the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the X-ray absorption spectra, to obtain short-range structural information for such light elements of biological interest as O or Fe. The Philips EM430 (250-300 keV) TEM was used to perform EELS microanalysis on Ca, P, O, Fe, Al and Si. The assessment of the detection limits of this method was obtained working with well-characterized samples containing Ca and P, and mimicking the actual cellular matrix. I applied EELS microanalysis to Ca detection in bone tissue during the mineralization process and to P detection in the cellular membrane of erythrocytes treated with an anti-tumoral drug, demonstrating that the cellular membrane is a drug target. I applied EELS microanalysis and selected area electron

  3. Radiation processing of liquid with low energy electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makuuchi, Keizo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2003-02-01

    Radiation induced emulsion polymerization, radiation vulcanization of NR latex (RVNRL) and radiation degradation of natural polymers were selected and reviewed as the radiation processing of liquid. The characteristic of high dose rate emulsion polymerization is the occurrence of cationic polymerization. Thus, it can be used for the production of new materials that cannot be obtained by radical polymerization. A potential application will be production of polymer emulsion that can be used as water-borne UV/EB curing resins. The technology of RVNRL by {gamma}-ray has been commercialized. RVNRL with low energy electron accelerator is under development for further vulcanization cost reduction. Vessel type irradiator will be favorable for industrial application. Radiation degradation of polysaccharides is an emerging and promising area of radiation processing. However, strict cost comparison between liquid irradiation with low energy EB and state irradiation with {gamma}-ray should be carried out. (author)

  4. Beam Profile Diagnostics for the Fermilab Medium Energy Electron Cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, A.; Kazakevich, G.; Nagaitsev, S.; Tassotto, G.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.

    2005-10-01

    The Fermilab Recycler ring will employ an electron cooler to store and cool 8.9 GeV antiprotons. The cooler will be based on a Pelletron electrostatic accelerator working in an energy-recovery regime. Several techniques for determining the characteristics of the beam dynamics are being investigated. Beam profiles have been measured as a function of the beam line optics at the energy of 3.5 MeV in the current range of 10/sup -4/-1 A, with a pulse duration of 2 /spl mu/s. The profiles were measured using optical transition radiation produced at the interface of a 250-/spl mu/m aluminum foil and also from YAG crystal luminescence. In addition, beam profiles measured using multiwire detectors were investigated. These three diagnostics will be used together to determine the profile dynamics of the beam. In this paper we report the results so far obtained using these techniques.

  5. Radiation processing of liquid with low energy electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makuuchi, Keizo

    2003-01-01

    Radiation induced emulsion polymerization, radiation vulcanization of NR latex (RVNRL) and radiation degradation of natural polymers were selected and reviewed as the radiation processing of liquid. The characteristic of high dose rate emulsion polymerization is the occurrence of cationic polymerization. Thus, it can be used for the production of new materials that cannot be obtained by radical polymerization. A potential application will be production of polymer emulsion that can be used as water-borne UV/EB curing resins. The technology of RVNRL by γ-ray has been commercialized. RVNRL with low energy electron accelerator is under development for further vulcanization cost reduction. Vessel type irradiator will be favorable for industrial application. Radiation degradation of polysaccharides is an emerging and promising area of radiation processing. However, strict cost comparison between liquid irradiation with low energy EB and state irradiation with γ-ray should be carried out. (author)

  6. Improving patient safety and quality: what are the challenges and gaps in introducing an integrated electronic adverse incident and recording system within health care industry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kerry; Antony, Jiju

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the challenges and gaps in using an electronic adverse incident recording and reporting system from a commercial supplier to an acute health care setting. The paper used action diary, documentation and triangulation to obtain an understanding of the challenges and gaps. The paper provides health care with further understanding of the complexity, challenges and gaps of using an electronic adverse incident recording system to improve patient safety. This paper explains the important views of clinicians and managers in relation to improving patient safety by using an electronic adverse incident management system.

  7. Implementation of new physics models for low energy electrons in liquid water in Geant4-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordage, M C; Bordes, J; Edel, S; Terrissol, M; Franceries, X; Bardiès, M; Lampe, N; Incerti, S

    2016-12-01

    A new alternative set of elastic and inelastic cross sections has been added to the very low energy extension of the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit, Geant4-DNA, for the simulation of electron interactions in liquid water. These cross sections have been obtained from the CPA100 Monte Carlo track structure code, which has been a reference in the microdosimetry community for many years. They are compared to the default Geant4-DNA cross sections and show better agreement with published data. In order to verify the correct implementation of the CPA100 cross section models in Geant4-DNA, simulations of the number of interactions and ranges were performed using Geant4-DNA with this new set of models, and the results were compared with corresponding results from the original CPA100 code. Good agreement is observed between the implementations, with relative differences lower than 1% regardless of the incident electron energy. Useful quantities related to the deposited energy at the scale of the cell or the organ of interest for internal dosimetry, like dose point kernels, are also calculated using these new physics models. They are compared with results obtained using the well-known Penelope Monte Carlo code. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigations of the valence-shell excitations of molecular ethane by high-energy electron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Qing; Xu, Long-Quan; Qi, De-Guang; Chen, Tao; Liu, Ya-Wei; Zhu, Lin-Fan

    2018-04-01

    The differential cross sections and generalized oscillator strengths for the low-lying excitations of the valence-shell 1eg orbital electron in ethane have been measured for the first time at a high incident electron energy of 1500 eV and a scattering angular range of 1.5°-10°. A weak feature, termed X here, with a band center of about 7.5 eV has been observed, which was also announced by the previous experimental and theoretical studies. The dynamic behaviors of the generalized oscillator strengths for the 3s (8.7 eV), 3s+3p (9.31 eV, 9.41 eV), and X (˜7.5 eV) transitions on the momentum transfer squared have been obtained. The integral cross sections of these transitions from their thresholds to 5000 eV have been obtained with the aid of the BE-scaling (B is the binding energy and E is the excitation energy) method. The optical oscillator strengths of the above transitions determined by extrapolating their generalized oscillator strengths to the limit of the squared momentum transfer K2 → 0 are in good agreement with the ones from the photoabsorption spectrum [J. W. Au et al., Chem. Phys. 173, 209 (1993)], which indicates that the present differential cross sections, generalized oscillator strengths, and integral cross sections can serve as benchmark data.

  9. Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop Summary: August 24, 2006, Sacramento, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treanton, B.; Palomo, J.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop, sponsored by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program and organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, was held Aug. 24, 2006, in Sacramento, Calif. The workshop provided a forum for industry stakeholders to share their knowledge and experience about technologies, manufacturing approaches, markets, and issues in power electronics for a range of distributed energy resources. It focused on the development of advanced power electronic interfaces for distributed energy applications and included discussions of modular power electronics, component manufacturing, and power electronic applications.

  10. Electron Attachment to POCl3: Measurement and Theoretical Analysis of Rate Constants and Branching Ratios as a Function of Gas Pressure and Temperature, Electron Temperature, and Electron Energy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Doren, Jane M; Friedman, Jeffrey F; Miller, Thomas M; Viggiano, A. A; Denifl, S; Scheier, P; Mark, T. D; Troe, J

    2006-01-01

    ... of the resonant POCl3 state and collisional stabilization of the parent anion. In the electron beam experiment at zero electron energy, the fragment ion POCl2- is the dominant ion product of attachment (96...

  11. Critical analysis of major incidents risks in civil nuclear energy; Analyse critique des risques d'incidents majeurs dans l'energie nucleaire civile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    The differences existing between the PWR type reactors and the RBMK type reactors are explained as well as the risk associated to each type when it exists. The Ines scale, tool to give the level of an accident gravity comprises seven levels, the number seven is the most serious and corresponds to the Chernobyl accident; The number zero is of no consequence but must be mentioned as a matter of form. The incidents from 1 to 3 concern increasing incidents, affecting the nuclear power plant but not the external public. The accidents from 4 to 7 have a nature to affect the nuclear power plant and the environment. An efficient tool exists between nuclear operators it is made of the reports on incidents encountered by close reactors. Two others type reactors are coming, the high temperature type reactors and the fast neutrons reactors. different risks are evoked, terrorism, proliferation, transport and radioactive wastes. (N.C.)

  12. Low energy electron point source microscopy: beyond imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2010-09-01

    Low energy electron point source (LEEPS) microscopy has the capability to record in-line holograms at very high magnifications with a fairly simple set-up. After the holograms are numerically reconstructed, structural features with the size of about 2 nm can be resolved. The achievement of an even higher resolution has been predicted. However, a number of obstacles are known to impede the realization of this goal, for example the presence of electric fields around the imaged object, electrostatic charging or radiation induced processes. This topical review gives an overview of the achievements as well as the difficulties in the efforts to shift the resolution limit of LEEPS microscopy towards the atomic level. A special emphasis is laid on the high sensitivity of low energy electrons to electrical fields, which limits the structural determination of the imaged objects. On the other hand, the investigation of the electrical field around objects of known structure is very useful for other tasks and LEEPS microscopy can be extended beyond the task of imaging. The determination of the electrical resistance of individual nanowires can be achieved by a proper analysis of the corresponding LEEPS micrographs. This conductivity imaging may be a very useful application for LEEPS microscopes.

  13. Collisions of low-energy electrons with cyclohexane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Bettega, Márcio H. F., E-mail: bettega@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil)

    2014-12-28

    We report calculated cross sections for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by cyclohexane (c-C{sub 6}H{sub 12}). We employed the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with norm-conserving pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations, for impact energies up to 30 eV. We compare our calculated integral cross section with experimental total cross sections available in the literature. We also compare our calculated differential cross sections (DCSs) with experimental results for benzene and experimental and theoretical results for 1,4-dioxane, in order to investigate the similarities between those molecules under electron collisions. Although benzene is a cyclic six-carbon molecule, as cyclohexane, we found that the differential cross sections of the latter are more similar to those of 1,4-dioxane than those of benzene. These similarities suggest that the geometry may play an important role in the behavior of the DCSs of these molecules. Our integral cross section displays a broad structure at around 8.5 eV, in agreement with the total cross section experimental data of 8 eV and vibrational excitation data of 7.5 eV. The present integral cross section also shows the presence of a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum at around 0.12 eV. In general, our integral cross section shows a qualitative agreement with the experimental total cross section.

  14. A Complete Reporting of MCNP6 Validation Results for Electron Energy Deposition in Single-Layer Extended Media for Source Energies <= 1-MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hughes, Henry Grady [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-04

    In this paper, we expand on previous validation work by Dixon and Hughes. That is, we present a more complete suite of validation results with respect to to the well-known Lockwood energy deposition experiment. Lockwood et al. measured energy deposition in materials including beryllium, carbon, aluminum, iron, copper, molybdenum, tantalum, and uranium, for both single- and multi-layer 1-D geometries. Source configurations included mono-energetic, mono-directional electron beams with energies of 0.05-MeV, 0.1-MeV, 0.3- MeV, 0.5-MeV, and 1-MeV, in both normal and off-normal angles of incidence. These experiments are particularly valuable for validating electron transport codes, because they are closely represented by simulating pencil beams incident on 1-D semi-infinite slabs with and without material interfaces. Herein, we include total energy deposition and energy deposition profiles for the single-layer experiments reported by Lockwood et al. (a more complete multi-layer validation will follow in another report).

  15. A code to determine the energy distribution, the incident energy and the flux of a beam of light ions into a stack of foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonzogni, A.A.; Romo, A.S.M.A.; Frosch, W.R.; Nassiff, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The stacked-foil technique is one of the most used methods to obtain excitation functions of nuclear reactions using light ions as projectiles. The purpose of this program is the calculation of the energy of the beam in the stack, as well as to obtain the incident energy and the flux of the beam by using monitor excitation functions. (orig.)

  16. Practical spatial resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A B; Ramasse, Q M; Wen, J G; Bhattacharya, A; Zuo, J M

    2011-08-01

    The resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is limited by delocalization of inelastic electron scattering rather than probe size in an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). In this study, we present an experimental quantification of EELS spatial resolution using chemically modulated 2×(LaMnO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) and 2×(SrVO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) superlattices by measuring the full width at half maxima (FWHM) of integrated Ti M(2,3), Ti L(2,3), V L(2,3), Mn L(2,3), La N(4,5), La N(2,3) La M(4,5) and Sr L(3) edges over the superlattices. The EELS signals recorded using large collection angles are peaked at atomic columns. The FWHM of the EELS profile, obtained by curve-fitting, reveals a systematic trend with the energy loss for the Ti, V, and Mn edges. However, the experimental FWHM of the Sr and La edges deviates significantly from the observed experimental tendency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Electronic properties of Mn-phthalocyanine–C60 bulk heterojunctions: Combining photoemission and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, Friedrich; Herzig, Melanie; Knupfer, Martin; Lupulescu, Cosmin; Darlatt, Erik; Gottwald, Alexander; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The electronic properties of co-evaporated mixtures (blends) of manganese phthalocyanine and the fullerene C 60 (MnPc:C 60 ) have been studied as a function of the concentration of the two constituents using two supplementary electron spectroscopic methods, photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in transmission. Our PES measurements provide a detailed picture of the electronic structure measured with different excitation energies as well as different mixing ratios between MnPc and C 60 . Besides a relative energy shift, the occupied electronic states of the two materials remain essentially unchanged. The observed energy level alignment is different compared to that of the related CuPc:C 60 bulk heterojunction. Moreover, the results from our EELS investigations show that, despite the rather small interface interaction, the MnPc related electronic excitation spectrum changes significantly by admixing C 60 to MnPc thin films

  18. Energy level alignment and electron transport through metal/organic contacts. From interfaces to molecular electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abad, Enrique

    2013-07-01

    A new calculational approach to describing metal/organic interfaces. A valuable step towards a better understanding of molecular electronics. Nominated as an outstanding contribution by the Autonomous University of Madrid. In recent years, ever more electronic devices have started to exploit the advantages of organic semiconductors. The work reported in this thesis focuses on analyzing theoretically the energy level alignment of different metal/organic interfaces, necessary to tailor devices with good performance. Traditional methods based on density functional theory (DFT), are not appropriate for analyzing them because they underestimate the organic energy gap and fail to correctly describe the van der Waals forces. Since the size of these systems prohibits the use of more accurate methods, corrections to those DFT drawbacks are desirable. In this work a combination of a standard DFT calculation with the inclusion of the charging energy (U) of the molecule, calculated from first principles, is presented. Regarding the dispersion forces, incorrect long range interaction is substituted by a van der Waals potential. With these corrections, the C60, benzene, pentacene, TTF and TCNQ/Au(111) interfaces are analyzed, both for single molecules and for a monolayer. The results validate the induced density of interface states model.

  19. Testing and Comparison of Imaging Detectors for Electrons in the Energy Range 10-20 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, J.; Moldovan, G.; Kirkland, A.; Allinson, N.; Abrahams, J. P.

    2017-11-01

    Interest in direct detectors for low-energy electrons has increased markedly in recent years. Detection of electrons in the energy range up to low tens of keV is important in techniques such as photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) on scanning electron microscopes (SEMs). The PEEM technique is used both in the laboratory and on synchrotron light sources worldwide. The ubiquity of SEMs means that there is a very large market for EBSD detectors for materials studies. Currently, the most widely used detectors in these applications are based on indirect detection of incident electrons. Examples include scintillators or microchannel plates (MCPs), coupled to CCD cameras. Such approaches result in blurring in scintillators/phosphors, distortions in optical systems, and inefficiencies due the limited active area of MCPs. In principle, these difficulties can be overcome using direct detection in a semiconductor device. Growing out of a feasibility study into the use of a direct detector for use on an XPEEM, we have built at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory a system to illuminate detectors with an electron beam of energy up to 20 keV . We describe this system in detail. It has been used to measure the performance of a custom back-thinned monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS), a detector based on the Medipix2 chip, and a commercial detector based on MCPs. We present a selection of the results from these measurements and compare and contrast different detector types.

