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Sample records for incident coronary events

  1. Long term exposure to ambient air pollution and incidence of acute coronary events

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    Cesaroni, Giulia; Forastiere, Francesco; Stafoggia, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    To study the effect of long term exposure to airborne pollutants on the incidence of acute coronary events in 11 cohorts participating in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE).......To study the effect of long term exposure to airborne pollutants on the incidence of acute coronary events in 11 cohorts participating in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE)....

  2. Coronary Artery Calcium Distribution Is an Independent Predictor of Incident Major Coronary Heart Disease Events: Results From the Framingham Heart Study.

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    Ferencik, Maros; Pencina, Karol M; Liu, Ting; Ghemigian, Khristine; Baltrusaitis, Kristin; Massaro, Joseph M; D'Agostino, Ralph B; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Hoffmann, Udo

    2017-10-01

    The presence and extent of coronary artery calcium (CAC) are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular events. We determined whether information on the distribution of CAC and coronary dominance as detected by cardiac computed tomography were incremental to traditional Agatston score (AS) in predicting incident major coronary heart disease (CHD). We assessed total AS and the presence of CAC per coronary artery, per segment, and coronary dominance by computed tomography in participants from the offspring and third-generation cohorts of the Framingham Heart Study. The primary outcome was major CHD (myocardial infarction or CHD death). We performed multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis and calculated relative integrated discrimination improvement. In 1268 subjects (mean age, 56.2±10.3 years, 63.2% men) with AS >0 and no history of major CHD, a total of 42 major CHD events occurred during median follow-up of 7.4 years. The number of coronary arteries with CAC (hazard ratio, 1.68 per artery; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-2.57; P =0.02) and the presence of CAC in the proximal dominant coronary artery (hazard ratio, 2.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-5.83; P =0.02) were associated with major CHD events after multivariable adjustment for Framingham risk score and categories of AS. In addition, measures of CAC distribution improved discriminatory capacity for major CHD events (relative integrated discrimination improvement, 0.14). Distribution of coronary atherosclerosis, especially CAC in the proximal dominant coronary artery and an increased number of coronary arteries with CAC, predict major CHD events independently of the traditional AS in community-dwelling men and women. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Catechol-o-methyltransferase gene polymorphism modifies the effect of coffee intake on incidence of acute coronary events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertti Happonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of coffee intake as a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD has been debated for decades. We examined whether the relationship between coffee intake and incidence of CHD events is dependent on the metabolism of circulating catecholamines, as determined by functional polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a cohort of 773 men who were 42 to 60 years old and free of symptomatic CHD at baseline in 1984-89, 78 participants experienced an acute coronary event during an average follow-up of 13 years. In logistic regression adjusting for age, smoking, family history of CHD, vitamin C deficiency, blood pressure, plasma cholesterol concentration, and diabetes, the odds ratio (90% confidence interval comparing heavy coffee drinkers with the low activity COMT genotype with those with the high activity or heterozygotic genotypes was 3.2 (1.2-8.4. Urinary adrenaline excretion increased with increasing coffee intake, being over two-fold in heavy drinkers compared with nondrinkers (p = 0.008 for trend. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Heavy coffee consumption increases the incidence of acute coronary events in men with low but not high COMT activity. Further studies are required to determine to which extent circulating catecholamines mediate the relationship between coffee intake and CHD.

  4. Long term exposure to ambient air pollution and incidence of acute coronary events: prospective cohort study and meta-analysis in 11 European cohorts from the ESCAPE Project.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cesaroni, Giulia; Forastiere, Francesco; Stafoggia, Massimo; Andersen, Zorana J; Badaloni, Chiara; Beelen, Rob|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483100X; Caracciolo, Barbara; de Faire, Ulf; Erbel, Raimund; Eriksen, Kirsten T; Fratiglioni, Laura; Galassi, Claudia; Hampel, Regina; Heier, Margit; Hennig, Frauke; Hilding, Agneta; Hoffmann, Barbara; Houthuijs, Danny; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Korek, Michal; Lanki, Timo; Leander, Karin; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Migliore, Enrica; Ostenson, Caes-Göran; Overvad, Kim; Pedersen, Nancy L; J, Juha Pekkanen; Penell, Johanna; Pershagen, Göran; Pyko, Andrei; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Ranzi, Andrea; Ricceri, Fulvio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Salomaa, Veikko; Swart, Wim; Turunen, Anu W; Vineis, Paolo; Weinmayr, Gudrun; Wolf, Kathrin; de Hoogh, Kees; Hoek, Gerard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069553475; Brunekreef, Bert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067548180; Peters, Annette

    OBJECTIVES: To study the effect of long term exposure to airborne pollutants on the incidence of acute coronary events in 11 cohorts participating in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE).\

  5. Risk of Incident Coronary Heart Disease Events in Men Compared to Women by Menopause Type and Race

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    Kim, Catherine; Cushman, Mary; Khodneva, Yulia; Lisabeth, Lynda D; Judd, Suzanne; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Howard, Virginia J; Safford, Monika M

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined whether type of menopause affects sex differences in coronary heart disease (CHD) events and whether the impact is similar in blacks and whites. Methods and Results Participants were enrolled in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort between 2003 and 2007 without CHD at baseline (n=23 086). Cox regression models were used to calculate the hazard of incident nonfatal CHD (definite or probable myocardial infarction) and acute CHD death, adjusting for age, age at last menstrual period menopause (hazard ratio [HR], 0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31, 0.66) and surgical menopause (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.42, 0.99) had a reduced hazard of nonfatal events, compared to white men. Black women in natural menopause (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.47, 1.03), but not surgical menopause (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.51, 1.29), had a marginally reduced hazard of nonfatal events, compared to black men. Women had lower risk of acute CHD death than men regardless of their menopause type and race. Conclusions Sex differences in the risk of incident CHD events were larger among whites than blacks and varied by type of menopause. Women consistently had a lower risk of incident CHD death than men, but the magnitude of sex differences was greater in whites than blacks for nonfatal events, regardless of menopause type. PMID:26133958

  6. Leukocyte count is associated with incidence of coronary events, but not with stroke: a prospective cohort study.

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    Li, Cairu; Engström, Gunnar; Hedblad, Bo

    2010-04-01

    Elevated leukocyte count is a classic marker of systemic inflammation. This study examined whether the leukocyte count is associated with incidence of coronary events (CE) and stroke during a long follow-up period. A total of 17,131 men and 2932 women, aged 27-61 years, without history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), were enrolled. Incidence of CE and stroke was studied in relation to leukocyte concentrations over a mean follow-up of 24 years. During the follow-up period, 2600 CE and 1333 stroke events occurred. After risk factor adjustments, leukocyte concentrations in the highest quartile (vs. lowest, >7.0 vs. leukocytes and CE was most pronounced in younger men (aged 27-46) and men without hypertension. In younger men, high leukocytes were associated with early CE (within 10 years of follow-up) and late CE (>10 years of follow-up). In older men (46-61 years), leukocytes were not associated with CE after more than 10 years of follow-up. The leukocyte count was not associated with incidence of stroke. Elevated leukocyte count in men is associated with increased incidence of CE, but not with stroke. The increased risk persisted after more than 10 years of follow-up in younger, but not in older men. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term Exposure to Particulate Matter Constituents and the Incidence of Coronary Events in 11 European Cohorts

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    Wolf, Kathrin; Stafoggia, Massimo; Cesaroni, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality but little is known about the role of the chemical composition of PM. This study examined the association of residential long-term exposure to PM components...... (PM2.5), and a priori selected constituents (copper, iron, nickel, potassium, silicon, sulfur, vanadium, and zinc) were estimated with land-use regression models. We used Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for a common set of confounders to estimate cohort-specific component effects...... to an association between long-term exposure to PM constituents and coronary events, especially for indicators of road dust....

  8. Panic disorder and incident coronary heart disease: a systematic review and meta-regression in 1131612 persons and 58111 cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, P J; Turnbull, D A; Beltrame, J; Horowitz, J; Cosh, S; Baumeister, H; Wittert, G A

    2015-10-01

    Substantial healthcare resources are devoted to panic disorder (PD) and coronary heart disease (CHD); however, the association between these conditions remains controversial. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review of studies assessing the association between PD, related syndromes, and incident CHD. Relevant studies were retrieved from Medline, EMBASE, SCOPUS and PsycINFO without restrictions from inception to January 2015 supplemented with hand-searching. We included studies that reported hazard ratios (HR) or sufficient data to calculate the risk ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) which were pooled using a random-effects model. Studies utilizing self-reported CHD were ineligible. Twelve studies were included comprising 1 131 612 persons and 58 111 incident CHD cases. PD was associated with the primary incident CHD endpoint [adjusted HR (aHR) 1.47, 95% CI 1.24-1.74, p < 0.00001] even after excluding angina (aHR 1.49, 95% CI 1.22-1.81, p < 0.00001). High to moderate quality evidence suggested an association with incident major adverse cardiac events (MACE; aHR 1.40, 95% CI 1.16-1.69, p = 0.0004) and myocardial infarction (aHR 1.36, 95% CI 1.12-1.66, p = 0.002). The risk for CHD was significant after excluding depression (aHR 1.64, 95% CI 1.45-1.85) and after depression adjustment (aHR 1.38, 95% CI 1.03-1.87). Age, sex, length of follow-up, socioeconomic status and diabetes were sources of heterogeneity in the primary endpoint. Meta-analysis showed that PD was independently associated with incident CHD, myocardial infarction and MACE; however, reverse causality cannot be ruled out and there was evidence of heterogeneity.

  9. Incidence and predictors of coronary stent thrombosis

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    D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Bollati, Mario; Clementi, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Stent thrombosis remains among the most feared complications of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting. However, data on its incidence and predictors are sparse and conflicting. We thus aimed to perform a collaborative systematic review on incidence and predictors of stent...... thrombosis....

  10. Development of a new diabetes risk prediction tool for incident coronary heart disease events: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study.

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    Yeboah, Joseph; Erbel, Raimund; Delaney, Joseph Chris; Nance, Robin; Guo, Mengye; Bertoni, Alain G; Budoff, Matthew; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Burke, Gregory L; Wong, Nathan D; Lehmann, Nils; Herrington, David M; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Greenland, Philip

    2014-10-01

    We develop a new diabetes CHD risk estimator using traditional risk factors plus coronary artery calcium (CAC), ankle-brachial index (ABI), high sensitivity C-reactive protein, family history of CHD, and carotid intima-media thickness and compared it with United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes study (UKPDS), Framingham risk and the NCEP/ATP III risk scores in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We combined data from T2DM without clinical CVD in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study (N = 1343). After a mean follow-up of 8.5 years, 85 (6.3%) participants had incident CHD. Among the novel risk markers, CAC best predicted CHD independent of the FRS [hazard ratio: HR (95% CI): log (CAC +25):1.69 (1.45-1.97), p 25 and ≤125:2.29 (0.87-5.95), >125 and ≤400: 3.87 (1.57-9.57), >400: 5.97 (2.57-13.84), respectively). The MESA-HNR diabetes CHD risk score has better accuracy for the main outcome versus the FRS or UKPDS [area under curve (AUC) of 0.76 vs. 0.70 and 0.69, respectively; all p III guidelines, the MESA-HNR score has an NRI of 0.74 for the main outcome. This new CHD risk estimator has better discriminative ability for incident CHD than the FRS, UKPDS, and the ATP III/NCEP recommendations in a multi-ethnic cohort with T2DM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Usefulness of Multiple Biomarkers for Predicting Incident Major Adverse Cardiac Events in Patients Who Underwent Diagnostic Coronary Angiography (from the Catheter Sampled Blood Archive in Cardiovascular Diseases [CASABLANCA] Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Cian P; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Gaggin, Hanna K; Simon, Mandy L; Ibrahim, Nasrien E; Gandhi, Parul; Kelly, Noreen; Motiwala, Shweta R; Belcher, Arianna M; Harisiades, Jamie; Magaret, Craig A; Rhyne, Rhonda F; Januzzi, James L

    2017-07-01

    We sought to develop a multiple biomarker approach for prediction of incident major adverse cardiac events (MACE; composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stroke) in patients referred for coronary angiography. In a 649-participant training cohort, predictors of MACE within 1 year were identified using least-angle regression; over 50 clinical variables and 109 biomarkers were analyzed. Predictive models were generated using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator with logistic regression. A score derived from the final model was developed and evaluated with a 278-patient validation set during a median of 3.6 years follow-up. The scoring system consisted of N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), kidney injury molecule-1, osteopontin, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1; no clinical variables were retained in the predictive model. In the validation cohort, each biomarker improved model discrimination or calibration for MACE; the final model had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.79 (p Time-to-first MACE was shorter in those with an elevated score (p <0.001); such risk extended to at least to 4 years. In conclusion, in a cohort of patients who underwent coronary angiography, we describe a novel multiple biomarker score for incident MACE within 1 year (NCT00842868). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Women, Loneliness, and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Rebecca C.; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine associations between loneliness and risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) over a 19-year follow-up period in a community sample of men and women. Loneliness, the perceived discrepancy between actual and desired social relationships, has been linked to several adverse health outcomes. However, no previous research has prospectively examined the association between loneliness and incident CHD in a community sample of men and women. Methods Hypotheses were examined using data from the First National Health and Nutrition Survey and its follow-up studies (n = 3003). Loneliness, assessed by one item from the Center for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression scale, and covariates were derived from baseline interviews. Incident CHD was derived from hospital records/death certificates over 19 years of follow-up. Hypotheses were evaluated, using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Among women, high loneliness was associated with increased risk of incident CHD (high: hazard ratio = 1.76, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.17â2.63; medium: hazard ratio = 0.98, 95% Confidence Interval = 0.64â1.49; reference: low), controlling for age, race, education, income, marital status, hypertension, diabetes, cholesterol, physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and body mass index. Findings persisted additionally controlling for depressive symptoms. No significant associations were observed among men. Conclusions Loneliness was prospectively associated with increased risk of incident CHD, controlling for multiple confounding factors. Loneliness among women may merit clinical attention, not only due to its impact on quality of life but also its potential implications for cardiovascular health. PMID:19661189

  13. Epigenetic Patterns in Blood Associated With Lipid Traits Predict Incident Coronary Heart Disease Events and Are Enriched for Results From Genome-Wide Association Studies.

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    Hedman, Åsa K; Mendelson, Michael M; Marioni, Riccardo E; Gustafsson, Stefan; Joehanes, Roby; Irvin, Marguerite R; Zhi, Degui; Sandling, Johanna K; Yao, Chen; Liu, Chunyu; Liang, Liming; Huan, Tianxiao; McRae, Allan F; Demissie, Serkalem; Shah, Sonia; Starr, John M; Cupples, L Adrienne; Deloukas, Panos; Spector, Timothy D; Sundström, Johan; Krauss, Ronald M; Arnett, Donna K; Deary, Ian J; Lind, Lars; Levy, Daniel; Ingelsson, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified loci influencing circulating lipid concentrations in humans; further information on novel contributing genes, pathways, and biology may be gained through studies of epigenetic modifications. To identify epigenetic changes associated with lipid concentrations, we assayed genome-wide DNA methylation at cytosine-guanine dinucleotides (CpGs) in whole blood from 2306 individuals from 2 population-based cohorts, with replication of findings in 2025 additional individuals. We identified 193 CpGs associated with lipid levels in the discovery stage ( P epigenetic mechanisms related to previous genome-wide association studies discoveries, and provide evidence implicating epigenetic regulation of reverse cholesterol transport in blood in relation to occurrence of cardiovascular disease events. © 2017 The Authors.

  14. A review of clinical trials in dietary interventions to decrease the incidence of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miettinen Tatu A

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Of the associations between dietary elements and coronary artery disease (CAD, the greatest body of evidence deals with the beneficial effect of reducing the dietary intake of saturated fatty acids and cholesterol. Furthermore, it is well established, on the basis of convincing evidence, that reduction in serum total cholesterol results in reduction in coronary morbidity and mortality, as well as in regression of other atherosclerotic manifestations.In fact, dietary intervention studies revealed that it is possible to reduce the incidence of coronary death and nonfatal myocardial infarction, as well as manifestations of atherosclerosis in cerebral and peripheral arteries, by reducing dietary intake of saturated fat and cholesterol. In two recently reported dietary interventions the incidence of coronary events, especially coronary mortality, and total mortality were reduced by increased intake of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and by a modification of the diet toward a Mediterranean-type diet (rich in α-linolenic acid. In addition to those findings, the potential efficacy of the dietary newcomers phytostanol and phytosterol esters on reducing coronary incidence is discussed in the present review.

  15. Metabolic Predictors of Incident Coronary Heart Disease in Women.

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    Paynter, Nina P; Balasubramanian, Raji; Giulianini, Franco; Wang, Dong D; Tinker, Lesley F; Gopal, Shuba; Deik, Amy A; Bullock, Kevin; Pierce, Kerry A; Scott, Justin; Martínez-González, Miguel A; Estruch, Ramon; Manson, JoAnn E; Cook, Nancy R; Albert, Christine M; Clish, Clary B; Rexrode, Kathryn M

    2018-02-20

    Although metabolomic profiling offers promise for the prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD), and metabolic risk factors are more strongly associated with CHD in women than men, limited data are available for women. We applied a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry metabolomics platform to measure 371 metabolites in a discovery set of postmenopausal women (472 incident CHD cases, 472 controls) with validation in an independent set of postmenopausal women (312 incident CHD cases, 315 controls). Eight metabolites, primarily oxidized lipids, were significantly dysregulated in cases after the adjustment for matching and CHD risk factors in both the discovery and validation data sets. One oxidized phospholipid, C34:2 hydroxy-phosphatidylcholine, remained associated with CHD after further adjustment for other validated metabolites. Subjects with C34:2 hydroxy-phosphatidylcholine levels in the highest quartile had a 4.7-fold increase in CHD odds in comparison with the lowest quartile; C34:2 hydroxy-phosphatidylcholine also significantly improved the area under the curve ( P <0.01) for CHD. The C34:2 hydroxy-phosphatidylcholine findings were replicated in a third replication data set of 980 men and women (230 cardiovascular events) with a stronger association observed in women. These data replicate known metabolite predictors, identify novel markers, and support the relationship between lipid oxidation and subsequent CHD. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Coronary events in patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation: perioperative evaluation and management.

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    Ali, Asghar; Bhardwaj, Hem L; Heuman, Douglas M; Jovin, Ion S

    2013-01-01

    Patients with advanced liver disease have a high prevalence of cardiac risk factors. The stress of liver transplant surgery predisposes these patients to major cardiac events, such as myocardial infarction or ventricular arrhythmias in addition to heart failure exacerbation. Liver transplant patients who experience coronary events in the perioperative period have a decreased five-yr survival rate. Cardiovascular risk stratification prior to liver transplant can be accomplished by dobutamine stress echocardiography, stress myocardial perfusion imaging, cardiac computed tomography, and coronary angiography. Pre-liver transplant management of cardiovascular pathology includes cardiovascular intervention like percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary bypass graft surgery, or medical management. Thorough screening and optimal management of underlying cardiovascular pathology and cardiovascular risk factors should decrease the incidence of new cardiac events in liver transplant recipients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Relationship of Hypertension to Coronary Atherosclerosis and Cardiac Events in Patients With Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Rine; Baskaran, Lohendran; Gransar, Heidi; Budoff, Matthew J; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Chow, Benjamin J W; DeLago, Augustin; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Cury, Ricardo; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert; Shaw, Leslee J; Villines, Todd C; Dunning, Allison; Marques, Hugo; Pontone, Gianluca; Andreini, Daniele; Rubinshtein, Ronen; Bax, Jeroen; Jones, Erica; Hindoyan, Niree; Gomez, Millie; Lin, Fay Y; Min, James K; Berman, Daniel S

    2017-08-01

    Hypertension is an atherosclerosis factor and is associated with cardiovascular risk. We investigated the relationship between hypertension and the presence, extent, and severity of coronary atherosclerosis in coronary computed tomographic angiography and cardiac events risk. Of 17 181 patients enrolled in the CONFIRM registry (Coronary CT Angiography Evaluation for Clinical Outcomes: An International Multicenter Registry) who underwent ≥64-detector row coronary computed tomographic angiography, we identified 14 803 patients without known coronary artery disease. Of these, 1434 hypertensive patients were matched to 1434 patients without hypertension. Major adverse cardiac events risk of hypertension and non-hypertensive patients was evaluated with Cox proportional hazards models. The prognostic associations between hypertension and no-hypertension with increasing degree of coronary stenosis severity (nonobstructive or obstructive ≥50%) and extent of coronary artery disease (segment involvement score of 1-5, >5) was also assessed. Hypertension patients less commonly had no coronary atherosclerosis and more commonly had nonobstructive and 1-, 2-, and 3-vessel disease than the no-hypertension group. During a mean follow-up of 5.2±1.2 years, 180 patients experienced cardiac events, with 104 (2.0%) occurring in the hypertension group and 76 (1.5%) occurring in the no-hypertension group (hazard ratios, 1.4; 95% confidence intervals, 1.0-1.9). Compared with no-hypertension patients without coronary atherosclerosis, hypertension patients with no coronary atherosclerosis and obstructive coronary disease tended to have higher risk of cardiac events. Similar trends were observed with respect to extent of coronary artery disease. Compared with no-hypertension patients, hypertensive patients have increased presence, extent, and severity of coronary atherosclerosis and tend to have an increase in major adverse cardiac events. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Low Incidence of Contrast Induced Nephropathy after Coronary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is associated with increased risk of in-hospital morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to find out whether continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) after coronary angiography in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is associated with a lower incidence ...

  19. Perceived job insecurity as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, George David

    2013-01-01

    To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease.......To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease....

  20. The Risk of Cardiovascular Events After an Acute Coronary Event Remains High, Especially During the First Year, Despite Revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Assi, Emad; López-López, Andrea; González-Salvado, Violeta; Redondo-Diéguez, Alfredo; Peña-Gil, Carlos; Bouzas-Cruz, Noelia; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Riziq-Yousef Abumuaileq, Rami; García-Acuña, José M; González-Juanatey, José R

    2016-01-01

    There is little information on the incidence and predictors of infarction, stroke, or cardiovascular death after acute coronary syndrome. We investigated these aspects and developed tools for predicting these events according to the time of their occurrence. A retrospective study was conducted of 4858 patients who survived an acute coronary event. We analyzed the incidence and predictors of acute myocardial infarction, stroke, or cardiovascular death during the first year (n=4858) vs successive years (n=4345 patients free of composite events during the first year). There were 329 events in the first year (cumulative incidence function: 7.3% person-years) and 616 in successive years (21.5% person-years; follow-up 4.9±2.4 years). The risk of events during the first year per tertile was 2.5% person-years in the low-risk tertile ( 6 points) (P 6 points) (P<.001). The 2 scales showed the following predictive indexes: C statistic, 0.74 and 0.69, respectively; P (Hosmer-Lemeshow test)≥0.44 CONCLUSION: The risk of recurrence of cardiovascular events remains high after acute coronary syndrome. The level of risk can be easily quantified with acceptable predictive ability. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Coding, recording and incidence of different forms of coronary heart disease in primary care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaraj Bhattarai

    Full Text Available To evaluate the coding, recording and incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD in primary care electronic medical records.Data were drawn from the UK General Practice Research Database. Analyses evaluated the occurrence of 271 READ medical diagnostic codes, including categories for 'Angina', 'Myocardial Infarction', 'Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting' (CABG, 'percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty' (PCTA and 'Other Coronary Heart Disease'. Time-to-event analyses were implemented to evaluate occurrences of different groups of codes after the index date.Among 300,020 participants aged greater than 30 years there were 75,197 unique occurrences of coronary heart disease codes in 24,244 participants, with 12,495 codes for incident events and 62,702 for prevalent events. Among incident event codes, 3,607 (28.87% were for angina, 3,262 (26.11% were for MI, 514 (4.11% for PCTA, 161 (1.29% for CABG and 4,951 (39.62% were for 'Other CHD'. Among prevalent codes, 20,254 (32.30% were for angina, 3,644 (5.81% for MI, 34,542 (55.09% for 'Other CHD' and 4,262 (6.80% for CABG or PCTA. Among 3,685 participants initially diagnosed exclusively with 'Other CHD' codes, 17.1% were recorded with angina within 5 years, 5.6% with myocardial infarction, 6.3% with CABG and 8.6% with PCTA. From 2000 to 2010, the overall incidence of CHD declined, as did the incidence of angina, but the incidence of MI did not change. The frequency of CABG declined, while PCTA increased.In primary care electronic records, a substantial proportion of coronary heart disease events are recorded with codes that do not distinguish between different clinical presentations of CHD. The results draw attention to the need to improve coding practice in primary care. The results also draw attention to the importance of code selection in research studies and the need for sensitivity analyses using different sets of codes.

  2. Population structure from NOS genes correlates with geographical differences in coronary incidence across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras-Torres, Robert; Ferran, Albert; Zanetti, Daniela; Esteban, Esther; Varesi, Laurent; Pojskic, Naris; Coia, Valentina; Chaabani, Hassen; Via, Marc; Moral, Pedro

    2016-12-01

    The population analysis of cardiovascular risk and non-risk genetic variation can help to identify adaptive or random demographic processes that shaped coronary incidence variation across geography. In this study, 114 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 17 tandem repeat polymorphisms from Nitric Oxide Synthases (NOS) regions were analyzed in 1686 individuals from 35 populations from Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East. NOS genes encode for key enzymes on nitric oxide availability, which is involved in several cardiovascular processes. These genetic variations were used to test for selection and to infer the population structure of NOS regions. Moreover, we tested whether the variation in the incidence of coronary events and in the levels of classical risk factors in 11 of these European populations could be explained by the population structure estimates. Our results supported, first, the absence of clear signs of selection for NOS genetic variants associated with cardiovascular diseases, and second, the presence of a continuous genetic pattern of variation across European and North African populations without a Mediterranean barrier for gene flow. Finally, population structure estimates from NOS regions are closely correlated with coronary event rates and classical risk parameters (explaining 39-98%) among European populations. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that genetic bases of cardiovascular diseases and associated complex phenotypes could be geographically shaped by random demographic processes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Darapladib for preventing ischemic events in stable coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, Harvey D.; Held, Claes; Stewart, Ralph; Tarka, Elizabeth; Brown, Rebekkah; Davies, Richard Y.; Budaj, Andrzej; Harrington, Robert A.; Steg, P. Gabriel; Ardissino, Diego; Armstrong, Paul W.; Avezum, Alvaro; Aylward, Philip E.; Bryce, Alfonso; Chen, Hong; Chen, Ming-Fong; Corbalan, Ramon; Dalby, Anthony J.; Danchin, Nicolas; de Winter, Robbert J.; Denchev, Stefan; Diaz, Rafael; Elisaf, Moses; Flather, Marcus D.; Goudev, Assen R.; Granger, Christopher B.; Grinfeld, Liliana; Hochman, Judith S.; Husted, Steen; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Koenig, Wolfgang; Linhart, Ales; Lonn, Eva; López-Sendón, José; Manolis, Athanasios J.; Mohler, Emile R.; Nicolau, José C.; Pais, Prem; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Pedersen, Terje R.; Pella, Daniel; Ramos-Corrales, Marco A.; Ruda, Mikhail; Sereg, Mátyás; Siddique, Saulat; Sinnaeve, Peter; Smith, Peter; Sritara, Piyamitr; Swart, Henk P.; Sy, Rody G.; Teramoto, Tamio; Tse, Hung-Fat; Watson, David; Weaver, W. Douglas; Weiss, Robert; Viigimaa, Margus; Vinereanu, Dragos; Zhu, Junren; Cannon, Christopher P.; Wallentin, Lars; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Bucan, Olga; Elfström, Charlotta; Hegg, Lisa; Jarosz, Marie; Krug-Gourley, Sue; Rudman, Jerry; Collins, Rory; Anderson, Jeffrey; DeMets, David; Ganz, Peter; Sandercock, Peter; Weber, Michael; Fisher, Marian; Buhr, Kevin; Diegel, Scott; Schultz, Melissa; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Alexander, John H.; Al-Khatib, Sana; Baron, Tomasz; Bergström, Olle; Bushnell, Cheryl; Christersson, Christina; Eggers, Kai; Fredlund, Bengt-Olov; Hagström, Emil; Hijazi, Ziad; Örndahl, Lovisa Holm; James, Stefan K.; Jernberg, Tomas; Johnston, Nina; Lopez, Renato D.; Mehta, Rajendra H.; Newby, Kristin L.; Nordmark, Örjan; Oldgren, Jonas; Roe, Matthew T.; Saldéen, Katarina; Stenborg, Anna; Szummer, Karolina; Varenhorst, Christoph; Åkerblom, Axel; Bodén, Ulrika; Holmgren, Pernilla; Alm, Cristina; Hallberg, Theresa; Forsman, Margareta; Ljung, Hanna; Svanberg, Camilla; Loebs, Patrick F.; Atwater, Karen; Baldwin, Robert; Butts, Maria; Chan, Tuan; Connolly, Patricia; Esposito, Gerry; Hillier, Jacalyn B.; Jordan, Marla; Lane, Kathleen; Eckart, Debra; O'Malia, Kimberly; Ryan, Grace; Smitheran, Patsy; Tait, Maunette; Vyas, Sachin; Frazilus, Jessy; Douglas, Sarah; Alsweiler, Caroline; Ball, Lorinda; Bucan, Ana; Mackay, Laura; Wiviott, Stephen; Gignac, Gretchen; Goessling, Wolfram; Hochberg, Ephraim; Lane, Andrew; Rosenberg, Carol; Wagner, Andrew; Wolpin, Brian M.; Lowe, Cheryl; Mills, Kristen; Alkhalil, Maria; Ruvido, Jessica; Rehman, Mian Qasim; Shimmer, Margarita; Stebletsova, Irina; Barnes, Allison; Chiswell, Karen; Stebbins, Amanda; Bustamante Labarta, Miguel; Cartasegna, Luis R.; Chekherdemian, Sergio; Cuello, Jose L.; Elías, Pedro; Giordano, Jorge; Hirschson, Alfredo; Hominal, Miguel Angel; Ibañez, Julio O.; Jure, Horacio O.; Litvak, Marcos; Macin, Stella M.; MacKinnon, Ignacio Jorge; Maffei, Laura Elena; Montaña, Oscar R.; Prado, Aldo D.; Sala, Jorgelina M.; Sanchez, Ramiro A.; Brieger, David; Chew, Derek; Cross, David; de Looze, Ferdinandus J.; Farshid, Ahmad; Hall, Stephen; Krum, Henry; Lane, Geoff K.; Oqueli Flores, Ernesto; Stickland, John; Purnell, Peter W.; Szto, Gregory Y. F.; Thompson, Peter L.; Waites, Jonathan; William, Maged; Beauloye, Christophe; Boland, Jean; Charlier, Filip; de Raedt, Herbert J. L. P.; Dens, Joseph A. Y.; Dujardin, Karl; Friart, Alain; Scheen, André; Schröder, Erwin; Sinnaeve, Peter R.; Verheye, Stefan; Vranckx, Pascal; Abrantes, José A. M.; Albuquerque, Denilson; Ardito, Wilma Roberta; Baracioli, Luciano M.; Bertolami, Marcelo C.; Bodanese, Luiz C.; Dos Santos Filho, Raul D.; Maia, Lilia N.; Manenti, Euler R. F.; Marino, Roberto L.; Ogawa Indio do Brasil, Clarisse K.; Paiva, Maria Sanali de Oliveira; Rabelo Alves Junior, Álvaro; Rassi, Salvador; Reis, Gilmar; Rossi, Paulo R. F.; Saraiva, José Francisco K.; Benov, Haralambi; Chompalova, Boryana; Goudev, Assen; Grigorova, Valentina; Mihov, Atanas; Mincheva, Valentina; Petrova, Sylvia; Staneva, Angelina; Raev, Dimitar; Tisheva, Snezhanka; Aronson, Ronnie; Bedard, Jacques; Bhargava, Rakesh K.; Borts, David; Constance, Christian; Cusson, Jean; Davies, Richard F.; Ducas, John; Ferguson, Murdo E. R.; Goldenberg, Ronald M.; Grondin, Francois; Gyenes, Gabor; Halperin, Frank; Kornder, Jan; Kouz, Simon; Lainesse, Andre Y.; Leader, Rolland; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Lonn, Eva M.; Milot, Alain; Pearce, Murray E.; Pliamm, Lew; Powell, Calvin N.; Rose, Barry F.; Rupka, Dennis W.; Siega, Anthony J. D.; Klinke, Peter W.; St-Amour, Eric; Talbot, Paul; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tishler, Steven J.; Title, Lawrence; Wong, Graham C.; Buller, Christopher E.; Acevedo Blanco, Monica Andrea; Albornoz Alarcon, Francisco Javier; Escobar, Edgardo; Florenzano Urzua, Fernando; Pedemonte Villablanca, Oneglio Antonio; Prieto Dominguez, Juan Carlos; Sanhueza Cardemil, Patricio; Varleta Olivares, Paola Elena; Chen, Jiyan; Dong, Yugang; Ge, Junbo; He, Ben; Huo, Yong; Li, Weimin; Li, Xin-li; Liao, Yuhua; Wei, Meng; Yan, Xiaowei; Ye, Ping; Yuan, Zuyi; Zhang, Yun; Zhu, Jianhua; Cermak, Ondrej; Dedek, Vratislav; Francek, Lumir; Grunfeldova, Hana; Hubac, Jan; Franc, Pavel; Kellnerova, Ivana; Klimsa, Zdenek; Kroupa, Josef; Kuchar, Ladislav; Malecha, Jan; Povolny, Jiri; Velimsky, Tomas; Volf, Roman; Jirka, Vladimir; Bang, Lia; Grande, Peer; Frost, Lars; Husted, Steen E.; Laursen, Rikke V.; Nielsen, Tonny; Hedman, Anu; Muda, Piibe; Planken, Ulle; Barnay, Claude; Bauters, Christophe; Bayet, Gilles; Bonnet, Jacques; Bruckert, Eric; Cottin, Yves; Courreges, Jean-Pierre; Decoulx, Eric; Demarcq, Jean-Michel; Dubois-Rande, Jean-Luc; Elbaz, Meyer; Khalife, Khalifé; Krempf, Michel; Maupas, Eric; Ovize, Michel; Roul, José Gérald; Schiele, François; Bassand, Jean-Pierre; Steg, Gabriel; Vaisse, Bernard; Aigner, Ulrich Michael; Bavendiek, Udo; Fischer, Dieter; Benedix, Gisela; Boeneke, Hilmar; Bott, Jochen; Brado, Bernadett; Buhr, Marianne; Butter, Christian; Fischer, Steffen; Foerster, Andreas P. D.; Grad, Marc Oliver; Grosskopf, Josef; Hanefeld, Markolf; Hoeltz, Susanne; Frick, Horst-Michael; Illies, Gabriele; Jung, Thomas W. G. E.; Kademann, Barbara; Kahrmann, Gert; Bourrat, Alexandra; Horacek, Thomas; Reusch, Regina; Klausmann, Gerhard; Klein, Christiane; Krause, Karl Heinz; Kuesters, Detlev; Mellwig, Klaus-Peter; Menke, Thomas; Mueller, Steve; Neumann, Gerhard; Nischik, Ruth; Preusche, Andreas; Prohaska, Martin; Regner, Stefan Franz; Rein, Wilfried; Rummel, Reinhard; Samer, Holger; Schaefer, Thomas; Schenkenberger, Isabelle; Schmidt, Ekkehard; Schoen, Norbert; Schreckenberg, Andreas; Schulze, Uwe; Wunderlich, Joachim; Sohn, Hae-Young; Klauss, Volker; Toursarkissian, Nicole; Voigt, Jan-Gerrit; Weber, Dirk; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Zuechner, Dirk; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria; Kremastinos, Dimitrios; Geleris, Parashos; Kallikazaros, Ioannis; Kranidis, Athanasios; Manolis, Athanasios; Mantas, Ioannis; Olympios, Christoforos; Tziakas, Dimitrios; Voudris, Vassilis; Lam, Yat Yin Homer; Yip, Wai Kwok Gabriel; Siu, Chung Wah David; Benczúr, Béla; Hornyik, Andrea; László, Zoltán; Papp, András; Papp, Anikó; Plés, Zsolt; Piros, Annamária; Szakál, Imre; Túri, Tibor; Vértes, András; Abraham, Sunitha; Banker, Darshan N.; Chandwani, Prakash; Gupta, Rajeev; Hiremath, Jagdish; Jayadev, Santhosh; Joseph, Stigimon; Menon, Jaideep; Keshavamurth, C.; Srinivas, Arun; Parikh, Keyur; Pothineni, Ramesh B.; Sathe, Shireesh P.; Sawhney, Jitendra P.; Sethi, Sumeet; Chandra, Praveen Kumar; Varma, Sudhir; Bobbio, Marco; Bongo, Angelo S.; Cipollone, Francesco; Mezzetti, Andrea; Colivicchi, Furio; Santini, Massimo; Esposito, Giovanni; Chiariello, Massimo; Marzilli, Mario; Merlini, Piera; Moretti, Luciano; Olivari, Zoran; Patrizi, Giampiero; Valgimigli, Marco; Amemiya, Hiroshi; Ando, Kenji; Iwabuchi, Masashi; Endo, Masahiro; Nagashima, Hirotaka; Kametani, Ryosuke; Koike, Akihiro; Kuramochi, Takehiko; Nakamura, Yuichiro; Oku, Koji; Okutsu, Masaaki; Sueyoshi, Atsushi; Takahashi, Wataru; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Tanabe, Jun; Tanaka, Hideki; Kashima, Katsuro; Tanaka, Yutaka; Takeshita, Satoshi; Teranishi, Junichi; Betsuyaku, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yamazaki, Seiji; Yano, Shoji; Yoshida, Kazuro; Chae, Jei-Keon; Chae, Shung-Chull; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Choi, Dong-Hoon; Choi, Dong-Ju; Hong, Taek-Jong; Jeon, Hui-Kyung; Jeong, MyungHo; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Ryu, Kyu-Hyung; Kim, Woo-Shik; Kim, Kwon-Sam; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lim, Do-Sun; Park, Seong-Wook; Seung, Ki-Bae; Cervantes-Escárcega, Jose-Luis; Hernández-Santamaría, Ismael; Sánchez-Díaz, Carlos Jerjes; Uribe-Rios, Marittza-Arasely; Alvarado-Ruiz, Ricardo; Dijkgraaf, René; Jansen, Rutger M. G.; Knufman, Nicole M. J.; Frederiks, Joost; Kuijper, Adrianus; Post, Johannes C.; Michels, Herman R.; Roeters van Lennep, Hendrik W. O.; Liem, Anho; Smits, Pieter C.; Swart, Hendrik P.; van Boven, Adrianus J.; van Daele, Marc E. R. M.; van der Zwaan, Coenraad; von Birgelen, Clemens; Westendorp, Iris C. D.; Davidson, Laura; Devlin, Gerard P.; Elliott, John M.; Hamer, Andrew W.; Harrison, Nigel A.; Rankin, Richard J.; Hart, Hamish H.; Hills, Matthew J.; O'Meeghan, Timothy J.; Scott, Douglas S.; Stewart, Ralph A. H.; Tisch, Jonathan G.; Williams, Michael J. A.; Chen, Victor H. T.; Berge, Christ; Istad, Helge; Sirnes, Per Anton; Hanif, Bashir; Ishaq, Riaz; Kayani, Azhar Mahmood; Qureshi, Muhammad Bilal Ahsan; Yaqub, Zia; Doig, Rafael; Britto, Frank; Yanac, Pedro; Horna, Manuel; Valdivia, José; Zubiate, Mario Cesar; Abelardo, Nelson S.; Abola, Maria Teresa B.; Añonuevo, John C.; Atilano, Alberto A.; Cheng, Federick C.; Gaspar-Trinidad, Emma Y.; Sison, Jorge A.; Sulit, Dennis Jose V.; Uy, Norbert Lingling; Chmielinski, Arkadiusz; Czepiel, Aleksandra; Guzniczak, Ewa M.; Siminiak, Tomasz; Kania, Grzegorz; Kincel, Krzysztof; Kopaczewski, Jerzy; Kubica, Jacek; Lysek, Roman; Miekus, Pawel; Mlodziankowski, Adam; Napora, Piotr; Prochaczek, Fryderyk; Ruscika, Teresa; Tarchalski, Janusz; Tracz, Wieslawa; Wrzosek, Bozena; Basarab, Gheorghe V.; Benedek, Imre; Cinteza, Mircea; Cristea, Madalina I.; Dimulescu, Doina R.; Dragusin, Daniela; Gabor, Iulia; Ginghina, Carmen D.; Macarie, Cezar E.; Sinescu, Crina; Tatu-Chitoiu, Gabriel; Andryushina, Natalya A.; Baum, Svetlana R.; Arkhipov, Mikhail V.; Barbarash, Olga L.; Boldueva, Svetlana; Boyarkin, Mikhail V.; Demko, Arkady P.; Freydlin, Marina S.; Golitsyn, Sergei P.; Gordeev, Ivan; Gratsiansky, Nikolay; Karpov, Yuri A.; Kobalava, Zhanna; Konstantinov, Vladimir; Kuimov, Andrey D.; Kukharchuk, Valery V.; Panov, Alexey; Ruda, Mikhail Y.; Sayganov, Sergey A.; Simanenkov, Vladimir; Smolenskaya, Olga G.; Tsyba, Larisa P.; Vishnevsky, Alexander Y.; Yakhontova, Polina K.; Yakushin, Sergey S.; Zateyshchikov, Dmitry A.; Gaspar, Ludovit; Hranai, Marian; Kokles, Martin; Badat, Aysha; Sliwa-Hahnle, Karen; Blignaut, Suzanne; Burgess, Lesley; Dalby, Anthony; Dawood, Saleem Y.; Gray, Thomas; Horak, Adrian R.; Mabin, Thomas; Manga, Pravin; Moodley, Rajendran; Pretorius, Maria M.; Hough, Frans S.; Roodt, Andre; Saaiman, Jan; Theron, Hendrik D.; Alonso Karlezi, Rodrigo; Mata López, Pedro; Aranda Granados, Pedro; Berrazueta Fernández, José Ramón; Carnevali Ruiz, Daniel; Castro Conde, Almudena; Cruz Fernández, José Ma; de Teresa Galván, Eduardo; de Teresa Parreño, Luis; Díaz Buschmann, Isabel; Domínguez Escribano, José Ramón; Garcia Puig, Juan; Gil Extremera, Blas; Gómez Cerezo, Jorge; Macaya, Carlos Miguel; Mostaza Prieto, José Ma; Muñoz Aguilera, Roberto; Pérez Muñoz, Carlos; Querejeta Iraola, Ramón; Romero Hinojosa, José Antonio; Ruilope Urioste, Luis Miguel; Sabán Ruiz, José; Sobrino Martínez, Javier; Suárez Suárez, Enma Concepción; Lozano Martínez-Luengas, Iñigo; Al-Khalili, Faris; Bandh, Stellan; Bennermo, Marie; Dellborg, Mikael; Herlitz, Johan; Johanson, Per; Hjelmaeus, Lars; Landergren, Karl; Linderfalk, Carina; Lindholm, Carl-Johan; Lindmark, Krister; Mooe, Thomas; Nilsson, Jan; Wodlin, Peter; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Hou, Charles; Hsia, Chien-Hsun; Lin, Shing-Jong; Tsai, Liang-Miin; Wang, Kuo-Yang; Chotinaiwattarakul, Chunhakasem; Kuanprasert, Srun; Sansanayudh, Nakarin; Suithichaiyakul, Taworn; Andriyevska, Svitlana; Basylevych, Andriy Y.; Denesiuk, Vitaliy I.; Kononenko, Lyudmyla G.; Korzh, Oleksii M.; Kovalenko, Volodymyr M.; Kraiz, Igor G.; Lishnevska, Viktoriia Y.; Lutay, Mykhaylo I.; Parkhomenko, Oleksandr M.; Rudenko, Leonid V.; Telyatnikova, Zinaida Y.; Tseluyko, Vira Y.; Vatutin, Mykola T.; Vizir, Vadym A.; Bakhai, Ameet; Bijral, Harbal S.; Stewart, Edmund; Dargie, Henry; Barlow, Marion G.; Dutka, David P.; Findlay, Iain N.; Fisher, Michael; Gorog, Diana A.; Jacques, Adam M.; Beeton, Ian; Logie, Brian; Pepper, John R.; Purcell, Ian F.; Scullion, William; Thompson, James F.; Senior, Roxy; Simpson, David A.; Thackray, Simon D. R.; Alamgir, Mohammed F.; Wilding, John P. H.; Wong, Yuk-ki; Ahmed, Abdel M.; Antonishen, Mark C.; Atassi, Keith; Azocar, Jose; Ball, Eric M.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Bays, Harold E.; Beavins, Jill E.; Benjamin, Sabrina A.; Benson, Mark R.; Berger, Peter B.; Buckley, Jeremy W.; Betz, William R.; Biederman, Robert W. W.; Bisher, Edward W.; Bittner, Vera A.; Breton, Cristian F.; Buttaci, Salvatore; Changlani, Mahesh; Patterson, John B.; Byrd, Leroy J.; Canaday, Donald B.; Cashion, William R.; Chandna, Harish; Chang, Anna R.; Chin, John; Claybrook, Harry P.; Martin, Frederick A.; Cohen, Kenneth R.; Colan, David R.; Coodley, Gregg O.; Corson, Marshall A.; Knopp, Robert H.; Paramsothy, Pathmaja; Cottiero, Richard A.; Dandona, Paresh; Davidson, Michael H.; Kamaradt, Kent T.; Davuluri, Ashwini K.; Desai, Vikas S.; Garson, Glen D.; East, Cara; Ebrahimi, Ramin; Ellison, Howard S.; Erickson, Bernard R.; Fernandes, Valerian L.; Flores, Angel R.; Folkerth, Steven D.; Foster, Robert E.; Gaona, Raul E.; Gardner, Timothy J.; George, William H.; Gessler, Carl J.; Gill, Santosh K.; Go, Alan S.; Goldberg, Anne C.; Goldschmidt, Marc E.; Gorman, Timothy A.; Brautigam, Donald F.; Guyton, John R.; Haffey, Thomas; Henry, Sheldon D.; Hermany, Paul R.; Hoekstra, John A.; Hudson, Michael; Iteld, Bruce J.; Jack, David B.; Johnson, Frank P.; Joswig, Bill C.; Kaissar, Amy J.; Karns, Adam D.; Karns, Robert M.; Kaster, Steven R.; Kerzner, Boris; Khan, Mohammed S.; Ahmed, Ismail S.; Kieval, Joshua; Kim, Edward; Klaff, Leslie J.; Klein, Eric J.; Koren, Michael J.; Kosinski, Edward J.; Krumian, Razmig; Portnoy, Edward B.; Kuvin, Jeffrey T.; Langer, Michael M.; Letts, Dustin P.; Lipetz, Robert S.; Long, William J.; Thomas, Ignatius; Lopes-Virella, Maria; Lubin, Barry C.; Martin, Richard A.; Masri, Bassem; Matthews, George; Corbelli, John C.; McCullum, Kevin; Meholick, Alan W.; Mitchell, Jerry R.; Modares, Fariba; Mohler, Emile; Morcos, Charle N.; Murdock, David K.; Narayan, Puneet; Oberoi, Mandeep S.; O'Connor, Thomas; Schnecker, Robert J.; O'Donnell, Philip J.; Ong, Stephen T.; Parang, Pirouz; Pasquini, John A.; Patel, Rajesh J.; Patlola, Raghotham; Penny, William; Pepine, Carl J.; Pierce, Charles H.; Stein, Evan A.; Popeil, Larry R.; Pratt, Stephen E.; Price, Robert W.; Raikhel, Marina; Ravi, Ram C.; Cho, Donald; Rhyne, James M.; Richards, Mary K.; Rivera, Ernesto; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Roth, Eli M.; Rubenstein, Carl J.; Sandoval, Jaime D.; Sangrigoli, Renee A.; Schramm, Erichn L.; Schwartzbard, Arthur; Serfer, Gregory T.; Shah, Dhiren H.; Shalek, Marc S.; Shanes, Jeffrey G.; Sharma, Marigene S.; Bretton, Elizabeth M.; Sheikh, Zafar; Sklaver, Neal L.; Solano, Maria Del Pilar; Goldberg, Ronald B.; Srivastava, Nalin K.; Staniloae, Cezar S.; Staub, Jonathan S.; Stillabower, Michael E.; Suresh, Damodhar P.; Szulawski, Ireneusz; Thompson, Paul; Polk, Donna M.; Tinkel, Jodi L.; Pandya, Utpal H.; Toth, Phillip T.; Traboulssi, Mourhaf; Tuohy, Edward R.; Uusinarkaus, Kari T.; Vijay, Nampalli K.; Voyce, Stephen; Wainwright, William; Rhancock, Holly; Walder, James S.; Wang, Tracy Yu-Ping; Watkins, Stanley P.; Weiss, Robert J.; Whitney, Edwin J.; Wickemeyer, William J.; Willis, John G.; Wilson, Dennis F.; Abrams, Cyril; Wiseman, Alan; Wolfson, Eric; Wright, David; Zawada, Edward T.; Verma, Suneet

    2014-01-01

    Elevated lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity promotes the development of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, and elevated plasma levels of this enzyme are associated with an increased risk of coronary events. Darapladib is a selective oral inhibitor of lipoprotein-associated

  4. Value of Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification for Risk Prediction of Coronary and Cardiovascular Events: Result of the HNR Study (Heinz Nixdorf Recall).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Nils; Erbel, Raimund; Mahabadi, Amir A; Rauwolf, Michael; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Moebus, Susanne; Kälsch, Hagen; Budde, Thomas; Schmermund, Axel; Stang, Andreas; Führer-Sakel, Dagmar; Weimar, Christian; Roggenbuck, Ulla; Dragano, Nico; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz

    2018-02-13

    Computed tomography (CT) allows estimation of coronary artery calcium (CAC) progression. We evaluated several progression algorithms in our unselected, population-based cohort for risk prediction of coronary and cardiovascular events. In 3281 participants (45-74 years of age), free from cardiovascular disease until the second visit, risk factors, and CTs at baseline (b) and after a mean of 5.1 years (5y) were measured. Hard coronary and cardiovascular events, and total cardiovascular events including revascularization, as well, were recorded during a follow-up time of 7.8±2.2 years after the second CT. The added predictive value of 10 CAC progression algorithms on top of risk factors including baseline CAC was evaluated by using survival analysis, C-statistics, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination index. A subgroup analysis of risk in CAC categories was performed. We observed 85 (2.6%) hard coronary, 161 (4.9%) hard cardiovascular, and 241 (7.3%) total cardiovascular events. Absolute CAC progression was higher with versus without subsequent coronary events (median, 115 [Q1-Q3, 23-360] versus 8 [0-83], P value of baseline CT and risk assessment in terms of C-statistic or integrated discrimination index, especially for total cardiovascular events. However, CAC progression did not improve models including CAC 5y and 5-year risk factors. An excellent prognosis was found for 921 participants with double-zero CAC b =CAC 5y =0 (10-year coronary and hard/total cardiovascular risk: 1.4%, 2.0%, and 2.8%), which was for participants with incident CAC 1.8%, 3.8%, and 6.6%, respectively. When CAC b progressed from 1 to 399 to CAC 5y ≥400, coronary and total cardiovascular risk were nearly 2-fold in comparison with subjects who remained below CAC 5y =400. Participants with CAC b ≥400 had high rates of hard coronary and hard/total cardiovascular events (10-year risk: 12.0%, 13.5%, and 30.9%, respectively). CAC progression is associated with

  5. Medical and sociodemographic factors predict persistent smoking after coronary events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverre, Elise; Otterstad, Jan Erik; Gjertsen, Erik; Gullestad, Lars; Husebye, Einar; Dammen, Toril; Moum, Torbjørn; Munkhaugen, John

    2017-09-06

    Understanding the determinants of persistent smoking after a coronary event constitutes the basis of modelling interventions of smoking cessation in secondary prevention programs. We aim to identify the potentially modifiable medical, sociodemographic and psychosocial factors, comprising the study factors, associated with unfavourable risk factor control after CHD events. A cross-sectional explorative study used logistic regression analysis to investigate the association between study factors and smoking status in 1083 patients hospitalized with myocardial infarction and/or coronary revascularization. Hospital record data, a self-report questionnaire, clinical examination and blood samples were applied. At the index hospitalization, 390 patients were smoking and at follow-up after 2-36 months 167 (43%) of these had quit, while 230 reported persistent smoking. In adjusted analyses, unemployed or disability benefits (Odds ratio (OR) 4.1), low education (OR 3.5), longer smoking duration (OR 2.3) and not having ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) as index event (OR 2.3) were significantly associated with persistent smoking. Psychosocial factors at follow-up were not associated with persistent smoking. Smokers reported high motivation for cessation, with 68% wanting help to quit. Only 42% had been offered nicotine replacement therapy or other cessation aids. Smokers rated use of tobacco as the most important cause of their coronary disease (6.8 on a 1-10 Likert scale). Low socioeconomic status, prior duration of smoking, and not having STEMI as index event were associated with persisting smoking. Persistent smokers in this study seem to have an acceptable risk perception and were motivated to cease smoking, but needed assistance through cessation programs including prescription of pharmacological aids. Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02309255 , registered retrospectively.

  6. Post-traumatic stress disorder and incidence of coronary heart disease: a twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarino, Viola; Goldberg, Jack; Rooks, Cherie; Shah, Amit J; Veledar, Emir; Faber, Tracy L; Votaw, John R; Forsberg, Christopher W; Bremner, J Douglas

    2013-09-10

    The aim of this study was to determine whether post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) using a prospective twin study design and objective measures of CHD. It has long been hypothesized that PTSD increases the risk of CHD, but empirical evidence using objective measures is limited. We conducted a prospective study of middle-aged male twins from the Vietnam Era Twin Registry. Among twin pairs without self-reported CHD at baseline, we selected pairs discordant for a lifetime history of PTSD, pairs discordant for a lifetime history of major depression, and pairs without either condition. All underwent a clinic visit after a median follow-up of 13 years. Outcomes included clinical events (myocardial infarction, other hospitalizations for CHD and coronary revascularization) and quantitative measures of myocardial perfusion by [(13)N] ammonia positron emission tomography, including a stress total severity score and coronary flow reserve. A total of 562 twins (281 pairs) with a mean age of 42.6 years at baseline were included in this study. The incidence of CHD was more than double in twins with PTSD (22.6%) than in those without PTSD (8.9%; p Stress total severity score was significantly higher (+95%, p = 0.001) and coronary flow reserve was lower (-0.21, p = 0.02) in twins with PTSD than in those without PTSD, denoting worse myocardial perfusion. Associations were only mildly attenuated in 117 twin pairs discordant for PTSD. Among Vietnam-era veterans, PTSD is a risk factor for CHD. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Perceived job insecurity as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, George David

    2013-01-01

    . REVIEW METHODS: Prospective cohort studies that reported risk estimates for clinically verified incident coronary heart disease by the level of self reported job insecurity. Two independent reviewers extracted published data. Summary estimates of association were obtained using random effects models...

  8. Incident sequence analysis; event trees, methods and graphical symbols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    When analyzing incident sequences, unwanted events resulting from a certain cause are looked for. Graphical symbols and explanations of graphical representations are presented. The method applies to the analysis of incident sequences in all types of facilities. By means of the incident sequence diagram, incident sequences, i.e. the logical and chronological course of repercussions initiated by the failure of a component or by an operating error, can be presented and analyzed simply and clearly

  9. Predicting risk of coronary events and all-cause mortality: role of B-type natriuretic peptide above traditional risk factors and coronary artery calcium scoring in the general population: the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Kaffer; Mahabadi, Amir A; Berg, Marie H; Lehmann, Nils; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Kälsch, Hagen; Bauer, Marcus; Moebus, Susanne; Dragano, Nico; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Neumann, Till; Erbel, Raimund

    2014-09-01

    Several biomarkers including B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) have been suggested to improve prediction of coronary events and all-cause mortality. Moreover, coronary artery calcium (CAC) as marker of subclinical atherosclerosis is a strong predictor for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. We aimed to evaluate the predictive ability of BNP and CAC for all-cause mortality and coronary events above traditional cardiovascular risk factors (TRF) in the general population. We followed 3782 participants of the population-based Heinz Nixdorf Recall cohort study without coronary artery disease at baseline for 7.3 ± 1.3 years. Associations of BNP and CAC with incident coronary events and all-cause mortality were assessed using Cox regression, Harrell's c, and time-dependent integrated discrimination improvement (IDI(t), increase in explained variance). Subjects with high BNP levels had increased frequency of coronary events and death (coronary events/mortality: 14.1/28.2% for BNP ≥100 pg/ml vs. 2.7/5.5% for BNP < 100 pg/ml, respectively). Subjects with a BNP ≥100 pg/ml had increased incidence of hard endpoints sustaining adjustment for CAC and TRF (for coronary events: hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) 3.41(1.78-6.53); for all-cause mortality: HR 3.35(2.15-5.23)). Adding BNP to TRF and CAC increased measures of predictive ability: coronary events (Harrell's c, for coronary events, 0.775-0.784, p = 0.09; for all-cause mortality 0.733-0.740, p = 0.04; and IDI(t) (95% CI), for coronary events: 2.79% (0.33-5.65%) and for all-cause mortality 1.78% (0.73-3.10%). Elevated levels of BNP are associated with excess incident coronary events and all-cause mortality rates, with BNP and CAC significantly and complementary improving prediction of risk in the general population above TRF. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Incidence and severity of coronary artery disease in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing first-time coronary angiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kralev

    Full Text Available In standard reference sources, the incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF ranged between 24 and 46.5%. Since then, the incidence of cardiovascular risk factors (CRF has increased and modern treatment strategies ("pill in the pocket" are only applicable to patients without structural heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and severity of CAD in patients with AF.From January 2005 until December 2009, we included 261 consecutive patients admitted to hospital with paroxysmal, persistent or permanent AF in this prospective study. All patients underwent coronary angiography and the Framingham risk score (FRS was calculated. Patients with previously diagnosed or previously excluded CAD were excluded.The overall incidence of CAD in patients presenting with AF was 34%; in patients >70 years, the incidence of CAD was 41%. The incidence of patients undergoing a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG was 21%. Patients with CAD were older (73±8 years vs 68±10 years, p = 0.001, had significantly more frequent hypercholesterolemia (60% vs 30%, p<0.001, were more frequent smokers (26% vs 13%, p = 0.017 and suffered from angina more often (37% vs 2%, p<0.001. There was a significant linear trend among the FRS categories in percentage and the prevalence of CAD and PCI/CABG (p<0.0001.The overall incidence of CAD in patients presenting with AF was relatively high at 34%; the incidence of PCI/CABG was 21%. Based upon increasing CRF in the western world, we recommend a careful investigation respecting the FRS to either definitely exclude or establish an early diagnosis of CAD--which could contribute to an early and safe therapeutic strategy considering type Ic antiarrhythmics and oral anticoagulation.

  11. Stressful life events and incident metabolic syndrome : The Hoorn study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutters, F.; Pilz, S.; Koopman, A.D.; Rauh, S.P.; Pouwer, F.; Stehouwer, C.D.; Elders, P.J.; Nijpels, G.; Dekker, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Stressful life events are associated with the metabolic syndrome in cross-sectional studies, but prospective studies addressing this issue are rare and limited. We therefore evaluated whether the number of stressful life events is associated with incident metabolic syndrome. We assessed the

  12. Analysis on Outcome of 3537 Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: Integrative Medicine for Cardiovascular Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu-ye Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To investigate the treatment of hospitalized patients with coronary artery disease (CAD and the prognostic factors in Beijing, China. Materials and Methods. A multicenter prospective study was conducted through an integrative platform of clinical and research at 12 hospitals in Beijing, China. The clinical information of 3537 hospitalized patients with CAD was collected from September 2009 to May 2011, and the efficacy of secondary prevention during one-year followup was evaluated. In addition, a logistic regression analysis was performed to identify some factors which will have independent impact on the prognosis. Results. The average age of all patients was 64.88 ± 11.97. Of them, 65.42% are males. The medicines for patients were as follows: antiplatelet drugs accounting for 91.97%, statins accounting for 83.66%, β-receptor blockers accounting for 72.55%, ACEI/ARB accounting for 58.92%, and revascularization (including PCI and CABG accounting for 40.29%. The overall incidence of cardiovascular events was 13.26% (469/3537. The logistic stepwise regression analysis showed that heart failure (OR, 3.707, 95% CI = 2.756–4.986, age ≥ 65 years old (OR, 2.007, 95% CI = 1.587–2.53, and myocardial infarction (OR, 1.649, 95% CI = 1.322–2.057 were the independent risk factors of others factors for cardiovascular events that occurred during followup of one-year period. Integrative medicine (IM therapy showed the beneficial tendency for decreasing incidence of cardiovascular events, although no statistical significance was found (OR, 0.797, 95% CI = 0.613~1.036. Conclusions. Heart failure, age ≥ 65 years old, and myocardial infarction were associated with an increase in incidence of cardiovascular events, and treatment with IM showed a tendency for decreasing incidence of cardiovascular events.

  13. THE EFFECT OF WAIST CIRCUMFERENCES MORE THAN NORMAL ON THE INCIDENT OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE

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    Pria Wahyu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coronary heart disease is known as the most common disease that causes mortality in the world, one of the examination to identify the risks of coronary heart disease is measuring waist circumference. The purpose of this study was to identify correlation between large waist circumferences and the incident of coroner heart disease. Method: Design used in this study was analytic observational (retrospective with cross sectional approach. There were 63 respondents which sampling by simple random sampling. The independent variable was waist circumferences and the dependent variable was coronary heart disease. Data were collected by direct observation then analyzed by spearman correlation statistic test with significance level α≤0.05. Result: The result showed that waist circumferences more than normal had significant correlation with the incident of coronary heart disease (p=0.02. Analysis: It can be concluded that there was correlation between waist circumferences more than normal and the incident of coronary heart disease to the clients with coroner cardiac disease. Discussion: Earlier screening and detection is needed to prevent coronary heart disease.

  14. Educational class inequalities in the incidence of coronary heart disease in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Giovanni; Ferrario, Marco M; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Bobak, Martin; Chambless, Lloyd E; Salomaa, Veikko; Soderberg, Stefan; Pajak, Andrzej; Jørgensen, Torben; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Drygas, Wojciech; Ferrieres, Jean; Giampaoli, Simona; Kee, Frank; Iacoviello, Licia; Malyutina, Sofia; Peters, Annette; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Tunstall-Pedoe, Hugh; Cesana, Giancarlo

    2016-06-15

    To estimate the burden of social inequalities in coronary heart disease (CHD) and to identify their major determinants in 15 European populations. The MORGAM (MOnica Risk, Genetics, Archiving and Monograph) study comprised 49 cohorts of middle-aged European adults free of CHD (110 928 individuals) recruited mostly in the mid-1980s and 1990s, with comparable assessment of baseline risk and follow-up procedures. We derived three educational classes accounting for birth cohorts and used regression-based inequality measures of absolute differences in CHD rates and HRs (ie, Relative Index of Inequality, RII) for the least versus the most educated individuals. N=6522 first CHD events occurred during a median follow-up of 12 years. Educational class inequalities accounted for 343 and 170 additional CHD events per 100 000 person-years in the least educated men and women compared with the most educated, respectively. These figures corresponded to 48% and 71% of the average event rates in each gender group. Inequalities in CHD mortality were mainly driven by incidence in the Nordic countries, Scotland and Lithuania, and by 28-day case-fatality in the remaining central/South European populations. The pooled RIIs were 1.6 (95% CI 1.4 to 1.8) in men and 2.0 (1.7 to 2.4) in women, consistently across population. Risk factors accounted for a third of inequalities in CHD incidence; smoking was the major mediator in men, and High-Density-Lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in women. Social inequalities in CHD are still widespread in Europe. Since the major determinants of inequalities followed geographical and gender-specific patterns, European-level interventions should be tailored across different European regions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Plasma d-Dimer and Incident Ischemic Stroke and Coronary Heart Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, Aaron R; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Appiah, Duke; Shahar, Eyal; Mosley, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have documented that plasma d-dimer, a fibrin degradation product, is a risk marker for coronary heart disease, but there is limited prospective evidence for stroke. Given that thrombosis is a key mechanism for many strokes, we studied whether d-dimer is a risk marker for ischemic stroke incidence in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. We measured d-dimer in 11 415 ARIC participants free of stroke and coronary heart disease in 1992 to 1995. We followed them for stroke, stroke subtype, and coronary heart disease events through 2012. Over a median of 18 years of follow-up, 719 participants had incident strokes (628 ischemic and 91 hemorrhagic). d-dimer was associated positively with risk of total, ischemic, and cardioembolic strokes, with risk elevated primarily for the highest quintile of d-dimer. After adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors, the hazard ratio for the highest versus lowest quintile of d-dimer was 1.30 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.67) for total stroke, 1.33 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.73) for ischemic stroke, and 1.79 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.95) for cardioembolic stroke. There was no association with hemorrhagic, lacunar, or nonlacunar stroke categories. d-dimer was positively but weakly associated with coronary heart disease incidence. A higher basal plasma d-dimer concentration in the general population is a risk marker for ischemic stroke, especially cardioembolic stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Economic impact profiling of CBRN events: focusing on biological incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallini, Simona; Bisogni, Fabio; Mastroianni, Marco

    2014-12-01

    Chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) incidents, both caused accidentally by human error or natural/technological events and determined intentionally as criminal/malicious/terroristic acts, have consequences that could be differently characterized. In the last years many efforts to analyze the economic impact of terrorist threat have been carried out, while researches specifically concerning CBRN events have not been extensively undertaken. This paper in particular aims at proposing a methodological approach for studying macro-level economic impact profiles of biological incidents caused by weaponized and non-weaponized materials. The suggested approach investigates the economic consequences of biological incidents according to two main dimensions: type of large-scale effect and persistence of effect. Biological incident economic impacts are analyzed taking into account the persistence of effect during time as short-term impact (i.e. immediately after the incident), medium-term impact (i.e. by a month) and long-term impact (i.e. by years). The costs due to preventive countermeasure against biological threats (e.g. prevention, protection and preparedness expenses) are not taken into account. To this purpose, information on the key features of past biological incidents can be used as case studies to try to build impact profiles taking into account the proposed two main dimensions. Consequence management and effect mitigation of CBRN emergencies and disasters may benefit from an ex ante definition of the impact profiling related to this kind of incidents. The final goal of this paper is to define an approach to organize information on possible biological events according to their impact profile for supporting more effective and efficient first responders' prompt actions and policy makers' strategic decisions after the event occurrence.

  17. Estimating the incidence of the acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten M.; Foldspang, Anders; Larsen, Mogens L.

    2007-01-01

    consecutive ACS patients from 1 April 2000 to 31 March 2002. The population was identified from Danish Population Registers. RESULTS: A total of 189 victims of SCD and 457 ACS patients who survived until admission to hospital were present. Consequently, crude incidence rate of ACS was 234 per 100 000 person......-years. Unstable angina pectoris constituted for 16.9%, MI for 53.8% and SCD for 29.3% of ACS patients. CONCLUSIONS: Crude incidence rates of ACS were 137 and 331 per 100 000 person years for women and men, respectively. The incidence rate of ACS, as measured directly, was insignificantly 6% higher than expected...

  18. Anxiety and Risk of Incident Coronary Heart Disease : A Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, Annelieke M.; Martens, Elisabeth J.; de Jonge, Peter; Denollet, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the association between anxiety and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Background Less research has focused on the association of anxiety with incident CHD in contrast to other negative emotions, such as depression. Methods A meta-analysis of

  19. Accumulation of non-traditional risk factors for coronary heart disease is associated with incident coronary heart disease hospitalization and death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay M K Wallace

    Full Text Available Assessing multiple traditional risk factors improves prediction for late-life diseases, including coronary heart disease (CHD. It appears that non-traditional risk factors can also predict risk. The objective was to investigate contributions of non-traditional risk factors to coronary heart disease risk using a deficit accumulation approach.Community-dwelling adults with no known history of CHD (n = 2195, mean age 46.9±18.7 years, 51.8% women participated in the 1995 Nova Scotia Health Survey. Three risk factor indices were constructed to quantify the proportion of deficits present in individuals: 1 a 17-item Non-Traditional Risk Factor Index (e.g. sinusitis, arthritis; 2 a 9-item Traditional Risk Factor Index (e.g. hypertension, diabetes; and 3 a frailty index (25 items combined from the other two index measures. Ten-year risks of CHD events (defined as CHD-related hospitalization and CHD-related mortality were evaluated.The Non-Traditional Risk Factor Index, made up of health deficits unrelated to CHD, was independently associated with incident CHD events over 10 years after controlling for age, sex, and the Traditional Risk Factor Index [adjusted {adj.} Hazard Ratio {HR} = 1.31; Confidence Interval {CI} 1.14-1.51]. When all health deficits, both those related and unrelated to CHD, were included in a frailty index the corresponding adjusted hazard ratio was 1.61; CI 1.40-1.85.Both traditional and non-traditional risk factor indices are independently associated with incident CHD events. CHD risk assessment may benefit from consideration of general health information as well as from traditional risk factors.

  20. A genetic risk score predicts cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh; Nyegaard, Mette; Larsen, Sanne Bøjet

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic risk scores (GRSs) may predict cardiovascular risk in community-based populations. However, studies investigating the association with recurrent cardiovascular events in patients with established coronary artery disease (CAD) are conflicting. METHODS: We genotyped 879 patients...

  1. Beta-blocker therapy and cardiac events among patients with newly diagnosed coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Shilane, David; Go, Alan S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of beta-blockers for preventing cardiac events has been questioned for patients who have coronary heart disease (CHD) without a prior myocardial infarction (MI). OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the association of beta-blockers with outcomes among...... patients with new-onset CHD. METHODS: We studied consecutive patients discharged after the first CHD event (acute coronary syndrome or coronary revascularization) between 2000 and 2008 in an integrated healthcare delivery system who did not use beta-blockers in the year before entry. We used time...

  2. Metabolic syndrome and the risk of adverse cardiovascular events after an acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Ilaria; Cannon, Christopher P; Braunwald, Eugene; Goodrich, Erica L; Im, KyungAh; Lukas, Mary Ann; O'Donoghue, Michelle L

    2018-01-01

    Background The incremental prognostic value of assessing the metabolic syndrome has been disputed. Little is known regarding its prognostic value in patients after an acute coronary syndrome. Design and methods The presence of metabolic syndrome (2005 International Diabetes Federation) was assessed at baseline in SOLID-TIMI 52, a trial of patients within 30 days of acute coronary syndrome (median follow-up 2.5 years). The primary endpoint was major coronary events (coronary heart disease death, myocardial infarction or urgent coronary revascularization). Results At baseline, 61.6% ( n = 7537) of patients met the definition of metabolic syndrome, 34.7% (n = 4247) had diabetes and 29.3% had both ( n = 3584). The presence of metabolic syndrome was associated with increased risk of major coronary events (adjusted hazard ratio (adjHR) 1.29, p definition, only diabetes (adjHR 1.48, p metabolic syndrome was numerically but not significantly associated with the risk of major coronary events (adjHR 1.13, p = 0.06). Conversely, diabetes was a strong independent predictor of major coronary events in the absence of metabolic syndrome (adjHR 1.57, p metabolic syndrome identified patients at highest risk of adverse outcomes but the incremental value of metabolic syndrome was not significant relative to diabetes alone (adjHR 1.07, p = 0.54). Conclusions After acute coronary syndrome, diabetes is a strong and independent predictor of adverse outcomes. Assessment of the metabolic syndrome provides only marginal incremental value once the presence or absence of diabetes is established.

