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Sample records for inboard shield developed

  1. Technology development for radiation shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jung Woo; Lee, Jae Kee; Kim, Jong Kyung

    1986-12-01

    Radiation shielding analysis in nuclear engineering fields is an important technology which is needed for the calculation of reactor shielding as well as radiation related safety problems in nuclear facilities. Moreover, the design technology required in high level radioactive waste management and disposal facilities is faced on serious problems with rapidly glowing nuclear industry development, and more advanced technology has to be developed for tomorrow. The main purpose of this study is therefore to build up the self supporting ability of technology development for the radiation shielding analysis in order to achieve successive development of nuclear industry. It is concluded that basic shielding calculations are possible to handle and analyze by using our current technology, but more advanced technology is still needed and has to be learned for the degree of accuracy in two-dimensional shielding calculation. (Author)

  2. Development of neutron shielding material for cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najima, K.; Ohta, H.; Ishihara, N.; Matsuoka, T.; Kuri, S.; Ohsono, K.; Hode, S.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1980's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd (MHI) has established transport and storage cask design 'MSF series' which makes higher payload and reliability for long term storage. MSF series transport and storage cask uses new-developed neutron shielding material. This neutron shielding material has been developed for improving durability under high condition for long term. Since epoxy resin contains a lot of hydrogen and is comparatively resistant to heat, many casks employ epoxy base neutron shielding material. However, if the epoxy base neutron shielding material is used under high temperature condition for a long time, the material deteriorates and the moisture contained in it is released. The loss of moisture is in the range of several percents under more than 150 C. For this reason, our purpose was to develop a high durability epoxy base neutron shielding material which has the same self-fire-extinction property, high hydrogen content and so on as conventional. According to the long-time heating test, the weight loss of this new neutron shielding material after 5000 hours heating has been lower than 0.04% at 150 C and 0.35% at 170 C. A thermal test was also performed: a specimen of neutron shielding material covered with stainless steel was inserted in a furnace under condition of 800 C temperature for 30 minutes then was left to cool down in ambient conditions. The external view of the test piece shows that only a thin layer was carbonized

  3. Shielding Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.; Gomez, Carlos F.; Scharber, Luke L.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation shielding analysis and development for the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) effort is currently in progress and preliminary results have enabled consideration for critical interfaces in the reactor and propulsion stage systems. Early analyses have highlighted a number of engineering constraints, challenges, and possible mitigating solutions. Performance constraints include permissible crew dose rates (shared with expected cosmic ray dose), radiation heating flux into cryogenic propellant, and material radiation damage in critical components. Design strategies in staging can serve to reduce radiation scatter and enhance the effectiveness of inherent shielding within the spacecraft while minimizing the required mass of shielding in the reactor system. Within the reactor system, shield design is further constrained by the need for active cooling with minimal radiation streaming through flow channels. Material selection and thermal design must maximize the reliability of the shield to survive the extreme environment through a long duration mission with multiple engine restarts. A discussion of these challenges and relevant design strategies are provided for the mitigation of radiation in nuclear thermal propulsion.

  4. Analysis of Shield Construction in Spherical Weathered Granite Development Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Quan; Li, Peigang; Gong, Shuhua

    2018-01-01

    The distribution of spherical weathered bodies (commonly known as "boulder") in the granite development area directly affects the shield construction of urban rail transit engineering. This paper is based on the case of shield construction of granite globular development area in Southern China area, the parameter control in shield machine selection and shield advancing during the shield tunneling in this special geological environment is analyzed. And it is suggested that shield machine should be selected for shield construction of granite spherical weathered zone. Driving speed, cutter torque, shield machine thrust, the amount of penetration and the speed of the cutter head of shield machine should be controlled when driving the boulder formation, in order to achieve smooth excavation and reduce the disturbance to the formation.

  5. Development of ceramics multifunctional shielding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senda, Tetsuya; Akiyama, Shigeru; Takahashi, Chiori; Matsuoka, Kazuyoshi; Uematsu, Susumu; Ueki, Kotaro; Ohashi, Atsuto; Naruyama, Nobuteru [Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    New aspect 'multifunctional shielding materials' with high temperature structure materials and shielding performance was proposed. The enhancement effects of shielding performance by combination of various ceramics were studied and the thermal impulse strength and surface damage-resistance were evaluated. In the case of combination of chromium carbide, titanium borate and boron nitride, the best shielding arrangement was proposed as chromium carbide with intermediate nucleus on the neutron beam source side and boron nitride, light element ceramics, on the other side and titanium borate between them. Each layer showed the special effects such as chromium carbide with the promotion effect of chromium, titanium borate to decrease neutron velocity and absorption and boron nitride to absorb neutron. The thermal shock characteristic value of chromium carbide was PL=3.3 W/mm{sup 2}, about 0.2 times of titanium borate, PL=16.5 W/mm{sup 2}. Accordingly, some thermal shock relaxation layer should be set, when chromium carbide was set on the beam source side. (S.Y.)

  6. Development of silicone rubber-type neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Jae Bum; Cho, Soo Hang; Kim, Ik Soo; Oh, Seung Chul; Hong, Soon Seok; Noh, Sung Ki; Jeong, Duk Yeon.

    1997-06-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear/radiation facilities. On this study, we developed silicone rubber based neutron shielding materials and their various material properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. (author). 16 tabs., 17 figs., 25 refs

  7. Development of epoxy resin-type neutron shielding materials (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Kim, Ik Soo; Shin, Young Joon; Do, Jae Bum; Ro, Seung Gy.

    1997-12-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear /radiation facilities. On this study, we developed epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various materials properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. (author). 31 refs., 22 tabs., 17 figs

  8. Development of special radiation shielding concretes using natural local materials and evaluation of their shielding characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Takeyeddin, M.; Al-Nassri, M.; Yousef, S.

    2008-01-01

    Concrete is one of the most important materials used for radiation shielding in facilities containing radioactive sources and radiation generating machines. The concrete shielding properties may vary depending on the composite of the concrete. Aggregates is the largest constituent (about 70-80% of the total weight of normal concrete). The aim of this work is to develop special concrete with good shielding properties for gamma and neutrons, using natural local materials. For this reason two types of typical concrete widely used in Syria (in Damascus and Aleppo) and four other types of concrete, using aggregates from different regions, have been prepared. The shielding properties of these six types were studied for gamma ray (from Cs-137 and Co-60 sources)and for neutrons (from am-Be source). A reduction of about 10% in the HVL was obtained for the concrete from Damascus in comparison with that from Aleppo, for both neutrons and gammas. One of the other four types of concrete (from Rajo site, mostly Hematite), was found to further reduce the HVL by about 10% for both neutrons and gamma rays.(author)

  9. Developments in shielding and criticality assessment for cask design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watmough, M.H.; Cooper, A.J.; Croxford, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents recent highlights from the shielding and criticality methods development programme that are of relevance to cask design. Specifically, the following points emerge: 1) the preparation of a licence application based upon UK methods and data used in a standardized fissile depletion and plutonium production model has been completed; 2) the assumptions used in the modelling of granules of broken fuel within the transport package following a postulated impact accident have been revised thereby allowing less pessimistic assessments to be performed; 3) enhancements are being made to the software used for shielding and criticality analysis enabling a more cost effective design service to be provided. These ongoing developments clearly show the activity to extend the scope of assessments while increasing the physical realism of the models. Through these developments BNFL continues to offer a comprehensive and cost effective shielding and criticality analysis service as part of its worldwide fuel transport business. (J.P.N.)

  10. Development of ceramics system many functions shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Tetsuya; Akiyama, Shigeru; Takahashi, Chiori; Matsuoka, Kazuyoshi; Uematsu, Susumu; Ushijima, Michio; Ueki, Kotaro; Ohashi, Atsuto; Naruyama, Nobuteru

    1997-01-01

    To develop many functions shielding materials with optimum structure combined shielding with other functions, we studied neutron shielding function of ceramics system materials and thermo-resistant bombardment and thermo fatigue strength of ceramics and its complex materials in this fiscal year. Titanium borate (TiB 2 ) and boron nitride (BN) were investigated about neutron shielding performance, estimation of thermo fatigue strength and evaluation of joint strength. Combination of stainless steel (SUS304) and shielding materials was measured. When stainless steel with 25 cm thickness was set up, enhancement effects of TiB 2 and BN were observed. The strength of brazing part of ceramics/metal and ceramics/ceramics was measured. The obtained results showed the first fracture (mode I) was generated in the interface of materials with smaller linear expansion coefficient and brazing part. Results of laser thermal shock test of ceramics proved that the thermal shock fatigue limit laser power density P fc (W/mm 2 ) had tendency to converge the constant value with repeating laser irradiation. (S.Y.)

  11. Development of ceramics system many functions shielding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senda, Tetsuya; Akiyama, Shigeru; Takahashi, Chiori; Matsuoka, Kazuyoshi; Uematsu, Susumu; Ushijima, Michio; Ueki, Kotaro; Ohashi, Atsuto; Naruyama, Nobuteru [Ship Research Inst., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    To develop many functions shielding materials with optimum structure combined shielding with other functions, we studied neutron shielding function of ceramics system materials and thermo-resistant bombardment and thermo fatigue strength of ceramics and its complex materials in this fiscal year. Titanium borate (TiB{sub 2}) and boron nitride (BN) were investigated about neutron shielding performance, estimation of thermo fatigue strength and evaluation of joint strength. Combination of stainless steel (SUS304) and shielding materials was measured. When stainless steel with 25 cm thickness was set up, enhancement effects of TiB{sub 2} and BN were observed. The strength of brazing part of ceramics/metal and ceramics/ceramics was measured. The obtained results showed the first fracture (mode I) was generated in the interface of materials with smaller linear expansion coefficient and brazing part. Results of laser thermal shock test of ceramics proved that the thermal shock fatigue limit laser power density P{sub fc} (W/mm{sup 2}) had tendency to converge the constant value with repeating laser irradiation. (S.Y.)

  12. SHIELD 1.0: development of a shielding calculator program in diagnostic radiology; SHIELD 1.0: desenvolvimento de um programa de calculo de blindagem em radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Romulo R.; Real, Jessica V.; Luz, Renata M. da [Hospital Sao Lucas (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Friedrich, Barbara Q.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: ana.marques@pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    In shielding calculation of radiological facilities, several parameters are required, such as occupancy, use factor, number of patients, source-barrier distance, area type (controlled and uncontrolled), radiation (primary or secondary) and material used in the barrier. The shielding design optimization requires a review of several options about the physical facility design and, mainly, the achievement of the best cost-benefit relationship for the shielding material. To facilitate the development of this kind of design, a program to calculate the shielding in diagnostic radiology was implemented, based on data and limits established by National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 147 and SVS-MS 453/98. The program was developed in C⌗ language, and presents a graphical interface for user data input and reporting capabilities. The module initially implemented, called SHIELD 1.0, refers to calculating barriers for conventional X-ray rooms. The program validation was performed by the comparison with the results of examples of shielding calculations presented in NCRP 147.

  13. Using natural local materials for developing special radiation shielding concretes, and deduction of its shielding characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Takeyeddin, M.; Al-Nassar, M.; Yousef, S.

    2006-06-01

    Concrete is considered as the most important material to be used for radiation shielding in facilities contain radioactive sources and radiation generating machines. The concrete shielding properties may vary depending on the construction of the concrete, which is highly relative to the composing aggregates i.e. aggregates consist about 70 - 80% of the total weight of normal concrete. In this project tow types of concrete used in Syria (in Damascus and Aleppo) had been studied and their shielding properties were defined for gamma ray from Cs-137 and Co-60 sources, and for neutrons from Am-Be source. About 10% reduction in HVL was found in the comparison between the tow concrete types for both neutrons and gammas. Some other types of concrete were studied using aggregates from different regions in Syria, to improve the shielding properties of concrete, and another 10% of reduction was achieved in comparison with Damascene concrete (20% in comparison with the concrete from Aleppo) for both neutrons and gamma rays. (author)

  14. SP-100 GES/NAT radiation shielding systems design and development testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.; Kulikowski, H.D.; McGinnis, C.A.; Reese, J.C.; Thomas, K.; Wiltshire, F.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced Energy Systems (AES) of Westinghouse Electric Corporation is under subcontract to the General Electric Company to supply nuclear radiation shielding components for the SP-100 Ground Engineering System (GES) Nuclear Assembly Test to be conducted at Westinghouse Hanford Company at Richland, Washington. The radiation shielding components are integral to the Nuclear Assembly Test (NAT) assembly and include prototypic and non-prototypic radiation shielding components which provide prototypic test conditions for the SP-100 reactor subsystem and reactor control subsystem components during the GES/NAT operations. W-AES is designing three radiation shield components for the NAT assembly; a prototypic Generic Flight System (GFS) shield, the Lower Internal Facility Shield (LIFS), and the Upper Internal Facility Shield (UIFS). This paper describes the design approach and development testing to support the design, fabrication, and assembly of these three shield components for use within the vacuum vessel of the GES/NAT. The GES/NAT shields must be designed to operate in a high vacuum which simulates space operations. The GFS shield and LIFS must provide prototypic radiation/thermal environments and mechanical interfaces for reactor system components. The NAT shields, in combination with the test facility shielding, must provide adequate radiation attenuation for overall test operations. Special design considerations account for the ground test facility effects on the prototypic GFS shield. Validation of the GFS shield design and performance will be based on detailed Monte Carlo analyses and developmental testing of design features. Full scale prototype testing of the shield subsystems is not planned

  15. Tip Vortex Index (TVI) Technique for Inboard Propeller Noise Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Sezen, Savaş; Dogrul, Ali; Bal, Şakir

    2018-01-01

    Cavitating marine propeller is one of the most dominant noise sources inmarine vessels.  The aim of this study isto examine the cavitating propeller noise induced by tip vortices for twinscrew passenger vessels. To determine the noise level inboard, tip vortex index(TVI) technique has been used. This technique is an approximate method based onnumerical and experimental data. In this study, it is aimed to predict theunderwater noise of a marine propeller by applying TVI technique for ...

  16. Development of highly effective neutron shields and neutron absorbing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, K.; Matsuda, F.; Taniuchi, H.; Yuhara, T.; Iida, T.

    1993-01-01

    A wide range of materials, including polymers and hydrogen-occluded alloys that might be usable as the neutron shielding material were examined. And a wide range of materials, including aluminum alloys that might be usable as the neutron-absorbing material were examined. After screening, the candidate material was determined on the basis of evaluation regarding its adaptabilities as a high-performance neutron-shielding and neutron-absorbing material. This candidate material was manufactured for trial, after which material properties tests, neutron-shielding tests and neutron-absorbing tests were carried out on it. The specifications of this material were thus determined. This research has resulted in materials of good performance; a neutron-shielding material based on ethylene propylene rubber and titanium hydride, and a neutron-absorbing material based on aluminum and titanium hydride. (author)

  17. Radioprotection to the Gonads in Pediatric Pelvic Radiography: Effectiveness of Developed Bismuth Shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Karami

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use and effectiveness of traditional lead gonad shields in pediatric pelvic radiography has been challenged by several literatures over the past two decades. The aim of this study was to develop a new radioprotective gonad shields to be use in pediatric pelvic radiography. Materials and Methods: The commercially available 0.06 mm lead equivalent bismuth garment has cropped squarely and used as ovarian shield to cover the entire region of pelvis. In order to prevent deterioration of image quality due to beam hardening artifacts, a 1-cm foam as spacer was located between the shield and patients pelvis. Moreover, we added a lead piece at the cranial position of the bismuth garment to absorb the scatter radiations to the radiosensitive organs. In girls, 49 radiographs with shield and 46 radiographs without shield was taken. The radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs. Image quality assessments were performed using the European guidelines. For boys, the lead testicular shields was developed using 2 cm bismuth garment, added to the sides. The prevalence and efficacy of testicular shields was assessed in clinical practice fromFebruary 2016 to June 2016. Results: Without increasing the dose to the breast, thyroid and the lens of the eyes, the use of bismuth shield has reduced the entrance skin dose(ESD of the pelvis and radiation dose to the ovaries by 62.2% and 61.7%, respectively (P

  18. Shielding Flowers Developing under Stress: Translating Theory to Field Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Chayut

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing reproductive organs within a flower are sensitive to environmental stress. A higher incidence of environmental stress during this stage of a crop plants’ developmental cycle will lead to major breaches in food security. Clearly, we need to understand this sensitivity and try and overcome it, by agricultural practices and/or the breeding of more tolerant cultivars. Although passion fruit vines initiate flowers all year round, flower primordia abort during warm summers. This restricts the season of fruit production in regions with warm summers. Previously, using controlled chambers, stages in flower development that are sensitive to heat were identified. Based on genetic analysis and physiological experiments in controlled environments, gibberellin activity appeared to be a possible point of horticultural intervention. Here, we aimed to shield flowers of a commercial cultivar from end of summer conditions, thus allowing fruit production in new seasons. We conducted experiments over three years in different settings, and our findings consistently show that a single application of an inhibitor of gibberellin biosynthesis to vines in mid-August can cause precocious flowering of ~2–4 weeks, leading to earlier fruit production of ~1 month. In this case, knowledge obtained on phenology, environmental constraints and genetic variation, allowed us to reach a practical solution.

  19. Design of the inboard passive stabilizer for TPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.; Boonstra, R.; Baxi, C.B.; Chin, E.; Drees, L.; Lee, W.; Redler, K.L.; Reis, E.E.; Bialek, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Inboard Passive Stabilizer (IPS) is part of the plasma stabilizing system built into the TPX. Its purpose is to provide passive stabilization of the plasma vertical instability on short time scales. With carbon fiber composite (CFC) armor tiles it serves as a startup limiter, protects the vacuum vessel from radiation heat load during steady state operation and also functions as Neutral Beam armor. The inboard passive stabilizer is a saddle coil, constructed of a ring of copper plates, armored with CFC tiles, that surrounds the inner vacuum vessel at the midplane. The design of the plates, the support structure, cooling lines, CFC tiles and tile attach method is described. Tiles that experience only the normal heat load of 0.4 MW/m 2 are attached with mechanical fasteners. Tiles in the neutral beam shine through area are exposed to as much as 1.7 MW/m 2 and are brazed to the IPS. Significant forces are generated in the plates by the stabilization currents as well as during the frequent bakeout cycles. These plates are required to be fully remotely handled, including tile replacement, and the influence of this requirement on the design is discussed

  20. SU-F-E-13: Design and Fabrication of Gynacological Brachytherapy Shielding & Non Shielding Applicators Using Indigenously Developed 3D Printing Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, S

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In this innovative work we have developed Gynecological Brachytherapy shielding & Non Shielding Applicators and compared with the commercially available applicators by using the indigenously developed 3D Printing machine. Methods: We have successfully indigenously developed the 3D printing machine. Which contain the 3 dimensional motion platform, Heater unit, base plate, ect… To fabricate the Gynecological Brachytherapy shielding & non shielding applicators the 3D design were developed in the computer as virtual design. This virtual design is made in a CAD computer file using a 3D modeling program. Separate programme for the shielding & non shielding applicators. We have also provided the extra catheter insert provision in the applicator for the multiple catheter. The DICOM file of the applicator were then converted to stereo Lithography file for the 3D printer. The shielding & Non Shielding Applicators were printed on a indigenously developed 3D printer material. The same dimensions were used to develop the applicators in the acrylic material also for the comparative study. A CT scan was performed to establish an infill-density calibration curve as well as characterize the quality of the print such as uniformity and the infill pattern. To commission the process, basic CT and dose properties of the printing materials were measured in photon beams and compared against water and soft tissue. Applicator were then scanned to confirm the placement of multiple catheter position. Finally dose distributions with rescanned CTs were compared with those computer-generated applicators. Results: The doses measured from the ion Chamber and X-Omat film test were within 2%. The shielded applicator reduce the rectal dose comparatively with the non shielded applicator. Conclusion: As of submission 3 unique cylinders have been designed, printed, and tested dosimetrically. A standardizable workflow for commissioning custom 3D printed applicators was codified and will be

  1. SU-F-E-13: Design and Fabrication of Gynacological Brachytherapy Shielding & Non Shielding Applicators Using Indigenously Developed 3D Printing Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this innovative work we have developed Gynecological Brachytherapy shielding & Non Shielding Applicators and compared with the commercially available applicators by using the indigenously developed 3D Printing machine. Methods: We have successfully indigenously developed the 3D printing machine. Which contain the 3 dimensional motion platform, Heater unit, base plate, ect… To fabricate the Gynecological Brachytherapy shielding & non shielding applicators the 3D design were developed in the computer as virtual design. This virtual design is made in a CAD computer file using a 3D modeling program. Separate programme for the shielding & non shielding applicators. We have also provided the extra catheter insert provision in the applicator for the multiple catheter. The DICOM file of the applicator were then converted to stereo Lithography file for the 3D printer. The shielding & Non Shielding Applicators were printed on a indigenously developed 3D printer material. The same dimensions were used to develop the applicators in the acrylic material also for the comparative study. A CT scan was performed to establish an infill-density calibration curve as well as characterize the quality of the print such as uniformity and the infill pattern. To commission the process, basic CT and dose properties of the printing materials were measured in photon beams and compared against water and soft tissue. Applicator were then scanned to confirm the placement of multiple catheter position. Finally dose distributions with rescanned CTs were compared with those computer-generated applicators. Results: The doses measured from the ion Chamber and X-Omat film test were within 2%. The shielded applicator reduce the rectal dose comparatively with the non shielded applicator. Conclusion: As of submission 3 unique cylinders have been designed, printed, and tested dosimetrically. A standardizable workflow for commissioning custom 3D printed applicators was codified and will be

  2. Development of highly effective neutron shielding material made of phenol-novolac type epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Jeong, Myeong Soo; Hong, Sun Seok; Lee, Won Kyoung; Kim, Ik Soo; Shin, Young Joon; Do, Jae Bum; Ro, Seung Gy; Oh, Seok Jin

    1998-06-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear/radiation facilities. On this study, we developed epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various material properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. Especially we developed phenol-novolac type epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their characteristics were also evaluated. (author). 22 refs., 11 tabs., 21 figs

  3. Engineering and Fabrication Considerations for Cost-Effective Space Reactor Shield Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Thomas A.; Disney, Richard K.

    2004-01-01

    Investment in developing nuclear power for space missions cannot be made on the basis of a single mission. Current efforts in the design and fabrication of the reactor module, including the reactor shield, must be cost-effective and take into account scalability and fabricability for planned and future missions. Engineering considerations for the shield need to accommodate passive thermal management, varying radiation levels and effects, and structural/mechanical issues. Considering these challenges, design principles and cost drivers specific to the engineering and fabrication of the reactor shield are presented that contribute to lower recurring mission costs

  4. Use of multiple radiographic techniques for nuclear shielding development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, S., E-mail: dayse@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., McMaster Nuclear Reactor, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    The McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR) is a medium-sized research reactor located on the campus of McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. The largest nuclear reactor on a Canadian university campus, MNR is an open-pool, light water research reactor, Equipped with both in-core and ex-core irradiation facilities, MNR serves research, education, and industrial needs while producing radioisotopes for medical applications. Presently the University is preparing for the installation of a positron beam line facility at one of the MNR beam ports. One of five such facilities worldwide, the McMaster Intense Positron Beam Facility (MIPBF) will provide orders of magnitude more positrons than a standard bench-top arrangement, making possible experiments not previously feasible. Funded by the Canadian Foundation for Innovation and the Ontario Research Foundation, the MIPBF project is a collaborative effort between positron groups at McMaster, Western, and York universities and researchers and staff at MNR, The project has involved design and fabrication of both the positron production and transport system and custom biological shielding. The MIPBF shielding fabrication is scheduled to be complete by fall 2015 followed shortly by installation and commissioning testing at MNR. Positron beam availability is planned for later in 2016. Applications include defect characterization and surface analysis of advanced engineering materials and fundamental science experiments on antimatter properties, The MIPBF will be the latest addition to the extensive array of materials-related facilities at McMaster University. (author)

  5. Radiation Exposure Analyses Supporting the Development of Solar Particle Event Shielding Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven A.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Abston, H. Lee; Simon, Hatthew A.; Gallegos, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA has plans for long duration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Outside of LEO, large solar particle events (SPEs), which occur sporadically, can deliver a very large dose in a short amount of time. The relatively low proton energies make SPE shielding practical, and the possibility of the occurrence of a large event drives the need for SPE shielding for all deep space missions. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) RadWorks Storm Shelter Team was charged with developing minimal mass SPE storm shelter concepts for missions beyond LEO. The concepts developed included "wearable" shields, shelters that could be deployed at the onset of an event, and augmentations to the crew quarters. The radiation transport codes, human body models, and vehicle geometry tools contained in the On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation In Space (OLTARIS) were used to evaluate the protection provided by each concept within a realistic space habitat and provide the concept designers with shield thickness requirements. Several different SPE models were utilized to examine the dependence of the shield requirements on the event spectrum. This paper describes the radiation analysis methods and the results of these analyses for several of the shielding concepts.