  20. The application analysis of high energy electron accelerator in food irradiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Wenmin; Chen Hao; Feng Lei; Zhang Yaqun; Chen Xun; Li Wenjun; Xiang Chengfen; Pei Ying; Wang Zhidong

    2012-01-01

    Irradiation technology of high energy electron accelerator has been highly concerned in food processing industry with its fast development, especially in the field of food irradiation processing. In this paper, equipment and research situation of high energy electron accelerator were collected, meanwhile, the similarities and differences between high energy electron beam and 60 Co γ-rays were discussed. In order to provide more references of high energy electron beam irradiation, the usages of high energy electron in food irradiation processing was prospected. These information would promote the development of domestic food irradiation industry and give a useful message to irradiation enterprises and researchers. (authors)

  1. Control of runaway electron energy using externally injected whistler waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zehua; McDevitt, Christopher J.; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2018-03-01

    One way of mitigating runaway damage of the plasma-facing components in a tokamak fusion reactor is by limiting the runaway electron energy under a few MeV, while not necessarily reducing the runaway current appreciably. Here, we describe a physics mechanism by which such momentum space engineering of the runaway distribution can be facilitated by externally injected high-frequency electromagnetic waves such as whistler waves. The drastic impact that wave-induced scattering can have on the runaway energy distribution is fundamentally the result of its ability to control the runaway vortex in the momentum space. The runaway vortex, which is a local circulation of runaways in momentum space, is the outcome of the competition between Coulomb collisions, synchrotron radiation damping, and runaway acceleration by the parallel electric field. By introducing a wave that resonantly interacts with runaways in a particular range of energies which is mildly relativistic, the enhanced scattering would reshape the vortex by cutting off the part that is highly relativistic. The efficiency of resonant scattering accentuates the requirement that the wave amplitude can be small so the power requirement from external wave injection is practical for the mitigation scheme.

  2. A Flexible Power Electronics Configuration for Coupling Renewable Energy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Filippini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A combination of series, parallel and multilevel power electronics has been investigated as a potential interface for two different types of renewable energy sources and in order to reach higher power levels. Renewable energy sources are typically dispersed in a territory, and sources, like wind and solar, allow small to medium-scale generation of electricity. The configuration investigated in this article aims at adapting the coupling solution to the specific generation characteristics of the renewable energy source to make it fit the electrical network. The configuration consists of a combination of three-phase multilevel converters and single-phase inverters, which are designed to provide flexibility, high power quality and high efficiency. A detailed analysis and simulation is performed to identify the properties in conjunction with the electrical grid requirements and the potential challenges encountered during operation. An optimized operation example of wind generation combined with solar PV generation is presented to exemplify the flexibility and benefits of the proposed configuration.

  3. Electron-Nuclear Energy Sharing in Above-Threshold Multiphoton Dissociative Ionization of H2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, J.; Kunitski, M.; Pitzer, M.

    2013-01-01

    We report experimental observation of the energy sharing between electron and nuclei in above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of H2 by strong laser fields. The absorbed photon energy is shared between the ejected electron and nuclei in a correlated fashion, resulting in multiple...... diagonal lines in their joint energy spectrum governed by the energy conservation of all fragment particles....

  4. Experimental measurement of the electron energy distribution function in the radio frequency electron cyclotron resonance inductive discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, ChinWook; Kim, S.S.; Chang, H.Y.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, the existence of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) in a weakly magnetized inductively coupled plasma (MICP) has been evidenced [ChinWook Chung et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 095002 (2002)]. The distinctive feature of the ECR effect in the MICP is efficacious heating of low-energy electrons. In the present paper, electron heating characteristics in the MICP have been investigated by observing electron energy distribution function dependencies on various external parameters such as gas pressure, driving frequency, and rf power (electron density). It is found that the ECR effect on electron heating becomes enhanced with decreasing pressure or increasing driving frequency. The ECR heating becomes weak at high rf power due to the electron-electron collisions

  5. Analysis of InGaN nanodots grown by droplet heteroepitaxy using grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, J. M.; Nikiforov, A. Yu.; Ludwig, K. F.; Moustakas, T. D.

    2017-08-01

    We present a detailed structural investigation of self-assembled indium gallium nitride nanodots grown on c-plane aluminum nitride templates by the droplet heteroepitaxy technique in a plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy reactor. Various growth parameters, including the total coverage of the metal species, relative and total metal effusion fluxes, and nitridation temperature were investigated. Analyses of in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction patterns and comparison with simulations showed that the resulting crystal structure was a mixture of wurtzite and twinned zinc blende phases, with the zinc blende phase increasingly dominant for lower metal coverages and lower nitridation temperatures, and the wurtzite phase increasingly dominant for higher nitridation temperature. Studies by field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed that the nanodots exhibit trimodal size distributions, with the dot morphologies of the intermediate size mode often resembling aggregations of distinct clusters. Nanodots grown at higher nitridation temperatures had larger inter-dot spacings, with hexagonal in-plane ordering observable at a sufficiently high temperature. Using grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering, we determined the nanodots to be approximately truncated cone shaped, and extracted the mean radius, height, and inter-dot distance for each distribution. Microstructural investigations of the nanodots by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicated that the majority of the dots were formed in dislocation-free regions, and confirmed that the intermediate size dots were approximately truncated cone shaped and consisted of both zinc blende and wurtzite regions. Mapping of the elemental distributions by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy mode indicated highly nonuniform indium distributions within both small and intermediate size dots which are potentially

  6. Scattering of near-zero-energy electrons and positrons by H2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, J.-Y.

    2014-04-15

    The parameters for S-wave elastic scattering of near-zero-energy electrons and positrons by H2 molecules are calculated using the stabilization method with explicitly correlated Gaussians. The confined variational method is applied to optimize the Gaussians to describe the short-range interaction of incident e± with H2 in the fixed-nuclei approximation. For e+-H2 scattering the scattering length of previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 223202 (2009)] is substantially improved. More importantly, for e−-H2 scattering, from first principles, the scattering length is computed as a function of the internuclear distance. In the case that the two nuclei are at the equilibrium distance the results are in a good agreement with values derived from fitting experimental total and diffusion cross sections to the modified effective range theory.

  7. Microdosimetry of electrons in liquid water using the low-energy models of Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakou, I.; Emfietzoglou, D.; Ivanchenko, V.; Bordage, M. C.; Guatelli, S.; Lazarakis, P.; Tran, H. N.; Incerti, S.

    2017-07-01

    The biological effects of ionizing radiation at the cellular level are frequently studied using the well-known formalism of microdosimetry, which provides a quantitative description of the stochastic aspects of energy deposition in irradiated media. Energy deposition can be simulated using Monte Carlo codes, some adopting a computationally efficient condensed-history approach, while others follow a more detailed track-structure approach. In this work, we present the simulation of microdosimetry spectra and related quantities (frequency-mean and dose-mean lineal energies) for incident monoenergetic electrons (50 eV-10 keV) in spheres of liquid water with dimensions comparable to the size of biological targets: base pairs (2 nm diameter), nucleosomes (10 nm), chromatin fibres (30 nm) and chromosomes (300 nm). Simulations are performed using the condensed-history low-energy physics models ("Livermore" and "Penelope") and the track-structure Geant4-DNA physics models, available in the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit. The spectra are compared and the influence of simulation parameters and different physics models, with emphasis on recent developments, is discussed, underlining the suitability of Geant4-DNA models for microdosimetry simulations. It is further shown that with an appropriate choice of simulation parameters, condensed-history transport may yield reasonable results for sphere sizes as small as a few tens of a nanometer.

  8. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S.; Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F.; Darbal, A. D.; Weiss, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio

  9. Electrostatic electron cyclotron waves generated by low-energy electron beams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menietti, J. D.; Santolík, Ondřej; Scudder, J. D.; Pickett, J. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 107, A10, 1285 (2002), s. SMP 8-1-8-11, doi: 10.1029/2001JA009223 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/01/1064 Grant - others:NASA(US) NAG5-7943; NASA(US) NAG5-9561; NASA(US) NAG5-8119 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911; CEZ:MSM 113200004 Keywords : low-energy electron beams * cyclotron frequency Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.245, year: 2002

  10. Progresses in low energy electron microscopy and photoemission electron microscopy studies (LEEM and PEEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshikawa, Takanori; Yasue, Tsuneo; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Kinoshita, Toyohiko; Ono, Kanta

    2008-02-01

    Photon factory workshop on low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) studies was held on October 12-13, 2005. The workshop had 18 presentations and 8 contributions to the poster session with 62 attendees. The workshop started with an invitation presentation about nano-imaging and nano-spectroscopy by photoemission electron microscope using synchrotron radiation x-rays. Next two reports were about antiferromagnetic domain structure observations of a NiO(100) surface using a combined method of PEEM and soft x-ray linear dichroism. Recent development of spin SEM (scanning electron microscope) and the observation of magnetic domains of La 1.36 Sr 1.64 Mn 2 O 7 were reported. A new method for observing magnetic domain structures with SEM was developed in which the image is the result of spin polarization of secondary electrons. This method is called spin SEM. A lecture about observation of ultra-high speed phenomena by PEEM and the invitation presentation about spin dynamics in nano-scale magnetic materials attracted much attention. Structural studies of surfaces by LEEM and PEEM were actively discussed. Summaries about the measurements of Au-Si alloy island at atomic steps on Si(111), fabrication of Ga nano-dots in SiO 2 , growth of pentacene films on thin bismuth film and graphite, the surface phase transition on metal surfaces of In/Cu(001) and Sn/Cu(001), and Cu thin film growth on W(110) were also compiled in this report. Many contributions in this report were resulted from the experiments by LEEM and PEEM using SPring-8 synchrotron radiations. (Y.K.)

  11. Polyurethanes irradiation by accelerated electrons: molecular and supramolecular evolution, incidence on the extractable and biomedical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guignot, C.

    2002-11-01

    Face to the development of radiosterilization and polymers medical devices it was wished to study the behavior of polyurethanes under accelerated electrons in oxidizing atmosphere. This study has been made to reveal the physico chemical and organisational modifications of polyurethanes for a medical use. (N.C.)

  12. Simulation of off-energy electron background in DELPHI

    CERN Document Server

    Falk, E; Von Holtey, Georg

    1997-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of off-energy electron background in the DELPHI luminometer STIC are reported. The study simulates the running conditions at 68 GeV with and without bunch trains. The electrostatic separators, which create the vertical separation bumps for the the bunch trains, cause a high concentration of background in the vertical plane. The simulations are compared to LEP data taken under similar running conditions. A comparison between the simulated running conditions at 68 GeV and those of the new LEP2 beam optics at 80.5 GeV is made. Moreover, the study investigates background components entering STIC elsewhere that through the front of the detector, and a significant portion is found to enter either from the back or from below. Possible improvements of the background situation are also discussed.

  13. Electronic Instrumentations for High Energy Particle Physics and Neutrino Physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00452332

    The present dissertation describes design, qualification and operation of several electronic instrumentations for High Energy Particle Physics experiments (LHCb) and Neutrino Physics experiments (CUORE and CUPID). Starting from 2019, the LHCb experiment at the LHC accelerator will be upgraded to operate at higher luminosity and several of its detectors will be redesigned. The RICH detector will require a completely new optoelectronic readout system. The development of such system has already reached an advanced phase, and several tests at particle beam facilities allowed to qualify the performance of the entire system. In order to achieve a higher stability and a better power supply regulation for the front-end chip, a rad-hard low dropout linear regulator, named ALDO, has been developed. Design strategies, performance tests and results from the irradiation campaign are presented. In the Neutrino Physics field, large-scale bolometric detectors, like those adopted by CUORE and its future upgrade CUPID, offer u...

  14. New directions in low energy electron molecule collision calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, P.G.; Noble, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    New theoretical and computational methods for studying low energy electron molecule collisions are discussed. Having considered the fixed-nuclei approximation and the form of the expansion of the total collision wavefunction, the various approximations which have been made are examined, including the static plus model exchange approximation, the static exchange approximation and the close coupling approximation, particular attention being paid to methods of including the molecular charge polarisation. Various ways which have been developed to solve the resultant equations are discussed and it is found that there is increasing emphasis being given to methods which combine the advantages of discrete multi-centre analytic bases with single centre numerical bases. (U.K.)

  15. Absorptive form factors for high-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, D.M.; King, Q.A.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal diffuse scattering contribution to the absorptive potential in high-energy electron diffraction is calculated in the form of an absorptive contribution to the atomic form factor. To do this, the Einstein model of lattice vibrations is used, with isotropic Debye-Waller factors. The absorptive form factors are calculated as a function of scattering vector s and temperature factor M on a grid which enables polynomial interpolation of the results to be accurate to better than 2% for much of the ranges 0≤Ms 2 ≤6 and 0≤M≤2 A 2 . The computed values, together with an interpolation routine, have been incorporated into a Fortran subroutine which calculates both the real and absorptive form factors for 54 atomic species. (orig.)

  16. Spectral representations of the electron energy loss in composite media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, R.; Barrera, R.G.; Carrillo, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Using a recently developed theory for the inverse longitudinal nonlocal dielectric response for a granular composite [R. G. Barrera and R. Fuchs, Phys. Rev. B 52, 3256 (1995)], we find an effective local dielectric response from the condition that it must give the same electron energy-loss probability density as the actual nonlocal response. This local response is expressed as a spectral representation: a sum of terms with simple poles corresponding to the excitation of bulk and interfacial modes. Taking as a guideline the condition that the strength and location of the poles must satisfy sum rules, a single-surface-mode approximation is proposed. This single-mode approximation is tested for a random system of aluminum spheres in vacuum. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. Influence of host matrices on krypton electron binding energies and KLL Auger transition energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Inoyatov, A. K.; Perevoshchikov, L. L.; Kovalík, Alojz; Filosofov, D. V.; Yushkevich, Yu. V.; Ryšavý, Miloš; Lee, B. Q.; Kibédi, T.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Zhdanov, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 197, DEC (2014), s. 64-71 ISSN 0368-2048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP203/12/1896; GA MŠk LG14004 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Kr-83 * Rb-83 * Sr-83 * electron binding energy * KLL transitions * natural atomic level width * multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.436, year: 2014

  18. Total kinetic energy release in 239Pu(n ,f ) post-neutron emission from 0.5 to 50 MeV incident neutron energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Duke, D. L.; Geppert-Kleinrath, V.; Manning, B.; Meharchand, R.; Mosby, S.; Shields, D.

    2016-09-01

    The average total kinetic energy (T K E ¯) in 239Pu(n ,f ) has been measured for incident neutron energies between 0.5 and 50 MeV. The experiment was performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) using the neutron time-of-flight technique, and the kinetic energy of fission fragments post-neutron emission was measured in a double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber. This represents the first experimental study of the energy dependence of T K E ¯ in 239Pu above neutron energies of 6 MeV.

  19. Dose conversion coefficients for monoenergetic electrons incident on a realistic human eye model with different lens cell populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, P; Vaz, P; Zankl, M; Schlattl, H

    2011-01-01

    The radiation-induced posterior subcapsular cataract has long been generally accepted to be a deterministic effect that does not occur at doses below a threshold of at least 2 Gy. Recent epidemiological studies indicate that the threshold for cataract induction may be much lower or that there may be no threshold at all. A thorough study of this subject requires more accurate dose estimates for the eye lens than those available in ICRP Publication 74. Eye lens absorbed dose per unit fluence conversion coefficients for electron irradiation were calculated using a geometrical model of the eye that takes into account different cell populations of the lens epithelium, together with the MCNPX Monte Carlo radiation transport code package. For the cell population most sensitive to ionizing radiation-the germinative cells-absorbed dose per unit fluence conversion coefficients were determined that are up to a factor of 4.8 higher than the mean eye lens absorbed dose conversion coefficients for electron energies below 2 MeV. Comparison of the results with previously published values for a slightly different eye model showed generally good agreement for all electron energies. Finally, the influence of individual anatomical variability was quantified by positioning the lens at various depths below the cornea. A depth difference of 2 mm between the shallowest and the deepest location of the germinative zone can lead to a difference between the resulting absorbed doses of up to nearly a factor of 5000 for electron energy of 0.7 MeV.

  20. Dose conversion coefficients for monoenergetic electrons incident on a realistic human eye model with different lens cell populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, P; Vaz, P [Technological and Nuclear Institute, Estrada Nacional No 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Zankl, M; Schlattl, H, E-mail: pedro.nogueira@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Research Unit Medical Radiation Physics and Diagnostics, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2011-11-07

    The radiation-induced posterior subcapsular cataract has long been generally accepted to be a deterministic effect that does not occur at doses below a threshold of at least 2 Gy. Recent epidemiological studies indicate that the threshold for cataract induction may be much lower or that there may be no threshold at all. A thorough study of this subject requires more accurate dose estimates for the eye lens than those available in ICRP Publication 74. Eye lens absorbed dose per unit fluence conversion coefficients for electron irradiation were calculated using a geometrical model of the eye that takes into account different cell populations of the lens epithelium, together with the MCNPX Monte Carlo radiation transport code package. For the cell population most sensitive to ionizing radiation-the germinative cells-absorbed dose per unit fluence conversion coefficients were determined that are up to a factor of 4.8 higher than the mean eye lens absorbed dose conversion coefficients for electron energies below 2 MeV. Comparison of the results with previously published values for a slightly different eye model showed generally good agreement for all electron energies. Finally, the influence of individual anatomical variability was quantified by positioning the lens at various depths below the cornea. A depth difference of 2 mm between the shallowest and the deepest location of the germinative zone can lead to a difference between the resulting absorbed doses of up to nearly a factor of 5000 for electron energy of 0.7 MeV.

