WorldWideScience

Sample records for inbuilt interactive evaluation

  1. A study of patient experience using a blood glucose meter with an in-built insulin dose calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramtoola, Shenaz; Jude, Edward; Robinson, Anthony; Malik, Iqbal; Rayman, Gerrard; Dang, Cuong; RossMartin, Graham David; Ali, Amar

    2014-07-01

    Accurate calculation and adjustment of insulin doses is integral to maintaining glycemic control in insulin treated patients. Difficulties with insulin dose calculations may lead to poor adherence to blood glucose monitoring and insulin treatment regimes, resulting in poor metabolic control. The main objective of this study was to evaluate ease of use and user preference of a high specification touch screen blood glucose meter, which has an in-built insulin calculator, compared to patients' usual method of testing blood glucose and deciding insulin doses. Patients with diabetes on a multiple daily injection insulin regime used the Test Meter without the insulin calculator and 1 of 3 comparator meters, each for a 7-day period. They then used the Test Meter with the in-built calculator for 10 days. Patients completed an ease of use questionnaire after each 7-day period, a preference questionnaire after the second 7-day period, and a questionnaire comparing the Test Meter with their usual method after the final 10-day period. Of 164 patients who completed the study, 76% stated a preference for the Test Meter as a diabetes management tool compared to their usual method. A small number of patients preferred familiar methods and/or calculating insulin doses themselves. The log book function of meters was important to most patients. The Test Meter system with in-built insulin calculator supports people to better manage their diabetes and increases their confidence. Patients have different needs and preferences which should be acknowledged and supported in a patient centered health service. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  2. Is There an Inherent Risk to Damage the Popliteus Tendon by Femoral Component With Inbuilt External Rotation? A Pilot Study in Indian Knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Dervendra Kumar; Dhillon, Mandeep S

    2016-02-01

    Femoral components with inbuilt rotation require thicker flexion resection of the lateral femoral condyle and could have a potential risk of damaging the popliteus tendon, especially in the smaller Asian knees. We prospectively evaluated 10 patients with bilateral varus osteoarthritis knee to size the cuts and their location in relation to the popliteus tendon. Two different types of implant were used on either side; one side requires resection in 3° external rotation (group A) and the other side requires a femoral component with inbuilt external rotation (group B). We observed the incidence of injury to the popliteus tendon and distance between flexion cut to its attachment over the lateral femoral condyle between both groups. We had popliteus tendon injury in 3 knees all from group B. Risk of damaging the popliteus tendon was found higher in group B, as the distance between flexion cut to popliteus tendon attachment was significantly low. Femoral component with inbuilt external rotation has more risk of injuring the popliteus tendon because flexion cut takes out more bone from the lateral femoral condyle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Accuracy of near-patient vs. inbuilt spirometry for monitoring tidal volumes in an in-vitro paediatric lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenroth, S; Thomas, J; Cannizzaro, V; Weiss, M; Schmidt, A R

    2018-03-01

    Spirometric monitoring provides precise measurement and delivery of tidal volumes within a narrow range, which is essential for lung-protective strategies that aim to reduce morbidity and mortality in mechanically-ventilated patients. Conventional anaesthesia ventilators include inbuilt spirometry to monitor inspiratory and expiratory tidal volumes. The GE Aisys CS 2 anaesthesia ventilator allows additional near-patient spirometry via a sensor interposed between the proximal end of the tracheal tube and the respiratory tubing. Near-patient and inbuilt spirometry of two different GE Aisys CS 2 anaesthesia ventilators were compared in an in-vitro study. Assessments were made of accuracy and variability in inspiratory and expiratory tidal volume measurements during ventilation of six simulated paediatric lung models using the ASL 5000 test lung. A total of 9240 breaths were recorded and analysed. Differences between inspiratory tidal volumes measured with near-patient and inbuilt spirometry were most significant in the newborn setting (p tidal volume measurements with near-patient spirometry were consistently more accurate than with inbuilt spirometry for all lung models (p tidal volumes decreased with increasing tidal volumes, and was smaller with near-patient than with inbuilt spirometry. The variability in measured tidal volumes was higher during expiration, especially with inbuilt spirometry. In conclusion, the present in-vitro study shows that measurements with near-patient spirometry are more accurate and less variable than with inbuilt spirometry. Differences between measurement methods were most significant in the smallest patients. We therefore recommend near-patient spirometry, especially for neonatal and paediatric patients. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. Adesão em materiais cimentícios: "In-built nanotechnology" Adhesion in cementitious materials: In-built nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Rossetto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A Engenharia de Materiais propiciou os avanços mais notáveis em termos do desempenho mecânico dos materiais cimentícios nas últimas décadas, por meio das técnicas de conformação e do projeto da microestrutura. Com isso foi demonstrada ser equivocada a idéia de que baixas resistências mecânicas seriam inerentes aos materiais cimentícios. No entanto, pouco ainda se sabe a respeito de um parâmetro físico-químico que poderá nos conduzir a novos avanços: a adesão entre as fases hidratadas. Logo, o objetivo do presente trabalho é investigar a adesão com o intuito de ampliar o entendimento sobre seu papel na resistência mecânica dos materiais cimentícios. Os resultados indicaram que a resistência mecânica desses materiais é governada por moléculas de água confinadas em películas nanométricas entre as superfícies das fases cimentícias hidratadas. Em outras palavras, essa pode ser uma contribuição para tornar viável a nanotecnologia desses materiais por meio de um tema até então pouco explorado: a adesão por água confinada.The Materials Engineering afforded the greatest known advances on the mechanical performance of cementitious materials in the latest decades, by casting techniques and microstructural design. Therewith, it was demonstrated to be inadequate the idea that low mechanical strengths should be inherent to cement-based materials. Nevertheless, another promising parameter still remains in the early stages of understanding: the adhesion. Thus, this paper aims to investigate adhesion in order to get an in-depth understanding about its role on the mechanical strength of cementitious materials. According to the experimental evidences, the mechanical strength of such materials is ruled by water molecules which are confined in nanolayers by the hydrated surfaces. These results provided helpful insights on in-built nanotechnology able to render high performance materials through a so far little explored subject

  5. Advax, a Delta Inulin Microparticle, Potentiates In-built Adjuvant Property of Co-administered Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Hayashi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Advax, a delta inulin-derived microparticle, has been developed as an adjuvant for several vaccines. However, its immunological characteristics and potential mechanism of action are yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that Advax behaves as a type-2 adjuvant when combined with influenza split vaccine, a T helper (Th2-type antigen, but behaves as a type-1 adjuvant when combined with influenza inactivated whole virion (WV, a Th1-type antigen. In addition, an adjuvant effect was not observed when Advax-adjuvanted WV vaccine was used to immunize toll-like receptor (TLR 7 knockout mice which are unable to respond to RNA contained in WV antigen. Similarly, no adjuvant effect was seen when Advax was combined with endotoxin-free ovalbumin, a neutral Th0-type antigen. An adjuvant effect was also not seen in tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α knockout mice, and the adjuvant effect required the presences of dendritic cells (DCs and phagocytic macrophages. Therefore, unlike other adjuvants, Advax potentiates the intrinsic or in-built adjuvant property of co-administered antigens. Hence, Advax is a unique class of adjuvant which can potentiate the intrinsic adjuvant feature of the vaccine antigens through a yet to be determined mechanism.

  6. Advax, a Delta Inulin Microparticle, Potentiates In-built Adjuvant Property of Co-administered Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Aoshi, Taiki; Haseda, Yasunari; Kobiyama, Kouji; Wijaya, Edward; Nakatsu, Noriyuki; Igarashi, Yoshinobu; Standley, Daron M; Yamada, Hiroshi; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Hara, Hiromitsu; Saito, Takashi; Takai, Toshiyuki; Coban, Cevayir; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Ishii, Ken J

    2017-02-01

    Advax, a delta inulin-derived microparticle, has been developed as an adjuvant for several vaccines. However, its immunological characteristics and potential mechanism of action are yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that Advax behaves as a type-2 adjuvant when combined with influenza split vaccine, a T helper (Th)2-type antigen, but behaves as a type-1 adjuvant when combined with influenza inactivated whole virion (WV), a Th1-type antigen. In addition, an adjuvant effect was not observed when Advax-adjuvanted WV vaccine was used to immunize toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 knockout mice which are unable to respond to RNA contained in WV antigen. Similarly, no adjuvant effect was seen when Advax was combined with endotoxin-free ovalbumin, a neutral Th0-type antigen. An adjuvant effect was also not seen in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α knockout mice, and the adjuvant effect required the presences of dendritic cells (DCs) and phagocytic macrophages. Therefore, unlike other adjuvants, Advax potentiates the intrinsic or in-built adjuvant property of co-administered antigens. Hence, Advax is a unique class of adjuvant which can potentiate the intrinsic adjuvant feature of the vaccine antigens through a yet to be determined mechanism. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Providing inbuilt economic resilience options : an obligation of comprehensive cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Eva Reitschuler; Emanuel, Linda

    2008-12-15

    For many, a cancer death in the family is the immediately obvious part of what is actually a double devastation. Overwhelming financial damage also results for many families, from the cost of medical care and from the loss of earning power by the patient and family. For some families, the consequences may be multigenerational and can affect the health of the survivors. Although this situation is not limited to cancer, the authors argue that oncology can take a lead in attending to these consequences of cancer as an integral part of its commitment to comprehensive cancer care. They make this case for both the national and the international settings. They also articulate and illustrate the notion of inbuilt options for economic resilience (IERs), which the authors suggest the medical industry, and its cancer care sectors in particular, should be providing to all patients and their families if they are at risk for damaging financial losses. After describing key features to IER, the authors illustrate it with 1 type of approach for households of the terminally ill: hospice care with provision of supplementary training and certification to the family caregiver. Such programming could generate a low-technology, semiskilled healthcare service economy as trained family caregivers provide support to other households in need, thereby both providing a recovery option for themselves and reduced economic devastation to the households which, by receiving the services, can stay in the workforce. Finally, the authors call for invigorated research on the economic impact of cancer on families and for the modeling, demonstration, and study of options for economic resilience, including IER programs.

  8. Fabrication of Micromachined SnO2 Based MOS Gas Sensor with Inbuilt Microheater for Detection of Methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Kakoty

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple method to fabricate a vertical closed membrane structured gas sensor on silicon substrate using micromachining technology for methanol detection at lower concentration. An undoped tin dioxide thin film is deposited by DC magnetron sputtering technique on a pair of gold interdigitated microelectrodes of dimension 820 µm ´ 925 µm. A meander shaped platinum micro heater of dimension 1025 µm ´ 1000 µm is incorporated to provide optimum operating temperature (about 350 0C for sensing operation. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy is done to confirm the chemical composition of the sensor. Temperature coefficient of resistance of the inbuilt micro heater is found to be 0.0941 /0C. The sensor resistance shows significant change when micro heater voltage is varied from 1.5 V-3 V. I-V analysis of the sensor is carried out at 25 0C, 50 0C and 75 0C, and shifts in current through the sensor at different temperatures are observed. I-V characterization is also carried out at different methanol concentration levels (50-110 ppm and it is found that at minimum 80 ppm, the sensor exhibits promising result. The response time and recovery time of the sensor is found to be 160 s and 167 s respectively.

  9. How to evaluate interaction between causes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallqvist, J; Ahlbom, A; Diderichsen, Finn

    1996-01-01

    To increase the knowledge of interaction or synergy between risk factors in an important task in medical research. Still, current literature in cardiovascular epidemiology reflects major misconceptions as how to evaluate interaction. This paper presents Rothman's model of causation from which...... those with combined exposure, comparing relative risks for one exposure after stratification by level of the other, and including an interaction term in the regression model and drawing conclusions from its P-value....

  10. How to evaluate interaction between causes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallqvist, J; Ahlbom, A; Diderichsen, Finn

    1996-01-01

    To increase the knowledge of interaction or synergy between risk factors in an important task in medical research. Still, current literature in cardiovascular epidemiology reflects major misconceptions as how to evaluate interaction. This paper presents Rothman's model of causation from which...

  11. Cockpit design and evaluation using interactive graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    A general overview of the characteristics of an interactive graphics system which was developed to assist cockpit engineers design and evaluate work stations was presented. The manikin used in this COMputerized BIomechanical MAN-model (COMBIMAN) was described, as are provisions for generating work stations and assessing interactions between man and environment. The applications of the present system are explained, and critiques of COMBIMAN are presented. The limitations of the existing programs and the requirements of the designers necessitate future revisions and additions to the biomechanical and erogonomic properties of COMBIMAN. Some of these enhancements are discussed.

  12. In vitro evaluation of the interaction between methanol extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial interaction studies between methanol extract of lichen (Ramalina farinacea (I) ach. (Fam: Ramalinacea) and tetracycline, against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated. Preliminary antimicrobial properties of the extract were evaluated. Antimicrobial interaction studies between the methanol ...

  13. Evaluation of drug interactions with nanofibrillar cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolakovic, Ruzica; Peltonen, Leena; Laukkanen, Antti; Hellman, Maarit; Laaksonen, Päivi; Linder, Markus B; Hirvonen, Jouni; Laaksonen, Timo

    2013-11-01

    Nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) (also referred to as cellulose nanofibers, nanocellulose, microfibrillated, or nanofibrillated cellulose) has recently gotten wide attention in various research areas and it has also been studied as excipient in formulation of the pharmaceutical dosage forms. Here, we have evaluated the interactions between NFC and the model drugs of different structural characteristics (size, charge, etc.). The series of permeation studies were utilized to evaluate the ability of the drugs in solution to diffuse through the thin, porous, dry NFC films. An incubation method was used to determine capacity of binding of chosen model drugs to NFC as well as isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to study thermodynamics of the binding process. A genetically engineered fusion protein carrying double cellulose binding domain was used as a positive control since its affinity and capacity of binding for NFC have already been reported. The permeation studies revealed the size dependent diffusion rate of the model drugs through the NFC films. The results of both binding and ITC studies showed that the studied drugs bind to the NFC material and indicated the pH dependence of the binding and electrostatic forces as the main mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Participant Interaction in Asynchronous Learning Environments: Evaluating Interaction Analysis Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Judith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this empirical study was to determine the extent to which three different objective analytical methods--sequence analysis, surface cohesion analysis, and lexical cohesion analysis--can most accurately identify specific characteristics of online interaction. Statistically significant differences were found in all points of…

  15. The user in interactive information retrieval evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    ) Request types, test persons, task-based simulations of search situations and relevance or performance measures in IIR; 2) Ultra-Light Interactive IR experiments; 3) Interactive-Light IR studies; and 4) Naturalistic field investigations of IIR. The chapter concludes with a summary section, a reference list...

  16. Interactive segmentation techniques algorithms and performance evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jia; Kuo, C-C Jay

    2013-01-01

    This book focuses on interactive segmentation techniques, which have been extensively studied in recent decades. Interactive segmentation emphasizes clear extraction of objects of interest, whose locations are roughly indicated by human interactions based on high level perception. This book will first introduce classic graph-cut segmentation algorithms and then discuss state-of-the-art techniques, including graph matching methods, region merging and label propagation, clustering methods, and segmentation methods based on edge detection. A comparative analysis of these methods will be provided

  17. Evaluation of HIV drug interaction web sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Nancy L; Kelly, Deborah V; Tseng, Alice L; van Heeswijk, Rolf P G; Béïque, Lizanne C; Hughes, Christine A

    2003-11-01

    Clinicians frequently consult HIV drug interaction Web sites of unknown quality. To systematically review and identify HIV drug interaction Web sites of high quality and usefulness for healthcare professionals. Relevant Web sites were identified through a structured search on commonly used search engines. An assessment tool containing 4 domains (content, reliability, access restrictions, ease of navigation) was developed. English and French Web sites were selected for review if they included HIV drug interaction information directed to healthcare professionals. Web sites were excluded if antiretroviral interaction data were not available or were out of date. Commercial online databases and sites that required payment were not included. Seventeen HIV pharmacists from across Canada participated in the review. The Web sites were ranked with total mean scores. Mean scores for each domain were then analyzed. Interrater agreement and ANOVA using the rater as a covariate were determined. Nine Web sites met the criteria for review. Web sites from Toronto General Hospital (Canada), HIVinSite (beta version) (US), and the University of Liverpool (UK) ranked highest for total mean scores and for content. Other Web sites were found to be reliable, accessible, and easy to navigate; however, they did not consistently include unpublished data or data on herbal preparations, recreational drugs, or multiple interactions. Three HIV interaction Web sites of high quality were identified that can be valuable tools for HIV and non-HIV health-care professionals. Regular reviews are necessary in order to keep pace with the growing body of HIV interaction data and the constant evolution of Web sites.

  18. The synthesis of four-layer gold-silver-polymer-silver core-shell nanomushroom with inbuilt Raman molecule for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Wang, Xiaolong; Zhou, Jun

    2017-12-01

    A facial two-step reduction method was proposed to synthesize four-layer gold-silver-polymer-silver (Au@Ag@PSPAA@Ag) core-shell nanomushrooms (NMs) with inbuilt Raman molecule. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) intensity of 4MBA adhered on the surface of Au core gradually increased with the modification of middle Ag shell and then Ag mushroom cap due to the formation of two kinds of ultra-small interior nanogap. Compared with the initial Au nanoparticles, the SERS enhancement ratio of the Au@Ag@PSPAA@Ag NMs approached to nearly 40. The novel core-shell NMs also exhibited homogeneous SERS signals for only one sample and reproducible signals for 10 different samples, certified by the low relative standard deviation values of less than 10% and 15% for the character peaks of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid, respectively. Such a novel four-layer core-shell nanostructure with reliable SERS performance has great potential application in quantitative SERS-based immunoassay.

  19. The user in interactive information retrieval evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter initially defines what characterizes and distinguishes research frameworks from research models. The Laboratory Research Framework for IR illustrates the case. We define briefly what is meant by the concept of research design, including research questions, and what this chapter regards......) Request types, test persons, task-based simulations of search situations and relevance or performance measures in IIR; 2) Ultra-Light Interactive IR experiments; 3) Interactive-Light IR studies; and 4) Naturalistic field investigations of IIR. The chapter concludes with a summary section, a reference list...

  20. Using Affinity Diagrams to Evaluate Interactive Prototypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucero, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Affinity diagramming is a technique used to externalize, make sense of, and organize large amounts of unstructured, far-ranging, and seemingly dissimilar qualitative data. HCI and interaction design practitioners have adopted and used affinity diagrams for different purposes. This paper discusses...

  1. Evaluation of interaction dynamics of concurrent processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobecki, Piotr; Białasiewicz, Jan T.; Gross, Nicholas

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the wavelet tools that enable the detection of temporal interactions of concurrent processes. In particular, the determination of interaction coherence of time-varying signals is achieved using a complex continuous wavelet transform. This paper has used electrocardiogram (ECG) and seismocardiogram (SCG) data set to show multiple continuous wavelet analysis techniques based on Morlet wavelet transform. MATLAB Graphical User Interface (GUI), developed in the reported research to assist in quick and simple data analysis, is presented. These software tools can discover the interaction dynamics of time-varying signals, hence they can reveal their correlation in phase and amplitude, as well as their non-linear interconnections. The user-friendly MATLAB GUI enables effective use of the developed software what enables to load two processes under investigation, make choice of the required processing parameters, and then perform the analysis. The software developed is a useful tool for researchers who have a need for investigation of interaction dynamics of concurrent processes.

  2. Order effect in interactive information retrieval evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Melanie Landvad; Borlund, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report a study of order effect in interactive information retrieval (IIR) studies. The phenomenon of order effect is well-known, and it is the main reason why searches are permuted (counter-balanced) between test participants in IIR studies. However, the ...

  3. Interaction and evaluation in emerging HCI environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Nijholt, Antinus

    In this abstract we outline new developments in HCI systems and identify challenges for design and evaluation of emerging systems. We illustrate these developments and challenges with examples from research projects we are involved in.

  4. 2nd Workshop on Evaluating Child Robot Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaga, Cristina; Lohse, M.; Charisi, Vasiliki; Evers, Vanessa; Neerincx, Marc; Kanda, Takayuki; Leite, Iolanda

    Many researchers have started to explore natural interaction scenarios for children. No matter if these children are normally developing or have special needs, evaluating Child-Robot Interaction (CRI) is a challenge. To find methods that work well and provide reliable data is difficult, for example

  5. Evaluation of self-interaction parameters from binary phase diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, T.L.

    1977-10-01

    The feasibility of calculating Wagner self-interaction parameters from binary phase diagrams was examined. The self-interaction parameters of 22 non-ferrous liquid solutions were calculated utilizing an equation based on the equality of the chemical potentials of a component in two equilibrium phases. Utilization of the equation requires the evaluation of the first and second derivatives of various liquidus and solidus data at infinite dilution of the solute component. Several numerical methods for evaluating the derivatives of tabular data were examined. A method involving power series curve fitting and subsequent differentiation of the power series was found to be the most suitable for the interaction parameter calculations. Comparison of the calculated self-interaction parameters with values obtained from thermodynamic measurements indicates that the Wagner self-interaction parameter can be successfully calculated from binary phase diagrams

  6. Evaluation of Interactive Website Design Indicators for e-Entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chao Chung

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Using an analytic network process (ANP as an analytical tool, this study aims to construct an ANP evaluation model of interactive website design indicators. Through a review of the literature, interactive website design of e-entrepreneurship is generalized to the following dimensions: (1 Design; (2 Checking; (3 Service; (4 Interactive; and (5 Promotion, including 19 design indicators. The research is conducted for a case company. According to the findings, the model helps the case company review its current execution of interactive website design indicators and the experts’ opinions of the importance of interactive website design indicators. In addition, by comprehensive comparison, it confirms key design indicators and analyzes the managerial implications to help the case company set up precise strategic planning and resource distribution to enhance corporate operational performance and competitiveness.

  7. Students' Evaluation of Classroom Interactions of Their Biology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Abstract. This correlational study investigated students' evaluation of their biology teachers' classroom interaction and their feelings towards biology lessons. Three research questions guided the study. Copies of a questionnaire containing 48 items were distributed to 1,216 senior secondary two students from nine ...

  8. Evaluation of drug-drug interactions among patients with chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is high in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) necessitating dose adjustments or the avoidance of drug combinations. This study aimed to evaluate DDIs among patients with CKD in the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu, South-East Nigeria.

  9. Evaluation of interactive teaching for undergraduate medical students using a classroom interactive response system in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Rakesh; Datta, Karuna; Venkatesh, M D

    2015-07-01

    The classical didactic lecture has been the cornerstone of the theoretical undergraduate medical education. Their efficacy however reduces due to reduced interaction and short attention span of the students. It is hypothesized that the interactive response pad obviates some of these drawbacks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an interactive response system by comparing it with conventional classroom teaching. A prospective comparative longitudinal study was conducted on 192 students who were exposed to either conventional or interactive teaching over 20 classes. Pre-test, Post-test and retentions test (post 8-12 weeks) scores were collated and statistically analysed. An independent observer measured number of student interactions in each class. Pre-test scores from both groups were similar (p = 0.71). There was significant improvement in both post test scores when compared to pre-test scores in either method (p Students taught with the interactive method were likely to score 8-10% higher (statistically significant) in the immediate post class time and 15-18% higher (statistically significant) after 8-12 weeks. The number of student-teacher interactions increases when using the interactive response pads.

  10. Using GOMS and NASA-TLX to Evaluate Human-Computer Interaction Process in Interactive Segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramkumar, A.; Stappers, P.J.; Niessen, W.J.; Adebahr, S; Schimek-Jasch, T; Nestle, U; Song, Y.

    2016-01-01

    HCI plays an important role in interactive medical image segmentation. The Goals, Operators, Methods, and Selection rules (GOMS) model and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) questionnaire are different methods that are often used to evaluate the HCI

  11. Evaluation Of The Pharmacokinetic Interaction Between Candesartan Cilexetil And Felodipine

    OpenAIRE

    Junior E.A.; Duarte L.F.; Oliveira L.; Barros F.P.

    2011-01-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the pharmacokinetic interaction of test formulation of candesartan 16 mg tablet and felodipine extended release 5 mg tablet together in a combination package, comparing with the fasting period intake of commercial formulations of both Atacand® 16 mg tablet and Splendil® extended release 5 mg tablet (Test formulation and reference formulation from AstraZeneca, Brazil) in 36 volunteers of both sexes. The study was conducted open with randomized three period c...

  12. [Interaction of diazepam and levodropropizine evaluated with quantitative EEG].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, A; Bejor, M; Beungarbe, D; Cosentina, R

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to evaluate the presence of possible interactions between Levodropropizine and benzodiazepines (BZ). Experience was performed recording bioccipital quantified EEG in 5 healthy volunteers in normal conditions, after BZ administration and after BZ plus Levodropropizine administration. The slight shifting towards lower frequences in quantified EEG, due to BZ, was not modified by Levodropropizine administration. As results from this experience Levodropropizine seems not to have sinergic action on BZ effect in quantified EEG.

  13. Evaluating user interactions with clinical information systems: a model based on human-computer interaction models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despont-Gros, Christelle; Mueller, Henning; Lovis, Christian

    2005-06-01

    This article proposes a model for dimensions involved in user evaluation of clinical information systems (CIS). The model links the dimensions in traditional CIS evaluation and the dimensions from the human-computer interaction (HCI) perspective. In this article, variables are defined as the properties measured in an evaluation, and dimensions are defined as the factors contributing to the values of the measured variables. The proposed model is based on a two-step methodology with: (1) a general review of information systems (IS) evaluations to highlight studied variables, existing models and frameworks, and (2) a review of HCI literature to provide the theoretical basis to key dimensions of user evaluation. The review of literature led to the identification of eight key variables, among which satisfaction, acceptance, and success were found to be the most referenced. Among those variables, IS acceptance is a relevant candidate to reflect user evaluation of CIS. While their goals are similar, the fields of traditional CIS evaluation, and HCI are not closely connected. Combining those two fields allows for the development of an integrated model which provides a model for summative and comprehensive user evaluation of CIS. All dimensions identified in existing studies can be linked to this model and such an integrated model could provide a new perspective to compare investigations of different CIS systems.

  14. Simplified Human-Robot Interaction: Modeling and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balazs Daniel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a novel concept of human-robot interaction (HRI modeling is proposed. Including factors like trust in automation, situational awareness, expertise and expectations a new user experience framework is formed for industrial robots. Service Oriented Robot Operation, proposed in a previous paper, creates an abstract level in HRI and it is also included in the framework. This concept is evaluated with exhaustive tests. Results prove that significant improvement in task execution may be achieved and the new system is more usable for operators with less experience with robotics; personnel specific for small and medium enterprises (SMEs.

  15. Evaluation of dispersion interaction in glyoxal/silica organomineral system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Y. V.; Ayzenshtadt, A. M.; Strokova, V. V.

    2017-11-01

    It is proposed to use an organomineral additive based on glyoxal and saponite-containing waste in order to stabilize the road base. Preliminary studies have shown that soil modification with the organomineral additive with a quantitative ratio of components of glyoxal - 0.52 % and saponite-containing material - 17 % of sand mass increases its specific cohesion by 50 times. However, it is necessary to study the mechanism of interaction between the additive components and soil to optimize the composition and technology of additive introduction into the soil. This paper examines dispersion interaction in glyoxal/silica organomineral system. The Hamaker constant was chosen as a main parameter to evaluate dispersion interaction. This constant is determined based on the principle of measuring the contact angle of wetting with service fluids and calculating the dispersion component of material surface tension. The Hamaker constant in the glyoxal/silica organomineral system was 0.25·10-20 - 2.8·10-20 J at different glyoxal contents, while its maximum value was observed at 0.52 % glyoxal content. The results compared with literature and previously obtained data demonstrated good reproducibility.

  16. Robust ray-tracing algorithms for interactive dose rate evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotte, L.

    2011-01-01

    More than ever, it is essential today to develop simulation tools to rapidly evaluate the dose rate received by operators working on nuclear sites. In order to easily study numerous different scenarios of intervention, computation times of available softwares have to be all lowered. This mainly implies to accelerate the geometrical computations needed for the dose rate evaluation. These computations consist in finding and sorting the whole list of intersections between a big 3D scene and multiple groups of 'radiative' rays meeting at the point where the dose has to be measured. In order to perform all these computations in less than a second, we first propose a GPU algorithm that enables the efficient management of one big group of coherent rays. Then we present a modification of this algorithm that guarantees the robustness of the ray-triangle intersection tests through the elimination of the precision issues due to floating-point arithmetic. This modification does not require the definition of scene-dependent coefficients ('epsilon' style) and only implies a small loss of performance (less than 10%). Finally we propose an efficient strategy to handle multiple ray groups (corresponding to multiple radiative objects) which use the previous results.Thanks to these improvements, we are able to perform an interactive and robust dose rate evaluation on big 3D scenes: all of the intersections (more than 13 million) between 700 000 triangles and 12 groups of 100 000 rays each are found, sorted along each ray and transferred to the CPU in 470 milliseconds. (author) [fr

  17. A Bone-Implant Interaction Mouse Model for Evaluating Molecular Mechanism of Biomaterials/Bone Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenlong; Dan, Xiuli; Wang, Ting; Lu, William W; Pan, Haobo

    2016-11-01

    The development of an optimal animal model that could provide fast assessments of the interaction between bone and orthopedic implants is essential for both preclinical and theoretical researches in the design of novel biomaterials. Compared with other animal models, mice have superiority in accessing the well-developed transgenic modification techniques (e.g., cell tracing, knockoff, knockin, and so on), which serve as powerful tools in studying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we introduced the establishment of a mouse model, which was specifically tailored for the assessment of bone-implant interaction in a load-bearing bone marrow microenvironment and could potentially allow the molecular mechanism study of biomaterials by using transgenic technologies. The detailed microsurgery procedures for developing a bone defect (Φ = 0.8 mm) at the metaphysis region of the mouse femur were recorded. According to our results, the osteoconductive and osseointegrative properties of a well-studied 45S5 bioactive glass were confirmed by utilizing our mouse model, verifying the reliability of this model. The feasibility and reliability of the present model were further checked by using other materials as objects of study. Furthermore, our results indicated that this animal model provided a more homogeneous tissue-implant interacting surface than the rat at the early stage of implantation and this is quite meaningful for conducting quantitative analysis. The availability of transgenic techniques to mechanism study of biomaterials was further testified by establishing our model on Nestin-GFP transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the distribution of Nestin + cells was demonstrated to be recruited to the surface of 45S5 glass as early as 3 days postsurgery, indicating that Nestin + lineage stem cells may participate in the subsequent regeneration process. In summary, the bone-implant interaction mouse model could serve as a potential candidate to evaluate the early stage tissue

  18. Evaluation of the Interactivity of Web-Based Learning Systems: Principles and Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Chris; Sabry, Khaled

    2003-01-01

    Considers the process of evaluating the interactivity of Web-based learning systems (WBLSs), adapting a heuristic approach usually employed for usability evaluations. Proposes a three-way model of interactivity, reports an evaluation using three different WBLSs, and concludes that heuristic evaluation provides a cheap, intuitive and practical…

  19. User-evaluated Gestures for Touchless Interactions from a Distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkert, F.W.; van der Vet, P.E.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2010-01-01

    Very big displays are now commonplace but interactions with them are limited, even poorly understood. Recently, understanding touch-based interactions have received a great deal of attention due to the popularity and low costs of these displays. The direct extension of such interactions, touch less

  20. Modelling operator cognitive interactions in nuclear power plant safety evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senders, J.W.; Moray, N.; Smiley, A.; Sellen, A.

    1985-08-01

    The overall objectives of the study were to review methods which are applicable to the analysis of control room operator cognitive interactions in nuclear plant safety evaluations and to indicate where future research effort in this area should be directed. This report is based on an exhaustive search and review of the literature on NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) operator error, human error, human cognitive function, and on human performance. A number of methods which have been proposed for the estimation of data for probabilistic risk analysis have been examined and have been found wanting. None addresses the problem of diagnosis error per se. Virtually all are concerned with the more easily detected and identified errors of action. None addresses underlying cause and mechanism. It is these mechanisms which must be understood if diagnosis errors and other cognitive errors are to be controlled and predicted. We have attempted to overcome the deficiencies of earlier work and have constructed a model/taxonomy, EXHUME, which we consider to be exhaustive. This construct has proved to be fruitful in organizing our thinking about the kinds of error that can occur and the nature of self-correcting mechanisms, and has guided our thinking in suggesting a research program which can provide the data needed for quantification of cognitive error rates and of the effects of mitigating efforts. In addition a preliminary outline of EMBED, a causal model of error, is given based on general behavioural research into perception, attention, memory, and decision making. 184 refs

  1. TISSUE INTERACTIONS WITH DERMAL SHEEP COLLAGEN IMPLANTS - A TRANSMISSION ELECTRON-MICROSCOPIC EVALUATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANWACHEM, PB; VANLUYN, MJA; DAMINK, LO; FEIJEN, J; NIEUWENHUIS, P

    1991-01-01

    Tissue interactions with discs of dermal sheep collagen (DSC), subcutaneously implanted in rats, were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. DSC cross-linked with hexamethylenediisocyanate (HDSC) had already been tested previously. In the present study, we compared tissue interactions of

  2. Long pulsed Nd: YAG laser with inbuilt cool sapphire tip for long term hair reduction on type- IV and V skin: A prospective analysis of 200 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Soni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laser hair reduction has become a very popular means to get rid of unwanted hair. Aims: We conducted the current study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Nd: YAG laser on dark skin. We also evaluated the effect of increasing the gap between sessions on the long term efficacy of hair reduction achieved with long pulsed Nd: YAG laser. Methods: A prospective study was conducted on 200 consecutive female patients who underwent laser hair reduction for unwanted hair over the face, at Kaya skin clinic Delhi, with long pulsed Nd: YAG laser, from May 2006 to May 2009. The gap between sessions was increased from 2 nd session itself. Results were evaluated 6 months after 6 sessions. Also a note was made of worsening of hair growth or any side effects experienced the patient during any of the sessions. Results: A total of 200 female patients (160 skin type IV and 40 skin type V were followed up. Of these, 64 enrolled for lower face, 88 for chin or upper neck and 48 for upper lip. 6 months after 6 sessions, more than 50% improvement was seen in 68.7% of lower face, 89.69% cases of chin and 59% of upper lip cases. None of the patients had any worsening. Conclusions: The current study shows that long pulsed Nd: YAG is a very safe and effective means of hair reduction in skin types IV and V. Adequate fluences and increasing the gap between sessions from the 2 nd session could be the key to achieving long term hair reduction with Nd: YAG laser. Adequate cooling and proper shaving are the key factors determining the safety.

  3. In vitro evaluation of the interaction between tea extracts and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The herb-drug interaction between tea (Carmelia sinensis) extract and penicillin G (Pen G) was investigated against three strains of Staphylococcus aureus using pair combinations in an in vitro decimal assay for additivity test. Results showed that the interactions between penicillin G and tea extracts were mainly additive ...

  4. Evaluating seal–seabird interactions in southern Africa: a critical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this review, past evidence for direct impacts of seals on seabird populations was scrutinised. It was found that frequently the interpretation of seabird numer ical trends, or of anecdotes on seal–seabird interactions, appear biased against seals. It is mooted that, as with seal–fishery interactions, the conspicuous nature of ...

  5. A critical evaluation of drug interactions with Echinacea spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Camille; Spelman, Kevin

    2008-07-01

    Accurate information concerning drug-herb interactions is vital for both healthcare providers and patients. Unfortunately, many of the reviews on drug-herb interactions contain overstated or inaccurate information. To provide accurate information on drug-herb interactions healthcare providers must account for product verification, dosage, medicinal plant species, and plant part used. This critical review assessed the occurrence of drug interactions with one of the top selling botanical remedies, echinacea including Echinacea angustifolia, E. pallida, and E. purpurea. Only eight papers containing primary data relating to drug interactions were identified. Herbal remedies made from E. purpurea appear to have a low potential to generate cytochrome P450 (CYP 450) drug-herb interactions including CYP 450 1A2 (CYP1A2) and CYP 450 3A4 (CYP3A4). Currently there are no verifiable reports of drug-herb interactions with any echinacea product. However, further pharmacokinetic testing is necessary before conclusive statements can be made about echinacea drug-herb interactions. Given our findings, the estimated risk of taking echinacea products (1 in 100,000), the number of echinacea doses consumed yearly (> 10 million), the number of adverse events (< 100) and that the majority of use is short term, E. purpurea products (roots and/or aerial parts) do not appear to be a risk to consumers.

  6. Introduction to a Protein Interaction System Used for Quantitative Evaluation of Biomolecular Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Yamniuk, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    A central goal of molecular biology is the determination of biomolecular function. This comes largely from a knowledge of the non-covalent interactions that biological small and macro-molecules experience. The fundamental mission of the Molecular Interactions Research Group (MIRG) of the ABRF is to show how solution biophysical tools are used to quantitatively characterize molecular interactions, and to educate the ABRF members and scientific community on the utility and limitations of core t...

  7. Students' Evaluation of Classroom Interactions of Their Biology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ' classroom interaction and their feelings towards biology lessons. Three research questions guided the study. Copies of a questionnaire containing 48 items were distributed to 1,216 senior secondary two students from nine randomly selected ...

  8. EVALUATING AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE PLAYER CONTRIBUTIONS USING INTERACTIVE NETWORK SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Sargent

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the contribution of Australian Football League (AFL players to their team's on-field network by simulating player interactions within a chosen team list and estimating the net effect on final score margin. A Visual Basic computer program was written, firstly, to isolate the effective interactions between players from a particular team in all 2011 season matches and, secondly, to generate a symmetric interaction matrix for each match. Negative binomial distributions were fitted to each player pairing in the Geelong Football Club for the 2011 season, enabling an interactive match simulation model given the 22 chosen players. Dynamic player ratings were calculated from the simulated network using eigenvector centrality, a method that recognises and rewards interactions with more prominent players in the team network. The centrality ratings were recorded after every network simulation and then applied in final score margin predictions so that each player's match contribution-and, hence, an optimal team-could be estimated. The paper ultimately demonstrates that the presence of highly rated players, such as Geelong's Jimmy Bartel, provides the most utility within a simulated team network. It is anticipated that these findings will facilitate optimal AFL team selection and player substitutions, which are key areas of interest to coaches. Network simulations are also attractive for use within betting markets, specifically to provide information on the likelihood of a chosen AFL team list "covering the line".

  9. Visualization of acoustic particle interaction and agglomeration: Theory evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, T.L.; Koopmann, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper experimentally observed trajectories of particles undergoing acoustically induced interaction and agglomeration processes are compared to and validated with numerically generated trajectories based on existing agglomeration theories. Models for orthokinetic, scattering, mutual radiation pressure, and hydrodynamic particle interaction are considered in the analysis. The characteristic features of the classical orthokinetic agglomeration hypothesis, such as collision processes and agglomerations due to the relative entrainment motion, are not observed in the digital images. The measured entrainment rates of the particles are found to be consistently lower than the theoretically predicted values. Some of the experiments reveal certain characteristics which may possibly be related to mutual scattering interaction. The study's most significant discovery is the so-called tuning fork agglomeration [T. L. Hoffmann and G. H. Koopmann, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 99, 2130 endash 2141 (1996)]. It is shown that this phenomenon contradicts the theories for mutual scattering interaction and mutual radiation pressure interaction, but agrees with the acoustic wake effect model in its intrinsic feature of attraction between particles aligned along the acoustic axis. A model by Dianov et al. [Sov. Phys. Acoust. 13 (3), 314 endash 319 (1968)] is used to describe this effect based on asymmetric flow fields around particles under Oseen flow conditions. It is concluded that this model is consistent with the general characteristics of the tuning fork agglomerations, but lacks certain refinements with respect to accurate quantification of the effect. copyright 1997 Acoustical Society of America

  10. Evaluating Australian football league player contributions using interactive network simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Jonathan; Bedford, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the contribution of Australian Football League (AFL) players to their team's on-field network by simulating player interactions within a chosen team list and estimating the net effect on final score margin. A Visual Basic computer program was written, firstly, to isolate the effective interactions between players from a particular team in all 2011 season matches and, secondly, to generate a symmetric interaction matrix for each match. Negative binomial distributions were fitted to each player pairing in the Geelong Football Club for the 2011 season, enabling an interactive match simulation model given the 22 chosen players. Dynamic player ratings were calculated from the simulated network using eigenvector centrality, a method that recognises and rewards interactions with more prominent players in the team network. The centrality ratings were recorded after every network simulation and then applied in final score margin predictions so that each player's match contribution-and, hence, an optimal team-could be estimated. The paper ultimately demonstrates that the presence of highly rated players, such as Geelong's Jimmy Bartel, provides the most utility within a simulated team network. It is anticipated that these findings will facilitate optimal AFL team selection and player substitutions, which are key areas of interest to coaches. Network simulations are also attractive for use within betting markets, specifically to provide information on the likelihood of a chosen AFL team list "covering the line ". Key pointsA simulated interaction matrix for Australian Rules football players is proposedThe simulations were carried out by fitting unique negative binomial distributions to each player pairing in a sideEigenvector centrality was calculated for each player in a simulated matrix, then for the teamThe team centrality measure adequately predicted the team's winning marginA player's net effect on margin could hence be estimated by replacing him in

  11. In vitro evaluation of the interactions between acetone extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of combinations of the acetone extract of Garcinia kola seeds and six first-line antibiotics was investigated by means of fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) indices as well as by the use of time kill assays. Using the FIC indices, synergistic interactions were observed largely against gram positive organisms (FIC ...

  12. MIX: a computer program to evaluate interaction between chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacqueline L. Robertson; Kimberly C. Smith

    1989-01-01

    A computer program, MIX, was designed to identify pairs of chemicals whose interaction results in a response that departs significantly from the model predicated on the assumption of independent, uncorrelated joint action. This report describes the MIX program, its statistical basis, and instructions for its use.

  13. Evaluating DEM results with FEM perspectives of load : soil interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tadesse, D.

    2004-01-01

    Keywords: Load - soil interaction, soil structure, soil mechanical properties, FEM (Finite Element Method), Plaxis (Finite Element Code), granular particles, shear stress, DEM (Distinct Element Method),

  14. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity and Interaction of Methanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the antibacterial activity and interaction of methanolic extract of Physcia grisea and cephalosporin on the clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes. The isolates of S. pyogenes used were obtained from the department of Pharmaceutical microbiology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka.

  15. A heuristic approach to evaluate peri interactions versus intermolecular interactions in an overcrowded naphthalene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, Tayur N. Guru

    2017-01-01

    Octachloronaphthalene (OCN), a serious environmental pollutant, has been investigated by charge density analysis to unravel several unexplored factors responsible for steric overcrowding. The topological features of the enigmatic peri interactions contributing to steric overcrowding are qualified and quantified from experimental and theoretical charge-density studies. A new facet in the fundamental understanding of peri interactions is revealed by NCI (non-covalent interaction) analysis. The potential role of these interactions in deforming the molecular geometry and subsequent effect on aromaticity are substantiated from NICS (Nuclear Independent Chemical Shift) and QTAIM (Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules) calculations. The eye-catching dissimilarity in the out-of-plane twisting of OCN renders the molecule in an asymmetric geometry in the crystalline phase compared with symmetric geometry in the optimized solvated phase. This is uniquely characterized by their molecular electrostatic potential (MESP), respectively, and is explained in terms of conflict between two opposing forces – peri interactions, and symbiotic intermolecular Cl⋯Cl and Cl⋯π contacts. PMID:28250940

  16. Nonunion of acetabular fractures: evaluation with interactive multiplanar CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlman, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.; Ney, D.R.; Brooker, A.F. Jr.; Magid, D.

    1989-01-01

    Nonunions involving fractures of the acetabulum are reportedly rare, with few citings and little discussion in the literature. It is possible that acetabular nonunions go undetected because imaging of the acetabulum is difficult by conventional radiography. We report two cases of fracture nonunion involving the weight-bearing surface of the acetabulum diagnosed with the aid of computed tomography (CT) and a newly developed interactive 2D/3D orthotool that uniquely processes and reformats routine CT data. The interactive 2D/3D orthotool is a sophisticated computer program that allows dynamic viewing of standard multiplanar reconstructions in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes as well as multiple oblique projections. The 2D/3D orthotool provides on screen correlation of two-dimensional multiplanar images with three-dimensional reconstructions of the pelvis. The authors found this capability ideally suited for studying fractures with off-axis orientation such as those through the acetabular dome, greatly facilitating the diagnosis of nonunion.

  17. Evaluating Interactions of Forest Conservation Policies on Avoided Deforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robalino, Juan; Sandoval, Catalina; Barton, David N.; Chacon, Adriana; Pfaff, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the effects on deforestation that have resulted from policy interactions between parks and payments and between park buffers and payments in Costa Rica between 2000 and 2005. We show that the characteristics of the areas where protected and unprotected lands are located differ significantly. Additionally, we find that land characteristics of each of the policies and of the places where they interact also differ significantly. To adequately estimate the effects of the policies and their interactions, we use matching methods. Matching is implemented not only to define adequate control groups, as in previous research, but also to define those groups of locations under the influence of policies that are comparable to each other. We find that it is more effective to locate parks and payments away from each other, rather than in the same location or near each other. The high levels of enforcement inside both parks and lands with payments, and the presence of conservation spillovers that reduce deforestation near parks, significantly reduce the potential impact of combining these two policies. PMID:25909323

  18. Evaluating interactions of forest conservation policies on avoided deforestation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Robalino

    Full Text Available We estimate the effects on deforestation that have resulted from policy interactions between parks and payments and between park buffers and payments in Costa Rica between 2000 and 2005. We show that the characteristics of the areas where protected and unprotected lands are located differ significantly. Additionally, we find that land characteristics of each of the policies and of the places where they interact also differ significantly. To adequately estimate the effects of the policies and their interactions, we use matching methods. Matching is implemented not only to define adequate control groups, as in previous research, but also to define those groups of locations under the influence of policies that are comparable to each other. We find that it is more effective to locate parks and payments away from each other, rather than in the same location or near each other. The high levels of enforcement inside both parks and lands with payments, and the presence of conservation spillovers that reduce deforestation near parks, significantly reduce the potential impact of combining these two policies.

  19. Evaluating interactions of forest conservation policies on avoided deforestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robalino, Juan; Sandoval, Catalina; Barton, David N; Chacon, Adriana; Pfaff, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the effects on deforestation that have resulted from policy interactions between parks and payments and between park buffers and payments in Costa Rica between 2000 and 2005. We show that the characteristics of the areas where protected and unprotected lands are located differ significantly. Additionally, we find that land characteristics of each of the policies and of the places where they interact also differ significantly. To adequately estimate the effects of the policies and their interactions, we use matching methods. Matching is implemented not only to define adequate control groups, as in previous research, but also to define those groups of locations under the influence of policies that are comparable to each other. We find that it is more effective to locate parks and payments away from each other, rather than in the same location or near each other. The high levels of enforcement inside both parks and lands with payments, and the presence of conservation spillovers that reduce deforestation near parks, significantly reduce the potential impact of combining these two policies.

  20. Evaluating an interactive voice response system for persons with disabilities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Greeff, M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available -Objective Problems with Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation Marde´ Greeff, Andries. P. Engelbrecht Abstract—Many optimisation problems are multi-objective and change dynamically. Many methods use a weighted average approach to the multiple objectives.... This paper introduces the usage of the vector evaluated particle swarm optimiser (VEPSO) to solve dynamic multi-objective optimisation prob- lems. Every objective is solved by one swarm and the swarms share knowledge amongst each other about the objective...

  1. Drug interactions evaluation: An integrated part of risk assessment of therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S.; Zhao, Ping; Huang, Shiew-Mei

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug interactions can lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. The evaluation of a new molecular entity's (NME's) drug-drug interaction potential is an integral part of risk assessment during drug development and regulatory review. Alteration of activities of enzymes or transporters involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a new molecular entity by concomitant drugs may alter drug exposure, which can impact response (safety or efficacy). The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft drug interaction guidance ( (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm072101.pdf)) highlights the methodologies and criteria that may be used to guide drug interaction evaluation by industry and regulatory agencies and to construct informative labeling for health practitioner and patients. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration established a 'Drug Development and Drug Interactions' website to provide up-to-date information regarding evaluation of drug interactions ( (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/DrugInteractionsLabeling/ucm080499.htm)). This review summarizes key elements in the FDA drug interaction guidance and new scientific developments that can guide the evaluation of drug-drug interactions during the drug development process.

  2. Evaluating Frugivore-fruit Interactions Using Avian Eye Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadzly, Nik; Burns, Kevin C; Zuharah, Wan Fatma

    2013-12-01

    Fruit phenotypes are often hypothesised to be affected by selection by frugivores. Here, we tested two hypotheses concerning frugivore-fruit interactions from the perspective of fruit colours. We measured the spectral properties of 26 fruits and the associated leaves of plants from 2 islands in New Zealand. Visual observations were also performed to record the birds that fed on the fruits. First, we tested the fruit-foliage hypothesis, where fruit colours are assumed to be evolutionarily constrained by their own leaf colour to maximise colour contrast and fruit conspicuousness. We ran a null model analysis comparing fruit colour contrast using an avian eye model. Second, we tested the frugivore specificity hypothesis, where specific fruit colours are thought to be connected with a specific bird frugivore. We performed a regression on the number of bird visits against the fruit colour in tetrahedral colour space based on an avian eye calculation using Mantel's test. The results show that fruit colours are not constrained by their own leaf colours. There is also no relationship or pattern suggesting a link between a specific fruit colour and specific bird visitors. We suggest that although fruit colour is one of the most highly discussed components, it is not the most important single deciding factor in frugivore fruit selection.

  3. The development of evaluation methodology for advanced interactive communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, K.

    2005-01-01

    Face-to-face communication is one of the essential style of communication. Trough face-to-face communication, people exchange much information at a time, both verbal and non-verbal information, which is most effective to learn each other. The authors focused on the face-to-face communication, and developed an evaluation method to quantify the effectiveness of communication. We regard conversation as an exchange of keywords. The effectiveness of conversation is valued by the amount of the keywords, and the achievement of mutual understandings. Through two people's face-to-face communication, the author quantified the shared information by measuring the change of the amount of the participants' knowledge. The participants' knowledge is counted by the words they can give. We measured the change in their shared knowledge (number of the words they gave associated to the theme). And we also quantified the discords in their understandings against their partners by measuring the discords between the knowledge that they think they share and the knowledge that they really share. Through these data, we evaluate the effectiveness of communication and analyzed the trends of mutual understanding. (authors)

  4. Development and Evaluation of an Interactive WebQuest Environment: "Web Macerasi"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahar, Yasemin; Madran, R. Orcun; Kalelioglu, Filiz

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop a web-based interactive system, Web Macerasi, for teaching-learning and evaluation purposes, and to find out the possible effects of this system. The study has two stages. In the first stage, a WebQuest site was designed as an interactive system in which various Internet and web technologies were used for…

  5. Evaluation Criteria for Interactive E-Books for Open and Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Aras; Bozkaya, Mujgan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this mixed method study is to identify evaluation criteria for interactive e-books. To find answers for the research questions of the study, both quantitative and qualitative data were collected through a four-round Delphi study with a panel consisting of 30 experts. After that, a total of 20 interactive e-books were examined with…

  6. Evaluation of osprey habitat suitability and interaction with contaminant exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toschik, P.C.; Christman, M.C.; Rattner, B.A.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) have been the focus of conservation efforts since their dramatic population decline attributed to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and related chemicals in the 1960s. Several recent studies of ospreys nesting in the United States have indicated improved reproduction. However, the density of breeding ospreys varies greatly among locations, with some areas seemingly habitable but not occupied. Because of concerns about pollution in the highly industrialized portions of the Delaware River and Bay, USA, we evaluated contaminant exposure and productivity in ospreys nesting on the Delaware River and Bay in 2002. We characterized habitat in the coastal zone of Delaware, USA, and the area around the river in Pennsylvania, USA, using data we collected as well as extant information provided by state and federal sources. We characterized habitat based on locations of occupied osprey nests in Delaware and Pennsylvania. We evaluated water clarity, water depth, land use and land cover, nest availability, and contaminants in sediment for use in a nest-occupancy model. Our results demonstrated that the presence of occupied nests was associated with water depth, water clarity, distance to an occupied osprey nest, and presence of urban land use, whereas a companion study demonstrated that hatching success was associated with the principal components derived from organochlorine-contaminant concentrations in osprey eggs (total polychlorinated biphenyls, p,p'-dichlorodiphenylethylene, chlordane and metabolites, and heptachlor epoxide). Our study provides guidelines for resource managers and local conservation organizations in management of ospreys and in development of habitat models that are appropriate for other piscivorous and marsh-nesting birds.

  7. Using observations to evaluate biosphere-atmosphere interactions in models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julia; Konings, Alexandra G.; Alemohammad, Seyed H.; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere interactions influence the hydrologic cycle by altering climate and weather patterns (Charney, 1975; Koster et al., 2006; Seneviratne et al., 2006), contributing up to 30% of precipitation and radiation variability in certain regions (Green et al., 2017). They have been shown to contribute to the persistence of drought in Europe (Seneviratne et al., 2006), as well as to increase rainfall in the Amazon (Spracklen et al., 2012). Thus, a true representation of these feedbacks in Earth System Models (ESMs) is crucial for accurate forecasting and planning. However, it has been difficult to validate the performance of ESMs since often-times surface and atmospheric flux data are scarce and/or difficult to observe. In this study, we use the results of a new global observational study (using remotely sensed solar-induced fluorescence to represent the biosphere flux) (Green et al., 2017) to determine how well a suite of 13 ESMs capture biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks. We perform a Conditional Multivariate Granger Causality analysis in the frequency domain with radiation, precipitation and temperature as atmospheric inputs and GPP as the biospheric input. Performing the analysis in the frequency domain allows for separation of feedbacks at different time-scales (subseasonal, seasonal or interannual). Our findings can be used to determine whether there is agreement between models, as well as, to pinpoint regions or time-scales of model bias or inaccuracy, which will provide insight on potential improvement. We demonstrate that in addition to the well-known problem of convective parameterization over land in models, the main issue in representing feedbacks between the land and the atmosphere is due to the misrepresentation of water stress. These results provide a direct quantitative assessment of feedbacks in models and how to improve them. References: Charney, J.G. Dynamics of deserts and drought in the Sahel. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological

  8. In Silico Evaluation of Predicted Regulatory Interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tranchina Daniel

    2009-12-01

    -target interactions. Conclusion These findings provide an approach and guidance for researchers interested in predicting transcriptional regulatory mechanisms using microarray data that they generate (or microarray data that is publically available combined with CRE detection in promoter sequence data.

  9. Combinations of Methods for Collaborative Evaluation of the Usability of Interactive Software Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Solano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Usability is a fundamental quality characteristic for the success of an interactive system. It is a concept that includes a set of metrics and methods in order to obtain easy-to-learn and easy-to-use systems. Usability Evaluation Methods, UEM, are quite diverse; their application depends on variables such as costs, time availability, and human resources. A large number of UEM can be employed to assess interactive software systems, but questions arise when deciding which method and/or combination of methods gives more (relevant information. We propose Collaborative Usability Evaluation Methods, CUEM, following the principles defined by the Collaboration Engineering. This paper analyzes a set of CUEM conducted on different interactive software systems. It proposes combinations of CUEM that provide more complete and comprehensive information about the usability of interactive software systems than those evaluation methods conducted independently.

  10. The influence of intention and outcome on evaluations of social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoying; Hua, Rui; Yang, Zhangxiang; Yin, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Reading and making sense of social interactions between individuals is an important part of our daily social lives. Given that actions tend to be interpreted in terms of intent within the observed outcome, we investigated how intent and outcome interactively influence evaluations of social interactions. Through visual animations, intent was operationalized as an agent's (i.e., actor's) act intentionally or unintentionally having an influence on another agent (i.e., affectee). In Experiment 1, the act was helpful and the consequences brought small or great benefits to the affectee. In Experiment 2, the act was harmful and brought small or great losses to the affectee. We found that for both helpful and harmful contexts, social interaction evaluations were influenced by an interaction between the intent and outcome of the act. Specifically, great help/harm (i.e., the great-benefits or great-losses condition) was rated as a stronger social interaction than small help/harm, and the difference was larger in the intentional condition than in the unintentional condition. Furthermore, regardless of the interaction valence, the effect of the intent was larger than the effect of the outcome when evaluating social interaction. This result suggests that observers consider the intent and outcome jointly when evaluating a given social interaction, and the intent has a privileged role in this process. These findings are consistent with the idea that the intent is often deemed to be the cause driving the effect of outcome, and they help us to understand how social interactions are constructed within the action understanding system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of two dependency parsers on biomedical corpus targeted at protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyysalo, Sampo; Ginter, Filip; Pahikkala, Tapio; Boberg, Jorma; Järvinen, Jouni; Salakoski, Tapio

    2006-06-01

    We present an evaluation of Link Grammar and Connexor Machinese Syntax, two major broad-coverage dependency parsers, on a custom hand-annotated corpus consisting of sentences regarding protein-protein interactions. In the evaluation, we apply the notion of an interaction subgraph, which is the subgraph of a dependency graph expressing a protein-protein interaction. We measure the performance of the parsers for recovery of individual dependencies, fully correct parses, and interaction subgraphs. For Link Grammar, an open system that can be inspected in detail, we further perform a comprehensive failure analysis, report specific causes of error, and suggest potential modifications to the grammar. We find that both parsers perform worse on biomedical English than previously reported on general English. While Connexor Machinese Syntax significantly outperforms Link Grammar, the failure analysis suggests specific ways in which the latter could be modified for better performance in the domain.

  12. Evaluation of pedestrian safety at intersections: A theoretical framework based on pedestrian-vehicle interaction patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ying; Wang, Menglong; Sun, Jian; Li, Keping

    2016-11-01

    Pedestrians are the most vulnerable road users, and pedestrian safety has become a major research focus in recent years. Regarding the quality and quantity issues with collision data, conflict analysis using surrogate safety measures has become a useful method to study pedestrian safety. However, given the inequality between pedestrians and vehicles in encounters and the multiple interactions between pedestrians and vehicles, it is insufficient to simply use the same indicator(s) or the same way to aggregate indicators for all conditions. In addition, behavioral factors cannot be neglected. To better use information extracted from trajectories for safety evaluation and pay more attention on effects of behavioral factors, this paper develops a more sophisticated framework for pedestrian conflict analysis that takes pedestrian-vehicle interactions into consideration. A concept of three interaction patterns has been proposed for the first time, namely "hard interaction," "no interaction," and "soft-interaction." Interactions have been categorized under one of these patterns by analyzing profiles of speed and conflict indicators during the whole interactive processes. In this paper, a support vector machine (SVM) approach has been adopted to classify severity levels for a dataset including 1144 events extracted from three intersections in Shanghai, China, followed by an analysis of variable importance. The results revealed that different conflict indicators have different contributions to indicating the severity level under various interaction patterns. Therefore, it is recommended either to use specific conflict indicators or to use weighted indicator aggregation for each interaction pattern when evaluating pedestrian safety. The implementation has been carried out at the fourth crosswalk, and the results indicate that the proposed method can achieve a higher accuracy and better robustness than conventional methods. Furthermore, the method is helpful for better

  13. New evaluation measures for multifactor dimensionality reduction classifiers in gene-gene interaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, Junghyun; Kim, Kyunga; Yi, Sungon; Chung, Wonil; Kwon, Min-Seok; Park, Taesung

    2009-02-01

    Gene-gene interactions are important contributors to complex biological traits. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) is a method to analyze gene-gene interactions and has been applied to many genetics studies of complex diseases. In order to identify the best interaction model associated with disease susceptibility, MDR classifiers corresponding to interaction models has been constructed and evaluated as a predictor of disease status via a certain measure such as balanced accuracy (BA). It has been shown that the performance of MDR tends to depend on the choice of the evaluation measures. In this article, we introduce two types of new evaluation measures. First, we develop weighted BA (wBA) that utilizes the quantitative information on the effect size of each multi-locus genotype on a trait. Second, we employ ordinal association measures to assess the performance of MDR classifiers. Simulation studies were conducted to compare the proposed measures with BA, a current measure. Our results showed that the wBA and tau(b) improved the power of MDR in detecting gene-gene interactions. Noticeably, the power increment was higher when data contains the greater number of genetic markers. Finally, we applied the proposed evaluation measures to real data.

  14. Evaluating the Effects of Interactivity in a Post-Editing Workbench

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underwood, Nancy; Mesa-Lao, Bartolomé; Martinez, Mercedes Garcia

    2014-01-01

    of interactive features designed to improve productivity and user satisfaction. Using CasMaCat's own facilities for logging keystrokes and eye tracking, data were collected from nine post-editors in a professional setting. These data were then used to investigate the effects of the interactive features......This paper describes the field trial and subsequent evaluation of a post-editing workbench which is currently under development in the EU-funded CasMaCat project. Based on user evaluations of the initial prototype of the workbench, this second prototype of the workbench includes a number...