  3. Executive function, but not memory, associates with incident coronary heart disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamian, Somayeh; van Buchem, Mark A; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Jukema, J Wouter; Mooijaart, Simon P; Sabayan, Behnam; de Craen, Anton J M

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the association of performance in cognitive domains executive function and memory with incident coronary heart disease and stroke in older participants without dementia. We included 3,926 participants (mean age 75 years, 44% male) at risk for cardiovascular diseases from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) with Mini-Mental State Examination score ≥24 points. Scores on the Stroop Color-Word Test (selective attention) and the Letter Digit Substitution Test (processing speed) were converted to Z scores and averaged into a composite executive function score. Likewise, scores of the Picture Learning Test (immediate and delayed memory) were transformed into a composite memory score. Associations of executive function and memory were longitudinally assessed with risk of coronary heart disease and stroke using multivariable Cox regression models. During 3.2 years of follow-up, incidence rates of coronary heart disease and stroke were 30.5 and 12.4 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. In multivariable models, participants in the lowest third of executive function, as compared to participants in the highest third, had 1.85-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39-2.45) higher risk of coronary heart disease and 1.51-fold (95% CI 0.99-2.30) higher risk of stroke. Participants in the lowest third of memory had no increased risk of coronary heart disease (hazard ratio 0.99, 95% CI 0.74-1.32) or stroke (hazard ratio 0.87, 95% CI 0.57-1.32). Lower executive function, but not memory, is associated with higher risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Lower executive function, as an independent risk indicator, might better reflect brain vascular pathologies. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. RANTES/CCL5 and risk for coronary events: results from the MONICA/KORA Augsburg case-cohort, Athero-Express and CARDIoGRAM studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Herder

    Full Text Available The chemokine RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted/CCL5 is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in mice, whereas less is known in humans. We hypothesised that its relevance for atherosclerosis should be reflected by associations between CCL5 gene variants, RANTES serum concentrations and protein levels in atherosclerotic plaques and risk for coronary events.We conducted a case-cohort study within the population-based MONICA/KORA Augsburg studies. Baseline RANTES serum levels were measured in 363 individuals with incident coronary events and 1,908 non-cases (mean follow-up: 10.2±4.8 years. Cox proportional hazard models adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, metabolic factors and lifestyle factors revealed no significant association between RANTES and incident coronary events (HR [95% CI] for increasing RANTES tertiles 1.0, 1.03 [0.75-1.42] and 1.11 [0.81-1.54]. None of six CCL5 single nucleotide polymorphisms and no common haplotype showed significant associations with coronary events. Also in the CARDIoGRAM study (>22,000 cases, >60,000 controls, none of these CCL5 SNPs was significantly associated with coronary artery disease. In the prospective Athero-Express biobank study, RANTES plaque levels were measured in 606 atherosclerotic lesions from patients who underwent carotid endarterectomy. RANTES content in atherosclerotic plaques was positively associated with macrophage infiltration and inversely associated with plaque calcification. However, there was no significant association between RANTES content in plaques and risk for coronary events (mean follow-up 2.8±0.8 years.High RANTES plaque levels were associated with an unstable plaque phenotype. However, the absence of associations between (i RANTES serum levels, (ii CCL5 genotypes and (iii RANTES content in carotid plaques and either coronary artery disease or incident coronary events in our cohorts suggests that RANTES may not be a

  5. Comparing Coronary Atheroma Progression Rates and Coronary Events in the United States, Canada, Latin America, and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Rishi; Nicholls, Stephen J; St John, Julie; Tuzcu, E Murat; Kapadia, Samir R; Uno, Kiyoko; Kataoka, Yu; Wolski, Kathy; Nissen, Steven E

    2016-12-01

    We explored for geographic variations in coronary atheroma progression rates in the United States compared to other world regions (Canada, Latin America, Western Europe, and Central-Eastern Europe) and sought to ascertain if this associated with regional differences in major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE; cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization). Across 7 randomized trials with a global recruitment pattern, 5,451 participants with angiographic coronary disease underwent serial coronary intravascular ultrasonography during 18 or 24 months, with adjudicated MACE. Change in coronary percent atheroma volume (ΔPAV) and MACE in the United States versus other world regions were assessed. Despite similar baseline angiographic and plaque characteristics across participants and regions, following propensity-weighted and multivariate analysis, US (n = 3,706) versus non-US (n = 1,745) participants demonstrated marginal but significantly greater annualized ΔPAV (least-square means ± SE: 0.27 ± 0.14% vs 0.062 ± 0.14%, p = 0.005). However, MACE rates were disproportionately higher in US compared to non-US participants (23.5% vs 10.9%, p <0.001), driven by a doubling in crude rates of coronary revascularization procedures (16.1% vs 7.8%, p <0.001). The US participants hospitalized with unstable angina demonstrated more significant disease progression than their non-US counterparts (ΔPAV: 0.57 ± 0.19% vs -0.30 ± 0.36%, p = 0.033) and greater MACE (9.1% vs 4.8%, p <0.001). A US geographic disposition independently associated with MACE (hazard ratio 1.53, 95% confidence interval 1.22 to 1.92, p <0.001). In conclusion, in participants with stable coronary disease, coronary atheroma progression rates are modestly higher in US-based compared to non-US-based participants. Elective coronary revascularization rates however are disproportionately greater in US-based participants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Incident diabetes mellitus may explain the association between sleep duration and incident coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Akiko Kishi; Svensson, Thomas; Kitlinski, Mariusz; Almgren, Peter; Engström, Gunnar; Nilsson, Peter M; Melander, Olle

    2018-02-01

    Sleep duration is a risk factor for incident diabetes mellitus and CHD. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate, in sex-specific analyses, the role of incident diabetes as the possible biological mechanism for the reported association between short/long sleep duration and incident CHD. Considering that diabetes is a major risk factor for CHD, we hypothesised that any association with sleep duration would not hold for cases of incident CHD occurring before incident diabetes ('non-diabetes CHD') but would hold true for cases of incident CHD following incident diabetes ('diabetes-CHD'). A total of 6966 men and 9378 women aged 45-73 years from the Malmö Diet Cancer Study, a population-based, prospective cohort, who had answered questions on habitual sleep duration and did not have a history of prevalent diabetes or CHD were included in the analyses. Incident cases of diabetes and CHD were identified using national registers. Sex-specific Cox proportional hazards regression models were stratified by BMI and adjusted for known covariates of diabetes and CHD. Mean follow-up times for incident diabetes (n = 1137/1016 [men/women]), incident CHD (n = 1170/578), non-diabetes CHD (n = 1016/501) and diabetes-CHD (n = 154/77) were 14.2-15.2 years for men, and 15.8-16.5 years for women. In men, short sleep duration (< 6 h) was associated with incident diabetes (HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.01, 1.80), CHD (HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.06, 1.89) and diabetes-CHD (HR 2.34, 95% CI 1.20, 4.55). Short sleep duration was not associated with incident non-diabetes CHD (HR 1.35, 95% CI 0.98, 1.87). Long sleep duration (≥ 9 h) was associated with incident diabetes (HR 1.37, 95% CI 1.03, 1.83), CHD (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.01, 1.75) and diabetes-CHD (HR 2.10, 95% CI 1.11, 4.00). Long sleep duration was not associated with incident non-diabetes CHD (HR 1.33, 95% CI 0.98, 1.80). In women, short sleep duration was associated with incident diabetes (HR 1.53, 95% CI 1.16, 2.01), CHD (HR 1

  7. [Vital exhaustion is significantly linked to acute coronary events in Argentine population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet, José; Mautner, Branco; Kerbage, Soraya; Bonet, María F; Pérez Lloret, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    To determine the strength of the association between the Vital exhaustion syndrome (VES) and acute coronary ischemic events in hospitalized Argentinean sample. VES was measured in 180 patients of both sexes, 90 admitted due to an acute coronary ischemic syndrome (AMI or unstable angina) and a control group of 90 admitted due to an acute non-coronary cardiac event. VES was evaluated with the Maastricht questionnaire during the first week of hospitalization. Dividing the sample in two categories: exhausted and non-exhausted, 57 (63,33%) of the coronary were exhausted, while among the non coronary group, 33 were exhausted (36,66%)(OR=3.1 (1.7-5.8)). The exhaustion score was: control mean score: 17,1 (sd 8,96); case mean score: 21,1 (sd10,60) p: 0.006. Dislipemia was another factor with a significant difference: control 27 (30%) case 44 (62%) OR= 2.2 (1.2-4.1) p=0.01. Logistic regression was performed, including an interaction model between DLP and exhaustion, and it did not show a significant effect. Our results indicate that in Argentina, among other countries as reported in the literature, VES is a psychological condition that is strongly and independent associated to acute coronary events.

  8. Large-scale metabolomic profiling identifies novel biomarkers for incident coronary heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ganna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of circulating metabolites in large prospective epidemiological studies could lead to improved prediction and better biological understanding of coronary heart disease (CHD. We performed a mass spectrometry-based non-targeted metabolomics study for association with incident CHD events in 1,028 individuals (131 events; 10 y. median follow-up with validation in 1,670 individuals (282 events; 3.9 y. median follow-up. Four metabolites were replicated and independent of main cardiovascular risk factors [lysophosphatidylcholine 18∶1 (hazard ratio [HR] per standard deviation [SD] increment = 0.77, P-value<0.001, lysophosphatidylcholine 18∶2 (HR = 0.81, P-value<0.001, monoglyceride 18∶2 (MG 18∶2; HR = 1.18, P-value = 0.011 and sphingomyelin 28∶1 (HR = 0.85, P-value = 0.015]. Together they contributed to moderate improvements in discrimination and re-classification in addition to traditional risk factors (C-statistic: 0.76 vs. 0.75; NRI: 9.2%. MG 18∶2 was associated with CHD independently of triglycerides. Lysophosphatidylcholines were negatively associated with body mass index, C-reactive protein and with less evidence of subclinical cardiovascular disease in additional 970 participants; a reverse pattern was observed for MG 18∶2. MG 18∶2 showed an enrichment (P-value = 0.002 of significant associations with CHD-associated SNPs (P-value = 1.2×10-7 for association with rs964184 in the ZNF259/APOA5 region and a weak, but positive causal effect (odds ratio = 1.05 per SD increment in MG 18∶2, P-value = 0.05 on CHD, as suggested by Mendelian randomization analysis. In conclusion, we identified four lipid-related metabolites with evidence for clinical utility, as well as a causal role in CHD development.

  9. Coronary heart disease incidence among non-Western immigrants compared to Danish-born people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bo, Anne; Zinckernagel, Line; Krasnik, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasing global migration has made immigrants’ health an important topic worldwide. We examined the effect of country of birth, migrant status (refugee/family-reunified) and income on coronary heart disease (CHD) incidence. Design: This was a historical prospective register-based co......Background: Increasing global migration has made immigrants’ health an important topic worldwide. We examined the effect of country of birth, migrant status (refugee/family-reunified) and income on coronary heart disease (CHD) incidence. Design: This was a historical prospective register......-based cohort study. Methods: The study cohort consisted of immigrants above 18 years from non-Western countries who had obtained a residence permit in Denmark as a refugee (n = 29,045) or as a family-reunified immigrant (n = 28,435) from 1 January 1993–31 December 1999 and a Danish-born reference population (n...... = 229,918). First-time CHD incidence was identified from 1 January 1993–31 December 2007. Incidence ratios for 11 immigrant groups were estimated using Cox regression analysis. Results: Immigrants from Afghanistan, Iraq, Turkey, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, South Asia, the Former Yugoslavia...

  10. Left ventricular hypertrophy and risk reclassification for coronary events in multi-ethnic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalawadiya, Sandip K; Gunasekaran, Prasad C; Bavishi, Chirag P; Veeranna, Vikas; Panaich, Sidakpal; Afonso, Luis

    2015-05-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) has not been evaluated for reclassification improvement in the intermediate Framingham risk category for incident hard coronary events in a large multi ethnic population free of cardiovascular disease at baseline. A post-hoc analysis on the Multi Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) dataset (n = 4921) was performed. LVH was defined as the upper 95 th percentile of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging derived left ventricular mass (LVM) indexed based on body surface area (BSA) and height. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the independent association between LVH and composite outcomes like all cardiovascular disease (CVDa) and hard coronary heart disease (CHDh) events over a mean follow-up period of 4.5 years. To assess the incremental value of LVH over traditional CV risk factors for CHDh prediction, we compared the discrimination, calibration and net reclassification index (NRI) of models comprising of traditional CV risk factors with and without LVH. LVH derived from LVM indexed by BSA (LVH-BSA) and height(1.7)(LVH-height) showed an independent association with CVDa (LVH-BSA: hazard ratio (HR) 1.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-2.20, p = 0.03; LVH-height(1.7): HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.14-2.18, p = 0.012) and CHDh (LVH-BSA: HR 2.36, 95% CI 1.37-4.04, p = 0.002; LVH-height(1.7): HR: 1.95, 95% CI: 1.17-3.26, p = 0.01). Addition of LVH to the model based on traditional CV risk factors demonstrated no significant improvement in NRI for CHDh in either the entire cohort (LVH-BSA: NRI 1.7%, 95% CI: -8.3% to 11.7%, p = 0.74; LVH-height(1.7): NRI 2.7%, 95% CI: -5.8% to 11.3%, p = 0.62) or the intermediate risk group (LVH-BSA: NRI 12.0%, 95% CI: -5.7% to 29.8%, p = 0.19; LVH-height(1.7): NRI 14.5%, 0.1% to 28.8%, p = 0.05). Although an independent predictor of cardiovascular events, LVH does not lead to clinically meaningful reclassification of the overall and intermediate

  11. High prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in patients with previous cerebrovascular or coronary event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, Jesper; Wiinberg, Niels; Joergensen, Bjarne S

    2010-01-01

    The presence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease identifies a population at increased risk of complications both during acute coronary events and on a long-term basis and possibly a population in whom secondary prevention...... of cardiovascular events should be addressed aggressively. The present study was aimed at providing a valid estimate on the prevalence of PAD in patients attending their general practitioner and having previously suffered a cardio- or cerebrovascular event....

  12. Smoking restrictions and hospitalization for acute coronary events in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, James D.; Demidenko, Eugene; Malenka, David J.; Li, Zhongze; Gohlke, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Aims To study the effects of smoking restrictions in Germany on coronary syndromes and their associated costs. Methods and results All German states implemented laws partially restricting smoking in the public and hospitality sectors between August 2007 and July 2008. We conducted a before-and-after study to examine trends for the hospitalization rate for angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) for an insurance cohort of 3,700,384 individuals 30 years and older. Outcome measures were hospitalization rates for coronary syndromes, and hospitalization costs. Mean age of the cohort was 56 years, and two-thirds were female. Some 2.2 and 1.1% persons were hospitalized for angina pectoris and AMI, respectively, during the study period from January 2004 through December 2008. Law implementation was associated with a 13.3% (95% confidence interval 8.2, 18.4) decline in angina pectoris and an 8.6% (5.0, 12.2) decline in AMI after 1 year. Hospitalization costs also decreased significantly for the two conditions—9.6% (2.5, 16.6) for angina pectoris and 20.1% (16.0, 24.2) for AMI at 1 year following law implementation. Assuming the law caused the observed declines, it prevented 1,880 hospitalizations and saved 7.7 million Euros in costs for this cohort during the year following law implementation. Conclusions Partial smoking restrictions in Germany were followed by reductions in hospitalization for angina pectoris and AMI, declines that continued through 1 year following these laws and resulted in substantial cost savings. Strengthening the laws could further reduce morbidity and costs from acute coronary syndromes in Germany. PMID:22350716

  13. Dietary choline and betaine; associations with subclinical markers of cardiovascular disease risk and incidence of CVD, coronary heart disease and stroke: the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Heather R; Musani, Solomon K; Dibaba, Daniel T; Talegawkar, Sameera A; Taylor, Herman A; Tucker, Katherine L; Bidulescu, Aurelian

    2018-02-01

    Several mechanisms have been described through which dietary intake of choline and its derivative betaine may be associated in both directions with subclinical atherosclerosis. We assessed the association of dietary intake of choline and betaine with cardiovascular risk and markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease. Data from 3924 Jackson Heart Study (JHS) African-American participants with complete food frequency questionnaire at baseline and follow-up measurements of heart disease measures were used. Multivariable linear regression models were employed to assess associations between choline and betaine intake with carotid intima-media thickness, coronary artery calcium, abdominal aortic calcium and left ventricular mass. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate associations with time to incident coronary heart disease (CHD), ischemic stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD). During an average nine years of follow-up, 124 incident CHD events, 75 incident stroke events and 153 incident CVD events were documented. In women, greater choline intake was associated with lower left ventricular mass (p = 0.0006 for trend across choline quartiles) and with abdominal aortic calcium score. Among all JHS participants, there was a statistically significant inverse association between dietary choline intake and incident stroke, β = -0.33 (p = 0.04). Betaine intake was associated with greater risk of incident CHD when comparing the third quartile of intake with the lowest quartile of intake (HR 1.89, 95 % CI 1.14, 3.15). Among our African-American participants, higher dietary choline intake was associated with a lower risk of incident ischemic stroke, and thus putative dietary benefits. Higher dietary betaine intake was associated with a nonlinear higher risk of incident CHD.

  14. Meta-analysis of perceived stress and its association with incident coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Safiya; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Falzon, Louise; Krupka, David; Davidson, Karina W; Edmondson, Donald

    2012-12-15

    Most studies examining potential associations between psychological factors and cardiovascular outcomes have focused on depression or anxiety. The effect of perceived stress on incident coronary heart disease (CHD) has yet to be reviewed systematically. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between perceived stress and incident CHD. Ovid, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO were searched as data sources. Prospective observational cohort studies were selected that measured self-reported perceived stress and assessed incident CHD at ≥6 months. We extracted study characteristics and estimates of the risk of incident CHD associated with high perceived stress versus low perceived stress. We identified 23 potentially relevant articles, of which 6 met our criteria (n = 118,696). Included studies measured perceived stress with validated measurements and nonvalidated simple self-report surveys. Incident CHD was defined as new diagnosis of, hospitalization for, or mortality secondary to CHD. Meta-analysis yielded an aggregate risk ratio of 1.27 (95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.45) for the magnitude of the relation between high perceived stress and incident CHD. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that high perceived stress is associated with a moderately increased risk of incident CHD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Soluble endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule and incident cardiovascular events in a multiethnic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hao-Yu; Khera, Amit; de Lemos, James A; Ayers, Colby R; Rohatgi, Anand

    2017-09-01

    Cell adhesion molecules are key regulators of atherosclerotic plaque development, but circulating levels of soluble fragments, such as intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM-1), have yielded conflicting associations with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM) is expressed exclusively in platelets and endothelial cells, and soluble ESAM (sESAM) levels have been associated with prevalent subclinical atherosclerosis. We therefore hypothesized that sESAM would be associated with incident ASCVD. sESAM, sICAM-1, and sVCAM-1 were measured in 2,442 participants without CVD in the Dallas Heart Study, a probability-based population sample aged 30-65 years enrolled between 2000 and 2002. ASCVD was defined as first myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, or CV death. A total of 162 ASCVD events were analyzed over 10.4 years. Increasing sESAM was associated with ASCVD, independent of risk factors (HR Q4 vs Q1: 2.7, 95% CI 1.6-4.6). Serial adjustment for renal function, sICAM-1, VCAM-1, and prevalent coronary calcium did not attenuate these associations. Continuous ESAM demonstrated similar findings (HR 1.31, 95% CI 1.2-1.4). Addition of sESAM to traditional risk factors improved discrimination and reclassification (delta c-index: P = .009; integrated-discrimination-improvement index P = .001; net reclassification index = 0.42, 95% CI 0.15-0.68). Neither sICAM-1 nor sVCAM-1 was independently associated with ASCVD. sESAM but not sICAM-1 or sVCAM-1 levels are associated with incident ASCVD. Further studies are warranted to investigate the role of sESAM in ASCVD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cardiac Events and the Maximum Diameter of Coronary Artery Aneurysms in Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Etsuko; Tsujii, Nobuyuki; Hayama, Yosuke

    2017-09-01

    To clarify the occurrence of cardiac events based on the maximal diameter of the maximal coronary artery aneurysm (CAA) in Kawasaki disease (KD). Two hundred fourteen patients (160 male and 54 female) who had had at least 1 CAA in the selective coronary angiogram less than 100 days after the onset of KD were studied. We measured the maximal CAA diameters in the major branches of the initial coronary angiograms. Death, myocardial infarction and coronary artery revascularization were included as cardiac events in this study. We divided the patients into three groups based on the maximal CAA diameter (large ≥8.0 mm; medium ≥6.0 mm and events based on laterality of maximal CAA (bilateral, unilateral) and body surface area (BSA). Cardiac events occurred in 44 patients (21%). For BSA event-free survival in the large and medium groups was 66% (n = 38, 95% CI, 49-80) and 62% (n = 27, 95% CI, 38-81), respectively. For BSA ≥ 0.50 m 2 , that in large group was 54% (n = 58, 95% CI, 40-67). There were no cardiac events in the medium group for BSA ≥0.50 m 2 (n = 36) and the small group (n = 56). In the large analyzed group, the 30-year cardiac event-free survival in the bilateral and unilateral groups was 40% (n = 48, 95% CI, 27-55) and 78% (n = 48, 95% CI, 63-89), respectively (P events was the patient group with the maximal CAA diameter ≥6.0 mm with BSA event-free survival was about 60%. Given the high rate of cardiac events in this patient population, life-long cardiovascular surveillance is advised. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Association of the Lipoprotein Receptor SCARB1 Common Missense Variant rs4238001 with Incident Coronary Heart Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Manichaikul

    Full Text Available Previous studies in mice and humans have implicated the lipoprotein receptor SCARB1 in association with atherosclerosis and lipid levels. In the current study, we sought to examine association of SCARB1 missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs4238001 with incident coronary heart disease (CHD.Genotypes for rs4238001 were imputed for 2,319 White, 1,570 African American, and 1,292 Hispanic-American MESA participants using the 1,000 Genomes reference set. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine association of rs4238001 with incident CHD, with adjustments for age, sex, study site, principal components of ancestry, body mass index, diabetes status, serum creatinine, lipid levels, hypertension status, education and smoking exposure. Meta-analysis across race/ethnic groups within MESA showed statistically significant association of the T allele with higher risk of CHD under a consistent and formally adjudicated definition of CHD events in this contemporary cohort study (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.49, 95% CI [1.04, 2.14], P = 0.028. Analyses combining MESA with additional population-based cohorts expanded our samples in Whites (total n = 11,957 with 871 CHD events and African Americans (total n = 5,962 with 355 CHD events and confirmed an increased risk of CHD overall (HR of 1.19 with 95% CI [1.04, 1.37], P = 0.013, in African Americans (HR of 1.49 with 95% CI [1.07, 2.06], P = 0.019, in males (HR of 1.29 with 95% CI [1.08, 1.54], P = 4.91 x 10(-3 and in White males (HR of 1.24 with 95% CI [1.03, 1.51], P = 0.026.SCARB1 missense rs4238001 is statistically significantly associated with incident CHD across a large population of multiple race/ethnic groups.

  18. Association of Breakfast Intake With Incident Stroke and Coronary Heart Disease: The Japan Public Health Center-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yasuhiko; Iso, Hiroyasu; Sawada, Norie; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-02-01

    The association between breakfast intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease, including stroke, among Asian people remains unknown. We sought to prospectively investigate whether the omission of breakfast is related to increased risks of stroke and coronary heart disease in general Japanese populations. A total of 82,772 participants (38,676 men and 44,096 women) aged 45 to 74 years without histories of cardiovascular disease or cancer were followed up from 1995 to 2010. Participants were classified as having breakfast 0 to 2, 3 to 4, 5 to 6, or 7 times/wk. The hazard ratios of cardiovascular disease were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. During the 1 050 030 person-years of follow-up, we documented a total of 4642 incident cases, 3772 strokes (1051 cerebral hemorrhages, 417 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 2286 cerebral infarctions), and 870 coronary heart disease. Multivariable analysis showed that those consuming no breakfast per week compared with those consuming breakfast everyday had hazard ratios (95% confidence interval; P for trend) of 1.14 (1.01-1.27; 0.013) for total cardiovascular disease, 1.18 (1.04-1.34; 0.007) for total stroke, and 1.36 (1.10-1.70; 0.004) for cerebral hemorrhage. Similar results were observed even after exclusion of early cardiovascular events. No significant association between the frequency of breakfast intake and the risk of coronary heart disease was observed. The frequency of breakfast intake was inversely associated with the risk of stroke, especially cerebral hemorrhage in Japanese, suggesting that eating breakfast everyday may be beneficial for the prevention of stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Mental Health and Stressful Life Events in Coronary Heart Disease Patients and Non- Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Nateghian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: "n The main goal of this study is to compare stressful life events and mental health in coronary heart disease (CHD patients and non-patients. "nMethod: In this research, 120 participants (n=68 male, n= 52 female were divided into two groups of patients (n=60 and non-patients (n=60. They were selected from Vali Asr Hospital of Meshginshahr (Iran and completed the  General Health Questionnaire (GHQ and Stressful Life Events Inventory . "nResults: Data was analyzed using independent t-test. The results showed significant differences between CHD patients and non-patients in mental health and stressful life events. CHD patients showed high rates of physical symptoms and anxiety of GHQ . "nConclusion: CHD patients reported more stressful life events. Therefore, it can be inferred that psychological factors are important in coronary heart disease.

  20. Prognostic value of computed tomographic coronary angiography and exercise electrocardiography for cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kye-Hwan; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Kang, Min Gyu; Ahn, Jong Hwa; Koh, Jin-Sin; Park, Yongwhi; Hwang, Seok-Jae; Jeong, Young-Hoon; Kwak, Choong Hwan; Hwang, Jin-Yong; Park, Jeong Rang

    2016-09-01

    This study is a head-to-head comparison of predictive values for long-term cardiovascular outcomes between exercise electrocardiography (ex-ECG) and computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients with chest pain. Four hundred and forty-two patients (mean age, 56.1 years; men, 61.3%) who underwent both ex-ECG and CTCA for evaluation of chest pain were included. For ex-ECG parameters, the patients were classified according to negative or positive results, and Duke treadmill score (DTS). Coronary artery calcium score (CACS), presence of plaque, and coronary artery stenosis were evaluated as CTCA parameters. Cardiovascular events for prognostic evaluation were defined as unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction, revascularization, heart failure, and cardiac death. The mean follow-up duration was 2.8 ± 1.1 years. Fifteen patients experienced cardiovascular events. Based on pretest probability, the low- and intermediate-risks of coronary artery disease were 94.6%. Odds ratio of CACS > 40, presence of plaque, coronary stenosis ≥ 50% and DTS ≤ 4 were significant (3.79, p = 0.012; 9.54, p = 0.030; 6.99, p < 0.001; and 4.58, p = 0.008, respectively). In the Cox regression model, coronary stenosis ≥ 50% (hazard ratio, 7.426; 95% confidence interval, 2.685 to 20.525) was only significant. After adding DTS ≤ 4 to coronary stenosis ≥ 50%, the integrated discrimination improvement and net reclassification improvement analyses did not show significant. CTCA was better than ex-ECG in terms of predicting long-term outcomes in low- to intermediate-risk populations. The predictive value of the combination of CTCA and ex-ECG was not superior to that of CTCA alone.

  1. THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON INFLAMMATORY MARKERS.THE RISK OF NEW CORONARY EVENT IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorka Savic

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and several markers of inflammation have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Physical activity may lower the risk of coronary heart disease(CHD by mitigating inflammation. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise training on systemic inflammatory response in patients with stabile coronary artery disease participating in a cardiovascular rehabilitation exercise program. Male (n=29 and female (n=23 patients with stable coronary heart disease were recruited for this study. All patients were divided into two groups: group with regular aerobic physical training during cardiovascular rehabilitation program phase II along 3 weeks in rehabilitation center and 3 weeks after that in home of patients and sedentary lifestyle group. There were no significant differences in gender distribution among analyzed groups. Student’s t test showed no significant difference in mean age, waist circumference (OS and waist/hip ratio (WHR. Degree of obesity was measured by BMI, and there was a significant improvement in BMI in patients who underwent the six-week physical training compared to control group (p<0.05.Physical training during 6 weeks did not show any effects on leukocyte count and ICAM-1 levels compared to control group. The exercise training induced reduction in plasma CRP levels by 23.72%, p<0.001, and reduction in plasma VCAM-1 levels by Moderate aerobic exercise training resulted in a significant reduction of inflammatory state by decreasing CRP and VCAM-1 levels without significant body mass and visceral obesity reduction. The obtained results indicate that regular physical activity is clinically attractive in primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart diseases.

  2. Association between hormonal changes at menopause and the risk of a coronary event: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Janet R; Taffe, John R; Lehert, Philippe; Burger, Henry G; Dennerstein, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the association of hormone levels at menopause, lifestyle variables, and body composition with the predicted 10-year risk of a coronary event, calculated using the PROCAM scoring system, in a population-based sample of Australian-born, middle-aged women. A 9-year prospective study of 438 Australian-born women, who at baseline were aged 45 to 55 years and had menstruated in the prior 3 months. Interviews, fasting blood, and physical measurements were taken annually. The risk of an acute coronary event was calculated using the PROCAM scoring system (includes: age, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, family history of premature myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, and triglycerides). Retention rate after 8 years of follow-up was 88% (n = 387). In women not using hormone therapy (HT): higher than average body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.001), BMI that increased (P < 0.005), lower than average estradiol levels (P < 0.005), estradiol levels that decreased (P < 0.001), and high free testosterone levels (P < 0.05) were associated with increased risk of a coronary event. There was a trend for high exercise frequency to be associated with a decreased risk (P < 0.07). After BMI and lifestyle variables were taken into account, use of HT did not have a significant effect on risk of a coronary event. In this longitudinal observational study of middle-aged Australian-born women, high BMI, an increase in BMI, high free testosterone, low estradiol, and a decrease in estradiol levels were the main determinants of increased risk of an acute coronary event, based on the PROCAM scoring system calculation. More frequent exercise tended to lower the risk.

  3. Left atrial enlargement increases the risk of major adverse cardiac events independent of coronary vasodilator capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Angela S. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Murthy, Venkatesh L.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Gayed, Peter; Bruyere, John; Di Carli, Marcelo F. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Wu, Justina [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, and the Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine (Cardiology) and Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Dorbala, Sharmila [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and the Division of Cardiology, Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Section, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Longstanding uncontrolled atherogenic risk factors may contribute to left atrial (LA) hypertension, LA enlargement (LAE) and coronary vascular dysfunction. Together they may better identify risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACE). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that chronic LA hypertension as assessed by LAE modifies the relationship between coronary vascular function and MACE. In 508 unselected subjects with a normal clinical {sup 82}Rb PET/CT, ejection fraction ≥40 %, no prior coronary artery disease, valve disease or atrial fibrillation, LAE was determined based on LA volumes estimated from the hybrid perfusion and CT transmission scan images and indexed to body surface area. Absolute myocardial blood flow and global coronary flow reserve (CFR) were calculated. Subjects were systematically followed-up for the primary end-point - MACE - a composite of all-cause death, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for heart failure, stroke, coronary artery disease progression or revascularization. During a median follow-up of 862 days, 65 of the subjects experienced a composite event. Compared with subjects with normal LA size, subjects with LAE showed significantly lower CFR (2.25 ± 0.83 vs. 1.95 ± 0.80, p = 0.01). LAE independently and incrementally predicted MACE even after accounting for clinical risk factors, medication use, stress left ventricular ejection fraction, stress left ventricular end-diastolic volume index and CFR (chi-squared statistic increased from 30.9 to 48.3; p = 0.001). Among subjects with normal CFR, those with LAE had significantly worse event-free survival (risk adjusted HR 5.4, 95 % CI 2.3 - 12.8, p < 0.0001). LAE and reduced CFR are related but distinct cardiovascular adaptations to atherogenic risk factors. LAE is a risk marker for MACE independent of clinical factors and left ventricular volumes; individuals with LAE may be at risk of MACE despite normal coronary vascular function. (orig.)

  4. Protein Interaction-Based Genome-Wide Analysis of Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majken Karoline; Pers, Tune Hannes; Dworzynski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    in genes associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods and Results-Genome-wide association analyses of approximately approximate to 700 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 899 incident CHD cases and 1823 age-and sex-matched controls within the Nurses' Health and the Health Professionals...... for the number of complexes tested, 1 gene set was overrepresented in CHD-associated genes (P = 0.002). Centered on the beta 1-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB1), this complex included 18 protein interaction partners that have not been identified as candidate loci for CHD. Of the 19 genes in the top complex, 5...... complex. Conclusions-The integration of a GWA study with PPI data successfully identifies a set of candidate susceptibility genes for incident CHD that would have been missed in single-marker GWA analysis. (Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2011; 4:549-556.)...

  5. Risk factors and incidence of contrast induced nephropathy following coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoga Yuniadi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN is one of important complication of contrast media administration. Its incidence and risk factors among Indonesian patients undergoing coronary intervention has not been reported yet. CIN was defined as increasing of serum creatinine by 0.5 mg/dl or more in the third day following contrast media exposure. Of 312 patients undergoing coronary intervention, 25% developed CIN. Patient-related risk factors comprised of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, NYHA class, proteinuria, serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dl and ejection fraction ≤ 35%. Contrast-related risk factors comprised of contrast media volume > 300 ml, contrast media type. However, our final model demonstrated that only hypertension [Hazard ratio (HR = 2.89, 95% confidence intrval (CI = 1.78 to 4.71, P = 0.000], diabetes mellitus (HR = 3.09, 95% CI = 1.89 to 5.06, P = 0.000, ejection fraction (EF ≤ 35% (HR = 2.92; 95% CI = 1.72 to 4.96; P = 0.000, total contrast volume > 300 ml (HR = 7.73; 95% CI = 3.09 to 19.37; P = 0.000 and proteinuria (HR = 14.96; 95% CI = 3.45 to 64.86; P = 0.000 were independent risk factors of CIN. In conclusion, CIN developed in 25% of patients undergoing coronary intervention. The independent risk factors of CIN included hypertension, diabetes mellitus, EF ≤ 35%, contrast volume > 300 ml and proteinuria. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 131-7Keywords: contrast induced nephropathy, coronary intervention

  6. Panic disorder and incident coronary heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Phillip J; Wittert, Gary A; Turnbull, Deborah A; Beltrame, John F; Horowitz, John D; Cosh, Suzanne; Baumeister, Harald

    2015-03-25

    The clinical presentation of panic disorder and panic attack overlaps many symptoms typically experienced in coronary heart disease (CHD). Etiological links between panic disorder and CHD are controversial and remain largely tenuous. This systematic review aims to pool together data regarding panic disorder with respect to incident CHD or myocardial infarction. Electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and SCOPUS) will be searched using a search strategy exploding the topics for CHD and panic disorder. Authors and reference lists of included studies will also be contacted to identify additional published and unpublished studies. Eligibility criteria are as follows: persons without CHD who meet criteria for panic disorder, panic attack, anxiety neurosis or elevated panic disorder symptoms; Comparison: persons without CHD who do not meet criteria for panic disorder, panic attack, anxiety neurosis or elevated panic disorder symptoms; verified fatal and non-fatal CHD at follow-up; including coronary revascularization procedure, coronary artery disease, and myocardial infarction. Studies adopting self-report CHD will be ineligible. Screening will be undertaken by two independent reviewers with disagreements resolved through discussion. Data extraction will include original data specified as hazard ratios, risk ratios, and original cell data if available. Risk of bias assessment will be undertaken by two independent reviewers. Meta-analytic methods will be used to synthesize the data collected relating to the CHD outcomes with Cochrane Review Manager 5.3. This systematic review aims to clarify whether panic disorder is associated with elevated risk for subsequent CHD. An evaluation of the etiological links between panic disorder with incident CHD might inform evidence-based clinical practice and policy concerning triaging chest pain patients, diagnostic assessment, and psychiatric intervention with panic disorder patients. PROSPERO CRD42014014891 .

  7. Serum insulin levels in non-obese, non-diabetic Asian Indians with acute coronary and non-coronary events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, A; Shukla, P; Reddy, K S; Lall, S B; Peshin, S S; Pandey, R M

    2000-01-01

    Significant insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia has been observed to be associated with coronary heart disease in epidemiological studies, particularly so in Asian Indians. This study attempted to investigate if hyperinsulinemia accompanies acute cardiovascular events in Asian Indians, and that it is not a metabolic response to acute stress alone. To test this hypothesis, a case-control study was carried out in a tertiary referral hospital in northern India. Group I (n = 19), consisting of non-diabetic, non-hypertensive, non-obese patients presenting with first episode of acute coronary event (first episode of angina or myocardial infarction) were compared with non-diabetic, non-hypertensive, non-obese patients of group II (n = 21) presenting with non-cardiovascular emergencies (severe abdominal pain e.g. uncomplicated ureteric colic or non-specific intestinal colic. Blood was analysed for glycosylated haemoglobin, fructosamine and insulin levels within 24 hours of the acute event. Elevated serum fructosamine was observed in 11 (57.8%) subjects in group I and 9 (42.9%) in group II (p = NS). Glycosylated haemoglobin was 6.8 +/- 0.1 percent in group I versus 5.9 +/- 0.04 percent in group II (p < 0.01). Three out of 11 subjects in group I and 1/9 subjects in group II having elevated serum fructosamine level also had increased glycosylated haemoglobin level. Five (26.3%) subjects in group I and 2 (9.5%) in group II with elevated glycosylated haemoglobin level were excluded from the analysis as these patients might have been diabetic. Mean serum insulin values were significantly higher in group I (161.3 +/- 8.15 micro IU/mL and 17.5 +/- 1.9 micro IU/mL in groups I and II, respectively; p < 0.001). Eleven (57.8%) subjects in group I had insulin values above 100 uIU/ml. The present study indicates that significant hyperinsulinemia accompanies acute cardiovascular events and it is not an acute response to pain or stress hyperglycemia. Markedly high insulin levels

  8. Analgesic Use and Risk for Acute Coronary Events in Patients With Osteoarthritis: A Population-based, Nested Case-control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Caridad; Marsal, Josep Ramon; Elorza, Josep Maria; Aragón, Maria; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Morros, Rosa

    2018-02-01

    Recent controversies on the safety profiles of opioids and paracetamol (acetaminophen) have led to changes in clinical guidance on osteoarthritis (OA) management. We studied the existing association between the use of different OA drug therapies and the risk for acute coronary events. A cohort of patients with clinically diagnosed OA (according to ICD-10 codes) was identified in the SIDIAP database. Within the cohort, cases with incident acute coronary events (acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina) between 2008 and 2012 were identified using ICD-10 codes and data from hospital admission. Controls were matched 3:1 to acute coronary event-free patients matched by sex, age (±5 years), geographic area, and years since OA diagnosis (±2 years). Linked pharmacy dispensation data were used for assessing exposure to drug therapies. Multivariate conditional logistic regression models were fitted to estimate adjusted odds ratios of acute coronary events. Totals of 5663 cases and 16,989 controls were studied. Previous morbidity and cardiovascular risk were higher in cases than in controls, with no significant differences in type or number of joints with OA. Multivariate adjusted analyses showed increased risks (odds ratio; 95% CI) related to the use of diclofenac (1.16; 1.06-1.27), naproxen (1.25; 1.04-1.48), and opioid analgesics (1.13; 1.03-1.24). No significant associations were observed with cyclooxygenase-2 selective NSAIDs, topical NSAIDs, glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate, paracetamol, or metamizole. In patients with clinically diagnosed OA, the use of nonselective NSAIDs or opioid analgesics is associated with an increased risk for acute coronary events. These risks should be considered when selecting treatments of OA in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Parathyroid hormone, calcidiol, calcitriol and adverse events in the acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Ruiz, P; Jaulent Huertas, L; Castañeda Sancirilo, M; Martínez Díaz, J J; Clavel Ruipérez, G; García de Guadiana Romualdo, L; Wasniewski, S; Merelo Nicolás, M; García Escribano, I; Soria Arcos, F; Castillo Moreno, J A; Consuegra Sánchez, L

    2018-03-01

    To know the clinical profile as well as the prognostic significance of elevated levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Observational and prospective study of patients admitted for ACS in a single Spanish center during a period of six months. The circulating concentrations of PTH, calcidiol, calcitriol, NT-proBNP, C-reactive protein, cystatinC and fibrinogen were determined within the first 48h at admission. We performed adjusted models to predict death or re-entry for ACS after hospital discharge. A total of 161 patients were recruited (age 67±14 years, 75.2% were men). Forty-one (25.5%) patients had elevated PTH values. During follow-up for a period of 275 person-years, 50 adverse events were recorded. Patients with elevated PTH levels were proportionally more women (21.2 vs. 39.0%) and older (63.3 vs. 77.8 years, both P<.05). Likewise, they presented significantly more cardiovascular risk and a worse prognosis during follow-up (incidence rate ratio 2.64 CI 95%: 1.5-4.6). However, in an adjusted model by the GRACE score, PTH levels were not shown to be an independent risk factor (hazard ratio=1.1; 95% CI: 0.6-2.2), neither other components of the panel. The proportion of patients with elevated levels of PTH admitted for ACS was high. The presence of high PTH levels was associated with an unfavorable clinical profile and a worse outcome during the follow-up, although it was not an independent predictor of poor prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  10. Patient-reported health as a prognostic factor for adverse events following percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biering K

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Karin Biering,1 Hans Erik Bøtker,2 Troels Niemann,3 Niels Henrik Hjollund4,51Department of Occupational Medicine, Regional Hospital West Jutland, Herning, 2Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Aarhus, 3Department of Cardiology, Regional Hospital West Jutland, Herning, 4WestChronic, Regional Hospital West Jutland, Herning, 5Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, DenmarkObjective: A relation may exist between self-reported health and adverse events in coronary heart disease. Previous studies have been vulnerable to possible selection bias. In the study reported here, we examined the association between self-rated health and adverse events in terms of cardiac events, cardiac readmissions, and all-cause mortality in a complete cohort of patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI.Study design and setting: A cohort of patients with coronary heart disease treated with PCI was followed up with questionnaires 4 weeks after PCI to measure self-rated health and in registers to identify adverse events. Of 1,752 eligible patients under 67 years, 26 died during the first 4 weeks. A total of 224 patients were excluded from the analysis because they were readmitted with a cardiac diagnosis before answering the first questionnaire. We received complete SF-12 Health Survey component summaries from 984 of the remaining 1,502 patients. We used multiple imputation to establish a complete cohort, including nonrespondents.Results: During follow-up, 83 patients died, 220 patients experienced a new cardiac event, and 526 patients experienced a hospital readmission related to coronary heart disease. Poor self-rated health was related to cardiac events, cardiac readmission, and all-cause mortality. The associations were stronger for all-cause mortality than for events and readmissions. Physical health was more important than mental health, but both revealed an exposure–response pattern

  11. Highly sensitive C-reactive protein and male gender are independently related to the severity of coronary disease in patients with metabolic syndrome and an acute coronary event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.C. Monteiro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with metabolic syndrome are at high-risk for development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. The objective of this study was to examine the major determinants of coronary disease severity, including those coronary risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome, during the early period after an acute coronary episode. We tested the hypothesis that inflammatory markers, especially highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP, are related to coronary atherosclerosis, in addition to traditional coronary risk factors. Subjects of both genders aged 30 to 75 years (N = 116 were prospectively included if they had suffered a recent acute coronary syndrome (acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina pectoris requiring hospitalization and if they had metabolic syndrome diagnosed according to the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III. Patients were submitted to a coronary angiography and the burden of atherosclerosis was estimated by the Gensini score. The severity of coronary disease was correlated (Spearman’s or Pearson’s coefficient with gender (r = 0.291, P = 0.008, age (r = 0.218, P = 0.048, hsCRP (r = 0.256, P = 0.020, ApoB/ApoA ratio (r = 0.233, P = 0.041, and carotid intima-media thickness (r = 0.236, P = 0.041. After multiple linear regression, only male gender (P = 0.046 and hsCRP (P = 0.012 remained independently associated with the Gensini score. In this high-risk population, male gender and high levels of hsCRP, two variables that can be easily obtained, were associated with more extensive coronary disease, identifying patients with the highest potential of developing new coronary events.

  12. Educational class inequalities in the incidence of coronary heart disease in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veronesi, Giovanni; Ferrario, Marco M.; Kuulasmaa, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the burden of social inequalities in coronary heart disease (CHD) and to identify their major determinants in 15 European populations. Methods: The MORGAM (MOnica Risk, Genetics, Archiving and Monograph) study comprised 49 cohorts of middle-aged European adults free of CHD...... (110 928 individuals) recruited mostly in the mid-1980s and 1990s, with comparable assessment of baseline risk and follow-up procedures. We derived three educational classes accounting for birth cohorts and used regression-based inequality measures of absolute differences in CHD rates and HRs (ie......, Relative Index of Inequality, RII) for the least versus the most educated individuals. Results: N=6522 first CHD events occurred during a median follow-up of 12 years. Educational class inequalities accounted for 343 and 170 additional CHD events per 100 000 person-years in the least educated men and women...

  13. Combined Value of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Risk Score for Predicting Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Mi, Lan; Liu, Xiaojun; Pan, Shuo; Xu, Jiaojiao; Xia, Dongyu; Liu, Zhongwei; Zhang, Yong; Xiang, Yu; Yuan, Zuyi; Guan, Gongchang; Wang, Junkui

    2015-01-01

    Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk score and red blood cell distribution width (RDW) content can both independently predict major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We investigated the combined predictive value of RDW and GRACE risk score for cardiovascular events in patients with ACS undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for the first time. We enrolled 480 ACS patients. During a median follow-up time of 37.2 months, 70 (14.58%) patients experienced MACEs. Patients were divided into tertiles according to the baseline RDW content (11.30-12.90, 13.00-13.50, 13.60-16.40). GRACE score was positively correlated with RDW content. Multivariate Cox analysis showed that both GRACE score and RDW content were independent predictors of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.039; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.024-1.055; p risk of MACEs increased with increasing RDW content (p value of combining RDW content and GRACE risk score was significantly improved, also shown by the net reclassification improvement (NRI = 0.352, p value of RDW and GRACE risk score yielded a more accurate predictive value for long-term cardiovascular events in ACS patients who underwent PCI as compared to each measure alone.

  14. The development of an incident event reporting system for nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Shwu-Fen; Huang, Ean-Wen; Chuang, Jen-Hsiang

    2009-01-01

    Incident events may occur when nursing students are present in the clinical setting. Their inexperience and unfamiliarity with clinical practice put them at risk for making mistakes that could potentially harm patients and themselves. However, there are deficiencies with incident event reporting systems, including incomplete data and delayed reports. The purpose of this study was to develop an incident event reporting system for nursing students in clinical settings and evaluate its effectiveness. This study was undertaken in three phases. In the first phase, a literature review and focus groups were used to develop the architecture of the reporting system. In the second phase, the reporting system was implemented. Data from incident events that involved nursing students were collected for a 12-month period. In the third phase, a pre-post trial was undertaken to evaluate the performance of the reporting system. The ASP.NET software and Microsoft Access 2003 were used to create an interactive web-based interface and design a database for the reporting system. Email notifications alerted the nursing student's teacher when an incident event was reported. One year after installing the reporting system, the number of reported incident events increased tenfold. However, the time to report the incident event and the time required to complete the reporting procedures were shorter than before implementation of the reporting system. The incident event reporting system appeared to be effective in more comprehensively reporting the number of incident events and shorten the time required for reporting them compared to traditional written reports.

  15. Lead-Related Genetic Loci, Cumulative Lead Exposure and Incident Coronary Heart Disease: The Normative Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Wang, Xin; Weisskopf, Marc G; Sparrow, David; Schwartz, Joel; Hu, Howard; Park, Sung Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Cumulative exposure to lead is associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Polymorphisms in the δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), hemochromatosis (HFE), heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), vitamin D receptor (VDR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) supergene family (GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTM1), apolipoprotein E (APOE),angiotensin II receptor-1 (AGTR1) and angiotensinogen (AGT) genes, are believed to alter toxicokinetics and/or toxicodynamics of lead. We assessed possible effect modification by genetic polymorphisms in ALAD, HFE, HMOX1, VDR, GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTM1, APOE, AGTR1 and AGT individually and as the genetic risk score (GRS) on the association between cumulative lead exposure and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) events. We used K-shell-X-ray fluorescence to measure bone lead levels. GRS was calculated on the basis of 22 lead-related loci. We constructed Cox proportional hazard models to compute adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident CHD. We applied inverse probability weighting to account for potential selection bias due to recruitment into the bone lead sub-study. Significant effect modification was found by VDR, HMOX1, GSTP1, APOE, and AGT genetic polymorphisms when evaluated individually. Further, the bone lead-CHD associations became larger as GRS increases. After adjusting for potential confounders, a HR of CHD was 2.27 (95%CI: 1.50-3.42) with 2-fold increase in patella lead levels, among participants in the top tertile of GRS. We also detected an increasing trend in HRs across tertiles of GRS (p-trend = 0.0063). Our findings suggest that lead-related loci as a whole may play an important role in susceptibility to lead-related CHD risk. These findings need to be validated in a separate cohort containing bone lead, lead-related genetic loci and incident CHD data.

  16. Lead-Related Genetic Loci, Cumulative Lead Exposure and Incident Coronary Heart Disease: The Normative Aging Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ding

    Full Text Available Cumulative exposure to lead is associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Polymorphisms in the δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD, hemochromatosis (HFE, heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1, vitamin D receptor (VDR, glutathione S-transferase (GST supergene family (GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTM1, apolipoprotein E (APOE,angiotensin II receptor-1 (AGTR1 and angiotensinogen (AGT genes, are believed to alter toxicokinetics and/or toxicodynamics of lead.We assessed possible effect modification by genetic polymorphisms in ALAD, HFE, HMOX1, VDR, GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTM1, APOE, AGTR1 and AGT individually and as the genetic risk score (GRS on the association between cumulative lead exposure and incident coronary heart disease (CHD events.We used K-shell-X-ray fluorescence to measure bone lead levels. GRS was calculated on the basis of 22 lead-related loci. We constructed Cox proportional hazard models to compute adjusted hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for incident CHD. We applied inverse probability weighting to account for potential selection bias due to recruitment into the bone lead sub-study.Significant effect modification was found by VDR, HMOX1, GSTP1, APOE, and AGT genetic polymorphisms when evaluated individually. Further, the bone lead-CHD associations became larger as GRS increases. After adjusting for potential confounders, a HR of CHD was 2.27 (95%CI: 1.50-3.42 with 2-fold increase in patella lead levels, among participants in the top tertile of GRS. We also detected an increasing trend in HRs across tertiles of GRS (p-trend = 0.0063.Our findings suggest that lead-related loci as a whole may play an important role in susceptibility to lead-related CHD risk. These findings need to be validated in a separate cohort containing bone lead, lead-related genetic loci and incident CHD data.

  17. Lead-Related Genetic Loci, Cumulative Lead Exposure and Incident Coronary Heart Disease: The Normative Aging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Marc G.; Sparrow, David; Schwartz, Joel; Hu, Howard; Park, Sung Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Cumulative exposure to lead is associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Polymorphisms in the δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), hemochromatosis (HFE), heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), vitamin D receptor (VDR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) supergene family (GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTM1), apolipoprotein E (APOE),angiotensin II receptor-1 (AGTR1) and angiotensinogen (AGT) genes, are believed to alter toxicokinetics and/or toxicodynamics of lead. Objectives We assessed possible effect modification by genetic polymorphisms in ALAD, HFE, HMOX1, VDR, GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTM1, APOE, AGTR1 and AGT individually and as the genetic risk score (GRS) on the association between cumulative lead exposure and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) events. Methods We used K-shell-X-ray fluorescence to measure bone lead levels. GRS was calculated on the basis of 22 lead-related loci. We constructed Cox proportional hazard models to compute adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident CHD. We applied inverse probability weighting to account for potential selection bias due to recruitment into the bone lead sub-study. Results Significant effect modification was found by VDR, HMOX1, GSTP1, APOE, and AGT genetic polymorphisms when evaluated individually. Further, the bone lead-CHD associations became larger as GRS increases. After adjusting for potential confounders, a HR of CHD was 2.27 (95%CI: 1.50–3.42) with 2-fold increase in patella lead levels, among participants in the top tertile of GRS. We also detected an increasing trend in HRs across tertiles of GRS (p-trend = 0.0063). Conclusions Our findings suggest that lead-related loci as a whole may play an important role in susceptibility to lead-related CHD risk. These findings need to be validated in a separate cohort containing bone lead, lead-related genetic loci and incident CHD data. PMID:27584680

  18. Bevacizumab increases the incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with metastatic breast or colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Kapelakis

    2017-05-01

    Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to conventional chemotherapy for metastatic breast or colorectal cancer increases the incidence of cardiovascular events, which is mainly due to the increased prevalence of myocardial infarction and thromboembolic events.

  19. Sustained ventricular arrhythmias among patients with acute coronary syndromes with no ST-segment elevation: incidence, predictors, and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.D. White (Harvey); R.A. Harrington (Robert Alex); R.J. Simes (John); E.J. Topol (Eric); D.J. Moliterno (David); C.B. Granger (Christopher); Y. Huang (Yao); K.L. Lee (Kerry); R.M. Califf (Robert); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); P.W. Armstrong (Paul); F.J.J. van de Werf (Frans); S.M. Al-Khatib (Sana)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The prognosis of ventricular arrhythmias among patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes is unknown. We studied the incidence, predictors, and outcomes of sustained ventricular arrhythmias in 4 large randomized trials of such patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: We

  20. Men's and Women's Health Beliefs Differentially Predict Coronary Heart Disease Incidence in a Population-Based Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korin, Maya Rom; Chaplin, William F.; Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Butler, Mark J.; Ojie, Mary-Jane; Davidson, Karina W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine gender differences in the association between beliefs in heart disease preventability and 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in a population-based sample. Methods: A total of 2,688 Noninstitutionalized Nova Scotians without prior CHD enrolled in the Nova Scotia Health Study (NSHS95) and were followed for 10…

  1. Predictive value of social inhibition and negative affectivity for cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denollet, Johan; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Vrints, Christiaan J

    2014-01-01

    Methodological considerations and selected null findings indicate the need to reexamine the Type D construct. We investigated whether associations with cardiac events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) involve the specific combination of negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition...

  2. Incidence of stroke and coronary heart disease in the adult health study sample, 1958 - 78

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kazunori; Shimizu, Yukiko; Sawada, Hisao; Kato, Hiroo.

    1986-04-01

    Approximately 16,000 study subjects in the Adult Health Study sample who had received examination at least once during the 20 years (1958 - 78) in Hiroshima or Nagasaki and were found to have neither stroke nor coronary heart disease (CHD) at the initial examination were studied for the incidence of stroke and CHD and the relationship of these to atomic bomb radiation exposure. Their secular trends were also studied. Findings suggestive of a relationship between stroke and radiation exposure among Hiroshima females were first discovered for the years 1969 - 73, that is, 24 - 28 years after A-bomb exposure. In general, this association is supported by the present analysis. Stroke incidence continued to decrease during the present report's period of observation. Analysis by type showed that cerebral infarction and cerebral hemorrhage both decreased, but the decrease of the latter is especially remarkable. The trend to decrease is observed in both sexes and in both cities. A relationship between CHD and radiation exposure was, as noted for stroke, first observed only in Hiroshima females for the years 1969 - 73, but from this analysis it appears that the trend began earlier and the association is getting stronger with the passage of time. Analysis by type showed myocardial infarction (MI), but not angina pectoris, to be related to radiation exposure. The incidence rate for CHD, especially for MI, was almost constant during the observation period, it being 1.2/1,000 person-years on the average. Comparing by sex, the incidence rate was constant in males. In females, the pattern varied with time. There appear to be no between-city differences in secular trends - essentially constant. (author)

  3. The changing incidence of AIDS events in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Sabin, Caroline A.; Phillips, Andrew; Sterne, Jonathan; May, Margaret; Justice, Amy; Dabis, Francois; Grabar, Sophie; Ledergerber, Bruno; Gill, John; Reiss, Peter; Egger, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the incidence of most AIDS events declines after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), this decline is more rapid for some conditions than others. We herein describe the decline in incidence of AIDS-defining events among 12,574 antiretroviral-naive

  4. Edge-detected common carotid artery intima-media thickness and incident coronary heart disease in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Joseph F; O'Leary, Daniel H

    2015-06-15

    Common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) can be measured either by hand or with an automated edge detector. We performed a direct comparison of these 2 approaches and studied their respective associations with coronary heart disease outcomes. We studied 5468 participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, composed of white, Chinese, Hispanic, and black participants with an average age of 61.9 years (47.8% men) and who were free of coronary heart disease at baseline. Manual-traced and edge-detected IMT measurements were made in the same location on ultrasound images of the right common carotid artery far wall in an area free of plaque. Manual-traced and edge-detected common carotid artery IMT measurements were added separately to multivariable Cox proportional hazards models with time to incident coronary heart disease as the outcome and adjusted for traditional coronary heart disease Framingham risk factors, lipid-lowering therapy, blood pressure-lowering therapy, and race or ethnicity. Additional models were generated after adding clinic site and reader. There were 349 events during a median follow-up of 10.2 years. In adjusted models, the hazard ratio was not significant (1.31; 95% CI 0.84 to 2.06) for each millimeter increase in manual-traced IMT but was significant for edge-detected IMT (hazard ratio 1.63; 95% CI 1.12 to 2.37). Edge-detected IMT remained statistically associated with outcomes after additional adjustment for clinic site and reader performing the IMT measurement (hazard ratio 1.59; 95% CI 1.07 to 2.35). Edge-detected common carotid artery far wall IMT has similar if not stronger associations with coronary heart disease outcomes when compared with manual-traced IMT. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/. Unique identifier: NCT00063440. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  5. Incidence, Clinical Presentation, and Predictors of Clinical Restenosis in Coronary Bioresorbable Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimeni, Alberto; Weissner, Melissa; Schochlow, Katharina; Ullrich, Helen; Indolfi, Ciro; Dijkstra, Jouke; Anadol, Remzi; Münzel, Thomas; Gori, Tommaso

    2017-09-25

    The aim of this study was to describe the incidence and clinical characteristics, including intracoronary imaging features, of clinical restenosis in bioresorbable coronary scaffolds (BRS). Further, the authors searched for clinical and procedural predictors of scaffold restenosis (ScR) and report on the clinical outcomes after treatment of ScR in a cohort of consecutive all-comer patients. Data from randomized controlled trials demonstrate a higher rate of target lesion failure in patients treated with BRS as compared with those treated with metal drug-eluting stents. Although in-scaffold thrombosis has been thoroughly investigated, there are little data available on the incidence and characteristics of ScR. A total of 657 consecutive patients (age 63 ± 12 years, 79% men, 21% diabetics, 67% acute coronary syndrome) who received a total of 883 BRS for the treatment of coronary artery stenoses between May 2012 and January 2015 were enrolled in a retrospective registry. During the median follow-up of 1,076 days (interquartile range: 762 to 1,206 days), a total of 49 cases of ScR were found in 41 patients (Kaplan-Meier incidence: 2.4%, 6.0%, and 9.0% at 12-, 24-, and 36-month follow-up, respectively). ScR presented as stable angina or as incidental finding in 73% of the cases. The angiographic pattern was complex (type II to IV) in 55% of the ScR lesions. The neointima was homogeneous with high signal intensity in all but 3 cases at optical coherence tomography. Prior revascularization (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5 to 5.1; p = 0.002), diabetes (HR: 2.9; 95%CI: 1.5 to 5.4; p = 0.001), lesion types B2 or C (HR: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.5 to 5.4; p = 0.002), and implantation technique (HR: 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1 to 0.6; p = 0.001) emerged as independent predictors of ScR. Oversizing (HR: 6.29; 95% CI: 2.4 to 16.4), undersizing (HR: 5.15; 95% CI: 1.99 to 13.30), and a residual stenosis >27% (HR: 8.9; 95% CI: 3.6 to 21.8) were associated with an

  6. Long-Term Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Incidence of Cerebrovascular Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stafoggia, Massimo; Cesaroni, Giulia; Peters, Annette

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have investigated effects of air pollution on the incidence of cerebrovascular events. OBJECTIVES: We assessed the association between long-term exposure to multiple air pollutants and the incidence of stroke in European cohorts. METHODS: Data from 11 cohorts were collecte...... found suggestive evidence of an association between fine particles and incidence of cerebrovascular events in Europe, even at lower concentrations than set by the current air quality limit value....

  7. Concomitant use of clopidogrel and statins and risk of major adverse cardiovascular events following coronary stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Morten Hvid; Johansen, Martin B; Maeng, Michael

    2012-01-01

    quantification of the interaction effect. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS • Clopidogrel and CYP3A4-metabolizing statin use were each associated with a substantially reduced rate of major adverse cardiovascular events within 12 months after coronary stent implantation. • Although we observed an interaction between use...... of clopidogrel and statins, statin use vs. non-use was not associated with an increased rate of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients using clopidogrel after coronary stent implantation. AIMS To examine whether CYP3A4-metabolizing statin use modified the association between clopidogrel use and major...... adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) after coronary stent implantation, using time-varying drug exposure ascertainment. METHODS We conducted this population-based cohort study in Western Denmark (population: 3 million) using medical databases. We identified all 13 001 patients with coronary stent...

  8. Pathological 99mTc-sestamibi myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is independently associated with emerging cardiac events in elderly patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucerius, Jan; Joe, Alexius Y.; Herder, Ellen; Brockmann, Holger; Biermann, Kim; Palmedo, Holger; Biersack, Hans-Juergen (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Bonn (Germany)), e-mail: jan.bucerius@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Tiemann, Klaus (Dept. of Internal Medicine II, Univ. of Bonn (Germany))

    2011-02-15

    Background: Only few data are available regarding the prognostic impact of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with 99mTc-sestamibi (MPS) regarding emerging cardiac events in elderly patients Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of MPS regarding emerging cardiac events in patients aged =70 years with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Material and Methods: One hundred and thirty-three patients (74.6 +- 3.7 years) who underwent exercise or pharmacological stress/rest MPS were included in this analysis. Semi-quantitative visual interpretation of MPS images was performed and Summed-Stress- (SSS), Summed-Difference- (SDS), and Summed-Rest Scores (SRS) were calculated. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were calculated for evaluation of the independent prognostic impact of MPS results and several cardiac-related patient characteristics with regard to emerging cardiac events. Kaplan-Meier survival- and log rank analyses were calculated for assessment of cardiac event-free survival. Results: Pathological SSS (OR: 3.3), angina (OR: 2.7) and ischemic ECG (OR: 3.0) were independently associated with cardiac events. Patients with pathological SSS (p = 0.005) and ischemic ECG (p = 0.012) had a significantly lower incidence of cardiac event-free survival. Conclusion: Pathological MPS is independently associated with emerging cardiac events predicting a significantly lower incidence of cardiac event-free survival in patients aged =70 years

  9. Events and incidents in 2011; Hendingar og uhell i 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    11. March 2011 Japan was hit by an earthquake measuring 9.0 on the Richter scale.The earthquake was followed by a massive tsunami. In all four Japanese nuclear power plants were affected of these events. The nuclear plant Fukushima Daiichi was hit hardest. In addition to Fukushima accident, 2011 was a year with several events, bow fires at nuclear waste facilities, icebreakers and submarines, which NRPA had to deal with. (eb)

  10. Long-term follow-up after near-infrared spectroscopy coronary imaging: Insights from the lipid cORe plaque association with CLinical events (ORACLE-NIRS) registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danek, Barbara Anna; Karatasakis, Aris; Karacsonyi, Judit; Alame, Aya; Resendes, Erica; Kalsaria, Pratik; Nguyen-Trong, Phuong-Khanh J; Rangan, Bavana V; Roesle, Michele; Abdullah, Shuaib; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    Coronary lipid core plaque may be associated with the incidence of subsequent cardiovascular events. We analyzed outcomes of 239 patients who underwent near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) coronary imaging between 2009-2011. Multivariable Cox regression was used to identify variables independently associated with the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE; cardiac mortality, acute coronary syndromes (ACS), stroke, and unplanned revascularization) during follow-up. Mean patient age was 64±9years, 99% were men, and 50% were diabetic, presenting with stable coronary artery disease (61%) or an acute coronary syndrome (ACS, 39%). Target vessel pre-stenting median lipid core burden index (LCBI) was 88 [interquartile range, IQR 50-130]. Median LCBI in non-target vessels was 57 [IQR 26-94]. Median follow-up was 5.3years. The 5-year MACE rate was 37.5% (cardiac mortality was 15.0%). On multivariable analysis the following variables were associated with MACE: diabetes mellitus, prior percutaneous coronary intervention performed at index angiography, and non-target vessel LCBI. Non-target vessel LCBI of 77 was determined using receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis to be a threshold for prediction of MACE in our cohort. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for non-target vessel LCBI ≥77 was 14.05 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.47-133.51, p=0.002). The 5-year cumulative incidence of events in the above-threshold group was 58.0% vs. 13.1% in the below-threshold group. During long-term follow-up of patients who underwent NIRS imaging, high LCBI in a non-PCI target vessel was associated with increased incidence of MACE. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Combined Value of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Risk Score for Predicting Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Zhao

    Full Text Available Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE risk score and red blood cell distribution width (RDW content can both independently predict major adverse cardiac events (MACEs in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS. We investigated the combined predictive value of RDW and GRACE risk score for cardiovascular events in patients with ACS undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI for the first time. We enrolled 480 ACS patients. During a median follow-up time of 37.2 months, 70 (14.58% patients experienced MACEs. Patients were divided into tertiles according to the baseline RDW content (11.30-12.90, 13.00-13.50, 13.60-16.40. GRACE score was positively correlated with RDW content. Multivariate Cox analysis showed that both GRACE score and RDW content were independent predictors of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.039; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.024-1.055; p < 0.001; 1.699; 1.294-2.232; p < 0.001; respectively. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that the risk of MACEs increased with increasing RDW content (p < 0.001. For GRACE score alone, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve for MACEs was 0.749 (95% CI: 0.707-0.787. The area under the ROC curve for MACEs increased to 0.805 (0.766-0.839, p = 0.034 after adding RDW content. The incremental predictive value of combining RDW content and GRACE risk score was significantly improved, also shown by the net reclassification improvement (NRI = 0.352, p < 0.001 and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI = 0.023, p = 0.002. Combining the predictive value of RDW and GRACE risk score yielded a more accurate predictive value for long-term cardiovascular events in ACS patients who underwent PCI as compared to each measure alone.

  12. LB01.02: MORNING HOME BLOOD PRESSURE IS A STRONG PREDICTOR OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE EVENTS AS WELL AS STROKE EVENTS IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS ON ANTIHYPERTENSIVE TREATMENT. THE HONEST STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kario, K; Saito, I; Kushiro, T; Teramukai, S; Tomono, Y; Okuda, Y; Shimada, K

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies indicated that clinic blood pressure (CBP) is a strong predictor of stroke events, but CBP does not predict coronary artery disease (CAD) events so strongly. Morning home blood pressure (HBP) is more closely associated with stroke risk than CBP. However, few studies have investigated the relationship between morning HBP and CAD risk. We investigated the relationship between morning HBP and incidence of stroke events and CAD events, respectively, using data from the HONEST study. HONEST was a prospective observational study of hypertensive outpatients on olmesartan-based antihypertensive treatment. All the ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebrovascular events expect transient ischemic attack were defined as stroke events, and myocardial infarction and angina pectoris with coronary revascularization procedure were defined as CAD events. In 21591 participants (mean age, 64.9 years; mean follow-up, 2.02 years), 127 (2.92/1000 patient years) stroke events and 121 (2.78/1000 patient years) CAD events occurred. The incidence of stroke events was significantly increased in morning HBP >=145 to =155 mmHg compared with =150 to =160 mmHg compared with morning HBP >155 mmHg was 6.01 (95% CI, 2.85-12.68) compared with =160 mmHg, it was 5.82 (3.17-10.67) compared with morning HBP predicted stroke events similarly to CBP. The incidence of CAD events was significantly increased in morning HBP>=145 to =155 mmHg compared with =160 mmHg compared with =150 to morning HBP >=155 mmHg was 6.24 (2.82-13.84). In contrast, the HR in CBP >=160 mmHg was 3.51 (1.71-7.20), indicating that CBP underestimated CAD risk compared to morning HBP. Morning HBP predicted CAD events similarly to stroke events. In contrast, CBP is more likely to underestimate CAD risk than morning HBP. Morning SBP-guided approach for managing hypertension may be more effective in predicting future risk of CAD events than CBP-based one.

  13. Improving long-term prediction of first cardiovascular event: the contribution of family history of coronary heart disease and social status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, G; Gianfagna, F; Giampaoli, S; Chambless, L E; Mancia, G; Cesana, G; Ferrario, M M

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study is to assess whether family history of coronary heart disease (CHD) and education as proxy of social status improve long-term cardiovascular disease risk prediction in a low-incidence European population. The 20-year risk of first coronary or ischemic stroke events was estimated using sex-specific Cox models in 3956 participants of three population-based surveys in northern Italy, aged 35-69 years and free of cardiovascular disease at enrollment. The additional contribution of education and positive family history of CHD was defined as change in discrimination and Net Reclassification Improvement (NRI) over the model including 7 traditional risk factors. Kaplan-Meier 20-year risk was 16.8% in men (254 events) and 6.4% in women (102 events). Low education (hazard ratio=1.35, 95%CI 0.98-1.85) and family history of CHD (1.55; 1.19-2.03) were associated with the endpoint in men, but not in women. In men, the addition of education and family history significantly improved discrimination by 1%; NRI was 6% (95%CI: 0.2%-15.2%), raising to 20% (0.5%-44%) in those at intermediate risk. NRI in women at intermediate risk was 7%. In low-incidence populations, family history of CHD and education, easily assessed in clinical practice, should be included in long-term cardiovascular disease risk scores, at least in men. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Heavy rainfall events and diarrhea incidence: the role of social and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Elizabeth J; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Goldstick, Jason; Cevallos, William; Trostle, James; Levy, Karen

    2014-02-01

    The impact of heavy rainfall events on waterborne diarrheal diseases is uncertain. We conducted weekly, active surveillance for diarrhea in 19 villages in Ecuador from February 2004 to April 2007 in order to evaluate whether biophysical and social factors modify vulnerability to heavy rainfall events. A heavy rainfall event was defined as 24-hour rainfall exceeding the 90th percentile value (56 mm) in a given 7-day period within the study period. Mixed-effects Poisson regression was used to test the hypothesis that rainfall in the prior 8 weeks, water and sanitation conditions, and social cohesion modified the relationship between heavy rainfall events and diarrhea incidence. Heavy rainfall events were associated with increased diarrhea incidence following dry periods (incidence rate ratio = 1.39, 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 1.87) and decreased diarrhea incidence following wet periods (incidence rate ratio = 0.74, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.92). Drinking water treatment reduced the deleterious impacts of heavy rainfall events following dry periods. Sanitation, hygiene, and social cohesion did not modify the relationship between heavy rainfall events and diarrhea. Heavy rainfall events appear to affect diarrhea incidence through contamination of drinking water, and they present the greatest health risks following periods of low rainfall. Interventions designed to increase drinking water treatment may reduce climate vulnerability.

  15. Association of type D personality with unhealthy lifestyle, and estimated risk of coronary events in the general Icelandic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svansdottir, Erla; Denollet, Johan; Thorsson, Bolli; Gudnason, Thorarinn; Halldorsdottir, Sigrun; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van den Broek, Krista C; Karlsson, Hrobjartur D

    2013-04-01

    Type D personality is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality risk in cardiovascular disease patients, but the mechanisms explaining this risk are unclear. We examined whether Type D was associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors, estimated risk of developing CAD, and previous cardiac events. Cross-sectional study in the general Icelandic population. A random sample of 4753 individuals (mean age 49.1 ± 12.0 years; 49% men) from the REFINE-Reykjavik study completed assessments for Type D personality and conventional CAD risk factors. Ten-year risk of developing CAD was estimated with the Icelandic risk calculator. Type D personality (22% of sample) was associated with a higher prevalence of hypertension (35 vs. 31%, p = 0.009), but less use of hypertension medication (58 vs. 65%, p = 0.013) in hypertensives, more diabetes (6 vs. 4%, p = 0.023), wider waist circumference (p = 0.007), and elevated body mass index (p = 0.025) and blood lipids (p personality was associated with differences in lifestyle-related CAD risk factors, a higher estimated risk of developing CAD, and higher incidence of previous cardiac events. Unhealthy lifestyles may partly explain the adverse cardiovascular effect of Type D personality.