  1. Dose conversion coefficients for monoenergetic electrons incident on a realistic human eye model with different lens cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, P; Zankl, M; Schlattl, H; Vaz, P

    2011-11-07

    The radiation-induced posterior subcapsular cataract has long been generally accepted to be a deterministic effect that does not occur at doses below a threshold of at least 2 Gy. Recent epidemiological studies indicate that the threshold for cataract induction may be much lower or that there may be no threshold at all. A thorough study of this subject requires more accurate dose estimates for the eye lens than those available in ICRP Publication 74. Eye lens absorbed dose per unit fluence conversion coefficients for electron irradiation were calculated using a geometrical model of the eye that takes into account different cell populations of the lens epithelium, together with the MCNPX Monte Carlo radiation transport code package. For the cell population most sensitive to ionizing radiation-the germinative cells-absorbed dose per unit fluence conversion coefficients were determined that are up to a factor of 4.8 higher than the mean eye lens absorbed dose conversion coefficients for electron energies below 2 MeV. Comparison of the results with previously published values for a slightly different eye model showed generally good agreement for all electron energies. Finally, the influence of individual anatomical variability was quantified by positioning the lens at various depths below the cornea. A depth difference of 2 mm between the shallowest and the deepest location of the germinative zone can lead to a difference between the resulting absorbed doses of up to nearly a factor of 5000 for electron energy of 0.7 MeV.

  2. Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction Studies of Interface Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukite, Paul

    1988-12-01

    The epitaxial growth of semiconductors, such as GaAs, by the technique of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has led to many improvements in device performance and capabilities. One important system is the epitaxial growth of GaAs on Si. This holds great promise for integrating optical and electronic devices on the same chip. The key to achieving this is to grow high quality GaAs layers on Si substrates. In this investigation, single-crystal GaAs was grown on Si and Ge substrates by MBE. The growth of the epitaxial layers was investigated in situ with reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Important in this heteroepitaxial system is that two possible GaAs crystal orientations can be obtained. By using a theory of kinematic electron diffraction developed in the course of this work, the mechanisms and growth conditions which choose between the two GaAs orientations have been determined for the first time. A further result is that the epitaxial growth processes are anisotropic on the two orientations. This leads to different crystalline qualities dependent on the orientation. To understand this in more detail, the crystal growth process was formulated mathematically. By incorporating the concepts of anisotropic diffusion and adsorption into a nonlinear differential equation, the time-dependent growth and RHEED behavior has been calculated and compared to experiment. The experimental observations of RHEED intensity oscillations and two-dimensional clustering are in excellent agreement with the diffraction and growth theories. It is concluded that surface steps play a vital role in the crystal growth and interface formation processes reported in this study.

  3. Electron energy-loss and soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of electronic structure of MgB4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yohei; Saito, Taiki; Tsuchiya, Kohei; Terauchi, Masami; Saito, Hiroki; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2017-09-01

    The electronic structure of MgB4, with the characteristic crystal structure comprising one-dimensional pentagonal B6 cluster chain, was investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy. The dielectric function and density of state of unoccupied and occupied states were clarified experimentally for the first time. Although theoretical calculations has predicted MgB4 to be a semiconductor, the electron energy-loss spectrum in this study show a plasmon peak at 0.4 eV, which might be due to carrier electrons. Theoretical calculations suggested that the electronic states near the Fermi energy are localized along the one dimensional B6 cluster chain. Therefore, one-dimensional electric conductivity is expected.

  4. An accurate full-dimensional potential energy surface for H-Au(111): Importance of nonadiabatic electronic excitation in energy transfer and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Svenja M; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Kandratsenka, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    We have constructed a potential energy surface (PES) for H-atoms interacting with fcc Au(111) based on fitting the analytic form of the energy from Effective Medium Theory (EMT) to ab initio energy values calculated with density functional theory. The fit used input from configurations of the H-Au system with Au atoms at their lattice positions as well as configurations with the Au atoms displaced from their lattice positions. It reproduces the energy, in full dimension, not only for the configurations used as input but also for a large number of additional configurations derived from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories at finite temperature. Adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations on this PES reproduce the energy loss behavior of AIMD. EMT also provides expressions for the embedding electron density, which enabled us to develop a self-consistent approach to simulate nonadiabatic electron-hole pair excitation and their effect on the motion of the incident H-atoms. For H atoms with an energy of 2.7 eV colliding with Au, electron-hole pair excitation is by far the most important energy loss pathway, giving an average energy loss ≈3 times that of the adiabatic case. This increased energy loss enhances the probability of the H-atom remaining on or in the Au slab by a factor of 2. The most likely outcome for H-atoms that are not scattered also depends prodigiously on the energy transfer mechanism; for the nonadiabatic case, more than 50% of the H-atoms which do not scatter are adsorbed on the surface, while for the adiabatic case more than 50% pass entirely through the 4 layer simulation slab.

  5. The Role of Low-Energy (less than 20 eV) Electrons in Astrochemistry: A Tale of Two Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumainayagam, Chris

    2016-07-01

    In the interstellar medium, UV photolysis of ice mantles encasing dust grains is thought to be the mechanism that drives the synthesis of "complex" molecules. The source of this reaction-initiating UV light is assumed to be local because externally-sourced UV radiation cannot pass through the ice-containing dark, dense molecular clouds. Externally sourced cosmic rays (E_{max} ˜10^{20} eV), in addition to producing UV light within these clouds, also produce large numbers of low-energy (≤ 20 eV) secondary electrons. The goal of our studies is to understand the low-energy electron-induced processes that occur when high-energy cosmic rays interact with interstellar ices. Using electron stimulated desorption (ESD), post-irradiation temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), we have investigated the radiolysis initiated by electrons in condensed methanol and ammonia at ˜90K under ultrahigh vacuum (1 × 10^{-9} Torr) conditions. We have identified fifteen low-energy electron-induced methanol radiolysis products, many of which have been previously identified as being formed by methanol UV photolysis in the interstellar medium. We have also found evidence for the electron-induced formation from ammonia of hydrazine (N_2 H_4), diazene (N_2 H_2), cyclotriazane/triazene (N_3 H_3) and triazane (N_3 H_5). We have investigated the reaction yields' dependence on film thickness, irradiation time, incident current, electron energy, and metal substrate. These results provide a basis from which we can begin to understand the mechanisms by which methanol and ammonia can form more complex species in cosmic ices. Studies such as ours may ultimately help us better understand the initial stages of the genesis of life.

  6. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System (CAIRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briscoe, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System (CAIRS) is a comprehensive data base containing more than 50,000 investigation reports of injury/illness, property damage and vehicle accident cases representing safety data from 1975 to the present for more than 150 DOE contractor organizations. A special feature is that the text of each accident report is translated using a controlled dictionary and rigid sentence structure called Factor Relationship and Sequence of Events (FRASE) that enhances the ability to retrieve specific types of information and to perform detailed analyses. DOE summary and individual contractor reports are prepared quarterly and annually. In addition, ''Safety Performance Profile'' reports for individual organizations are prepared to provide advance information to appraisal teams, and special topical reports are prepared for areas of concern such as an increase in the number of security injuries or environmental releases. The data base is open to all DOE and Contractor registered users with no access restrictions other than that required by the Privacy Act

  7. On the Emission of Electrons from Solid H_2 and D_2 by Bombardment with 1-3 keV Electrons up to Very Large Angles of Incidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1982-01-01

    Electron emission, i.e. electron reflection (ER) and secondary electron emission (SEE), was studied for solid H2 and D2 for oblique incidence of 1-3 keV electrons up to an angle of incidence θ of 83°. The ER coefficient η was small at low angles, and rose rapidly with increasing θ above 60...... at the largest angles. The results agree well with the existing qualitative tendencies described in the literature. The variation with the angle of incidence shows a fair agreement with an estimate based on data for the angular distribution of electrons ejected from ionized hydrogen molecules. In addition......, an ionization cascade treatment leads to an expression for the behavior of the yield of those secondary electrons that are generated directly by the primaries. The agreement with experimental data is good...

  8. Probe method of measuring the electron energy distribution in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, Hiroshi

    1984-01-01

    The function for the velocity distribution of electrons in plasma in a basic function associated with various phenomena. The probe method gives the distribution by a simple technique to insert a micro-electrode into plasma, and has good spatial resolution. It is specifically useful for weakly ionized, low temperature plasma. The purpose of this paper is to assist experimenters so that they can easily use this method for various phenomena by starting at its basic principle and explaining the scope of application and actual measuring techniques. The scope of application is considered by dividing it into the problems of sheath thickness, collision effect, the energy distribution of beam, the influence of probe end, probe surface phenomenon, magnetized plasma, the measurement of high energy tail, etc. For sheath thickness, it is accepted if the difference between sheath radius and probe radius is shorter than mean free path, and this is a measure for the application limit. The probe method is applicable as far as the beam density is far smaller than plasma density, and the symmetry of positive ion sheath is not disturbed. The surface area of a counter electrode should be 10 4 .Rc/lambda times or more of the probe surface area, where Rc is the radius of a counter electrode. The differentiation method of the probe characteristics includes A.C. method, high speed sweep measurement or digital method, and some applications are described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. High-Resolution Measurements of Low-Energy Conversion Electrons

    CERN Multimedia

    Gizon, A; Putaux, J

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of low-energy internal conversion electrons have been performed with high energy resolution in some N = 105 odd and odd-odd nuclei using a semi-circular spectrograph associated to a specific tape transport system. These experiments aimed to answer the following questions~: \\begin{itemize} \\item Do M3 isomeric transitions exist in $^{183}$Pt and $^{181}$Os, isotones of $^{184}$Au~? \\item Are the neutron configurations proposed to describe the isomeric and ground states of $^{184}$Au right or wrong~? \\item Does it exist an isomeric state in $^{182}$Ir, isotone of $^{181}$Os, $^{183}$Pt and $^{184}$Au~? \\item What are the spin and parity values of the excited states of $^{182}$Ir~? \\end{itemize} In $^{183}$Pt, the 35.0 keV M3 isomeric transition has been clearly observed and the reduced transition probability has been determined. The deduced hindrance factor is close to that observed in the neighbouring odd-odd $^{184}$Au nucleus. This confirms the neutron configurations previously proposed for the ...

  10. Conductive Elastomers for Stretchable Electronics, Sensors and Energy Harvesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Seo Noh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There have been a wide variety of efforts to develop conductive elastomers that satisfy both mechanical stretchability and electrical conductivity, as a response to growing demands on stretchable and wearable devices. This article reviews the important progress in conductive elastomers made in three application fields of stretchable technology: stretchable electronics, stretchable sensors, and stretchable energy harvesters. Diverse combinations of insulating elastomers and non-stretchable conductive materials have been studied to realize optimal conductive elastomers. It is noted that similar material combinations and similar structures have often been employed in different fields of application. In terms of stretchability, cyclic operation, and overall performance, fields such as stretchable conductors and stretchable strain/pressure sensors have achieved great advancement, whereas other fields like stretchable memories and stretchable thermoelectric energy harvesting are in their infancy. It is worth mentioning that there are still obstacles to overcome for the further progress of stretchable technology in the respective fields, which include the simplification of material combination and device structure, securement of reproducibility and reliability, and the establishment of easy fabrication techniques. Through this review article, both the progress and obstacles associated with the respective stretchable technologies will be understood more clearly.

  11. Calculation of nuclear data for incident energies to 200 MeV with the FKK-GNASH code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.

    1993-02-01

    We describe how the FKK-GNASH code system has been extended to calculate nucleon-induced reactions up to 200 MeV, and used to predict (p,xn) and (p,xp) cross sections on 208 Pb at incident energies of 25, 45, 80 and 160 MeV, for an intermediate energy code intercomparison. Details of the reaction mechanisms calculated by FKK-GNASH are given, and the calculational procedure is described

  12. Radiosensitivity of chlorella after medium energy accelerated electron irradiation; Radiosensibilite des chlorelles aux electrons acceleres de moyenne energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, J.C. [commissariat a L' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-06-01

    The survival curves (capability of multiplication) of chlorella pyrenoidosa after irradiations can be used for soft electrons (0.65 and 1 MeV), hence penetrating into only 2 to 4 millimeters of water: the algae are laying on porous membranes and the doses are calculated from the power of the electron beam measured by the electric current on a metallic target or by Fricke's dosimetry. With these techniques, it is showed and discussed the part of anoxia in the radioprotection (magnitude or reduction of the dose calculated from the slope of survival curves: 2.5 ) that is more important than the restoration studied by the fractionation of the dose. The 0.65 and 1 MeV electrons have a biologic effect lesser than 180 keV X-rays (RBE - relative biological efficiency - calculated on the slope of survival curves is 0.92 in aerated irradiation, 0.56 in the deoxygenated irradiation). (author) [French] Les courbes de survie clonale (capacite de multiplication) de chlorella pyrenoidosa apres irradiation sont realisables meme avec des electrons peu energetiques (0.65 et 1 MeV), donc peu penetrants, par l'irradiation d'algues deposees sur membrane filtrante et grace au calcul de la dose a partir de l'energie du faisceau mesure par le courant que celui-ci cree dans une cible metallique ou par dosimetrie de Fricke. Par ces techniques, on a montre et discute le role de l'anoxie dans la radioprotection des chlorelles (facteur de reduction de la dose calcule sur la pente des courbes de survie de 2.5) qui est plus important que le pouvoir de restauration etudie par le fractionnement de la dose. Les electrons utilises ont un effet biologique moins grand que les rayons X de 180 keV (l'efficacite biologique relative - EBR - calculee sur la pente des courbes de survie est de 0.9 en presence d'air, 0.6 en presence d'azote)

  13. Excitation and dissociation of molecules by low-energy (0-15 eV) electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaart, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    The author deals with excitation and dissociation processes which result from the interaction between low-energy (0.15 eV) electrons and molecules. Low-energy electron-impact spectroscopy is used to gain a better knowledge of the electronic structure of halomethanes, ethylene and some of its halogen substituted derivatives, and some more complex organic molecules. (Auth.)

  14. The electronic states of isoxazole studied by VUV absorption, electron energy-loss spectroscopies and ab initio multi-reference configuration interaction calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Isobel C.; Palmer, Michael H.; Delwiche, Jacques; Hoffmann, Soeren V.; Vieora, P. Limao; Mason, Nigel J.; Guest, Martyn F.; Hubin-Franskin, Marie-Jeanne; Heinesch, J.; Giuliani, A.

    2004-01-01

    The VUV absorption spectrum of isoxazole (5-10.8 eV, 250-115 nm) has been recorded for the first time. The molecule has also been probed using electron impact with electrons of different incident energies and the He(I) photoelectron spectrum has been re-measured. Electronic excitation energies for valence and Rydberg-type states have been computed using multi-reference multi-root CI methods. Calculated energies for Rydberg states are close to those expected, but the precision of the calculated 1 ππ* states is more variable, especially for the lowest members. More than 30 valence excited states having finite oscillator strengths are computed to lie between 6 and 12 eV, but most of the intensity in the VUV absorption spectrum is from excitation of states of 1 ππ* character. From the results of the calculations, it is concluded that the first two 1 ππ* states lie at about 6 and 7 eV, respectively, and are separated by a state of type 1 σπ*, where σ is nitrogen lone pair; dominant higher bands near 8 and 9 eV are also largely 1 ππ* in character. The lowest-lying triplet states, located by experiment at about 4.1 eV and 5.3 eV, are calculated to be 3 ππ*. Short-lived anionic states (electron-molecule resonances) have been detected in both inelastic scattering and dissociative electron attachment channels. Some one-electron properties derived from the ground state wavefunction of the molecule have also been computed for comparison with experiment

  15. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, A.; Mahmoud, S.; Kleint, C.; Ritschel, M. (Inst. fuer Werkstoffphysik und Schichttechnology, Dresden (Germany) Fachbereich Physik, Univ. Leipzig (Germany))

    1991-01-01

    Electronic excitations of Y-Ba-Cu-O polycrystalline material in superconducting form have been investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy in reflection. The data obtained confirm recent band structure models for this material. Low electron energy losses correspond to energy levels close to the Fermi energy with an upper and lower Hubbard subband and an anionic O 2p band in the middle. Loss peaks due to interband transitions, plasmon excitations, and core electron excitations have been observed, the origin of which is interpreted by a schematic energy level diagram. (orig.).