  6. Development of simplified methods and data bases for radiation shielding calculations for concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuiyan, S.I.; Roussin, R.W.; Lucius, J.L.; Marable, J.H.; Bartine, D.A.

    1986-06-01

    Two simplified methods have been developed which allow rapid and accurate calculations of the attenuation of neutrons and gamma rays through concrete shields. One method, called the BEST method, uses sensitivity coefficients to predict changes in the transmitted dose from a fission source that are due to changes in the composition of the shield. The other method uses transmission factors based on adjoint calculations to predict the transmitted dose from an arbitrary source incident on a given shield. The BEST method, utilizing an exponential molecule that is shown to be a significant improvement over the traditional linear model, has been successfully applied to slab shields of standard concrete and rebar concrete. It has also been tested for a special concrete that has been used in many shielding experiments at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility, as well as for a deep-penetration sodium problem. A comprehensive data base of concrete sensitivity coefficients generated as part of this study is available for use in the BEST model. For problems in which the changes are energy independent, application of the model and data base can be accomplished with a desk calculator. Larger-scale calculations required for problems that are energy dependent are facilitated by employing a simple computer code, which is included, together with the data base and other calculational aids, in a data package that can be obtained from the ORNL Radiation Shielding Information Center (request DLC-102/CONSENT). The transmission factors used by the second method are a byproduct of the sensitivity calculations and are mathematically equivalent to the surface adjoint function phi*, which gives the dose equivalent transmitted through a slab of thickness T due to one particle incident on the surface in the gth energy group and jth direction. 18 refs., 1 fig., 50 tabs.

  7. The Pontic-Shield: Partial Extraction Therapy for Ridge Preservation and Pontic Site Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluckman, Howard; Du Toit, Jonathan; Salama, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Augmentive ridge preservation techniques aim to manage the postextraction ridge. The partial extraction of teeth may better preserve the ridge form by maintaining the bundle bone-periodontal ligament apparatus. Root submergence has been demonstrated to retain the periodontal tissues and preserve the ridge beneath dentures or fixed prostheses. The socket-shield technique entails preparing a tooth root section simultaneous to immediate implant placement and has demonstrated histologic and clinical results contributory to esthetic implant treatment. A retrospective 10-patient case series treating 14 partial extraction sites demonstrates how a modification of the socket-shield technique can successfully develop pontic sites and preserve the ridge.

  8. Development of Hot Structures Materials for Inflatable Heat Shield Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative low cost, lightweight, durable structural concepts that feature simple robust designs, efficient packaging, and assembly are critical to the development...

  9. Calculation of gamma-ray attenuation parameters for locally developed shielding material: Polyboron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripan Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the mass attenuation coefficient (μm has been calculated analytically for a locally developed shielding material, polyboron, and compared with the values obtained from the WinXCom code, a Windows version of the XCOM database at the photon energy range 0.001 MeV–20 MeV. A good agreement has been observed between these two values. The linear attenuation coefficients (μ and relaxation lengths (λ have also been calculated from the obtained μm values and their variations with photon energy have been plotted. For comparison, other four shielding materials- ordinary concrete, pure polyethylene, borated polyethylene and water have also been studied. The obtained result shows that μm, μ and λ strongly depends on the photon energy, chemical composition and density of the shielding materials. The values of μm and μ of polyboron have been found greater than those of pure polyethylene and borated polyethylene but less than those of ordinary concrete and water at low photon energy range; and at the intermediate photon energy range (0.125 MeV–6 MeV, all the sample materials have approximately the same μm values. It has also been noticed that polyboron has the medial relaxation length (λ over the entire photon energy range. The total mass attenuation coefficient (μm and linear attenuation coefficient (μ, Half Value Layer (HVL and Tenth Value Layer (TVL of the five sample materials for some common gamma sources have been worked out and the transmission curves have been plotted. The curves exhibit that the transmission factor of the sample materials decreases with the increase in shielding thickness. The results of this study can be utilized to comprehend the shielding effectiveness of this locally developed material.

  10. Development of oil for lead shielded glass windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antony, M.P.; Subramaniam, S.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    1997-01-01

    Oil filled glass windows are used in Hot Cells for viewing purposes. Absorption of moisture and radiation can cause degradation of the oil and the degradation products will make the oil cloudy. Hence, it is necessary to replace the oil at least once in two years. The requirements of the oil were met so far by importing it from USA, Germany and France. An attempt has been made to make the oil indigenously with a view to replenish the oil in future, and also as an alternate source for oil import. The details of the development of a radiation resistant oil, its specifications and the test procedures are discussed in this report. (author)

  11. Monte Carlo-based development of a shield and total background estimation for the COBRA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidrich, Nadine

    2014-11-01

    The COBRA experiment aims for the measurement of the neutrinoless double beta decay and thus for the determination the effective Majorana mass of the neutrino. To be competitive with other next-generation experiments the background rate has to be in the order of 10 -3 counts/kg/keV/yr, which is a challenging criterion. This thesis deals with the development of a shield design and the calculation of the expected total background rate for the large scale COBRA experiment containing 13824 6 cm 3 CdZnTe detectors. For the development of a shield single-layer and multi-layer shields were investigated and a shield design was optimized concerning high-energy muon-induced neutrons. As the best design the combination of 10 cm boron doped polyethylene as outermost layer, 20 cm lead and 10 cm copper as innermost layer were determined. It showed the best performance regarding neutron attenuation as well as (n, γ) self-shielding effects leading to a negligible background rate of less than 2.10 -6 counts/kg/keV/yr. Additionally. the shield with a thickness of 40 cm is compact and costeffective. In the next step the expected total background rate was computed taking into account individual setup parts and various background sources including natural and man-made radioactivity, cosmic ray-induced background and thermal neutrons. Furthermore, a comparison of measured data from the COBRA demonstrator setup with Monte Carlo data was used to calculate reliable contamination levels of the single setup parts. The calculation was performed conservatively to prevent an underestimation. In addition, the contribution to the total background rate regarding the individual detector parts and background sources was investigated. The main portion arise from the Delrin support structure, the Glyptal lacquer followed by the circuit board of the high voltage supply. Most background events originate from particles with a quantity of 99 % in total. Regarding surface events a contribution of 26

  12. Developing light nano-composites with improved mechanical properties for neutron shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamali, F. [Shiraz Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). School of Medicine; Mortazavi, S.M.J. [Shiraz Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Medical Physics and Medical Engineering; Shiraz Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). The Center for Radiological Research; Kardan, M. [Nuclear Science and Technology Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application School; Mosleh-Shirazi, M.A. [Shiraz Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiotherapy Dept.; Sina, S. [Shiraz Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Research Center; Rahpeyma, J.

    2017-12-15

    Although radiation exposures in manned space missions are normally below the limits recommended to NASA by NCRP, in long-duration deep space exploratory missions astronauts may receive relatively high doses of ionizing radiation. Novel light polyethylene-based composites can be considered as effective radiation shields in space explorations. However, normally these composites cannot provide desired mechanical properties. Over the past several years our laboratories have focused on developing efficient methods for both physical and biological protection of the crew in long term space missions. In this study carbon nanotubes and either nano-sized or micro-sized boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) fillers were incorporated into the continuous phase of low density polyethylene (LDPE). In the next phase, the mechanical characteristics of the composites as well as their neutron attenuation properties were studied. Findings of this study indicated enhanced mechanical properties accompanied by an enhanced shielding efficiency for neutrons at some specific weight fraction of the fillers.

  13. Structural considerations for the practical development of primary shielding of X-ray rooms of megavoltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lava, Deise D.; Borges, Diogo da S.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de L.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the necessity of the use of accelerators with voltages above 10 MV in medical facilities, becomes necessary to evaluate the efficiency of the thickness of shielding materials used in rooms that contain these devices. This work presents the development of an algorithm able to provide data in a practical way, regarding the thickness of materials that can be used for an effective shielding against primary beams from these equipment. The use of the computer language C ++ allowed developing a practical tool for determining the thickness of materials required to protect the public and Individuals Occupationally Exposed (IOEs) against major powers beams. Furthermore, it was considered by calculations Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Technique (IMRT). The construction of this tool was based to ensure the dose limits established in the CNEN-NN-3.01. The dose limiting is done through the use of loops able to validate the efficiency of thickness determined by the algorithm itself, and ensure if the radiation dose exceeds the limits set by the standard, it will be the inclusion of sufficient Half-Reducer Layers in so that the dose is within the parameters established by the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). The code validation is performed by comparing results obtained in the examples p recalculated in the NCRP Report-151 (Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for megavoltage X and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities) with the results generated by the code. The results are satisfactory and consistent with that report

  14. Development of a computer code for shielding calculation in X-ray facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Diogo da S.; Lava, Deise D.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de L.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.

    2014-01-01

    The construction of an effective barrier against the interaction of ionizing radiation present in X-ray rooms requires consideration of many variables. The methodology used for specifying the thickness of primary and secondary shielding of an traditional X-ray room considers the following factors: factor of use, occupational factor, distance between the source and the wall, workload, Kerma in the air and distance between the patient and the receptor. With these data it was possible the development of a computer program in order to identify and use variables in functions obtained through graphics regressions offered by NCRP Report-147 (Structural Shielding Design for Medical X-Ray Imaging Facilities) for the calculation of shielding of the room walls as well as the wall of the darkroom and adjacent areas. With the built methodology, a program validation is done through comparing results with a base case provided by that report. The thickness of the obtained values comprise various materials such as steel, wood and concrete. After validation is made an application in a real case of radiographic room. His visual construction is done with the help of software used in modeling of indoor and outdoor. The construction of barriers for calculating program resulted in a user-friendly tool for planning radiographic rooms to comply with the limits established by CNEN-NN-3:01 published in September / 2011

  15. 40 CFR 1045.105 - What exhaust emission standards must my sterndrive/inboard engines meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What exhaust emission standards must my sterndrive/inboard engines meet? 1045.105 Section 1045.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... from advertisements or other marketing materials for any engines in the engine family. (B) Your basic...

  16. Development of the breeding blanket and shield model for the fusion power reactors system SYCOMORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li-Puma, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.lipuma@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jaboulay, Jean-Charles, E-mail: Jean-Charles.jaboulay@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Martin, Brunella, E-mail: brunella.martin@gmail.com [Incka, 19-21 Rue du 8 mai 1945, F-94110 Arcueil (France)

    2014-10-15

    SYCOMORE, a fusion reactor system code based on a modular approach is under development at CEA. Within this framework, this paper describes the relevant sub-modules which have been implemented to model the main outputs of the breeding blanket and shield block of the system code: tritium breeding ratio, peak energy deposition in toroidal field coils, reactor layout and power deposition, blanket pressure drops and materials inventory. Blanket and shield requirements are calculated by several sub-modules: the blanket assembly and layout sub-module, the neutronic sub-module, the blanket design sub-module (thermal hydraulic and thermo-mechanic pre-design tool). A power flow module has also been developed which is directly linked to the blanket thermo-dynamic performances, which is not described in this paper. For the blanket assembly and layout and the blanket module design sub-modules, explicit analytic models have been developed and implemented; for the neutronic sub-module neural networks that replicate the results of appropriate simplified 1D and 2D neutronic simulations have been built. Presently, relevant model for the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead is available. Sub-modules have been built in a way that they can run separately or coupled into the breeding blanket and shield module in order to be integrated in SYCOMORE. In the paper, the objective and main input/output parameters of each sub-module are reported and relevant models discussed. The application to previous studied reactor models (PPCS model AB, DEMO-HCLL 2006–2007 studies) is also presented.

  17. Preliminary study for development of low dose radiation shielding material using liquid silicon and metallic compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seo Goo; Lee, Sung Soo [Dept. of Medical Science, Graduate School of Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Su Chul [Div. of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung Jin [SoonChunHyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sung Wook [Graduate school of SeJong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    This study measured and compared the protective clothing using Pb used for shielding in a diagnostic X-ray energy range, and the shielding rates of X-ray fusion shielding materials using Si and TiO{sub 2}. For the experiment, a pad type shielding with a thickness of 1 mm was prepared by mixing Si-TiO{sub 2}, and the X-ray shielding rate was compared with 0.5 mmPb plate of The shielding rate of shielding of 0.5 mmPb plate 95.92%, 85.26 % based on the case of no shielding under each 60kVp, 100kVp tube voltage condition. When the shielding of Si-TiO{sub 2} pad was applied, the shielding rate equal to or greater than 0.5 mmPb plate was obtained at a thickness of 11 mm or more, and the shielding rate of 100% or more was confirmed at a thickness of 13 nn in 60kVp condition. When the shielding of Si-TiO{sub 2} pad was applied, the shielding rate equal to or greater than 0.5 mmPb plate was obtained at a thickness of 17 mm or more, and a shielding rate of 0.5 mmPb plate was observed at a thickness of 23 mm in 100kVp condition. Through the results of this study, We could confirm the possibility of manufacturing radiation protective materials that does not contain lead hazard using various metallic compound and liquid Si. This study shows that possibility of liquid Si and other metallic compound can harmonize easily. Beside, It is flexible and strong to physical stress than Pb obtained radiation protective clothes. But additional studies are needed to increase the shielding rate and reduce the weight.

  18. Specialty glass development for radiation shielding windows and nuclear waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, S.; Ghorui, S.; Roy Chowdhury, A.; Sen, R.; Chakraborty, A.K.; Sen, S.; Maiti, H.S.

    2015-01-01

    The technology of two important varieties of specialty glasses, namely high density Radiation Shielding Window (RSW) glass and specialty glass beads of borosilicate composition have been successfully developed in CGCRI with an aim to meet the countries requirement. Radiation Shielding Windows used in nuclear installations, are viewing devices, which allow direct viewing into radioactive areas while still providing adequate protection to the operating personnel. The glass blocks are stabilized against damage from radiation by introducing cerium in definite proportions. Considering the essentially of developing an indigenous technology to make the country self-sufficient for this critical item, CGCRI has taken up a major programme to develop high lead containing glasses required for RSWs under a MoD with BARC. On the other hand, the specialty glass bead of specific composition and properties is a critical material required for management of radioactive waste in a closed nuclear fuel cycle that is followed by India. During reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel, high level radio-active liquid waste (HLW) is produced containing unwanted radio isotopes some of which remain radioactive for thousands of years. The need is to immobilize them within a molecular structure so that they will not come out and be released to the ambience and thereby needs to be resolved if nuclear power is to make a significant contribution to the country's power requirement. Borosilicate glass has emerged as the material of choice for immobilization due to its unique random network structure

  19. Development of point Kernel radiation shielding analysis computer program implementing recent nuclear data and graphic user interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S.; Lee, S.; Chung, C.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for safe and efficient use of radiation and radioactive work activity along with shielding analysis as a result the number of nuclear and conventional facilities using radiation or radioisotope rises. Most Korean industries and research institutes including Korea Power Engineering Company (KOPEC) have been using foreign computer programs for radiation shielding analysis. Korean nuclear regulations have introduced new laws regarding the dose limits and radiological guides as prescribed in the ICRP 60. Thus, the radiation facilities should be designed and operated to comply with these new regulations. In addition, the previous point kernel shielding computer code utilizes antiquated nuclear data (mass attenuation coefficient, buildup factor, etc) which were developed in 1950∼1960. Subsequently, the various nuclear data such mass attenuation coefficient, buildup factor, etc. have been updated during the past few decades. KOPEC's strategic directive is to become a self-sufficient and independent nuclear design technology company, thus KOPEC decided to develop a new radiation shielding computer program that included the latest regulatory requirements and updated nuclear data. This new code was designed by KOPEC with developmental cooperation with Hanyang University, Department of Nuclear Engineering. VisualShield is designed with a graphical user interface to allow even users unfamiliar to radiation shielding theory to proficiently prepare input data sets and analyzing output results

  20. Radiation shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Yasuaki

    1993-01-01

    In the present invention, the thickness of the radiation shields is minimized to save the quantity of shields thereby utilizing spaces in a facility effectively. That is, the radiation shields of the present invention comprise first and second shields forming stepwise gaps. They are disposed between a high dose region and a low dose region. The first and second shields have a feature in that the thickness thereof can be set to a size capable of shielding the gaps in accordance with the strength of the radiation source to be shielded. With such a constitution, the thickness of the shields of the radiation processing facility can be minimized. Accordingly, the quantity of the shields can be greatly saved. Spaces in the facility can be utilized effectively. (I.S.)

  1. ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] shield and blanket work package report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This report summarizes nuclear-related work in support of the US effort for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Study. The purpose of this work was to prepare for the first international ITER workshop devoted to defining a basic ITER concept that will serve as a basis for an indepth conceptual design activity over the next 2-1/2 years. Primary tasks carried out during the past year included: design improvements of the inboard shield developed for the TIBER concept, scoping studies of a variety of tritium breeding blanket options, development of necessary design guidelines and evaluation criteria for the blanket options, further safety considerations related to nuclear components and issues regarding structural materials for an ITER device. 44 refs., 31 figs., 29 tabs

  2. Passive system for cooling the inboard region in case of a severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccaccini, L.V. E-mail: lorenzo.boccaccini@irs.fzk.de; Gordeev, S.; Malang, S

    2002-12-01

    Previous calculations performed for different fusion reactor concepts indicated that the absence of an effective heat sink for the after-heat in the inboard region can cause concerns for the temperatures reached in case of a severe accident. This can compromise the mechanical stability of the vacuum vessel (VV) or cause unacceptable temperatures of the inboard in-vessel components with consequence in the overall safety strategy. This paper describes a design solution that has been proposed for the European Helium Cooled Solid Breeder Reactor that allows transporting the heat from the inboard to the outboard side with a passive cooling system located in the VV and based on natural circulation of liquid lead. The presented calculations aim to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of such a system. The presented results have been obtained for a geometry and parameters based on a particular reactor, nevertheless the system can be adopted for a large variety of reactor concepts being relatively independent of a particular blanket or maintenance schema.

  3. Development and preliminary verification of 2-D transport module of radiation shielding code ARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Penghe; Chen Yixue; Zhang Bin; Zang Qiyong; Yuan Longjun; Chen Mengteng

    2013-01-01

    The 2-D transport module of radiation shielding code ARES is two-dimensional neutron and radiation shielding code. The theory model was based on the first-order steady state neutron transport equation, adopting the discrete ordinates method to disperse direction variables. Then a set of differential equations can be obtained and solved with the source iteration method. The 2-D transport module of ARES was capable of calculating k eff and fixed source problem with isotropic or anisotropic scattering in x-y geometry. The theoretical model was briefly introduced and series of benchmark problems were verified in this paper. Compared with the results given by the benchmark, the maximum relative deviation of k eff is 0.09% and the average relative deviation of flux density is about 0.60% in the BWR cells benchmark problem. As for the fixed source problem with isotropic and anisotropic scattering, the results of the 2-D transport module of ARES conform with DORT very well. These numerical results of benchmark problems preliminarily demonstrate that the development process of the 2-D transport module of ARES is right and it is able to provide high precision result. (authors)

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF EXTREMELY LOW FREQUENCY PASSIVE SHIELDING APPLICATION USING MAGNETIC AQUEOUS SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOOR ASHIKIN MOHD RASHID

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Public concerns on Extremely Low Frequency (ELF Electromagnetic Field (EMF exposure have been elongated since the last few decades. Electrical substations and high tension rooms in commercial buildings were among the contributing factors emanating ELF magnetic fields. This paper discussed various shielding methods conventionally used in mitigating the ELF exposure. Nevertheless, the standard methods were found to be impractical and incapable of meeting currents shielding demands. In response to that, remarkable researches were conducted in effort to invent novel methods which is more convenient and efficient such as magnetic aqueous shielding or paint, textiles and papers shielding. A magnetic aqueous substrate, Manganese Zinc Ferrite was used as shielding material. The magnetic field and flux distribution inside the aqueous magnetic material are evaluated to optimize shielding against ELFEMF exposure, as to mitigate its exposure.

  5. The shielding properties of the newly developed container for transport of samples contaminated with CBRN substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisera, O.; Kares, J.

    2014-01-01

    A container for transport of environmental samples to the analytical laboratory is being developed as part of the development of system for collection and transport of samples contaminated with chemical, biological, radioactive and nuclear (CBRN) substances after CBRN incidents. The proposed system corresponds with current requirements of NATO publication AEP-66. The proposed container will meet the requirements of mechanical stability and tightness for the packaging of the chemical, biological and radioactive substances. Verification of shielding properties and satisfaction of requirements of radiation protection during transport of potentially relatively high active samples was the aim of this part of research. The results, together with a wall thickness of the inner steel container, the inner lining and the outer transport package, give excellent assumption that the radiation protection requirements for the proposed container and transport package will be satisfied. (authors)

  6. Electromagnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Wen-Shian V.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials are well known in the art in forms such as gaskets, caulking compounds, adhesives, coatings and the like for a variety of EMI shielding purposes. In the past, where high shielding performance is necessary, EMI shielding has tended to use silver particles or silver coated copper particles dispersed in a resin binder. More recently, aluminum core silver coated particles have been used to reduce costs while maintaining good electrical and physical properties. (author). 8 figs

  7. Development of heat-resistant neutron shielding resin for high payload metal cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamoshida, Mamoru; Hiranuma, Takeshi; Shimizu, Masashi

    2007-01-01

    A new neutron shielding resin has been developed for a dual-purpose metal cask. The resin is composed of a cycloaliphatic epoxy, anhydrous acid, catalyst, aluminum hydroxide and boron tetracarbide. Its long-term stability was verified by thermal degradation tests. Estimated weight loss of the resin during storage was about 1-2%. Because the curing reaction of epoxy and curing reagents was moderate at room temperature, a large amount of resin could be treated at one time which would lower fabrication cost. The fabrication process was verified by a full-scale mock-up test. No significant voids or cracks were found in the resin and uniform elemental composition was confirmed. (author)

  8. Development of mechanical shield docking method; MSD (mekanikaru/shirudo/dokkingu) koho no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokota, I. [Tokyo Metroplitan Government Water Supply Bureau, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, T.; Hagiwara, H. [Shimizu Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nishitake, S. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Endo, M. [Obayashi Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1993-09-20

    For the construction works of underground tunnels, mainly the shield method has so far been adopted, but in order to make underground junction of shield machines, the method of utilizing a shaft or the method of improving the earth by the auxiliary methods such as chemical feeding have been adopted. However, either method has restriction for its practical application. The MSD method uses no auxiliary method at all, can join directly two shield machines mechanically underground, has high water stoppability at its junction, is applicable for either of shield machines of slush type or mud pressure type, and is the method to solve totally various problems in the existing joining methods. This method is the one that two shield machines, one on the out-pushing side and another on the in-receiving side, progress from both sides and face each other, then the both are joined mechanically for unification by pushing a steel penetration ring built-in the out-pushing shield machine to the rubber ring built-in the penetration chamber of the in-receiving shield machine. After joining, the shield machines are disassembled for removal leaving the junction only, and the secondary lining is done with concrete. 6 figs.