  15. Thermodynamic and kinetic approaches for evaluation of monoclonal antibody - Lipoprotein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multia, Evgen; Sirén, Heli; Andersson, Karl; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Forssén, Patrik; Fornstedt, Torgny; Öörni, Katariina; Jauhiainen, Matti; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2017-02-01

    Two complementary instrumental techniques were used, and the data generated was processed with advanced numerical tools to investigate the interactions between anti-human apoB-100 monoclonal antibody (anti-apoB-100 Mab) and apoB-100 containing lipoproteins. Partial Filling Affinity Capillary Electrophoresis (PF-ACE) combined with Adsorption Energy Distribution (AED) calculations provided information on the heterogeneity of the interactions without any a priori model assumptions. The AED calculations evidenced a homogenous binding site distribution for the interactions. Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) studies were used to evaluate thermodynamics and kinetics of the Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) and anti-apoB-100 Mab interactions. High affinity and selectivity were observed, and the emerging data sets were analysed with so called Interaction Maps. In thermodynamic studies, the interaction between LDL and anti-apoB-100 Mab was found to be predominantly enthalpy driven. Both techniques were also used to study antibody interactions with Intermediate-Density (IDL) and Very Low-Density (VLDL) Lipoproteins. By screening affinity constants for IDL-VLDL sample in a single injection we were able to distinguish affinity constants for both subpopulations using the numerical Interaction Map tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Maternal depression and attachment: the evaluation of mother–child interactions during feeding practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santona, Alessandra; Tagini, Angela; Sarracino, Diego; De Carli, Pietro; Pace, Cecilia S.; Parolin, Laura; Terrone, Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Internal working models (IWMs) of attachment can moderate the effect of maternal depression on mother–child interactions and child development. Clinical depression pre-dating birthgiving has been found to predict incoherent and less sensitive caregiving. Dysfunctional patterns observed, included interactive modes linked to feeding behaviors which may interfere with hunger–satiation, biological rhythms, and the establishment of children’s autonomy and individuation. Feeding interactions between depressed mothers and their children seem to be characterized by repetitive interactive failures: children refuse food through oppositional behavior or negativity. The aim of this study was to investigate parenting skills in the context of feeding in mothers with major depression from the point of view of attachment theory. This perspective emphasizes parents’ emotion, relational and affective history and personal resources. The sample consisted of 60 mother–child dyads. Mothers were divided into two groups: 30 with Major Depression and 30 without disorders. Children’s age ranged between 12 and 36 months The measures employed were the Adult Attachment Interview and the Scale for the Evaluation of Alimentary Interactions between Mothers and Children. Insecure attachment prevailed in mothers with major depression, with differences on the Subjective Experience and State of Mind Scales. Groups also differed in maternal sensitivity, degrees of interactive conflicts and negative affective states, all of which can hinder the development of adequate interactive patterns during feeding. The results suggest that IWMs can constitute an indicator for the evaluation of the relational quality of the dyad and that evaluations of dyadic interactions should be considered when programming interventions. PMID:26379576

  17. Maternal depression and attachment: the evaluation of mother-child interactions during feeding practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santona, Alessandra; Tagini, Angela; Sarracino, Diego; De Carli, Pietro; Pace, Cecilia S; Parolin, Laura; Terrone, Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Internal working models (IWMs) of attachment can moderate the effect of maternal depression on mother-child interactions and child development. Clinical depression pre-dating birthgiving has been found to predict incoherent and less sensitive caregiving. Dysfunctional patterns observed, included interactive modes linked to feeding behaviors which may interfere with hunger-satiation, biological rhythms, and the establishment of children's autonomy and individuation. Feeding interactions between depressed mothers and their children seem to be characterized by repetitive interactive failures: children refuse food through oppositional behavior or negativity. The aim of this study was to investigate parenting skills in the context of feeding in mothers with major depression from the point of view of attachment theory. This perspective emphasizes parents' emotion, relational and affective history and personal resources. The sample consisted of 60 mother-child dyads. Mothers were divided into two groups: 30 with Major Depression and 30 without disorders. Children's age ranged between 12 and 36 months The measures employed were the Adult Attachment Interview and the Scale for the Evaluation of Alimentary Interactions between Mothers and Children. Insecure attachment prevailed in mothers with major depression, with differences on the Subjective Experience and State of Mind Scales. Groups also differed in maternal sensitivity, degrees of interactive conflicts and negative affective states, all of which can hinder the development of adequate interactive patterns during feeding. The results suggest that IWMs can constitute an indicator for the evaluation of the relational quality of the dyad and that evaluations of dyadic interactions should be considered when programming interventions.

  18. Evaluating Treatments for Functionally Equivalent Problem Behavior Maintained by Adult Compliance with Mands during Interactive Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jonathan D.; Bednar, Mary K.; Willse, Lena V.; Goetzel, Amanda L.; Concepcion, Anthony; Pincus, Shari M.; Hardesty, Samantha L.; Bowman, Lynn G.

    2017-01-01

    A primary goal of behavioral interventions is to reduce dangerous or inappropriate behavior and to generalize treatment effects across various settings. However, there is a lack of research evaluating generalization of treatment effects while individuals with functionally equivalent problem behavior interact with each other. For the current study,…

  19. Evaluating Intimacy and Ludic Engagement with a Musical Interactive Art Installation that Explores Remote Abstract Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The main contribution of the paper is a usability evaluation of an interactive art installation where several different factors for ludic and intimate engagement in this specific context of remote face-to-face non-verbal communication are compared. Experiments are carried out with the following...

  20. An Evaluation-Driven Design Approach to Develop Learning Environments Based on Full-Body Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverni, Laura; Schaper, Marie-Monique; Pares, Narcís

    2016-01-01

    The development of learning environments based on full-body interaction has become an increasingly important field of research in recent years. However, the design and evaluation strategies currently used present some significant limitations. Two major shortcomings are: the inadequate involvement of children in the design process and a lack of…

  1. Pre-evaluation and interactive editing of B-spline and GERBS curves and surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laksâ, Arne

    2017-12-01

    Interactive computer based geometry editing is very useful for designers and artists. Our goal has been to develop useful tools for geometry editing in a way that increases the ability for creative design. When we interactively editing geometry, we want to see the change happening gradually and smoothly on the screen. Pre-evaluation is a tool for increasing the speed of the graphics when doing interactive affine operation on control points and control surfaces. It is then possible to add details on surfaces, and change shape in a smooth and continuous way. We use pre-evaluation on basis functions, on blending functions and on local surfaces. Pre-evaluation can be made hierarchi-cally and is thus useful for local refinements. Sampling and plotting of curves, surfaces and volumes can today be handled by the GPU and it is therefore important to have a structured organization and updating system to be able to make interactive editing as smooth and user friendly as possible. In the following, we will show a structure for pre-evaluation and an optimal organisation of the computation and we will show the effect of implementing both of these techniques.

  2. Evaluation of Two Methods for Modeling Measurement Errors When Testing Interaction Effects with Observed Composite Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yu-Yu; Kwok, Oi-Man; Lai, Mark H. C.

    2018-01-01

    Path models with observed composites based on multiple items (e.g., mean or sum score of the items) are commonly used to test interaction effects. Under this practice, researchers generally assume that the observed composites are measured without errors. In this study, we reviewed and evaluated two alternative methods within the structural…

  3. An Interactive Web-Based Program for Stepfamilies: Development and Evaluation of Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelatt, Vicky A.; Adler-Baeder, Francesca; Seeley, John R.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a family life education program for stepfamilies that is self-administered, interactive, and web-based. The program uses behavior-modeling videos to demonstrate effective couple, parenting, and stepparenting practices. A diverse sample of 300 parents/stepparents of a child aged 11-15 years were randomized into…

  4. Battalion Evaluation of the Combat Vehicle Command and Control System in Distributed Interactive Simulation. Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-30

    Unit at Fort Knox, Kentucky S~ai Barbara A. Black, Chief - Training Systems Research Division - Jack H. Hiller , Director U.S. Army Research...This manning structure was shaped by the evaluation’s focus on the C3 interactions among battalion and company leaders, battalion TOC eva luation

  5. Quantitative evaluation of noncovalent interactions between polyphosphate and dissolved humic acids in aqueous conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Wang, Long-Fei; Ye, Xiao-Dong; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    As one kind of phosphorus species, polyphosphate (poly-P) is ubiquitous in natural environments, and the potential interactions between poly-P and humic substances in the sediments or natural waters would influence the fate of poly-P in the environments. However, the mechanism of the interactions has not yet been understood clearly. In this work, the characteristics and mechanisms of the interactions between humic acids (HA) and two model poly-P compounds with various chain lengths have been investigated. Results show that a stable polyphosphate-HA complex would be formed through the noncovalent interactions, and hydrogen bond might be the main driving force for the binding process, which might be formed between the proton-accepting groups of poly-P (e.g., P=O and P–O − ) and the oxygen containing functional groups in HA. Our findings implied that the presence of humic substances in natural waters, soils and sediments would influence the potential transport and/or mobility of environmental poly-P. - Highlights: • Noncovalent interactions between polyphosphate and HA were quantitatively evaluated. • Hydrogen bonding was the main driving force in the interaction between HA and poly-P. • The association played important roles in the environmental fate of poly-P in waters. - Stable polyP-HA complex would be formed through the noncovalent interactions and thus influence the poly-P fates in the natural environments.

  6. A study of the use of simulated work task situations in interactive information retrieval evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borlund, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report a study of how the test instrument of a simulated work task situation is used in empirical evaluations of interactive information retrieval (IIR) and reported in the research literature. In particular, the author is interested to learn whether....... The paper addresses the need to carefully design and tailor simulated work task situations to suit the test participants in order to obtain the intended authentic and realistic IIR under study. Keywords Interactive information retrieval study, IIR study, Test design, Simulated work task situations, Meta-evaluation...... situations in IIR evaluations. In particular, with respect to the design and creation of realistic simulated work task situations. There is a lack of tailoring of the simulated work task situations to the test participants. Likewise, the requirement to include the test participants’ personal information...

  7. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... including puppetry and dance. However, the aesthetics of these traditions vary across cultures and carry different associative and interpretive meanings. Puppetry offers a useful frame for understanding the relationship between abstract and imitative gestures and behavior, and instantiates the complex...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  8. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists such as ......The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...... also key figures in the philosophical discussions of nature and science - from philosophical tendencies like logical empiricism via critical rationalism to various neo-Kantian trends....

  9. Evaluating the quality of interaction between medical students and nurses in a large teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cushing Herbert E

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective health care depends on multidisciplinary collaboration and teamwork, yet little is known about how well medical students and nurses interact in the hospital environment, where physicians-in-training acquire their first experiences as members of the health care team. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of interaction between third-year medical students and nurses during clinical rotations. Methods We surveyed 268 Indiana University medical students and 175 nurses who worked at Indiana University Hospital, the School's chief clinical training site. The students had just completed their third year of training. The survey instrument consisted of 7 items that measured "relational coordination" among members of the health care team, and 9 items that measured psychological distress. Results Sixty-eight medical students (25.4% and 99 nurses (56.6% completed the survey. The relational coordination score (ranked 1 to 5, low to high, which provides an overall measure of interaction quality, showed that medical students interacted with residents the best (4.16 and with nurses the worst (2.98; p Conclusion The quality of interaction between medical students and nurses during third-year clinical rotations is poor, which suggests that medical students are not receiving the sorts of educational experiences that promote optimal physician-nurse collaboration. Medical students and nurses experience different levels of psychological distress, which may adversely impact the quality of their interaction.

  10. MATERNAL DEPRESSION AND ATTACHMENT: THE EVALUATION OF MOTHER-CHILD INTERACTIONS DURING FEEDING PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eSantona

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Internal working models of attachment (IWM can moderate the effect of maternal depression on mother-child interactions and child development. Clinical depression pre-dating birthgiving has been found to predict incoherent and less sensitive caregiving. Dysfunctional patterns observed, included interactive modes linked to feeding behaviors which may interfere with hunger-satiation biological rhythms and the establishment of children’s autonomy and individuation. Feeding interactions between depressed mothers and their children seem to be characterized by repetitive interactive failures: children refuse food through oppositional behavior or negativity. The aim of this study was to investigate parenting skills in the context of feeding in mothers with major depression from the point of view of attachment theory. This perspective emphasises parents’ emotion, relational and affective history and personal resources. The sample consisted of 60 mother-child dyads. Mothers were divided into two groups: 30 with Major Depression and 30 without disorders. Children’s age ranged between 12 and 36 months The measures employed were the Adult Attachment Interview and the Scale for the Evaluation of Alimentary Interactions between Mothers and Children. Insecure attachment prevailed in mothers with major depression,, with differences on the Subjective Experience and State of Mind Scales. Groups also differed in maternal sensitivity, degrees of interactive

  11. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... including puppetry and dance. However, the aesthetics of these traditions vary across cultures and carry different associative and interpretive meanings. Puppetry offers a useful frame for understanding the relationship between abstract and imitative gestures and behavior, and instantiates the complex...

  12. Roles of biomarkers in evaluating interactions among mixtures of lead, cadmium and arsenic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Gensheng; Fowler, Bruce A.

    2008-01-01

    Human exposure to environmental chemicals is most correctly characterized as exposure to mixtures of these agents. The metals/metalloids, lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As), are among the leading toxic agents detected in the environment. Exposure to these elements, particularly at chronic low dose levels, is still a major public health concern. Concurrent exposure to Pb, Cd, or As may produce additive or synergistic interactions or even new effects that are not seen in single component exposures. Evaluating these interactions on a mechanistic basis is essential for risk assessment and management of metal/metalloid mixtures. This paper will review a number of individual studies that addressed interactions of these metals/metalloids in both experimental and human exposure studies with particular emphasis on biomarkers. In general, co-exposure to metal/metalloid mixtures produced more severe effects at both relatively high dose and low dose levels in a biomarker-specific manner. These effects were found to be mediated by dose, duration of exposure and genetic factors. While traditional endpoints, such as morphological changes and biochemical parameters for target organ toxicity, were effective measures for evaluating the toxicity of high dose metal/metalloid mixtures, biomarkers for oxidative stress, altered heme biosynthesis parameters, and stress proteins showed clear responses in evaluating toxicity of low dose metal/metalloid mixtures. Metallothionein, heat shock proteins, and glutathione are involved in regulating interactive effects of metal/metalloid mixtures at low dose levels. These findings suggest that further studies on interactions of these metal/metalloid mixtures utilizing biomarker endpoints are highly warranted

  13. Protein structure modelling and evaluation based on a 4-distance description of side-chain interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inbar Yuval

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate evaluation and modelling of residue-residue interactions within and between proteins is a key aspect of computational structure prediction including homology modelling, protein-protein docking, refinement of low-resolution structures, and computational protein design. Results Here we introduce a method for accurate protein structure modelling and evaluation based on a novel 4-distance description of residue-residue interaction geometry. Statistical 4-distance preferences were extracted from high-resolution protein structures and were used as a basis for a knowledge-based potential, called Hunter. We demonstrate that 4-distance description of side chain interactions can be used reliably to discriminate the native structure from a set of decoys. Hunter ranked the native structure as the top one in 217 out of 220 high-resolution decoy sets, in 25 out of 28 "Decoys 'R' Us" decoy sets and in 24 out of 27 high-resolution CASP7/8 decoy sets. The same concept was applied to side chain modelling in protein structures. On a set of very high-resolution protein structures the average RMSD was 1.47 Å for all residues and 0.73 Å for buried residues, which is in the range of attainable accuracy for a model. Finally, we show that Hunter performs as good or better than other top methods in homology modelling based on results from the CASP7 experiment. The supporting web site http://bioinfo.weizmann.ac.il/hunter/ was developed to enable the use of Hunter and for visualization and interactive exploration of 4-distance distributions. Conclusions Our results suggest that Hunter can be used as a tool for evaluation and for accurate modelling of residue-residue interactions in protein structures. The same methodology is applicable to other areas involving high-resolution modelling of biomolecules.

  14. Evaluating the effect of interactive audience response systems on the perceived learning experience of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Ava G; Tousman, Stuart

    2010-09-01

    Interactive Audience Response Systems (ARS) are widely used as tools to promote active learning in the classroom in many disciplines. Researchers have found that ARS technology with question-driven instruction (QDI) makes classroom instruction more student centered, while creating an environment for active learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ARS with QDI in one bachelors of science in nursing course on the perceived learning experience of the students. ARS technology with QDI was used in a beginning medical-surgical class of junior-level students throughout one semester. Descriptive statistical analyses indicated that nursing students positively evaluated the effect of ARS with QDI on their learning. Qualitative analyses indicated that students had better understanding of the material via post-question discussion of the rationales for answers, enhanced NCLEX-RN preparation, and increased interactivity, which led to paying more attention in class.

  15. An evaluation of diverse methods of obtaining effective Schroedinger interaction potentials for elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, K.; Allen, L.J.; Steward, C.; Hodgson, P.E.; Sofianos, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Direct solution of the Schroedinger equation and inversion methods of analysis of elastic scattering data are considered to evaluate the information that they can provide about the physical interaction between colliding nuclear particles. It was found that both optical model and inversion methods based upon inverse scattering theories are subject to ambiguities. Therefore, it is essential that elastic scattering data analyses are consistent with microscopic calculations of the potential. 25 refs

  16. The social-devaluation effect: Interactive evaluation deteriorates likeability of objects based on daily relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsunori eAriga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although previous research has explored the effects of discussion on optimal and collective group outcomes, it is unclear how an individual's preference for an object is modulated by discussion with others. This study investigated the determinants of likeability ratings under two conditions. In Experiment 1, pairs of participants consisting of friends evaluated various photographic images. Under the interactive condition, the participants discussed their impressions of each image for 30 seconds and then independently rated how much they liked it. Under the non-interactive condition, the participants did not interact with each other but instead only thought about their impressions of each image for 30 seconds before rating its likeability. The results indicate that the exchange of impressions between the participants affected the individual likeability ratings of objects. More specifically, the interactive participants generally rated the images as less likeable than did the non-interactive participants (social-devaluation effect. However, in Experiment 2, the effect was eliminated when the pairs consisted of strangers. These findings suggest that shared information modulates individual preferences but only when a daily relationship exists within a group.

  17. HRI usability evaluation of interaction modes for a teleoperated agricultural robotic sprayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamides, George; Katsanos, Christos; Parmet, Yisrael; Christou, Georgios; Xenos, Michalis; Hadzilacos, Thanasis; Edan, Yael

    2017-07-01

    Teleoperation of an agricultural robotic system requires effective and efficient human-robot interaction. This paper investigates the usability of different interaction modes for agricultural robot teleoperation. Specifically, we examined the overall influence of two types of output devices (PC screen, head mounted display), two types of peripheral vision support mechanisms (single view, multiple views), and two types of control input devices (PC keyboard, PS3 gamepad) on observed and perceived usability of a teleoperated agricultural sprayer. A modular user interface for teleoperating an agricultural robot sprayer was constructed and field-tested. Evaluation included eight interaction modes: the different combinations of the 3 factors. Thirty representative participants used each interaction mode to navigate the robot along a vineyard and spray grape clusters based on a 2 × 2 × 2 repeated measures experimental design. Objective metrics of the effectiveness and efficiency of the human-robot collaboration were collected. Participants also completed questionnaires related to their user experience with the system in each interaction mode. Results show that the most important factor for human-robot interface usability is the number and placement of views. The type of robot control input device was also a significant factor in certain dependents, whereas the effect of the screen output type was only significant on the participants' perceived workload index. Specific recommendations for mobile field robot teleoperation to improve HRI awareness for the agricultural spraying task are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluating display fidelity and interaction fidelity in a virtual reality game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Ryan P; Bowman, Doug A; Zielinski, David J; Brady, Rachael B

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, consumers have witnessed a technological revolution that has delivered more-realistic experiences in their own homes through high-definition, stereoscopic televisions and natural, gesture-based video game consoles. Although these experiences are more realistic, offering higher levels of fidelity, it is not clear how the increased display and interaction aspects of fidelity impact the user experience. Since immersive virtual reality (VR) allows us to achieve very high levels of fidelity, we designed and conducted a study that used a six-sided CAVE to evaluate display fidelity and interaction fidelity independently, at extremely high and low levels, for a VR first-person shooter (FPS) game. Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the effects of fidelity on the user in a complex, performance-intensive context. The results of our study indicate that both display and interaction fidelity significantly affect strategy and performance, as well as subjective judgments of presence, engagement, and usability. In particular, performance results were strongly in favor of two conditions: low-display, low-interaction fidelity (representative of traditional FPS games) and high-display, high-interaction fidelity (similar to the real world).

  19. Evaluation of drug interactions in patients treated with antidepressants at a tertiary care cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Lincy Subha; Zhuang, Amy; Hung, Frank; Feng, Chun; Arbuckle, Rebecca; Fisch, Michael J

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated potential drug interactions in patients treated with antidepressants at a tertiary care cancer center to determine if it affects resource utilization. We identified a cohort of patients with continuous care at the study institution by tagging patients who received at least three prescriptions for antidepressants within a continuous 6-month period. Data collected included demographics, cancer type and comorbidities, resource utilization (hospital and emergency room visits), and potential major drug interactions. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were utilized in the analysis. The study population, which included 297 patients, was 70% female and 71% Caucasian; the mean age was 53 years (SD, 12 years), with a mean follow-up period (duration of therapy) of 403 days. Overall, 145 (49%) of the patients had a drug combination that could result in a potential major drug interaction with antidepressants. There were 118 (40%) patients with a potential major drug interaction that could lead to serotonin syndrome symptoms and 59 (20%) patients with a potential major drug interaction with anticoagulants. Potential major drug interactions were associated with an increased number of hospital and ER visits (odds ratio [OR], 2.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-4.03). This finding was consistent for the two subanalysis groups as well, serotonin syndrome-inducing drugs (OR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.33-3.92) and anticoagulants (OR, 3.66; 95% CI, 1.85-7.22). Potential drug interactions are frequent in patients receiving antidepressants in a tertiary care cancer center and are associated with an increase in resource utilization.

  20. Evaluation of Aerosol-cloud Interaction in the GISS Model E Using ARM Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoer, G.; Bauer, S. E.; Toto, T.; Menon, Surabi; Vogelmann, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Observations from the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program are used to evaluate the ability of the NASA GISS ModelE global climate model in reproducing observed interactions between aerosols and clouds. Included in the evaluation are comparisons of basic meteorology and aerosol properties, droplet activation, effective radius parameterizations, and surface-based evaluations of aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI). Differences between the simulated and observed ACI are generally large, but these differences may result partially from vertical distribution of aerosol in the model, rather than the representation of physical processes governing the interactions between aerosols and clouds. Compared to the current observations, the ModelE often features elevated droplet concentrations for a given aerosol concentration, indicating that the activation parameterizations used may be too aggressive. Additionally, parameterizations for effective radius commonly used in models were tested using ARM observations, and there was no clear superior parameterization for the cases reviewed here. This lack of consensus is demonstrated to result in potentially large, statistically significant differences to surface radiative budgets, should one parameterization be chosen over another.

  1. An Interactive Website to Reduce Sexual Risk Behavior: Process Evaluation of TeensTalkHealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Sonya S; Sieving, Renee E; Terveen, Loren G; Rosser, B R Simon; Kodet, Amy J; Rothberg, Vienna D

    2015-09-02

    Different theoretical frameworks support the use of interactive websites to promote sexual health. Although several Web-based interventions have been developed to address sexual risk taking among young people, no evaluated interventions have attempted to foster behavior change through moderated interaction among a virtual network of adolescents (who remain anonymous to one another) and health professionals. The objective was to conduct a summative process evaluation of TeensTalkHealth, an interactive sexual health website designed to promote condom use and other healthy decision making in the context of romantic and sexual relationships. Evaluation data were obtained from 147 adolescents who participated in a feasibility and acceptability study. Video vignettes, teen-friendly articles, and other content served as conversation catalysts between adolescents and health educators on message boards. Adolescents' perceptions that the website encouraged condom use across a variety of relationship situations were very high. Almost 60% (54/92, 59%) of intervention participants completed two-thirds or more of requested tasks across the 4-month intervention. Adolescents reported high levels of comfort, perceived privacy, ease of website access and use, and perceived credibility of health educators. Potential strategies to enhance engagement and completion of intervention tasks during future implementations of TeensTalkHealth are discussed, including tailoring of content, periodic website chats with health educators and anonymous peers, and greater incorporation of features from popular social networking websites. TeensTalkHealth is a feasible, acceptable, and promising approach to complement and enhance existing services for youth.

  2. Learning objects and interactive whiteboards: a evaluation proposal of learning objects for mathematics teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Henrique Fiscarelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current conditions of the classroom learning tend to be a one-way process based in teacher exposition, this make a negative impact on learning make it a mechanical and not meaningful activity. One possibility to improve the quality of teaching is to innovate methodologies and varying forms of presenting information to students, such as the use of technology in the teaching process. The Interactive Whiteboard (IBW is one of the technologies that are being implemented in Brazilian schools. One of the promising possibilities to add value to the use of LDI in classroom are "learning objects" (LO. However, one problem is that often the LO are not fully suited to the dynamics of IWB, whether functional or pedagogical point of view. The objective of this study is to analyze and propose a set of indicators that evaluate the learning objects for use in conjunction with Interactive Whiteboards. The selection and definition of evaluation indicators was carried from the literature review on the subject and based on LDI experiences of use in Municipal Elementary School. After defining the set of indicators was conducted a evaluation of a sample of 30 OA utilized to teaching mathematics in 3rd grade of elementary school. The results of the evaluation indicate that the proposed indicators are suitable for a pre-analysis of OA and assisting in the process of selection of these.

  3. Evaluating Otto the Auto: Does Engagement in an Interactive Website Improve Young Children's Transportation Safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebel, David C; Johnston, Anna; Shen, Jiabin; Li, Peng

    2017-07-19

    Transportation-related injuries are a leading cause of pediatric death, and effective interventions are limited. Otto the Auto is a website offering engaging, interactive activities. We evaluated Otto among a sample of sixty-nine 4- and 5-year-old children, who participated in a randomized parallel group design study. Following baseline evaluation, children engaged with either Otto or a control website for 2 weeks and then were re-evaluated. Children who used Otto failed to show increases in transportation safety knowledge or behavior compared to the control group, although there was a dosage effect whereby children who engaged in the website more with parents gained safer behavior patterns. We conclude Otto may have some efficacy when engaged by children with their parents, but continued efforts to develop and refine engaging, effective, theory-driven strategies to teach children transportation safety, including via internet, should be pursued.

  4. Nominalizing evaluative suffixes in Russian: The interaction of declension class, gender, and animacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Steriopolo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a study of Russian nominalizing evaluative suffixes that form nouns of the -a-declension. Such suffixes are very interesting to investigate because they can consistently change the animacy, declension class, and grammatical gender of the base to which they attach. However, the resulting nominalizations belong to different grammatical genders that seem to depend on the biological gender of a discourse referent. This work investigates morphosyntactic properties of such evaluative suffixes and proposes an account for the differences in grammatical gender. Nominalizing evaluative suffixes in Russian are drastically understudied. However, they contribute significantly to many important and much-debated questions in the current linguistic literature concerning the interaction between grammatical gender and declension class, mixed gender agreement, interpretability of gender features, and default gender. This research is done in the framework of Distributed Morphology (Halle and Marantz 1993; Halle 1997; Marantz 1997, among many others and contributes to our understanding of the process of nominalization.

  5. Evaluation of cell interaction with polymeric biomaterials based on hyaluronic acid and chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Mônica Helena Monteiro; Ferreira, Mariselma; Malmonge, Sônia Maria; Lombello, Christiane Bertachini

    2017-05-01

    Tissue engineering involves the development of new materials or devices capable of specific interactions with biological tissues, searching the use of biocompatible materials as scaffolds for in vitro cell growth, and functional tissue development, that is subsequently implanted into patient. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the initial aspects of cell interaction with the polymeric biomaterials blends based on hyaluronic acid with chitosan. The hypothesis approach involves synthesis and analysis of swelling and thermal degradation (thermal gravimetric analysis) of the polymer blend; and Vero cell interaction with the biomaterial, through analysis of cytotoxicity, adhesion and cell morphology. The blend resulted in a biomaterial with a high swelling ratio that can allow nutrient distribution and absorption. The thermal gravimetric analysis results showed that the blend had two stages of degradation at temperatures very close to those observed for pure polymers, confirming that the physical mixing of hydrogels occurred, resulting in the presence of both hyaluronic acid and chitosan in the blend. The evaluation of indirect cytotoxicity showed that the blend was non cytotoxic for Vero cells, and the quantitative analysis performed with the MTT could verify a cell viability of 98%. The cells cultured on the blend showed adhesion, spreading and proliferation on this biomaterial, distinguished from the pattern of the control cells. These results showed that the blends produced from hyaluronic acid and chitosan hydrogels are promising for applications in tissue engineering, aiming at future cartilaginous tissue.

  6. Evaluation of interaction of Zinc, Aluminum, Copper and Manganese on Chromobacterium violaceum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Laureano da Rosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of metallic salts in the environment resulted from the explotation, mineralogy, industrial, and agro-industrial activities and urban residues affect the dynamic balance of ecosystems, generating environmental and economic problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interaction of Chromobacterium violaceum with four metallic salts: aluminum sulphate, copper sulphate, manganese sulphate and zinc sulphate at concentration of 100mg/L or the absence of them, as well as a possible 2nd order interaction effect, using a complete 24 factorial design. The 16 experimental tests were carried out in microplate culture. Suspension of microorganism was prepared in Nutrient Broth and added to the orifices. After incubation at 37ºC during 24 hours, the absorbance was carried out using a 410nm in Versamax reader. The results showed remarkable bacterial adaptability. Student t test analysis showed that manganese was the only metal that did not have significant effect on the population growth of C. violaceum while zinc was the most influent. Positive interactions involving zinc was observed, interaction between aluminum and copper was not relevant.

  7. A calorimetric evaluation of the interaction of amphiphilic prodrugs of idebenone with a biomembrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatello, R; Intravaia, V D; Puglisi, G

    2006-07-15

    Lipoamino acids (LAA) are useful promoieties to modify physicochemical properties of drugs, namely lipophilicity and amphiphilicity. The resulting membrane-like character of drug-LAA conjugates can increase the absorption profile of drugs through cell membranes and biological barriers. To show the role of amphiphilicity with respect to lipophilicity in the interaction of drugs with biomembranes, in the present study we evaluated the mode of such an interaction of lipophilic conjugates of LAA with the antioxidant drug idebenone (IDE). DSC analysis and transfer kinetic studies were carried out using dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) multilamellar liposomes (MLVs) as a model. For comparison, two esters of IDE with alkanoic acids were synthesized and included in the analysis. The experimental results indicate that based on their different structure, IDE-LAA conjugates interacted at different levels with respect to pure IDE with DMPC bilayers. In particular, a progressive penetration inside the vesicles was observed upon incubation of IDE-LAA compounds with empty liposomes. The enhanced amphiphilicity of the drug due to the LAA moieties caused more complex interactions with DMPC bilayers, compared to those registered with the native drug or IDE alkanoate esters.

  8. Evaluation of the interaction of surfactants with stratum corneum model membrane from Bothrops jararaca by DSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, André Rolim; Lacerda, Aurea Cristina Lemos; Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles; Lopes, Patrícia Santos; Kawano, Yoshio; Kaneko, Telma Mary

    2006-07-06

    The interaction of surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) and lauryl alcohol ethoxylated (12 mol ethylene oxide) (LAE-12OE) was evaluated on the stratum corneum (SC) of shed snake skins from Bothrops jararaca, used as model membrane, and thermal characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Surfactant solutions were employed above of the critical micellar concentration (CMC) with treatment time of 8h. The SDS interaction with the SC model membrane has increased the characteristic transition temperature of 130 degrees C in approximately 10 degrees C for the water loss and keratin denaturation, indicating an augmentation of the water content. Samples treated with CTAC have a decrease of the water loss temperature, while, for the LAE-12OE treated samples, changes on the transition temperature have not been observed.

  9. Evaluating the Effects of Immersive Embodied Interaction on Cognition in Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Dhaval

    Virtual reality is on its advent of becoming mainstream household technology, as technologies such as head-mounted displays, trackers, and interaction devices are becoming affordable and easily available. Virtual reality (VR) has immense potential in enhancing the fields of education and training, and its power can be used to spark interest and enthusiasm among learners. It is, therefore, imperative to evaluate the risks and benefits that immersive virtual reality poses to the field of education. Research suggests that learning is an embodied process. Learning depends on grounded aspects of the body including action, perception, and interactions with the environment. This research aims to study if immersive embodiment through the means of virtual reality facilitates embodied cognition. A pedagogical VR solution which takes advantage of embodied cognition can lead to enhanced learning benefits. Towards achieving this goal, this research presents a linear continuum for immersive embodied interaction within virtual reality. This research evaluates the effects of three levels of immersive embodied interactions on cognitive thinking, presence, usability, and satisfaction among users in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. Results from the presented experiments show that immersive virtual reality is greatly effective in knowledge acquisition and retention, and highly enhances user satisfaction, interest and enthusiasm. Users experience high levels of presence and are profoundly engaged in the learning activities within the immersive virtual environments. The studies presented in this research evaluate pedagogical VR software to train and motivate students in STEM education, and provide an empirical analysis comparing desktop VR (DVR), immersive VR (IVR), and immersive embodied VR (IEVR) conditions for learning. This research also proposes a fully immersive embodied interaction metaphor (IEIVR) for learning of computational

  10. An Interactive Website to Reduce Sexual Risk Behavior: Process Evaluation of TeensTalkHealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieving, Renee E; Terveen, Loren G; Rosser, BR Simon; Kodet, Amy J; Rothberg, Vienna D

    2015-01-01

    Background Different theoretical frameworks support the use of interactive websites to promote sexual health. Although several Web-based interventions have been developed to address sexual risk taking among young people, no evaluated interventions have attempted to foster behavior change through moderated interaction among a virtual network of adolescents (who remain anonymous to one another) and health professionals. Objective The objective was to conduct a summative process evaluation of TeensTalkHealth, an interactive sexual health website designed to promote condom use and other healthy decision making in the context of romantic and sexual relationships. Methods Evaluation data were obtained from 147 adolescents who participated in a feasibility and acceptability study. Video vignettes, teen-friendly articles, and other content served as conversation catalysts between adolescents and health educators on message boards. Results Adolescents’ perceptions that the website encouraged condom use across a variety of relationship situations were very high. Almost 60% (54/92, 59%) of intervention participants completed two-thirds or more of requested tasks across the 4-month intervention. Adolescents reported high levels of comfort, perceived privacy, ease of website access and use, and perceived credibility of health educators. Potential strategies to enhance engagement and completion of intervention tasks during future implementations of TeensTalkHealth are discussed, including tailoring of content, periodic website chats with health educators and anonymous peers, and greater incorporation of features from popular social networking websites. Conclusions TeensTalkHealth is a feasible, acceptable, and promising approach to complement and enhance existing services for youth. PMID:26336157

  11. Critical experiments on interaction systems using STACY and their analytical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonoike, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Miyoshi, Yoshinori

    2005-01-01

    A series of experiments with neutron interactive cores that consisted of two slab tanks was conducted to measure the neutronic characteristics of the multiple-unit system. The measured characteristics are useful to discuss the issues of criticality safety design such as the modeling scheme of multiple-unit systems, the accuracy of computation methods of the weekly-coupled system, and so far. In this presentation, conditions of the series of experiments will be outlined. Their analytical evaluation for the validation of computational methods will be also discussed. (author)

  12. An evaluation framework for multimodal interaction determining quality aspects and modality choice

    CERN Document Server

    Wechsung, Ina

    2014-01-01

    This book presents (1) an exhaustive and empirically validated taxonomy of quality aspects of multimodal interaction as well as respective measurement methods, (2) a validated questionnaire specifically tailored to the evaluation of multimodal systems and covering most of the taxonomy‘s quality aspects, (3) insights on how the quality perceptions of multimodal systems relate to the quality perceptions of its individual components, (4) a set of empirically tested factors which influence modality choice, and (5) models regarding the relationship of the perceived quality of a modality and the actual usage of a modality.

  13. Consensus Recommendations for Systematic Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Evidence for Clinical Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheife, Richard T.; Hines, Lisa E.; Boyce, Richard D.; Chung, Sophie P.; Momper, Jeremiah; Sommer, Christine D.; Abernethy, Darrell R.; Horn, John; Sklar, Stephen J.; Wong, Samantha K.; Jones, Gretchen; Brown, Mary; Grizzle, Amy J.; Comes, Susan; Wilkins, Tricia Lee; Borst, Clarissa; Wittie, Michael A.; Rich, Alissa; Malone, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare organizations, compendia, and drug knowledgebase vendors use varying methods to evaluate and synthesize evidence on drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This situation has a negative effect on electronic prescribing and medication information systems that warn clinicians of potentially harmful medication combinations. Objective To provide recommendations for systematic evaluation of evidence from the scientific literature, drug product labeling, and regulatory documents with respect to DDIs for clinical decision support. Methods A conference series was conducted to develop a structured process to improve the quality of DDI alerting systems. Three expert workgroups were assembled to address the goals of the conference. The Evidence Workgroup consisted of 15 individuals with expertise in pharmacology, drug information, biomedical informatics, and clinical decision support. Workgroup members met via webinar from January 2013 to February 2014. Two in-person meetings were conducted in May and September 2013 to reach consensus on recommendations. Results We developed expert-consensus answers to three key questions: 1) What is the best approach to evaluate DDI evidence?; 2) What evidence is required for a DDI to be applicable to an entire class of drugs?; and 3) How should a structured evaluation process be vetted and validated? Conclusion Evidence-based decision support for DDIs requires consistent application of transparent and systematic methods to evaluate the evidence. Drug information systems that implement these recommendations should be able to provide higher quality information about DDIs in drug compendia and clinical decision support tools. PMID:25556085

  14. [Systematic evaluation of retention behavior of carbohydrates in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qing; Wang, Jun; Liang, Tu; Xu, Xiaoyong; Jin, Yu

    2013-11-01

    A systematic evaluation of retention behavior of carbohydrates in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was performed. The influences of mobile phase, stationary phase and buffer salt on the retention of carbohydrates were investigated. According to the results, the retention time of carbohydrates decreased as the proportion of acetonitrile in mobile phase decreased. Increased time of carbohydrates was observed as the concentration of buffer salt in mobile phase increased. The retention behavior of carbohydrates was also affected by organic solvent and HILIC stationary phase. Furthermore, an appropriate retention equation was used in HILIC mode. The retention equation lnk = a + blnC(B) + cC(B) could quantitatively describe the retention factors of carbohydrates of plant origin with good accuracy: the relative error of the predicted time to actual time was less than 0.3%. The evaluation results could provide guidance for carbohydrates to optimize the experimental conditions in HILIC method development especially for carbohydrate separation

  15. A life evaluation under creep-fatigue-environment interaction of Ni-base wrought alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Masaki; Ohtomo, Akira; Itoh, Mitsuyoshi

    1986-01-01

    In order to determine a failure criteria under cyclic loading and affective environment for HTGR systems, a series of strain controlled low-cycle fatigue tests were carried out at HTGR maximum gas temperatures in air, in vacuum and in HTGR helium environments on two nickel-base wrought alloys, namely Inconel 617 and Hastelloy XR. This paper first describes the creep-fatigue-environment properties of these alloys followed by a proposal of an evaluation method of creep-fatigue-environment interaction based on the experimental data to define the more reasonable design criteria, which is a modification of the linear damage summation rule. Second, the creep-fatigue properties of Hastelloy XR at 900 deg C and the result evaluated by this proposed method are shown. This criterion is successfully applied to the life prediction at 900 deg C. In addition, the creep-fatigue properties of Hastelloy XR-II are discussed. (author)

  16. Evaluation of a computerized aid for creating human behavioral representations of human-computer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kent E; Voigt, Jeffrey R

    2004-01-01

    The research reported herein presents the results of an empirical evaluation that focused on the accuracy and reliability of cognitive models created using a computerized tool: the cognitive analysis tool for human-computer interaction (CAT-HCI). A sample of participants, expert in interacting with a newly developed tactical display for the U.S. Army's Bradley Fighting Vehicle, individually modeled their knowledge of 4 specific tasks employing the CAT-HCI tool. Measures of the accuracy and consistency of task models created by these task domain experts using the tool were compared with task models created by a double expert. The findings indicated a high degree of consistency and accuracy between the different "single experts" in the task domain in terms of the resultant models generated using the tool. Actual or potential applications of this research include assessing human-computer interaction complexity, determining the productivity of human-computer interfaces, and analyzing an interface design to determine whether methods can be automated.

  17. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of an alpha-helix mimetic library targeting protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaginian, Alex; Whitby, Landon R; Hong, Sukwon; Hwang, Inkyu; Farooqi, Bilal; Searcey, Mark; Chen, Jiandong; Vogt, Peter K; Boger, Dale L

    2009-04-22

    The design and solution-phase synthesis of an alpha-helix mimetic library as an integral component of a small-molecule library targeting protein-protein interactions are described. The iterative design, synthesis, and evaluation of the candidate alpha-helix mimetic was initiated from a precedented triaryl template and refined by screening the designs for inhibition of MDM2/p53 binding. Upon identifying a chemically and biologically satisfactory design and consistent with the screening capabilities of academic collaborators, the corresponding complete library was assembled as 400 mixtures of 20 compounds (20 x 20 x 20-mix), where the added subunits are designed to mimic all possible permutations of the naturally occurring i, i + 4, i + 7 amino acid side chains of an alpha-helix. The library (8000 compounds) was prepared using a solution-phase synthetic protocol enlisting acid/base liquid-liquid extractions for purification on a scale that insures its long-term availability for screening campaigns. Screening of the library for inhibition of MDM2/p53 binding not only identified the lead alpha-helix mimetic upon which the library was based, but also suggests that a digestion of the initial screening results that accompany the use of such a comprehensive library can provide insights into the nature of the interaction (e.g., an alpha-helix mediated protein-protein interaction) and define the key residues and their characteristics responsible for recognition.

  18. Interactive contour delineation of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Clinical evaluation on NSCLC patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolz, J., E-mail: jose.dolz.upv@gmail.com [AQUILAB, Loos-les-Lille 59120, France and University Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, U1189–ONCO-THAI–Image Assisted Laser Therapy for Oncology, Lille F-59000 (France); Kirişli, H. A.; Massoptier, L. [AQUILAB, Loos-les-Lille 59120 (France); Fechter, T.; Karnitzki, S.; Oehlke, O.; Nestle, U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center, Freiburg 79106 (Germany); Vermandel, M. [Inserm Onco Thai U1189, Université Lille 2, CHRU Lille, Lille 59037 (France)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Accurate delineation of organs at risk (OARs) on computed tomography (CT) image is required for radiation treatment planning (RTP). Manual delineation of OARs being time consuming and prone to high interobserver variability, many (semi-) automatic methods have been proposed. However, most of them are specific to a particular OAR. Here, an interactive computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs required for thoracic radiation therapy is introduced. Methods: Segmentation information (foreground and background seeds) is interactively added by the user in any of the three main orthogonal views of the CT volume and is subsequently propagated within the whole volume. The proposed method is based on the combination of watershed transformation and graph-cuts algorithm, which is used as a powerful optimization technique to minimize the energy function. The OARs considered for thoracic radiation therapy are the lungs, spinal cord, trachea, proximal bronchus tree, heart, and esophagus. The method was evaluated on multivendor CT datasets of 30 patients. Two radiation oncologists participated in the study and manual delineations from the original RTP were used as ground truth for evaluation. Results: Delineation of the OARs obtained with the minimally interactive approach was approved to be usable for RTP in nearly 90% of the cases, excluding the esophagus, which segmentation was mostly rejected, thus leading to a gain of time ranging from 50% to 80% in RTP. Considering exclusively accepted cases, overall OARs, a Dice similarity coefficient higher than 0.7 and a Hausdorff distance below 10 mm with respect to the ground truth were achieved. In addition, the interobserver analysis did not highlight any statistically significant difference, at the exception of the segmentation of the heart, in terms of Hausdorff distance and volume difference. Conclusions: An interactive, accurate, fast, and easy-to-use computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs

  19. Interactive contour delineation of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Clinical evaluation on NSCLC patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolz, J.; Kirişli, H. A.; Massoptier, L.; Fechter, T.; Karnitzki, S.; Oehlke, O.; Nestle, U.; Vermandel, M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate delineation of organs at risk (OARs) on computed tomography (CT) image is required for radiation treatment planning (RTP). Manual delineation of OARs being time consuming and prone to high interobserver variability, many (semi-) automatic methods have been proposed. However, most of them are specific to a particular OAR. Here, an interactive computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs required for thoracic radiation therapy is introduced. Methods: Segmentation information (foreground and background seeds) is interactively added by the user in any of the three main orthogonal views of the CT volume and is subsequently propagated within the whole volume. The proposed method is based on the combination of watershed transformation and graph-cuts algorithm, which is used as a powerful optimization technique to minimize the energy function. The OARs considered for thoracic radiation therapy are the lungs, spinal cord, trachea, proximal bronchus tree, heart, and esophagus. The method was evaluated on multivendor CT datasets of 30 patients. Two radiation oncologists participated in the study and manual delineations from the original RTP were used as ground truth for evaluation. Results: Delineation of the OARs obtained with the minimally interactive approach was approved to be usable for RTP in nearly 90% of the cases, excluding the esophagus, which segmentation was mostly rejected, thus leading to a gain of time ranging from 50% to 80% in RTP. Considering exclusively accepted cases, overall OARs, a Dice similarity coefficient higher than 0.7 and a Hausdorff distance below 10 mm with respect to the ground truth were achieved. In addition, the interobserver analysis did not highlight any statistically significant difference, at the exception of the segmentation of the heart, in terms of Hausdorff distance and volume difference. Conclusions: An interactive, accurate, fast, and easy-to-use computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs

  20. Modeling of dynamic vehicle-road interactions for safety-related road evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfila, O; Coiret, A; Do, M T; Mammar, S

    2010-11-01

    Usually, road safety is assessed by following adequate highway geometric design standards and can be controlled later by measurement and expertise. Nevertheless, interactions between vehicle dynamics and road characteristics cannot be simultaneously analyzed for these two means of safety evaluation. In this study, an analytical method based on road/vehicle physical interactions applied to road diagnosis is proposed. Vehicle "point" and "bicycle" models are used in this first approach. French highway geometric design standards and a statistical method are presented and evaluated on a real curve case. The proposed numerical criterion, for the "bicycle" model, is then compared to these two classical methods for the considered road section. Its advantages are that it takes into account several combined parameters, that road defects are precisely localized and that it provides hierarchically classified solutions to the road managers. After this comparison step, further improvements should be focused on the modeling of successive curves and on the improvement of the informations given to the road manager. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development and evaluation of an interactive electronic laboratory manual for cooperative learning of medical histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Kirkley, Debbie L; Kibble, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development of an interactive computer-based laboratory manual, created to facilitate the teaching and learning of medical histology. The overarching goal of developing the manual is to facilitate self-directed group interactivities that actively engage students during laboratory sessions. The design of the manual includes guided instruction for students to navigate virtual slides, exercises for students to monitor learning, and cases to provide clinical relevance. At the end of the laboratory activities, student groups can generate a laboratory report that may be used to provide formative feedback. The instructional value of the manual was evaluated by a questionnaire containing both closed-ended and open-ended items. Closed-ended items using a five-point Likert-scale assessed the format and navigation, instructional contents, group process, and learning process. Open-ended items assessed student's perception on the effectiveness of the manual in facilitating their learning. After implementation for two consecutive years, student evaluation of the manual was highly positive and indicated that it facilitated their learning by reinforcing and clarifying classroom sessions, improved their understanding, facilitated active and cooperative learning, and supported self-monitoring of their learning. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  2. Evaluation on Impact Interaction between Abutment and Steel Girder Subjected to Nonuniform Seismic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to evaluate the impact interaction between the abutment and the girder subjected to nonuniform seismic excitation. An impact model based on tests is presented by taking material properties of the backfill of the abutment into consideration. The conditional simulation is performed to investigate the spatial variation of earthquake ground motions. A two-span continuous steel box girder bridge is taken as the example to analyze and assess the pounding interaction between the abutment and the girder. The detailed nonlinear finite element (FE model is established and the steel girder and the reinforced concrete piers are modeled by nonlinear fiber elements. The pounding element of the abutment is simulated by using a trilinear compression gap element. The elastic-perfectly plastic element is used to model the nonlinear rubber bearings. The comparisons of the pounding forces, the shear forces of the nonlinear bearings, the moments of reinforced concrete piers, and the axial pounding stresses of the steel girder are studied. The made observations indicate that the nonuniform excitation for multisupport bridge is imperative in the analysis and evaluation of the pounding effects of the bridges.

  3. A Multimedia Interactive Education System for Prostate Cancer Patients: Development and Preliminary Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Brian P

    2004-01-01

    Background A cancer diagnosis is highly distressing. Yet, to make informed treatment choices patients have to learn complicated disease and treatment information that is often fraught with medical and statistical terminology. Thus, patients need accurate and easy-to-understand information. Objective To introduce the development and preliminary evaluation through focus groups of a novel highly-interactive multimedia-education software program for patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. Methods The prostate interactive education system uses the metaphor of rooms in a virtual health center (ie, reception area, a library, physician offices, group meeting room) to organize information. Text information contained in the library is tailored to a person's information-seeking preference (ie, high versus low information seeker). We conducted a preliminary evaluation through 5 separate focus groups with prostate cancer survivors (N = 18) and their spouses (N = 15). Results Focus group results point to the timeliness and high acceptability of the software among the target audience. Results also underscore the importance of a guide or tutor who assists in navigating the program and who responds to queries to facilitate information retrieval. Conclusions Focus groups have established the validity of our approach and point to new directions to further enhance the user interface. PMID:15111269

  4. Generating Phenotypical Erroneous Human Behavior to Evaluate Human-automation Interaction Using Model Checking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Matthew L; Bass, Ellen J; Siminiceanu, Radu I

    2012-11-01

    Breakdowns in complex systems often occur as a result of system elements interacting in unanticipated ways. In systems with human operators, human-automation interaction associated with both normative and erroneous human behavior can contribute to such failures. Model-driven design and analysis techniques provide engineers with formal methods tools and techniques capable of evaluating how human behavior can contribute to system failures. This paper presents a novel method for automatically generating task analytic models encompassing both normative and erroneous human behavior from normative task models. The generated erroneous behavior is capable of replicating Hollnagel's zero-order phenotypes of erroneous action for omissions, jumps, repetitions, and intrusions. Multiple phenotypical acts can occur in sequence, thus allowing for the generation of higher order phenotypes. The task behavior model pattern capable of generating erroneous behavior can be integrated into a formal system model so that system safety properties can be formally verified with a model checker. This allows analysts to prove that a human-automation interactive system (as represented by the model) will or will not satisfy safety properties with both normative and generated erroneous human behavior. We present benchmarks related to the size of the statespace and verification time of models to show how the erroneous human behavior generation process scales. We demonstrate the method with a case study: the operation of a radiation therapy machine. A potential problem resulting from a generated erroneous human action is discovered. A design intervention is presented which prevents this problem from occurring. We discuss how our method could be used to evaluate larger applications and recommend future paths of development.

  5. Generating Phenotypical Erroneous Human Behavior to Evaluate Human-automation Interaction Using Model Checking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Matthew L.; Bass, Ellen J.; Siminiceanu, Radu I.

    2012-01-01

    Breakdowns in complex systems often occur as a result of system elements interacting in unanticipated ways. In systems with human operators, human-automation interaction associated with both normative and erroneous human behavior can contribute to such failures. Model-driven design and analysis techniques provide engineers with formal methods tools and techniques capable of evaluating how human behavior can contribute to system failures. This paper presents a novel method for automatically generating task analytic models encompassing both normative and erroneous human behavior from normative task models. The generated erroneous behavior is capable of replicating Hollnagel’s zero-order phenotypes of erroneous action for omissions, jumps, repetitions, and intrusions. Multiple phenotypical acts can occur in sequence, thus allowing for the generation of higher order phenotypes. The task behavior model pattern capable of generating erroneous behavior can be integrated into a formal system model so that system safety properties can be formally verified with a model checker. This allows analysts to prove that a human-automation interactive system (as represented by the model) will or will not satisfy safety properties with both normative and generated erroneous human behavior. We present benchmarks related to the size of the statespace and verification time of models to show how the erroneous human behavior generation process scales. We demonstrate the method with a case study: the operation of a radiation therapy machine. A potential problem resulting from a generated erroneous human action is discovered. A design intervention is presented which prevents this problem from occurring. We discuss how our method could be used to evaluate larger applications and recommend future paths of development. PMID:23105914

  6. SciSpark: Highly Interactive and Scalable Model Evaluation and Climate Metrics for Scientific Data and Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We will construct SciSpark, a scalable system for interactive model evaluation and for the rapid development of climate metrics and analyses. SciSpark directly...

  7. [Application of SAS macro to evaluated multiplicative and additive interaction in logistic and Cox regression in clinical practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Z Q; Ou, Y Q; Zhuang, J; Qu, Y J; Mai, J Z; Chen, J M; Liu, X Q

    2016-05-01

    Conditional logistic regression analysis and unconditional logistic regression analysis are commonly used in case control study, but Cox proportional hazard model is often used in survival data analysis. Most literature only refer to main effect model, however, generalized linear model differs from general linear model, and the interaction was composed of multiplicative interaction and additive interaction. The former is only statistical significant, but the latter has biological significance. In this paper, macros was written by using SAS 9.4 and the contrast ratio, attributable proportion due to interaction and synergy index were calculated while calculating the items of logistic and Cox regression interactions, and the confidence intervals of Wald, delta and profile likelihood were used to evaluate additive interaction for the reference in big data analysis in clinical epidemiology and in analysis of genetic multiplicative and additive interactions.

  8. Use of live interactive webcasting for an international postgraduate module in ehealth: case study evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ray B; Maramba, Inocencio; Boulos, Maged N Kamel; Alexander, Tara

    2009-11-13

    Producing "traditional" e-learning can be time consuming, and in a topic such as eHealth, it may have a short shelf-life. Students sometimes report feeling isolated and lacking in motivation. Synchronous methods can play an important part in any blended approach to learning. The aim was to develop, deliver, and evaluate an international postgraduate module in eHealth using live interactive webcasting. We developed a hybrid solution for live interactive webcasting using a scan converter, mixer, and digitizer, and video server to embed a presenter-controlled talking head or copy of the presenter's computer screen (normally a PowerPoint slide) in a student chat room. We recruited 16 students from six countries and ran weekly 2.5-hour live sessions for 10 weeks. The content included the use of computers by patients, patient access to records, different forms of e-learning for patients and professionals, research methods in eHealth, geographic information systems, and telehealth. All sessions were recorded-presentations as video files and the student interaction as text files. Students were sent an email questionnaire of mostly open questions seeking their views of this form of learning. Responses were collated and anonymized by a colleague who was not part of the teaching team. Sessions were generally very interactive, with most students participating actively in breakout or full-class discussions. In a typical 2.5-hour session, students posted about 50 messages each. Two students did not complete all sessions; one withdrew from the pressure of work after session 6, and one from illness after session 7. Fourteen of the 16 responded to the feedback questionnaire. Most students (12/14) found the module useful or very useful, and all would recommend the module to others. All liked the method of delivery, in particular the interactivity, the variety of students, and the "closeness" of the group. Most (11/14) felt "connected" with the other students on the course. Many

  9. Evaluation of different delivery modes of an interactive e-learning programme for teaching cultural diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Kamila; Prout, Hayley; Kinnersley, Paul; Houston, Helen

    2009-01-01

    UK medical schools find it challenging to provide standardised teaching to expanding year intakes. In addition, developing and implementing diversity training can cause difficulties. This paper describes the evaluation of an interactive e-learning programme to raise awareness and understanding of communication difficulties in diversity consultations. The programme was part of an undergraduate portfolio-based community module. Three hundred and two students were assigned to one of three delivery methods--a large group setting, small groups with a facilitator, and as part of distance learning while on community placement. The evaluation included analysis of their coursework marks, a self-completed evaluation questionnaire, and small group discussions. Two hundred and twenty-three students took part in the evaluation. They were able to apply the concepts they learnt to clinical examples from their own experiences. Type of delivery did not affect coursework marks, but students tended to prefer the e-learning as part of a distance learning package. They offered helpful suggestions to improve its complexity and range. The acceptability and utility of this e-learning module both in face to face teaching and remote placement has been demonstrated, and evaluation by the students has provided valuable information for its further development. All medical schools should include some diversity training, and further research should concentrate on the effects of this type of learning on longer term outcomes such as attitude and performance tests. Such tools could reduce demands on staff time in facilitation of small groupwork, and their cost effectiveness could be increased by making them available to other medical schools.

  10. Evaluating interactive technology for an evolving case study on learning and satisfaction of graduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Marjorie A; Schaffner, Barbara H

    2016-07-01

    Nursing education is challenged to prepare students for complex healthcare needs through the integration of teamwork and informatics. Technology has become an important teaching tool in the blended classroom to enhance group based learning experiences. Faculty evaluation of classroom technologies is imperative prior to adoption. Few studies have directly compared various technologies and their impact on student satisfaction and learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate technology enhanced teaching methods on the learning and satisfaction of graduate students in an advanced pharmacology class using an unfolding case study. After IRB approval, students were randomly assigned to one of three groups: blogging group, wiki group or webinar group. Students completed the evolving case study using the assigned interactive technology. Student names were removed from the case studies. Faculty evaluated the case study using a rubric, while blinded to the assigned technology method used. No significant difference was found on case study grades, the range of grades on the assignment demonstrated little differences between the methods used. Students indicated an overall positive impact related to networking and collaboration on a satisfaction survey. Impact of technology methods needs to be explored in other areas of graduate nursing education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Evaluation of pharmacokinetic drug-drug-interactions. Critical considerations of the relevance of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of proton pump inhibitors in self medication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Karl-Uwe

    2011-08-01

    Mechanisms and evaluation of pharmacokinetic drug interactions are discussed in general, including mechanisms beyond the hepatic phase-I reactions, and especially for the example of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), preferentially omeprazole. Particular attention is paid to the use of PPI as self-prescribed drugs. The sequelae of pharmacokinetic drug interactions can be serious. However, only the evidence of clinical consequences will convert such an interaction from a laboratory finding into a possible adverse effect. Without this, interacting drugs can still be co-administered if the specific characteristics of the concerned drugs, quantitative aspects of the interaction, and especially severity and frequency of possible clinical correlates are taken into consideration. It is encouraging that the laboratory findings reported for the PPI--in vitro or ex vivo from volunteer studies--have hardly found equivalents in clinical consequences. As of today, this is also true of the widely discussed interaction with clopidogrel. Regarding the safety of use of PPI as self-prescribed drugs, it also needs to be emphasized that a sizable number of interactions reported for omeprazole and/or pantoprazole were observed at higher dose levels than the 20 mg licensed for self medication. In conjunction with the temporal limitation of PPI self-prescription (14 days), it can be expected that pharmacokinetic drug interactions will generally be no critical factor in the usage of PPI in self-medication. However clinically relevant interactions can occur, e.g. when PPI are combined with extracts from St. John's wort, methotrexat or some inhibitors of HIV-protease with pH-dependent absorption.

  12. Train-Network Interactions and Stability Evaluation in High-Speed Railways--Part I: Phenomena and Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Haitao; Tao, Haidong; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an impedance-based model to systematically investigate the interaction performance of multiple trains and traction network interaction system, aiming to evaluate the serious phenomena, including low-frequency oscillation (LFO), harmonic resonance and resonance instability....... The train-network interaction mechanism is therefore studied and one presents a detailed coupling model for investigating the three interactive phenomena and their characteristics, influential factors, analysis methods and possible mitigation schemes. In the Part I of the two-part paper, the measured...

  13. Evaluation of an interactive, case-based review session in teaching medical microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, Earl L; Kisamore, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    Background Oklahoma State University-Center for Health Sciences (OSU-CHS) has replaced its microbiology wet laboratory with a variety of tutorials including a case-based interactive session called Microbial Jeopardy!. The question remains whether the time spent by students and faculty in the interactive case-based tutorial is worthwhile? This study was designed to address this question by analyzing both student performance data and assessing students' perceptions regarding the tutorial. Methods Both quantitative and qualitative data were used in the current study. Part One of the study involved assessing student performance using archival records of seven case-based exam questions used in the 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007 OSU-CHS Medical Microbiology course. Two sample t-tests for proportions were used to test for significant differences related to tutorial usage. Part Two used both quantitative and qualitative means to assess student's perceptions of the Microbial Jeopardy! session. First, a retrospective survey was administered to students who were enrolled in Medical Microbiology in 2006 or 2007. Second, responses to open-ended items from the 2008 course evaluations were reviewed for comments regarding the Microbial Jeopardy! session. Results Both student performance and student perception data support continued use of the tutorials. Quantitative and qualitative data converge to suggest that students like and learn from the interactive, case-based session. Conclusion The case-based tutorial appears to improve student performance on case-based exam questions. Additionally, students perceived the tutorial as helpful in preparing for exam questions and reviewing the course material. The time commitment for use of the case-based tutorial appears to be justified. PMID:19712473

  14. Evaluation of an interactive, case-based review session in teaching medical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, Earl L; Kisamore, Jennifer L

    2009-08-27

    Oklahoma State University-Center for Health Sciences (OSU-CHS) has replaced its microbiology wet laboratory with a variety of tutorials including a case-based interactive session called Microbial Jeopardy!. The question remains whether the time spent by students and faculty in the interactive case-based tutorial is worthwhile? This study was designed to address this question by analyzing both student performance data and assessing students' perceptions regarding the tutorial. Both quantitative and qualitative data were used in the current study. Part One of the study involved assessing student performance using archival records of seven case-based exam questions used in the 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007 OSU-CHS Medical Microbiology course. Two sample t-tests for proportions were used to test for significant differences related to tutorial usage. Part Two used both quantitative and qualitative means to assess student's perceptions of the Microbial Jeopardy! session. First, a retrospective survey was administered to students who were enrolled in Medical Microbiology in 2006 or 2007. Second, responses to open-ended items from the 2008 course evaluations were reviewed for comments regarding the Microbial Jeopardy! session. Both student performance and student perception data support continued use of the tutorials. Quantitative and qualitative data converge to suggest that students like and learn from the interactive, case-based session. The case-based tutorial appears to improve student performance on case-based exam questions. Additionally, students perceived the tutorial as helpful in preparing for exam questions and reviewing the course material. The time commitment for use of the case-based tutorial appears to be justified.

  15. Redesign of a computerized clinical reminder for colorectal cancer screening: a human-computer interaction evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Jason J; Haggstrom, David A; Militello, Laura G; Flanagan, Mindy; Kiess, Chris L; Arbuckle, Nicole; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2011-11-29

    Based on barriers to the use of computerized clinical decision support (CDS) learned in an earlier field study, we prototyped design enhancements to the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA's) colorectal cancer (CRC) screening clinical reminder to compare against the VHA's current CRC reminder. In a controlled simulation experiment, 12 primary care providers (PCPs) used prototypes of the current and redesigned CRC screening reminder in a within-subject comparison. Quantitative measurements were based on a usability survey, workload assessment instrument, and workflow integration survey. We also collected qualitative data on both designs. Design enhancements to the VHA's existing CRC screening clinical reminder positively impacted aspects of usability and workflow integration but not workload. The qualitative analysis revealed broad support across participants for the design enhancements with specific suggestions for improving the reminder further. This study demonstrates the value of a human-computer interaction evaluation in informing the redesign of information tools to foster uptake, integration into workflow, and use in clinical practice.

  16. Team interaction skills evaluation criteria for nuclear power plant control room operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, J.C.; Toquam, J.; Gaddy, C.

    1991-09-01

    Previous research has shown the value of good team interaction skills to group performance, yet little progress has been made on in terms of how such skills can be measured. In this study rating scales developed previously (Montgomery, et al., 1990) were extensively revised and cast into a Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale (BARS) and a Behavioral Frequency format. Rating data were collected using 13 training instructors at the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Plant, who rated three videotapes of simulator scenario performance during a day-long training session and later evaluated control room crews during requalification training. High levels of interrater agreement on both rating scales were found. However, the factor structure of the ratings was generally inconsistent with that hypothesized. Analysis of training ratings using Cronbach's components of accuracy (Cronbach, 1955) indicated that BARS ratings generally exhibited less error than did the Behavioral Frequency ratings. The results are discussed in terms of both field and research implications

  17. Evaluation of genotype x environment interactions in maize hybrids using GGE biplot analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Aykut Tonk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventeen hybrid maize genotypes were evaluated at four different locations in 2005 and 2006 cropping seasonsunder irrigated conditions in Turkey. The analysis of variance showed that mean squares of environments (E, genotypes (G andGE interactions (GEI were highly significant and accounted for 74, 7 and 19 % of treatment combination sum squares, respectively.To determine the effects of GEI on grain yield, the data were subjected to the GGE biplot analysis. Maize hybrid G16 can be proposedas reliably growing in test locations for high grain yield. Also, only the Yenisehir location could be best representative of overalllocations for deciding about which experimental hybrids can be recommended for grain yield in this study. Consequently, using ofgrain yield per plant instead of grain yield per plot in hybrid maize breeding programs could be preferred by private companies dueto some advantages.