  16. Energy dependence of ulrathin LiF-dosemeters for high energy electrons and high energy X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupfer, T.

    1977-02-01

    The energy dependence of ultrathin LiF-dosemeters for high energy electrons (5-40 MeV) and high energy X-radiation (6 MV, 42 MV) is experimentally determined. The experimental values are compared to values calculted earlier by other authors. The influence of the thickness of the dosemeters have been considered by comparison of experimental values for 0.03 mm thick dosemeters and theoretical values for 0.13 mm and 0.38 mm thick ones. Also different commersially available dosemeters have been compared by experiments. It is difficult to draw any other conclutions about the energy dependence than that the variation of the relative responce is within +- 3 percent (2S). However the results seems to be sulficient for clinical applications

  17. Introduction to electronics and applications in high energy physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    Electronics in HEP experiments: specificities and evolution The Art of Electronics: is there something beyond Ohm's law? Basic building blocks of Analog electronics: quickly understanding a schematic Charge preamps, current preamps and future preamps, shaping and the rest Electronics noise: fundamental and practical Evolution of technology: ASICs, FPGAs...

  18. Energy Dependence of Near-relativistic Electron Spectrum at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the Relativistic Electron Dropouts (REDs) and the Relativistic Electron Enhancements. (REEs) observed at the geosynchronous altitudes. The sudden drop in the relativistic electron flux often by two orders of magnitude is called RED which is usually pre- ceded by the gradual enhancement in the relativistic electron fluxes, ...

  19. Energy efficient hotspot-targeted embedded liquid cooling of electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Chander Shekhar; Tiwari, Manish K.; Zimmermann, Severin; Brunschwiler, Thomas; Schlottig, Gerd; Michel, Bruno; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a novel concept for hotspot-targeted, energy efficient ELC for electronic chips. • Microchannel throttling zones distribute flow optimally without any external control. • Design is optimized for highly non-uniform multicore chip heat flux maps. • Optimized design minimizes chip temperature non-uniformity. • This is achieved with pumping power consumption less than 1% of total chip power. - Abstract: Large data centers today already account for nearly 1.31% of total electricity consumption with cooling responsible for roughly 33% of that energy consumption. This energy intensive cooling problem is exacerbated by the presence of hotspots in multicore microprocessors due to excess coolant flow requirement for thermal management. Here we present a novel liquid-cooling concept, for targeted, energy efficient cooling of hotspots through passively optimized microchannel structures etched into the backside of a chip (embedded liquid cooling or ELC architecture). We adopt an experimentally validated and computationally efficient modeling approach to predict the performance of our hotspot-targeted ELC design. The design is optimized for exemplar non-uniform chip power maps using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). For industrially acceptable limits of approximately 0.4 bar (40 kPa) on pressure drop and one percent of total chip power on pumping power, the optimized designs are computationally evaluated against a base, standard ELC design with uniform channel widths and uniform flow distribution. For an average steady-state heat flux of 150 W/cm 2 in core areas (hotspots) and 20 W/cm 2 over remaining chip area (background), the optimized design reduces the maximum chip temperature non-uniformity by 61% to 3.7 °C. For a higher average, steady-state hotspot heat flux of 300 W/cm 2 , the maximum temperature non-uniformity is reduced by 54% to 8.7 °C. It is shown that the base design requires a prohibitively high level of pumping power (about

  20. Modeling the high-energy electronic state manifold of adenine: Calibration for nonlinear electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenov, Artur, E-mail: Artur.Nenov@unibo.it; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K. [Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician,” Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, IT-40126 Bologna (Italy); Rivalta, Ivan [Université de Lyon, CNRS, Institut de Chimie de Lyon, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d’Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Cerullo, Giulio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, IT-20133 Milano (Italy); Mukamel, Shaul [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 (United States); Garavelli, Marco, E-mail: marco.garavelli@unibo.it, E-mail: marco.garavelli@ens-lyon.fr [Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician,” Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, IT-40126 Bologna (Italy); Université de Lyon, CNRS, Institut de Chimie de Lyon, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d’Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2015-06-07

    Pump-probe electronic spectroscopy using femtosecond laser pulses has evolved into a standard tool for tracking ultrafast excited state dynamics. Its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart is becoming an increasingly available and promising technique for resolving many of the limitations of pump-probe caused by spectral congestion. The ability to simulate pump-probe and 2D spectra from ab initio computations would allow one to link mechanistic observables like molecular motions and the making/breaking of chemical bonds to experimental observables like excited state lifetimes and quantum yields. From a theoretical standpoint, the characterization of the electronic transitions in the visible (Vis)/ultraviolet (UV), which are excited via the interaction of a molecular system with the incoming pump/probe pulses, translates into the determination of a computationally challenging number of excited states (going over 100) even for small/medium sized systems. A protocol is therefore required to evaluate the fluctuations of spectral properties like transition energies and dipole moments as a function of the computational parameters and to estimate the effect of these fluctuations on the transient spectral appearance. In the present contribution such a protocol is presented within the framework of complete and restricted active space self-consistent field theory and its second-order perturbation theory extensions. The electronic excited states of adenine have been carefully characterized through a previously presented computational recipe [Nenov et al., Comput. Theor. Chem. 1040–1041, 295-303 (2014)]. A wise reduction of the level of theory has then been performed in order to obtain a computationally less demanding approach that is still able to reproduce the characteristic features of the reference data. Foreseeing the potentiality of 2D electronic spectroscopy to track polynucleotide ground and excited state dynamics, and in particular its expected ability to provide

  1. Modeling the high-energy electronic state manifold of adenine: Calibration for nonlinear electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenov, Artur; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K.; Rivalta, Ivan; Cerullo, Giulio; Mukamel, Shaul; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Pump-probe electronic spectroscopy using femtosecond laser pulses has evolved into a standard tool for tracking ultrafast excited state dynamics. Its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart is becoming an increasingly available and promising technique for resolving many of the limitations of pump-probe caused by spectral congestion. The ability to simulate pump-probe and 2D spectra from ab initio computations would allow one to link mechanistic observables like molecular motions and the making/breaking of chemical bonds to experimental observables like excited state lifetimes and quantum yields. From a theoretical standpoint, the characterization of the electronic transitions in the visible (Vis)/ultraviolet (UV), which are excited via the interaction of a molecular system with the incoming pump/probe pulses, translates into the determination of a computationally challenging number of excited states (going over 100) even for small/medium sized systems. A protocol is therefore required to evaluate the fluctuations of spectral properties like transition energies and dipole moments as a function of the computational parameters and to estimate the effect of these fluctuations on the transient spectral appearance. In the present contribution such a protocol is presented within the framework of complete and restricted active space self-consistent field theory and its second-order perturbation theory extensions. The electronic excited states of adenine have been carefully characterized through a previously presented computational recipe [Nenov et al., Comput. Theor. Chem. 1040-1041, 295-303 (2014)]. A wise reduction of the level of theory has then been performed in order to obtain a computationally less demanding approach that is still able to reproduce the characteristic features of the reference data. Foreseeing the potentiality of 2D electronic spectroscopy to track polynucleotide ground and excited state dynamics, and in particular its expected ability to provide

  2. Models for the transport of low energy electrons in water and the yield of hydrated electrons at early times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.J.; Miller, J.H.; Ritchie, R.H.; Bichsel, H.

    1985-01-01

    An insulator model with four experimental energy bands was used to fit the optical properties of liquid water and to extend these data to non-zero momentum transfer. Inelastic mean free paths derived from this dielectric response function provided the basic information necessary to degrade high energy electrons to the subexcitation energy domain. Two approaches for the transport of subexcitation electrons were investigated. (i) Gas phase cross sections were used to degrade subexcitation electrons to thermal energy and the thermalization lengths were scaled to unit density. (ii) Thermalization lengths were estimated by age-diffusion theory with a stopping power deduced from the data on liquid water and transport cross sections derived from elastic scattering in water vapor. Theoretical ranges were compared to recent experimental results. A stochastic model was used to calculate the rapid diffusion and reaction of hydrated electrons with other radiolysis products. The sensitivity of the calculated yields to the model assumptions and comparison with experimental data are discussed

  3. The role of low-energy (≤ 20 eV) electrons in astrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Michael C.; Rivas, Nathalie; Tran, Audrey A.; Verish, Clarissa A.; Arumainayagam, Christopher R.

    2016-10-01

    UV photon-driven condensed phase cosmic ice reactions have been the main focus in understanding the extraterrestrial synthesis of complex organic molecules. Low-energy (≤ 20 eV) electron-induced reactions, on the other hand, have been largely ignored. In this article, we review studies employing surface science techniques to study low-energy electron-induced condensed phase reactions relevant to astrochemistry. In particular, we show that low-energy electron irradiation of methanol ices leads to the synthesis of many of the same complex molecules formed through UV irradiation. Moreover, our results are qualitatively consistent with the hypothesis that high-energy condensed phase radiolysis is mediated by low-energy electron-induced reactions. In addition, due to the numbers of available low-energy secondary electrons resulting from the interaction of high-energy radiation with matter as well as differences between electron- and photon-induced processes, low-energy electron-induced reactions are perhaps as, or even more, effective than photon-induced reactions in initiating condensed-phase chemical reactions in the interstellar medium. Consequently, we illustrate a need for astrochemical models to include the details of electron-induced reactions in addition to those driven by UV photons. Finally, we show that low-energy electron-induced reactions may lead to the production of unique molecular species that could serve as tracer molecules for electron-induced condensed phase reactions in the interstellar medium.

  4. Electronic energy transfer through non-adiabatic vibrational-electronic resonance. II. 1D spectra for a dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivek; Jonas, David M.

    2018-02-01

    Vibrational-electronic resonance in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes invalidates Förster's adiabatic framework for interpreting spectra and energy transfer, thus complicating determination of how the surrounding protein affects pigment properties. This paper considers the combined effects of vibrational-electronic resonance and inhomogeneous variations in the electronic excitation energies of pigments at different sites on absorption, emission, circular dichroism, and hole-burning spectra for a non-degenerate homodimer. The non-degenerate homodimer has identical pigments in different sites that generate differences in electronic energies, with parameters loosely based on bacteriochlorophyll a pigments in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson antenna protein. To explain the intensity borrowing, the excited state vibrational-electronic eigenvectors are discussed in terms of the vibrational basis localized on the individual pigments, as well as the correlated/anti-correlated vibrational basis delocalized over both pigments. Compared to those in the isolated pigment, vibrational satellites for the correlated vibration have the same frequency and precisely a factor of 2 intensity reduction through vibrational delocalization in both absorption and emission. Vibrational satellites for anti-correlated vibrations have their relaxed emission intensity reduced by over a factor 2 through vibrational and excitonic delocalization. In absorption, anti-correlated vibrational satellites borrow excitonic intensity but can be broadened away by the combination of vibronic resonance and site inhomogeneity; in parallel, their vibronically resonant excitonic partners are also broadened away. These considerations are consistent with photosynthetic antenna hole-burning spectra, where sharp vibrational and excitonic satellites are absent. Vibrational-excitonic resonance barely alters the inhomogeneously broadened linear absorption, emission, and circular dichroism spectra from those for a

  5. Why do Electrons with "Anomalous Energies" appear in High-Pressure Gas Discharges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, Andrey; Kozhevnikov, Vasily; Semeniuk, Natalia

    2018-01-01

    Experimental studies connected with runaway electron beams generation convincingly shows the existence of electrons with energies above the maximum voltage applied to the discharge gap. Such electrons are also known as electrons with "anomalous energies". We explain the presence of runaway electrons having so-called "anomalous energies" according to physical kinetics principles, namely, we describe the total ensemble of electrons with the distribution function. Its evolution obeys Boltzmann kinetic equation. The dynamics of self-consistent electromagnetic field is taken into the account by adding complete Maxwell's equation set to the resulting system of equations. The electrodynamic mechanism of the interaction of electrons with a travelling-wave electric field is analyzed in details. It is responsible for the appearance of electrons with high energies in real discharges.

  6. Slow electron energy balance for hybrid models of direct-current glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseev, S. I.; Bogdanov, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the formulation of slow electron energy balance for hybrid models of direct current (DC) glow discharge. Electrons originating from non-local ionization (secondary) contribute significantly to the energy balance of slow electrons. An approach towards calculating effective energy brought by a secondary electron to the group of slow electrons by means of Coulomb collisions is suggested. The value of effective energy shows a considerable dependence on external parameters of a discharge, such as gas pressure, type, and geometric parameters. The slow electron energy balance was implemented into a simple hybrid model that uses analytical formulation for the description of non-local ionization by fast electrons. Simulations of short (without positive column) DC glow discharge in argon are carried out for a range of gas pressures. Comparison with experimental data showed generally good agreement in terms of current-voltage characteristics, electron density, and electron temperature. Simulations also capture the trend of increasing electron density with decreasing pressure observed in the experiment. Analysis shows that for considered conditions, the product of maximum electron density ne and electron temperature Te in negative glow is independent of gas pressure and depends on the gas type, cathode material, and discharge current. Decreasing gas pressure reduces the heating rate of slow electrons during Coulomb collisions with secondary electrons, which leads to lower values of Te and, in turn, higher maximum ne.

  7. Calcium measurements with electron probe X-ray and electron energy loss analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeFurgey, A.; Ingram, P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a broad survey of the rationale for electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPXMA) and the various methods for obtaining qualitative and quantitative information on the distribution and amount of elements, particularly calcium, in cryopreserved cells and tissues. Essential in an introductory consideration of microanalysis in biological cryosections is the physical basis for the instrumentation, fundamentals of X-ray spectrometry, and various analytical modes such as static probing and X-ray imaging. Some common artifacts are beam damage and contamination. Inherent pitfalls of energy dispersive X-ray systems include Si escape peaks, doublets, background, and detector calibration shifts. Quantitative calcium analysis of thin cryosections is carried out in real time using a multiple least squares fitting program on filtered X-ray spectra and normalizing the calcium peak to a portion of the continuum. Recent work includes the development of an X-ray imaging system where quantitative data can be retrieved off-line. The minimum detectable concentration of calcium in biological cryosections is approximately 300 mumole kg dry weight with a spatial resolution of approximately 100 A. The application of electron energy loss (EELS) techniques to the detection of calcium offers the potential for greater sensitivity and spatial resolution in measurement and imaging. Determination of mass thickness with EELS can facilitate accurate calculation of wet weight concentrations from frozen hydrated and freeze-dried specimens. Calcium has multiple effects on cell metabolism, membrane transport and permeability and, thus, on overall cell physiology or pathophysiology. Cells can be rapidly frozen for EPXMA during basal or altered functional conditions to delineate the location and amount of calcium within cells. 72 references

  8. Neutron emission cross sections on 93Nb at 20 MeV incident energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinkowski, A.; Kielan, D.

    1991-01-01

    Over the last years fully quantum-mechanical theories of nuclear reactions have been developed that provide, at least in principle, parameter-free methods of calculating double-differential continuum cross sections. The DWBA-based theory of direct processes to the continuum was derived by Tamura et al. The statistical theory of Feshback, Kerman and Koonin (FKK) introduced two reaction types in parallel as complementary mechanisms contributing to the preequilibrium decay. The multistep compound mechanism (MSC) results in symmetric angular distributions of the emitted particles, whereas the multistep direct mechanism (MSD) gives rise to the forward-peaked angular distributions. The theories of the MSC reactions differ in that the FKK theory incorporates the ''never come back'' hypothesis, which allowed the formulation of an applicable model that was successfully used in practical calculations. On the other hand the FKK theory of the MSD reactions differs conceptually from the theory of Tamura et al. and from the more general theory developed most recently by Nishioka et al. The latter theories were shown to be founded upon a postulated chaos located in the residual nucleus. In contrast, the theory of FKK assumes a chaotic interaction of the continuum particle to be emitted with the residual nucleus. The continuum or leading-particle statistics of the FKK theory results in the simple, convolution like, MSD cross section formula, which facilitates numerical calculations. Nevertheless two-step statistical DWBA calculations have been also performed. This paper extends the application of the FKK theory to the 93 Nb(n,xn) reaction at 20 MeV incident energy. (author). 14 refs, 1 fig

  9. Evolutionary developments in x ray and electron energy loss microanalysis instrumentation for the analytical electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaluzec, Nester J.