  9. New shielding material development for compact accelerator-driven neutron source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Hu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Accelerator-driven Neutron Source (CANS, especially the transportable neutron source is longing for high effectiveness shielding material. For this reason, new shielding material is researched in this investigation. The component of shielding material is designed and many samples are manufactured. Then the attenuation detection experiments were carried out. In the detections, the dead time of the detector appeases when the proton beam is too strong. To grasp the linear range and nonlinear range of the detector, two currents of proton are employed in Pb attenuation detections. The transmission ratio of new shielding material, polyethylene (PE, PE + Pb, BPE + Pb is detected under suitable current of proton. Since the results of experimental neutrons and γ-rays appear as together, the MCNP and PHITS simulations are applied to assisting the analysis. The new shielding material could reduce of the weight and volume compared with BPE + Pb and PE + Pb.

  10. Development of radiation shielding materials and NBC pads for infantry combat vehicle and tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, R.S.; Gautam, O.P.; Katiyar, Mohit; Tripathi, D.N.; Singh, R.K.

    2008-01-01

    Tanks have special lining materials inside, providing a certain degree of radiation protection for operation in nuclear scenario's. At present these special lining materials in the form of sheets are imported and are fitted into armoured vehicles. Three types of polymer compositions; PE(M)SE, PEC-ISE and PEC-IISE were formulated based on polymer matrix, specific fillers and anti-ageing additives. Prototype NBC pads based on polymer composition PEC-ISE was finalized for moulding of NBC pads for use in ICVs and composition PE(M)SE was finalized for T-90 tanks. The physico-mechanical properties for NBC pads have been evaluated. Radiography of test samples was conducted to ensure homogeneity of specific fillers in the polymer matrix. Radiation shielding factors against nuclear radiation sources ( 60 Co, I37 Cs and 252 Cf) were evaluated at DL Jodhpur and found to be better than imported Russian Pads designed for ICVs and T-90 Tanks. Drawings for twelve types of NBC pads for ICVs and one hundred eighteen types of pads for T-90 tank were generated with the help of design tool, Auto Desk Inventor-II and metallic moulds for moulding of NBC pads were fabricated. Prototype NBC pads were moulded through compression moulding process. Radiation protection factors of prototype NBC pads, after fitment in ICVs, were also evaluated against neutron and gamma (primary and secondary) radiation sources. Prototype NBC pads for ICVs have shown 20% improvement in overall protection level and NBC pads for T-90 tanks have been developed as per design requirements. Manufacturing facility for NBC shielding pads have been established in association with industries. (author)

  11. Development of a low activation concrete shielding wall by multi-layered structure for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Satoshi; Maegawa, Toshio; Yoshimatsu, Kenji; Sato, Koichi; Nonaka, Akira; Takakura, Kosuke; Ochiai, Kentaro; Konno, Chikara

    2011-01-01

    A multi-layered concrete structure has been developed to reduce induced activity in the shielding for neutron generating facilities such as a fusion reactor. The multi-layered concrete structure is composed of: (1) an inner low activation concrete, (2) a boron-doped low activation concrete as the second layer, and (3) ordinary concrete as the outer layer of the neutron shield. With the multi-layered concrete structure the volume of boron is drastically decreased compared to a monolithic boron-doped concrete. A 14 MeV neutron shielding experiment with multi-layered concrete structure mockups was performed at FNS and several reaction rates and induced activity in the mockups were measured. This demonstrated that the multi-layered concrete effectively reduced low energy neutrons and induced activity.

  12. Advanced shield development for a fission surface power system for the lunar surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craft, A.E.; Silver, I.J.; Clark, C.M.; Howe, S.D.; King, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    A nuclear reactor power system such as the affordable fission surface power system enables a potential outpost on the moon. A radiation shield must be included in the reactor system to reduce the otherwise excessive dose to the astronauts and other vital system components. The radiation shield is typically the most massive component of a space reactor system, and thus must be optimized to reduce mass asmuchas possible while still providing the required protection.Various shield options for an on-lander reactor system are examined for outpost distances of 400m and 1 km from the reactor. Also investigated is the resulting mass savings from the use of a high performance cermet fuel. A thermal analysis is performed to determine the thermal behaviours of radiation shields using borated water. For an outpost located 1000m from the core, a tetramethylammonium borohydride shield is the lightest (5148.4 kg), followed by a trilayer shield (boron carbide-tungsten-borated water; 5832.3 kg), and finally a borated water shield (6020.7 kg). In all of the final design cases, the temperature of the borated water remains below 400 K.

  13. Heat-shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) Development Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Ellerby, Don; Gage, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Heat shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) Project is a NASA STMD and SMD co-funded effort. The goal is to develop and mission infuse a new ablative Thermal Protection System that can withstand extreme entry. It is targeted to support NASA's high priority missions, as defined in the latest decadal survey, to destinations such as Venus and Saturn in-situ robotic science missions. Entry into these planetary atmospheres results in extreme heating. The entry peak heat-flux and associated pressure are estimated to be between one and two orders of magnitude higher than those experienced by Mars Science Laboratory or Lunar return missions. In the recent New Frontiers community announcement NASA has indicated that it is considering providing an increase to the PI managed mission cost (PIMMC) for investigations utilizing the Heat Shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) and in addition, NASA is considering limiting the risk assessment to only their accommodation on the spacecraft and the mission environment. The HEEET ablative TPS utilizes 3D weaving technology to manufacture a dual layer material architecture. The 3-D weaving allows for flat panels to be woven. The dual layer consists of a top layer designed to withstand the extreme external environment while the inner or insulating layer by design, is designed to achieve low thermal conductivity, and it keeps the heat from conducting towards the structure underneath. Both arc jet testing combined with material properties have been used to develop thermal response models that allows for comparison of performance with heritage carbon phenolic. A 50% mass efficiency is achieved by the dual layer construct compared to carbon phenolic for a broad range of missions both to Saturn and Venus. The 3-D woven flat preforms are molded to achieve the shape as they are compliant and then resin infusion with curing forms a rigid panels. These panels are then bonded on to the aeroshell structure. Gaps

  14. Development of BaO-ZnO-B2O3 glasses as a radiation shielding material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanthima, N.; Kaewkhao, J.; Limkitjaroenporn, P.; Tuscharoen, S.; Kothan, S.; Tungjai, M.; Kaewjaeng, S.; Sarachai, S.; Limsuwan, P.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of the BaO on the optical, physical and radiation shielding properties of the xBaO: 20ZnO: (80-x)B2O3, where x=5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mol%, were investigated. The glasses were developed by the conventional melt-quenching technique at 1400 °C with high purity chemicals of H3BO3, ZnO, and BaSO4. The optical transparency of the glasses indicated that the glasses samples were high, as observed by visual inspections. The mass attenuation coefficients (μm), the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and the effective electron densities (Ne) were increased with the increase of BaO concentrations, and the decrease of gamma-ray energy. The developed glass samples were investigated and compared with the shielding concretes and glasses in terms of half value layer (HVL). The overall results demonstrated that the developed glasses had good shielding properties, and highly practical potentials in the environmental friendly radiation shielding materials without an additional of Pb.

  15. Development and Evaluation of a Proposed Neck Shield for the 5 Percentile Hybrid III Female Dummy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banglmaier, Richard F; Pecoraro, Katie M; Feustel, Jim R; Scherer, Risa D; Rouhana, Stephen W

    2005-11-01

    Frontal airbag interaction with the head and neck of the Hybrid III family of dummies may involve a non-biofidelic interaction. Researchers have found that the deploying airbag may become entrapped in the hollow cavity behind the dummy chin. This study evaluated a prototype neck shield design, the Flap Neck Shield, for biofidelic response and the ability to prevent airbag entrapment in the chin/jaw cavity. Neck pendulum calibration tests were conducted for biofidelity evaluation. Static and dynamic airbag deployments were conducted to evaluate neck shield performance. Tests showed that the Flap Neck Shield behaved in a biofidelic manner with neck loads and head motion within established biofidelic limits. The Flap Neck Shield did not alter the neck loads during static or dynamic airbag interactions, but it did consistently prevent the airbag from penetrating the chin/jaw cavity. Use of the Flap Neck Shield with the 5(th) percentile Hybrid III female dummy is recommended for frontal airbag deployments given its acceptable biofidelic response and repeatable performance.

  16. Numerical Simulations of Subscale Wind Turbine Rotor Inboard Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, Myra L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Thermal/ Fluid Sciences & Engineering Dept.; Maniaci, David Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technologies Dept.; Resor, Brian R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technologies Dept.

    2015-04-01

    New blade designs are planned to support future research campaigns at the SWiFT facility in Lubbock, Texas. The sub-scale blades will reproduce specific aerodynamic characteristics of utility-scale rotors. Reynolds numbers for megawatt-, utility-scale rotors are generally above 2-8 million. The thickness of inboard airfoils for these large rotors are typically as high as 35-40%. The thickness and the proximity to three-dimensional flow of these airfoils present design and analysis challenges, even at the full scale. However, more than a decade of experience with the airfoils in numerical simulation, in the wind tunnel, and in the field has generated confidence in their performance. Reynolds number regimes for the sub-scale rotor are significantly lower for the inboard blade, ranging from 0.7 to 1 million. Performance of the thick airfoils in this regime is uncertain because of the lack of wind tunnel data and the inherent challenge associated with numerical simulations. This report documents efforts to determine the most capable analysis tools to support these simulations in an effort to improve understanding of the aerodynamic properties of thick airfoils in this Reynolds number regime. Numerical results from various codes of four airfoils are verified against previously published wind tunnel results where data at those Reynolds numbers are available. Results are then computed for other Reynolds numbers of interest.

  17. Fusion Engineering Device (FED) first wall/shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, P.H.; Fuller, G.; Cramer, B.; Davisson, J.; Haines, J.; Kirchner, J.

    1981-01-01

    The torus of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) is comprised of the bulk shield and its associated spool lstructure and support system, the first wall water-cooled panel and armor systems, and the pumped limiter. The bulk shielding is provided by ten shield sectors that are installed in the spool structure in such a way as to permit extraction of the sectors through the openings between adjacent toroidal field coils with a direct radial movement. The first wall armor is installed on the inboard and top interior walls of these sectors, and the water-cooled panels are installed on the outboard interior walls and the pumped limiter in the bottom of the sectors. The overall design of the first wall and shield system is described in this paper

  18. Development of Z-type hexaferrites for high frequency EMI shielding applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magham, S. B. S.; Sharma, M.; Shannigrahi, S. R.; Tan, Hui Ru; Sharma, V.; Meng, Yu Song; Idapalpati, S.; Ramanujan, R. V.; Repaka, D. V. M.

    2017-11-01

    Barium Z-type hexaferrites (Ba3Co2Cr2xFe24-2xO41 with x = 0, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9) were synthesised using solid state reaction technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the formation of single phase Z-type hexaferrite structure. From transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis platelet morphologies were observed in all the studied samples and the average grain size were calculated, which were around 100 nm. Magnetisation measurements (M-H) and (M-T) were carried out using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Saturation magnetisation (Ms) was found to decrease with increasing Cr content in the samples whereas, magnetic coercive field (Hc) and remanent magnetisation (Mr) were increased. Electromagnetic absorption properties of all the ferrite samples were tested in 2-18 GHz frequency range using Agilent Vector Network Analyser. The sample Ba3Co2Cr1.2Fe22.8O41 (x = 0.6) had exhibited maximum microwave absorption of 99.8% at 5.34 GHz. All the samples showed broad absorption bandwidth of 3-3.2 GHz as well significantly high enough reflection loss of -10 dB. Therefore, the developed Z-type hexaferrites can be used for good electromagnetic shielding/absorber applications.

  19. Shielding container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darling, K.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    A shielding container incorporates a dense shield, for example of depleted uranium, cast around a tubular member of curvilinear configuration for accommodating a radiation source capsule. A lining for the tubular member, in the form of a close-coiled flexible guide, provides easy replaceability to counter wear while the container is in service. Container life is extended, and maintenance costs are reduced. (author)

  20. Development of a computer code for determining the thickness of shielding used in cardiac angiography techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lava, Deise D.; Borges, Diogo da S.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de L.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.

    2014-01-01

    The construction of an effective shielding against the interaction of ionizing radiation in X-ray rooms requires consideration of many variables. The methodology used for specification of a primary and secondary shielding thickness of a X-ray room considers the following factors: use factor, occupational factor, distance between the source and the wall, workload, Kerma in the air and distance between the patient and the receptor. The program built from this data, has the objective of identifying and using variables in functions obtained through linear regressions of graphics offered by NCRP Report-147 (Structural Shielding Design for Medical X-Ray Imaging Facilities) for the shielding calculation of the room walls as wall dark room and adjacent areas. With the methodology constructed a program validation is done by comparison of results with a base case provided by that report. The values of the thicknesses obtained comprise various materials such as steel, wood and concrete. Once validated an application is made in a real case of X-ray room. His visual construction is done with the help of software used in modeling of interiors and exteriors. The construction of shielding calculating program has the goal of being an easy tool for planning of X-ray rooms in order to meet the established limits by CNEN-NN-3:01 published in September 2011

  1. Multifunctional Hot Structure Heat Shield

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project is performing preliminary development of a Multifunctional Hot Structure (HOST) heat shield for planetary entry. Results of this development will...

  2. Shielding Effectiveness of Laminated Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Rao

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Shielding prevents coupling of undesired radiated electromagnetic energy into equipment otherwise susceptible to it. In view of this, some studies on shielding effectiveness of laminated shields with conductors and conductive polymers using plane-wave theory are carried out in this paper. The plane wave shielding effectiveness of new combination of these materials is evaluated as a function of frequency and thickness of material. Conductivity of the polymers, measured in previous investigations by the cavity perturbation technique, is used to compute the overall reflection and transmission coefficients of single and multiple layers of the polymers. With recent advances in synthesizing stable highly conductive polymers these lightweight mechanically strong materials appear to be viable alternatives to metals for EM1 shielding.

  3. Development and verification of signal processing system of avalanche photo diode for the active shields onboard ASTRO-H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, M., E-mail: ohno@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kawano, T.; Edahiro, I.; Shirakawa, H.; Ohashi, N.; Okada, C.; Habata, S.; Katsuta, J.; Tanaka, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Mizuno, T.; Fukazawa, Y. [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Murakami, H.; Kobayashi, S.; Miyake, K.; Ono, K.; Kato, Y.; Furuta, Y.; Murota, Y.; Okuda, K. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); and others

    2016-09-21

    The hard X-ray Imager and Soft Gamma-ray Detector onboard ASTRO-H demonstrate high sensitivity to hard X-ray (5–80 keV) and soft gamma-rays (60–600 keV), respectively. To reduce the background, both instruments are actively shielded by large, thick Bismuth Germanate scintillators. We have developed the signal processing system of the avalanche photodiode in the BGO active shields and have demonstrated its effectiveness after assembly in the flight model of the HXI/SGD sensor and after integration into the satellite. The energy threshold achieved is about 150 keV and anti-coincidence efficiency for cosmic-ray events is almost 100%. Installed in the BGO active shield, the developed signal processing system successfully reduces the room background level of the main detector. - Highlights: • A detail of development of signal processing system for ASTRO-H is presented. • Digital filer with FPGA instead of discrete analog circuit is applied. • Expected performance is verified after integration of the satellite.

  4. REACTOR SHIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  5. Nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, R.C.; Nienart, L.F.; Toelcke, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for preparing melt-processable nuclear shielding compositions from chloro-fluoro substituted ethylene polymers, particularly PCTFE and E-CTFE, containing 1 to 75 percent by weight of a gadolinium compound. 13 claims, no drawings

  6. Shielding Design and Radiation Shielding Evaluation for LSDS System Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Younggook; Kim, Jeongdong; Lee, Yongdeok

    2015-01-01

    As the system characteristics, the target in the spectrometer emits approximately 1012 neutrons/s. To efficiently shield the neutron, the shielding door designs are proposed for the LSDS system through a comparison of the direct shield and maze designs. Hence, to guarantee the radiation safety for the facility, the door design is a compulsory course of the development of the LSDS system. To improve the shielding rates, 250x250 covering structure was added as a subsidiary around the spectrometer. In this study, the evaluations of the suggested shielding designs were conducted using MCNP code. The suggested door design and covering structures can shield the neutron efficiently, thus all evaluations of all conditions are satisfied within the public dose limits. From the Monte Carlo code simulation, Resin(Indoor type) and Tungsten(Outdoor type) were selected as the shielding door materials. From a comparative evaluation of the door thickness, In and Out door thickness was selected 50 cm

  7. Development of a highly sensitive current and position monitor with HTS squids and an HTS magnetic shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.; Ikeda, T.; Kase, M.; Yano, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Sasaki, Y.; Kawaguchi, T.

    2005-01-01

    A highly sensitive current and position monitor with HTS (High-Temperature Superconducting) SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) and an HTS magnetic shield for the measurement of the intensity of faint beams, such as a radioisotope beam, has been developed for the RIKEN RI beam factory project. The HTS magnetic shield and the HTS current sensor including the HTS SQUID are cooled by a low-vibration pulse-tube refrigerator. Both the HTS magnetic shield and the HTS current sensor were fabricated by dip-coating a thin Bi 2 -Sr 2 -Ca 2 -Cu 3 -O x (Bi-2223) layer on 99.9% MgO ceramic substrates. The HTS technology enables us to develop a system equipped with a downsized and highly sensitive current monitor. Recently, a prototype system was completed and installed in the beam transport line of the RIKEN Ring Cyclotron to measure the DC-current of high-energy heavy-ion beams. As a result, we succeeded in measuring the intensity of the 600 nA 40 Ar 17+ beam (95 MeV/u). We describe the present status of the monitor system and the results of the beam measurements. (author)

  8. Solar Storm GIC Forecasting: Solar Shield Extension Development of the End-User Forecasting System Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, A.; Mahmood, S.; Ngwira, C.; Balch, C.; Lordan, R.; Fugate, D.; Jacobs, W.; Honkonen, I.

    2015-01-01

    A NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Heliophysics Science Division-led team that includes NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, the Catholic University of America, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Electric Research and Management, Inc., recently partnered with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) to better understand the impact of Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GIC) on the electric power industry. This effort builds on a previous NASA-sponsored Applied Sciences Program for predicting GIC, known as Solar Shield. The focus of the new DHS S&T funded effort is to revise and extend the existing Solar Shield system to enhance its forecasting capability and provide tailored, timely, actionable information for electric utility decision makers. To enhance the forecasting capabilities of the new Solar Shield, a key undertaking is to extend the prediction system coverage across Contiguous United States (CONUS), as the previous version was only applicable to high latitudes. The team also leverages the latest enhancements in space weather modeling capacity residing at Community Coordinated Modeling Center to increase the Technological Readiness Level, or Applications Readiness Level of the system http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/ExpandedARLDefinitions4813.pdf.

  9. Development of a computational code for calculations of shielding in dental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lava, Deise D.; Borges, Diogo da S.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.; Moreira, Maria de L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is prepared in order to address calculations of shielding to minimize the interaction of patients with ionizing radiation and / or personnel. The work includes the use of protection report Radiation in Dental Medicine (NCRP-145 or Radiation Protection in Dentistry), which establishes calculations and standards to be adopted to ensure safety to those who may be exposed to ionizing radiation in dental facilities, according to the dose limits established by CNEN-NN-3.1 standard published in September / 2011. The methodology comprises the use of computer language for processing data provided by that report, and a commercial application used for creating residential projects and decoration. The FORTRAN language was adopted as a method for application to a real case. The result is a programming capable of returning data related to the thickness of material, such as steel, lead, wood, glass, plaster, acrylic, acrylic and leaded glass, which can be used for effective shielding against single or continuous pulse beams. Several variables are used to calculate the thickness of the shield, as: number of films used in the week, film load, use factor, occupational factor, distance between the wall and the source, transmission factor, workload, area definition, beam intensity, intraoral and panoramic exam. Before the application of the methodology is made a validation of results with examples provided by NCRP-145. The calculations redone from the examples provide answers consistent with the report

  10. Development of silver coating process and facilities for ITER thermal shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, D.K. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, R.G. [COTEC Corp., Changwon 641-846 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, K., E-mail: kwnam@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, C.H.; Chung, W. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, D.C. [COTEC Corp., Changwon 641-846 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, K.; Baek, J.P. [SFA Engineering Corp., Asan 336-873 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes both the test results of the bath type silver coating and the design of the bath to construct the silver coating plant for ITER thermal shield. The tests of small specimens made of SS304L and SS304LN were carried out to investigate the effect of the nitrogen content in SS304LN on the silver coating quality. The effect of different degreasing agents was also investigated to improve silver coating process. Small mock-up was tested to find a proper dipping direction during the electroplating process. Finally, noble bath design was conceived and structurally validated. Overall layout of silver coating plant is also shown in this paper.

  11. Summary of Blast Shield and Material Testing for Development of Solid Debris Collection at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaughnessy, D.A.; Gostic, J.M.; Moody, K.J.; Grant, P.M.; Lewis, L.A.; Hutcheon, I.D.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to collect solid debris from the target chamber following a NIF shot has application for both capsule diagnostics, particularly for fuel-ablator mix, and measuring cross sections relevant to the Stockpile Stewardship program and nuclear astrophysics. Simulations have shown that doping the capsule with up to 10 15 atoms of an impurity not otherwise found in the capsule does not affect its performance. The dopant is an element that will undergo nuclear activations during the NIF implosion, forming radioactive species that can be collected and measured after extraction from the target chamber. For diagnostics, deuteron or alpha induced reactions can be used to probe the fuel-ablator mix. For measuring neutron cross sections, the dopant should be something that is sensitive to the 14 MeV neutrons produced through the fusion of deuterium and tritium. Developing the collector is a challenge due to the extreme environment of the NIF chamber. The collector surface is exposed to a large photon flux from x-rays and unconverted laser light before it is exposed to a debris wind that is formed from vaporized material from the target chamber center. The photons will ablate the collector surface to some extent, possibly impeding the debris from reaching the collector and sticking. In addition, the collector itself must be mechanically strong enough to withstand the large amount of energy it will be exposed to, and it should be something that will be easy to count and chemically process. In order to select the best material for the collector, a variety of different metals have been tested in the NIF chamber. They were exposed to high-energy laser shots in order to evaluate their postshot surface characterization, morphology, degree of melt, and their ability to retain debris from the chamber center. The first set of samples consisted of 1 mm thick pieces of aluminum that had been fielded in the chamber as blast shields protecting the neutron activation diagnostic. Ten

  12. Summary of Blast Shield and Material Testing for Development of Solid Debris Collection at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaughnessy, D A; Gostic, J M; Moody, K J; Grant, P M; Lewis, L A; Hutcheon, I D

    2011-11-21

    The ability to collect solid debris from the target chamber following a NIF shot has application for both capsule diagnostics, particularly for fuel-ablator mix, and measuring cross sections relevant to the Stockpile Stewardship program and nuclear astrophysics. Simulations have shown that doping the capsule with up to 10{sup 15} atoms of an impurity not otherwise found in the capsule does not affect its performance. The dopant is an element that will undergo nuclear activations during the NIF implosion, forming radioactive species that can be collected and measured after extraction from the target chamber. For diagnostics, deuteron or alpha induced reactions can be used to probe the fuel-ablator mix. For measuring neutron cross sections, the dopant should be something that is sensitive to the 14 MeV neutrons produced through the fusion of deuterium and tritium. Developing the collector is a challenge due to the extreme environment of the NIF chamber. The collector surface is exposed to a large photon flux from x-rays and unconverted laser light before it is exposed to a debris wind that is formed from vaporized material from the target chamber center. The photons will ablate the collector surface to some extent, possibly impeding the debris from reaching the collector and sticking. In addition, the collector itself must be mechanically strong enough to withstand the large amount of energy it will be exposed to, and it should be something that will be easy to count and chemically process. In order to select the best material for the collector, a variety of different metals have been tested in the NIF chamber. They were exposed to high-energy laser shots in order to evaluate their postshot surface characterization, morphology, degree of melt, and their ability to retain debris from the chamber center. The first set of samples consisted of 1 mm thick pieces of aluminum that had been fielded in the chamber as blast shields protecting the neutron activation diagnostic

  13. Improved Metal-Polymeric Laminate Radiation Shielding, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed Phase I program, a multifunctional lightweight radiation shield composite will be developed and fabricated. This structural radiation shielding will...