  16. Effect of cardiovascular prevention strategies on incident coronary disease hospitalisation rates in Spain; an ecological time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, María José; Alcalde-Cabero, Enrique; Ortíz, Cristina; Galán, Iñaki

    2014-02-17

    To assess the overall population impact of primary prevention strategies (promotion of healthy lifestyles, prevention of smoking and use of vascular risk drug therapy) of coronary disease in Spain. Ecological time series analysis, 1982-2009. All public and private hospitals in Spain. General population. Incident coronary disease hospitalisation as derived from official hospital discharge data. Annual hospitalisation rates were modelled according to nationwide use of statins, antihypertensive, antidiabetic and antiplatelet drugs, and prevalences of smoking, obesity and overweight. Additive generalised models and mixed Poisson regression models were used for the purpose, taking year as the random-effect variable and adjusting for age, sex, prevalence of vascular risk factors and the number of hospital beds in intensive and coronary care units. Across 28 years and 671.5 million person-years of observation, there were 2 986 834 hospitalisations due to coronary disease; of these, 1 441 980 (48.28%) were classified as incident. Hospitalisation rates increased from 1982 to 1996, with an inflection point in 1997 and a subsequent 52% decrease until 2009. Prevalences of smoking, obesity, overweight and use of vascular risk drug therapy were significantly associated with hospitalisation rates (pstress on excessive body weight prevention.

  17. Very high coronary artery calcium score with normal myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging is associated with a moderate incidence of severe coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuoness, Salem A.; Goha, Ahmed M.; Romsa, Jonathan G.; Akincioglu, Cigdem; Warrington, James C.; Datta, Sudip; Gambhir, Sanjay; Urbain, Jean-Luc C.; Vezina, William C. [London Health Sciences Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London, ON (Canada); Massel, David R. [London Health Sciences Centre, Division of Cardiology, London, ON (Canada); Martell, Rafael [Private Practice, London, ON (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has limitations in the presence of balanced multivessel disease (MVD) and left main (LM) coronary artery disease, occasionally resulting in false-normal results despite the high cardiovascular risk associated with this condition. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of severe coronary artery disease (CAD) in the presence of a very high Agatston coronary artery calcium (CAC) score (>1,000) in stable symptomatic patients without known CAD but with normal MPI results. A total of 2,659 prospectively acquired consecutive patients were referred for MPI and evaluation of CAC score by CT. Of this patient population, 8 % (222/2,659) had ischemia without myocardial infarction (MI) on MPI and 11 % (298/2,659) had abnormal MPI (MI and/or ischemia). On presentation 1 % of the patients (26/2,659) were symptomatic, had a CAC score >1,000 and normal MPI results. The definition of normal MPI was strict and included a normal hemodynamic response without ischemic ECG changes and normal imaging, particularly absence of transient ischemic dilation. All of these 26 patients with a CAC score >1,000 and normal MPI findings underwent cardiac catheterization. Of these 26 patients, 58 % (15/26) had severe disease (≥70 % stenosis) leading to revascularization. Of this group, 47 % (7/15) underwent percutaneous intervention, and 53 % (8/15) underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. All of these 15 patients had either MVD (14/15) or LM coronary artery disease (1/15), and represented 0.6 % (15/2,659) of all referred patients (95 % CI 0.3 - 0.9 %). The majority, 90 % (8/9), had severe CAD with typical chest pain. A very high CAC score (>1,000) with normal MPI in a small subset of symptomatically stable patients was associated with a moderate incidence of severe CAD (95 % CI 37 - 77 %). Larger studies and/or a meta-analysis of small studies are needed to more precisely estimate the incidence of CAD in this population. This study also supports

  18. Insulin resistance, blood glucose and inflammatory cytokine levels are risk factors for cardiovascular events in diabetic patients complicated with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changmei; Li, Fang; Guo, Jingjing; Li, Congcong; Xu, Dashuai; Wang, Bin

    2018-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relation of insulin resistance, blood glucose and inflammatory cytokines with cardiovascular events in diabetic patients complicated with coronary heart disease (CHD). A total of 120 patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) complicated with CHD admitted to Jinan Central Hospital from January 2015 to March 2016 were enrolled in this study. There were 60 cases complicated with cardiovascular events and 60 had no history of cardiovascular events; there were 40 cases with abnormal blood glucose, 40 with insulin resistance and 40 with elevated inflammatory cytokines. Changes in the levels of blood glucose, fasting serum insulin and inflammatory cytokines as well as changes in the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance indexes (HOMA-IR) were recorded and compared among groups of patients. Besides, changes in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk score and the incidence rate of cardiovascular events were also detected and multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted so as to identify relevant risk factors. Our results showed the fasting blood glucose and the 2 h postprandial blood glucose levels in the non-cardiovascular event group were lower than those in the cardiovascular event group (Pcardiovascular event group were significantly higher than those in the cardiovascular event group (Pcardiovascular event group were significantly lower than those in the cardiovascular event group (Prisk scores in patients with elevated inflammatory cytokines were higher than those in patients with insulin resistance and those in patients with blood glucose abnormalities (Pcardiovascular events in patients with blood glucose abnormalities was lower than that in patients with insulin resistance and that in patients with elevated inflammatory cytokines. There was a positive correlation between TNF-α and HOMA-IR (Prisk score (Prisk factors for cardiovascular events. Based on our findings, stronger

  19. Psychosocial Working Environment and Risk of Adverse Cardiac Events in Patients Treated for Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering, Karin; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Lund, Thomas; Hjollund, Niels Henrik

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades a possible association between psychosocial working environment and increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) has been debated and moderate evidence supports that high psychological demands, lack of social support and iso-strain (the combination of high job strain and lack of social support) is associated with primary CHD. Whether psychosocial working environment plays a role as risk factor for new cardiac events and readmissions in patients with existing cardiovascular disease is less studied. A cohort of patients psychosocial working environment. Patients were followed in the Danish National Patient Registry and the Danish Civil Registration System for 3+ years to identify adverse cardiac events and death. We analysed the association between psychosocial working environment and adverse cardiac events by Cox Regression. A number of 528 patients had returned to work 12 weeks after PCI, while 97 were still sick-listed. We identified 12 deaths and 211 other events during follow-up. We found no statistically significant associations between psychosocial working environment and risk of adverse cardiac events and readmissions or mortality. The psychosocial working environment was not associated with adverse cardiac events.

  20. Vasovagal syncope related to emotional stress predicts coronary events in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zysko, Dorota; Melander, Olle; Fedorowski, Artur

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether history of vasovagal syncope (VVS) mediated by emotional (emotional VVS) or orthostatic stress (orthostatic VVS) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) events in later life. Retrospective analysis based on medical records of the consecutive 3,288 cardiologic outpatients (mean age, 61 ± 12 years; 43% men). A total of 254 patients (7.7%) reported emotional VVS, whereas 294 (9.0%) had history of orthostatic VVS. First-ever syncopal episode was reported at a median age of 16 years (interquartile range [IQR], 12 years to 28 years), and the median total number of episodes was two (IQR, 1 to 5). There were 779 patients (23.7%) with at least one CV event, and the median age for the first CV event was 59 years (IQR, 52 years to 67 years). In the fully adjusted model, history of emotional VVS was predictive of CV event (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.63, [1.27-2.09]; P emotional VVS and gender. Emotional VVS was predictive of CV event in men (1.89 [1.41-2.53]; P emotional but not orthostatic VVS is independently associated with increased risk of coronary events in later life. The relationship between predisposition to emotional VVS in adolescence and development of cardiovascular disease requires further studies. ©2013, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Case fatality of acute coronary events is improving even among elderly patients; the FINAMI study 1995-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukkunen, Heli; Havulinna, Aki S; Lehto, Seppo; Ketonen, Matti; Mustonen, Juha; Airaksinen, Juhani K; Ukkola, Olavi; Kesäniemi, Y Antero; Salomaa, Veikko

    2018-02-01

    To examine trends in incidence and 28-day case fatality of myocardial infarction (MI) in persons aged 75-99 years in four areas of Finland. The Finnish Acute Myocardial Infarction (FINAMI) register is a population-based MI register study, which during 1995-2012 recorded 30561 suspected acute coronary syndromes in persons aged ≥75 years. Of them, 16229 fulfilled the American Heart Association criteria for a definite, probable or possible MI or coronary death. This age-group contributed 56.8% of all MIs of which 62.7% occurred in women. The incidence of MI decreased by -3.3%/year (95% CI -4.2; -2.4) in women aged 75-84 years, and by -1.2%/year (-1.9; -0.5) in women aged 85-99 years, but among men in these age-groups, only a non-significant reduction occurred. The 28-day case fatality of MI was high. In the age-group 75-84 years, it decreased non-significantly by -1.6%/year in men, and significantly by -2.4%/year (-3.9; -0.8) in women. In the age-group 85-99 years, the decrease was more remarkable: -5.1%/year (-7.8; -2.3) and -3.9%/year (-5.5; -2.2), respectively. In Finland, more than half of MIs occur in the age-group 75-99 years, and most of them in women. The incidence of MI decreased significantly in elderly women but non-significantly in elderly men. The 28-day case fatality decreased especially in the age-group 85-99 years. Key Messages In Finland, more than one half of all myocardial infarctions (MIs) occur in the age-group of 75 years or older. Furthermore, 62.7% of MIs among elderly patients occur among women, although 58.0% of the elderly population are women. The incidence of MI decreased significantly in elderly women but not in elderly men. The 28-day case fatality in elderly patients was high but decreased significantly during the study period 1995-2012. This study provides population-based data on treatment strategies and trends in incidence, event rate, mortality and case fatality of MI in elderly individuals. Elderly patients with acute coronary

  2. Work stress and the risk of recurrent coronary heart disease events: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Zhang, Min; Loerbroks, Adrian; Angerer, Peter; Siegrist, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Though much evidence indicates that work stress increases the risk of incident of coronary heart disease (CHD), little is known about the role of work stress in the development of recurrent CHD events. The objective of this study was to review and synthesize the existing epidemiological evidence on whether work stress increases the risk of recurrent CHD events in patients with the first CHD. A systematic literature search in the PubMed database (January 1990 - December 2013) for prospective studies was performed. Inclusion criteria included: peer-reviewed English papers with original data, studies with substantial follow-up (> 3 years), end points defined as cardiac death or nonfatal myocardial infarction, as well as work stress assessed with reliable and valid instruments. Meta-analysis using random-effects modeling was conducted in order to synthesize the observed effects across the studies. Five papers derived from 4 prospective studies conducted in Sweden and Canada were included in this systematic review. The measurement of work stress was based on the Demand- Control model (4 papers) or the Effort-Reward Imbalance model (1 paper). According to the estimation by meta-analysis based on 4 papers, a significant effect of work stress on the risk of recurrent CHD events (hazard ratio: 1.65, 95% confidence interval: 1.23-2.22) was observed. Our findings suggest that, in patients with the first CHD, work stress is associated with an increased relative risk of recurrent CHD events by 65%. Due to the limited literature, more well-designed prospective research is needed to examine this association, in particular, from other than western regions of the world. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  3. In situ simulation: Taking reported critical incidents and adverse events back to the clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jonas; Paltved, Charlotte; Krogh, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    improve patient safety if coupled with training and organisational support2. Insight into the nature of reported critical incidents and adverse events can be used in writing in situ simulation scenarios and thus lead to interventions that enhance patient safety. The patient safety literature emphasises...... well-developed non-technical skills in preventing medical errors3. Furthermore, critical incidents and adverse events reporting systems comprise a knowledgebase to gain in-depth insights into patient safety issues. This study explores the use of critical incidents and adverse events reports to inform...... in situ simulation to improve patient safety. Design and purpose The study uses a case study design of in situ simulation training tailored to two emergency departments in the Central Denmark Region. We aim to: - Develop a model that integrates critical incidents and adverse events, a contextual needs...

  4. [Pulse pressure and mean pressure: physiopathology and predictive value of coronary events and ictus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdecchia, P

    2001-11-01

    Increased pulse pressure (PP) reflects an increased stiffness of aorta and other large elastic arteries. These arteries dilate by about 10% during systole and contract owing to elastic return during diastole. As a result, blood flow towards periphery becomes less pulsatile and more continuous. An increased stiffness of aorta and large elastic arteries due to progressively reduced elastic content with aging (atherosclerotic processes) leads to increased systolic blood pressure (BP), because of their reduced distension during systole, and decreased diastolic BP due to their reduced blood content at the beginning of diastole. Several epidemiological studies have shown that PP is the BP component which most closely predicts cardiovascular risk, particularly over 55 years of age. In particular, increased PP is an important predictor of coronary events, while increased mean BP is a more specific predictor of cerebrovascular events.

  5. Only incident depressive episodes after myocardial infarction are associated with new cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Peter; van den Brink, Rob H. S.; Spijkerman, Titia A.; Ormel, Johan

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this research was to study whether incident and non-incident depression after myocardial infarction (MI) are differentially associated with prospective fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events. BACKGROUND Post-MI depression is defined as the presence of depression after

  6. Statin Intolerance and Risk of Coronary Heart Events and All-Cause Mortality Following Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serban, Maria-Corina; Colantonio, Lisandro D; Manthripragada, Angelika D; Monda, Keri L; Bittner, Vera A; Banach, Maciej; Chen, Ligong; Huang, Lei; Dent, Ricardo; Kent, Shia T; Muntner, Paul; Rosenson, Robert S

    2017-03-21

    Many patients report adverse reactions to, and may not tolerate, statin therapy. These patients may be at increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) events and mortality. This study evaluated the risk for recurrent myocardial infarction (MI), CHD events, and all-cause mortality in Medicare beneficiaries with statin intolerance and in those with high adherence to statin therapy. We studied 105,329 Medicare beneficiaries who began a moderate- or high-intensity statin dosage after hospitalization for MI between 2007 and 2013. Statin intolerance was defined as down-titrating statins and initiating ezetimibe therapy, switching from statins to ezetimibe monotherapy, having International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, diagnostic codes for rhabdomyolysis or an antihyperlipidemic adverse event, followed by statin down-titration or discontinuation, or switching between ≥3 types of statins within 1 year after initiation. High statin adherence over the year following hospital discharge was defined as proportion of days covered ≥80%. Recurrent MI, CHD events (recurrent MI or a coronary revascularization procedure), and mortality were identified from 1 year after hospital discharge through December 2014. Overall, 1,741 patients (1.65%) had statin intolerance, and 55,567 patients (52.8%) had high statin adherence. Over a median of 1.9 to 2.3 years of follow-up, there were 4,450 recurrent MIs, 6,250 CHD events, and 14,311 deaths. Compared to beneficiaries with high statin adherence, statin intolerance was associated with a 36% higher rate of recurrent MI (41.1 vs. 30.1 per 1,000 person-years, respectively), a 43% higher rate of CHD events (62.5 vs. 43.8 per 1,000 person-years, respectively), and a 15% lower rate of all-cause mortality (79.9 vs. 94.2 per 1,000 person-years, respectively). The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) comparing beneficiaries with statin intolerance versus those with high statin adherence were 1.50 (95% confidence interval [CI

  7. Alpha-linolenic acid intake and 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in 20,000 middle-aged men and women in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janette de Goede

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whether intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, the plant-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA, could prevent cardiovascular diseases is not yet clear. We examined the associations of ALA intake with 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke in the Netherlands. METHODS: Data were collected from a general population of 20,069 generally healthy men and women, aged 20 to 65 years. Habitual diet was assessed at baseline (1993-1997 with a validated 178-item food frequency questionnaire. Incidences of CHD and stroke were assessed through linkage with mortality and morbidity registers. Hazard ratios (HR were calculated with multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age, gender, lifestyle, and dietary factors. RESULTS: During 8-13 years of follow-up, we observed 280 incident CHD events (19% fatal and 221 strokes (4% fatal. Intakes of energy-adjusted ALA in quintiles ranged from less than 1.0 g/d in the bottom quintile (Q1 to more than 1.9 g/d in the top quintile (Q5. ALA intake was not associated with incident CHD, with HRs varying between 0.89 and 1.01 (all p>0.05 in Q2-Q5 compared with the bottom quintile of ALA intake. For incident stroke, however, participants in Q2-Q5 had a 35-50% lower risk compared with the reference group. HRs were 0.65 (0.43-0.97, 0.49 (0.31-0.76, 0.53 (0.34-0.83, and 0.65 (0.41-1.04 for Q2-Q5 respectively. CONCLUSION: In this general Dutch population, ALA intake was not associated with incident CHD. The data suggested that a low intake of ALA may be a risk factor for incident stroke. These results warrant confirmation in other population-based studies and in trials.

  8. Alpha-linolenic acid intake and 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in 20,000 middle-aged men and women in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goede, Janette; Verschuren, W M Monique; Boer, Jolanda M A; Kromhout, Daan; Geleijnse, Johanna M

    2011-03-25

    Whether intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the plant-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), could prevent cardiovascular diseases is not yet clear. We examined the associations of ALA intake with 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in the Netherlands. Data were collected from a general population of 20,069 generally healthy men and women, aged 20 to 65 years. Habitual diet was assessed at baseline (1993-1997) with a validated 178-item food frequency questionnaire. Incidences of CHD and stroke were assessed through linkage with mortality and morbidity registers. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated with multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age, gender, lifestyle, and dietary factors. During 8-13 years of follow-up, we observed 280 incident CHD events (19% fatal) and 221 strokes (4% fatal). Intakes of energy-adjusted ALA in quintiles ranged from less than 1.0 g/d in the bottom quintile (Q1) to more than 1.9 g/d in the top quintile (Q5). ALA intake was not associated with incident CHD, with HRs varying between 0.89 and 1.01 (all p>0.05) in Q2-Q5 compared with the bottom quintile of ALA intake. For incident stroke, however, participants in Q2-Q5 had a 35-50% lower risk compared with the reference group. HRs were 0.65 (0.43-0.97), 0.49 (0.31-0.76), 0.53 (0.34-0.83), and 0.65 (0.41-1.04) for Q2-Q5 respectively. In this general Dutch population, ALA intake was not associated with incident CHD. The data suggested that a low intake of ALA may be a risk factor for incident stroke. These results warrant confirmation in other population-based studies and in trials.

  9. Coronary artery calcifications predict long term cardiovascular events in non diabetic Caucasian hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noce, Annalisa; Canale, Maria Paola; Capria, Ambrogio; Rovella, Valentina; Tesauro, Manfredi; Splendiani, Giorgio; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; Manzuoli, Micol; Simonetti, Giovanni; Di Daniele, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Vascular calcifications are frequent in chronic renal disease and are associated to significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The long term predictive value of coronary artery calcifications detected by multi‐layer spiral computed tomography for major cardiovascular events was evaluated in non‐diabetic Caucasian patients on maintenance hemodialysis free of clinical cardiovascular disease. Two‐hundred and five patients on maintenance hemodialysis were enrolled into this observational, prospective cohort study. Patients underwent a single cardiac multi‐layer spiral computed tomography. Calcium load was quantified and patients grouped according to the Agatston score: group 1 (Agatston score: 0), group 2 (Agatston score 1‐400), group 3 (Agatston score 401‐1000) and group 4 (Agatston score >1000). Follow‐up was longer than seven years. Primary endpoint was death from a major cardiovascular event. Actuarial survival was calculated separately in the four groups with Kaplan‐Meier method. Patients who died from causes other than cardiovascular disease and transplanted patients were censored. The “log rank” test was employed to compare survival curves. One‐hundred two patients (49.7%) died for a major cardiovascular event during the follow‐up period. Seven‐year actuarial survival was more than 90% for groups 1 and 2, but failed to about 50% for group 3 and to 400 predicts a significantly higher cardiovascular mortality compared with Agatston score 300 pg/l were associated to a lower survival (p < 0.05). Extended coronary artery calcifications detected by cardiac multi‐layer spiral computed tomography, strongly predicted long term cardiovascular mortality in nondiabetic Caucasian patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Moreover, it was not related to conventional indices of atherosclerosis, but to other non‐traditional risk factors, as serum Parathyroid hormone levels. A full cost‐benefit analysis is however necessary to justify a

  10. Coronary atheroma volume and cardiovascular events during maximally intensive statin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Rishi; Nissen, Steven E; Shao, Mingyuan; Ballantyne, Christie M; Barter, Phillip J; Chapman, M John; Erbel, Raimund; Libby, Peter; Raichlen, Joel S; Uno, Kiyoko; Kataoka, Yu; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2013-11-01

    The impact of baseline coronary plaque burden on the clinical outcome in patients receiving aggressive low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering therapy to levels PAV) and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE: death, myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, hospitalization for unstable angina) in patients with baseline PAV less than (n = 519) or greater than (n = 520) the median. Patients with a higher baseline PAV had a similar LDL-C compared with those with a lower baseline PAV at baseline (119.0 ± 29 vs. 121.0 ± 27 mg/dL, P = 0.09) and at follow-up (65.3 ± 23 vs. 65.8 ± 22 mg/dL, P = 0.47). In multivariable analysis, each standard deviation increase in baseline PAV was associated with a 28% increase in MACE [HR 1.28 (1.05, 1.57), P = 0.01]. Those with the highest quartile of baseline PAV (>41.8%) had a 2-year cumulative MACE rate of 12%, which was significantly higher (log-rank P = 0.001) than MACE rates of all lower PAV quartiles (MACE: quartile 3, 2, and 1 were 5.7, 7.9, and 5.1%, respectively). LDL-C levels at baseline [HR 0.96 (0.79, 1.18), P = 0.73] and on-treatment [HR 1.19 (0.83, 1.73), P = 0.35] were not associated with MACE. Following 2 years of high-intensity statin therapy, a baseline coronary atheroma volume predicted MACE, despite the achievement of very low on-treatment LDL-C levels.

  11. Lidocaine-Associated Cardiac Events in Newborns with Seizures : Incidence, Symptoms and Contributing Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeke, Lauren C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413986446; Schalkwijk, Stein; Toet, Mona C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/28827024X; Van Rooij, Linda G M; De Vries, Linda S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072995408; van den Broek, Marcel P H

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lidocaine is an effective therapy for neonatal seizures; however, it is not widely used, presumably due to the risk of cardiac events. Objective: To investigate the incidence of cardiac events in full-term and preterm infants receiving lidocaine for seizures. Methods: Full-term (n = 368)

  12. Lidocaine-Associated Cardiac Events in Newborns with Seizures: Incidence, Symptoms and Contributing Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeke, L.C.; Schalkwijk, S.J.; Toet, M.C.; Rooij, LG van; Vries, L.S. de; Broek, M.P. van den

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lidocaine is an effective therapy for neonatal seizures; however, it is not widely used, presumably due to the risk of cardiac events. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence of cardiac events in full-term and preterm infants receiving lidocaine for seizures. METHODS: Full-term (n = 368)

  13. Number of recent stressful life events and incident cardiovascular disease: Moderation by lifetime depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntson, Jessica; Patel, Jay S; Stewart, Jesse C

    2017-08-01

    We investigated whether number of recent stressful life events is associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and whether this relationship is stronger in adults with a history of clinical depression. Prospective data from 28,583 U.S. adults (mean age=45years) initially free of CVD who participated in Waves 1 (2001-2002) and 2 (2004-2005) of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) were examined. Number of past-year stressful life events (Wave 1), lifetime depressive disorder (Wave 1), and incident CVD (Wave 2) were determined by structured interviews. There were 1069 cases of incident CVD. Each additional stressful life event was associated with a 15% increased odds of incident CVD [Odds Ratio (OR)=1.15, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.11, 1.19]. As hypothesized, a stressful life events by lifetime depressive disorder interaction was detected (P=0.003). Stratified analyses indicated that stressful life events had a stronger association with incident CVD among adults with (OR=1.18, 95% CI: 1.10, 1.27, n=4908) versus without (OR=1.10, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.14, n=23,675) a lifetime depressive disorder. Our findings suggest that a greater number of recent stressful life events elevate the risk of new-onset CVD and that this risk is potentiated in adults with a history of clinical depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Design and baseline data from the Gratitude Research in Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Jeff C; Beale, Eleanor E; Beach, Scott R; Celano, Christopher M; Belcher, Arianna M; Moore, Shannon V; Suarez, Laura; Gandhi, Parul U; Motiwala, Shweta R; Gaggin, Hanna; Januzzi, James L

    2015-09-01

    Positive psychological constructs, especially optimism, have been linked with superior cardiovascular health. However, there has been minimal study of positive constructs in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), despite the prevalence and importance of this condition. Furthermore, few studies have examined multiple positive psychological constructs and multiple cardiac-related outcomes within the same cohort to determine specifically which positive construct may affect a particular cardiac outcome. The Gratitude Research in Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) study examines the association between optimism/gratitude 2weeks post-ACS and subsequent clinical outcomes. The primary outcome measure is physical activity at 6months, measured via accelerometer, and key secondary outcome measures include levels of prognostic biomarkers and rates of nonelective cardiac rehospitalization at 6months. These relationships will be analyzed using multivariable linear regression, controlling for sociodemographic, medical, and negative psychological factors; associations between baseline positive constructs and subsequent rehospitalizations will be assessed via Cox regression. Overall, 164 participants enrolled and completed the baseline 2-week assessment; the cohort had a mean age of 61.5+/?10.5years and was 84% men; this was the first ACS for 58% of participants. The GRACE study will determine whether optimism and gratitude are prospectively and independently associated with physical activity and other critical outcomes in the 6months following an ACS. If these constructs are associated with superior outcomes, this may highlight the importance of these constructs as independent prognostic factors post-ACS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Incidence and determinants of medication errors and adverse drug events among hospitalized children in West Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Dedefo, Mohammed Gebre; Mitike, Abraham Haileamlak; Angamo, Mulugeta Tarekegn

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication errors cause a large number of adverse drug events with negative patient health outcomes and are a major public-health burden contributing to 18.7?56?% of all adverse drug events among hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and determinants of medication errors and adverse drug events among hospitalized children. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted among hospitalized children in the pediatrics ward of Nekemte Referral...

  16. Coronary calcium score as a predictor for coronary artery disease and cardiac events in Japanese high-risk patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hideya; Ohashi, Norihiko; Ishibashi, Ken; Utsunomiya, Hiroto; Kunita, Eiji; Oka, Toshiharu; Kihara, Yasuki; Horiguchi, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Although the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score as measured with computed tomography (CT) is associated with cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in Western countries, little is known in Asian populations. Three hundred and seventeen Japanese patients (205 men and 112 women) were followed in the study and they underwent both coronary angiography and CT for CAC measurements. The frequencies of angiographic coronary artery disease (CAD) were 5%, 36%, 76%, 80%, and 94% (P 1,000 (n=49), respectively. In the average of 6.0 (range, 1-10) years follow-up period, 34 patients died including 13 from reasons of cardiac disease. In a Cox proportional hazard model after adjustment for age and sex, traditional coronary risk factors, previous myocardial infarction, and the need for revascularization, the hazard ratio for cardiac mortality in patients with a CAC score >1,000 was 2.98 (95% confidence interval: 1.15-9.40) compared with those with a CAC score=0-100. The CAC score has a predictive value for angiographical CAD and long-term mortality from cardiac disease in Japanese high-risk patients who undergo coronary angiography. (author)

  17. Effect of skeletonization of the internal thoracic artery for coronary revascularization on the incidence of sternal wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saso, Srdjan; James, David; Vecht, Joshua A; Kidher, Emaddin; Kokotsakis, John; Malinovski, Vitali; Rao, Christopher; Darzi, Ara; Anderson, Jon R; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2010-02-01

    Use of the internal thoracic artery in coronary revascularization confers excellent benefit. We assessed the impact of skeletonization on the incidence of postoperative sternal wound infection in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. We also investigated whether there is an advantage in using this technique when harvesting both internal thoracic arteries in high-risk groups, such as diabetic patients. Skeletonization was associated with beneficial reduction in the odds ratio of sternal wound infection (odds ratio, 0.41; 95% confidence interval, 0.26 to 0.64). This effect was more evident when analyzing diabetic patients undergoing bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting (odds ratio, 0.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.10 to 0.34). 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Risk prediction models for major adverse cardiac event (MACE) following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI): A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manan, Norhafizah A.; Abidin, Basir

    2015-02-01

    Five percent of patients who went through Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) experienced Major Adverse Cardiac Events (MACE) after PCI procedure. Risk prediction of MACE following a PCI procedure therefore is helpful. This work describes a review of such prediction models currently in use. Literature search was done on PubMed and SCOPUS database. Thirty literatures were found but only 4 studies were chosen based on the data used, design, and outcome of the study. Particular emphasis was given and commented on the study design, population, sample size, modeling method, predictors, outcomes, discrimination and calibration of the model. All the models had acceptable discrimination ability (C-statistics >0.7) and good calibration (Hosmer-Lameshow P-value >0.05). Most common model used was multivariate logistic regression and most popular predictor was age.

  19. Lipoprotein predictors of cardiovascular events in statin-treated patients with coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Ingar; Cater, Nilo B; Faergeman, Ole

    2008-01-01

    the relationships between on-treatment levels of lipoprotein components to subsequent major coronary events (MCE). FINDINGS: Variables related to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) carried more predictive information than those related to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), but LDL-C was less...... predictive than both non-HDL-C and apoB. The ratio of apoB to apoA-1 was most strongly related to MCE. However, for estimating differences in relative risk reduction between the treatment groups, apoB and non-HDL-C were the strongest predictors. INTERPRETATION: The on-treatment level of apoB/apoA-1...

  20. Effort-Reward Imbalance at Work and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragano, Nico; Siegrist, Johannes; Nyberg, Solja T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic evidence for work stress as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is mostly based on a single measure of stressful work known as job strain, a combination of high demands and low job control. We examined whether a complementary stress measure that assesses an imbalance...... between efforts spent at work and rewards received predicted coronary heart disease. Methods: This multicohort study (the “IPD-Work” consortium) was based on harmonized individual-level data from 11 European prospective cohort studies. Stressful work in 90,164 men and women without coronary heart disease...... have an increased risk of coronary heart disease, and this appears to be independent of job strain experienced. These findings support expanding focus beyond just job strain in future research on work stress....

  1. Stable angina pectoris with no obstructive coronary artery disease is associated with increased risks of major adverse cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, L.; Hvelplund, A.; Abildstrom, S. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Patients with chest pain and no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) are considered at low risk for cardiovascular events but evidence supporting this is scarce. We investigated the prognostic implications of stable angina pectoris in relation to the presence and degree of CAD with no o...... with stable angina and normal coronary arteries or diffuse non-obstructive CAD have elevated risks of MACE and all-cause mortality compared with a reference population without ischaemic heart disease.......Aims Patients with chest pain and no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) are considered at low risk for cardiovascular events but evidence supporting this is scarce. We investigated the prognostic implications of stable angina pectoris in relation to the presence and degree of CAD...... (MACE), defined as cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke or heart failure, and all-cause mortality. Significantly more women (65%) than men (32%) had no obstructive CAD (P

  2. An algorithm that identifies coronary and heart failure events in the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottke, Thomas E; Baechler, Courtney Jordan

    2013-01-01

    The advent of universal health care coverage in the United States and the use of electronic health records can make the medical record a disease surveillance tool. The objective of our study was to identify criteria that accurately categorize acute coronary and heart failure events by using electronic health record data exclusively so that the medical record can be used for surveillance without manual record review. We serially compared 3 computer algorithms to manual record review. The first 2 algorithms relied on ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification) codes, troponin levels, electrocardiogram (ECG) data, and echocardiograph data. The third algorithm relied on a detailed coding system, Intelligent Medical Objects, Inc., (IMO) interface terminology, troponin levels, and echocardiograph data. Cohen's κ for the initial algorithm was 0.47 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-0.54). Cohen's κ was 0.61 (95% CI, 0.55-0.68) for the second algorithm. Cohen's κ for the third algorithm was 0.99 (95% CI, 0.98-1.00). Electronic medical record data are sufficient to categorize coronary heart disease and heart failure events without manual record review. However, only moderate agreement with medical record review can be achieved when the classification is based on 4-digit ICD-9-CM codes because ICD-9-CM 410.9 includes myocardial infarction with elevation of the ST segment on ECG (STEMI) and myocardial infarction without elevation of the ST segment on ECG (nSTEMI). Nearly perfect agreement can be achieved using IMO interface terminology, a more detailed coding system that tracks to ICD9, ICD10 (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification), and SnoMED-CT (Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine - Clinical Terms).

  3. Gender Differences in Associations Between Intraprocedural Thrombotic Events During Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Adverse Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Mikkel; Mehran, Roxana; Dangas, George D

    2016-01-01

    Women are frequently reported to have increased morbidity after presentation with acute coronary syndromes and myocardial infarction; however, whether a greater thrombotic tendency contributes to gender differences in clinical outcomes of urgent percutaneous coronary intervention is unknown. Intr...

  4. Disentangling the effect of illness perceptions on health status in people with type 2 diabetes after an acute coronary event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Rimke Cathelijne; Kasteleyn, Marise Jeannine; Heijmans, Monique Johanna; de Leeuw, Elke; Schellevis, François Georges; Rijken, Mieke; Rutten, Guy Emile

    2018-03-02

    Chronically ill patients such as people with type 2 diabetes develop perceptions of their illness, which will influence their coping behaviour. Perceptions are formed once a health threat has been recognised. Many people with type 2 diabetes suffer from multimorbidity, for example the combination with cardiovascular disease. Perceptions of one illness may influence perceptions of the other condition. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of an intervention in type 2 diabetes patients with a first acute coronary event on change in illness perceptions and whether this mediates the intervention effect on health status. The current study is a secondary data analysis of a RCT. Two hundred one participants were randomised (1:1 ratio) to the intervention (n = 101, three home visits) or control group (n = 100). Outcome variables were diabetes and acute coronary event perceptions, assessed with the two separate Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaires (BIPQs); and health status (Euroqol Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS)). The intervention effect was analysed using ANCOVA. Linear regression analyses were used to assess whether illness perceptions mediated the intervention effect on health status. A positive intervention effect was found on the BIPQ diabetes items coherence and treatment control (F = 8.19, p = 0.005; F = 14.01, p event, a positive intervention effect on treatment control was found (F = 7.81, p = 0.006). No intervention effect was found on the other items of the acute coronary event BIPQ. Better diabetes coherence was associated with improved health status, whereas perceiving more treatment control was not. The mediating effect of the diabetes perception 'coherence' on health status was not significant. Targeting illness perceptions of people with diabetes after an acute coronary event has no effect on most domains, but can improve the perceived understanding of their diabetes. Discussing perceptions prevents people

  5. Psychological coping and recurrent major adverse cardiac events following acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli-Bürgy, Nadine; Molloy, Gerard J; Poole, Lydia; Wikman, Anna; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Steptoe, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Depressed mood and stress are associated with recurrent adverse outcomes following acute coronary syndrome (ACS), but the impact of psychological coping style has not been evaluated in detail. We tested the relationship between task-oriented coping and event-free survival following ACS. We followed 158 patients with ACS for an average of 59.8 months for major adverse cardiac outcomes. Psychological coping was assessed with the Coping Inventory of Stressful Situations. Compared with patients in the lower half of the distribution, those reporting higher task-oriented coping had a reduced hazard of adverse cardiac events (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.28, 95% CI 0.11-0.68, P = 0.005) independently of demographic, clinical and behavioural covariates. The combination of low task-oriented coping and high depressive symptoms showed a strong association with adverse outcomes (HR = 6.25, 95% CI 1.88-20.82, P = 0.003). The tendency to cope using task-oriented strategies may promote event-free survival following ACS. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  6. Platelet density per monocyte predicts adverse events in patients after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Bert; Roest, Mark; McClellan, Elizabeth A; Sels, Jan W; Stubbs, Andrew; Jukema, J Wouter; Doevendans, Pieter A; Waltenberger, Johannes; van Zonneveld, Anton-Jan; Pasterkamp, Gerard; De Groot, Philip G; Hoefer, Imo E

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte recruitment to damaged endothelium is enhanced by platelet binding to monocytes and contributes to vascular repair. Therefore, we studied whether the number of platelets per monocyte affects the recurrence of adverse events in patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Platelet-monocytes complexes with high and low median fluorescence intensities (MFI) of the platelet marker CD42b were isolated using cell sorting. Microscopic analysis revealed that a high platelet marker MFI on monocytes corresponded with a high platelet density per monocyte while a low platelet marker MFI corresponded with a low platelet density per monocyte (3.4 ± 0.7 vs 1.4 ± 0.1 platelets per monocyte, P=0.01). Using real-time video microscopy, we observed increased recruitment of high platelet density monocytes to endothelial cells as compared with low platelet density monocytes (P=0.01). Next, we classified PCI scheduled patients (N=263) into groups with high, medium and low platelet densities per monocyte and assessed the recurrence of adverse events. After multivariate adjustment for potential confounders, we observed a 2.5-fold reduction in the recurrence of adverse events in patients with a high platelet density per monocyte as compared with a low platelet density per monocyte [hazard ratio=0.4 (95% confidence interval, 0.2-0.8), P=0.01]. We show that a high platelet density per monocyte increases monocyte recruitment to endothelial cells and predicts a reduction in the recurrence of adverse events in patients after PCI. These findings may imply that a high platelet density per monocyte protects against recurrence of adverse events.

  7. Tailored support for type 2 diabetes patients after an acute coronary event : The Diacourse-ACE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasteleyn, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aims of this thesis were to define the clinical profile and difficulties encountered by type 2 diabetes patients with a first acute coronary event (ACE), to develop and evaluate a tailored supportive intervention for type 2 diabetes patients with a first ACE and to examine diabetes-related

  8. [Association between acute coronary events and psychosocial risk factors: vital exhaustion, anxiety and anger in an Argentinian population. A correlation study between risks factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet, José; Suárez-Bagnasco, Mariana; Kerbage, Soraya; Bonet, María Fernanda; Mautner, Branco

    2013-01-01

    To study the association between vital exhaustion, anxiety and anger with acute coronary event; second, determine whether they are associated with each other, and third, if the joint interaction of two or more factors increases the risk for coronary event. We conducted a case-control study with 165 patients, both sexes, between 35 and 75 years, 90 patients with acute ischemic coronary event and 75 controls hospitalized with an acute event of non-ischemic cardiac causes. Statistically significant differences between the control group and the ischemic coronary group for vital exhaustion was found (OR = 3.0 (1.6-5.5) p Psychosocial risk factors are associated each with p psychosocial risk factors are associated with each other and simultaneous presence of vital exhaustion and anxiety increases the probability of an acute ischemic coronary event.

  9. Summarizing the incidence of adverse events using volcano plots and time intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Richard C; Wolfinger, Russell D; Mann, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Adverse event incidence analyses are a critical component for describing the safety profile of any new intervention. The results typically are presented in lengthy summary tables. For therapeutic areas where patients have frequent adverse events, analysis and interpretation are made more difficult by the sheer number and variety of events that occur. Understanding the risk in these instances becomes even more crucial. We describe a space-saving graphical summary that overcomes the limitations of traditional presentations of adverse events and improves interpretability of the safety profile. We present incidence analyses of adverse events graphically using volcano plots to highlight treatment differences. Data from a clinical trial of patients experiencing an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage are used for illustration. Adjustments for multiplicity are illustrated. Color is used to indicate the treatment with higher incidence; bubble size represents the total number of events that occur in the treatment arms combined. Adjustments for multiple comparisons are displayed in a manner to indicate clearly those events for which the difference between treatment arms is statistically significant. Furthermore, adverse events can be displayed by time intervals, with multiple volcano plots or animation to appreciate changes in adverse event risk over time. Such presentations can emphasize early differences across treatments that may resolve later or highlight events for which treatment differences may become more substantial with longer follow-up. Treatment arms are compared in a pairwise fashion. Volcano plots are space-saving tools that emphasize important differences between the adverse event profiles of two treatment arms. They can incorporate multiplicity adjustments in a manner that is straightforward to interpret and, by using time intervals, can illustrate how adverse event risk changes over the course of a clinical trial.

  10. Efficacy of Different Perioperative Statin Regimens on Protection Against Post-Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Major Adverse Cardiac and Cerebral Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmarsafawi, Aya G; Abbassi, Maggie M; Elkaffas, Sameh; Elsawy, Hassan M; Sabry, Nirmeen A

    2016-12-01

    Comparing different perioperative statin regimens for the prevention of post-coronary artery bypass grafting adverse events. A randomized, prospective study. Cardiothoracic surgical units in a government hospital. The study comprised 94 patients scheduled for elective, isolated on- or off- pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Patients were assigned randomly to 1 of the following 3 treatment groups: group I (80 mg of atorvastatin/day for 2 days preoperatively), group II (40 mg of atorvastatin/day for 5-9 days preoperatively), or group III (80 mg of atorvastatin/day for 5-9 days preoperatively). The same preoperative doses were restarted postoperatively and continued for 1 month. Cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were assayed preoperatively; at 8, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively; and at discharge. CRP levels at 24 hours (p = 0.045) and 48 hours (p = 0.009) were significantly lower in group III compared with the other 2 groups. However, troponin I levels at 8 hours (p = 0.011) and 48 hours (p = 0.025) after surgery were significantly lower in group II compared with group III. The incidence of postoperative major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events was assessed, and there was no significant difference among the 3 groups. The 3 regimens did not result in any significant difference in outcomes, but only simple trends. The higher-dose regimen resulted in a significant reduction in the CRP level. Thus, more studies are needed to confirm the benefit of higher-dose statins for the protection from post-coronary artery bypass grafting adverse events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A taurine-supplemented vegan diet may blunt the contribution of neutrophil activation to acute coronary events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F

    2004-01-01

    Neutrophils are activated in the coronary circulation during acute coronary events (unstable angina and myocardial infarction), often prior to the onset of ischemic damage. Moreover, neutrophils infiltrate coronary plaque in these circumstances, and may contribute to the rupture or erosion of this plaque, triggering thrombosis. Activated neutrophils secrete proteolytic enzymes in latent forms which are activated by the hypochlorous acid (HOCl) generated by myeloperoxidase. These phenomena may help to explain why an elevated white cell count has been found to be an independent coronary risk factor. Low-fat vegan diets can decrease circulating leukocytes--neutrophils and monocytes--possibly owing to down-regulation of systemic IGF-I activity. Thus, a relative neutropenia may contribute to the coronary protection afforded by such diets. However, vegetarian diets are devoid of taurine - the physiological antagonist of HOCl--and tissue levels of this nutrient are relatively low in vegetarians. Taurine has anti-atherosclerotic activity in animal models, possibly reflecting a role for macrophage-derived myeloperoxidase in the atherogenic process. Taurine also has platelet-stabilizing and anti-hypertensive effects that presumably could reduce coronary risk. Thus, it is proposed that a taurine-supplemented low-fat vegan diet represents a rational strategy for diminishing the contribution of activated neutrophils to acute coronary events; moreover, such a regimen would work in a number of other complementary ways to promote cardiovascular health. Moderate alcohol consumption, the well-tolerated drug pentoxifylline, and 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors--zileuton, boswellic acids, fish oil--may also have potential in this regard. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Application of Near Infrared Spectroscopy, Intravascular Ultrasound and the Coronary Calcium Score to Predict Adverse Coronary Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    patients undergoing Bioflow coronary stent implantation . This will expand our possible screening population. 8 Reportable Outcomes Data...in 2013 and is accruing at a rate of 2-5 per month, usual for a significant risk cardiovascular study. Follow-up is desired for five years. We are

  13. Risk of Adverse Cardiac and Bleeding Events Following Cardiac and Noncardiac Surgery in Patients With Coronary Stent: How Important Is the Interplay Between Stent Type and Time From Stenting to Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saia, Francesco; Belotti, Laura Maria Beatrice; Guastaroba, Paolo; Berardini, Alessandra; Rossini, Roberta; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Campo, Gianluca; Guiducci, Vincenzo; Tarantino, Fabio; Menozzi, Alberto; Varani, Elisabetta; Santarelli, Andrea; Tondi, Stefano; De Palma, Rossana; Rapezzi, Claudio; Marzocchi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiology and consequences of surgery in patients with coronary stents are not clearly defined, as well as the impact of different stent types in relationship with timing of surgery. Among 39 362 patients with previous coronary stenting enrolled in a multicenter prospective registry and followed for 5 years, 13 128 patients underwent 17 226 surgical procedures. The cumulative incidence of surgery at 30 days, 6 months, 1 year, and 5 years was 3.6%, 9.4%, 14.3%, and 40.0%, respectively, and of cardiac and noncardiac surgery was 0.8%, 2.1%, 2.6%, and 4.0% and 1.3%, 5.1%, 9.1%, and 31.7%, respectively. We assessed the incidence and the predictors of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and serious bleeding event within 30 days from surgery. Cardiac death occurred in 438 patients (2.5%), myocardial infarction in 256 (1.5%), and serious bleeding event in 1099 (6.4%). Surgery increased 1.58× the risk of cardiac death during follow-up. Along with other risk factors, the interplay between stent type and time from percutaneous coronary intervention to surgery was independently associated with cardiac death/myocardial infarction. In comparison with bare-metal stent implanted >12 months before surgery, old-generation drug-eluting stent was associated with higher risk of events at any time point. Conversely, new-generation drug-eluting stent showed similar safety as bare-metal stent >12 months and between 6 and 12 months and appeared trendly safer between 0 and 6 months. Surgery is frequent in patients with coronary stents and carries a considerable risk of ischemic and bleeding events. Ischemic risk is inversely related with time from percutaneous coronary intervention to surgery and is influenced by stent type. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Assessment for the impact of dust events on measles incidence in western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuxia; Zhou, Jianding; Yang, Sixu; Zhao, Yuxin; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2017-05-01

    Dust events affect human health in both drylands and downwind environments. In this study, we used county-level data during the period of 1965-2005 to assess the impact of dust events on measles incidence in Gansu province in Western China. We used Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to set up the cyclical regression model; in particular, we set the model to downwind direction for the typical cities in the Hexi Corridor as well as the capital city Lanzhou. The results showed that Spring measles incidence was the highest in the Hexi Corridor, where dust events occur the most frequently over Gansu province. Measles incidence declined on the pathway of dust storms from west to east due to the weakening of both intensity and duration in dust storms. Measles incidence was positively correlated with monthly wind speed and negatively correlated with rainfall amount, relative humidity, and air pressure. Measles incidence was significantly (p ≤ 0.01) positively correlated with daily coarse particles, e.g., TSP and PM10. According to the cyclical regression model, average monthly excess measles that is related to dust events was 39.1 (ranging from 17.3 to 87.6), 149.9 (ranging from 7.1 to 413.4), and 31.3 (ranging from 20.6 to 63.5) in Zhangye, Lanzhou, and Jiuquan, respectively.

  15. Incidence and management of life-threatening adverse events during cardiac catheterization for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C Huie; Hegde, Sanjeet; Marshall, Audrey C; Porras, Diego; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Balzer, David T; Beekman, Robert H; Torres, Alejandro; Vincent, Julie A; Moore, John W; Holzer, Ralf; Armsby, Laurie; Bergersen, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Continued advancements in congenital cardiac catheterization and interventions have resulted in increased patient and procedural complexity. Anticipation of life-threatening events and required rescue measures is a critical component to preprocedural preparation. We sought to determine the incidence and nature of life-threatening adverse events in congenital and pediatric cardiac catheterization, risk factors, and resources necessary to anticipate and manage events. Data from 8905 cases performed at the 8 participating institutions of the Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes were captured between 2007 and 2010 [median 1,095/site (range 133-3,802)]. The incidence of all life-threatening events was 2.1 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.8-2.4 %], whereas mortality was 0.28 % (95 % CI 0.18-0.41 %). Fifty-seven life-threatening events required cardiopulmonary resuscitation, whereas 9 % required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Use of a risk adjustment model showed that age events. Using this model, standardized life-threatening event ratios were calculated, thus showing that one institution had a life-threatening event rate greater than expected. Congenital cardiac catheterization and intervention can be performed safely with a low rate of life-threatening events and mortality; preprocedural evaluation of risk may optimize preparation of emergency rescue and bailout procedures. Risk predictors (age < 1, hemodynamic vulnerability, and procedure risk category) can enhance preprocedural patient risk stratification and planning.

  16. Atherosclerosis profile and incidence of cardiovascular events: a population-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bullano Michael F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerosis is a chronic progressive disease often presenting as clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD events. This study evaluated the characteristics of individuals with a diagnosis of atherosclerosis and estimated the incidence of CVD events to assist in the early identification of high-risk individuals. Methods Respondents to the US SHIELD baseline survey were followed for 2 years to observe incident self-reported CVD. Respondents had subclinical atherosclerosis if they reported a diagnosis of narrow or blocked arteries/carotid artery disease without a past clinical CVD event (heart attack, stroke or revascularization. Characteristics of those with atherosclerosis and incident CVD were compared with those who did not report atherosclerosis at baseline but had CVD in the following 2 years using chi-square tests. Logistic regression model identified characteristics associated with atherosclerosis and incident events. Results Of 17,640 respondents, 488 (2.8% reported having subclinical atherosclerosis at baseline. Subclinical atherosclerosis was associated with age, male gender, dyslipidemia, circulation problems, hypertension, past smoker, and a cholesterol test in past year (OR = 2.2 [all p Conclusion Self-report of subclinical atherosclerosis identified an extremely high-risk group with a >25% risk of a CVD event in the next 2 years. These characteristics may be useful for identifying individuals for more aggressive diagnostic and therapeutic efforts.

  17. Statin Use and the Risk for Incident Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhen-Fang; Wang, Chen-Yu; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan; Lin Wu, Fe-Lin

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between statin use by individuals and the risk for incident diabetes mellitus in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients who were hospitalized for ACS between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2010, and who had undergone PCI (n=30,665); the data were retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A propensity score technique was used to establish a 1:1 matched cohort for statin users and non-statin users (n=9043 for each group). The risk for incident diabetes mellitus in statin users compared to non-statin users for patients with ACS after PCI was estimated by the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model. Statin use was associated with a significant increase of 27% in the risk for new-onset diabetes mellitus (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.27, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.41) compared to non-statin use in the matched cohort. The matched cohort analysis indicated that almost all individual statins were associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk for new-onset diabetes mellitus compared to those without statin use. Our study indicated an association between increased risk for new-onset diabetes mellitus and statin use. Because the benefits of statins in prevention of morbidity and mortality in patients with ACS are well-established, clinical decision making should not be changed for patients with existing cardiovascular disease in whom statin therapy is recommended. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristics, Predictors, and Mechanisms of Thrombosis in Coronary Bioresorbable Scaffolds: Differences Between Early and Late Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Tommaso; Weissner, Melissa; Gönner, Svenja; Wendling, Franziska; Ullrich, Helen; Ellis, Stephen; Anadol, Remzi; Polimeni, Alberto; Münzel, Thomas

    2017-12-11

    The study sought to investigate the incidence, characteristics, predictors, and possible mechanisms of early and 3-year coronary scaffold thrombosis (ScT). An increased incidence of both early and late ScT has been shown in randomized trials. Consecutive patients were enrolled in a single-center registry. Quantitative coronary angiography was performed. Incidence and predictors of ScT were assessed with Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. A total of 657 patients (63 ± 12 years of age, 79% men, 21% diabetic, 64% acute coronary syndrome) who received 925 coronary bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) (Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, California) between May 2012 and January 2015 were enrolled. Clinical and procedural characteristics and outcome data at 1,076 (interquartile range: 762 to 1,206) days (3-year follow-up rate 93%) were collected. Twenty-eight ScTs were recorded: 14 early (Kaplan-Meier estimate: 2.2%), 5 late (Kaplan-Meier estimate: 0.9%), and 9 very late (Kaplan-Meier estimate: 1.7%). The incidence of ScT followed a U-shaped curve with highest incidence at the extremes of the distributions of reference vessel diameter (RVD) and the ratio of BRS nominal diameter to RVD. At quantitative coronary angiography, RVD (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.14; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.04 to 0.49) and BRS oversizing (ratio of BRS nominal diameter to RVD >1.15; HR: 107.40; 95% CI: 9.20 to 1,261.30) emerged as potent predictors of early ScT. RVD (HR: 9.55; 95% CI: 3.90 to 23.42) and BRS undersizing (ratio of BRS nominal diameter to RVD BRS sizing. Different mechanisms underlie early and late ScT: although incomplete BRS deployment was a predictor of the former, the latter was associated with large vessel size and BRS undersizing. However, both phenomena are significantly less frequent with an optimized implantation technique. (Mainz Intracoronary Database. The Coronary Slow-flow and Microvascular Diseases Registry [MICAT]; NCT02180178). Copyright © 2017 American

  19. The Positive Emotions after Acute Coronary Events behavioral health intervention: Design, rationale, and preliminary feasibility of a factorial design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Jeffery C; Albanese, Ariana M; Campbell, Kirsti A; Celano, Christopher M; Millstein, Rachel A; Mastromauro, Carol A; Healy, Brian C; Chung, Wei-Jean; Januzzi, James L; Collins, Linda M; Park, Elyse R

    2017-04-01

    Positive psychological constructs, such as optimism, are associated with greater participation in cardiac health behaviors and improved cardiac outcomes. Positive psychology interventions, which target psychological well-being, may represent a promising approach to improving health behaviors in high-risk cardiac patients. However, no study has assessed whether a positive psychology intervention can promote physical activity following an acute coronary syndrome. In this article we will describe the methods of a novel factorial design study to aid the development of a positive psychology-based intervention for acute coronary syndrome patients and aim to provide preliminary feasibility data on study implementation. The Positive Emotions after Acute Coronary Events III study is an optimization study (planned N = 128), subsumed within a larger multiphase optimization strategy iterative treatment development project. The goal of Positive Emotions after Acute Coronary Events III is to identify the ideal components of a positive psychology-based intervention to improve post-acute coronary syndrome physical activity. Using a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial design, Positive Emotions after Acute Coronary Events III aims to: (1) evaluate the relative merits of using positive psychology exercises alone or combined with motivational interviewing, (2) assess whether weekly or daily positive psychology exercise completion is optimal, and (3) determine the utility of booster sessions. The study's primary outcome measure is moderate-to-vigorous physical activity at 16 weeks, measured via accelerometer. Secondary outcome measures include psychological, functional, and adherence-related behavioral outcomes, along with metrics of feasibility and acceptability. For the primary study outcome, we will use a mixed-effects model with a random intercept (to account for repeated measures) to assess the main effects of each component (inclusion of motivational interviewing in the exercises

  20. Protocol for the China PEACE (Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events) retrospective study of coronary catheterisation and percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Li, Xi; Lin, Zhenqiu; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Lixin

    2014-03-07

    During the past decade, the volume of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in China has risen by more than 20-fold. Yet little is known about patterns of care and outcomes across hospitals, regions and time during this period of rising cardiovascular disease and dynamic change in the Chinese healthcare system. Using the China PEACE (Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events) research network, the Retrospective Study of Coronary Catheterisation and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (China PEACE-Retrospective CathPCI Study) will examine a nationally representative sample of 11 900 patients who underwent coronary catheterisation or PCI at 55 Chinese hospitals during 2001, 2006 and 2011. We selected patients and study sites using a two-stage cluster sampling design with simple random sampling stratified within economical-geographical strata. A central coordinating centre will monitor data quality at the stages of case ascertainment, medical record abstraction and data management. We will examine patient characteristics, diagnostic testing patterns, procedural treatments and in-hospital outcomes, including death, complications of treatment and costs of hospitalisation. We will additionally characterise variation in treatments and outcomes by patient characteristics, hospital, region and study year. The China PEACE collaboration is designed to translate research into improved care for patients. The study protocol was approved by the central ethics committee at the China National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases (NCCD) and collaborating hospitals. Findings will be shared with participating hospitals, policymakers and the academic community to promote quality monitoring, quality improvement and the efficient allocation and use of coronary catheterisation and PCI in China. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01624896).

  1. Long-term treatment with a platelet glycoprotein-receptor antagonist after percutaneous coronary revascularization. EXCITE Trial Investigators. Evaluation of Oral Xemilofiban in Controlling Thrombotic Events.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M. Knudtson; G.A. van Es (Gerrit Anne); G.C. Timmis; C. van der Zwaan (Coen); J. Kleiman; J. Gong (Jianjian); E.B. Roecker; R. Dreiling; J.C. Alexander (John); R.J. Anders (Robert); W.W. O'Neill (William)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: When administered intravenously at the time of percutaneous coronary revascularization, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonists decrease the incidence of death and nonfatal myocardial infarction and the need for urgent revascularization. We hypothesized that long-term

  2. Gender disparities in the presentation, management and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome patients: data from the 2nd Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehab, Abdulla; Al-Dabbagh, Bayan; AlHabib, Khalid F; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Almahmeed, Wael; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Nagelkerke, Nicolaas; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; Hersi, Ahmad; Al Faleh, Hussam; Asaad, Nidal; Al Saif, Shukri; Amin, Haitham

    2013-01-01

    Gender-related differences in mortality of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) have been reported. The extent and causes of these differences in the Middle-East are poorly understood. We studied to what extent difference in outcome, specifically 1-year mortality are attributable to demographic, baseline clinical differences at presentation, and management differences between female and male patients. Baseline characteristics, treatment patterns, and 1-year mortality of 7390 ACS patients in 65 hospitals in 6 Arabian Gulf countries were evaluated during 2008-2009, as part of the 2nd Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE-2). Women were older (61.3±11.8 vs. 55.6±12.4; Pmanagement differences contributed to a worse outcome in women. Together these variables explained almost all mortality disparities. Differences between genders in mortality appeared to be largely explained by differences in prognostic variables and management patterns. However, the origin of the latter differences need further study.

  3. Interaction between Obesity and the NFKB1 - 94ins/delATTG Promoter Polymorphism in Relation to Incident Acute Coronary Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegger, Jakob Gerhard; Schmidt, Erik Berg; Berentzen, Tina Landsvig

    2013-01-01

    subunit, and the variant allele has been associated with the risk of several inflammatory diseases as well as coronary heart disease where inflammation is important in the pathogenesis. The objective of this study was to explore the potential interaction between the NFKB1-94ins/delATTG promoter...... polymorphism and general, abdominal, and gluteofemoral obesity in relation to the risk of incident acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in three large independent cohorts....

  4. Safety in the operating room during orthopedic trauma surgery-incidence of adverse events related to technical equipment and logistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Delft, E. A. K.; Schepers, T.; Bonjer, H. J.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; Goslings, J. C.; Schep, N. W. L.

    2017-01-01

    Safety in the operating room is widely debated. Adverse events during surgery are potentially dangerous for the patient and staff. The incidence of adverse events during orthopedic trauma surgery is unknown. Therefore, we performed a study to quantify the incidence of these adverse events. Primary

  5. Incident Type 2 Myocardial Infarction in a Cohort of Patients Undergoing Coronary or Peripheral Arterial Angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaggin, H.K.; Liu, Y.; Lyass, A.; Kimmenade, R.R.J. van; Motiwala, S.R.; Kelly, N.P.; Mallick, A.; Gandhi, P.U.; Ibrahim, N.E.; Simon, M.L.; Bhardwaj, A.; Belcher, A.M.; Harisiades, J.E.; Massaro, J.M.; D'Agostino, R.B., Sr.; Januzzi, J.L., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite growing recognition of type 2 myocardial infarction (T2MI; related to supply/demand mismatch), little is known about its risk factors or its association with outcome. METHODS: A single-center cohort of patients undergoing coronary or peripheral angiography with or without

  6. Low Incidence of Early Postoperative Cerebral Edema After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottens, Thomas H.; Hendrikse, J; Slooter, Arjen J. C.; van Herwerden, LA; Dieleman, Stefan; van Dijk, Diederik

    Objective: Using magnetic resonance imaging, the authors studied the influence of a single high dose of intraoperative dexamethasone on the severity of cerebral edema that can occur early after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). It was hypothesized that high-dose intraoperative dexamethasone

  7. Patient record review of the incidence, consequences, and causes of diagnostic adverse events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, L.; de Bruijne, M.; Wagner, C.; Thijs, A.; Smits, M.; van der Wal, G.; Timmermans, D.R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic errors often result in patient harm. Previous studies have shown that there is large variability in results in different medical specialties. The present study explored diagnostic adverse events (DAEs) across all medical specialties to determine their incidence and to gain

  8. Patient record review of the incidence, consequences, and causes of diagnostic adverse events.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, L.; Bruijne, M. de; Wagner, C.; Thijs, A.; Smits, M.; Wal, G. van der; Timmermans, D.R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic errors often result in patient harm. Previous studies have shown that there is large variability in results in different medical specialties. The present study explored diagnostic adverse events (DAEs) across all medical specialties to determine their incidence and to gain

  9. Incidence and pattern of 12 years of reported transfusion adverse events in Zimbabwe: A retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Mvere, David A.; Chitiyo, McLeod E.; Postma, Maarten J.; Van Hulst, Marinus

    2014-01-01

    Background. Haemovigilance hinges on a systematically structured reporting system, which unfortunately does not always exist in resource-limited settings. We determined the incidence and pattern of transfusion-related adverse events reported to the National Blood Service Zimbabwe. Materials and

  10. Mental health in retired professional football players: 12-month incidence, adverse life events and support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ramele, Serena; Aoki, Haruhito; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Gouttebarge, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The primary aim was to explore the incidence of symptoms of common mental disorders (CMD; distress, sleep disturbance, anxiety/depression, adverse alcohol use) in retired professional football players and to explore the association between adverse life events and the onset of symptoms of

  11. Saline Infusion Test highly associated with the incidence of cardio- and cerebrovascular events in primary aldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Reiko; Tamada, Daisuke; Murata, Masahiko; Mukai, Kosuke; Kitamura, Tetsuhiro; Otsuki, Michio; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2017-05-30

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is caused by excess secretion of aldosterone and is an independent risk factor for cardio-cerebro-vascular (CCV) events. The goal of treatment of PA should include prevention of CCV events. A definitive diagnosis of PA is established by confirmatory tests [saline infusion test (SIT), furosemide upright test (FUT) and captopril challenge test (CCT)]. However, there is no information on whether the hormone levels measured by these confirmatory tests are associated with CCV events. The aim of this retrospective study was to elucidate the relationship between the results of the above confirmatory tests and prevalence of CCV disease in patients with PA. The study subjects were 292 PA patients who were assessed for past history of CCV events at the time of diagnosis of PA. CCV events were significantly higher in patients with positive than negative SIT (12.8% vs. 3.3%, p=0.04). There were no differences in the incidences of CCV events between patients with positive and negative CCT and FUT (CCT: 11.0% vs. 3.9%, p=0.13, FUT: 6.1% vs. 5.7%, p=0.93). Our results demonstrated a higher incidence of CCV disease in PA SIT-positive patients compared to those with negative test. SIT is a potentially useful test not only for the diagnosis of PA but also assessment of the risk of CCV events.

  12. [All-cause mortality and incidence of major cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients with ASCOT-type profile in a Spanish population setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicras-Mainar, Antoni; Fernández de Bobadilla, Jaime; Navarro-Artieda, Ruth; Rejas-Gutiérrez, Javier

    2010-08-01

    Mediterranean populations are traditionally considered to be associated with lower incidence of cardiovascular events (CVE). However, this might not be homogeneous throughout different patient strata. The goal was to compare the incidence of CVE and all-causes mortality in hypertensive patients with an ASCOT-type profile with that of the rest hypertensive subjects. A retrospective analysis was carried out using a claim database. Hypertensive patients without known cardiovascular disease on antihypertensive therapy included during year 2006 were followed up for two consecutive years to ascertain the incidence of all-causes mortality and any CVE. CVE included any of the following: coronary heart disease, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), angina, stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA) and peripheral artery disease. Patients with ASCOT and ASCOT-LLA type profiles were identified and compared with non-ASCOT-type profile hypertensive subjects. A total of 11,104 were included in the analysis; 68.0+/-11.4 years, 41.6% males. More than 73% of subjects fulfilled criteria for ASCOT-type profile. All-causes mortality were numerically higher in ASCOT and ASCOT-LLA subjects compared with non-ASCOT-type; hazard ratio (95% CI)=1.3 (0.8-1.9) and 1.6 (0.9-2.8), respectively. However, any-coronary event rate was significantly higher in ASCOT-type [2.3 (1.8-2.8), plikely to have any cardiovascular event than those hypertensive patients without ASCOT profile in a Mediterranean setting in Spain. Copyright 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of rheumatoid arthritis-associated autoantibodies on the incidence of cardiovascular events in a large inception cohort of early inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Lillian J; Pope, Janet E; Hitchon, Carol; Boire, Gilles; Schieir, Orit; Lin, Daming; Thorne, Carter J; Tin, Diane; Keystone, Edward C; Haraoui, Boulos; Jamal, Shahin; Bykerk, Vivian P

    2017-05-01

    . RA is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events (CVEs). The objective was to estimate independent effects of RA autoantibodies on the incident CVEs in patients with early RA. Patients were enrolled in the Canadian Early Inflammatory Arthritis Cohort, a prospective multicentre inception cohort. Incident CVEs, including acute coronary syndromes and cerebrovascular events, were self-reported by the patient and partially validated by medical chart review. Seropositive status was defined as either RF or ACPA positive. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards survival analysis was used to estimate the effects of seropositive status on incident CVEs, controlling for RA clinical variables and traditional cardiovascular risk factors. . A total of 2626 patients were included: the mean symptom duration at diagnosis was 6.3 months ( s . d . 4.6), the mean age was 53 years ( s . d . 15), 72% were female and 86% met classification criteria for RA. Forty-six incident CVEs occurred over 6483 person-years [incidence rate 7.1/1000 person-years (95% confidence interval 5.3, 9.4)]. The CVE rate did not differ in seropositive vs seronegative subjects and seropositivity was not associated with incident CVEs in multivariable Cox regression models. Baseline covariates independently associated with incident CVEs were older age, a history of hypertension and a longer duration of RA symptoms prior to diagnosis. The rate of CVEs early in the course of inflammatory arthritis was low; however, delays in the diagnosis of arthritis increased the rate of CVEs. Hypertension was the strongest independent risk factor for CVEs. Results support early aggressive management of RA disease activity and co-morbidities to prevent severe complications. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Management of acute coronary syndromes in Maghreb countries: The ACCESS (ACute Coronary Events - a multinational Survey of current management Strategies) registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustaghfir, Abdelhamid; Haddak, Mohand; Mechmeche, Rachid

    2012-11-01

    The burden of cardiovascular diseases is anticipated to rise in developing countries. We sought to describe the epidemiology, management, and clinical outcomes of patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in three countries in western North Africa. Adult patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of ACS were enrolled in the prospective ACute Coronary Events - a multinational Survey of current management Strategies (ACCESS) registry over a 13-month period (January 2007 to January 2008). We report on patients enrolled at sites in Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia. A standardized form was used to collect data on patient characteristics, treatments and outcomes. A total of 1687 patients with confirmed ACS were enrolled (median age 59 [interquartile range 52, 68] years; 76% men), 59% with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 41% with non-ST-elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS). During hospitalization, most patients received aspirin (96%) and a statin (90%), 83% received a beta-blocker and 74% an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. Among eligible STEMI patients, 42% (419/989) did not receive fibrinolysis or undergo percutaneous coronary intervention. All-cause death at 12 months was 8.1% and did not differ significantly between patients with STEMI or NSTE-ACS (8.3% vs 7.7%, respectively; Log-rank test P=0.82). Clinical factors associated with higher risk of death at 12 months included cardiac arrest, cardiogenic shock, bleeding episodes and diabetes, while percutaneous coronary intervention and male sex were associated with lower risk. In this observational study of ACS patients from three Maghreb countries, the use of evidence-based pharmacological therapies for ACS was quite high; however, 42% of the patients with STEMI were not given any form of reperfusion therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Remote ischemic preconditioning reduces perioperative cardiac and renal events in patients undergoing elective coronary intervention: a meta-analysis of 11 randomized trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanjun Pei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Results from randomized controlled trials (RCT concerning cardiac and renal effect of remote ischemic preconditioning(RIPC in patients with stable coronary artery disease(CAD are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to explore whether RIPC reduce cardiac and renal events after elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. METHODS AND RESULTS: RCTs with data on cardiac or renal effect of RIPC in PCI were searched from Pubmed, EMBase, and Cochrane library (up to July 2014. Meta-regression and subgroup analysis were performed to identify the potential sources of significant heterogeneity(I(2 ≥ 40%. Eleven RCTs enrolling a total of 1713 study subjects with stable CAD were selected. Compared with controls, RIPC significantly reduced perioperative incidence of myocardial infarction (MI [odds ratio(OR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.91; P = 0.01; I(2 = 41.0%] and contrast-induced acute kidney injury(AKI (OR = 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.98; P = 0.04; I(2 = 39.0%. Meta-regression and subgroup analyses confirmed that the major source of heterogeneity for the incidence of MI was male proportion (coefficient  = -0.049; P = 0.047; adjusted R(2 = 0.988; P = 0.02 for subgroup difference. CONCLUSIONS: The present meta-analysis of RCTs suggests that RIPC may offer cardiorenal protection by reducing the incidence of MI and AKI in patients undergoing elective PCI. Moreover, this effect on MI is more pronounced in male subjects. Future high-quality, large-scale clinical trials should focus on the long-term clinical effect of RIPC.

  16. Fibrinogen concentration and risk of ischemic stroke and acute coronary events in 5113 patients with transient ischemic attack and minor ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothwell, PM; Howard, SC; Power, DA; Gutnikov, SA; Algra, A; van Gijn, J; Clark, TG; Murphy, MFG; Warlow, CP

    2004-01-01

    Background and Purpose - Fibrinogen is an independent risk factor for coronary events in population-based studies and in patients with coronary heart disease, but there is uncertainty about prediction of stroke, particularly in secondary prevention. Methods - We studied unpublished data from 3

  17. Predictive value of coronary calcifications for future cardiac events in asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus: A prospective study in 716 patients over 8 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tittus Janine

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To establish an efficient prophylaxis of coronary artery disease reliable risk stratification is crucial, especially in the high risk population of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus. This prospective study determined the predictive value of coronary calcifications for future cardiovascular events in asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods We included 716 patients suffering from diabetes mellitus (430 men, 286 women, age 55.2 ± 15.2 years in this study. On study entry all patients were asymptomatic and had no history of coronary artery disease. In addition, all patients showed no signs of coronary artery disease in ECG, stress ECG or echocardiography. Coronary calcifications were determined with the Imatron C 150 XP electron beam computed tomograph. For quantification of coronary calcifications we calculated the Agatston score. After a mean observation period of 8.1 ± 1.1 years patients were contacted and the event rate of cardiac death (CD and myocardial infarction (MI was determined. Results During the observation period 40 patients suffered from MI, 36 patients died from acute CD. The initial Agatston score in patients that suffered from MI or died from CD (475 ± 208 was significantly higher compared to those without cardiac events (236 ± 199, p Conclusion By determination of coronary calcifications patients at risk for future MI and CD could be identified within an asymptomatic high risk group of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus. On the other hand future events could be excluded in patients without coronary calcifications.

  18. The validity of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score for the prediction of the incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke, and total mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Pankow, James; Lindström, Jaana; Jousilahti, Pekka; Hu, Gang; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2005-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease shares several risk factors with type 2 diabetes. We tested whether the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC), recently developed in a Finnish population to estimate the future risk of diabetes, would also identify individuals at high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, and total mortality in this same population. Independent risk factor surveys were conducted in 1987, 1992, and 1997 in Finland, comprising 8268 men and 9457 women aged 25-64 years and free of CHD and stroke at baseline. During the follow-up until the end of 2001, 699 incident acute CHD events, 324 acute stroke events, and 765 deaths occurred. The data were analysed by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and the Cox-regression model. The areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were 71% for CHD, 73% for stroke, and 68% for total mortality in men and 78, 68, and 72% in women, respectively. The addition of systolic and diastolic blood pressures, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and smoking increased the AUC values modestly (the change of the absolute values from 2.6 to 6.5%), but the additional use of plasma glucose had only a slight effect on the AUC values for CHD and stroke. The FINDRISC is a reasonably good predictor of CHD, stroke and total mortality.