    Developments in instrumentation for both X ray Dispersive and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (XEDS/EELS) over the last ten years have given the experimentalist a greatly enhanced set of analytical tools for characterization. Microanalysts have waited for nearly two decades now in the hope of getting a true analytical microscope and the development of 300 to 400 kV instruments should have allowed us to attain this goal. Unfortunately, this has not generally been the case. While there have been some major improvements in the techniques, there has also been some devolution in the modern AEM (Analytical Electron Microscope). In XEDS, the majority of today's instruments are still plagued by the hole count effect, which was first described in detail over fifteen years ago. The magnitude of this problem can still reach the 20 percent level for medium atomic number species in a conventional off-the-shelf intermediate voltage AEM. This is an absurd situation and the manufacturers should be severely criticized. Part of the blame, however, also rests on the AEM community for not having come up with a universally agreed upon standard test procedure. Fortunately, such a test procedure is in the early stages of refinement. The proposed test specimen consists of an evaporated Cr film approx. 500 to 1000A thick supported upon a 3mm diameter Molybdenum 200 micron aperture.

  10. Electrons' energy in GRB afterglows implied by radio peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniamini, Paz; van der Horst, Alexander J.

    2017-12-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows have been observed across the electromagnetic spectrum, and physical parameters of GRB jets and their surroundings have been derived using broad-band modelling. While well-sampled light curves across the broad-band spectrum are necessary to constrain all the physical parameters, some can be strongly constrained by the right combination of just a few observables, almost independently of the other unknowns. We present a method involving the peaks of radio light curves to constrain the fraction of shock energy that resides in electrons, εe. This parameter is an important ingredient for understanding the microphysics of relativistic shocks. Based on a sample of 36 radio afterglows, we find εe has a narrow distribution centred around 0.13-0.15. Our method is suggested as a diagnostic tool for determining εe, and to help constrain the broad-band modelling of GRB afterglows. Some earlier measurements of the spreads in parameter values for εe, the kinetic energy of the shock and the density of the circumburst medium, based on broad-band modelling across the entire spectrum, are at odds with our analysis of radio peaks. This could be due to different modelling methods and assumptions, and possibly missing ingredients in past and current modelling efforts. Furthermore, we show that observations at ≳10 GHz performed 0.3-30 d after the GRB trigger are best suited for pinpointing the synchrotron peak frequency, and, consequently, εe. At the same time, observations at lower radio frequencies can pin down the synchrotron self-absorption frequency and help constrain the other physical parameters of GRB afterglows.

  11. Applications of CCTO supercapacitor in energy storage and electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R. K.; Stapleton, W. A.; Tate, J.; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.; Sutanto, I.; Sprissler, S.; Lin, S.

    2013-06-01

    Since the discovery of colossal dielectric constant in CCTO supercapacitor in 2000, development of its practical application to energy storage has been of great interest. In spite of intensive efforts, there has been thus far, no report of proven application. The object of this research is to understand the reason for this lack of success and to find ways to overcome this limitation. Reported herein is the synthesis of our research in ceramic processing of this material and its characterization, particularly with the objective of identifying potential applications. Experimental results have shown that CCTO's permittivity and loss tangent, the two most essential dielectric parameters of fundamental importance for the efficiency of a capacitor device, are intrinsically coupled. They increase or decrease in tandem. Therefore, efforts to simultaneously retain the high permittivity while minimizing the loss tangent of CCTO might not succeed unless an entirely non-typical approach is taken for processing this material. Based on the experimental results and their analysis, it has been identified that it is possible to produce CCTO bulk ceramics with conventional processes having properties that can be exploited for fabricating an efficient energy storage device (EDS). We have additionally identified that CCTO can be used for the development of efficient solid state capacitors of Class II type comparable to the widely used barium titanate (BT) capacitors. Based on high temperature studies of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient it is found that CCTO is a wide bandgap n-type semiconductor material which could be used for high temperature electronics. The temperature dependence of the linear thermal expansion of CCTO shows the presence of possible phase changes at 220 and 770 °C the origin of which remains unexplained.

  12. Applications of CCTO supercapacitor in energy storage and electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Pandey

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of colossal dielectric constant in CCTO supercapacitor in 2000, development of its practical application to energy storage has been of great interest. In spite of intensive efforts, there has been thus far, no report of proven application. The object of this research is to understand the reason for this lack of success and to find ways to overcome this limitation. Reported herein is the synthesis of our research in ceramic processing of this material and its characterization, particularly with the objective of identifying potential applications. Experimental results have shown that CCTO's permittivity and loss tangent, the two most essential dielectric parameters of fundamental importance for the efficiency of a capacitor device, are intrinsically coupled. They increase or decrease in tandem. Therefore, efforts to simultaneously retain the high permittivity while minimizing the loss tangent of CCTO might not succeed unless an entirely non-typical approach is taken for processing this material. Based on the experimental results and their analysis, it has been identified that it is possible to produce CCTO bulk ceramics with conventional processes having properties that can be exploited for fabricating an efficient energy storage device (EDS. We have additionally identified that CCTO can be used for the development of efficient solid state capacitors of Class II type comparable to the widely used barium titanate (BT capacitors. Based on high temperature studies of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient it is found that CCTO is a wide bandgap n-type semiconductor material which could be used for high temperature electronics. The temperature dependence of the linear thermal expansion of CCTO shows the presence of possible phase changes at 220 and 770 °C the origin of which remains unexplained.

  13. Energy measurement of prompt fission neutrons in 239Pu(n,f) for incident neutron energies from 1 to 200 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatillon, A; Granier, Th; Laurent, B; Taïeb, J; Noda, S; Haight, R C; Devlin, M; Nelson, R O; O’Donnell, J M

    2010-01-01

    Prompt fission neutron spectra in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu have been measured for incident neutron energies from 1 to 200 MeV at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Preliminary results are discussed and compared to theoretical model calculation.

  14. Electronic medical record cancer incidence over six years comparing new users of glargine with new users of NPH insulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Lim

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggested that insulin glargine use could be associated with increased risk of cancer. We compared the incidence of cancer in new users of glargine versus new users of NPH in a longitudinal clinical cohort with diabetes for up to 6 years.From all patients who had been regularly followed at Massachusetts General Hospital from 1/01/2005 to 12/31/2010, 3,680 patients who had a medication record for glargine or NPH usage were obtained from the electronic medical record (EMR. From those we selected 539 new glargine users (age: 60.1±13.6 years, BMI: 32.7±7.5 kg/m2 and 343 new NPH users (61.5±14.1 years, 32.7±8.3 kg/m2 who had no prevalent cancer during 19 months prior to glargine or NPH initiation. All incident cancer cases were ascertained from the EMR requiring at least 2 ICD-9 codes within a 2 month period. Insulin exposure time and cumulative dose were validated. The statistical analysis compared the rates of cancer in new glargine vs. new NPH users while on treatment, adjusted for the propensity to receive one or the other insulin. There were 26 and 28 new cancer cases in new glargine and new NPH users for 1559 and 1126 person-years follow-up, respectively. There were no differences in the propensity-adjusted clinical characteristics between groups. The adjusted hazard ratio for the cancer incidence comparing glargine vs. NPH use was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.36-1.19.Insulin glargine is not associated with development of cancers when compared with NPH in this longitudinal and carefully retrieved EMR data.

  15. Mapping the Local Density of States by Very-Low-Energy Scanning Electron Microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Zuzana; Frank, Luděk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2010), s. 214-218 ISSN 1345-9678 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : density of states * scanning low energy electron microscopy * aluminum * very-low-energy scanning electron microscopy * electron band structure Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.779, year: 2010 http://www.jim.or.jp/journal/e/51/02/214.html

  16. Optimization of power output and study of electron beam energy spread in a Free Electron Laser oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Abramovich, A; Efimov, S; Gover, A; Pinhasi, Y; Yahalom, A

    2001-01-01

    Design of a multi-stage depressed collector for efficient operation of a Free Electron Laser (FEL) oscillator requires knowledge of the electron beam energy distribution. This knowledge is necessary to determine the voltages of the depressed collector electrodes that optimize the collection efficiency and overall energy conversion efficiency of the FEL. The energy spread in the electron beam is due to interaction in the wiggler region, as electrons enter the interaction region at different phases relative to the EM wave. This interaction can be simulated well by a three-dimensional simulation code such as FEL3D. The main adjustable parameters that determine the electron beam energy spread after interaction are the e-beam current, the initial beam energy, and the quality factor of the resonator out-coupling coefficient. Using FEL3D, we study the influence of these parameters on the available radiation power and on the electron beam energy distribution at the undulator exit. Simulations performed for I=1.5 A, E...

  17. Preservation effect of high energy electron beam on kyoho grape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qiufeng; Chen Zhaoliang; Qiao Yongjin; Wang Haihong; Qiao Xuguang

    2010-01-01

    The Kyoho grapes were kept in cold storage of-0.5 degree C ∼ 0.5 degree C, RH 85% ∼ 95% after irradiation of 400, 700, 1000, 1500, 2500 Gy and SO 2 treatment, and the antiseptic effect and storage quality were studied. The result showed that high energy electron beam could control the growth of bacteria, mould, yeast, coliform, alleviate the deterioration of grapes during storage. Irradiation below the dose 1000 Gy can decrease the respiration intensity, prevent the decreasing of titratable acid, ascorbic acid content, and keep higher activity of SOD enzyme. The Vc content was 3.79 mg /100 g after 700 Gy irradiation 90 days, the titratable acid and total soluble sugar content were 0.348%, 11.44%, and the activity of SOD was 14.89 U /g, which was higher than the control significantly (P 2 bleaching spot. Integrate the effects on microorganism control and grape quality, treatment of 700 Gy had the best preservation effect in this study. After preserved for 98 d, the good fruit rate of 700 Gy treatment was 93.33% , significantly higher than other treatments (P < 0.05). (authors)

  18. High-Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyoung Park

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when β (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure is of order unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high β a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. While not able to confirm the details of Grad’s work, the current experiment does validate, for the first time, the conjecture that confinement is substantially improved at high β. This represents critical progress toward an understanding of the plasma dynamics in a high-β cusp system. We hope that these results will stimulate a renewed interest in the cusp configuration as a fusion confinement candidate. In addition, the enhanced high-energy electron confinement resolves a key impediment to progress of the Polywell fusion concept, which combines a high-β cusp configuration with electrostatic fusion for a compact, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  19. Pathway and conversion of energy incident on auroral and sub-auroral ionosphere at substorm expansion onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2017-12-01

    One explanation for SAPS/SAID is the poleward ionospheric electric field arising from a pair of Region 1 and Region 2 field-aligned currents (FACs). At substorm expansion onset, the FACs are intensified, resulting in intensification of energy incident on the auroral and sub-auroral ionosphere. Where does the energy comes from? Based on the results obtained by the global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation, we present energy flow and energy conversion associated with the Region 1 and Region 2 FACs that are intensified at the onset of substorm expansion. The cusp/mantle region transmits electromagnetic energy to almost the entire region of the magnetosphere. A part of electromagnetic energy is stored in the lobe in the growth phase. When reconnection takes place in the near-Earth tail region, the stored energy is released in addition to the continuously supplied one from the cusp/mantle dynamo. Two types of pathways of energy seem to be involved in the generation of the near-Earth dynamo that is associated with FACs at the expansion onset. The first type is related to the earthward fast flow in the plasma sheet. The electromagnetic energy coming from the lobe splits into the thermal energy and the kinetic energy. The kinetic energy is then converted to the thermal energy and the electromagnetic energy, in association of flow braking. The second type is that the plasma coming from the lobe goes into the inner magnetosphere directly. The electromagnetic energy is converted to the thermal energy, followed by the electromagnetic energy at off-equator. The near-Earth dynamo region seems to be embedded in the magnetospheric convection system. In this sense, the expansion onset may be regarded as a sudden, local intensification of the convection.

  20. Idempotent Dirac density matrix for ten-electron central field inhomogeneous electron liquids in terms of electron- and kinetic energy-densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2006-08-01

    A differential equation for the Dirac density matrix γ(r, r'), given ground-state electron- and kinetic energy-densities, has been derived by March and Suhai for one- and two-level occupancy. For ten-electron spin-compensated spherical systems, it is shown here that γ ≡ γ[ρ, t g ] where ρ and t g are electron- and kinetic energy-densities. The philosophy of March and Suhai is confirmed beyond two-level filling. An important byproduct of the present approach is an explicit expression for the one-body potential of DFT in terms of the p-shell electron density. (author)

  1. Electron heating and energy inventory during asymmetric reconnection in a laboratory plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, J.; Na, B.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Argall, M. R.; Fox, W.; Chen, L. J.

    2017-12-01

    Electron heating and the energy inventory during asymmetric reconnection are studied in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) [1]. In this plasma, the density ratio is about 8 across the current sheet. Typical features of asymmetric reconnection such as the large density gradients near the low-density-side separatrices, asymmetric in-plane electric field, and bipolar out-of-plane magnetic field are observed. Unlike the symmetric case [2], electrons are also heated near the low-density-side separatrices. The measured parallel electric field may explain the observed electron heating. Although large fluctuations driven by lower-hybrid drift instabilities are also observed near the low-density-side separatrices, laboratory measurements and numerical simulations reported here suggest that they do not play a major role in electron energization. The average electron temperature increase in the exhaust region is proportional to the incoming magnetic energy per an electron/ion pair but exceeds the scaling of the previous space observations [3]. This discrepancy is explained by differences in the boundary condition and system size. The profile of electron energy gain from the electric field shows that there is additional electron energy gain associated with the electron diamagnetic current besides a large energy gain near the X-line. This additional energy gain increases electron enthalpy, not the electron temperature. Finally, a quantitative analysis of the energy inventory during asymmetric reconnection is conducted. Unlike the symmetric case where the ion energy gain is about twice more than the electron energy gain [4], electrons and ions obtain a similar amount of energy during asymmetric reconnection. [1] J. Yoo et al., accepted for a publication in J. Geophys. Res. [2] J. Yoo et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 055706 (2014). [3] T. Phan et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 40, 4475 (2013). [4] M. Yamada et al., Nat. Comms. 5, 4474 (2014).

  2. Characterisation of a monolithic active pixel sensor for electron detection in the energy range 10-20 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheson, J.; Moldovan, G.; Clark, A.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Derbyshire, G.; Kirkland, A.; Allinson, N.

    2009-01-01

    As part of a feasibility study into the use of novel electron detectors for X-ray photoelectron emission microscopes (XPEEM), we have characterised the imaging performance of a back-illuminated monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) operating under both integrating and counting modes for electrons in the energy range 10-20 keV. For integrating mode, we present the detective quantum efficiency (DQE), which shows marked improvements over conventional indirect detectors based on microchannel plates. We also present the modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum (NPS), again demonstrating significantly improved performance. For counting mode, we present the quantum efficiency (QE) as a function of incident electron energy. We have evaluated the charge collection efficiency (CCE) and we thereby demonstrate the presence of a ∼200 nm thick dead layer that is linked with reduced CCE at low electron energies. Based on our findings, we believe that the MAPS technology is well matched to future XPEEM instruments using aberration correction.

  3. Observation of Time-Domain Modulation of Free-Electron-Laser Pulses by Multipeaked Electron-Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, V.; Anania, M. P.; Artioli, M.; Bacci, A.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Giannessi, L.; Mostacci, A.; Musumeci, P.; Petralia, A.; Pompili, R.; Quattromini, M.; Rau, J. V.; Ronsivalle, C.; Rossi, A. R.; Sabia, E.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.

    2013-09-01

    We present the experimental demonstration of a new scheme for the generation of ultrashort pulse trains based on free-electron-laser (FEL) emission from a multipeaked electron energy distribution. Two electron beamlets with energy difference larger than the FEL parameter ρ have been generated by illuminating the cathode with two ps-spaced laser pulses, followed by a rotation of the longitudinal phase space by velocity bunching in the linac. The resulting self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL radiation, measured through frequency-resolved optical gating diagnostics, reveals a double-peaked spectrum and a temporally modulated pulse structure.