  14. Nano lead oxide and epdm composite for development of polymer based radiation shielding material: Gamma irradiation and attenuation tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, T.; Güngör, A.; Akbay, I. K.; Uzun, H.; Babucçuoglu, Y.

    2018-03-01

    It is important to have a shielding material that is not easily breaking in order to have a robust product that guarantee the radiation protection of the patients and radiation workers especially during the medical exposure. In this study, nano sized lead oxide (PbO) particles were used, for the first time, to obtain an elastomeric composite material in which lead oxide nanoparticles, after the surface modification with silane binding agent, was used as functional material for radiation shielding. In addition, the composite material including 1%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% weight percent nano sized lead oxide was irradiated with doses of 81, 100 and 120 kGy up to an irradiation period of 248 days in a gamma ray source with an initial dose rate of 21.1 Gy/h. Mechanical, thermal properties of the irradiated materials were investigated using DSC, DMA, TGA and tensile testing and modifications in thermal and mechanical properties of the nano lead oxide containing composite material via gamma irradiation were reported. Moreover, effect of bismuth-III oxide addition on radiation attenuation of the composite material was investigated. Nano lead oxide and bismuth-III oxide particles were mixed with different weight ratios. Attenuation tests have been conducted to determine lead equivalent values for the developed composite material. Lead equivalent thickness values from 0.07 to 0.65 (2-6 mm sample thickness) were obtained.

  15. Development of a new neutron shielding material, TN trademark Resin Vyal for transport/storage casks for radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadie, P.

    2004-01-01

    TN trademark Resin Vyal, a patent pending composite, is a new neutron shielding material developed by COGEMA LOGISTICS for transport/storage casks of radioactive materials (spent fuel, reprocessed fuel,..). This material is composed of a thermosetting resin (vinylester resin in solution of styrene) and two mineral fillers (alumine hydrate and zinc borate). Its shielding ability for neutron radiation is related to a high hydrogen content (for slowing down neutrons) and a high boron content (for absorbing neutrons). Source of hydrogen is organic matrix (resin) and alumine hydrate; source of boron is zinc borate. Atomic concentrations are equal to 5.10 22 at/cm 3 for hydrogen and 9.10 20 at/cm 3 for boron. Due to the flame retardant character of components, the final material has a good fire resistance (it is auto-extinguishable). Its density is equal to 1,8. The manufacturing process of these material is easy: it consists in mixing the fillers and pouring in-situ (in cask); so, the curing of this composite, which leads to a three-dimensional structure, takes place at ambient temperature. Temperature resistance of this material was evaluated by performing exposition tests of samples at different temperatures (150 C to 170 C). According to tests results, its maximal temperature of use was confirmed equal to 160 C

  16. Neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodaka, M.; Iida, T.; Taniuchi, H.; Yosimura, K.; Nagahama, H.

    1993-01-01

    From among the neutron shielding materials of the 'kobesh' series developed by Kobe Steel, Ltd. for transport and storage packagings, silicon rubber base type material has been tested for several items with a view to practical application and official authorization, and in order to determine its adaptability to actual vessels. Silicon rubber base type 'kobesh SR-T01' is a material in which, from among the silicone rubber based neutron shielding materials, the hydrogen content is highest and the boron content is most optimized. Its neutron shielding capability has been already described in the previous report (Taniuchi, 1986). The following tests were carried out to determine suitability for practical application; 1) Long-term thermal stability test 2) Pouring test on an actual-scale model 3) Fire test The experimental results showed that the silicone rubber based neutron shielding material has good neutron shielding capability and high long-term fire resistance, and that it can be applied to the advanced transport packaging. (author)

  17. Development of high-performance heavy density concrete using different aggregates for gamma-ray shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed S. Ouda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The performance requirements of the concrete of containment structures are mainly radiological protection, structural integrity, durability, etc. For this purpose, high-performance heavy density concrete can be used. After extensive trials and errors, 15 concrete mixes were prepared by using coarse aggregates of barite, magnetite, goethite and serpentine with an addition of 10% silica fume (SF, 20% fly ash (FA and 30% ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS to the total content of OPC. The compressive strength of hardened concrete was determined after 7, 28 and 90 days. In some concrete mixes, compressive strength was also tested up to 90 days upon replacing sand with the fine portions of magnetite, barite and goethite. The results revealed that, the concrete mixes containing magnetite coarse aggregate with 10% SF reaches the highest compressive strength values exceeding over the M60 requirement by 14% after 28 days. Whereas, the compressive strength of concrete containing barite aggregate was very close to M60 concrete and exceeds for 90 days. The results also indicated that, the compressive strength of the high-performance concrete incorporating magnetite as fine aggregate was significantly higher than that containing sand by 23%. Also, concrete made with magnetite fine aggregate has higher physico-mechanical properties than those containing barite and goethite. High-performance concrete incorporating magnetite as fine aggregate enhances the shielding efficiency against γ-rays.

  18. Development of a new RF coil and {gamma}-ray radiation shielding assembly for improved MR image quality in SPECT/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Seunghoon; Hamamura, Mark J; Roeck, Werner W; Muftuler, L Tugan; Nalcioglu, Orhan [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)], E-mail: seunghoh@uci.edu

    2010-05-07

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-based multimodality imaging systems, such as single-photon emission tomography (SPECT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI, face many difficulties because of problems with the compatibility of the nuclear detector system with the MR system. However, several studies have reported on the design considerations of MR-compatible nuclear detectors for combined SPECT/MRI. In this study, we developed a new radiofrequency (RF) coil and {gamma}-ray radiation shielding assembly to advance the practical implementation of SPECT/MRI in providing high sensitivity while minimizing the interference between the MRI and SPECT systems. The proposed assembly consists of a three-channel receive-only RF coil and {gamma}-ray radiation shields made of a specialized lead composite powder designed to reduce conductivity and thus minimizing any effect on the magnetic field arising from the induced eddy currents. A conventional birdcage RF coil was also tested for comparison with the proposed RF coil. Quality (Q)-factors were measured using both RF coils without any shielding, with solid lead shielding, and with our composite lead shielding. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were calculated using 4 T MR images of phantoms both with and without the new {gamma}-ray radiation shields. The Q-factor and SNR measurements demonstrate the improved MRI performance due to the new RF coil/{gamma}-ray radiation shield assembly designed for SPECT/MRI, making it a useful addition to multimodality imaging technology not only for animal studies but also for in vivo study of humans.

  19. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-01-01

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  20. Development of a Fault Analysis Algorithm for HTS Power Cable Using RTDS Considering Both Conducting and Shield Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. H.; Park, C. H.; Park, M.; Yu, I. K.

    High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) power cable consists of a conducting layer and a shield layer for carrying the required current. Geometrically, the conducting and shield layers each have self inductance; and the mutual inductance exists between the conducting and shield layers. Therefore, the direction of the current of shield the layer is opposite that of the conducting layer current. The value of the shield layer current is over 95% of the conducting layer current at the steady state. However, if a fault current passes through an HTS power cable, the quench occurs in both the conducting and shield layers. After the quench, resistance appears, and the even self inductance values are not changed a great deal, but the mutual inductance value is directly affected. According to the above mentioned processes, the current distribution of the conducting and shield layers changes due to the fault current. In this paper, the authors describe the transient state analysis of a real manufactured HTS power model cable, considering both the conducting and the shield layers. The manufactured system is coupled with RTDS, in which a utility grid is composed and simulated. These results provide important data for the design of an HTS power cable.

  1. Self-shielding characteristics of aqueous self-cooled blankets for next generation fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelloni, S.; Cheng, E.T.; Embrechts, M.J.

    1987-11-01

    The present study examines self-shielding characteristics for two aqueous self-cooled tritium producing driver blankets for next generation fusion devices. The aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket concept (ASCB) is a very simple blanket concept that relies on just structural material and coolant. Lithium compounds are dissolved in water to provide for tritium production. An ASCB driver blanket would provide a low technology and low temperature environment for blanket test modules in a next generation fusion reactor. The primary functions of such a blanket would be shielding, energy removal and tritium production. One driver blanket considered in this study concept relates to the one proposed for the Next European Torus (NET), while the second concept is indicative for the inboard shield design for the Engineering Test Reactor proposed by the USA (TIBER II/ETR). The driver blanket for NET is based on stainless steel for the structural material and aqueous solution, while the inboard shielding blanket for TIBER II/ETR is based on a tungsten/aqueous solution combination. The purpose of this study is to investigate self-shielding and heterogeneity effects in aqueous self-cooled blankets. It is found that no significant gains in tritium breeding can be achieved in the stainless steel blanket if spatial and energy self-shielding effects are considered, and the heterogeneity effects are also insignificant. The tungsten blanket shows a 5 percent increase in tritium production in the shielding blanket when energy and spatial self-shielding effects are accounted for. However, the tungsten blanket shows a drastic increase in the tritium breeding ratio due to heterogeneity effects. (author) 17 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  2. Development and testing of multigroup library with correction of self-shielding effects in fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jun; He Zhaozhong; Zeng Qin; Qiu Yuefeng; Wang Minghuang

    2010-01-01

    A multigroup library HENDL2.1/SS (Hybrid Evaluated Nuclear Data Library/Self-Shielding) based on ENDF/B-VII.0 evaluate data has been generated using Bondarenko and flux calculator method for the correction of self-shielding effect of neutronics analyses. To validate the reliability of the multigroup library HENDL2.1/SS, transport calculations for fusion-fission hybrid system FDS-I were performed in this paper. It was verified that the calculations with the HENDL2.1/SS gave almost the same results with MCNP calculations and were better than calculations with the HENDL2.0/MG which is another multigroup library without self-shielding correction. The test results also showed that neglecting resonance self-shielding caused underestimation of the K eff , neutron fluxes and waste transmutation ratios in the multigroup calculations of FDS-I.

  3. Radiation protection/shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation protection/shielding design of a nuclear facility requires a coordinated effort of many engineering disciplines to meet the requirements imposed by regulations. In the following discussion, the system approach to Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) radiation protection will be described, and the program developed to implement this approach will be defined. In addition, the principal shielding design problems of LMFBR nuclear reactor systems will be discussed in realtion to LWR nuclear reactor system shielding designs. The methodology used to analyze these problems in the U.S. LMFBR program, the resultant design solutions, and the experimental verification of these designs and/or methods will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. Development and calibration of the shielded measurement system for fissile contents measurements on irradiated nuclear fuel in dry storage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosby, W. R.; Jensen, B. A.

    2002-05-31

    In recent years there has been a trend towards storage of Irradiated Nuclear Fuel (INF) in dry conditions rather than in underwater environments. At the same time, the Department of Energy (DOE) has begun encouraging custodians of INF to perform measurements on INF for which no recent fissile contents measurement data exists. INF, in the form of spent fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 (EBR-II), has been stored in close-fitting, dry underground storage locations at the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility (RSWF) at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) for many years. In Fiscal Year 2000, funding was obtained from the DOE Office of Safeguards and Security Technology Development Program to develop and prepare for deployment a Shielded Measurement System (SMS) to perform fissile content measurements on INF stored in the RSWF. The SMS is equipped to lift an INF item out of its storage location, perform scanning neutron coincidence and high-resolution gamma-ray measurements, and restore the item to its storage location. The neutron and gamma-ray measurement results are compared to predictions based on isotope depletion and Monte Carlo neutral-particle transport models to provide confirmation of the accuracy of the models and hence of the fissile material contents of the item as calculated by the same models. This paper describes the SMS and discusses the results of the first calibration and validation measurements performed with the SMS.

  5. Radiation shielding for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation shielding requirements for fusion reactors present different problems than those for fission reactors and accelerators. Fusion devices, particularly tokamak reactors, are complicated by geometry constraints that complicate disposition of fully effective shielding. This paper reviews some of these shielding issues and suggested solutions for optimizing the machine and biological shielding. Radiation transport calculations are essential for predicting and confirming the nuclear performance of the reactor and, as such, must be an essential part of the reactor design process. Development and optimization of reactor components from the first wall and primary shielding to the penetrations and containment shielding must be carried out in a sensible progression. Initial results from one-dimensional transport calculations are used for scoping studies and are followed by detailed two- and three-dimensional analyses to effectively characterize the overall radiation environment. These detail model calculations are essential for accounting for the radiation leakage through ports and other penetrations in the bulk shield. Careful analysis of component activation and radiation damage is cardinal for defining remote handling requirements, in-situ replacement of components, and personnel access at specific locations inside the reactor containment vessel. (author)

  6. About the Scythian Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    About the Scythian Shields

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shields played major role in the armament system of the Scythians. Made from organic materials, they are poorly traced on the materials of archaeological excavations. Besides, scaly surface of shields was often perceived in practice as the remnants of the scaly armor. E. V. Chernenko was able to discern the difference between shields’ scaly plates and armor scales. The top edge of the scales was bent inwards, and shield plates had a wire fixation. These observations let significantly increase the number of shields, found in the burial complexes of the Scythians. The comparison of archaeological materials and the images of Scythian warriors allow distinguishing the main forms of Scythian shields. All shields are divided into fencing shields and cover shields. The fencing shields include round wooden shields, reinforced with bronze sheet, and round moon-shaped shields with a notch at the top, with a metal scaly surface. They came to the Scythians under the Greek influence and are known in the monuments of the 4th century BC. Oval shields with scaly surface (back cover shields were used by the Scythian cavalry. They protected the rider in case of frontal attack, and moved back in case of maneuver or closein fighting. Scythian battle tactics were based on rapid approaching the enemy and throwing spears and further rapid withdrawal. Spears stuck in the shields of enemies, forcing them to drop the shields, uncover, and in this stage of the battle the archers attacked the disorganized ranks of the enemy. That was followed by the stage of close fight. Oval form of a wooden shield with leather covering was used by the Scythian infantry and spearmen. Rectangular shields, including wooden shields and the shields pleached from rods, represented a special category. The top of such shield was made of wood, and a pleached pad on leather basis was attached to it. This shield could be a reliable protection from arrows, but it could not protect against javelins

  7. Shielding benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi

    1984-01-01

    Iron data in JENDL-2 have been tested by analyzing shielding benchmark experiments for neutron transmission through iron block performed at KFK using CF-252 neutron source and at ORNL using collimated neutron beam from reactor. The analyses are made by a shielding analysis code system RADHEAT-V4 developed at JAERI. The calculated results are compared with the measured data. As for the KFK experiments, the C/E values are about 1.1. For the ORNL experiments, the calculated values agree with the measured data within an accuracy of 33% for the off-center geometry. The d-t neutron transmission measurements through carbon sphere made at LLNL are also analyzed preliminarily by using the revised JENDL data for fusion neutronics calculation. (author)

  8. Radiation shielding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Yamagami, Makoto.

    1996-01-01

    A fixed shielding member made of a radiation shielding material is constituted in perpendicular to an opening formed on radiation shielding walls. The fixed shielding member has one side opened and has other side, the upper portion and the lower portion disposed in close contact with the radiation shielding walls. Movable shielding members made of a radiation shielding material are each disposed openably on both side of the fixed shielding member. The movable shielding member has a shaft as a fulcrum on one side thereof for connecting it to the radiation shielding walls. The other side has a handle attached for opening/closing the movable shielding member. Upon access of an operator, when each one of the movable shielding members is opened/closed on every time, leakage of linear or scattered radiation can be prevented. Even when both of the movable shielding members are opened simultaneously, the fixed shielding member and the movable shielding members form labyrinth to prevent leakage of linear radioactivity. (I.N.)

  9. Development of dual-purpose metal cask for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (3). A new type of durable neutron shielding resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamoshida, Mamoru; Nishi, Takashi; Iga, Kiminori; Shimizu, Masashi; Kashiwakura, Jun; Hayashi, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    Hitachi Ltd. has been developing a new neutron shielding resin for the dual-purpose metal cask. The newly developed resin is composed of a thermo setting epoxy and magnesium hydroxide. Highly durable resin can be obtained by combining base polymer having dense cross linkage and fire retardant with high dehydration temperature. Estimated weight loss of the resin during storage period is less than 1%. Fabrication process of shielding unit suitable for the new material is also developed. In the new process, a resin block constituted of cured resin and heat transfer fin is manufactured and fitted to the cask. This process was verified by fabricating about 200 resin blocks for real size mock-up of Hitachi's metal cask. (author)

  10. Advances in the development of a subgroup method for the self-shielding of resonant isotopes in arbitrary geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, A.

    1997-01-01

    The subgroup method is used to compute self-shielded cross sections defined over coarse energy groups in the resolved energy domain. The validity of the subgroup approach was extended beyond the unresolved energy domain by partially taking into account correlation effects between the slowing-down source with the collision probability terms of the transport equation. This approach enables one to obtain a pure subgroup solution of the self-shielding problem without relying on any form of equivalence in dilution. Specific improvements are presented on existing subgroup methods: an N-term rational approximation for the fuel-to-fuel collision probability, a new Pade deflation technique for computing probability tables, and the introduction of a superhomogenization correction. The absorption rates obtained after self-shielding are compared with exact values obtained using an elastic slowing-down calculation where each resonance is modeled individually in the resolved energy domain

  11. Criticality safety and shielding design issues in the development of a high-capacity cask for truck transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boshoven, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) will be submitting an application for certification to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the GA-4 and GA-9 Casks In 1992. The GA-4 and GA-9 Casks are high-capacity legal weight truck casks designed to transport light water reactor spent fuel assemblies. To maintain a capacity of four pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) spent fuel assemblies, the GA-4 Cask uses burnup credit as part of the criticality control for initial enrichments over 3.0 wt% U-235. Using the US Department of Energy (DOE) Burnup Credit Program as a basis, GA has performed burnup credit analysis which is included in the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). The GA-9 Cask can meet the criticality safety requirements using the ''fresh fuel'' assumption. Our approach to shielding design is to optimize the GA-4 and GA-9 Cask shielding configurations for minimum weights and maximum payloads. This optimization involves the use of the most effective shielding material, square cross-section geometry with rounded corners and tapered neutron shielding sections in the non-fuel regions

  12. Development of paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites with additions of B2O3 for thermal neutron shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyen, Donruedee; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak

    2017-01-01

    In this work, paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites with additions of boron oxide (B 2 O 3 ) were prepared to evaluate the viscosity, flexural, and thermal neutron shielding properties for uses as thermal neutron shielding materials. The results showed that the addition of 3 wt% or 9 wt% bitumen to paraffin increased the overall flexural properties with the content of 9 wt% bitumen having the highest values. The improvement in flexural properties made the composites less brittle, stiffer, and longer-lasting. Furthermore, different contents of B 2 O 3 (0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 wt%) were added to paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites to investigate the effects of the B 2 O 3 contents. The results indicated that an increase in B 2 O 3 contents improved the shielding properties but slightly reduced the flexural properties. Specifically for 5-mm paraffin and 5-mm paraffin/bitumen samples with 35 wt% of B 2 O 3 , both samples could reduce neutron flux by more than 70%. The overall results suggested that the paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites with additions of B 2 O 3 showed improved properties for utilization as effective thermal neutron shielding materials. (author)

  13. 49 CFR Figure 4 to Subpart E of... - Trailer Car In-Board Vestibule End Structure Conceptual Implementation 1-to Subpart E

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trailer Car In-Board Vestibule End Structure Conceptual Implementation 1-to Subpart E 4 Figure 4 to Subpart E of Part 238 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...

  14. Shielding technology for high energy radiation production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Heon Il

    2004-06-01

    In order to develop shielding technology for high energy radiation production facility, references and data for high energy neutron shielding are searched and collected, and calculations to obtain the characteristics of neutron shield materials are performed. For the evaluation of characteristics of neutron shield material, it is chosen not only general shield materials such as concrete, polyethylene, etc., but also KAERI developed neutron shields of High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) mixed with boron compound (B 2 O 3 , H 2 BO 3 , Borax). Neutron attenuation coefficients for these materials are obtained for later use in shielding design. The effect of source shape and source angular distribution on the shielding characteristics for several shield materials is examined. This effect can contribute to create shielding concept in case of no detail source information. It is also evaluated the effect of the arrangement of shield materials using current shield materials. With these results, conceptual shielding design for PET cyclotron is performed. The shielding composite using HDPE and concrete is selected to meet the target dose rate outside the composite, and the dose evaluation is performed by configuring the facility room conceptually. From the result, the proper shield configuration for this PET cyclotron is proposed

  15. Development of heat resistant concrete and its application to concrete casks. Improvement of neutron shielding performance of concrete in high temperature environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owaki, Eiji; Hata, Akihito; Sugihara, Yutaka; Shimojo, Jun; Taniuchi, Hiroaki; Mantani, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Heat resistant concrete with hydrogen, which is able to shield neutron at more than 100degC, was developed. Using this new type concrete, a safety concrete cask having the same concept of metal casks was designed and produced. The new type cask omitted the inhalation and exhaust vent of the conventional type concrete casks. The new concrete consists of Portland cement added calcium hydroxide, iron powder and iron fiber. It showed 2.17 g/cm 3 density, 10.8 mass% water content, 1.4 W/(m·K) thermal conductivity at 150degC. Increasing of heat resistance made possible to produce the perfect sealing type structure, which had high shielding performance of radiation no consideration for streaming of radiation. Moreover, a monitor of sealing can be set. General view of concrete casks, outer view of 1/3 scaled model, cask storage system in the world, properties of new developed heat resistant concrete, results of shielding calculation are contained. (S.Y.)

  16. Design of emergency shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    Manufacturing of an emergency movable shield in the hot laboratories center is urgently needed for the safety of personnel in case of accidents or spilling of radioactive materials. In this report, a full design for an emergency shield is presented and the corresponding dose rates behind the shield for different activities (from 1 mCi to 5 Ci) was calculated by using micro shield computer code. 4 figs., 1 tab

  17. Electromagnetically shielded building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Nakamura, M.; Yabana, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Nagata, K.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a building having an electromagnetic shield structure well-suited for application to an information network system utilizing electromagnetic waves, and more particularly to an electromagnetically shielded building for enhancing the electromagnetic shielding performance of an external wall. 6 figs

  18. Radiation dose reduction by water shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeb, J.; Arshed, W.; Ahmad, S.S.

    2007-06-01

    This report is an operational manual of shielding software W-Shielder, developed at Health Physics Division (HPD), Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission. The software estimates shielding thickness for photons having their energy in the range 0.5 to 10 MeV. To compute the shield thickness, self absorption in the source has been neglected and the source has been assumed as a point source. Water is used as a shielding material in this software. The software is helpful in estimating the water thickness for safe handling, storage of gamma emitting radionuclide. (author)

  19. The Dalkon Shield in perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, P; Hirsh, H L

    1986-01-01

    When the Dalkon Shield IUD became clinically available in the early 1970s, it appeared that an ideal contraceptive had been developed, with essentially no adverse effects (very safe) and a very high degree of efficacy. Within a few years, however, it became apparent that the Dalkon Shield had not lived up to expectations. In fact, it caused very severe complications, not infrequently resulting in the loss of reproductive ability and in 17 cases, death. In addition, the pregnancy rate among women using this IUD was significantly high, with many resulting in mid-trimester abortion when the IUD remained in-place. The authors trace the legal consequences of this medical disaster, which has resulted in both the development of new and the extension of old legal theories and doctrines involving negligence and product liability. Dalkon Shield litigation is most likely to continue. Many women are assumed to wear the shield still, and neither the FDA or A.H. Robins, manufacturer of the shield, has issued a formal recall.