  19. All-Cause Mortality up to and After Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Events in European Middle-Aged Men: The PRIME Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majed, Bilal; Montaye, Michèle; Wagner, Aline; Arveiler, Dominique; Ducimetiere, Pierre; Tafflet, Muriel; Ferrieres, Jean; Ruidavets, Jean-Bernard; Kee, Frank; Evans, Alun; Amouyel, Philippe; Prugger, Christof; Empana, Jean-Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The aim was to investigate prospectively the all-cause mortality risk up to and after coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke events in European middle-aged men. The study population comprised 10 424 men 50 to 59 years of age recruited between 1991 and 1994 in France (N=7855) and Northern Ireland (N=2747) within the Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction. Incident CHD and stroke events and deaths from all causes were prospectively registered during the 10-year follow-up. In Cox's proportional hazards regression analysis, CHD and stroke events during follow-up were used as time-dependent covariates. A total of 769 CHD and 132 stroke events were adjudicated, and 569 deaths up to and 66 after CHD or stroke occurred during follow-up. After adjustment for study country and cardiovascular risk factors, the hazard ratios of all-cause mortality were 1.58 (95% confidence interval 1.18-2.12) after CHD and 3.13 (95% confidence interval 1.98-4.92) after stroke. These findings support continuous efforts to promote both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Management and outcomes following an acute coronary event in patients with chronic heart failure 1999-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Isuru; Naoum, Chris; Aliprandi-Costa, Bernadette; Sindone, Andrew P; Steg, P Gabriel; Elliott, John; McGarity, Bruce; Lefkovits, Jeffrey; Brieger, David

    2012-05-01

    The outcome of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) following an ischaemic event is poorly understood. We evaluated the management and outcomes of CHF patients presenting with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and explored changes in outcomes over time. A total of 5556 patients enrolled in the Australia-New Zealand population of the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) between 1999 and 2007 were included. Patients with CHF (n = 609) were compared with those without CHF (n = 4947). Patients with CHF were on average 10 years older, were more likely to be female, had more co-morbidities and cardiac risk factors, and were more likely to have a prior history of angina, myocardial infarction, and revascularization by coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) when compared with those without CHF. CHF was associated with a substantial increase in in-hospital renal failure [odds ratio (OR) 1.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-2.71], readmission post-discharge (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.17-1.90), and 6-month mortality (OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.55-3.27). Over the 9 year study period, in-hospital and 6 month mortality in those with CHF declined by absolute rates of 7.5% and 14%, respectively. This was temporally associated with an increase in prescription of thienopyridines, beta-blockers, statins, and angiotensin II receptor blockers, increased rates of coronary angiography, and 31.8% absolute increase in referral rates for cardiac rehabilitation. Acute coronary syndrome patients with pre-existing CHF are a very high risk group and carry a disproportionate mortality burden. Encouragingly, there was a marked temporal improvement in outcomes over a 9 year period with an increase in evidence-based treatments and secondary preventative measures.

  1. Prevalence and management of hypertension in patients with acute coronary syndrome vary with gender: Observations from the Chinese registry of acute coronary events (CRACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yun; Pan, Weiqi; Ning, Shangqiu; Song, Xiantao; Jin, Zening; Lv, Shuzheng

    2013-07-01

    Hypertension affects one billion people worldwide and is an independent risk factor for death after acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and medical treatment of hypertension among 1,301 ACS patients enrolled into the Chinese registry of acute coronary events (CRACE) trial. Analyses were performed by gender, with both genders combined and according to international practice. Multivariable models identified factors associated with use of different classes of antihypertensive medication, and examined the correlation between hypertension and gender with mortality. The use of angiotensin‑converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI), β-blockers, calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and diuretics increased in both genders during management of presenting ACS. Hypertensive men were more likely to have been receiving β-blockers when they were discharged (77.2%) than women (69.2%). Hypertensive women were more likely to have received diuretics when they were discharged (28.4%) than men (22%). ACEI use increased by ~60% (absolute increase) in both women and men as a result of ACS treatment, but remained similar between the genders, and the same phenomenon was observed in the use of CCBs. Moreover, hypertensive women were less likely to receive evidence‑based medication to treat their acute coronary event than men (for women and men, respectively: β-blocker, 69.2 vs. 77.2%; ACEI, 85.8 vs. 87.5%). Hypertension is more prevalent in women than in men with ACS, and its medical management varies with gender, but it has a similar association with mortality in both genders. Opportunities exist to improve medical therapy and outcomes for women with hypertension.

  2. Incidence and preventability of adverse events requiring intensive care admission: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlayen, Annemie; Verelst, Sandra; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Schrooten, Ward; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree

    2012-04-01

    Adverse events are unintended patient injuries or complications that arise from health care management resulting in death, disability or prolonged hospital stay. Adverse events that require critical care are a considerable financial burden to the health care system, but also their global impact on patients and society is probably underestimated. The objectives of this systematic review were to synthesize the best available evidence regarding the estimates of the incidence and preventability of adverse events that necessitate intensive care admission, to determine the type and consequences [mortality, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and costs] of these adverse events. MEDLINE (from 1966 to present), EMBASE (from 1974 to present) and CENTRAL (version 1-2010) were searched for studies reporting on unplanned admissions on ICUs. Several other sources were searched for additional studies. Only quantitative studies that used chart review for the detection of adverse events requiring intensive care admission were considered for eligibility. For the purposes of this systematic review, ICUs were defined as specialized hospital facilities which provide continuous monitoring and intensive care for acutely ill patients. Studies that were published in the English, Dutch, German, French or Spanish language were eligible for inclusion. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. A total of 27 studies were reviewed. Meta-analysis of the data was not appropriate because of methodological and statistical heterogeneity between studies; therefore, results are presented in a descriptive way. The percentage of surgical and medical adverse events that required ICU admission ranged from 1.1% to 37.2%. ICU readmissions varied from 0% to 18.3%. Preventability of the adverse events varied from 17% to 76.5%. Preventable adverse events are further synthesized by type of event. Consequences of the adverse events included a

  3. Executive function, but not memory, associates with incident coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostamian, Somayeh; van Buchem, Mark A; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2015-01-01

    from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) with Mini-Mental State Examination score ≥24 points. Scores on the Stroop Color-Word Test (selective attention) and the Letter Digit Substitution Test (processing speed) were converted to Z scores and averaged into a composite.......57-1.32). CONCLUSION: Lower executive function, but not memory, is associated with higher risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Lower executive function, as an independent risk indicator, might better reflect brain vascular pathologies....

  4. Effect of Loading Dose of Atorvastatin Prior to Planned Percutaneous Coronary Intervention on Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Acute Coronary Syndrome: The SECURE-PCI Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwanger, Otavio; Santucci, Eliana Vieira; de Barros E Silva, Pedro Gabriel Melo; Jesuíno, Isabella de Andrade; Damiani, Lucas Petri; Barbosa, Lilian Mazza; Santos, Renato Hideo Nakagawa; Laranjeira, Ligia Nasi; Egydio, Flávia de Mattos; Borges de Oliveira, Juliana Aparecida; Dall Orto, Frederico Toledo Campo; Beraldo de Andrade, Pedro; Bienert, Igor Ribeiro de Castro; Bosso, Carlos Eduardo; Mangione, José Armando; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne; Sousa, Amanda Guerra de Moraes Rego; Kalil, Renato Abdala Karam; Santos, Luciano de Moura; Sposito, Andrei Carvalho; Rech, Rafael Luiz; Sousa, Antônio Carlos Sobral; Baldissera, Felipe; Nascimento, Bruno Ramos; Giraldez, Roberto Rocha Corrêa Veiga; Cavalcanti, Alexandre Biasi; Pereira, Sabrina Bernardez; Mattos, Luiz Alberto; Armaganijan, Luciana Vidal; Guimarães, Hélio Penna; Sousa, José Eduardo Moraes Rego; Alexander, John Hunter; Granger, Christopher Bull; Lopes, Renato Delascio

    2018-04-03

    The effects of loading doses of statins on clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and planned invasive management remain uncertain. To determine if periprocedural loading doses of atorvastatin decrease 30-day major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with ACS and planned invasive management. Multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial conducted at 53 sites in Brazil among 4191 patients with ACS evaluated with coronary angiography to proceed with a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) if anatomically feasible. Enrollment occurred between April 18, 2012, and October 6, 2017. Final follow-up for 30-day outcomes was on November 6, 2017. Patients were randomized to receive 2 loading doses of 80 mg of atorvastatin (n = 2087) or matching placebo (n = 2104) before and 24 hours after a planned PCI. All patients received 40 mg of atorvastatin for 30 days starting 24 hours after the second dose of study medication. The primary outcome was MACE, defined as a composite of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, and unplanned coronary revascularization through 30 days. Among the 4191 patients (mean age, 61.8 [SD, 11.5] years; 1085 women [25.9%]) enrolled, 4163 (99.3%) completed 30-day follow-up. A total of 2710 (64.7%) underwent PCI, 333 (8%) underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery, and 1144 (27.3%) had exclusively medical management. At 30 days, 130 patients in the atorvastatin group (6.2%) and 149 in the placebo group (7.1%) had a MACE (absolute difference, 0.85% [95% CI, -0.70% to 2.41%]; hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.69-1.11; P = .27). No cases of hepatic failure were reported; 3 cases of rhabdomyolysis were reported in the placebo group (0.1%) and 0 in the atorvastatin group. Among patients with ACS and planned invasive management with PCI, periprocedural loading doses of atorvastatin did not reduce the rate of MACE at 30 days. These findings do not support the routine use

  5. Relationships Between Components of Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Petiot, Emmanuelle; Greenlaw, Nicola; Ford, Ian; Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim M; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tendera, Michal; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Bhatt, Deepak L; Steg, P Gabriel

    2018-01-01

    Observational studies have shown a J-shaped relationship between diastolic blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease. We investigated whether the increased risk associated with low diastolic BP reflects elevated pulse pressure (PP). In 22 672 hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease from the CLARIFY registry (Prospective Observational Longitudinal Registry of Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease), followed for a median of 5.0 years, BP was measured annually and averaged. The relationships between PP and diastolic BP, alone or combined, and the primary composite outcome (cardiovascular death or myocardial infarction) were analyzed using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. Adjusted hazard ratios for the primary outcome were 1.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40-1.87), 1.00 (ref), 1.07 (95% CI, 0.94-1.21), 1.54 (95% CI, 1.32-1.79), and 2.34 (95% CI, 1.95-2.81) for PPhypertensive patients with coronary artery disease persists in patients within the lowest-risk PP range and is therefore unlikely to be solely the consequence of an increased PP reflecting advanced vascular disease. URL: http://www.clarify-registry.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN43070564. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. The Incidence of Major Cardiovascular Events in Immigrants to Ontario, Canada: The CANHEART Immigrant Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jack V; Chu, Anna; Rezai, Mohammad R; Guo, Helen; Maclagan, Laura C; Austin, Peter C; Booth, Gillian L; Manuel, Douglas G; Chiu, Maria; Ko, Dennis T; Lee, Douglas S; Shah, Baiju R; Donovan, Linda R; Sohail, Qazi Zain; Alter, David A

    2015-08-31

    -Immigrants from ethnic minority groups represent an increasing proportion of the population in many high-income countries but little is known about the causes and amount of variation between various immigrant groups in the incidence of major cardiovascular events. -We conducted the Cardiovascular Health in Ambulatory Care Research Team (CANHEART) Immigrant study, a big data initiative, linking information from Citizenship and Immigration Canada's Permanent Resident database to nine population-based health databases. A cohort of 824 662 first-generation immigrants aged 30 to 74 as of January 2002 from eight major ethnic groups and 201 countries of birth who immigrated to Ontario, Canada between 1985 and 2000 were compared to a reference group of 5.2 million long-term residents. The overall 10-year age-standardized incidence of major cardiovascular events was 30% lower among immigrants compared with long-term residents. East Asian immigrants (predominantly ethnic Chinese) had the lowest incidence overall (2.4 in males, 1.1 in females per 1000 person-years) but this increased with greater duration of stay in Canada. South Asian immigrants, including those born in Guyana had the highest event rates (8.9 in males, 3.6 in females per 1000 person-years), along with immigrants born in Iraq and Afghanistan. Adjustment for traditional risk factors reduced but did not eliminate differences in cardiovascular risk between various ethnic groups and long-term residents. -Striking differences in the incidence of cardiovascular events exist among immigrants to Canada from different ethnic backgrounds. Traditional risk factors explain part but not all of these differences.

  7. Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesperance, Ann M.

    2008-06-30

    On March 19, 2008, policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and Public Health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about restoration and recovery through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems.

  8. Incidence of severe critical events in paediatric anaesthesia (APRICOT) : a prospective multicentre observational study in 261 hospitals in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habre, Walid; Disma, Nicola; Virag, Katalin; Becke, Karin; Hansen, Tom G; Jöhr, Martin; Leva, Brigitte; Morton, Neil S.; Vermeulen, Petronella M; Zielinska, Marzena; Boda, Krisztina; Veyckemans, Francis

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the incidence of severe critical events in children undergoing general anaesthesia in Europe. We aimed to identify the incidence, nature, and outcome of severe critical events in children undergoing anaesthesia, and the associated potential risk factors. METHODS:

  9. Residential relocation by older adults in response to incident cardiovascular health events : A case-crossover analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lovasi, G.; Richardson, J.M.; Rodriguez, C.J.; Kop, W.J.; Ahmed, A.; Brown, A.F.; Greenlee, H.; Siscovick, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We use a case-crossover analysis to explore the association between incident cardiovascular events and residential relocation to a new home address. Methods. We conducted an ambidirectional case-crossover analysis to explore the association between incident cardiovascular events and

  10. Plasma phospholipid fatty acid concentration and incident coronary heart disease in men and women: the EPIC-Norfolk prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay-Tee Khaw

    Full Text Available The lack of association found in several cohort studies between dietary saturated fat and coronary heart disease (CHD risk has renewed debate over the link between dietary fats and CHD.We assessed the relationship between plasma phospholipid fatty acid (PFA concentration and incident CHD using a nested case control design within a prospective study (EPIC-Norfolk of 25,639 individuals aged 40-79 years examined in 1993-1997 and followed up to 2009. Plasma PFA concentrations were measured by gas chromatography in baseline samples retrieved from frozen storage. In 2,424 men and women with incident CHD compared with 4,930 controls alive and free of cardiovascular disease, mean follow-up 13 years, saturated PFA (14:0, 16:0,18:0 plasma concentrations were significantly associated with increased CHD risk (odds ratio [OR] 1.75, 95% CI 1.27-2.41, p<0.0001, in top compared to bottom quartiles (Q, and omega-6 polyunsaturated PFA concentrations were inversely related (OR 0.77, 0.60-0.99, p<0.05 after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, blood pressure, smoking, alcohol intake, plasma vitamin C, social class, education, and other PFAs. Monounsaturated PFA, omega-3 PFA, and trans PFA concentrations were not significantly associated with CHD. Odd chain PFA (15:0, 17:0 concentrations were significantly inversely associated with CHD (OR 0.73, 0.59-0.91, p<0.001, Q4 versus Q1. Within families of saturated PFA or polyunsaturated PFA, significantly heterogeneous relationships with CHD were observed for individual fatty acids.In this study, plasma concentrations of even chain saturated PFA were found to be positively and omega-6 polyunsaturated PFA inversely related to subsequent coronary heart disease risk. These findings are consistent with accumulating evidence suggesting a protective role of omega-6 fats substituting for saturated fats for CHD prevention.

  11. Left Atrial Volume Index and Prediction of Events in Acute Coronary Syndrome: Solar Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Alves Secundo Junior

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to some international studies, patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS and increased left atrial volume index (LAVI have worse long-term prognosis. However, national Brazilian studies confirming this prediction are still lacking. Objective: To evaluate LAVI as a predictor of major cardiovascular events (MCE in patients with ACS during a 365-day follow-up. Methods: Prospective cohort of 171 patients diagnosed with ACS whose LAVI was calculated within 48 hours after hospital admission. According to LAVI, two groups were categorized: normal LAVI (≤ 32 mL/m2 and increased LAVI (> 32 mL/m2. Both groups were compared regarding clinical and echocardiographic characteristics, in- and out-of-hospital outcomes, and occurrence of ECM in up to 365 days. Results: Increased LAVI was observed in 78 patients (45%, and was associated with older age, higher body mass index, hypertension, history of myocardial infarction and previous angioplasty, and lower creatinine clearance and ejection fraction. During hospitalization, acute pulmonary edema was more frequent in patients with increased LAVI (14.1% vs. 4.3%, p = 0.024. After discharge, the occurrence of combined outcome for MCE was higher (p = 0.001 in the group with increased LAVI (26% as compared to the normal LAVI group (7% [RR (95% CI = 3.46 (1.54-7.73 vs. 0.80 (0.69-0.92]. After Cox regression, increased LAVI increased the probability of MCE (HR = 3.08, 95% CI = 1.28-7.40, p = 0.012. Conclusion: Increased LAVI is an important predictor of MCE in a one-year follow-up.

  12. Elevated infection parameters and infection symptoms predict an acute coronary event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesonen, Erkki; Andsberg, Eva; Grubb, Anders; Rautelin, Hilpi; Meri, Seppo; Persson, Kenneth; Puolakkainen, Mirja; Sarna, Seppo; Ohlin, Hans

    2008-12-01

    The etiology and significance of flu-like symptoms often appearing before myocardial infarction should be clarified. In a case-control study of 323 matched controls and a random sample of 110 out of 351 cases the presence of infection symptoms during the preceding four weeks before admission were asked and blood samples taken. Enterovirus (EV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and Chlamydia pneumoniae IgA titers were significantly higher in cases than in controls (p<0.001, 0.008 and 0.046, respectively). Flu-like symptoms appeared significantly more often in patients than in controls the most common one being fatigue (p<0.001). In controls with fatigue, EV and HSV titers showed a trend to be higher (1.50 vs 1.45 and 4.29 vs 3.73) than in controls without fatigue but only HSV titers were statistically significantly higher (3.47 vs 3.96, p = 0.02). Even CRP and amyloid A concentrations (3.49 vs 2.08, p<0.0001 and 5.70 vs 3.77 mg/l, p = 0.003, respectively) as well as C4 (0.40 vs 0.44, p = 0.02) were higher in controls with fatigue. Odds ratios for a coronary event in a logistic regression model were 4.79 for fatigue and 2.72 for EV antibody levels in their fourth quartile. A linear-by-linear association test showed increasing number of single symptoms with higher EV titer quartiles (p = 0.004).

  13. Psychosocial stress and major cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagström, E; Norlund, F; Stebbins, A; Armstrong, P W; Chiswell, K; Granger, C B; López-Sendón, J; Pella, D; Soffer, J; Sy, R; Wallentin, L; White, H D; Stewart, R A H; Held, C

    2018-01-01

    Assess the risk of ischaemic events associated with psychosocial stress in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD). Psychosocial stress was assessed by a questionnaire in 14 577 patients (median age 65.0, IQR 59, 71; 81.6% males) with stable CHD on optimal secondary preventive therapy in the prospective randomized STABILITY clinical trial. Adjusted Cox regression models were used to assess associations between individual stressors, baseline cardiovascular risk factors and outcomes. After 3.7 years of follow-up, depressive symptoms, loss of interest and financial stress were associated with increased risk (hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval) of CV death (1.21, 1.09-1.34; 1.15, 1.05-1.27; and 1.19, 1.08-1.30, respectively) and the primary composite end-point of CV death, nonfatal MI or nonfatal stroke (1.21, 1.13-1.30; 1.19, 1.11-1.27; and 1.17, 1.10-1.24, respectively). Living alone was related to higher risk of CV death (1.68, 1.38-2.05) and the primary composite end-point (1.28, 1.11-1.48), whereas being married as compared with being widowed, was associated with lower risk of CV death (0.64, 0.49-0.82) and the primary composite end-point (0.81, 0.67-0.97). Psychosocial stress, such as depressive symptoms, loss of interest, living alone and financial stress, were associated with increased CV mortality in patients with stable CHD despite optimal medical secondary prevention treatment. Secondary prevention of CHD should therefore focus also on psychosocial issues both in clinical management and in future clinical trials. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  14. Recalibration of the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk score in a multiethnic Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mark Y; Shah, Bimal R; Gao, Fei; Sim, Ling Ling; Chua, Terrance; Tan, Huay Cheem; Yeo, Tiong Cheng; Ong, Hean Yee; Foo, David; Goh, Ping Ping; Surrun, Soondal K; Pieper, Karen S; Granger, Christopher B; Koh, Tian Hai; Salim, Agus; Tai, E Shyong

    2011-08-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a leading cause of mortality in Asia. However, quantitative risk scores to predict mortality after AMI were developed without the participation of Asian countries. We evaluated the performance of the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) in-hospital mortality risk score, directly and after recalibration, in a large Singaporean cohort representing 3 major Asian ethnicities. The GRACE cohort included 11,389 patients, predominantly of European descent, hospitalized for AMI or unstable angina from 2002 to 2003. The Singapore cohort included 10,100 Chinese, 3,005 Malay, and 2,046 Indian patients hospitalized for AMI from 2002 to 2005.Using the original GRACE score, predicted in-hospital mortality was 2.4% (Chinese), 2.0% (Malay), and 1.6% (Indian). However, observed in-hospital mortality was much greater at 9.8% (Chinese), 7.6% (Malay), and 6.4% (Indian). The c statistic for Chinese, Malays, and Indians was 0.86, 0.86, and 0.84, respectively, and the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic was 250, 56, and 41, respectively. Recalibration of the GRACE score, using the mean-centered constants derived from the Singapore cohort, did not change the c statistic but substantially improved the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic to 90, 24, and 18, respectively. The recalibrated GRACE score predicted in-hospital mortality as follows: 7.7% (Chinese), 6.0% (Malay), and 5.2% (Indian). In this large cohort of 3 major Asian ethnicities, the original GRACE score, derived from populations outside Asia, underestimated in-hospital mortality after AMI. Recalibration improved risk estimation substantially and may help adapt externally developed risk scores for local practice. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Operating Experience from Events Reported to the IAEA Incident Reporting System for Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-03-01

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism in providing lessons learned from events and the associated corrective actions to prevent them, helping to improve safety at nuclear installations. The Incident Reporting System for Research Reactors (IRSRR), which is operated by the IAEA, is an important tool for international exchange of operating experience feedback for research reactors. The IRSRR reports contain information on events of safety significance with their root causes and lessons learned which help in reducing the occurrence of similar events at research reactors. To improve the effectiveness of the system, it is essential that national organizations demonstrate an appropriate interest for the timely reporting of events important to safety and share the information in the IRSRR database. At their biennial technical meetings, the IRSRR national coordinators recommended collecting the operating experience from the events reported to the IRSRR and disseminating it in an IAEA publication. This publication highlights the root causes, safety significance, lessons learned, corrective actions and the causal factors for the events reported to the IRSRR up to September 2014. The publication also contains relevant summary information on research reactor events from sources other than the IRSRR, operating experience feedback from the International Reporting System for Operating Experience considered relevant to research reactors, and a description of the elements of an operating experience programme as established by the IAEA safety standards. This publication will be of use to research reactor operating organizations, regulators and designers, and any other organizations or individuals involved in the safety of research reactors

  16. Predictors of 30 ـ day Incidence of Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Hassanzadeh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The previous investigations show that cardiovascular diseases, which are spreading all over our country, account for most health and social problems. The objective of this study was to determine the relation between demographic factors, medical history as well as para clinical factors and Coronary Artery Disease (CAD within a period of 30 days for patients with chest pain. Materials & Methods: This was a prospective cohort study. Patients referred to the emergency department of Tehran heart centre with a chief complaint of chest pain without ST ـ segment elevation were followed for 30 days. The outcome variable was coronary artery disease. The Poisson Regression Model was applied in order to identify significant predictors of outcome. Applying this model, we could calculate Adjusted Risk Ratio and 95% confidence interval. The data were analyzed by standard statistical tests using SAS and Stata software. Results: 609 eligible patients were enrolled. Of these 51% were male and 49% female. Based on the final model of Poisson Regression, variables like sex, blood pressure history, heart disease history, changes in electrocardiogram, WBC and CRP had meaningful relationship with CAD. Conclusion: We concluded that prognosis in patients with chest pain needed considering clinical factors (acquired through interview, electrocardiogram and lab findings. Also we were conducted not to rely on traditional risk factors such as history of diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, smoking and family history of heart disease for prediction of the disease.

  17. Coronary artery disease and risk of adverse cardiac events and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kevin Kris Warnakula; Madsen, Morten; Lip, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    artery disease and long-term risk of ischemic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cohort study of coronary angiographies performed in Western Denmark from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2012. Patients were stratified according to the number of vessels affected by obstructive coronary artery disease (lumen...... narrowing ≥50%) at the time of angiography: 0-, 1-, 2- or 3-vessel disease and diffuse vessel disease. We followed patients for a maximum of 7 years. Endpoints were all-cause death, cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and ischemic stroke. Cumulative risks and crude and adjusted rate ratios were estimated...... range 1.7-6.0 years). Increasing severity of obstructive coronary artery disease was associated with an increasing risk of all-cause death, cardiac death, MI, and ischemic stroke during follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The presence and extent of coronary artery disease was associated with an incremental risk...

  18. Markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are associated with incident cardiovascular disease, all-cause mortality, and progression of coronary calcification in type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Scholten, Bernt Johan; Reinhard, Henrik; Hansen, Tine Willum

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We evaluated markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction and their associations with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD), all-cause mortality and progression of coronary artery calcium (CAC) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and microalbuminuria but without known corona...

  19. Alpha-Linolenic Acid Intake and 10-Year Incidence of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke in 20,000 Middle-Aged Men and Women in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, de J.; Verschuren, W.M.M.; Boer, J.M.A.; Kromhout, D.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background - Whether intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the plant-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), could prevent cardiovascular diseases is not yet clear. We examined the associations of ALA intake with 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in the Netherlands.

  20. [INCIDENCE OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE IN COMBINATION WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS ESTIMATED FROM RESULTS OF AN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF 20-59 YEAR OLD WOMEN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanova, S S; Kasumova, E N; Mamedova, R N

    2015-01-01

    We report evaluation of the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in combination with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) estimated from results of an epidemiological study of 20-59 year old women. CPD was shown to occur twice more frequently in association with DM2 especilly in the age groups of 30-39 and 50-59 years.

  1. Additive influence of genetic predisposition and conventional risk factors in the incidence of coronary heart disease: a population-based study in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    An additive genetic risk score (GRS) for coronary heart disease (CHD) has previously been associated with incident CHD in the population-based Greek European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In this study, we explore GRS-‘environment’ joint actions on CHD for severa...

  2. Incidence of associated events during the performance of invasive procedures in healthy human volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highstead, R. Grant; Tipton, Kevin D.; Creson, Daniel L.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Ferrando, Arny A.

    2005-01-01

    Metabolic investigations often utilize arteriovenous sampling and muscle biopsy. These investigations represent some risk to the subject. We examined 369 studies performed in the General Clinical Research Center between January 1994 and May 2003 for events related to femoral catheterization and muscle biopsies. Incidents were further examined by age (younger: 18-59 yr, n=133; and older: 60-76 yr, n=28). There were no clinically defined major complications associated with either procedure. The incidence of femoral catheter repositioning or reinsertion was higher in the older group (25.5 vs. 9.7%). There was no difference in the incidence of premature removal of catheters, ecchymosis or hematoma, or the persistence of pain after discharge. The occurrence of all incidents did not increase with multiple catheterizations. Muscle biopsy was associated with infrequent ecchymosis or hematoma in both groups (1.1 and 3.6% in younger and older groups, respectively). Both procedures entail a small likelihood of a vagallike response (3.3% overall), resulting in nausea, dizziness, and rarely a loss of consciousness. These results indicate that, in skilled hands and a defined clinical setting, the incidents associated with femoral catheterization and muscle biopsy in healthy volunteers are reasonable and largely controllable.

  3. Mediterranean Diet Mediates the Adverse Effect of Depressive Symptomatology on Short-Term Outcome in Elderly Survivors from an Acute Coronary Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Chrysohoou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. We evaluated the interaction effect between depressive symptoms and dietary habits on 30-day development of cardiovascular disease (CVD (death or rehospitalization in elderly, acute coronary syndrome (ACS survivors. Methods. During 2006–2008, we recorded 277 nonfatal, consecutive ACS admissions (75 ± 6 years, 70% males, 70% had diagnosis of myocardial infarction with complete 30-day follow-up. Assessment of recent depressive symptoms was based on the CES-D scale. Among sociodemographic, bioclinical, lifestyle characteristics, the MedDietScore that assesses the inherent characteristics of the Mediterranean diet was applied. Results. 22% of the ACS pts developed a CVD event during the first 30 days (14.8% rehospitalization and 9.4% death. Patients in the upper tertile of the CES-D scale (i.e., >18 had higher incidence of CVD events as compared with those in the lowest tertile (21% versus 8%, =.01. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that 1-unit increase in CES-D was associated with 4% higher odds (95% CI 1.008–1.076, =.01 of CVD events; however, when MedDietScore was entered in the model, CES-D lost its significance (=.20. Conclusion. Short-term depressive symptoms are related to a worsen 30-day prognosis of ACS patients; however, this relationship was mediated by Mediterranean diet adherence.

  4. Ventilator-Related Adverse Events: A Taxonomy and Findings From 3 Incident Reporting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Julius Cuong; Williams, Tamara L; Sparnon, Erin M; Cillie, Tam K; Scharen, Hilda F; Marella, William M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2009, researchers from Johns Hopkins University's Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality; public agencies, including the FDA; and private partners, including the Emergency Care Research Institute and the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) Safety Intelligence Patient Safety Organization, sought to form a public-private partnership for the promotion of patient safety (P5S) to advance patient safety through voluntary partnerships. The study objective was to test the concept of the P5S to advance our understanding of safety issues related to ventilator events, to develop a common classification system for categorizing adverse events related to mechanical ventilators, and to perform a comparison of adverse events across different adverse event reporting systems. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of ventilator-related adverse events reported in 2012 from the following incident reporting systems: the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority's Patient Safety Reporting System, UHC's Safety Intelligence Patient Safety Organization database, and the FDA's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database. Once each organization had its dataset of ventilator-related adverse events, reviewers read the narrative descriptions of each event and classified it according to the developed common taxonomy. RESULTS: A Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, FDA, and UHC search provided 252, 274, and 700 relevant reports, respectively. The 3 event types most commonly reported to the UHC and the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority's Patient Safety Reporting System databases were airway/breathing circuit issue, human factor issues, and ventilator malfunction events. The top 3 event types reported to the FDA were ventilator malfunction, power source issue, and alarm failure. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we found that (1) through the development of a common taxonomy, adverse events from 3 reporting systems can be evaluated, (2) the types of

  5. A systematic review and economic evaluation of statins for the prevention of coronary events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, S; Lloyd Jones, M; Pandor, A; Holmes, M; Ara, R; Ryan, A; Yeo, W; Payne, N

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of statins for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in adults with, or at risk of, coronary heart disease (CHD). Electronic databases were searched between November 2003 and April 2004. A review was undertaken to identify and evaluate all literature relating to the clinical and cost effectiveness of statins in the primary and secondary prevention of CHD and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the UK. A Markov model was developed to explore the costs and health outcomes associated with a lifetime of statin treatment using a UK NHS perspective. Thirty-one randomised studies were identified that compared a statin with placebo or with another statin, and reported clinical outcomes. Meta-analysis of the available data from the placebo-controlled studies indicates that, in patients with, or at risk of, CVD, statin therapy is associated with a reduced relative risk of all cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, CHD mortality and fatal myocardial infarction (MI), but not of fatal stroke. It is also associated with a reduced relative risk of morbidity [non-fatal stroke, non-fatal MI, transient ischaemic attack (TIA), unstable angina] and of coronary revascularisation. It is hardly possible, on the evidence available from the placebo-controlled trials, to differentiate between the clinical efficacy of atorvastatin, fluvastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin. However, there is some evidence from direct comparisons between statins to suggest that atorvastatin may be more effective than pravastatin in patients with symptomatic CHD. There is limited evidence for the effectiveness of statins in different subgroups. Statins are generally considered to be well tolerated and to have a good safety profile. This view is generally supported both by the evidence of the trials included in this review and by postmarketing surveillance data. Increases in creatine kinase and myopathy have been reported, but

  6. Incidence and determinants of medication errors and adverse drug events among hospitalized children in West Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedefo, Mohammed Gebre; Mitike, Abraham Haileamlak; Angamo, Mulugeta Tarekegn

    2016-07-07

    Medication errors cause a large number of adverse drug events with negative patient health outcomes and are a major public-health burden contributing to 18.7-56 % of all adverse drug events among hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and determinants of medication errors and adverse drug events among hospitalized children. A prospective observational study was conducted among hospitalized children in the pediatrics ward of Nekemte Referral Hospital from February 24 to March 28, 2014. Data were collected by using checklist guided observation and review of medication order sheets, medication administration records, and other medical charts of the patients. To identify the independent predictors of medication errors and adverse drug events, backward logistic regression analysis was used. Statistical significance was considered at p-value Nekemte Referral Hospital. In particular, children with multiple medications and longer hospital stays, and those with co-morbidities and longer hospital stays, were at greater risk for medication errors and adverse drug events, respectively.

  7. Systematic review of the incidence and characteristics of preventable adverse drug events in ambulatory care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard; Winterstein, Almut G; Søndergaard, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incidence and describe characteristics of preventable adverse drug events (pADEs) in ambulatory care. DATA SOURCES: Studies were searched in PubMed (1966-March 2007), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-December 2006), the Cochrane database of systematic reviews...... (1993-March 2007), EMBASE (1980-February 2007), and Web of Science (1945-March 2007). Key words included medication error, adverse drug reaction, iatrogenic disease, outpatient, ambulatory care, primary health care, general practice, patient admission, hospitalization, observational study, retrospective....../pADE incidence, (2) clinical outcomes, (3) associated drug groups, and/or (4) underlying medication errors were included. Study country, year and design, sample size, follow-up time, ADE/pADE identification method, proportion of ADEs/pADEs and ADEs/pADEs requiring hospital admission, and frequency distribution...

  8. Safety and efficacy of angioplasty with intracoronary stenting in patients with unstable coronary syndromes. Comparison with stable coronary syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís C. L. Correia

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess safety and efficacy of coronary angioplasty with stent implantation in unstable coronary syndromes. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of in-hospital and late evolution of 74 patients with unstable coronary syndromes (unstable angina or infarction without elevation of the ST segment undergoing coronary angioplasty with stent placement. These 74 patients were compared with 31 patients with stable coronary syndromes (stable angina or stable silent ischemia undergoing the same procedure. RESULTS: No death and no need for revascularization of the culprit artery occurred in the in-hospital phase. The incidences of acute non-Q-wave myocardial infarction were 1.4% and 3.2% (p=0.6 in the unstable and stable coronary syndrome groups, respectively. In the late follow-up (11.2±7.5 months, the incidences of these events combined were 5.7% in the unstable coronary syndrome group and 6.9% (p=0.8 in the stable coronary syndrome group. In the multivariate analysis, the only variable with a tendency to significance as an event predictor was diabetes mellitus (p=0.07; OR=5.2; 95% CI=0.9-29.9. CONCLUSION: The in-hospital and late evolutions of patients with unstable coronary syndrome undergoing angioplasty with intracoronary stent implantation are similar to those of the stable coronary syndrome group, suggesting that this procedure is safe and efficacious when performed in unstable coronary syndrome patients.

  9. Endotoxemia, immune response to periodontal pathogens, and systemic inflammation associate with incident cardiovascular disease events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pussinen, Pirkko J; Tuomisto, Karolina; Jousilahti, Pekka; Havulinna, Aki S; Sundvall, Jouko; Salomaa, Veikko

    2007-06-01

    In periodontitis, overgrowth of gram-negative bacteria may cause endotoxemia and systemic inflammation leading to cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We investigated in a prospective study the associations of serum endotoxin, antibodies to periodontal pathogens, and inflammation markers with the risk of incident CVD. The FINRISK 1992 cohort of 6051 individuals was followed up for 10 years. We examined 185 incident CVD events and a control cohort of 320 individuals using a prospective case-cohort design. High antibody response to periodontal pathogens independently predicted incident CVD events with hazard ratios (HR, quartile 4 versus quartiles 1 to 3, 95% CI) of 1.87 (1.13 to 3.08). The subjects with a high antibody response and high CRP or interleukin (IL)-6 had multivariate-adjusted HRs of 3.01 (1.27 to 7.09) and 3.11 (1.42 to 6.83) compared with low-responders, respectively. The corresponding HRs for high endotoxin concentration were 1.82 (1.22 to 2.73, alone), 3.92 (1.99 to 7.74, with CRP), 3.54 (1.78 to 7.03, with IL-6), and 2.26 (1.13 to 4.52, with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha) after adjusting for age and gender. These associations were abolished after adjusting for serum lipids. High endotoxin/HDL ratio, however, had a multivariate-adjusted HR of 1.92 (1.19 to 3.08) for CVD events. Our results suggest that the exposure to periodontal pathogens or endotoxin induces systemic inflammation leading to increased risk for CVD.

  10. Sex Differences in the Association Between Insulin Resistance and Incident Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Among Blacks Without Diabetes Mellitus: The Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effoe, Valery S; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Echouffo Tcheugui, Justin B; Chen, Haiying; Joseph, Joshua J; Kalyani, Rita R; Bell, Ronny A; Wu, Wen-Chih H; Casanova, Ramon; Bertoni, Alain G

    2017-02-02

    Studies exploring the association between insulin resistance (IR) and cardiovascular disease in blacks have not been conclusive, especially for coronary heart disease (CHD). The McAuley index and homeostasis model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) perform differently in predicting cardiovascular disease. We investigated this association in the Jackson Heart Study, a large longitudinal cohort of blacks. IR was estimated for 3565 participants without diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease at baseline using the McAuley index and HOMA-IR, and their associations with incident CHD and stroke (composite outcome) were compared. A lower McAuley index and higher HOMA-IR are indicative of IR. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios for incident CHD and/or stroke. There were 158 events (89 CHD-only, 58 stroke-only, and 11 CHD/stroke) over a median follow-up of 8.4 years. After adjustment for demographic factors, the risk of the composite outcome decreased with each SD increase in the McAuley index (hazard ratio 0.80; 95% CI: 0.67-0.96), with no attenuation after further accounting for CHD and stroke risk factors. When considered individually, McAuley index and HOMA-IR were associated with CHD (hazard ratio 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55-0.92 and hazard ratio 1.33, 95% CI: 1.03-1.72, respectively), but not stroke risk. The logHOMA-IR and CHD association was present in men, but not in women (P interaction =0.01). Both HOMA-IR and the McAuley index demonstrate strong associations with CHD but not stroke risk in blacks. The logHOMA-IR and CHD association was present in men, but not in women. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  11. Health-related quality of life and risk of composite coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular events in the Moli-sani study cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccio, Marialaura; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; Costanzo, Simona; Persichillo, Mariarosaria; De Curtis, Amalia; Cerletti, Chiara; Donati, Maria Benedetta; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    2018-02-01

    Background To assess the association between health-related quality of life (HRQL) and a composite outcome including incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular events in a large general population-based cohort. Design Prospective analysis on 17,102 men and women (mean age 53 ± 11) free from cardiovascular disease at time of enrolment in the Moli-sani cohort (2005-2010). Methods HRQL was assessed by the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using multivariable Cox-proportional hazard models. Results At the end of follow-up (median 4.2 years), 237 new events occurred (coronary heart disease n = 197, cerebrovascular disease n = 42). In a multivariable model adjusted for socioeconomic factors, chronic disease and health-related behaviours, both mental and physical HRQL were inversely associated with the risk of the composite outcome (hazard ratio = 0.57; 0.39-0.84 and hazard ratio = 0.62; 0.40-0.94, respectively; highest vs. lowest quartile). Further adjustment for C-reactive protein marginally modified the association with physical HRQL (hazard ratio = 0.67; 0.43-1.02). Similar findings were obtained when only CHD events were analysed (hazard ratio = 0.63; 0.41-0.96 for highest versus lowest mental HRQL) although results with physical HRQL were no longer significant (hazard ratio = 0.65; 0.40-1.04 for highest versus lowest quartile). Associations with incident cerebrovascular disease showed a trend toward protection (hazard ratio = 0.50; 0.22-1.17 and hazard ratio = 0.51; 0.22-1.23 for highest versus lowest tertile of mental and physical HRQL, respectively). Conclusions HRQL is an independent predictor of composite CHD/cerebrovascular outcomes in an adult population. The magnitude of the association was not affected either by socioeconomic factors, health conditions or health-related behaviours. Improvement of quality of life may be a major factor

  12. Survey of the incidence and effect of major life events on graduate medical education trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars J. Grimm

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to assess the incidence of major life events during graduate medical education (GME training and to establish any associations with modifiable activities and career planning. Methods: The authors surveyed graduating GME trainees from their parent institution in June 2013. Demographic information (clinical department, gender, training duration and major life events (marriage, children, death/illness, home purchase, legal troubles, property loss were surveyed. Respondents were queried about the relationship between life events and career planning. A multivariable logistic regression model tested for associations. Results: A total of 53.2% (166/312 of graduates responded to the survey. 50% (83/166 of respondents were female. Major life events occurred in 96.4% (160/166 of respondents. Male trainees were more likely (56.1% [46/82] vs. 30.1% [25/83] to have a child during training (p=0.01. A total of 41.6% (69/166 of responders consciously engaged or avoided activities during GME training, while 31.9% (53/166 of responders reported that life events influenced their career plans. Trainees in lifestyle residencies (p=0.02, those who experienced the death or illness of a close associate (p=0.01, and those with legal troubles (p=0.04 were significantly more likely to consciously control life events. Conclusion: Major life events are very common and changed career plans in nearly a third of GME trainees. Furthermore, many trainees consciously avoided activities due to their responsibilities during training. GME training programs should closely assess the institutional support systems available to trainees during this difficult time.

  13. Differences in coronary artery disease by CT angiography between patients developing unstable angina pectoris vs. major adverse cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlett, Christopher L; Nance, John W; Schoepf, U Joseph; O'Brien, Terrence X; Ebersberger, Ullrich; Headden, Gary F; Hoffmann, Udo; Bamberg, Fabian

    2014-07-01

    CT angiography (CTA) has prognostic value in patients. But it is unknown whether differences in atherosclerosis by CTA predict the development of unstable angina pectoris (UAP) vs. major adverse cardiac events (MACE). We followed patients undergoing CTA as part of their acute chest pain work-up. Primary outcome was the development of UAP or MACE (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, revascularization) during a minimum follow-up of 12-months. CTAs were assessed for extent and composition of coronary plaque and stenosis. Ordinal regression with a 3-level outcome (no events, UAP, MACE) was applied. Among 315 patients, 22 developed UAP and 31 MACE. While UAP patients had higher atherosclerosis burden with respect to all assessed features compared to patients with no events (p ≤ 0.02), only mixed plaque extent was significantly different between UAP and MACE patients (p=0.02). The odds ratio was 4.55 for being in a higher disease-level comparing patients with low extent to those with no mixed plaque, and 3.02 comparing patients with high to those with low. These findings remained after adjustments for potential confounders. The extent of mixed coronary plaque is different between patients who develop UAP vs. MACE, supporting the hypothesis that it is a more culprit morphology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. RISK OF REPEATED THROMBOTIC EVENTS IN PATIENTS SURVIVED ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME AND HAVING LABORATORY PROVEN RESISTANCE TO ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Puchinyan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate risk of repeated atherothrombotic events in patients survived acute coronary syndrome (ACS and having poorly reduced platelet aggregation (proven by optical aggregometry in response to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA therapy.Material and methods. 200 patients with ACS (aged 56,6±9,2 y.o. were included in the study. Platelet functional activity during ASA therapy was evaluated with laser aggregometer. ASA resistance was defined if the summarizing index of platelet aggregation (induced with ADP, 5 mμml/l was 50% or higher during ASA therapy. Observation period was 18±6 months. Atherothrombotic events (unstable angina, myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiovascular death were considered.Results. Lack ASA response rate was about 12%. Totally 22 repeated atherothrombotic events were registered: 5,6% among ASA sensitive patients and 50% - among ASA resistant patients. Repeated atherothrombotic events were registered in ASA resistance patients during first 14 days. ASA sensitive patients showed repeated atherothrombotic events in some months after ACS. The relative risk of cardiovascular event in ASA resistance patients was 8,92 (CI 95% 4,39; 17,84 р=0,05.Conclusion. The high level of the induced platelet aggregation (proven by laser aggregometry points to high risk of repeated atherothrombotic events in patients with ACS.

  15. Acute coronary events in general practice: the Imminent Myocardial Infarction Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van der Does (Emiel); J. Lubsen (Jacob)

    1978-01-01

    textabstractWith the advent of coronary care units in the early sixties, the first concentrated effort was made to reduce mortality from myocardial infarction. Subsequent experience has demonstrated that in-hospital deaths, particularly those from arrhythmias, have decreased from some thirty-five

  16. Coronary collateral circulation in patients of coronary ectasia with significant coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Chao Hsu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Patients with coronary ectasia (CE usually have coexisting coronary stenosis resulting in myoischemia. Coronary collateral plays an important role in protecting myocardium from ischemia and reducing cardiovascular events. However, limited studies investigate the role of CE in coronary collaterals development. METHODS: We evaluated 1020 consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography and 552 patients with significant coronary artery disease (SCAD, defined as diameter stenosis more than 70%, were finally analyzed. CE is defined as the ectatic diameter 1.5 times larger than adjacent reference segment. Rentrop collateral score was used to classify patients into poor (grades 0 and 1 or good (grades 2 and 3 collateral group. RESULTS: 73 patients (13.2% had CE lesions which were most located in the right coronary artery (53.4%. Patients with CE had a lower incidence of diabetes (43.8% vs 30.1%, p = 0.03, higher body mass index (25.4±3.5 vs 26.7±4.6, p = 0.027 and poorer coronary collateral (58.2% vs 71.2%, p = 0.040. Patients with poor collateral (n = 331 had a higher incidence of CE (15.7% vs 9.5%, p = 0.040 and fewer diseased vessels numbers (1.96±0.84 vs 2.48±0.69, p<0.001. Multivariate analysis showed diabetes (odd ratio (OR 0.630, p = 0.026, CE (OR = 0.544, p = 0.048, and number of diseased vessels (OR = 2.488, p<0.001 were significant predictors of coronary collaterals development. CONCLUSION: The presence of CE was associated with poorer coronary collateral development in patients with SCAD.

  17. The carotid intima media thickness: a predictor of the clincal coronary events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jinzy Mariam; Bhat, Raghavendra; Pai, K Mohan; S, Arun; Jeganathan, Jayakumar

    2013-06-01

    The Carotid Intima-Media Thickness (CIMT) is a simple and an inexpensive tool which can be used to assess the cumulative effect of atherosclerotic risk factors and it is also an independent predictor of the future cardiovascular risk. Nevertheless, criticism has been raised throughout the scientific community, based on the observations which indicated a weak correlation between CIMT and coronary atherosclerosis. It has been suggested by the International Atherosclerosis Project, that the atherosclerotic process occurs at the same time in the carotid, cerebral and the coronary arteries. Measurement of the Carotid Intima-Media Thickness (CIMT) of the Common Carotid Artery (CCA) by B-mode ultrasound was found to be a suitable non-invasive method, to visualize the arterial walls and to monitor the early stages of the atherosclerotic process. This study sought to determine the usefulness of B-mode ultrasound as a non-invasive marker to examine the association between CIMT and the extent and the severity of coronary artery disease and its association with the cardiovascular risk factors, if any. A cross-sectional study was done among hundred cases and hundred age and sex matched controls who were in the age group of 30-65 years. The cases included those who had undergone coronary angiography. The controls included non-diabetic non-hypertensives with no cardiovascular risk factors. The CIMT was assessed by using a 7MHz linear array transducer. Fasting blood samples were collected for measuring the blood sugar and the lipid profiles. The statistical analysis was done by using the Student's t test and ANOVA and a p value of Media Thickness (AVCIMT) was higher in the cases (0.90 vs 0.47 in controls, p<0.001, very highly significant). The AVCIMT was found to be higher in those with triple vessel disease (1.00mm) coronaries (0.65mm). The easy applicability and the non invasive nature of B

  18. Recent events in NPPs and incident reporting system (IRS) activity. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The IAEA convened the 1996 Joint Meeting to Exchange Information on Recent Events in Nuclear Power Plants and the Technical Committee-Annual Meeting of the Incident Reporting System (IRS) national co-ordinators, organized jointly with the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the OECD in Paris, France from 22-26 April 1996. These consecutive meetings took place at the OECD Headquarters, 2 rue Andre Pascal. The main objective of the first meeting (22-24 April 1996) was to exchange and discuss information on recent events which occurred in NPPs. The second meeting (25-26 April 1996) was devoted to the IAEA and NEA activity in the framework of the IRS. The main issues of the programme at the meetings were as follows: in-depth discussion on NPP recent events, presented by the participants; panel discussion on operational safety experience issues identified by the participants; IAEA and NEA activities on IRS subjects in 1995-1996 and plans for the future; issues from the inter-agency's IRS Advisory Committee. Annexes I and II provide more information on the programme at the meetings. A list of participants is given in Annex III (50 participants from 22 countries and 3 international organization). Annexes IV and V provide information on national presentations on recent events. Figs, tabs

  19. Association of plasma phytosterol concentrations with incident coronary heart disease Data from the CORA study, a case-control study of coronary artery disease in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windler, Eberhard; Zyriax, Birgit-Christiane; Kuipers, Folkert; Linseisen, Jakob; Boeing, Heiner

    Aims: Phytosterols have been proposed to be atherogenic. This research investigates whether plasma concentrations of phytosterols correlate with the manifestation of coronary heart disease. Methods and results: The CORA study compares clinical, biochemical, and lifestyle factors in consecutive pre-

  20. A simple Bayesian approach to quantifying confidence level of adverse event incidence proportion in small samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang

    2016-01-01

    In both clinical development and post-marketing of a new therapy or a new treatment, incidence of an adverse event (AE) is always a concern. When sample sizes are small, large sample-based inferential approaches on an AE incidence proportion in a certain time period no longer apply. In this brief discussion, we introduce a simple Bayesian framework to quantify, in small sample studies and the rare AE case, (1) the confidence level that the incidence proportion of a particular AE p is over or below a threshold, (2) the lower or upper bounds on p with a certain level of confidence, and (3) the minimum required number of patients with an AE before we can be certain that p surpasses a specific threshold, or the maximum allowable number of patients with an AE after which we can no longer be certain that p is below a certain threshold, given a certain confidence level. The method is easy to understand and implement; the interpretation of the results is intuitive. This article also demonstrates the usefulness of simple Bayesian concepts when it comes to answering practical questions.

  1. Incidence, feasibility and outcome of percutaneous coronary intervention after transcatheter aortic valve implantation with a self-expanding prosthesis. Results from a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allali, Abdelhakim; El-Mawardy, Mohamed; Schwarz, Bettina; Sato, Takao; Geist, Volker; Toelg, Ralph; Richardt, Gert; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can become technically challenging after implantation of the self-expanding Medtronic CoreValve (MCV) device, which completely covers the aortic root. The aim of this study was to report on the incidence, feasibility and outcome of PCI after TAVI with the MCV device. Between 2007 and 2014, all patients subjected to PCI after MCV implantation in a single-center institutional TAVI database were retrospectively identified. Clinical, angiographic and procedural characteristics were reviewed and analyzed. We identified a total of 17 patients (5.7%) treated with 24 PCI procedures for 29 lesions at a median of 17.7months (range 1-72) after MCV implantation. The mean age was 79.7±6.8years and the mean logistic EuroSCORE was 30.3%±18.9%. Nine procedures were performed for patients with acute coronary syndrome. 89.6% of the treated lesions were of type B2/C and 79.3% were de novo ones. A median of one guiding catheter was necessary to intubate the target coronary ostium (range 1-10) and 95% of the lesions on the left coronary artery were treated through a Judkins catheter. In one primary PCI for STEMI the intubation of the right coronary ostium was not successful. Final procedural success was obtained in 95.8%, and peri-procedural death occurred in one patient. The need for PCI after MCV is not uncommon and is mostly related to coronary artery disease progression. PCI after MCV is usually feasible and safe, but coronary intubation in an emergency setting can be challenging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gender disparities in the presentation, management and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome patients: data from the 2nd Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Shehab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gender-related differences in mortality of acute coronary syndrome (ACS have been reported. The extent and causes of these differences in the Middle-East are poorly understood. We studied to what extent difference in outcome, specifically 1-year mortality are attributable to demographic, baseline clinical differences at presentation, and management differences between female and male patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Baseline characteristics, treatment patterns, and 1-year mortality of 7390 ACS patients in 65 hospitals in 6 Arabian Gulf countries were evaluated during 2008-2009, as part of the 2nd Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE-2. Women were older (61.3±11.8 vs. 55.6±12.4; P<0.001, more overweight (BMI: 28.1±6.6 vs. 26.7±5.1; P<0.001, and more likely to have a history of hypertension, hyperlipidemia or diabetes. Fewer women than men received angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE, aspirin, clopidogrel, beta blockers or statins at discharge. They also underwent fewer invasive procedures including angiography (27.0% vs. 34.0%; P<0.001, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI (10.5% vs. 15.6%; P<0.001 and reperfusion therapy (6.9% vs. 20.2%; P<0.001 than men. Women were at higher unadjusted risk for in-hospital death (6.8% vs. 4.0%, P<0.001 and heart failure (HF (18% vs. 11.8%, P<0.001. Both 1-month and 1-year mortality rates were higher in women than men (11% vs. 7.4% and 17.3% vs. 11.4%, respectively, P<0.001. Both baseline and management differences contributed to a worse outcome in women. Together these variables explained almost all mortality disparities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Differences between genders in mortality appeared to be largely explained by differences in prognostic variables and management patterns. However, the origin of the latter differences need further study.

  3. Renin-angiotensin system blockade reduces cardiovascular events in nonheart failure, stable patients with prior coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young; Lim, Sungmin; Lee, Kwan Yong; Park, Ha-Wook; Byeon, Jaeho; Hwang, Byung-Hee; Kim, Jin Jin; Oh, Yong-Seog; Youn, Ho-Joong; Jung, Wook Sung; Seung, Ki-Bae; Chang, Kiyuk

    2018-02-27

    The effects of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade on the clinical outcome in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) are conflicting. We evaluated the long-term effects of RAS blockers (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker) on the clinical outcomes in patients with SCAD without heart failure (HF) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stent using a large-scale, multicenter, prospective cohort registry. A total of 5722 patients with SCAD were enrolled and divided into two groups according to the use of RAS blockers after PCI: RAS blocker group included 4070 patients and no RAS blocker group included 1652 patients. Exclusion criteria were left ventricular ejection fraction less than 50% and the history of HF or myocardial infarction. A major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) was defined as a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and stroke. During a median follow-up of 29.7 months, RAS blockers were associated with a significant reduction in the risk of MACE [adjusted hazard ratio (HR): 0.781; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.626-0.975; P=0.015] and all-cause death (adjusted HR: 0.788; 95% CI: 0.627-0.990; P=0.041) but did not affect the risk of coronary revascularization. In the propensity score matched cohort, overall findings were consistent (MACE: adjusted HR: 0.679; 95% CI: 0.514-0.897; P=0.006; all-cause death: adjusted HR: 0.723; 95% CI: 0.548-0.954; P=0.022), and the benefit of RAS blockade was maintained in all predefined subgroups. This study demonstrated that RAS blockers were effective preventive therapies for reducing long-term cardiovascular events in patients with SCAD without HF who underwent PCI.

  4. Apolipoprotein C-III Levels and Incident Coronary Artery Disease Risk: The EPIC-Norfolk Prospective Population Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Capelleveen, Julian C; Bernelot Moens, Sophie J; Yang, Xiaohong; Kastelein, John J P; Wareham, Nicholas J; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Stroes, Erik S G; Witztum, Joseph L; Hovingh, G Kees; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2017-06-01

    Apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) is a key regulator of triglyceride metabolism. Elevated triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and apoC-III levels are causally linked to coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. The mechanism(s) through which apoC-III increases CAD risk remains largely unknown. The aim was to confirm the association between apoC-III plasma levels and CAD risk and to explore which lipoprotein subfractions contribute to this relationship between apoC-III and CAD risk. Plasma apoC-III levels were measured in baseline samples from a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk study. The study comprised 2711 apparently healthy study participants, of whom 832 subsequently developed CAD. We studied the association of baseline apoC-III levels with incident CAD risk, lipoprotein subfractions measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and inflammatory biomarkers. ApoC-III levels were significantly associated with CAD risk (odds ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.48-2.48 for highest compared with lowest quintile), retaining significance after adjustment for traditional CAD risk factors (odds ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.94). ApoC-III levels were positively correlated with triglyceride levels, ( r =0.39), particle numbers of very-low-density lipoprotein ( r =0.25), intermediate-density lipoprotein ( r =0.23), small dense low-density lipoprotein ( r =0.26), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ( r =0.15), whereas an inverse correlation was observed with large low-density lipoprotein particle number ( r =-0.11), P C-reactive protein. ApoC-III levels are significantly associated with incident CAD risk. Elevated levels of remnant lipoproteins, small dense low-density lipoprotein, and low-grade inflammation may explain this association. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Prospective study of breakfast eating and incident coronary heart disease in a cohort of male US health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Leah E; Chiuve, Stephanie E; Mekary, Rania A; Jensen, Majken K; Flint, Alan J; Hu, Frank B; Rimm, Eric B

    2013-07-23

    Among adults, skipping meals is associated with excess body weight, hypertension, insulin resistance, and elevated fasting lipid concentrations. However, it remains unknown whether specific eating habits regardless of dietary composition influence coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. The objective of this study was to prospectively examine eating habits and risk of CHD. Eating habits, including breakfast eating, were assessed in 1992 in 26 902 American men 45 to 82 years of age from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer. During 16 years of follow-up, 1527 incident CHD cases were diagnosed. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals for CHD, adjusted for demographic, diet, lifestyle, and other CHD risk factors. Men who skipped breakfast had a 27% higher risk of CHD compared with men who did not (relative risk, 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.53). Compared with men who did not eat late at night, those who ate late at night had a 55% higher CHD risk (relative risk, 1.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-2.29). These associations were mediated by body mass index, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus. No association was observed between eating frequency (times per day) and risk of CHD. Eating breakfast was associated with significantly lower CHD risk in this cohort of male health professionals.

  6. Insulin resistance and risk of incident cardiovascular events in adults without diabetes: meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin B Gast

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucose, insulin and Homeostasis Model Assessment Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR are markers of insulin resistance. The objective of this study is to compare fasting glucose, fasting insulin concentrations and HOMA-IR in strength of association with incident cardiovascular disease. METHODS: We searched the PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, ScienceDirect and Cochrane Library databases from inception to March, 2011, and screened reference lists. Cohort studies or nested case-control studies that investigated the association between fasting glucose, fasting insulin or HOMA-IR and incident cardiovascular disease, were eligible. Two investigators independently performed the article selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment. Cardiovascular endpoints were coronary heart disease (CHD, stroke or combined cardiovascular disease. We used fixed and random-effect meta-analyses to calculate the pooled relative risk for CHD, stroke and combined cardiovascular disease, comparing high to low concentrations of glucose, insulin or HOMA-IR. Study heterogeneity was calculated with the I(2 statistic. To enable a comparison between cardiovascular disease risks for glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR, we calculated pooled relative risks per increase of one standard deviation. RESULTS: We included 65 studies (involving 516,325 participants in this meta-analysis. In a random-effect meta-analysis the pooled relative risk of CHD (95% CI; I(2 comparing high to low concentrations was 1.52 (1.31, 1.76; 62.4% for glucose, 1.12 (0.92, 1.37; 41.0% for insulin and 1.64 (1.35, 2.00; 0% for HOMA-IR. The pooled relative risk of CHD per one standard deviation increase was 1.21 (1.13, 1.30; 64.9% for glucose, 1.04 (0.96, 1.12; 43.0% for insulin and 1.46 (1.26, 1.69; 0.0% for HOMA-IR. CONCLUSIONS: The relative risk of cardiovascular disease was higher for an increase of one standard deviation in HOMA-IR compared to an increase of one standard deviation in fasting

  7. Total Cardiovascular Events Analysis of the EXAMINE Trial in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Recent Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Matthew A; White, William B; Liu, Yuyin; Massaro, Joseph M; Bergenstal, Richard M; Mehta, Cyrus R; Zannad, Faiez; Heller, Simon; Cushman, William C; Cannon, Christopher P

    2018-04-13

    Alogliptin, a dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 inhibitor, is approved for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. EXAMINE was a randomized-controlled clinical trial designed to demonstrate the cardiovascular safety of alogliptin. In the trial, 5380 patients with established T2DM who had a recent ACS event (between 15-90 days) were randomized to treatment with either alogliptin or placebo. To better understand and describe the cardiovascular (CV) safety of alogliptin, we analyzed data from the EXAMINE randomized clinical trial to determine whether treatment with alogliptin affected recurrent and total CV events. Poisson regression analysis was performed to compare the total number of occurrences of CV death, MI, stroke, unstable angina, and coronary revascularization between all patients randomized to alogliptin versus placebo groups. Patients with recurrent CV events were older and more likely to have renal disease and history of heart failure. There were 1100 first CV events and an additional 666 recurrent events over a median of 18 months of follow-up. There were no significant differences with regard to the total number of events in patients treated with alogliptin (n=873) or placebo (n=893; p=0.52). Furthermore, there were no differences in the types of events seen in patients treated with alogliptin or placebo. Alogliptin did not increase the risk of either first or recurrent CV events when compared to placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes and recent ACS. These data support the CV safety of alogliptin in patients who are at increased risk of future CV events. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Relation of periprocedural bleeding complications and long-term outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary revascularization (from the Evaluation of Oral Xemilofiban in Controlling Thrombotic Events [EXCITE] Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugts, Jasper Jan; Mercado, Nestor; Hu, Stephen; Guarneri, Mimi; Price, Matthew; Schatz, Richard; Teirstein, Paul; Wijns, William; Serruys, Patrick W; O'Neill, William W; Boersma, Eric

    2009-04-01

    Several clinical trials have shown that antagonists of the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor decreased the incidence of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and the need for urgent revascularization when administered immediately before or during the 24- to 48-hour period after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, these agents increased the risk of thrombocytopenia and periprocedural bleeding complications. Therefore, the relation between periprocedural bleeding complications during PCI and long-term outcome was assessed in 6,995 patients in the EXCITE trial. Periprocedural bleeding was classified as none, mild, moderate, and severe. Measured outcomes included the incidence of all-cause mortality or the composite end point (cardiovascular disease) of death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. Subjects were followed up for a median of 210 days (7 months). Mean patient age was 59.1 years, and 21.8% were women. Periprocedural bleeding complications occurred in 1,869 patients (26.7%), and blood transfusion was administered to 189 patients (2.7%). In multivariate analysis, periprocedural bleeding complications were significantly associated with increased risk of the composite outcome for mild (hazard ratio [HR] 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64 to 0.97), moderate (HR 2.38, 95% CI 1.78 to 3.20), and severe bleeding complications (HR 3.55, 95% CI 2.20 to 5.73) during follow-up. Also, the necessity of blood transfusion was an important predictor of the composite end point (HR 2.61, 95% CI 1.96 to 3.60). Patients in the United States were more likely to be administered a blood transfusion than non-US patients independently of cardiovascular risk factors. In conclusion, moderate and severe periprocedural bleeding complications increased the risk of mortality and incident cardiovascular events after PCI.

  9. Coronary artery disease is associated with an increased mortality rate following video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandri, Alberto; Petersen, Rene Horsleben; Decaluwé, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and mortality following video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy in patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS: Multicentre retrospective analysis of 1699 patients undergoing VATS lobectomy...

  10. Differences in coronary artery disease by CT angiography between patients developing unstable angina pectoris vs. major adverse cardiac events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlett, Christopher L. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg (Germany); Nance, John W. Jr. [Heart and Vascular Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Heart and Vascular Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); O’Brien, Terrence X. [Heart and Vascular Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); The Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC (United States); Ebersberger, Ullrich [Heart and Vascular Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Heart Centre Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Headden, Gary F. [Heart and Vascular Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Hoffmann, Udo [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Bamberg, Fabian [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Munich, Grosshadern Campus, and Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany); Department of Radiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Patients developing UAP had overall more atherosclerosis as patients without any events. • Patients developing MACE had only more mixed plaque as those developing UAP. • Different atherosclerotic plaque components by CTA carry different prognostic value. - Abstract: Objective: CT angiography (CTA) has prognostic value in patients. But it is unknown whether differences in atherosclerosis by CTA predict the development of unstable angina pectoris (UAP) vs. major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Methods: We followed patients undergoing CTA as part of their acute chest pain work-up. Primary outcome was the development of UAP or MACE (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, revascularization) during a minimum follow-up of 12-months. CTAs were assessed for extent and composition of coronary plaque and stenosis. Ordinal regression with a 3-level outcome (no events, UAP, MACE) was applied. Results: Among 315 patients, 22 developed UAP and 31 MACE. While UAP patients had higher atherosclerosis burden with respect to all assessed features compared to patients with no events (p ≤ 0.02), only mixed plaque extent was significantly different between UAP and MACE patients (p = 0.02). The odds ratio was 4.55 for being in a higher disease-level comparing patients with low extent to those with no mixed plaque, and 3.02 comparing patients with high to those with low. These findings remained after adjustments for potential confounders. Conclusion: The extent of mixed coronary plaque is different between patients who develop UAP vs. MACE, supporting the hypothesis that it is a more culprit morphology.

  11. Medication errors and adverse drug events in kidney transplant recipients: incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, David J; Pilch, Nicole A; Bratton, Charles F; McGillicuddy, John W; Chavin, Kenneth D; Baliga, Prabhakar K

    2012-12-01

    To determine the incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcomes associated with clinically significant medication errors or adverse drug events in kidney transplant recipients. Retrospective observational study. Transplant center at an academic medical center. A total of 476 adults who received kidney transplants between June 2006 and July 2009. Severe or significant medication errors and adverse drug events (medication-related problems [MRPs]) were identified by medical record review. Only patient-induced medication errors (e.g., took wrong dose or frequency of drug, took drug not prescribed) were captured. Clinical outcomes included patient and graft survival, infections (including cytomegalovirus), readmissions, and acute rejection episodes. Thirty-seven (8%) of the 476 patients developed a clinically significant MRP. Univariate and confirmatory multivariate analyses revealed that female sex, African-American race, pretransplantation diabetes mellitus, delayed graft function, and retransplant recipients were independent risk factors for developing an MRP. Patients with MRPs had significantly higher rates of acute rejection (11% vs 30%, p=0.004), cytomegalovirus infection (15% vs 30%, p=0.033), and 30-day readmissions (5% vs 16%, p=0.018). Graft survival was also significantly lower in patients who had MRPs (pmedication errors and associated adverse drug events were common in kidney transplant recipients. General and transplant-specific risk factors were associated with the development of these MRPs, and MRPs were associated with increased risk of rejection and graft loss. © 2012 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  12. Coronary Venous Dissection from Left Ventricular Lead Placement During Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy With Defibrillator Implantation and Associated in-Hospital Adverse Events (from the NCDR ICD Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jonathan C; Varosy, Paul D; Bao, Haikun; Dewland, Thomas A; Curtis, Jeptha P; Marcus, Gregory M

    2018-01-01

    Coronary venous dissection is a known complication of left ventricular lead placement during implantation of a cardiac resynchronization with defibrillator (CRT-D) system. A large-scale evaluation of the prevalence of coronary venous dissection and associated in-hospital clinical outcomes has not been performed. We sought to identify predictors of coronary venous dissection and evaluate subsequent in-hospital adverse events in those with the complication. We studied 140,991 first-time CRT-D recipients in the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) Registry implanted between 2006 and 2011. Using hierarchical multivariable logistic regression adjusting for patient, implanting physician, and hospital characteristics, we examined predictors of coronary venous dissection and its association with other major complications, length of hospital stay, and in-hospital mortality. Coronary venous dissection occurred in 392 patients (0.28%). After multivariable adjustment, female gender and left bundle branch block were associated with greater odds of coronary venous dissection. Conversely, atrial fibrillation, previous coronary artery bypass graft, and higher implanter procedure volume were associated with lower odds of coronary venous dissection (all p values 3 days (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.29, p <0.0001), but not in-hospital death (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.12 to 5.25, p = 0.8012). In conclusion, in a large population of first-time CRT-D recipients, specific patient and implanter characteristics predicted coronary venous dissection risk. Coronary venous dissection was associated with major in-hospital complications and prolonged hospitalization, but not death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study for Incident Myocardial Infarction and Coronary Heart Disease in Prospective Cohort Studies: The CHARGE Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Dehghan

    Full Text Available Data are limited on genome-wide association studies (GWAS for incident coronary heart disease (CHD. Moreover, it is not known whether genetic variants identified to date also associate with risk of CHD in a prospective setting.We performed a two-stage GWAS analysis of incident myocardial infarction (MI and CHD in a total of 64,297 individuals (including 3898 MI cases, 5465 CHD cases. SNPs that passed an arbitrary threshold of 5×10-6 in Stage I were taken to Stage II for further discovery. Furthermore, in an analysis of prognosis, we studied whether known SNPs from former GWAS were associated with total mortality in individuals who experienced MI during follow-up.In Stage I 15 loci passed the threshold of 5×10-6; 8 loci for MI and 8 loci for CHD, for which one locus overlapped and none were reported in previous GWAS meta-analyses. We took 60 SNPs representing these 15 loci to Stage II of discovery. Four SNPs near QKI showed nominally significant association with MI (p-value<8.8×10-3 and three exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold when Stage I and Stage II results were combined (top SNP rs6941513: p = 6.2×10-9. Despite excellent power, the 9p21 locus SNP (rs1333049 was only modestly associated with MI (HR = 1.09, p-value = 0.02 and marginally with CHD (HR = 1.06, p-value = 0.08. Among an inception cohort of those who experienced MI during follow-up, the risk allele of rs1333049 was associated with a decreased risk of subsequent mortality (HR = 0.90, p-value = 3.2×10-3.QKI represents a novel locus that may serve as a predictor of incident CHD in prospective studies. The association of the 9p21 locus both with increased risk of first myocardial infarction and longer survival after MI highlights the importance of study design in investigating genetic determinants of complex disorders.