  18. DMSO containing ruthenium(ii) hydrazone complexes: in vitro evaluation of biomolecular interaction and anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagesan, M; Sathyadevi, P; Krishnamoorthy, P; Bhuvanesh, N S P; Dharmaraj, N

    2014-11-14

    Synthesis, spectral, electrochemical and single crystal X-ray diffraction data of a new series of DMSO containing bivalent ruthenium hydrazone complexes are presented. XRD data of two of the new complexes revealed an octahedral coordination around the ruthenium ion satisfied by NOS2Cl2 atoms. Electrochemical studies showed the metal centred, quasi-reversible, one-electron redox behaviour of the new complexes. The binding of these complexes with biomolecules such as calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein investigated by different spectrophotometric methods revealed an intercalative mode of interaction. The in vitro cytotoxicity of these complexes evaluated by the MTT assay on a panel of cancer and normal cell lines indicated that the above complexes are more toxic to cancer cells with a few micromolar concentrations as the IC50 value, but are significantly less toxic to normal cell lines. The observed variations in the binding interactions and cytotoxicity of the complexes were attributed to the nature of the hydrazide moiety of the hydrazones that influences their biological activities.

  19. In vitro evaluation of the interactions between human corneal endothelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jin San; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Giegengack, Matthew; Khan, Faraaz A; Soker, Shay; Khang, Gilson

    2013-01-01

    The corneal endothelium is the innermost cell layer of the cornea and rests on Descemet's membrane consisting of various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins which can directly affect the cellular behaviors such as cell adhesion, proliferation, polarity, morphogenesis and function. The objective of this study was to investigate the interactions between the ECM environment and human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), with the ultimate goal to improve cell proliferation and function in vitro. To evaluate the interaction of HCECs with ECM proteins, cells were seeded on ECM-coated tissue culture dishes, including collagen type I (COL I), collagen type IV (COL IV), fibronectin (FN), FNC coating mix (FNC) and laminin (LM). Cell adhesion and proliferation of HCECs on each substratum and expression of CEC markers were studied. The results showed that HCECs plated on the COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC-coated plates had enhanced cell adhesion initially; the number for COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC was significantly higher than the control (P < 0.05). In addition, cells grown on ECM protein-coated dishes showed more compact cellular morphology and CEC marker expression compared to cells seeded on uncoated dishes. Collectively, our results suggest that an adequate ECM protein combination can provide a long-term culture environment for HCECs for corneal endothelium transplantation. (paper)

  20. Evaluation of Algorithms for Photon Depth of Interaction Estimation for the TRIMAGE PET Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarlinghi, Niccolò; Belcari, Nicola; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Pennazio, Francesco; Sportelli, Giancarlo; Zaccaro, Emanuele; Del Guerra, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    The TRIMAGE consortium aims to develop a multimodal PET/MR/EEG brain scanner dedicated to the early diagnosis of schizophrenia and other mental health disorders. The TRIMAGE PET component features a full ring made of 18 detectors, each one consisting of twelve 8 ×8 Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPMs) tiles coupled to two segmented LYSO crystal matrices with staggered layers. The identification of the pixel where a photon interacted is performed on-line at the front-end level, thus allowing the FPGA board to emit fully digital event packets. This allows to increase the effective bandwidth, but imposes restrictions on the complexity of the algorithms to be implemented. In this work, two algorithms, whose implementation is feasible directly on an FPGA, are presented and evaluated. The first algorithm is driven by physical considerations, while the other consists in a two-class linear Support Vector Machine (SVM). The validation of the algorithm performance is carried out by using simulated data generated with the GAMOS Monte Carlo. The obtained results show that the achieved accuracy in layer identification is above 90% for both the proposed approaches. The feasibility of tagging and rejecting events that underwent multiple interactions within the detector is also discussed.

  1. Disaster Medicine Online: evaluation of an online, modular, interactive, asynchronous curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Adam; Lam, Kenneth; Parks, Paul

    2002-11-01

    Canada has no formal training program in disaster medicine for health care professionals. The University of Alberta's Division of Emergency Medicine has developed a means to fill the gap. Disaster Medicine Online (DMO) is an Internet-based, interactive, facilitator-guided distance-learning course on the fundamentals of disaster medicine. The 3-week pilot of DMO was offered in March 2002 and taken by a multidisciplinary group of 22 health care professionals, including resident and attending physicians, paramedics and nurses. Evaluation of the learning materials and educational methodology by experts and learners demonstrated a high degree of satisfaction with the Web interface, site usability, lesson content and format, and the interactive components of the online course. Learners reported spending a mean of 11.2 hours (range = 5-20) over the 3-week course period. Twenty of 22 learners completed the final assignment, and all 20 were successful in passing the course. Overall, 95% of learners said they would pursue another module if offered, and 100% would recommend DMO to their colleagues. DMO is a viable option for health care professionals who would like to pursue continuing medical education in this area without having to take time out of their personal and professional lives to travel to a face-to-face, traditional educational program.

  2. The Utility of a Population Approach in Drug-Drug Interaction Assessments: A Simulation Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Diane D; Yu, Yanke; Kassir, Nastya; Zhu, Min; Hanley, William D; Earp, Justin C; Chow, Andrew T; Gupta, Manish; Hu, Chuanpu

    2017-10-01

    This study aims at evaluating the utility of the population pharmacokinetics approach in therapeutic protein drug-drug-interaction (DDI) assessment. Simulations were conducted for 2 representative victim drugs, methotrexate and trastuzumab, using a parallel-group design with and without the interaction drug. The effect of a perpetrator on the exposure of the victim drug is described as the ratio of clearance/apparent clearance of the victim drug given with or without the perpetrator. The power of DDI assessment was calculated as the percentage of runs with 90% confidence interval of the estimated DDI effect within 80% to 125% for the scenarios of no DDI, benchmarked with the noncompartmental approach with intensive sampling. The impact of the number of subjects, the number of sampling points per subject, sampling time error, and model misspecification on the power of DDI determination were evaluated. Results showed that with equal numbers of subjects in each arm, the population pharmacokinetics approach with sparse sampling may need about the same or a higher number of subjects compared to a noncompartmental approach in order to achieve similar power. Increasing the number of subjects, even if only in the study drug alone arm, can increase the power. Sampling or dosing time error had notable impacts on the power for methotrexate but not for trastuzumab. Model misspecification had no notable impacts on the power for trastuzumab. Overall, the population pharmacokinetics approach with sparse sampling built in phase 2/3 studies allows appropriate DDI assessment with adequate study design and analysis and can be considered as an alternative to dedicated DDI studies. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  3. Separation and characterization of resins and asphaltenes coming from Castilla crude Evaluation of their molecular interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Lina; Alvarez, Mario; Grosso, Jorge Luis; Navarro, Uriel

    2004-01-01

    The study of resins and asphaltenes, the heaviest fractions of oil, has become an area of interest due to the abundance of heavy crude oils in Colombia and Latin America. We studied the chemical composition of the heavy fractions of Castilla crude oil, evaluated some of its molecular parameters and found evidence of the interaction between the resins extracted from the crude with the asphaltenes of the original crude. With this objective, we carried out at the pilot plant level precipitation of the resin-asphaltene (R-A) aggregate by adding and mixing under controlled conditions, a paraffin solvent, from the Apiay refinery, called Apiasol. By extracting Soxhlet with the same solvent, resin 1 of aggregate R-A was separated. Resin ll defined as the soluble fraction that is part of the maltenes, was separated from the deasphalted crude by open column chromatography, using alumina as support, according to the SAR method (Saturated, Aromatics, Resins). The fractions of resins and the asphaltenes obtained, were characterized by: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), FT-lR, DRX, elementary analysis (C, H, N, S), metal content (Ni and V), distribution of molecular weight by GPC, and average molecular weight by VPO. The results obtained show evidence that resin l which is part of the aggregate has less average molecular weight than resin ll which is present in the fraction of maltenes. In addition, some changes were found in the elementary analysis of among the resins. On the one hand, and taking into account the existing theories of molecular interactions among these fractions, it was found that the resins l separated from the R-A aggregate, when added to the crude, they stabilize their asphaltenes. This evaluation was carried out by analyzing the flocculation point of the crude and its mixtures with 1,9% and 3,8% of resin l, when they are titrated with a precipitating agent in an NIR cell that works with high pressure and temperature

  4. Evaluating the Impact of Increasing General Education Teachers' Ratio of Positive-to-Negative Interactions on Students' Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Clayton R.; Grady, Erin A.; Long, Anna C.; Renshaw, Tyler; Codding, Robin S.; Fiat, Aria; Larson, Madeline

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and evaluate the impact of increasing teachers' ratios of positive-to-negative interactions with their students. Training teachers on the 5:1 ratio was evaluated using a randomized-block pre-post control design with general education classroom teachers (N = 6) that were characterized by a higher ratio of…

  5. The Blue Dog: evaluation of an interactive software program to teach young children how to interact safely with dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebel, David C; Morrongiello, Barbara A; Davis, Aaron L; Stewart, Julia; Bell, Melissa

    2012-04-01

    Pre-post-randomized design evaluated The Blue Dog, a dog safety software program. 76 children aged 3.5-6 years completed 3 tasks to evaluate dog safety pre- and postintervention: (a) pictures (recognition of safe/risky behavior), (b) dollhouse (recall of safe behavior via simulated dollhouse scenarios), and (c) live dog (actual behavior with unfamiliar live dog). Following preintervention evaluation, children were randomly assigned to dog or fire safety conditions, each involving 3 weeks of home computer software use. Children using Blue Dog had greater change in recognition of risky dog situations than children learning fire safety. No between-group differences emerged in recall (dollhouse) or engagement (live-dog) in risky behavior. Families enjoyed using the software. Blue Dog taught children knowledge about safe engagement with dogs, but did not influence recall or implementation of safe behaviors. Dog bites represent a significant pediatric injury concern and continued development of effective interventions is needed.

  6. Design and evaluation of multimedia security warnings for the interaction between humans and industrial robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruth, Jana; Kraetzer, Christian; Dittmann, Jana

    2011-01-01

    In this document a multi-media security warning design approach for automated production scenarios with industrial robots is introduced. This first approach is based on and adapts design principles of common security programs and a German VDI standard for safety warnings design. We focus on direct human-to-robot interaction scenarios, e.g. the online-programming of industrial robots, because of their potential indirect safety impacts, which could be caused by malicious codes infection of a robots control computer. We designed ten different multi-media security warnings, composed of visual and acoustical information. Visual information of warnings is transported via a traffic light metaphor (symbolizing three different threat levels), different warn icons (symbolizing properties of malicious codes) and instructions icons to programmers or operators and additional textual information. With an acknowledgment button in the middle of the warning, the programmer's confirmation of the reception of the warning is verified. Additionally, three different acoustical signals also indicate the threat level of the warning. Furthermore, an evaluation is presented, which uses concepts known from usability testing (method of loud thinking, questionnaire, time measurement). The aim is to evaluate general design criteria of our developed security warnings and tendency of user perception for further advancement of our warnings design.

  7. The interactive effects of affect and shopping goal on information search and product evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangyuan; Wyer, Robert S; Shen, Hao

    2015-12-01

    Although shoppers often want to evaluate products to make a purchase decision, they can also shop for enjoyment. In each case, the amount of time they spend on shopping and the number of options they consider can depend on the mood they happen to be in. We predicted that mood can signal whether the goal has been attained and when people should stop processing information. When people are primarily motivated to purchase a particular type of product, positive mood signals that they have done enough. Thus, they consider less information if they are happy than if they are unhappy. When people shop for enjoyment, however, positive mood signals that they are still having fun. Thus, they consider more information when they are happy than when they are not. Four experiments among university students (N = 827) examined these possibilities. Experiment 1 provided initial evidence for the interactive effects of mood and goals on search behavior and product evaluation. Other studies examined the implications of this conceptualization for different domains: (a) the relative impact of brand and attribute information on judgments (Experiment 2), (b) gender differences in shopping behavior (Experiment 3), and (c) the number of options that people review in an actual online shopping website (Experiment 4). (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Evaluation of immunological interaction between spermatozoa and fallopian tube epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandieh, Z; Ashrafi, M; Jameie, B; Amanpour, S; Mosaffa, N; Salman Yazdi, R; Pacey, A; Aflatoonian, R

    2015-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are one of the major compartments of innate immune system. It was revealed that the TLR have relevance in ovulation, sperm capacitation and fertilisation. So, in this study, the expression of TLR, their adaptor molecules and cytokines in human fallopian tube cell line under the effect of human normal spermatozoa was evaluated. TLR mRNA and protein were evaluated in OE-E6/E7 cell line. Semen samples from 10 donors were collected and co-incubated with OE-E6/E7 cell line and used as sperm group, and cell line without spermatozoa was used as control group. Afterwards, the level of TLR, their adaptor molecule and cytokine mRNA expression was compared using qPCR in sperm and control groups, and supernatant was used for ELISA. To determine whether elevated cytokine reaction to spermatozoa in OE-E6/E7 cell line is mediated via TLR, TLR3 function-blocking antibody was used. OE-E6/E7 cell line expressed TLR1-6 genes and proteins. TLR expressions, especially TLR3 and TLR5, in OE-E6/E7 cell line under the effect of spermatozoa were significantly higher. Also, levels of adaptor molecules and cytokine production were increased in sperm group than in control group (P spermatozoa and fallopian tube immunological interaction and for preparing safe environment for important events in fallopian tube. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Subjective evaluation of user experience in interactive 3D visualization in a medical context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourancheau, Sylvain; Sjöström, Mårten; Olsson, Roger; Persson, Anders; Ericson, Thomas; Rudling, Johan; Norén, Bengt

    2012-02-01

    New display technologies enable the usage of 3D-visualization in a medical context. Even though user performance seems to be enhanced with respect to 2D thanks to the addition of recreated depth cues, human factors, and more particularly visual comfort and visual fatigue can still be a bridle to the widespread use of these systems. This study aimed at evaluating and comparing two different 3D visualization systems (a market stereoscopic display, and a state-of-the-art multi-view display) in terms of quality of experience (QoE), in the context of interactive medical visualization. An adapted methodology was designed in order to subjectively evaluate the experience of users. 14 medical doctors and 15 medical students took part in the experiment. After solving different tasks using the 3D reconstruction of a phantom object, they were asked to judge their quality of the experience, according to specific features. They were also asked to give their opinion about the influence of 3D-systems on their work conditions. Results suggest that medical doctors are opened to 3D-visualization techniques and are confident concerning their beneficial influence on their work. However, visual comfort and visual fatigue are still an issue of 3D-displays. Results obtained with the multi-view display suggest that the use of continuous horizontal parallax might be the future response to these current limitations.

  10. Simulations and experimental evaluation of an active orthosis for interaction in virtual environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsveov Mihail

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the development of a human arm active orthosis is presented. The orthosis is designed primarily for training and rehabilitation in virtual environments.The orthosis system is intended for embodiment in virtual reality where it is allowing human to perceive forces at different body parts or the weight of lifted objects. In the paper the choice of a mechanical structure is shown equivalent to the structure of the human arm. A mechanical model of the orthosis arm as haptic device is built, where kinematic and dynamic parameters are evaluated. Impedance control scheme is selected as the most suitable for force refection at the hand or arm. An open-loop impedance controller is presented in the paper. Computer experiments are carried out using the dimensions of a real arm orthosis. Computer experiments have been carried out to provide force reflection by VR, according to virtual scenario. The conducted simulations show the range of the forces on the operator hand, orthosis can provide. The results of additional measurements and experimental evaluations of physical quantities in the interaction in a virtual environment are revealed in the paper.

  11. Heuristics to Evaluate Interactive Systems for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Khowaja

    Full Text Available In this paper, we adapted and expanded a set of guidelines, also known as heuristics, to evaluate the usability of software to now be appropriate for software aimed at children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. We started from the heuristics developed by Nielsen in 1990 and developed a modified set of 15 heuristics. The first 5 heuristics of this set are the same as those of the original Nielsen set, the next 5 heuristics are improved versions of Nielsen's, whereas the last 5 heuristics are new. We present two evaluation studies of our new heuristics. In the first, two groups compared Nielsen's set with the modified set of heuristics, with each group evaluating two interactive systems. The Nielsen's heuristics were assigned to the control group while the experimental group was given the modified set of heuristics, and a statistical analysis was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the modified set, the contribution of 5 new heuristics and the impact of 5 improved heuristics. The results show that the modified set is significantly more effective than the original, and we found a significant difference between the five improved heuristics and their corresponding heuristics in the original set. The five new heuristics are effective in problem identification using the modified set. The second study was conducted using a system which was developed to ascertain if the modified set was effective at identifying usability problems that could be fixed before the release of software. The post-study analysis revealed that the majority of the usability problems identified by the experts were fixed in the updated version of the system.

  12. Heuristics to Evaluate Interactive Systems for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khowaja, Kamran; Salim, Siti Salwah; Asemi, Adeleh

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we adapted and expanded a set of guidelines, also known as heuristics, to evaluate the usability of software to now be appropriate for software aimed at children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We started from the heuristics developed by Nielsen in 1990 and developed a modified set of 15 heuristics. The first 5 heuristics of this set are the same as those of the original Nielsen set, the next 5 heuristics are improved versions of Nielsen's, whereas the last 5 heuristics are new. We present two evaluation studies of our new heuristics. In the first, two groups compared Nielsen's set with the modified set of heuristics, with each group evaluating two interactive systems. The Nielsen's heuristics were assigned to the control group while the experimental group was given the modified set of heuristics, and a statistical analysis was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the modified set, the contribution of 5 new heuristics and the impact of 5 improved heuristics. The results show that the modified set is significantly more effective than the original, and we found a significant difference between the five improved heuristics and their corresponding heuristics in the original set. The five new heuristics are effective in problem identification using the modified set. The second study was conducted using a system which was developed to ascertain if the modified set was effective at identifying usability problems that could be fixed before the release of software. The post-study analysis revealed that the majority of the usability problems identified by the experts were fixed in the updated version of the system.

  13. Pattern mining of user interaction logs for a post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology PACS client.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Cnossen, Fokie; Dierckx, Rudi A; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van Ooijen, Peter M A

    2016-01-01

    To perform a post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) client based on pattern mining of user interaction log data, and to assess the usefulness of this approach compared to a field study. All user actions performed on the PACS client were logged for four months. A data mining technique called closed sequential pattern mining was used to automatically extract frequently occurring interaction patterns from the log data. These patterns were used to identify usability issues with the PACS. The results of this evaluation were compared to the results of a field study based usability evaluation of the same PACS client. The interaction patterns revealed four usability issues: (1) the display protocols do not function properly, (2) the line measurement tool stays active until another tool is selected, rather than being deactivated after one use, (3) the PACS's built-in 3D functionality does not allow users to effectively perform certain 3D-related tasks, (4) users underuse the PACS's customization possibilities. All usability issues identified based on the log data were also found in the field study, which identified 48 issues in total. Post-deployment usability evaluation based on pattern mining of user interaction log data provides useful insights into the way users interact with the radiology PACS client. However, it reveals few usability issues compared to a field study and should therefore not be used as the sole method of usability evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydroxyurea-Lactose Interaction Study: In Silico and In Vitro Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachchhao, Kunal B; Patil, R R; Patil, C R; Patil, Dipak D

    2017-11-01

    The Maillard reaction between hydroxyurea (a primary amine-containing drug) and lactose (used as an excipient) was explored. The adduct of these compounds was synthesized by heating hydroxyurea with lactose monohydrate at 60 °C in borate buffer (pH 9.2) for 12 h. Synthesis of the adduct was confirmed using UV-visible spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared, differential scanning calorimetry, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry studies. An in silico investigation of how the adduct formation affected the interactions of hydroxyurea with its biological target oxyhemoglobin, to which it binds to generate nitric oxide and regulates fetal hemoglobin synthesis, was carried out. The in silico evaluations were complemented by an in vitro assay of the anti-sickling activity. Co-incubation of hydroxyurea with deoxygenated blood samples reduced the percentage of sickled cells from 38% to 12 ± 1.6%, whereas the percentage of sickled cells in samples treated with the adduct was 17 ± 1.2%. This indicated loss of anti-sickling activity in the case of the adduct. This study confirmed that hydroxyurea can participate in a Maillard reaction if lactose is used as a diluent. Although an extended study at environmentally feasible temperatures was not carried out in the present investigation, the partial loss of the anti-sickling activity of hydroxyurea was investigated along with the in silico drug-target interactions. The results indicated that the use of lactose in hydroxyurea formulations needs urgent reconsideration and that lactose must be replaced by other diluents that do not form Maillard adducts.

  15. Evaluation of algorithms for photon depth of interaction estimation for the TRIMAGE PET component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarlinghi, Niccolo; Belcari, Nicola [University of Pisa (Italy); Cerello, Piergiorgio [University of Torino (Italy); Sportelli, Giancarlo [University of Pisa (Italy); Pennazio, Francesco [University of Torino (Italy); Zaccario, Emanuele; Del Guerra, Alberto [University of Pisa (Italy)

    2015-05-18

    The TRIMAGE consortium aims to develop a multimodal PET/MR/EEG brain scanner dedicated to the early diagnosis of schizophrenia and other mental health disorders. The PET component features a full ring made of 18 detectors, each one consisting of twelve 8x8 Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPMs) tiles coupled to two segmented LYSO crystal matrices with staggered layers. In each module, the crystals belonging to the bottom layer are coupled one to one to the SiPMs, while each crystal of the top layer is coupled to four crystals of the bottom layer. This configuration allows to increase the crystal thickness while reducing the depth of interaction uncertainty, as photons interacting in different layers are expected to produce different light patterns on the SiPMs. The PET scanner will implement the pixel/layer identification on a front-end FPGA. This will allow increasing the effective bandwidth, setting at the same time restrictions on the complexity of the algorithms to be implemented. In this work two algorithms whose implementation is feasible directly on an FPGA are presented and evaluated. The first algorithm implements a method based on adaptive thresholding, while the other uses a linear Support Vector Machine (SVM) trained to distinguish the light pattern coming from two different layers. The validation of the algorithm performance is carried out by using simulated data generated with the GAMOS Monte Carlo. The obtained results show that the achieved accuracy in layer and pixel identification is above the 90% for both the proposed approaches.

  16. A GOAL QUESTION METRIC (GQM APPROACH FOR EVALUATING INTERACTION DESIGN PATTERNS IN DRAWING GAMES FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Sulistiyo Kusumo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing interest to use smart devices’ drawing games for educational benefit. In Indonesia, our government classifies children age four to six years old as preschool children. Not all preschool children can use drawing games easily. Further, drawing games may not fulfill all Indonesia's preschool children’s drawing competencies. This research proposes to use Goal-Question Metric (GQM to investigate and evaluate interaction design patterns of preschool children in order to achieve the drawing competencies for preschool children in two drawing Android-based games: Belajar Menggambar (in English: Learn to Draw and Coret: Belajar Menggambar (in English: Scratch: Learn to Draw. We collected data from nine students of a preschool children education in a user research. The results show that GQM can assist to evaluate interaction design patterns in achieving the drawing competencies. Our approach can also yield interaction design patterns by comparing interaction design patterns in two drawing games used.

  17. Evaluation of novel candidate variations and their interactions related to bipolar disorders: Analysis of GWAS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acikel C

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cengizhan Acikel,1 Yesim Aydin Son,2 Cemil Celik,3 Husamettin Gul4 1Department of Biostatistics, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, 2Department of Health Informatics, Graduate School of Informatics, Middle East Technical University, 3Department of Medical Psychiatry, 4Department of Medical Informatics, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara, Turkey Background: Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR is a nonparametric approach that can be used to detect relevant interactions between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. The aim of this study was to build the best genomic model based on SNP associations and to identify candidate polymorphisms that are the underlying molecular basis of the bipolar disorders. Methods: This study was performed on Whole-Genome Association Study of Bipolar Disorder (dbGaP [database of Genotypes and Phenotypes] study accession number: phs000017.v3.p1 data. After preprocessing of the genotyping data, three classification-based data mining methods (ie, random forest, naïve Bayes, and k-nearest neighbor were performed. Additionally, as a nonparametric, model-free approach, the MDR method was used to evaluate the SNP profiles. The validity of these methods was evaluated using true classification rate, recall (sensitivity, precision (positive predictive value, and F-measure. Results: Random forests, naïve Bayes, and k-nearest neighbors identified 16, 13, and ten candidate SNPs, respectively. Surprisingly, the top six SNPs were reported by all three methods. Random forests and k-nearest neighbors were more successful than naïve Bayes, with recall values >0.95. On the other hand, MDR generated a model with comparable predictive performance based on five SNPs. Although different SNP profiles were identified in MDR compared to the classification-based models, all models mapped SNPs to the DOCK10 gene. Conclusion: Three classification-based data mining approaches, random forests, naïve Bayes, and k-nearest neighbors

  18. Evaluation of Lagrangian, Eulerian, and arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian methods for fluid-structure interaction problems in HCDA analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.W.; Chu, H.Y.; Gvildys, J.; Wang, C.Y.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis of fluid-structure interaction involves the calculation of both fluid transient and structure dynamics. In the structural analysis, Lagrangian meshes have been used exclusively, whereas for the fluid transient, Lagrangian, Eulerian, and arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (quasi-Eulerian) meshes have been used. This paper performs an evaluation on these three types of meshes. The emphasis is placed on the applicability of the method in analyzing fluid-structure interaction problems in HCDA analysis

  19. Evaluating Types of Students' Interactions in a Wiki-Based Collaborative Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofieva, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Wiki technology has been promoted as a collaborative software platform. This study investigates interactions that occur in a wiki-based collaborative learning project. The study draws on interaction literature and investigates the types of interactions with which students are engaged in wiki-based group projects, clusters that reflect online…

  20. Social interactions between people with dementia: pilot evaluation of an observational instrument in a nursing home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mabire, J.B.; Gay, M.C.; Vrignaud, P.; Garitte, C.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In dementia, cognitive and psychological disorders might interfere with maintaining social interactions. We have little information about the nature of these interactions of people with dementia in nursing homes. The aim of this study is to investigate social interactions between people

  1. Evaluation of physical and chemical properties and their interactions in fat, oil, and grease (FOG) deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Martin A; Jensen, Jeanette L; Gracz, Hanna S; Dancer, Jens; Keener, Kevin M

    2017-10-15

    Fat, oil and grease (FOG) blockages in sewer systems are a substantial problem in the United States. It has been estimated that over 50% of sewer overflows are a result of FOG blockages. In this work, a thorough laboratory study was undertaken to examine key variables that contribute to FOG deposit formation under controlled conditions. Physical and chemical properties and their interactions were evaluated and conditions that generated deposits that mimicked field FOG deposits were identified. It was found that 96 of the of 128 reaction conditions tested in the laboratory formed FOG deposits with similar physical and chemical characteristics as field FOG deposits. It was also found that FOG deposits can be created through fatty acid crystallization and not just saponification. Furthermore FOG deposits were found to be more complex than previously documented and contain free fatty acids, fatty acid metal salts, triacylglycerol's, diacylglycerol's and, monoacylglycerol's. Lastly it was found that FOG deposits that only contained saturated fatty acids were on average 2.1 times higher yield strength than deposits that contained unsaturated fatty acids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Analytical evaluation of the short-range interaction energy for ground state H+2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battezzati, Michele; Magnasco, Valerio

    2004-11-01

    This work aims at the extension of the power series in R and ln R of interaction energy k and separation constant A for the system of two protons and one electron in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The wave equation is separated into confocal elliptic coordinates, in order to obtain two one-dimensional problems. The approach that we present here is based upon our previous calculations, where a relation between A and k for the (outer) ξ-equation was obtained in two different but substantially equivalent ways: either by an integral equation representation of the solution or by a logarithmic-perturbative expansion, in powers of the energy difference k, from the united atom state. At variance with our previous work, we make use of the (inner) η-equation of a remarkably simple determinantal equation proposed long ago by Hylleraas for which we develop a recursive method of calculation. By combining the two procedures we obtain the solution of the problem by solving for the coefficients of the R and ln R expansion. We calculate in this way coefficients up to O(R7) and show how higher order coefficients may be evaluated recursively.

  3. Redesign of a computerized clinical reminder for colorectal cancer screening: a human-computer interaction evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Jason J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on barriers to the use of computerized clinical decision support (CDS learned in an earlier field study, we prototyped design enhancements to the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA's colorectal cancer (CRC screening clinical reminder to compare against the VHA's current CRC reminder. Methods In a controlled simulation experiment, 12 primary care providers (PCPs used prototypes of the current and redesigned CRC screening reminder in a within-subject comparison. Quantitative measurements were based on a usability survey, workload assessment instrument, and workflow integration survey. We also collected qualitative data on both designs. Results Design enhancements to the VHA's existing CRC screening clinical reminder positively impacted aspects of usability and workflow integration but not workload. The qualitative analysis revealed broad support across participants for the design enhancements with specific suggestions for improving the reminder further. Conclusions This study demonstrates the value of a human-computer interaction evaluation in informing the redesign of information tools to foster uptake, integration into workflow, and use in clinical practice.

  4. Preparation of microcapsules with the evaluation of physicochemical properties and molecular interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Cho, Su-Ah; Lim, Jun Yeul; Lim, Dae Gon; Moon, Cheol; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare and characterize dutasteride (a hydrophobic model drug) microcapsules using ethyl cellulose as a capsule shell polymer with different drug/polymer ratios of 1:1, 1:3, and 1:5. The microcapsules were prepared by a solvent evaporation method and the prepared microcapsules were evaluated for percent yield, percent drug content, encapsulation efficiency, particle size distribution, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and in vitro drug release studies. SEM revealed the spherical shape of all prepared microcapsules. The particle size of the microcapsules was about 95-119 μm with good yield and encapsulation efficiency. PXRD showed different X-ray patterns compared to the drug itself suggesting possibility of crystalline form change during the process. Moreover, it confirmed that ethyl cellulose was changed to amorphous state. The physical property changes may affect the overall quality and drug release behavior. In the FT-IR studies, hydrogen bonding was observed between the drug and polymer at the molecular level. DSC data provided consistent results with the FT-IR and PXRD analyses. Drug release profiles showed the overall sustained release of drug and anomalous diffusion mechanism based on the Korsmeyer-Peppas equation. Understanding the physicochemical properties of a drug and polymer including molecular interactions may facilitate formulation of microcapsules with acceptable properties and drug release behaviors.

  5. Evaluating interactive computer-based scenarios designed for learning medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Johanna; Dalholm, Elisabeth Hornyánszky; Wallergård, Mattias; Johansson, Gerd

    2014-11-01

    The use of medical equipment is growing in healthcare, resulting in an increased need for resources to educate users in how to manage the various devices. Learning the practical operation of a device is one thing, but learning how to work with the device in the actual clinical context is more challenging. This paper presents a computer-based simulation prototype for learning medical technology in the context of critical care. Properties from simulation and computer games have been adopted to create a visualization-based, interactive and contextually bound tool for learning. A participatory design process, including three researchers and three practitioners from a clinic for infectious diseases, was adopted to adjust the form and content of the prototype to the needs of the clinical practice and to create a situated learning experience. An evaluation with 18 practitioners showed that practitioners were positive to this type of tool for learning and that it served as a good platform for eliciting and sharing knowledge. Our conclusion is that this type of tools can be a complement to traditional learning resources to situate the learning in a context without requiring advanced technology or being resource-demanding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of a Mixed Method Approach for Studying User Interaction with Novel Building Control Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Painter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy-efficient building performance requires sophisticated control systems that are based on realistic occupant behaviour models. To provide robust data for the development of these models, research studies in real-world settings are needed. Yet, such studies are challenging and necessitate careful design in terms of data collection methods and procedures. This paper describes and critiques the design of a mixed methods approach for occupant behaviour research. It reviews the methodology developed for a longitudinal study in a real-world office environment where occupants’ experience with a novel facade technology (electrochromic glazing was investigated. The methodology integrates objective physical measurements, observational data and self-reported experience data. Using data from one day of the study, this paper illustrates how the different sources can be combined in order to derive an in-depth understanding of the interplay between external daylight conditions, characteristics of the facade technology, occupant interaction with the technology and the resulting occupant experience. It was found that whilst the individual methods may be affected by practical limitations, these can be partially offset by combining physical measurements and observations with self-reported data. The paper critically evaluates the individual techniques, as well as the benefits of their integration and makes recommendations for the design of future occupant behaviour studies in real-world settings.

  7. Evaluation of the interaction mechanisms between red muds and heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santona, Laura; Castaldi, Paola; Melis, Pietro

    2006-08-21

    This paper investigated the heavy metal adsorption of non-treated (RM(nt)) and acid-treated red muds (RM(a)), bauxite ore processing waste, in order to evaluate how efficient they are in reducing metal solubility and bioavaliability in polluted soils. Red mud samples were artificially polluted with solutions containing increasing concentrations of Pb, Cd and Zn. Cancrinite and hematite were the main phases of the red muds, and were also the components which adsorbed most heavy metals. The results showed that the RM(nt) adsorption capacity for the three heavy metals was Zn> or =Pb>Cd. Acid treatment with HCl decreased the red mud's capacity to adsorb the heavy metals by 30%. In order to study the different heavy metal-RM interaction mechanisms, all samples after artificial contamination were treated with solutions with gradually increasing extraction capacity. H(2)O and Ca(NO(3))(2) treatments only extracted very low concentrations of Pb, Cd and Zn, while EDTA treatment extracted the most adsorbed heavy metals from the sorbent particles. In particular the water-soluble and exchangeable metal fractions were higher in the RM(a) than they were in the RM(nt), while the concentrations of Pb, Cd and Zn extracted with EDTA were lower. The results showed that red muds can be used successfully to reduce the solubility and bioavailability of heavy metals in polluted soils.

  8. Study on the analytical methods to evaluate the interaction effects of embedded nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, R.; Chiba, O.; Tohdo, M.; Hatori, T.

    1987-01-01

    For the seismic response analyses of nuclear power plants which are more or less embedded into soil medium, it is very important to evaluate the interactive effects on the interface between soil and foundation wall, such as wave propagation to infinity radiated from the side wall. The methods generally used in these analyses can be classified into the two basic procedures. One is the direct procedure in which a structure and soil are medeled together into finite elements or beam elements having the quiet boundary; transmitting boundary, non-reflecting boundary. The other is the substructure procedure in which the computational procedure is divided into two steps. In the first step the behavior of massless foundation due to an external force and seismic motion under the assumption as rigid foundation is analyzed, and the results are represented by impedance functions and foundation input motions. Using the results, the structural response analyses are performed. Taking the substructure procedure for seismic response analyses of embedded nuclear power plants, it is the purpose of this paper to present the features of solutions on impedance functions and foundation input motions obtained by various methods such as 3- or 2-dimensional approach, and their influences on structural responses

  9. Evaluation of creep-fatigue/ environment interaction in Ni-base wrought alloys for HTGR application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Masaki; Ohtomo, Akira

    1986-01-01

    High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) systems should be designed based on the high temperature structural strength design procedures. On the development of design code, the determination of failure criteria under cyclic loading and severe environments is one of the most important items. By using the previous experimental data for Ni-base wrought alloys, Inconel 617 and Hastelloy XR, several evaluation methods for creep-fatigue interaction were examined for their capability to predict their cyclic loading behavior for HTGR application. At first, the strainrange partitioning method, the frequency modified damage function and the linear damage summation rule were discussed. However, these methods were not satisfactory with the above experimental results. Thus, in this paper, a new fracture criterion, which is a modification of the linear damage summation rule, is proposed based on the experimental data. In this criterion, fracture is considered to occur when the sum of the fatigue damage, which is the function of the applied cyclic strain magnitude, and the modified creep damage, which is the function of the applied cyclic stress magnitude (determined as time devided by cyclic creep rupture time reflecting difference of creep damages by tensile creep and compressive creep), reaches a constant value. This criterion was successfully applied to the life prediction of materials at HTGR temperatures. (author)

  10. Aircraft Abnormal Conditions Detection, Identification, and Evaluation Using Innate and Adaptive Immune Systems Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Azzawi, Dia

    Abnormal flight conditions play a major role in aircraft accidents frequently causing loss of control. To ensure aircraft operation safety in all situations, intelligent system monitoring and adaptation must rely on accurately detecting the presence of abnormal conditions as soon as they take place, identifying their root cause(s), estimating their nature and severity, and predicting their impact on the flight envelope. Due to the complexity and multidimensionality of the aircraft system under abnormal conditions, these requirements are extremely difficult to satisfy using existing analytical and/or statistical approaches. Moreover, current methodologies have addressed only isolated classes of abnormal conditions and a reduced number of aircraft dynamic parameters within a limited region of the flight envelope. This research effort aims at developing an integrated and comprehensive framework for the aircraft abnormal conditions detection, identification, and evaluation based on the artificial immune systems paradigm, which has the capability to address the complexity and multidimensionality issues related to aircraft systems. Within the proposed framework, a novel algorithm was developed for the abnormal conditions detection problem and extended to the abnormal conditions identification and evaluation. The algorithm and its extensions were inspired from the functionality of the biological dendritic cells (an important part of the innate immune system) and their interaction with the different components of the adaptive immune system. Immunity-based methodologies for re-assessing the flight envelope at post-failure and predicting the impact of the abnormal conditions on the performance and handling qualities are also proposed and investigated in this study. The generality of the approach makes it applicable to any system. Data for artificial immune system development were collected from flight tests of a supersonic research aircraft within a motion-based flight

  11. Streamlined analysis technique for the evaluation of pellet clad interaction in PWR reload cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, Ch.; Morita, T.; Brown, J.

    2007-01-01

    For some applications, an analysis is required to explicitly demonstrate that fuel failure due to pellet-clad interaction (PCI) is prevented by the core limits and the protection system for both Condition I (normal operation) operation and for Condition II (events of moderate frequency) events. This analysis needs to address the entire range of normal operation allowed by the Technical Specifications and all Condition II transients. The obvious approach which has been utilized for many years is a simulation of normal operation power maneuvers followed by explicit Condition II transients as a function of key core parameters. This is a sampling approach and has concerns about the overall coverage of the potential space. An alternative approach is the 3D FAC power distribution analysis methodology that was based upon the Westinghouse Relaxed Axial Offset Control Strategy (RAOC) evaluation process. The 3D FAC methodology uses a parametric representation of variables affecting the power distributions, defining a grid mesh over a space of Condition I and Condition II parameters. The operation space is defined by a power range, temperature range, rod position range, axial offset range, core protection limits and representative xenon distributions. Then the 3D FAC evaluation consists of systematically calculating the 3D power distribution and margin to the core and fuel limits for each mesh point of this multi-dimensional space. The PCI margin is obtained by the comparison of the 3D power distributions over the Condition II space and the 3D maximum allowed power, which is dependent on the fuel rod history. The fuel history model utilizes the power history developed in the 3-dimensional nuclear analysis code to define local powers for the specified fuel rods to be analyzed. It tracks the rod history and provides the maximum allowed power for the point. This model is appropriate for base load operation, extended reduced power operation, return to power operation and

  12. Evaluation of multiple intelligences in children aged 7 to 11 years through the implementation of an interactive software

    OpenAIRE

    Rebolledo Rodríguez, Rigel A.; Samaniego González, Euclides

    2017-01-01

    This document describes the evaluation project of multiple intelligences in children aged 7 to 11 years through the implementation of an interactive software, developed on Android for tablets, allowing parents, teachers, tutors, psy-chologists or other responsible adult, identifying the different types of intelligences that have children in order to know each other and develop their skills and their future potential. Similarly, research was developed to evaluate the effective-ness of the t...

  13. Construction and evaluation of interactive educational technology for family members acting as caregivers on caring for dependent people

    OpenAIRE

    Maria José Silva Lumini Landeiro; Heloísa Helena Ciqueto Peres; Teresa Vieira Martins

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the process of constructing and evaluating an interactive educational technology for family members acting as caregivers who care for dependent people to ensure continuity of care after hospital discharge. This is an applied research, descriptive exploratory, developed between 2012 and 2013. The educational technology construction based on the ADDIE model, which in turn based on the Contextualized Instructional Design. Six experts evaluated the technology with a q...

  14. Maternal depression and attachment: the evaluation of mother–child interactions during feeding practice

    OpenAIRE

    Santona, Alessandra; Tagini, Angela; Sarracino, Diego; De Carli, Pietro; Pace, Cecilia S.; Parolin, Laura; Terrone, Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Internal working models (IWMs) of attachment can moderate the effect of maternal depression on mother–child interactions and child development. Clinical depression pre-dating birthgiving has been found to predict incoherent and less sensitive caregiving. Dysfunctional patterns observed, included interactive modes linked to feeding behaviors which may interfere with hunger–satiation, biological rhythms, and the establishment of children’s autonomy and individuation. Feeding interactions betwee...

  15. Evaluating Multiple Levels of an Interaction Fidelity Continuum on Performance and Learning in Near-Field Training Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Ayush; Bertrand, Jeffrey W; Gramopadhye, Anand K; Madathil, Kapil C; Babu, Sabarish V

    2018-04-01

    With costs of head-mounted displays (HMDs) and tracking technology decreasing rapidly, various virtual reality applications are being widely adopted for education and training. Hardware advancements have enabled replication of real-world interactions in virtual environments to a large extent, paving the way for commercial grade applications that provide a safe and risk-free training environment at a fraction of the cost. But this also mandates the need to develop more intrinsic interaction techniques and to empirically evaluate them in a more comprehensive manner. Although there exists a body of previous research that examines the benefits of selected levels of interaction fidelity on performance, few studies have investigated the constituent components of fidelity in a Interaction Fidelity Continuum (IFC) with several system instances and their respective effects on performance and learning in the context of a real-world skills training application. Our work describes a large between-subjects investigation conducted over several years that utilizes bimanual interaction metaphors at six discrete levels of interaction fidelity to teach basic precision metrology concepts in a near-field spatial interaction task in VR. A combined analysis performed on the data compares and contrasts the six different conditions and their overall effects on performance and learning outcomes, eliciting patterns in the results between the discrete application points on the IFC. With respect to some performance variables, results indicate that simpler restrictive interaction metaphors and highest fidelity metaphors perform better than medium fidelity interaction metaphors. In light of these results, a set of general guidelines are created for developers of spatial interaction metaphors in immersive virtual environments for precise fine-motor skills training simulations.

  16. Evaluation of the interaction between plant roots and preferential flow paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinghu; Niu, Jianzhi; Zhang, Mingxiang; Xiao, Zixing; Zhu, Weili

    2017-04-01

    Introduction Preferential flow causing environmental issues by carrying contaminants to the groundwater resources level, occurs throughout the world. Soil water flow and solute transportation via preferential flow paths with little resistance could bypass soil matrix quickly. It is necessary to characterize preferential flow phenomenon because of its understanding of ecological functions of soil, including the degradation of topsoil, the low activity of soil microorganisms, the loss of soil nutrients, and the serious source of pollution of groundwater resources (Brevik et al., 2015; Singh et al., 2015). Studies on the interaction between plant roots and soil water flow in response to preferential flow is promising increasingly. However, it is complicated to evaluate soil hydrology when plant roots are associated with the mechanisms of soil water flow and solute transportation, especially preferential flow (Ola et al., 2015). Root channels formed by living/decayed plant roots and root-soil interfaces affect soil hydrology (Tracy et al., 2011). For example, Jørgensen et al. (2002) stated that soil water flow was more obvious in soil profiles with plant roots than in soil profiles without plant roots. The present study was conducted to investigate the interaction between plant roots and soil water flow in response to preferential flow in stony soils. Materials and methods Field experiments: field dye tracing experiments centered on experimental plants (S. japonica Linn, P. orientalis (L.) Franco, and Q. dentata Thunb) were conducted to characterize the root length density, preferential flow paths (stained areas), and soil matrix (unstained areas). Brilliant Blue FCF (C.I. Food Blue 2) as dye solution (50 L) was applied to the experimental plots. Laboratory analyses: undisturbed soil columns (7-cm diameter, 10 cm high) obtained from soil depths of 0-20, 20-40, and 40-60 cm, respectively, were conducted with breakthrough curves experiments under different conditions

  17. Dynamic Interaction: A Measurement Development and Empirical Evaluation of Knowledge Based Systems and Web 2.0 Decision Support Mashups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemer, Brandon Alan

    2010-01-01

    The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the organizational and consumer need for knowledge based support in unstructured domains, by developing a measurement scale for dynamic interaction. Addressing this need is approached and evaluated from two different perspectives. The first approach is the development of Knowledge Based…

  18. Designing and Evaluating Tutoring Feedback Strategies for Digital Learning Environments on the Basis of the Interactive Tutoring Feedback Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narciss, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the interactive tutoring feedback model (ITF-model; Narciss, 2006; 2008), and how it can be applied to the design and evaluation of feedback strategies for digital learning environments. The ITF-model conceptualizes formative tutoring feedback as a multidimensional instructional activity that aims at contributing to the…

  19. Understanding the Effect of Response Rate and Class Size Interaction on Students Evaluation of Teaching in a Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kuwaiti, Ahmed; AlQuraan, Mahmoud; Subbarayalu, Arun Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the interaction between response rate and class size and its effects on students' evaluation of instructors and the courses offered at a higher education Institution in Saudi Arabia. Study Design: A retrospective study design was chosen. Methods: One thousand four hundred and forty four different courses…

  20. Pattern mining of user interaction logs for a post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology PACS client

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Cnossen, Fokie; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.

    Objectives: To perform a post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) client based on pattern mining of user interaction log data, and to assess the usefulness of this approach compared to a field study. Methods: All user actions performed on

  1. Evaluation of an Interactive Workshop Designed to Teach Practical Welfare Techniques to Beef Cattle Caretakers and Decision Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewell, Reneé; Hanthorn, Christy; Danielson, Jared; Burzette, Rebecca; Coetzee, Johann; Griffin, D. Dee; Ramirez, Alejandro; Dewell, Grant

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to evaluate the use of an interactive workshop designed to teach novel practical welfare techniques to beef cattle caretakers and decision makers. Following training, respondents reported being more likely to use or recommend use of local anesthesia for dehorning and castration and were more inclined to use meloxicam…

  2. In-vitro evaluation of the P-glycoprotein interactions of a series of potentially CNS-active Amaryllidaceae alkaloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, André Huss; Rønsted, Nina; Jäger, Anna Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Drug compounds interacting with the blood-brain barrier efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) might have limited access to brain tissue. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether nine potentially CNS-active Amaryllidaceae alkaloids of the crinine, lycorine and galanthamine types...

  3. Some fundamental aspects of fault-tree and digraph-matrix relationships for a systems-interaction evaluation procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alesso, H.P.

    1982-02-28

    Recent events, such as Three Mile Island-2, Brown's Ferry-3, and Crystal River-3, have demonstrated that complex accidents can occur as a result of dependent (common-cause/mode) failures. These events are now being called Systems Interactions. A procedure for the identification and evaluation of Systems Interactions is being developed by the NRC. Several national laboratories and utilities have contributed preliminary procedures. As a result, there are several important views of the Systems Interaction problem. This report reviews some fundamental mathematical background of both fault-oriented and success-oriented risk analyses in order to bring out the advantages and disadvantages of each. In addition, it outlines several fault-oriented/dependency analysis approaches and several success-oriented/digraph-matrix approaches. The objective is to obtain a broad perspective of present options for solving the Systems Interaction problem.

  4. Some fundamental aspects of fault-tree and digraph-matrix relationships for a systems-interaction evaluation procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alesso, H.P.

    1982-01-01

    Recent events, such as Three Mile Island-2, Brown's Ferry-3, and Crystal River-3, have demonstrated that complex accidents can occur as a result of dependent (common-cause/mode) failures. These events are now being called Systems Interactions. A procedure for the identification and evaluation of Systems Interactions is being developed by the NRC. Several national laboratories and utilities have contributed preliminary procedures. As a result, there are several important views of the Systems Interaction problem. This report reviews some fundamental mathematical background of both fault-oriented and success-oriented risk analyses in order to bring out the advantages and disadvantages of each. In addition, it outlines several fault-oriented/dependency analysis approaches and several success-oriented/digraph-matrix approaches. The objective is to obtain a broad perspective of present options for solving the Systems Interaction problem

  5. Experimental evaluation of the interaction between strength concrete block walls under vertical loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. CASTRO

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper aims to evaluate the interaction between structural masonry walls made of high performance concrete blocks, under vertical loads. Two H-shaped flanged wall series, all full scale and using direct bond, have been analyzed experimentally. In one series, three flanged-walls were built with the central wall (web supported and, in the other one, three specimens were built without any support at the central web. The load was applied on the central wall and vertical displacements were measured by means of displacement transducers located at eighteen points in the wall-assemblages. The results showed that the estimated load values for the flanges were close to those supported by the walls without central support, where 100% of the load transfer to the flanges occur. The average transfer load rate calculated based on the deformation ratio in the upper and lower section of the flanged-walls, with the central web support, were 37.65% and 77.30%, respectively, showing that there is load transfer from the central wall (web toward the flanges, particularly in the lower part of the flanged walls. Thus, there is indication that the distribution of vertical loads may be considered for projects of buildings for service load, such as in the method of isolated walls group. For estimation of the failure load, the method that considers the walls acting independently showed better results, due to the fact that failure started at the top of the central wall, where there is no effect of load distribution from the adjacent walls.

  6. Limbic-Auditory Interactions of Tinnitus: An Evaluation Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunbey, H P; Gunbey, E; Aslan, K; Bulut, T; Unal, A; Incesu, L

    2017-06-01

    Tinnitus is defined as an imaginary subjective perception in the absence of an external sound. Convergent evidence proposes that tinnitus perception includes auditory, attentional and emotional components. The aim of this study was to investigate the thalamic, auditory and limbic interactions associated with tinnitus-related distress by Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). A total of 36 tinnitus patients, 20 healthy controls underwent an audiological examination, as well as a magnetic resonance imaging protocol including structural and DTI sequences. All participants completed the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and Visual Analog Scales (VAS) related with tinnitus. The fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were obtained for the auditory cortex (AC), inferior colliculus (IC), lateral lemniscus (LL), medial geniculate body (MGB), thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), amygdala (AMG), hippocampus (HIP), parahippocampus (PHIP) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). In tinnitus patients the FA values of IC, MGB, TRN, AMG, HIP decreased and the ADC values of IC, MGB, TRN, AMG, PHIP increased significantly. The contralateral IC-LL and bilateral MGB FA values correlated negatively with hearing loss. A negative relation was found between the AMG-HIP FA values and THI and VAS scores. Bilateral ADC values of PHIP and PFC significantly correlated with the attention deficiency-VAS scores. In conclusion, this is the first DTI study to investigate the grey matter structures related to tinnitus perception and the significant correlation of FA and ADC with clinical parameters suggests that DTI can provide helpful information for tinnitus. Magnifying the microstructures in DTI can help evaluate the three faces of tinnitus nature: hearing, emotion and attention.

  7. Evaluating Interactive Fatigue Management Workshops for Occupational Health Professionals in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sheila; Chalder, Trudie; Madan, Ira

    2014-01-01

    Background Disabling fatigue is common in the working age population. It is essential that occupational health (OH) professionals are up-to-date with the management of fatigue in order to reduce the impact of fatigue on workplace productivity. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of one-day workshops on OH professionals' knowledge of fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and their confidence in diagnosing and managing these in a working population. Methods Five interactive problem-based workshops were held in the United Kingdom. These workshops were developed and delivered by experts in the field. Questionnaires were self-administered immediately prior to, immediately after, and 4 months following each workshop. Questionnaires included measures of satisfaction, knowledge of fatigue and CFS, and confidence in diagnosing and managing fatigue. Open-ended questions were used to elicit feedback about the workshops. Results General knowledge of fatigue increased significantly after training (with a 25% increase in the median score). Participants showed significantly higher levels of confidence in diagnosing and managing CFS (with a 62.5% increase in the median score), and high scores were maintained 4 months after the workshops. OH physicians scored higher on knowledge and confidence than nurses. Similarly, thematic analysis revealed that participants had increased knowledge and confidence after attending the workshops. Conclusion Fatigue can lead to severe functional impairment with adverse workplace outcomes. One-day workshops can be effective in training OH professionals in how to diagnose and manage fatigue and CFS. Training may increase general knowledge of fatigue and confidence in fatigue management in an OH setting. PMID:25516811

  8. An Interactive 3D Virtual Anatomy Puzzle for Learning and Simulation - Initial Demonstration and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Erik; Wilcox, Jascha; Dawson-Elli, Alexander; Diaz, Gabriel; Linte, Cristian A

    2016-01-01

    To inspire young students (grades 6-12) to become medical practitioners and biomedical engineers, it is necessary to expose them to key concepts of the field in a way that is both exciting and informative. Recent advances in medical image acquisition, manipulation, processing, visualization, and display have revolutionized the approach in which the human body and internal anatomy can be seen and studied. It is now possible to collect 3D, 4D, and 5D medical images of patient specific data, and display that data to the end user using consumer level 3D stereoscopic display technology. Despite such advancements, traditional 2D modes of content presentation such as textbooks and slides are still the standard didactic equipment used to teach young students anatomy. More sophisticated methods of display can help to elucidate the complex 3D relationships between structures that are so often missed when viewing only 2D media, and can instill in students an appreciation for the interconnection between medicine and technology. Here we describe the design, implementation, and preliminary evaluation of a 3D virtual anatomy puzzle dedicated to helping users learn the anatomy of various organs and systems by manipulating 3D virtual data. The puzzle currently comprises several components of the human anatomy and can be easily extended to include additional organs and systems. The 3D virtual anatomy puzzle game was implemented and piloted using three display paradigms - a traditional 2D monitor, a 3D TV with active shutter glass, and the DK2 version Oculus Rift, as well as two different user interaction devices - a space mouse and traditional keyboard controls.

  9. Evaluation of Interactive Visualization on Mobile Computing Platforms for Selection of Deep Brain Stimulation Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butson, Christopher R; Tamm, Georg; Jain, Sanket; Fogal, Thomas; Krüger, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been significant growth in the use of patient-specific models to predict the effects of neuromodulation therapies such as deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, translating these models from a research environment to the everyday clinical workflow has been a challenge, primarily due to the complexity of the models and the expertise required in specialized visualization software. In this paper, we deploy the interactive visualization system ImageVis3D Mobile, which has been designed for mobile computing devices such as the iPhone or iPad, in an evaluation environment to visualize models of Parkinson's disease patients who received DBS therapy. Selection of DBS settings is a significant clinical challenge that requires repeated revisions to achieve optimal therapeutic response, and is often performed without any visual representation of the stimulation system in the patient. We used ImageVis3D Mobile to provide models to movement disorders clinicians and asked them to use the software to determine: 1) which of the four DBS electrode contacts they would select for therapy; and 2) what stimulation settings they would choose. We compared the stimulation protocol chosen from the software versus the stimulation protocol that was chosen via clinical practice (independent of the study). Lastly, we compared the amount of time required to reach these settings using the software versus the time required through standard practice. We found that the stimulation settings chosen using ImageVis3D Mobile were similar to those used in standard of care, but were selected in drastically less time. We show how our visualization system, available directly at the point of care on a device familiar to the clinician, can be used to guide clinical decision making for selection of DBS settings. In our view, the positive impact of the system could also translate to areas other than DBS.

  10. Cytogenetic evaluation and DNA interaction studies of the food colorants amaranth, erythrosine and tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpountoukas, Panagiotis; Pantazaki, Anastasia; Kostareli, Efterpi; Christodoulou, Pantelitsa; Kareli, Dimitra; Poliliou, Stamatia; Mourelatos, Costas; Lambropoulou, Vasso; Lialiaris, Theodore

    2010-10-01

    Food coloring agents, amaranth, erythrosine and tartrazine have been tested at 0.02-8mM in human peripheral blood cells in vitro, in order to investigate their genotoxic, cytotoxic and cytostatic potential. Amaranth at the highest concentration (8mM) demonstrates high genotoxicity, cytostaticity and cytotoxicity. The frequency of SCEs/cell was increased 1.7 times over the control level. Additionally, erythrosine at 8, 4 and 2mM shows a high cytotoxicity and cytostaticity. Finally, tartrazine seems to be toxic at 8 and 4mM. No signs of genotoxicity were observed. Reversely, tartrazine showed cytotoxicity at 1 and 2mM. Furthermore, spectroscopic titration studies for the interaction of these food additives with DNA showed that these dyes bind to calf thymus DNA and distinct isosbestic points are observed clearly suggesting binding of the dyes to DNA. Additionally DNA electrophoretic mobility experiments showed that these colorants are obviously capable for strong binding to linear dsDNA causing its degradation. PCR amplification of all DNA fragments (which previously were pre-treated with three different concentrations of the colorants, extracted from agarose gel after separation and then purified), seems to be attenuated with a manner dye concentration-dependent reflecting in a delayed electrophoretic mobility due to the possible binding of some molecules of the dyes. Evaluation of the data and curves were obtained after quantitative and qualitative analysis of the lanes of the gel by an analyzer computer program. Our results indicate that these food colorants had a toxic potential to human lymphocytes in vitro and it seems that they bind directly to DNA. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. SciSpark: Highly Interactive and Scalable Model Evaluation and Climate Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B. D.; Palamuttam, R. S.; Mogrovejo, R. M.; Whitehall, K. D.; Mattmann, C. A.; Verma, R.; Waliser, D. E.; Lee, H.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing data and climate model output are multi-dimensional arrays of massive sizes locked away in heterogeneous file formats (HDF5/4, NetCDF 3/4) and metadata models (HDF-EOS, CF) making it difficult to perform multi-stage, iterative science processing since each stage requires writing and reading data to and from disk. We are developing a lightning fast Big Data technology called SciSpark based on ApacheTM Spark under a NASA AIST grant (PI Mattmann). Spark implements the map-reduce paradigm for parallel computing on a cluster, but emphasizes in-memory computation, "spilling" to disk only as needed, and so outperforms the disk-based ApacheTM Hadoop by 100x in memory and by 10x on disk. SciSpark will enable scalable model evaluation by executing large-scale comparisons of A-Train satellite observations to model grids on a cluster of 10 to 1000 compute nodes. This 2nd generation capability for NASA's Regional Climate Model Evaluation System (RCMES) will compute simple climate metrics at interactive speeds, and extend to quite sophisticated iterative algorithms such as machine-learning based clustering of temperature PDFs, and even graph-based algorithms for searching for Mesocale Convective Complexes. We have implemented a parallel data ingest capability in which the user specifies desired variables (arrays) as several time-sorted lists of URL's (i.e. using OPeNDAP model.nc?varname, or local files). The specified variables are partitioned by time/space and then each Spark node pulls its bundle of arrays into memory to begin a computation pipeline. We also investigated the performance of several N-dim. array libraries (scala breeze, java jblas & netlib-java, and ND4J). We are currently developing science codes using ND4J and studying memory behavior on the JVM. On the pyspark side, many of our science codes already use the numpy and SciPy ecosystems. The talk will cover: the architecture of SciSpark, the design of the scientific RDD (sRDD) data structure, our

  12. Establishment and Usability Evaluation of an Interactive AR Learning System on Conservation of Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hao-Chiang Koong; Hsieh, Min-Chai; Wang, Cheng-Hung; Sie, Zong-Yuan; Chang, Shei-Hsi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we develop an interactive AR Learning System based on Augmented Reality and interactive touch-screen. The learning content knowledge is about conservation of fish in Taiwan. The system combines the game by the concept of AR book which allows children to learn about the importance of conservation of fish. A mechanism is designed to…

  13. A communicational framework for evaluating interaction with IT by analyzing user-reception of electronic texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wentzer, Helle

    2006-01-01

    through semiotic texts is presented, termed the poetics of the e-text. The poetics of the e-text offers a meta-communicational framework for identifying user constraints in the possibilities of interacting with the system. Identifying communicational problems with ICT-mediated interactions again offer...

  14. Development and Evaluation of an Interactive Electronic Laboratory Manual for Cooperative Learning of Medical Histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed K.; Kirkley, Debbie L.; Kibble, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development of an interactive computer-based laboratory manual, created to facilitate the teaching and learning of medical histology. The overarching goal of developing the manual is to facilitate self-directed group interactivities that actively engage students during laboratory sessions. The design of the manual…

  15. Automatic Hydraulic Jack Inbuilt In A Four Wheeler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parth M. Patel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With increasing levels of technology efforts being put to increase the comfort and safety. These can be done by implementation of better design. This paper describes Implementation of Automatic hydraulic jack Mechanism in a four wheeler itself. The jack will be powered by the battery. So at a time of puncture to replace the wheel one has to just press the button and the jack which is fitted in the car itself will lift the car.

  16. IDRC and BetterEvaluation launch an interactive guide to manage ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-10-21

    Oct 21, 2016 ... While most evaluation resources are written for individuals who undertake evaluations, this guide is intended for program and project managers. As commissioners of evaluations, they define the purpose, scope, budget, and timing of an evaluation; they determine what evidence will be most useful; and they ...

  17. Relevant patient perceptions and experiences for evaluating quality of interaction with physiotherapists during outpatient rehabilitation: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Baño-Aledo, M Elena; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Escolar-Reina, Pilar; Montilla-Herrador, Joaquina; Collins, Sean M

    2014-03-01

    To identify elements of the physiotherapist-patient interaction considered by patients when they evaluate the quality of care in outpatient rehabilitation settings. A qualitative study with nine focus groups, Two researchers conducted the focus groups, and a topic guide with predetermined questions was used. Each group discussion was audiotaped,, transcribed verbatim and analyzed thematically according to a modified grounded theory approach. Three postacute ambulatory centers in Barcelona, Madrid and Seville (Spain). Fifty-seven adults undergoing outpatient rehabilitation for musculoskeletal conditions/injuries. Patients based their evaluations of quality of care on their assessment of physiotherapists' willingness to provide information and education, technical expertise and interpersonal manners (eg. respect, emotional support and sensitivity changes in the patient's status). Both positive and negative aspects of the physiotherapist-patient interaction emerged under all these themes, except for friendly and respectful communication. This study identified which elements of the physiotherapist-patient interaction are considered by patients when evaluating the quality of care in rehabilitation outpatient settings. Further research should work to develop self-report questionnaires about patients' experiences of the physiotherapist-patient interaction in rehabilitation services to provide empirical and quantitative evidence. Copyright © 2013 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. GSFLOW model simulations used to evaluate the impact of irrigated agriculture on surface water - groundwater interaction

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Watershed-scale coupled surface water (SW) – groundwater (GW) flow modeling was used to examine changes in streamflow and SW – GW interaction resulting from...