  20. Shielding benchmark problems, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Shin, Kazuo; Tada, Keiko.

    1980-02-01

    Shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Committee on Shielding Design in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Shielding Laboratory in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Fourteen shielding benchmark problems are presented newly in addition to twenty-one problems proposed already, for evaluating the calculational algorithm and accuracy of computer codes based on discrete ordinates method and Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in codes. The present benchmark problems are principally for investigating the backscattering and the streaming of neutrons and gamma rays in two- and three-dimensional configurations. (author)

  1. SHIELDS Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania Koleva [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-03

    Predicting variations in the near-Earth space environment that can lead to spacecraft damage and failure, i.e. “space weather”, remains a big space physics challenge. A new capability was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to understand, model, and predict Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large Dynamic Storms, the SHIELDS framework. This framework simulates the dynamics of the Surface Charging Environment (SCE), the hot (keV) electrons representing the source and seed populations for the radiation belts, on both macro- and micro-scale. In addition to using physics-based models (like RAM-SCB, BATS-R-US, and iPIC3D), new data assimilation techniques employing data from LANL instruments on the Van Allen Probes and geosynchronous satellites were developed. An order of magnitude improvement in the accuracy in the simulation of the spacecraft surface charging environment was thus obtained. SHIELDS also includes a post-processing tool designed to calculate the surface charging for specific spacecraft geometry using the Curvilinear Particle-In-Cell (CPIC) code and to evaluate anomalies' relation to SCE dynamics. Such diagnostics is critically important when performing forensic analyses of space-system failures.

  2. Active Shielding in Measurements of DC Near Biomagnetic Fields

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nowak, Hannes

    2001-01-01

    .... An effective SQUID based active shielding system has been developed and installed at the magnetically shielded rooms in the Biomagnetic Center of the University Jena to reduce external low frequency disturbances...

  3. PC based temporary shielding administrative procedure (TSAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D.E.; Pederson, G.E. [Sargent & Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States); Hamby, P.N. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A completely new Administrative Procedure for temporary shielding was developed for use at Commonwealth Edison`s six nuclear stations. This procedure promotes the use of shielding, and addresses industry requirements for the use and control of temporary shielding. The importance of an effective procedure has increased since more temporary shielding is being used as ALARA goals become more ambitious. To help implement the administrative procedure, a personal computer software program was written to incorporate the procedural requirements. This software incorporates the useability of a Windows graphical user interface with extensive help and database features. This combination of a comprehensive administrative procedure and user friendly software promotes the effective use and management of temporary shielding while ensuring that industry requirements are met.

  4. PC based temporary shielding administrative procedure (TSAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.E.; Pederson, G.E.; Hamby, P.N.

    1995-01-01

    A completely new Administrative Procedure for temporary shielding was developed for use at Commonwealth Edison's six nuclear stations. This procedure promotes the use of shielding, and addresses industry requirements for the use and control of temporary shielding. The importance of an effective procedure has increased since more temporary shielding is being used as ALARA goals become more ambitious. To help implement the administrative procedure, a personal computer software program was written to incorporate the procedural requirements. This software incorporates the useability of a Windows graphical user interface with extensive help and database features. This combination of a comprehensive administrative procedure and user friendly software promotes the effective use and management of temporary shielding while ensuring that industry requirements are met

  5. Spherical warm shield design for infrared imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qijie; Chang, Songtao; He, Fengyun; Li, Zhou; Qiao, Yanfeng

    2017-09-01

    The F-number matching is the primary means to suppress stray radiation for infrared imaging systems. However, it is difficult to achieve exact F-number matching, owing to the restriction from detectors, or multiple F-number design. Hence, an additional shield is required to block the certain thermal radiation. Typical shield is called flat warm shield, which is flat and operates at room temperature. For flat warm shield, it cannot suppress stray radiation while achieving F-number matching. To overcome the restriction, a spherical reflective warm shield is required. First of all, the detailed theory of spherical warm shield design is developed on basis of the principle that stray radiation cannot directly reach the infrared focal plane array. According to the theory developed above, a polished spherical warm shield, whose radius is 18 mm, is designed to match an F/2 infrared detector with an F/4 infrared imaging system. Then, the performance and alignment errors of the designed spherical warm shield are analyzed by simulation. Finally, a contrast experiment between the designed spherical warm shield and two differently processed flat warm shields is performed in a chamber with controllable inside temperatures. The experimental results indicate that the designed spherical warm shield cannot only achieve F-number matching but suppress stray radiation sufficiently. Besides, it is demonstrated that the theory of spherical warm shield design developed in this paper is valid and can be employed by arbitrary infrared imaging systems.

  6. Neutron shielding material based on colemanite and epoxy resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a need for compact shielding design such as self-shielding of a PET cyclotron or upgradation of radiation machinery in existing facilities. In these cases, high performance shielding materials are needed. Concrete or polyethylene have been used for a neutron shield. However, for compact shielding, they fall short in terms of performance or durability. Therefore, a new type of neutron shielding material based on epoxy resin and colemanite has been developed. Slab attenuation experiments up to 40 cm for the new shielding material were carried out using a 252Cf neutron source. Measurement was carried out using a REM-counter, and compared with calculation. The results show that the shielding performance is better than concrete and polyethylene mixed with 10 wt% boron oxide. From the result, we confirmed that the performance of the new material is suitable for practical use.

  7. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Ingersoll, J.K.

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone?, a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory

  8. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D T [comp.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ingersoll, J K [comp.; Tec-Com, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  9. Extensive neutronic sensitivity-uncertainty analysis of a fusion reactor shielding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogenbirk, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the results are presented of an extensive neutronic sensitivity-uncertainty study performed for the design of a shielding blanket for a next-step fusion reactor, such as ITER. A code system was used, which was developed at ECN Petten. The uncertainty in an important response parameter, the neutron heating in the inboard superconducting coils, was evaluated. Neutron transport calculations in the 100 neutron group GAM-II structure were performed using the code ANISN. For the sensitivity and uncertainty calculations the code SUSD was used. Uncertainties due to cross-section uncertainties were taken into account as well as uncertainties due to uncertainties in energy and angular distributions of scattered neutrons (SED and SAD uncertainties, respectively). The subject of direct-term uncertainties (i.e. uncertainties due to uncertainties in the kerma factors of the superconducting coils) is briefly touched upon. It is shown that SAD uncertainties, which have been largely neglected until now, contribute significantly to the total uncertainty. Moreover, the contribution of direct-term uncertainties may be large. The total uncertainty in the neutron heating, only due to Fe cross-sections, amounts to approximately 25%, which is rather large. However, uncertainty data are scarce and the data may very well be conservative. It is shown in this paper that with the code system used, sensitivity and uncertainty calculations can be performed in a straightforward way. Therefore, it is suggested that emphasis is now put on the generation of realistic, reliable covariance data for cross-sections as well as for angular and energy distributions. ((orig.))

  10. Long Duration Space Shelter Shielding, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has developed fiber reinforced ceramic composites for radiation shielding that can be used for external walls in long duration manned...

  11. Long Duration Space Shelter Shielding, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has developed a ceramic composite material system that is more effective for shielding both GCR and SPE than aluminum. The composite...

  12. Passive Shielding for Low Frequency Magnetic Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damaskos, Nickander

    1997-01-01

    Report developed under SBIR Contract. An approach to low frequency shielding is shown with application to suppression of electromagnetic fields emanating from rail gun barrels and power cable busses. Damaskos, Inc...

  13. Thermal shielding walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Takenori.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the amount of heat released from a pressure vessel and reliably shield neutron fluxes and gamma rays from a reactor core by the addition of cooling ducts in a thermal shielding wall provided with a blower and an air cooling cooler. Constitution: A thermal shielding wall is located on a pedestal so as to surround a pressure vessel and the pressure vessel is located by way of a skirt in the same manner. Heat insulators are disposed between the pressure vessel and the shielding wall while closer to the skirt in the skirt portion and closer to the shielding wall in the vessel body portion. A plurality of cooling ducts are arranged side by side at the inner side in the shielding wall. A through-duct radially passing through the wall is provided in the lower portion thereof and a blower fan for cooling air and a cooler for cooling returned air are connected by way of a communication duct to the other end of the through-duct. This enables to provide a shielding wall capable of suppressing the amount of heat released from the pressure vessel as much as possible and giving more effective cooling. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. Shielding high energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Graham Roger

    2001-01-01

    After introducing the subject of shielding high energy accelerators, point source, line-of-sight models, and in particular the Moyer model. are discussed. Their use in the shielding of proton and electron accelerators is demonstrated and their limitations noted. especially in relation to shielding in the forward direction provided by large, flat walls. The limitations of reducing problems to those using it cylindrical geometry description are stressed. Finally the use of different estimators for predicting dose is discussed. It is suggested that dose calculated from track-length estimators will generally give the most satisfactory estimate. (9 refs).

  15. Development of a pencil-type single shield graphite quasi-adiabatic calorimeter and comparison of its performance with a double-shield graphite calorimeter for the measurement of nuclear heat deposition rate in a fusion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joneja, O.P.; Rosselet, M.; Ligou, J.; Gardel, P.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, heat deposition rate measurements were reported that used a quasi-adiabatic double-shield graphite calorimeter. It was found that for a better understanding of nuclear heating due to incident radiation, having a calorimeter that could be conveniently moved axially and radially inside large material blocks would be advisable. Here, a simpler design, based on three elements, i.e., core, jacket, and shield is conceived. The fabrication and testing details are presented, and the performance of the current calorimeter is compared with a double-shield calorimeter under similar conditions. Such a system is found to be extremely sensitive and can be employed successfully at the LOTUS facility for future nuclear heat deposition rate measurements in large blocks of materials. The current design paves the way for the convenient testing of a large amount of kerma factor data required for constructing future fusion machines. The same configuration with minor changes can be extended to most of the fusion materials of interest. The core of the new calorimeter measures 11 mm in diameter and height and has overall dimensions of 24 mm in diameter and 180 mm in height. The response of the calorimeter is measured by placing it in front of the Haefely neutron generator. 12 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs

  16. The Shielding Analysis for the I and C System(GSF-2002) Development of an Instrumented Fuel Capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Su; Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, Bong Goo; Park, Chang Je

    2006-09-15

    The Origen-2 code have been used to calculate the amount of nuclides generated in this study. It was validated by a comparison with the values calculated by this code and the measured ones by gathering the fission gases from two spent fuel rod (burned PWR fuel rods in Kori and Yungkwang). Error rate the between two values was estimated to be less than 10% in this study. The quantities of the nuclides generated by fission, calculated by the Origen-2, were larger than that by Origen-ARP. These differences of the two values are 1Ci to 40Ci. If the fuel is not intact, even if operated in a closed system, radioactive gases will be released to the gas flow tube from the instrumented capsule and the I and C system (GSF-2002) In a previous case study after 27 nuclides of Kr, Xe, I and Br series have been chosen, source term was generated. R/B ratio, used in this case, was calculated to serve this analysis with a reference to the ANS-5.4 model. And the leakage ratio adopted the result of the leak test in the PLUTO reactor. Specific points in the work place were determined and the radioactivity dose rates were calculated by running the Microshield 6.20. code at these points. Equivalent dose rates were 4.82X10-2{approx}3.74 {mu}Sv/hr at each point. These were distributed within the safety guide(6.25{mu}Sv/hr). In the failure case, almost all of the fission gases in the flow tube will be sucked into the delay tank, thus the condition of this tank will be a high radioactive area. Therefore the delay tank should be shielded by heavy materials and the thicknesses of them should be calculated with 9 cm and 20.5cm depending on performing conditions.

  17. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800 degree C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280 degree F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found

  18. Scintillation counter, segmented shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.; Thumim, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    A scintillation counter, particularly for counting gamma ray photons, includes a massive lead radiation shield surrounding a sample-receiving zone. The shield is disassembleable into a plurality of segments to allow facile installation and removal of a photomultiplier tube assembly, the segments being so constructed as to prevent straight-line access of external radiation through the shield into radiation-responsive areas. Provisions are made for accurately aligning the photomultiplier tube with respect to one or more sample-transmitting bores extending through the shield to the sample receiving zone. A sample elevator, used in transporting samples into the zone, is designed to provide a maximum gamma-receiving aspect to maximize the gamma detecting efficiency. (U.S.)

  19. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott [Dublin, CA; Rader, Daniel John [Albuquerque, NM; Walton, Christopher [Berkeley, CA; Folta, James [Livermore, CA

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  20. Grounding, shielding, and bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrysse, J.

    1991-06-01

    In the electromagnetic compatibility design (EMC) of systems and circuits, both grounding and shielding are related to the coupling mechanisms of the system with (radiated) electromagnetic fields. Grounding is more related to the source or victim circuit (or system) and determines the characteristic of the coupling mechanism between fields and currents/voltages. Shielding is a way of interacting in the radiation path of an electromagnetic field. The basic principles and practical design rules are discussed.

  1. Radiation shielding member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuochi, Akira; Narita, Takuya; Omori, Tetsu; Nemezawa, Isao; Kimura, Kunihiro.

    1997-01-01

    A radiation shielding member comprising a lead plate or a lead fabrication product is covered integrally with a rubber, a synthetic resin or a flame retardant fabric having a thickness greater than that of an oxidation preventive membrane made of a copper material. Radiation rays are shielded by the lead material, and not only oxidation but also failure of the lead material and generation of lead pieces or powder can be prevented by the coating of the rubber, the synthetic resin or the flame retardant fabric. The shape of the radiation shielding member can be conformed to constitutional products, a reinforcing frame or plate is formed integrally with the radiation shielding plate, alternatively, lowering of strength of the structure by fabrication of the shape is reinforced by the reinforcing frame or plate. The radiation shielding member is suspended by hanging a rope on a grommet, or disposed on constitutional products, or adjacent radiation shielding members are combined with each other by fixing metals. The thickness of the coating made of rubber, synthetic rubber or flame retardant fabric is determined to 0.1mm or greater to prevent failures of the lead material or formation of lead powder. (N.H.)

  2. PWR upper/lower internals shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homyk, W.A. [Indian Point Station, Buchanan, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    During refueling of a nuclear power plant, the reactor upper internals must be removed from the reactor vessel to permit transfer of the fuel. The upper internals are stored in the flooded reactor cavity. Refueling personnel working in containment at a number of nuclear stations typically receive radiation exposure from a portion of the highly contaminated upper intervals package which extends above the normal water level of the refueling pool. This same issue exists with reactor lower internals withdrawn for inservice inspection activities. One solution to this problem is to provide adequate shielding of the unimmersed portion. The use of lead sheets or blankets for shielding of the protruding components would be time consuming and require more effort for installation since the shielding mass would need to be transported to a support structure over the refueling pool. A preferable approach is to use the existing shielding mass of the refueling pool water. A method of shielding was devised which would use a vacuum pump to draw refueling pool water into an inverted canister suspended over the upper internals to provide shielding from the normally exposed components. During the Spring 1993 refueling of Indian Point 2 (IP2), a prototype shield device was demonstrated. This shield consists of a cylindrical tank open at the bottom that is suspended over the refueling pool with I-beams. The lower lip of the tank is two feet below normal pool level. After installation, the air width of the natural shielding provided by the existing pool water. This paper describes the design, development, testing and demonstration of the prototype device.

  3. Reliability Methods for Shield Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is a major challenge to the exploration and development of space. The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in deep space operations. In this enabling technology, we have developed methods for optimized shield design over multi-segmented missions involving multiple work and living areas in the transport and duty phase of space missions. The total shield mass over all pieces of equipment and habitats is optimized subject to career dose and dose rate constraints. An important component of this technology is the estimation of two most commonly identified uncertainties in radiation shield design, the shielding properties of materials used and the understanding of the biological response of the astronaut to the radiation leaking through the materials into the living space. The largest uncertainty, of course, is in the biological response to especially high charge and energy (HZE) ions of the galactic cosmic rays. These uncertainties are blended with the optimization design procedure to formulate reliability-based methods for shield design processes. The details of the methods will be discussed.

  4. Reactor shielding. Report of a panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    Reactor shielding is necessary that people may work and live in the vicinity of reactors without receiving detrimental biological effects and that the necessary materials and instrumentation for reactor operation may function properly. Much of the necessary theoretical work and experimental measurement has been accomplished in recent years. Scientists have developed some very sophisticated methods which have contributed to a more thorough understanding of the problems involved and have produced some very reliable results leading to significant reductions in shield configurations. A panel of experts was convened from 9 to 13 March 1964 in Vienna at the Headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency to discuss the present status of reactor shielding. The participants were prominent shielding experts from most of the laboratories engaged in this field throughout the world. They presented status reports describing the past history and plans for further development of reactor shielding in their countries and much valuable discussion took place on some of the most relevant aspects of reactor shielding. All this material is presented in this report, together with abstracts of the supporting papers read to the Panel

  5. Potential of Nanocellulose Composite for Electromagnetic Shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Yah Nurul Fatihah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, most people rely on the electronic devices for work, communicating with friends and family, school and personal enjoyment. As a result, more new equipment or devices operates in higher frequency were rapidly developed to accommodate the consumers need. However, the demand of using wireless technology and higher frequency in new devices also brings the need to shield the unwanted electromagnetic signals from those devices for both proper operation and human health concerns. This paper highlights the potential of nanocellulose for electromagnetic shielding using the organic environmental nanocellulose composite materials. In addition, the theory of electromagnetic shielding and recent development of green and organic material in electromagnetic shielding application has also been reviewed in this paper. The use of the natural fibers which is nanocelllose instead of traditional reinforcement materials provides several advantages including the natural fibers are renewable, abundant and low cost. Furthermore, added with other advantages such as lightweight and high electromagnetic shielding ability, nanocellulose has a great potential as an alternative material for electromagnetic shielding application.

  6. Method for dismantling shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, Rokuro; Kondo, Nobuhiro; Kamiyama, Yoshinori; Kawasato, Ken; Hiraga, Tomoaki.

    1990-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to enable operators to dismantle shieldings contaminated by radioactivity easily and in a short period of time without danger of radiation exposure. A plurality of introduction pipes are embedded previously to the shielding walls of shielding members which contain a reactor core in a state where both ends of the introduction pipes are in communication with the outside. A wire saw is inserted into the introduction pipes to cut the shieldings upon dismantling. Then, shieldings can be dismantled easily in a short period of time with no radiation exposure to operator's. Further, according to the present invention, since the wire saw can be set easily and a large area can be cut at once, operation efficiency is improved. Further, since remote control is possible, cutting can be conducted in water and complicated places of the reactor. Biting upon starting the wire saw in the introduction pipe is reduced to facilitate startup for the rotation. (I.S.)

  7. Double-layer neutron shield design as neutron shielding application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyer, Demet; Küçer, Rahmi

    2018-02-01

    The shield design in particle accelerators and other high energy facilities are mainly connected to the high-energy neutrons. The deep penetration of neutrons through massive shield has become a very serious problem. For shielding to be efficient, most of these neutrons should be confined to the shielding volume. If the interior space will become limited, the sufficient thickness of multilayer shield must be used. Concrete and iron are widely used as a multilayer shield material. Two layers shield material was selected to guarantee radiation safety outside of the shield against neutrons generated in the interaction of the different proton energies. One of them was one meter of concrete, the other was iron-contained material (FeB, Fe2B and stainless-steel) to be determined shield thicknesses. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used for shield design geometry and required neutron dose distributions. The resulting two layered shields are shown better performance than single used concrete, thus the shield design could leave more space in the interior shielded areas.

  8. Radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Akio; Isobe, Eiji.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the shielding capacity of the radiation shielding material having an abundant flexibility. Constitution: A mat consisting of a lead or lead alloy fibrous material is covered with a cloth, and the two are made integral by sewing in a kilted fashion by using a yarn. Thereafter, the system is covered with a gas-tight film or sheet. The shielding material obtained in this way has, in addition to the above merits, advantages in that (1) it is free from restoration due to elasticity so that it can readily seal contaminants, (2) it can be used in a state consisting of a number of overlapped layers, (3) it fits the shoulder well and is readily portable and (4) it permits attachment of fasteners or the like. (Ikeda, J.)

  9. Innovative technologies for Faraday shield cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, J.H.; Lindemuth, J.E.; North, M.T.; Goulding, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Alternative advanced technologies are being evaluated for use in cooling the Faraday shields used for protection of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICR) antennae in Tokamaks. Two approaches currently under evaluation include heat pipe cooling and gas cooling. A Monel/water heat pipe cooled Faraday shield has been successfully demonstrated. Heat pipe cooling offers the advantage of reducing the amount of water discharged into the Tokamak in the event of a tube weld failure. The device was recently tested on an antenna at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The heat pipe design uses inclined water heat pipes with warm water condensers located outside of the plasma chamber. This approach can passively remove absorbed heat fluxes in excess of 200 W/cm 2 ;. Helium-cooled Faraday shields are also being evaluated. This approach offers the advantage of no liquid discharge into the Tokamak in the event of a tube failure. Innovative internal cooling structures based on porous metal cooling are being used to develop a helium-cooled Faraday shield structure. This approach can dissipate the high heat fluxes typical of Faraday shield applications while minimizing the required helium blower power. Preliminary analysis shows that nominal helium flow and pressure drop can sufficiently cool a Faraday shield in typical applications. Plans are in progress to fabricate and test prototype hardware based on this approach

  10. Hybrid Active-Passive Radiation Shielding System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A radiation shielding system is proposed that integrates active magnetic fields with passive shielding materials. The objective is to increase the shielding...

  11. Glove box shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  12. Development of a Long-Life 100-kW Class Nested Hall Thruster: X3 Magnetically Shielded

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposed here is the development and testing of a long-life high-power Hall thruster. The thruster will be a 50-kW class nested-channel Hall thruster. The thruster...

  13. Hinged Shields for Machine Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallande, J. B.; Poland, W. W.; Tull, S.

    1985-01-01

    Flaps guard against flying chips, but fold away for tool setup. Clear plastic shield in position to intercept flying chips from machine tool and retracted to give operator access to workpiece. Machine shops readily make such shields for own use.

  14. Electrostatic shielding of transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Leon, Francisco

    2017-11-28

    Toroidal transformers are currently used only in low-voltage applications. There is no published experience for toroidal transformer design at distribution-level voltages. Toroidal transformers are provided with electrostatic shielding to make possible high voltage applications and withstand the impulse test.

  15. Radiation shielding member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Nobuo; Ito, Masato; Nihei, Ken-ichi; Takeshi, Tetsu

    1998-01-01

    A radiation shielding member comprises a metal vessel and a liquid therein, and is disposed to the upper surface of a lower flange of a reactor core shroud. Waterproof hot wires are contained in the liquid and are connected to a power source disposed at the outside. Electric current is supplied to the hot wires to elevate the temperature of the liquid, and the temperature of the vessel is kept higher than an atmospheric temperature thereby suppressing generation of dew condensation or water droplets. In addition, a water repellent coating is applied to the shielding member itself to prevent deposition of water droplets. Further, the bottom of the shielding member is inclined, and a water droplet-recovering vessel is disposed at the lower portion of the shielding member, so that the water droplets collected by the inclination of the bottom are recovered to the water droplet recovering vessel. With such a constitution, access of an operator to the inside of a reactor pressure vessel is facilitated, and at the same time, the working circumstance at the reactor bottom can be improved. (I.N.)

  16. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  17. Heat shielding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatabe, Hiroshi; Motoya, Koji; Kodama, Hiroshi.

    1997-01-01

    Panel-like water cooling tubes are disposed on a shielding concrete wall as a floor surface on which a reactor pressure vessel of a HTGR type reactor is settled. The panel like water cooling tube comprises a large number of water cooling tubes and fin plates connecting them with each other. A heat shielding device is disposed to the opening of an air vent hole on the shielding concrete wall. The heat shielding device has a plurality of supports are disposed between a disk-like upper support plate larger than the opening of the vent hole and covered with a heat insulation material and a lower support plate having a vent hole at the center. The lower support plate is connected with the fin plate. A portion between the supports is formed as pressure releasing channels. Radiation heat from the reactor pressure vessel is transferred to the fin plate by way of the upper support plate, support and a lower support plate and transferred to cooling water of a water-cooling pipeline. Accordingly, radiation heat of the reactor pressure vessel is not transferred to the vent holes. (I.N.)