  14. Morning and Evening Home Blood Pressure and Risks of Incident Stroke and Coronary Artery Disease in the Japanese General Practice Population: The Japan Morning Surge-Home Blood Pressure Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshide, Satoshi; Yano, Yuichiro; Haimoto, Hajime; Yamagiwa, Kayo; Uchiba, Kiyoshi; Nagasaka, Shoichiro; Matsui, Yoshio; Nakamura, Akira; Fukutomi, Motoki; Eguchi, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Joji; Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-07-01

    Our aim is to determine the optimal time schedule for home blood pressure (BP) monitoring that best predicts stroke and coronary artery disease in general practice. The Japan Morning Surge-Home Blood Pressure (J-HOP) study is a nationwide practice-based study that included 4310 Japanese with a history of or risk factors for cardiovascular disease, or both (mean age, 65 years; 79% used antihypertensive medication). Home BP measures were taken twice daily (morning and evening) over 14 days at baseline. During a mean follow-up of 4 years (16 929 person-years), 74 stroke and 77 coronary artery disease events occurred. Morning systolic BP (SBP) improved the discrimination of incident stroke (C statistics, 0.802; 95% confidence interval, 0.692-0.911) beyond traditional risk factors including office SBP (0.756; 0.646-0.866), whereas the changes were smaller with evening SBP (0.764; 0.653-0.874). The addition of evening SBP to the model (including traditional risk factors plus morning SBP) significantly reduced the discrimination of incident stroke (C statistics difference, -0.008; 95% confidence interval: -0.015 to -0.008; P=0.03). The category-free net reclassification improvement (0.3606; 95% confidence interval, 0.1317-0.5896), absolute integrated discrimination improvement (0.015; SE, 0.005), and relative integrated discrimination improvement (58.3%; all Pmorning SBP to the model (including traditional risk factors) were greater than those with evening SBP and with combined morning and evening SBP. Neither morning nor evening SBP improved coronary artery disease risk prediction. Morning home SBP itself should be evaluated to ensure best stroke prediction in clinical practice, at least in Japan. This should be confirmed in the different ethnic groups. URL: http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/. Unique identifier: UMIN000000894. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. [Fatal incidents by crowd crush during mass events. (Un)preventable phenomenon?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, U; Fälker, A; Wenzel, V

    2013-01-01

    Crowd crushes with dozens or even hundreds of casualties have occurred several times at the Hajj in Saudi Arabia and also in soccer stadiums in Western Europe. As fatal accidents after human stampedes during mass events occur very rarely and are usually accompanied by many years of criminal court proceedings in order to identify underlying responsible mechanisms and culprits, it is very difficult to draw conclusions and formulate precautions from an emergency medical point of view. This study analyzed a fatal crowd crush which occurred on 4 December 1999 following the "Air & Style" snowboard contest with approximately 22,000 people attending in the Bergisel stadium in Innsbruck, Austria. Firstly, focused interviews were conducted with professional rescuers, police and physicians and secondly publicly available court records dealing with this incident in the district court of Innsbruck, Austria were analyzed. During the snowboard contest 87 emergency medical technicians, 6 emergency physicians, 1 leading emergency physician, 21 policemen and 140 security personnel were present. Following the accident additionally some 100 emergency medical technicians, 36 emergency medical service vehicles and 4 physician-staffed emergency medical service vehicles responded to the scene. The deadly crowd crush resulting in 6 fatalities, 4 patients still in a vegetative state and 38 injured, was due to a severe crowd accumulation at one stadium exit, which was not recognized and dispersed in time. Construction of the exit in line with darkness, steep slope and slippery surface contributed adversely to this dangerous situation, although panic did not occur at any time. Unfortunately, there is no patent remedy to completely prevent fatal accidents by a crowd crush at mass events. If planning is initiated early, sufficient material and personnel reserves are kept in reserve and despite conflicting interests of the organizers, the host community, security, police and emergency medical

  16. Increased incidence of apparently life-threatening events due to supine position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Albane B R; Schäppi, Michela G; Benkebil, Faiza; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M; Belli, Dominique C

    2006-11-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) has a high prevalence in infancy. The supine position is among numerous aggravating factors. The exact relationship between GOR and apparently life-threatening events (ALTE) is not clear, although it has been repeatedly investigated. In 1992 the worldwide Back to Sleep campaign was implemented, which had a dramatic effect on the incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) with a drop of 50%. Although the vast majority of children now sleep on their back, the effect of this position on ALTE has not been studied. In this retrospective study, we aim to define the potential association between GOR and ALTE. We hypothesise that the incidence of ALTE has increased since the 1992 recommendation. No bias in the population's selection was introduced, as our centre is the only one for paediatric emergencies in the county. A total of 107 children presenting with ALTE were identified during the study period (1987-99). A pH study was performed in the 75 patients presenting with ALTE in the last 6 years of the study (1994-99). Neither morbidity nor mortality was noted in a long-term 4-year follow-up. Our present results show that the frequency of ALTE increased sevenfold (P masks the negative effect of an increase in ALTE.

  17. Reporting Clinical End Points and Safety Events in an Acute Coronary Syndrome Trial: Results With Integrated Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Patrícia O; Lopes, Renato D; Stevens, Susanna R; Zimerman, André; Wruck, Lisa; James, Stefan K; Haque, Ghazala; Giraldez, Roberto Rocha C V; Alexander, John H; Alexander, Karen P

    2017-04-24

    End points and adverse events (AEs) are collected separately in clinical trials, yet regulatory requirements for serious AE reporting vary across regions, so classifying end points according to seriousness criteria can be useful in global trials. In the Apixaban for Prevention of Acute Ischemic Events 2 (APPRAISE-2) trial, patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome were randomized to apixaban or placebo for the prevention of recurrent ischemic events. Suspected end points (myocardial infarction, stroke, or bleeding) were adjudicated by an independent clinical events classification committee. Safety criteria were collected for suspected end points and AEs. Patient-level event rates per 100 patient-days of follow-up, modeled using Poisson regression, explored the influence of region and patient characteristics on event reporting. Overall, 13 909 events were reported by 858 sites in 39 countries; 8.4% (n=1166) were suspected end points, and 91.6% (n=12 743) were AEs. Overall, 66.0% of suspected end points were confirmed by the clinical events classification committee. Most clinical events classification committee-confirmed end points met criteria to be classified as serious (94.0%); many clinical events classification committee-negated end points also did (63.2%), but fewer AEs met seriousness criteria (17.9%). The most common seriousness criterion was hospitalization (79.9%, n=2594). Region explained 28.7% of end point- and 26.4% of serious AE-reporting variation, and patient characteristics explained an additional 25.4% of end point and 13.4% of serious AE variation. Nonserious AE-reporting variation was not explained by adjustment. An integrated collection of end points and serious AEs is feasible in a multinational trial and illustrates the shared characteristics of events. Tailoring event collection to fit the phase and purpose of the trial is achievable and informative. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00831441. © 2017 The

  18. Evaluation of the Methods and Management of Acute Coronary Events (EMMACE)-3: protocol for a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabas, O A; West, R M; Gillott, R G; Khatib, R; Hall, A S; Gale, C P

    2015-06-23

    Patients with cardiovascular disease are living longer and are more frequently accessing healthcare resources. The Evaluation of the Methods and Management of Acute Coronary Events (EMMACE)-3 national study is designed to improve understanding of the effect of quality of care on health-related outcomes for patients hospitalised with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). EMMACE-3 is a longitudinal study of 5556 patients hospitalised with an ACS in England. The study collects repeated measures of health-related quality of life, information about medications and patient adherence profiles, a survey of hospital facilities, and morbidity and mortality data from linkages to multiple electronic health records. Together with EMMACE-3X and EMMACE-4, EMMACE-3 will assimilate detailed information for about 13 000 patients across more than 60 hospitals in England. EMMACE-3 was given a favourable ethical opinion by Leeds (West) Research Ethics committee (REC reference: 10/H131374). On successful application, study data will be shared with academic collaborators. The findings from EMMACE-3 will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, at scientific conferences, the media, and through patient and public involvement. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01808027. Information about the study is also available at EMMACE.org. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Superficial and deep sternal wound infection after more than 9000 coronary artery bypass graft (CABG: incidence, risk factors and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi Kyomars

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sternal wound infection (SWI is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening complication of cardiac surgery. Predisposing factors for SWI are multiple with varied frequencies in different studies. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence, risk factors, and mortality of SWI after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG at Tehran Heart Center. Methods This study prospectively evaluated multiple risk factors for SWI in 9201 patients who underwent CABG at Tehran Heart Center between January 2002 and February 2006. Cases of SWI were confirmed based on the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Deep SWI (bone and mediastinitis was categorized according to the Oakley classification. Results In the study period, 9201 CABGs were performed with a total SWI rate of 0.47 percent (44 cases and deep SWI of 0.22 percent (21 cases. Perioperative (in-hospital mortality was 9.1% for total SWI and about 14% for deep SWI versus 1.1% for non-SWI CABG patients. Female gender, preoperative hypertension, high functional class, diabetes mellitus, obesity, prolonged intubation time (more than 48 h, and re-exploration for bleeding were significant risk factors for developing SWI (p = 0.05 in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, hypertension (OR = 10.7, re-exploration (OR = 13.4, and female gender (OR = 2.7 were identified as significant predictors of SWI (p Conclusion Rarely reported previously, the two risk factors of hypertension and the female gender were significant risk factors in our study. Conversely, some other risk factors such as cigarette smoking and age mentioned as significant in other reports were not significant in our study. Further studies are needed for better documentation.

  20. Survival After Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in a Population with a Low Incidence of Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, Nerea; Clara, Albert; Diaz-Duran, Carles; Ruiz-Carmona, Carlos; Ibañez, Sara

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a prophylactic procedure, so the decision to operate should consider, as recent guidelines suggest, the life expectancy of the patient. Several models for predicting life span have been already designed, but little is known about how intervened patients evolve in Southern European Countries, where the incidence of coronary artery disease, the main cause of death among these subjects, is low. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 176 consecutive patients who underwent elective EVAR at the Vascular Surgery Department of the Hospital del Mar (Barcelona, Spain) during 2000-2014. Cox regressions were performed to identify preoperative factors associated with long-term survival after EVAR, and a risk model was developed. Three- and five-year survival rates were 73.9 and 53.9 %, respectively. During the follow-up, 72 deaths (40.9 %) were registered, cancer being the most frequent cause (41.7 %). Preoperative variables negatively associated with long-term survival were serum creatinine ≥ 150 µmol/L (HR 2.5; 95 % CI 1.4-4.2), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR 1.9; 95 % CI 1.2-3.1), atrial fibrillation (HR 2.0; 95 % CI 1.2-3.4), and prior cancer history (HR 1.9; 95 % CI 1.2-3.1). Distal pulses present in both lower limbs were marginally associated with survival (HR 0.65; 95 % CI 0.4-1.07). The survival predictive model showed a good discrimination capacity (C statistic = 0.703; 95 % CI 0.641-0.765). Long-term survival of patients submitted to EVAR in our setting was worse than expected and markedly related to cancer. Our study suggests that predictive models for long-term survival after EVAR may be influenced by regional characteristics of the intervened population. This effect should be taken in consideration in the decision-making process of these patients.

  1. Aggressive Event Incidence using the Staff Observation of Aggression Scale-Revised (SOAS-R): A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iennaco, Joanne DeSanto; Whittemore, Robin; Dixon, Jane

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify aggressive event incidence rates in the inpatient psychiatric setting, describe characteristics of events and differences based on aggression target and type (verbal vs. physical). A longitudinal study was carried out of aggressive events identified by workers in four inpatient psychiatric units using the Staff Observation of Aggression Scale-Revised (SOAS-R) over 6 weeks. A total of 113 aggressive events were recorded resulting in a rate of 13.27 events per bed per year. Verbal aggression was demonstrated in 86 % and physical aggression in 57 % of events. Most events (70.8 %, n = 81) targeted a worker. Compared to other targets, workers were 3.4 times more likely to feel threatened (95 % CI 1.2-9.6, χ 2  = 5.08, p = 0.0242), and less likely to have a visible injury (OR 0.15, 95 % CI 0.04-0.6; χ 2  = 7.1, p = 0.0078). Event severity ranged from 0 to 21 with a mean of 9.5(SD = 5.1), with 20 % considered severe. Verbal events had lower mean severity of 6.5(SD = 3.8) versus physical events with a severity of 11.8(SD = 4.8; t = 6.5, df = 111, p Aggression incidence was similar to incidence found in other studies. Workers were the target of most aggressive events and many were identified as having no understandable provocation. Further understanding of event characteristics will promote more effective prevention and management of aggressive events.

  2. Analysis of incidence and risk factors for ERCP-related adverse events in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BI Rongxin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the incidence and risk factors for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP-related adverse events in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC. MethodsThis study included 72 patients who were diagnosed with PSC by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and underwent ERCP in the Third Hospital of Xingtai City from December 2009 to December 2013. The incidence of postoperative adverse events within 30 d after ERCP was monitored and recorded. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the risk factors for ERCP-related adverse events in PSC patients. ResultsThe success rate of ERCP was 94.4% (68/72. Among all adverse events, the incidence of pancreatitis and biliary tract infection were highest (6.94% and 4.17%, while the incidence of perforation was lowest (1.38%. Univariate logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of adverse events was significantly higher in patients who underwent cholangiopancreatography and sphincterotomy than in those not undergoing these procedures (OR=13.642, P=0.017; OR=7.381, P=0.000; guide wire insertion and cholangiopancreatography also increased the incidence of adverse reactions (OR=8.042, P=0.000; OR=2.651, P=0.032. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that guide wire insertion (OR = 4.547, 95%CI: 1.076-12.543 and biliary sphincterotomy (OR=5.023, 95%CI: 2.643-18.321 are associated with the incidence of ERCP-related adverse events. ConclusionSphincterotomy and guide wire insertion can increase the risk of adverse events in PSC patients after ERCP.

  3. One-year Mortality after an Acute Coronary Event and its Clinical Predictors: The ERICO Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itamar Souza Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Information about post-acute coronary syndrome (ACS survival have been mostly short-term findings or based on specialized, cardiology referral centers. Objectives: To describe one-year case-fatality rates in the Strategy of Registry of Acute Coronary Syndrome (ERICO cohort, and to study baseline characteristics as predictors. Methods: We analyzed data from 964 ERICO participants enrolled from February 2009 to December 2012. We assessed vital status by telephone contact and official death certificate searches. The cause of death was determined according to the official death certificates. We used log-rank tests to compare the probabilities of survival across subgroups. We built crude and adjusted (for age, sex and ACS subtype Cox regression models to study if the ACS subtype or baseline characteristics were independent predictors of all-cause or cardiovascular mortality. Results: We identified 110 deaths in the cohort (case-fatality rate, 12.0%. Age [Hazard ratio (HR = 2.04 per 10 year increase; 95% confidence interval (95%CI = 1.75–2.38], non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (HR = 3.82 ; 95%CI = 2.21–6.60 or ST elevation myocardial infarction (HR = 2.59; 95%CI = 1.38–4.89 diagnoses, and diabetes (HR = 1.78; 95%CI = 1.20‑2.63 were significant risk factors for all-cause mortality in the adjusted models. We found similar results for cardiovascular mortality. A previous coronary artery disease diagnosis was also an independent predictor of all-cause mortality (HR = 1.61; 95%CI = 1.04–2.50, but not for cardiovascular mortality. Conclusion: We found an overall one-year mortality rate of 12.0% in a sample of post-ACS patients in a community, non-specialized hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. Age, ACS subtype, and diabetes were independent predictors of poor one‑year survival for overall and cardiovascular-related causes.

  4. Incidence and characteristics of patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction and non-obstructive coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, Khalid; Boateng, Stephen; Sangodkar, Sandeep; Mahmood, Shad; Whitney, Hannah; Wang, Chihsiung E; Racsa, Patrick; Sanborn, Timothy A

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to characterize the etiologies of patients presenting with myocardial infarction (MI) and found to have non-obstructive coronary artery disease (NOCAD) and compare risk factors and in-hospital mortality to those with obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients presenting with an MI are often found to have NOCAD defined as less than 50% luminal diameter reduction by visual estimation on coronary angiography. This study is a retrospective analysis of a total of 2,038 patients that presented to NorthShore University HealthSystem with MI and underwent coronary angiography from 2010 to 2013. 1,822 patients (89%) had CAD and 216 (11%) had NOCAD. Of the NOCAD patients, the most common etiologies were Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (28%), no alternative explanation (26%), demand ischemia (21%), myopericarditis (7%), coronary artery vasospasm (5%), and coronary artery dissection (3%). NOCAD patients were more likely to be younger and female. There was no significant difference between NOCAD and CAD patients in terms of in-hospital mortality (3.7% vs. 4.0% respectively, OR = 1.1, 95% CI 0.5-2.3, P = 0.83 by univariate logistic regression, OR = 1.2, 95% CI 0.5-3.1, P = 0.74 by multivariable analysis). CAD patients were more likely to have traditional risk factors of diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, previous MI, previous revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Patients presenting with MI and NOCAD were found to have several different etiologies on coronary angiography with the most common being Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Circadian Variation in Coronary Stent Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoud, Karim D.; Lennon, Ryan J.; Ting, Henry H.; Rihal, Charanjit S.; Holmes, David R.

    Objectives We sought to determine the circadian, weekly, and seasonal variation of coronary stent thrombosis. Background Other adverse cardiovascular events such as acute myocardial infarction are known to have higher incidences during the early morning hours, Mondays, and winter months. Methods The

  6. Burden and Prevention of Adverse Cardiac Events in Patients with Concomitant Chronic Heart Failure and Coronary Artery Disease: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Louis; Khoury, Hanane; Welner, Sharon; Briere, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-06-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) or coronary artery disease (CAD) confers risk for thromboembolism and secondary adverse cardiac events (ACEs) (e.g., mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke). When HF and CAD occur concomitantly, ACE risk is reported to be elevated. We investigated ACEs, their epidemiology, and the resulting burden among patients with concomitant HF and CAD through a structured review of recent literature. Antithrombotic treatment for ACE prevention was assessed. Pertinent databases (PubMed, other) were searched for relevant articles published from January 2004 to March 2015. Data collected included ACE incidence, healthcare resource use, costs, change in quality of life attributed to ACEs, and treatment practice for prevention of ACEs in patients with concomitant HF and CAD. Mortality rates for patients with both HF and CAD ranged from 4.9-12.3% at 30 days to 13.7-86% for periods between 9.9 months and 10 years. Incidence of ACEs among HF patients with CAD is, respectively, at least 82% and 15% higher than for patients without HF or without CAD, except for stroke investigated in two studies. All-cause and HF-related hospitalization is the main driver of the economic burden in patients with HF, the majority of whom had CAD origin. Despite high prevalence of ischemic complications, there is limited evidence to support the use of warfarin-type antithrombotics among HF patients. This study confirms that patients with concomitant HF and CAD are at elevated risk for ACEs and suggests the need for effective new antithrombotic treatments to further decrease ischemic complication rates in this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Albuminuria and cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndromes: Results from the TRACER trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åkerblom, Axel; Clare, Robert M; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Wallentin, Lars; Held, Claes; Van de Werf, Frans; Moliterno, David J; Patel, Uptal D; Leonardi, Sergio; Armstrong, Paul W; Harrington, Robert A; White, Harvey D; Aylward, Philip E; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Tricoci, Pierluigi

    2016-08-01

    Albuminuria is associated with cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. We evaluated albuminuria, alone and in combination with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), as a predictor of mortality and CV morbidity in 12,944 patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes. Baseline serum creatinine and urinary dipsticks were obtained, with albuminuria stratified into no/trace albuminuria, microalbuminuria (≥30 but albuminuria and creatinine values were available in 9473 patients (73.2%). More patients with macroalbuminuria, versus no/trace albuminuria, had diabetes (66% vs 27%) or hypertension (86% vs 68%). Rates for CV death and overall mortality per strata were 3.1% and 4.8% (no/trace albuminuria); 5.8% and 9.0% (microalbuminuria); and 7.7% and 12.6% (macroalbuminuria) at 2 years of follow-up. Corresponding rates for CV death or MI were 12.2%, 16.9%, and 23.5%, respectively. Observed acute kidney injury rates were 0.6%, 1.2%, and 2.9% (n = 79), respectively. Adjusted HRs for macroalbuminuria on CV mortality were 1.65 (95% CI 1.15-2.37), and after adjustment with eGFR, 1.37 (95% CI 0.93-2.01). Corresponding HRs for overall mortality were 1.82 (95% CI 1.37-2.42) and 1.47 (95% CI 1.08-1.98). High-risk patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes and albuminuria have increased morbidity and increased overall mortality independent of eGFR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A computational evaluation of sedentary lifestyle effects on carotid hemodynamics and atherosclerotic events incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Maria Vittoria; Serra, Raffaele; Perri, Paolo; Buffone, Gianluca; Caliò, Francesco Giuseppe; DE Franciscis, Stefano; Fragomeni, Fragomeni

    2017-01-01

    Hemodynamics has a key role in atheropathogenesis. Indeed, atherosclerotic phenomena occur in vessels characterized by complex geometry and flow pattern, like the carotid bifurcation. Moreover, lifestyle is a significant risk factor. The aim of this study is to evaluate the hemodynamic effects due to two sedentary lifestyles - sitting and standing positions - in the carotid bifurcation in order to identify the worst condition and to investigate the atherosclerosis incidence. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was chosen to carry out the analysis, in which in vivo non-invasive measurements were used as boundary conditions. Furthermore, to compare the two conditions, one patient-specific 3D model of a carotid bifurcation was reconstructed starting from computer tomography. Different mechanical indicators, correlated with atherosclerosis incidence, were calculated in addition to flow pattern and pressure distribution: the time average wall shear stress (TAWSS), the oscillatory shear index (OSI) and the relative residence time (RRT). The results showed that the bulb and the external carotid artery emergence are the most probable regions in which atherosclerotic events could happen. Indeed, low velocity and WSS values, high OSI and, as a consequence, areas with chaotic-swirling flow, with stasis (high RRT), occur. Moreover, the sitting position is the worst condition: considering a cardiac cycle, TAWSS is less than 17.2% and OSI and RRT are greater than 17.5% and 21.2%, respectively. This study suggests that if a person spends much time in the sitting position, a high risk of plaque formation and, consequently, of stenosis could happen.

  9. The impact of different doses of clopidogrel used after percutaneous coronary intervention on cardiovascular events: a Meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Diangeng; Chen Yao; Li Rongshan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To make a comprehensive evaluation of the efficacy and safety of different doses of clopidogrel that was used after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in preventing the cardiovascular events in order to provide scientific basis for physician in making therapeutic strategic decision. Methods: The authors searched the electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CNKI and Wan Fan) and reference lists from original studies and reviewed the related articles.Statistical analysis was performed by using RevMan 4.2 software. Results: A total of 6 studies containing 1027 patients were included. The results of meta-analysis showed that significant differences in the rate of cardiovascular events [OR = 0.52, 95%CI (0.36, 0.77)] existed between higher clopidogrel maintenance dose and standard dose. No obvious difference was found in major or minor bleeding [OR=1.25, 95%CI(0.43, 3.63)] and [OR = 1.25, 95%CI (0.77, 2.02)]. Conclusion: A higher maintenance dose of clopidogrel employed in patients undergoing PCI can reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular events after PCI without increasing the bleeding risk. (J Intervent Radiol, 2011, 20 : 97-102) (authors)

  10. [Relationship of polymedication in controlling blood pressure: compliance, persistence, costs and incidence of new cardiovascular events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicras Mainar, Antoni; Muñoz Ortí, Genís; Font Ramos, Beatriu; Majós Oró, Núria; Navarro Artieda, Ruth; Ibáñez Nolla, Jordi

    2013-07-21

    To determine the relationship of polypharmacy on blood pressure (BP) control, compliance, persistence, the cost and incidence of cardiovascular events (CVD) in patients with moderate/severe hypertension. An observational multicenter retrospective study. We evaluated patients > 30 years who started a third antihypertensive treatment during 2004-2006. Depending on the number of chronic medications, we established 3 groups: regular consumption of 3-6 drugs, including between 7-10 and ≥ 11. Top-measures: sociodemographic, comorbidity, BP, compliance and persistence. For each group we determined the incidence of new CVD totals and total costs. We evaluated 1,906 patients, 765 between 3-6 drugs, 624 between 7-10 and 517 in ≥ 11 (P<.001). Overage age: 69.4 years and 55.5% women. The group of 3-6 drugs showed better BP control (51.8 vs. 47.0 and 41.1%, P<.001), compliance (71.4 vs. 69.9 and 67.1%, P=.017), persistence (50.1 vs. 45.5 and 46.2%, P=.044) and lower incidence of CVD (12.2 vs. 19.7 and 30.2%, P<.001), respectively. The average/unit total costs was 3,369.1 vs. 4,362.1 and € 4,902.3 (P<.001). The presence of CVD was associated with therapy noncompliance (odds ratio [OR] 1.9, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.1 to 3.6) and controlled by the lower BP control (OR 1.4 (95%CI 1.1-2.0) (P < .05). The use of antihypertensive fixed dose has greater compliance (72.8 vs. 68.2%), persistence (64.4 vs. 39.3%) and degree of BP control (52.6 vs. 43, 8%) (p<.001). Polypharmacy is associated with lower compliance and persistence to antihypertensive treatment, cardiovascular disease and increased health care costs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Design of a system for detecting and reporting security incidents and adverse events in thyroid and parathyroid surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis PARDAL-REFOYO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient safety is defined as the reduction of risk of unnecessary harm associated with healthcare. Up to 9.3% of patients admitted into a hospital present some adverse event related to the assistance. This can cause damage to the patient, more instrumentation, increased morbidity, increased hospital stay and increased cost. To identify, record and analyze adverse events is necessary to have an incident reporting system. Objective: Developing a local system for reporting security incidents and adverse events in surgery of the thyroid gland. Method: A working group was formed with representatives from all units related to the process of thyroidectomy, checkpoints were established, checklists for each control point were designed, a strategic analysis of the group's activity was performed, a literature review was done in order to identify the major incident reporting systems, the items that the incident report form must have were identified and the form was designed. Results: The incident report form collects data on the patient, the communicator and the incident (type, cause, consequence, severity, frequency, risk matrix. It has a first paragraph with narrative sections and a second with drop-down lists. The form is accessible only to the working group for voluntary use. Conclusions: The purpose of the reporting system is learning and prevention.

  12. 20. Prediction of 10-year risk of hard coronary events among Saudi adults based on prevalence of heart disease risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Adil Soofi

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Our study is the first to estimate the 10-year risk of HCE among adults in an emerging country and discovered a significant proportion of younger aged population are at risk for development of hard coronary events. Public awareness programs to control risk factors are warranted.

  13. Tailored support for type 2 diabetes patients with an acute coronary event after discharge from hospital - design and development of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasteleyn, M.J.; Gorter, K.J.; Stellato, R.K.; Rijken, M.; Nijpels, G.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with an acute coronary event (ACE) experience decreased quality of life and increased distress. According to the American Diabetes Association, discharge from the hospital is a time of increased distress for all patients. Tailored support specific to

  14. Tailored support for type 2 diabetes patients with an acute coronary event after discharge from hospital: design and development of a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasteleyn, M.J.; Gorter, K.J.; Stellato, R.K.; Rijken, M.; Nijpels, G.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with an acute coronary event (ACE) experience decreased quality of life and increased distress. According to the American Diabetes Association, discharge from the hospital is a time of increased distress for all patients. Tailored support specific to

  15. Effects of high-dose atorvastatin on cerebrovascular events in patients with stable coronary disease in the TNT (treating to new targets) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waters, David D.; LaRosa, John C.; Barter, Philip; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Gotto, Antonio M.; Carter, Roddy; Breazna, Andrei; Kastelein, John J. P.; Grundy, Scott M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess the effects on cerebrovascular events of treating patients with stable coronary disease with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels substantially below 100 mg/dl. BACKGROUND: Lowering LDL-C with statins has been shown to reduce the risk of stroke in

  16. New treatment of low probability events with particular application to nuclear power plant incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Critchley, O.H.

    1986-01-01

    The 'New Treatment' attempts to resolve the 'Zero-Infinity Dilemmas' posed by the threat of low probability events (LPE) philosophical approach which rejects mathematical idealism in favour of the engineering pragmatism that is characteristic of the scientific method. The LPE is seen as a rare singularity in the stream of 'Event-noise' of mundane, untoward incidents that afflict industrial systems. Engineering inspection which has evolved as a regulatory mechanism can be effective in reducing this 'noise' and the competent inspector is able to recognise the 'loss of resistance to failure' which so often comes before an LPE. Despite that an intractable residual risk remains, but this can be made societally tolerable if there is a justifiable conviction that safety is defended by trustworthy engineering. In an age marked by an increasing complexity and sophistication in its science and technology, the engineer is emerging as the proper central decision maker in such matters standing, athwart pure administration and theory on the one hand and expertise and practice on the other. Moreover, evidence that his intellect may be peculiarly adapted for such a role is coming from recent findings in neuropsychology. The Nuclear Installations Inspectorate is cited as an exemplar of the engineering inspection needed to apprehend those human fallibilities in design and application to which most catastrophic failures of technology are due. However, such regulatory systems and the assessment functions associated with them lack accountability and, as an interpretation of Goedel's theorem suggests, cannot assess their own efficiency. Independent, disinterested appraisal assisted by Signal Detection Theory is offered as a remedy.

  17. Impact of metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus on cardiovascular events in coronary artery disease without ischemia on stress thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography after percutaneous coronary intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Takao; Ohashi, Yoshitaka; Ejiri, Junya; Takatsuki, Kiyonobu; Ichikawa, Shinobu; Awano, Kojiro

    2005-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) is a predictor of cardiovascular events. However, the significance of metabolic syndrome for cardiovascular events has been not clarified in Japan. The impact of metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus on cardiovascular events was investigated, especially in the high risk group after percutaneous coronary intervention. We studied 456 patients (mean age 63±10 years, range 36-88 years) without ischemia on stress thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography after percutaneous coronary intervention. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was made according to the modified NCEP ATP III criteria. Cardiovascular events were examined for mean 3.7±1.8 years (range 2.0-8.7 years). There were 196 patients without diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome (Group D-M-), 89 patients without diabetes mellitus but with metabolic syndrome (Group D-M+), 61 patients with diabetes mellitus but without metabolic syndrome (Group D+M-), and 110 patients with both diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (Group D+M+). The event-free survival curve in Group D-M+ was significantly lower than that in Group D-M- (p<0.05), but not different from that in Group D+M-. The survival curve was markedly lower in Group D+M+ than that in Group D-M+ (p<0.005). The Cox proportional hazard model revealed that diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome were independent significant risk factors for events. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was helpful for identification of patients with high cardiovascular event rate even in patients after percutaneous coronary intervention. The combination of metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus markedly increases the risk for cardiovascular events. (author)

  18. Does the use of a volatile anesthetic regimen attenuate the incidence of cardiac events after vascular surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, S. G.; Longrois, D.; Yang, H.; Fleisher, L. A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of a volatile anesthetic to a non-volatile anesthetic regimen on the incidence of postoperative cardiac events, including the postoperative elevation of troponin I values after arterial vascular surgery in high risk patients. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of data

  19. Routine Troponin Measurements Are Unnecessary to Exclude Asymptomatic Coronary Events in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farwa; Young, Jimmy; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Flemming, Kelly D; Fugate, Jennifer E

    2016-05-01

    Obtaining serum troponin levels in every patient with acute stroke is recommended in recent stroke guidelines, but there is no evidence that these contribute positively to clinical care. We sought to determine the clinical significance of measuring troponin levels in acute ischemic stroke patients. We reviewed 398 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke at a large academic institution from 2010 to 2012. Troponin levels were measured as a result of protocol in place during part of the study period. The mean age was 70 years (standard deviation ±16 years) and 197 (49.5%) were men. Chronic kidney disease was present in 78 (19.6%), coronary artery disease in 107 (26.9%), and atrial fibrillation in 107 (26.9%). Serum troponin T was measured in 246 of 398 patients (61.8%). Troponin was elevated (>.01 ng/mL) at any point in 38 of 246 patients (15.5%) and was elevated in 28 patients at all 3 measurements (11.3% of those with troponin measured). Only 4 of 246 patients (1.6%) had a significant uptrend. Two were iatrogenic in the setting of hemodynamic augmentation using vasopressors to maintain cerebral perfusion. One case was attributed to stroke and chronic kidney disease and another case to heart failure from inflammatory fibrocalcific mitral valvular heart disease. Serum troponin elevation in patients with ischemic stroke is not usually caused by clinically significant acute myocardial ischemia unless iatrogenic in the setting of vasopressor administration. Serum troponin levels should be measured judicially, based on clinical context, rather than routinely in all stroke patients. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Subclinical coronary atherosclerosis identified by coronary computed tomographic angiography in asymptomatic morbidly obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. McCullough

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a common public health problem and obese individuals in particular have a disproportionate incidence of acute coronary events. This study was undertaken to identify coronary artery lesions as well as associated clinical features, risk factors and demographics in patients with a body mass index (BMI >40 kg/m2 without known coronary artery disease (CAD. Morbidly obese subjects were prospectively recruited to undergo coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA using a dual-source computed tomography (CT system. CAD was defined as the presence of any atherosclerotic lesion in any one coronary artery segment. The presence, location, and severity of atherosclerosis were related to patient characteristics. Forty-one patients (28 women, mean age, 50.4±10.0 years, mean BMI, 43.8±4.8 kg/m2 served as the study population. Of these, 25 patients (61% had at least one coronary stenosis. All but 2 patients within the CAD cohort had coronary artery calcium (CAC scores >0, and most plaques identified (75.4% were non-calcified. There was a predilection of calcified and non-calcified atherosclerosis involving the left anterior descending (LAD coronary artery compared with other coronary segments. Univariate predictors of CAD included older age, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. In this preliminary study of young morbidly obese patients, CCTA detected a high prevalence of calcified and non-calcified CAD, although the later predominated.

  1. The effect of major adverse renal cardiovascular event (MARCE) incidence, procedure volume, and unit cost on the hospital savings resulting from contrast media use in inpatient angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuffel, Eric; McCullough, Peter A; Todoran, Thomas M; Brilakis, Emmanouil S; Palli, Swetha R; Ryan, Michael P; Gunnarsson, Candace

    2018-04-01

    To determine the net economic impact of switching from low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM) to iso-osmolar contrast media (IOCM; iodixanol) in patients undergoing inpatient coronary or peripheral angioplasty in the United States (US). A budget impact model (BIM) was developed from a hospital perspective. Nationally representative procedural and contrast media prevalence rates, along with MARCE (major adverse renal cardiovascular event) incidence and episode-related cost data were derived from Premier Hospital Data (October 2014 to September 2015). A previously estimated relative risk reduction in MARCE associated with IOCM usage (9.3%) was applied. The higher cost of IOCM was included when calculating the net impact estimates at the aggregate, hospital type, and per hospital levels. One-way (±25%) and probabilistic sensitivity analyses identified the model's most important inputs. Based on weighted analysis, 513,882 US inpatient angioplasties and 35,610 MARCE cases were estimated annually. Switching to an "IOCM only" strategy from a "LOCM only" strategy increases contrast media cost, but prevents 2,900 MARCE events. The annual budget impact was an estimated saving of $30.71 million, aggregated across all US hospitals, $6,316 per hospital, or $60 per procedure. Net savings were maintained across all univariate sensitivity analyses. While MARCE/event-free cost differential was the most important factor driving total net savings for hospitals in the Northeast and West, procedural volume was important in the Midwest and rural locations. Switching to an "IOCM only" strategy from a "LOCM only" approach yields substantial net global savings to hospitals, both at the national level and within hospital sub-groups. Hospital administrators should maintain awareness of the factors that are likely to be more influential for their hospital and recognize that purchasing on the basis of lower contrast media cost may result in higher overall costs for patients undergoing inpatient

  2. Adverse Event Incidences following Facial Plastic Surgery Procedures: Incorporating FACE-Q Data to Improve Patient Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Christopher M; Schwitzer, Jonathan A; Hung, Rex W; Baker, Stephen B

    2018-01-01

    Before creation and validation of the FACE-Q by Pusic et al., adverse event types and incidences following facial cosmetic procedures were objectively measured and reported by physicians, potentially leading to misrepresentation of the true patient experience. This article analyzes and compares adverse event data from both FACE-Q and recent review articles, incorporating patient-reported adverse event data to improve patient preparation for facial cosmetic procedures. FACE-Q adverse event data were extracted from peer-reviewed validation articles for face lift, rhinoplasty, and blepharoplasty, and these data were compared against adverse effect risk data published in recent Continuing Medical Education/Maintenance of Certification and other articles regarding the same procedures. The patient-reported adverse event data sets and the physician-reported adverse event data sets do contain overlapping elements, but each data set also contains unique elements. The data sets represent differing viewpoints. Furthermore, patient-reported outcomes from the FACE-Q provided incidence data that were otherwise previously not reported. In the growing facial cosmetic surgery industry, patient perspective is critical as a determinant of success; therefore, incorporation of evidence-based patient-reported outcome data will not only improve patient expectations and overall experience, but will also reveal adverse event incidences that were previously unknown. Given that there is incomplete overlap between patient-reported and physician-reported adverse events, presentation of both data sets in the consultation setting will improve patient preparation. Furthermore, use of validated tools such as the FACE-Q will allow surgeons to audit themselves critically.

  3. The study of the prognostic value scales of assessing the risk of adverse coronary events in patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST-segment elevation in combination with comorbid conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorokhova O.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify the most prognostically significant scale risk assessment of patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST-segment elevation in combination with diabetes mellitus type 2, chronic renal failure, multifo-cal coronarocardiosclerosis, dyscirculatory encephalopathy. Material and methods. 260 patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST-segment elevation were divided into 4 groups according to the presence of severe concomitant diseases: patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (71 people, chronic renal failure (49, multifocal lesions of the coronary arteries (76 and patients with dyscirculatory encephalopathy of grade 2-3, including ischemic stroke (64. All patients were stratified by major scales risk: TIMI, GRACE, PURSUIT. The development of negative coronary events was assessed in hospital and during the year after discharge. On the basis of the results, all scales were studied using the criterion of Mann-Whitney and identified the most predictably significant groups of patients with specific comorbid conditions. Results. It is revealed that the significance of the scales TIMI and GRACE in the study of distant forecast (up to 6 months is the most reliable with acute coronary syndrome without ST-segment elevation in combination with diabetes mellitus type 2. For the patients with combination with chronic renal insufficiency the best prognostic significance was obtained by the GRACE scale in the study of hospital risk and forecast up to 6 months. TIMI and GRACE scales in the study of hospital risk and forecast up to 6 months had the greatest prognostic significance for the patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST-segment elevation on the background of multifocal lesions of the coronary arteries. For the patients with dyscirculatory encephalopathy of the 2nd and 3rd grades, the greatest prognostic significance was obtained by stratification of risk on PURSUIT and GRACE scales in the study of hospital risk and

  4. Operative strategies to reduce cerebral embolic events during on- and off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery: A stratified, prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkos, Michael E; Anderson, Aaron; Binongo, Jose Nilo G; Stringer, Anthony; Lasanajak, Yi; Thourani, Vinod H; Lattouf, Omar M; Guyton, Robert A; Baio, Kim T; Sarin, Eric; Keeling, William B; Cook, N Renee; Carssow, Katherine; Neill, Alexis; Glas, Kathryn E; Puskas, John D

    2017-10-01

    To determine the impact of different aortic clamping strategies on the incidence of cerebral embolic events during coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Between 2012 and 2015, 142 patients with low-grade aortic disease (epiaortic ultrasound grade I/II) undergoing primary isolated CABG were studied. Those undergoing off-pump CABG were randomized to a partial clamp (n = 36) or clampless facilitating device (CFD; n = 36) strategy. Those undergoing on-pump CABG were randomized to a single-clamp (n = 34) or double-clamp (n = 36) strategy. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) was performed to identify high-intensity transient signals (HITS) in the middle cerebral arteries during periods of aortic manipulation. Neurocognitive testing was performed at baseline and 30-days postoperatively. The primary endpoint was total number of HITS detected by TCD. Groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. In the off-pump group, the median number of total HITS were higher in the CFD subgroup (30.0; interquartile range [IQR], 22-43) compared with the partial clamp subgroup (7.0; IQR, 0-16; P 1 CFD (12.5 [IQR, 4-19] vs 36.0 [IQR, 25-47]; P = .001). In the on-pump group, the median number of total HITS was 10.0 (IQR, 3-17) in the single-clamp group, compared with 16.0 (IQR, 4-49) in the double-clamp group (P = .10). There were no differences in neurocognitive outcomes across the groups. For patients with low-grade aortic disease, the use of CFDs was associated with an increased rate of cerebral embolic events compared with partial clamping during off-pump CABG. A single-clamp strategy during on-pump CABG did not significantly reduce embolic events compared with a double-clamp strategy. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Proximal aortic distensibility is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality and incident CV events: the MESA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redheuil, Alban; Wu, Colin O; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Ohyama, Yoshiaki; Yan, Raymond T; Bertoni, Alain G; Hundley, Gregory W; Duprez, Daniel A; Jacobs, David R; Daniels, Lori B; Darwin, Christine; Sibley, Christopher; Bluemke, David A; Lima, João A C

    2014-12-23

    The predictive value of ascending aortic distensibility (AAD) for mortality and hard cardiovascular disease (CVD) events has not been fully established. This study sought to assess the utility of AAD to predict mortality and incident CVD events beyond conventional risk factors in MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis). AAD was measured with magnetic resonance imaging at baseline in 3,675 MESA participants free of overt CVD. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to evaluate risk of death, heart failure (HF), and incident CVD in relation to AAD, CVD risk factors, indexes of subclinical atherosclerosis, and Framingham risk score. There were 246 deaths, 171 hard CVD events (myocardial infarction, resuscitated cardiac arrest, stroke and CV death), and 88 HF events over a median 8.5-year follow-up. Decreased AAD was associated with increased all-cause mortality with a hazard ratio (HR) for the first versus fifth quintile of AAD of 2.7 (p = 0.008) independent of age, sex, ethnicity, other CVD risk factors, and indexes of subclinical atherosclerosis. Overall, patients with the lowest AAD had an independent 2-fold higher risk of hard CVD events. Decreased AAD was associated with CV events in low to intermediate- CVD risk individuals with an HR for the first quintile of AAD of 5.3 (p = 0.03) as well as with incident HF but not after full adjustment. Decreased proximal aorta distensibility significantly predicted all-cause mortality and hard CV events among individuals without overt CVD. AAD may help refine risk stratification, especially among asymptomatic, low- to intermediate-risk individuals. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reporting of coronary artery calcification on chest CT studies in breast cancer patients at high risk of cancer therapy related cardiac events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Phillips

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The identification of coronary artery calcification (CAC detected coincidentally on chest CT exams could assist in cardiovascular risk assessment but may not be reported consistently on clinical studies. Cardiovascular risk factor stratification is important to predict short term cardiac events during cancer therapy and long term cardiac event free survival in cancer patients. We sought to determine the prevalence of CAC and clinical reporting rates in a cohort of cancer patients at high risk of cancer therapy related cardiac events. Methods: 408 Breast cancer patients who were referred to a cardiac oncology clinic were screened. Inclusion criteria included having had a CT chest and the absence of known coronary disease. Among those screened 263 patients were included in the study. Results: CAC was identified in 70 patients (26%. CAC was reported in 18% of studies. The reporting rates of CAC increased with the extent of coronary calcification (p < 0.01 and increased during the period of the study (p < 0.05. Conclusions: CAC was commonly detected on chest CT studies in this observational study of breast cancer patients at high risk of cardiac oncology events. The presence of CAC was often not reported clinically but reporting rates have increased over time. Recent SCCT/STR guidelines recommend reporting the presence of CAC on routine chest CT scans in recognition of the importance of CAC as a predictor of cardiovascular events. Reporting of CAC on chest CTs may help to further risk stratify breast cancer patients and improve cardiovascular outcomes in this vulnerable population. Keywords: Cardiac oncology, Coronary calcification and chest CT

  7. Incidence and predictors of very late (>or=4 years) major cardiac adverse events in the DESIRE (Drug-Eluting Stents in the Real World)-Late registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, J Ribamar; Sousa, Amanda; Moreira, Adriana C; Costa, Ricardo A; Cano, Manuel; Maldonado, Galo; Campos, Cantídio; Carballo, Mariana; Pavanello, Ricardo; Sousa, J Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Our aim was to access the incidence of late major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and stent thrombosis (ST) in nonselected, complex patients followed for a period >/=4 years. Despite the efficacy of drug-eluting stents (DES) in reducing repeated target lesion revascularization, concerns regarding the occurrence of late and very late ST have partially obscured the benefits of this novel technology. All consecutive patients treated solely with DES between May 2002 and January 2005 were enrolled into this prospective, nonrandomized, single-center registry. The primary end point was long-term occurrence of MACE up to 7 years. Independent predictors of MACE, cardiac death, target lesion revascularization, and ST were obtained by a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model. A total of 1,010 patients were enrolled. Most of them were men (77%) with a mean age of 63.7 years. Stent/patient rate was 1.4. Patients were kept in dual antiplatelet therapy for 3 and 6 months after Cypher (Cordis, Johnson & Johnson, Miami Lakes, Florida) and Taxus (Boston Scientific Corp., Natick, Massachusetts) stent implantation, respectively. Follow-up was obtained in 98.2% of the cohort (median 5.01 years). Survival free of MACE and cumulative incidence of definite/probable ST were 84.6% and 1.7%, respectively. Independent predictors of ST were percutaneous coronary intervention in the setting of acute myocardial infarction, DES overlapping, treatment of multivessel disease, presence of moderate-to-severe calcification at lesion site, and in-stent residual stenosis. The deployment of DES in complex, real-world patients resulted in a low rate of very long-term MACE and ST. However, ST still occurs very long after the index procedure. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Incidence, prognostic impact, and optimal definition of contrast-induced acute kidney injury in consecutive patients with stable or unstable coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. insights from the all-comer PRODIGY trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimi, Gabriele; Leonardi, Sergio; Costa, Francesco; Ariotti, Sara; Tebaldi, Matteo; Biscaglia, Simone; Valgimigli, Marco

    2015-07-01

    Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is associated with poor outcome. Whether this association differs in stable coronary artery disease (CAD) as compared to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients is unknown. Definitions and Methods: PRODIGY trial patients were defined as stable CAD or ACS according to the initial presentation. CI-AKI was defined as an increase (Δ) of serum creatinine (SCr) ≥25% above baseline. Two endpoints were considered: all-cause death and the composite of death, stroke, or myocardial infarction (MI). The interaction between CI-AKI, clinical setting, and the impact of increasing ΔSCr% cut-offs were also explored. Two thousand three patients were enrolled in the PRODIGY trial, 85 patients were excluded for missing SCr data, leading to a population of 1,918 patients. CI-AKI incidence was 6.7% in stable CAD and 12.2% in ACS patients. CI-AKI was associated with all-cause mortality [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 2.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38-3.05, P  0.001]. In a large, contemporary, all-comers percutaneous coronary intervention population, CI-AKI was associated with an increased risk of all-cause death and the composite of death, stroke, or MI. While CI-AKI is more common in ACS than in stable CAD patients, its adjusted prognostic impact on the composite endpoint appears to be more pronounced in patients with stable CAD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Incidence of definite stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis after drug-eluting stent implantation for treatment of coronary in-stent restenosis. From western denmark heart registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl

    2012-01-01

    There are limited data on the optimal management of in-stent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with bare metal stent (BMS) or drug-eluting stent (DES) implantations. We assessed the clinical presentation, the incidence, and prognosis of definite stent thrombosis or resteno......There are limited data on the optimal management of in-stent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with bare metal stent (BMS) or drug-eluting stent (DES) implantations. We assessed the clinical presentation, the incidence, and prognosis of definite stent thrombosis...

  10. Associations between C-reactive protein, coronary artery calcium, and cardiovascular events: implications for the JUPITER population from MESA, a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, Michael J; Budoff, Matthew J; DeFilippis, Andrew P; Blankstein, Ron; Rivera, Juan J; Agatston, Arthur; O'Leary, Daniel H; Lima, Joao; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram

    2011-08-20

    The JUPITER trial showed that some patients with LDL-cholesterol concentrations less than 3·37 mmol/L (JUPITER, we established whether coronary artery calcium (CAC) might further stratify risk; additionally we compared hsCRP with CAC for risk prediction across the range of low and high hsCRP values. 950 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atheroslcerosis (MESA) met all criteria for JUPITER entry. We compared coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease event rates and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios after stratifying by burden of CAC (scores of 0, 1-100, or >100). We calculated 5-year number needed to treat (NNT) by applying the benefit recorded in JUPITER to the event rates within each CAC strata. Median follow-up was 5·8 years (IQR 5·7-5·9). 444 (47%) patients in the MESA JUPITER population had CAC scores of 0 and, in this group, rates of coronary heart disease events were 0·8 per 1000 person-years. 74% of all coronary events were in the 239 (25%) of participants with CAC scores of more than 100 (20·2 per 1000 person-years). For coronary heart disease, the predicted 5-year NNT was 549 for CAC score 0, 94 for scores 1-100, and 24 for scores greater than 100. For cardiovascular disease, the NNT was 124, 54, and 19. In the total study population, presence of CAC was associated with a hazard ratio of 4·29 (95% CI 1·99-9·25) for coronary heart disease, and of 2·57 (1·48-4·48) for cardiovascular disease. hsCRP was not associated with either disease after multivariable adjustment. CAC seems to further stratify risk in patients eligible for JUPITER, and could be used to target subgroups of patients who are expected to derive the most, and the least, absolute benefit from statin treatment. Focusing of treatment on the subset of individuals with measurable atherosclerosis could allow for more appropriate allocation of resources. National Institutes of Health-National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  11. Does the use of a volatile anesthetic regimen attenuate the incidence of cardiac events after vascular surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hert, S G; Longrois, D; Yang, H; Fleisher, L A

    2008-01-01

    To compare the effects of a volatile anesthetic to a non-volatile anesthetic regimen on the incidence of postoperative cardiac events, including the postoperative elevation of troponin I values after arterial vascular surgery in high risk patients. Retrospective analysis of data of a phase II study that compared the Na+/H+ exchanger type II inhibitor, zoniporide to placebo on the occurrence of cardiac events. Multicenter study conducted in 105 sites throughout the United States, South America, Europe and Asia. 784 subjects scheduled for urgent or elective major arterial vascular surgery and a history of at least 3 of the following: age > or = 65 years, hypertension, documented stroke or transient ischemic attack, previous myocardial infarction, active angina pectoris diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, or symptomatic cardiac arrhythmia. Type of anesthesia was retrospectively retrieved from the database and patients were subdivided in two groups: inhalational (group A) vs non-inhalational anesthetic regimen (group B). Incidence of postoperative cardiac events was compared between the two groups. The incidence of postoperative cardiac events was not different between the two groups. Maximum postoperative troponin I levels was not different between the two groups in the total population and in the patients undergoing peripheral arterial surgery. In patients undergoing aortic surgery the incidence of elevated troponin levels higher than 1.5 and 4 ng x mL(-1) tended to be lower in group A than in group B in the aortic surgery (28% vs 18% and 30% vs 20% respectively) but this difference did not reach statistical significance. The results of this hypothesis-generating study suggest that potential beneficial effects on extent of postoperative myocardial damage in high risk patients undergoing arterial surgery will probably be more apparent in abdominal aortic surgery than in peripheral vascular surgery. Further sufficiently powered studies using a standardized

  12. Patients with coronary, cerebrovascular or peripheral arterial obstructive disease differ in risk for new vascular events and mortality: the SMART study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Sefanja; Cramer, Maarten J M; Kappelle, L Jaap; de Borst, Gert Jan; Visseren, Frank L J; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Algra, Ale

    2010-08-01

    Atherosclerosis causes coronary artery disease (CAD), cerebrovascular disease (CVD) or peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD). The risk of new vascular events and mortality is high. Direct comparisons of vascular event rates are scarce. Vascular risk factors and outcome events of 3563 patients from a university hospital presenting with nondisabling CAD, CVD or PAOD were compared with regression analyses, adjusted for age and sex (median follow-up, 3.9 years). The primary outcome was the composite of myocardial infarction, stroke and vascular death. The risk among the three groups of outcomes was compared using the Cox regression analysis. At baseline, CAD patients were the most obese; PAOD patients smoked the most and suffered more often from hypertension and hyperlipidaemia. The average rate of vascular events was 2.5% per year; the hazard ratio (HR) of CVD/CAD was 1.7 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3-2.2] and PAOD/CAD was 1.8 (95% CI: 1.5-2.0). PAOD patients had a higher risk for coronary events than CAD (HR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.2-2.1). Patients with CVD or PAOD had a higher risk for major bleeding than CAD patients (HR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.4-3.2). Patients with a recent CVD or PAOD have almost twice the risk for future vascular events than those with CAD.

  13. Causal Factors and Adverse Events of Aviation Accidents and Incidents Related to Integrated Vehicle Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Jones, Sharon M.; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Leone, Karen M.; Sandifer, Carl E.

    2011-01-01

    Causal factors in aviation accidents and incidents related to system/component failure/malfunction (SCFM) were examined for Federal Aviation Regulation Parts 121 and 135 operations to establish future requirements for the NASA Aviation Safety Program s Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project. Data analyzed includes National Transportation Safety Board (NSTB) accident data (1988 to 2003), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) incident data (1988 to 2003), and Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) incident data (1993 to 2008). Failure modes and effects analyses were examined to identify possible modes of SCFM. A table of potential adverse conditions was developed to help evaluate IVHM research technologies. Tables present details of specific SCFM for the incidents and accidents. Of the 370 NTSB accidents affected by SCFM, 48 percent involved the engine or fuel system, and 31 percent involved landing gear or hydraulic failure and malfunctions. A total of 35 percent of all SCFM accidents were caused by improper maintenance. Of the 7732 FAA database incidents affected by SCFM, 33 percent involved landing gear or hydraulics, and 33 percent involved the engine and fuel system. The most frequent SCFM found in ASRS were turbine engine, pressurization system, hydraulic main system, flight management system/flight management computer, and engine. Because the IVHM Project does not address maintenance issues, and landing gear and hydraulic systems accidents are usually not fatal, the focus of research should be those SCFMs that occur in the engine/fuel and flight control/structures systems as well as power systems.

  14. Socioeconomic variation in incidence of primary and secondary major cardiovascular disease events: an Australian population-based prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korda, Rosemary J; Soga, Kay; Joshy, Grace; Calabria, Bianca; Attia, John; Wong, Deborah; Banks, Emily

    2016-11-21

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) disproportionately affects disadvantaged people, but reliable quantitative evidence on socioeconomic variation in CVD incidence in Australia is lacking. This study aimed to quantify socioeconomic variation in rates of primary and secondary CVD events in mid-age and older Australians. Baseline data (2006-2009) from the 45 and Up Study, an Australian cohort involving 267,153 men and women aged ≥ 45, were linked to hospital and death data (to December 2013). Outcomes comprised first event - death or hospital admission - for major CVD combined, as well as myocardial infarction and stroke, in those with and without prior CVD (secondary and primary events, respectively). Cox regression estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for each outcome in relation to education (and income and area-level disadvantage), separately by age group (45-64, 65-79, and ≥ 80 years), adjusting for age and sex, and additional sociodemographic factors. There were 18,207 primary major CVD events over 1,144,845 years of follow-up (15.9/1000 person-years), and 20,048 secondary events over 260,357 years (77.0/1000 person-years). For both primary and secondary events, incidence increased with decreasing education, with the absolute difference between education groups largest for secondary events. Age-sex adjusted hazard ratios were highest in the 45-64 years group: for major CVDs, HR (no qualifications vs university degree) = 1.62 (95% CI: 1.49-1.77) for primary events, and HR = 1.49 (1.34-1.65) for secondary events; myocardial infarction HR = 2.31 (1.87-2.85) and HR = 2.57 (1.90-3.47) respectively; stroke HR = 1.48 (1.16-1.87) and HR = 1.97 (1.42-2.74) respectively. Similar but attenuated results were seen in older age groups, and with income. For area-level disadvantage, CVD gradients were weak and non-significant in older people (> 64 years). Individual-level data are important for quantifying socioeconomic variation in CVD incidence, which

  15. Effect of valsartan on the incidence of diabetes and cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, John J; Holman, Rury R; Haffner, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    It is not known whether drugs that block the renin-angiotensin system reduce the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular events in patients with impaired glucose tolerance.......It is not known whether drugs that block the renin-angiotensin system reduce the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular events in patients with impaired glucose tolerance....

  16. Effect of nateglinide on the incidence of diabetes and cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Rury R; Haffner, Steven M; McMurray, John J

    2010-01-01

    The ability of short-acting insulin secretagogues to reduce the risk of diabetes or cardiovascular events in people with impaired glucose tolerance is unknown.......The ability of short-acting insulin secretagogues to reduce the risk of diabetes or cardiovascular events in people with impaired glucose tolerance is unknown....

  17. Coronary heart disease incidence among non-Western immigrants compared to Danish-born people: effect of country of birth, migrant status, and income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Anne; Zinckernagel, Line; Krasnik, Allan; Petersen, Jorgen H; Norredam, Marie

    2015-10-01

    Increasing global migration has made immigrants' health an important topic worldwide. We examined the effect of country of birth, migrant status (refugee/family-reunified) and income on coronary heart disease (CHD) incidence. This was a historical prospective register-based cohort study. The study cohort consisted of immigrants above 18 years from non-Western countries who had obtained a residence permit in Denmark as a refugee (n = 29,045) or as a family-reunified immigrant (n = 28,435) from 1 January 1993-31 December 1999 and a Danish-born reference population (n = 229,918). First-time CHD incidence was identified from 1 January 1993-31 December 2007. Incidence ratios for 11 immigrant groups were estimated using Cox regression analysis. Immigrants from Afghanistan, Iraq, Turkey, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, South Asia, the Former Yugoslavia, and the Middle East and North Africa had significantly higher incidences of CHD (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.36; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05-1.75 to HR = 2.86; 95% CI: 2.01-4.08) compared with Danish-born people. Immigrants from Somalia, South and Middle America, Sub-Saharan Africa and women from East Asia and the Pacific did not differ significantly from Danish-born people, whereas immigrant men from East Asia and the Pacific had a significantly lower incidence (HR = 0.32; 95% CI: 0.17-0.62). When also including migrant status, the higher incidences were reduced. Refugee men (HR = 1.35; 95% CI: 1.11-1.65) and women (HR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.08-1.65) had a significantly higher incidence of CHD than family-reunified immigrants. When migrant status and income were included simultaneously, the incidences decreased to an insignificant level for most immigrant groups. Most non-Western immigrant groups had a higher incidence of CHD than Danish-born people. The study revealed that migrant status and income are important underlying mechanisms of the effect of country of birth on CHD. © The European

  18. [Incidence rate of adverse reaction/event by Qingkailing injection: a Meta-analysis of single rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Chun-ling; Xie, Yan-ming; Li, Ming-quan; Wang, Lian-xin; Liao, Xing

    2015-12-01

    To systematically review the incidence rate of adverse drug reaction/event by Qingkailing injection. Such databases as the PubMed, EMbase, the Cochrane library, CNKI, VIP WanFang data and CBM were searched by computer from foundation to July 30, 2015. Two reviewers independently screened literature according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extracted data and cross check data. Then, Meta-analysis was performed by using the R 3.2.0 software, subgroup sensitivity analysis was performed based on age, mode of medicine, observation time and research quality. Sixty-three studies involving 9,793 patients with Qingkailing injection were included, 367 cases of adverse reactions/events were reported in total. The incidence rate of adverse reaction in skin and mucosa group was 2% [95% CI (0.02; 0.03)]; the digestive system adverse reaction was 6% [95% CI(0.05; 0.07); the injection site adverse reaction was 4% [95% CI (0.02; 0.07)]. In the digestive system as the main types of adverse reactions/events, incidence of children and adults were 4.6% [0.021 1; 0.097 7] and 6.9% [0.053 5; 0.089 8], respectively. Adverse reactions to skin and mucous membrane damage as the main performance/event type, the observation time > 7 days and ≤ 7 days incidence of 3% [0.012 9; 0.068 3] and 1.9% [0.007 8; 0.046 1], respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that different types of adverse reactions, combination in the incidence of adverse reactions/events were higher than that of single drug, the difference was statistically significant (P reactions occur, and clinical rational drug use, such as combination, age and other fators, and the influence factors vary in different populations. Therefore, clinical doctors for children and the elderly use special care was required for a clear and open spirit injection, the implementation of individualized medication.

  19. Chronic exposure to traffic-related air pollution and cancer incidence among 10,000 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions: A historical prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Gali; Levy, Ilan; Yuval; Kark, Jeremy D; Levin, Noam; Witberg, Guy; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Bental, Tamir; Broday, David M; Steinberg, David M; Kornowski, Ran; Gerber, Yariv

    2018-04-01

    Background Exposure to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) is considered to have a carcinogenic effect. The authors previously reported a nonsignificant association between TRAP and cancer risk in a relatively small cohort of myocardial infarction survivors. This study assessed whether TRAP exposure is associated with subsequent cancer in a large cohort of coronary patients. Methods & results Consecutive patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions in a major medical centre in central Israel from 2004 to 2014 were followed for cancer through 2015. Residential levels of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) - a proxy for TRAP - were estimated based on a high-resolution national land use regression model. Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to study relationships with cancer. Among 12,784 candidate patients, 9816 had available exposure data and no history of cancer (mean age, 68 years; 77% men). During a median (25th-75th percentiles) follow-up of 7.0 (3.9-9.3) years, 773 incident cases of cancer (8%) were diagnosed. In a multivariable-adjusted model, a 10-ppb increase in mean NO x exposure was associated with hazard ratios (HRs) of 1.07 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.15) for all-site cancer and 1.16 (95% CI 1.05-1.28) for cancers previously linked to TRAP (lung, breast, prostate, kidney and bladder). A stronger association was observed for breast cancer (HR = 1.43; 95% CI 1.12-1.83). Associations were slightly strengthened after limiting the cohort to patients with more precise exposure assessment. Conclusion Coronary patients exposed to TRAP are at increased risk of several types of cancer, particularly lung, prostate and breast. As these cancers are amenable to prevention strategies, identifying highly exposed patients may provide an opportunity to improve clinical care.

  20. Association of KIF6 Variant with Lipid Level and Angiographic Coronary Artery Disease Events Risk in the Han Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Wu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available KIF6 is a class of molecular motor from the kinesin superfamily. Recently, multiple large studies consisting mainly of Europeans have shown that KIF6 Trp719Arg SNP may be a new predictive factor for coronary artery disease (CAD event risk. The allelic frequency distribution of rs20455 is different in various populations, yet studies among the Han population, one of the largest ethnic groups in the World, have not been conducted. This study is aimed to evaluate the association of KIF6 Trp719Arg variant with angiographic CAD and serum lipid levels in the Han population from northern China. In this case-controlled study, peripheral blood samples were collected from 356 patients and 568 controls of Han Chinese origin. Genotyping was performed by a high-resolution melting curve. The impact of rs20455 on CAD and non-fatal MI was evaluated in a dominant genetic model with stepwise multiple regression analysis. There were no significant differences of genotypes and allele frequency between angiographic CAD and control groups (p > 0.05; however, that of MI and non-MI subgroups were significant differences (p < 0.05. After adjusting for significant risk factors, angiographic CAD risk was not significantly increased in 719Arg allele carriers compared with non-carriers. Further analysis revealed that the non-fatal MI risk and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in 719Arg allele carriers than non-carriers. In conclusion, KIF6 719Arg allele was not an independent risk factor for angiographic CAD susceptibility in Han populations from northern China. However, it was associated with a significantly higher TG level, which may indicate an increased myocardial infarction risk in angiographic CAD patients.

  1. Effects of Italian smoking regulation on rates of hospital admission for acute coronary events: a country-wide study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Barone-Adesi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies have reported a reduction in acute coronary events (ACEs in the general population after the enforcement of smoking regulations, although there is uncertainty concerning the magnitude of the effect of such interventions. We conducted a country-wide evaluation of the health effects of the introduction of a smoking ban in public places, using data on hospital admissions for ACEs from the Italian population after the implementation of a national smoking regulation in January 2005. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Rates of admission for ACEs in the 20 Italian regions from January 2002 to November 2006 were analysed using mixed-effect regression models that allowed for long-term trends and seasonality. Standard methods for interrupted time-series were adopted to assess the immediate and gradual effects of the smoking ban. Effect modification by age was investigated, with the assumption that exposure to passive smoking in public places would be greater among young people. In total, 936,519 hospital admissions for ACEs occurred in the Italian population during the study period. A 4% reduction in hospital admissions for ACEs among persons aged less than 70 years was evident after the introduction of the ban (Rate Ratio [RR], 0.96; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 0.95-0.98. No effect was found among persons aged at least 70 years (RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.99-1.02. Effect modification by age was further suggested by analyses using narrower age categories. CONCLUSIONS: Smoke-free policies can constitute a simple and inexpensive intervention for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and thus should be included in prevention programmes.

  2. Incidence of adverse events among healthcare workers following H1N1 Mass immunization in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankrah, Daniel N A; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K; De Bruin, Marie L

    2013-01-01

    in the Pandemrix(®) SPC, but while injection-site pain was the most frequent in the SPC and other foreign studies, we recorded headache as the most frequent. Even fatigue, muscle/joint aches and fever had higher incidence rates compared with injection-site pain. Tachycardia (n = 6), tinnitus (n = 1) and decreased...

  3. Comparison of the prevalence and characteristics of inpatient adverse events using medical records review and incident reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macharia, W M; Muteshi, C M; Wanyonyi, S Z; Mukaindo, A M; Ismail, A; Ekea, H; Abdallah, A; Tole, J M; Ngugi, A K

    2016-09-08

    Information on adverse events (AEs) in hospitalised patients in developing countries is scanty. To compare the magnitude and characteristics of inpatient AEs in a tertiary, not-for-profit healthcare facility in Kenya, using medical records review and incident reporting. Estimation of prevalence was done using incidents reported in 2010 from a random sample of medical records for hospital admissions. Nurse reviewers used 18 screening criteria, followed by physician reviewers to confirm occurrence. An AE was defined as an unexpected clinical event (UE) associated with death, disability or prolonged hospitalisation not explained by the disease condition. The kappa statistic was used to estimate inter-rater agreement, and analysis was done using logistic regression. The study identified 53 UEs from 2 000 randomly selected medical records and 33 reported UEs from 23 026 admissions in the index year. The prevalences of AEs from medical records review and incident reports were 1.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9 - 2.0) and 0.03% (95% CI 0.012 - 0.063), respectively. Compared with incident reporting, review of medical records identified more disability (13.2% v. 0%; p=0.03) and prolonged hospital stays (43.4% v. 18.2%; p=0.02). Review of medical records is preferable to incident reporting in determining the prevalence of AEs in health facilities with limited inpatient quality improvement experience. Further research is needed to determine whether staff education and a positive culture change through promotion of non-punitive UE reporting or a combination of approaches would improve the comprehensiveness of AE reporting.

  4. Baseline plasma fatty acids profile and incident cardiovascular events in the SU.FOL.OM3 trial: the evidence revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léopold K Fezeu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the association between baseline plasma fatty acids profile and the risk of future major cardiovascular events in patients with a history of ischaemic heart disease or ischemic stroke. METHODS: Baseline plasma fatty acids as well as established cardiovascular risk factors were measured in 2,263 patients enrolled in the SUpplementation with FOLate, vitamins B-6 and B-12 and/or OMega-3 fatty acids randomized controlled trial. Incident major cardiovascular, cardiac and cerebrovascular events were ascertained during the 4.7 years of follow up. Hazard ratios were obtained from Cox proportional hazards models after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. RESULTS: During the follow-up, 154, 379 and 84 patients had major cardiovascular, cardiac and cerebrovascular events respectively. Upon adjustment for gender, initial event, baseline age and BMI, the risk of developing a major cardiovascular event decreased significantly in successive quartiles of arachidonic acid (P trend<0.002, total omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (P trend<0.03, docosapentaenoic acid (P trend<0.019, docosahexaenoic acid (P trend<0.004, eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid (P trend<0.03 and eicosapentaenoic acid + docosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid (P trend<0.02. This inverse association was borderline significant with increased quartiles of stearidonic acid (P trend<0.06. In the full model, only stearidonic acid remained inversely associated with the risk of developing a major cardiovascular event (P trend<0.035, a cardiac event (P trend<0.016 or a cerebrovascular event (P trend<0.014, while arachidonic acid was inversely associated with the risk a cerebrovascular event (P trend<0.033. CONCLUSION: The inverse association of long chain omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids with recurrence of Cardiovascular diseases was mainly driven by well-known cardiovascular risk factors. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN

  5. Using Web Crawler Technology for Geo-Events Analysis: A Case Study of the Huangyan Island Incident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Social networking and network socialization provide abundant text information and social relationships into our daily lives. Making full use of these data in the big data era is of great significance for us to better understand the changing world and the information-based society. Though politics have been integrally involved in the hyperlinked world issues since the 1990s, the text analysis and data visualization of geo-events faced the bottleneck of traditional manual analysis. Though automatic assembly of different geospatial web and distributed geospatial information systems utilizing service chaining have been explored and built recently, the data mining and information collection are not comprehensive enough because of the sensibility, complexity, relativity, timeliness, and unexpected characteristics of political events. Based on the framework of Heritrix and the analysis of web-based text, word frequency, sentiment tendency, and dissemination path of the Huangyan Island incident were studied by using web crawler technology and the text analysis. The results indicate that tag cloud, frequency map, attitudes pie, individual mention ratios, and dissemination flow graph, based on the crawled information and data processing not only highlight the characteristics of geo-event itself, but also implicate many interesting phenomenon and deep-seated problems behind it, such as related topics, theme vocabularies, subject contents, hot countries, event bodies, opinion leaders, high-frequency vocabularies, information sources, semantic structure, propagation paths, distribution of different attitudes, and regional difference of net citizens’ response in the Huangyan Island incident. Furthermore, the text analysis of network information with the help of focused web crawler is able to express the time-space relationship of crawled information and the information characteristic of semantic network to the geo-events. Therefore, it is a useful tool to

  6. Estimating the incidence of the acute coronary syndrome: data from a Danish cohort of 138 290 persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Foldspang, Anders; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2007-01-01

    -years. Unstable angina pectoris constituted for 16.9%, MI for 53.8% and SCD for 29.3% of ACS patients. CONCLUSIONS: Crude incidence rates of ACS were 137 and 331 per 100 000 person years for women and men, respectively. The incidence rate of ACS, as measured directly, was insignificantly 6% higher than expected...... consecutive ACS patients from 1 April 2000 to 31 March 2002. The population was identified from Danish Population Registers. RESULTS: A total of 189 victims of SCD and 457 ACS patients who survived until admission to hospital were present. Consequently, crude incidence rate of ACS was 234 per 100 000 person...

  7. A comparative analysis of predictors for 1-year recurrent acute coronary syndromes events, by age group: the Greek observational study of ACS (GREECS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Notara, Venetia; Georgousopoulou, Ekavi N; Pitsavos, Christos; Antonoulas, Antonis; Kogias, Yannis; Mantas, Yannis; Stravopodis, Petros; Zombolos, Spyros; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the potential differences in risk factors' profile for in-hospital mortality and up to 1-year prognosis, between younger and older patients with first acute coronary syndromes (ACS). From October 2003 to September 2004, 1323 patients with first ACS event from 6 urban and rural Greek hospitals were enrolled into the study, classified as those period of 6-months, the event-rate was higher among the younger patients (p < 0.001). Current smoking was associated with increased risk of 1-month recurrent events, in patients < 65 years (p < 0.05). Myocardial infarction and history of diabetes were associated with increased risk in older patients (p < 0.1). Age-specific identification of the risk factors for recurrent events may have important clinical and public health implications and lead to the development of more effective risk reduction strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Incidence and predictors of urotoxic adverse events in cyclophosphamide-treated patients with systemic necrotizing vasculitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guenno, Guillaume; Mahr, Alfred; Pagnoux, Christian; Dhote, Robin; Guillevin, Loïc

    2011-05-01

    To assess hemorrhagic cystitis and urinary tract cancer incidence and predictors in cyclophosphamide (CYC)-treated patients with systemic necrotizing vasculitis (SNV). The French Vasculitis Study Group database, which contains longitudinal data on SNV patients, was searched for urinary tract cancer and/or hemorrhagic cystitis occurrences in patients diagnosed as having Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, or polyarteritis nodosa. The observed incidence of urinary tract cancer was compared to the expected incidence in the general population by calculating standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). Relationships between urinary tract cancer and/or hemorrhagic cystitis and 10 variables, including CYC dosage and administration route, were investigated by survival analyses for a nested subgroup of patients for whom detailed information on CYC exposure was available. Among the 805 patients observed over 4,230 patient-years (mean followup 5.3 years), 22 cases of hemorrhagic cystitis and 7 of urinary tract cancer were identified in 27 patients. The SIRs for urinary tract cancer were 5.00 for all patients with SNV (P = 0.001) and 5.96 for patients with WG (P = 0.03). Based on 467 patients with detailed CYC information, cumulative CYC dose (hazard ratio [HR] for 10-gm increments 1.09; P = 0.03), ever-oral CYC administration (HR 5.50; P = 0.001), and WG (HR 2.96; P = 0.01) independently predicted urinary tract cancer and/or hemorrhagic cystitis. According to univariate analyses, smoking (ever) (HR 8.20; P = 0.02) and a prior hemorrhagic cystitis episode (HR 5.20; P = 0.046) significantly predicted urinary tract cancer. Our findings indicate that CYC treatment of SNV is associated with a 5-fold higher risk of developing urinary tract cancer. Urotoxicity risk in SNV is associated with the cumulative CYC dose and its oral administration, and might be higher in WG. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Exploring human error in military aviation flight safety events using post-incident classification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Brionny J; O'Hare, David P A

    2013-08-01

    Human error classification systems theoretically allow researchers to analyze postaccident data in an objective and consistent manner. The Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) framework is one such practical analysis tool that has been widely used to classify human error in aviation. The Cognitive Error Taxonomy (CET) is another. It has been postulated that the focus on interrelationships within HFACS can facilitate the identification of the underlying causes of pilot error. The CET provides increased granularity at the level of unsafe acts. The aim was to analyze the influence of factors at higher organizational levels on the unsafe acts of front-line operators and to compare the errors of fixed-wing and rotary-wing operations. This study analyzed 288 aircraft incidents involving human error from an Australasian military organization occurring between 2001 and 2008. Action errors accounted for almost twice (44%) the proportion of rotary wing compared to fixed wing (23%) incidents. Both classificatory systems showed significant relationships between precursor factors such as the physical environment, mental and physiological states, crew resource management, training and personal readiness, and skill-based, but not decision-based, acts. The CET analysis showed different predisposing factors for different aspects of skill-based behaviors. Skill-based errors in military operations are more prevalent in rotary wing incidents and are related to higher level supervisory processes in the organization. The Cognitive Error Taxonomy provides increased granularity to HFACS analyses of unsafe acts.