  19. Evaluation of a silicon oxynitride hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column in saccharide and glycoside separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Huihui; Sheng, Qianying; Zhong, Hongmin; Guo, Xiujie; Fu, Qing; Liu, Yanfang; Xue, Xingya; Liang, Xinmiao

    2015-05-01

    The retention characteristics of a silicon oxynitride stationary phase for carbohydrate separation were studied in hydrophilic interaction chromatography mode. Four saccharides including mono-, di-, and trisaccharides were employed to investigate the effects of water content and buffer concentration in the mobile phase on hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography retention. For the tested saccharides, the silicon oxynitride column demonstrated excellent performance in terms of separation efficiency, hydrophilicity, and interesting separation selectivity for carbohydrates compared to the bare silica stationary phase. Finally, the silicon oxynitride hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column was employed in the separation of complex samples of fructooligosaccharides, saponins, and steviol glycoside from natural products. The resulting chromatograms demonstrated good separation efficiency and longer retention compared with silica, which further confirmed the advantages and potential application of silicon oxynitride stationary phase for hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography separation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. 'Do you smell rotten eggs?' Evaluating interactions with mobile agents in crisis response situations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winterboer, A.; Cramer, H.S.M.; Pavlin, G.; Groen, F.C.A.; Evers, V.; Oppermann, R.; Eisenhauer, M.; Jarke, M.; Wulf, V.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present ongoing research concerning the interaction between users and autonomous mobile agents in the environmental monitoring domain. The overarching project, DIADEM, deals with developing a system that detects potentially hazardous situations in populated industrial areas using

  1. Evaluating mobile centric information access and interaction compatibility for learning websites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chipangura, B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available and interaction. Mobile cellular phones come in many different form factors. The handset form factor determines the scope of interaction with the phone and the type of content that a user can access. Open Rubric Pan African International Conference...]. Qualitative research requires that the researcher coordinates data collection, deals with multi realities that exist in the context Pan African International Conference on Information Science, Computing and Telecommunications (2013) 219 without influencing...

  2. Soil-structure interaction effects on the reliability evaluation of reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, J.; Hwang, H.; Reich, M.

    1986-01-01

    The probability-based method for the seismic reliability assessment of nuclear structures, which has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is extended to include the effects of soil-structure interaction. A reinforced concrete containment building is analyzed in order to examine soil-structure interaction effects on: (1) structural fragilities; (2) floor response spectra statistics; and (3) correlation coefficients for total acceleration responses at specified structural locations

  3. A Gateway-Based System for Fast Evaluation of Protein-Protein Interactions in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Thorsten; Barlag, Britta; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Hensel, Michael; Sourjik, Victor; Gerlach, Roman G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are important layers of regulation in all kingdoms of life. Identification and characterization of these interactions is one challenging task of the post-genomic era and crucial for understanding of molecular processes within a cell. Several methods have been successfully employed during the past decades to identify protein-protein interactions in bacteria, but most of them include tedious and time-consuming manipulations of DNA. In contrast, the MultiSite Gateway system is a fast tool for transfer of multiple DNA fragments between plasmids enabling simultaneous and site directed cloning of up to four fragments into one construct. Here we developed a new set of Gateway vectors including custom made entry vectors and modular Destination vectors for studying protein-protein interactions via Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), Bacterial two Hybrid (B2H) and split Gaussia luciferase (Gluc), as well as for fusions with SNAP-tag and HaloTag for dual-color super-resolution microscopy. As proof of principle, we characterized the interaction between the Salmonella effector SipA and its chaperone InvB via split Gluc and B2H approach. The suitability for FRET analysis as well as functionality of fusions with SNAP- and HaloTag could be demonstrated by studying the transient interaction between chemotaxis response regulator CheY and its phosphatase CheZ. PMID:25856398

  4. Exploring a capability-demand interaction model for inclusive design evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Persad, Umesh

    2012-01-01

    Designers are required to evaluate their designs against the needs and capabilities of their target user groups in order to achieve successful, inclusive products. This dissertation presents exploratory research into the specific problem of supporting analytical design evaluation for Inclusive Design. The analytical evaluation process involves evaluating products with user data rather than testing with actual users. The work focuses on the exploration of a capability-demand model of product i...

  5. Evaluation of Drug Interactions and Prescription Errors of Poultry Veterinarians in North of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madadi MS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug prescription errors are a common cause of adverse incidents and may lead to adverse outcomes, sometimes in subtle ways, being compounded by circumstances or further errors. Therefore, it is important that veterinarians issue the correct drug at the correct dose. Using two or more prescribed drugs may lead to drug interactions. Some drug interactions are very harmful and may have potential threats to the patient's health that is called antagonism. In a survey study, medication errors of 750 prescriptions, including dosage errors and drug interactions were studied. The results indicated that 20.8% of prescriptions had at least one drug interaction. The most interactions were related to antibiotics (69.1%, Sulfonamides (46.7%, Methenamine (46.7% and Florfenicol (20.2%. Analysis of dosage errors indicated that total drugs consumed by broilers in the summer are more than winter seasons. Based on these results, avoiding medication errors are important in the balanced prescribing of drugs and regular education of veterinary practitioners in a certain interval is needed.

  6. Evaluation of Chemical Interactions between Small Molecules in the Gas Phase Using Chemical Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Ju, Soomi; Kim, In Tae; Jung, Sun-Hwa; Min, Sun-Joon; Kim, Chulki; Sim, Sang Jun; Kim, Sang Kyung

    2015-12-04

    Chemical force microscopy analyzes the interactions between various chemical/biochemical moieties in situ. In this work we examined force-distance curves and lateral force to measure the interaction between modified AFM tips and differently functionalized molecular monolayers. Especially for the measurements in gas phase, we investigated the effect of humidity on the analysis of force-distance curves and the images in lateral force mode. Flat chemical patterns composed of different functional groups were made through micro-contact printing and lateral force mode provided more resolved analysis of the chemical patterns. From the images of 1-octadecanethiol/11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid patterns, the amine group functionalized tip brought out higher contrast of the patterns than an intact silicon nitride tip owing to the additional chemical interaction between carboxyl and amine groups. For more complex chemical interactions, relative chemical affinities toward specific peptides were assessed on the pattern of 1-octadecanethiol/phenyl-terminated alkanethiol. The lateral image of chemical force microscopy reflected specific preference of a peptide to phenyl group as well as the hydrophobic interaction.

  7. DISTANCE LEARNING STUDENTS’ NEED: Evaluating Interactions from Moore’s Theory of Transactional Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusmanizah USTATI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study draws on the experience from a focus group interviews under the distance learning programme known as Program Pensiswazahan Guru (PPG organized by the Malaysian Ministry of Education in collaboration with local universities and institutes of education. Its purpose is to uncover students’ perception about the platform used by International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM which is the Learning Management System (LMS. LMS is a vital instructional medium especially for the varsity distant learners. Michael Moore’s Theory of Transactional Distance is used as the guiding framework to gain insights on learning and interactions in this e-learning setting. Teacher-student interactions are analyzed for better understanding of the phenomena under study. The findings indicate that in terms of usability LMS is perceived as a good platform to acquire information on content and to receive feedback from instructors. However, IIUM learners hope for more interactivity where learners can communicate amongst themselves beside engaging with the instructor-learner- content interactions that they currently experience via the system. This study aspires to provide insights on the significance of interactions from distance learners’ perception.

  8. Development and Evaluation of an Interactive System for the visually impaired

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma L. Esparza-Maldonado

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This document presents the experimentation, development and results of testing conducted on a computer application designed for visually impaired people. The interactive system aims to promote some places in the State of Aguascalientes, Mexico, and improve the memory of blind users. The purpose of this article is to describe the construction of the system and the testing conducted to measure the degree of interactivity with blind people. Creating interactivity-focused applications is important since it can improve the degree of technology usage (mobile devices of people with disabilities. To assess the quality of this type of software, the specifications they should meet need to be established. They involve big screens, adapted keyboards and ergonomics [1] and depend on the type of disability being addressed. Therefore, they should be characterized to determine how to develop them and assess their quality with the degree of interaction obtained. The main contribution of this work is presenting the results of the degree of interactivity of the system when used by blind people and detailing part of the Team Software Process (TSP defined by Watts Humphrey and adopted for developing the application [2].

  9. Systematic research review of observational approaches used to evaluate mother-child mealtime interactions during preschool years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmeier, Heidi; Skouteris, Helen; Hetherington, Marion

    2015-01-01

    The family meal and social interactions during the meal are important events in a child's life. Specifically, mealtime interactions have been linked to child weight status, the development of children's eating patterns, and socialization. Mealtime interactions may be observed and evaluated to provide insights into this important event beyond self-reported measurements. We aimed to identify, review, and examine studies in which mother-child mealtime behaviors were measured through observation. MEDLINE Complete, PsycINFO, and PsycARTICLES were systematically searched by using sensitive search strategies. We included observational studies of mother-child eating and mealtimes and associations between mother-child interactions and preschool child eating or weight status published to March 2014. Thirteen articles were included in our review. All studies but one were cross-sectional, and none of the studies evaluated how mutual dimensions (e.g., parent responsiveness to the child and child responsiveness to the parent) of dyadic interactions between mothers and children influence maternal feeding practices, children's eating, and weight. The parenting style was associated with maternal feeding practices but not directly with children's eating. Parental discouragements to eat and negative statements about food were associated with higher child weight status. Parental encouragement to eat was associated with higher child weight status as well as maternal body mass index. No associations were shown between maternal reports of feeding practices and observed maternal feeding practices. Parents' overarching attitudes and approaches to parenting appear to be associated with their feeding practices or styles. Future studies should implement longitudinal observational methods with the capacity to measure levels of dimensions within bidirectional parent-child interactions and the extent to which these factors influence maternal practices, children's eating, and weight status.

  10. Studies of DNA dumbbells VII: evaluation of the next-nearest-neighbor sequence-dependent interactions in duplex DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarzy, R; Vallone, P M; Goldstein, R F; Benight, A S

    1999-01-01

    Melting experiments were conducted on 22 DNA dumbbells as a function of solvent ionic strength from 25-115 mM Na(+). The dumbbell molecules have short duplex regions comprised of 16-20 base pairs linked on both ends by T(4) single-strand loops. Only the 4-8 central base pairs of the dumbbell stems differ for different molecules, and the six base pairs on both sides of the central sequence and adjoining loops on both ends are the same in every molecule. Results of melting analysis on the 22 new DNA dumbbells are combined with our previous results on 17 other DNA dumbbells, with stem lengths containing from 14-18 base pairs, reported in the first article of this series (Doktycz, Goldstein, Paner, Gallo, and Benight, Biopoly 32, 1992, 849-864). The combination of results comprises a database of optical melting parameters for 39 DNA dumbbells in ionic strengths from 25-115 mM Na(+). This database is employed to evaluate the thermodynamics of singlet, doublet, and triplet sequence-dependent interactions in duplex DNA. Analysis of the 25 mM Na(+) data reveals the existence of significant sequence-dependent triplet or next-nearest-neighbor interactions. The enthalpy of these interactions is evaluated for all possible triplets. Some of the triplet enthalpy values are less than the uncertainty in their evaluation, indicating no measurable interaction for that particular sequence. This finding suggests that the thermodynamic stability of duplex DNA depends on solvent ionic strength in a sequence-dependent manner. As a part of the analysis, the nearest-neighbor (base pair doublet) interactions in 55, 85, and 115 mM Na(+) are also reevaluated from the larger database. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Evaluation of the effect of prepulses on HF laser-target interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzen, M.K.

    1979-06-01

    We have assessed the effect of multinanosecond, low-power-density prepulses on the interaction of multinanosecond, 10 14 W/cm 2 , approx. 3 -μm HF laser pulses with slab targets. The emphasis is on analyzing absorption and x-ray conversion efficiency. A survey of previous experiments gives no evidence that these prepulses will affect the total absorption. However, prepulses have been observed to cause qualitative changes in both the x-ray spectrum and conversion efficiency. Numerical simulations indicate that the laser-target interaction is effectively insensitive to low-power-density prepulses. These studies imply that basic laser-target experiments with multiplexed, HF laser pulses will provide an important characterization of the interaction of long pulse, multi-line, approx. 3 μm radiation with targets. Future wavelength comparison experiments will require prepulse suppression or target isolation

  12. Exact path-integral evaluation of locally interacting systems: The subtlety of operator ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Nobuhiko

    2017-10-01

    We discuss how one calculates the coherent path integrals for locally interacting systems, where some inconsistencies with exact results have been reported previously. It is shown that the operator ordering subtlety that is hidden in the local interaction term modifies the Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation in the continuous time formulation, and it helps reproduce known results by the operator method. We also demonstrate that many-body effects in the strong interaction limit can be well characterized by the free-particle theory that is subject to annealed random potentials and dynamical gauge (or phase) fields. The present treatment expands the conventional paradigm of the one-particle description, and it provides a simple, viable picture for strongly correlated materials of either bosonic or fermionic systems.

  13. A new concept for interactive radiotherapy planning with multicriteria optimization: first clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieke, Christian; Küfer, Karl-Heinz; Monz, Michael; Scherrer, Alexander; Alonso, Fernando; Oelfke, Uwe; Huber, Peter E; Debus, Jürgen; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-11-01

    Currently, inverse planning for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can be a time-consuming trial and error process. This is because many planning objectives are inherently contradictory and cannot reach their individual optimum all at the same time. Therefore in clinical practice the potential of IMRT cannot be fully exploited for all patients. Multicriteria (multiobjective) optimization combined with interactive plan navigation is a promising approach to overcome these problems. We developed a new inverse planning system called "Multicriteria Interactive Radiotherapy Assistant (MIRA)". The optimization result is a database of patient specific, Pareto-optimal plan proposals. The database is explored with an intuitive user interface that utilizes both a new interactive element for plan navigation and familiar dose visualizations in form of DVH and isodose projections. Two clinical test cases, one paraspinal meningioma case and one prostate case, were optimized using MIRA and compared with the clinically approved planning program KonRad. Generating the databases required no user interaction and took approx. 2-3h per case. The interactive exploration required only a few minutes until the best plan was identified, resulting in a significant reduction of human planning time. The achievable plan quality was comparable to KonRad with the additional benefit of having plan alternatives at hand to perform a sensitivity analysis or to decide for a different clinical compromise. The MIRA system provides a complete database and interactive exploration of the solution space in real time. Hence, it is ideally suited for the inherently multicriterial problem of inverse IMRT treatment planning.

  14. A new concept for interactive radiotherapy planning with multicriteria optimization: First clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thieke, Christian; Kuefer, Karl-Heinz; Monz, Michael; Scherrer, Alexander; Alonso, Fernando; Oelfke, Uwe; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Juergen; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Currently, inverse planning for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can be a time-consuming trial and error process. This is because many planning objectives are inherently contradictory and cannot reach their individual optimum all at the same time. Therefore in clinical practice the potential of IMRT cannot be fully exploited for all patients. Multicriteria (multiobjective) optimization combined with interactive plan navigation is a promising approach to overcome these problems. Patients and methods: We developed a new inverse planning system called 'Multicriteria Interactive Radiotherapy Assistant (MIRA)'. The optimization result is a database of patient specific, Pareto-optimal plan proposals. The database is explored with an intuitive user interface that utilizes both a new interactive element for plan navigation and familiar dose visualizations in form of DVH and isodose projections. Two clinical test cases, one paraspinal meningioma case and one prostate case, were optimized using MIRA and compared with the clinically approved planning program KonRad. Results: Generating the databases required no user interaction and took approx. 2-3 h per case. The interactive exploration required only a few minutes until the best plan was identified, resulting in a significant reduction of human planning time. The achievable plan quality was comparable to KonRad with the additional benefit of having plan alternatives at hand to perform a sensitivity analysis or to decide for a different clinical compromise. Conclusions: The MIRA system provides a complete database and interactive exploration of the solution space in real time. Hence, it is ideally suited for the inherently multicriterial problem of inverse IMRT treatment planning

  15. Evaluation of bentonite alteration due to interactions with iron. Sensitivity analyses to identify the important factors for the bentonite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Wilson, James; Sato, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Performance assessment of geological disposal systems for high-level radioactive waste requires a consideration of long-term systems behaviour. It is possible that the alteration of swelling clay present in bentonite buffers might have an impact on buffer functions. In the present study, iron (as a candidate overpack material)-bentonite (I-B) interactions were evaluated as the main buffer alteration scenario. Existing knowledge on alteration of bentonite during I-B interactions was first reviewed, then the evaluation methodology was developed considering modeling techniques previously used overseas. A conceptual model for smectite alteration during I-B interactions was produced. The following reactions and processes were selected: 1) release of Fe 2+ due to overpack corrosion; 2) diffusion of Fe 2+ in compacted bentonite; 3) sorption of Fe 2+ on smectite edge and ion exchange in interlayers; 4) dissolution of primary phases and formation of alteration products. Sensitivity analyses were performed to identify the most important factors for the alteration of bentonite by I-B interactions. (author)

  16. Evaluating interaction forces between BSA and rabbit anti-BSA in sulphathiazole sodium, tylosin and levofloxacin solution by AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congzhou; Wang, Jianhua; Deng, Linhong

    2011-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions play crucial roles in numerous biological processes. However, it is still challenging to evaluate the protein-protein interactions, such as antigen and antibody, in the presence of drug molecules in physiological liquid. In this study, the interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and rabbit anti-BSA was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the presence of various antimicrobial drugs (sulphathiazole sodium, tylosin and levofloxacin) under physiological condition. The results show that increasing the concentration of tylosin decreased the single-molecule-specific force between BSA and rabbit anti-BSA. As for sulphathiazole sodium, it dramatically decreased the specific force at a certain critical concentration, but increased the nonspecific force as its concentration increasing. In addition, the presence of levofloxacin did not greatly influence either the specific or nonspecific force. Collectively, these results suggest that these three drugs may adopt different mechanisms to affect the interaction force between BSA and rabbit anti-BSA. These findings may enhance our understanding of antigen/antibody binding processes in the presence of drug molecules, and hence indicate that AFM could be helpful in the design and screening of drugs-modulating protein-protein interaction processes.

  17. "Introduction to Teaching Online": Usability Evaluation of Interactivity in an Online Social Constructivist Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Heather A.; Sheffield, Anneliese; Phillips, Alana S.; Moore, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the usability of a social constructivist online teacher preparation course was examined using a framework developed for asynchronous constructivist courses. In particular, students' approaches to learning through interactivity were examined. Students from around the world participated in the course. Data from weekly feedback were…

  18. Evaluating endoglucanase Cel7B-lignin interaction mechanisms and kinetics using quartz crystal microgravimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Sorek, Hagit; Roche, Christine M; Strobel, Kathryn L; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-11-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of protein interactions with solid surfaces are important to fields as diverse as industrial biocatalysis, biomedical engineering, food science, and cell biology. The nonproductive adsorption of cellulase enzymes to lignin, a plant cell wall polymer, reduces their effectiveness in saccharifying biomass. Cellulase has been shown to interact with lignin, but the heterogeneity of lignin surfaces, challenges in measuring irreversible components of these interactions, and fast adsorption rates make quantifying the reaction kinetics difficult. This work employs quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) for real-time measurement of adsorbed mass on a flat lignin surface. We have developed a method for casting homogeneous lignin films that are chemically similar to lignin found in pretreated biomass, and used QCM-D to compare three models of reversible-irreversible binding behavior: a single-site transition model, a transition model with changing adsorbate footprint, and a two-site transition model. Of the three models tested, the two-site transition model provides the only kinetic mechanism able to describe the behavior of Cel7B binding to lignin. While the direct implications of lignin-cellulase interactions may be limited to biomass deconstruction for renewable energy and green chemistry, the analytical and experimental methods demonstrated in this work are relevant to any system in which the kinetics and reaction mechanism of reversible and irreversible protein adsorption at a solid-liquid interface are important. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Monitoring and evaluating citizen-agency interactions: a framework developed for adaptive management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce Shindler; Kristin Aldred Cheek; George H. Stankey

    1999-01-01

    As the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management turn toward ecosystem and adaptive models of forest stewardship, they are being called on to develop meaningful and lasting relations with citizens. These new management styles require not only improved strategies for public involvement but also methods to examine the interactions between citizens and agencies in...

  20. A systematic evaluation of protein kinase a-a-kinase anchoring protein interaction motifs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgers, Pepijn P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341566551; van der Heyden, Marcel A G; Kok, Bart; Heck, Albert J R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332; Scholten, Arjen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313939780

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) in vertebrates is localized to specific locations in the cell via A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). The regulatory subunits of the four PKA isoforms (RIα, RIβ, RIIα, and RIIβ) each form a homodimer, and their dimerization domain interacts with a small helical region present

  1. A systematic evaluation of protein kinase A-A-kinase anchoring protein interaction motifs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgers, Pepijn P; van der Heyden, MAG; Kok, Bart; Heck, Albert J R; Scholten, Arjen

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) in vertebrates is localized to specific locations in the cell via A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). The regulatory subunits of the four PKA isoforms (RIα, RIβ, RIIα, and RIIβ) each form a homodimer, and their dimerization domain interacts with a small helical region present

  2. Sound Synthesis and Evaluation of Interactive Footsteps for Virtual Reality Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Rolf; Serafin, Stefania; Turchet, Luca

    2010-01-01

    A system to synthesize in real-time the sound of footsteps on different materials is presented. The system is based on microphones which allow the user to interact with his own footwear. This solution distinguishes our system from previous efforts that require specific shoes enhanced with sensors...

  3. What Works: The Results of Evaluations on Two Interactive Multimedia Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kathy J.

    The American Institute for Learning (AIL) has developed two interactive multimedia drug-awareness programs for secondary students who have used substances experimentally or are being challenged by others to experiment with drugs. The first, "Addiction and Its Processes," is an awareness program with video and computer capabilities and an…

  4. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Interactive Multimedia Computer-based Patient Education Program in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Ng Yuen Yee; Fai, Tam Sing

    2001-01-01

    A study compared 48 cardiac patients who used an interactive multimedia computer-assisted patient education program and 48 taught by tutorial. The computer-assisted instructional method resulted in significantly better knowledge about exercise and self-management of chronic diseases. (Contains 29 references.) (JOW)

  5. State College Scavenger: Evaluating the Perspectives of Mobile Computing Interactions within Community Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Blaine

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on the impact of mobile computing on individuals' perspectives of places within their community. A technological intervention is designed and deployed to augment the user experience of visiting different locations around town, physically exploring them while also interacting with an online tool. The tool-supported activity serves…

  6. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...

  7. Evaluation of kinetic constants of biomolecular interaction on optical surface plasmon resonance sensor with Newton Iteration Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Guoliang; Hu, Jiandong; Hu, Fengjiang; Wei, Jianguang; Shi, Liang

    2010-10-01

    In the immunology, there are two important types of biomolecular interaction: antigens-antibodies and receptors-ligands. Monitoring the response rate and affinity of biomolecular interaction can help analyze the protein function, drug discover, genomics and proteomics research. Moreover the association rate constant and dissociation rate constant of receptors-ligands are the important parameters for the study of signal transmission between cells. Recent advances in bioanalyzer instruments have greatly simplified the measurement of the kinetics of molecular interactions. Non-destructive and real-time monitoring the response to evaluate the parameters between antigens and antibodies can be performed by using optical surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor technology. This technology provides a quantitative analysis that is carried out rapidly with label-free high-throughput detection using the binding curves of antigens-antibodies. Consequently, the kinetic parameters of interaction between antigens and antibodies can be obtained. This article presents a low cost integrated SPR-based bioanalyzer (HPSPR-6000) designed by ourselves. This bioanalyzer is mainly composed of a biosensor TSPR1K23, a touch-screen monitor, a microprocessor PIC24F128, a microflow cell with three channels, a clamp and a photoelectric conversion device. To obtain the kinetic parameters, sensorgrams may be modeled using one of several binding models provided with BIAevaluation software 3.0, SensiQ or Autolab. This allows calculation of the association rate constant (ka) and the dissociation rate constant (kd). The ratio of ka to kd can be used to estimate the equilibrium constant. Another kind is the analysis software OriginPro, which can process the obtained data by nonlinear fitting and then get some correlative parameters, but it can't be embedded into the bioanalyzer, so the bioanalyzer don't support the use of OriginPro. This paper proposes a novel method to evaluate the kinetic parameters

  8. Understanding Usefulness in Human-Computer Interaction to Enhance User Experience Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Craig Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The concept of usefulness has implicitly played a pivotal role in evaluation research, but the meaning of usefulness has changed over time from system reliability to user performance and learnability/ease of use for non-experts. Despite massive technical and social changes, usability remains the "gold standard" for system evaluation.…

  9. Methods for evaluating genotype-environment interactions illustrated by laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, P K; Horst, P

    1994-01-12

    The relative efficiency of several methods of studying genotype-environment interactions has been illustrated, considering some performance traits in laying hens as a model. The comparison involved methods of classifying, detecting the existence, and estimating the magnitude of genotype-environment interactions. The environments consisted of warm (32 °C) and temperate (20 °C) climatic conditions. Classification and qualitative description of interactions is useful when very few genotypes and environments are involved. The illustration with an example suggested that a classification based on comparison of relative magnitudes of average genotypic, environmental and interaction effects would be most meaningful. The interactions carry greater significance if they exceed the average genotypic effects. A factorial analysis of variance followed by an F-test can be useful in detecting the existence of interactions, but statistical significance should not be overemphasized for biological relevance. Invariably, the magnitude of interactions must be estimated to derive useful conclusions. The seven methods of estimating this correlation mainly involved principles of intraclass correlation, rank correlation and product-moment correlation. An analysis of data revealed that the intraclass correlation methods, in general, yielded higher estimates compared to the rest of the methods. Among them, the formula given by Dickerson (1962) was found more appropriate in mixed-model analysis with unbalanced data, while the method given by Yamada (1962) resulted in negative estimates when the interaction variance was large. The least reliable among the methods were estimations directly utilizing the mean squares from factorial analysis of variance as suggested by Robertson (1959). Rank correlations were similar for phenotypic as well as genetic rankings and also coincided to some extent with the correlation among the breeding values, revealing distinct changes in ranks of genotypes in

  10. Using Publicly Available Data to Quantify Plant-Pollinator Interactions and Evaluate Conservation Seeding Mixes in the Northern Great Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, C R V; O'Dell, S; Bryant, R B; Euliss, N H; Bush, R M; Smart, M D

    2017-06-01

    Concern over declining pollinators has led to multiple conservation initiatives for improving forage for bees in agroecosystems. Using data available through the Pollinator Library (npwrc.usgs.gov/pollinator/), we summarize plant-pollinator interaction data collected from 2012-2015 on lands managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and private lands enrolled in U.S. Department of Agriculture conservation programs in eastern North Dakota (ND). Furthermore, we demonstrate how plant-pollinator interaction data from the Pollinator Library and seed cost information can be used to evaluate hypothetical seeding mixes for pollinator habitat enhancements. We summarize records of 314 wild bee and 849 honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) interactions detected on 63 different plant species. The wild bee observations consisted of 46 species, 15 genera, and 5 families. Over 54% of all wild bee observations were represented by three genera-Bombus, Lassioglossum, and Melissodes. The most commonly visited forbs by wild bees were Monarda fistulosa, Sonchus arvensis, and Zizia aurea. The most commonly visited forbs by A. mellifera were Cirsium arvense, Melilotus officinalis, and Medicago sativa. Among all interactions, 13% of A. mellifera and 77% of wild bee observations were made on plants native to ND. Our seed mix evaluation shows that mixes may often need to be tailored to meet the unique needs of wild bees and managed honey bees in agricultural landscapes. Our evaluation also demonstrates the importance of incorporating both biologic and economic information when attempting to design cost-effective seeding mixes for supporting pollinators in a critically important part of the United States. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Evaluation of kinematic interaction of soil-foundation systems by boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Y.; Schmid, G.

    1983-01-01

    The boundary element formulation leads first to a displacement/traction relation for limb soil-structure interfaces. Through simple matrix manipulation the dynamic stiffness matrix of a limb foundation may be derived. It could be used in this form to handle mass and stiffness coupling with the structure. Structure-structure interaction does not bring in any more complexity other than higher demands on computer time and storage for the numerical calculation. If the foundation can be considered as rigid, kinematic restrictions on the soil-structure interface are introduced to condense the dynamic stiffness matrix to the rigid body degrees of freedom before coupling with the structure is performed. Parametric studies are presented for rigid foundations. These include comparison of compliance coefficients of slender 3-dimensional and strip foundations, the effect of topographical disturbances of the soil surface and the influence of embedment on structure-structure interaction, calculated here for two-dimensional problems. (orig./HP)

  12. Evaluation of Binocular Eye Trackers and Algorithms for 3D Gaze Interaction in Virtual Reality Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, Thies; Latoschik, Marc E.; Wachsmuth, Ipke

    2007-01-01

    Tracking user's visual attention is a fundamental aspect in novel human-computer interaction paradigms found in Virtual Reality. For example, multimodal interfaces or dialogue-based communications with virtual and real agents greatly benefit from the analysis of the user's visual attention as a vital source for deictic references or turn-taking signals. Current approaches to determine visual attention rely primarily on monocular eye trackers. Hence they are restricted to the interpretation of...

  13. Towards a Context Oriented Approach to Ethical Evaluation of Interactive Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hansen, Sandra Burri; Schärfe, Henrik; Dinesen, Jens Vilhelm

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores and develops the notion of applying the ethical perspective of Danish philosopher and theologian K.E. Løgstrup, when designing and developing interactive technologies. The ethical reflections presented in this paper are currently considered in the development of Persuasive...... Learning Designs within the EU funded PLOT project, thus enabling this paper to support the argumentation with a practical example of integrating ethical considerations into the different stages of a design process....

  14. Evaluation of Pseudo-Haptic Interactions with Soft Objects in Virtual Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a pseudo-haptic feedback method conveying simulated soft surface stiffness information through a visual interface. The method exploits a combination of two feedback techniques, namely visual feedback of soft surface deformation and control of the indenter avatar speed, to convey stiffness information of a simulated surface of a soft object in virtual environments. The proposed method was effective in distinguishing different sizes of virtual hard nodules integrated into the simulated soft bodies. To further improve the interactive experience, the approach was extended creating a multi-point pseudo-haptic feedback system. A comparison with regards to (a nodule detection sensitivity and (b elapsed time as performance indicators in hard nodule detection experiments to a tablet computer incorporating vibration feedback was conducted. The multi-point pseudo-haptic interaction is shown to be more time-efficient than the single-point pseudo-haptic interaction. It is noted that multi-point pseudo-haptic feedback performs similarly well when compared to a vibration-based feedback method based on both performance measures elapsed time and nodule detection sensitivity. This proves that the proposed method can be used to convey detailed haptic information for virtual environmental tasks, even subtle ones, using either a computer mouse or a pressure sensitive device as an input device. This pseudo-haptic feedback method provides an opportunity for low-cost simulation of objects with soft surfaces and hard inclusions, as, for example, occurring in ever more realistic video games with increasing emphasis on interaction with the physical environment and minimally invasive surgery in the form of soft tissue organs with embedded cancer nodules. Hence, the method can be used in many low-budget applications where haptic sensation is required, such as surgeon training or video games, either using desktop computers or portable devices, showing

  15. Seismic Performance Evaluation of Concrete Gravity Dams with Penetrated Cracks Considering Fluid–Structure Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Behshad

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a comprehensive study on the seismic behavior of fractured concrete gravity dams during ground shakings is carried out considering dam–reservoir interaction effects. To gain the seismic behavior of the whole system, finite and boundary elements are employed to model the liquid region and the cracked structure, respectively. Formulation and different computational aspects of the suggested staggered hybrid approach are thoroughly argued. A computer code was developed in order to discuss the presented hybrid BE–DE technique and comparisons are made between the obtained results and those reported in the literature. To gain this goal, several problems of seismic excitations in frequency- and time-domains are presented employing the proposed approach, showing that the present results agree well with the results from other numerical procedures. The cracked Koyna Dam is scrutinized, considering the dynamic interaction between dam and reservoir with focus on the nonlinear behavior due to its top profile crack. The developed numerical model is rigorously validated by extensive comparisons with available results in the literature in which the dam–reservoir interaction were simplified by added masses. It can be concluded that there is significant disparity between the overturning and sliding response schemes of the nonlinear analysis and those of added mass technique.

  16. Evaluating web-based static, animated and interactive maps for injury prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Cinnamon

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Public health planning can benefit from visual exploration and analysis of geospatial data. Maps and geovisualization tools must be developed with the user-group in mind. User-needs assessment and usability testing are crucial elements in the iterative process of map design and implementation. This study presents the results of a usability test of static, animated and interactive maps of injury rates and socio-demographic determinants of injury by a sample of potential end-users in Toronto, Canada. The results of the user-testing suggest that different map types are useful for different purposes and for satisfying the varying skill level of the individual user. The static maps were deemed to be easy to use and versatile, while the animated maps could be made more useful if animation controls were provided. The split-screen concept of the interactive maps was highlighted as particularly effective for map comparison. Overall, interactive maps were identified as the preferred map type for comparing patterns of injury and related socio-demographic risk factors. Information collected from the user-tests is being used to expand and refine the injury web maps for Toronto, and could inform other public health-related geo-visualization projects.

  17. Fundamental evaluation of the interaction between RAS/RAP and virgin asphalt binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    A comprehensive laboratory testing program was conducted in this research project to examine the blending between reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP)/recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) and virgin asphalt binders and to evaluate the factors that may affect ...

  18. Evaluating Otto the Auto: Does Engagement in an Interactive Website Improve Young Children’s Transportation Safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Anna; Shen, Jiabin; Li, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Transportation-related injuries are a leading cause of pediatric death, and effective interventions are limited. Otto the Auto is a website offering engaging, interactive activities. We evaluated Otto among a sample of sixty-nine 4- and 5-year-old children, who participated in a randomized parallel group design study. Following baseline evaluation, children engaged with either Otto or a control website for 2 weeks and then were re-evaluated. Children who used Otto failed to show increases in transportation safety knowledge or behavior compared to the control group, although there was a dosage effect whereby children who engaged in the website more with parents gained safer behavior patterns. We conclude Otto may have some efficacy when engaged by children with their parents, but continued efforts to develop and refine engaging, effective, theory-driven strategies to teach children transportation safety, including via internet, should be pursued. PMID:28753920

  19. Construction and evaluation of interactive educational technology for family members acting as caregivers on caring for dependent people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Silva Lumini Landeiro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the process of constructing and evaluating an interactive educational technology for family members acting as caregivers who care for dependent people to ensure continuity of care after hospital discharge. This is an applied research, descriptive exploratory, developed between 2012 and 2013. The educational technology construction based on the ADDIE model, which in turn based on the Contextualized Instructional Design. Six experts evaluated the technology with a questionnaire with closed and open questions. The educational technology contains information, guidelines, photos, videos and audio, structured by three themes related to feeding by tube, positioning and transferring. The experts positively evaluated the educational technology, approved its content and made suggestions for its improvement. Educational technology was adequate to provide reliable information, adapted to the needs of the family members acting as caregivers, and could be a facilitating platform to assist them in the self-care context of the dependent people.

  20. Usefulness and economic evaluation of ADSL-based live interactive teledermatology in areas with shortage of dermatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekio, Itaru; Hanada, Eisuke; Chinuki, Yuko; Akaki, Tatsuya; Kitani, Mitsuhiro; Shiraishi, Yuko; Kaneko, Sakae; Furumura, Minao; Morita, Eishin

    2010-11-01

    To overcome the problem of maldistribution of dermatologists in rural areas, live interactive teleconsultation systems are being used in some countries. However, these systems are not in common use because few evaluations on their efficiency and economic viability were reported. We constructed an easy-to-use asymmetric digital subscriber line (ADSL)-based live interactive teleconsultation system and conducted 150 trial sessions between two rural hospitals and Shimane University Hospital. The clinical usefulness and economic advantages of this system were evaluated using data obtained from the trials. The system efficiently captured images at a resolution sufficient for specialized consultations: follicular openings were visible in the images obtained from a distance of 2 m. This system is more advantageous than a conventional clinic if the following condition is fulfilled: y ≤ 6.00 x-3.86 [x, time required for one-way travel (h); y, time required for consultation (h)]. Our two lines in trial fulfilled this condition. Asymmetric digital subscriber line-based live interactive teleconsultation technology is beneficial in many rural hospitals that do not have a dermatologist. © 2010 The International Society of Dermatology.

  1. An evaluation of the potential drug interaction between warfarin and levothyroxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M D; Delate, T; Clark, M; Clark, N; Horn, J R; Witt, D M

    2014-08-01

    Drug interaction references report that initiation of levothyroxine potentiates the effects of warfarin, and recommend more frequent International Normalized Ratio (INR) monitoring, but the mechanism is not well understood. To assess the impact of levothyroxine initiation on INR response. A retrospective, self-controlled study was performed on patients aged ≥ 18 years receiving chronic warfarin therapy who were started on levothyroxine between 1 January 2006 and 30 June 2013, and who were followed for 90 days prior to and after levothyroxine initiation. The included patients had at least one elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone laboratory value in the pre-period, continuous warfarin therapy for 100 days prior to levothyroxine initiation, no purchases of medications known to interact with warfarin, no procedures requiring warfarin interruption, and no bleeding or thromboembolic event during the study period. The primary outcome was a comparison of the warfarin dose/INR ratio recorded before the initiation of levothyroxine with the ratio recorded during the post-period after two consecutive INRs with no warfarin dose change. One hundred and two patients were included in the primary outcome. The mean warfarin dose/INR ratios in the pre-period and post-period were equivalent (P = 0.825). Although the mean warfarin dose was numerically lower in the post-period than in the pre-period, this difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.068). No difference in the mean warfarin dose/INR ratio before and after initiation of levothyroxine was detected. The results suggest that there is not a clinically significant interaction between warfarin and levothyroxine, and so additional monitoring may not be necessary. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  2. Evaluating the Cognitive Aspects of User Interaction with 2D Visual Tagging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Olugbenga King

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available There has been significant interest in thedevelopment and deployment of visual taggingapplications in recent times. But user perceptions aboutthe purpose and function of visual tagging systems havenot received much attention. This paper presents a userexperience study that investigates the cognitive modelsthat novice users have about interacting with visualtagging applications. The results of the study show thatalthough most users are unfamiliar with visual taggingtechnologies, they could accurately predict the purposeand mode of retrieval of data stored in visual tags. Thestudy concludes with suggestions on how to improve therecognition, ease of recall and design of visual tags.

  3. Evaluation of the Stillinger-Weber classical interaction potential for tetragonal semiconductors in nonideal atomic configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodson, B.W.

    1986-01-01

    A classical potential incorporating two- and three-body interaction terms has recently been introduced by Stillinger and Weber (SW) for simulation of the liquefaction transition of silicon. The equilibrium mechanical properties of this potential are determined and found to agree well with experimental values. The potential also seems to be adequate for problems involving computation of defect energies, such as the stability of strained-layer superlattice interfaces. However, inadequate treatment of configurations with low coordination number makes modeling of the epitaxial growth of (111) silicon impossible. Simple modifications of the SW potential form do allow for (111) epitaxial growth, but the earliest stages of growth then become unphysical

  4. Social learning within a community of practice: Investigating interactions about evaluation among zoo education professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Kathayoon; Ardoin, Nicole M; Wojcik, Deborah

    2017-04-01

    The accessibility and ubiquity of zoos and aquariums-which reach over 700 million people worldwide annually-make them critical sites for science and environmental learning. Through educational offerings, these sites can generate excitement and curiosity about nature and motivate stewardship behavior, but only if their programs are high quality and meet the needs of their audiences. Evaluation is, therefore, critical: knowing what works, for whom, and under what conditions must be central to these organizations. Yet, many zoo and aquarium educators find evaluation to be daunting, and they are challenged to implement evaluations and/or use the findings iteratively in program development and improvement. This article examines how zoo education professionals engage with one another in a learning community related to evaluation. We use a communities of practice lens and social network analysis to understand the structure of this networked learning community, considering changes over time. Our findings suggest that individuals' roles in a networked learning community are influenced by factors such as communicative convenience and one's perceptions of others' evaluation expertise, which also contribute to forming and sustaining professional relationships. This study illuminates how project-based professional networks can become communities of practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. FENDL/E-2.0. Evaluated nuclear data library of neutron-nucleus interaction cross sections and photon production cross sections and photon-atom interaction cross sections for fusion applications. Version 1, March 1997. Summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.; Wienke, H.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the description of a physical tape containing the basic evaluated nuclear data library of neutron-nucleus interaction cross sections, photon production cross sections and photon-atom interaction cross sections for fusion applications. It is part of the evaluated nuclear data library for fusion applications FENDL-2. The data are available cost-free from the Nuclear Data Section upon request. The data can also be retrieved by the user via online access through international computer networks. (author)

  6. π -Stacking interactions in YFP, quantum mechanics and force field evaluations in the S0 and S1 states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabti, Karim Elhadj; Azizi, Sihem; Ridard, Jacqueline; Lévy, Bernard; Demachy, Isabelle

    2017-08-01

    We study the π -stacking interaction between the chromophore and Tyr203 in the Yellow Fluorescent Protein (YFP) in order to (i) evaluate the contribution of the internal interaction energy of the isolated Chromophore-Tyrosine complex (Eint) to the 26 nm red shift observed from GFP to YFP, (ii) compare the effects of Eint and of the proteic environment. To that end, we perform quantum mechanical and force field (ff) calculations of the isolated complex in S0 and S1 states on a large sample of geometries, together with molecular dynamics simulations and potential of mean force analysis. The calculated absorption wavelengths are found red shifted with respect to the isolated chromophore by 12-19 nm, that represents a large part of the GFP-YFP shift. We find that the effect of the protein is determinant on the dynamics of the complex while the error that results from using a classicalff is of limited effect.

  7. Harmonic Propagation and Interaction Evaluation between Small-Scale Wind Farms and Nonlinear Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Xiong Mao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Distributed generation is a flexible and effective way to utilize renewable energy. The dispersed generators are quite close to the load, and pose some power quality problems such as harmonic current emissions. This paper focuses on the harmonic propagation and interaction between a small-scale wind farm and nonlinear loads in the distribution grid. Firstly, by setting the wind turbines as P – Q(V nodes, the paper discusses the expanding Newton-Raphson power flow method for the wind farm. Then the generalized gamma mixture models are proposed to study the non-characteristic harmonic propagation of the wind farm, which are based on Gaussian mixture models, improved phasor clustering and generalized Gamma models. After the integration of the small-scale wind farm, harmonic emissions of nonlinear loads will become random and fluctuating due to the non-stationary wind power. Furthermore, in this paper the harmonic coupled admittance matrix model of nonlinear loads combined with a wind farm is deduced by rigorous formulas. Then the harmonic propagation and interaction between a real wind farm and nonlinear loads are analyzed by the harmonic coupled admittance matrix and generalized gamma mixture models. Finally, the proposed models and methods are verified through the corresponding simulation models in MATLAB/SIMULINK and PSCAD/EMTDC.

  8. Team interaction skills evaluation criteria for nuclear power plant control room operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, J.C.; Hauth, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Team interaction skills are an essential aspect of safe nuclear power plant control room operations. Previous research has shown that, when a group works together, rather than as individuals, more effective operations are possible. However, little research has addressed how such team interaction skills can be measured. In this study rating scales were developed specifically for such a measurement purpose. Dimensions of team skill performance were identified from previous research and experience in the area, incorporating the input of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) contract operator licensing examiners. Rating scales were developed on the basis of these dimensions, incorporating a modified Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale (BARS) as well as Behavioral Frequency formats. After a pilot-testing/revision process, rating data were collected using 11 control room crews responding to simulator scenarios at a boiling water and a pressurized water reactor. Statistical analyses of the resulting data revealed moderate inter-rater reliability using the Behavioral Frequency scales, relatively low inter-rater reliability using the BARS, and moderate support for convergent and discriminant validity of the scales. It was concluded that the scales show promise psychometrically and in terms of user acceptability, but that additional scale revision is needed before field implementation. Recommendations for scale revision and directions for future research were presented

  9. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of the interaction between oral kaempferol and ethanol in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhaoxiang; Wang, Meng; Guo, Zengjun; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-12-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the effect of ethanol on oral bioavailability of kaempferol in rats, namely, at disclosing their possible interaction. Kaempferol (100 or 250 mg kg-1 bm) was administered to the rats by oral gavage with or without ethanol (600 mg kg-1 bm) co-administration. Intravenous administration (10 and 25 mg kg-1 bm) of kaempferol was used to determine the bioavailability. The concentration of kaempferol in plasma was estimated by ultra high performance liquid chromatography. During coadministration, a significant increase of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve as well as the peak concentration were observed, along with a dramatic decrease in total body clearance. Consequently, the bioavailability of kaempferol in oral control groups was 3.1 % (100 mg kg-1 bm) and 2.1 % (250 mg kg-1 bm). The first was increased by 4.3 % and the other by 2.8 % during ethanol co-administration. Increased permeability of cell membrane and ethanolkaempferol interactions on CYP450 enzymes may enhance the oral bioavailability of kaempferol in rats.

  10. Hepatic transporter drug-drug interactions: an evaluation of approaches and methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Beth; Riley, Robert J

    2017-12-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) continue to account for 5% of hospital admissions and therefore remain a major regulatory concern. Effective, quantitative prediction of DDIs will reduce unexpected clinical findings and encourage projects to frontload DDI investigations rather than concentrating on risk management ('manage the baggage') later in drug development. A key challenge in DDI prediction is the discrepancies between reported models. Areas covered: The current synopsis focuses on four recent influential publications on hepatic drug transporter DDIs using static models that tackle interactions with individual transporters and in combination with other drug transporters and metabolising enzymes. These models vary in their assumptions (including input parameters), transparency, reproducibility and complexity. In this review, these facets are compared and contrasted with recommendations made as to their application. Expert opinion: Over the past decade, static models have evolved from simple [I]/k i models to incorporate victim and perpetrator disposition mechanisms including the absorption rate constant, the fraction of the drug metabolised/eliminated and/or clearance concepts. Nonetheless, models that comprise additional parameters and complexity do not necessarily out-perform simpler models with fewer inputs. Further, consideration of the property space to exploit some drug target classes has also highlighted the fine balance required between frontloading and back-loading studies to design out or 'manage the baggage'.

  11. Interactive breast cancer segmentation based on relevance feedback: from user-centered design to evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouze, A.; Kieffer, S.; Van Brussel, C.; Moncarey, R.; Grivegnée, A.; Macq, B.

    2009-02-01

    Computer systems play an important role in medical imaging industry since radiologists depend on it for visualization, interpretation, communication and archiving. In particular, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems help in lesion detection tasks. This paper presents the design and the development of an interactive segmentation tool for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. The tool conception is based upon a user-centered approach in order to ensure that the application is of real benefit to radiologists. The analysis of user expectations, workflow and decision-making practices give rise to the need for an interactive reporting system based on the BIRADS, that would not only include the numerical features extracted from the segmentation of the findings in a structured manner, but also support human relevance feedback as well. This way, the numerical results from segmentation can be either validated by end-users or enhanced thanks to domain-experts subjective interpretation. Such a domain-expert centered system requires the segmentation to be sufficiently accurate and locally adapted, and the features to be carefully selected in order to best suit user's knowledge and to be of use in enhancing segmentation. Improving segmentation accuracy with relevance feedback and providing radiologists with a user-friendly interface to support image analysis are the contributions of this work. The preliminary result is first the tool conception, and second the improvement of the segmentation precision.

  12. Design, development, and evaluation of an interactive simulator for engineering ethics education (SEEE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Christopher A; Alfred, Michael

    2009-06-01

    Societal pressures, accreditation organizations, and licensing agencies are emphasizing the importance of ethics in the engineering curriculum. Traditionally, this subject has been taught using dogma, heuristics, and case study approaches. Most recently a number of organizations have sought to increase the utility of these approaches by utilizing the Internet. Resources from these organizations include on-line courses and tests, videos, and DVDs. While these individual approaches provide a foundation on which to base engineering ethics, they may be limited in developing a student's ability to identify, analyze, and respond to engineering ethics situations outside of the classroom environment. More effective approaches utilize a combination of these types of approaches. This paper describes the design and development of an internet based interactive Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education. The simulator places students in first person perspective scenarios involving different types of ethical situations. Students must gather data, assess the situation, and make decisions. This requires students to develop their own ability to identify and respond to ethical engineering situations. A limited comparison between the internet based interactive simulator and conventional internet web based instruction indicates a statistically significant improvement of 32% in instructional effectiveness. The simulator is currently being used at the University of Houston to help fulfill ABET requirements.

  13. A discussion of techniques used in defining the Interactive Measurement Evaluation and Control System at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, B.K.; Hunt, V.; Schweitzer, M.F.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes both the general methodology used to study the current needs for a measurement control and evaluation system at Rocky Flats Plant and the recommendations for implementation into the Interactive Measurement Evaluation and Control System (IMECS). The study resulted in a clear assessment of the current system and recommendations for the system which will be its replacement. To arrive at the recommendations, the authors used a formal analysis approach that is based on an in-depth study of the measurement evaluation and control problems and user needs. The problems and needs were defined by interviews with present and potential users of this kind of system throughout the nuclear industry. Some of the recommendations are to provide: timely sample measurement feedback; representative measurement error estimates; a history data base of sample measurements To meet the user needs, the new system will: be interactive with user selection menus; use standards which cover the range of application; facilitate historical analysis of sample data and bookkeeping. The implementation of this program is projected to be more cost effective than the current program. Also included are the authors' recommendations to those involved in the design of a system of similar large magnitude

  14. WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] panel entryway seal: Numerical simulation of seal composite interaction for preliminary design evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argueello, J.G.

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the results of a series of structural analyses performed to evaluate the structural interaction of the components of a potential two-component panel entryway seal configuration with each other and with the rock salt formation at the repository horizon of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. A two-dimensional axisymmetric geomechanical model is used to numerically simulate the interaction of the components of a 30.48 m (100 ft) long seal, consisting of concrete end caps and a crushed salt core, with each other and with the surrounding formation. Issues addressed in this report pertain to the consolidation of the crushed salt in terms of how much of the seal core reaches effective consolidation in the presence of the stiff concrete end caps since these could conceivably cause bridging (retardation of closure around the core) to occur. In addition, the stress field in the end caps is evaluated to determine if the concrete component maintains its integrity. The stresses induced in the surrounding formation are also evaluated to determine if the presence of the concrete component in the seal system results in a ''tightening'' of the formation around the seal. 20 refs., 43 figs., 2 tabs

  15. NNAlign: a platform to construct and evaluate artificial neural network models of receptor-ligand interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Andreatta, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    of the model, as well as evaluations on independent data. Many features of the training sequences can be encoded as input, and the network architecture is highly customizable. The results returned by the server include a graphical representation of the motif identified by the method, performance values...

  16. Use of Interactive Electronic Audience Response Tools (Clickers) to Evaluate Knowledge Gained in Extension Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Patrick; Loy, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Effectively measuring short-term impact, particularly a change in knowledge resulting from Extension programming, can prove to be challenging. Clicker-based technology, when used properly, is one alternative that may allow educators to better evaluate this aspect of the logic model. While the potential interface between clicker technology and…

  17. Integral evaluation of a road surface and the interaction between road and vehicle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennis, T.A.; Wit, L.B. de; Hoogvelt, R.B.J.; Jansen, S.T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of several road characteristics like longitudinal and transverse evenness and skid resistance are always evaluated separately on the aspects comfort and/or safety. This passes over the influence these surface characteristics can have in combination on riding comfort and safety. This

  18. Organizational Compliance : An agent-based model for designing and evaluating organizational interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, J.

    2015-01-01

    The motivation of this research comes from the need of devising and evaluating solutions to achieving organizational compliance, which is an important factor in ensuring the success of business operations and the safety of business environments. Using normative multi-agent systems as the basis of

  19. Conjugation effects on antibody-drug conjugates: evaluation of interaction kinetics in real time on living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondza, Sina; Stenberg, Jonas; Nestor, Marika; Andersson, Karl; Björkelund, Hanna

    2014-11-03

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) have shown promising effects in cancer therapy by combining the target specificity of an antibody with the toxicity of a chemotherapeutic drug. As the number of therapeutic antibodies is significantly larger than those used as ADCs, there is unused potential for more effective therapies. However, the conjugation of an additional molecule to an antibody may affect the interaction with its target, altering association rate, dissociation rate, or both. Any changes of the binding kinetics can have subsequent effects on the efficacy of the ADCs, thus the kinetics are important to monitor during ADC development and production. This paper describes a method for the analysis of conjugation effects on antibody binding to its antigen, using the instrument LigandTracer and a fluorescent monovalent anti-IgG binder denoted FIBA, which did not affect the interaction. All measurements were done in real time using living cells which naturally expressed the antigens. With this method the binding profiles of different conjugations of the therapeutic anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab and the anti-CD44v6 antibody fragment AbD15171 were evaluated and compared. Even comparatively small modifications of cetuximab altered the interaction with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In contrast, no impact on the AbD15171-CD44v6 interaction was observed upon conjugation. This illustrates the importance to study the binding profile for each ADC combination, as it is difficult to draw any general conclusion about conjugation effects. The modification of interaction kinetics through conjugation opens up new possibilities when optimizing an antibody or an ADC, since the conjugations can be used to create a binding profile more apt for a specific clinical need.

  20. Chemistry-Climate Interactions in the GISS GCM. Part 1; Tropospheric Chemistry Model Description and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindell, Drew T.; Grenfell, J. Lee; Rind, David; Price, Colin; Grewe, Volker; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A tropospheric chemistry module has been developed for use within the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to study interactions between chemistry and climate change. The model uses a simplified chemistry scheme based on CO-NOx-CH4 chemistry, and also includes a parameterization for emissions of isoprene, the most important non-methane hydrocarbon. The model reproduces present day annual cycles and mean distributions of key trace gases fairly well, based on extensive comparisons with available observations. Examining the simulated change between present day and pre-industrial conditions, we find that the model has a similar response to that seen in other simulations. It shows a 45% increase in the global tropospheric ozone burden, within the 25% - 57% range seen in other studies. Annual average zonal mean ozone increases by more than 125% at Northern Hemisphere middle latitudes near the surface. Comparison of model runs that allow the calculated ozone to interact with the GCM's radiation and meteorology with those that do not shows only minor differences for ozone. The common usage of ozone fields that are not calculated interactively seems to be adequate to simulate both the present day and the pre-industrial ozone distributions. However, use of coupled chemistry does alter the change in tropospheric oxidation capacity, enlarging the overall decrease in OH concentrations from the pre-industrial to the present by about 10% (-5.3% global annual average in uncoupled mode, -5.9% in coupled mode). This indicates that there may be systematic biases in the simulation of the pre-industrial to present day decrease in the oxidation capacity of the troposphere (though a 10% difference is well within the total uncertainty). Global annual average radiative forcing from pre-industrial to present day ozone change is 0.32 W/sq m. The forcing seems to be increased by about 10% when the chemistry is coupled to the GCM. Forcing values greater

  1. Evaluation of possible interaction among drugs contemplated for use during manned space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Possible interactions among drugs contemplated for use during manned spaceflights have been studied in several animal species. The following seven drugs were investigated: nitrofurantoin, chloral hydrate, hexobarbital, phenobarbital, flurazepam, diphenoxylate, and phenazopyridine. Particular combinations included: chloral hydrate, hexabarbital or flurazepam with nitrofurantoin; phenobarbital or flurazepam with phenazopyridine; and diphenoxylate with two does formulations of nitrofurantoin. Studies were carried out in several species to determine whether induction of liver microsomal enzymes would increase the tendency of phenazopyridine to produce methemoglobin in vivo. Animals were premedicated with phenobarbital, a known inducer of azoreductase, and in a separate experiment with flurazepam, before administration of phenazopyridine. Methemoglobin production was determined in each animal after receiving phenazopyridine. No evidence was found for increased production of methemoglobin in the rat, dog, or rabbit that could be attributed to increased amounts of microsomal enzymes.

  2. A novel interaction fingerprint derived from per atom score contributions: exhaustive evaluation of interaction fingerprint performance in docking based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Julia B; Humbeck, Lina; Brinkjost, Tobias; Koch, Oliver

    2018-03-16

    Protein ligand interaction fingerprints are a powerful approach for the analysis and assessment of docking poses to improve docking performance in virtual screening. In this study, a novel interaction fingerprint approach (PADIF, protein per atom score contributions derived interaction fingerprint) is presented which was specifically designed for utilising the GOLD scoring functions' atom contributions together with a specific scoring scheme. This allows the incorporation of known protein-ligand complex structures for a target-specific scoring. Unlike many other methods, this approach uses weighting factors reflecting the relative frequency of a specific interaction in the references and penalizes destabilizing interactions. In addition, and for the first time, an exhaustive validation study was performed that assesses the performance of PADIF and two other interaction fingerprints in virtual screening. Here, PADIF shows superior results, and some rules of thumb for a successful use of interaction fingerprints could be identified.

  3. Preparation of modified clay with benzethonium or cetylpyridinium chloride and evaluation of their interactions with PVC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resende, Daniel K.; Dornelas, Camila B.; Moreira, Leonardo A.; Gomes, Ailton S.; Tavares, Maria I.B.; Cabral, Lucio M.; Simeoni, Luiz A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was the preparation of modified clays with benzethonium or cetylpyridinium to obtain organophilic silicates with good stability and evaluate the possible use of them for the preparation of nanocomposites of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC). The reactions of modification of clays and the PVC were prepared by solution intercalation. The new clays were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The reactions of clays with PVC were assessed by Low-field NMR, through the determination of proton spin lattice relaxation time. The stability of new organophilic clays and their reactions with PVC were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). High stability was observed for organophilic clays prepared. The degradation of PVC materials obtained with the organophilic clay began at temperatures above 200 deg C. If it is considered that the temperatures normally used in the processing of PVC are between 140 deg C to 180 deg C, the observed results may indicate the possibility of the use of clays for preparation of nanomaterials with PVC. (author)

  4. Patient-centred communication intervention study to evaluate nurse-patient interactions in complex continuing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGilton Katherine S

    2012-10-01

    facilitate interactions with patients and to minimize agitation associated with considerable stress. The improvement of these interactions will lead to a reduction of agitation, which has the additional significance of increasing patients’ well-being, quality of life, and satisfaction with care. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01654029

  5. Uranium mobility in mine areas: evaluation of the water-rock interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuddas, P. [UFR Sciences de la Terre. PEPS. Universite Claude Bernard. Lyon (France); Rocha Scislewski, A.; Faivre, D.; Lopez, O. [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Toxicity and natural radioactivity of uranium are among the main environmental concerns for exploitation and processing of uranium ore. Weathering processes and potential contamination paths of these areas have to be identified to preserve the water resources. In this work, leaching experiments were carried out in flow-through reactors. Approximately 750 g of crushed rock of selected grain size between 0.35 and 0.80 mm were introduced into a Pyrex column. Distilled and deionized water, saturated with 5% CO{sub 2}/95% air mixture, was introduced through a glass inlet fitted at the base of the column. Input solution pH was constantly equal to 4.2 while the low flow rate was obtained from a peristaltic pump. The output solution was sampled periodically for about 1 year. Three different rock samples were used: an untreated granite rock with high levels of uranium minerals, a rock with low uranium content and a rock rejected after the lixiviation process for uranium industrial extraction. For untreated rocks pH and silica decrease by 1-2 orders of magnitude while sodium decreases by 2-3 orders of magnitude. This indicates the strong albitite dissolution. Total dissolved uranium has a rather constant level indicating the constant dissolution rate of the uranium mineral assemblage. Thermodynamic modelling of the interacting output solutions indicates that 80% of the dissolved uranium content is under the form of two main carbonate complexes (i.e. UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2-} and UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-}), while solutions are saturated on chalcedony, kaolinite and calcium clay minerals. Solutions are under saturated with respect to uraninite and low-temperature albite. In experiments where material was treated with sulphuric acid in the plant, pH is constantly equal to 4 indicating the lack of rock buffering properties. Na, Ca, and SO{sub 4} decrease by several orders of magnitude (from some initial mmol/kg) reaching

  6. Evaluating the Intraspecific Interactions of Indian Rosewood (Dalbergia sissoo Roxb. Trees in Indian Rosewood Reserveof Khuzestan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Erfanifard

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Positive and negative (facilitative and competitive interactions of plants are important issues in autecology and can be evaluated by the spatial pattern analysis in plant ecosystems. This study investigates the intraspecific interactions of Indian rosewood (Dalbergia sissoo Roxb. trees in Indian rosewood Reserve of Khuzestan province. Three 150 m × 200 m plots were selected and the spatial locations of all Indian rosewoods (239 trees were specified. Structurally different summary statistics (nearest neighbour distribution function D(r, K2-index K2(r, pair correlation function g(r, and O-ring O(r were also implemented to analyze the spatial pattern of the trees. The distribution of Indian rosewood trees significantly followed inhomogeneous Poisson process (α=0.05. The results of D(r and K2(r showed that the maximum distance to nearest tree was 12 m and density was decreased to this scale. The results of g(r and O(r also revealed the significant aggregation of Indian rosewood trees at scales of 1.5 to 4 m (α=0.05. In general, it was concluded that Indian rosewood trees had positive intraspecific interactions in Indian rosewood Reserve of Khuzestan province and their aggregation showed their facilitative effects on one another.

  7. Evaluating public education messages aimed at monitoring and responding to social interactive technology on smartphones among young drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauld, Cassandra S; Lewis, Ioni; White, Katherine M; Fleiter, Judy J; Watson, Barry

    2017-07-01

    Young drivers are more likely than any other age group to access social interactive technology (e.g., Facebook, E-mail) on a smartphone while driving. The current study formed part of a larger investigation and was guided by The Step Approach to Message Design and Testing (SatMDT) to evaluate the relative effectiveness of three different public education messages aimed at reducing smartphone use among young drivers. The messages were each adapted to the specific behaviours of monitoring/reading and responding to social interactive technology on smartphones. Participants (n=288; 199F, 89M) were drivers aged 17-25 years who resided in the Australian state of Queensland. Message acceptance (i.e., intention and effectiveness) and message rejection were both assessed using a self-report survey. Multivariate analyses found that, overall, the messages targeting monitoring/reading behaviour were considered more effective than those targeting responding behaviour. The message that challenged the underlying motivation that believing you are a good driver makes it easier to monitor/read social interactive technology while driving was considered particularly effective by young male drivers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of a treatment manual and workshops for disseminating, parent-child interaction therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschell, Amy D; McNeil, Cheryl B; Urquiza, Anthony J; McGrath, Jean M; Zebell, Nancy M; Timmer, Susan G; Porter, Alissa

    2009-01-01

    This study's main purposes were to: (a) evaluate a treatment manual as a dissemination strategy, (b) compare two workshop formats for evidence-based treatment (EBT) training, and (c) provide preliminary data on therapist characteristics potentially associated with successful EBT adoption. Forty-two community-based clinicians were assigned to one of two training groups (didactic or experiential). Behavior observation and self-report data were collected at four time points. Results suggest that reading a treatment manual is useful, but not sufficient. Experiential and didactic training were equally effective in increasing knowledge, skill, and satisfaction; however, after a 2-day training, few participants demonstrated mastery of skills.