  18. Space Shielding Materials for Prometheus Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Lewis

    2006-01-20

    At the time of Prometheus program restructuring, shield material and design screening efforts had progressed to the point where a down-selection from approximately eighty-eight materials to a set of five ''primary'' materials was in process. The primary materials were beryllium (Be), boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), tungsten (W), lithium hydride (LiH), and water (H{sub 2}O). The primary materials were judged to be sufficient to design a Prometheus shield--excluding structural and insulating materials, that had not been studied in detail. The foremost preconceptual shield concepts included: (1) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W/LiH shield; (2) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W shield; (3) and a Be/B{sub 4}C/H{sub 2}O shield. Since the shield design and materials studies were still preliminary, alternative materials (e.g., {sup nal}B or {sup 10}B metal) were still being screened, but at a low level of effort. Two competing low mass neutron shielding materials are included in the primary materials due to significant materials uncertainties in both. For LiH, irradiation-induced swelling was the key issue, whereas for H{sub 2}O, containment corrosion without active chemistry control was key, Although detailed design studies are required to accurately estimate the mass of shields based on either hydrogenous material, both are expected to be similar in mass, and lower mass than virtually any alternative. Unlike Be, W, and B{sub 4}C, which are not expected to have restrictive temperature limits, shield temperature limits and design accommodations are likely to be needed for either LiH or H{sub 2}O. The NRPCT focused efforts on understanding swelting of LiH, and observed, from approximately fifty prior irradiation tests, that either casting ar thorough out-gassing should reduce swelling. A potential contributor to LiH swelling appears to be LiOH contamination due to exposure to humid air, that can be eliminated by careful processing. To better understand LiH irradiation performance and

  19. Shielding design method for LMFBR validation on the Phenix factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrillat, J.C.; Crouzet, J.; Misrakis, J.; Salvatores, M.; Rado, V.; Palmiotti, G.

    1983-05-01

    Shielding design methods, developed at CEA for shielding calculations find a global validation by the means of Phenix power reactor (250 MWe) measurements. Particularly, the secondary sodium activation of pool type LMFBR such as Super Phenix (1200 MWe) which is subject to strict safety limitation is well calculated by the adapted scheme, i.e. a two dimension transport calculation of shielding coupled to a Monte-Carlo calculation of secondary sodium activation

  20. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  1. Adjustment and start-up of an irradiator self shielding model Isogamma LL.CO. in the Centre of Technological Applications and Nuclear Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Dania Soguero; Ardanza, Armando Chavez

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the process of installation of a self-shielded irradiator category I, model ISOGAMMA LL.Co of 60 Co, with a nominal 25 kCi activity, rate of absorbed dose 8 kG/h and 5 L workload. The stages are describe step by step: import, the customs procedure which included the interview with the master of the vessel transporter, the monitoring of the entire process by the head of radiological protection of the importing Center, control of the levels of surface contamination of the shipping container of the sources before the removal of the ship, the supervision of the national regulatory authority and the transportation to the final destination. Details of assembling of the installation and the opening of the container for transportation of supplies is outlined. The action plan previously developed for the case of occurrence of radiological successful events is presented, detailing the phase of the load of radioactive sources by the specialists of the company selling the facility (IZOTOP). Finally describes the setting and implementation of the installation and the procedure of licensing for exploitation

  2. Shielding experiments for accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-06-01

    A series of shielding experiments was carried out by using AVF cyclotron accelerator of TIARA at JAERI in order to validate shielding design methods for accelerator facilities in intermediate energy region. In this paper neutron transmission experiment through thick shields and radiation streaming experiment through a labyrinth are reported. (author)

  3. Shielding experiments for accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio

    2000-01-01

    A series of shielding experiments was carried out by using AVF cyclotron accelerator of TIARA at JAERI in order to validate shielding design methods for accelerator facilities in intermediate energy region. In this paper neutron transmission experiment through thick shields and radiation streaming experiment through a labyrinth are reported. (author)

  4. Non-inductive current start-up and plasma equilibrium with an inboard poloidal field null by means of electron cyclotron waves in QUEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zushi, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Hanada, K.; Idei, H.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Matsuoka, K.; Tashima, S.; Ishiguro, M.; Banerjee, S.; Sharma, S.K.; Liu, H.; Nishino, N.; Isobe, M.; Toi, K.; Okamura, S.; Maekawa, T.; Fukuyama, A.; Ejiri, A.; Yamaguchi, T.; Hiratsuka, J.; Takase, Y.; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Ueda, Y.; Mitarai, O.

    2012-11-01

    Non-inductive current start-up via relativistic electron cyclotron resonance interaction is investigated for the high ratio (∼10%) of vertical B v to toroidal B t fields and the concave field lines in the QUEST spherical tokamak. In the start-up scenario with an internal poloidal field null (IPN), the fast current start-up rate of 0.3-0.5 MA/sec and correlation with mildly relativistic electrons accelerated due to multiple ECR interaction are observed. In steady state high β p equilibrium characterized by the inboard null (R s ∼ 0.7×R 0 ) and εβ p of 1.5 is achieved, where ε, β p are the inverse aspect ratio and poloidal beta, respectively. Relaxation oscillations in this equilibrium and confinement of the energetic electrons are discussed. (author)

  5. Graphene-Based Sandwich Structures for Frequency Selectable Electromagnetic Shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei-Li; Gong, Congcheng; Li, Huimin; Cheng, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Mingji; Yuan, Xujin; Chen, Haosen; Yang, Yazheng; Fang, Daining

    2017-10-18

    Due to substantial development of electronics and telecommunication techniques, materials with electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding performance are significant in alleviating the interference impacts induced from a remarkable variety of devices. In the work, we propose novel sandwich structures for manipulating the EM wave transport, which holds unique EMI shielding features of frequency selectivity. By employing electrical and magnetic loss spacers, the resultant sandwich structures are endowed with tunable EMI shielding performance, showing substantial improvements in overall shielding effectiveness along with pronounced shielding peak shift. The mechanisms suggest that the multiple interfaces, electromagnetic loss media, and changes of representative EM wavelength could be critical roles in tailoring the EMI shielding performance. The results provide a versatile strategy that could be extended in other frequency ranges and various types of sandwich structures, promising great opportunities for designing and fabricating advanced electromagnetic attenuation materials and devices.

  6. Radiation shielding properties of barite coated fabric by computer programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akarslan, F.; Molla, T. [Suleyman Demirel University, Engineering Fac. Textile Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Üncü, I. S. [Suleyman Demirel University, Technological Fac. Electrical-Electronic Eng. Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Kılıncarslan, S., E-mail: seref@tef.sdu.edu.tr [Suleyman Demirel University, Engineering Fac. Civil Eng. Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Akkurt, I. [Suleyman Demirel University, Art and Science Fac., Physics Dep., Isparta (Turkey)

    2015-03-30

    With the development of technology radiation started to be used in variety of different fields. As the radiation is hazardous for human health, it is important to keep radiation dose as low as possible. This is done mainly using shielding materials. Barite is one of the important materials in this purpose. As the barite is not used directly it can be used in some other materials such as fabric. For this purposes barite has been coated on fabric in order to improve radiation shielding properties of fabric. Determination of radiation shielding properties of coated fabric has been done by using computer program written C# language. With this program the images obtained from digital Rontgen films is used to determine radiation shielding properties in terms of image processing numerical values. Those values define radiation shielding and in this way the coated barite effect on radiation shielding properties of fabric has been obtained.

  7. Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. De

    2003-02-24

    One potential failure mechanism for titanium and its alloys under repository conditions is via the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. The resulting decreased ductility and fracture toughness may lead to brittle mechanical fracture called hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) or hydrogen embrittlement. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, HIC may be a problem since the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this scientific analysis and modeling activity is to evaluate whether the drip shield will fail by HIC or not under repository conditions within 10,000 years of emplacement. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) addresses features, events, and processes related to hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield. REV 00 of this AMR served as a feed to ''Waste Package Degradation Process Model Report'' and was developed in accordance with the activity section ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' of the development plan entitled ''Analysis and Model Reports to Support Waste Package PMR'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This AMR, prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Materials Data Analyses and Modeling'' (BSC 2002), is to feed the License Application.

  8. Shielding container for radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Tetsuo; Tosa, Masayoshi; Hatogai, Tatsuaki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To effect opening and closing bidirectional radiation used particularly for a gamma densimeter or the like by one operation. Structure: This device comprises a rotatable shielding body for receiving radioactive isotope in the central portion thereof and having at least two radiation openings through which radiation is taken out of the isotope, and a shielding container having openings corresponding to the first mentioned radiation openings, respectively. The radioactive isotope is secured to a rotational shaft of the shielding body, and the shielding body is rotated to register the openings of the shielding container with the openings of the shielding body or to shield the openings, thereby effecting radiation and cut off of gamma ray in the bidirection by one operation. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Primary shield displacement and bowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, K.V.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor primary shield is constructed of high density concrete and surrounds the reactor core. The inlet, outlet and side primary shields were constructed in-place using 2.54 cm (1 in) thick steel plates as the forms. The plates remained as an integral part of the shields. The elongation of the pressure tubes due to thermal expansion and pressurization is not moving through the inlet nozzle hardware as designed but is accommodated by outward displacement and bowing of the inlet and outlet shields. Excessive distortion of the shields may result in gas seal failures, intolerable helium gas leaks, increased argon-41 emissions, and shield cooling tube failures. The shield surveillance and testing results are presented

  10. Light shielding apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Richard Dean; Thom, Robert Anthony

    2017-10-10

    A light shielding apparatus for blocking light from reaching an electronic device, the light shielding apparatus including left and right support assemblies, a cross member, and an opaque shroud. The support assemblies each include primary support structure, a mounting element for removably connecting the apparatus to the electronic device, and a support member depending from the primary support structure for retaining the apparatus in an upright orientation. The cross member couples the left and right support assemblies together and spaces them apart according to the size and shape of the electronic device. The shroud may be removably and adjustably connectable to the left and right support assemblies and configured to take a cylindrical dome shape so as to form a central space covered from above. The opaque shroud prevents light from entering the central space and contacting sensitive elements of the electronic device.

  11. Radiation Storm vs. The Magnetic Shield: Superheroes of Magnetism & Space Weather Education - A Model for Teacher Professional Development Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, R. M.; Johnson, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic and electric fields and phenomena play important roles in various situations in astronomy, planetary science, and Earth science. Students often lack an intuitive sense of electromagnetic phenomena, and therefore struggle with the complexities of planetary and stellar magnetic fields. Hands-on magnetism activities can provide students with an intuitive grasp of the basics of magnetism, preparing them for more challenging conceptual studies of magnetic phenomena. For the past six years, we have been presenting a professional development workshop for teachers covering the topics of magnetism and space weather. The workshop, which has been conducted more than 20 times for a range of audiences, blends together several simple hands-on activities, background information on space weather and geomagnetism, a collection of images, animations, and interactives that illustrate important concepts, and guidance about specific links between these topics and national science education standards. These workshops have been very well-received, and have consistently been rated highly by participants in surveys. We believe the methods used in these workshops can be applied to other topics in science education and to astronomy and Earth science education specifically. In this presentation, we will describe our magnetism and space weather workshop, including some of the hands-on activities. We will describe successful aspects of the workshop and comment on ways we think this approach could be replicated for other topics. We will also display some of the interactives, graphics, and animations shown during the workshops. Resources have been added to the workshop over the years in response to recurring questions from teachers; we will comment on this process and how it might be applied to other topics. The activities and extensive background content used or referenced in the workshop are available for free on the Windows to the Universe web site (www.windows2universe.org). Hands on

  12. Neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoshige, Toru; Fujii, Yasumasa; Nifuku, Masataka.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain shielding materials excellent in heat and radiation resistance, as well as having mechanical strength in a reduced weight. Constitution: A mixture comprising from 30 to 80 % by weight of epoxy resin, from 5 to 50 % by weight of polyethylene and from 1 to 50 % by weight of inorganic boron compound is cured to prepare a neutron shielding material. The epoxy resin used herein is a compound having more than 18 epoxy groups per one molecule. Polyethylene is a polyethylene homopolymer or a copolymer of ethylene and less than 10 % of other copolymerizable monomer which is preferably powdery and in the grain size of from 10 to 200 μm. The inorganic boric compound can include, for example, boron carbide, boron nitride and anhydrous boric acid. As the curing agent, all sorts of compounds known as the curing agent for epoxy resins can be used. The shielding material is excellent in heat resistance, particularly, in the strength, thermal deformation temperature and the bondability at high temperature and also satisfactory in compression strength and bondability. (Kawakami, Y.)

  13. Radiation Shielding Materials Containing Hydrogen, Boron, and Nitrogen: Systematic Computational and Experimental Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of the proposed research are to develop a space radiation shielding material system that has high efficacy for shielding radiation and also has high...

  14. Radiation Shielding Materials Containing Hydrogen, Boron, and Nitrogen: Systematic Computational and Experimental Study Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of the proposed research are to develop a space radiation shielding material system that has high efficacy for shielding radiation and also has high...

  15. Shielding effectiveness measurements of materials and enclosures using a dual vibrating intrinsic reverberation chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, Han; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Reverberation chambers create a statistical uniformly distributed field which is very useful for shielding effectiveness measurements. Two adjacent reverberation chambers made of flexible cloth have been developed and are used for shielding effectiveness measurements. The field stirring is achieved

  16. On The Deign And Construction Of A Radiation Shielding System For Development Of Neutron Beams Based On The Horizontal Channel No.2 Of Dalat Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong Huu Tan; Pham Ngoc Son; Nguyen Nhi Dien

    2011-01-01

    An optimal structural system of filtered neutron beam and radiation shielding has been designed and calculated using the Monte-Carlo code MCNP5. The system was constructed and installed into the horizontal channel No. 2 of the Dalat reactor. The neutron beam is applied for experimental studies on nuclear physics, nuclear data measurements, and personal training. (author)

  17. Split shielding plates in electrostatic sector analyzers and Wien filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavor, Mikhail I.

    1995-09-01

    An analytical method is developed for calculation of the influence of the splitted shielding plates in inhomogeneous electrostatic sector analyzers and Wien filters on their electron optical properties. The method allows one to simplify considerably the choice of the mode of operation of the shielding plates needed to achieve a required electrostatic field distribution inside the analyzer.

  18. Analysis and evaluation of a shielding for scum mensurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viant Garrido, E.; Fernandez Rondon, M.; Torres Berdeguez, M.; Fernandez, M.; Perez Sanchez, D.; Falcon, L.

    1998-01-01

    In this work the evaluation of a shielding is presented developed by the Nuclear Technology Center of carry out scum mensurations in systems of mensuration gamma spectrometric. The evaluation of the capacity of attenuation of the shielding one carries out starting from the comparisons of the count rates with systems used by anteriority by the Laboratory of Environmental Radiological Surveillance

  19. Neoproterozoic tectonics of the Arabian-Nubian Shield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasband, B.

    2006-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic tectonic development of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) can be divided in three parts: 1) the oceanic stage; 2) the arc-accretion stage; 3) the extensional stage. Three key-areas in the Arabian-Nubian Shield, namely the Bi'r Umq Complex, The Tabalah and Tarj Complex and the Wadi

  20. Progress of the ITER Thermal Shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Her, Namil, E-mail: namil.her@iter.org [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon – CS 90046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Hick, Robby; Le Barbier, Robin; Arzoumanian, Terenig; Choi, Chang-Ho; Sborchia, Carlo [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon – CS 90046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Chung, Wooho; Nam, Kwanwoo; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Gyoung-O. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Youngkil; Lim, Kisuk [SFA Engineering Corporation, Hwaseong-si, Gyeonggi-do 10060 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Design improvement of the ITER Thermal Shields was introduced. • Design of TS manifold and TS instrumentation were summarized. • Produced main material of the TS (SS304LN) was summarized. • Status of the VVTS manufacturing and the inspection requirements were summarized. - Abstract: The role of the ITER Thermal Shields (TS) is to minimize the radiation heat load from the warm components such as vacuum vessel and cryostat to magnet operating at 4.5 K. The final design of TS was completed in 2013 and manufacturing of the vacuum vessel thermal shield (VVTS) is now on-going. This paper describes the development status of the TS in particular the design improvements, the fabrication and the requirements.

  1. First Wall, Blanket, Shield Engineering Technology Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program sponsored by the Office of Fusion Energy of DOE has the overall objective of providing engineering data that will define performance parameters for nuclear systems in advanced fusion reactors. The program comprises testing and the development of computational tools in four areas: (1) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of first-wall component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads; (2) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of blanket and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on bulk heating; (3) electromagnetic effects in first wall, blanket, and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on transient field penetration and eddy-current effects; (4) assembly, maintenance and repair with emphasis on remote-handling techniques. This paper will focus on elements 2 and 4 above and, in keeping with the conference participation from both fusion and fission programs, will emphasize potential interfaces between fusion technology and experience in the fission industry

  2. A contribution to shielding effectiveness analysis of shielded tents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vranić Zoran M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of shielding effectiveness (SE of the shielded tents made of the metallised fabrics is given. First, two electromagnetic characteristic fundamental for coupling through electrically thin shield, the skin depth break frequency and the surface resistance or transfer impedance, is defined and analyzed. Then, the transfer function and the SE are analyzed regarding to the frequency range of interest to the Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC Community.

  3. Channels in tokamak reactor shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchipakin, O.L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of calculations of neutron transport through the channels in the tokamak reactor radiation shields, obtained by the Monte Carlo method and by the method of discrete ordinates, are considered. The given data show that the structural materials of the channel and that of the blanket and shields in the regions close to it are subjected to almost the same irradiation as the first wall and therefore they should satisfy the technical requirements. The radiation energy release in the injector channel wall, caused by neutron shooting, substantially depends on the channel dimensions. At the channel large diameter (0.7-10 m) this dependence noticeably decreases. The investigation of the effect of the injector channel cross section form on the neutron flux density through the channel, testifies to weak dependence of shooting radiation intensity on the form of the channel cross section. It is concluded that measures to decrease unfavourable effect of the channels on the safety of the power tokamak reactor operation and maintenance cause substantial changes in reactor design due to which the channel protection must be developed at first stages. The Monte Carlo method is recommended to be used for variant calculations and when calculating the neutron flux functionals in specific points of the system the discrete ordinate method is preferred [ru

  4. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Herlemann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005. Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  5. Neutron Shielding composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Kiiro; Okuda, Hisashi; Harada, Yoshihisa.

    1994-01-01

    1, 3-bis (N, N-diglycidyl aminomethyl) cyclohexane as a specific epoxy resin is used together with a usual epoxy resin. A polyamine mixture and an imidazole type compound are used as a hardening agent. Further, a boron compound and an inorganic filler are added. Such a neutron shielding composition is hardened at a normal temperature without requiring heating, and mechanical strength, especially, compression strength can be kept over a wide range from low temperature to high temperature after the hardening. (T.M.)

  6. A shield against distraction

    OpenAIRE

    Halin, N.; Marsh, J.E.; Hellman, A.; Hellstrom, I.; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the basic idea of a trade-off between the level of concentration and distractibility to test whether a manipulation of task difficulty can shield against distraction. Participants read, either in quiet or with a speech noise background, texts that were displayed either in an easy-to-read or a hard-to-read font. Background speech impaired prose recall, but only when the text was displayed in the easy-to-read font. Most importantly, recall was better in the background sp...

  7. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    A shield for a nuclear reactor includes at least two layers of alternating wide and narrow rectangular blocks so arranged that the spaces between blocks in adjacent layers are out of registry, each block having an opening therein equally spaced from the sides of the blocks and nearer the top of the block than the bottom, the distance from the top of the block to the opening in one layer being different from this distance in adjacent layers, openings in blocks in adjacent layers being in registry. 1 claim, 7 drawing figures

  8. Selective shielding device for scintiphotography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.W.; Kay, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    A selective shielding device to be used in combination with a scintillation camera is described. The shielding device is a substantially oval-shaped configuration removably secured to the scintillation camera. As a result of this combination scanning of preselected areas of a patient can be rapidly and accurately performed without the requirement of mounting any type of shielding paraphernalia on the patient. 1 claim, 2 drawing figures

  9. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Bahadori Amir; Semones Edward; Ewert Michael; Broyan James; Walker Steven

    2017-01-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles ...

  10. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F. Hua

    2004-01-01

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847])

  11. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  12. Experience with a servo-hydraulic mechanical testing machine installed in a new shielded active facility at Windscale Nuclear Power Development Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlick, A.; Hindmarch, P.; Gravenor, J.G.; Rhodes, D.

    1982-03-01

    An Instron model 1273 servo-hydraulic machine has been installed within a lead-shielded cell at Windscale in order to provide a facility capable of performing a wide range of mechanical tests on nuclear reactor structural materials and fuel assembly components. This particular type of machine was chosen because it has design features associated with the load frame, location of the actuator and adjustment and clamping of the cross-head that are especially well suited to remote operation within a shielded cell. The design of the testing facility is described and the programmes of work that have been completed over the past 11/2 years of operation are reviewed. (author)

  13. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  14. Development of a double plasma gun device for investigation of effects of vapor shielding on erosion of PFC materials under ELM-like pulsed plasma bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    It is considered that thermal transient events such as type I edge localized modes (ELMs) could limit the lifetime of plasma-facing components (PFCs) in ITER. We have investigated surface damage of tungsten (W) materials under transient heat and particle loads by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device at University of Hyogo. The capacitor bank energy for the plasma discharge is 144 kJ (2.88 mF, 10 kVmax). Surface melting of a W material was clearly observed at the energy density of ˜2 MJ/m2. It is known that surface melting and evaporation during a transient heat load could generate a vapor cloud layer in front of the target material [1]. Then, the subsequent erosion could be reduced by the vapor shielding effect. In this study, we introduce a new experiment using two MCPG devices (MCPG-1, 2) to understand vapor shielding effects of a W surface under ELM-like pulsed plasma bombardment. The capacitor bank energy of MCPG-2 is almost same as that of MCPG-1. The second plasmoid is applied with a variable delay time after the plasmoid produced by MCPG-1. Then, a vapor cloud layer could shield the second plasma load. To verify the vapor shielding effects, surface damage of a W material is investigated by changing the delay time. In the conference, the preliminary experimental results will be shown.[4pt] [1] A. Hassanein et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 390-391, pp. 777-780 (2009).

  15. [The model of radiation shielding of the service module of the International space station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomenskiĭ, A V; Kuznetsov, V G; Laĭko, Iu A; Bengin, V V; Shurshakov, V A

    2001-01-01

    Compared and contrasted were models of radiation shielding of habitable compartments of the basal Mir module that had been used to calculate crew absorbed doses from space radiation. Developed was a model of the ISS Service module radiation shielding. It was stated that there is a good agreement between experimental shielding function and the one calculated from this model.

  16. Gamma shielding by aluminum (Al-shielder manual)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeb, J.; Arshad, W.; Rashid, A.; Akhter, P.