  10. Evaluation of myocardial bridging by coronary computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Marcio Vinicius Lins; Rabelo, Daniel Rocha; Siqueira, Maria Helena Albernaz, E-mail: marciovlbarros@uol.com.br [Hospital Mater Dei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Garretto, Luiza Samarane; Paula, Marcela Mascarenhas De; Carvalho, Marina Oliveira; Alves, Marina Rangel Moreira Barros [Faculdade de Saude e Ecologia Humana (FASEH), Vespasiano, MG (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    The myocardial bridge (MB) is defined as a segment of an epicardial coronary artery that has an intramural course in the myocardium. Although MB is clinically silent in most cases, has been associated with myocardial ischemia, arrhythmias and sudden death. Coronary conventional angiography is the gold standard for detection of MB, but is invasive and cannot be sufficiently sensitive compared to autopsy studies. Recently, multislice computed tomography of coronary arteries (MCTCA) has allowed the detection of coronary artery course, including PM. Objectives: to evaluate MB prevalence in patients with suspected coronary artery disease undergoing MCTCA and to evaluate the predictive value of this method at medium term. Methods: during the period 2008 to 2011, 498 consecutive patients were examined by TMC for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease, being conducted to evaluate the presence of BM and followed for a mean follow-up of 23 months for the occurrence of cardiovascular hard events (death, hospitalization or revascularization). Results: patients mean age was 55.3 ± 14.2, being male 71.1%. Among the patients, 7.6% (38 patients) showed MB. Main findings included angina pectoris in 40% and a positive stress test in 34%. 34.2% had atherosclerotic disease, and one patient had significant coronary stenosis. During follow-up, no patients showed adverse events. Conclusion: MCTCA is a noninvasive technique with high accuracy in anatomical evaluation of the coronary arteries and may be particularly useful to assess the incidence, location and morphology of myocardial bridging in vivo. (author)

  11. Masking in reports of "most serious" events: bias in estimators of sports injury incidence in Canadian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gupta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surveys that collect information on injuries often focus on the single "most serious" event to help limit recall error and reduce survey length. However, this can mask less serious injuries and result in biased incidence estimates for specific injury subcategories. Methods: Data from the 2002 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC survey and from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP were used to compare estimates of sports injury incidence in Canadian children. Results: HBSC data indicate that 6.7% of children report sustaining a sports injury that required an emergency department (ED visit. However, details were only collected on a child's "most serious" injury, so children who had multiple injuries requiring an ED visit may have had sports injuries that went unreported. The rate of 6.7% can be seen to be an underestimate by as much as 4.3%. Corresponding CHIRPP surveillance data indicate an incidence of 9.9%. Potential masking bias is also highlighted in our analysis of injuries attended by other health care providers. Conclusion: The "one most serious injury" line of questioning induces potentially substantial masking bias in the estimation of sports injury incidence, which limits researchers' ability to quantify the burden of sports injury. Longer survey recall periods naturally lead to greater masking. The design of future surveys should take these issues into account. In order to accurately inform policy decisions and the direction of future research, researchers must be aware of these limitations.

  12. Incidents in transport of radioactive materials for civil use: IRSN draws lessons from events reported between 1999 and 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Some 900,000 packages of radioactive materials for civil use are transported each year in France. The great majority of these shipments involve radioactive materials used in the fields of medicine, pharmaceuticals, industry or property. Transport of radioactive materials linked to the nuclear fuel cycle actually represents only 15% of transport. A great variety of material is transported, differing in weight (from a few grams to tens of tons), form, activity and packaging. The associated risks are also different: radioactive contamination, external exposure to ionising radiation, chemical risk etc. In its role of technical support to safety and radioprotection authorities, IRSN's mission is to assess the design, manufacturing, testing and use of packaging and transport systems. The Institute is also involved in the management and analysis of events that occur during transport of radioactive materials. To assist with this, the IRSN manages a database which lists reported deviations, anomalies, incidents and accidents (known in a generic way as 'events') relating to transport. With an aim of reduction of the risks related to transport, the feedback resulting from the thorough analysis of the notified events is capitalized by IRSN, just as the feedback of the assessments of the safety analysis reports of the various package designs. Based on these feedbacks, IRSN proposes axes of improvement relating to package designs and transport operations, and regulatory evolutions, as well as priority topics for the inspections carried out by the French Nuclear safety authority (ASN). The IRSN has carried out a transversal analysis of all events in transport of radioactive materials that occurred in France from 1999 to 2007 as listed in its database (i.e. 901 events). For each event, some 70 parameters have been recorded from the analysis of the notifications and reports of the events, transmitted by the operators (type of event, type of package, level on the INES scale). This

  13. Modeling time to recovery and initiating event frequency for loss of off-site power incidents at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iman, R.L.; Hora, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Industry data representing the time to recovery of loss of off-site power at nuclear power plants for 63 incidents caused by plant-centered losses, grid losses, or severe weather losses are fit with exponential, lognormal, gamma and Weibull probability models. A Bayesian analysis is used to compare the adequacy of each of these models and to provide uncertainty bounds on each of the fitted models. A composite model that combines the probability models fitted to each of the three sources of data is presented as a method for predicting the time to recovery of loss of off-site power. The composite model is very general and can be made site specific by making adjustments on the models used, such as might occur due to the type of switchyard configuration or type of grid, and by adjusting the weights on the individual models, such as might occur with weather conditions existing at a particular plant. Adjustments in the composite model are shown for different models used for switchyard configuration and for different weights due to weather. Bayesian approaches are also presented for modeling the frequency of initiating events leading to loss of off-site power. One Bayesian model assumes that all plants share a common incidence rate for loss of off-site power, while the other Bayesian approach models the incidence rate for each plant relative to the incidence rates of all other plants. Combining the Bayesian models for the frequency of the initiating events with the composite Bayesian model for recovery provides the necessary vehicle for a complete model that incorporates uncertainty into a probabilistic risk assessment

  14. Process review of a departmental change from conventional coronary artery bypass grafting to totally arterial coronary artery bypass and its effects on the incidence and severity of postoperative stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Alexander; Sergeant, Paul; Florath, Ines; Ismael, Mohammed; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Ennker, Jürgen

    2011-04-01

    We evaluated the process of changing from conventional coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) to totally arterial off-pump coronary artery bypass (TOPCAB) at a single heart center in Germany. We (1) used multivariate statistical methods to assess real-time monitoring of OPCAB effects, (2) conducted a case review to assess preventable deaths and identify areas of improvement, (3) conducted a team survey, and (4) evaluated benchmarking results. All surgeons and assistants (n = 18) at this center were involved and were guided by the department head and one of the consultants, who was trained in this procedure in 2004 at the Leuven OPCAB school. The frequency of OPCAB operations increased abruptly in 2005 from 5% to 43% and then increased gradually to 67% (n = 546) by 2008 (total, 1781 OPCAB cases and 1563 on-pump cases). The in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates for OPCAB surgeries (n = 10 [0.6%] and 21 [1.2%], respectively) were lower than for on-pump surgeries (n = 27 [1.7%] and 26 [1.7%], respectively). Stroke rates were also lower for OPCAB surgeries (7 cases [0.4%] versus 15 cases [1%]). The lower risk of stroke in the OPCAB group was significant (P popularity, and a top national rank). The change from conventional CABG to TOPCAB was effective in decreasing the incidence and severity of stroke, in developing a team routine and a positive team attitude, and in producing excellent benchmarking results. The presence of a training and communication deficiency at the beginning of the study suggested an area for further improvement. After 6 years TOPCAB had largely replaced conventional CABG.

  15. Diabetes Mellitus, Preexisting Coronary Heart Disease, and the Risk of Subsequent Coronary Heart Disease Events in Patients Infected With Human Immunodeficiency Virus The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D Study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worm, Signe W.; de Wit, Stephane; Weber, Rainer; Sabin, Caroline A.; Reiss, Peter; El-Sadr, Wafaa; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Kirk, Ole; Fontas, Eric; Dabis, Francois; Law, Matthew G.; Lundgren, Jens D.; Friis-Møller, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Background-Although guidelines in individuals not infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) consider diabetes mellitus (DM) to be a coronary heart disease (CHD) equivalent, there is little information on its association with CHD in those infected with HIV. We investigated the impact of DM

  16. Pre-operative high sensitive C-reactive protein predicts cardiovascular events after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery: A prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balciunas Mindaugas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein is a powerful independent predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease. The relation between C-reactive protein (CRP concentration and in-hospital outcome, after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG, has not yet been established. The study aims to evaluate the predictive value of pre-operative CRP for in-hospital cardiovascular events after CABG surgery. High-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP levels were measured pre-operatively on the day of surgery in 66 patients scheduled for elective on pump CABG surgery. Post-operative cardiovascular events such as death from cardiovascular causes, ischemic stroke, myocardial damage, myocardial infarction and low output heart failure were recorded. During the first 30 days after surgery, 54 patients were free from observed events and 14 developed the following cardiovascular events: 10 (15% had myocardial damage, four (6% had low output heart failure and two (3% suffered stroke. No patients died during the follow-up period. Serum concentration of hs-CRP ≥ 3.3 mg/l (cut-off point obtained by ROC analysis was related to higher risk of post-operative cardiovascular events (36% vs 6%, P = 0.01, myocardial damage (24% vs 6%, P = 0.04 and low output heart failure (12% vs 0%, P = 0.04. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that hs-CRP ≥ 3.3 mg/l ( P = 0.002, O.R.: 19.3 (95% confidence interval (CI 2.9-128.0, intra-operative transfusion of red blood cells ( P = 0.04, O.R.: 9.9 (95% C.I. 1.1-85.5 and absence of diuretics in daily antihypertensive treatment ( P = 0.02, O.R.: 15.1 (95% C.I. 1.4-160.6 were independent predictors of combined cardiovascular event. Patients having hs-CRP value greater or equal to 3.3 mg/l pre-operatively have an increased risk of post-operative cardiovascular events after on pump coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.

  17. Combined assessment of flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity improves the prediction of future coronary events in patients with chronic coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugamata, Wataru; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Uematsu, Manabu; Kitta, Yoshinobu; Fujioka, Daisuke; Saito, Yukio; Kawabata, Ken-ichi; Obata, Jun-ei; Watanabe, Yosuke; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2014-09-01

    Measurement of either flow-mediated endothelium-dependent dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), or intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid artery is useful for risk assessment of future cardiovascular events. This study examined whether combination of these vascular parameters may have an additive effect on the ability of traditional risk factors to predict coronary events in patients with chronic coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients (n=923) with stable CAD had measurements of FMD, baPWV, and maximum IMT (maxIMT), and were prospectively followed up for predictive value of traditional risk factors [area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), 0.67] was increased more by the addition of FMD and baPWV combined (AUC, 0.75) compared with the addition of either maxIMT, FMD, or baPWV alone, or the combination of maxIMT and FMD or maxIMT and baPWV (AUC, 0.67, 0.71, 0.71, 0.71 and 0.71, respectively). The combined addition of FMD and baPWV to the risk assessment algorithms may be useful for risk stratification of chronic CAD patients. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Using Web Crawler Technology for Text Analysis of Geo-Events: A Case Study of the Huangyan Island Incident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H.; Ge, Y. J.

    2013-11-01

    With the social networking and network socialisation have brought more text information and social relationships into our daily lives, the question of whether big data can be fully used to study the phenomenon and discipline of natural sciences has prompted many specialists and scholars to innovate their research. Though politics were integrally involved in the hyperlinked word issues since 1990s, automatic assembly of different geospatial web and distributed geospatial information systems utilizing service chaining have explored and built recently, the information collection and data visualisation of geo-events have always faced the bottleneck of traditional manual analysis because of the sensibility, complexity, relativity, timeliness and unexpected characteristics of political events. Based on the framework of Heritrix and the analysis of web-based text, word frequency, sentiment tendency and dissemination path of the Huangyan Island incident is studied here by combining web crawler technology and the text analysis method. The results indicate that tag cloud, frequency map, attitudes pie, individual mention ratios and dissemination flow graph based on the data collection and processing not only highlight the subject and theme vocabularies of related topics but also certain issues and problems behind it. Being able to express the time-space relationship of text information and to disseminate the information regarding geo-events, the text analysis of network information based on focused web crawler technology can be a tool for understanding the formation and diffusion of web-based public opinions in political events.

  19. Triple antithrombotic therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing coronary artery stenting: hovering among bleeding risk, thromboembolic events, and stent thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menozzi Mila

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dual antiplatelet treatment with aspirin and clopidogrel is the antithrombotic treatment recommended after an acute coronary syndrome and/or coronary artery stenting. The evidence for optimal antiplatelet therapy for patients, in whom long-term treatment oral anticoagulation is mandatory, is however scarce. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the various antithrombotic strategies adopted in this population, we reviewed the available evidence on the management of patients receiving oral anticoagulation, such as a vitamin-k-antagonists, referred for coronary artery stenting. Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent indication for oral anticoagulation. The need of starting antiplatelet therapy in this clinical scenario raises concerns about the combination to choose: triple therapy with warfarin, aspirin, and a thienopyridine being the most frequent and advised. The safety of this regimen appeared suboptimal because of an increased risk in hemorrhagic complications. On the other hand, the combination of oral anticoagulation and an antiplatelet agent is suboptimal in preventing thromboembolic events and stent thrombosis; dual antiplatelet therapy may be considered only when a high hemorrhagic risk and low thromboembolic risk are perceived. Indeed, the need for prolonged multiple-drug antithrombotic therapy increases the bleeding risks when drug eluting stents are used. Since current evidence derives mainly from small, single-center and retrospective studies, large-scale prospective multicenter studies are urgently needed.

  20. Polarization-resolved angular patterns of nematic liquid crystal cells: Topological events driven by incident light polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Vovk, Roman G.; Egorov, Roman I.; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2008-09-01

    We study the angular structure of polarization of light transmitted through a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cell by analyzing the polarization state as a function of the incidence angles and the polarization of the incident wave. The polarization-resolved angular (conoscopic) patterns emerging after the NLC cell illuminated by the convergent light beam are described in terms of the polarization singularities such as C points (points of circular polarization) and L lines (lines of linear polarization). For the homeotropically aligned cell, the Stokes polarimetry technique is used to measure the polarization resolved conoscopic patterns at different values of the ellipticity of the incident light, γell(inc) , impinging onto the cell. Using the exact analytical expressions for the transfer matrix we show that variations of the ellipticity, γell(inc) , induce transformations of the angular pattern exhibiting the effect of avoided L -line crossings and characterized by topological events such as creation and annihilation of the C points. The predictions of the theory are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Association of Type D personality with unhealthy lifestyle, and estimated risk of coronary events in the general Icelandic population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svansdóttir, E.; Denollet, J.; Thorsson, B.; Gudnason, T.; Halldorsdottir, S.; Gudnason, V.; van den Broek, K.C.; Karlsson, D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Type D personality is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality risk in cardiovascular disease patients, but the mechanisms explaining this risk are unclear. We examined whether Type D was associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors, estimated risk of developing

  2. Incidence of thromboembolic events in asymptomatic carriers of IgA anti ß2 glycoprotein-I antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Tortosa

    Full Text Available The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is defined by simultaneous presence of vascular clinical events and antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL. The aPL considered as diagnostics are lupus anticoagulant and antibodies anticardiolipin (aCL and anti-ß2 glycoprotein-I (aB2GP1. During recent years, IgA aB2GP1 antibodies have been associated with thrombotic events both in patients positive, and mainly negative for other aPL, however its value as a pro-thrombotic risk-factor in asymptomatic patients has not been well defined.To test the role of IgA anti B2GP1 as a risk factor for the development of APS-events (thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity in asymptomatic population with a 5-year follow-up.244 patients isolated positive for anti-beta2-glycoprotein I IgA (Group-1 study and 221 negative patients (Group-2 control were studied. All the patients were negative for IgG and IgM aCL.During the follow-up, 45 patients (9.7% had APS-events, 38 positive for IgA-aB2GP1 and 7 negative (15.6% vs 3.2%, p<0.001. The incidence rate of APS-events was 3.1% per year in IgA-aB2GP1 positive patients and 0.6% per year in the control group. Arterial thrombosis were the most frequent APS-events (N = 25, 55% and were mainly observed in Group-1 patients (21 vs 4, p = 0.001. Multivariate analysis were shown as independent risk-factors for the development of APS-events, age, sex (men and presence of IgA-aB2GP1 (odds ratio 5.25, 95% CI 2.24 to 12.32.The presence of IgA-aB2GP1 in people with no history of APS-events is the main independent risk factor for the development of these types of events, mainly arterial thrombosis.

  3. Isolated lung events following radiation for early stage breast cancer: incidence and predictors for primary lung vs metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Buren, Teresa A; Harris, Jay R; Sugarbaker, David J; Schneider, Lindsey; Healey, Elizabeth A

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: 1) To define the incidence of isolated lung events in a cohort of women treated with conservative surgery (CS) and radiation therapy (RT) for early stage breast cancer. 2) Among such patients, to define the relative distribution of primary lung cancer, metastatic breast cancer, and indeterminate lesions; and to identify any predictors for a diagnosis of lung vs metastatic breast cancer. 3) To examine the cohort with respect to whether a higher than expected incidence of lung cancer is seen following breast irradiation. Materials and Methods: Between 1968 and 1986, 1865 patients with clinical stage I-II breast cancer were treated with CS and RT; the median follow-up for surviving patients is 129 months. The study population was limited to patients who developed a subsequent isolated lung event as the first site of distant disease. Isolated lung event was defined as disease limited to the thoracic cavity, without evidence of either uncontrolled local breast disease or metastatic disease elsewhere. Diagnosis of the lung event as a primary lung cancer, a metastatic breast lesion, or an indeterminate lesion was documented from the viewpoint of 1) the pathologic analysis and 2) the clinical impression at the time of the lung event. Results: Sixty six of the 1865 patients (3.5%) developed an isolated lung event. The relative distribution of the pathologic and clinical diagnoses is shown below: The 66 lung events were characterized either as a solitary pulmonary nodule (27), multiple nodules (23), pleural effusion alone (10), unknown (2), or miscellaneous other findings (4). Among the 47 patients for whom pathology was available, the diagnosis remained indeterminate for 24 (51%). For patients with a definitive pathologic diagnosis, 69% ((9(13))) of smokers had a new lung cancer compared to 20% ((2(10))) of non-smokers (p=0.036), and 67% ((10(15))) of patients with a solitary pulmonary nodule had lung cancer compared to 14% ((1(7))) for other lung presentations (p

  4. Respiratory physiotherapy and incidence of pulmonary complications in off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery: an observational follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pértega-Díaz Sonia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart surgery is associated with an occurrence of pulmonary complications. The aim of this study was to determine whether pre-surgery respiratory physiotherapy reduces the incidence of post-surgery pulmonary complications. Methods Observational study of 263 patients submitted to off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG surgery at the A Coruña University Hospital (Spain. 159 (60.5% patients received preoperative physiotherapy. The fact that patients received preoperative physiotherapy or not was related to whether they were admitted to the cardiac surgery unit or to an alternative unit due to a lack of beds. A physiotherapist provided a daily session involving incentive spirometry, deep breathing exercises, coughing and early ambulation. A logistic regression analysis was carried out in order to identify variables associated with pulmonary complications. Results Both groups of patients (those that received physiotherapy and those that did not were similar in age, sex, body mass index, creatinine, ejection fraction, number of affected vessels, O2 basal saturation, prevalence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, exposure to tobacco, age at smoking initiation, number of cigarettes/day and number of years as a smoker. The most frequent postoperative complications were hypoventilation (90.7%, pleural effusion (47.5% and atelectasis (24.7%. In the univariate analysis, prophylactic physiotherapy was associated with a lower incidence of atelectasis (17% compared to 36%, p = 0.01. After taking into account age, sex, ejection fraction and whether the patients received physiotherapy or not, we observed that receiving physiotherapy is the variable with an independent effect on predicting atelectasis. Conclusion Preoperative respiratory physiotherapy is related to a lower incidence of atelectasis.

  5. Respiratory physiotherapy and incidence of pulmonary complications in off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery: an observational follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yánez-Brage, Isabel; Pita-Fernández, Salvador; Juffé-Stein, Alberto; Martínez-González, Ursicino; Pértega-Díaz, Sonia; Mauleón-García, Angeles

    2009-07-28

    Heart surgery is associated with an occurrence of pulmonary complications. The aim of this study was to determine whether pre-surgery respiratory physiotherapy reduces the incidence of post-surgery pulmonary complications. Observational study of 263 patients submitted to off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery at the A Coruña University Hospital (Spain). 159 (60.5%) patients received preoperative physiotherapy. The fact that patients received preoperative physiotherapy or not was related to whether they were admitted to the cardiac surgery unit or to an alternative unit due to a lack of beds. A physiotherapist provided a daily session involving incentive spirometry, deep breathing exercises, coughing and early ambulation. A logistic regression analysis was carried out in order to identify variables associated with pulmonary complications. Both groups of patients (those that received physiotherapy and those that did not) were similar in age, sex, body mass index, creatinine, ejection fraction, number of affected vessels, O2 basal saturation, prevalence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, exposure to tobacco, age at smoking initiation, number of cigarettes/day and number of years as a smoker. The most frequent postoperative complications were hypoventilation (90.7%), pleural effusion (47.5%) and atelectasis (24.7%). In the univariate analysis, prophylactic physiotherapy was associated with a lower incidence of atelectasis (17% compared to 36%, p = 0.01). After taking into account age, sex, ejection fraction and whether the patients received physiotherapy or not, we observed that receiving physiotherapy is the variable with an independent effect on predicting atelectasis. Preoperative respiratory physiotherapy is related to a lower incidence of atelectasis.

  6. Incidence and predictors of target lesion failure in a multiethnic Asian population receiving the SYNERGY coronary stent: A prospective all-comers registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishna, Rajiv; Kristanto, William; Liu, Li; Chan, Siew-Pang; Loh, Poay Huan; Tay, Edgar L; Chan, Koo Hui; Chan, Mark Y; Lee, Chi-Hang; Low, Adrian F; Tan, Huay Cheem; Loh, Joshua P

    2018-03-07

    To evaluate the target lesion failure (TLF) rate of the SYNERGY stent in all-comers, multiethnic Asian population. Currently, most drug eluting stents deliver anti-proliferative drugs from a durable polymer which is associated with a risk of late stent thrombosis. The novel everolimus-eluting, platinum chromium SYNERGY stent is coated with a bioabsorbable abluminal polymer that resolves within 4 months. This was a prospective, single center registry of consecutive patients treated with the SYNERGY stent between December 2012 and April 2015. The primary outcome was the incidence of TLF, defined as the combination of cardiac death, target vessel myocardial infarction, or clinically driven target lesion revascularization (TLR) at 1 year. A total of 807 patients received the SYNERGY stent during the study period. One-year clinical outcome data was available for 765 patients (94.8%) and were considered for statistical analysis. The mean age was 60.7 ± 10.8 years, and 83.4% were males. Patients with acute myocardial infarction consisted of 50.3% (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: 23.0%, Non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: 27.3%) of the study population. The treated lesions were complex (ACC/AHA type B2/C: 72.7%). The primary end point of TLF at 1 year was 5.8%. Rates of cardiac mortality, target vessel myocardial infarction, and TLR were 4.2, 1.0, and 1.3%, respectively, at 1 year. Predictors of the incidence and time to early TLF were female gender, Malay ethnicity, diabetes mellitus, acute myocardial infarction at presentation, a prior history of coronary artery bypass surgery and the presence of lesion calcification. The incidence of definite stent thrombosis was 0.4% at 1 year. In this registry, the use of the SYNERGY stent was associated with low rates of TLF at 1 year. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Perioperative ascorbic acid supplementation does not reduce the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation in on-pump coronary artery bypass graft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonic, Miha; Lipovec, Robert; Gregorcic, Franc; Juric, Peter; Kosir, Gorazd

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia following cardiac surgery. It is associated with increased hemodynamic instability, systemic embolization, and complications linked to anticoagulant therapy. Oxidative stress and consequent electrophysiological remodeling have been proposed as a cause of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Ascorbic acid supplementation was suggested as a novel and effective preventive agent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of ascorbic acid to reduce the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) patients. A prospective randomized single-center trial was conducted in patients scheduled for an elective on-pump CABG surgery. Subjects in the ascorbic acid group received 2g of ascorbic acid 24h and 2h before the surgery and 1g twice a day for five days after the surgery. Postoperatively, the patients were monitored for atrial fibrillation and other complications. The ascorbic acid group consisted of 52 patients and the control group included 53 patients. The groups were well matched for baseline demographics, preoperative medications, comorbidities, and had similar intraoperative characteristics. The incidence of atrial fibrillation in the ascorbic acid group was 13.5% and 18.9% in the control group (p=0.314). No difference was found between groups in the time of occurrence of atrial fibrillation (3.71±1.89 vs. 2.91±1.58 days after the surgery; p=0.342). There was also no difference in the other observed postoperative complications. The results of this study do not support the effectiveness of ascorbic acid supplementation in reducing the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation in elective on-pump CABG patients. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Changes in geriatric nutritional risk index and risk of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events in incident peritoneal dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Jung Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI is a validated nutritional assessment method, and lower GNRI values are closely associated with adverse clinical outcomes in dialysis patients. This study investigated the impact of changes in GNRI during the first year of dialysis on cardiovascular outcomes in incident peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. Methods: We reviewed medical records in 133 incident PD patients to determine GNRI at the start of PD and after 12 months. Patients were categorized into improved (delta GNRI > 0 and worsening/stationary (delta GNRI ≤ 0 groups. The primary outcome was major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs. Results: During a mean follow-up of 51.1 months, the primary outcome was observed in 42 patients (31.6%. The baseline GNRI at PD initiation was not significantly associated with MACCEs (log-rank test, P = 0.40. However, the cumulative event-free rate was significantly lower in the worsening or stationary GNRI group than in the improved group (log-rank test, P = 0.004. Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that a worsening or stationary GNRI was independently associated with higher risk for MACCEs (hazard ratio, 2.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.15–5.29; P = 0.02. In subgroup analysis, patients with worsening or stationary GNRI were at significantly greater risk for MACCEs in both the lower (P = 0.04 and higher (P = 0.01 baseline GNRI groups. Conclusion: Baseline GNRI was not associated with MACCEs, but patients with deteriorating or stationary nutritional status were at significantly greater risk for MACCEs, suggesting that serial monitoring of nutritional status is important to stratify cardiovascular risk in incident PD patients.

  9. Grade scale for nuclear incidents or accidents and events in radioprotection within the frame of radio-therapies; Les echelles de classement des incidents et accidents nucleaires et des evenements en radioprotection dans le cadre de radiotherapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This leaflet presents the French 'ASN-SFRO' classification scale which assigns grades to radioprotection events occurring within the frame of a radiotherapy procedure. Depending on the severity, this scale defines different accident, incident or event levels. Classification criteria are commented. They are related to recognized consequences, to dose and potential effects, or to the number of exposed patients

  10. Incident Cardiovascular Events and Death in Individuals With Restless Legs Syndrome or Periodic Limb Movements in Sleep: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendzerska, Tetyana; Kamra, Maneesha; Murray, Brian J; Boulos, Mark I

    2017-03-01

    To systematically review the current evidence examining restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) as prognostic factors for all-cause mortality and incident cardiovascular events (CVE) in longitudinal studies published in the adult population. All English language studies (from 1947 to 2016) found through Medline and Embase, as well as bibliographies of identified articles, were considered eligible. Quality was evaluated using published guidelines. Among 18 cohorts (reported in 13 manuscripts), 15 evaluated the association between RLS and incident CVE and/or all-cause mortality and 3 between PLMS and CVE and mortality. The follow-up periods ranged from 2 to 20 years. A significant relationship between RLS and CVE was reported in four cohorts with a greater risk suggested for severe RLS with longer duration and secondary forms of RLS. Although a significant association between RLS and all-cause mortality was reported in three cohorts, a meta-analysis we conducted of the four studies of highest quality found no association (pooled hazard ratio = 1.09, 95% confidence interval: 0.80-1.78). A positive association between PLMS and CVE and/or mortality was demonstrated in all included studies with a greater risk attributed to PLMS with arousals. The available evidence on RLS as a prognostic factor for incident CVE and all-cause mortality was limited and inconclusive; RLS duration, severity, and secondary manifestations may be important in understanding a possible relationship. Although very limited, the current evidence suggests that PLMS may be a prognostic factor for incident CVE and mortality. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Relationship of testis size and LH levels with incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events in older men with sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastrelli, Giulia; Corona, Giovanni; Lotti, Francesco; Boddi, Valentina; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of testis volume (TV) is a reliable clinical procedure that predicts reproductive fitness. However, the role of TV in overall and cardiovascular (CV) fitness has never been studied. The study aims to analyze the clinical correlates of TV in patients with sexual dysfunction (SD) and to verify the value of this parameter and its determinants (i.e., luteinizing hormone [LH] levels) in predicting major adverse CV events (MACE). A consecutive series of 2,809 subjects without testiculopathy (age 51.2 ± 13.1) consulting for SD was retrospectively studied. A subset of this sample (n=1,395) was enrolled in a longitudinal study. Several clinical and biochemical parameters were investigated. After adjusting for confounders, TV was negatively associated with both LH (Adj. r=-0.234; PTV (hazard ratio [HR]=1.041 [1.021-1.061], PTV (Adj. r=0.157; PTV were only partially related to changes in gonadotropin levels. In the longitudinal analysis, after adjusting for confounders, TV was associated with a higher incidence of MACE (HR=1.066 [1.013-1.122]; P=0.014), and the stepwise introduction in the Cox model of lifestyle factors, mean blood pressure and body mass index progressively smoothed out the association, which was no longer statistically significant in the fully adjusted model. Conversely, the association of higher LH levels with increased incidence of MACE was not attenuated by the progressive introduction of the aforementioned confounders in the model. Our data show that in SD subjects, TV and LH are associated with an adverse CV risk profile that mediate the higher TV-associated incidence of MACE. High LH levels are an independent marker of CV risk. Further studies are needed for clarifying determinants and mechanisms of testis enlargement that, beyond gonadotropins, could mediate the increased incidence of MACE. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  12. Incidence and types of adverse events during mass vaccination campaign with the meningococcal a conjugate vaccine (MENAFRIVAC™) in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateudjieu, Jerome; Stoll, Beat; Nguefack-Tsague, Georges; Yakum, Martin Ndinakie; Mengouo, Marcellin Nimpa; Genton, Blaise

    2016-10-01

    A new vaccine against meningitis A was introduced in Africa meningitis belt in 2010. This study was planned to describe the incidence and types of adverse events following immunization (AEFIs) with a new conjugate vaccine against meningitis A (MenAfrivac™) in a Cameroonian vaccination campaign. The campaign was conducted in Adamawa and North West regions in December 2012 and the AEFIs enhanced surveillance from December 2012 to January 2013. Incidence rates (IR) of overall and serious AEFIs were estimated as well as AEFI incidence rates by type, age group and region. AEFI symptoms were aggregated in System Organ Class (SOC). Of 2 093 381 persons vaccinated, 1352 AEFIs were reported. Of these, 228 (16.9%) were excluded because of not meeting inclusion criteria and 1124 (83.1%) included (IR: 53.7/100 000 doses administered/8 weeks). Of the 82 serious AEFIs reported, 52 (63.2%) met the case definition. 23 (28.1%) were investigated, of which 4 (17.4%) were probably vaccine product-related reactions (IR: 0.2/100 000 doses administered/8 weeks). Fever was the most common reported AEFI with 626 cases (IR: 31.4/100 000 doses administered/8 weeks). The proportion of people with the SOC "Gastrointestinal disorders" was significantly lower in ages 5-15 and 16-29 years than 1-4 years [aRR = 0.63(0.42-0.93) and 0.54(0.36-0.81) respectively]. Incidence and types of AEFI reported during MenAfriVac TM vaccination campaign organized in Cameroon in 2012 did not suggest concern regarding the vaccine safety. Differences in frequency of AEFIs types per age group could guide the monitoring of AEFIs frequency in future campaigns. Efforts are needed to improve the investigation rate of serious AEFIs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Efficacy of topical chamomile on the incidence of phlebitis due to an amiodarone infusion in coronary care patients: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi-Ardani, Maryam; Yekefallah, Leili; Asefzadeh, Saeed; Nassiri-Asl, Marjan

    2017-09-01

    Amiodarone is a useful antiarrhythmic drug. Phlebitis, caused by intravenous amiodarone, is common in patients in coronary care units (CCUs). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical chamomile on the incidence of phlebitis due to the administration of an amiodarone infusion into the peripheral vein. This was a randomized, double-blind clinical trial, conducted on 40 patients (n = 20 per group) in two groups-an intervention group (chamomile ointment) and a control group (lanoline, as a placebo), hospitalized in the CCUs and undergoing an amiodarone infusion into the peripheral vein over 24 h. Following the cannulation and commencement of the infusion, placebo or chamomile ointment was rubbed in, up to 10 cm superior to the catheter and repeated every eight hours for three days. The cannula site was then assessed based on the phlebitis checklist. The incidence and time of occurrence of phlebitis, relative risk, severity of phlebitis were the main outcome measures. Nineteen patients (19/20) in the control group had phlebitis on the first day of the study and one patient (20/20) on the second day. In the intervention group, phlebitis occurred in 13 cases (13/20) on the first day and another two (2/7) was found on the second day. The incidence of phlebitis was significantly different between two groups (P = 0.023). The cumulative incidence of phlebitis in the intervention group (15/20) is significantly later and lower than that in the control group (20/20) during two days (P = 0.008). Two patients in the intervention group did not develop phlebitis at all during the 3-day study. Also, the relative risk of phlebitis in the two groups was 0.68 (P = 0.008 5). A significant difference was not observed with regard to phlebitis severity in both groups. It seems that phlebitis occurred to a lesser extent and at a later time frame in the intervention group compared to control group. Topical chamomile may be effective in decreasing the incidence of phlebitis

  14. Psychosocial factors during the first year after a coronary heart disease event in cases and referents. Secondary Prevention in Uppsala Primary Health Care Project (SUPRIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toss Henrik

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large number of studies have reported on the psychosocial risk factor pattern prior to coronary heart disease events, but few have investigated the situation during the first year after an event, and none has been controlled. We therefore performed a case-referent study in which the prevalence of a number of psychosocial factors was evaluated. Methods Three hundred and forty-six coronary heart disease male and female cases no more than 75 years of age, discharged from hospital within the past 12 months, and 1038 referents from the general population, matched to the cases by age, sex and place of living, received a postal questionnaire in which information on lifestyle, psychosocial and quality of life measures were sought. Results The cases were, as expected, on sick leave to a larger extent than the referents, reported poorer fitness, poorer perceived health, fewer leisure time activities, but unexpectedly reported better social support, and more optimistic views of the future than the referents. There were no significant case-referent differences in everyday life stress, stressful life events, vital exhaustion, depressive mood, coping or life orientation test. However, women reported less favourable situations than men regarding stressful life events affecting others, vital exhaustion, depressive mood, coping, self-esteem, sleep, and symptom reporting, and female cases reported the most unfavourable situation of all groups. Conclusion In this first controlled study of the situation during the first year after a CHD event disease and gender status both appeared to be determinants of psychological well-being, with gender status apparently the strongest. This may have implications for cardiac rehabilitation programmes.

  15. Coronary revascularization does not decrease cardiac events in patients with stable ischemic heart disease but might do in those who showed moderate to severe ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroi, Masao; Yamashina, Akira; Tsukamoto, Kazumasa; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2012-07-12

    As an initial management strategy for stable ischemic heart disease (IHD), coronary revascularization therapy is thought to be equal to optimal medical therapy alone regarding prognosis. Whether or not the effects of revascularization on the prognosis of patients with stable IHD are associated with the amount of ischemic myocardium detected by nuclear stress imaging was evaluated. This retrospective study analyzed data from 4629 patients with suspected or known IHD who underwent gated stress myocardial-perfusion SPECT at 117 hospitals in Japan. The follow-up periods were three years and the combined endpoints consisted of cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure requiring hospitalization. After matching propensity scores between patients who underwent early revascularization and those who did not (n=316 per group), we compared cardiac event rates in relation to the amount of ischemic myocardium. Cardiac event rates did not significantly differ between patients who underwent early revascularization and those who did not (5.4% vs. 6.4%). Among patients with ≤ 5%, 6-10%, and >10% ischemic myocardium, cardiac event rates were 8%, 3% and 0% respectively, who underwent early revascularization compared with 4.5%, 6.1%, and 12.3%, respectively, among those who did not. Cardiac event rates were significantly lower among patients with >10% ischemic myocardium who underwent early revascularization compared with those who did not (0% vs. 12.3%, p=0.0062). Coronary revascularization for stable IHD does not decrease major cardiac events in all patients but might do in patients with moderate to severe ischemia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Predicting neuropathy and reactions in leprosy at diagnosis and before incident events-results from the INFIR cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Cairns S Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy is a disease of skin and peripheral nerves. The process of nerve injury occurs gradually through the course of the disease as well as acutely in association with reactions. The INFIR (ILEP Nerve Function Impairment and Reactions Cohort was established to identify clinically relevant neurological and immunological predictors for nerve injury and reactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study, in two centres in India, recruited 188 new, previously untreated patients with multi-bacillary leprosy who had no recent nerve damage. These patients underwent a series of novel blood tests and nerve function testing including motor and sensory nerve conduction, warm and cold detection thresholds, vibrometry, dynamometry, monofilament sensory testing and voluntary muscle testing at diagnosis and at monthly follow up for the first year and every second month for the second year. During the 2 year follow up a total of 74 incident events were detected. Sub-clinical changes to nerve function at diagnosis and during follow-up predicted these new nerve events. Serological assays at baseline and immediately before an event were not predictive; however, change in TNF alpha before an event was a statistically significant predictor of that event. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings increase our understanding of the processes of nerve damage in leprosy showing that nerve function impairment is more widespread than previously appreciated. Any nerve involvement, including sub-clinical changes, is predictive of further nerve function impairment. These new factors could be used to identify patients at high risk of developing impairment and disability.

  17. The impact of chronic kidney disease as a predictor of major cardiac events in patients with no evidence of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuhashi, Tatsuhiko; Moroi, Masao; Joki, Nobuhiko; Hase, Hiroki; Masai, Hirofumi; Kunimasa, Taeko; Nakazato, Ryo; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Sugi, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    Normal stress myocardial perfusion images (MPI) generally show good prognosis for cardiovascular events. However, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the important risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD), and the interpretation of normal stress MPI has not been well established in CKD patients with no evidence of CAD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term prognostic value of stress MPI in CKD patients with no evidence of myocardial ischemia or infarction. Patients who had no history but were suspected of CAD and had normal stress MPI (n=307, male=208, age=67 years, CKD/non-CKD=46/261) were followed-up for 4.5 years. CKD was defined as a glomerular filtration ratio of 2 and/or persistent proteinuria. Cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and unstable angina requiring hospitalization were defined as major cardiac events. Major cardiac events were observed in 3 of 261 (1.1%) non-CKD patients and 6 of 46 (13%) CKD patients (p<0.001, with log-rank test). CKD was an independent risk factor for major cardiac events (hazard ratio=13.1, p<0.001, multivariate Cox regression analysis). Normal stress MPI does not always promise a good prognosis for major cardiac events. Even in patients with no evidence of CAD from stress MPI, CKD can be an independent and significant risk factor for major cardiac events. (author)

  18. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 polymorphism associates with recurrent coronary event risk in patients with high HDL and C-reactive protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, James P; Salzman, Peter; Ryan, Dan; Moss, Arthur J; Zareba, Wojciech; Sparks, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate whether fibrinolysis plays a role in establishing recurrent coronary event risk in a previously identified group of postinfarction patients. This group of patients was defined as having concurrently high levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and C-reactive protein (CRP) and was previously demonstrated to be at high-risk for recurrent coronary events. Potential risk associations of a genetic polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) were probed as well as potential modulatory effects on such risk of a polymorphism of low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP-1), a scavenger receptor known to be involved in fibrinolysis in the context of cellular internalization of plasminogen activator/plansminogen activator inhibitor complexes. To this end, Cox multivariable modeling was performed as a function of genetic polymorphisms of PAI-2 (SERPINB, rs6095) and LRP-1 (LRP1, rs1800156) as well as a set of clinical parameters, blood biomarkers, and genetic polymorphisms previously demonstrated to be significantly and independently associated with risk in the study population including cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP, rs708272), p22phox (CYBA, rs4673), and thrombospondin-4 (THBS4, rs1866389). Risk association was demonstrated for the reference allele of the PAI-2 polymorphism (hazard ratio 0.41 per allele, 95% CI 0.20-0.84, p=0.014) along with continued significant risk associations for the p22phox and thrombospondin-4 polymorphisms. Additionally, further analysis revealed interaction of the LRP-1 and PAI-2 polymorphisms in generating differential risk that was illustrated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. We conclude from the study that fibrinolysis likely plays a role in establishing recurrent coronary risk in postinfarction patients with concurrently high levels of HDL-C and CRP as manifested by differential effects on risk by polymorphisms of several genes linked to key

  19. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 polymorphism associates with recurrent coronary event risk in patients with high HDL and C-reactive protein levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Corsetti

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to investigate whether fibrinolysis plays a role in establishing recurrent coronary event risk in a previously identified group of postinfarction patients. This group of patients was defined as having concurrently high levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and C-reactive protein (CRP and was previously demonstrated to be at high-risk for recurrent coronary events. Potential risk associations of a genetic polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2 were probed as well as potential modulatory effects on such risk of a polymorphism of low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP-1, a scavenger receptor known to be involved in fibrinolysis in the context of cellular internalization of plasminogen activator/plansminogen activator inhibitor complexes. To this end, Cox multivariable modeling was performed as a function of genetic polymorphisms of PAI-2 (SERPINB, rs6095 and LRP-1 (LRP1, rs1800156 as well as a set of clinical parameters, blood biomarkers, and genetic polymorphisms previously demonstrated to be significantly and independently associated with risk in the study population including cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP, rs708272, p22phox (CYBA, rs4673, and thrombospondin-4 (THBS4, rs1866389. Risk association was demonstrated for the reference allele of the PAI-2 polymorphism (hazard ratio 0.41 per allele, 95% CI 0.20-0.84, p=0.014 along with continued significant risk associations for the p22phox and thrombospondin-4 polymorphisms. Additionally, further analysis revealed interaction of the LRP-1 and PAI-2 polymorphisms in generating differential risk that was illustrated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. We conclude from the study that fibrinolysis likely plays a role in establishing recurrent coronary risk in postinfarction patients with concurrently high levels of HDL-C and CRP as manifested by differential effects on risk by polymorphisms of several genes linked

  20. Effect of Hurricane Katrina on the incidence of acute coronary syndrome at a primary angioplasty center in New Orleans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Sandeep; Menachem, Jonathan; Srivastav, Sudesh K; Delafontaine, Patrice; Irimpen, Anand

    2009-10-01

    In August 2005, New Orleans was hit by Hurricane Katrina, the costliest natural disaster in US history. Previous studies have shown an increase in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the immediate hours to weeks after natural disasters. The goals of our study were to detect any long-term increase in the incidence of AMI after Katrina and to investigate any pertinent contributing factors. This was a single-center retrospective cohort observational study. Patients admitted with AMI to Tulane Health Sciences Center hospital in the 2 years before Katrina and in the 2 years after the hospital reopened (5 months after Katrina) were identified from hospital records. The 2 groups (pre- and post-Katrina) were compared for prespecified demographic and clinical data. In the post-Katrina group, there were 246 admissions for AMI, out of a total census of 11,282 patients (2.18%), as compared with 150 AMI admissions out of a total of 21,229 patients (0.71%) in the pre-Katrina group (P affected (P housing (P = 0.003). The role of chronic stress in the pathogenesis of AMI is poorly understood, especially in the aftermath of natural disasters. Our data suggest that Katrina was associated with prolonged loss of employment and insurance, decreased access to preventive health services, and an increased incidence of AMI. In addition, it appears that chronic stress after a natural disaster can be associated with tobacco abuse and medication and therapeutic noncompliance. We found a 3-fold increased incidence of AMI more than 2 years after Hurricane Katrina. Even allowing for the loss of some local hospitals after the disaster, this represents a significant change in overall health of the study population and supports the need for further study into the health effects of chronic stress.

  1. The incidence and management of cutaneous adverse events of the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Owczarek

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is found in many cancers, including those of the head and neck area, non-small-cell lung cancer, and colorectal, cervical, prostate, breast, ovary, stomach, and pancreatic cancer. The EGFR inhibitors are used at present in the treatment of such cancers. Skin lesions that develop during and after cancer treatment may be due to specific cytostatics, molecular-targeted drugs, radiation therapy, complementary therapy, or the cancer itself, and hence knowledge is essential to distinguish between them. The mechanism through which skin toxicity arises during treatment with EGFR inhibitors is not well known, but seems to be due to the modification of the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signal path associated with its activation, which results in the similarity between the adverse effects of EGFR inhibitors and the treatment of melanoma with BRAF and MEK inhibitors. The most common side effects are pruritus, xerosis, papulopustular rash, hand-foot skin reaction, alopecia and dystrophy of the hair, and paronychia. This work presents options for prevention and suggestions for managing these adverse events, which are of importance in the care of patients undergoing oncological treatment.

  2. Morphological study on coronary ostial and clinicoangiographic analysis of isolated coronary ostial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanoh, Tatsuji

    2007-01-01

    A morphological study of coronary ostia was performed in 70 autopsied human hearts, with particular attention being focused on the funnel-shaped structure, aging changes, and relation to atherosclerosis. The following results were obtained: The ostium is particularly well-defined and forms a funnel-shaped structure. The structure is predominantly a double circular shape on the right and comet-shaped on the left. The funnel-shaped structure of coronary ostia is characterized by a longitudinal smooth muscle arrangement in the inner layer and circular one in the outer layer. Including overhang formation, coronary sclerosis of the ostium appears mainly on the upper margin of the funnel-shaped structure of the right ostium and at the upper right margin of the left. In ischemic heart disease, along with changes in coronary arteries themselves, changes in the ostia of these arteries should be paid close attention. Ostial stenosis of the coronary artery in the absence of distal vessel obstructions, isolated ostial stenosis, is a rare form of coronary artery disease. In a previous review of the international literature, the incidence of coronary ostial stenosis varied between 0.13% and 2.7%. Among 7,500 patients undergoing selective coronary cineangiography at Juntendo University Hospital and Juntendo Urayasu Hospital from 1975 to 1990, five women (0.07%) were diagnosed as having ''isolated coronary ostial stenosis'', of which the cause is unknown. Atherosclerosis, particularly early premature atherome, congenital coronary anomaly, fibro-muscular dysplasia, Takayasu's aortitis, humoral factors, spasm, and iatrogenic events have been considered as its causes. In contrast to usual atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, patients with isolated coronary ostial stenosis of unknown etiology were characterized as being middle-aged, premenopausal, slender females having few coronary risk factors, experiencing severe angina pector is with marked ischemic electrocardiogram changes

  3. Fractional Flow Reserve and Cardiac Events in Coronary Artery Disease: Data From a Prospective IRIS-FFR Registry (Interventional Cardiology Research Incooperation Society Fractional Flow Reserve).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jung-Min; Park, Duk-Woo; Shin, Eun-Seok; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Nam, Chang-Wook; Doh, Joon-Hyung; Kim, Jun Hong; Chae, In-Ho; Yoon, Jung-Han; Her, Sung-Ho; Seung, Ki-Bae; Chung, Woo-Young; Yoo, Sang-Yong; Lee, Jin Bae; Choi, Si Wan; Park, Kyungil; Hong, Taek Jong; Lee, Sang Yeub; Han, Minkyu; Lee, Pil Hyung; Kang, Soo-Jin; Lee, Seung-Whan; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Cheol Whan; Park, Seong-Wook; Park, Seung-Jung

    2017-06-06

    We evaluated the prognosis of deferred and revascularized coronary stenoses after fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurement to assess its revascularization threshold in clinical practice. The IRIS-FFR registry (Interventional Cardiology Research In-cooperation Society Fractional Flow Reserve) prospectively enrolled 5846 patients with ≥1coronary lesion with FFR measurement. Revascularization was deferred in 6468 lesions and performed in 2165 lesions after FFR assessment. The primary end point was major adverse cardiac events (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and repeat revascularization) at a median follow-up of 1.9 years and analyzed on a per-lesion basis. A marginal Cox model accounted for correlated data in patients with multiple lesions, and a model to predict per-lesion outcomes was adjusted for confounding factors. For deferred lesions, the risk of major adverse cardiac events demonstrated a significant, inverse relationship with FFR (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.08; P <0.001). However, this relationship was not observed in revascularized lesions (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-1.02; P =0.70). For lesions with FFR ≥0.76, the risk of major adverse cardiac events was not significantly different between deferred and revascularized lesions. Conversely, in lesions with FFR ≤0.75, the risk of major adverse cardiac events was significantly lower in revascularized lesions than in deferred lesions (for FFR 0.71-0.75, adjusted hazard ratio, 0.47; 95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.89; P =0.021; for FFR ≤0.70, adjusted hazard ratio 0.47; 95% confidence interval, 0.26-0.84; P =0.012). This large, prospective registry showed that the FFR value was linearly associated with the risk of cardiac events in deferred lesions. In addition, revascularization for coronary artery stenosis with a low FFR (≤0.75) was associated with better outcomes than the deferral, whereas for a stenosis with a high FFR (≥0

  4. Incidence and risk factors of serious adverse events during antituberculous treatment in Rwanda: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Lorent

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB and TB-human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV coinfection is a major public health concern in resource-limited settings. Although TB treatment is challenging in HIV-infected patients because of treatment interactions, immunopathological reactions, and concurrent infections, few prospective studies have addressed this in sub-Saharan Africa. In this study we aimed to determine incidence, causes of, and risk factors for serious adverse events among patients on first-line antituberculous treatment, as well as its impact on antituberculous treatment outcome. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Prospective observational cohort study of adults treated for TB at the Internal Medicine department of the Kigali University Hospital from May 2008 through August 2009. Of 263 patients enrolled, 253 were retained for analysis: median age 35 (Interquartile range, IQR 28-40, 55% male, 66% HIV-positive with a median CD4 count 104 cells/mm(3 (IQR 44-248 cells/mm(3. Forty percent had pulmonary TB, 43% extrapulmonary TB and 17% a mixed form. Sixty-four (26% developed a serious adverse event; 58/167 (35% HIV-infected vs. 6/86 (7% HIV-uninfected individuals. Commonest events were concurrent infection (n = 32, drug-induced hepatitis (n = 24 and paradoxical reactions/TB-IRIS (n = 23. HIV-infection (adjusted Hazard Ratio, aHR 3.4, 95% Confidence Interval, CI 1.4-8.7 and extrapulmonary TB (aHR 2, 95%CI 1.1-3.7 were associated with an increased risk of serious adverse events. For TB/HIV co-infected patients, extrapulmonary TB (aHR 2.0, 95%CI 1.1-3.9 and CD4 count <100 cells/mm3 at TB diagnosis (aHR 1.7, 95%CI 1.0-2.9 were independent predictors. Adverse events were associated with an almost two-fold higher risk of unsuccessful treatment outcome at 6 months (HR 1.89, 95%CI 1.3-3.0. CONCLUSION: Adverse events frequently complicate the course of antituberculous treatment and worsen treatment outcome, particularly in patients with extrapulmonary

  5. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis of the correlation of Chinese medicine syndrome evolvement and cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Li, Si-wei; Shang, Qing-hua; Fu, Chang-geng; Gao, Zhu-ye; Xu, Hao; Shi, Da-zhuo; Chen, Ke-ji

    2014-05-01

    To analyze the correlation of Chinese medicine syndrome evolvement and cardiovascular: events in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD). This prospective cohort study investigated and: collected the clinical information of patients with stable CHD and observed the syndrome type at the baseline and 6-month at follow-up, as well as the cardiovascular events during the 6-month and 12-month follow-up. The patients were divided into the event group and the non-event group. The interaction and the impact of syndrome evolvement on cardiovascular events were examined through multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) analysis and the results were verified by Chi-square test. Totally 1,333 of 1,503 stable CHD patients enrolled met the inclusion criteria: of MDR analysis. Among them, 959 (71.9%) cases were males and 374 (28.1%) cases were females. Thirty seven cases had cardiovascular events during 6 to 12 months after the study began. The results of the MDR analysis and verification using Chi-square test showed that the development of cardiovascular events was positively correlated with interaction between blood stasis and toxic syndrome at the baseline, blood stasis at the baseline and qi deficiency at the 6-month follow-up, toxic syndrome at the baseline and qi deficiency at the 6-month follow-up, toxic syndrome at the base line and blood stasis at the 6-month follow-up, qi deficiency and blood stasis at the 6-month follow-up (P<0.05 for all). Blood stasis, toxic syndrome and qi deficiency are important factors of stable CHD. There: are positive correlation between cardiovascular events and syndrome evolution from blood stasis to qi deficiency, from toxic syndrome to qi deficiency and from toxic syndrome to blood stasis, indicating the pathogenesis of toxin consuming qi, toxin leading to blood-stasis in stable CHD patients prone to recurrent cardiovascular events.

  6. The effect of a disease management algorithm and dedicated postacute coronary syndrome clinic on achievement of guideline compliance: results from the parkland acute coronary event treatment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorio, Jeff; Viswanathan, Sundeep; See, Raphael; Uchal, Linda; McWhorter, Jo Ann; Spencer, Nali; Murphy, Sabina; Khera, Amit; de Lemos, James A; McGuire, Darren K

    2008-01-01

    The application of disease management algorithms by physician extenders has been shown to improve therapeutic adherence in selected populations. It is unknown whether this strategy would improve adherence to secondary prevention goals after acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) in a largely indigent county hospital setting. Patients admitted for ACS were randomized at the time of discharge to usual follow-up care versus the same care with the addition of a physician extender visit. Physician extender visits were conducted according to a treatment algorithm based on contemporary practice guidelines. Groups were compared using the primary end point of achievement of low-density lipoprotein treatment goals at 3 months after discharge and achievement of additional evidence-based practice goals. One hundred forty consecutive patients were randomized. A similar proportion of patients returned for study follow-up in both groups at 3 months (54 [79%]/68 in the usual care group vs 57 [79%]/72 in the intervention group; P = 0.97). Among those completing the 3-month visit, a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level less than 100 mg/dL was achieved in 37 (69%) of the usual care patients compared with 35 (57%) of those in the intervention group (P = 0.43). There was no statistical difference in implementation of therapeutic lifestyle changes (smoking cessation, cardiac rehabilitation, or exercise) between groups. Prescription rates of evidence-based therapeutics at 3 months were similar in both groups. The implementation of a post-ACS clinic run by a physician extender applying a disease management algorithm did not measurably improve adherence to evidence-based secondary prevention treatment goals. Despite initially high rates of evidence-based treatment at discharge, adherence with follow-up appointments and sustained implementation of evidence-based therapies remains a significant challenge in this high-risk cohort.

  7. Effects of Optimism and Gratitude on Physical Activity, Biomarkers, and Readmissions After an Acute Coronary Syndrome: The Gratitude Research in Acute Coronary Events Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Jeff C; Beale, Eleanor E; Celano, Christopher M; Beach, Scott R; Belcher, Arianna M; Moore, Shannon V; Suarez, Laura; Motiwala, Shweta R; Gandhi, Parul U; Gaggin, Hanna K; Januzzi, James L

    2016-01-01

    Positive psychological constructs, such as optimism, are associated with beneficial health outcomes. However, no study has separately examined the effects of multiple positive psychological constructs on behavioral, biological, and clinical outcomes after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Accordingly, we aimed to investigate associations of baseline optimism and gratitude with subsequent physical activity, prognostic biomarkers, and cardiac rehospitalizations in post-ACS patients. Participants were enrolled during admission for ACS and underwent assessments at baseline (2 weeks post-ACS) and follow-up (6 months later). Associations between baseline positive psychological constructs and subsequent physical activity/biomarkers were analyzed using multivariable linear regression. Associations between baseline positive constructs and 6-month rehospitalizations were assessed via multivariable Cox regression. Overall, 164 participants enrolled and completed the baseline 2-week assessments. Baseline optimism was significantly associated with greater physical activity at 6 months (n=153; β=102.5; 95% confidence interval, 13.6-191.5; P=0.024), controlling for baseline activity and sociodemographic, medical, and negative psychological covariates. Baseline optimism was also associated with lower rates of cardiac readmissions at 6 months (n=164), controlling for age, sex, and medical comorbidity (hazard ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, [0.86-0.98]; P=0.006). There were no significant relationships between optimism and biomarkers. Gratitude was minimally associated with post-ACS outcomes. Post-ACS optimism, but not gratitude, was prospectively and independently associated with superior physical activity and fewer cardiac readmissions. Whether interventions that target optimism can successfully increase optimism or improve cardiovascular outcomes in post-ACS patients is not yet known, but can be tested in future studies. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique

  8. The Effects of Optimism and Gratitude on Physical Activity, Biomarkers, and Readmissions Following an Acute Coronary Syndrome: The Gratitude Research in Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Jeff C.; Beale, Eleanor E.; Celano, Christopher M.; Beach, Scott R.; Belcher, Arianna M.; Moore, Shannon V.; Suarez, Laura; Motiwala, Shweta R.; Gandhi, Parul U.; Gaggin, Hanna; Januzzi, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Positive psychological constructs, such as optimism, are associated with beneficial health outcomes. However, no study has separately examined the effects of multiple positive psychological constructs on behavioral, biological, and clinical outcomes after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Accordingly, we aimed to investigate associations of baseline optimism and gratitude with subsequent physical activity, prognostic biomarkers, and cardiac rehospitalizations in post-ACS patients. Methods and Results Participants were enrolled during admission for ACS and underwent assessments at baseline (2 weeks post-ACS) and follow-up (6 months later). Associations between baseline positive psychological constructs and subsequent physical activity/biomarkers were analyzed using multivariable linear regression. Associations between baseline positive constructs and 6-month rehospitalizations were assessed via multivariable Cox regression. Overall, 164 participants enrolled and completed the baseline 2-week assessments. Baseline optimism was significantly associated with greater physical activity at 6 months (n=153; β=102.5; 95% confidence interval [13.6-191.5]; p=.024), controlling for baseline activity and sociodemographic, medical, and negative psychological covariates. Baseline optimism was also associated with lower rates of cardiac readmissions at 6 months (N=164), controlling for age, gender, and medical comorbidity (hazard ratio=.92; 95% confidence interval [.86-.98]; p=.006). There were no significant relationships between optimism and biomarkers. Gratitude was minimally associated with post-ACS outcomes. Conclusions Post-ACS optimism, but not gratitude, was prospectively and independently associated with superior physical activity and fewer cardiac readmissions. Whether interventions that target optimism can successfully increase optimism or improve cardiovascular outcomes in post-ACS patients is not yet known, but can be tested in future studies. Clinical

  9. Predictive value of social inhibition and negative affectivity for cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with coronary artery disease: the type D personality construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denollet, Johan; Pedersen, Susanne S; Vrints, Christiaan J; Conraads, Viviane M

    2013-01-01

    Methodological considerations and selected null findings indicate the need to reexamine the Type D construct. We investigated whether associations with cardiac events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) involve the specific combination of negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI), or rather the main effect of either trait alone. In this 5-year follow-up of 541 patients with CAD, the Type D construct (14-item Type D Scale) was tested by examining a) the interaction of continuous NA and SI z scores and b) a four-group classification defined by low/high trait scores. End points were major adverse cardiac events (MACEs; death, myocardial infarction [MI], coronary revascularization) and cardiac death/MI. At follow-up, 113 patients had a MACE, including 47 patients with cardiac death/MI. After adjustment for disease severity, age, sex, and main trait effects, the interaction of NA and SI z scores was associated with MACE (odds ratio [OR] = 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11-1.67). This continuous measure of Type D was also associated with cardiac death/MI (OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.11-1.96) and remained an independent predictor of events after adjustment for depressive symptoms. Using a cutoff of 10 on both NA and SI scales, Type D was associated with an adjusted OR of 1.74 (95% CI = 1.11-2.73) for MACE and an OR of 2.35 (95% CI = 1.26-4.38) for death/MI but was unrelated to noncardiac death. Patients with high NA or SI alone were not at increased risk. Continuous (NA × SI interaction) and dichotomized measures of Type D were associated with cardiovascular events in patients with CAD. Research is needed to explore moderating factors that may alter this association.

  10. Arterial wave reflections and incident cardiovascular events and heart failure: MESA (Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirinos, Julio A; Kips, Jan G; Jacobs, David R; Brumback, Lyndia; Duprez, Daniel A; Kronmal, Richard; Bluemke, David A; Townsend, Raymond R; Vermeersch, Sebastian; Segers, Patrick

    2012-11-20

    This study sought to assess the relationship between central pressure profiles and cardiovascular events (CVEs) in a large community-based sample. Experimental and physiologic data mechanistically implicate wave reflections in the pathogenesis of left ventricular failure and cardiovascular disease, but their association with these outcomes in the general population is unclear. Aortic pressure waveforms were derived from a generalized transfer function applied to the radial pressure waveform recorded noninvasively from 5,960 participants in the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. The central pressure waveform was separated into forward and reflected waves using a physiologic flow waveform. Reflection magnitude (RM = [Reflected/Forward wave amplitude] × 100), augmentation index ([Second/First systolic peak] × 100) and pulse pressure amplification ([Radial/aortic pulse pressure] × 100) were assessed as predictors of CVEs and congestive heart failure (CHF) during a median follow-up of 7.61 years. After adjustment for established risk factors, aortic AIx independently predicted hard CVEs (hazard ratio [HR] per 10% increase: 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01 to 1.14; p = 0.016), whereas PPA independently predicted all CVEs (HR per 10% increase: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.70 to 0.96; p = 0.012). RM was independently predictive of all CVEs (HR per 10% increase: 1.34; 95% CI: 1.08 to 1.67; p = 0.009) and hard CVEs (HR per 10% increase: 1.46; 95% CI: 1.12 to 1.90; p = 0.006) and was strongly predictive of new-onset CHF (HR per 10% increase: 2.69; 95% CI: 1.79 to 4.04; p < 0.0001), comparing favorably to other risk factors for CHF as per various measures of model performance, reclassification, and discrimination. In a fully adjusted model, compared to nonhypertensive subjects with low RM, the HRs (95% CI) for hypertensive subjects with low RM, nonhypertensive subjects with high RM, and hypertensive subjects with high RM were 1.81 (0.85 to 3.86), 2.16 (1.07 to 5.01), and 3

  11. Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor Level Is an Independent Predictor of the Presence and Severity of Coronary Artery Disease and of Future Adverse Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eapen, Danny J; Manocha, Pankaj; Ghasemzedah, Nima

    2014-01-01

    -statistic for a model based on traditional risk factors was improved from 0.72 to 0.74 (P=0.008) with the addition of suPAR. CONCLUSION: Elevated levels of plasma suPAR are associated with the presence and severity of CAD and are independent predictors of death and MI in patients with suspected or known CAD.......INTRODUCTION: Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is an emerging inflammatory and immune biomarker. Whether suPAR level predicts the presence and the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD), and of incident death and myocardial infarction (MI) in subjects with suspected CAD......, is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: We measured plasma suPAR levels in 3367 subjects (67% with CAD) recruited in the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank and followed them for adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes of death and MI over a mean 2.1±1.1 years. Presence of angiographic CAD (≥50% stenosis in ≥1 coronary...

  12. Coronary risk in candidates for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a word of caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borioni, Raoul; Tomai, Fabrizio; Pederzoli, Alessio; Fratticci, Laura; Barberi, Filippo; De Luca, Leonardo; Albano, Marzia; Garofalo, Mariano

    2014-11-01

    Current guidelines do not recommend routine coronary evaluation preceding abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) repair in low-risk patients. The purpose of the present study is to report the incidence of coronary lesions in candidates for AAA repair with a Revised Cardiac Risk (Lee) Index (RCRI) coronary angiography and myocardial revascularization (percutaneous coronary intervention, PCI; coronary artery bypass grafting, CABG) before elective open or endovascular AAA repair (January 2005-December 2012). Severe coronary artery disease (CAD) was revealed in 43 patients (28.9%), who underwent successful myocardial revascularization by means of PCI (n.35) or off-pump CABG (n.8). The incidence of severe CAD in patients resulted at low risk on the basis of risk models was approximately 25%. The incidence of severe CAD in asymptomatic patients was 29.8%. Endovascular (n.52, 35.1%) and open (n.96, 64.9%) AAA repair was performed with low morbidity (0.6%) and mortality (0.6%) in 148 patients. The long-term estimated survival (freedom from fatal cardiovascular events) was 97% at 60 months and 82% at 90 months. The incidence of severe correctable CAD is not negligible in low-risk patients scheduled for AAA repair. Waiting for further recommendations based on large population studies of vascular patients, a more extensive indication to coronary angiography and revascularization should be considered in many candidates for AAA repair.

  13. Predictors of coronary heart disease events among asymptomatic persons with low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankstein, Ron; Budoff, Matthew J; Shaw, Leslee J; Goff, David C; Polak, Joseph F; Lima, Joao; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram

    2011-07-19

    Our aim was to identify risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) events among asymptomatic persons with low (≤ 130 mg/dl) low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Even among persons with low LDL-C, some will still experience CHD events and may benefit from more aggressive pharmacologic and lifestyle therapies. The MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) is a prospective cohort of 6,814 participants free of clinical cardiovascular disease. Of 5,627 participants who were not receiving any baseline lipid-lowering therapies, 3,714 (66%) had LDL-C ≤ 130 mg/dl and were included in the present study. Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios were calculated to assess the association of traditional risk factors and biomarkers with CHD events. To determine if subclinical atherosclerosis markers provided additional information beyond traditional risk factors, coronary artery calcium (CAC) and carotid intima media thickness were each separately added to the multivariable model. During a median follow-up of 5.4 years, 120 (3.2%) CHD events were observed. In unadjusted analysis, age, male sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), high triglycerides, and subclinical atherosclerosis markers (CAC >0; carotid intima media thickness ≥1 mm) predicted CHD events. Independent predictors of CHD events included age, male sex, hypertension, diabetes, and low HDL-C. After accounting for all traditional risk factors, the predictive value of CAC was attenuated but remained highly significant. The relationship of all independent clinical predictors remained robust even after accounting for elevated CAC. Among persons with low LDL-C, older age, male sex, hypertension, diabetes, and low HDL-C are associated with adverse CHD events. Even after accounting for all such variables, the presence of CAC provided incremental prognostic value. These results may serve as a basis for deciding which patients with low LDL-C may be considered for

  14. High-Dose Statin Pretreatment Decreases Periprocedural Myocardial Infarction and Cardiovascular Events in Patients Undergoing Elective Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A Meta-Analysis of Twenty-Four Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Peng, Pingan; Zhang, Ou; Xu, Xiaohan; Yang, Shiwei; Zhao, Yingxin; Zhou, Yujie

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that high-dose statin pretreatment may reduce the risk of periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) for certain patients; however, previous analyses have not considered patients with a history of statin maintenance treatment. In this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), we reevaluated the efficacy of short-term high-dose statin pretreatment to prevent PMI and MACE in an expanded set of patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention. Methods We searched the PubMed/Medline database for RCTs that compared high-dose statin pretreatment with no statin or low-dose statin pretreatment as a prevention of PMI and MACE. We evaluated the incidence of PMI and MACE, including death, spontaneous myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization at the longest follow-up for each study for subgroups stratified by disease classification and prior low-dose statin treatment. Results Twenty-four RCTs with a total of 5,526 patients were identified. High-dose statin pretreatment was associated with 59% relative reduction in PMI (odds ratio [OR]: 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.34–0.49; Pstatin pretreatment on MACE was significant for statin-naive patients (OR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.50–0.95; P = 0.02) and prior low dose statin-treated patients (OR: 0.28; 95% CI: 0.12–0.65; P = 0.003); and for patients with acute coronary syndrome (OR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.34–0.79; P = 0.003), but not for patients with stable angina (OR: 0.71; 95% CI 0.45–1.10; P = 0.12). Long-term effects on survival were less obvious. Conclusions High-dose statin pretreatment can result in a significant reduction in PMI and MACE for patients undergoing elective PCI. The positive effect of high-dose statin pretreatment on PMI and MACE is significant for statin-naïve patients and patients with prior treatment. The positive effect of high-dose statin pretreatment on MACE is significant for

  15. Incidence of stressful life events and influence of sociodemographic and clinical variables on the onset of first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butjosa, Anna; Gómez-Benito, Juana; Huerta-Ramos, Elena; Del Cacho, Núria; Barajas, Ana; Baños, Iris; Usall, Judith; Dolz, Montserrat; Sánchez, Bernardo; Carlson, Janina; Maria Haro, Josep; Ochoa, Susana

    2016-11-30

    This study presents a quantitative analysis of the incidence of stressful life events (SLEs) and the variables gender, age at onset, family history and psychotic symptoms in patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP). A descriptive, cross-sectional methodology was used to interview 68 patients with FEP between 13 and 47 years of age. The Psychiatric Epidemiology Research Interview Life Events Scale collected one-year period prior to onset of FEP - used to analyse the subcategories academic, work, love and marriage, children, residence, legal affairs, finances and social activities-, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, and Clinical Global Impression-Schizophrenia scale were used to assess the relevance of certain SLEs during adolescence. Age at onset showed a significant negative correlation with the categories academic and social activities. By contrast, it showed a positive correlation with work and children. A significant relationship was found between paternal family history and social activities and between maternal family history and academic and love and marriage. Finally, an inverse relationship was observed between negative symptoms and the categories children and finance. Depressive symptoms were significantly correlated with the category academic. Our results show the importance of SLEs during adolescence and suggest that there is a clear need to develop preventive actions that promote effective strategies for dealing with the accumulation of psychosocial stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Egg consumption, serum total cholesterol concentrations and coronary heart disease incidence: Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Iso, Hiroyasu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Okada, Katsutoshi; Konishi, Masafumi; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2006-11-01

    Limited egg consumption is often recommended to reduce serum cholesterol concentration for the prevention of CHD. We examined the association of egg consumption and total cholesterol concentration with the risk of CHD. A total of 90 735 subjects (19 856 men and 21 408 women, aged 40-59 years in cohort I; 23 463 men and 26 008 women, aged 40-69 years in cohort II) were followed from 1990-4 to the end of 2001 under the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study. Total cholesterol was obtained in 36 % of the subjects. Men and women were combined for the analyses. The subjects were categorised into four groups according to egg consumption. Subjects with total cholesterol >or=2200 mg/l were less frequent in frequent egg consumption groups in both cohorts (trend Pegg consumption were more likely to avoid a cholesterol-rich diet. Egg consumption was not associated with the risk of CHD, although total cholesterol was significantly related to the risk of CHD. The multivariate hazard ratio of CHD in subjects with total cholesterol >or=2400 v. eggs more frequently, up to almost daily, was not associated with an increase in CHD incidence for middle-aged Japanese men and women. Subjects with hypercholesterolaemia were less frequently in frequent egg consumption groups, probably because they avoided eating eggs.