  9. Evaluating depressive symptom interactions on adolescent smoking prevention program mediators: a mediated moderation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Kari-Lyn Kobayakawa; Sun, Ping; Unger, Jennifer B; Johnson, C Anderson

    2010-11-01

    Smoking prevention interventions have been shown to be effective in reducing smoking prevalence in the United States. Further work is needed to address smoking in China, where over one third of the world's current smokers reside. China, with more than 60% of the male population being smokers, also presents a unique opportunity to test cognitive processes involved in depression, social influences, and smoking. Adolescents at-risk for developing depression may process social information differently from low-risk counterparts. The Wuhan Smoking Prevention Trial was a school-based longitudinal randomized controlled trial aimed at preventing initiation and escalation of adolescent smoking behaviors. Thousand three hundred and ninety-one male seventh-grade students were assessed with a 200-item paper-and-pencil baseline survey, and it was readministered 1 year later following program implementation. Friend prevalence estimates were significantly higher among 30-day smokers and among those at highest risk for depression symptoms. The program appeared to be successful in changing the perception of friend smoking prevalence only among adolescents with a comorbidity of high scores of depression symptoms and who have experimented previously with smoking. This Program x Comorbidity interaction on perceived friend smoking prevalence was significant in predicting 30-day smoking 1 year after program implementation. This study provides evidence that those adolescents with high levels of depressive symptoms may be more sensitive to social influences associated with smoking prevalence. Individual Disposition x Social Environmental Influences may be important when developing future effective prevention programming.

  10. Development and evaluation of a tracer-injection hydrothermal technique for studies of waste package interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.E.; Coles, D.G.; Britton, R.C.; Burnell, J.R.

    1986-11-01

    A tracer-injection system has been developed for use in characterizing reactions of waste package materials under hydrothermal conditions. High-pressure liquid chromatographic instrumentation has been coupled with Dickson-type rocking autoclaves to allow injection of selected components into the hydrothermal fluid while maintaining run temperature and pressure. Hydrothermal experiments conducted using this system included the interactions of depleted uranium oxide and Zircaloy-4 metal alloy discs with trace levels of 99 Tc and non-radioactive Cs and I in a simulated groundwater matrix. After waste-package components and simulated waste forms were pre-conditioned in the autoclave systems (usually 4 to 6 weeks), known quantities of tracer-doped fluids were injected into the autoclaves' gold reaction bag at run conditions. Time-sequenced sampling of the hydrothermal fluid providing kinetic data on the reactions of tracers with waste package materials. The injection system facilitates the design of experiments that will better define ''steady-state'' fluid compositions in hydrothermal reactions. The injection system will also allow for the formation of tracer-bearing solid phases in detectable quantities

  11. Evaluating the interactions of vertebrate receptors with persistent pollutants and antifouling pesticides using recombinant yeast assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguerol, Tania-Noelia; Boronat, Susanna; Casado, Marta; Pina, Benjamin [Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona, CSIC, Department of Molecular Biology, Barcelona (Spain); Raldua, Demetrio [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, INTEXTER -UP, Terrassa (Spain); Barcelo, Damia [IIQAB-CSIC, Department of Environmental Chemistry, Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-07-15

    The development of in vitro methods for screening potentially harmful biological activities of new compounds is an extremely important way to increase not only their intrinsic environmental safety, but also the public perception of the safety standards associated with them. In this work we use two yeast systems to test the ability of different chemicals to bind and activate two vertebrate receptors which are intimately related to adverse biological effects of pollution in exposed fauna: the estrogen receptor (ER) and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). The panel of compounds analysed here includes well-known pollutants, like PCBs, pp'-DDT and hexachlorobenzene, together with the less-known, emerging putative pollutants, such as Sea-Nine, Irgarol and diuron. Results show the ability of some of these compounds to interact with one or both receptors, provide hints about the relationship between structure and activity, and suggest mechanistic explanations for the biological activities already described in whole-animal experiments. In addition, we show that AhR may have an intrinsic ligand promiscuity comparable to that of ER, a feature not fully appreciated in the past due to the technical difficulties involved with testing highly lipophilic substances in yeast-based assays. (orig.)

  12. Laser light interaction for texture evaluation of native woods and Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.R.; Mori, F.A.; Rabelo, G.F.; Braga Junior, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    This work had the objective of study in patterns of the ''speckle'' as function of the wood texture of Bowdichia virgilioides check for this species in other resources (sucupira), Swietenia macrophylla check for this species in other resources (mogno), Balfourodendron riedelianum check for this species in other resources (paumarfim) and Eucalyptus grandis wood. The He-Ne laser 10 mW was used to illuminate the wood samples and a digital camera captured the result of the interaction of the wood with the laser light. The results obtained from image analysis were compared with the pattern obtained by microscopic methodology. The captured images show the intensities of each pixel, varying between 0 and 255 in the gray scale. From the images, a central area of 16x16 pixels was removed and analyzed by the application of the convolution function and its Fourier Transform, resulting in the power density spectrum. The results showed that the information obtained by the power density spectrum of the ''speckle'' space variation allow classing samples of woods with different texture [pt

  13. Evaluation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography stationary phases for analysis of opium alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mohsen; Taheri, Mohammadreza; Farhadpour, Mohsen; Rezadoost, Hassan; Ghassempour, Alireza; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2017-08-18

    The separation of a mixture containing five major opium alkaloids, namely morphine, codeine, thebaine, noscapine and papaverine has been investigated in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mode using five different stationary phases: bare silica, zwitterion, aminopropyl, diol and cyanopropyl. In order to propose the appropriate column for separation and purification, retention behaviors of the five natural opioids have been studied on mentioned HILIC stationary phases. The mechanism of separation in diverse HILIC media, based on the formation of water-rich layer on surface of the HILIC stationary phases and the physicochemical properties of opium alkaloids, such as pKa (acidic pK) and the octanol-water distribution coefficient (log Do/w) are discussed. Chromatographic responses including modified limit of detection LOD m , signal to noise ratio (S/N) m , and defined modified R Sm have considered for suggestion of the suitable column for quantitative/qualitative and preparative purposes. According to the obtained results, diol stationary phase is best suited for analytical chromatography, whereas bare silica and zwitterionic stationary phases are appropriate for preparative applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Design, development, and evaluation of a second generation interactive Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education (SEEE2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfred, Michael; Chung, Christopher A

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes a second generation Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education. Details describing the first generation activities of this overall effort are published in Chung and Alfred (Sci Eng Ethics 15:189-199, 2009). The second generation research effort represents a major development in the interactive simulator educational approach. As with the first generation effort, the simulator places students in first person perspective scenarios involving different types of ethical situations. Students must still gather data, assess the situation, and make decisions. The approach still requires students to develop their own ability to identify and respond to ethical engineering situations. However, were as, the generation one effort involved the use of a dogmatic model based on National Society of Professional Engineers' Code of Ethics, the new generation two model is based on a mathematical model of the actual experiences of engineers involved in ethical situations. This approach also allows the use of feedback in the form of decision effectiveness and professional career impact. Statistical comparisons indicate a 59 percent increase in overall knowledge and a 19 percent improvement in teaching effectiveness over an Internet Engineering Ethics resource based approach.

  15. Using video-based observation research methods in primary care health encounters to evaluate complex interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asan, Onur; Montague, Enid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of video-based observation research methods in primary care environment and highlight important methodological considerations and provide practical guidance for primary care and human factors researchers conducting video studies to understand patient-clinician interaction in primary care settings. We reviewed studies in the literature which used video methods in health care research, and we also used our own experience based on the video studies we conducted in primary care settings. This paper highlighted the benefits of using video techniques, such as multi-channel recording and video coding, and compared "unmanned" video recording with the traditional observation method in primary care research. We proposed a list that can be followed step by step to conduct an effective video study in a primary care setting for a given problem. This paper also described obstacles, researchers should anticipate when using video recording methods in future studies. With the new technological improvements, video-based observation research is becoming a promising method in primary care and HFE research. Video recording has been under-utilised as a data collection tool because of confidentiality and privacy issues. However, it has many benefits as opposed to traditional observations, and recent studies using video recording methods have introduced new research areas and approaches.

  16. Fluorescence Lifetime and UV-Vis Spectroscopy to Evaluate the Interactions Between Quercetin and Its Yeast Microcapsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham-Hoang, Bao-Ngoc; Winckler, Pascale; Waché, Yves

    2018-01-01

    Quercetin is a fragile bioactive compound. Several works have tried to preserve it by encapsulation but the form of encapsulation (mono- or supra-molecular structure, tautomeric form), though important for stability and bioavailability, remains unknown. The present work aims at developing a fluorescence lifetime technique to evaluate the structure of quercetin during encapsulation in a vector capsule that has already proven efficiency, yeast cells. Molecular stabilization was observed during a 4-month storage period. The time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) technique was used to evaluate the interaction between quercetin molecules and the yeast capsule. The various tautomeric forms, as identified by UV-Vis spectroscopy, result in various lifetimes in TCSPC, although they varied also with the buffer environment. Quercetin in buffer exhibited a three-to-four longer long-time after 24 h (changing from 6-7 to 18-23 ns), suggesting an aggregation of molecules. In yeast microcapsules, the long-time population exhibited a longer lifetime (around 27 ns) from the beginning and concerned about 20% of molecules compared to dispersed quercetin. This shows that lifetime analysis can show the monomolecular instability of quercetin in buffer and the presence of interactions between quercetin molecules and their microcapsules. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Designing and Evaluating Tutoring Feedback Strategies for digital learning environments on the basis of the Interactive Tutoring Feedback Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Narciss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the interactive tutoring feedback model (ITF-model; Narciss, 2006; 2008, and how it can be applied to the design and evaluation of feedback strategies for digital learning environments. The ITF-model conceptualizes formative tutoring feedback as a multidimensional instructional activity that aims at contributing to the regulation of a learning process in order to help learners acquire or improve the competencies needed to master learning tasks. It integrates findings from systems theory with recommendations of prior research on interactive instruction and elaborated feedback, on task analyses, on error analyses, and on tutoring techniques. Based on this multi-dimensional view of formative tutoring feedback methodological implications for designing and investigating multiple effects of feedback under multiple individual and situational conditions are described. Furthermore, the paper outlines how the implications of the ITF-model have been applied in several studies to the design and evaluation of tutoring feedback strategies for digital learning environments (e.g., Narciss, 2004; Narciss & Huth, 2006; Narciss, Schnaubert, Andres, Eichelmann, Goguadze, & Sosnovsky, 2013.

  18. Evaluation of a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography design space for sugars and sugar alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetrick, Evan M; Kramer, Timothy T; Risley, Donald S

    2017-03-17

    Based on a column-screening exercise, a column ranking system was developed for sample mixtures containing any combination of 26 sugar and sugar alcohol analytes using 16 polar stationary phases in the HILIC mode with acetonitrile/water or acetone/water mobile phases. Each analyte was evaluated on the HILIC columns with gradient elution and the subsequent chromatography data was compiled into a statistical software package where any subset of the analytes can be selected and the columns are then ranked by the greatest separation. Since these analytes lack chromophores, aerosol-based detectors, including an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) and a charged aerosol detector (CAD) were employed for qualitative and quantitative detection. Example qualitative applications are provided to illustrate the practicality and efficiency of this HILIC column ranking. Furthermore, the design-space approach was used as a starting point for a quantitative method for the trace analysis of glucose in trehalose samples in a complex matrix. Knowledge gained from evaluating the design-space led to rapid development of a capable method as demonstrated through validation of the following parameters: specificity, accuracy, precision, linearity, limit of quantitation, limit of detection, and range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of a high visibility enforcement project focused on passenger vehicles interacting with commercial vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, F Dennis; Blomberg, Richard D; Peck, Raymond C; Cosgrove, Linda A; Salzberg, Philip M

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, Washington State applied NHTSA's High Visibility Enforcement model used in the Click It or Ticket seat belt campaign in an attempt to reduce unsafe driving behaviors around commercial motor vehicles (CMVs). The program was called Ticketing Aggressive Cars and Trucks (TACT). This paper details the methods used to evaluate the program's effectiveness and the results of the evaluation. Four high-crash interstate highway corridors, each approximately 25 miles in length, were selected. Two of these corridors received TACT media messages and increased enforcement over an 18-month period while two comparison corridors did not receive any increased media or enforcement. A total of 4,737 contacts were made with drivers during the two enforcement waves, and 72% of these contacts led to a citation. Drivers at the intervention sites who said they saw or heard any of the TACT messages increased from 17.7% in the pre period to a high of 67.3% in the post periods. Drivers at the intervention sites also reported increased exposure to the core message of leaving more space when passing trucks (14% pre to 40% post period). The percentage of drivers who said they leave more room when passing trucks than when passing cars rose from 16% in the pre period to 24% in the post period at the intervention sites, while comparison sites showed no change. Over 150 hours of video recorded by law enforcement officers in unmarked vehicles were utilized to examine violation rates and severity of violations before and after the intervention campaigns. Statistical analyses showed that violation rates were reduced significantly at the intervention sites (between 23% and 46%), while remaining constant at the comparison sites. Analyses of the video data also showed that the seriousness of the residual violations at the intervention sites decreased. Overall, the evaluation results provide a consistent picture of the effectiveness of the TACT pilot project. Success was demonstrated at every step

  20. Evaluation of the Interaction between the Poincianella pyramidalis (Tul. LP Queiroz Extract and Antimicrobials Using Biological and Analytical Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago P Chaves

    Full Text Available Poincianella pyramidalis (Tul. LP Queiroz (Fabaceae is an endemic tree of northeastern Brazil, occurring mainly in the Caatinga. Its medicinal use is widespread and is an important therapeutic option against diarrhea, dysentery, and respiratory and urinary infections, among other diseases. In this study we determined the chemical marker and evaluated the interaction between P. pyramidalis extract and a commercial antimicrobial through the use of biological and analytical models. To obtain the extract, an ethanol-water mixture (50:50 v/v was used as solvent. It was nebulized in a spray dryer using colloidal silicon dioxide as a drying adjuvant. The extract (ENPp was subjected to HPLC analysis to verify the presence of certain secondary metabolites. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of the extract against Gram-negative bacteria was determined by broth microdilution and the MIC of synthetic antimicrobial drugs in the presence and absence of the extract. The antioxidant activity of ENPp was evaluated by the DPPH method. The compatibility between the antimicrobial and the extract was evaluated by thermal analysis (TG/DTA. The acute toxicity of the extract was evaluated in vivo in rodents. The results indicate significant additive action of the extract on synthetic antibiotics, considerable antioxidant activity and absence of toxicity. This extract shows high potential for the development of formulations for antimicrobial therapy when used with a vegetable-active ingredient.

  1. Development and Use of an Interactive Computerized Dog Model to Evaluate Cranial Nerve Knowledge in Veterinary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogert, K; Platt, Simon; Haley, Allison; Kent, Marc; Edwards, Gaylen; Dookwah, H; Johnsen, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, the cognitive skills necessary to interpret neurological disorders from text-based case descriptions may not translate into the diagnostic capabilities required for clinical neurological patients. As live animals exhibiting certain specific neurological disorders are infrequent during a student's exposure to clinics, students may graduate without the experience necessary to make an accurate diagnosis in the field. To address this, we have developed a computerized simulated dog head that can exhibit cranial nerve dysfunctions and respond to specific testing procedures in a clinically accurate manner. To evaluate whether this type of model could add value to traditional student assessments, we created a multiple-choice quiz system with three types of questions: standard text-based cases, videos of an expert performing an examination of the simulated dog, and an interactive version requiring the student to perform an appropriate examination of the simulated dog to uncover the lesion localization. In an experiment conducted with 97 freshman veterinary students who had recently been taught cranial nerve anatomy and function, we found that examination performance decreased with the need for interactivity compared to memorization of fact, while satisfaction increased. Students were less likely to identify the correct disorder when they had to conduct the examination of the virtual dog themselves, revealing an inadequacy in traditional neuroanatomical teaching. However, students overwhelmingly supported the use of interactive question for assessment. Interestingly, performance on text-based questions did not correlate significantly with interactive or video questions. The results have implications for veterinary teaching and assessment within the classroom and in clinical environments.

  2. Critical evaluation of dipolar, acid-base and charge interactions I. Electron displacement within and between molecules, liquids and semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenholm, Jarl B

    2017-09-01

    Specific dipolar, acid-base and charge interactions involve electron displacements. For atoms, single bonds and molecules electron displacement is characterized by electronic potential, absolute hardness, electronegativity and electron gap. In addition, dissociation, bonding, atomization, formation, ionization, affinity and lattice enthalpies are required to quantify the electron displacement in solids. Semiconductors are characterized by valence and conduction band energies, electron gaps and average Fermi energies which in turn determine Galvani potentials of the bulk, space charge layer and surface states. Electron displacement due to interaction between (probe) molecules, liquids and solids are characterized by parameters such as Hamaker constant, solubility parameter, exchange energy density, surface tension, work of adhesion and immersion. They are determined from permittivity, refractive index, enthalpy of vaporization, molar volume, surface pressure and contact angle. Moreover, acidic and basic probes may form adducts which are adsorbed on target substrates in order to establish an indirect measure of polarity, acidity, basicity or hydrogen bonding. Acidic acceptor numbers (AN), basic donor numbers (DN), acidic and basic "electrostatic" (E) and "covalent" (C) parameters determined by enthalpy of adduct formation are considered as general acid-base scales. However, the formal grounds for assignments as dispersive, Lifshitz-van der Waals, polar, acid, base and hydrogen bond interactions are inconsistent. Although correlations are found no of the parameters are mutually fully compatible and moreover the enthalpies of acid-base interaction do not correspond to free energies. In this review the foundations of different acid-base parameters relating to electron displacement within and between (probe) molecules, liquids and (semiconducting) solids are thoroughly investigated and their mutual relationships are evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  3. Screening Evaluation of the Interaction of Linear-Chain or Branched-Chain Peptides with Multilamellar Vesicle, Using Confocal Laser Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Junko; Marume, Tetsuya; Mita, Hajime

    2017-06-01

    In the present research, we prepared an acidic liposome as a cell model and used confocal laser microscopy to evaluate its interaction with oligopeptides that had high membrane permeability or affinity. The results showed that, for short peptides of about ten residues, the positive charge peptides interacted with the acidic liposome strongly. For peptides that interacted with the liposome, no difference was found between linear-chain and branched-chain peptides due to their structure.

  4. Evaluation of Nutrient Rresource and Crop Diversity Interaction on Radiation Use Efficiency in Different Cropping Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Azizi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing interest to use multiple cropping was due to potential of these planting patterns for increasing yield by improved resource use efficiency such as radiation use efficiency (RUE. In order to investigate the effects of plant diversity and nutrient resource on radiation use efficiency, an experiment was conducted as split plot based on complete randomized block design with three replications at the Agricultural Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran, during 2006 and 2007. Treatments included manure and chemical fertilizers as main plots and intercropping of 3 soybean varieties (Wiliams, Sahar and Gorgan3, intercropping of 3 Millet species (common millet, foxtail millet and pearl millet, intercropping of millet, soybean, sesame (Sesamum indicum and intercropping of millet, sesame, fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum, ajowan (Trachyspermum ammi as sub plots. Results indicated that in the manure and chemical fertilizer treatments, LAI of plants in intercropping decreased compared to monoculture. The effect of planting pattern on RUE was significant. In monocultures, common millet and soybean (Wiliams and Gorgan3 varieties had highest RUE based on photosynthetic active radiation (PAR. The lowest RUE was obtained in sesame and foxtail millet monocultures. In the intercropping systems, when functional diversity increased, radiation use efficiency was increased, so that maximum of RUE (3.31 g.MJ-1 was obtained in 4 species intercropping (common millet, sesame, fenugreek and ajowan. Minimum of RUE (1.96 g.MJ-1 was observed in intercropping of 3 millet species. The interaction of planting pattern and nutrient resource on RUE was significant. In general, the highest RUE was observed in 4 species intercropping (common millet, sesame, fenugreek and ajowan with manure treatment.

  5. Evaluation of the Interaction between NMDA Receptors of Nucleus Accumbens and Muscarinic Receptors in Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Taheri

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Whereas studies have indicated the interaction between NMDA and cholinergic systems, this study was performed with the aim of determining the role of NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens (NAc in scopolamine-induced amnesia.Methods: In this study, at first rats were anesthetized with intra-peritoneal injection of ketamine hydrochloride plus xylazine, and then placed in a stereotaxic apparatus. Two stainless-steel cannulas were placed 2mm above nucleus accumbens shell. All animals were allowed to recover for one week, before beginning the behavioral testing. Then, animals were trained in a step-through type inhibitory avoidance task. The drugs were injected after successful training and before testing. The animals were tested 24h after training, and the step-through latency time was measured as the memory criterion in male Wistar rats. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s test were used for analysis of the data. p<0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: Intra-nucleus accumbens (intra-NAc injection of scopolamine or NMDA caused impairment in memory in rats. Although, co-administration of an ineffective dose of NMDA with an ineffective dose of scopolamine had no significant effect on memory performance, effective doses of NMDA prevented the amnesic effect of scopolamine on inhibitory avoidance memory. On the other hand, intra-NAc injection of NMDA receptor antagonist, i.e., MK-801 caused no change in memory performance by itself, and its co-administration with an effective dose of scopolamine could not prevent the impairing effect of the latter drug. Conclusion: The finding of this study indicated that NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens are involved in the modulation of scopolamine-induced amnesia.

  6. Evaluation of an interactive web-based nursing course with streaming videos for medication administration skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowan, Azizeh K; Idhail, Jamila Abu

    2014-08-01

    Nursing students should exhibit competence in nursing skills in order to provide safe and quality patient care. This study describes the design and students' response to an interactive web-based course using streaming video technology tailored to students' needs and the course objectives of the fundamentals of nursing skills clinical course. A mixed-methodology design was used to describe the experience of 102 first-year undergraduate nursing students at a school of nursing in Jordan who were enrolled in the course. A virtual course with streaming videos was designed to demonstrate medication administration fundamental skills. The videos recorded the ideal lab demonstration of the skills, and real-world practice performed by registered nurses for patients in a hospital setting. After course completion, students completed a 30-item satisfaction questionnaire, 8 self-efficacy scales, and a 4-item scale solicited their preferences of using the virtual course as a substitute or a replacement of the lab demonstration. Students' grades in the skill examination of the procedures were measured. Relationships between the main variables and predictors of satisfaction and self-efficacy were examined. Students were satisfied with the virtual course (3.9 ± 0.56, out of a 5-point scale) with a high-perceived overall self-efficacy (4.38 ± 0.42, out of a 5-point scale). Data showed a significant correlation between student satisfaction, self-efficacy and achievement in the virtual course (r = 0.45-0.49, p streaming videos for clinical courses is a complex process that should be carefully designed to positively influence the learning experience. However, the learning benefits gained from such pedagogical approach are worth faculty, institution and students' efforts. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Evaluating a technology supported interactive response system during the laboratory section of a histology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Vera D; Lorr, Nancy A; Williams, Kimberly

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring of student learning through systematic formative assessment is important for adjusting pedagogical strategies. However, traditional formative assessments, such as quizzes and written assignments, may not be sufficiently timely for making adjustments to a learning process. Technology supported formative assessment tools assess student knowledge, allow for immediate feedback, facilitate classroom dialogues, and have the potential to modify student learning strategies. As an attempt to integrate technology supported formative assessment in the laboratory section of an upper-level histology course, the interactive application Learning Catalytics TM , a cloud-based assessment system, was used. This study conducted during the 2015 Histology courses at Cornell University concluded that this application is helpful for identifying student misconceptions "on-the-go," engaging otherwise marginalized students, and forming a new communication venue between students and instructors. There was no overall difference between grades from topics that used the application and grades from those that did not, and students reported that it only slightly helped improve their understanding of the topic (3.8 ± 0.99 on a five-point Likert scale). However, they highly recommended using it (4.2 ± 0.71). The major limitation was regarding the image display and graphical resolution of this application. Even though students embrace the use of technology, 39% reported benefits of having the traditional light microscope available. This cohort of students led instructors to conclude that the newest tools are not always better, but rather can complement traditional instruction methods. Anat Sci Educ 10: 328-338. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  8. [Evaluation of digital educational student-technology interaction in neonatal nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Fernanda Salim Ferreira de; Dias, Danielle Monteiro Vilela; Higarashi, Ieda Harumi; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti

    2015-02-01

    To assess the digital educational technology interface Caring for the sensory environment in the neonatal unit: noise, lighting and handling based on ergonomic criteria. Descriptive study, in which we used the guidelines and ergonomic criteria established by ISO 9241-11 and an online Likert scale instrument to identify problems and interface qualities. The instrument was built based on Ergolist, which follows the criteria of ISO 9141-11. There were 58 undergraduate study participants from the School of Nursing of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, who attended the classes about neonatal nursing content. All items were positively evaluated by more than 70% of the sample. Educational technology is appropriate according to the ergonomic criteria and can be made available for teaching nursing students.

  9. Man/terminal interaction evaluation of computer operating system command and control service concepts. [in Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, D. W.; Shields, N. L., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The Experiment Computer Operating System (ECOS) of the Spacelab will allow the onboard Payload Specialist to command experiment devices and display information relative to the performance of experiments. Three candidate ECOS command and control service concepts were reviewed and laboratory data on operator performance was taken for each concept. The command and control service concepts evaluated included a dedicated operator's menu display from which all command inputs were issued, a dedicated command key concept with which command inputs could be issued from any display, and a multi-display concept in which command inputs were issued from several dedicated function displays. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed in terms of training, operational errors, task performance time, and subjective comments of system operators.

  10. Evaluacion de la Interaccion Adulto-Nino en Aulas Pre-escolares de Concepcion, Chile. [Evaluation Adult-Child Interaction in Preschool Classrooms of Concepcion, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiesen De G., Maria Elena; Herrera G., Maria Olivia; Villalon B., Malva; Suzuky S., Emy

    2000-01-01

    Presents findings from investigation of the validity of the Arnett Caregiver Interaction Scale, CIS (1989), in preschools in Concepcion, Chile. Demonstrates the reliability and validity of the scale to evaluate the interaction of the childhood educator with young children, suggesting changes to the scale. Notes differences found for school type.…

  11. Evaluation of potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between armodafinil and risperidone in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mona; Bond, Mary; Yang, Ronghua; Hellriegel, Edward T; Robertson, Philmore

    2015-11-01

    Patients with bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia have an increased risk of obstructive sleep apnea. The effects of armodafinil, a weak cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 inducer, on pharmacokinetics and safety of risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic used to treat major psychiatric illness, were investigated. Healthy subjects received 2 mg risperidone alone and after armodafinil pretreatment (titrated to 250 mg/day). Pharmacokinetic parameters were derived from plasma concentrations of risperidone and its active metabolite, 9-hydroxyrisperidone (formed via CYP2D6 and CYP3A4), collected before and over 4 days after risperidone administration, and from steady-state plasma concentrations of armodafinil and its circulating metabolites, R-modafinil acid and modafinil sulfone. Safety and tolerability were assessed. Thirty-six subjects receiving study drug were evaluable for safety; 34 were evaluable for pharmacokinetics. Risperidone maximum plasma concentration (C max) decreased from mean 16.5 ng/mL when given alone to 9.2 ng/mL after armodafinil pretreatment (geometric mean ratio [90 % CI] 0.55 [0.50-0.61]); area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0-∞) decreased from 92.3 to 44.5 ng·h/mL (geometric mean ratio [90 % CI] 0.51 [0.46-0.55]). C max and AUC0-∞ for 9-hydroxyrisperidone were also reduced (geometric mean ratios [90 % CI] 0.81 [0.77-0.85] and 0.73 [0.69-0.77], respectively). Adverse events were consistent with known safety profiles. Consistent with CYP3A4 induction, risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone systemic exposure was reduced in the presence of armodafinil. Concomitant armodafinil and risperidone use may necessitate risperidone dosage adjustment, particularly when starting or stopping coadministration of the two drugs. However, any such decision should be based on patient disease state and clinical status.

  12. Man vs. Machine: An interactive poll to evaluate hydrological model performance of a manual and an automatic calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesemann, Johannes; Burgholzer, Reinhard; Herrnegger, Mathew; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, a lot of research in hydrological modelling has been invested to improve the automatic calibration of rainfall-runoff models. This includes for example (1) the implementation of new optimisation methods, (2) the incorporation of new and different objective criteria and signatures in the optimisation and (3) the usage of auxiliary data sets apart from runoff. Nevertheless, in many applications manual calibration is still justifiable and frequently applied. The hydrologist performing the manual calibration, with his expert knowledge, is able to judge the hydrographs simultaneously concerning details but also in a holistic view. This integrated eye-ball verification procedure available to man can be difficult to formulate in objective criteria, even when using a multi-criteria approach. Comparing the results of automatic and manual calibration is not straightforward. Automatic calibration often solely involves objective criteria such as Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency Coefficient or the Kling-Gupta-Efficiency as a benchmark during the calibration. Consequently, a comparison based on such measures is intrinsically biased towards automatic calibration. Additionally, objective criteria do not cover all aspects of a hydrograph leaving questions concerning the quality of a simulation open. This contribution therefore seeks to examine the quality of manually and automatically calibrated hydrographs by interactively involving expert knowledge in the evaluation. Simulations have been performed for the Mur catchment in Austria with the rainfall-runoff model COSERO using two parameter sets evolved from a manual and an automatic calibration. A subset of resulting hydrographs for observation and simulation, representing the typical flow conditions and events, will be evaluated in this study. In an interactive crowdsourcing approach experts attending the session can vote for their preferred simulated hydrograph without having information on the calibration method that

  13. The development and evaluation of an interactive videodisc system to train radiation therapy technology students on the use of the linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. The first part was to describe the development and evaluation of an interactive videodisc system to train radiation therapy technology students how to treat malignancies using a Linear Accelerator. The second part of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the interactive videodisc system as a simulation. The Gagne-Briggs instructional model was adapted to develop the interactive videodisc system. A model emerged as part of the project to conduct the formative evaluation of the prototype. A quasiexperimental research design was used to conduct the summative evaluation with two groups of first-year Radiation Therapy Technology students who entered the program in consecutive years. All testing and evaluation instruments were developed for the study with the exception of the clinical evaluation form. This latter form was already being used at the clinical sites. T-tests were used to analyze all data. A significant difference in cognitive achievement was evidenced between students exposed to the interactive videodisc system and students who were not exposed to the system. There was no significant difference found in clinical performance achievement and in attitude toward the clinical experience between both sets of participants. Instructor time was reduced by 1 and 1/2 hours for students on the interactive videodisc system. In conclusion, the interactive videodisc system was found to be more effective as an instructional method for cognitive achievement and as equally an effective method preparing students for clinical performance

  14. Anthraquinone-chalcone hybrids: synthesis, preliminary antiproliferative evaluation and DNA-interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Violeta; Debeljak, Nevena; Stanojković, Tatjana; Kolundžija, Branka; Sladić, Dušan; Vujčić, Miroslava; Janović, Barbara; Tanić, Nikola; Perović, Milka; Tešić, Vesna; Antić, Jadranka; Joksović, Milan D

    2015-01-07

    Novel anthraquinone based chalcone compounds were synthesized starting from 1-acetylanthraquinone in a Claisen-Schmidt reaction and evaluated for their anticancer potential against three human cancer cell lines. Compounds 4a, 4b and 4j showed promising activity in inhibition of HeLa cells with IC50 values ranging from 2.36 to 2.73 μM and low cytotoxicity against healthy MRC-5 cell lines. The effects that compounds produces on the cell cycle were investigated by flow cytometry. It was found that 4a, 4b and 4j cause the accumulation of cells in the S and G2/M phases in a dose-dependent manner and induce caspase-dependent apoptosis. All of three compounds exhibit calf thymus DNA-binding activity. The determined binding constants by absorption titrations (2.65 × 10(3) M(-1), 1.36 × 10(3) M(-1)and 2.51 × 10(3) M(-1) of 4a/CT-DNA, 4b/CT-DNA and 4j/CT-DNA, respectively) together with fluorescence displacement analysis designate 4a, 4b and 4j as strong minor groove binders, but no cleavage of plasmid DNA was observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Performance evaluation of an interactive teleradiology system for real-time teleconsultation in different network environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian Ping; Gong Jun; Zhuang Jun; Sun Jianyong; Yang Yuanyuan; Zhang Jianguo; Meng Lili

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Measure the performance of self-developed Interoperable teleradiology system at various communication conditions. Methods: Through three different network media ( satellite network, Asymmetrical Digital Subscriber Loop (ADSL), and Shanghai health system's private broadband WAN), Digital images in radiology were transmitted and experiments on teleradiology consultation were applied. Results such as transmission time were recorded, effects of real-time consultation were evaluated subjectively, and experimental data were analyzed. Results: In satellite network, time spent on the transmission of images is long and effects of consultation is normal; in broadband network, time spent is short and no delay is observed in interoperation. Conclusion: teleconsultation can be hold on image sets composed of small matrix size images and compressed large matrix size images in satellite narrowband network, optimum transmission bandwidth is 192 kbps; original large matrix size images such as CR can be transmitted through broadband network and be used in teleconsultation. Real-time interoperation of the system doesn't require very high bandwidth. It can be implemented at various communication conditions

  16. Ab initio thermodynamic evaluation of Pd atom interaction with CeO(2) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayernick, Adam D; Janik, Michael J

    2009-08-28

    Palladium supported on ceria is an effective catalytic material for three-way automotive catalysis, catalytic combustion, and solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes. The morphology, oxidation state, and particle size of Pd on ceria affect catalytic activity and are a function of experimental conditions. This work utilizes ab initio thermodynamics using density functional theory (DFT) (DFT+U) methods to evaluate the stability of Pd atoms, PdO(x) species, and small Pd particles in varying configurations on CeO(2) (111), (110), and (100) single crystal surfaces. Over specific oxygen partial pressure and temperature ranges, palladium incorporation to form a mixed surface oxide is thermodynamically favorable versus other single Pd atom states on each ceria surface. For example, Pd atoms may incorporate into Ce fluorite lattice positions in a Pd(4+) oxidation state on the CeO(2) (111) surface. The ceria support shifts the transition between formal Pd oxidation states (Pd(0), Pd(2+), Pd(4+)) relative to bulk palladium and stabilizes certain oxidized palladium species on each surface. We show that temperature, oxygen pressure, and cell potential in a SOFC can influence the stable states of palladium supported on ceria surfaces, providing insight into structural stability during catalytic operation.

  17. Evaluating the usability of an interactive, bi-lingual, touchscreen-enabled breastfeeding educational programme: application of Nielson's heuristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ashish; Perin, Douglas M Puricelli; Amadi, Chioma; Trout, Kate

    2015-03-05

    The study purpose was to conduct heuristic evaluation of an interactive, bilingual touchscreen-enabled breastfeeding educational programme for Hispanic women living in rural settings in Nebraska. Three raters conducted the evaluation during May 2013 using principles of Nielson's heuristics. A total of 271 screens were evaluated and included: interface (n = 5), programme sections (n = 223) and educational content (n = 43). A total of 97 heuristic violations were identified and were mostly related to interface (8 violations/5 screens) and programme components (89 violations/266 screens). The most common heuristic violations reported were recognition rather than recall (62%, n = 60), consistency and standards (14%, n = 14) and match between the system and real world (9%, n = 9). Majority of the heuristic violations had minor usability issues (73%, n = 71). The only grade 4 heuristic violation reported was due to the visibility of system status in the assessment modules. The results demonstrated that the system was more consistent with Nielsen's usability heuristics. With Nielsen's usability heuristics, it is possible to identify problems in a timely manner, and help facilitate the identification and prioritisation of problems needing urgent attention at an earlier stage before the final deployment of the system.

  18. Evaluation of long-term interaction between cement and bentonite for geological disposal (1) - Project Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owada, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Daisuke; Yahagi, Ryoji; Ishii, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Bentonitic and cementitious materials are both planned for use as engineered barrier materials in the geological disposal of high level vitrified waste and TRU (transuranic) waste in Japan. As shown in Figure 1, bentonitic material will be placed around the waste packages as buffer material and a large amount of cementitious material is specified for use as filler, structure, support and grout. Cementitious material supplies an alkaline solution with high calcium concentration through reaction with groundwater. However, the alkaline solution will cause chemical and physical alteration of the bentonitic material. Since many important functions of an engineered barrier system (EBS), such as watertightness, chemical buffering, and sorption of radioactive nuclides, will be maintained by the properties of the buffer material, evaluation of long-term chemical or mechanical alteration of the buffer material is necessary to demonstrate the robustness of the EBS. Although many researches on chemical and mechanical alteration of bentonitic material, there was large uncertainty because the chemical alteration of bentonitic material is very slow and the altered region is very limited. In this project, the dissolution rate of montmorillonite under compaction and the spatial distribution of secondary C-S-H precipitation were obtained and mechanical and hydrological changes caused by the mineralogical change of bentonite material were modeled to reduce the uncertainty in the safety assessment of EBS performance. To improve the accuracy of the long term evaluation of the EBS performance, coupled analyses between hydraulic/mechanical calculations and geochemical-mass transport coupled calculations were performed. Alteration of mechanical properties caused by chemical degradation should be modeled for the coupled calculations. Because the mechanical properties of bentonitic material depend strongly on the montmorillonite content and

  19. Evaluation of the interactions between chitosan and humics in media for the controlled release of nitrogen fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Bruno R; Romão, Luciane P C; Doumer, Marta E; Mangrich, Antonio S

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the interactions of peat, humic acids, and humin with urea dispersed in chitosan, in systems intended for the controlled release of urea. Spheres of chitosan with humic material and urea intentionally added to the media were prepared and characterized by means of elemental analysis (CHN), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The spheres possessed functional groups related to humic substances that interacted with the chitosan, and the presence of urea in the media was also confirmed after it has been added. Release experiments demonstrated that the samples released urea in a controlled manner that was dependent on pH, increasing in the order: pH 2.5 humin-urea (CHMU) obtained in the first day of the experiment. The release of urea did not exceed 70% after 7 days. The results demonstrated the potential of using peat, humic acids, and humin, in combination with chitosan, in order to manufacture controlled release urea fertilizers and contribute to reducing adverse environmental and economic impacts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact evaluation of green-grey infrastructure interaction on built-space integrity: an emerging perspective to urban ecosystem service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, Abhishek; Kumar, Prashant

    2014-07-15

    This paper evaluates the role of urban green infrastructure (GI) in maintaining integrity of built-space. The latter is considered as a lateral ecosystem function, worth including in future assessments of integrated ecosystem services. The basic tenet is that integrated green-grey infrastructures (GGIs) would have three influences on built-spaces: (i) reduced wind withering from flow deviation; (ii) reduced material corrosion/degeneration from pollution removal; and (iii) act as a biophysical buffer in altering the micro-climate. A case study is presented, combining the features of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in micro-environmental modelling with the emerging science on interactions of GGIs. The coupled seasonal dynamics of the above three effects are assessed for two building materials (limestone and steel) using the following three scenarios: (i) business as usual (BAU), (ii) summer (REGEN-S), and (iii) winter (REGEN-W). Apparently, integrated ecosystem service from green-grey interaction, as scoped in this paper, has strong seasonal dependence. Compared to BAU our results suggest that REGEN-S leads to slight increment in limestone recession (<10%), mainly from exacerbation in ozone damage, while large reduction in steel recession (up to 37%) is observed. The selection of vegetation species, especially their bVOC emission potential and seasonal foliage profile, appears to play a vital role in determining the impact GI has on the integrity of the neighbouring built-up environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Experimental and analytical studies for a BWR nuclear reactor building. Evaluation of soil-structure interaction behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, N.; Tsushima, Y.

    1975-01-01

    This paper evaluates the spatial characteristics of dynamic properties, especially soil-structure interaction behaviour, of the BWR nuclear building by experimental and analytical studies. It is well known that the damping effects in soil-structure interaction are remarkable on the building with short periods by the dissipation of vibrational energy to the soil. The authors have previously reported an analytical method for estimating the damping effects the properties of which are characterized as follows: 1) The complex damping is used, because the so-called structural damping may be more suitable for estimating the damping effects of an elastic structure. 2) H. Tajimi's theory is used for estimating the dynamical soil-foundation stiffness with the dissipation of vibrational energy on the elastic half-space soil. In this paper, an approximate explanation is presented in regard to the more developmental mathematical method for estimating the damping effects than the above-mentioned previous method, which is 'Modes Superposition Method for Multi-Degrees of Freedom System' with the constant complex stiffness showing the structural damping effects and the dynamical soil-foundation stiffness approximated by the linear or quadratic functions of the eigenvalues. An approximate explanation is presented in regard to the experimental results of the No. 1 reactor building (BWR) of Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, The Chubu Electric Power Co., Ltd. (Auth.)

  2. Evaluation of social interaction, task management, and trust among dental hygiene students in a collaborative learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Catherine D; Keselyak, Nancy T; Simmer-Beck, Melanie; Tira, Daniel

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of collaborative learning on the development of social interaction, task management, and trust in dental hygiene students. These three traits were assessed with the Teamwork Assessment Scale in two different learning environments (traditional lecture/lab and collaborative learning environment). A convenience sample of fifty-six entry-level dental hygiene students taking an introductory/preclinic course at two metropolitan area dental hygiene programs provided comparable experimental and control groups. Factor scores were computed for the three traits, and comparisons were conducted using the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsh multiple comparison procedure among specific cell comparisons generated from a two-factor repeated measures ANOVA. The results indicate that the collaborative learning environment influenced dental hygiene students positively regarding the traits of social interaction, task management, and trust. However, comparing dental hygiene students to undergraduate students overall indicates that dental hygiene students already possess somewhat higher levels of these traits. Future studies on active learning strategies should examine factors such as student achievement and explore other possible active learning methodologies.

  3. Evaluation of Drug-Disease Interactions and Their Association with Unplanned Hospital Readmission Utilizing STOPP Version 2 Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Hau Man Lau

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Early hospital readmission is a common problem among geriatric patients, as they are more susceptible to adverse drug events, which are associated with increased hospital admission. The objective is to examine the association between exposure to potentially inappropriate medications under selected STOPP version 2 criteria related to drug-disease interactions and unplanned early hospitalization within 28 days of index admission in elderly patients prescribed a potentially inappropriate medication. This retrospective single-center study reviewed patients 75 years of age or older that were discharged with 5 or more medications, including at least one selected medication listed in the STOPP version 2 criteria relating to drug-disease interactions. 182 patients, with a mean age of 83.5 years, were included in the study, with anticholinergics being the most common potentially inappropriate medications (22.4%. Potentially inappropriate medications (57.1% vs. 17.1%, p < 0.001, gout (31% vs. 11.5%, p = 0.003, and gastrointestinal disease (11.9% vs. 2.5%, p = 0.026 were shown to increase risk of 28-day readmission, whereas no other factors assessed correlated with readmission. A rapid evaluation of elderly patient discharge medications and concomitant disease states with the aid of the STOPP version 2 criteria could potentially reduce hospital readmissions or emergency department visits.

  4. Evaluation of the genotype, environment and their interaction on carotenoid and ascorbic acid accumulation in tomato germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselló, Salvador; Adalid, Ana Maria; Cebolla-Cornejo, Jaime; Nuez, Fernando

    2011-04-01

    Tomatoes are an important source of antioxidants (carotenoids, vitamin C, etc.) owing to their high level of consumption. There is great interest in developing cultivars with increased levels of lycopene, β-carotene or L-ascorbic acid. There is necessary to survey new sources of variation. In this study, the potential of improvement for each character in tomato breeding programmes, in a single or joint approach, and the nature of genotype (G), environment (E) and G × E interaction effects in the expression of these characters were investigated. The content of lycopene, β-carotene and ascorbic acid determined was very high in some phenotypes (up to 281, 35 and 346 mg kg(-1) respectively). The important differences in the three environments studied (with some stressing conditions in several situations) had a remarkable influence in the phenotypic expression of the functional characters evaluated. Nevertheless, the major contribution came from the genotypic effect along with a considerable G × E interaction. The joint accumulation of lycopene and β-carotene has a high genetic component. It is possible to select elite genotypes with high content of both carotenoids in tomato breeding programmes but multi-environment trials are recommended. The improvement of ascorbic acid content is more difficult because the interference of uncontrolled factors mask the real genetic potential. Among the accessions evaluated, there are four accessions with an amazing genetic potential for functional properties that can be used as donor parents in tomato breeding programmes or for direct consumption in quality markets. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Quantum Mechanical Calculation of Noncovalent Interactions: A Large-Scale Evaluation of PMx, DFT, and SAPT Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations of noncovalent interactions are uniquely useful as tools to test and improve molecular mechanics force fields and to model the forces involved in biomolecular binding and folding. Because the more computationally tractable QM methods necessarily include approximations, which risk degrading accuracy, it is essential to evaluate such methods by comparison with high-level reference calculations. Here, we use the extensive Benchmark Energy and Geometry Database (BEGDB) of CCSD(T)/CBS reference results to evaluate the accuracy and speed of widely used QM methods for over 1200 chemically varied gas-phase dimers. In particular, we study the semiempirical PM6 and PM7 methods; density functional theory (DFT) approaches B3LYP, B97-D, M062X, and ωB97X-D; and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) approach. For the PM6 and DFT methods, we also examine the effects of post hoc corrections for hydrogen bonding (PM6-DH+, PM6-DH2), halogen atoms (PM6-DH2X), and dispersion (DFT-D3 with zero and Becke–Johnson damping). Several orders of the SAPT expansion are also compared, ranging from SAPT0 up to SAPT2+3, where computationally feasible. We find that all DFT methods with dispersion corrections, as well as SAPT at orders above SAPT2, consistently provide dimer interaction energies within 1.0 kcal/mol RMSE across all systems. We also show that a linear scaling of the perturbative energy terms provided by the fast SAPT0 method yields similar high accuracy, at particularly low computational cost. The energies of all the dimer systems from the various QM approaches are included in the Supporting Information, as are the full SAPT2+(3) energy decomposition for a subset of over 1000 systems. The latter can be used to guide the parametrization of molecular mechanics force fields on a term-by-term basis. PMID:24803867

  6. Yakima River Species Interactions Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Temple, Gabriel M.; Fritts, Anthony L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2005-05-01

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the thirteenth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003, Pearsons et al. 2004). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may

  7. Comparative Human and Automatic Evaluation of Glass-Box and Black-Box Approaches to Interactive Translation Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torregrosa Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Interactive translation prediction (ITP is a modality of computer-aided translation that assists professional translators by offering context-based computer-generated continuation suggestions as they type. While most state-of-the-art ITP systems follow a glass-box approach, meaning that they are tightly coupled to an adapted machine translation system, a black-box approach which does not need access to the inner workings of the bilingual resources used to generate the suggestions has been recently proposed in the literature: this new approach allows new sources of bilingual information to be included almost seamlessly. In this paper, we compare for the first time the glass-box and the black-box approaches by means of an automatic evaluation of translation tasks between related languages such as English–Spanish and unrelated ones such as Arabic–English and English–Chinese, showing that, with our setup, 20%–50% of keystrokes could be saved using either method and that the black-box approach outperformed the glass-box one in five out of six scenarios operating under similar conditions. We also performed a preliminary human evaluation of English to Spanish translation for both approaches. On average, the evaluators saved 10% keystrokes and were 4% faster with the black-box approach, and saved 15% keystrokes and were 12% slower with the glass-box one; but they could have saved 51% and 69% keystrokes respectively if they had used all the compatible suggestions. Users felt the suggestions helped them to translate faster and easier. All the tools used to perform the evaluation are available as free/open–source software.

  8. Application and evaluation of interactive 3D PDF for presenting and sharing planning results for liver surgery in clinical routine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Newe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: The Portable Document Format (PDF is the de-facto standard for the exchange of electronic documents. It is platform-independent, suitable for the exchange of medical data, and allows for the embedding of three-dimensional (3D surface mesh models. In this article, we present the first clinical routine application of interactive 3D surface mesh models which have been integrated into PDF files for the presentation and the exchange of Computer Assisted Surgery Planning (CASP results in liver surgery. We aimed to prove the feasibility of applying 3D PDF in medical reporting and investigated the user experience with this new technology. METHODS: We developed an interactive 3D PDF report document format and implemented a software tool to create these reports automatically. After more than 1000 liver CASP cases that have been reported in clinical routine using our 3D PDF report, an international user survey was carried out online to evaluate the user experience. RESULTS: Our solution enables the user to interactively explore the anatomical configuration and to have different analyses and various resection proposals displayed within a 3D PDF document covering only a single page that acts more like a software application than like a typical PDF file ("PDF App". The new 3D PDF report offers many advantages over the previous solutions. According to the results of the online survey, the users have assessed the pragmatic quality (functionality, usability, perspicuity, efficiency as well as the hedonic quality (attractiveness, novelty very positively. CONCLUSION: The usage of 3D PDF for reporting and sharing CASP results is feasible and well accepted by the target audience. Using interactive PDF with embedded 3D models is an enabler for presenting and exchanging complex medical information in an easy and platform-independent way. Medical staff as well as patients can benefit from the possibilities provided by 3D PDF. Our results open

  9. Evaluation of toxic and interactive toxic effects of three agrochemicals and copper using a battery of microbiotests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kungolos, A; Emmanouil, C; Tsiridis, V; Tsiropoulos, N

    2009-08-01

    Three commonly used test organisms of different trophic levels (Vibrio fischeri, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Daphnia magna) were exposed to selected agrochemicals (fosthiazate, metalaxyl-M, imidacloprid) and copper, in single doses or in binary mixtures. The toxicity of each single compound varied up to two orders of magnitude, depending on the test species examined. V. fischeri was the most sensitive test organism regarding fosthiazate and metalaxyl-M, indicating an IC(50) value of 0.20 mg/L (0.17-0.25 mg/L) and 0.88 mg/L (0.35-1.57 mg/L), respectively. Imidacloprid was the least toxic compound, indicating an EC(50) value on D. magna of 64.6 mg/L (43.3-122.5 mg/L) and an IC(50) value on V. fischeri of 226 mg/L (159-322 mg/L), while for imidacloprid at a concentration of 1000 mg/L the effect on P. subcapitata was lower than 50%. Copper was the most toxic compound towards all test organisms exhibiting the highest toxic effect on P. subcapitata, with an IC(50) value of 0.05 mg/L (0.003-0.008 mg/L). The toxic effects of the binary mixtures have been compared to the theoretically expected effect, resulting from a simple mathematical model based on the theory of probabilities. The independent action model was used in order to predict the theoretically expected effect. The interactive effects were mostly antagonistic or additive, while in few cases (interactive effects of metalaxyl-M and copper on V. fischeri) a synergistic mode of action was observed for some concentration combinations. Experiments showed that interactive effects of chemicals may vary depending on the test species used as well as on the chemicals and their respective concentrations. Although most of the concentrations of chemicals tested in this study are higher than the ones usually found in natural environment, the evaluation of their interactive toxic effects using a battery of bioassays may comprise a useful tool for the estimation of the environmental hazard of chemicals.

  10. Application and evaluation of interactive 3D PDF for presenting and sharing planning results for liver surgery in clinical routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newe, Axel; Becker, Linda; Schenk, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The Portable Document Format (PDF) is the de-facto standard for the exchange of electronic documents. It is platform-independent, suitable for the exchange of medical data, and allows for the embedding of three-dimensional (3D) surface mesh models. In this article, we present the first clinical routine application of interactive 3D surface mesh models which have been integrated into PDF files for the presentation and the exchange of Computer Assisted Surgery Planning (CASP) results in liver surgery. We aimed to prove the feasibility of applying 3D PDF in medical reporting and investigated the user experience with this new technology. We developed an interactive 3D PDF report document format and implemented a software tool to create these reports automatically. After more than 1000 liver CASP cases that have been reported in clinical routine using our 3D PDF report, an international user survey was carried out online to evaluate the user experience. Our solution enables the user to interactively explore the anatomical configuration and to have different analyses and various resection proposals displayed within a 3D PDF document covering only a single page that acts more like a software application than like a typical PDF file ("PDF App"). The new 3D PDF report offers many advantages over the previous solutions. According to the results of the online survey, the users have assessed the pragmatic quality (functionality, usability, perspicuity, efficiency) as well as the hedonic quality (attractiveness, novelty) very positively. The usage of 3D PDF for reporting and sharing CASP results is feasible and well accepted by the target audience. Using interactive PDF with embedded 3D models is an enabler for presenting and exchanging complex medical information in an easy and platform-independent way. Medical staff as well as patients can benefit from the possibilities provided by 3D PDF. Our results open the door for a wider use of this new technology, since the basic idea

  11. Evaluation of the interactions between human serum albumin (HSA and warfarin or diflunisal by using molecular fluorescence using two approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Amézqueta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Serum albumin is the main drug transporter of the bloodstream and contains two main binding sites:  Sudlow I or acidic drug binding site, and Sudlow II or benzodiazepine binding site. Warfarin, a well-known anticoagulant drug commonly used in the prevention of thrombosis and thromboembolism, binds to Sudlow I site, whereas non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as diflunisal bind preferentially to Sudlow II site.  Albumin is a fluorophore that modifies its fluorescence (quenching or enhancement effect when it is bound to a drug. The application of the double logarithm Stern-Volmer equation allows the calculation of the stoichiometry and the binding constant of the process. This procedure does not consider the possible interferences coming from the fluorescence of the drug though. Another strategy to evaluate the binding constants is to consider the whole spectrum, taking into account all the possible species in equilibrium; in this case we have used an extended version of the STAR program, which can deal with 300 spectra, each containing up to 300 data points. The aim of this work is to compare both approaches to evaluate the interaction between warfarin (Sudlow I and diflunisal (Sudlow II and HSA: the double logarithm Stern-Volmer equation and the STAR program.

  12. Evaluation of sloshing resistance performance for LNG carrier insulation system based on fluid-structure interaction analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Seung Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the sloshing resistance performance of a huge-size LNG carrier's insulation system is evaluated by the fluid-structure interaction (FSI analysis. To do this, the global-local analysis which is based on the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE method is adopted to accurately calculate the structural behavior induced by internal LNG sloshing of a KC-1 type LNG carrier insulation system. During the global analysis, the sloshing flow and hydrodynamic pressure of internal LNG are analyzed by postulating the flexible insulation system as a rigid body. In addition, during the local analysis, the local hydroelastic response of the LNG carrier insulation system is computed by solving the local hydroelastic model where the entire and flexible insulation system is adopted and the numerical analysis results of the global analysis such as initial and boundary conditions are implemented into the local finite element model. The proposed novel analysis techniques can potentially be used to evaluate the structural integrity of LNG carrier insulation systems.

  13. Incorporating stakeholders' preferences for ex ante evaluation of energy and climate policy interactions. Development of a Multi Criteria Analysis weighting methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grafakos, S.; Zevgolis, D.; Oikonomou, V.

    2008-03-01

    Evaluation of energy and climate policy interactions is a complex issue which has not been addressed systematically. Multi Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) evaluation processes have been applied widely to different policy and decision cases as they have the ability to cope with high complexity, by structuring and analyzing the policy problem in a transparent and systematic way. Criteria weights elicitation techniques are developed within the framework of MCDA to integrate stakeholders' preferential information in the decision making and evaluation process. There are variant methods to determine criteria weights which can be used in various ways for different policy evaluation purposes. During decision making, policy makers and relevant stakeholders implicitly or explicitly express their relative importance between the evaluation criteria by assigning weighting factors to them. More particular, climate change policy problems lack a simple, transparent and structured way to incorporate stakeholders' views and values. In order to incorporate stakeholders' weighting preferences into an ex ante evaluation of climate change and energy policy instruments interaction, an integrative constructive weighting methodology has been developed. This paper presents the main characteristics of evaluation of energy and climate policy interactions, the reasoning behind the development of the weighting tool, its main theoretical and functional characteristics and the results of its application to obtain and incorporate stakeholders' preferences on energy and climate change policy evaluation criteria. The weighting method that has been elaborated and applied to derive stakeholders' preferences for criteria weights is a combination of pair wise comparisons and ratio importance weighting methods. Initially introduces the stakeholders to the evaluation process through a warming up holistic approach for ranking the criteria and then requires them to express their ratio relative importance

  14. Interaction between holo transferrin and HSA-PPIX complex in the presence of lomefloxacin: An evaluation of PPIX aggregation in protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Zohreh; Iranfar, Hediye; Asoodeh, Ahmad; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Mazhari, Mahboobeh; Chamani, Jamshidkhan

    2012-11-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) and holo transferrin (TF) are two serum carrier proteins that are able to interact with each other, thereby altering their binding behavior toward their ligands. During the course of this study, the interaction between HSA-PPIX and TF, in the presence and absence of lomefloxacin (LMF), was for the first time investigated using different spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques. Fluorescence spectroscopy experiments were performed in order to study conformational changes of proteins. The RLS technique was utilized to investigate the effect of LMF on J-aggregation of PPIX, which is the first report of its kind. Our findings present clear-cut evidence for the alteration of interactions between HSA and TF in the presence of PPIX and changes in drug-binding to HSA and HSA-PPIX complex upon interaction with TF. Moreover, molecular modeling studies suggested that the binding site for LMF became switched in the presence of PPIX, and that LMF bound to the site IIA of HSA. The obtained results should give new insight into research in this field and may cast some light on the dynamics of drugs in biological systems.

  15. Evaluating the usability of an interactive, bi-lingual, touchscreen-enabled breastfeeding educational programme: application of Nielson’s heuristics

    OpenAIRE

    Ashish Joshi; Douglas M Puricelli Perin; Chioma Amadi; Kate Trout

    2015-01-01

    Background: Usability challenges have to be met in an interactive computer program development and should meet all users’ needs. Objective: The study purpose was to conduct heuristic evaluation of an interactive, bilingual touch screen enabled breastfeeding educational program for Hispanic women living in rural settings.Methods: Two usability experts used Nielsen’s heuristics while reviewing the user interface in May 2013 using principles of Nielson’s Heuristics. Nielson’s heuristics are a se...

  16. Evaluating the Data Analytic Features of Blackboard Learn 9.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Walsh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Learning Management Systems (LMSs track and store vast quantities of data on student engagement with course content. Research shows that Higher Education Institutes can harness the power of this data to build a better understanding of student learning. This study is an exploratory Learning Analytics initiative to evaluate the inbuilt analytic features available within Blackboards LMS solution namely Blackboard Learn 9.1 to determine if it informs academic staff on student engagement. The two analytic features analysed in this study are Module Reports and Blackboard’s inbuilt early warning system called the “Retention Center”. Analysis of LMS variables extracted from these analytic features established a statistically significant weakly positive correlation between hit activity, login activity and student examination results. A statistically significant weakly positive correlation was also established between Multiple Choice Quiz (MQQ score and examination results. These findings suggest that activity within LMS, measured by logins, hit activity and results in MCQs provide indicators of student academic performance. Lecturers involved in the study felt the analytic features provided them with a sense of student engagement with course modules and better understanding of their student cohorts.

  17. Evaluation of Processes of Interaction between the Enterprise and Potential Contractors in the Context of Ensuring Economic Security of Foreign Economic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havlovska Nataliia I.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The author’s approach to evaluating appropriateness of interaction of domestic enterprises-subjects of foreign economic activity with foreign partners taking into account balancing benefits and safety has been presented. To solve the problems set in the study, there were used means of economic and mathematical simulation, namely, conceptual provisions of the theory of games. Preconditions for simulating scenarios of interaction between contractors and evaluation of effects of this interaction have been determined. A dyadic game model, in which each player will only have two pure strategies, has been proposed, and possibility of using a three-player game with development of a corresponding matrix of wins of each player has been considered. On the basis of the calculation of possible options of interaction between the major players possible options for this interaction have been found and a questionnaire for expert evaluation of the matrix elements of each player’s decisions has been developed. There suggested solutions of the game by relevant matrices, where two Nash equilibrium situations and 10 Pareto efficient situations are defined. The optimal solution of the game for all participants in the interaction, which allows to achieve a sufficient level of efficiency and safety of each player has been found

  18. Development and evaluation of a new simulation model for interactive training of the medical response to major incidents and disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennquist Montán, K; Hreckovski, B; Dobson, B; Örtenwall, P; Montán, C; Khorram-Manesh, A; Lennquist, S

    2014-08-01

    The need for and benefit of simulation models for interactive training of the response to major incidents and disasters has been increasingly recognized during recent years. One of the advantages with such models is that all components of the chain of response can be trained simultaneously. This includes the important communication/coordination between different units, which has been reported as the most common cause of failure. Very few of the presently available simulation models have been suitable for the simultaneous training of decision-making on all levels of the response. In this study, a new simulation model, originally developed for the scientific evaluation of methodology, was adapted to and developed for the postgraduate courses in Medical Response to Major Incidents (MRMI) organized under the auspices of the European Society for Trauma and Emergency Surgery (ESTES). The aim of the present study was to describe this development process, the model it resulted in, and the evaluation of this model. The simulation model was based on casualty cards giving all information normally available for the triage and primary management of traumatized patients. The condition of the patients could be changed by the instructor according to the time passed since the time of injury and treatments performed. Priority of the casualties as well as given treatments could be indicated on the cards by movable markers, which also gave the time required for every treatment. The exercises were run with real consumption of time and resources for all measures performed. The magnetized cards were moved by the trainees through the scene, through the transport lines, and through the hospitals where all functions were trained. For every patient was given the definitive diagnosis and the times within certain treatments had to be done to avoid preventable mortality and complications, which could be related to trauma-scores. The methodology was tested in nine MRMI courses with a total of

  19. In Vitro and Clinical Evaluations of the Drug-Drug Interaction Potential of a Metabotropic Glutamate 2/3 Receptor Agonist Prodrug with Intestinal Peptide Transporter 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Y Anne; Long, Amanda J; Annes, William F; Witcher, Jennifer W; Knadler, Mary Pat; Ayan-Oshodi, Mosun A; Mitchell, Malcolm I; Leese, Phillip; Hillgren, Kathleen M

    2017-02-01

    Despite peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1) being responsible for the bioavailability for a variety of drugs, there has been little study of its potential involvement in drug-drug interactions. Pomaglumetad methionil, a metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptor agonist prodrug, utilizes PEPT1 to enhance absorption and bioavailability. In vitro studies were conducted to guide the decision to conduct a clinical drug interaction study and to inform the clinical study design. In vitro investigations determined the prodrug (LY2140023 monohydrate) is a substrate of PEPT1 with K m value of approximately 30 µM, whereas the active moiety (LY404039) is not a PEPT1 substrate. In addition, among the eight known PEPT1 substrates evaluated in vitro, valacyclovir was the most potent inhibitor (IC 50 = 0.46 mM) of PEPT1-mediated uptake of the prodrug. Therefore, a clinical drug interaction study was conducted to evaluate the potential interaction between the prodrug and valacyclovir in healthy subjects. No effect of coadministration was observed on the pharmacokinetics of the prodrug, valacyclovir, or either of their active moieties. Although in vitro studies showed potential for the prodrug and valacyclovir interaction via PEPT1, an in vivo study showed no interaction between these two drugs. PEPT1 does not appear to easily saturate because of its high capacity and expression in the intestine. Thus, a clinical interaction at PEPT1 is unlikely even with a compound with high affinity for the transporter. Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s).