    2010-12-01

    This report is an operational manual of shielding software 'AI-Shielder', developed at Health Physics Division (HPD), PINSTECH. The AI-Shielder software estimates shielding thickness of Aluminum for photons having energy in the range 0.5 to 10 MeV. The software is helpful in safe handling or storage of gamma emitting radionuclide(s) by using Aluminum as shielding material. To compute the shield thickness, self absorption in the source has been neglected and the source has been assumed as a point source. This report is intended not only to serve as a manual of the AI-Shielder, but also to provide the user(s) with the necessary information about gamma shielding. (author)

  17. Open Rotor Noise Shielding by Blended-Wing-Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yueping; Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of open rotor noise shielding by Blended Wing Body (BWB) aircraft by using model scale test data acquired in the Boeing Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF) with a legacy F7/A7 rotor model and a simplified BWB platform. The objective of the analysis is the understanding of the shielding features of the BWB and the method of application of the shielding data for noise studies of BWB aircraft with open rotor propulsion. By studying the directivity patterns of individual tones, it is shown that though the tonal energy distribution and the spectral content of the wind tunnel test model, and thus its total noise, may differ from those of more advanced rotor designs, the individual tones follow directivity patterns that characterize far field radiations of modern open rotors, ensuring the validity of the use of this shielding data. Thus, open rotor tonal noise shielding should be categorized into front rotor tones, aft rotor tones and interaction tones, not only because of the different directivities of the three groups of tones, but also due to the differences in their source locations and coherence features, which make the respective shielding characteristics of the three groups of tones distinctly different from each other. To reveal the parametric trends of the BWB shielding effects, results are presented with variations in frequency, far field emission angle, rotor operational condition, engine installation geometry, and local airframe features. These results prepare the way for the development of parametric models for the shielding effects in prediction tools.

  18. Space nuclear reactor shields for manned and unmanned applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKissock, B.I.; Bloomfield, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    Missions which use nuclear reactor power systems require radiation shielding of payload and/or crew areas to predetermined dose rates. Since shielding can become a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, it is of interest to show the effect of various parameters on shield thickness and mass for manned and unmanned applications. Algorithms were developed to give the thicknesses needed if reactor thermal power, separation distances and dose rates are given as input. The thickness algorithms were combined with models for four different shield geometries to allow tradeoff studies of shield volume and mass for a variety of manned and unmanned missions. The shield design tradeoffs presented in this study include the effects of: higher allowable dose rates; radiation hardened electronics; shorter crew exposure times; shield geometry; distance of the payload and/or crew from the reactor; and changes in the size of the shielded area. Specific NASA missions that were considered in this study include unmanned outer planetary exploration, manned advanced/evolutionary space station and advanced manned lunar base. (author)

  19. Space nuclear reactor shields for manned and unmanned applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mckissock, B.I.; Bloomfield, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Missions which use nuclear reactor power systems require radiation shielding of payload and/or crew areas to predetermined dose rates. Since shielding can become a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, it is of interest to show the effect of various parameters on shield thickness and mass for manned and unmanned applications. Algorithms were developed to give the thicknesses needed if reactor thermal power, separation distances, and dose rates are given as input. The thickness algorithms were combined with models for four different shield geometries to allow tradeoff studies of shield volume and mass for a variety of manned and unmanned missions. Shield design tradeoffs presented in this study include the effects of: higher allowable dose rates; radiation hardened electronics; shorter crew exposure times; shield geometry; distance of the payload and/or crew from the reactor; and changes in the size of the shielded area. Specific NASA missions that were considered in this study include unmanned outer planetary exploration, manned advanced/evolutionary space station, and advanced manned lunar base

  20. Radiation shield for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esenov, Amra; Pustovgar, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    One of the chief structures of a reactor pit is a 'dry' shield. Setting up a 'dry' shield includes the technologically complex process of thermal processing of serpentinite concrete. Modern advances in the area of materials technology permit avoiding this complex and demanding procedure, and this significantly decreases the duration, labor intensity, and cost of setting it up. (orig.)

  1. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  2. Shield calculations, optimization vs. paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo D, N.; Hernandez S, A.; Martinez G, A.

    2006-01-01

    Many shieldings have been designed under the criteria of 'Maximum dose rates of project'. It has created the paradigm of those 'low dose rates', for the one which not few specialists would consider unacceptable levels of dose rate superior to the units of μSv.h -1 , independently of the exposure times. At the present time numerous shieldings are being designed considering dose restrictions in real times of exposure. After these new shieldings, the dose rates could be notably superior to those after traditional shieldings, without it implies inadequate designs or constructive errors. In the work significant differences in levels of dose rates and thickness of shieldings estimated by both methods for some typical facilities. It was concluded that the use of real times of exposure is more adequate for the optimization of the Radiological Protection, although this method demands bigger care in its application. (Author)

  3. Parameters calculation of shielding experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavazza, S.

    1986-02-01

    The radiation transport methodology comparing the calculated reactions and dose rates for neutrons and gama-rays, with experimental measurements obtained on iron shield, irradiated in the YAYOI reactor is evaluated. The ENDF/B-IV and VITAMIN-C libraries and the AMPX-II modular system, for cross sections generation collapsed by the ANISN code were used. The transport calculations were made using the DOT 3.5 code, adjusting the boundary iron shield source spectrum to the reactions and dose rates, measured at the beginning of shield. The neutron and gamma ray distributions calculated on the iron shield presented reasonable agreement with experimental measurements. An experimental arrangement using the IEA-R1 reactor to determine a shielding benchmark is proposed. (Author) [pt

  4. Socket Shield Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, João Eduardo Freitas

    2017-01-01

    Nos dias atuais, é cada vez mais comum a realização de extrações de dentes que estejam severamente comprometidos e substituí-los por implantes dentários. Após extração, existe uma reabsorção de osso alveolar que vai resultar numa perda de osso vertical e horizontal, tornando-se um dos fatores que subsequentemente se vai colocar como uma das maiores dificuldades na colocação de implantes. A técnica Socket Shield é uma técnica de preservação de osso alveolar em situações de implantes imediatos,...

  5. Shielded Canister Transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidem, G.G. Jr.; Fages, R.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) will produce canisters filled with high-level radioactive waste immobilized in borosilicate glass. This report discusses a Shielded Canister Transporter (SCT) which will provide the means for safe transportation and handling of the canisters from the Vitrification Building to the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The stainless steel canisters are 0.61 meters in diameter, 3.0 meters tall, and weigh approximately 2,135 kilograms, with a maximum exterior surface dose rate of 90,000 R/hr. The canisters are placed into storage tubes to a maximum of three tall (two for overpack canisters) with an impact limiter placed at the tube bottom and between each canister. A floor plug seals the top of the storage tube at the operating floor level of the CSB

  6. Computational shielding benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Nuclear Society Standards Committee 6.2.1 is engaged in the documentation of radiation transport problems and their solutions. The primary objective of this effort is to test computational methods used within the international shielding community. Dissemination of benchmarks will, it is hoped, accomplish several goals: (1) Focus attention on problems whose solutions represent state-of-the-art methodology for representative transport problems of generic interest; (2) Specification of standard problems makes comparisons of alternate computational methods, including use of approximate vs. ''exact'' computer codes, more meaningful; (3) Comparison with experimental data may suggest improvements in computer codes and/or associated data sets; (4) Test reliability of new methods as they are introduced for the solution of specific problems; (5) Verify user ability to apply a given computational method; and (6) Verify status of a computer program being converted for use on a different computer (e.g., CDC vs IBM) or facility

  7. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-A19897, R.H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280degF. Table 1 lists the neutron shield materials tested. The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found. The Bisco modified NS-4 and Reactor Experiments HMPP are both acceptable materials from a thermal accident standpoint for use in the shipping cask. Tests of the Kobe PP-R01 and Envirotech HDPE were stopped for safety reasons, due to inability to deal with the heavy smoke, before completion of the 30-minute heating phase. However these materials may prove satisfactory if they could undergo the complete heating. (J.P.N.)

  8. MPACT Subgroup Self-Shielding Efficiency Improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stimpson, Shane; Liu, Yuxuan; Collins, Benjamin S.; Clarno, Kevin T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments to improve the efficiency of the MOC solvers in MPACT have yielded effective kernels that loop over several energy groups at once, rather that looping over one group at a time. These kernels have produced roughly a 2x speedup on the MOC sweeping time during eigenvalue calculation. However, the self-shielding subgroup calculation had not been reevaluated to take advantage of these new kernels, which typically requires substantial solve time. The improvements covered in this report start by integrating the multigroup kernel concepts into the subgroup calculation, which are then used as the basis for further extensions. The next improvement that is covered is what is currently being termed as ''Lumped Parameter MOC''. Because the subgroup calculation is a purely fixed source problem and multiple sweeps are performed only to update the boundary angular fluxes, the sweep procedure can be condensed to allow for the instantaneous propagation of the flux across a spatial domain, without the need to sweep along all segments in a ray. Once the boundary angular fluxes are considered to be converged, an additional sweep that will tally the scalar flux is completed. The last improvement that is investigated is the possible reduction of the number of azimuthal angles per octant in the shielding sweep. Typically 16 azimuthal angles per octant are used for self-shielding and eigenvalue calculations, but it is possible that the self-shielding sweeps are less sensitive to the number of angles than the full eigenvalue calculation.

  9. Subsurface Shielding Source Term Specification Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S.Su

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to establish appropriate and defensible waste-package radiation source terms for use in repository subsurface shielding design. This calculation supports the shielding design for the waste emplacement and retrieval system, and subsurface facility system. The objective is to identify the limiting waste package and specify its associated source terms including source strengths and energy spectra. Consistent with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M and O 2001, p. 15), the scope of work includes the following: (1) Review source terms generated by the Waste Package Department (WPD) for various waste forms and waste package types, and compile them for shielding-specific applications. (2) Determine acceptable waste package specific source terms for use in subsurface shielding design, using a reasonable and defensible methodology that is not unduly conservative. This calculation is associated with the engineering and design activity for the waste emplacement and retrieval system, and subsurface facility system. The technical work plan for this calculation is provided in CRWMS M and O 2001. Development and performance of this calculation conforms to the procedure, AP-3.12Q, Calculations

  10. A robust helium-cooled shield/blanket design for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C. P. C.; Bourque, R. F.; Baxi, C. B.; Colleraine, A. P.; Grunloh, H. J.; Letchenberg, T.; Leuer, J. A.; Reis, E. E.; Redler, K.; Will, R.

    1993-11-01

    General Atomics Fusion and Reactor Groups have completed a helium-cooled, conceptual shield/blanket design for ITER. The configuration selected is a pressurized tubes design embedded in radially oriented plates. This plate can be made from ferritic steel or from V-alloy. Helium leakage to the plasma chamber is eliminated by conservative, redundant design and proper quality control and inspection programs. High helium pressure at 18 MPa is used to reduce pressure drop and enhance heat transfer. This high gas pressure is believed practical when confined in small diameter tubes. Ample industrial experience exists for safe high gas pressure operations. Inboard shield design is highlighted in this study since the allowable void fraction is more limited. Lithium is used as the thermal contacting medium and for tritium breeding; its safety concerns are minimized by a modular, low inventory design that requires no circulation of the liquid metal for the purpose of heat removal. This design is robust, conservative, reliable, and meets all design goals and requirements. It can also be built with present-day technology.

  11. A robust helium-cooled shield/blanket design for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Bourque, R.F.; Baxi, C.B.

    1993-11-01

    General Atomics Fusion and Reactor Groups have completed a helium-cooled, conceptual shield/blanket design for ITER. The configuration selected is a pressurized tubes design embedded in radially oriented plates. This plate can be made from ferritic steel or from V-alloy. Helium leakage to the plasma chamber is eliminated by conservative, redundant design and proper quality control and inspection programs. High helium pressure at 18 MPa is used to reduce pressure drop and enhance heat transfer. This high gas pressure is believed practical when confined in small diameter tubes. Ample industrial experience exists for safe high gas pressure operations. Inboard shield design is highlighted in this study since the allowable void fraction is more limited. Lithium is used as the thermal contacting medium and for tritium breeding, its safety concerns are minimized by a modular, low inventory design that requires no circulation of the liquid metal for the purpose of heat removal. This design is robust, conservative, reliable, and meets all design goals and requirements. It can also be built with present-day technology

  12. SINBAD: Shielding integral benchmark archive and database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, H.T.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Roussin, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    SINBAD is a new electronic database developed to store a variety of radiation shielding benchmark data so that users can easily retrieve and incorporate the data into their calculations. SINBAD is an excellent data source for users who require the quality assurance necessary in developing cross-section libraries or radiation transport codes. The future needs of the scientific community are best served by the electronic database format of SINBAD and its user-friendly interface, combined with its data accuracy and integrity

  13. Low Cost, Lightweight, Multifunctional Structural Shielding Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR involves the development of a lightweight innovative material for use as structure and radiation shielding in one. APS has assembled a uniquely qualified...

  14. Criticality Evaluation - Cask Unloading Using the Shielded Transfer System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.; Nadeau, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    This evaluation reviewed the criticality aspects of Shielded Transfer System (STS) operation. The existing Nuclear Safety Control (NSC) elements were examined and new NSC elements were developed, as needed

  15. Efficient Radiation Shielding Through Direct Metal Laser Sintering

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have developed a method for efficient component-level radiation shielding that can be printed by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) from files generated by the...

  16. Improved Metal-Polymeric Laminate Radiation Shielding, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed Phase II program, builds on the phase I feaibility where a multifunctional lightweight radiation shield composite was developed and fabricated. This...

  17. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable

  18. Radiation shielding in dental radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenström, B; Rehnmark-Larsson, S; Julin, P; Richter, S

    1983-01-01

    The protective effect in the thyroid region from different types of radiation shielding at intraoral radiography has been studied as well as the reduction of the absorbed dose to the sternal and the gonadal regions. The shielding tested were the different types of leaded aprons, of which three had an attached leaded collar and the other two were used in combination with separate soft leaded collars. Furthermore one of the soft leaded collars and an unflexible horizontal leaded shield were tested separately. Two dental x-ray machines of 60 and 65 kVp with rectangular and circular tube collimators were used. The exposure times corresponded to speed group E film. The absorbed doses were measured with two ionization chambers. No significant difference in the protective effect in the thyroid gland could be found between the different types of radiation shieldings. There was a dose reduction by approximately a factor of 2 to the thyroid region down to 0.08 mGy per full survey using parallelling technique, and below 0.001 mGy per single bitewing exposure. The shielding reduced the thyroid dose using bisecting-angle technique by a factor of 5 down to 0.15 mGy per full survey (20 exposures). In the sternal region the combinations of apron and collar reduced the absorbed dose from a full survey to below 2 microGy compared with 18 microGy (parallelling) and 31 microGy (bisecting-angle) without any shielding. With the horizontal leaded shield a reduction by a factor of 6 was obtained, but no significant sternal dose reduction could be detected from the soft collar alone. The gonadal dose could be reduced by a factor of 10 with the horizontal leaded shield, parallelling technique and circular collimator. Using leaded aprons the gonadal was approximately one per cent of the dose without any shielding, i.e. below 0.01 microGy per single intraoral exposure.

  19. Radiation shielding in dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenstroem, B.; Rehnmark-Larsson, S.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.

    1983-01-01

    The protective effect in the thyroid region from different types of radiation shieldings at intraoral radiography has been studied as well as the reduction of the absorbed dose to the sternal and the gonadal regions. The shieldings tested were five different types of leaded aprons, of which three had an attached leaded collar and the other two were used in combination with separate soft leaded collars. Furthermore one of the soft leaded collars and an unflexible horizontal leaded shield were tested separately. Two dental x-ray machines of 60 and 65 kVp with rectangular and circular tube collimators were used. The exposure time corresponded to speed group E film. The absorbed doses were measured with two ionization chambers. No significant difference in the protective effect in the thyroid gland could be found between the different types of radiation shieldings. There was a dose reduction by approximately a factor of 2 to the thyroid region down to 0.08 mGy per full survey using parallelling technique, and below 0.001 mGy per single bitewing exposure. The shieldings reduced the thyroid dose using bisecting-angle technique by a factor of 5 down to 0.15 mGy per full survey (20 exposures). In the sternal region the combinations of apron and collar reduced the absorbed dose from a full survey to below 2 ..mu..Gy compared with 18 ..mu..Gy (parallelling) and 31 ..mu..Gy (biscting-angle) without any shielding. With the horizontal leaded shield a reduction by a factor of 6 was obtained but no significant sternal dose reduction could be detected from the soft collar alone. The gonadal dose could be reduced by a factor of 10 with the horizontal leaded shield, parallelling technique and circular collimator. Using leaded aprons the gonadal dose was approximately one per cent of the dose without any shielding, i.e. below 0.01 ..mu..Gy per single intraoral exposure.

  20. Radiation shielding in dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenstroem, B.; Rehnmark-Larsson, S.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.

    1984-01-01

    The protective effect in the thyroid region from different types of radiation shieldings at intraoral radiography has been studied as well as the reduction of the absorbed dose to the sternal and the gonadal regions. The shieldings tested were five different types of leaded aprons, of which three had an attached leaded collar and the other two were used in combination with separate soft leaded collars. Furthermore one of the soft leaded collars and an unflexible horizontal leaded shield were tested separately. Two dental x-ray machines of 60 and 65 kVp with rectangular and circular tube collimators were used. The exposure time corresponded to speed group E film. The absorbed doses were measured with two ionization chambers. No significant difference in the protective effect in the thyroid gland could be found between the different types of radiation shieldings. There was a dose reduction by approximately a factor of 2 to the thyroid region down to 0.08 mGy per full survey using parallelling technique, and below 0.001 mGy per single bitewing exposure. The shieldings reduced the thyroid dose using bisecting-angle technique by a factor of 5 down to 0.15 mGy per full survey. In the sternal region the combinations of apron and collar reduced the absorbed dose from a full survey to below 2 ..mu..Gy compared with 18 ..mu..Gy (parallelling) and 31 ..mu..Gy (biscting-angle) without any shielding. With the horizontal leaded shield a reduction by a factor of 6 was obtained but no significant sternal dose reduction could be detected from the soft collar alone. The gonadal dose could be reduced by a factor of 10 with the horizontal leaded shield, parallelling technique and circular collimator. Using leaded aprons the gonadal dose was approximately one per cent of the dose without any shielding, i.e. below 0.01 ..mu..Gy per single intraoral exposure.

  1. Morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2018-03-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low-angle edifices built primarily by the accumulation of successive lava flows. This generic view of shield volcano morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galápagos). Here, the morphometry of 158 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes is analyzed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution SRTM DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 24 lava-dominated 'shield-like' volcanoes, considered so far as stratovolcanoes, are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes from 0.1 to > 1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width (H/WB) ratios mostly from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients (average slopes mostly from 1° to 15°), elongation and summit truncation. Although there is no clear-cut morphometric difference between shield volcanoes and stratovolcanoes, an approximate threshold can be drawn at 12° average slope and 0.10 H/WB ratio. Principal component analysis of the obtained database enables to identify four key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Hierarchical cluster analysis of these descriptors results in 12 end-member shield types, with intermediate cases defining a continuum of morphologies. The shield types can be linked in terms of growth stages and shape evolution, related to (1) magma composition and rheology, effusion rate and lava/pyroclast ratio, which will condition edifice steepness; (2) spatial distribution of vents, in turn related to the magmatic feeding system and the tectonic framework, which will control edifice plan shape; and (3) caldera formation, which will condition edifice truncation.

  2. Overview of first wall/blanket/shield technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.

    1983-04-01

    This brief overview of first wall, blanket, and shield technology focuses first on changes and trends in important design issues from the 1970's to the 1980's, then on current perceptions of critical issues in first wall, blanket, and shield design and related technology. The emphasis is on base technology rather than either systems engineering or materials development, on the two primary confinement systems, tokamaks and mirrors, and on production of electricity as the primary goal for development

  3. Shielding around spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragopoulou, M; Manolopoulou, M; Stoulos, S; Brandt, R; Westmeier, W; Krivopustov, M; Sosnin, A; Golovatyuk, S; Zamani, M

    2006-01-01

    Spallation neutron sources provide more intense and harder neutron spectrum than nuclear reactors for which a substantial amount of shielding measurements have been performed. Although the main part of the cost for a spallation station is the cost of the shielding, measurements regarding shielding for the high energy neutron region are still very scarce. In this work calculation of the neutron interaction length in polyethylene moderator for different neutron energies is presented. Measurements which were carried out in Nuclotron accelerator at the Laboratory of High Energies (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna) and comparison with calculation are also presented. The measurements were performed with Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs)

  4. Design of platform for removing screws from LCD display shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zimei; Qin, Qin; Dou, Jianfang; Zhu, Dongdong

    2017-11-01

    Removing the screws on the sides of a shield is a necessary process in disassembling a computer LCD display. To solve this issue, a platform has been designed for removing the screws on display shields. This platform uses virtual instrument technology with LabVIEW as the development environment to design the mechanical structure with the technologies of motion control, human-computer interaction and target recognition. This platform removes the screws from the sides of the shield of an LCD display mechanically thus to guarantee follow-up separation and recycle.

  5. Shielding analysis methods available in the scale computational system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, C.V.; Tang, J.S.; Hermann, O.W.; Bucholz, J.A.; Emmett, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Computational tools have been included in the SCALE system to allow shielding analysis to be performed using both discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques. One-dimensional discrete ordinates analyses are performed with the XSDRNPM-S module, and point dose rates outside the shield are calculated with the XSDOSE module. Multidimensional analyses are performed with the MORSE-SGC/S Monte Carlo module. This paper will review the above modules and the four Shielding Analysis Sequences (SAS) developed for the SCALE system. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Survivor shielding. Part C. Improvements in terrain shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, Stephen D.; Kaul, Dean C.; Roberts, James A.; Kerr, George D.

    2005-01-01

    A number of atomic-bomb survivors were affected by shielding provided by terrain features. These terrain features can be a small hill, affecting one or two houses, or a high mountain that shields large neighborhoods. In the survivor dosimetry system, terrain shielding can be described by a transmission factor (TF), which is the ratio between the dose with and without the terrain present. The terrain TF typically ranges between 0.1 and 1.0. After DS86 was implemented at RERF, the terrain shielding categories were examined and found to either have a bias or an excessive uncertainty that could readily be removed. In 1989, an improvement in the terrain model was implemented at RERF in the revised DS86 code, but the documentation was not published. It is now presented in this section. The solution to the terrain shielding in front of a house is described in this section. The problem of terrain shielding of survivors behind Hijiyama mountain at Hiroshima and Konpirasan mountain at Nagasaki has also been recognized, and a solution to this problem has been included in DS02. (author)

  7. Self-shielding factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    Throughout the last two decades many efforts have been made to estimate the effect of body self-shielding on organ doses from externally incident neutrons and gamma rays. These began with the use of simple geometry phantoms and have culminated in the use of detailed anthropomorphic phantoms. In a recent effort, adjoint Monte Carlo analysis techniques have been used to determine dose and dose equivalent to the active marrow as a function of energy and angle of neutron fluence externally incident on an anthropomorphic phantom. When combined with fluences from actual nuclear devices, these dose-to-fluence factors result in marrow dose values that demonstrate great sensitivity to variations in device type, range, and body orientation. Under a state-of-the-art radiation transport analysis demonstration program for the Japanese cities, sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency at the request of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, the marrow dose study referred to above is being repeated to obtain spectral distributions within the marrow for externally incident neutrons and gamma rays of arbitrary energy and angle. This is intended to allow radiobiologists and epidemiologists to select and to modify numbers of merit for correlation with health effects and to permit a greater understanding of the relationship between human and laboratory subject dosimetry

  8. Radiation shielding member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemezawa, Isao; Kimura, Tadahiro; Mizuochi, Akira; Omori, Tetsu

    1998-01-01

    A single body of a radiation shield comprises a bag prepared by welding or bonding a polyurethane sheet which is made flat while interposing metal plates at the upper and the lower portion of the bag. Eyelet fittings are disposed to the upper and the lower portions of the bag passing through the metal plates and the flat portion of the bag. Water supplying/draining ports are disposed to two upper and lower places of the bag at a height where the metal plates are disposed. Reinforcing walls welded or bonded to the inner wall surface of the bag are elongated in vertical direction to divide the inside of the bag to a plurality of cells. The bag is suspended and supported from a frame with S-shaped hooks inserted into the eyelet fittings as connecting means. A plurality of bags are suspended and supported from the frame at a required height by way of the eyelets at the lower portion of the suspended and supported bag and the eyelet fittings at the upper portion of the bag below the intermediate connection means. (I.N.)