  4. Extension of a nuclear reaction calculation code CCONE toward higher incident energies. Multiple preequilibrium emission, and spectrum in laboratory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    A nuclear reaction calculation code CCONE, which was developed for nuclear data evaluation for JENDL/AC-2008 and JENDL-4, has been upgraded to improve the prediction accuracy for calculated cross sections at nucleon incident energies higher than 20 MeV. Multiple particle emission, in which nucleons and complex particles up to α-particle are involved, from pre-equilibrium reaction process was implemented based on the sequential-decay calculations for all produced exciton states within the framework of the two-component exciton model. The effect of velocity-change of particle-emitting nuclei on the multiple emission in preequilibrium and compound processes, which was not included in the previous evaluations, was taken into account to obtain spectra in the laboratory system using an average velocity approximation for each composite/compound nucleus. Calculated nucleon emission spectra at nucleon incident energies from 20 to 200 MeV were compared with experimental and evaluated data for the proton- and neutron-induced reactions on 27 Al. The present results are in good agreement with experimental data. It was found that their predictions were better than those of JENDL/HE-2007 especially for low emission energies at high incident energies. (author)

  5. Many-Body Theory of Proton-Generated Point Defects for Losses of Electron Energy and Photons in Quantum Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danhong; Iurov, Andrii; Gao, Fei; Gumbs, Godfrey; Cardimona, D. A.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of point defects on the loss of either energies of ballistic electron beams or incident photons are studied by using a many-body theory in a multi-quantum-well system. This theory includes the defect-induced vertex correction to a bare polarization function of electrons within the ladder approximation, and the intralayer and interlayer screening of defect-electron interactions is also taken into account in the random-phase approximation. The numerical results of defect effects on both energy-loss and optical-absorption spectra are presented and analyzed for various defect densities, numbers of quantum wells, and wave vectors. The diffusion-reaction equation is employed for calculating distributions of point defects in a layered structure. For completeness, the production rate for Frenkel-pair defects and their initial concentration are obtained based on atomic-level molecular-dynamics simulations. By combining the defect-effect, diffusion-reaction, and molecular-dynamics models with an available space-weather-forecast model, it will be possible in the future to enable specific designing for electronic and optoelectronic quantum devices that will be operated in space with radiation-hardening protection and, therefore, effectively extend the lifetime of these satellite onboard electronic and optoelectronic devices. Specifically, this theory can lead to a better characterization of quantum-well photodetectors not only for high quantum efficiency and low dark current density but also for radiation tolerance or mitigating the effects of the radiation.

  6. Electron energy probability function in the temporal afterglow of a dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denysenko, I. B.; Azarenkov, N. A.; Ostrikov, K.; Yu, M. Y.

    2018-01-01

    The kinetic description of the electron energy probability function (EEPF) in a dusty afterglow plasma is considered for two typical cases: when the rate of electron-neutral momentum-transfer collisions is independent of the electron energy and when it is a power function of the electron energy. The electron Boltzmann equation is solved using the method of characteristics and analytical expressions for the EEPF are obtained for different initial EEPFs (including both Maxwellian and Druyvesteyn distributions) at electron energies larger than the dust-surface potential. The analytical EEPF functions are then used to analyze several experimental parameter regimes of the dust radius and density, the dust-charge decay time, the afterglow duration, etc. It is also found that absorption of electrons by the dust particles plays an important role in determining the EEPF in a dusty afterglow.

  7. Energy modulation of nonrelativistic electrons in an optical near field on a metal microslit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, R.; Bae, J.; Mizuno, K.

    2001-04-01

    Energy modulation of nonrelativistic electrons with a laser beam using a metal microslit as an interaction circuit has been investigated. An optical near field is induced in the proximity of the microslit by illumination of the laser beam. The electrons passing close to the slit are accelerated or decelerated by an evanescent wave contained in the near field whose phase velocity is equal to the velocity of the electrons. The electron-evanescent wave interaction in the microslit has been analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The theory has predicted that electron energy can be modulated at optical frequencies. Experiments performed in the infrared region have verified theoretical predictions. The electron-energy changes of more than ±5 eV with a 10 kW CO2 laser pulse at the wavelength of 10.6 μm has been successfully observed for an electron beam with an energy of less than 80 keV.

  8. Comparison between the mechanical and radiative electron-capture processes at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.D.; Miraglia, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The ground-state--ground-state mechanical and radiative electron-capture processes are studied at very high, but not relativistic, projectile velocities. Three-body calculations were carried out with use of the continuum distorted-wave theoretical method for both processes. Total cross sections and final-atom angular distributions were computed, and the importance of each mechanism examined. For total cross sections, the numerical results reaffirm that the radiative process is the predominant mechanism at very high projectile energies. For a given incident charge, the range of projectile energies in which the nonrelativistic radiative mechanism is the most important decreases as the target charge increases. It is found that the radiative mechanism produces a very sharp final-atom angular distribution in the forward direction. When both processes, the radiative and mechanical, give the same total cross section, the calculations show that the radiative differential cross section in the forward direction is almost 2 orders of magnitude larger than the mechanical one

  9. Measurement of the BESSY II electron beam energy by Compton-backscattering of laser photons

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, R; Thornagel, R; Brandt, G; Görgen, R; Ulm, G

    2002-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of all storage ring parameters is essential for the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) to operate the electron storage ring BESSY II as a primary source standard. One parameter entering the Schwinger equation for the calculation of the spectral photon flux of bending magnet radiation is the electron beam energy. So at BESSY II the electron beam energy is measured by two independent techniques one of which is described in this paper: the photons from a CO sub 2 -laser are scattered in a head-on collision with the stored electrons. From the spectrum of the backscattered photons that are detected by an energy-calibrated HPGe detector the electron beam energy can be determined. The experimental set-up at the BESSY II electron storage ring as well as the current experimental status are described for operation of the storage ring at the energies of 900 and 1700 MeV.

  10. Electronic energy loss effects on chemical modification of polyimide induced by high energy xenon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Youmei; Zhu Zhiyong; Jin Yunfan; Wang Zhiguang; Hou Mingdong

    2004-01-01

    Stacked polyimide (PI) films of about 25 μm in thickness were irradiated with 1.755 GeV xenon ions under vacuum at room temperature. The chemical changes of modified PI films were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis) absorption spectroscopy. The FTIR results show that the absorbance of the typical function groups decreases exponentially as a function of fluence. Under 8.8 keV/nm (minimum) and 11.5 keV/nm (maximum) electronic energy loss of 136 Xe irradiation, the mean degradation radius of all function groups in PI is 3.6 and 4.1 nm, respectively. The alkyne end group was found after irradiation and its formation radius was 5.6 nm and 5.9 nm corresponding to 8.8 keV/nm and 11.5 keV/nm, respectively. the UV/Vis analysis indicates the radiation induced absorbance change follows a linear relation with fluence, and the production efficiency of chromospheres depends strongly on the electronic energy loss (dE/dX) e . (authors)

  11. Search for high energy γ-rays emission in 28Si, 32Si+64Ni dissipative reactions at about 5 MeV/amu incident energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Anzalone, A.; Coniglione, R.; Zoppo, A. del; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Papa, M.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Wang, Q.; DeRosa, A.; Fioretto, E.; Inglima, G.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.

    1991-01-01

    Photons emitted in the 28 Si+ 64 Ni and 32 S+ 64 Ni reactions at 143 MeV and 156 MeV incident energy respectively, have been detected in coincidence with the ejected charged fragments. An array of 48 BaF 2 γ-rays detector and 6 solid state silicon detector telescopes have been used. Photon energy spectra measured in the energy range from 2 to 20 MeV in coincidence with ejectiles coming from deep inelastic reactions, are consistent with statistical emission from the reaction products. (orig.)

  12. Search for high energy. gamma. -rays emission in sup 28 Si, sup 32 Si+ sup 64 Ni dissipative reactions at about 5 MeV/amu incident energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Anzalone, A.; Coniglione, R.; Zoppo, A. del; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Papa, M.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Wang, Q. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud); Bellia, G.; Cavallaro, S.; Migneco, E.; Pappalardo, G.; Rizzo, F.; Russo, G. (Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud); Cardella, G.; Wang, G.S. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy)); DeRosa, A.; Fioretto, E.; Inglima, G.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M. (Naples-2 Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Naples (Italy))

    1991-11-01

    Photons emitted in the {sup 28}Si+{sup 64}Ni and {sup 32}S+{sup 64}Ni reactions at 143 MeV and 156 MeV incident energy respectively, have been detected in coincidence with the ejected charged fragments. An array of 48 BaF{sub 2} {gamma}-rays detector and 6 solid state silicon detector telescopes have been used. Photon energy spectra measured in the energy range from 2 to 20 MeV in coincidence with ejectiles coming from deep inelastic reactions, are consistent with statistical emission from the reaction products. (orig.).

  13. Measurement of the single-shot pulse energy of a free electron laser using a cryogenic radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masahiro, Kato; Norio, Saito; Yuichiro, Morishita; Takahiro, Tanaka [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), NMIJ, Tsukuba (Japan); Masahiro, Kato; Norio, Saito; Kai, Tiedtke; Pavle N, Juranic; Sorokin, A.A.; Richter, M.; Takahiro, Tanaka; Mitsuru, Nagasono; Makina, Yabashi; Kensuke, Tono; Tadashi, Togashi; Tetsuya, Ishikawa [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Kai, Tiedtke; Pavle N, Juranic; Sorokin, A.A.; Jastrow, U. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Sorokin, A.A. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Polytekhnicheskaya 26, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Richter, M.; Kroth, U.; Schoppe, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, PTB, Berlin (Germany); Tadashi, Togashi; Hiroaki, Kimura; Haruhiko, Ohashi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    The absolute single-shot pulse energy of the SPring 8 extreme ultraviolet (EUV) free electron laser (FEL) was measured using a cryogenic radiometer with a relative standard uncertainty of 3%. The temperature change of the cavity in the cryogenic radiometer caused by an incident FEL pulse was determined using a lock-in amplifier and an ac Wheatstone bridge. The measured pulse energies were compared with a gas-monitor detector developed by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt/Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron/Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute (Ioffe) at a wavelength of 51.3 nm at the SPring-8 EUV-FEL in a shot-to-shot mode. The pulse energies measured using the two detectors agree within 2.0%. (authors)

  14. Tailoring electron energy distribution functions through energy confinement in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, C.; Waskoenig, J. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Gans, T. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-08

    A multi-scale numerical model based on hydrodynamic equations with semi-kinetic treatment of electrons is used to investigate the influence of dual frequency excitation on the effective electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma. It is found that variations of power density, voltage ratio, and phase relationship provide separate control over the electron density and the mean electron energy. This is exploited to directly influence both the phase dependent and time averaged effective EEDF. This enables tailoring the EEDF for enhanced control of non-equilibrium plasma chemical kinetics at ambient pressure and temperature.

  15. Low energy electron loss peaks of CuInTe/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleint, C. (Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Physik); Schulze, S. (Technische Hochschule, Karl-Marx-Stadt (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Physik/Elektronische Bauelemente); Tomlinson, R.D. (Salford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1982-09-01

    Reflection low energy electron loss spectra were observed from CuInTe/sub 2/ monocrystals. The spectra were taken with a LEED system to obtain the first derivative of the scattered electron energy distribution using primary energies of 50, 90, and 190 eV. The second derivative and the loss maxima energies have been determined after a smoothing procedure. The loss peaks are coordinated to plasmon features, surfaces states, and interband transitions.

  16. Energy distribution of the 'shake off' electrons at the 152Eu decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrokhovich, N.F.

    2008-01-01

    On the special vacuum installation of coincidences of g-quanta and beta-particles with low energy electrons, including e 0 -electrons of the secondary electron emission (gamma beta e 0 -coincidences) for the first time the energy spectrum of 'shake off' electrons at 152 Eu decay is investigated in the range of 200 - 1700 eV. Registration of electrons of 'shake off' is carried out on e 0 -electrons of the secondary electron emission, created by them. By realization of threshold measurements the integral spectrum was obtained and on this basis the differential spectrum is computed. It is established, that the continuum of 'shake off' electrons is low energy and practically finishes at 400 eV. In the region of 300 eV the maximum energetic distribution is observed

  17. Nanoscale Energy-Filtered Scanning Confocal Electron Microscopy Using a Double-Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I.; Nellist, Peter D.; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that a transmission electron microscope fitted with two spherical-aberration correctors can be operated as an energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscope. A method for establishing this mode is described and initial results showing 3D chemical mapping with nanoscale sensitivity to height and thickness changes in a carbon film are presented. Importantly, uncorrected chromatic aberration does not limit the depth resolution of this technique and moreover performs an energy-filtering role, which is explained in terms of a combined depth and energy-loss response function.

  18. Low energy electron generator design and depth dose prediction for micro-superficies tumors treatment purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshidi, Abdollah; Rajaee, Azimeh; Ahmadinejad, Marjan; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Ettelaee, Mehdi

    2014-09-01

    We investigate deposited energy and linear energy transfer (LET) of low energy ejection electrons in air and water layers of a generator design via a plasma source. A structured model of a concave cold cathode electron generator was designed and simulated by using Monte Carlo n-particle version X 2.7.0 (MCNPX) code. A negative dc high voltage was applied to a concave cathode up to -12 kV to determine electron energy activity. Results determined that the geometric dimensions of field size toward the anode increased in relation to the angle of the conic beam, widening the accumulated bulks. The increased field size increased the anode current, which also resulted in an increase of electron energy, a reduction in LET, a stretched build-up area and a dose curve that shifted to a higher depth. The biological effect of low energy electron radiation can be increased with an increase of LET; as the depth dose decreased, the electron energy increased at the same time. The study of electron irradiation as a conic beam from an electron generator may provide an accurate investigation of the indirect effect of low energy electrons on bystander cells.

  19. Electronic structure analyses of BN network materials using high energy-resolution spectroscopy methods based on transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, M

    2006-07-01

    Electronic structures of boron-nitride (BN) nanotubes and a BN cone-structure material were studied by using a high energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) microscope. A trial of the whole electronic structure study of hexagonal BN (h-BN), which consists of flat BN honeycomb layers, was conducted by a combination of EELS and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) (TEM-EELS/XES). The pi and pi+sigma plasmon energies of BN nanotubes (BNT) were smaller than those of h-BN. The pi+sigma energy was explained by the surface plasmon excitation. The spectrum of a two-wall BNT of 2.7 nm in diameter showed a new spectral onset at 4 eV. The valence electron excitation spectra obtained from the tip region of the BN cone with an apex angle of 20 degrees showed similar intensity distribution with those of BNTs. The B K-shell electron excitation spectra obtained from the bottom edge region of the BN cone showed additional peak intensity when compared with those of h-BN and BNT. The B K-shell electron excitation spectra and B K-emission spectra of h-BN were compared with a result of a LDA band calculation. It showed that high symmetry points in the band diagram appear as peak and/or shoulder structures in the EELS and XES spectra. Interband transitions appeared in the imaginary part of the dielectric function of h-BN experimentally obtained were assigned in the band diagram. The analysis also presented that the LDA calculation estimated the bandgap energy smaller than the real material by an amount of 2 eV. Those results of TEM-EELS/XES analysis presented that high energy-resolution spectroscopy methods combined with TEM is a promising method to analyze whole electronic structures of nanometer scale materials. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. High energy gain of trapped electrons in a tapered, diffraction-dominated inverse-free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Tochitsky, S Ya; Boucher, S; Clayton, C E; Doyuran, A; England, R J; Joshi, C; Pellegrini, C; Ralph, J E; Rosenzweig, J B; Sung, C; Tolmachev, S; Travish, G; Varfolomeev, A A; Varfolomeev, A A; Yarovoi, T; Yoder, R B

    2005-04-22

    Energy gain of trapped electrons in excess of 20 MeV has been demonstrated in an inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) accelerator experiment. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is copropagated with a 400 GW CO2 laser beam in a 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The Rayleigh range of the laser, approximately 1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length yielding a diffraction-dominated interaction. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Simulations, in good agreement with the experimental data, show that most of the energy gain occurs in the first half of the undulator at a gradient of 70 MeV/m and that the structure in the measured energy spectrum arises because of higher harmonic IFEL interaction in the second half of the undulator.

  1. High Energy Gain of Trapped Electrons in a Tapered, Diffraction-Dominated Inverse-Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P.; Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Boucher, S.; Clayton, C. E.; Doyuran, A.; England, R. J.; Joshi, C.; Pellegrini, C.; Ralph, J. E.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Sung, C.; Tolmachev, S.; Travish, G.; Varfolomeev, A. A.; Varfolomeev, A. A.; Yarovoi, T.; Yoder, R. B.

    2005-04-01

    Energy gain of trapped electrons in excess of 20 MeV has been demonstrated in an inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) accelerator experiment. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is copropagated with a 400 GW CO2 laser beam in a 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The Rayleigh range of the laser, ˜1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length yielding a diffraction-dominated interaction. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Simulations, in good agreement with the experimental data, show that most of the energy gain occurs in the first half of the undulator at a gradient of 70 MeV/m and that the structure in the measured energy spectrum arises because of higher harmonic IFEL interaction in the second half of the undulator.