  20. Interaction of demographic factors with the results of the surgery for degenerative disease of the cervical spine: a retrospective evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Garreta Prats Dias

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Degenerative disease of the cervical spine is a frequent source of intermittent neck pain, where the predominant symptom is axial neck pain. The indications for surgical treatment are reserved for the cases where the conservative treatment has not relieved the symptoms or the patient presents progressive neurological impairment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic factors involved in patients submitted to surgical treatment of the cervical spine, Methods: The study analyzed data from patients submitted to cervical spine surgery between July 2011 and November 2015 (n= 58. The evaluated data included smoking habits, hypertension, diabetes, overweight, surgical technique, and number of levels of fusion. The primary outcome was defined as pain and the secondary outcomes were quality of life and disability., Results: A statistically significant difference was found between baseline and the 12-month post-operative results regarding pain in favor of non-hypertensive patients (p= 0.009 and discectomy plus instrumentation (, p= 0.004. There was also significant difference between the results of neck disability in favor of non-hypertensive patients (p= 0.028 and patients with body mass index lower than 25, kg/m2 (p= 0.005. There was no significant interaction between any analyzed data and the quality of life score results. Conclusions: Non-hypertensive patients, those with body mass index lower than 25 kg/m2, and those submitted to discectomy combined with arthrodesis of the cervical spine are the most benefited by cervical degenerative disease surgery.

  1. Interaction of demographic factors with the results of the surgery for degenerative disease of the cervical spine: a retrospective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Celso Garreta Prats; Roberto, Bruno Braga; Basaglia, Lucas; Lenza, Mario; Nicolau, Rodrigo Junqueira; Ferretti, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the cervical spine is a frequent source of intermittent neck pain, where the predominant symptom is axial neck pain. The indications for surgical treatment are reserved for the cases where the conservative treatment has not relieved the symptoms or the patient presents progressive neurological impairment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic factors involved in patients submitted to surgical treatment of the cervical spine. The study analyzed data from patients submitted to cervical spine surgery between July 2011 and November 2015 ( n  = 58). The evaluated data included smoking habits, hypertension, diabetes, overweight, surgical technique, and number of levels of fusion. The primary outcome was defined as pain and the secondary outcomes were quality of life and disability. A statistically significant difference was found between baseline and the 12-month post-operative results regarding pain in favor of non-hypertensive patients ( p  = 0.009) and discectomy plus instrumentation ( p  = 0.004). There was also significant difference between the results of neck disability in favor of non-hypertensive patients ( p  = 0.028) and patients with body mass index lower than 25 kg/m 2 ( p  = 0.005). There was no significant interaction between any analyzed data and the quality of life score results. Non-hypertensive patients, those with body mass index lower than 25 kg/m 2 , and those submitted to discectomy combined with arthrodesis of the cervical spine are the most benefited by cervical degenerative disease surgery.

  2. Interactive program system for application of modern evaluation of coal deposits and their parts under complicated conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Hoňková

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In the contribution methodical procedures of modeling and assessing of coal deposits, applied in the frame of the solution of the (Grant Agency of the Czech Republic project No 105/03/1417 entitled „Interactive program system for application of modern methods of evaluation of coal deposits and their parts under complicated conditions“, are presented. The development of the computer technology as well as the new results in the domain of scientific geoinformatics have enabled an application of new modeling procedures and subsequent assessing of coal seams. Above all, the procedures in the sphere of the statistical data processing, geostatistics, selection and the application of a proper interpolation method, the graphic elaboration of maps and the 3D visualization of modeled coal seams and further procedures facilitating the selection of in-seam balanced thickness as well as identifying and correlating of coal seams are concerned. The program system formed in this way is conceived for applying to all types of coal deposits occurring in the Czech Republic.

  3. Launch Vehicle Manual Steering with Adaptive Augmenting Control:In-Flight Evaluations of Adverse Interactions Using a Piloted Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Curt; Miller, Chris; Wall, John H.; VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    An Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) algorithm for the Space Launch System (SLS) has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as part of the launch vehicle's baseline flight control system. A prototype version of the SLS flight control software was hosted on a piloted aircraft at the Armstrong Flight Research Center to demonstrate the adaptive controller on a full-scale realistic application in a relevant flight environment. Concerns regarding adverse interactions between the adaptive controller and a potential manual steering mode were also investigated by giving the pilot trajectory deviation cues and pitch rate command authority, which is the subject of this paper. Two NASA research pilots flew a total of 25 constant pitch rate trajectories using a prototype manual steering mode with and without adaptive control, evaluating six different nominal and off-nominal test case scenarios. Pilot comments and PIO ratings were given following each trajectory and correlated with aircraft state data and internal controller signals post-flight.

  4. Evaluation of Seismic Response Trends from Long-Term Monitoring of Two Instrumented RC Buildings Including Soil-Structure Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faheem Butt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents analyses of the seismic responses of two reinforced concrete buildings monitored for a period of more than two years. One of the structures was a three-storey reinforced concrete (RC frame building with a shear core, while the other was a three-storey RC frame building without a core. Both buildings are part of the same large complex but are seismically separated from the rest of it. Statistical analysis of the relationships between maximum free field accelerations and responses at different points on the buildings was conducted and demonstrated strong correlation between those. System identification studies using recorded accelerations were undertaken and revealed that natural frequencies and damping ratios of the building structures vary during different earthquake excitations. This variation was statistically examined and relationships between identified natural frequencies and damping ratios, and the peak response acceleration at the roof level were developed. A general trend of decreasing modal frequencies and increasing damping ratios was observed with increased level of shaking and response. Moreover, the influence of soil structure interaction (SSI on the modal characteristics was evaluated. SSI effects decreased the modal frequencies and increased some of the damping ratios.

  5. Tissue-resonance interaction method for the noninvasive diagnosis of prostate cancer: analysis of a multicentre clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Pozzo, Luigi; Scattoni, Vincenzo; Mazzoccoli, Bruno; Rigatti, Patrizio; Manferrari, Fabio; Martorana, Giuseppe; Pietropaolo, Francesco; Belgrano, Emanuele; Prezioso, Domenico; Lotti, Tullio; Villari, Donata; Nicita, Giulio

    2007-11-01

    To determine, in a multicentre prospective study, the accuracy of the tissue-resonance interaction method (TRIMprob, new technology developed for the noninvasive analysis of electromagnetic anisotropy in biological tissues) in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Two hundred patients (mean age 67.4 years) scheduled to have prostatic biopsies (because of a prostate-specific, PSA, antigen level of >/=4 ng/mL or a suspicious digital rectal examination, DRE) were preliminarily examined while unaware of their clinical details using TRIMprob in five different centres. The final diagnosis obtained with TRIMprob was compared with the final histological diagnosis after extended biopsies. Of the 188 evaluable patients (mean PSA level 9.3 ng/mL, sd 8.8; mean prostate volume 62.0 mL, sd 32.4), 61 (32.4%) had a positive biopsy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of TRIMprob were 80%, 51%, 44%, 84% and 60%, respectively. The prostate cancer detection rate after biopsy was significantly higher in patients with a positive examination (49/111, 44%) than in patients with a negative TRIMprob (12/77, 15%; P indications for prostatic biopsy or repeated series of biopsies in patients suspected of having prostate cancer.

  6. Interactive Two-Way mHealth Interventions for Improving Medication Adherence: An Evaluation Using The Behaviour Change Wheel Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Nicole; Guo, Michael; Amico, K Rivet; Atkins, Lou; Lester, Richard T

    2018-04-12

    Medication adherence is an important but highly complex set of behaviors, which for life-threatening and infectious diseases such as HIV carry critical consequences for individual and public health. There is growing evidence that mobile phone text messaging interventions (mHealth) connecting providers with patients positively impact medication adherence, particularly two-way engagement platforms that require bidirectional communication versus one-way in which responses are not mandatory. However, mechanisms of action have not been well defined. The Behavior Change Wheel is a comprehensive framework for behavior change that includes an all-encompassing model of behavior known as Capability Opportunity Motivation-Behavior and is complemented by a taxonomy of behavior change techniques. Evaluating mHealth interventions for medication adherence using these tools could provide useful insights that may contribute to optimizing their integration into the healthcare system and successful scaling-up. This study aimed to help address the current knowledge gap regarding how two-way mHealth interventions for medication adherence may work by applying the Behavior Change Wheel to characterize WelTel: an interactive digital health outreach platform with robust evidence for improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy. To characterize how WelTel may promote medication adherence, we applied the Behavior Change Wheel to systematically (1) generate a behavioral diagnosis through mapping known antiretroviral therapy adherence barriers onto the Capability Opportunity Motivation-Behavior model of behavior, (2) specify the behavior change techniques that WelTel delivers, (3) link identified behavior change techniques to corresponding intervention functions of the Behavior Change Wheel, and (4) connect these behavior change techniques and intervention functions to respective Capability Opportunity Motivation-Behavior influences on behavior to determine potential mechanisms of action. Our

  7. Research on Credit Evaluation of Mobile Medical APP Interactive Online Consultation Service-Take Haodaifu APP Online Payment Service as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Dandan; Zhao, Lei

    2017-10-01

    Mobile medical industry is developing rapidly, but the relevant credit evaluation system is still in the exploratory stage. Haodaifu in the interactive online consulting services more representatives and has a credit evaluation system, but the system is not perfect. There are many problems in the system, such as credits indicators cannot better reflect the results of user’s evaluation, the lack of user qualification supervision, evaluation index system and assessment channels are not perfect. On the basis of drawing on the advantages of E-commerce evaluation system and combining with the characteristics of mobile medical itself, two suggestions are put forward: Improve the credit evaluation model (Generate physician static credit index, Change the doctor 's dynamic credit index algorithm, Update the dynamic credit index), Improve the basic mechanism of credit evaluation.

  8. Evaluation of late Permian mafic magmatism in the central Tibetan Plateau as a response to plume-subduction interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Ma, Chang-Qian; Guo, Pan; Sun, Yang; Gao, Ke; Guo, Yu-Heng

    2016-11-01

    An integrated study of the geochronology, mineralogy, geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotope compositions of the upper Permian Yushu mafic rocks in the central Tibetan Plateau (CTP) was conducted to evaluate the interaction between the Emeishan mantle plume and the Paleo-Tethyan subduction system. These mafic rocks can be geochemically subdivided into three groups. Group 1 rocks yielded a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 258 ± 2 Ma. They have relatively high TiO2, FeOt, Nb/Y and high εNd(t) values and display oceanic island basalts (OIB)-like rare earth and trace element patterns, with obvious enrichment of Nb and Ta. Group 2 and 3 rocks yield weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 258 ± 1 Ma and 257 ± 1 Ma, respectively. Both have relatively low TiO2, FeOt, Nb/Y and εNd(t) values and island arc tholeiites (IAT)-like rare earth and trace element patterns with obvious depletion of Nb and Ta. However, the Group 2 rocks have relatively low FeOt/MgO ratios, but high MgO, Mg#, Cr and Ni contents, resembling primitive magmas. They have lower light rare earth element (LREE), Nb, Ti and Zr contents and higher εNd(t) values than the Group 1 rocks. The geochemical and isotopic variations suggest that the Group 1 rocks might be derived from a plume-related mantle source, whereas Group 2 and Group 3 rocks originated from subduction-modified asthenospheric mantle and lithospheric mantle. Moderate degrees of olivine and clinopyroxene fractionation under low oxygen fugacities (fO2) appear to be responsible for the Fe-Ti enrichment in the Group 1 rocks. We propose a model involving plume-subduction interaction to explain the geodynamics and generation of the late Permian mafic magmatism in the CTP. The study region was rifted by the Emeishan mantle plume activity in association with rollback of Longmuco-Shuanghu oceanic lithosphere in late Permian times. Deep melting of the plume source led to the generation of the Group 1 plume-related magmas, whereas shallower melting of the subduction

  9. Data Evaluation and the Establishment of a Standard Library of Atomic, Molecular and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion. Summary Report of an IAEA Consultants' Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.

    2012-08-01

    Seven experts in the field of atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M+PMI) data and data evaluation for fusion plasma physics met with IAEA A+M Data Unit staff at IAEA Headquarters to provide advice towards the establishment of an evaluated and recommended library of A+M+PMI data for fusion. The proceedings and conclusions of the meeting are summarized here. (author)

  10. An interactive, bilingual, culturally targeted website about living kidney donation and transplantation for hispanics: development and formative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Elisa J; Feinglass, Joe; Carney, Paula; Ramirez, Daney; Olivero, Maria; O'Connor, Kate; MacLean, Jessica; Brucker, James; Caicedo, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-20

    ". Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory and Gagne's Conditions of Learning Theory guided website design to facilitate adult learning. The website, "Infórmate: Living Kidney Donation for Hispanics/Latinos" (Infórmate Acerca de la Donación de Riñón en Vida), includes six sections: Treatment Options, Donation: Step-by-Step, Benefits and Risks, Financial Issues, Immigrant Issues, and Cultural Beliefs and Myths. Sections host 5-10 interactive messages that summarize important points and link to detailed explanations for users interested in learning more about specific issues. The website hosts interactive videos, multimedia testimonials, telenovelas, games, and quizzes. Photographs and videos of Hispanic living donors are shown to promote pride and ownership. Our success in developing a website was driven by a development team with expertise in transplantation, social science, evaluation, instructional design, and Hispanic perspectives, and by a patient-centered approach toward content and design. Based on feedback from usability testing and our CAB, the website is sensitive to Hispanic cultural sensibilities. We have nearly completed a formal evaluation of the website's impact on increasing Hispanics' knowledge about LKD and will disseminate the website thereafter.

  11. Evaluating the Impact of the "Teaching as a Chemistry Laboratory Graduate Teaching Assistant" Program on Cognitive and Psychomotor Verbal Interactions in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, A.; O'Dwyer, A.; Mannix-McNamara, P.; Leahy, J. J.

    2017-01-01

    Designing and evaluating teacher development programs for graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) who teach in the laboratory is a prominent feature of chemistry education research. However, few studies have investigated the impact of a GTA teacher development program on the verbal interactions between participating GTAs and students in the…

  12. Are automated molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy calculations realistic tools in lead optimization? An evaluation of the linear interaction energy (LIE) method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stjernschantz, E.M.; Marelius, J.; Medina, C.; Jacobsson, M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Oostenbrink, C.

    2006-01-01

    An extensive evaluation of the linear interaction energy (LIE) method for the prediction of binding affinity of docked compounds has been performed, with an emphasis on its applicability in lead optimization. An automated setup is presented, which allows for the use of the method in an industrial

  13. Evaluating a staff training program on the interaction between staff and people with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour : An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Zijlmans, L.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a training program focusing on improvement of emotional intelligence (EI) and support staffs’ awareness of their behaviour towards people with an intellectual disability based on interactional patterns. The support provided regarding

  14. Evaluation of an online interactive Diabetes Needs Assessment Tool (DNAT versus online self-directed learning: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellner Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methods for the dissemination, understanding and implementation of clinical guidelines need to be examined for their effectiveness to help doctors integrate guidelines into practice. The objective of this randomised controlled trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of an interactive online Diabetes Needs Assessment Tool (DNAT (which constructs an e-learning curriculum based on individually identified knowledge gaps, compared with self-directed e-learning of diabetes guidelines. Methods Health professionals were randomised to a 4-month learning period and either given access to diabetes learning modules alone (control group or DNAT plus learning modules (intervention group. Participants completed knowledge tests before and after learning (primary outcome, and surveys to assess the acceptability of the learning and changes to clinical practice (secondary outcomes. Results Sixty four percent (677/1054 of participants completed both knowledge tests. The proportion of nurses (5.4% was too small for meaningful analysis so they were excluded. For the 650 doctors completing both tests, mean (SD knowledge scores increased from 47.4% (12.6 to 66.8% (11.5 [intervention group (n = 321, 64%] and 47.3% (12.9 to 67.8% (10.8 [control group (n = 329, 66%], (ANCOVA p = 0.186. Both groups were satisfied with the usability and usefulness of the learning materials. Seventy seven percent (218/284 of the intervention group reported combining the DNAT with the recommended reading materials was "very useful"/"useful". The majority in both groups (184/287, 64.1% intervention group and 206/299, 68.9% control group [95% CI for the difference (-2.8 to 12.4] reported integrating the learning into their clinical practice. Conclusions Both groups experienced a similar and significant improvement in knowledge. The learning materials were acceptable and participants incorporated the acquired knowledge into practice. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN67215088

  15. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential of tivantinib (ARQ 197) using cocktail probes in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Masaya; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos P; Strickler, John H; Puzanov, Igor; Gajee, Roohi; Wang, Yibin; Zahir, Hamim

    2018-01-01

    This phase 1, open-label, crossover study sought to evaluate drug-drug interactions between tivantinib and cytochrome P450 (CYP) substrates and tivantinib and P-glycoprotein. The effect of tivantinib doses on the pharmacokinetics of the probe drugs for CYP1A2 (caffeine), CYP2C9 (S-warfarin), CYP2C19 (omeprazole), and CYP3A4 (midazolam), and for P-glycoprotein (digoxin) was investigated in 28 patients with advanced cancer using a cocktail probe approach. Patients received single doses of probe drugs alone and, after 5 days of treatment, with tivantinib 360 mg twice daily. The ratios of geometric least squares mean (90% confidence interval) for the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to the last quantifiable concentration in the presence/absence of tivantinib were 0.97 (0.89-1.05) for caffeine, 0.88 (0.76-1.02) for S-warfarin, 0.89 (0.60-1.31) for omeprazole, 0.83 (0.67-1.02) for midazolam, and 0.69 (0.51-0.94) for digoxin. Similar effects were observed for maximum plasma concentrations; the ratio for digoxin in the presence/absence of tivantinib was 0.75 (0.60-0.95). The data suggest that tivantinib 360 mg twice daily has either a minimal or no effect on the pharmacokinetics of probe drugs for CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 substrates, and decreases the systemic exposure of P-glycoprotein substrates when administered with tivantinib. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Growing-Up Hand in Hand with Robots : Designing and Evaluating Child-Robot Interaction from a Developmental Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaga, Cristina; Charisi, Vicky; Schadenberg, Bob; Reidsma, Dennis; Neerincx, Mark; Prescott, Tony; Zillich, Michael; Verschure, Paul; Evers, Vanessa

    Robots are becoming part of children's care, entertainment, education, social assistance and therapy. A steadily growing body of Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) research shows that child-robot interaction (CRI) holds promises to support children's development in novel ways. However, research has shown

  17. Structuring Design and Evaluation of an Interactive Installation Through Swarms of Light Rays with Human-Artifact Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erkut, Cumhur; Fehr, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    out a questionnaire afterwards. In this paper, we report our preliminary work on the analysis of the tensions of interaction with the installation under the Human-Artifact Model. Our results indicate exploration and discovery as the main motives of the interaction. This is different than utilitarian...

  18. Some Behavioral Considerations on the GPS4GEF Cloud-Based Generator of Evaluation Forms with Automatic Feedback and References to Interactive Support Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel HOMOCIANU

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces some considerations on a previously defined general purpose system used to dynamically generate online evaluation forms with automatic feedback immediately after submitting responses and working with a simple and well-known data source format able to store questions, answers and links to additional support materials in order to increase the productivity of evaluation and assessment. Beyond presenting a short description of the prototype’s components and underlining advantages and limitations of using it for any user involved in assessment and evaluation processes, this paper promotes the use of such a system together with a simple technique of generating and referencing interactive support content cited within this paper and defined together with the LIVES4IT approach. This type of content means scenarios having adhoc documentation and interactive simulation components useful when emulating concrete examples of working with real world objects, operating with devices or using software applications from any activity field.

  19. A methodology for the design and evaluation of user interfaces for interactive information systems. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report, 1 Jul. 1985 - 31 Dec. 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Farooq, Mohammad U.

    1986-01-01

    The definition of proposed research addressing the development and validation of a methodology for the design and evaluation of user interfaces for interactive information systems is given. The major objectives of this research are: the development of a comprehensive, objective, and generalizable methodology for the design and evaluation of user interfaces for information systems; the development of equations and/or analytical models to characterize user behavior and the performance of a designed interface; the design of a prototype system for the development and administration of user interfaces; and the design and use of controlled experiments to support the research and test/validate the proposed methodology. The proposed design methodology views the user interface as a virtual machine composed of three layers: an interactive layer, a dialogue manager layer, and an application interface layer. A command language model of user system interactions is presented because of its inherent simplicity and structured approach based on interaction events. All interaction events have a common structure based on common generic elements necessary for a successful dialogue. It is shown that, using this model, various types of interfaces could be designed and implemented to accommodate various categories of users. The implementation methodology is discussed in terms of how to store and organize the information.

  20. Observer variation in target volume delineation of lung cancer related to radiation oncologist-computer interaction: A 'Big Brother' evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Duppen, Joop C.; Fitton, Isabelle; Deurloo, Kirsten E.I.; Zijp, Lambert; Uitterhoeve, Apollonia L.J.; Rodrigus, Patrick T.R.; Kramer, Gijsbert W.P.; Bussink, Johan; Jaeger, Katrien De; Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Hart, Augustinus A.M.; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Herk, Marcel van; Rasch, Coen R.N.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the process of target volume delineation in lung cancer for optimization of imaging, delineation protocol and delineation software. Patients and methods: Eleven radiation oncologists (observers) from five different institutions delineated the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) including positive lymph nodes of 22 lung cancer patients (stages I-IIIB) on CT only. All radiation oncologist-computer interactions were recorded with a tool called 'Big Brother'. For each radiation oncologist and patient the following issues were analyzed: delineation time, number of delineated points and corrections, zoom levels, level and window (L/W) settings, CT slice changes, use of side windows (coronal and sagittal) and software button use. Results: The mean delineation time per GTV was 16 min (SD 10 min). The mean delineation time for lymph node positive patients was on average 3 min larger (P=0.02) than for lymph node negative patients. Many corrections (55%) were due to L/W change (e.g. delineating in mediastinum L/W and then correcting in lung L/W). For the lymph node region, a relatively large number of corrections was found (3.7 corr/cm 2 ), indicating that it was difficult to delineate lymph nodes. For the tumor-atelectasis region, a relative small number of corrections was found (1.0 corr/cm 2 ), indicating that including or excluding atelectasis into the GTV was a clinical decision. Inappropriate use of L/W settings was frequently found (e.g. 46% of all delineated points in the tumor-lung region were delineated in mediastinum L/W settings). Despite a large observer variation in cranial and caudal direction of 0.72 cm (1 SD), the coronal and sagittal side windows were not used in 45 and 60% of the cases, respectively. For the more difficult cases, observer variation was smaller when the coronal and sagittal side windows were used. Conclusions: With the 'Big Brother' tool a method was developed to trace the delineation process. The differences between

  1. Evaluation of herb-drug interaction of a polyherbal Ayurvedic formulation through high throughput cytochrome P450 enzyme inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Subrata; Kanjilal, Satyajyoti; Awasthi, Anshumali; Chaudhary, Anika; Banerjee, Dipankar; Bhatt, B N; Narwaria, Avinash; Singh, Rahul; Dutta, Kakoli; Jaggi, Manu; Singh, Anu T; Sharma, Neena; Katiyar, Chandra Kant

    2017-02-02

    Arishtas are Ayurvedic formulation made with decoction of herbs. Arjunarishta formulation is being used in Ayurveda for cardio-protective activity. Ashwagandharishta formulation possesses antioxidant, anti-atherosclerotic and anti-stress properties. Ridayarishta, a novel empirical formulation was prepared using combination of selected ingredients from these two formulations to support healthy heart functions and to reduce stress. Aim of the Study was to investigate herb-drug interaction (HDI) of Ridayarishta formulation through human hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme inhibition assay. Ridayarishta formulation was phyto-chemically standardized against arjunolic acid, arjunetin, berberine, piperine, resveratrol and withaferin-A using high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) analysis. The formulation was standardized with respect to ethanol by gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. HDI was evaluated with Ridayarishta formulation and amlodipine besilate, atenolol, atorvastatin, metformin, glipizide glimepiride cocktail using high throughput CYP450 enzyme inhibition assay; against CYP1A2, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4 isozymes. Contents of arjunolic acid, arjunetin, berberine, piperine, resveratrol and withaferin-A in Ridayarishta formulation were found to be 1.76±0.12, 1.51±0.09, 1.85±0.05, 3.2±0.12, 1.21±0.08, and 2.16±0.09ppm, respectively. Quantity of ethanol in Ridayarishta was found to be 7.95±0.023% (V/V). Ridayarishta showed significantly higher (Pdrugs showed significantly (P<0.001and P<0.01) less or negligible HDI. Ridayarishta formulation alone and cocktail with amlodipine besilate, atenolol, atorvastatin, metformin, glipizide, glimepiride had negligible or insignificant effect on CYP450 inhibition. It may be concluded that consumption of Ridayarishta along with selective cardio protective, antihypertensive and anti-diabetic conventional medicine is safe with negligible or without any significant CYP450 (CYP1A2, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4) inhibition mediated

  2. Fuzzy set implementation for controlling and evaluation of factors affecting melting, crystallinity and interaction in polymer blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Rawajfeh, Aiman Eid; Mamlook, Rustom

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the factors (i.e. weight fractions, crystallization temperatures and interaction such as hydrogen bonding) affecting melting, crystallinity, interaction parameters and miscibility of polymer blends (PB) have been studied by implementation of a fuzzy set. The interaction parameters were calculated using the Nishi-Wang equation, which is based on the Flory-Huggins theory. The values of interaction parameters χ 12 were negative for all blend compositions suggesting that χ 12 depends on the volume fraction (Φ) of the polymer. The various characteristics for the case study was synthesized and converted into relative weights w.r.t fuzzy set method. The fuzzy set analysis for the case study reveal increase as confirmed by the experimental data. The application of the fuzzy set methodology offers reasonable prediction and assessment for detecting yield in polymer blends

  3. Evaluating an Interactive, Multimedia Education and Decision Program for Early-Stage Prostate Cancer Patients in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diefenbach, Michael A

    2005-01-01

    ...). To educate patients about prostate cancer and its treatment and to ease their decisional burden, we have developed an innovative CD-ROM based multimedia prostate cancer interactive education system...

  4. Interaction between Gallotannin and a Recombinant Form of Arginine Kinase of Trypanosoma brucei: Thermodynamic and Spectrofluorimetric Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Adeyemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current chemotherapies against trypanosomiasis are beset with diverse challenges, a situation which underscores the numerous research efforts aimed at finding newer and effective treatments. Arginine kinase of trypanosome has been validated as target for drug development against trypanosomiasis. The present study investigated the interaction between a recombinant form of the arginine kinase (rTbAK of trypanosome and gallotannin. The interaction between gallotannin and recombinant arginine kinase of Trypanosoma brucei caused significant decrease of enzyme activity. Kinetic analysis revealed the interaction to be of noncompetitive inhibition. Further thermodynamic analysis showed that the interaction between gallotannin and the recombinant arginine kinase was nonspontaneous and involved hydrophobic forces. The Ksv values and the FRET analysis suggest that static quenching of fluorescence intensity by gallotannin was static. Data revealed inhibitory interactions between gallotannin and rTbAK of trypanosome. Although the mechanism of inhibition is not clear yet, molecular docking studies are ongoing to clearly define the inhibitory interactions between the gallotannin and rTbAK. The knowledge of such binding properties would enrich development of selective inhibitors for the arginine kinase of Trypanosoma brucei.

  5. The Design and Pilot Evaluation of an Interactive Learning Environment for Introductory Programming Influenced by Cognitive Load Theory and Constructivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moons, Jan; De Backer, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the architecture and evaluation of a novel environment for programming education. The design of this programming environment, and the way it is used in class, is based on the findings of constructivist and cognitivist learning paradigms. The environment is evaluated based on qualitative student and teacher evaluations and…

  6. Evaluation of intensity and energy interaction parameters for the complexation of Pr(III) with selected nucleoside and nucleotide through absorption spectral studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendangsenla, N.; Moaienla, T.; David Singh, Th.; Sumitra, Ch.; Rajmuhon Singh, N.; Indira Devi, M.

    2013-02-01

    The interactions of Pr(III) with nucleosides and nucleotides have been studied in different organic solvents employing absorption difference and comparative absorption spectrophotometry. The magnitudes of the variations in both energy and intensity interaction parameters were used to explore the degree of outer and inner sphere co-ordination, incidence of covalency and the extent of metal 4f-orbital involvement in chemical bonding. Various electronic spectral parameters like Slater-Condon (Fk), Racah (Ek), Lande parameter (ξ4f), Nephelauxatic ratio (β), bonding (b1/2), percentage covalency (δ) and intensity parameters like oscillator strength (P) and Judd Ofelt electronic dipole intensity parameter (Tλ, λ = 2, 4, 6) have been evaluated. The variation of these evaluated parameters were employed to interpret the nature of binding of Pr(III) with different ligands i.e. Adenosine/ATP in presence and absence of Ca2+.

  7. Comparative evaluation of efficacy of self-ligating interactive bracket with conventional preadjusted bracket: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balajee Jayachandran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: This clinical study was conducted to compare the interactive self-ligating twin brackets and the standard double width brackets for their efficiency in Rate of Retraction. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 patients with Angle's class I or class II or class III dento-alveolar malocclusions between the age group of 18-25 years were selected. 10 patients in each group both males and females were randomly selected for the study. Ten patients were bonded using conventional brackets (Group I the other ten patients were bonded using Interactive self-ligating brackets (Group II. The Rate of retraction was quantified using the scanned models. Pretreatment and post treatment models were taken and scanned to measure the amount of Incisor movement and Anchor loss. Results: (1 Interactive Self-ligating brackets showed significant Rate of retraction when compared with conventional brackets on right and left quadrant. (Group I 0.545 ± .205: Group II 0.827 ± .208 P= .013* (Group I 0.598 ± .160: Group II 0.804 ± .268 P= .071 (2 Interactive self-ligating brackets when compared with conventional brackets had significant amount of incisor movement on right and left quadrant. (Group I 3.51 ± .548: Group II 4.38 ± .1.06 P= .047* and (Group I 3.66 ± .899: Group II 4.67 ± 1.02 P= .047* (3 Conventional brackets showed significant Amount of Anchor loss when compared with that of Interactive self-ligating brackets on right and left quadrant. (Group I .948 ± .392: Group II 0.501 ± .229 P= .013*. In the left side (Group I 0.861 ± .464: Group II 0.498 ± .227 P= .060. Conclusion: The interactive self-ligating brackets show more efficiency in Rate of Retraction, Amount of Incisor movement and Amount of Anchor loss when compared with the conventional brackets.

  8. Evaluating the usability of an interactive, bi-lingual, touchscreen-enabled breastfeeding educational programme: application of Nielson’s heuristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Joshi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Usability challenges have to be met in an interactive computer program development and should meet all users’ needs. Objective: The study purpose was to conduct heuristic evaluation of an interactive, bilingual touch screen enabled breastfeeding educational program for Hispanic women living in rural settings.Methods: Two usability experts used Nielsen’s heuristics while reviewing the user interface in May 2013 using principles of Nielson’s Heuristics. Nielson’s heuristics are a set of usability engineering principles developed to identify issues in user interface design and involves analysis of the interface. The heuristic evaluations were carried out in the interface, program sections, and interactive educational modules. A total of 271 screens were evaluated and included: interface (n=5, program sections (n=223 and educational content (n=43.Results: A total of 97 violations were identified and were mostly related to interface (8violations/5screens and program components (89violations/266screens. The most common violations reported were recognition rather than recall (62%, n=60, consistency and standards (14%, n=14, and match between the system and real world (9%, n= 9. Majority of the violations had minor usability issues (73%, n=71. The only catastrophic violation reported was due to the visibility of system status in the assessment modules.Conclusion: The results demonstrated that the system was more consistent with Nielsen’s usability heuristics. 

  9. An Evaluation of Interactive Computer Training to Teach Instructors to Implement Discrete Trials with Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Joy S.; Higbee, Thomas S.; Akers, Jessica S.; Brodhead, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Discrete-trial instruction (DTI) is a teaching strategy that is often incorporated into early intensive behavioral interventions for children with autism. Researchers have investigated time- and cost-effective methods to train staff to implement DTI, including self-instruction manuals, video modeling, and interactive computer training (ICT). ICT…

  10. The Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Digital Interactive Globe System Integrated into an Earth Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to design and implement a digital interactive globe system (DIGS), by integrating low-cost equipment to make DIGS cost-effective. DIGS includes a data processing unit, a wireless control unit, an image-capturing unit, a laser emission unit, and a three-dimensional hemispheric body-imaging screen. A quasi-experimental study…

  11. Monitoring Student Interaction during Collaborative Learning: Design and Evaluation of a Training Program for Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaendler, Celia; Wiedmann, Michael; Leuders, Timo; Rummel, Nikol; Spada, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring by teachers of collaborative, cognitive, and meta-cognitive student activities in collaborative learning is crucial for fostering beneficial student interaction. In a quasi-experimental study, we trained pre-service teachers (N = 74) to notice behavioral indicators for these three dimensions of student activities. Video clips of…

  12. An evaluation of learning clinical decision-making for early rehabilitation in the ICU via interactive education with audience response system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonstra, Amy L; Nelliot, Archana; Aronson Friedman, Lisa; Zanni, Jennifer M; Hodgson, Carol; Needham, Dale M

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge-related barriers to safely implement early rehabilitation programs in intensive care units (ICUs) may be overcome via targeted education. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an interactive educational session on short-term knowledge of clinical decision-making for safe rehabilitation of patients in ICUs. A case-based teaching approach, drawing from published safety recommendations for initiation of rehabilitation in ICUs, was used with a multidisciplinary audience. An audience response system was incorporated to promote interaction and evaluate knowledge before vs. after the educational session. Up to 175 audience members, of 271 in attendance (129 (48%) physical therapists, 51 (19%) occupational therapists, 31 (11%) nursing, 14 (5%) physician, 46 (17%) other), completed both the pre- and post-test questions for each of the six unique patient cases. In four of six patient cases, there was a significant (pcorrect answer regarding initiation of rehabilitation activities. This learning effect was similar irrespective of participants' years of experience and clinical discipline. An interactive, case-based, educational session may be effective for increasing short-term knowledge, and identifying knowledge gaps, regarding clinical decision-making for safe rehabilitation of patients in ICUs. Implications for Rehabilitation Lack of knowledge regarding the safety considerations for early rehabilitation of ICU patients is a barrier to implementing early rehabilitation. Interactive educational formats, such as the use of audience response systems, offer a new method of teaching and instantly assessing learning of clinically important information. In a small study, we have shown that an interactive, case-based educational format may be used to effectively teach clinical decision-making for the safe rehabilitation of ICU patients to a diverse audience of clinicians.

  13. Status Report on Irradiation Capsules Designed to Evaluate FeCrAl-UO2 Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-24

    This status report provides the background and current status of a series of irradiation capsules that were designed and are being built to test the interactions between candidate FeCrAl cladding for enhanced accident tolerant applications and prototypical enriched commercial UO2 fuel in a neutron radiation environment. These capsules will test the degree, if any, of fuel cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) between FeCrAl and UO2. The capsules are to be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory to burn-ups of 10, 30, and 50 GWd/MT with a nominal target temperature at the interfaces between the pellets and clad of 350°C.

  14. Synthesis of N-(Methoxycarbonylthienylmethylthioureas and Evaluation of Their Interaction with Inducible and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Threadgill

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Two isomeric N-(methoxycarbonylthienylmethylthioureas were synthesised by a sequence of radical bromination of methylthiophenecarboxylic esters, substitution with trifluoroacetamide anion, deprotection, formation of the corresponding isothiocyanates and addition of ammonia. The interaction of these new thiophene-based thioureas with inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase was evaluauted. These novel thienylmethylthioureas stimulated the activity of inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS.

  15. Evaluating the Role of Drone-Produced Chemical Signals in Mediating Social Interactions in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Gabriel; Wolfson, Megan D; Hefetz, Abraham; Grozinger, Christina M

    2018-01-01

    Pheromones play a critical role in shaping societies of social insects, including honey bees, Apis mellifera. While diverse functions have been ascribed to queen- and worker-produced compounds, few studies have explored the identity and function of male-produced (drone) compounds. However, several lines of evidence suggest that drones engage in a variety of social interactions inside and outside of the colony. Here we elucidate the chemical composition of extracts of the drone mandibular gland, and test the hypothesis that compounds produced in these glands, or a synthetic blend consisting of the six main compounds, mediate drone social interactions in and out of the colony. Drone mandibular glands primarily produce a blend of saturated, unsaturated and methyl branched fatty acids ranging in chain length from nonanoic to docosanoic acids, and both gland extracts and synthetic blends of these chemicals serve to attract drones outside of the hive, but do not attract workers inside the hive. These studies shed light on the role drones and drone-produced chemicals have on mediating social interactions with other drones and highlight their potential importance in communicating with other castes.

  16. Evaluation of Porin Interaction with Adenine Nucleotide Translocase and Cyclophilin-D Proteins after Brain Ischemia and Reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Atlasi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective (s Porin is a mitochondrial outer membrane channel, which usually functions as the pathway for the movement of various substances in and out of the mitochondria and is considered to be a component of the permeability transition (PT pore complex that plays a role in the PT. We addressed the hypothesis that porin interacts with other mitochondrial proteins after ischemic injury.Materials and MethodsFor this purpose, we used in vivo 4-vessel occlusion model of rat brain and porin purification method by hydroxyapatite column. After SDS gel electrophoresis and silver nitrate staining, Western blotting was done for porin, adenine nucleotide translocase and cyclophilin-D proteins.Results Porin was purified from mitochondrial mixture in ischemic brain and control groups. Investigation of interaction of adenine nucleotide transposes (ANT and cyclophilin-D with porin by Western blotting showed no proteins co-purified with porin from injured tissues.Conclusion The present study implies that there may not be interaction between porin, and ANT or cyclophilin-D, and if there is any, it is not maintained during the purification procedure.

  17. Observer variation in target volume delineation of lung cancer related to radiation oncologist-computer interaction: a 'Big Brother' evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, R.J.; Duppen, J.C.; Fitton, I.; Deurloo, K.E.; Zijp, L.; Uitterhoeve, A.L.; Rodrigus, P.T.; Kramer, G.W.P.M.; Bussink, J.; Jaeger, K. de; Belderbos, J.S.; Hart, A.A.M.; Nowak, P.J.; Herk, M. van; Rasch, C.R.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To evaluate the process of target volume delineation in lung cancer for optimization of imaging, delineation protocol and delineation software. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eleven radiation oncologists (observers) from five different institutions delineated the Gross Tumor Volume

  18. Drooling in children with cerebral palsy: a qualitative method to evaluate parental perceptions of its impact on daily life, social interaction, and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Burg, Jan; Jongerius, Peter; van Limbeek, Jacques; van Hulst, Karen; Rotteveel, Jan

    2006-06-01

    Research on the treatment of drooling applies measures such as salivary flow rate, qualitative observations of drooling severity in standardized situations, and anecdotal or one-dimensional parental and teacher reports. To assess drooling severity in a range of everyday conditions, and its impact on the daily life of children and their families, two parent questionnaires were constructed. Results of baseline measurements of 43 children with cerebral palsy showed that the questionnaires measured the variation in drooling severity across daily life conditions, and enabled evaluation of the impact of drooling on the ability to eat, drink and speak, on daily care, economic consequences, and social interactions. The section on the impact of drooling on self-esteem appeared not to be fully applicable for non-speaking children with a low developmental status. The questionnaires offer a qualitative method to evaluate parental perceptions of the impact of drooling and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to reduce drooling.

  19. Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Potential Between Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) and Statins Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen; Ji, Tao; Einolf, Heidi; Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Lin, Tsu-Han; Hanna, Imad; Heimbach, Tycho; Breen, Christopher; Jarugula, Venkateswar; He, Handan

    2017-05-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) has been approved for the treatment of heart failure. Sacubitril is an in vitro inhibitor of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs). In clinical studies, LCZ696 increased atorvastatin C max by 1.7-fold and area under the plasma concentration-time curve by 1.3-fold, but had little or no effect on simvastatin or simvastatin acid exposure. A physiologically based pharmacokinetics modeling approach was applied to explore the underlying mechanisms behind the statin-specific LCZ696 drug interaction observations. The model incorporated OATP-mediated clearance (CL int,T ) for simvastatin and simvastatin acid to successfully describe the pharmacokinetic profiles of either analyte in the absence or presence of LCZ696. Moreover, the model successfully described the clinically observed drug effect with atorvastatin. The simulations clarified the critical parameters responsible for the observation of a low, yet clinically relevant, drug-drug interaction DDI between sacubitril and atorvastatin and the lack of effect with simvastatin acid. Atorvastatin is administered in its active form and rapidly achieves C max that coincide with the low C max of sacubitril. In contrast, simvastatin requires a hydrolysis step to the acid form and therefore is not present at the site of interactions at sacubitril concentrations that are inhibitory. Similar models were used to evaluate the drug-drug interaction risk for additional OATP-transported statins which predicted to maximally result in a 1.5-fold exposure increase. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Exploration of Electrochemical Intermediates of the Anticancer Drug Doxorubicin Hydrochloride Using Cyclic Voltammetry and Simulation Studies with an Evaluation for Its Interaction with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Sarathi Guin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical behavior of the anticancer drug doxorubicin hydrochloride was studied using cyclic voltammetry in aqueous medium using Hepes buffer (pH~7.4. At this pH, doxorubicin hydrochloride undergoes a reversible two-electron reduction with E1/2 value −665±5 mV (versus Ag/AgCl, saturated KCl. Depending on scan rates, processes were either quasireversible (at low scan rates or near perfect reversible (at high scan rates. This difference in behavior of doxorubicin hydrochloride with scan rate studied over the same potential range speaks of differences in electron transfer processes in doxorubicin hydrochloride. Attempt was made to identify and understand the species involved using simulation. The information obtained was used to study the interaction of doxorubicin hydrochloride with calf thymus DNA. Cathodic peak current gradually decreased as more calf thymus DNA was added. The decrease in cathodic peak current was used to estimate the interaction of the drug with calf thymus DNA. Nonlinear curve fit analysis was applied to evaluate the intrinsic binding constant and site size of interaction that was compared with previous results on doxorubicin hydrochloride-DNA interaction monitored by cyclic voltammetry or spectroscopic techniques.

  1. Evaluation of CO2-Fluid-Rock Interaction in Enhanced Geothermal Systems: Field-Scale Geochemical Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Pan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that using supercritical CO2 (scCO2 instead of water as a heat transmission fluid in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS may improve energy extraction. While CO2-fluid-rock interactions at “typical” temperatures and pressures of subsurface reservoirs are fairly well known, such understanding for the elevated conditions of EGS is relatively unresolved. Geochemical impacts of CO2 as a working fluid (“CO2-EGS” compared to those for water as a working fluid (H2O-EGS are needed. The primary objectives of this study are (1 constraining geochemical processes associated with CO2-fluid-rock interactions under the high pressures and temperatures of a typical CO2-EGS site and (2 comparing geochemical impacts of CO2-EGS to geochemical impacts of H2O-EGS. The St. John’s Dome CO2-EGS research site in Arizona was adopted as a case study. A 3D model of the site was developed. Net heat extraction and mass flow production rates for CO2-EGS were larger compared to H2O-EGS, suggesting that using scCO2 as a working fluid may enhance EGS heat extraction. More aqueous CO2 accumulates within upper- and lower-lying layers than in the injection/production layers, reducing pH values and leading to increased dissolution and precipitation of minerals in those upper and lower layers. Dissolution of oligoclase for water as a working fluid shows smaller magnitude in rates and different distributions in profile than those for scCO2 as a working fluid. It indicates that geochemical processes of scCO2-rock interaction have significant effects on mineral dissolution and precipitation in magnitudes and distributions.

  2. Multiple imputation of missing covariates with non-linear effects and interactions: an evaluation of statistical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Shaun R; Bartlett, Jonathan W; White, Ian R

    2012-04-10

    Multiple imputation is often used for missing data. When a model contains as covariates more than one function of a variable, it is not obvious how best to impute missing values in these covariates. Consider a regression with outcome Y and covariates X and X2. In 'passive imputation' a value X* is imputed for X and then X2 is imputed as (X*)2. A recent proposal is to treat X2 as 'just another variable' (JAV) and impute X and X2 under multivariate normality. We use simulation to investigate the performance of three methods that can easily be implemented in standard software: 1) linear regression of X on Y to impute X then passive imputation of X2; 2) the same regression but with predictive mean matching (PMM); and 3) JAV. We also investigate the performance of analogous methods when the analysis involves an interaction, and study the theoretical properties of JAV. The application of the methods when complete or incomplete confounders are also present is illustrated using data from the EPIC Study. JAV gives consistent estimation when the analysis is linear regression with a quadratic or interaction term and X is missing completely at random. When X is missing at random, JAV may be biased, but this bias is generally less than for passive imputation and PMM. Coverage for JAV was usually good when bias was small. However, in some scenarios with a more pronounced quadratic effect, bias was large and coverage poor. When the analysis was logistic regression, JAV's performance was sometimes very poor. PMM generally improved on passive imputation, in terms of bias and coverage, but did not eliminate the bias. Given the current state of available software, JAV is the best of a set of imperfect imputation methods for linear regression with a quadratic or interaction effect, but should not be used for logistic regression.

  3. Multiple imputation of missing covariates with non-linear effects and interactions: an evaluation of statistical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seaman Shaun R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple imputation is often used for missing data. When a model contains as covariates more than one function of a variable, it is not obvious how best to impute missing values in these covariates. Consider a regression with outcome Y and covariates X and X2. In 'passive imputation' a value X* is imputed for X and then X2 is imputed as (X*2. A recent proposal is to treat X2 as 'just another variable' (JAV and impute X and X2 under multivariate normality. Methods We use simulation to investigate the performance of three methods that can easily be implemented in standard software: 1 linear regression of X on Y to impute X then passive imputation of X2; 2 the same regression but with predictive mean matching (PMM; and 3 JAV. We also investigate the performance of analogous methods when the analysis involves an interaction, and study the theoretical properties of JAV. The application of the methods when complete or incomplete confounders are also present is illustrated using data from the EPIC Study. Results JAV gives consistent estimation when the analysis is linear regression with a quadratic or interaction term and X is missing completely at random. When X is missing at random, JAV may be biased, but this bias is generally less than for passive imputation and PMM. Coverage for JAV was usually good when bias was small. However, in some scenarios with a more pronounced quadratic effect, bias was large and coverage poor. When the analysis was logistic regression, JAV's performance was sometimes very poor. PMM generally improved on passive imputation, in terms of bias and coverage, but did not eliminate the bias. Conclusions Given the current state of available software, JAV is the best of a set of imperfect imputation methods for linear regression with a quadratic or interaction effect, but should not be used for logistic regression.

  4. In vivo evaluation of drug-drug interactions linked to UGT inhibition: the effect of probenecid on dalcetrapib pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves Baldó, Pau; Anzures-Cabrera, Judith; Bentley, Darren

    2013-03-01

    To assess the effect of the UGT inhibitor probenecid on the pharmacokinetics of dalcetrapib, an investigational drug whose pharmacologically active thiol form undergoes glucuronidation (fm UGT ≥ 0.25). A two-way crossover study in 20 healthy subjects. Subjects received a single 600 mg dose of dalcetrapib with or without probenecid (500 mg 4 times daily for 6 days). AUC∞ and Cmax of dalcetrapib thiol were increased by 14% and 21%, respectively, by co-administration of probenecid. This case study illustrates the difficulty in predicting clinically relevant drug-drug interactions for UGT substrates based only on the fraction metabolized by glucuronidation.

  5. A Cochlear Implant Performance Prognostic Test Based on Electrical Field Interactions Evaluated by eABR (Electrical Auditory Brainstem Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Guevara

    Full Text Available Cochlear implants (CIs are neural prostheses that have been used routinely in the clinic over the past 25 years. They allow children who were born profoundly deaf, as well as adults affected by hearing loss for whom conventional hearing aids are insufficient, to attain a functional level of hearing. The "modern" CI (i.e., a multi-electrode implant using sequential coding strategies has yielded good speech comprehension outcomes (recognition level for monosyllabic words about 50% to 60%, and sentence comprehension close to 90%. These good average results however hide a very important interindividual variability as scores in a given patients' population often vary from 5 to 95% in comparable testing conditions. Our aim was to develop a prognostic model for patients with unilateral CI. A novel method of objectively measuring electrical and neuronal interactions using electrical auditory brainstem responses (eABRs is proposed.The method consists of two measurements: 1 eABR measurements with stimulation by a single electrode at 70% of the dynamic range (four electrodes distributed within the cochlea were tested, followed by a summation of these four eABRs; 2 Measurement of a single eABR with stimulation from all four electrodes at 70% of the dynamic range. A comparison of the eABRs obtained by these two measurements, defined as the monaural interaction component (MIC, indicated electrical and neural interactions between the stimulation channels. Speech recognition performance without lip reading was measured for each patient using a logatome test (64 "vowel-consonant-vowel"; VCV; by forced choice of 1 out of 16. eABRs were measured in 16 CI patients (CIs with 20 electrodes, Digisonic SP; Oticon Medical ®, Vallauris, France. Significant correlations were found between speech recognition performance and the ratio of the amplitude of the V wave of the eABRs obtained with the two measurements (Pearson's linear regression model, parametric correlation: r

  6. Scale interactions in economics: application to the evaluation of the economic damages of climatic change and of extreme events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallegatte, S.

    2005-06-01

    Growth models, which neglect economic disequilibria, considered as temporary, are in general used to evaluate the damaging effects generated by climatic change. This work shows, through a series of modeling experiences, the importance of disequilibria and of endogenous variability of economy in the evaluation of damages due to extreme events and climatic change. It demonstrates the impossibility to separate the evaluation of damages from the representation of growth and of economic dynamics: the comfort losses will depend on both the nature and intensity of impacts and on the dynamics and situation of the economy to which they will apply. Thus, the uncertainties about the damaging effects of future climatic changes come from both scientific uncertainties and from uncertainties about the future organization of our economies. (J.S.)

  7. Experimental evaluation of depth-of-interaction correction in a small-animal positron emission tomography scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael V; Ostrow, Harold G; Seidel, Jurgen; Pomper, Martin G

    2010-12-01

    Human and small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanners with cylindrical geometry and conventional detectors exhibit a progressive reduction in radial spatial resolution with increasing radial distance from the geometric axis of the scanner. This "depth-of-interaction" (DOI) effect is sufficiently deleterious that many laboratories have devised novel schemes to reduce the magnitude of this effect and thereby yield PET images of greater quantitative accuracy. Here we examine experimentally the effects of a particular DOI correction method (dual-scintillator phoswich detectors with pulse shape discrimination) implemented in a small-animal PET scanner by comparing the same phantom and same mouse images with and without DOI correction. The results suggest that even this relatively coarse, two-level estimate of radial gamma ray interaction position significantly reduces the DOI parallax error. This study also confirms two less appreciated advantages of DOI correction: a reduction in radial distortion and radial source displacement as a source is moved toward the edge of the field of view and a resolution improvement detectable in the central field of view likely owing to improved spatial sampling.

  8. Deaf students and their classroom communication: an evaluation of higher order categorical interactions among school and background characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Thomas E; Anderson, Melissa L

    2010-01-01

    This article investigated to what extent age, use of a cochlear implant, parental hearing status, and use of sign in the home determine language of instruction for profoundly deaf children. Categorical data from 8,325 profoundly deaf students from the 2008 Annual Survey of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children and Youth were analyzed using chi-square automated interaction detector, a stepwise analytic procedure that allows the assessment of higher order interactions among categorical variables. Results indicated that all characteristics were significantly related to classroom communication modality. Although younger and older students demonstrated a different distribution of communication modality, for both younger and older students, cochlear implantation had the greatest effect on differentiating students into communication modalities, yielding greater gains in the speech-only category for implanted students. For all subgroups defined by age and implantation status, the use of sign at home further segregated the sample into communication modality subgroups, reducing the likelihood of speech only and increasing the placement of students into signing classroom settings. Implications for future research in the field of deaf education are discussed.

  9. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of 2,5-Diketopiperazines as Inhibitors of the MDM2-p53 Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariell Pettersson

    Full Text Available The transcription factor p53 is the main tumour suppressor in cells and many cancer types have p53 mutations resulting in a loss of its function. In tumours that retain wild-type p53 function, p53 activity is down-regulated by MDM2 (human murine double minute 2 via a direct protein-protein interaction. We have designed and synthesised two series of 2,5-diketopiperazines as inhibitors of the MDM2-p53 interaction. The first set was designed to directly mimic the α-helical region of the p53 peptide, containing key residues in the i, i+4 and i+7 positions of a natural α-helix. Conformational analysis indicated that 1,3,6-trisubstituted 2,5-diketopiperazines were able to place substituents in the same spatial orientation as an α-helix template. The key step of the synthesis involved the cyclisation of substituted dipeptides. The other set of tetrasubstituted 2,5-diketopiperazines were designed based on structure-based docking studies and the Ugi multicomponent reaction was used for the synthesis. This latter set comprised the most potent inhibitors which displayed micromolar IC50-values in a biochemical fluorescence polarisation assay.

  10. Cancer genetics education in a low- to middle-income country: evaluation of an interactive workshop for clinicians in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Hill

    Full Text Available Clinical genetic testing is becoming an integral part of medical care for inherited disorders. While genetic testing and counseling are readily available in high-income countries, in low- and middle-income countries like Kenya genetic testing is limited and genetic counseling is virtually non-existent. Genetic testing is likely to become widespread in Kenya within the next decade, yet there has not been a concomitant increase in genetic counseling resources. To address this gap, we designed an interactive workshop for clinicians in Kenya focused on the genetics of the childhood eye cancer retinoblastoma. The objectives were to increase retinoblastoma genetics knowledge, build genetic counseling skills and increase confidence in those skills.The workshop was conducted at the 2013 Kenyan National Retinoblastoma Strategy meeting. It included a retinoblastoma genetics presentation, small group discussion of case studies and genetic counseling role-play. Knowledge was assessed by standardized test, and genetic counseling skills and confidence by questionnaire.Knowledge increased significantly post-workshop, driven by increased knowledge of retinoblastoma causative genetics. One-year post-workshop, participant knowledge had returned to baseline, indicating that knowledge retention requires more frequent reinforcement. Participants reported feeling more confident discussing genetics with patients, and had integrated more genetic counseling into patient interactions.A comprehensive retinoblastoma genetics workshop can increase the knowledge and skills necessary for effective retinoblastoma genetic counseling.

  11. Multilevel summation methods for efficient evaluation of long-range pairwise interactions in atomistic and coarse-grained molecular simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    The availability of efficient algorithms for long-range pairwise interactions is central to the success of numerous applications, ranging in scale from atomic-level modeling of materials to astrophysics. This report focuses on the implementation and analysis of the multilevel summation method for approximating long-range pairwise interactions. The computational cost of the multilevel summation method is proportional to the number of particles, N, which is an improvement over FFTbased methods whos cost is asymptotically proportional to N logN. In addition to approximating electrostatic forces, the multilevel summation method can be use to efficiently approximate convolutions with long-range kernels. As an application, we apply the multilevel summation method to a discretized integral equation formulation of the regularized generalized Poisson equation. Numerical results are presented using an implementation of the multilevel summation method in the LAMMPS software package. Preliminary results show that the computational cost of the method scales as expected, but there is still a need for further optimization.

  12. Fouling behavior of lysozyme on different membrane surfaces during the MD operation: An especial interest in the interaction energy evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Chen, Lin; Zhu, Liang

    2017-08-01

    The membrane fouling behaviors of lysozyme (LYS) on three different membranes were systematically investigated during the membrane distillation (MD) process, including polypropylene (PP), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes. The results showed that PP membrane was not suitable for the MD operation due to its lower heat resistance. A flux decline of 50% was observed for the PTFE, while PVDF displayed a more severe decrement of 70%. Additionally, the PTFE and PVDF membranes both demonstrated a faster flux decline during the early period, and then a clear decrement of fouling rate was obtained at the later period. To better understand the interactions between LYS and different membranes, the interaction energy between LYS and the reconstructed membrane surface, represented by XDLVO potential, was calculated by surface element integration. The PVDF membrane exhibited higher roughness and lower energy barrier, indicating that rougher membrane was tended to be fouled by LYS. Finally, a "four stages model" was suggested for the MD fouling process, which was associated with three LYS deposition patterns of smooth, protuberance and valley. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of Soil-Structure Interaction on the Seismic Response of Liquid Storage Tanks under Earthquake Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Farajian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil-structure interaction (SSI could affect the seismic response of structures. Since liquid storage tanks are vital structures and must continue their operation under severe earthquakes, their seismic behavior should be studied. Accordingly, the seismic response of two types of steel liquid storage tanks (namely, broad and slender, with aspect ratios of height to radius equal to 0.6 and 1.85 founded on half-space soil is scrutinized under different earthquake ground motions. For a better comparison, the six considered ground motions are classified, based on their pulse-like characteristics, into two groups, named far and near fault ground motions. To model the liquid storage tanks, the simplified mass-spring model is used and the liquid is modeled as two lumped masses known as sloshing and impulsive, and the interaction of fluid and structure is considered using two coupled springs and dashpots. The SSI effect, also, is considered using a coupled spring and dashpot. Additionally, four types of soils are used to consider a wide variety of soil properties. To this end, after deriving the equations of motion, MATLAB programming is employed to obtain the time history responses. Results show that although the SSI effect leads to a decrease in the impulsive displacement, overturning moment, and normalized base shear, the sloshing (or convective displacement is not affected by such effects due to its long period.

  14. Evaluation of the influence of the polymer-filler interaction on compounds based on epoxidized elastomeric matrix and precipitated silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana L. A. C. Rocha

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of epoxy groups into the main chain of elastomers has emerged as a promising alternative, considering the monitoring of polymer-filler interaction leading to changes in the properties of vulcanizates. The epoxidation reaction (in situ was chosen to modify elastomers, such as polybutadiene (BR and copolymer of styrene-butadiene-rubber (SBR, because it is a simple, easily controlled reaction, even considering the small epoxidation degree. The modification degree of the polymeric chain was studied with FT-IR and ¹H-NMR. The shift of the Tg to high temperatures with the increase of the epoxy group in the polymer chain was monitored through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. An analysis of the dynamic modulus of the material in relation to its dependence on the amplitude and temperature was carried out. The interaction between epoxidized elastomeric matrix and silica as filler was extremely improved, even in the presence of very low content of epoxy groups into the polymer chain.

  15. Novel near-infrared BiFC systems from a bacterial phytochrome for imaging protein interactions and drug evaluation under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minghai; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhiping; Liu, Sanying; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Xian-En; Cui, Zongqiang

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in live subjects is critical for understanding these fundamental biological processes. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) provides a good technique for imaging PPIs; however, a BiFC system with a long wavelength remains to be pursued for in vivo imaging. Here, we conducted systematic screening of split reporters from a bacterial phytochrome-based, near-infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP). Several new near-infrared phytochrome BiFC systems were built based on selected split sites including the amino acids residues 97/98, 99/100, 122/123, and 123/124. These new near-infrared BiFC systems from a bacterial phytochrome were verified as powerful tools for imaging PPIs under physiological conditions in live cells and in live mice. The interaction between HIV-1 integrase (IN) and cellular cofactor protein Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) was visualized in live cells using the newly constructed iRFP BiFC system because of its important roles in HIV-1 integration and replication. Because the HIV IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction is an attractive anti-HIV target, drug evaluation assays to inhibit the HIV IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction were also performed using the newly constructed BiFC system. The results showed that compound 6 and carbidopa inhibit the HIV IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction in a dose-dependent manner under physiological conditions in the BiFC assays. This study provides novel near-infrared BiFC systems for imaging protein interactions under physiological conditions and provides guidance for splitting other bacterial phytochrome-like proteins to construct BiFC systems. The study also provides a new method for drug evaluation in live cells based on iRFP BiFC systems and supplies some new information regarding candidate drugs for anti-HIV therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Proposed Integration Environment for Enhanced User Interaction and Value-Adding of Electronic Documents: An Empirical Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Chern Li; Chennupati, K. R.; Foo, Schubert

    2001-01-01

    Explores the potential and impact of an innovative information environment in enhancing user activities in using electronic documents for various tasks, and to support the value-adding of these e-documents. Discusses the conceptual design and prototyping of a proposed environment, PROPIE. Presents an empirical and formative evaluation of the…

  17. Lab-scale impact test to investigate the pipe-soil interaction and comparative study to evaluate structural responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Man Ryu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the dynamic response of a subsea pipeline under an impact load to determine the effect of the seabed soil. A laboratory-scale soil-based pipeline impact test was carried out to investigate the pipeline deformation/strain as well as the interaction with the soil-pipeline. In addition, an impact test was simulated using the finite element technique, and the calculated strain was compared with the experimental results. During the simulation, the pipeline was described based on an elasto-plastic analysis, and the soil was modeled using the Mohr-Coulomb fail-ure criterion. The results obtained were compared with ASME D31.8, and the differences between the analysis results and the rules were specifically investigated. Modified ASME formulae were proposed to calculate the precise structural behavior of a subsea pipeline under an impact load when considering sand- and clay-based seabed soils.

  18. Launch Vehicle Manual Steering with Adaptive Augmenting Control In-flight Evaluations of Adverse Interactions Using a Piloted Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Curt; Miller, Chris; Wall, John H.; Vanzwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive augmenting control algorithm for the Space Launch System has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center as part of the launch vehicles baseline flight control system. A prototype version of the SLS flight control software was hosted on a piloted aircraft at the Armstrong Flight Research Center to demonstrate the adaptive controller on a full-scale realistic application in a relevant flight environment. Concerns regarding adverse interactions between the adaptive controller and a proposed manual steering mode were investigated by giving the pilot trajectory deviation cues and pitch rate command authority. Two NASA research pilots flew a total of twenty five constant pitch-rate trajectories using a prototype manual steering mode with and without adaptive control.

  19. [Evaluation of postural characteristics in patients with vertigo by modified clinical test of sensory interaction and balance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Kong, Weijia; Lai, Changqin

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the application of modified clinical test of sensory interaction and balance (mCTSIB) in the patients with vertigo. One hundred and six patients with vertigo (62 cases with peripheral and 44 cases with central vestibular disorder) were taken the mCTSIB of the firm surface and foam surface with eye open and eye closed for 30 seconds respectively. The standing foam surface was to interrupt the somatosensory and closing eyes was to interrupt the visual input in the postural stability. The falling during the test was recorded. The results between the mCTSIB and video nystagmography (VNG) were compared. In vestibular peripheral disorder, the abnormal of mCTSIB was 45.16% (28/62) and agreement to VNG was 67.74% (42/62). In vestibular central disorder, the abnormal of mCTSIB was 27.27% (12/44) and agreement to VNG was 81.82% (36/44). For all these patients with vertigo in this study, the abnormal of mCTSIB was 37.74% (40/106) and agreement to VNG was 73.58% (78/106). Regarding the falling as abnormality, the mCTSIB was not significant different between the vestibular peripheral and central disorders (chi2 = 3.505, P > 0.05). Although the mCTSIB, which was easy to carry out, can not be a method to differentiate the vestibular peripheral and central disorders, it was a suitable to assess the ability of sensory interaction to maintain balance in patients with vertigo.