  17. Noninvasive detection of increased carotid artery temperature in patients with coronary artery disease predicts major cardiovascular events at one year: Results from a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Benetos, Georgios; Koutagiar, Iosif; Barampoutis, Nikolaos; Mitropoulou, Fotini; Davlouros, Periklis; Sfikakis, Petros P; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Siores, Elias; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2017-07-01

    Limited prospective data have been reported regarding the impact of carotid inflammation on cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Microwave radiometry (MWR) is a noninvasive, simple method that has been used for evaluation of carotid artery temperature which, when increased, predicts 'inflamed' plaques with vulnerable characteristics. We prospectively tested the hypothesis that increased carotid artery temperature predicts future cerebro- and cardiovascular events in patients with CAD. Consecutive patients from 3 centers, with documented CAD by coronary angiography, were studied. In both carotid arteries, common carotid intima-media thickness and plaque thickness were evaluated by ultrasound. Temperature difference (ΔT), measured by MWR, was considered as the maximal temperature along the carotid artery minus the minimum; ΔT ≥0.90 °C was assigned as high. Major cardiovascular events (MACE, death, stroke, myocardial infarction or revascularization) were recorded during the following year. In total, 250 patients were studied; of them 40 patients (16%) had high ΔT values in both carotid arteries. MACEs occurred in 30% of patients having bilateral high ΔT versus 3.8% in the remaining patients (p<0.001). Bilateral high ΔT was independently associated with increased one-year MACE rate (HR = 6.32, 95% CI 2.42-16.53, p<0.001, by multivariate cox regression hazard model). The addition of ΔT information on a baseline model based on cardiovascular risk factors and extent of CAD significantly increased the prognostic value of the model (c-statistic increase 0.744 to 0.845, p dif  = 0.05) CONCLUSIONS: Carotid inflammation, detected by MWR, has an incremental prognostic value in patients with documented CAD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Vital Exhaustion and Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate the empiri......OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate.......22-1.85) for prospective studies, and 2.61 (95% CI = 1.66-4.10) for case-control studies using hospital controls. Risk of recurrent events in patients with CHD was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.54-2.68). The pooled adjusted risk of chronic heart failure in healthy populations was 1.37 (95% CI = 1.21-1.56), but this was based...

  19. Primary coronary angioplasty in 9,434 patients during acute myocardial infarction: predictors of major in- hospital adverse events from 1996 to 2000 in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattos Luiz Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify the results after the performance of primary coronary angioplasty in Brazil in the last 4 years. METHODS: During the first 24 hours of acute myocardial infarction onset, 9,434 (12.2% patients underwent primary PTCA. We analyzed the success and occurrence of major in-hospital events, comparing them over the 4-year period. RESULTS: Primary PTCA use increased compared with that of all percutaneous interventions (1996=10.6% vs. 2000=13.1%; p<0.001. Coronary stent implantation increased (1996=20% vs. 2000=71.9%; p<0.001. Success was greater (1998=89.5% vs. 1999=92.5%; p<0.001. Reinfarction decreased (1998=3.9% vs. 99=2.4% vs. 2000=1.5%; p<0.001 as did emergency bypass surgery (1996=0.5% vs. 2000=0.2%; p=0.01. In-hospital deaths remained unchanged (1996=5.7% vs. 2000=5.1%, p=0.53. Balloon PTCA was one of the independent predictors of a higher rate of unsuccessful procedures (odds ratio 12.01 [CI=95%] 1.58-22.94, and stent implantation of lower mortality rates (odds ratio 4.62 [CI=95%] 3.19-6.08. CONCLUSION: The success rate has become progressively higher with a significant reduction in reinfarction and urgent bypass surgery, but in-hospital death remains nearly unchanged. Coronary stenting was a predictor of a lower death rate, and balloon PTCA was associated with greater procedural failure.

  20. Markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are associated with incident cardiovascular disease, all-cause mortality, and progression of coronary calcification in type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Scholten, Bernt Johan; Reinhard, Henrik; Hansen, Tine Willum; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Stehouwer, Coen; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Jacobsen, Peter Karl; Rossing, Peter

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction and their associations with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD), all-cause mortality and progression of coronary artery calcium (CAC) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and microalbuminuria but without known coronary artery disease (CAD). Prospective study including 200 patients receiving multifactorial treatment. Markers of inflammation (TNF-ɑ, sICAM-1, sICAM-3, hsCRP, SAA, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8) and endothelial dysfunction (thrombomodulin, sVCAM-1, sICAM-1, sICAM-3, sE-selectin, sP-selectin) were measured at baseline. Adjustment included traditional CVD risk factors, and full adjustment additionally NT-proBNP and CAC. The "SQRT method" assessed CAC progression after 5.8years, and cut-point was an annualised difference >2.5. Occurrence of CVD (n=40) and all-cause mortality (n=26) was traced after 6.1years. In adjusted and fully adjusted Cox models, TNF-ɑ was a determinant of CVD and all-cause mortality (p≤0.007). Further, in adjusted and fully adjusted logistic regression, TNF-ɑ was related to CAC progression (p≤0.042). Of the other biomarkers, sICAM-3 and thrombomodulin were also associated with both endpoints (p≤0.046), IL-1β with CVD endpoints (p=0.021), and sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 with all-cause mortality (p≤0.005). Higher composite z-scores including all markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction were associated with CVD and all-cause mortality (p≤0.008). In patients with T2D and microalbuminuria without known CAD and receiving multifactorial treatment, biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction were independently associated with CVD, all-cause mortality and CAC progression. Especially TNF-ɑ was a robust determinant, even after adjusting for NT-proBNP and CAC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Traditional Risk Factors Versus Biomarkers for Prediction of Secondary Events in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease: From the Heart and Soul Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Alexis L; Ku, Ivy A; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Christenson, Robert H; DeFilippi, Christopher R; Ganz, Peter; Ix, Joachim H; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Omland, Torbjørn; Sabatine, Marc S; Schiller, Nelson B; Shlipak, Michael G; Skali, Hicham; Takeuchi, Madoka; Vittinghoff, Eric; Whooley, Mary A

    2015-07-06

    Patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) have widely varying prognoses and treatment options. Validated models for risk stratification of patients with CHD are needed. We sought to evaluate traditional and novel risk factors as predictors of secondary cardiovascular (CV) events, and to develop a prediction model that could be used to risk stratify patients with stable CHD. We used independent derivation (912 participants in the Heart and Soul Study) and validation (2876 participants in the PEACE trial) cohorts of patients with stable CHD to develop a risk prediction model using Cox proportional hazards models. The outcome was CV events, defined as myocardial infarction, stroke, or CV death. The annual rate of CV events was 3.4% in the derivation cohort and 2.2% in the validation cohort. With the exception of smoking, traditional risk factors (including age, sex, body mass index, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes) did not emerge as the top predictors of secondary CV events. The top 4 predictors of secondary events were the following: N-terminal pro-type brain natriuretic peptide, high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T, urinary albumin:creatinine ratio, and current smoking. The 5-year C-index for this 4-predictor model was 0.73 in the derivation cohort and 0.65 in the validation cohort. As compared with variables in the Framingham secondary events model, the Heart and Soul risk model resulted in net reclassification improvement of 0.47 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.73) in the derivation cohort and 0.18 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.40) in the validation cohort. Novel risk factors are superior to traditional risk factors for predicting 5-year risk of secondary events in patients with stable CHD. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  2. Association between P2RY12 gene polymorphisms and adverse clinical events in coronary artery disease patients treated with clopidogrel: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Lei; Fu, Yu; Qin, Si-Bei; Liang, Guang-Kai; Liu, Jian; Nie, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Jing; Shi, Lu-Wen; Shao, Hong; Lu, Yun

    2018-05-30

    Investigate the association between P2Y12 Purinoceptor (P2RY12) polymorphisms and adverse clinical events in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients treated with clopidogrel. We performed a comprehensive database search, with a particular focus on P2RY12 polymorphisms and their effects on clopidogrel-treated CAD patients, in the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, clinicaltrials.gov, Web of Science, and Chinese databases from their inceptions to April 8, 2017. The primary endpoints were composite ischemic events (including cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ischemic events), the secondary endpoints were independent cardiovascular events (mortality, non-fatal myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, unstable angina, and target vessel revascularization) and the safety endpoints were bleeding events. Overall 10 studies and 10,810 clopidogrel-treated CAD patients were studied in the present work. Subjects of the common alleles of P2RY12 polymorphisms showed higher risk for composite ischemic events compared to non-carriers (n = 434 of 3268[13.3%] vs. n = 646 of 6133[10.5%]; RR: 1.39, 95%CI: 1.14-1.69; p = 0.001). These allele carriers also showed increased risk for stent thrombosis (RR: 2.67, 95%CI: 1.03-6.91; p = 0.04), myocardial infarction (RR: 1.60, 95%CI: 1.06-2.42; p = 0.03), and unstable angina (RR: 1.72, 95%CI: 1.37-2.16; p events, stent thrombosis, non-fatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina. While we found no significant effect on mortality, target vessel revascularization or bleeding. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Patient safety incident reports related to traditional Japanese Kampo medicines: medication errors and adverse drug events in a university hospital for a ten-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yutaka; Fujimoto, Makoto; Nogami, Tatsuya; Watari, Hidetoshi; Kitahara, Hideyuki; Misawa, Hiroki; Kimbara, Yoshiyuki

    2017-12-21

    Kampo medicine is traditional Japanese medicine, which originated in ancient traditional Chinese medicine, but was introduced and developed uniquely in Japan. Today, Kampo medicines are integrated into the Japanese national health care system. Incident reporting systems are currently being widely used to collect information about patient safety incidents that occur in hospitals. However, no investigations have been conducted regarding patient safety incident reports related to Kampo medicines. The aim of this study was to survey and analyse incident reports related to Kampo medicines in a Japanese university hospital to improve future patient safety. We selected incident reports related to Kampo medicines filed in Toyama University Hospital from May 2007 to April 2017, and investigated them in terms of medication errors and adverse drug events. Out of 21,324 total incident reports filed in the 10-year survey period, we discovered 108 Kampo medicine-related incident reports. However, five cases were redundantly reported; thus, the number of actual incidents was 103. Of those, 99 incidents were classified as medication errors (77 administration errors, 15 dispensing errors, and 7 prescribing errors), and four were adverse drug events, namely Kampo medicine-induced interstitial pneumonia. The Kampo medicine (crude drug) that was thought to induce interstitial pneumonia in all four cases was Scutellariae Radix, which is consistent with past reports. According to the incident severity classification system recommended by the National University Hospital Council of Japan, of the 99 medication errors, 10 incidents were classified as level 0 (an error occurred, but the patient was not affected) and 89 incidents were level 1 (an error occurred that affected the patient, but did not cause harm). Of the four adverse drug events, two incidents were classified as level 2 (patient was transiently harmed, but required no treatment), and two incidents were level 3b (patient was

  4. Off-pump versus on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting: Insights from the Arterial Revascularization Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Umberto; Altman, Douglas G; Gerry, Stephen; Gray, Alastair; Lees, Belinda; Flather, Marcus; Taggart, David P

    2018-04-01

    The long-term effects of off-pump coronary artery bypass continue to be controversial because some studies have reported increased adverse event rates with off-pump coronary artery bypass when compared with on-pump coronary artery bypass. The Arterial Revascularization Trial compared survival after bilateral versus single internal thoracic artery grafting. The choice of off-pump coronary artery bypass versus on-pump coronary artery bypass was based on the surgeon's discretion. We performed a post hoc analysis of the Arterial Revascularization Trial to compare 5-year outcomes with 2 strategies. Among 3102 patients enrolled in the Arterial Revascularization Trial, we selected 1260 patients who underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass versus 1700 patients who underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass with cardioplegic arrest for the present comparison. Primary outcomes were 5-year mortality and incidence of major cardiac and cerebrovascular events, including cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, and revascularization after index procedure. Propensity score matching selected 1260 pairs for final comparison. Stratified Cox models were used for treatment effect estimate. Hospital mortality was comparable between off-pump coronary artery bypass and on-pump coronary artery bypass groups (12 [1.0%] vs 15 [1.2%]; P = .7). Conversion rate to on-pump during off-pump coronary artery bypass was 29 of 1260 (2.3%). When compared with off-pump coronary artery bypass not converted, off-pump coronary artery bypass converted to on-pump presented a remarkably higher hospital mortality (10.3% vs 0.7%; P pump coronary artery bypass and on-pump coronary artery bypass groups, respectively, with no significant difference (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.86-1.52; P = .35). Incidence of major cardiac and cerebrovascular events was 175 (14.3) versus 169 (13.8) in the off-pump coronary artery bypass and on-pump coronary artery bypass groups

  5. Rational and design of a stepped-wedge cluster randomized trial evaluating quality improvement initiative for reducing cardiovascular events among patients with acute coronary syndromes in resource-constrained hospitals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenshen; Wu, Yangfeng; Du, Xin; Li, Xian; Patel, Anushka; Peterson, Eric D; Turnbull, Fiona; Lo, Serigne; Billot, Laurent; Laba, Tracey; Gao, Runlin

    2015-03-01

    Acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality, yet effective ACS treatments are frequently underused in clinical practice. Randomized trials including the CPACS-2 study suggest that quality improvement initiatives can increase the use of effective treatments, but whether such programs can impact hard clinical outcomes has never been demonstrated in a well-powered randomized controlled trial. The CPACS-3 study is a stepped-wedge cluster-randomized trial conducted in 104 remote level 2 hospitals without PCI facilities in China. All hospitalized ACS patients will be recruited consecutively over a 30-month period to an anticipated total study population of more than 25,000 patients. After a 6-month baseline period, hospitals will be randomized to 1 of 4 groups, and a 6-component quality improvement intervention will be implemented sequentially in each group every 6months. These components include the following: establishment of a quality improvement team, implementation of a clinical pathway, training of physicians and nurses, hospital performance audit and feedback, online technical support, and patient education. All patients will be followed up for 6months postdischarge. The primary outcome will be the incidence of in-hospital major adverse cardiovascular events comprising all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction or reinfarction, and nonfatal stroke. The CPACS-3 study will be the first large randomized trial with sufficient power to assess the effects of a multifaceted quality of care improvement initiative on hard clinical outcomes, in patients with ACS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. (n-3) Fatty acid content of red blood cells does not predict risk of future cardiovascular events following an acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarsetoey, Hildegunn; Pönitz, Volker; Grundt, Heidi; Staines, Harry; Harris, William S; Nilsen, Dennis W T

    2009-03-01

    A reduced risk of fatal coronary artery disease has been associated with a high intake of (n-3) fatty acids (FA) and a direct cardioprotective effect by their incorporation into myocardial cells has been suggested. Based on these observations, the omega-3 index (eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid in cell membranes of RBC expressed as percent of total FA) has been suggested as a new risk marker for cardiac death. In this study, our aim was to evaluate the omega-3 index as a prognostic risk marker following hospitalization with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The omega-3 index was measured at admission in 460 patients with an ACS as defined by Troponin-T (TnT) > or = 0.02 microg/L. During a 2-y follow-up, recurrent myocardial infarctions (MI) (defined as TnT > 0.05 microg/L with a typical MI presentation) and cardiac and all-cause mortality were registered. Cox regression analyses were used to relate the risk of new events to the quartiles of the omega-3 index at inclusion. After correction for age, sex, previous heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, brain natriuretic peptide, creatinine, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerol, homocysteine, BMI, and medication, there was no significant reduction in risk for all-cause mortality, cardiac death, or MI with increasing values of the index. In conclusion, we could not confirm the omega-3 index as a useful prognostic risk marker following an ACS.

  7. Diabetes mellitus, preexisting coronary heart disease, and the risk of subsequent coronary heart disease events in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus: the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Signe W; De Wit, Stephane; Weber, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    of DM and preexisting CHD on the development of a new CHD episode among 33,347 HIV-infected individuals in the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D Study). METHODS AND RESULTS: Over 159,971 person-years, 698 CHD events occurred. After adjustment for gender, age, cohort, HIV...

  8. Evaluation and comparison of the Minnesota Code and Novacode for electrocardiographic Q-ST wave abnormalities for the independent prediction of incident coronary heart disease and total mortality (from the Women's Health Initiative).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhu-ming; Prineas, Ronald J; Eaton, Charles B

    2010-07-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) Q- and ST-T-wave abnormalities predict coronary heart disease (CHD) and total mortality. No comparison has been made of the classification of these abnormalities by the 2 most widely used ECG coding systems for epidemiologic studies-the Minnesota Code (MC) and Novacode (NC). We evaluated 12-lead electrocardiograms from 64,597 participants (49 to 79 years old, 82% non-Hispanic white) in the Women's Health Initiative clinical trial in 1993 to 1998, with a maximum of 11 years of follow-up. We used MC and NC criteria to identify Q-wave, ST-segment, and T-wave abnormalities for comparison. In total, 3,322 participants (5.1%) died during an average 8-year follow-up, and 1,314 had incident CHD in the baseline cardiovascular disease-free group. Independently, ECG myocardial infarction criteria by the MC or NC were generally equivalent and were strong predictors for CHD death and total mortality (hazard ratio 1.62, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 2.51 for CHD death; hazard ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval 1.09 to 1.71 for total mortality) in a multivariable analytic model. Electrocardiograms with major ST-T abnormalities by the MC or NC coding system were stronger in predicting CHD deaths and total mortality than was the presence of Q waves alone. In conclusion, the ECG classification systems for myocardial infarction/ischemia abnormalities from the MC and NC are valuable and useful in clinical trials and epidemiologic studies. ST-T abnormalities are stronger predictors for CHD events and total mortality than isolated Q-wave abnormalities. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Influence of leukocytes on coronary flow reserve, left ventricular systolic function, and in-hospital events, in patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction treated by primary angioplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meimoun, P; Elmkies, F; Boulanger, J; Zemir, H; Benali, T; Espanel, C; Clerc, J; Doutrelan, L; Beausoleil, M; Luycx-Bore, A

    2010-11-01

    To assess the relationship between leukocyte count, non invasive coronary flow reserve (CFR), left ventricular systolic function, and in-hospital adverse events in acute anterior myocardial infarction (AMI) treated by primary angioplasty. Leukocyte count at admission and within 24h after angioplasty, and differential count at admission were obtained in 72 consecutive patients with a first AMI (mean age 56±12 years) successfully treated by primary angioplasty. Transthoracic Doppler echocardiography was performed within 24h after angioplasty and 3 months later to assess the CFR (using intravenous adenosine), in the left anterior descending artery (LAD), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and the wall motion score index using the nine segments assigned to the LAD territory (WMSi-lad). In hospital events were defined as death, heart failure (Killip≥2) and reinfarction. Leukocyte count was higher before and after angioplasty in patients with impaired acute CFR (leukocyte, neutrophil and monocyte count (PLeukocyte (before and after angioplasty), and neutrophil count, were lower in patients with recovery of global and regional LV function (Pleukocyte count before and after angioplasty, and, initial and follow-up LVEF, and WMSi-lad (all, P≤0.01). Leukocyte (before and after angioplasty) and monocyte count were higher in patients with in-hospital events (n=14), by comparison to patients without events (all, Pleukocyte count after angioplasty was an independent predictor of CFR, and in-hospital events, and neutrophil count of WMSi-lad at follow-up (all, Pleukocyte count is inversely correlated to CFR, and global and regional LV systolic function at follow-up. These links are higher after than before reperfusion. And, leukocyte count after angioplasty is an independent predictor of in-hospital adverse events. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R; Junier, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated......, including 571 participants with a first CAD event during the 9-year study period and 1304 controls matched on sex and cohort. RESULTS: A genetic risk score built from 23 CAD-associated SNPs contributed significantly to CAD (P = 2.9 × 10(-4)). In the final multivariable model, participants...... with an unfavorable genetic background (top genetic score quartile) had a CAD odds ratio (OR) of 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-2.04). This effect was similar to hypertension (OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.06-1.73), hypercholesterolemia (OR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.16-1.96), diabetes (OR = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.10-2.49), ≥ 1...

  11. Usefulness of proteinuria as a prognostic marker of mortality and cardiovascular events among patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (data from the Evaluation of Oral Xemilofiban in Controlling Thrombotic Events [EXCITE] trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Nestor; Brugts, Jasper J; Ix, Joachim H; Shlipak, Michael G; Dixon, Simon R; Gersh, Bernard J; Lemos, Pedro A; Guarneri, Mimi; Teirstein, Paul S; Wijns, William; Serruys, Patrick W; Boersma, Eric; O'Neill, William W

    2008-11-01

    Proteinuria was associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in community-based cohorts. The association of proteinuria with mortality and cardiovascular events in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was unknown. The association of urinary dipstick proteinuria with mortality and cardiovascular events (composite of death, myocardial infarction, or nonhemorrhagic stroke) in 5,835 subjects of the EXCITE trial was evaluated. Dipstick urinalysis was performed before PCI, and proteinuria was defined as trace or greater. Subjects were followed up for 210 days/7 months after enrollment for the occurrence of events. Multivariate Cox regression analysis evaluated the independent association of proteinuria with each outcome. Mean age was 59 years, 21% were women, 18% had diabetes mellitus, and mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Proteinuria was present in 750 patients (13%). During follow-up, 22 subjects (2.9%) with proteinuria and 54 subjects (1.1%) without proteinuria died (adjusted hazard ratio 2.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.65 to 4.84, p use tool as urinary dipstick may be useful to identify and treat patients at high risk of mortality at the time of PCI.

  12. Relative associations between depression and anxiety on adverse cardiovascular events: does a history of coronary artery disease matter? A prospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Roxanne; Arsenault, André; Dupuis, Jocelyn; Laurin, Catherine; Blais, Lucie; Lavoie, Kim L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether depression and anxiety increase the risk of mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), among patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD). Design and setting, and patients DECADE (Depression Effects on Coronary Artery Disease Events) is a prospective observational study of 2390 patients referred at the Montreal Heart Institute. Patients were followed for 8.8 years, between 1998 and 2009. Depression and anxiety were assessed using a psychiatric interview (Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders, PRIME-MD). Outcomes data were obtained from Quebec provincial databases. Main outcome measures All-cause mortality and MACE. Results After adjustment for covariates, patients with depression were at increased risks of all-cause mortality (relative risk (RR)=2.84; 95% CI 1.25 to 6.49) compared with patients without depression. Anxiety was not associated with increased mortality risks (RR=0.86; 95% CI 0.31 to 2.36). When patients were stratified according to CAD status, depression increased the risk of mortality among patients with no CAD (RR=4.39; 95% CI 1.12 to 17.21), but not among patients with CAD (RR=2.32; 95% CI 0.78 to 6.88). Neither depression nor anxiety was associated with MACE among patients with or without CAD. Conclusions and relevance Depression, but not anxiety, was an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality in patients without CAD. The present study contributes to a better understanding of the relative and unique role of depression versus anxiety among patients with versus without CAD. PMID:26671946

  13. What follow-up care and self-management support do patients with type 2 diabetes want after their first acute coronary event? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasteleyn, Marise J; Gorter, Kees J; van Puffelen, Anne L; Heijmans, Monique; Vos, Rimke C; Jansen, Hanneke; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2014-10-01

    Despite diabetes patients' efforts to control their disease, many of them are confronted with an acute coronary event. This may evoke depressive feelings and self-management may be complicated. According to the American Diabetes Association, the transition from hospital to home after an acute coronary event (ACE) is a high-risk time for diabetes patients; it should be improved. Before developing an intervention for diabetes patients with an ACE in the period after discharge from hospital, we want to gain a detailed understanding of patients' views, perceptions and feelings in this respect. Qualitative design. Two semi-structured focus groups were conducted with 14 T2DM patients (71% male, aged 61-77 years) with a recent ACE. One focus group with partners (67% male, aged 64-75 years) was held. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by two independent researchers. Patients believed that coping with an ACE differs between patients with and without T2DM. They had problems with physical exercise, sexuality and pharmacotherapy. Patients and partners were neither satisfied with the amount of information, especially on the combination of T2DM and ACE, nor with the support offered by healthcare professionals after discharge. Participants would appreciate tailored self-management support after discharge from hospital. Patients with T2DM and their partners lack tailored support after a first ACE. Our findings underpin the ADA recommendations to improve the transition from hospital to home. The results of our study will help to determine the exact content of a self-management support program delivered at home to help this specific group of patients to cope with both conditions. Copyright © 2013 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Serum uric acid and coronary heart disease in 9,458 incident cases and 155,084 controls: prospective study and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy G Wheeler

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been suggested throughout the past fifty years that serum uric acid concentrations can help predict the future risk of coronary heart disease (CHD, but the epidemiological evidence is uncertain. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We report a "nested" case-control comparison within a prospective study in Reykjavik, Iceland, using baseline values of serum uric acid in 2,456 incident CHD cases and in 3,962 age- and sex-matched controls, plus paired serum uric acid measurements taken at baseline and, on average, 12 y later in 379 participants. In addition, we conducted a meta-analysis of 15 other prospective studies in eight countries conducted in essentially general populations. Compared with individuals in the bottom third of baseline measurements of serum uric acid in the Reykjavik study, those in the top third had an age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio for CHD of 1.39 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-1.58 which fell to 1.12 (CI, 0.97-1.30 after adjustment for smoking and other established risk factors. Overall, in a combined analysis of 9,458 cases and 155,084 controls in all 16 relevant prospective studies, the odds ratio was 1.13 (CI, 1.07-1.20, but it was only 1.02 (CI, 0.91-1.14 in the eight studies with more complete adjustment for possible confounders. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of serum uric acid levels is unlikely to enhance usefully the prediction of CHD, and this factor is unlikely to be a major determinant of the disease in general populations.

  15. Depressive symptomatology in relation to 10-year (2004-2014) acute coronary syndrome incidence; the moderating role of diet and financial status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notara, Venetia; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Tsompanaki, Elena; Kouvari, Matina; Kogias, Yannis; Papanagnou, George; Antonoulas, Antonis; Stravopodis, Petros; Zombolos, Spyros; Stergiouli, Ifigenia; Mantas, Yannis; Babatsikou, Fotoula; Pitsavos, Christos

    2016-05-01

    The association between depression status and 10-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence among acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, in relation to nutritional and financial status, was evaluated. From October 2003 to September 2004, a sample of 2172 consecutive ACS patients from 6 Greek hospitals was enrolled. In 2013-14, the 10-year follow-up was performed. Depressive symptoms were evaluated using the validated CES-D score (range 0-60). Adherence to Mediterranean diet was assessed through MedDietScore (range 0-55) and financial status was determined by the annual income. Ranking from the 1st to 3rd CES-D tertile, recurrent fatal/non fatal ACS rates were 33%, 37% and 42%, respectively (p=0.006). Multiple logistic regression models revealed an adverse association of severe depression status (i.e. 3rd tertile) compared to no depression (i.e. 1st tertile) [odds ratio (OR)=1.31, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.01, 1.69]. When controlling for financial status, the relationship between depression and ACS prognosis remained marginally significant; while subgroup analysis revealed that only patients with low/moderate income were negatively affected [OR=1.36, 95% CI 0.98, 1.88]. Further stratified analysis, by MedDietScore group, was applied; the above association remained significant only in patients with low compliance to this dietary pattern [OR=1.68, 95% CI 1.10, 2.18]. ACS coexisting with severe depression status seems to result in adverse disease outcomes while financial status and Mediterranean diet are proposed as potential moderators. Public health programs should focus on vulnerable groups and minimize depressive symptoms through appropriate medical treatment and lifestyle interventions, so as to ameliorate the disease prognosis in clinical and community levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The projected impact of population and high-risk strategies for risk-factor control on coronary heart disease and stroke events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Erkki A; Laatikainen, Tiina; Philpot, Benjamin; Janus, Edward D; Davis-Lameloise, Nathalie; Dunbar, James A

    2011-01-03

    To model the impact of both population and high-risk strategies on cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes. A CVD risk-factor survey was carried out in rural south-eastern Australia from 2004 to 2006. Using a stratified random sample, data for 1116 participants aged 35-74 years were analysed. Applying the Framingham risk equations to risk-factor data, 5-year probabilities of a coronary heart disease event, stroke and cardiovascular event were calculated. The effect of different changes in risk factors were modelled to assess the extent to which cardiovascular diseases can be prevented by changing the risk factors at a population level (population strategy), among the high-risk individuals (high-risk strategy) or both. Among men, a population strategy could reduce cardiovascular events by 19.3% (193 per 1000 per 5 years), the high-risk strategy by 12.6% (126 per 1000) and a combined strategy by 24.1% (241 per 1000); and among women, by 21.9% (219 per 1000), 19.0% (190 per 1000) and 28.7% (287 per 1000), respectively. For prevention of CVD in Australia, it is important both to treat high-risk individuals and to reduce the mean risk-factor levels in the population. We show how risk-factor survey data can be used to set targets for prevention and to monitor progress in line with the recommendations of the National Preventative Health Taskforce.

  17. Major types of dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; O'Reilly, Eilis J; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake increases plasma LDL-cholesterol concentrations; therefore, intake should be reduced to prevent coronary heart disease (CHD). Lower habitual intakes of SFAs, however, require substitution of other macronutrients to maintain energy balance. OBJECTIVE: We...... fatty acids or carbohydrates should replace energy from SFAs to prevent CHD. DESIGN: This was a follow-up study in which data from 11 American and European cohort studies were pooled. The outcome measure was incident CHD. RESULTS: During 4-10 y of follow-up, 5249 coronary events and 2155 coronary deaths...... occurred among 344,696 persons. For a 5% lower energy intake from SFAs and a concomitant higher energy intake from PUFAs, there was a significant inverse association between PUFAs and risk of coronary events (hazard ratio: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.77, 0.97); the hazard ratio for coronary deaths was 0.74 (95% CI: 0...

  18. Multicenter prospective cohort study of the incidence of adverse events associated with cosmetic dermatologic procedures: lasers, energy devices, and injectable neurotoxins and fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Murad; Kakar, Rohit; Nodzenski, Michael; Ibrahim, Omer; Disphanurat, Wareeporn; Bolotin, Diana; Borovicka, Judy H; Pace, Natalie; Alster, Tina S; Arndt, Kenneth A; Beer, Kenneth R; Berlin, Joshua M; Bernstein, Leonard J; Brightman, Lori A; Butterwick, Kimberly; Cox, Sue Ellen; Chotzen, Vera; Fabi, Sabrina G; Fitzpatrick, Richard E; Geronemus, Roy G; Goldman, Mitchel P; Groff, William F; Kaminer, Michael S; Kilmer, Suzanne; Rohrer, Thomas E; Tanzi, Elizabeth L; Silva, Susan K; Yoo, Simon S; Weinkle, Susan H; Strasswimmer, John; Poon, Emily; Dover, Jeffrey S

    2015-03-01

    Common noninvasive to minimally invasive cosmetic dermatologic procedures are widely believed to be safe given the low incidence of reported adverse events, but reliable incidence data regarding adverse event rates are unavailable to date. To assess the incidence of adverse events associated with noninvasive to minimally invasive cosmetic dermatologic procedures, including those involving laser and energy devices, as well as injectable neurotoxins and fillers. A multicenter prospective cohort study (March 28, 2011, to December 30, 2011) of procedures performed using laser and energy devices, as well as injectable neurotoxins and soft-tissue augmentation materials, among 8 geographically dispersed US private and institutional dermatology outpatient clinical practices focused on cosmetic dermatology, with a total of 23 dermatologists. Participants represented a consecutive sample of 20 399 cosmetic procedures. Data acquisition was for 3 months (13 weeks) per center, with staggered start dates to account for seasonal variation. Web-based data collection daily at each center to record relevant procedures, by category type and subtype. Adverse events were detected by (1) initial observation by participating physicians or staff; (2) active ascertainment from patients, who were encouraged to self-report after their procedure; and (3) follow-up postprocedural phone calls to patients by staff, if appropriate. When adverse events were not observed by physicians but were suspected, follow-up visits were scheduled within 24 hours to characterize these events. Detailed information regarding each adverse event was entered into an online form. The main outcome was the total incidence of procedure-related adverse events (total adverse events divided by total procedures performed), as verified by clinical examination. Forty-eight adverse events were reported, for a rate of 0.24% (95% CI, 0.18%-0.31%). Overall, 36 procedures resulted in at least 1 adverse event, for a rate of 0

  19. Associations of egg and cholesterol intakes with carotid intima-media thickness and risk of incident coronary artery disease according to apolipoprotein E phenotype in men: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Jyrki K; Mursu, Jaakko; Virtanen, Heli Ek; Fogelholm, Mikael; Salonen, Jukka T; Koskinen, Timo T; Voutilainen, Sari; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka

    2016-03-01

    In general populations, the effects of dietary cholesterol on blood cholesterol concentrations are modest. However, the relation is stronger in those with an ɛ4 allele in the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). There is little information on the association between cholesterol intake and the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) among those with the ApoE4 phenotype. We investigated the associations of intakes of cholesterol and eggs, a major source of dietary cholesterol, with carotid intima-media thickness and the risk of incident CAD in middle-aged and older men from eastern Finland. The study included 1032 men aged 42-60 y in 1984-1989 at the baseline examinations of the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study. Data on common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) were available for 846 men. Dietary intakes were assessed with 4-d food records. Associations with incident CAD and baseline CCA-IMT were analyzed by using Cox regression and ANCOVA, respectively. The ApoE4 phenotype was found in 32.5% of the men. During the average follow-up of 20.8 y, 230 CAD events occurred. Egg or cholesterol intakes were not associated with the risk of CAD. Each 1 additional egg (55 g)/d was associated with a multivariable-adjusted HR of 1.17 (95% CI: 0.85, 1.61) in the ApoE4 noncarriers and an HR of 0.93 (95% CI: 0.50, 1.72) in the ApoE4 carriers (P-interaction = 0.34). Each 100-mg/d higher cholesterol intake was associated with an HR of 1.04 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.22) in the ApoE4 noncarriers and an HR of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.73, 1.25) in the ApoE4 carriers (P-interaction = 0.81). Egg or cholesterol intakes were also not associated with increased CCA-IMT. Egg or cholesterol intakes were not associated with increased CAD risk, even in ApoE4 carriers (i.e., in highly susceptible individuals). © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. Brief communication: high incidence of venous thrombotic events among patients with Wegener granulomatosis: the Wegener's Clinical Occurrence of Thrombosis (WeCLOT) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Peter A; Lo, Grace H; Holbrook, Janet T; Tibbs, Andrea K; Allen, Nancy B; Davis, John C; Hoffman, Gary S; McCune, W Joseph; St Clair, E William; Specks, Ulrich; Spiera, Robert; Petri, Michelle; Stone, John H

    2005-04-19

    Venous thrombotic events (VTEs) have been observed in Wegener granulomatosis, but the incidence rate is not known. To measure the incidence of VTEs in patients with Wegener granulomatosis. Prospective, observational cohort study. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled treatment trial for Wegener granulomatosis. 180 patients with Wegener granulomatosis enrolled during periods of active disease. Venous thrombotic events (deep venous thromboses or pulmonary emboli) were documented and confirmed prospectively. Incidence rates were calculated on the basis of time to first VTE. Thirteen patients had VTEs before enrollment. During 228 person-years of prospective follow-up, 16 VTEs occurred in 167 patients with no history of VTE. Median time from enrollment to VTE for patients with an event was 2.1 months. The incidence of VTE among patients with Wegener granulomatosis was 7.0 per 100 person-years (95% CI, 4.0 to 11.4). Although prospectively recorded, screening for VTEs did not occur. The incidence rate of VTEs in Wegener granulomatosis is high when compared with available rates in the general population, patients with lupus, and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. These results have important implications for clinical care of patients with Wegener granulomatosis.

  1. Associated Factors of Anxiety among Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients in Kelantan and Terengganu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Adnan Wan-Nor-Asyikeen

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: It was concluded that anxiety had myriad effects on cardiovascular physiology, which plays an important role in the increased incidence of ischemic events in patients. A screening tool should be created to refine and identify the psychological status of acute coronary syndrome patients, so that early treatment could be given.

  2. The incidence of rugby-related catastrophic injuries (including cardiac events) in South Africa from 2008 to 2011: a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, J.C.; Lambert, M.I.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; Readhead, C.; van Mechelen, W.; Viljoen, W.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To establish an accurate and comprehensive injury incidence registry of all rugby union-related catastrophic events in South Africa between 2008 and 2011. An additional aim was to investigate correlates associated with these injuries. Design: Prospective. Setting: The South African

  3. Prognostic Value of Ventricular Wall Motion Score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Score in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Li; Wang, Maosong; You, Tao; Jiao, Yang; Chen, Jianchang; Xu, Weiting

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic values of ventricular wall motion score (WMS) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) score in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a 12-month single-center prospective cohort. Consecutive inpatients diagnosed with AMI in the Department of Cardiology of The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University from September 2012 through March 2015 were enrolled in this study. Echocardiography was issued to all subjects to calculate WMS within 24 hours after admission, and GRACE score of each patient was obtained simultaneously. During a 12-month follow-up period, all major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were recorded. After 12 months of observation, 124 of 635 patients with AMI developed MACE. The WMS (23.70 ± 3.80 versus 20.47 ± 3.25) and GRACE score (185.59 ± 45.16 versus 152.19 ± 36.51) were significantly higher in patients with MACE than those without MACE (P WMS (95% CI: 1.082-1.184, P WMS, GRACE score and the combination of WMS and GRACE score were 0.768 (P WMS and GRACE score were independent predictors of MACE in patients with AMI in 12-month follow-up, and the combined application of WMS and GRACE score can significantly improve the predictive value. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Case-control study to investigate variables associated with incidents and adverse events in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrie, Jamie; Yeoh, Michael; Richardson, Jo; Blunt, Andrew; Davey, Peter; Taylor, David; Ugoni, Antony

    2017-04-01

    To detect and analyse incidents (Is) and adverse events (AEs) in the ED. We hypothesised that I/AE are associated with patient load. We undertook a case-control study in a tertiary level hospital ED (from 1 April 2012 to 31 March 2013). Three percent of patients were randomly selected and screened for I/AEs. I/AEs were adjudicated by consensus of four FACEMs. Controls were matched to cases 2:1. Logistic regression was used to analyse the data. We sampled 2167 patients. After exclusions, 217 I/AEs were detected and analysed. The I and AE rates were 6.0 and 4.1%, respectively. The serious AE rate was 0.8% and 30 day mortality was 0.1%. Diagnostic error occurred in 3.7% of all patients and adverse drug reactions in 2.5%. Seventy-seven percent of the I/AEs were judged preventable. ED occupancy of 46 patients (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.0-3.1). Higher hospital occupancy (90-99%) was a protective factor for sustaining an I/AE (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.35-0.92, P = 0.02). I/AEs are common in the ED and a large proportion is preventable. Strategies for prevention are required. The relationship with patient load needs further clarification, since our data suggests increased I/AE rates with higher occupancy but not highest occupancy. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  5. To what extent are adverse events found in patient records reported by patients and healthcare professionals via complaints, claims and incident reports?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Wal Gerrit

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient record review is believed to be the most useful method for estimating the rate of adverse events among hospitalised patients. However, the method has some practical and financial disadvantages. Some of these disadvantages might be overcome by using existing reporting systems in which patient safety issues are already reported, such as incidents reported by healthcare professionals and complaints and medico-legal claims filled by patients or their relatives. The aim of the study is to examine to what extent the hospital reporting systems cover the adverse events identified by patient record review. Methods We conducted a retrospective study using a database from a record review study of 5375 patient records in 14 hospitals in the Netherlands. Trained nurses and physicians using a method based on the protocol of The Harvard Medical Practice Study previously reviewed the records. Four reporting systems were linked with the database of reviewed records: 1 informal and 2 formal complaints by patients/relatives, 3 medico-legal claims by patients/relatives and 4 incident reports by healthcare professionals. For each adverse event identified in patient records the equivalent was sought in these reporting systems by comparing dates and descriptions of the events. The study focussed on the number of adverse event matches, overlap of adverse events detected by different sources, preventability and severity of consequences of reported and non-reported events and sensitivity and specificity of reports. Results In the sample of 5375 patient records, 498 adverse events were identified. Only 18 of the 498 (3.6% adverse events identified by record review were found in one or more of the four reporting systems. There was some overlap: one adverse event had an equivalent in both a complaint and incident report and in three cases a patient/relative used two or three systems to complain about an adverse event. Healthcare professionals

  6. Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Karyakin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The 9th ARRCN Symposium 2015 was held during 21st–25th October 2015 at the Novotel Hotel, Chumphon, Thailand, one of the most favored travel destinations in Asia. The 10th ARRCN Symposium 2017 will be held during October 2017 in the Davao, Philippines. International Symposium on the Montagu's Harrier (Circus pygargus «The Montagu's Harrier in Europe. Status. Threats. Protection», organized by the environmental organization «Landesbund für Vogelschutz in Bayern e.V.» (LBV was held on November 20-22, 2015 in Germany. The location of this event was the city of Wurzburg in Bavaria.

  7. Trends in Incidences and Risk Factors for Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Other Liver Events in HIV and Hepatitis C Virus-coinfected Individuals From 2001 to 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjærde, Lars Iversen; Shepherd, Leah; Jablonowska, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While liver-related deaths in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected individuals have declined over the last decade, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) may have increased. We describe the epidemiology of HCC and other liver events in a multicohort...... collaboration of HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals. METHODS: We studied HCV antibody-positive adults with HIV in the EuroSIDA study, the Southern Alberta Clinic Cohort, the Canadian Co-infection Cohort, and the Swiss HIV Cohort study from 2001 to 2014. We calculated the incidence of HCC and other liver events...... (defined as liver-related deaths or decompensations, excluding HCC) and used Poisson regression to estimate incidence rate ratios. RESULTS: Our study comprised 7229 HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals (68% male, 90% white). During follow-up, 72 cases of HCC and 375 other liver events occurred, yielding...

  8. Concomitant use of clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors is not associated with major adverse cardiovascular events following coronary stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, M; Johansen, M B; Robertson, D J

    2012-01-01

    Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2012; 35: 165-174 SUMMARY: Background  Cytochrome P450 inhibition by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may attenuate the effectiveness of clopidogrel. Aim  To examine whether PPI use modifies the association between clopidogrel use and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE...

  9. Retrospective and emergency dosimetry in response to radiological incidents and nuclear mass-casualty events: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Sholom, S.; McKeever, S.W.S.

    2016-01-01

    simulations based on Monte Carlo code form an essential component in the application of dose determinations by EPR and OSL to dose reconstruction problems. We include in the review examples where the translation from the physical quantity of cumulative dose determined in the sampled medium to a dose quantity that can be applied in the reconstruction of dose to individuals and/or populations; these take into account the source terms, release patterns and the movements of people in the affected areas. One role for retrospective luminescence dosimetry has been to provide benchmark dose determinations for testing the models employed in dose reconstruction for exposed populations, notably at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The discussion is framed within the context of the well-known radiation incidents mentioned above. - Highlights: • Review of luminescence and EPR in retrospective and emergency dosimetry. • OSL, TL, and EPR results on biological and physical materials. • Use in emergency and retrospective dosimetry for large-scale radiological events.

  10. Benefits of smoking cessation for coronary heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Hidayat

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD incidence increases with age and is frequently higher in the elderly.(1 Therefore prevention of CVD in the elderly through management of risk factors is important in order to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD. There are several risk factors of CVD that can be modified, such as smoking, physical activity, and unhealthy diet. Cessation of smoking is the most potent measure to prevent thousands of CVD events and death

  11. Accumulation of oxidative stress-related gene polymorphisms and the risk of coronary heart disease events in patients with type 2 diabetes--an 8-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakami, Naoto; Kaneto, Hideaki; Matsuoka, Taka-Aki; Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Osonoi, Takeshi; Saitou, Miyoko; Kawai, Koichi; Ishibashi, Fukashi; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Shimomura, Iichiro; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu

    2014-08-01

    Oxidative stress, which is provoked in patients with diabetes, plays critical roles in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD). We simultaneously determined 5 relatively common genetic variants related to oxidative stress and evaluated the combined effect on CHD. We enrolled 1977 Japanese type 2 diabetic subjects without history of CVD (males 66.1%, 59.5 ± 10.0 years old), determined their genotypes regarding glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM) C-588T, manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) Val16Ala, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) G894T, NAD(P)H oxidase p22phox (CYBA) C242T, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) G-463A polymorphisms, and prospectively evaluated the association between these polymorphisms and CHD events. The median follow-up period was 7.5 years and there were 85 new CHD events. The single association analysis revealed that there were no statistically significant associations between each polymorphism and the prevalence of CHD. Interestingly, the risk of CHD event was higher with the increase of the total number of 10 concomitant unfavorable "pro-oxidant alleles" in each subject (p for trend = 0.018, log-rank test). Especially, the carriers of ≥8 pro-oxidant alleles had a significantly increased risk as compared to the carriers of stress is likely associated with the development of CHD in patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting that the combined information about these variants is useful to assess the risk of CHD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Associations of Perceived Mental Stress, Sense of Purpose in Life, and Negative Life Events With the Risk of Incident Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia: The SHEZ Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Yukiko; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Mori, Yasuko; Asada, Hideo; Yamanishi, Koichi; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2018-02-01

    In the present population-based prospective study, we examined the associations of psychosocial factors with the incidence of herpes zoster (HZ) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Data were collected from 12,359 participants (≥50 years of age) who answered a self-completed health questionnaire in the Shozu County of Kagawa Prefecture in Japan. During a 3-year follow-up between December 2008 and November 2012, HZ and PHN were diagnosed in 400 and 79 subjects, respectively. We used Cox regression analysis to estimate hazard ratios of incident HZ and PHN according to psychosocial factors, adjusting for age, sex, histories of HZ, cancer, and diabetes, smoking and drinking habits, and time from disease onset to treatment. Men with high levels of mental stress were twice as likely to be at risk for incident HZ. The risk of incident HZ was approximately 60% lower among men and women who reported a high sense of purpose in life. Women who experienced negative life events-particularly changes in their work, living environment, and relationships-had a 2- to 3-fold higher risk of incident PHN. Psychosocial factors such as perceived mental stress, sense of purpose in life, and negative life events may contribute to the development of HZ and PHN in the general population. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Incidence and classification of neointimal proliferation and in-stent restenosis in post-stenting patients at 1-year interval: Findings from non-invasive coronary computed tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Nan; Zhang, Jiayin; Li, Minghua; Pan, Jingwei; Lu, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The incidence of silent in-stent restenosis at 1-year as revealed by CT is 7.6%. • The incidence of neointimal proliferation at 1-year as revealed by CT is 12.6%. • Diabetes are associated with higher incidence of neointimal proliferation. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the incidence of coronary in-stent restenosis (ISR) and neointimal proliferation by coronary CT angiography (CCTA) at 1-year follow-up in asymptomatic patients. Methods: 234 patients (mean age: 67 ± 10.2 years, range 39–88 years, 180 males and 54 females) with 379 stents were prospectively enrolled in this study. Binary ISR was classified by CCTA into 4 types using Mehran classification. Neointimal proliferation was similarly classified into focal and diffuse types. All patients with CCTA-revealed ISR or neointimal proliferation underwent further invasive coronary angiography (ICA) for validation. Fisher's exact test was used for comparison. Results: ICA revealed patent stents with neointimal proliferation in 39 patients (16.7%, 39/234) and binary ISR in 23 patients (9.8%, 23/234). Lesion-based analysis showed 12 type I ISR lesions, 4 type II ISR lesions, 1 type III ISR lesion and 7 type IV ISR lesions. Among cases with neointimal proliferation, 27 lesions were classified as focal type whereas 13 lesions were classified as diffuse type. Patients with diabetes mellitus were associated with higher incidence of CCTA-revealed neointimal proliferation (21/77 vs. 18/157, p = 0.002) as well as ISR (12/77 vs. 11/157, p = 0.038), compared to patients without diabetes. CCTA was found to have good diagnostic performance for neointimal proliferation and ISR detection as well as classification, with an overall accuracy of 84.4% (54/64). Conclusions: Silent ISR as well as neointimal proliferation is not uncommon findings in asymptomatic post-stenting patients at 1-year interval, as revealed by CCTA. Patients with diabetes are prone to have higher incidence of neointimal

  14. Incidence and classification of neointimal proliferation and in-stent restenosis in post-stenting patients at 1-year interval: Findings from non-invasive coronary computed tomography angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Nan, E-mail: southmuch@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, No. 150, Jimo Road, Shanghai 200120 (China); Zhang, Jiayin, E-mail: andrewssmu@msn.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, No. 600, Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233 (China); Li, Minghua, E-mail: drliminghua@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, No. 600, Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233 (China); Pan, Jingwei, E-mail: drpanjingwei@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, No. 600, Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233 (China); Lu, Zhigang, E-mail: drluzhigang@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, No. 600, Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The incidence of silent in-stent restenosis at 1-year as revealed by CT is 7.6%. • The incidence of neointimal proliferation at 1-year as revealed by CT is 12.6%. • Diabetes are associated with higher incidence of neointimal proliferation. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the incidence of coronary in-stent restenosis (ISR) and neointimal proliferation by coronary CT angiography (CCTA) at 1-year follow-up in asymptomatic patients. Methods: 234 patients (mean age: 67 ± 10.2 years, range 39–88 years, 180 males and 54 females) with 379 stents were prospectively enrolled in this study. Binary ISR was classified by CCTA into 4 types using Mehran classification. Neointimal proliferation was similarly classified into focal and diffuse types. All patients with CCTA-revealed ISR or neointimal proliferation underwent further invasive coronary angiography (ICA) for validation. Fisher's exact test was used for comparison. Results: ICA revealed patent stents with neointimal proliferation in 39 patients (16.7%, 39/234) and binary ISR in 23 patients (9.8%, 23/234). Lesion-based analysis showed 12 type I ISR lesions, 4 type II ISR lesions, 1 type III ISR lesion and 7 type IV ISR lesions. Among cases with neointimal proliferation, 27 lesions were classified as focal type whereas 13 lesions were classified as diffuse type. Patients with diabetes mellitus were associated with higher incidence of CCTA-revealed neointimal proliferation (21/77 vs. 18/157, p = 0.002) as well as ISR (12/77 vs. 11/157, p = 0.038), compared to patients without diabetes. CCTA was found to have good diagnostic performance for neointimal proliferation and ISR detection as well as classification, with an overall accuracy of 84.4% (54/64). Conclusions: Silent ISR as well as neointimal proliferation is not uncommon findings in asymptomatic post-stenting patients at 1-year interval, as revealed by CCTA. Patients with diabetes are prone to have higher incidence of neointimal

  15. The incidence of rugby-related catastrophic injuries (including cardiac events) in South Africa from 2008 to 2011: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James Craig; Lambert, Mike I; Verhagen, Evert; Readhead, Clint; van Mechelen, Willem; Viljoen, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    To establish an accurate and comprehensive injury incidence registry of all rugby union-related catastrophic events in South Africa between 2008 and 2011. An additional aim was to investigate correlates associated with these injuries. Prospective. The South African amateur and professional rugby-playing population. An estimated 529 483 Junior and 121 663 Senior rugby union ('rugby') players (population at risk). Annual average incidences of rugby-related catastrophic injuries by type (cardiac events, traumatic brain and acute spinal cord injuries (ASCIs)) and outcome (full recoveries-fatalities). Playing level (junior and senior levels), position and event (phase of play) were also assessed. The average annual incidence of ASCIs and Traumatic Brain Injuries combined was 2.00 per 100 000 players (95% CI 0.91 to 3.08) from 2008 to 2011. The incidence of ASCIs with permanent outcomes was significantly higher at the Senior level (4.52 per 100 000 players, 95% CI 0.74 to 8.30) than the Junior level (0.24 per 100 000 players, 95% CI 0 to 0.65) during this period. The hooker position was associated with 46% (n=12 of 26) of all permanent ASCI outcomes, the majority of which (83%) occurred during the scrum phase of play. The incidence of rugby-related catastrophic injuries in South Africa between 2008 and 2011 is comparable to that of other countries and to most other collision sports. The higher incidence rate of permanent ASCIs at the Senior level could be related to the different law variations or characteristics (eg, less regular training) compared with the Junior level. The hooker and scrum were associated with high proportions of permanent ASCIs. The BokSmart injury prevention programme should focus efforts on these areas (Senior level, hooker and scrum) and use this study as a reference point for the evaluation of the effectiveness of the programme.

  16. Acute incident rapid response at a mass-gathering event through comprehensive planning systems: a case report from the 2013 Shamrock Shuffle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başdere, Mehmet; Ross, Colleen; Chan, Jennifer L; Mehrotra, Sanjay; Smilowitz, Karen; Chiampas, George

    2014-06-01

    Planning and execution of mass-gathering events involves various challenges. In this case report, the Chicago Model (CM), which was designed to organize and operate such events and to maintain the health and wellbeing of both runners and the public in a more effective way, is described. The Chicago Model also was designed to prepare for unexpected incidents, including disasters, during the marathon event. The model has been used successfully in the planning and execution stages of the Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle and the Bank of America Chicago Marathon since 2008. The key components of the CM are organizational structure, information systems, and communication. This case report describes how the organizers at the 2013 Shamrock Shuffle used the key components of the CM approach in order to respond to an acute incident caused by a man who was threatening to jump off the State Street Bridge. The course route was changed to accommodate this unexpected event, while maintaining access to key health care facilities. The lessons learned from the incident are presented and further improvements to the existing model are proposed.

  17. The incidence, root-causes, and outcomes of adverse events in surgical units: implication for potential prevention strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We need to know the scale and underlying causes of surgical adverse events (AEs in order to improve the safety of care in surgical units. However, there is little recent data. Previous record review studies that reported on surgical AEs in detail are now more than ten years old. Since then surgical technology and quality assurance have changed rapidly. The objective of this study was to provide more recent data on the incidence, consequences, preventability, causes and potential strategies to prevent AEs among hospitalized patients in surgical units. Methods A structured record review study of 7,926 patient records was carried out by trained nurses and medical specialist reviewers in 21 Dutch hospitals. The aim was to determine the presence of AEs during hospitalizations in 2004 and to consider how far they could be prevented. Of all AEs, the consequences, responsible medical specialty, causes and potential prevention strategies were identified. Surgical AEs were defined as AEs attributable to surgical treatment and care processes and were selected for analysis in detail. Results Surgical AEs occurred in 3.6% of hospital admissions and represented 65% of all AEs. Forty-one percent of the surgical AEs was considered to be preventable. The consequences of surgical AEs were more severe than for other types of AEs, resulting in more permanent disability, extra treatment, prolonged hospital stay, unplanned readmissions and extra outpatient visits. Almost 40% of the surgical AEs were infections, 23% bleeding, and 22% injury by mechanical, physical or chemical cause. Human factors were involved in the causation of 65% of surgical AEs and were considered to be preventable through quality assurance and training. Conclusions Surgical AEs occur more often than other types of AEs, are more often preventable and their consequences are more severe. Therefore, surgical AEs have a major impact on the burden of AEs during hospitalizations

  18. [Risk of fatal/non-fatal events in patients with previous coronary heart disease/acute myocardial infarction and treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Olmo, L; Juan Armas, J; Gomariz García, J J

    2017-09-04

    Primary Care is the fundamental axis of our health system and obliges us to be consistent with our prescriptions. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk and increased risk of all causes of death, as well as acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with a previous myocardial infarction. Pain and cardiac patient management are 2 basic pillars in our daily activity, and we must know the limitations of NSAIDs in patients with established cardiovascular risk. We present a review of the scientific literature with primary interest in the role of NSAIDs and cardiovascular risk. The objective is to determine the relationship between the consumption of different NSAIDs and the fatal and non-fatal events among patients with known coronary disease. This is a review of the scientific literature with primary interest in the role of NSAIDs and cardiovascular risk. The literature review was conducted in PubMed search engines like Tripdatabase and with certain keywords. Of the 15 original papers found, 9 did not correspond completely to the central focus, so the approach was decided from 6 original articles from the past 5 years, which address the central focus of increased cardiovascular risk found (fatal and non-fatal events) in patients with prior cardiovascular disease or AMI being prescribed NSAIDs for any reason. The risk of fatal/non-fatal events in each of the studies is expressed by the odds ratio (OR)/hazard ratio (HR), defined as the probability of an event occurring. A moderate risk was observed for ibuprofen. It increases the risk of acute coronary syndrome after 5 years of cardiovascular event, especially in the 2nd year (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.42-1.87). It also increases the risk of stroke (HR 1.23; 95% IC 1.10-1.38). Cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors were the third risk group, after nabumetone and diclofenac. Celecoxib increases risk from the 14th day of treatment (HR 2.3; 95% CI 1.79-3.02), having an OR

  19. Syntax Score and Major Adverse Cardiac Events in Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease: Results from a Cohort Study in a University-Affiliated Hospital in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Felipe C; Ribeiro, Jorge P; Fuchs, Flávio D; Wainstein, Marco V; Bergoli, Luis C; Wainstein, Rodrigo V; Zen, Vanessa; Kerkhoff, Alessandra C; Moreira, Leila B; Fuchs, Sandra C

    2016-09-01

    The importance of coronary anatomy in predicting cardiovascular events is well known. The use of traditional anatomical scores in routine angiography, however, has not been incorporated to clinical practice. SYNTAX score (SXscore) is a scoring system that estimates the anatomical extent of coronary artery disease (CAD). Its ability to predict outcomes based on a baseline diagnostic angiography has not been tested to date. To evaluate the performance of the SXscore in predicting major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in patients referred for diagnostic angiography. Prospective cohort of 895 patients with suspected CAD referred for elective diagnostic coronary angiography from 2008 to 2011, at a university-affiliated hospital in Brazil. They had their SXscores calculated and were stratified in three categories: no significant CAD (n = 495), SXscoreLOW-INTERMEDIATE: anatomia coronariana na predição de eventos cardiovasculares é bem conhecida. O uso de escores anatômicos tradicionais na cineangiocoronariografia de rotina, entretanto, não foi incorporado à prática clínica. O SYNTAX escore (SXescore) é um sistema de escore que estima a extensão anatômica da doença arterial coronariana (DAC). Sua capacidade para predizer desfechos com base na cineangiocoronariografia diagnóstica de base ainda não foi testada. Avaliar o desempenho do SXescore para predizer eventos cardíacos adversos maiores (MACE) em pacientes encaminhados para cineangiocoronariografia diagnóstica. Coorte prospectiva de 895 pacientes com suspeita de DAC encaminhados para cineangiocoronariografia diagnóstica eletiva de 2008 a 2011, em hospital universitário no Brasil. Os pacientes tiveram seus SXescores calculados e foram estratificados em três categorias: 'sem DAC significativa' (n = 495); SXescoreBAIXO-INTERMEDIÁRIO: < 23 (n = 346); e SXescoreALTO: ≥ 23 (n = 54). O desfecho primário foi composto de morte cardíaca, infarto do miocárdio e revascularização tardia. Os desfechos secund

  20. Post-event reviews: Using a quantitative approach for analysing incident response to demonstrate the value of business continuity programmes and increase planning efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Karthik

    2017-01-01

    Business continuity management is often thought of as a proactive planning process for minimising impact from large-scale incidents and disasters. While this is true, and it is critical to plan for the worst, consistently validating plan effectiveness against smaller disruptions can enable an organisation to gain key insights about its business continuity readiness, drive programme improvements, reduce costs and provide an opportunity to quantitatively demonstrate the value of the programme to management. This paper describes a post mortem framework which is used as a continuous improvement mechanism for tracking, reviewing and learning from real-world events at Microsoft Customer Service & Support. This approach was developed and adopted because conducting regular business continuity exercises proved difficult and expensive in a complex and distributed operations environment with high availability requirements. Using a quantitative approach to measure response to incidents, and categorising outcomes based on such responses, enables business continuity teams to provide data-driven insights to leadership, change perceptions of incident root cause, and instil a higher level of confidence towards disaster response readiness and incident management. The scope of the framework discussed here is specific to reviewing and driving improvements from operational incidents. However, the concept can be extended to learning and evolving readiness plans for other types of incidents.

  1. Five-factor model personality traits as predictors of incident coronary heart disease in the community: a 10.5-year cohort study based on the Baltimore epidemiologic catchment area follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hochang Benjamin; Offidani, Emanuela; Ziegelstein, Roy C; Bienvenu, Oscar Joseph; Samuels, Jack; Eaton, William W; Nestadt, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Certain personality and behavioral traits (e.g., type A and type D) have been reported to be associated with development and progression of coronary heart disease (CHD), but few have examined the relationship using a comprehensive assessment of personality along with a structured assessment of psychiatric disorders. Based on participants (age: 47.3 ± 12.8; female: 62.6%) of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area follow-up study, we examined the relationship between the 5 major domains of personality traits (neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness) and incident CHD between Wave III (1993-1996) and Wave IV (2004-2005). Incident CHD developed in 65 participants during the follow-up. Those with incident CHD had lower on openness (44.06 ± 9.29 vs. 47.18 ± 8.80; p = 0.007) and extraversion (45.98 ± 9.25 vs. 49.12 ± 8.92; p = 0.007) scores than those without. Logistic regression models revealed an inverse association (OR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.54-0.98) between openness factor z-scores and incident CHD after adjusting for putative confounding factors, including DSM III-R Major Depressive Disorder. High openness appears to be an independent protective factor for incident CHD in the community. Future studies should examine behavioral and pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying this association. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A high diet quality is associated with lower incidence of cardiovascular events in the Malmö diet and cancer cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Hlebowicz

    Full Text Available To investigate if diet quality is related to incidence of cardiovascular (CV events.A diet quality index based on the 2005 Swedish Nutrition Recommendations and the Swedish Dietary Guidelines was created and included six dietary components: saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, fish and shellfish, dietary fiber, fruit and vegetables, and sucrose. The index ranked 17126 participants (59% women of the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort (Sweden on their dietary intakes. Total index score was categorized as low, medium or high. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to model associations between index score categories and index components with risk of incident CV events, with adjustment for potential confounders. The incidence of first CV events (non-fatal or fatal myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke or death from ischemic heart disease was monitored from baseline (1991-1996 until December 31, 2008; 703 CV events occurred in women and 1093 in men.A high diet quality was associated with decreased risk of CV events when compared to a low diet quality. In multivariate analysis, the risk reduction was 32% (hazard ratio = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.49-0.73 in men and 27% (hazard ratio = 0.73, 95% confidence interval: 0.59-0.91 in women. When examined separately and mutually adjusted for each other, the individual components were either not associated with CV risk or marginally decreased risks were seen.High quality diets in line with current recommendations may reduce the risk of CV events. This study illustrates the importance of considering a combination of dietary factors when evaluating diet-disease associations.

  3. Topological events in polarization resolved angular patterns of nematic liquid crystal cells at varying ellipticity of incident wave

    OpenAIRE

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Vovk, Roman G.

    2008-01-01

    We study the angular structure of polarization of light transmitted through a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cell by analyzing the polarization state as a function of the incidence angles and the polarization of the incident wave. The polarization resolved angular patterns emerging after the NLC cell illuminated by the convergent light beam are described in terms of the polarization singularities such as C-points (points of circular polarization) and L-lines (lines of linear polarization). For ...

  4. [Pregnancy and coronary artery dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction during pregnancy is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality. Coronary atherosclerosis is the most common cause due to an increase in the age of the patients and the association with cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, and the existence of family history of coronary disease. However, thrombosis, coronary dissection or coronary vasospasms are other causes that may justify it. We report the case of a 33 weeks pregnant first-time mother, without cardiovascular risk factors, who presented an acute coronary event in the context of atherosclerotic disease and coronary dissection after percutaneous coronary intervention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Analyzing the Influence of the Angles of Incidence and Rotation on MBU Events Induced by Low LET Heavy Ions in a 28-nm SRAM-Based FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonfat, Jorge; Kastensmidt, Fernanda Lima; Artola, Laurent; Hubert, Guillaume; Medina, Nilberto H.; Added, Nemitala; Aguiar, Vitor A. P.; Aguirre, Fernando; Macchione, Eduardo L. A.; Silveira, Marcilei A. G.

    2017-08-01

    This paper shows the impact of low linear energy transfer heavy ions on the reliability of 28-nm Bulk static random access memory (RAM) cells from Artix-7 field-programmable gate array. Irradiation tests on the ground showed significant differences in the multiple bit upset cross section of configuration RAM and block RAM memory cells under various angles of incidence and rotation of the device. Experimental data are analyzed at transistor level by using the single-event effect prediction tool called multiscale single-event phenomenon prediction platform coupled with SPICE simulations.

  6. Emergency coronary artery bypass surgery for failed percutaneous coronary angioplasty. A 10-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, J M; Weintraub, W S; Jones, E L; Guyton, R A; Hatcher, C R

    1992-01-01

    Six hundred ninety-nine patients have required emergency coronary artery bypass after failed elective percutaneous coronary angioplasty during the decade September 1980 through December 1990. This represents 4% of 9860 patients having 12,146 elective percutaneous coronary angioplasty procedures during this interval. Emergency coronary artery bypass was required for acute refractory myocardial ischemia in 82%. Hospital mortality rate for all patients was 3.1%; 3.7% in patients with refractory myocardial ischemia but 0.8% in patients without refractory myocardial ischemia, p = 0.08. Postprocedural Q-wave myocardial infarctions were observed in 21% versus 2.4%, p less than 0.0001, and intra-aortic balloon pumping was required in 19% with versus 0.8% without refractory myocardial ischemia, p less than 0.0001. Multivessel disease, p = 0.004, age older than 65 years, p = 0.005, and refractory myocardial ischemia, p = 0.08, interacted to produce the highest risk of in-hospital death. Follow-up shows that there have been 28 additional late deaths, including 23 of cardiac causes for a 91% survival at 5 years. Freedom from both late death and Q-wave myocardial infarction at 5 years was 61%. In the group going to emergency coronary artery bypass with refractory myocardial ischemia, the late cardiac survival was 90%, and in those without ischemia, 92% at 5 years, p = not significant. The MI--free survival in the group with refractory ischemia, however, was 56% versus 83% in the group without ischemia, p less than 0.0001. Multivariate analysis showed the highest late event rates for patients with Q-wave myocardial infarction at the initial emergency coronary artery bypass, age older than 65 years, angina class III or IV, and prior coronary bypass surgery. In spite of a continuing high incidence of early acute myocardial infarction and an increasing operative mortality rate (7%) in the latest 3 years cohort of patients, excellent late survival and low subsequent cardiac event

  7. Accuracy of non-invasive techniques for diagnosis of coronary artery disease and prediction of cardiac events in patients with left bundle branch block: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagini, Elena [Thoraxcenter Erasmus MC, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University of Bologna, Institute of Cardiology, S.Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Shaw, Leslee J. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Poldermans, Don; Schinkel, Arend F.L.; Rizzello, Vittoria [Thoraxcenter Erasmus MC, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Elhendy, Abdou [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Rapezzi, Claudio [University of Bologna, Institute of Cardiology, S.Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Bax, Jeroen J. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2006-12-15

    Non-invasive evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) has limitations inherent to different tests, and the relative merits of these tests are unclear. This meta-analysis assessed the accuracy of the frequently used non-invasive techniques, including exercise electrocardiography (ECG), myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and stress echocardiography (SE), for detection of CAD and prediction of cardiac events in patients with LBBB. A review was conducted of all reports on detection of CAD and prediction of cardiac events in patients with LBBB (published between January 1970 and December 2004), and revealed 55 diagnostic and nine prognostic reports with sufficient details to calculate test accuracy. Weighted (by sample size) sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Summary relative risk ratios (95% confidence intervals) were calculated. Overall sensitivity was higher for exercise ECG and (quantitatively analysed) MPI than for SE (83.4% and 88.5% versus 74.6% respectively, p<0.0001). SE had a higher specificity (88.7%) than MPI (41.2%) and exercise ECG (60.1%) (p<0.0001). Based on analysis of eight reports, the relative risk of cardiac death or myocardial infarction in patients with an abnormal SE and MPI was elevated more than sevenfold, but it did not differ by imaging modality (p=0.9). Meta-analysis of non-invasive CAD assessment in LBBB patients revealed that exercise ECG and MPI had the highest sensitivity, while SE had the highest specificity. The prognostic accuracy of MPI and SE appeared similar. (orig.)

  8. Marital Status, Hypertension, Coronary Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Death among African American Women and Men: Incidence and Prevalence in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Hilary M.; Coresh, Josef; Hindin, Michelle J.

    2010-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and African Americans disproportionately experience more cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, and diabetes. The literature documents a complex relationship between marital status and health, which varies by gender. We prospectively examine…

  9. Walking beyond the GRACE (Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events) model in the death risk stratification during hospitalization in patients with acute coronary syndrome: what do the AR-G (ACTION [Acute Coronary Treatment and Intervention Outcomes Network] Registry and GWTG [Get With the Guidelines] Database), NCDR (National Cardiovascular Data Registry), and EuroHeart Risk Scores Provide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Abu-Assi, Emad; Cabanas-Grandío, Pilar; Agra-Bermejo, Rosa María; Gestal-Romarí, Santiago; Pereira-López, Eva; Fandiño-Vaquero, Rubén; Álvarez-Álvarez, Belén; Cambeiro, Cristina; Rodríguez-Cordero, Marta; Lear, Pamela; Martínez-Monzonís, Amparo; Peña-Gil, Carlos; García-Acuña, José María; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2012-11-01

    This study sought to compare the in-hospital prognostic values of the original and updated GRACE (Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events) risk score (RS) and the AR-G (ACTION [Acute Coronary Treatment and Intervention Outcomes Network] Registry and the GWTG [Get With the Guidelines] Database) RS in acute coronary syndromes (ACS). To evaluate the utility of recalculating risk after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with newer RS models (NCDR [National Cardiovascular Data Registry] and EHS [EuroHeart Score] RS). Defined in 2003, GRACE is among the most popular systems of risk stratification in ACS. An updated version of GRACE has since appeared and new RS have been developed, aiming to improve risk prediction. From 2004 to 2010, 4,497 consecutive patients admitted to a single center in Spain with an ACS were included (32.1% ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, 19.2% unstable angina). Discrimination (C-statistic) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow [HL]) indexes were used to assess performance of each RS. A comparative analysis of RS designed to predict post-PCI mortality NCDR and EHS RS versus the GRACE and AR-G RS was performed in a subgroup of 1,113 consecutive patients included in the study. There were 265 in-hospital deaths (5.9%). Original and updated GRACE RS and the AR-G RS all demonstrated good discrimination for in-hospital death (C-statistics: 0.91, 0.90 and 0.90, respectively) with optimal calibration (HL p: 0.42, 0.50, and 0.47, respectively) in all spectra of ACS, according to different managements (PCI vs. conservative) and without significant differences between the 3 different RS. In patients undergoing PCI, EHS and NCDR RS (C-statistic = 0.80 and 0.84, respectively) were not superior to GRACE RS (C-statistic = 0.91), albeit in the subgroup of patients undergoing PCI who were categorized as high risk using the GRACE RS, both EHS and NCDR have contributed to decrease the false positive rate generated by using the GRACE RS. Despite having

  10. Investigating the association between weather conditions, calendar events and socio-economic patterns with trends in fire incidence: an Australian case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Jonathan; Higgs, Gary; Rohde, David; Chhetri, Prem

    2011-06-01

    Fires in urban areas can cause significant economic, physical and psychological damage. Despite this, there has been a comparative lack of research into the spatial and temporal analysis of fire incidence in urban contexts. In this paper, we redress this gap through an exploration of the association of fire incidence to weather, calendar events and socio-economic characteristics in South-East Queensland, Australia using innovative technique termed the quad plot. Analysing trends in five fire incident types, including malicious false alarms (hoax calls), residential buildings, secondary (outdoor), vehicle and suspicious fires, results suggest that risk associated with all is greatly increased during school holidays and during long weekends. For all fire types the lowest risk of incidence was found to occur between one and six a.m. It was also found that there was a higher fire incidence in socially disadvantaged neighbourhoods and there was some evidence to suggest that there may be a compounding impact of high temperatures in such areas. We suggest that these findings may be used to guide the operations of fire services through spatial and temporal targeting to better utilise finite resources, help mitigate risk and reduce casualties.