  2. Study of the (16O,12C) reaction on even nickel isotopes at 60 MeV incident energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthier, B.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental results and Exact Finite Range DWBA analysis (EFR-DWBA) of ( 16 O, 12 C) transfer reactions on even nickel isotopes are presented. It is shown EFR-DWBA calculations which reproduce ( 16 O, 12 C) transfer data using optical model parameters deduced from elastic scattering analysis. The 58 Ni, 60 Ni, 62 Ni, 64 Ni( 16 O, 12 C) 62 Zn, 64 Zn, 66 Zn, 68 Zn reactions at 60 MeV incident energy leading to the ground state and the 2 + and 3 - low lying states in zinc isotopes and the 58 Ni, 60 Ni, 62 Ni, 64 Ni + 16 O elastic scattering at 60 MeV incident energy and 64 Zn, 66 Zn, 68 Zn + 12 C elastic scattering at 54 MeV in the range of scattering angles theta(c.m.)=17 0 - 100 0 have been measured

  3. Energy deposition model for low-energy electrons (10-10 000 eV) in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roldan, A.; Perez, J.M.; Williart, A.; Blanco, F.; Garcia, G.

    2004-01-01

    An energy deposition model for electrons in air that can be useful in microdosimetric applications is presented in this study. The model is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the single electron scattering processes that can take place with the molecular constituents of the air in the energy range 10-10 000 eV. The input parameters for this procedure have been the electron scattering cross sections, both differential and integral. These parameters were calculated using a model potential method which describes the electron scattering with the molecular constituent of air. The reliability of the calculated integral cross section values has been evaluated by comparison with direct total electron scattering cross-section measurements performed by us in a transmission beam experiment. Experimental energy loss spectra for electrons in air have been used as probability distribution functions to define the electron energy loss in single collision events. The resulting model has been applied to simulate the electron transport through a gas cell containing air at different pressures and the results have been compared with those observed in the experiments. Finally, as an example of its applicability to dosimetric issues, the energy deposition of 10 000 eV by means of successive collisions in a free air chamber has been simulated

  4. Theoretical modeling of energy redistribution and stereodynamics in CF scattering from Si(100) under grazing incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gou, F.; Gleeson, M. A.; Kleyn, A. W.

    2006-01-01

    We have simulated CF scattering from Si(100) using the molecular dynamics method. Translational energy loss spectra are presented. The shape of the energy loss distribution as a result of internal energy release is analyzed. At the classical turning point, the internal energy of the molecule is

  5. Technical Training: ELEC-2005 - Electronics in High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    Learning for the LHC! ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme, in an extended format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series. This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 is composed of four Terms that will run throughout the year: Winter Term: Introduction to electronics in HEP (January-February, 6 lectures) Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics (March, 6 lectures) Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) Autumn Term: Electronics applications in HEP experiments (November-December, 10 lectures) Lectures within each Term will take place on Tuesdays an...

  6. Energy transport by energetic electrons released during solar flares. I - Thermal versus nonthermal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.; Pritchett, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    The propagation of energetic electrons through a flaring flux tube is studied in an attempt to determine how the energy of the electrons is deposited in the flux tube. One-dimensional electrostatic particle simulations are used in the present investigation. As the energetic electrons propagate into the system, a return current of ambient plasma electrons and some of the energetic electrons is drawn into the energetic electron source. It is found that, as the ambient temperature relative to the ion temperature increases above about 3, the heated return-current electrons can excite ion-sound waves.

  7. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis in the electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, DC

    2003-01-01

    This book provides an in-depth description of x-ray microanalysis in the electron microscope. It is sufficiently detailed to ensure that novices will understand the nuances of high-quality EDX analysis. Includes information about hardware design as well as the physics of x-ray generation, absorption and detection, and most post-detection data processing. Details on electron optics and electron probe formation allow the novice to make sensible adjustments to the electron microscope in order to set up a system which optimises analysis. It also helps the reader determine which microanalytical me

  8. Low-energy positron and electron diffraction and positron-stimulated secondary electron emission from Cu(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    The results of two series of experiments are reported. In the first, an electrostatically guided beam of low-energy (40-400 eV) positrons, delta/sub p/ was used to study low-energy positron diffraction (LEPD) from a Cu(100) surface under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) data were obtained from the same sample in the same apparatus. Comparison of LEPD and LEED intensity versus energy data with model calculations made using computer programs developed by C.B. Duke and collaborators indicated that: LEPD data is adequately modeled using potentials with no exchange-correlation term. The inelastic mean free path, lambda/sub ee/, is shorter for positrons than for electrons at low (< approx.80 eV). LEED is better than LEPD at making a determination of the first-layer spacing of Cu(100) for the particular data set reported. In the second set of experiments, the same apparatus and sample were used to compare positron- and electron-stimulated secondary-electron emission (PSSEE and ESSEE). The results were found to be consistent with existing models of secondary-electron production for metals. The energy distributions of secondary-electrons had broad low-energy (<10 eV) peaks for both positron and electron stimulation. But the PSEE distribution showed no elastic peak. Measurements of secondary-electron angular distributions, found to be cosine-like in both the PSSEE and ESSEE case, were used to obtain total secondary yield ratios, delta, at four beam energies ranging from 40-400 eV. The secondary yield ratio for primary positrons and the yield for primary electrons, delta/sub e/, were similar at these energies. For 400-eV primary particles the secondary yields were found to be delta/sub p/ = 0.94 +/- 0.12 and delta/sub e/ = 0.94 +/- 0./12, giving a ratio of unity for positron-stimulated secondary yield to electron-stimulated secondary yield

  9. Treatment of Electronic Energy Level Transition and Ionization Following the Particle-Based Chemistry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark

    2010-01-01

    A new method of treating electronic energy level transitions as well as linking ionization to electronic energy levels is proposed following the particle-based chemistry model of Bird. Although the use of electronic energy levels and ionization reactions in DSMC are not new ideas, the current method of selecting what level to transition to, how to reproduce transition rates, and the linking of the electronic energy levels to ionization are, to the author s knowledge, novel concepts. The resulting equilibrium temperatures are shown to remain constant, and the electronic energy level distributions are shown to reproduce the Boltzmann distribution. The electronic energy level transition rates and ionization rates due to electron impacts are shown to reproduce theoretical and measured rates. The rates due to heavy particle impacts, while not as favorable as the electron impact rates, compare favorably to values from the literature. Thus, these new extensions to the particle-based chemistry model of Bird provide an accurate method for predicting electronic energy level transition and ionization rates in gases.

  10. The Horse That Drank: Electronic Communication and the High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connell, Heath B

    2000-08-15

    High energy physicists submit their papers to electronic archives, have them published in electronic journals and indexed in online databases. Despite this system now having been in place basically in its entirety since the middle of the 1990's, other fields have been slow to follow. What makes high energy physics special (and what doesn't)?

  11. 78 FR 15941 - Petition for Waiver of Samsung Electronics America, Inc. From the Department of Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... for Waiver of Samsung Electronics America, Inc. From the Department of Energy Residential Refrigerator... receipt of a petition for waiver from Samsung Electronics America, Inc. (Samsung) seeking an exemption... energy consumption of electric refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers. Samsung asks that it be permitted...

  12. Quasi-emf under contact interaction of bodies during cutting as electron potential energy measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that cutting quasi-emf measured under the contact interaction of a number of pure metals (molybdenum, titanium, niobium, iron, copper, beryllium, lead, nickel and cobalt), graphite and silicon correlates closely with Fermi levels calculated for them, i.e. it reflects the potential electron energy. Correlation is observed at different cutting rate (temperature) and consequently at different electron kinetic energy

  13. Inspection of 56Fe γ-Ray angular distributions as a function of incident neutron energy using optical model approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanhoy J.R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron inelastic scattering cross sections measured directly through (n,n or deduced from γ-ray production cross sections following inelastic neutron scattering (n,n′γ are a focus of basic and applied research at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory (www.pa.uky.edu/accelerator. For nuclear data applications, angle-integrated cross sections are desired over a wide range of fast neutron energies. Several days of experimental beam time are required for a data set at each incident neutron energy, which limits the number of angular distributions that can be measured in a reasonable amount of time. Approximations can be employed to generate cross sections with a higher energy resolution, since at 125o, the a2P2 term of the Legendre expansion is identically zero and the a4P4 is assumed to be very small. Provided this assumption is true, a single measurement at 125o would produce the γ-ray production cross section. This project tests these assumptions and energy dependences using the codes CINDY/SCAT and TALYS/ECIS06/SCAT. It is found that care must be taken when interpreting γ-ray excitation functions as cross sections when the incident neutron energy is < 1000 keV above threshold or before the onset of feeding.

  14. Inspection of 56Fe γ-Ray angular distributions as a function of incident neutron energy using optical model approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoy, J. R.; Ramirez, A. P.; Alcorn-Dominguez, D. K.; Hicks, S. F.; Peters, E. E.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Yates, S. W.

    2017-09-01

    Neutron inelastic scattering cross sections measured directly through (n,n) or deduced from γ-ray production cross sections following inelastic neutron scattering (n,n'γ) are a focus of basic and applied research at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory (www.pa.uky.edu/accelerator). For nuclear data applications, angle-integrated cross sections are desired over a wide range of fast neutron energies. Several days of experimental beam time are required for a data set at each incident neutron energy, which limits the number of angular distributions that can be measured in a reasonable amount of time. Approximations can be employed to generate cross sections with a higher energy resolution, since at 125o, the a2P2 term of the Legendre expansion is identically zero and the a4P4 is assumed to be very small. Provided this assumption is true, a single measurement at 125o would produce the γ-ray production cross section. This project tests these assumptions and energy dependences using the codes CINDY/SCAT and TALYS/ECIS06/SCAT. It is found that care must be taken when interpreting γ-ray excitation functions as cross sections when the incident neutron energy is < 1000 keV above threshold or before the onset of feeding.

  15. Thick-target method in the measurement of inner-shell ionization cross-sections by low-energy electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Z.; Wu, Y.; Liu, M.T.; Duan, Y.M.; Tang, C.H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied the thick-target method for the measurements of atomic inner-shell ionization cross-section or X-ray production cross-section by keV electron impact. We find that in the processes of electron impact on the thick targets, the ratios of the characteristic X-ray yields of photoelectric ionization by bremsstrahlung to the total characteristic X-ray yields are Z-dependent and shell-dependent, and the ratios also show the weak energy-dependence. In addition, in the lower incident energy region (i.e. U < 5-6), the contribution from the rediffusion effect and the secondary electrons can be negligible. In general, the thick-target method can be appropriately applied to the measurements of atomic inner-shell ionization cross-sections or X-ray production cross-sections by electron impact for low and medium Z elements in the lower incident electron energy (i.e. U < 5-6). The experimental accuracies by the thick-target method can reach to the level equivalent or superior to the accuracies of experimental data based on the thin-target method. This thick-target method has been applied to the measurement of K-shell ionization cross-sections of Ni element by electron impact in this paper

  16. Dissociative electron attachment, electron transmission, and electron energy-loss study of the temporary negative ion of acetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, R.; Allan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The three title electron-impact techniques are used to study the ground and excited states of acetylene negative ion and their decay processes. The π* resonance at 2.6 eV predissociates into C 2 H - and H. Four narrow resonances are observed in the transmission spectrum in the 7.5--9.5 eV region and assigned to Feshbach and core-excited shape resonances with double occupation of Rydberg orbitals and ground state positive ion core. These four resonances decay into low-lying Rydberg states of neutral acetylene, the first two undergo quasiresonant autodetachment ejecting low energy ( - 2 . One additional resonance is observed in the C - 2 yield, which is not observable in other decay channels. The shapes of the dissociative attachment bands differ qualitatively from the band shapes of the parent and grandparent states, indicating either a strong v dependence of the dissociation rate or the admixture of σ* orbitals in some of the dissociating anion states

  17. Spectrum and angular distribution of low energy electrons from 152Eu deca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Sydorenko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Angular distribution of low energy electrons from 152Eu decay was measured. Measurements were carried out in cylindrical geometry, which permits minimum distortions of data. These data confirm existence of angular distribution dependence on the energy of emitted electrons but this dependence somewhat differs from theory predicted. It is noted that the theory predicts too low intensity of near-zero energy electrons e0 (Ee ~ 1 - 2 eV emission; also, the static screening of charge used in theory should not influence the emission of e0-electrons.

  18. Investigation of electron emission energy composition from micro-pinch discharge plasma with time resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulin, M.A.; Dolgov, A.N.; Kirichenko, N.N.; Savelov, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    Time features of electron emission from micro-pinch discharge plasma are investigated. Detection of > 25 keV energy electrons, emitted in the axial direction and x radiation with > 2 keV quantum energy is performed with nanosecond time resolution using a multichannel system of scintillation detectors. Comparison of amplitude ratio of electron signals from two detectors, placed behind aluminium filters, to the estimated ratio, corresponding to one-component temperature model of particle energy spectrum, allows one to distinguish two groups of emitted electrons: one is characterized by effective kT e e > 30 keV. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Mapping of valence energy losses via energy-filtered annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lin; Sigle, Wilfried; Koch, Christoph T; Nelayah, Jaysen; Srot, Vesna; van Aken, Peter A

    2009-08-01

    The advent of electron monochromators has opened new perspectives on electron energy-loss spectroscopy at low energy losses, including phenomena such as surface plasmon resonances or electron transitions from the valence to the conduction band. In this paper, we report first results making use of the combination of an energy filter and a post-filter annular dark-field detector. This instrumental design allows us to obtain energy-filtered (i.e. inelastic) annular dark-field images in scanning transmission electron microscopy of the 2-dimensional semiconductor band-gap distribution of a GaN/Al(45)Ga(55)N structure and of surface plasmon resonances of silver nanoprisms. In comparison to other approaches, the technique is less prone to inelastic delocalization and relativistic artefacts. The mixed contribution of elastic and inelastic contrast is discussed.

  20. Coherent Pair Production by Photons in the 20-170 GeV Energy Range Incident on Crystals and Birefringence

    CERN Document Server

    Apyan, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballestrero, S.; Biino, C.; Birol, I.; Cenci, P.; Connell, S.H.; Eichblatt, S.; Fonseca, T.; Freund, A.; Gorini, B.; Groess, R.; Ispirian, K.; Ketel, T.J.; Kononets, Yu.V.; Lopez, A.; Mangiarotti, A.; van Rens, B.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Shieh, M.; Sona, P.; Strakhovenko, V.; Uggerhoj, E.; Uggerhj, Ulrik Ingerslev; Unel, G.; Velasco, M.; Vilakazi, Z.Z.; Wessely, O.; Kononets, Yu.V.

    2003-01-01

    The cross section for coherent pair production by linearly polarised photons in the 20-170 GeV energy range was measured for photon aligned incidence on ultra-high quality diamond and germanium crystals. The theoretical description of coherent bremsstrahlung and coherent pair production phenomena is an area of active theoretical debate and development. However, under our experimental conditions, the theory predicted the combined cross section and polarisation experimental observables very well indeed. In macroscopic terms, our experiment measured a birefringence effect in pair production in a crystal. This study of this effect also constituted a measurement of the energy dependent linear polarisation of photons produced by coherent bremsstrahlung in aligned crystals. New technologies for manipulating high energy photon beams can be realised based on an improved understanding of QED phenomena at these energies. In particular, this experiment demonstrates an efficient new polarimetry technique. The pair product...

  1. An overview of power electronic converter technology for renewable energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents power electronic technology which is an enabling tool for modern wind and marine energy conversion systems. In this chapter, the main power electronic devices are described. Various power electronic converter topologies are represented, and commonly used modulation schemes...... and control methods are introduced....

  2. Electron beam guiding by grooved SiO{sub 2} parallel plates without energy loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Yingli; Yu, Deyang, E-mail: d.yu@impcas.ac.cn; Liu, Junliang; Zhang, Mingwu; Yang, Bian; Zhang, Yuezhao; Cai, Xiaohong [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-12-21

    Using a pair of grooved SiO{sub 2} parallel plates, stably guided electron beams were obtained without energy loss at 800–2000 eV. This shows that the transmitted electrons are guided by a self-organized repulsive electric field, paving the way for a self-adaptive manipulation of electron beams.