  20. Fabrication of robot head module using contact resistance force sensor for human robot interaction and its evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Ki; Kim, Jong Ho [Korea Reserch Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyun Joon [Univ. of Maryland, Maryland (United States); Kwon, Young Ha [Kyung Hee Univ., Gyunggi Do (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    This paper presents a design of a robot head module with touch sensing algorithms that can simultaneously detect contact force and location. The module is constructed with a hemisphere and three sensor units that are fabricated using contact resistance force sensors. The surface part is designed with the hemisphere that measures 300 mm in diameter and 150 mm in height. Placed at the bottom of the robot head module are three sensor units fabricated using a simple screen printing technique. The contact force and the location of the model are evaluated through the calibration setup. The experiment showed that the calculated contact positions almost coincided with the applied load points as the contact location changed with a location error of about {+-}8.67 mm. The force responses of the module were evaluated at two points under loading and unloading conditions from 0 N to 5 N. The robot head module showed almost the same force responses at the two points.

  1. Interaction study of polyisobutylene with paraffins by NMR using the evaluation of spin-lattice relaxation times for hydrogen nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Rosana G.G.; Tavares, Maria I.B.

    2001-01-01

    The evaluation of spin-lattice relaxation times of 1 H for polyisobutylene/paraffin systems, were obtained using the classic inversion recovery technique, and also through Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP/MAS) techniques varying the contact time and also by the delayed contact time pulse sequence. NMR results showed that the polyisobutylene/paraffin systems in which high molecular weight paraffins were used, is heterogeneous. However, for paraffins with low molecular weight, the system presents good homogeneity. (author)

  2. Comparative Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of Heavy Ion Interactions at a Few GeV to a Few Hundred GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopa Bhoumik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the multifractality of pion emission process in 16O-AgBr interactions at 2.1 AGeV  and  60 AGeV, 12C-AgBr  and  24Mg-AgBr interactions at 4.5 AGeV, and 32S-AgBr interactions at 200 AGeV using Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MFDFA method which is capable of extracting the actual multifractal property filtering out the average trend of fluctuation. The analysis reveals that the pseudorapidity distribution of the shower particles is multifractal in nature for all the interactions; that is, pion production mechanism has inbuilt multiscale self-similarity property. We have employed MFDFA method for randomly generated events for 32S-AgBr interactions at 200 AGeV. Comparison of expt. results with those obtained from randomly generated data set reveals that the source of multifractality in our data is the presence of long range correlation. Comparing the results obtained from different interactions, it may be concluded that strength of multifractality decreases with projectile mass for the same projectile energy and for a particular projectile it increases with energy. The values of ordinary Hurst exponent suggest that there is long range correlation present in our data for all the interactions.

  3. Evaluating hydrogen bond interactions in enzymes containing Mn(III)-histidine complexation using manganese-imidazole complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendiran, M; Caudle, T; Kirk, Martin L; Setyawati, Ika; Kampf, Jeff W; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2003-02-01

    It is often difficult to control hydrogen bond interactions in small molecule compounds that model metalloenzyme active sites. The imidazole-containing ligands 4,5-dicarboxyimidazole (H(3)DCBI) and 4,5-dicarboxy- N-methylimidazole (H(2)MeDCBI) allow examination of the effects of internal hydrogen bonding between carboxylate and imidazole nitrogen atoms. A new series of mononuclear manganese imidazole complexes have been prepared using these ligands: Mn(III)(salpn)(H(2)DCBI)(DMF) (1), Mn(III)(salpn)(HMeDCBI) (2), Mn(III)(dtsalpn)(HMeDCBI) (3), [Mn(IV)(dtsalpn)(HMeDCBI)]PF(6) (4), Mn(III)(salpn)(H(2)DCBI) (5), Mn(III)(dtsalpn)(H(2)DCBI) (6), and Mn(IV)(dtsalpn)(H(2)DCBI)PF(6) (8). Complexes 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 have been prepared by direct reaction of salpn [salpn=(salicylideneaminato)-1,3-diaminopropane)] or dtsalpn [dtsalpn=(3,5-di- t-butylsalicylideneaminato)-1,3-diaminopropane)] and H(3)DCBI and H(2)MeDCBI with Mn(III) acetate, while complexes 4 and 8 were made by bulk electrolysis of complex 3 or 6 in dichloromethane. Complexes 1, 2, and 6 were characterized by X-ray diffraction. The impact of hydrogen bonding interactions of the complexes has been demonstrated by X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, and EPR spectroscopy. In all complexes the central metal ion is present in a six-coordinate geometry. Magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm the spin and oxidation states of the complexes. The cyclic voltammograms of 3 and 6 in dichloromethane reveal single, reversible redox waves with E(1/2)=600 mV and 690 mV, respectively. The X-band EPR spectrum of 4 shows a broad signal around g=4.4, and the corresponding complex 8 possesses a broad signal at slightly lower field ( g=5.5) than 4. These studies demonstrate that even small changes in the effective charge of the imidazole ligand can have a profound impact on the structure, spectroscopy, and magnetism of manganese(IV) complexes. We use these observations to present a model that may explain the origin of the g=4

  4. Preparation and chromatographic evaluation of a newly designed steviol glycoside modified-silica stationary phase in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography and reversed phase liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tu; Fu, Qing; Shen, Aijin; Wang, Hui; Jin, Yu; Xin, Huaxia; Ke, Yanxiong; Guo, Zhimou; Liang, Xinmiao

    2015-04-03

    A diterpene glycoside compound, rebaudioside A (commonly abbreviated as RA), was immobilized onto porous silica surface through "thiol-ene" click chemistry strategy. The successful immobilization of the RA on the silica support was confirmed by FT-IR and elemental analysis. Chromatographic characteristics of the new stationary phase, named Click TE-RA, were evaluated by a set of diverse analytes such as carbohydrates, nucleosides, and organic acids in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mode. The effects of water content, buffer pH and concentration were investigated and a typical HILIC retention feature of Click TE-RA was observed at high organic modifier content. The Click TE-RA stationary phase was further studied by a series of glycoside compounds. Tunable retention mechanisms from hydrophilic to hydrophobic interactions were observed. Separation of very polar compounds including oligosaccharides, nucleic acid bases and nucleosides using Click TE-RA in HILIC mode was successfully accomplished. In addition, separation of saponins both in HILIC and reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) modes was performed, demonstrating the presence of orthogonality between two different modes on Click TE-RA column. The multiple interactions induced by polar sugar group and hydrophobic aglycone group allowed this Click TE-RA to serve as a multi-mode stationary phase in two-dimensional liquid chromatography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A usability evaluation of an interactive application for halal products using optical character recognition and augmented reality technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Meng Chun; Nizam, Siti Soleha Muhammad; Arshad, Haslina; A'isyah Ahmad Shukri, Saidatul; Hashim, Nurhazarifah Che; Putra, Haekal Mozzia; Abidin, Rimaniza Zainal

    2017-10-01

    This article discusses the usability of an interactive application for halal products using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) and Augmented Reality (AR) technologies. Among the problems that have been identified in this study is that consumers have little knowledge about the E-Code. Therefore, users often have doubts about the halal status of the product. Nowadays, the integrity of halal status can be doubtful due to the actions of some irresponsible people spreading false information about a product. Therefore, an application that uses OCR and AR technology developed in this study will help the users to identify the information content of a product by scanning the E-Code label and by scanning the product's brand to know the halal status of the product. In this application, E-Code on the label of a product is scanned using OCR technology to display information about the E-Code. The product's brand is scan using augmented reality technology to display halal status of the product. The findings reveal that users are satisfied with this application and it is useful and easy to use.

  6. Experimental Evaluation of Depth-of-Interaction Correction in a Small-Animal Positron Emission Tomography Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V. Green

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Human and small-animal positron emission tomography (PET scanners with cylindrical geometry and conventional detectors exhibit a progressive reduction in radial spatial resolution with increasing radial distance from the geometric axis of the scanner. This “depth-of-interaction” (DOI effect is sufficiently deleterious that many laboratories have devised novel schemes to reduce the magnitude of this effect and thereby yield PET images of greater quantitative accuracy. Here we examine experimentally the effects of a particular DOI correction method (dual-scintillator phoswich detectors with pulse shape discrimination implemented in a small-animal PET scanner by comparing the same phantom and same mouse images with and without DOI correction. The results suggest that even this relatively coarse, two-level estimate of radial gamma ray interaction position significantly reduces the DOI parallax error. This study also confirms two less appreciated advantages of DOI correction: a reduction in radial distortion and radial source displacement as a source is moved toward the edge of the field of view and a resolution improvement detectable in the central field of view likely owing to improved spatial sampling.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy evaluation of the interaction pattern between dentin and resin after cavity preparation using Er:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schein, Marcelo Thome

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the interaction pattern formed between dentin and resin on cavities prepared with an erbium laser (Er:YAG). The morphological aspect of the irradiated dentin after acid etching was also observed. Ten dentin disks were obtained from fresh extracted third molars. Each disk received two cavities, one prepared with a conventional high-speed drill, while the other cavity was obtained by the use of an Er:YAG laser (KaVo KEY Laser, KaVo Co.). The laser treatment was performed with 250 mJ/pulse, 4 Hz, non contact mode, focused beam, and a fine water mist was used. Five disks were prepared for morphological analysis of the acid etched dentin. The other five disks had their cavities restored with Single Bond (3M) followed by Z100 resin (3M). The specimens were observed under scanning electron microscopy after dentin-resin interface demineralization and deproteinization. It was observed that the morphological characteristics of the acid-etched irradiated dentin were not favorable to the diffusion of monomers through the collagen network. The dentin resin interfacial aspect of irradiated dentin, after acid etching, showed thin tags and scarce hybridization zones, which agreed with the morphology of the irradiated and acid-etched dentin substrate observed. (author)

  8. Electrochemical Evaluation of trans-Resveratrol Levels in Red Wine Based on the Interaction between Resveratrol and Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lantao; Zhou, Yanli; Kang, Yiyu; Huang, Haihong; Li, Congming; Xu, Maotian; Ye, Baoxian

    2017-01-01

    trans -Resveratrol is often considered as one of the quality standards of red wine, and the development of a sensitive and reliable method for monitoring the trans -resveratrol levels in red wine is an urgent requirement for the quality control. Here, a novel voltammetric approach was described for probing trans -resveratrol using a graphene-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The proposed electrode was prepared by one-step electrodeposition of reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) at a GC electrode. Compared with the bare GC electrode, the introduced graphene film on the electrode surface dramatically improved the sensitivity of the sensor response due to the π - π interaction between the graphene and trans -resveratrol. The developed sensor exhibited low detection limit of 0.2  μ M with wide linear range of 0.8-32  μ M and high stability. For the analysis of trans -resveratrol in red wine, the high anti-interference ability and the good recoveries indicated the great potential for practical applications.

  9. Evaluation of a new Implicit Coupling Algorithm for the Partitioned Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annerel, Sebastiaan; Degroote, Joris; Claessens, Tom; Vierendeels, Jan

    2010-06-01

    We present a newly developed Fluid-Structure Interaction coupling algorithm to simulate Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valves dynamics in a partitioned way. The coupling iterations between the flow solver and the leaflet motion solver are accelerated by using the Jacobian with the derivatives of the pressure and viscous moments acting on the leaflets with respect to the leaflet acceleration. This Jacobian is used in the leaflet motion solver when new positions of the leaflets are computed during the coupling iterations. The Jacobian is numerically derived from the flow solver by applying leaflet perturbations. Instead of calculating this Jacobian every time step, the Jacobian is extrapolated from previous time steps and a recalculation of the Jacobian is only done when needed. The efficiency of our new algorithm is subsequently compared to existing algorithms which use fixed relaxation and dynamic Aitken Δ2 relaxation in the coupling iterations when the new positions of the leaflets are computed. Results show that dynamic Aitken Δ2 relaxation outperforms fixed relaxation. Moreover, during the opening phase of the valve, our new algorithm needs fewer subiterations per time step to achieve convergence than the method with Aitken Δ2 relaxation. Thus, our newly developed FSI coupling scheme outperforms the existing coupling schemes.

  10. Blended learning in a first-year language class: Evaluating the acceptance of an interactive learning environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jako Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly blended learning, as a combination of face-to-face and online instruction is applied in university classrooms. In this study the use of an interactive learning environment (ILE, within a Sakai-based learning management system, as well as face-to-face teaching and learning in a first-year Afrikaans language class is explored. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM was employed by means of a survey and the Structure Equation Model was used to explore factors relevant to this first-year class. In addition, qualitative research was conducted through an open questionnaire in order to determine the perceptions regarding the blended learning context and the ILE. It was found that students are generally able to function within the ILE and they are quite positive towards the use of the learning environment for learning and teaching. However, it is clear that some students still prefer printed study material. Despite the fact that students indicated that they use the ILE daily, actual usage statistics did not always correspond. Finally, this paper makes suggestions with regard to adapting teaching in terms of students’ behaviour based on their computer anxiety and Internet self-efficacy as well as the perceived usefulness and ease of use of the ILE.

  11. Learning and assessing competence in reflective practice: Student evaluation of the relative value of aspects of an integrated, interactive reflective practice syllabus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canniford, Lynda J; Fox-Young, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Although the literature is rich with information on the value of reflective practice, there is a paucity of information on techniques to assess whether professionals have learnt this essential skill. In this article, we describe the introduction and evaluation of an innovative, integrated, interactive approach to teaching and assessing competence in reflective practice using an online self directed learning package. As part of a new staff start up scholarship of teaching and learning grant project in an Australian university, we converted an existing one day reflective practice workshop for undergraduate nursing students to an interactive online learning package that could also be applicable for students in other health professions. The assessment of learning in the package was integrated with overall clinical competence assessment using Tanner's Clinical Judgement Model and Lasater's Clinical Judgement rubric to enable immediate online feedback to students on their progress. In this article, we focus on those aspects of the package that students evaluated as most beneficial to their learning, specifically immediate feedback by lecturers guided by Lasater's rubric.

  12. An ex vivo co-culture model system to evaluate stromal-epithelial interactions in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, T S; Le, T T; Nichols, M B; Bauer, E; Cheng, J; Camarillo, I G

    2013-01-15

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women worldwide. High breast cancer incidence and mortality rates, especially in obese patients, emphasize the need for a better biological understanding of this disease. Previous studies provide substantial evidence for a vital role of the local extracellular environment in multiple steps of tumor progression, including proliferation and invasion. Current evidence supports the role of adipocytes as an endocrine organ, which produces steroid hormones, pro-inflammatory cytokines and adipokines, such as leptin. To further define the role of the mammary microenvironment on tumorigenesis, we have developed an adipose-tumor epithelial cell co-culture system designed to reproduce the in vivo mammary environment. We validate this model through use of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, a label-free vibrational imaging technique. CARS analysis demonstrates the sustained viability of the adipocytes, and that mammary cancer cell morphology parallels that of tumors in vivo. Also, characterized was the influence of mammary adipose tissue on tumor cell growth and migration. Adipose tissue co-cultured with mammary tumor epithelial cells, in the absence of any serum or supplemental growth factors, resulted in substantial increases in growth and migration of tumor cells. In conclusion, this novel co-culture system provides an ideal model to study epithelial-stromal interactions in the mammary gland. Understanding the relationship between adipose tissue, the most abundant and least studied component of the breast stroma and tumor epithelial cells is critical to clarifying the influence of obesity on the development, progression and prognosis of breast cancer. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  13. A "do-it-yourself" interactive bone structure module: development and evaluation of an online teaching resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Peter; Guy, Richard

    2013-01-01

    A stand-alone online teaching module was developed to cover an area of musculoskeletal anatomy (structure of bone) found to be difficult by students. The material presented in the module was not formally presented in any other way, thus providing additional time for other curriculum components, but it was assessed in the final examination. The module was developed using "in-house" software designed for academics with minimal computer experience. The efficacy and effectiveness of the module was gauged via student surveys, testing student knowledge before and after module introduction, and analysis of final examination results. At least 74% of the class used the module and student responses were positive regarding module usability (navigation, interaction) and utility (learning support). Learning effectiveness was demonstrated by large significant improvements in the post-presentation test scores for "users" compared with "non-users" and by the percentage of correct responses to relevant multiple choice questions in the final examination. Performance on relevant short answer questions in the final examination was, on average, comparable to that for other components. Though limited by study structure, it was concluded that the module produced learning outcomes equivalent to those generated by more traditional teaching methods. This "Do-It-Yourself" e-learning approach may be particularly useful for meeting specific course needs not catered for by commercial applications or where there are cost limitations for generation of online learning material. The specific approaches used in the study can assist in development of effective online resources in anatomy. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

  14. Biotinidase Resistant 68Gallium-Radioligand Based on Biotin/Avidin Interaction for Pretargeting: Synthesis and Preclinical Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Surbhi; Hazari, Puja Panwar; Meena, Virendra Kumar; Jaswal, Ambika; Khurana, Harleen; Kukreti, Shrikant; Mishra, Anil Kumar

    2016-11-16

    A new macrocyclic system 2,2'-(12-amino-11,13-dioxo-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclotridecane-4,7-diyl)diacetic acid (ATRIDAT) was designed for coordinating metals in +2 and +3 oxidation states particularly 68 Ga(III), for PET imaging. ATRIDAT was conjugated to d-biotin for pretargeting via biotin-avidin interaction. This model provides high tumor targeting efficiency and stability to biotinidase activity leading to modest signal amplification at the tumor site. Cyclization of triethylenetetramine with protected diethylamino malonate resulted in the formation of 13 membered diamide ring. d-Biotin was then anchored on the pendant amine rendering α-methyne carbon to the biotinamide bond which blocks the biotinidase enzyme activity. Biotinidase stability assay showed remarkable stability toward the action of biotinidase with ∼95% remaining intact after treatment following 4 h. Binding affinity experiments such as HABA assay, competitive displacement studies with d-biotin and CD showed high binding affinity of the molecule with avidin in nanomolar range. Biotin conjugate was successfully radiolabeled with 68 Ga(III) with radiolabeling efficiency of ∼70% and then purified to get 99.9% radiochemical yield. IC 50 of the compound was found to be 2.36 mM in HEK cell line and 0.82 mM in A549 as assessed in MTT assay. In biodistribution studies, the major route of excretion was found to be renal. Significant uptake of 4.15 ± 0.35% was observed in tumor in the avidin pretreated mouse at 1 h. μPET images also showed a high tumor to muscle ratio of 26.8 and tumor to kidney ratio of 1.74 at 1 h post-injection after avidin treatment.

  15. Competency-Based Teaching in Radiology - Implementation and Evaluation of Interactive Workstation-Based Learning to Apply NKLM-Based Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestner, Wolfgang; Otten, Wiebke; Kaireit, Till; Wacker, Frank K; Dettmer, Sabine

    2017-11-01

    Purpose  New teaching formats are required to implement competency-based teaching in radiology teaching. Therefore, we have established and evaluated two practical competency-based radiological courses. Materials and Methods  The courses were held in a multimedia room with 25 computers and a professional DICOM viewer. Students were taught basic image analysis and presented clinical cases with a DICOM viewer under supervision of an instructor using desktop monitoring software. Two courses (elective course and obligatory course) were evaluated by the students (n = 160 and n = 100) and instructors (n = 9) using an anonymized online survey. Results  Courses were evaluated positively by the students and instructors. From the perspective of the students, the courses increased understanding of cross-sectional anatomy (elective/obligatory course: 97 %/95 %) and radiologic findings (97 %/99 %). Furthermore, the course increased the students' interest in radiology (61 %/65 %). The students considered this way of teaching to be relevant to their future occupation (92 % of students in the obligatory course). The higher incidence of teacher-student interaction and the possibility of independent image analysis were rated positively. The majority of instructors did not observe increased distractibility due to the computers (67 %) or notice worse preparation for MC tests (56 %). However, 56 % of instructors reported greater preparation effort. Conclusion  Practical competency-based radiological teaching using a DICOM viewer is a feasible innovative approach with high acceptance among students and instructors. It fosters competency-based learning as proposed by the model curriculum of the German Radiological Society (DRG) and the National Competency-based Catalogue of Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM). Key Points   · Practical competency-based radiological teaching is highly accepted by students and instructors

  16. An evaluation of The Great Escape: can an interactive computer game improve young children's fire safety knowledge and behaviors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrongiello, Barbara A; Schwebel, David C; Bell, Melissa; Stewart, Julia; Davis, Aaron L

    2012-07-01

    Fire is a leading cause of unintentional injury and, although young children are at particularly increased risk, there are very few evidence-based resources available to teach them fire safety knowledge and behaviors. Using a pre-post randomized design, the current study evaluated the effectiveness of a computer game (The Great Escape) for teaching fire safety information to young children (3.5-6 years). Using behavioral enactment procedures, children's knowledge and behaviors related to fire safety were compared to a control group of children before and after receiving the intervention. The results indicated significant improvements in knowledge and fire safety behaviors in the intervention group but not the control. Using computer games can be an effective way to promote young children's understanding of safety and how to react in different hazardous situations.

  17. Evaluating the Quality of the Interaction between Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities and Direct Support Staff: A Preliminary Application of Three Observation Scales from Parent-Infant Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostyn, Ine; Petry, Katja; Lambrechts, Greet; Maes, Bea

    2011-01-01

    Background: Affective and reciprocal interactions with others are essential for persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD), but it is a challenge to assess their quality. This study aimed to investigate the usefulness of instruments from parent-infant research to evaluate these interactions. Method: Eighteen videotaped…

  18. Interaction region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The Interaction Region Group addressed the basic questions of how to collide the SLC beams, how to maximize and monitor the luminosity, and how to minimize the detector backgrounds at the interaction region. In practice, five subgroups evolved to study these questions. The final focus group provided three alternative designs to acheive the 1 to 2 micron beam spot size required by the SLC, as well as studying other problems including: eta, eta' matching from the collider arcs, the implementation of soft bends near the interaction region, beam emittance growth, and magnet tolerances in the final focus. The beam position monitor group proposed two devices, a strip line monitor, and a beamstrahlung monitor, to bring the beams into collision. The luminosity monitor group reviewed the possible QED processes that would be insensitive to weak interaction (Z 0 ) effects. The beam dumping group proposed locations for kicker and septum magnets in the final focus that would achieve a high dumping efficiency and would meet the desired beam tolerances at the Moller scattering target in the beam dump line. Working with the Polarization Group, the Moller experiment was designed into the beam dump beam line. A beam dump was proposed that would maintain radiation backgrounds (penetrating muons) at acceptible levels. The detector backgrounds group proposed soft-bend and masking configurations to shield the detector from synchrotron radiation from the hard/soft bends and from the final focus quadrupoles and evaluated the effectiveness of these designs for the three final focus optics designs. Backgrounds were also estimated from: large angle synchrotron radiation, local and distant beam-gas interactions, 2-photon interactions, and from neutrons and backscattered photons from the beamstrahlung dump

  19. Characterization of the Oriskany and Berea Sandstones: Evaluating Biogeochemical Reactions of Potential Sandstone–Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verba, Circe [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Harris, Aubrey [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2016-07-07

    , guar gum, and isopropanol]; 3) reviews the known research about the interactions between several hydraulic fracturing chemicals [e.g. polyacrylamide, ethylene glycol, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), and glutaraldehyde] with the minerals (quartz, clay, pyrite, and carbonates) common to the lithologies of the Marcellus shale and its surrounding sandstones; and 4) characterizes the Berea sandstone and analyzes the physical and chemical effects of flowing guar gum through a Berea sandstone core.

  20. Audiovisual Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karandreas, Theodoros-Alexandros

    importance of each modality with respect to the overall quality evaluation. The results show that this was not due to specific interactions between stimuli but rather because the auditory modality dominated over the visual modality. Furthermore, for all experiments where less than optimal stimuli......Product sound quality evaluation aims to identify relevant attributes and assess their influence on the overall auditory impression. This results in an accurate representation of the product in a singular modality - usually the one primarily associated with the product's main function. However, any...... given product is rarely perceived in isolation, but rather judged within a global context which includes information from all modalities (senses). This PhD thesis investigates the relative importance of audio and visual information in subjective evaluations of a product. A multimodal setup was developed...

  1. ZebrafishMiner: an open source software for interactive evaluation of domain-specific fluorescence in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reischl Markus

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput microscopy makes it possible to observe the morphology of zebrafish on large scale to quantify genetic, toxic or drug effects. The image acquisition is done by automated microscopy, images are evaluated automatically by image processing pipelines, tailored specifically to the requirements of the scientific question. The transfer of such algorithms to other projects, however, is complex due to missing guidelines and lack of mathematical or programming knowledge. In this work, we implement an image processing pipeline for automatic fluorescence quantification in user-defined domains of zebrafish embryos and larvae of different age. The pipeline is capable of detecting embryos and larvae in image stacks and quantifying domain activity. To make this protocol available to the community, we developed an open source software package called „ZebrafishMiner“ which guides the user through all steps of the processing pipeline and makes the algorithms available and easy to handle. We implemented all routines in an MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI that gives the user control over all image processing parameters. The software is shipped with a manual of 30 pages and three tutorial datasets, which guide the user through the manual step by step. It can be downloaded at https://sourceforge.net/projects/scixminer/.

  2. Interactive analysis and evaluation of ERTS data for regional planning and urban development: A Los Angeles Basin case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raje, S.; Economy, R.; Willoughby, G.; Mcknight, J.

    1974-01-01

    The progression endemic to the ERTS Data Use Experiment SR 124 in data quality, analysis sophistication and applications responsiveness is reviewed. The roles of the variety of ERTS products, including the supporting underflight aircraft imagery at various scales, are discussed in the context of this investigation. The versatility of interpretation techniques and outputs developed and implemented via the General Electric Multispectral Information Extraction Systems is described and exemplified by both system-expository and applications-explanatory products. The wide-ranging and in-depth applications studied in the course of this experiment can be characterized as community-oriented and agency-directed. In the former, generic category, which is primarily data-contextual, problems analyzed dealt with agricultural systems, surface water bodies, snow cover, brush fire burns, forestry, grass growth, parks - golf courses - cemeteries, dust storms, grading sites, geological features and coastal water structure. The ERTS MSS band selectivity and measurements thresholds were of primary interest here. The agency-directed application areas have been user-evaluational in nature. Beginning with overall urbanized regional analysis of land cover density-development intensity, residential areas were analyzed for ascertaining if housing types could be aggregated with any degree of reliability.

  3. Effects of an Interactive School-Based Program for Preventing Adolescent Sexual Harassment: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lijster, Gaby P A; Felten, Hanneke; Kok, Gerjo; Kocken, Paul L

    2016-05-01

    Many adolescents experience sexual harassment and victims of sexual harassment have higher risks regarding well-being and health behaviors such as higher risks of suicidal thoughts, suicidal ideation and feeling unsafe at school. A peer-performed play and school lessons on preventing sexual harassment behavior were presented to secondary school students. We evaluated its effectiveness, using a cluster-randomized controlled design to assign schools to an experimental condition [n = 14 schools; 431 students (51 % female)] and a control condition [n = 11 schools; 384 students (51 % female)]. To measure the effects of the intervention at first post-test and 6-month follow-up, our multilevel analyses used a two-level random intercept model. Outcome measures were sexual harassment behaviors, behavioral determinants and distal factors influencing these behaviors. At post-test, students in the experimental group reported a reduced intention to commit sexual harassment behavior and higher self-efficacy in rejecting it. At post-test and follow-up there was a significant positive effect on social norms for rejecting sexual harassment behavior. At follow-up, sexual self-esteem was higher in students in the experimental group than in the control group. Effects on these determinants will benefit adolescents' future sexual behaviors. In combination, the play and lessons, possibly together with continued sexual health education and skills programs on social-emotional learning in subsequent school years, have potential for preventing sexual harassment behavior.

  4. Trait analysis, diversity, and genotype x environment interaction in some wheat landraces evaluated under drought and heat stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindhu Sareen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Both drought and heat stress are responsible for decline in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. production in many regions of the world. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC has predicted increase in these areas. Development of heat and drought tolerant genotypes is on priority. Landraces are unexploited genetic resources for various agronomic traits contributing tolerance to abiotic stress. Twenty-five wheat genotypes were evaluated in irrigated timely, rainfed timely and irrigated late sown conditions for 2 yr using 10 agronomic traits for their response to drought and heat stress and four stress indices (stress susceptibility index, stress tolerance index, mean productivity, and stress tolerance were calculated. Variability averaged over traits was highest under rainfed conditions. Grain yield, plant height, and productive tillers were more sensitive and test grain weight as tolerant under drought. Under heat stress grain yield, grain weight, test grain weight and phenological traits were more sensitive. Productive tillers and grain number per spike were identified as important selection parameters for drought and grain weight (per spike and test grain weight as for heat tolerance. Genotypes IC 321987, IC 322005, IC 138852, IC 138870 adapted to stressed environments or genotypes CPAN 4079 and NEPAL 38 stable over all environments can be used for introgression of the stress tolerance in elite cultivars.

  5. Interactions between delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol as evaluated by drug discrimination procedures in rats and pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen, A J; Järbe, T U

    1986-02-01

    Animals (rats and pigeons) were trained to discriminate between the presence and absence of delta 9-THC; the training doses were, respectively: 0.56 mg/kg (pigeons) and 3.0 mg/kg (rats). Once the drug discrimination was mastered, the pigeons were tested repeatedly after a single intramuscular (i.m.) injection of delta 9-THC (0.56 mg/kg) at the following intervals 0.5, 1.5, 4.5 and 9 hr after the injection. These results were compared with data from a separate procedure, i.e. where the various intervals after injection were examined only once per injection and both procedures yielded essentially the same outcome. Thus, less than 50% appropriate responding to THC was observed at 0.5 and 9 hr after injection, whereas greater than 90% responding to THC occurred at 1.5 and 4.5 hr. The two procedures have previously been compared in rats (Järbe, Swedberg and Mechoulam, 1981). The repeated tests procedure was then used to evaluate combinations of delta 9-THC and cannabidiol in both species. Cannabidiol prolonged the cue effects of 1 mg/kg of delta 9-THC (intraperitoneal route of administration) in rats but did not change the time-effect curve for delta 9-THC in pigeons (dose range examined: 0.10--0.56 mg/kg); the challenge doses of cannabidiol were, respectively: 30.0 mg/kg (i.p.) and 17.5 mg/kg (i.m.). The rate of responding did not differ in tests with combinations of delta 9-THC and cannabidiol as compared to delta 9-THC given alone in pigeons. Subcutaneously administered 3-PPP, a dopamine pre-synaptic blocker, did not induce responding appropriate for delta 9-THC in rats.

  6. Post-cementation colorimetric evaluation of the interaction between the thickness of ceramic veneers and the shade of resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calgaro, Patricia Angélica Milani; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Correr, Gisele Maria; Ornaghi, Bárbara Pick; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the color parameters (CIELab*) after the cementation of ceramic disks of different thicknesses onto a resin substrate using four different shades of resin cements, and determine the color difference (ΔE) between the adhesively cemented disks and a 10 mm-thick A1 shade ceramic control (target color). Ceramic disks, simulating laminate veneers, with thicknesses of 0.5, 0.7 and 1.0 mm (shade A1, IPS Classic) were fabricated (n = 40) and cemented with a dual-cured resin cement (Variolink II, shades A1, bleach, opaque and transparent) onto 120 2 mm-thick resin composite substrates (shade A3.5, Adoro). Each ceramic disk was photocured for 80 seconds. The determination of the CIELab* parameters of each ceramic-cement-substrate set was performed with a spectrophotometer. A 10 mm-thick A1 ceramic disk was used as a control. The results for the color difference (ΔE) obtained from L*, a* and b* parameters were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The ΔE values ranged from 2.46 (1.0 mm, opaque cement) to 12.11 (0.5 mm, A1 cement). The opaque cement showed the lower ΔE values, followed by the bleach, transparent and A1 cements. With respect to the thickness of the ceramic, color differences between the target color and the group with 1.0 mm ceramic disks were smaller for all cement shades tested. Only the combination of 1.0 mm ceramic disks cemented with the opaque cement was able to mask the background color (ΔE resin cement were smaller in comparison with the bleach, transparent and A1 cements.

  7. Evaluation of modafinil as a perpetrator of metabolic drug-drug interactions using a model informed cocktail reaction phenotyping trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Angela; van Dyk, Madelé; Warncken, David; Mangoni, Arduino A; Sorich, Michael J; Rowland, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the capacity for modafinil to be a perpetrator of metabolic drug-drug interactions by altering cytochrome P450 activity following a single dose and dosing to steady state. A single centre, open label, single sequence cocktail drug interaction trial. On days 0, 2 and 8 participants were administered an oral drug cocktail comprising 100 mg caffeine, 30 mg dextromethorphan, 25 mg losartan, 1 mg midazolam and 20 mg enteric-coated omeprazole. Timed blood samples were collected prior to and for up to 6 h post cocktail dosing. Between days 2 and 8 participants orally self-administered 200 mg modafinil each morning. Following a single 200 mg dose of modafinil mean (± 95% CI) AUC ratios for caffeine, dextromethorphan, losartan, midazolam and omeprazole were 0.95 (± 0.08), 1.01 (± 0.35), 0.97 (± 0.10), 0.98 (± 0.10) and 1.36 (± 0.06), respectively. Following dosing of modafinil to steady state (200 mg for 7 days), AUC ratios for caffeine, dextromethorphan, losartan, midazolam and omeprazole were 0.90 (± 0.16), 0.79 (± 0.09), 0.98 (± 0.11), 0.66 (± 0.12) and 1.90 (± 0.53), respectively. These data support consideration of the risk of clinically relevant metabolic drug-drug interactions perpetrated by modafinil when this drug is co-administered with drugs that are primarily cleared by CYP2C19 (single modafinil dose or steady state modafinil dosing) or CYP3A4 (steady state modafinil dosing only) catalysed metabolic pathways. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Evaluation of the surface chemistry and drug-polymer interaction of semi-crystalline micro-particles for the development of controlled release formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithu, Sadeque H; Haque, Syed N; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Nokhodchi, Ali; Maniruzzaman, Mohammed

    2017-07-01

    This research work explores the surface chemistry and drug-polymer interaction in the manufactured controlled release micro-particles. Isoniazid (INH) was used as a model anti-tubercular drug while Eudragit® S100 (S100), Eudragit® L100-55 based co-processed Acryl EZE (EZE) and Ethylcellulose ECN10 (ECN10) were used as polymeric carriers. INH containing micro-particles were prepared using a mini spray dryer B-290 (Buchi, Switzerland). The drug polymer ratios were optimized at 1:1 and 1:3 to evaluate the effect of polymers on the release of the drug from the micro-particles. Solid state characterization via SEM and particle size analysis of the manufactured micro-particles showed densely aggregated spherical particles with a mean diameter drug distribution on the spray dried micro-particles. The physico-chemical characterization carried out by using DSC and XRPD showed an increase in the amorphicity of the drug during the spray drying process while the chemical elemental analysis via XPS revealed a strong intermolecular interaction between the amine group of the drug and the carboxyl group of the polymers. As expected, the in vitro dissolution study showed a slow release pattern for the highly water soluble drug INH in acidic media (pH1.2) for the first 2h followed by a burst release upon changing the pH to 6.8. It was concluded that emerging spray drying processing can be used as a valuable tool to encapsulate drug for controlled release dosage forms by means of facilitating a possible drug/polymer interaction as outlined by novel XPS analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Andersen, Michael; Wandall, Jakob

    for forståelsen af, hvad der sker på uddannelsesområdet. Vi har med bogen villet give en sammenhængende forståelse af de forskellige processer og indsatser inden for feltet med henblik på, hvordan man kan evaluere disse. Vi har gjort det ved at beskrive principperne for de forskellige tilgange til evaluering. Vi...

  10. Evaluation of cross sections for neutron interactions with {sup 238}U in the energy region between 5 keV and 150 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirakov, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Capote, R.; Trkov, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, NAPC-Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Gritzay, O. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); Kim, H.I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Nuclear Data Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kopecky, S.; Paradela, C.; Schillebeeckx, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Geel (Belgium); Kos, B. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pronyaev, V.G. [Rosatom State Corporation, Atomsrandart, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-10-15

    Cross sections for neutron interactions with {sup 238}U in the energy region from 5 keV to 150 keV have been evaluated. Average total and capture cross sections have been derived from a least squares analysis using experimental data reported in the literature. The resulting cross sections have been parameterised in terms of average resonance parameters maintaining full consistency with results of optical model calculations by using a dispersive coupled channel optical model potential. The average compound partial cross sections have been expressed in terms of transmission coefficients by applying the Hauser-Feshbach statistical reaction theory including width-fluctuations. A generalized single-level representation compatible with the energy-dependent options of the ENDF-6 format has been applied using standard boundary conditions. The results have been transferred into a full ENDF-6 compatible data file. (orig.)

  11. Using ARM observations to evaluate cloud and convection parameterizations and cloud-convection-radiation interactions in the GFDL general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donner, Leo J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington, DC (United States); Lin, Yanluan [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington, DC (United States); Cooke, Will [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-01-11

    GFDL CM3 convective vertical velocities, parameterized because their scales are below those resolved in current climate models, have been compared with observations from DOE ARM. Single-column forcing has been used for this comparison for two time periods from TWP-ICE and three from MC3E. These are the first independent evaluations of the parameterized vertical velocities against observations. The results show that basic characteristics of the observations are captured by CM3 when forced with single-column observations and constrained to observed large-scale states. In many, but not all, cases, the parameterized vertical velocities exceed those observed, especially at higher levels in the clouds. Similar problems have been noted by others in cloud-resolving models. The results have important implications for cloud-aerosol interactions, which depend on vertical velocities, and likely pose constraints on entrainment by convection, which may be related to climate sensitivity.

  12. Mobile phone-based interactive voice response as a tool for improving access to healthcare in remote areas in Ghana - an evaluation of user experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkel, J; May, J; Krumkamp, R; Lamshöft, M; Kreuels, B; Owusu-Dabo, E; Mohammed, A; Bonacic Marinovic, A; Dako-Gyeke, P; Krämer, A; Fobil, J N

    2017-05-01

    To investigate and determine the factors that enhanced or constituted barriers to the acceptance of an mHealth system which was piloted in Asante-Akim North District of Ghana to support healthcare of children. Four semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted with a total of 37 mothers. Participants were selected from a study population of mothers who subscribed to a pilot mHealth system which used an interactive voice response (IVR) for its operations. Data were evaluated using qualitative content analysis methods. In addition, a short quantitative questionnaire assessed system's usability (SUS). Results revealed 10 categories of factors that facilitated user acceptance of the IVR system including quality-of-care experience, health education and empowerment of women. The eight categories of factors identified as barriers to user acceptance included the lack of human interaction, lack of update and training on the electronic advices provided and lack of social integration of the system into the community. The usability (SUS median: 79.3; range: 65-97.5) of the system was rated acceptable. The principles of the tested mHealth system could be of interest during infectious disease outbreaks, such as Ebola or Lassa fever, when there might be a special need for disease-specific health information within populations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Evaluation of drug-drug interaction between henagliflozin, a novel sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, and metformin in healthy Chinese males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liupeng; Wu, Chunyong; Shen, Lu; Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Ying; Liu, Fang; Wang, Youqun; Yang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    1. Henagliflozin is a novel sodium-glucose transporter 2 inhibitor and presents a complementary therapy to metformin for patients with T2DM due to its insulin-independent mechanism of action. This study evaluated the potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between henagliflozin and metformin in healthy Chinese male subjects. 2. In open-label, single-center, single-arm, two-period, three-treatment self-control study, 12 subjects received 25 mg henagliflozin, 1000 mg metformin or the combination. Lack of PK interaction was defined as the ratio of geometric means and 90% confidence interval (CI) for combination: monotherapy being within the range of 0.80-1.25. 3. Co-administration of henagliflozin with metformin had no effect on henagliflozin area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) (GRM: 1.08; CI: 1.05, 1.10) and peak plasma concentration (Cmax) (GRM: 0.99; CI: 0.92, 1.07). Reciprocally, co-administration of metformin with henagliflozin had no clinically significant on metformin AUC0-24 (GRM: 1.09, CI: 1.02, 1.16) although there was an 11% increase in metformin Cmax (GRM 1.12; CI 1.02, 1.23). All monotherapies and combination therapy were well tolerated. 4. Henagliflozin can be co-administered with metformin without dose adjustment of either drug.

  14. Evaluation of inelastic constitutive models under plasticity-creep interaction for 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel: Results of joint work (A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, T.; Ohno, N.; Suzuki, A.; Igari, T.

    1987-01-01

    In order to evaluate the validity of existing inelastic constitutive models under the condition of plasticity-creep interaction, ten kinds of constitutive models were applied to sixteen bench mark problems of four categories, and the calculated results were compared with the experiments of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel at 600 0 C. The present bench mark project provides the following remarks: (1) The strain rate effect on the stress-strain relation can be represented, in some degree, even by a simple superposition model of classical type, and some of unified models describe the saturation of increase in flow stress with higher strain rate. (2) The characteristics of the plasticity-creep interaction were predicted by the modified superposition model as well as by unified ones in the actual calculations for the propounded problems. (3) Although the sophisticated unified constitutive models tend to give qualitatively better results, the complicated procedures in determining material parameters from the data of conventional tests need some improvements. The subcommittee has been reorganized to focus her attention in applying thus developed results under uniaxial stress state to multiaxial one, and the out-put will be expected to report in a couple of years

  15. A pilot evaluation of an online cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia disorder - targeted screening and interactive Web design lead to improved sleep in a community population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kirstie N; Goldsmith, Paul; Gardiner, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Computerized or online cognitive behavioral therapies (CBTs) are increasingly being developed to deliver insomnia therapy (CBT-i). They seek to address the difficulty of delivering an evidence-based technology to a large number of patients at low cost. Previous online applications have shown significant but variable improvements in sleep efficiency and a decrease in insomnia severity when compared with control groups. The best online methodology remains debated, and there are no such applications currently available within the UK National Health Service. Evaluation of treatment outcomes in 75 participants with insomnia disorder using an open-access, novel, interactive online therapy. Rigorous screening was first undertaken to exclude those with probable sleep apnea, restless legs, circadian rhythm disorder, or significant anxiety or depression prior to commencing therapy. A modern interactive video-based website was used to encourage compliance by personalizing therapy based on response. Sleep efficiency, sleep latency, total sleep time, and sleep quality were all assessed prior to and after intervention. Of those who accessed therapy, 62% were excluded based on a likely diagnosis of another sleep disorder (788/1281). Participants who completed therapy all had severe insomnia disorder, with a group mean sleep efficiency of 55%. After intervention there was a significant increase in sleep efficiency and sleep latency, with modest nonsignificant improvements in total sleep time. The majority of users reported improved sleep quality, and compliance with therapy was very good, with over 64/75 completing >90% of sleep diary entries. Online CBT-i can be designed to deliver personalized therapy with good reported outcomes and high compliance rates in those who start therapy. This initial evaluation also suggests that screening for other sleep disorders and mental health problems is necessary as many other sleep disorders are detected in those who self-refer with insomnia

  16. Factorial design for the evaluation of the interaction effect between particle size and heating rate in the kinetic energy of coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Ivonete; Silva, Eugenio A.G.; Mortari, Daniela A.; Crnkovic, Paula M.; Milioli, Fernando E. [University of Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Engineering School. Group of Thermal and Fluids Engineering], Emails: iavila@sc.usp.br, eugenio.silva@usp.br, paulam@sc.usp.br, milioli@sc.usp.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper evaluates the behavior of kinetic energy for different heating rates ({alpha}) and particle sizes of the material in the study of the coal combustion process. It aims to obtain a response surface in a large range of particle size, using heating rates between the minimum and maximum values allowed by the equipment. Therefore it searches for a model to evaluate the interaction effect between particle size and the heating rate and to predict the activation energy of the process studied. The activation energy of the process was determined using the isoconversional model Model Free Kinetics. In this model, the activation energy (E{sub {alpha}}) is obtained as a function of the reaction extent ({alpha}). The subscript in E{sub {alpha}} designates the values related to a given value of conversion ({alpha}). All experiments were conducted in thermogravimetric balance using samples of a Brazilian coal (EC4500) witch average particle size between 163 to 650 {mu}m and heating rates between 10 and 40 deg C min{sup -1} in dynamic atmosphere of air. A central rotatable composite design was applied for the 2{sup 2} factorial design including 4 tests under the axial conditions and 3 repetitions in the central point. As expected, the results show that both the particle size and the heating rate affected significantly the values of activation energy of the coal combustion process obtained by the model used. (author)

  17. Working together: Using a unique approach to evaluate an interactive and clinic-based longitudinal interprofessional education experience with 13 professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Britta M; Bratzler, Dale W; Fisher, Mark J; Torres, Amie; Faculty, Epic; Sparks, Rhonda A

    2016-11-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) involving an interactive and longitudinal clinic experience at an inner-city charitable clinic from September to May 2013/2014 was evaluated. Pre-, mid-, and post-intervention data were collected from students in 13 different professions including medicine (medical and physician assistant), dentistry (dental and dental hygiene), nursing (undergraduate and clinical nurse specialist), public health, pharmacy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, nutritional sciences, speech and language pathology, and social work. To evaluate their interprofessional attitudes, students completed the TeamSTEPPS Teamwork Attitudes Questionnaire (T-TAQ) and Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS). They also completed a unique measure, healthcare professionals circles diagrams (HPCDs), that indicated student conceptualisation of a healthcare team caring for a complex patient, along with perception of their team's progress towards meeting patient goals. Results from the T-TAQ and RIPLS scores indicated small but significant increases from pre- to post-intervention (p = 0.005 and 0.012, respectively). Analysis of the HPCDs revealed significant increases in students' perceptions of the types of interprofessional team members, relationships, and communication between professions to provide medical care to patients (p assistants as members of the healthcare team from pre- to post-intervention. Implications of our data indicated the importance of IPE interventions that include not only classroom-based sessions, but actual patient care experiences within interprofessional teams. It also reinforced the importance of new and unique methods to assess IPE.

  18. Frontalunterricht oder interaktive Gruppenarbeit? Ein Vergleich des Lernerfolgs und der studentischen Evaluation für das Fach Biochemie [Didactic lecture or interactive group discussion? A comparison of the learning success and the student evaluation in biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadmon, Martina

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aims: Interactive, student-centered teaching methods have replaced traditional teacher-centered didactic formats in many modern medical curricula in the past few years. However, in the natural sciences such as biochemistry, interactive teaching methods are not well proven. The present study was conducted to compare the effect of the teaching format on the performance of undergraduate students in biochemistry and their evaluation of the respective format. Methods: A total of 421 second-year students were randomized into two groups: The control group was taught in a traditional lecture-like format, whereas the study group dealt with the same topic in an interactive group discussion. At the end of each lesson, students performed a multiple-choice test and completed a questionnaire. The same MCQ test was repeated 4–6 weeks after the last lesson. Results: Students who were taught in a lecture-like format performed significantly better in the first MCQ test immediately after the lesson than students taught in the interactive format. However, in the second MCQ test, there was no difference between the two groups. In the questionnaire, students rated the lecture-based course significantly better than the interactive group discussion. Conclusion: One reason why students prefer a didactic lecture to an interactive group discussion might be due to the subject biochemistry, which is strongly knowledge-based. Students perceived that the transfer of knowledge by a professional lecturer was more effective than the knowledge obtained in a student-centered discussion group. Other reasons might be the method of assessment and the overall design of the curriculum. [german] Zielsetzung: Interaktive, Lerner-orientierte Unterrichtsmethoden werden vielfach mit moderner und guter Lehre in Verbindung gebracht und ersetzen zunehmend konventionellen, Lehrer-zentrierten Frontalunterricht. In naturwissenschaftlichen Fächern, wie Biochemie, sind interaktive

  19. IPAT: a freely accessible software tool for analyzing multiple patent documents with inbuilt landscape visualizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajay, Dara; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent Patent Analysis Tool (IPAT) is an online data retrieval tool, operated based on text mining algorithm to extract specific patent information in a predetermined pattern into an Excel sheet. The software is designed and developed to retrieve and analyze technology information from multiple patent documents and generate various patent landscape graphs and charts. The software is C# coded in visual studio 2010, which extracts the publicly available patent information from the web pages like Google Patent and simultaneously study the various technology trends based on user-defined parameters. In other words, IPAT combined with the manual categorization will act as an excellent technology assessment tool in competitive intelligence and due diligence for predicting the future R&D forecast.

  20. Evaluation of the time-concentration-mortality responses of Plutella xylostella larvae to the interaction of Isaria fumosorosea with the insecticides beta-cypermethrin and Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Xiao-ge; He, Yu-rong; Lu, Li-hua; Zhao, Rui

    2015-02-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi are potential candidates for controlling Plutella xylostella, a cosmopolitan pest of crucifers. In this study, bioassays were conducted to evaluate the interaction between Isaria fumosorosea and sublethal doses of two insecticides, beta-cypermethrin and Bacillus thuringiensis, against P. xylostella. Data of each assay were in good agreement with the time-concentration-mortality model, indicating a strong dependence of the fungus and insecticide interaction on both concentration and post-exposure time. Using beta-cypermethrin 58-116 µg mL(-1) or B. thuringiensis 222.5-890 µg mL(-1) with the fungus significantly enhanced fungal efficacy. The LC50 values of the fungus declined over a 1-7 day period after exposure, and the LT50 values decreased with increasing concentration. Based on LC50 or LC90 estimates, synergism between the fungus and beta-cypermethrin resulted in a 2.7-28.3-fold reduction in LC50 values and a 12.1-19.6-fold reduction in LC90 values, while synergism of the fungus with B. thuringiensis led to a 2.4-385.0-fold reduction in LC50 values and a 4.4-151.7-fold reduction in LC90 values. Results show that sublethal doses of B. thuringiensis and beta-cypermethrin can synergise I. fumosorosea activity on P. xylostella, suggesting that combination of I. fumosorosea with the two insecticides might offer an integrated approach to controlling P. xylostella in practice. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF THE INTERACTION OF GROUNDWATER WITH THE COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE 100-D AREA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2008-11-05

    river water and site groundwater in this zone has been estimated to be equal parts of groundwater and river water, a wide range of mixing ratios likely occurs at various times of the day and year. The degree of mixing and dilution appears to be greatly influenced by the river stage and other groundwater/surface water interaction. The extent of mixing, thus, has implications for the design and operation of the groundwater remediation systems. Improved understanding of this 'dilution' mechanism is needed to design an optimum 'systems approach' to accelerate remediation of the near-shore contaminant plumes. More information on the pathway from near-river mapped plumes to riverbed receptor locations is also needed to develop a defensible proposed plan for a future ROD for final remedial action of contaminated groundwater. In April 2008, an expert panel of scientists was convened to review existing information and provide observations and suggestions to improve the current understanding of groundwater surface water interactions in the 100 Areas (primarily focusing on 100-D Area), and to identify what additional analyses or approaches may provide critical information needed to design and implement remediation systems that will minimize impacts to river aquatic systems. Specific objectives provided to the panel included: (1) comment on approaches and methods to improve the current understanding of groundwater-surface water interactions, specifically how contaminated groundwater enters the riverbed and how this relates to remediation of chromate in the groundwater in the 100 Areas; (2) evaluate past and current data collection methods, data analysis techniques, assumptions, and groundwater transport and mixing mechanisms; (3) evaluate the current monitoring network (monitoring wells, aquifer tubes, and shoreline/river monitoring); (4) evaluate the role played by modeling; and (5) suggest additional research to fill data gaps and perform modeling.

  2. A pilot evaluation of an online cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia disorder – targeted screening and interactive Web design lead to improved sleep in a community population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson KN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Kirstie N Anderson, Paul Goldsmith, Alison Gardiner Regional Sleep Service, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK Introduction: Computerized or online cognitive behavioral therapies (CBTs are increasingly being developed to deliver insomnia therapy (CBT-i. They seek to address the difficulty of delivering an evidence-based technology to a large number of patients at low cost. Previous online applications have shown significant but variable improvements in sleep efficiency and a decrease in insomnia severity when compared with control groups. The best online methodology remains debated, and there are no such applications currently available within the UK National Health Service. Method: Evaluation of treatment outcomes in 75 participants with insomnia disorder using an open-access, novel, interactive online therapy. Rigorous screening was first undertaken to exclude those with probable sleep apnea, restless legs, circadian rhythm disorder, or significant anxiety or depression prior to commencing therapy. A modern interactive video-based website was used to encourage compliance by personalizing therapy based on response. Sleep efficiency, sleep latency, total sleep time, and sleep quality were all assessed prior to and after intervention. Results: Of those who accessed therapy, 62% were excluded based on a likely diagnosis of another sleep disorder (788/1281. Participants who completed therapy all had severe insomnia disorder, with a group mean sleep efficiency of 55%. After intervention there was a significant increase in sleep efficiency and sleep latency, with modest nonsignificant improvements in total sleep time. The majority of users reported improved sleep quality, and compliance with therapy was very good, with over 64/75 completing >90% of sleep diary entries. Conclusion: Online CBT-i can be designed to deliver personalized therapy with good reported outcomes and high compliance rates in those who start therapy. This initial

  3. A framework for evaluating the influence of climate, dispersal limitation, and biotic interactions using fossil pollen associations across the late Quaternary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blois, Jessica L.; Gotelli, Nicholas J.; Behrensmeyer, Anna K.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental conditions, dispersal lags, and interactions among species are major factors structuring communities through time and across space. Ecologists have emphasized the importance of biotic interactions in determining local patterns of species association. In contrast, abiotic limits, dis...

  4. The interaction between land use change, sediment fluxes and carbon dynamics: evaluating an integrated soil-landscape model at the millennial time-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchoms, Samuel; Van Oost, Kristof; Vanacker, Veerle

    2015-04-01

    Soil-landscape modelling has received growing attention as it allows us to evaluate the interaction between earth surface and soil bio-physical processes. At the landscape scale, human-induced land use change has altered the balance between soil erosion and production, and largely modified sediment fluxes. Intensification in soil redistribution rates affects the interaction between soil chemical, physical and biological processes at the landscape scale. Here, we evaluate the SPEROS-LT model, a spatially explicit 3D model combining a dynamic representation of land use, soil erosion and deposition and the soil carbon cycle. We assess the impact of millennial-scale human-induced land use change on sediment fluxes and carbon dynamics in the Dijle catchement (central Belgium). The watershed has undergone a 3000 years continuous human-induced alteration of the vegetation covers for agricultural characterized by Our study is based on land use reconstructions for the last 3000 years, including massive deforestation for agriculture in Roman Times and the Middle Ages followed by urbanization in the last 150 years. Land use reconstructions rely on simple land use allocation rules based on slope gradients. SPEROS-LT is parametrized for erosion rates against available figures in the literature by changing the transport capacity and the transfer coefficient which defines the amount of flux transferred between different land uses. Carbon content profiles at steady state (i.e. without influence of erosion or deposition) are calibrated for each land use and for the first upper meter of soil by comparing modeled profiles to an averaged observed profiles in stable areas of the pedologic region. We present a model sensitivity analysis and a full validation of the predicted soil carbon storage (horizontally, i.e. in space, and vertically, i.e. with depth) using a large database of observational data. The results indicate (i) a good agreement of the erosion rates. Speros LT modeled

  5. Direct evaluation of the hyperconjugative interactions in 1,1,1-trihaloethane (CH3CX3, X = F, Cl, and Br).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenhua; Corminboeuf, Clémence; Mo, Yirong

    2014-08-07

    Following the computational strategy proposed by Mulliken in 1939 ( J. Chem. Phys. 1939, 7 (5), 339-352), when the concept of hyperconjugation was coined, we evaluated the hyperconjugative stabilization energy in 1,1,1-trihaloethane using the block-localized wave function (BLW) method. The BLW method is the simplest and most efficient variant of ab initio valence bond (VB) theory and can derive the strictly electron-localized state wave function self-consistently. The latter serves as a reference for the quantification of the electron delocalization effect in terms of the resonance theory. Computations show that the overall hyperconjugative interactions in 1,1,1-trihaloethane, dominated by σ(CH) → σ'(CX) with minor contribution from σ(CX) → σ'(CH), ranges from 9.59 to 7.25 kcal/mol in the staggered structures and decreases in the order Br > Cl > F. This is in accord with the (1)H NMR spectra of CH3CX3. Notably, the hyperconjugation effect accounts for 35-40% of the rotation barriers in these molecules, which are dominated by the conventional steric repulsion. This is consistent with the recent findings with 1,2-difluoroethane (Freitas, Bühl, and O'Hagan. Chem. Comm. 2012, 48, 2433-2435) that the variation of (1)J(CF) with the FCCF torsional angle cannot be well explained by the hyperconjugation model

  6. Application of capillary electrophoresis-frontal analysis for comparative evaluation of the binding interaction of captopril with human serum albumin in the absence and presence of hydrochlorothiazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Xiang, Li-Li; Wang, Jian-Ling; Chen, Dong-Ying

    2015-11-10

    The application of capillary electrophoresis-frontal analysis for comparative evaluation of the binding interaction between antihypertensive drug captopril and human serum albumin in the absence and presence of diuretic drug hydrochlorothiazide was presented in this work. At near-physiological conditions (67mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, I=0.17, 37°C), the individual solution of 100μM captopril and the co-binding solution with 60μM hydrochlorothiazide added were pre-equilibrated with series concentrations of HSA (10-475μM) respectively, introducing hydrodynamically into an uncoated fused silica capillary (35cm×50μm I.D. with 26.5cm effective length). The values of number of binding sites, the binding constant for captopril and hydrochlorothiazide binding to HSA were obtained, respectively. It can be found that both drugs exhibit moderate binding properties towards HSA and there does not exist significant competitive binding effects between them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of an interaction-skills training for reducing the burden of family caregivers of patients with severe mental illness: a pre-posttest design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavi, Yasmin; Stringer, Barbara; Hoogendoorn, Adriaan; Boogaarts, Jan; Van Raaij, Bas; Van Meijel, Berno

    2018-03-27

    Family members who care for patients with severe mental illness experience emotional distress and report a higher incidence of mental illness than those in the general population. They report feeling inadequately prepared to provide the necessary practical and emotional support for these patients. The MAT training, an Interaction-Skills Training program (IST) for caregivers, was developed to meet those needs. This study used a single-arm pretest-posttest design to examine the impact of the training on caregivers' sense of competence (self-efficacy) and burden. One hundred family caregivers recruited from three mental health institutions participated in the training. Burden was assessed using the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire, and self-efficacy using the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to investigate whether participation in the training changed the level of family caregivers' burden and self-efficacy. Pearson's correlation was used to examine the relationships between self-efficacy and burden. Our results indicate that, after the training, self-efficacy increased significantly over time (p training. After following the IST program, family caregivers of patients with severe mental illness experienced a greater sense of competence and a significant decrease in burden. The training was greatly appreciated and satisfied caregivers' need to acquire the skills required in complex caregiving situations. This study was retrospectively registered (14/01/2018) in the ISRCTN registry with study ID ISRCTN44495131 .

  8. Performance evaluation of Maxwell and Cercignani-Lampis gas-wall interaction models in the modeling of thermally driven rarefied gas transport

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Tengfei

    2013-07-16

    A systematic study on the performance of two empirical gas-wall interaction models, the Maxwell model and the Cercignani-Lampis (CL) model, in the entire Knudsen range is conducted. The models are evaluated by examining the accuracy of key macroscopic quantities such as temperature, density, and pressure, in three benchmark thermal problems, namely the Fourier thermal problem, the Knudsen force problem, and the thermal transpiration problem. The reference solutions are obtained from a validated hybrid DSMC-MD algorithm developed in-house. It has been found that while both models predict temperature and density reasonably well in the Fourier thermal problem, the pressure profile obtained from Maxwell model exhibits a trend that opposes that from the reference solution. As a consequence, the Maxwell model is unable to predict the orientation change of the Knudsen force acting on a cold cylinder embedded in a hot cylindrical enclosure at a certain Knudsen number. In the simulation of the thermal transpiration coefficient, although all three models overestimate the coefficient, the coefficient obtained from CL model is the closest to the reference solution. The Maxwell model performs the worst. The cause of the overestimated coefficient is investigated and its link to the overly constrained correlation between the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient and the tangential energy accommodation coefficient inherent in the models is pointed out. Directions for further improvement of models are suggested.

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Two Final Irrigation Techniques for the Removal of Precipitate Formed by the Interaction between Sodium Hypochlorite and Chlorhexidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metri, Malasiddappa; Hegde, Swaroop; Dinesh, K; Indiresha, H N; Nagaraj, Shruthi; Bhandi, Shilpa H

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of two final irrigation techniques for the removal of precipitate formed by the interaction between sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine (CHX). Sixty freshly extracted human maxillary incisor teeth were taken and randomly divided into three groups, containing 20 teeth each. Group 1 (control group), were irrigated with 5 ml of 2.5% NaOCl and a final flush with 5 ml of 2% chlorhexidine. Group 2 were irrigated with 5 ml of 2.5% NaOCl and 5 ml of 2% chlorhexidine followed by 5 ml of saline and agitated with F-files. Group 3 were irrigated with 5 ml of 2.5% NaOCl and 5 ml of 2% chlorhexidine followed by 5 ml of 15% citric acid and passively agitated with ultrasonics. A thin longitudinal groove was made along the buccal and lingual aspect of the root using diamond disks and split with chisel and mallet. Both halves of the split tooth will be examined under stereomicroscope. Results were tabulated and analyzed statistically using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Mann-Whitney U test. There was a significant difference between the mean values (p chlorhexidine irrigation protocol has been practiced since from many years to achieve good results. However, it has adverse effect in the form of precipitate and which is considered to be a carcinogenic in nature, hence this precipitate should be removed.

  10. Seismic response trends evaluation via long term monitoring and finite element model updating of an RC building including soil-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, F.; Omenzetter, P.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a study on the seismic response trends evaluation and finite element model updating of a reinforced concrete building monitored for a period of more than two years. The three storey reinforced concrete building is instrumented with five tri-axial accelerometers and a free-field tri-axial accelerometer. The time domain N4SID system identification technique was used to obtain the frequencies and damping ratios considering flexible base models taking into account the soil-structure-interaction (SSI) using 50 earthquakes. Trends of variation of seismic response were developed by correlating the peak response acceleration at the roof level with identified frequencies and damping ratios. A general trend of decreasing frequencies was observed with increased level of shaking. To simulate the behavior of the building, a three dimensional finite element model (FEM) was developed. To incorporate real in-situ conditions, soil underneath the foundation and around the building was modeled using spring elements and non-structural components (claddings and partitions) were also included. The developed FEM was then calibrated using a sensitivity based model updating technique taking into account soil flexibility and non-structural components as updating parameters. It was concluded from the investigation that knowledge of the variation of seismic response of buildings is necessary to better understand their behavior during earthquakes, and also that the participation of soil and non-structural components is significant towards the seismic response of the building and these should be considered in models to simulate the real behavior.