  11. Management of coronary artery disease in Kyrgyzstan: a comparison with Turkey and europe according to European Action on Primary and secondary prevention by intervention to reduce events III results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Rasim; Muratalievic, Tolkun Murataliev; Memetoglu, Mehmet Erdem

    2014-09-01

    The European Action on Primary and Secondary Prevention by Intervention to Reduce Events (EUROASPIRE III) Study in coronary artery disease had been undertaken between the years of 2006 and 2007, with the participation of 22 countries in Europe including Turkey (76 centers). In this study, the situation in the management of coronary artery disease in Kyrgyzstan was compared with EUROASPIRE III findings of Turkey and Europe. The results of 1067 patients with stable coronary artery disease admitted to 22 centers in Kyrgyzstan were studied retrospectively and compared with the European and Turkish findings in EUROASPIRE III. During the study, the patients were interviewed and examined in the first year after the initial coronary event and/or intervention. The gender distribution of the 1067 patients in the study was 658 female (61.7%) and 409 male (38.3%), and the average age was 68 ± 14 years. The ratio of young patients (Kyrgyzstan and Turkey were higher compared with the other European countries (Kyrgyzstan 28.2%, Turkey 20% and Europe 12.7%). The number of patients followed after the coronary event in Kyrgyzstan was 524 (49.1%). Although there was not a big difference of the classical risk factors between Turkey and Europe, in Kyrgyzstan, smoking (75%), hypertension (84%), dyslipidemia (86.5%), and diabetes (74.4%) were much higher when compared to the other countries. The biggest difference between Kyrgyzstan and the other countries in EUROASPIRE III study including Turkey, was the infrequency of medical (78% vs. 95%) and interventional treatment (1.9% vs. 57%). Also, smoking cessation (27.4% vs.70.8% in Europe), physical activity (17.5% vs. 59.1% in Europe), and weight loss (37.2% vs. 58.2% in Europe) ratios after the coronary event were found to be much lower in Kyrgyzstan than in EUROASPIRE III study. When compared to the results of EUROASPIRE III study of Turkey and Europe; the Kyrgyzstan results were found to be behind for the prevention, follow-up and

  12. [How to detect myocardial ischemia in patients following acute coronary syndrome treated by PCI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Nicolas; Malergue, Marie Christine; Achkouty, Guy; Czitrom, Daniel; Caussin, Christophe

    Unstable coronary artery disease is a more aggressive condition than stable coronary artery disease, accounting for the high incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events following acute coronary syndromes (ACS), which includes the need for iterative repeat revascularization. The aim of myocardial ischemia screening in post-ACS patients is to detect this unfavourable evolution (either on initial culprit or non culprit lesions) and to prevent any clinical complication. Although there is no strict recommendation in this particular situation, screening should be based on the use of stress imaging techniques. The optimal timing and frequency for testing will depend on the clinical characteristics of the patients and the coronary revascularization procedure features. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Coronary artery disease: medical therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reviews the impact of medical therapy on the risk of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. SA Fam Pract 2010;52(4):305-306 ... and the risk factors influence the development of atherosclerosis throughout one's lifetime.2 ... studies persistently reported a decreased number of coronary heart disease events in ...

  14. Five year clinical effect of coronary stenting and coronary artery bypass grafting in renal insufficient patients with multivessel coronary artery disease: insights from ARTS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Jiro; Ong, Andrew T L; Hoye, Angela; van Herwerden, Lex A; Sousa, J Eduardo; Jatene, Adib; Bonnier, Johannes J R M; Schönberger, Jacques P M A; Buller, Nigel; Bonser, Robert; Lindeboom, Wietze; Unger, Felix; Serruys, Patrick W

    2005-08-01

    To compare coronary stent implantation and bypass surgery for multivessel coronary disease in patients with renal insufficiency. In the ARTS trial, 142 moderate renal insufficient patients (Ccr<60 mL/min) with multivessel coronary disease were randomly assigned to stent implantation (n=69) or CABG (n=73). At 5 years, there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of mortality (14.5% in the stent group vs. 12.3% in the CABG group, P=0.81), or combined endpoint of death, cerebrovascular accident (CVA), or myocardial infarction (MI) (30.4% in the stent group vs. 23.3% in the CABG group, P=0.35). Among patients who survived without CVA or MI, 18.8% in the stent group underwent a second revascularization procedure when compared with 8.2% in the surgery group (P=0.08). The event-free survival at 5 years was 50.7% in the stent group and 68.5% in the surgery group (P=0.04). At 5 years, the differences in mortality and combined incidence of death, CVA, and MI between coronary stenting and surgery did not reach statistically significant level. However, the occurrence of MACCE in the stent group was higher than in the CABG group, mainly driven by the higher incidence of repeat revascularization in the stent group.

  15. Beyond Framingham risk factors and coronary calcification: does aortic valve calcification improve risk prediction? The Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälsch, Hagen; Lehmann, Nils; Mahabadi, Amir A; Bauer, Marcus; Kara, Kaffer; Hüppe, Patricia; Moebus, Susanne; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Dragano, Nico; Schmermund, Axel; Stang, Andreas; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Erbel, Raimund

    2014-06-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is considered a manifestation of atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated whether AVC adds to cardiovascular risk prediction beyond Framingham risk factors and coronary artery calcification (CAC). A total of 3944 subjects from the population based Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study (59.3±7.7 years; 53% females) were evaluated for coronary events, stroke, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events (including all plus CV death) over 9.1±1.9 years. CT scans were performed to quantify AVC. Cox proportional hazards regressions and Harrell's C were used to examine AVC as event predictor in addition to risk factors and CAC. During follow-up, 138 (3.5%) subjects experienced coronary events, 101 (2.6%) had a stroke, and 257 (6.5%) experienced CVD events. In subjects with AVC>0 versus AVC=0 the incidence of coronary events was 8.0% versus 3.0% (pAVC scores (pAVC scores (3rd tertile) remained independently associated with coronary events (HR 2.21, 95% CI 1.28 to 3.81) and CVD events (HR 1.67, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.58). After further adjustment for CAC score, HRs were attenuated (coronary events 1.55, 95% CI 0.89 to 2.69; CVD events 1.29, 95% CI 0.83 to 2.00). When adding AVC to the model containing traditional risk factors and CAC, Harrell's C indices did not increase for coronary events (from 0.744 to 0.744) or CVD events (from 0.759 to 0.759). AVC is associated with incident coronary and CVD events independent of Framingham risk factors. However, AVC fails to improve cardiovascular event prediction over Framingham risk factors and CAC. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Contribution of Genetic Background, Traditional Risk Factors, and HIV-Related Factors to Coronary Artery Disease Events in HIV-Positive Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R.; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D.; Poloni, Estella S.; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle; Gras, Luuk A.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Albini, Laura; Torti, Carlo; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Li, Xiuhong; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Carli, Federica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ford, Emily S.; Sereti, Irini; Hadigan, Colleen; Martinez, Esteban; Arnedo, Mireia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Gatell, Jose M.; Law, Matthew; Bendall, Courtney; Petoumenos, Kathy; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Kabamba, Kabeya; Delforge, Marc; De Wit, Stephane; Berger, Florian; Mauss, Stefan; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Losso, Marcelo; Belloso, Waldo H.; Leyes, Maria; Campins, Antoni; Mondi, Annalisa; De Luca, Andrea; Bernardino, Ignacio; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Torrecilla-Rodriguez, Ana; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Arribas, José R.; Fanti, Iuri; Gel, Silvia; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Mar; Domingo, Pere; Fischer, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Macken, Alan; Woo, James; McGinty, Tara; Mallon, Patrick; Mangili, Alexandra; Skinner, Sally; Wanke, Christine A.; Reiss, Peter; Weber, Rainer; Bucher, Heiner C.; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio; Tarr, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the setting of HIV infection. Methods In the general population, 23 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were shown to be associated with CAD through genome-wide association analysis. Using the Metabochip, we genotyped 1875 HIV-positive, white individuals enrolled in 24 HIV observational studies, including 571 participants with a first CAD event during the 9-year study period and 1304 controls matched on sex and cohort. Results A genetic risk score built from 23 CAD-associated SNPs contributed significantly to CAD (P = 2.9×10−4). In the final multivariable model, participants with an unfavorable genetic background (top genetic score quartile) had a CAD odds ratio (OR) of 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–2.04). This effect was similar to hypertension (OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.06–1.73), hypercholesterolemia (OR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.16–1.96), diabetes (OR = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.10–2.49), ≥1 year lopinavir exposure (OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.06–1.73), and current abacavir treatment (OR = 1.56; 95% CI, 1.17–2.07). The effect of the genetic risk score was additive to the effect of nongenetic CAD risk factors, and did not change after adjustment for family history of CAD. Conclusions In the setting of HIV infection, the effect of an unfavorable genetic background was similar to traditional CAD risk factors and certain adverse antiretroviral exposures. Genetic testing may provide prognostic information complementary to family history of CAD. PMID:23532479

  17. Tailored support for type 2 diabetes patients with an acute coronary event after discharge from hospital - design and development of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasteleyn, Marise J; Gorter, Kees J; Stellato, Rebecca K; Rijken, Mieke; Nijpels, Giel; Rutten, Guy Ehm

    2014-01-18

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with an acute coronary event (ACE) experience decreased quality of life and increased distress. According to the American Diabetes Association, discharge from the hospital is a time of increased distress for all patients. Tailored support specific to diabetes is scarce in that period. We developed an intervention based on Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory, Leventhal's Common Sense Model, and results of focus groups. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention to reduce distress in type 2 diabetes patients who experienced a first ACE. Randomised controlled trial. Two hundred patients are recruited in thirteen hospitals. A diabetes nurse visits the patients in the intervention group (n = 100) at home within three weeks after discharge from hospital, and again after two weeks and two months. The control group (n = 100) receives a consultation by telephone. The primary outcome is diabetes-related distress, measured with the Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are well-being, health status, anxiety, depression, HbA1c, blood pressure and lipids. Mediating variables are self-management, self-efficacy and illness representations. Outcomes are measured with questionnaires directly after discharge from hospital and five months later. Biomedical variables are obtained from the records from the primary care physician and the hospital. Differences between groups in change over time are analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The Holm-Bonferroni correction is used to adjust for multiplicity. Type 2 diabetes patients who experience a first ACE need tailored support after discharge from the hospital. This trial will provide evidence on the effectiveness of a supportive intervention in reducing distress in these patients. NCT01801631.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of point-of-care testing for acute coronary syndromes, heart failure and thromboembolic events in primary care: a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diemand Albert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence of the clinical benefit of 3-in-1 point-of-care testing (POCT for cardiac troponin T (cTnT, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP and D-dimer in cardiovascular risk stratification at primary care level for diagnosing acute coronary syndromes (ACS, heart failure (HF and thromboembolic events (TE is very limited. The aim of this study is to analyse the diagnostic accuracy of POCT in primary care. Methods Prospective multicentre controlled trial cluster-randomised to POCT-assisted diagnosis and conventional diagnosis (controls. Men and women presenting in 68 primary care practices in Zurich County (Switzerland with chest pain or symptoms of dyspnoea or TE were consecutively included after baseline consultation and working diagnosis. A follow-up visit including confirmed diagnosis was performed to determine the accuracy of the working diagnosis, and comparison of working diagnosis accuracy between the two groups. Results The 218 POCT patients and 151 conventional diagnosis controls were mostly similar in characteristics, symptoms and pre-existing diagnoses, but differed in working diagnosis frequencies. However, the follow-up visit showed no statistical intergroup difference in confirmed diagnosis frequencies. Working diagnoses overall were significantly more correct in the POCT group (75.7% vs 59.6%, p = 0.002, as were the working diagnoses of ACS/HF/TE (69.8% vs 45.2%, p = 0.002. All three biomarker tests showed good sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion POCT confers substantial benefit in primary care by correctly diagnosing significantly more patients. Trial registration DRKS: DRKS00000709

  19. The incidence of rugby-related catastrophic injuries (including cardiac events) in South Africa from 2008 to 2011: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James Craig; Lambert, Mike I; Verhagen, Evert; Readhead, Clint; van Mechelen, Willem; Viljoen, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To establish an accurate and comprehensive injury incidence registry of all rugby union-related catastrophic events in South Africa between 2008 and 2011. An additional aim was to investigate correlates associated with these injuries. Design Prospective. Setting The South African amateur and professional rugby-playing population. Participants An estimated 529 483 Junior and 121 663 Senior rugby union (‘rugby’) players (population at risk). Outcome measures Annual average incidences of rugby-related catastrophic injuries by type (cardiac events, traumatic brain and acute spinal cord injuries (ASCIs)) and outcome (full recoveries—fatalities). Playing level (junior and senior levels), position and event (phase of play) were also assessed. Results The average annual incidence of ASCIs and Traumatic Brain Injuries combined was 2.00 per 100 000 players (95% CI 0.91 to 3.08) from 2008 to 2011. The incidence of ASCIs with permanent outcomes was significantly higher at the Senior level (4.52 per 100 000 players, 95% CI 0.74 to 8.30) than the Junior level (0.24 per 100 000 players, 95% CI 0 to 0.65) during this period. The hooker position was associated with 46% (n=12 of 26) of all permanent ASCI outcomes, the majority of which (83%) occurred during the scrum phase of play. Conclusions The incidence of rugby-related catastrophic injuries in South Africa between 2008 and 2011 is comparable to that of other countries and to most other collision sports. The higher incidence rate of permanent ASCIs at the Senior level could be related to the different law variations or characteristics (eg, less regular training) compared with the Junior level. The hooker and scrum were associated with high proportions of permanent ASCIs. The BokSmart injury prevention programme should focus efforts on these areas (Senior level, hooker and scrum) and use this study as a reference point for the evaluation of the effectiveness of the programme. PMID:23447464

  20. Urinary Vitamin D Binding Protein and KIM-1 Are Potent New Biomarkers of Major Adverse Renal Events in Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubov Chaykovska

    Full Text Available Vitamin-D-binding protein (VDBP is a low molecular weight protein that is filtered through the glomerulus as a 25-(OH vitamin D 3/VDBP complex. In the normal kidney VDBP is reabsorbed and catabolized by proximal tubule epithelial cells reducing the urinary excretion to trace amounts. Acute tubular injury is expected to result in urinary VDBP loss. The purpose of our study was to explore the potential role of urinary VDBP as a biomarker of an acute renal damage.We included 314 patients with diabetes mellitus or mild renal impairment undergoing coronary angiography and collected blood and urine before and 24 hours after the CM application. Patients were followed for 90 days for the composite endpoint major adverse renal events (MARE: need for dialysis, doubling of serum creatinine after 90 days, unplanned emergency rehospitalization or death.Increased urine VDBP concentration 24 hours after contrast media exposure was predictive for dialysis need (no dialysis: 113.06 ± 299.61 ng/ml, n = 303; need for dialysis: 613.07 ± 700.45 ng/ml, n = 11, Mean ± SD, p<0.001, death (no death during follow-up: 121.41 ± 324.45 ng/ml, n = 306; death during follow-up: 522.01 ± 521.86 ng/ml, n = 8; Mean ± SD, p<0.003 and MARE (no MARE: 112.08 ± 302.00 ng/ml, n = 298; MARE: 506.16 ± 624.61 ng/ml, n = 16, Mean ± SD, p<0.001 during the follow-up of 90 days after contrast media exposure. Correction of urine VDBP concentrations for creatinine excretion confirmed its predictive value and was consistent with increased levels of urinary Kidney Injury Molecule-1 (KIM-1 and baseline plasma creatinine in patients with above mentioned complications. The impact of urinary VDBP and KIM-1 on MARE was independent of known CIN risk factors such as anemia, preexisting renal failure, preexisting heart failure, and diabetes.Urinary VDBP is a promising novel biomarker of major contrast induced nephropathy-associated events 90 days after contrast media exposure.

  1. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on anxiety, depression, and major cardiac and cerebro-vascular events in obstructive sleep apnea patients with and without coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Chung; Shen, Yu-Chih; Wang, Ji-Hung; Li, Yu-Ying; Li, Tzu-Hsien; Chang, En-Ting; Wang, Hsiu-Mei

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with bad cardiovascular outcomes and a high prevalence of anxiety and depression. This study investigated the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the severity of anxiety and depression in OSA patients with or without coronary artery disease (CAD) and on the rate of cardio- and cerebro-vascular events in those with OSA and CAD. This prospective study included patients with moderate-to-severe OSA, with or without a recent diagnosis of CAD; all were started on CPAP therapy. Patients completed the Chinese versions of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) at baseline and after 6-month follow-up. The occurrence of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) was assessed every 3 months up to 1 year. BAI scores decreased from 8.5 ± 8.4 at baseline to 5.4 ± 6.9 at 6 months in CPAP-compliant OSA patients without CAD ( P < 0.05). BAI scores also decreased from 20.7 ± 14.9 to 16.1 ± 14.5 in CPAP-compliant OSA patients with CAD. BDI-II scores decreased in CPAP-compliant OSA patients without CAD (from 11.1 ± 10.7 at baseline to 6.6 ± 9.5 at 6 months) and in CPAP-compliant OSA patients with CAD (from 20.4 ± 14.3 to 15.9 ± 7.3). In addition, there was a large effect size (ES) of BAI and BDI in 6-month CPAP treatment of OSA patients with CAD and a large ES in those with OSA under CPAP treatment. In OSA patients with CAD, the occurrence of MACCE was significantly lower in CPAP-compliant patients than that in CPAP noncompliant patients (11% in CPAP compliant and 50% in noncompliant; P < 0.05). CPAP improved anxiety and depression in OSA patients regardless of CAD. In OSA patients with CAD, CPAP-compliant patients had a lower 1-year rate of MACCE than CPAP-noncompliant patients.

  2. The 2012 AASM Respiratory Event Criteria Increase the Incidence of Hypopneas in an Adult Sleep Center Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duce, Brett; Milosavljevic, Jasmina; Hukins, Craig

    2015-12-15

    To investigate the effect of the 2012 American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) respiratory event criteria on severity and prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) relative to previous respiratory event criteria. A retrospective, randomized comparison was conducted in an Australian clinical sleep laboratory in a tertiary hospital. The polysomnograms (PSG) of 112 consecutive patients undertaking polysomnography (PSG) for suspected OSA were re-scored for respiratory events using either 2007 AASM recommended (AASM2007Rec), 2007 AASM alternate (AASM2007Alt), Chicago criteria (AASM1999), or 2012 AASM recommended (AASM2012) respiratory event criteria. The median AHI using AASM2012 was approximately 90% greater than the AASM2007Rec AHI, approximately 25% greater than the AASM2007Alt AHI, and approximately 15% lower than the AASM1999 AHI. These changes increased OSA diagnoses by approximately 20% and 5% for AASM2007Rec and AASM2007Alt, respectively. Minimal changes in OSA diagnoses were observed between AASM1999 and AASM2012 criteria. To achieve the same OSA prevalence as AASM2012, the threshold for previous criteria would have to shift to 2.6/h, 3.6/h, and 7.3/h for AASM2007Rec, AASM2007Alt, and AASM1999, respectively. Differences between the AASM2007Rec and AASM2012 hypopnea indices (HI) were predominantly due to the change in desaturation levels required. Alterations to respiratory event duration rules had no effect on the HI. This study demonstrates that implementation of the 2012 AASM respiratory event criteria will increase the AHI in patients undergoing PSG, and more patients are likely to be diagnosed with OSA. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1357. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  3. Prediction of injuries caused by explosive events: A case study of a hand grenade incident in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Whyte, TN

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available injuries when the subject is in very close proximity to the explosive charge is still unknown. Further such case studies and research into injury mechanisms and injury criteria are necessary to enable injuries caused by explosive events to be accurately...

  4. Incidences of Unfavorable Events in the Management of Low-Risk Papillary Microcarcinoma of the Thyroid by Active Surveillance Versus Immediate Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Hitomi; Miyauchi, Akira; Ito, Yasuhiro; Yoshioka, Kana; Nakayama, Ayako; Sasai, Hisanori; Masuoka, Hiroo; Yabuta, Tomonori; Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Higashiyama, Takuya; Kihara, Minoru; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Miya, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of papillary microcarcinoma (PMC) of the thyroid is rapidly increasing globally, making the management of PMC an important clinical issue. Excellent oncological outcomes of active surveillance for low-risk PMC have been reported previously. Here, unfavorable events following active surveillance and surgical treatment for PMC were studied. From February 2005 to August 2013, 2153 patients were diagnosed with low-risk PMC. Of these, 1179 patients chose active surveillance and 974 patients chose immediate surgery. The oncological outcomes and the incidences of unfavorable events of these groups were analyzed. In the active surveillance group, 94 patients underwent surgery for various reasons; tumor enlargement and the appearance of novel lymph node metastases were the reasons in 27 (2.3%) and six patients (0.5%), respectively. One of the patients with conversion to surgery had nodal recurrence, and five patients in the immediate surgery group had a recurrence in a cervical node or unresected thyroid lobe. All of these recurrences were successfully treated. None of the patients had distant metastases, and none died of the disease. The immediate surgery group had significantly higher incidences of transient vocal cord paralysis (VCP), transient hypoparathyroidism, and permanent hypoparathyroidism than the active-surveillance group did (4.1% vs. 0.6%, p < 0.0001; 16.7% vs. 2.8%, p < 0.0001; and 1.6% vs. 0.08%, p < 0.0001, respectively). Permanent VCP occurred only in two patients (0.2%) in the immediate surgery group. The proportion of patients on L-thyroxine for supplemental or thyrotropin (TSH)-suppressive purposes was significantly larger in the immediate surgery group than in the active surveillance group (66.1% vs. 20.7%, p < 0.0001). The immediate surgery group had significantly higher incidences of postsurgical hematoma and surgical scar in the neck compared with the active surveillance group (0.5% vs. 0%, p < 0.05; and 8.0% vs

  5. Effectiveness of manual pressure hemostasis following transfemoral coronary angiography in patients on therapeutic warfarin anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jack, Seifeddin S; Ruygrok, Peter N; Webster, Mark W I; Stewart, James T; Bass, Nigel M; Armstrong, Guy P; Ormiston, John A; Pornratanarangsi, Suwatchai

    2006-02-15

    We evaluated the effectiveness of manual pressure hemostasis after transfemoral coronary angiography in patients on therapeutic warfarin anticoagulation (international normalized ratio [INR] 2.0 to 3.0) compared with discontinuing warfarin > or =48 hours before the procedure (INR <2.0). There was a low incidence of small hematomas with either strategy (no significant difference) and no major vascular complications. No prolonged hospital stay due to an access site complication was observed, and no thromboembolic events occurred. In conclusion, transfemoral coronary angiography appears to be safe in patients on warfarin with an INR of 2.0 to 3.0).

  6. Incidence of thromboembolic events after use of gelatin-thrombin-based hemostatic matrix during intracranial tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Galarza, Marcelo; Conti, Carlo; De Bonis, Costanzo

    2018-01-01

    Association between the use of hemostatic agents made from collagen/gelatin mixed with thrombin and thromboembolic events in patients undergoing tumor resection has been suggested. This study evaluates the relationship between flowable hemostatic matrix and deep vein thrombosis in a large cohort of patients treated for brain tumor removal. The authors conducted a retrospective, multicenter, clinical review of all craniotomies for tumor removal performed between 2013 and 2014. Patients were classified in three groups: group I (flowable gelatin hemostatic matrix with thrombin), group II (gelatin hemostatic without thrombin), and group III (classical hemostatic). A total of 932 patients were selected: tumor pathology included 441 gliomas, 296 meningiomas, and 195 metastases. Thromboembolic events were identified in 4.7% of patients in which gelatin matrix with thrombin was applied, in 8.4% of patients with gelatin matrix without thrombin, and in 3.6% of cases with classical methods of hemostasis. Patients with venous thromboembolism had an increased proportion of high-grade gliomas (7.2%). Patients receiving a greater dose than 10 ml gelatin hemostatic had a higher rate of thromboembolic events. Intracranial hematoma requiring reintervention occurred in 19 cases: 4.5% of cases of group III, while reoperation was performed in 1.3 and 1.6% of patients in which gelatin matrix with or without thrombin was applied. Gelatin matrix hemostat is an efficacious tool for neurosurgeons in cases of difficult intraoperative bleeding during cranial tumor surgery. This study may help to identify those patients at high risk for developing thromboembolism and to treat them accordingly.

  7. Organization of public authorities in France for the event of an incident or accident involving nuclear safety: Simulation of a nuclear crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartigny, J.; Majorel, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The French nuclear safety regulations lay down the action to be taken in the event of an incident or accident involving the types of radiological hazard that could arise in a nuclear installation or during the transport of radioactive material. The organization established for this purpose is designed to ensure that the technical measures taken by the authorities responsible for nuclear safety, radiation protection, public order and public safety are fully effective. The Interministerial Nuclear Safety Committee (Comite interministeriel de la securite nucleaire), which reports to the Prime Minister, co-ordinates the measures taken by the public authorities. The public authorities and the operators together organize exercises designed to verify the whole complex of measures foreseen in the event of an incident or accident. These exercises, which have been carried out in a systematic manner in France for some years, are based on scenarios which are as realistic as possible and enable the following objectives to be achieved: (1) analysis of the crisis apparatus (ORSECRAD plans, individual intervention plans, information conventions); (2) uncovering gaps or inadequacies; (3) arrangements for interchange of information between the various participants whose responsibilities involve them in the emergency; and (4) allowance for the information requirements of the media and the population. The information drawn from these exercises enables the various procedures to be improved step by step. (author)

  8. MODELS OF MAJOR ADVERSE CARDIAC EVENT RISK USING RESULTS OF EXERCISE STRESS ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY WITH NONINVASIVE CORONARY ARTERY FLOW ASSESSMENT IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zagatina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound non-invasive coronary artery imaging contributes to the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease (IHD in clinical practice. However, data of the prognostic value obtained from a complex analysis of contractility disorders and coronary blood flow parameters during exercise tests in the world literature are still not available. Aim. To develop risk models for adverse outcomes in patients with probable or definite IHD based on the results of a stress test with a noninvasive coronary blood flow study. Material and methods. Medical data of 689 patients with probable or definite IHD who underwent stress echocardiography with satisfactory visualization of the anterior interventricular artery (AIVA were included in the analysis. All patients had stress echocardiography on a horizontal bicycle ergometer. Registration of coronary blood flow in the middle third of the AIVA was performed at rest and at the peak of the load with calculation of the coronary reserve value. Further patient follow-up lasted 3 years. Models of further negative outcomes were developed on the basis of the stress echocardiography results and of coronary blood flow parameters. Results. Three models that take into account the factors associated with further mortality, mortality/myocardial infarction and sum of negative outcomes were developed in the study. These models divide a cohort of patients with probable or definite IHD into groups of low, medium and very high risks. Factors associated with the risk of death include: age >56 years, load power <100 W, breach of contractility in the blood supply zone of the circumflex artery initially and during exercise, the difference in blood flow velocities in the AIVA<10 cm/s, coronary reserve of AIVA<2. The risk model of death, taking into account these factors, suggests dividing patients into low-risk group if there are ≤2 factors (mortality 0.6% for 3 years, medium risk – from 2 to 4 factors (mortality 1.8%, high risk – ≥5

  9. Metabolic syndrome and risk of major coronary events among the urban diabetic patients: North Indian Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease Study-NIDCVD-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Gurjit Kaur; Bhadada, Sanjay Kumar; Vijayvergiya, Rajesh; Mastana, Sarabjit Singh; Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed at estimating the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and prospectively, evaluating cardiovascular events among Asian Indians type 2 diabetic subjects. The sample comprised 1522 type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM) subjects aged 25-91years, who participated in the North Indian Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease Study (NIDCVD). The participants were screened for hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and cardiovascular events. Anthropometric, clinical and biochemical measurements were done in all subjects. The prevalence of MetS was estimated in all the subjects according to the harmonized criteria of 2009. The prevalence of MetS among urban Indian diabetic subjects was 71.9% and was significantly higher in females (86%) as compared to males (57.9%). To determine the independent predictors of the MetS in diabetic sample, binary logistic regression analyses were performed using demographic and biochemical parameters. Significant differences in the indices of generalized and abdominal obesity and lipids (total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein) were observed (prisk/predictor of CAD (odd ratio (OR)=3.44, CI 1.31-9.01, p=0.012) along with higher age groups, BMI and hypertension in Indian population. The study demonstrated that the high prevalence of MetS and its different components were positively associated with a higher risk of CAD in north Indian diabetic subjects. Nevertheless, MetS is a major health problem in India, comprehensive population studies are warranted for estimation of incidence and prevalence, and education should be provided on its prevention and control to reduce the diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Psychological Stress, Inflammation, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Petra H; von Känel, Roland

    2017-09-20

    In this review, we summarize evidence on the risk factor psychological stress in the context of coronary heart disease (CHD) in humans and explore the role of inflammation as a potential underlying mechanism. While chronic stress increases the risk of incident CHD and poor cardiovascular prognosis, acute emotional stress can trigger acute CHD events in vulnerable patients. Evidence supporting a potential role for inflammation as a promising biological mechanism comes from population-based studies showing associations between chronic stress and increased inflammation. Similarly, experimental studies demonstrate acute stress-induced increases in inflammatory markers and suggest modulatory potential for pharmacological and biobehavioral interventions. So far, studies investigating patients with cardiovascular disease are few and the full sequence of events from stress to inflammation to CHD remains to be established. Psychological stress is an independent CHD risk factor associated with increased inflammation. Although promising, causality needs to be further explored.

  11. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis overestimates cumulative incidence of health-related events in competing risk settings: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacny, Sarah; Wilson, Todd; Clement, Fiona; Roberts, Derek J; Faris, Peter; Ghali, William A; Marshall, Deborah A

    2018-01-01

    Kaplan-Meier survival analysis overestimates cumulative incidence in competing risks (CRs) settings. The extent of overestimation (or its clinical significance) has been questioned, and CRs methods are infrequently used. This meta-analysis compares the Kaplan-Meier method to the cumulative incidence function (CIF), a CRs method. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS Previews, Web of Science (1992-2016), and article bibliographies for studies estimating cumulative incidence using the Kaplan-Meier method and CIF. For studies with sufficient data, we calculated pooled risk ratios (RRs) comparing Kaplan-Meier and CIF estimates using DerSimonian and Laird random effects models. We performed stratified meta-analyses by clinical area, rate of CRs (CRs/events of interest), and follow-up time. Of 2,192 identified abstracts, we included 77 studies in the systematic review and meta-analyzed 55. The pooled RR demonstrated the Kaplan-Meier estimate was 1.41 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.36, 1.47] times higher than the CIF. Overestimation was highest among studies with high rates of CRs [RR = 2.36 (95% CI: 1.79, 3.12)], studies related to hepatology [RR = 2.60 (95% CI: 2.12, 3.19)], and obstetrics and gynecology [RR = 1.84 (95% CI: 1.52, 2.23)]. The Kaplan-Meier method overestimated the cumulative incidence across 10 clinical areas. Using CRs methods will ensure accurate results inform clinical and policy decisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rivaroxaban for Preventing Atherothrombotic Events in People with Acute Coronary Syndrome and Elevated Cardiac Biomarkers: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandor, Abdullah; Pollard, Daniel; Chico, Tim; Henderson, Robert; Stevenson, Matt

    2016-05-01

    As part of its Single Technology Appraisal process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the company that manufactures rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Bayer) to submit evidence of the clinical and cost effectiveness of rivaroxaban for the prevention of adverse outcomes in patients after the acute management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology, based upon the company's submission to NICE. The evidence was derived mainly from a randomised, double-blind, phase III, placebo-controlled trial of rivaroxaban (either 2.5 or 5 mg twice daily) in patients with recent ACS [unstable angina, non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)]. In addition, all patients received antiplatelet therapy [aspirin alone or aspirin and a thienopyridine either as clopidogrel (approximately 99 %) or ticlopidine (approximately 1 %) according to national or local guidelines]. The higher dose of rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily) did not form part of the marketing authorisation. A post hoc subgroup analysis of the licensed patients who had ACS with elevated cardiac biomarkers (that is, patients with STEMI and NSTEMI) without prior stroke or transient ischaemic stroke showed that compared with standard care, the addition of rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) to existing antiplatelet therapy reduced the composite endpoint of cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction or stroke, but increased the risk of major bleeding and intracranial haemorrhage. However, there were a number of limitations in the evidence base that warrant caution in its interpretation. In particular, the evidence may be confounded because of the post hoc subgroup

  13. História, eventos e narrativa: incidentes e cultura do quotidiano History, events and narrative: incidents and daily culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Darnton

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Escândalos, massacres, desabamentos, seqüestros: muitos temas que eram associados a tablóides e romances policiais têm sido objeto de um grande número de livros de história, que vêm ganhando espaço privilegiado nas estantes das livrarias. Trata-se do despontar de um novo gênero historiográfico, o das "análises dos incidentes", que está alcançando grande êxito de público. Abordando assuntos diversos, estas análises coincidem em sua tentativa de circunscrever um evento, reconstruí-lo, e relatá-lo como uma estória, usando toda sorte de técnicas narrativas; além de acompanharem sua repercussão e suas versões, atrav és do tempo. Ao fazê-lo, tais estudos refletem o interesse recente dos historiadores pelo modo como se constrói e se significa a experiência da história. Ao mesmo tempo, suscitam indagações sobre os limites da reconstru ção de um evento, e da utilização de artifícios em seu relato, resituando a discussão sobre a fronteira entre história, narração e ficção. Partindo do exame do livro A Sentimental Murder. [Love and Madness in the Eighteenth Century (BREWER, 2004], no qual se aborda um crime passional ocorrido em Londres, em 1779, e suas repercussões, até 1950, o presente ensaio procura debater o panorama historiográfico criado pela emergência das análises de acontecimentos.Scandals, massacres, collapse, kidnappings: many themes that were associated with tabloids and crime novels have been the object of a great number of books of history, which have been garnering privileged space on the shelves of bookstores. This is a matter of the rise of a new historiographical genre, that of the "analyses of events", which is attaining great public success. Examining diverse subjects, these analyses coincide in their attempt to circumscribe an event, reconstruct it, and tell it as a story, using every sort of narrative technique, as well as following up its repercussions and versions throughout time. Such

  14. Incidence of bone metastases and skeletal-related events in breast cancer patients: A population-based cohort study in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryzek Jon P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer (BrCa is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the industrialized world. More than half of women presenting with metastatic BrCa develop bone metastases. Bone metastases increase the risk of skeletal-related events (SREs, defined as pathological fractures, spinal cord compression, bone pain requiring palliative radiotherapy, and orthopaedic surgery. Both bone metastases and SREs are associated with unfavorable prognosis and greatly affect quality of life. Few epidemiological data exist on SREs after primary diagnosis of BrCa and subsequent bone metastasis. We therefore estimated the incidence of bone metastases and SREs in newly-diagnosed BrCa patients in Denmark from 1999 through 2007. Methods We estimated the overall and annual incidence of bone metastases and SREs in newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients in Denmark from January 1, 1999 to December 31, 2007 using the Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR, which covers all Danish hospitals. We estimated the cumulative incidence of bone metastases and SREs and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Of the 35,912 BrCa patients, 178 (0.5% presented with bone metastases at the time of primary breast cancer diagnosis, and of these, 77 (43.2% developed an SRE during follow up. A total of 1,272 of 35,690 (3.6% BrCa patients without bone metastases at diagnosis developed bone metastases during a median follow-up time of 3.4 years. Among these patients, 590 (46.4% subsequently developed an SRE during a median follow-up time of 0.7 years. Incidence rates of bone metastases were highest the first year after the primary BrCa diagnosis, particularly among patients with advanced BrCa at diagnosis. Similarly, incidence rates of a first SRE was highest the first year after first diagnosis of a bone metastasis. Conclusions The high incidence of SREs following the first year after first diagnosis of a bone metastasis

  15. Treatment with tumor necrosis factor blockers is associated with a lower incidence of first cardiovascular events in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Lennart T H; Turesson, Carl; Gülfe, Anders; Kapetanovic, Meliha C; Petersson, Ingemar F; Saxne, Tore; Geborek, Pierre

    2005-07-01

    To investigate the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, compared to a standard RA population. Patients were recruited from a regional register, which includes over 90% of patients with RA started on TNF blockers in 1999 or later, and a local community based cohort of RA patients, established in 1997. Of a total of 983 patients in the combined cohort, 531 received treatment with etanercept or infliximab during the study period. The total cohort (n = 983) was linked with national registers for inpatient care and cause of death through December 31, 2001. CVD was defined as the first inpatient care or death from CVD without inpatient care for CVD prior to study entry. First CVD events in those treated versus not treated with TNF blockers were estimated, using age and sex adjusted incidence density computations with treatment and disease severity markers as time-dependent covariates. In the anti-TNF-treated patients, the age-sex adjusted incidence rate of first CVD event was 14.0/1000 person-years at risk (95% CI 5.7-22.4), compared with 35.4/1000 person-years (95% CI 16.5-54.4) in those not treated. Controlling for disability, the age-sex adjusted rate ratio was 0.46 (95% CI 0.25-0.85, p = 0.013) in anti-TNF-treated versus not treated. These findings suggest that the risk of developing CVD is lower in patients with RA treated with TNF blockers. This is compatible with the hypothesis that inflammation contributes to the development of cardiovascular events.

  16. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D; Poloni, Estella S; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle; Gras, Luuk A; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Albini, Laura; Torti, Carlo; Jacobson, Lisa P; Li, Xiuhong; Kingsley, Lawrence A; Carli, Federica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ford, Emily S; Sereti, Irini; Hadigan, Colleen; Martinez, Esteban; Arnedo, Mireia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Gatell, Jose M; Law, Matthew; Bendall, Courtney; Petoumenos, Kathy; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Kabamba, Kabeya; Delforge, Marc; De Wit, Stephane; Berger, Florian; Mauss, Stefan; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Losso, Marcelo; Belloso, Waldo H; Leyes, Maria; Campins, Antoni; Mondi, Annalisa; De Luca, Andrea; Bernardino, Ignacio; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Torrecilla-Rodriguez, Ana; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Arribas, José R; Fanti, Iuri; Gel, Silvia; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Mar; Domingo, Pere; Fischer, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Macken, Alan; Woo, James; McGinty, Tara; Mallon, Patrick; Mangili, Alexandra; Skinner, Sally; Wanke, Christine A; Reiss, Peter; Weber, Rainer; Bucher, Heiner C; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio; Tarr, Philip E; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    BACKGROUND: Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the

  17. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R.; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D.; Poloni, Estella S.; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle; Gras, Luuk A.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Albini, Laura; Torti, Carlo; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Li, Xiuhong; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Carli, Federica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ford, Emily S.; Sereti, Irini; Hadigan, Colleen; Martinez, Esteban; Arnedo, Mireia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Gatell, Jose M.; Law, Matthew; Bendall, Courtney; Petoumenos, Kathy; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Kabamba, Kabeya; Delforge, Marc; de Wit, Stephane; Berger, Florian; Mauss, Stefan; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Losso, Marcelo; Belloso, Waldo H.; Leyes, Maria; Campins, Antoni; Mondi, Annalisa; de Luca, Andrea; Bernardino, Ignacio; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Torrecilla-Rodriguez, Ana; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Arribas, José R.; Fanti, Iuri; Gel, Silvia; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Mar; Domingo, Pere; Fischer, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Macken, Alan; Woo, James; McGinty, Tara; Mallon, Patrick; Mangili, Alexandra; Skinner, Sally; Wanke, Christine A.; Reiss, Peter; Weber, Rainer; Bucher, Heiner C.; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio; Tarr, Philip E.; Gras, A. Luuk; van Wout, Angelique B.; Arnedo-Valero, Mireia; Sierra, Mariana de Paz; Rodriguez, Ana Torrecilla; Garcia, Juan Gonzalez; Arribas, Jose R.; Aubert, V.; Barth, J.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H. C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Francioli, P.; Furrer, H.; Fux, C. A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Haerry, D.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H. H.; Hirschel, B.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Kind, C.; Klimkait, T.; Kovari, H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez de Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Prins, Yerly S. J. M.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Scherpbier, H. J.; Boer, K.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Godfried, M. H.; van der Poll, T.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Lange, J. M. A.; Geerlings, S. E.; van Vugt, M.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; Pajkrt, D.; Bos, J. C.; van der Valk, M.; Schreij, G.; Lowe, S.; Oude Lashof, A.; Pronk, M. J. H.; Bravenboer, B.; van der Ende, M. E.; de Vries-Sluijs, T. E. M. S.; Schurink, C. A. M.; van der Feltz, M.; Nouwen, J. L.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; Verbon, A.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; van de Ven-de Ruiter, E. D.; Slobbe, L.; Haag, Den; Kauffmann, R. H.; Schippers, E. F.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Alleman, M. A.; Bouwhuis, J. W.; ten Kate, R. W.; Soetekouw, R.; Kroon, F. P.; van den Broek, P. J.; van Dissel, J. T.; Arend, S. M.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; de Boer, M. J. G.; Jolink, H.; den Hollander, J. G.; Pogany, K.; Bronsveld, W.; Kortmann, W.; van Twillert, G.; van Houte, D. P. F.; Polée, M. B.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; ten Napel, C. H. H.; Kootstra, G. J.; Brinkman, K.; Blok, W. L.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Schouten, W. E. M.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; Juttmann, J. R.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Brouwer, A. E.; Mulder, J. W.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Smit, P. M.; Weijer, S.; van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; Sprenger, H. G.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; van Assen, S.; Stek, C. J.; Hoepelman, I. M.; Mudrikova, T.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Jaspers, C. A. J. J.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Peters, E. J. G.; Maarschalk-Ellerbroek, L. J.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Arends, J. E.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; van der Hilst, J. C. H.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J. P.; Gisolf, E. H.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Plankey, Michael; Crain, Barbara; Dobs, Adrian; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Gallant, Joel; Johnson-Hill, Lisette; Sacktor, Ned; Selnes, Ola; Shepard, James; Thio, Chloe; Phair, John P.; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Badri, Sheila; Conover, Craig; O'Gorman, Maurice; Ostrow, David; Palella, Frank; Ragin, Ann; Detels, Roger; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Aronow, Aaron; Bolan, Robert; Breen, Elizabeth; Butch, Anthony; Fahey, John; Jamieson, Beth; Miller, Eric N.; Oishi, John; Vinters, Harry; Visscher, Barbara R.; Wiley, Dorothy; Witt, Mallory; Yang, Otto; Young, Stephen; Zhang, Zuo Feng; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Becker, James T.; Cranston, Ross D.; Martinson, Jeremy J.; Mellors, John W.; Silvestre, Anthony J.; Stall, Ronald D.; Muñoz, Alvaro; Abraham, Alison; Althoff, Keri; Cox, Christopher; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Gange, Stephen J.; Golub, Elizabeth; Schollenberger, Janet; Seaberg, Eric C.; Su, Sol; Huebner, Robin E.; Dominguez, Geraldina; Moroni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Carosi, G.; Cauda, R.; Monforte, A. d'Arminio; Di Perri, G.; Galli, M.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Lazzarin, A.; Perno, C. F.; Sagnelli, E.; Viale, P. L.; Von Schlosser, F.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Ammassari, A.; Andreoni, M.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, M. R.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; de Luca, A.; Gargiulo, M.; Gervasoni, C.; Girardi, E.; Lichtner, M.; Lo Caputo, S.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Murri, R.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Torti, C.; Fanti, I.; Formenti, T.; Galli, Laura; Lorenzini, Patrizia; Montroni, M.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Riva, A.; Tirelli, U.; Martellotta, F.; Ladisa, N.; Lazzari, G.; Verucchi, G.; Castelli, F.; Scalzini, A.; Minardi, C.; Bertelli, D.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P. E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Carnevale, G.; Lorenzotti, S.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Leoncini, F.; Mazzotta, F.; Pozzi, M.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, G.; Viscoli, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Caramma, I.; Chiodera, A.; Castelli, P.; Rizzardini, G.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Foschi, A.; Salpietro, S.; Galli, A.; Bigoloni, A.; Spagnuolo, V.; Merli, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Cicconi, P.; Bisio, L.; Gori, A.; Lapadula, G.; Abrescia, N.; Chirianni, A.; de Marco, M.; Ferrari, C.; Borghi, R.; Baldelli, F.; Belfiori, B.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; Narciso, P.; Tozzi, V.; Vullo, V.; d'Avino, A.; Zaccarelli, M.; Gallo, L.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Trotta, M. P.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A. M.; Mura, M. S.; Caramello, P.; Orofino, G. C.; Sciandra, M.; Raise, N. N.; Ebo, F.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.; Law, M.; Petoumenos, K.; McManus, H.; Wright, S.; Bendall, C.; Moore, R.; Edwards, S.

    2013-01-01

    Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the setting of HIV

  18. Scared to Death? Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease The Heart and Soul Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Elisabeth J.; de Jonge, Peter; Na, Beeya; Cohen, Beth E.; Lett, Heather; Whooley, Mary A.

    Context: Anxiety is common in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), but studies examining the effect of anxiety on cardiovascular prognosis and the role of potential mediators have yielded inconsistent results. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) on

  19. Occult coronary artery disease in middle-aged sportsmen with a low cardiovascular risk score : The Measuring Athlete's Risk of Cardiovascular Events (MARC) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braber, Thijs L.; Mosterd, Arend; Prakken, Niek H.; Rienks, Rienk; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; Mali, Willem P.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Backx, Frank J.; Bots, Michiel L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Most exercise-related cardiac arrests in men aged 45 years are due to coronary artery disease (CAD). The current sports medical evaluation (SME) of middle-aged sportsmen includes medical history, physical examination and resting and exercise electrocardiography (ECG). We investigated the

  20. Occult coronary artery disease in middle-aged sportsmen with a low cardiovascular risk score : The Measuring Athlete's Risk of Cardiovascular Events (MARC) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braber, Thijs L.; Mosterd, Arend; Prakken, Niek H.; Rienks, R; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; Mali, Willem P.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Backx, Frank J.; Bots, Michiel L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most exercise-related cardiac arrests in men aged ≥45 years are due to coronary artery disease (CAD). The current sports medical evaluation (SME) of middle-aged sportsmen includes medical history, physical examination and resting and exercise electrocardiography (ECG). We investigated

  1. Characteristics and outcomes associated with 30-day readmissions following acute coronary syndrome 2000-2013: the Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litovchik, Ilia; Pereg, David; Shlomo, Nir; Vorobeichik, Dina; Beigel, Roy; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Vered, Zvi; Goldenberg, Ilan; Minha, Sa'ar

    2018-04-01

    Readmissions following acute myocardial infarction are associated with poor outcomes and a heavy economic burden. There are few evidence-based data on the characteristics and outcomes of patients readmitted following acute coronary syndrome. We explored the incidence and outcomes of patients readmitted after an acute coronary syndrome in the past decade. The study population comprised all acute coronary syndrome patients who were enrolled and prospectively followed up in the biennial Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey from 2000 to 2013. Multivariate analysis identified factors independently associated with readmission and long-term mortality. There were 13,010 study patients, of whom 556 (4.2%) had an unplanned readmission within 30 days of the index event. Stent thrombosis during the index hospitalisation (odds ratio (OR) 8.43; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.11-16.07; P65 years; OR 1.28; 95% CI 1.06-1.55; P=0.011), and lack of dual-antiplatelet therapy (OR 1.52; 95% CI 1.25-1.86; Psyndrome was observed between 2000 and 2013 ( Psyndrome comprise an undertreated, high-risk cohort. Our findings indicate that despite a significant decline in readmission rates following acute coronary syndrome over the past decade, readmission within 30 days following acute coronary syndrome still portends a grave outcome.

  2. RANKL inhibition with denosumab does not influence 3-year progression of aortic calcification or incidence of adverse cardiovascular events in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and high cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelson, Elizabeth J; Miller, Paul D; Christiansen, Claus; Daizadeh, Nadia S; Grazette, Luanda; Anthony, Mary S; Egbuna, Ogo; Wang, Andrea; Siddhanti, Suresh R; Cheung, Angela M; Franchimont, Nathalie; Kiel, Douglas P

    2014-02-01

    Atherosclerosis and osteoporosis are chronic diseases that progress with age, and studies suggest aortic calcification, an indicator of atherosclerosis, is inversely associated with bone mineral density (BMD). The osteoprotegerin (OPG)/receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK)/RANK ligand (RANKL) system has been proposed as a shared regulatory system for bone and vasculature. Denosumab (DMAb), a monoclonal antibody against RANKL, improved BMD and reduced fracture risk in the Fracture Reduction Evaluation of Denosumab in Osteoporosis Every 6 Months (FREEDOM) trial. We evaluated whether or not treatment with DMAb influenced progression of aortic calcification (AC) and incidence of cardiovascular (CV) adverse events. We included 2363 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (1142 placebo, 1221 DMAb), selected from 7808 participants in the FREEDOM trial (3906 placebo, 3902 DMAb), at high risk of CV events according to modified Raloxifene Use for the Heart (RUTH) criteria. CV adverse events were reported by participants. AC scores were assessed using a semiquantitative method from lateral spine X-rays. Change in AC score from baseline to 12 (n = 1377), 24 (n = 1231), and 36 months (n = 1045) was calculated as AC score at follow-up minus AC score at baseline. AC progression was defined as change in AC score >0. Baseline characteristics, CV risk factors, and AC scores were similar between treatment groups. Mean age of participants was 74 years (range, 60-90), 88% were white, and 77% had AC score >0 at baseline. Frequency of AC progression over 3 years did not differ between women in placebo (22%) and DMAb (22%) groups (p = 0.98). AC progression did not differ between treatment groups when analyzed by baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate or by baseline AC scores. Frequency of CV adverse events did not differ between placebo (40%) and DMAb (38%) groups (p = 0.26). In conclusion, DMAb treatment had no effect on progression of AC or incidence of CV

  3. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Amount as an Independent Risk Factor for the Incidence of Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Stage C or D Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Myocardial fibrosis (MF is a risk factor for poor prognosis in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE of the myocardium on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR represents MF. We examined whether the LGE amount increases the incidence of adverse cardiovascular events in patients with stage C or D heart failure (HF. Methods Eighty-four consecutive patients with stage C or D HF, either ischemic or non-ischemic, were enrolled. Comprehensive clinical and CMR evaluations were performed. All patients were followed up for a composite endpoint of cardiovascular death, heart transplantation, and cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D.Results LGE was present in 79.7% of the end-stage HF patients. LGE distribution patterns were mid-wall, epi-myocardial, endo-myocardial, and the morphological patterns were patchy, transmural, and diffuse. During the average follow-up of 544 days, 13 (15.5% patients had endpoint events: 7 patients cardiac death, 2 patients heart transplantation, and 4 patients underwent CRT-D implantation. On univariate analysis, LGE quantification on cardiac magnetic resonance, blood urine nitrogen, QRS duration on electrocardiogram, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD and left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV on CMR had the strongest associations with the composite endpoint events. However, on multivariate analysis for both Model I (after adjusting for age, sex, and body mass index and Model II (after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, renal function, QRS duration and atrial fibrillation on electrocardiogram, the etiology of HF, LVEF, CMR-LVEDD and CMR-LVEDV, LGE amount was a significant risk factor for composite endpoint events (Model I 6SD HR 1.037, 95%CI 1.005-1.071, p=0.022; Model II 6SD HR 1.045, 95%CI 1.001-1.084, p=0.022. Conclusion LGE amount from high-scale threshold on CMR increased the incidence of adverse cardiovascular events for patients in either stage C or D HF.

  4. Metabolic Syndrome Derived from Principal Component Analysis and Incident Cardiovascular Events: The Multi Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA and Health, Aging, and Body Composition (Health ABC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhashish Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The NCEP metabolic syndrome (MetS is a combination of dichotomized interrelated risk factors from predominantly Caucasian populations. We propose a continuous MetS score based on principal component analysis (PCA of the same risk factors in a multiethnic cohort and compare prediction of incident CVD events with NCEP MetS definition. Additionally, we replicated these analyses in the Health, Aging, and Body composition (Health ABC study cohort. Methods and Results. We performed PCA of the MetS elements (waist circumference, HDL, TG, fasting blood glucose, SBP, and DBP in 2610 Caucasian Americans, 801 Chinese Americans, 1875 African Americans, and 1494 Hispanic Americans in the multiethnic study of atherosclerosis (MESA cohort. We selected the first principal component as a continuous MetS score (MetS-PC. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between MetS-PC and 5.5 years of CVD events (n=377 adjusting for age, gender, race, smoking and LDL-C, overall and by ethnicity. To facilitate comparison of MetS-PC with the binary NCEP definition, a MetS-PC cut point was chosen to yield the same 37% prevalence of MetS as the NCEP definition (37% in the MESA cohort. Hazard ratio (HR for CVD events were estimated using the NCEP and Mets-PC-derived binary definitions. In Cox proportional models, the HR (95% CI for CVD events for 1-SD (standard deviation of MetS-PC was 1.71 (1.54–1.90 (P<0.0001 overall after adjusting for potential confounders, and for each ethnicity, HRs were: Caucasian, 1.64 (1.39–1.94, Chinese, 1.39 (1.06–1.83, African, 1.67 (1.37–2.02, and Hispanic, 2.10 (1.66-2.65. Finally, when binary definitions were compared, HR for CVD events was 2.34 (1.91–2.87 for MetS-PC versus 1.79 (1.46–2.20 for NCEP MetS. In the Health ABC cohort, in a fully adjusted model, MetS-PC per 1-SD (Health ABC remained associated with CVD events (HR=1.21, 95%CI 1.12–1.32 overall, and for each ethnicity, Caucasian (HR

  5. Metabolic Syndrome Derived from Principal Component Analysis and Incident Cardiovascular Events: The Multi Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and Health, Aging, and Body Composition (Health ABC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Subhashish; Jacobs, David R; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Sibley, Christopher T; Jorgensen, Neal W; Rotter, Jerome I; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Andrews, Jeanette S; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Goodpaster, Bret; Kanaya, Alka; Newman, Anne B; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Herrington, David M

    2012-01-01

    Background. The NCEP metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a combination of dichotomized interrelated risk factors from predominantly Caucasian populations. We propose a continuous MetS score based on principal component analysis (PCA) of the same risk factors in a multiethnic cohort and compare prediction of incident CVD events with NCEP MetS definition. Additionally, we replicated these analyses in the Health, Aging, and Body composition (Health ABC) study cohort. Methods and Results. We performed PCA of the MetS elements (waist circumference, HDL, TG, fasting blood glucose, SBP, and DBP) in 2610 Caucasian Americans, 801 Chinese Americans, 1875 African Americans, and 1494 Hispanic Americans in the multiethnic study of atherosclerosis (MESA) cohort. We selected the first principal component as a continuous MetS score (MetS-PC). Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between MetS-PC and 5.5 years of CVD events (n = 377) adjusting for age, gender, race, smoking and LDL-C, overall and by ethnicity. To facilitate comparison of MetS-PC with the binary NCEP definition, a MetS-PC cut point was chosen to yield the same 37% prevalence of MetS as the NCEP definition (37%) in the MESA cohort. Hazard ratio (HR) for CVD events were estimated using the NCEP and Mets-PC-derived binary definitions. In Cox proportional models, the HR (95% CI) for CVD events for 1-SD (standard deviation) of MetS-PC was 1.71 (1.54-1.90) (P definitions were compared, HR for CVD events was 2.34 (1.91-2.87) for MetS-PC versus 1.79 (1.46-2.20) for NCEP MetS. In the Health ABC cohort, in a fully adjusted model, MetS-PC per 1-SD (Health ABC) remained associated with CVD events (HR = 1.21, 95%CI 1.12-1.32) overall, and for each ethnicity, Caucasian (HR = 1.24, 95%CI 1.12-1.39) and African Americans (HR = 1.16, 95%CI 1.01-1.32). Finally, when using a binary definition of MetS-PC (cut point 0.505) designed to match the NCEP definition in terms of prevalence in the Health ABC cohort (35

  6. The incremental value of brachial flow-mediated dilation measurements in risk stratification for incident cardiovascular events: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sanne A E; den Ruijter, Hester M; Bots, Michiel L

    2012-06-01

    Abstract Adequate risk assessment for cardiovascular disease (CVD) is essential as a guide to initiate drug treatment. Current methods based on traditional risk factors could be improved considerably. Although brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) predicts subsequent cardiovascular events, its predictive value on top of traditional risk factors is unknown. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the incremental predictive value of FMD on top of traditional risk factors in asymptomatic individuals. Using PubMed and reference tracking, three studies were identified that reported on the incremental value of FMD using change in the area under the curve (AUC). Two large cohort studies found no improvement in AUC when FMD was added to traditional risk prediction models, whereas one small case-control study found an improvement. One study used the net reclassification improvement (NRI) to assess whether FMD measurement leads to correct risk stratification in risk categories. Although this study did not find an improvement in AUC, the NRI was statistically significant. Based on the reclassification results of this study, FMD measurement might be helpful in risk prediction. Evidence supporting the use of FMD measurement in clinical practice for risk stratification for CVD on top of traditional risk factors is limited, and future studies are needed.

  7. Trends of Incidence, Clinical Presentation, and In-Hospital Mortality Among Women With Acute Myocardial Infarction With or Without Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection: A Population-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed N; Taduru, Siva Sagar; Mentias, Amgad; Mahtta, Dhruv; Barakat, Amr F; Saad, Marwan; Elgendy, Akram Y; Mojadidi, Mohammad K; Omer, Mohamed; Abuzaid, Ahmed; Agarwal, Nayan; Elgendy, Islam Y; Anderson, R David; Saw, Jacqueline

    2018-01-08

    The authors sought to determine the clinical characteristics and in-hospital survival of women presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD). The clinical presentation and in-hospital survival of women with AMI and SCAD remains unclear. The National Inpatient Sample (2009 to 2014) was queried for all women with a primary diagnosis of AMI and concomitant SCAD. Iatrogenic coronary dissection was excluded. The main outcome was in-hospital mortality. Propensity score matching and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed. Among 752,352 eligible women with AMI, 7,347 had a SCAD diagnosis. Women with SCAD were younger (61.7 vs. 67.1 years of age) with less comorbidity. SCAD was associated with higher incidence of in-hospital mortality (6.8% vs. 3.4%). In SCAD patients, a decrease in in-hospital mortality was evident with time (11.4% in 2009 vs. 5.0% in 2014) and concurred with less percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (82.5% vs. 69.1%). Propensity score yielded 7,332 SCAD and 14,352 patients without SCAD. The odds ratio (OR) of in-hospital mortality remained higher with SCAD after propensity matching (OR: 1.87, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.65 to 2.11) and on multivariable regression analyses (OR: 2.41, 95% CI: 2.07 to 2.80). PCI was associated with higher mortality in SCAD patients presenting with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (OR: 2.01; 95% CI: 1.00 to 4.47), but not with STEMI (OR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.41 to 0.96). Women presenting with AMI and SCAD appear to be at higher risk of in-hospital mortality. Lower rates of PCI were associated with improved survival, with evidence of worse outcomes when PCI was performed for SCAD in the setting of non with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Early Psychological Preventive Intervention For Workplace Violence: A Randomized Controlled Explorative and Comparative Study Between EMDR-Recent Event and Critical Incident Stress Debriefing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarquinio, Cyril; Rotonda, Christine; Houllé, William A; Montel, Sébastien; Rydberg, Jenny Ann; Minary, Laetitia; Dellucci, Hélène; Tarquinio, Pascale; Fayard, Any; Alla, François

    2016-11-01

    This randomized controlled trial study aims to investigate the efficacy of an early psychological intervention called EMDR-RE compared to Critical Incident Stress Debriefing on 60 victims of workplace violence, which were divided into three groups: 'EMDR-RE' (n = 19), 'CISD' (n = 23), and 'delayed EMDR-RE' (n = 18). EMDR-RE and CISD took place 48 hours after the event, whilst third intervention was delayed by an additional 48 hours. Results showed that after 3 months PCLS and SUDS scores were significantly lower with EMDR-RE and delayed EMDR-RE compared to CISD. After 48 hours and 3 months, none of the EMDR-RE-treated victims showed PTSD symptoms.

  9. Haemochromatosis gene mutations and risk of coronary heart disease: a west of Scotland coronary prevention study (WOSCOPS) substudy

    OpenAIRE

    Gunn, I R; Maxwell, F K; Gaffney, D; McMahon, A D; Packard, C J

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To measure the frequency of genotypes of the HFE (haemochromatosis) gene in patients recruited to the west of Scotland coronary prevention study (WOSCOPS), and relate them to the subsequent occurrence of coronary clinical events.

  10. A modified Mediterranean diet score is associated with a lower risk of incident metabolic syndrome over 25 years among young adults: the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Lyn M; Van Horn, Linda; Daviglus, Martha L; Zhou, Xia; Reis, Jared P; Loria, Catherine M; Jacobs, David R; Duffey, Kiyah J

    2014-11-28

    The Mediterranean diet has been reported to be inversely associated with incident metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) among older adults; however, this association has not been studied in young African American and white adults. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the association of a modified Mediterranean diet (mMedDiet) score with the 25-year incidence of the MetSyn in 4713 African American and white adults enrolled in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. A diet history questionnaire was used to assess dietary intake at baseline, year 7 and year 20 and a mMedDiet score was created. Cardiovascular risk factors were measured at multiple examinations over 25 years. The MetSyn was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis was use to evaluate associations for incident MetSyn across the mMedDiet score categories adjusting for demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors and BMI. Higher mMedDiet scores represented adherence to a dietary pattern rich in fruit, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and fish, but poor in red and processed meat and snack foods. The incidence of MetSyn components (abdominal obesity, elevated TAG concentrations and low HDL-cholesterol concentrations) was lower in those with higher mMedDiet scores than in those with lower scores. Furthermore, the incidence of the MetSyn was lower across the five mMedDiet score categories; the hazard ratios and 95 % CI from category 1 to category 5 were 1·0; 0·94 (0·76, 1·15); 0·84 (0·68, 1·04); 0·73 (0·58, 0·92); and 0·72 (0·54, 0·96), respectively (P trend= 0·005). These findings suggest that the risk of developing the MetSyn is lower when consuming a diet rich in fruit, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and fish.

  11. Computer simulation of nuclear pollutant diffusion from Shimane nuclear power plants and development of an evacuation strategy in the event of a nuclear incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakura, Haruna; Kurimasa, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    Beginning from Tohoku (northeastern) Earthquake on March 11, an accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant resulted in a substantial release of radioactivity to the environment. The accident forced a large number of residents to evacuate from surrounding areas. Moreover, the nuclear incident was life-threatening for the elderly and for people with serious illnesses who were confined in hospital or nursing homes. Strikingly, the causes of death were not directly attributed to radiation exposure but to problems encountered during evacuation. Using nuclear diffusion data from the Fukushima incident, we simulated nuclear pollutant dispersion using computer software A2C in an area of Tottori and Shimane Prefectures surrounding the Shimane Nuclear Power Plant. We generated a model for the spread of nuclear pollutants around the Emergency Planning Zone, id est (i.e.) EPZ. From these findings, we proposed evacuation strategies for residents near the power plant to ensure a safe and reliable escape from nuclear pollutants. Our recommendations include: immediate evacuation from PAZ area (within 5 km), securing indoor shelter in the area of the UPZ (from 5 km to 30 km) and preparations to evacuate further outwards from the nuclear plant site, daytime evacuation within a 30 km area after considering wind direction and velocity, and preparation of a planned evacuation strategy that identifies secure facilities for weaker people in the event of a disaster. (author)

  12. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    OpenAIRE

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D; Poloni, Estella S; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the setting of HIV infection. METHODS: In the general population, 23 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were shown to be associated with CAD through genome-wide association analysis. Using the ...

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies That the ABO Blood Group System Influences Interleukin-10 Levels and the Risk of Clinical Events in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, ?sa; Alfredsson, Jenny; Eriksson, Niclas; Wallentin, Lars; Siegbahn, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of mortality worldwide. We have previously shown that increased interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels are associated with poor outcome in ACS patients. Method We performed a genome-wide association study in 2864 ACS patients and 408 healthy controls, to identify genetic variants associated with IL-10 levels. Then haplotype analyses of the identified loci were done and comparisons to levels of IL-10 and other known ACS related biomarkers. Res...

  14. Haplotype and genotype effects of the F7 gene on circulating factor VII, coagulation activation markers and incident coronary heart disease in UK men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken-Dror, G; Drenos, F; Humphries, S E; Talmud, P J; Hingorani, A D; Kivimäki, M; Kumari, M; Bauer, K A; Morrissey, J H; Ireland, H A

    2010-11-01

    Evidence for the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the F7 gene and factor (F)VII levels and with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) is inconsistent. We examined whether F7 tagging SNPs (tSNPs) and haplotypes were associated with FVII levels, coagulation activation markers (CAMs) and CHD risk in two cohorts of UK men. Genotypes for eight SNPs and baseline levels of FVIIc, FVIIag and CAMs (including FVIIa) were determined in 2773 healthy men from the Second Northwick Park Heart Study (NPHS-II). A second cohort, Whitehall II study (WH-II, n = 4055), was used for replication analysis of FVIIc levels and CHD risk. In NPHS-II the minor alleles of three SNPs (rs555212, rs762635 and rs510317; haplotype H2) were associated with higher levels of FVIIag, FVIIc and FVIIa, whereas the minor allele for two SNPs (I/D323 and rs6046; haplotype H5) was associated with lower levels. Adjusted for classic risk factors, H2 carriers had a CHD hazard ratio of 1.34 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12-1.59; independent of FVIIc], whereas H5 carriers had a CHD risk of 1.29 (95% CI: 1.01-1.56; not independent of FVIIc) and significantly lower CAMs. Effects of haplotypes on FVIIc levels were replicated in WH-II, as was the association of H5 with higher CHD risk [pooled-estimate odds ratio (OR) 1.16 (1.00-1.36), P = 0.05], but surprisingly, H2 exhibited a reduced risk for CHD.  tSNPs in the F7 gene strongly influence FVII levels. The haplotype associated with low FVIIc level, with particularly reduced functional activity, was consistently associated with increased risk for CHD, whereas the haplotype associated with high FVIIc level was not. © 2010 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  15. Association of body size and muscle strength with incidence of coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases: a population-based cohort study of one million Swedish men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Tynelius, Per; Batty, G David; Rasmussen, Finn

    2009-02-01

    Muscle strength and body size may be associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke risk. However, perhaps because of a low number of cases, existing evidence is inconsistent. Height, weight, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), elbow flexion, hand grip and knee extension strength were measured in young adulthood in 1 145 467 Swedish men born between 1951 and 1976. Information on own and parental social position was derived from censuses. During the register-based follow-up until the end of 2006, 12 323 CHD and 8865 stroke cases emerged, including 1431 intracerebral haemorrhage, 1316 subarachoid haemorrhage and 2944 intracerebral infarction cases. Hazard ratios (HR) per 1 SD in the exposures of interest were computed using Cox proportional hazard model. Body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) showed increased risk with CHD and intracerebral infarction, whereas for intracerebral and subarachoid haemorrhage both under- and overweight was associated with increased risk. Height was inversely associated with CHD and all types of stroke. After adjustment for height, BMI, SBP, DBP and social position, all strength indicators were inversely associated with disease risk. For CHD and intracerebral infarction, grip strength showed the strongest association (HR = 0.89 and 0.91, respectively) whereas for intracerebral and subarachoid haemorrhage, knee extension strength was the best predictor (HR = 0.88 and 0.92, respectively). Body size and muscle strength in young adulthood are important predictors of risk of CHD and stroke in later life. In addition to adiposity, underweight needs attention since it may predispose to cerebrovascular complications.

  16. Coronary artery bypass surgery or coronary stenting in diabetic patients: too soon to make a statement?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Alfredo E., E-mail: arodriguez@centroceci.com.ar

    2014-11-15

    Diabetic patients have been associated with poor procedural and long term outcome if they were treated either with percutaneous coronary interventions or coronary artery bypass surgery. Recently several randomized clinical trials (RCT) in this subset of patients have been published showing a greater incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events, death/myocardial infarction/stroke, if they were treated with first generation drug eluting stents (DES) which was not observed previously in the bare metal stent era. However, almost simultaneously with this data, several RCT demonstrated better safety profile with new generation DES including biocompatible polymers, biodegradable polymers and lately complete absorbable DES, all of them showed reduction in adverse cardiac events compared to 1st generation DES in patients with diabetes. In this editorial we review the old and new randomized data in diabetic patients and conclude that there are many unresolved issues to make a definitive statement regarding which is the best revascularization preference in diabetic patients and the measured final efficacy of PCI and CABG will not be reached until the arrival of RCT using next generation DES, including complete absorbable scaffolds. - Highlights: • Diabetic patients have been associated with poor procedural and long term outcome if they were treated either with percutaneous coronary interventions or coronary artery bypass surgery. Recently several randomized clinical trials (RCT) in this subset of patients have been published showing a greater incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events, death/myocardial infarction/stroke, if they were treated with first generation drug eluting stents (DES) which was not observed previously in the bare metal stent era. • In recent years, several RCT demonstrated better safety profile with new generation DES including biocompatible polymers, biodegradable polymers and lately complete absorbable DES, all of them showed reduction in

  17. Eventos com aparente risco de vida: incidência, etiologia e investigação clínica = Apparent life-threatening events: incidence, etiology and investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjos, Alessandra Marques dos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar a incidência, fatores etiológicos e investigação clínica de pacientes com Evento com Aparente Risco de vida (Apparent life-threatening event – ALTE. Métodos: Revisão da literatura através de pesquisa no banco de dados Medline e LILACS entre 1986- 2006 e publicações da Associação Latinoamericana de Pediatria, selecionados a partir de autores com experiência reconhecida em ALTE. Foram revisados 13 artigos de autores renomados além de 3 consensos: americano sobre apnéia infantil e monitorização domiciliar, consenso latinoamericano sobre ALTE e consenso da sociedade européia para estudo e preven- ção de morte infantil. Resultados: A incidência de ALTE descrita foi de 0,6 a 2,27% nos casos revisados. Quanto a etiologia aproximadamente 50% dos casos de ALTE são sintomáticos, sendo mais freqüente doenças do trato gastrointestinal e neurológicas. A investigação deve ser realizada seguindo protocolo padrão e estar direcionada para o diagnóstico da doença de base que definirá o prognóstico do ALTE. Casos recorrentes sem etiologia definida na investigação inicial necessitam de exames complementares, devendo ser considerado o abuso infantil e Munchausen por procura- ção como diagnóstico diferencial. Conclusão: Como o episódio de ALTE pode ser a manifestação inicial de entidades nosológicas diversas recomenda-se sempre sua investigação diagnóstica direcionada para doença de base

  18. Incidence rates and risk factors for owner-reported adverse events following vaccination of dogs that did or did not receive a Leptospira vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Peng Ju; Stephenson, Nicole; Foley, Janet E; Toussieng, Chuck R; Farver, Thomas B; Sykes, Jane E; Fleer, Katryna A

    2015-11-15

    To determine incidence rates (IRs) and potential risk factors for owner-reported adverse events (AEs) following vaccination of dogs that did or did not receive a Leptospira vaccine. Observational, retrospective cohort study. 130,557 dogs. Electronic records of mobile veterinary clinics from June 2012 to March 2013 were searched to identify dogs that received ≥ 1 vaccine in a given visit. Signalment data, vaccinations received, medications administered, and owner-reported clinical signs consistent with AEs that developed ≤ 5 days after vaccination were recorded. Associations between potential risk factors and owner-reported AEs were evaluated by logistic regression analysis. The IR/10,000 dogs for owner-reported postvaccination AEs was 26.3 (95% CI, 23.6 to 29.2), whereas that for dogs that received a Leptospira vaccine alone or with other vaccines was 53.0 (95% CI, 42.8 to 64.9). Significant factors for increasing or decreasing risk of AEs were as follows: receiving a Leptospira vaccine (adjusted OR, 2.13), age at vaccination 1 to dogs), and IRs for these events did not differ significantly between dogs vaccinated with or without a Leptospira component. The overall IR for owner-reported postvaccination AEs was low. Results suggested vaccination against Leptospira (an organism that can cause fatal disease) is safe in the majority of cases, slightly increasing the risk of owner-reported AEs but not associated with a significant increase in hypersensitivity reactions, compared with other vaccinations administered.

  19. Depression After First Hospital Admission for Acute Coronary Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Mårtensson, Solvej; Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim

    2016-01-01

    for depression and mortality via linkage to patient, prescription, and