  3. High energy gain electron beam acceleration by 100TW laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Shuji; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Matoba, Toru; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    A laser wakefield acceleration experiment using a 100TW laser is planed at JAERI-Kansai. High quality and short pulse electron beams are necessary to accelerate the electron beam by the laser. Electron beam - laser synchronization is also necessary. A microtron with a photocathode rf-gun was prepared as a high quality electron injector. The quantum efficiency (QE) of the photocathode of 2x10 -5 was obtained. A charge of 100pC from the microtron was measured. The emittance and pulse width of the electron beam was 6π mm-mrad and 10ps, respectively. In order to produce a short pulse electron beam, and to synchronize between the electron beam and the laser pulse, an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is planned. One of problems of LWFA is the short acceleration length. In order to overcome the problem, a Z-pinch plasma waveguide will be prepared as a laser wakefield acceleration tube for 1 GeV acceleration. (author)

  4. Surface influence on convoy electron emission at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    It is studied the dependence of the production of convoy electrons induced by H + - 60 KeV with surface conditions of Al targets by in situ deposition of Na and O. The conclusion is that convoy electron production increases with the work function of the surface. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  5. Detection methods for cereal grains treated with low and high energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Delincée, Henry; Stahl, Mario; Röder, Olaf; Schaller, Hans Jürgen

    2005-04-01

    Cereal grains can be treated with low energy (<300keV) or high energy (1-10MeV) electrons for decontamination of phytopathogenic and spoilage organisms. In this preliminary study, wheat and barley samples were treated with low energy electrons of 145keV or high energy electrons of 10MeV. To identify the electron treatment, different detection methods have been investigated: (1) photostimulated luminescence (PSL), (2) thermoluminescence (TL), (3) electron spin resonance (ESR) and (4) DNA Comet Assay. These four methods are already standardised at a European level and are now adopted as general Codex methods for detection of irradiated foodstuffs. The results suggest that the most suitable detection methods for electron-treated grains are the PSL and TL methods. The results from the other two methods (ESR and Comet Assay) are not so promising because they seem only to be applicable in special cases.

  6. Long-term preservation of bacon by high energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannah, K.W.; Simic, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Extra long-term storage of frozen, vacuum packed, cured bacon can be achieved by electronation, using 3 MeV electrons generated by an electron accelerator. A combination process consisting of low nitrite curing (40 ppm), smoking, vacuum packaging in Saran plastic, electronation (1 to 3 Mrad), and freezing (-10 C) allows storage for at least 2 1/2 years without any noticeable loss in quality, e.g. color, appearance, smell, or taste. This process also eliminates microbiological hazards associated with Salmonella and C. botulinum. Six Mrad tons/hour throughput of a 3 MeV 50 kw electron beam accelerator for standard sliced bacon packaging indicates a practical and economic commercial use for this combination process. (author)

  7. Innovative energy efficient low-voltage electron beam emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felis, Kenneth P.; Avnery, Tovi; Berejka, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced electron beams (AEB) has developed a modular, low voltage (80-125 keV), high beam current (up to 40 ma), electron emitter with typically 25 cm of beam width, that is housed in an evacuated, returnable chamber that is easy to plug in and connect. The latest in nanofabrication enables AEB to use an ultra-thin beam window. The power supply for AEB's emitter is based on solid-state electronics. This combination of features results in a remarkable electrical efficiency. AEB's electron emitter relies on a touch screen, computer control system. With 80 μm of unit density beam penetration, AEB's electron emitter has gained market acceptance in the curing of opaque, pigmented inks and coatings used on flexible substrates, metals and fiber composites and in the curing of adhesives in foil based laminates

  8. Innovative energy efficient low-voltage electron beam emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Kenneth P.; Avnery, Tovi; Berejka, Anthony J.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced electron beams (AEB) has developed a modular, low voltage (80-125 keV), high beam current (up to 40 ma), electron emitter with typically 25 cm of beam width, that is housed in an evacuated, returnable chamber that is easy to plug in and connect. The latest in nanofabrication enables AEB to use an ultra-thin beam window. The power supply for AEB's emitter is based on solid-state electronics. This combination of features results in a remarkable electrical efficiency. AEB's electron emitter relies on a touch screen, computer control system. With 80 μm of unit density beam penetration, AEB's electron emitter has gained market acceptance in the curing of opaque, pigmented inks and coatings used on flexible substrates, metals and fiber composites and in the curing of adhesives in foil based laminates.

  9. Review of kerma-area product and total energy incident on patients in radiography, mammography and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Hai; He, Wenjun; Huda, Walter; Mah, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    This study estimated the energy incident on patients in radiography, mammography and CT using data related to X-ray beam quantity and quality. The total X-ray beam quantity is the average Air Kerma multiplied by the X-ray beam area and expressed as the Kerma-Area Product (Gy cm -2 ). The X-ray beam quality primarily depends on the target material (and anode angle), X-ray voltage (and ripple) as well as X-ray beam filtration. For any X-ray spectra, dividing total energy (fluence x mean energy) by the X-ray beam Kerma-Area Product yields the energy per Kerma-Area Product value (ε/KAP). Published data on X-ray spectra characteristics and energy fluence per Air Kerma conversion factors were used to determine 1/KAP factors. In radiography, ε/KAP increased from 6 mJ Gy -1 cm -2 at the lowest X-ray tube voltage (50 kV) to 25 mJ Gy -1 cm -2 at the highest X-ray tube voltage (140 kV). 1/KAP values ranged between 1 and 5 mJ Gy -1 cm -2 in mammography and between 24 and 42 mJ Gy -1 cm -2 in CT. Changes in waveform ripple resulted in variations in ε/KAP of up to 15 %, similar to the effect of changes resulting in the choice of anode angle. For monoenergetic X-ray photons, there was a sigmoidal-type increase in ε/KAP from 2 mJ Gy -1 cm -2 at 20 keV to 42 mJ Gy -1 cm -2 at 80 keV. However, between 80 and 150 keV, the ε/KAP shows variations with changing photon energy of <10 %. Taking the average spectrum energy to consist of monoenergetic X rays generally overestimates the true value of ε/KAP. This study illustrated that the energy incident on a patient in any area of radiological imaging can be estimated from the total X-ray beam intensity (KAP) when X-ray beam quality is taken into account. Energy incident on the patient can be used to estimate the energy absorbed by the patient and the corresponding patient effective dose. (authors)

  10. Tracking Electron Uptake from a Cathode into Shewanella Cells: Implications for Energy Acquisition from Solid-Substrate Electron Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette R. Rowe

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available While typically investigated as a microorganism capable of extracellular electron transfer to minerals or anodes, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can also facilitate electron flow from a cathode to terminal electron acceptors, such as fumarate or oxygen, thereby providing a model system for a process that has significant environmental and technological implications. This work demonstrates that cathodic electrons enter the electron transport chain of S. oneidensis when oxygen is used as the terminal electron acceptor. The effect of electron transport chain inhibitors suggested that a proton gradient is generated during cathode oxidation, consistent with the higher cellular ATP levels measured in cathode-respiring cells than in controls. Cathode oxidation also correlated with an increase in the cellular redox (NADH/FMNH2 pool determined with a bioluminescence assay, a proton uncoupler, and a mutant of proton-pumping NADH oxidase complex I. This work suggested that the generation of NADH/FMNH2 under cathodic conditions was linked to reverse electron flow mediated by complex I. A decrease in cathodic electron uptake was observed in various mutant strains, including those lacking the extracellular electron transfer components necessary for anodic-current generation. While no cell growth was observed under these conditions, here we show that cathode oxidation is linked to cellular energy acquisition, resulting in a quantifiable reduction in the cellular decay rate. This work highlights a potential mechanism for cell survival and/or persistence on cathodes, which might extend to environments where growth and division are severely limited.

  11. Electrons in a relativistic-intensity laser field: generation of zeptosecond electromagnetic pulses and energy spectrum of the accelerated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, A A; Galkin, A L; Kalashnikov, M P; Korobkin, V V; Romanovsky, Mikhail Yu; Shiryaev, O B

    2011-01-01

    We study the motion of an electron and emission of electromagnetic waves by an electron in the field of a relativistically intense laser pulse. The dynamics of the electron is described by the Newton equation with the Lorentz force in the right-hand side. It is shown that the electrons may be ejected from the interaction region with high energy. The energy spectrum of these electrons and the technique of using the spectrum to assess the maximal intensity in the focus are analysed. It is found that electromagnetic radiation of an electron moving in an intense laser field occurs within a small angle around the direction of the electron trajectory tangent. The tangent quickly changes its direction in space; therefore, electromagnetic radiation of the electron in the far-field zone in a certain direction in the vicinity of the tangent is a short pulse with a duration as short as zeptoseconds. The calculation of the temporary and spectral distribution of the radiation field is carried out. (superintense laser fields)

  12. Electron linac for medical isotope production with improved energy efficiency and isotope recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, John; Walters, Dean; Virgo, Matt; Lewellen, John

    2015-09-08

    A method and isotope linac system are provided for producing radio-isotopes and for recovering isotopes. The isotope linac is an energy recovery linac (ERL) with an electron beam being transmitted through an isotope-producing target. The electron beam energy is recollected and re-injected into an accelerating structure. The ERL provides improved efficiency with reduced power requirements and provides improved thermal management of an isotope target and an electron-to-x-ray converter.

  13. A Wien filter velocity analyzer for intermediate energy electron impact spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boechat-Roberty, H.M. [Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, G.G.B. de [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    1995-09-01

    A new electron velocity analyzer based on the Wien Filter principle, has been developed. In this analyzer an electrical and magnetic field perpendicular to each other, disperse electrons of different energies. Immersion electrostatic lenses are employed, in order to decelerate and accelerate the electrons respectively before and after energy dispersion. This analyzer has demonstrated an excellent capability in the determination of energy-loss spectra in an extended impact energy range (0.2 to 1.5 KeV). The high inherent signal/noise ratio has lead to the acquisition of well-defined and reliable inner-shell excitation spectra. (author). 18 refs.

  14. Optimization of Monochromated TEM for Ultimate Resolution Imaging and Ultrahigh Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Lopatin, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    The performance of a monochromated transmission electron microscope with Wien type monochromator is optimized to achieve an extremely narrow energy spread of electron beam and an ultrahigh energy resolution with spectroscopy. The energy spread in the beam is improved by almost an order of magnitude as compared to specified values. The optimization involves both the monochromator and the electron energy loss detection system. We demonstrate boosted capability of optimized systems with respect to ultra-low loss EELS and sub-angstrom resolution imaging (in a combination with spherical aberration correction).

  15. Observation of high energy electrons and protons in the South Atlantic geomagnetic anomaly by Ohzora Satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, K.; Murakami, H.; Nakamoto, A.; Hasebe, N.; Kikuche, J.; Doke, T.

    1988-01-01

    Observed results of the high energy electrons (0.19 - 3.2 MeV) and protons (0.58 - 35 MeV) of the South Atlantic Geomagnetic Anomaly are presented. Two silicon Δ E-E telescopes on the ohzora satellite (EXOS-C, 1984-15A) were used to observe the high energy particle and the maximum intensity of electrons and protons. The powers of energy spectra above 1 MeV have different values from energy region below 1 MeV. The electron and proton intensities are greatest at pitch angle maximized at 90 0 . (author) [pt

  16. Studying substrate effects on localized surface plasmons in an individual silver nanoparticle using electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshifumi; Nemoto, Takashi; Kurata, Hiroki, E-mail: kurata@eels.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2017-04-15

    In this study, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in conjunction with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) was used to investigate surface plasmons in a single silver nanoparticle (NP) on a magnesium oxide substrate, employing an incident electron trajectory parallel to the substrate surface. This parallel irradiation allowed a direct exploration of the substrate effects on localized surface plasmon (LSP) excitations as a function of the distance from the substrate. The presence of the substrate was found to lower the symmetry of the system, such that the resonance energies of LSPs were dependent on the polarization direction relative to the substrate surface. The resulting mode splitting could be detected by applying different electron trajectories, providing results similar to those previously obtained from optical studies using polarized light. However, the LSP maps obtained by STEM-EELS analysis show an asymmetric intensity distribution with the highest intensity at the top surface of the NP (that is, far from the substrate), a result that is not predicted by optical simulations. We show that modifications of the applied electric field by the substrate cause this asymmetric intensity distribution in the LSP maps.

  17. From Molecular Electronics to Solar Thermal Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stine Tetzschner

    for the utilization of solar energy. An eective technology for storing the solar energy is required. This thesis focuses on solar thermal energy storage in molecules, since it oers a very compact and eective storage method. The rst chapter after the introduction of the thesis, chapter two, introduces the fundamental...... of storing solar thermal energy. A theoretical model describing both the macroscopic and the microscopic parameters of a hybrid solar thermal system consisting of a solar water heating system and a molecular solar thermal system (MOST) for energy storage is presented. The model elucidates how much stored...... energy dierent types of molecular classes can be expected to produce in a realistic system setup. The photochromic system of dihydroazulene (DHA)/ vinylheptafulvene (VHF) is of particular interest. The DHA/VHF system is found to be a very promising molecular system for solar thermal energy storage...

  18. Structure and Dissipation Characteristics of an Electron Diffusion Region Observed by MMS During a Rapid, Normal-Incidence Magnetopause Crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Argall, M. R.; Alm, L.; Farrugia, C. J.; Forbes, T. G.; Giles, B. L.; Rager, A.; Dorelli, J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Wilder, F. D.; Ahmadi, N.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Khotyaintsev, Y.

    2017-12-01

    On 22 October 2016, the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft encountered the electron diffusion region (EDR) when the magnetosheath field was southward, and there were signatures of fast reconnection, including flow jets, Hall fields, and large power dissipation. One rapid, normal-incidence crossing, during which the EDR structure was almost stationary in the boundary frame, provided an opportunity to observe the spatial structure for the zero guide field case of magnetic reconnection. The reconnection electric field was determined unambiguously to be 2-3 mV/m. There were clear signals of fluctuating parallel electric fields, up to 6 mV/m on the magnetosphere side of the diffusion region, associated with a Hall-like parallel current feature on the electron scale. The width of the main EDR structure was determined to be 2 km (1.8 de). Although the MMS spacecraft were in their closest tetrahedral separation of 8 km, the divergences and curls for these thin current structures could therefore not be computed in the usual manner. A method is developed to determine these quantities on a much smaller scale and applied to compute the normal component of terms in the generalized Ohm's law for the positions of each individual spacecraft (not a barocentric average). Although the gradient pressure term has a qualitative dependence that follows the observed variation of E + Ve × B, the quantitative magnitude of these terms differs by more than a factor of 2, which is shown to be greater than the respective errors. Thus, future research is required to find the manner in which Ohm's law is balanced.

  19. Correlation between energy deposition and molecular damage from Auger electrons: A case study of ultra-low energy (5–18 eV) electron interactions with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaee, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Rezaee@USherbrooke.ca; Hunting, Darel J.; Sanche, Léon [Groupe en Sciences des Radiations, Département de Médecine Nucléaire et Radiobiologie, Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The present study introduces a new method to establish a direct correlation between biologically related physical parameters (i.e., stopping and damaging cross sections, respectively) for an Auger-electron emitting radionuclide decaying within a target molecule (e.g., DNA), so as to evaluate the efficacy of the radionuclide at the molecular level. These parameters can be applied to the dosimetry of Auger electrons and the quantification of their biological effects, which are the main criteria to assess the therapeutic efficacy of Auger-electron emitting radionuclides. Methods: Absorbed dose and stopping cross section for the Auger electrons of 5–18 eV emitted by{sup 125}I within DNA were determined by developing a nanodosimetric model. The molecular damages induced by these Auger electrons were investigated by measuring damaging cross section, including that for the formation of DNA single- and double-strand breaks. Nanoscale films of pure plasmid DNA were prepared via the freeze-drying technique and subsequently irradiated with low-energy electrons at various fluences. The damaging cross sections were determined by employing a molecular survival model to the measured exposure–response curves for induction of DNA strand breaks. Results: For a single decay of{sup 125}I within DNA, the Auger electrons of 5–18 eV deposit the energies of 12.1 and 9.1 eV within a 4.2-nm{sup 3} volume of a hydrated or dry DNA, which results in the absorbed doses of 270 and 210 kGy, respectively. DNA bases have a major contribution to the deposited energies. Ten-electronvolt and high linear energy transfer 100-eV electrons have a similar cross section for the formation of DNA double-strand break, while 100-eV electrons are twice as efficient as 10 eV in the induction of single-strand break. Conclusions: Ultra-low-energy electrons (<18 eV) substantially contribute to the absorbed dose and to the molecular damage from Auger-electron emitting radionuclides; hence, they should

  20. Contribution from individual nearby sources to the spectrum of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedrati, R.; Attallah, R.

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, very important data on high-energy cosmic-ray electrons and positrons from high-precision space-born and ground-based experiments have attracted a great deal of interest. These particles represent a unique probe for studying local comic-ray accelerators because they lose energy very rapidly. These energy losses reduce the lifetime so drastically that high-energy cosmic-ray electrons can attain the Earth only from rather local astrophysical sources. This work aims at calculating, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the contribution from some known nearby astrophysical sources to the cosmic-ray electron/positron spectra at high energy (≥10GeV). The background to the electron energy spectrum from distant sources is determined with the help of the GALPROP code. The obtained numerical results are compared with a set of experimental data