  11. Design and evaluation of mPEG-PLA micelles functionalized with drug-interactive domains as improved drug carriers for docetaxel delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dingqing; Gong, Feirong; Teng, Xin; Ma, Mingming; Wen, Huijing; Yuan, Weihao; Cheng, Yi; Lu, Chong

    2017-10-01

    Polymeric micelles are very attractive drug delivery systems for hydrophobic agents, owing to their readily tailorable chemical structure and ease for scale-up preparation. However, the intrinsic poor stability of drug-loaded micelles presents one of the major challenges for most micellar systems in the translation to clinical applications. In this study, a simple, well-defined, and easy-to-scale up 9-Fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) and tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc) containing lysine dendronized mPEG-PLA (mPEG-PLA-Lys(FB) 2 ) micellar formulation was designed and prepared for docetaxel (DTX) delivery, in an effort to improve the stability of the micelles, and its physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetics, and anti-tumor efficacy against SKOV-3 ovarian cancer were evaluated. MPEG-PLA-Lys(FB) 2 was synthesized via a three-step synthetic route, and it actively interacted with DTX in aqueous media to form stable micelles with small particle sizes (~17-19 nm) and narrow size distribution (PI PLA-Lys(FB) 2 micelles achieved delayed and sustained release manner of DTX in comparison with mPEG-PLA micelles. Further in vivo xenograft tumor model in nude mice DTX/mPEG-PLA-Lys(FB) 2 micelles demonstrated significantly higher inhibitory effect on tumor growth than the marketed formulation Taxotere. Thus, our system may hold promise as a simple and effective delivery system for DTX with a potential for translation into clinical study.

  12. Chemical Synthesis and Evaluation of a Disialic Acid-Containing Dextran Polymer as an Inhibitor for the Interaction between Siglec 7 and Its Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Sho; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Yasuda, Yu; Mori, Airi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Takashi; Kitajima, Ken; Sato, Chihiro

    2017-07-04

    A new sialic acid (Sia)-containing glycopolymer-a fluorescent probe with high-density disialic acid (diSia) on the surface of polysaccharide dextran (diSia-Dex)-was synthesized as a key molecule to regulate the Sia recognition lectins, Siglecs, that are involved in the immune system. According to our original methods, diSia was synthesized by α-selective sialylation, and a dextran template possessing terminal acetylenes and amino groups was prepared. A diSia and a fluorescent molecule were subsequently introduced to surface-modified dextran by Hüisgen reaction and amidation, respectively. The modulatory activity of Siglec7 was evaluated by using synthetic probes. DiSia-Dex showed high binding avidity toward Siglec7, with a K D value of 5.87×10 -10  m, and a high inhibitory activity for the interaction between Siglec7 and a ligand (GD3), with a IC 50 value of 1.0 nm. Notably, diSia-Dex was able to release Siglec7 from the pre-existing Siglec7-GD3 complex, possibly due to its unique properties of a slow dissociation rate and a high association rate. Together, these data show that diSia-Dex can be widely applicable as a modulator of Siglec7 functions. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Synthesis of dimeric aryl{beta}-D-galactopyranosides for the evaluation of their interaction with the Erythrina cristagalli lectin; Sintese de {beta}-D-galactopiranosideos de arila dimericos para avaliacao de sua interacao com a lectina de Erythrina cristagalli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, Rute Cunha; Meyer, Nadia Burkowski; Prado, Maria Auxiliadora Fontes; Alves, Ricardo Jose [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia. Dept. de Produtos Farmaceuticos], e-mail: ricardodylan@farmacia.ufmg.br; Rojo, Javier [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Sevilla (Spain). Inst. de Investigaciones Quimicas. Grupo de Carbohidratos

    2009-07-01

    The synthesis of two new D-galactose-based dimers having a 1,4-butanediamine spacer is reported aiming at the evaluation of their interaction with the Erythrina cristagalli lectin. The title compounds were prepared in four and five steps from 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside bromide, in 20 % and 15 % overall yield, respectively, using the Doebner modification of the Koenavenagel reaction as the key sep. The lectin-carbohydrate interaction could be evaluated for only one dimer, due to solubility problems. A twofold enhancement of affinity was observed, compared to the corresponding monovalent ligand. (author)

  14. Application of WRF/Chem-MADRID and WRF/Polyphemus in Europe – Part 1: Model description, evaluation of meteorological predictions, and aerosol–meteorology interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive model evaluation and comparison of two 3-D air quality modeling systems (i.e., the Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF/Polyphemus and WRF with chemistry and the Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization, and Dissolution (MADRID (WRF/Chem-MADRID are conducted over Western Europe. Part 1 describes the background information for the model comparison and simulation design, the application of WRF for January and July 2001 over triple-nested domains in Western Europe at three horizontal grid resolutions: 0.5°, 0.125°, and 0.025°, and the effect of aerosol/meteorology interactions on meteorological predictions. Nine simulated meteorological variables (i.e., downward shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes (SWDOWN and LWDOWN, outgoing longwave radiation flux (OLR, temperature at 2 m (T2, specific humidity at 2 m (Q2, relative humidity at 2 m (RH2, wind speed at 10 m (WS10, wind direction at 10 m (WD10, and precipitation (Precip are evaluated using available observations in terms of spatial distribution, domainwide daily and site-specific hourly variations, and domainwide performance statistics. The vertical profiles of temperature, dew points, and wind speed/direction are also evaluated using sounding data. WRF demonstrates its capability in capturing diurnal/seasonal variations and spatial gradients and vertical profiles of major meteorological variables. While the domainwide performance of LWDOWN, OLR, T2, Q2, and RH2 at all three grid resolutions is satisfactory overall, large positive or negative biases occur in SWDOWN, WS10, and Precip even at 0.125° or 0.025° in both months and in WD10 in January. In addition, discrepancies between simulations and observations exist in T2, Q2, WS10, and Precip at mountain/high altitude sites and large urban center sites in both months, in particular, during snow events or thunderstorms. These results indicate the model's difficulty in capturing meteorological variables in complex

  15. A developmental evaluation to enhance stakeholder engagement in a wide-scale interactive project disseminating quality improvement data: study protocol for a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, Alison; Bailie, Jodie; Matthews, Veronica; Cunningham, Frances; Harvey, Gillian; Percival, Nikki; Bailie, Ross

    2017-07-13

    Bringing together continuous quality improvement (CQI) data from multiple health services offers opportunities to identify common improvement priorities and to develop interventions at various system levels to achieve large-scale improvement in care. An important principle of CQI is practitioner participation in interpreting data and planning evidence-based change. This study will contribute knowledge about engaging diverse stakeholders in collaborative and theoretically informed processes to identify and address priority evidence-practice gaps in care delivery. This paper describes a developmental evaluation to support and refine a novel interactive dissemination project using aggregated CQI data from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary healthcare centres in Australia. The project aims to effect multilevel system improvement in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary healthcare. Data will be gathered using document analysis, online surveys, interviews with participants and iterative analytical processes with the research team. These methods will enable real-time feedback to guide refinements to the design, reports, tools and processes as the interactive dissemination project is implemented. Qualitative data from interviews and surveys will be analysed and interpreted to provide in-depth understanding of factors that influence engagement and stakeholder perspectives about use of the aggregated data and generated improvement strategies. Sources of data will be triangulated to build up a comprehensive, contextualised perspective and integrated understanding of the project's development, implementation and findings. The Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) of the Northern Territory Department of Health and Menzies School of Health Research (Project 2015-2329), the Central Australian HREC (Project 15-288) and the Charles Darwin University HREC (Project H15030) approved the study. Dissemination will include articles in peer-reviewed journals, policy

  16. Integrated system for production of neutronics and photonics calculational constants. Volume 15, Part C. The LLL Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL): translation of ENDL neutron-induced interaction data into the ENDF/B format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howerton, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The LLL evaluated nuclear data library (ENDL) has been translated into the evaluated neutron data file/version B (ENDF/B) format. This translation is for the convenience of those who wish to use ENDL data but who are more familiar with ENDF/B formats and procedures. Only that portion of ENDL dealing with neutron-induced interactions (including photon production from neutron-induced reactions) has been translated

  17. Consumer participation in quality improvements for chronic disease care: development and evaluation of an interactive patient-centered survey to identify preferred service initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradgley, Elizabeth A; Paul, Christine L; Bryant, Jamie; Roos, Ian A; Henskens, Frans A; Paul, David J

    2014-12-19

    With increasing attention given to the quality of chronic disease care, a measurement approach that empowers consumers to participate in improving quality of care and enables health services to systematically introduce patient-centered initiatives is needed. A Web-based survey with complex adaptive questioning and interactive survey items would allow consumers to easily identify and prioritize detailed service initiatives. The aim was to develop and test a Web-based survey capable of identifying and prioritizing patient-centered initiatives in chronic disease outpatient services. Testing included (1) test-retest reliability, (2) patient-perceived acceptability of the survey content and delivery mode, and (3) average completion time, completion rates, and Flesch-Kincaid reading score. In Phase I, the Web-based Consumer Preferences Survey was developed based on a structured literature review and iterative feedback from expert groups of service providers and consumers. The touchscreen survey contained 23 general initiatives, 110 specific initiatives available through adaptive questioning, and a relative prioritization exercise. In Phase II, a pilot study was conducted within 4 outpatient clinics to evaluate the reliability properties, patient-perceived acceptability, and feasibility of the survey. Eligible participants were approached to complete the survey while waiting for an appointment or receiving intravenous therapy. The age and gender of nonconsenters was estimated to ascertain consent bias. Participants with a subsequent appointment within 14 days were asked to complete the survey for a second time. A total of 741 of 1042 individuals consented to participate (71.11% consent), 529 of 741 completed all survey content (78.9% completion), and 39 of 68 completed the test-retest component. Substantial or moderate reliability (Cohen's kappa>0.4) was reported for 16 of 20 general initiatives with observed percentage agreement ranging from 82.1%-100.0%. The majority of

  18. In vitro evaluation of the effects of the interaction between irrigating solutions, intracanal medication and Er:YAG laser in dentin permeability of the endodontic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raldi Denise Pontes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effects of different associations between irrigating solutions (EDTA-T and citric acid, intracanal medicament (NDP, and Er:YAG laser irradiation on dentin permeability. Fifty-one extracted single-rooted teeth were instrumented and divided into seven groups. Groups GI and GII had final irrigation with a demineralizing solution only (EDTA-T and citric acid, respectively. Groups GIII and GIV had final irrigation with EDTA-T and citric acid, respectively, plus an association of irrigating solution and Er:YAG laser. Groups GV and GVI had final irrigation with EDTA-T and citric acid, respectively, plus an association of intracanal medication and Er:YAG laser. Group GVII (control group had final irrigation with distilled water. All root canals were filled with NDP associated with rhodamine B dye. After the experimental period, the samples were transversely cut into six 2.0 mm thick slices for subsequent reading using the ImageLab software. Analysis of the results allowed us to conclude that there were statistically significant differences (p < 0.05 between the groups as to the penetration of the dye-intracanal medication solution. Groups III and IV presented smaller values of dentinal permeability when compared to the other groups. The best results were obtained with the interaction between a demineralizing irrigating solution and the association of intracanal medicament and laser Er:YAG (groups V and VI. In these groups the observed penetration of the intracanal medicament plus dye solution in the apical third was, on average, 29% greater than in the other groups.

  19. Evaluating signals of oil spill impacts, climate, and species interactions in Pacific herring and Pacific salmon populations in Prince William Sound and Copper River, Alaska.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Ward

    Full Text Available The Exxon Valdez oil spill occurred in March 1989 in Prince William Sound, Alaska, and was one of the worst environmental disasters on record in the United States. Despite long-term data collection over the nearly three decades since the spill, tremendous uncertainty remains as to how significantly the spill affected fishery resources. Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii and some wild Pacific salmon populations (Oncorhynchus spp. in Prince William Sound declined in the early 1990s, and have not returned to the population sizes observed in the 1980s. Discerning if, or how much of, this decline resulted from the oil spill has been difficult because a number of other physical and ecological drivers are confounded temporally with the spill; some of these drivers include environmental variability or changing climate regimes, increased production of hatchery salmon in the region, and increases in populations of potential predators. Using data pre- and post-spill, we applied time-series methods to evaluate support for whether and how herring and salmon productivity has been affected by each of five drivers: (1 density dependence, (2 the EVOS event, (3 changing environmental conditions, (4 interspecific competition on juvenile fish, and (5 predation and competition from adult fish or, in the case of herring, humpback whales. Our results showed support for intraspecific density-dependent effects in herring, sockeye, and Chinook salmon, with little overall support for an oil spill effect. Of the salmon species, the largest driver was the negative impact of adult pink salmon returns on sockeye salmon productivity. Herring productivity was most strongly affected by changing environmental conditions; specifically, freshwater discharge into the Gulf of Alaska was linked to a series of recruitment failures-before, during, and after EVOS. These results highlight the need to better understand long terms impacts of pink salmon on food webs, as well as the

  20. A Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Low Cycle Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Interaction on Surface Morphology and Tensile Properties of 316L(N) Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, K.; Shankar, Vani; Sandhya, R.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Laha, Kinkar

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, the deformation and damage evolution in 316L(N) stainless steel during low cycle fatigue (LCF) and creep-fatigue interaction (CFI) loadings have been compared by evaluating the residual tensile properties. Towards this, LCF and CFI experiments were carried out at constant strain amplitude of ±0.6 pct, strain rate of 3 × 10-3 s-1 and temperature of 873 K (600 °C). During CFI tests, 30 minutes hold period was introduced at peak tensile strain. Experiments were interrupted up to various levels of fatigue life viz. 5, 10, 30, 50, and 60 pct of the total fatigue life ( N f) under both LCF and CFI conditions. The specimens subjected to interrupted fatigue loadings were subsequently monotonically strained at the same strain rate and temperature up to fracture. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and profilometry were conducted on the untested and tested samples to elucidate the damage evolution during the fatigue cycling under both LCF and CFI conditions. The yield strength (YS) increased sharply with the progress of fatigue damage and attained saturation within 10 pct of N f under LCF condition. On the contrary, under CFI loading condition, the YS continuously increased up to 50 pct of N f, with a sharp increase of YS up to 5 pct of N f followed by a more gradual increase up to 50 pct of N f. The difference in the evolution of remnant tensile properties was correlated with the synergistic effects of the underlying deformation and damage processes such as cyclic hardening/softening, oxidation, and creep. The evolution of tensile properties with prior fatigue damage has been correlated with the change in surface roughness and other surface features estimated by surface replica technique and fractography.

  1. Evaluating signals of oil spill impacts, climate, and species interactions in Pacific herring and Pacific salmon populations in Prince William Sound and Copper River, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Eric J; Adkison, Milo; Couture, Jessica; Dressel, Sherri C; Litzow, Michael A; Moffitt, Steve; Hoem Neher, Tammy; Trochta, John; Brenner, Rich

    2017-01-01

    The Exxon Valdez oil spill occurred in March 1989 in Prince William Sound, Alaska, and was one of the worst environmental disasters on record in the United States. Despite long-term data collection over the nearly three decades since the spill, tremendous uncertainty remains as to how significantly the spill affected fishery resources. Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and some wild Pacific salmon populations (Oncorhynchus spp.) in Prince William Sound declined in the early 1990s, and have not returned to the population sizes observed in the 1980s. Discerning if, or how much of, this decline resulted from the oil spill has been difficult because a number of other physical and ecological drivers are confounded temporally with the spill; some of these drivers include environmental variability or changing climate regimes, increased production of hatchery salmon in the region, and increases in populations of potential predators. Using data pre- and post-spill, we applied time-series methods to evaluate support for whether and how herring and salmon productivity has been affected by each of five drivers: (1) density dependence, (2) the EVOS event, (3) changing environmental conditions, (4) interspecific competition on juvenile fish, and (5) predation and competition from adult fish or, in the case of herring, humpback whales. Our results showed support for intraspecific density-dependent effects in herring, sockeye, and Chinook salmon, with little overall support for an oil spill effect. Of the salmon species, the largest driver was the negative impact of adult pink salmon returns on sockeye salmon productivity. Herring productivity was most strongly affected by changing environmental conditions; specifically, freshwater discharge into the Gulf of Alaska was linked to a series of recruitment failures-before, during, and after EVOS. These results highlight the need to better understand long terms impacts of pink salmon on food webs, as well as the interactions between

  2. Interaction of a Transapical Miniaturized Ventricular Assist Device With the Left Ventricle: Hemodynamic Evaluation and Visualization in an Isolated Heart Setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granegger, Marcus; Aigner, Philipp; Haberl, Thomas; Mahr, Stephane; Tamez, Daniel A; Graham, Joel; Nunez, Nathalie J; Schima, Heinrich; Moscato, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    New left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) offer both important advantages and potential hazards. VAD development requires better and expeditious ways to identify these advantages and hazards. We validated in an isolated working heart the hemodynamic performance of an intraventricular LVAD and investigated how its outflow cannula interacted with the aortic valve. Hearts from six pigs were explanted and connected to an isolated working heart setup. A miniaturized LVAD was implanted within the left ventricle (tMVAD, HeartWare Inc., Miami Lakes, FL, USA). In four experiments blood was used to investigate hemodynamics under various loading conditions. In two experiments crystalloid perfusate was used, allowing visualization of the outflow cannula within the aortic valve. In all hearts the transapical miniaturized ventricular assist device (tMVAD) implantation was successful. In the blood experiments hemodynamics similar to those observed clinically were achieved. Pump speeds ranged from 9 to 22 krpm with a maximum of 7.6 L/min against a pressure difference between ventricle and aorta of ∼50 mm Hg. With crystalloid perfusate, central positioning of the outflow cannula in the aortic root was observed during full and partial support. With decreasing aortic pressures the cannula tended to drift toward the aortic root wall. The tMVAD could unload the ventricle similarly to LVADs under conventional cannulation. Aortic pressure influenced central positioning of the outflow cannula in the aortic root. The isolated heart is a simple, accessible evaluation platform unaffected by complex reactions within a whole, living animal. This platform allowed detection and visualization of potential hazards. Copyright © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Kinesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Fritsch, Jonas; Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    Within the Human-Computer Interaction community there is a growing interest in designing for the whole body in interaction design. The attempts aimed at addressing the body have very different outcomes spanning from theoretical arguments for understanding the body in the design process, to more...... practical examples of designing for bodily potential. This paper presents Kinesthetic Interaction as a unifying concept for describing the body in motion as a foundation for designing interactive systems. Based on the theoretical foundation for Kinesthetic Interaction, a conceptual framework is introduced...... to be utilized when analyzing existing designs, as well as developing designs exploring new ways of designing kinesthetic interactions....

  4. [Incorporation of glycoproteins of the Aujeszky's disease virus ( Suid herpesvirus 1) into artificial liposome membranes and their interaction with cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrublevskaia, V V; Vinokurov, M G; Kholodkov, O A; Kornev, A N; Morenkov, O S

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the case study was to investigate the interplay between liposomes, containing the in-built glycoproteins of the Aujeszky disease virus (ADV, Suid herpesvirus 1) with plasmatic membranes of sensitive cells. The conditions of reconstructing the ADV glycoproteins into artificial-liposome membranes were optimized. The above liposomes (virosomes), 40 x 200 nm, were impermeable to univalent ions, which confirmed the virosome membranes were intact. The gE and gB glycoproteins (90-98% of them) were located, inside the liposome membrane with the outwards orientation of their ecto-domain fragments. Virosomes were binding with cells in the dose-dependent mode. The purified ADV virions, the ADV gB glycoproteins and heparin inhibited such binding process of virosomes with cells, which denoted the specificity of their interaction with cells. An effective internalization of cell-binding virosomes was observed at 37 degrees C. The conclusion is that the ADV glycoproteins, constructed into the liposome membranes, simulate adequately enough the viral receptor structures and that the thus obtained virosomes could be used to investigate the interplay between alpha-herpes viruses and cells.

  5. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanda, R.

    1981-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidences to form a basis for Lagrangian Quantum field theory for Weak Interactions are discussed. In this context, gauge invariance aspects of such interactions are showed. (L.C.) [pt

  6. Food-drug interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between food and drugs may inadvertently reduce or increase the drug effect. The majority of clinically relevant food-drug interactions are caused by food-induced changes in the bioavailability of the drug. Since the bioavailability and clinical effect of most drugs are correlated......, the bioavailability is an important pharmacokinetic effect parameter. However, in order to evaluate the clinical relevance of a food-drug interaction, the impact of food intake on the clinical effect of the drug has to be quantified as well. As a result of quality review in healthcare systems, healthcare providers...... are increasingly required to develop methods for identifying and preventing adverse food-drug interactions. In this review of original literature, we have tried to provide both pharmacokinetic and clinical effect parameters of clinically relevant food-drug interactions. The most important interactions are those...

  7. Organ Impairment—Drug–Drug Interaction Database: A Tool for Evaluating the Impact of Renal or Hepatic Impairment and Pharmacologic Inhibition on the Systemic Exposure of Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, CK; Yoshida, K; Kusama, M; Zhang, H; Ragueneau-Majlessi, I; Argon, S; Li, L; Chang, P; Le, CD; Zhao, P; Zhang, L; Sugiyama, Y; Huang, S-M

    2015-01-01

    The organ impairment and drug–drug interaction (OI-DDI) database is the first rigorously assembled database of pharmacokinetic drug exposure data from publicly available renal and hepatic impairment studies presented together with the maximum change in drug exposure from drug interaction inhibition studies. The database was used to conduct a systematic comparison of the effect of renal/hepatic impairment and pharmacologic inhibition on drug exposure. Additional applications are feasible with the public availability of this database. PMID:26380158

  8. Interactive Information Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borlund, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The paper introduces the research area of interactive information retrieval (IIR) from a historical point of view. Further, the focus here is on evaluation, because much research in IR deals with IR evaluation methodology due to the core research interest in IR performance, system interaction...... and satisfaction with retrieved information. In order to position IIR evaluation, the Cranfield model and the series of tests that led to the Cranfield model are outlined. Three iconic user-oriented studies and projects that all have contributed to how IIR is perceived and understood today are presented......: The MEDLARS test, the Book House fiction retrieval system, and the OKAPI project. On this basis the call for alternative IIR evaluation approaches motivated by the three revolutions (the cognitive, the relevance, and the interactive revolutions) put forward by Robertson & Hancock-Beaulieu (1992) is presented...

  9. Interaction in Information Systems - Beyond Human-Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and analyze the role of interaction in information systems. Interaction represents dynamic relations between actors and other elements in information systems. We introduce a semi-formal notation that we use to describe a set of interaction patterns and we...... illustrate how the notation can be used to describe mediated interaction. We use the interaction patterns to evaluate a set of modeling languages. No single language supports all relevant aspects of interaction modeling. We use the interaction patterns to identify to general and supplementary forms...... of interaction-interaction based on exchange of objects and interaction based on exchange of commands. None of the modeling languages that we analyze support both forms in a rich way....

  10. Exploring the bases for a mixed reality stroke rehabilitation system, Part I: A unified approach for representing action, quantitative evaluation, and interactive feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Although principles based in motor learning, rehabilitation, and human-computer interfaces can guide the design of effective interactive systems for rehabilitation, a unified approach that connects these key principles into an integrated design, and can form a methodology that can be generalized to interactive stroke rehabilitation, is presently unavailable. Results This paper integrates phenomenological approaches to interaction and embodied knowledge with rehabilitation practices and theories to achieve the basis for a methodology that can support effective adaptive, interactive rehabilitation. Our resulting methodology provides guidelines for the development of an action representation, quantification of action, and the design of interactive feedback. As Part I of a two-part series, this paper presents key principles of the unified approach. Part II then describes the application of this approach within the implementation of the Adaptive Mixed Reality Rehabilitation (AMRR) system for stroke rehabilitation. Conclusions The accompanying principles for composing novel mixed reality environments for stroke rehabilitation can advance the design and implementation of effective mixed reality systems for the clinical setting, and ultimately be adapted for home-based application. They furthermore can be applied to other rehabilitation needs beyond stroke. PMID:21875441

  11. Argo: an integrative, interactive, text mining-based workbench supporting curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Rafal; Rowley, Andrew; Black, William; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Curation of biomedical literature is often supported by the automatic analysis of textual content that generally involves a sequence of individual processing components. Text mining (TM) has been used to enhance the process of manual biocuration, but has been focused on specific databases and tasks rather than an environment integrating TM tools into the curation pipeline, catering for a variety of tasks, types of information and applications. Processing components usually come from different sources and often lack interoperability. The well established Unstructured Information Management Architecture is a framework that addresses interoperability by defining common data structures and interfaces. However, most of the efforts are targeted towards software developers and are not suitable for curators, or are otherwise inconvenient to use on a higher level of abstraction. To overcome these issues we introduce Argo, an interoperable, integrative, interactive and collaborative system for text analysis with a convenient graphic user interface to ease the development of processing workflows and boost productivity in labour-intensive manual curation. Robust, scalable text analytics follow a modular approach, adopting component modules for distinct levels of text analysis. The user interface is available entirely through a web browser that saves the user from going through often complicated and platform-dependent installation procedures. Argo comes with a predefined set of processing components commonly used in text analysis, while giving the users the ability to deposit their own components. The system accommodates various areas and levels of user expertise, from TM and computational linguistics to ontology-based curation. One of the key functionalities of Argo is its ability to seamlessly incorporate user-interactive components, such as manual annotation editors, into otherwise completely automatic pipelines. As a use case, we demonstrate the functionality of an in-built

  12. Interactive lecturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Geoff

    2011-12-01

    Lectures can vary from being entirely teacher-centred through to those that value learner-teacher and learner-learner interaction. Advocates of the exclusively didactic (teacher-centred) lecture aim to maximise the amount of lecture time available to their delivery of content, and regard other activities as 'lost' lecture time. Educational research has, however, identified the potential benefit of interactivity that promotes mentally active learning and improved learning outcomes. This article reviews the notion of 'active learning', outlines how active learning is promoted by interactivity and concludes with strategies for including interactivity within lectures. Narrative review and discussion. The article begins with a summary of the purposes of lecturing, and the distinctions between mentally active and passive learning. The associations between interactivity, cognitively active learning and improved learning outcomes are considered, and strategies for promoting interactivity and active learning are explored. Three student-student interaction strategies are discussed, and an exemplar of each of these strategies in action is provided. The exemplar addresses the 'lost time' concern of some advocates of the exclusively didactic lecture. Interactivity can be readily introduced to lectures without a significant reduction in the amount of time available for didactic lecturing. This paper challenges the view that the inclusion of interactivity equates to a loss of learning time, by showing that students' achievement of learning outcomes is enhanced by planned and structured engagement with others. The paper concludes with an example of how interactivity can be incorporated within the traditional lecture format. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  13. Evaluation and characterization of the interactions between colloids and actinides in soils by on-line fractionation multi-detection methods: example of uranium in carbonated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claveranne-Lamolere, C.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess the fate of actinides in the environment, it is essential to identify the interactions between actinides and soil components. In the case of problems connected to the nuclear industry (deep geologic storage, dismantling and environmental monitoring of nuclear sites), the purpose of this study was to characterize the uranium-colloids interactions by on-line fractionation multi-detection methods. The main advantage here is to supply a lot of information on the uranium distribution within the various colloidal populations. By varying the keys-parameters of a batch leaching protocol, different scenarios potentially implied in the colloidal mobilization of uranium were studied. Each sample collected was also characterized and their size (hydrodynamic and gyration radius), their nature as well as the uranium concentration carried by colloids were determined. The mechanisms of the uranium-colloids interactions were also studied. (author) [fr

  14. Analysis of the protein-protein interactions between the human acidic ribosomal P-proteins: evaluation by the two hybrid system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchórzewski, M; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O

    2000-01-01

    on the function of these proteins, we are the first to have precisely analyzed mutual interactions among human P-proteins, employing the two hybrid system. The human acidic ribosomal P-proteins, (P1 or P2,) were fused to the GAL4 binding domain (BD) as well as the activation domain (AD), and analyzed in yeast...... forms the 60 S ribosomal stalk: P0-(P1/P2)(2). Additionally, mutual interactions among human and yeast P-proteins were analyzed. Heterodimer formation could be observed between human P2 and yeast P1 proteins....

  15. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogava, S.; Savada, S.; Nakagava, M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the use of weak interaction laws to study models of elementary particles is discussed. The most typical examples of weak interaction is beta-decay of nucleons and muons. Beta-interaction is presented by quark currents in the form of universal interaction of the V-A type. Universality of weak interactions is well confirmed using as examples e- and μ-channels of pion decay. Hypothesis on partial preservation of axial current is applicable to the analysis of processes with pion participation. In the framework of the model with four flavours lepton decays of hadrons are considered. Weak interaction without lepton participation are also considered. Properties of neutral currents are described briefly

  16. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per

    2006-01-01

    We report an ongoing study of palpable computing to support surgical rehabilitation, in the general field of interaction design for ubiquitous computing. Through explorative design, fieldwork and participatory design techniques, we explore the design principle of explicit interaction...... as an interpretation of palpability, comprising usability as well as patient empowerment and socially performative issues. We present a prototype environment for video recording during physiotherapeutical consultation which illustrates our current thoughts on explicit interaction and serves as material for further...

  17. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  18. Interactive Timetabling

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Tomas; Bartak, Roman

    2001-01-01

    Timetabling is a typical application of constraint programming whose task is to allocate activities to slots in available resources respecting various constraints like precedence and capacity. In this paper we present a basic concept, a constraint model, and the solving algorithms for interactive timetabling. Interactive timetabling combines automated timetabling (the machine allocates the activities) with user interaction (the user can interfere with the process of timetabling). Because the ...

  19. Tables and graphs of electron-interaction cross sections from 10 eV to 100 GeV derived from the LLNL Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL), Z = 1--100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, S.T.; Cullen, D.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Seltzer, S.M. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NML), Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Center for Radiation Research)

    1991-11-12

    Energy-dependent evaluated electron interaction cross sections and related parameters are presented for elements H through Fm (Z = 1 to 100). Data are given over the energy range from 10 eV to 100 GeV. Cross sections and average energy deposits are presented in tabulated and graphic form. In addition, ionization cross sections and average energy deposits for each shell are presented in graphic form. This information is derived from the Livermore Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL) as of July, 1991.

  20. Evaluation of groundwater and surface-water interactions in the Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area, Caddo County, Oklahoma, 2010-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Shana L.; Smith, S. Jerrod

    2014-01-01

    Streamflows, springs, and wetlands are important natural and cultural resources to the Caddo Nation. Consequently, the Caddo Nation is concerned about the vulnerability of the Rush Springs aquifer to overdrafting and whether the aquifer will continue to be a viable source of water to tribal members and other local residents in the future. Interest in the long-term viability of local water resources has resulted in ongoing development of a comprehensive water plan by the Caddo Nation. As part of a multiyear project with the Caddo Nation to provide information and tools to better manage and protect water resources, the U.S. Geological Survey studied the hydraulic connection between the Rush Springs aquifer and springs and streams overlying the aquifer. The Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area is located in southwestern Oklahoma, primarily in Caddo County. Underlying the Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area is the Permian-age Rush Springs aquifer. Water from the Rush Springs aquifer is used for irrigation, public, livestock and aquaculture, and other supply purposes. Groundwater from the Rush Springs aquifer also is withdrawn by domestic (self-supplied) wells, although domestic use was not included in the water-use summary in this report. Perennial streamflow in many streams and creeks overlying the Rush Springs aquifer, such as Cobb Creek, Lake Creek, and Willow Creek, originates from springs and seeps discharging from the aquifer. This report provides information on the evaluation of groundwater and surface-water resources in the Caddo Nation Jurisdictional Area, and in particular, information that describes the hydraulic connection between the Rush Springs aquifer and springs and streams overlying the aquifer. This report also includes data and analyses of base flow, evidence for groundwater and surface-water interactions, locations of springs and wetland areas, groundwater flows interpreted from potentiometric-surface maps, and hydrographs of water levels

  1. Playful Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The video Playful Interaction describes a future architectural office, and envisions ideas and concepts for playful interactions between people, materials and appliances in a pervasive and augmented working environment. The video both describes existing developments, technologies and designs...... as well as ideas not yet implemented such as playful modes of interaction with an augmented ball. Playful Interaction has been used as a hybrid of a vision video and a video prototype (1). Externally the video has been used to visualising our new ideas, and internally the video has also worked to inspire...

  2. A systemic evaluation of drug in acrylic pressure sensitive adhesive patch in vitro and in vivo: The roles of intermolecular interaction and adhesive mobility variation in drug controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Quan, Peng; Li, Shanshan; Zhao, Yongshan; Fang, Liang

    2017-04-28

    Though acrylic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are widely used in transdermal drug delivery system, molecular details of drug-PSA interactions, PSA molecular mobility variations and their influences on drug skin permeation are unclear. In this study, three classes of acrylic PSAs containing hydroxyl (AAOH), carboxyl (AACOOH) and non-functional group (AAnone) were synthesized. Their abilities of controlling drug release were evaluated using propranolol (PRO) and zaltoprofen (ZAL) in vitro and in vivo. Interaction details were identified by FT-IR, solid-state NMR and molecular modeling. Thermodynamic activity of drug and strength of drug-PSA interaction were characterized using miscibility study. PSA mobility was characterized using thermal analysis and rheology study. Thus, ionic interaction reduced the thermodynamic activity of PRO and mobility of AACOOH, which made PRO-AACOOH obtain a significant lower bioavailability (11.8±0.7%) than these of PRO-AAnone (40.7±2.5%) and PRO-AAOH (42.3±2.9%). Though thermodynamic activity of ZAL in AACOOH was lower than that in AAOH due to the hydrogen bonding, bioavailability of ZAL-AAOH (19.0±4.1%) exhibited no significant difference with ZAL-AACOOH (15.4±2.8%), mainly because AAOH mobility was decreased by ZAL. In conclusion, the strength, types and involved functional groups of drug-PSA interactions were identified. On this basis, it was found that different control patterns of drug release were not only caused by the thermodynamic or kinetic hindrance effects of drug-PSA interactions, but also influenced by the interactions introduced PSA mobility variations, which was an innovative mechanism of controlled release in transdermal patch. The conclusions extended our understanding about the mechanism of controlled drug release of drug-in-adhesive patch. In addition, they contributed to the design of TDDS and custom acrylic PSAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of cumulus cloud – radiation interaction effects on air quality –relevant meteorological variables from WRF, from a regional climate perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aware only of the resolved, grid-scale clouds, the Weather Research & Forecasting model (WRF) does not consider the interactions between subgrid-scale convective clouds and radiation. One consequence of this omission may be WRF’s overestimation of surface precipitation during sum...

  4. The Development of Case Studies to Evaluate the Usefulness of Teaching Interactions in One-to-One Teaching of Early Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Bronwyn

    2016-01-01

    This research paper reports on phase two of an Australian study that examined video-recorded intensive one-to-one teaching interactions with 6-7-year-old students who were in their second year of schooling and identified by the their class teacher as low attaining in early number. The two-phased study from which this paper emerges was originally…

  5. An Exploratory Investigation of Micro-Teaching as a Pre-Service Technique and Its Evaluation, Using the Flanders System of Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Alfred John

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of microteaching as an alternative to the traditional observation-discussion method of supervising student teachers. A sample of eight pre-service science teachers was randomly assigned, half to one condition and half to the other. Approximately six hours of verbal interaction data…

  6. Re-Evaluation of a Tetraploid Wheat Population Indicates That the Tsn1-ToxA Interaction is the Only Factor Governing Stagonospora Nodorum Blotch Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    The wheat Tsn1 gene on chromosome 5B confers sensitivity to the host-selective toxin ToxA produced by the pathogens that cause tan spot and Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB). A compatible Tsn1-ToxA interaction is known to play a major role in conferring susceptibility of hexaploid (common) wheat to...

  7. A Single Case Design Evaluation of a Software and Tutor Intervention Addressing Emotion Recognition and Social Interaction in Four Boys with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacava, Paul G.; Rankin, Ana; Mahlios, Emily; Cook, Katie; Simpson, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Many students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) have delays learning to recognize emotions. Social behavior is also challenging, including initiating interactions, responding to others, developing peer relationships, and so forth. In this single case design study we investigated the relationship between use of computer software ("Mind Reading:…

  8. Evaluation of two methods for assessing gene-environment interactions using data from the Danish case-control study of facial clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etheredge, Analee J; Christensen, Kaare; Del Junco, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological investigations have begun to consider gene-environment (GE) interactions as potential risk factors for many diseases, including several different birth defects. However, traditional methodological approaches for the analysis of case-control data tend to have low power...

  9. Combining crystallographic information and an aspherical-atom data bank in the evaluation of the electrostatic interaction energy in an enzyme–substrate complex: influenza neuraminidase inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominiak, Paulina M., E-mail: pdomin@chem.uw.edu.pl [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Volkov, Anatoliy; Dominiak, Adam P. [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Jarzembska, Katarzyna N. [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Coppens, Philip, E-mail: pdomin@chem.uw.edu.pl [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States)

    2009-05-01

    The electrostatic component of the enzyme/inhibitor interaction of a wide range influenza neuraminidases and inhibitors has been analyzed using transferable aspherical-atom densities from a recently compiled databank. Results are subdivided into the contributions of individual active-site residues and different functional groups of the inhibitors, and the effect of the Arg292→Lys mutation is considered. Although electrostatic interactions contribute only a part of the interaction energies between macromolecules, unlike dispersion forces they are highly directional and therefore dominate the nature of molecular packing in crystals and in biological complexes and contribute significantly to differences in inhibition strength among related enzyme inhibitors. In the reported study, a wide range of complexes of influenza neuraminidases with inhibitor molecules (sialic acid derivatives and others) have been analyzed using charge densities from a transferable aspherical-atom data bank. The strongest interactions of the residues are with the acidic group at the C2 position of the inhibitor (∼−300 kJ mol{sup −1} for —COO{sup −} in non-aromatic inhibitors, ∼−120–210 kJ mol{sup −1} for —COO{sup −} in aromatic inhibitors and ∼−450 kJ mol{sup −1} for —PO{sub 3}{sup 2−}) and with the amino and guanidine groups at C4 (∼−250 kJ mol{sup −1}). Other groups contribute less than ∼100 kJ mol{sup −1}. Residues Glu119, Asp151, Glu227, Glu276 and Arg371 show the largest variation in electrostatic energies of interaction with different groups of inhibitors, which points to their important role in the inhibitor recognition. The Arg292→Lys mutation reduces the electrostatic interactions of the enzyme with the acidic group at C2 for all inhibitors that have been studied (SIA, DAN, 4AM, ZMR, G20, G28, G39 and BCZ), but enhances the interactions with the glycerol group at C6 for inhibitors that contain it. This is in agreement with the lower level

  10. Aesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Martin; Petersen, M.G.; Iversen, O.

    2004-01-01

    , as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  11. Evaluation by fluorescence, STD-NMR, docking and semi-empirical calculations of the o-NBA photo-acid interaction with BSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Otávio A.; Jesus, Catarina S. H.; Cruz, Pedro F.; Sant'Anna, Carlos M. R.; Brito, Rui M. M.; Serpa, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Serum albumins present reversible pH dependent conformational transitions. A sudden laser induced pH-jump is a methodology that can provide new insights on localized protein (un)folding processes that occur within the nanosecond to microsecond time scale. To generate the fast pH jump needed to fast-trigger a protein conformational event, a photo-triggered acid generator as o-nitrobenzaldehyde (o-NBA) can be conveniently used. In order to detect potential specific or nonspecific interactions between o-NBA and BSA, we have performed ligand-binding studies using fluorescence spectroscopy, saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR, molecular docking and semi-empirical calculations. Fluorescence quenching indicates the formation of a non-fluorescent complex in the ground-state between the fluorophore and the quencher, but o-NBA does not bind much effectively to the protein (Ka 4.34 × 103 M- 1) and thus can be considered a relatively weak binder. The corresponding thermodynamic parameters: ΔG°, ΔS° and ΔH° showed that the binding process is spontaneous and entropy driven. Results of 1H STD-NMR confirm that the photo-acid and BSA interact, and the relative intensities of the signals in the STD spectra show that all o-NBA protons are equally involved in the binding process, which should correspond to a nonspecific interaction. Molecular docking and semi-empirical calculations suggest that the o-NBA binds preferentially to the Trp-212-containing site of BSA (FA7), interacting via hydrogen bonds with Arg-217 and Tyr-149 residues.

  12. The evaluations of the influence of surface conductivity to the energy of particles in discharge channel and interaction force in contact charging process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alisoy, H.Z. [Department of Electric and Electronics Engineering, Inonu University, 44280 Malatya (Turkey)]. E-mail: halis@inonu.edu.tr; Alisoy, G.T. [Department of Mathematics Education, Inonu University, 44280 Malatya (Turkey); Sahin, A. [Department of Physics, Inonu University, 44280 Malatya (Turkey); Yeroglu, C. [Department of Electric and Electronics Engineering, Inonu University, 44280 Malatya (Turkey)

    2006-12-18

    In this Letter, we present some analytical expressions by using the equations of electric field, inside and outside of a cylindrical void, taking the surface conductivity into consideration. We apply the obtained expressions to the high voltage insulation and ion electron technology, such as: (i) energies of charged particles occurring in discharge channel in accordance with Townsend approach; (ii) interaction force between the dielectric particle and the electrode for DC and AC cases.

  13. Evaluation by fluorescence, STD-NMR, docking and semi-empirical calculations of the o-NBA photo-acid interaction with BSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Otávio A; Jesus, Catarina S H; Cruz, Pedro F; Sant'Anna, Carlos M R; Brito, Rui M M; Serpa, Carlos

    2016-12-05

    Serum albumins present reversible pH dependent conformational transitions. A sudden laser induced pH-jump is a methodology that can provide new insights on localized protein (un)folding processes that occur within the nanosecond to microsecond time scale. To generate the fast pH jump needed to fast-trigger a protein conformational event, a photo-triggered acid generator as o-nitrobenzaldehyde (o-NBA) can be conveniently used. In order to detect potential specific or nonspecific interactions between o-NBA and BSA, we have performed ligand-binding studies using fluorescence spectroscopy, saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR, molecular docking and semi-empirical calculations. Fluorescence quenching indicates the formation of a non-fluorescent complex in the ground-state between the fluorophore and the quencher, but o-NBA does not bind much effectively to the protein (Ka~4.34×10(3)M(-1)) and thus can be considered a relatively weak binder. The corresponding thermodynamic parameters: ΔG°, ΔS° and ΔH° showed that the binding process is spontaneous and entropy driven. Results of (1)H STD-NMR confirm that the photo-acid and BSA interact, and the relative intensities of the signals in the STD spectra show that all o-NBA protons are equally involved in the binding process, which should correspond to a nonspecific interaction. Molecular docking and semi-empirical calculations suggest that the o-NBA binds preferentially to the Trp-212-containing site of BSA (FA7), interacting via hydrogen bonds with Arg-217 and Tyr-149 residues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of temperature effect on the interaction between β-lactoglobulin and anti-β-lactoglobulin antibody by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, Jun'ichi; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2012-01-10

    Molecular recognition such as antigen-antibody interaction is characterized by the parameters of kinetics and the energy landscape. Examinations of molecules involved in the interaction at different temperatures using atomic force microscopy (AFM) can provide information on not only the effects of temperature on the unbinding force between a molecule of interest and a complementary molecule but also the parameters of kinetics and the energy landscape for dissociation of the molecular complex. We investigated the effect of temperature on the dissociation process of the complex of β-lactoglobulin and anti-bovine β-lactoglobulin IgG polyclonal antibody using AFM. Measurements of the unbinding forces between β-lactoglobulin and the antibody were performed at 25, 35, and 45 °C. The following results were obtained in our present study: (i) The unbinding forces decreased as temperature increased, suggesting that the binding force between β-lactoglobulin and the antibody includes the force originating from temperature-dependent interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding). (ii) At each temperature, the unbinding force exhibited two linear regimes in the force spectra, indicating that the dissociation process of the β-lactoglobulin-antibody complex passes at least two energy barriers from the bound state to the dissociated state. (iii) The dissociation rates at zero force and the position of energy barriers increased as temperature increased. (iv) The heights of the two energy barriers in the reaction coordinates were 49.7 k(B)T and 14.5 k(B)T. (v) The values of roughness of the barriers were ca. 6.1 k(B)T and 3.2 k(B)T. Overall, the present study using AFM revealed more information about the β-lactoglobulin-antibody interaction than studies using conventional bulk measurement such as surface plasmon resonance.

  15. Evaluation of the dynamic responses of high rise buildings with respect to the direct methods for soil-foundation-structure interaction effects and comparison with the approximate methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahangir Khazaei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In dynamic analysis, modeling of soil medium is ignored because of the infinity and complexity of the soil behavior and so the important effects of these terms are neglected, while the behavior of the soil under the structure plays an important role in the response of the structure during an earthquake. In fact, the soil layers and soil foundation structure interaction phenomena can increase the applied seismic forces during earthquakes that has been examined with different methods. In this paper, effects of soil foundation structure interaction on a steel high rise building has been modeled using Abaqus software for nonlinear dynamic analysis with finite element direct method and simulation of infinite boundary condition for soil medium and also approximate Cone model. In the direct method, soil, structure and foundation are modeled altogether. In other hand, for using Cone model as a simple model, dynamic stiffness coefficients have been employed to simulate soil with considering springs and dashpots in all degree of freedom. The results show that considering soil foundation structure interaction cause increase in maximum lateral displacement of structure and the friction coefficient of soil-foundation interface can alter the responses of structure. It was also observed that the results of the approximate methods have good agreement for engineering demands.

  16. Collocated Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E. Fischer, Joel; Porcheron, Martin; Lucero, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    , and wearable technologies, spaces and spatial interaction, and those interested in the social aspects of interaction, such as conversation analysis and ethnomethodology. These communities have matured considerably, and produced significant exemplars of systems, methods, and studies concerned with collocated...... interactions. Yet, new challenges abound as people wear and carry more devices than ever, creating fragmented device ecologies at work, and changing the ways we socialise with each other. In this workshop we seek to start a dialogue to look back as well as forward, review best practices, discuss and design...

  17. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  18. Yakima River Species Interactions Study; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 7 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Temple, Gabriel M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2004-05-01

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the twelfth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2003. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong

  19. Interaction graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interaction graphs were introduced as a general, uniform, construction of dynamic models of linear logic, encompassing all Geometry of Interaction (GoI) constructions introduced so far. This series of work was inspired from Girard's hyperfinite GoI, and develops a quantitative approach that should...... be understood as a dynamic version of weighted relational models. Until now, the interaction graphs framework has been shown to deal with exponentials for the constrained system ELL (Elementary Linear Logic) while keeping its quantitative aspect. Adapting older constructions by Girard, one can clearly define...... "full" exponentials, but at the cost of these quantitative features. We show here that allowing interpretations of proofs to use continuous (yet finite in a measure-theoretic sense) sets of states, as opposed to earlier Interaction Graphs constructions were these sets of states were discrete (and finite...

  20. Embarrassing Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Lucero, Andrés; Holopainen, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Wherever the rapid evolution of interactive technologies disrupts standing situational norms, creates new, often unclear situational audiences, or crosses cultural boundaries, embarrassment is likely. This makes embarrassment a fundamental adoption and engagement hurdle, but also a creative design...

  1. Interaction Widget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Mads

    2003-01-01

    This pattern describes the idea of making a user interface of discrete, reusable entities---here called interaction widgets. The idea behind widgets is described using two perspectives, that of the user and that of the developer. It is the forces from these two perspectives that are balanced...... in the pattern. The intended audience of the pattern is developers and researchers within the field of human computer interaction....

  2. Hair Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Cani, Marie-Paule; Bertails, Florence

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Processing interactions is one of the main challenges in hair animation. Indeed, in addition to the collisions with the body, an extremely large number of contacts with high friction rates are permanently taking place between individual hair strands. Simulating the latter is essential: without hair self-interactions, strands would cross each other during motion or come to rest at the same location, yielding unrealistic behavior and a visible lack of hair volume. This c...

  3. An interactive ocean surface albedo scheme (OSAv1.0): formulation and evaluation in ARPEGE-Climat (V6.1) and LMDZ (V5A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séférian, Roland; Baek, Sunghye; Boucher, Olivier; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Decharme, Bertrand; Saint-Martin, David; Roehrig, Romain

    2018-01-01

    Ocean surface represents roughly 70 % of the Earth's surface, playing a large role in the partitioning of the energy flow within the climate system. The ocean surface albedo (OSA) is an important parameter in this partitioning because it governs the amount of energy penetrating into the ocean or reflected towards space. The old OSA schemes in the ARPEGE-Climat and LMDZ models only resolve the latitudinal dependence in an ad hoc way without an accurate representation of the solar zenith angle dependence. Here, we propose a new interactive OSA scheme suited for Earth system models, which enables coupling between Earth system model components like surface ocean waves and marine biogeochemistry. This scheme resolves spectrally the various contributions of the surface for direct and diffuse solar radiation. The implementation of this scheme in two Earth system models leads to substantial improvements in simulated OSA. At the local scale, models using the interactive OSA scheme better replicate the day-to-day distribution of OSA derived from ground-based observations in contrast to old schemes. At global scale, the improved representation of OSA for diffuse radiation reduces model biases by up to 80 % over the tropical oceans, reducing annual-mean model-data error in surface upwelling shortwave radiation by up to 7 W m-2 over this domain. The spatial correlation coefficient between modeled and observed OSA at monthly resolution has been increased from 0.1 to 0.8. Despite its complexity, this interactive OSA scheme is computationally efficient for enabling precise OSA calculation without penalizing the elapsed model time.

  4. Evaluation of the potential roles of microribonucleic acids in the interaction of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    -pathogen interactions. Some miRNAs in mammals have been shown to directly inhibit viruses, whereas other cellular miRNAs can be co-opted by viruses to promote viral replication or evade host immune responses. We have previously observed that two miRNAs known from zebrafish, miR-462 and miR-731, were the most highly...... expressed miRNAs in rainbow trout liver following Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) infection. These miRNAs were also upregulated in the liver and muscle (vaccination site) of fish vaccinated with a DNA vaccine encoding the glycoprotein of VHSV. Recent studies further suggest that the expression...

  5. Evaluation of an automated ultraviolet-C light disinfection device and patient hand hygiene for reduction of pathogen transfer from interactive touchscreen computer kiosks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhmidi, Heba; Cadnum, Jennifer L; Piedrahita, Christina T; John, Amrita R; Donskey, Curtis J

    2018-04-01

    Touchscreens are a potential source of pathogen transmission. In our facility, patients and visitors rarely perform hand hygiene after using interactive touchscreen computer kiosks. An automated ultraviolet-C touchscreen disinfection device was effective in reducing bacteriophage MS2, bacteriophage ϕX174, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Clostridium difficile spores inoculated onto a touchscreen. In simulations, an automated ultraviolet-C touchscreen disinfection device alone or in combination with hand hygiene reduced transfer of the viruses from contaminated touchscreens to fingertips. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Parametric study of the low-enriched uranium integrated Fort-Saint-Vrain element; comparative evaluation with the interacting tubular element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerles, J.M.; Carvallo, G.; Vallepin, C.

    1971-11-01

    This paper presents a study of the influence of the different geometric and neutronic parameters on the calculation of the cycle with low-enriched uranium in a Fort-Saint-Vrain type brick. The study is divided in two parts: a stage of physics, essentially neutronics; an economical part where the costs are taken into account. At the level of studies of neutronics and costs, a parallel comparison is developed between the brick Fort-Saint-Vrain and the interacting tubular element, and even thorium. 6 refs. 29 figs [fr

  7. Interactive Foresight Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Sanne; Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Jacobsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Combined Simulation Approach (CSA) is a way to evaluate risks and address potential unforeseen problems in a more interactive way than what is often observed in practice in companies or sectors. The approach is based on a combination of scenario analysis and discrete-event computer simulation...

  8. Diachronic Perspective and Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchetti, Emanuela; Valente, Andrea

    . Although this interaction style may appeal to teachers, as it reminds of school teaching, it has several disadvantages: a dialogue never occurs between adults and children, who listen in silence, hence it becomes hard to evaluate what has being learnt and how deeply, and finally it is not very engaging...... seem to demand for solutions: the absence of a dialogue between museums and young audiences, and ineffective approaches to convey historical processes. Typical young visitors are pupils participating to guided tours, in which guides provide oral narratives about historical artifacts and events....... Explorations of more interactive representations of the diachronic perspective, through play and tangible interaction, may foster a dialogue with young visitors. Therefore, a new interactive installation is being designed, intended as a tool to enrich learning, allowing children to experience historical...

  9. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, Arminda; Ørngreen, Rikke

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume....... The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability......, and mobile probing. They have been organized in the following topical sections: work analysis: dimensions and methods; interactions, models and approaches; and evaluations, interactions and applications....

  10. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability......This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume......, and mobile probing. They have been organized in the following topical sections: work analysis: dimensions and methods; interactions, models and approaches; and evaluations, interactions and applications....

  11. Interaction between silica and dentin during enlargement of a root canal with Nd:YAG laser beam during a fiber optic: an SEM evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Guy C.

    1992-06-01

    Lasers are certainly a major expectation to improve the quality of endodontic preparation. Very little research has been published in the field of interaction between a laser beam and the dentin walls of a root canal. CO2 lasers have been used to sterilize the periapical areas during apical surgeries. Dederich has demonstrated that the exposure of the dentin wall with a Nd-YAG laser beam gives a closure of the dentinal tubules and leads to a reduction in the permeability of the dentin walls to fluids or bacteria. The latest study has demonstrated that it was possible to enlarge a root canal with a Nd-YAG laser beam driven through a fiber optic. This technique improved the cleanliness of the canal after laser cleaning and shaping. This research demonstrated the interest in using a fiber optic during the canal preparation. Another interesting finding was the fact that the silica fiber was shortening itself during the endodontic procedure. The purpose of this study was to determine through an electron microscopic examination the interaction between the components of the fiber optic and canal walls during canal preparation.

  12. Evaluation of overturning capacity of low level radioactive waste drum during earthquake. Part 2. Investigation of drum weight distribution effect and drum columns interaction by numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochigi, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Numerical analysis case study is carried out for three layered and four layered low level radioactive waste drums by numerical models based on the results of shaking table test. First of all, numerical analysis results about drums displacement due to uplift and sliding on pallets during earthquake are compared with the experimental results and it is shown good agreement in both results. By this analytical model effects of drum weight distribution along height direction and drum columns interaction followed by each other drum's collisions on overturning capacity during earthquake are researched. From numerical analysis results the limit acceleration which is minimum value of input acceleration at storage building floor when three layered or four layered waste drums overturn is researched. It is shown that overturning capacity during earthquake decline when height of gravity center of three layered and four layered drums get large. So it is available to get down height of gravity center by controlling drum weight distribution along height direction. And as effect of drum columns interaction it is indicated that overturning capacity of single column arrangement drums is larger than that of many columns arrangement drums because phase deference between drum columns occur and decrease vibration amplitude by each other collisions. (author)

  13. Evaluation of DNA/Protein interactions and cytotoxic studies of copper(II) complexes incorporated with N, N donor ligands and terpyridine ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummalapalli, Kiran; C S, Vasavi; Munusami, Punnagai; Pathak, Madhvesh; M M, Balamurali

    2017-02-01

    A series of four new copper(II) heteroleptic complexes, [Cu(2‴-pytpy) (L)] (NO 3 ) 2 ·2H 2 O (1-4), where 2‴-pytpy=4'-(2'''-Pyridyl)-2, 2':6', 2''-terpyridine, L=bipyridyl (bpy), 1, 10 phenanthroline(phen), dipyridoquinoxaline(dpq) and dipyridophenazine (dppz) were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic techniques. Further, the molecular structure of the complex (2) was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique and the data revealed a penta coordinated, distorted square-pyramidal geometry with triclinic system. The interactions of four complexes with calf thymus DNA and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy techniques. Spectral studies substantiated an intercalative binding mode of metal complexes with ct-DNA. Significant binding interactions of the complexes with protein have been further revealed from fluorescence studies. Furthermore, all the four complexes show potential cytotoxicity towards the human liver carcinoma cell line (HepG-2). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; James, Brenda B.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-05-01

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al

  15. Stripe rust and leaf rust resistance QTL mapping, epistatic interactions, and co-localization with stem rust resistance loci in spring wheat evaluated over three continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A; Knox, R E; DePauw, R M; Singh, A K; Cuthbert, R D; Campbell, H L; Shorter, S; Bhavani, S

    2014-11-01

    In wheat, advantageous gene-rich or pleiotropic regions for stripe, leaf, and stem rust and epistatic interactions between rust resistance loci should be accounted for in plant breeding strategies. Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks.) and stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. tritici Eriks) contribute to major production losses in many regions worldwide. The objectives of this research were to identify and study epistatic interactions of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for stripe and leaf rust resistance in a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from the cross of Canadian wheat cultivars, AC Cadillac and Carberry. The relationship of leaf and stripe rust resistance QTL that co-located with stem rust resistance QTL previously mapped in this population was also investigated. The Carberry/AC Cadillac population was genotyped with DArT(®) and simple sequence repeat markers. The parents and population were phenotyped for stripe rust severity and infection response in field rust nurseries in Kenya (Njoro), Canada (Swift Current), and New Zealand (Lincoln); and for leaf rust severity and infection response in field nurseries in Canada (Swift Current) and New Zealand (Lincoln). AC Cadillac was a source of stripe rust resistance QTL on chromosomes 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B, 5B, and 7B; and Carberry was a source of resistance on chromosomes 2B, 4B, and 7A. AC Cadillac contributed QTL for resistance to leaf rust on chromosome 2A and Carberry contributed QTL on chromosomes 2B and 4B. Stripe rust resistance QTL co-localized with previously reported stem rust resistance QTL on 2B, 3B, and 7B, while leaf rust resistance QTL co-localized with 4B stem rust resistance QTL. Several epistatic interactions were identified both for stripe and leaf rust resistance QTL. We have identified useful combinations of genetic loci with main and epistatic effects. Multiple disease resistance regions identified on chromosomes 2A, 2B, 3B, 4B, 5B, and 7B are prime candidates for further investigation and

  16. Prospective evaluation of a cognitive vulnerability-stress model for depression: the interaction of schema self-structures and negative life events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeds, Pamela M; Dozois, David J A

    2010-12-01

    This study tested the diathesis-stress component of Beck's (1967) cognitive theory of depression. Initially, participants completed measures assessing cognitive organization of the self-schema and depressive symptoms. One year later, participants completed measures assessing cognitive organization of the self-schema, depressive symptoms, and negative life events. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses, controlling for initial depression, indicated that more tightly interconnected negative content was associated with greater elevations in depressive symptoms following the occurrence of life events. More diffusely interconnected positive content for interpersonal self-referent information also interacted with life events to predict depressive symptoms. Cognitive organization dimensions showed moderate to high stability across the follow-up, suggesting that they may be trait-like vulnerability factors. Implications for the cognitive vulnerability-stress model of depression are discussed. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Development and evaluation of a practical method to measure the Depth of Interaction function for a single side readout PET detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stringhini, G.; Ghezzi, A.; Stojkovic, A.; Paganoni, M.; Auffray, E.

    2016-01-01

    In small animal and organ dedicated PET scanners, the knowledge of depth of interaction (DOI) of the gamma ray along the main axis of the scintillator is a fundamental information in order to avoid parallax error and to achieve high performances in terms of spatial resolution. Recently we developed a new method to obtain the DOI function for a single side readout PET module, recirculating the scintillation light in the matrix by means of a mirror placed on top of the module. In a complete PET scanner, periodical DOI calibrations have to be performed to prevent time dependent miscalibrations and performance degradations. The current DOI calibration relies on a coincidence system between the module and an external scintillator to provide a priori the DOI information and it is clearly not feasible in a real system without unpractical disassemblies of the scanner. In this paper we develop instead a fast and precise calibration method based on uniform irradiation of the scintillators. Three irradiation modalities ...

  18. Evaluation of exchange interactions in (Gd{sub x}Y{sub 1-x}){sub 3}Co{sub 11}B{sub 4} compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Zhiqiang; Tang Wei; Qin Hongxia; Du Youwei [Nanjing Univ., JS (China). Dept. of Physics; Zhang Jianrong

    1998-01-01

    Two-sublattice molecular field theory (MFT) is employed to describe the temperature dependence of magnetization for (Gd{sub x}Y{sub 1-x}){sub 3}Co{sub 11}B{sub 4} compounds. Three molecular field coefficients, n{sub RCo}, n{sub CoCo}, n{sub RR}, have been calculated by a numerical fitting process. MFT with a single coefficient provides quite a reasonable description for Y{sub 3}Co{sub 11}B{sub 4}. For x > 0, we find that n{sub CoCo} is the largest coefficient, implying that the magnetic interactions are dominated by exchange between cobalt 3d electrons. (orig.) 4 refs.

  19. Assessment Planning and Evaluation of Renewable Energy Resources: an Interactive Computer Assisted Procedure. [hydroelectricity, biomass, and windpower in the Pittsfield metropolitan region, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, T. W.; Fabos, J. G.; Macdougall, E. B.

    1982-01-01

    Adaptation and derivation were used to develop a procedure for assessing the availability of renewable energy resources on the landscape while simultaneously accounting for the economic, legal, social, and environmental issues required. Done in a step-by-step fashion, the procedure can be used interactively at the computer terminals. Its application in determining the hydroelectricity, biomass, and windpower in a 40,000 acre study area of Western Massachusetts shows that: (1) three existing dam sites are physically capable of being retrofitted for hydropower; (2) each of three general areas has a mean annual windspeed exceeding 14 mph and is conductive to windpower; and (3) 20% of the total land area consists of prime agricultural biomass while 30% of the area is prime forest biomass land.

  20. Analysis of the protein-protein interactions between the human acidic ribosomal P-proteins: evaluation by the two hybrid system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchórzewski, M; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O

    2000-01-01

    cells. It is concluded that the heterodimeric complex of the P1/P2 proteins is formed preferentially. Formation of homodimers (P1/P1 and P2/P2) can also be observed, though with much less efficiency. Regarding that, we propose to describe the double heterodimeric complex as a protein configuration which......The surface acidic ribosomal proteins (P-proteins), together with ribosomal core protein P0 form a multimeric lateral protuberance on the 60 S ribosomal subunit. This structure, also called stalk, is important for efficient translational activity of the ribosome. In order to shed more light...... on the function of these proteins, we are the first to have precisely analyzed mutual interactions among human P-proteins, employing the two hybrid system. The human acidic ribosomal P-proteins, (P1 or P2,) were fused to the GAL4 binding domain (BD) as well as the activation domain (AD), and analyzed in yeast...