  9. Implementing Dust Shielding as a Criteria for Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Lindsey; Christensen, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    Star formation is observed to occur in dense regions of molecular gas. Although the exact nature of the link between star formation and molecular hydrogen is still unclear, it has been suggested that dust shielding of dense gas is the key factor enabling the presence of both. We present a model in which star formation is linked explicitly to local dust shielding, rather than molecular hydrogen abundance, in smoothed particle hydrodynamics galaxy formation simulations. We used simulations of isolated Milky-Way-mass disk galaxies to develop a dust shielding model in which the radiative shielding length was based off of the Jeans length with a T=40 K temperature cap. Using this shielding model, we compare the effects of different star formation recipes, including recipes in which star formation is based on the amount of dust shielding or the local molecular hydrogen abundance. We test our star formation models on two sets of isolated disk galaxies with solar and sub-solar metallicities and on a cosmological dwarf galaxy simulation. We find that the shielding-based model can reproduce the observed transition from atomic to molecular hydrogen at realistic surface densities, exhibits periodic bursts of star formation, and allows for star formation at higher temperatures and lower densities than a model in which star formation is tied directly to H2 abundance.

  10. Active Radiation Shield, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DEC-Shield technology offers the means to generate electric power from cosmic radiation sources and fuse dissimilar systems and functionality into a structural...

  11. Shielding calculations. Optimization vs. Paradigms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo Diaz, Nestor; Hernandez Saiz, Alejandro; Martinez Gonzalez, Alina

    2005-01-01

    Many radiation shielding barriers in Cuba have been designed according to the criterion of Maxi-mum Projected Dose Rates. This fact has created the paradigm of low dose rates. Because of this, dose rate levels greater than units of Sv.h-1 would be considered unacceptable by many specialists, regardless of the real exposure times. Nowadays many shielding barriers are being designed using dose constraints in real exposure times. Behind the new barriers, dose rates could be notably greater than those behind the traditional ones, and it does not imply inadequate designs or constructive errors. In this work were obtained significant differences in dose rate levels and shield-ing thicknesses calculated by both methods for some typical installations. The work concludes that real exposure time approach is more adequate in order to optimise Radiation Protection, although this method should be carefully applied

  12. Monte Carlo methods for shield design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimstone, M.J.

    1974-01-01

    A suite of Monte Carlo codes is being developed for use on a routine basis in commercial reactor shield design. The methods adopted for this purpose include the modular construction of codes, simplified geometries, automatic variance reduction techniques, continuous energy treatment of cross section data, and albedo methods for streaming. Descriptions are given of the implementation of these methods and of their use in practical calculations. 26 references. (U.S.)

  13. Shielding and maintainability in an experimental tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Fuller, G.; Hager, E.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an attempt to develop an understanding of the various factors involved. This work was performed as a part of the task assigned to one of the expert groups on the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). The shielding penalties for requiring personnel access are quantified. This is followed by a quantitative estimate of the benefits associated with personnel access. The penalties to the benefits and conclusions and recommendations on resolving the issue are discussed

  14. Computer control of shielded cell operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffords, W.R. III.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes in detail a computer system to remotely control shielded cell operations. System hardware, software, and design criteria are discussed. We have designed a computer-controlled buret that provides a tenfold improvement over the buret currently in service. A computer also automatically controls cell analyses, calibrations, and maintenance. This system improves conditions for the operators by providing a safer, more efficient working environment and is expandable for future growth and development

  15. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadori Amir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  16. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir; Semones, Edward; Ewert, Michael; Broyan, James; Walker, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  17. Particle Tracing Modeling with SHIELDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodroffe, J. R.; Brito, T. V.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2017-12-01

    The near-Earth inner magnetosphere, where most of the nation's civilian and military space assets operate, is an extremely hazardous region of the space environment which poses major risks to our space infrastructure. Failure of satellite subsystems or even total failure of a spacecraft can arise for a variety of reasons, some of which are related to the space environment: space weather events like single-event-upsets and deep dielectric charging caused by high energy particles, or surface charging caused by low to medium energy particles; other space hazards are collisions with natural or man-made space debris, or intentional hostile acts. A recently funded project through the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program aims at developing a new capability to understand, model, and predict Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large Dynamic Storms, the SHIELDS framework. The project goals are to understand the dynamics of the surface charging environment (SCE), the hot (keV) electrons on both macro- and microscale. These challenging problems are addressed using a team of world-class experts and state-of-the-art physics-based models and computational facilities. We present first results of a coupled BATS-R-US/RAM-SCB/Particle Tracing Model to evaluate particle fluxes in the inner magnetosphere. We demonstrate that this setup is capable of capturing the earthward particle acceleration process resulting from dipolarization events in the tail region of the magnetosphere.

  18. Passive magnetic shielding for the submillimeter and far infrared experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Koji; Warner, B.A.; Di Pirro, M.J.; Numazawa, Takenori

    2003-05-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center is developing the submillimeter and far infrared experiment (SAFIRE). SAFIRE will use SQUIDs as amplifiers for detectors, which must be shielded from the magnet cooling system, an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The magnetic field at the detector package must remain at or below the 10{sup -7} tesla level while the detectors are operating. We discuss laboratory tests of the passive shielding and simulations.

  19. Analysis methods for Kevlar shield response to rotor fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstle, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Several empirical and analytical approaches to rotor burst shield sizing are compared and principal differences in metal and fabric dynamic behavior are discussed. The application of transient structural response computer programs to predict Kevlar containment limits is described. For preliminary shield sizing, present analytical methods are useful if insufficient test data for empirical modeling are available. To provide other information useful for engineering design, analytical methods require further developments in material characterization, failure criteria, loads definition, and post-impact fragment trajectory prediction.

  20. Thermoforming plastic in lead shield construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahams, M.E.; Chow, C.H.; Loyd, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation treatments using low energy X-rays or electrons frequently require a final field defining shield to be placed on the patient's skin. A custom made lead cut-out is used to provide a close fit to a particular patient's surface contours. We have developed a procedure which utilizes POLYFORM thermoplastic to obtain a negative mold of the patient instead of the traditional plaster bandage or dental impression gel. The Polyform is softened in warm water, molded carefully over the patient's surface, and is removed when set or hardened, usually within five minutes. Then lead sheet cut-outs can be formed within this negative. For shielding cut-outs requiring thicker lead sheet, a positive is made from dental stone using this Polyform negative. We have found this procedure to be neat, fast and comfortable for both patient and the dosimetrist

  1. Symbolic math for computation of radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suman, Vitisha; Datta, D.; Sarkar, P.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation transport calculations for shielding studies in the field of accelerator technology often involve intensive numerical computations. Traditionally, radiation transport equation is solved using finite difference scheme or advanced finite element method with respect to specific initial and boundary conditions suitable for the geometry of the problem. All these computations need CPU intensive computer codes for accurate calculation of scalar and angular fluxes. Computation using symbols of the analytical expression representing the transport equation as objects is an enhanced numerical technique in which the computation is completely algorithm and data oriented. Algorithm on the basis of symbolic math architecture is developed using Symbolic math toolbox of MATLAB software. Present paper describes the symbolic math algorithm and its application as a case study in which shielding calculation of rectangular slab geometry is studied for a line source of specific activity. Study of application of symbolic math in this domain evolves a new paradigm compared to the existing computer code such as DORT. (author)

  2. A Launch Requirements Trade Study for Active Space Radiation Shielding for Long Duration Human Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Bollweg, Ken; Martin, Trent; Westover, Shayne; Battiston, Roberto; Burger, William J.; Meinke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    A trade study for an active shielding concept based on magnetic fields in a solenoid configuration versus mass based shielding was developed. Monte Carlo simulations were used to estimate the radiation exposure for two values of the magnetic field strength and the mass of the magnetic shield configuration. For each field strength, results were reported for the magnetic region shielding (end caps ignored) and total region shielding (end caps included but no magnetic field protection) configurations. A value of 15 cSv was chosen to be the maximum exposure for an astronaut. The radiation dose estimate over the total shield region configuration cannot be used at this time without a better understanding of the material and mass present in the end cap regions through a detailed vehicle design. The magnetic shield region configuration, assuming the end cap regions contribute zero exposure, can be launched on a single Space Launch System rocket and up to a two year mission can be supported. The magnetic shield region configuration results in two versus nine launches for a comparable mass based shielding configuration. The active shielding approach is clearly more mass efficient because of the reduced number of launches than the mass based shielding for long duration missions.

  3. A Shielding Concept for the MedAustron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jägerhofer, L.; Feldbaumer, E.; Roesler, S.; Theis, C.; Vincke, H.

    2017-09-01

    MedAustron is a synchrotron based accelerator facility for cancer therapy and research in Wiener Neustadt, 50 km south of Vienna. The facility will provide protons up to kinetic energies of 250 MeV and carbon ions up to 400 MeV/n for ion beam therapy. Additionally, protons up to 800 MeV kinetic energy will be used in a dedicated room for non-clinical research. In order to obtain a shielding concept for this facility a detailed geometry of the accelerator facility was implemented into the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA and shielding simulations were performed. In the course of these simulations the contributions of different particle types to the mixed fields around the accelerator and behind shielding were analysed. In an iterative process with the architect the final design of the shielding concept was developed until it was capable of reducing the effect of secondary radiation on humans and the environment below Austrian legal limits.

  4. Shielding calculation for treatment rooms of high energy linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elleithy, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    A review of German Institute of Standardization (DIN) scheme of the shielding calculation and the essential data required has been done for X-rays and electron beam in the energy range from 1 MeV to 50 MeV. Shielding calculation was done for primary and secondary radiations generated during X-ray operation of Linac. In addition, shielding was done against X-rays generated (Bremsstrahlung) by useful electron beams. The calculations also covered the neutrons generated from the interactions of useful X-rays (at energies above 8 MeV) with the surrounding. The present application involved the computation of shielding against the double scattered components of X-rays and neutrons in the maze area and the thickness of the paraffin wax of the room door. A new developed computer program was designed to assist shielding thickness calculations for a new Linac installation or in replacing an existing machine. The program used a combination of published tables and figures in computing the shielding thickness at different locations for all possible radiation situations. The DIN published data of 40 MeV accelerator room was compared with the program calculations. It was found that there is good agreement between both calculations. The developed program improved the accuracy and speed of calculation

  5. High frequency electromagnetic interference shielding magnetic polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingliang

    Electromagnetic interference is one of the most concerned pollution and problem right now since more and more electronic devices have been extensively utilized in our daily lives. Besides the interference, long time exposure to electromagnetic radiation may also result in severe damage to human body. In order to mitigate the undesirable part of the electromagnetic wave energy and maintain the long term sustainable development of our modern civilized society, new technology development based researches have been made to solve this problem. However, one of the major challenges facing to the electromagnetic interference shielding is the relatively low shielding efficiency and the high cost as well as the complicated shielding material manufacture. From the materials science point of view, the key solutions to these challenges are strongly depended on the breakthrough of the current limit of shielding material design and manufacture (such as hierarchical material design with controllable and predictable arrangement in nanoscale particle configuration via an easy in-situ manner). From the chemical engineering point of view, the upgrading of advanced material shielding performance and the enlarged production scale for shielding materials (for example, configure the effective components in the shielding material in order to lower their usage, eliminate the "rate-limiting" step to enlarge the production scale) are of great importance. In this dissertation, the design and preparation of morphology controlled magnetic nanoparticles and their reinforced polypropylene polymer nanocomposites will be covered first. Then, the functionalities of these polymer nanocomposites will be demonstrated. Based on the innovative materials design and synergistic effect on the performance advancement, the magnetic polypropylene polymer nanocomposites with desired multifunctionalities are designed and produced targeting to the electromagnetic interference shielding application. In addition

  6. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  7. MMW [multimegawatt] shielding design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Reactor shielding for multimegawatt (MMW) space power must satisfy a mass constraint as well as performance specifications for neutron fluence and gamma dose. A minimum mass shield is helpful in attaining the launch mass goal for the entire vehicle, because the shield comprises about 1% to 2% of the total vehicle mass. In addition, the shield internal heating must produce tolerable temperatures. The analysis of shield performance for neutrons and gamma rays is emphasized. Topics addressed include cross section preparation for multigroup 2D S/sub n/-transport analyses, and the results of parametric design studies on shadow shield performance and mass versus key shield design variables such as cone angle, number, placement, and thickness of layers of tungsten, and shield top radius. Finally, adjoint methods are applied to the shield in order to spatially map its relative contribution to dose reduction, and to provide insight into further design optimization. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Design and validation of a large-format transition edge sensor array magnetic shielding system for space application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, A.; Van Weers, H. J.; Bruineman, C.; Dhallé, M. M.J.; Krooshoop, H. J.G.; Ter Brake, H. J.M.; Ravensberg, K.; Jackson, B. D.; Wafelbakker, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the development and the experimental validation of a cryogenic magnetic shielding system for transition edge sensor based space detector arrays. The system consists of an outer mu-metal shield and an inner superconducting niobium shield. First, a basic comparison is made between

  9. A novel comprehensive utilization of vanadium slag: As gamma ray shielding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Mengge [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Xue, Xiangxin, E-mail: xuexx@mail.neu.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Yang, He; Liu, Dong [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Wang, Chao [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Zhefu [Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A novel comprehensive utilization method for vanadium slag is proposed. • Shielding properties of vanadium slag are better than ordinary concrete. • HVL of vanadium slag is between Lead and concrete to shield {sup 60}Co gamma ray. • HVL of composite is higher than concrete when adding amount of vanadium slag is 900. • Composite can be used as injecting mortar for cracks developed in concrete shields. - Abstract: New exploration of vanadium slag as gamma ray shielding material was proposed, the shielding properties of vanadium slag was higher than concrete when the energy of photons was in 0.0001 MeV–100000 MeV. Vanadium slag/epoxy resin composites were prepared, shielding and material properties of materials were tested by {sup 60}Co gamma ray, simultaneous DSC-TGA, electronic universal testing machine and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results showed that the shielding properties of composite would be better with the increase of vanadium slag addition amount. The HVL (half value layer thickness) of vanadium slag was between Lead and concrete while composite was higher than concrete when the addition amount of vanadium slag was 900 used as material to shield {sup 60}Co gamma ray, also the resistance temperature of composite was about 215 °C and the bending strength was over 10 MPa. The composites could be used as injecting mortar for cracks developed in biological concrete shields, coating for the floor of the nuclear facilities, and shielding materials by itself.

  10. Gravitational Field Shielding by Scalar Field and Type II Superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang B. J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The gravitational field shielding by scalar field and type II superconductors are theoret- ically investigated. In accord with the well-developed five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein theory with a scalar field, which unifies the Einsteinian general relativity and Maxwellian electromagnetic theory, the scalar field cannot only polarize the space as shown previously, but also flatten the space as indicated recently. The polariza- tion of space decreases the electromagnetic field by increasing the equivalent vacuum permittivity constant, while the flattening of space decreases the gravitational field by decreasing the equivalent gravitational constant. In other words, the scalar field can be also employed to shield the gravitational field. A strong scalar field significantly shield the gravitational field by largely decreasing the equivalent gravitational constant. According to the theory of gravitational field shielding by scalar field, the weight loss experimentally detected for a sample near a rotating ceramic disk at very low tempera- ture can be explained as the shielding of the Earth gravitational field by the Ginzburg- Landau scalar field, which is produced by the type II superconductors. The significant shielding of gravitational field by scalar field produced by superconductors may lead to a new spaceflight technology in future.

  11. Radiation shielding calculation for the MOX fuel fabrication plant Melox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.K.; Nimal, J.C.; Chiron, M.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation shielding calculation is an important engineering work in the design of the MOX fuel fabrication plant MELOX. Due to the recycle of plutonium and uranium from UO2 spent fuel reprocessing and the large capacity of production (120t HM/yr.), the shielding design requires more attention in this LWR fuel plant. In MELOX, besides several temporary storage facilities of massive fissile material, about one thousand radioactive sources with different geometries, forms, densities, quantities and Pu concentrations, are distributed through different workshops from the PuO 2 powder reception unit to the fuel assembly packing room. These sources, with or without close shield, stay temporarily in different locations, containers and glove boxes. In order to optimize the dimensions, the material and the cost of shield as well as to limit the calculation work in a reasonable engineer-hours, a calculation scheme for shielding design of MELOX is developed. This calculation scheme has been proved to be useful in consideration of the feedback from the evolutionary design and construction. The validated shielding calculations give a predictive but reliable radiation doses information. (authors). 2 figs., 10 refs

  12. Shieldings for X-ray radiotherapy facilities calculated by computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa, Paulo S.; Farias, Marcos S.; Gavazza, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a methodology for calculation of X-ray shielding in facilities of radiotherapy with help of computer. Even today, in Brazil, the calculation of shielding for X-ray radiotherapy is done based on NCRP-49 recommendation establishing a methodology for calculating required to the elaboration of a project of shielding. With regard to high energies, where is necessary the construction of a labyrinth, the NCRP-49 is not very clear, so that in this field, studies were made resulting in an article that proposes a solution to the problem. It was developed a friendly program in Delphi programming language that, through the manual data entry of a basic design of architecture and some parameters, interprets the geometry and calculates the shields of the walls, ceiling and floor of on X-ray radiation therapy facility. As the final product, this program provides a graphical screen on the computer with all the input data and the calculation of shieldings and the calculation memory. The program can be applied in practical implementation of shielding projects for radiotherapy facilities and can be used in a didactic way compared to NCRP-49.

  13. Shielding design at Fermilab: Calculations and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    The development of the Fermilab accelerator complex during the past two decades from its concept as the ''200 BeV accelerator'' to that of the present tevatron, designed to operate at energies as high as 1 TeV, has required a coincidental refinement and development in methods of shielding design. In this paper I describe these methods as used by the radiation protection staff of Fermilab. This description will review experimental measurements which substantiate these techniques in realistic situations. Along the way, observations will be stated which likely are applicable to other protron accelerators in the multi-hundred GeV energy region, including larger ones yet to be constructed

  14. Shielding and maintainability in an experimental tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Fuller, G.; Hager, E.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an attempt to develop an understanding of the various factors involved. This work was performed as a part of the task assigned to one of the expert groups on the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). However, the results of this investigation are believed to be generally applicable to the broad class of the next generation of experimental tokamak facilities such as ETF. The shielding penalties for requiring personnel access are quantified. This is followed by a quantitative estimate of the benefits associated with personnel access. The penalties are compared to the benefits and conclusions and recommendations are developed on resolving the issue

  15. Shielding structure analysis for LSDS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong Yeop; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Ho Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel) itself and the target material to generate neutrons is the LSDS system for isotopic fissile assay release of high intensity neutron and gamma rays. This research was performed to shield from various strong radiation. A shielding evaluation was carried out with a facilities model of LSDS system. The MCNPX 2.5 code was used and a shielding evaluation was performed for the shielding structure and location. The radiation dose based on the hole structure and location of the wall was evaluated. The shielding evaluation was performed to satisfy the safety standard for a normal person (1 μSv/h) and to use enough interior space. The MCNPX2.5 code was used and a dose evaluation was performed for the location of the shielding material, shielding structure, and hole structure. The evaluation result differs according to the shielding material location. The dose rate was small when the shielding material was positioned at the center. The dose evaluation result regarding the location of the shielding material was applied to the facility and the shielding thickness was determined (In 50 cm + Borax 5 cm + Out 45cm). In the existing hole structure, the radiation leak is higher than the standard. A hole structure model to prevent leakage of radiation was proposed. The general public dose limit was satisfied when using the concrete reinforcement and a zigzag structure. The shielding result will be of help to the facility shielding optimization.

  16. Shielding structure analysis for LSDS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hong Yeop; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Ho Dong

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel) itself and the target material to generate neutrons is the LSDS system for isotopic fissile assay release of high intensity neutron and gamma rays. This research was performed to shield from various strong radiation. A shielding evaluation was carried out with a facilities model of LSDS system. The MCNPX 2.5 code was used and a shielding evaluation was performed for the shielding structure and location. The radiation dose based on the hole structure and location of the wall was evaluated. The shielding evaluation was performed to satisfy the safety standard for a normal person (1 μSv/h) and to use enough interior space. The MCNPX2.5 code was used and a dose evaluation was performed for the location of the shielding material, shielding structure, and hole structure. The evaluation result differs according to the shielding material location. The dose rate was small when the shielding material was positioned at the center. The dose evaluation result regarding the location of the shielding material was applied to the facility and the shielding thickness was determined (In 50 cm + Borax 5 cm + Out 45cm). In the existing hole structure, the radiation leak is higher than the standard. A hole structure model to prevent leakage of radiation was proposed. The general public dose limit was satisfied when using the concrete reinforcement and a zigzag structure. The shielding result will be of help to the facility shielding optimization

  17. A Novel Radiation Shielding Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation shielding simulations showed that epoxy loaded with 10-70% polyethylene would be an excellent shielding material against GCRs and SEPs. Milling produced an...

  18. Simulation of a Shielded Thermocouple

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    performance of shielded thermocouple designs. A mathematical model of the thermocouple is obtained by derivation of the heat propagation equation in cylindrical coordinates and by considering the ... Here k is the thermal conductivity, p c is the specific heat capacity, ρ is the density,. ∞. T is the ambient temperature, and μ ...

  19. Development of a 4K/80K multiple operating type of GM refrigeration system for the superconducting magnet in maglev use. Cooling characteristics of the nitrogen self-circulated cooling-type radiation shield plate; Fujoshiki tetsudoyo chodendojishaku no 4K/80K ryoyo GM reito sisutemu no kaihatsu. Chisso shizen junkanhoshiki netsu shirudo no reikyaku tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Sanada, Yoshinao; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Yamaji, Mutsuhiko [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Terai, Motoaki [Central Japan Railway Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Igarashi, Motohiro; Yamaguchi, Mitsugu [Niigata Unviersity, Niigata (Japan)

    1999-02-25

    An onboard refrigeration system is one of the most important components in the superconducting magnetically levitated system (Maglev system). In the superconducting magnet, liquid helium and nitrogen are used to cool the superconducting coils and the radiation shields. At the Yamanashi Maglev Test Line, the operation of the superconducting magnet without a supplement of liquid helium has been achieved by the onboard 4 K Gifford-McMahon/Joule-Thomson (GM/JT) refrigerators- . As for the liquid nitrogen, it is supplied to the radiation shields periodically. Our final target for an onboard refrigeration system for commercial use is to operate magnets with no supplementation of cryogen. That is the operations of magnets should not depend on a helium liquefaction plant or a liquid nitrogen supplying system in the train depot, except for occasions of the magnet's precooling or when the vehicle is being overhauled. To meet these requirements, we have been developing a new type of onboard GM refrigeration (GM refrigerator application) system that features a combination of a 4K/80K multiple-operating type of GM refrigerator and a self-circulated cooling-type radiation shield. The nitrogen self-circulated cooling-type radiation shield plate was demonstrated by using the radiation shield plate mock-up. (author)

  20. Nanoscale microwave microscopy using shielded cantilever probes

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji

    2011-04-21

    Quantitative dielectric and conductivity mapping in the nanoscale is highly desirable for many research disciplines, but difficult to achieve through conventional transport or established microscopy techniques. Taking advantage of the micro-fabrication technology, we have developed cantilever-based near-field microwave probes with shielded structures. Sensitive microwave electronics and finite-element analysis modeling are also utilized for quantitative electrical imaging. The system is fully compatible with atomic force microscope platforms for convenient operation and easy integration of other modes and functions. The microscope is ideal for interdisciplinary research, with demonstrated examples in nano electronics, physics, material science, and biology.

  1. Electron cyclotron emission spectra in X- and O-mode polarisation at JET: Martin-Puplett interferometer, absolute calibration, revised uncertainties, inboard/outboard temperature profile, and wall properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuck, S; Fessey, J; Boom, J E; Meneses, L; Abreu, P; Belonohy, E; Lupelli, I

    2016-09-01

    At the tokamak Joint European Torus (JET), the electron cyclotron emission spectra in O-mode and X-mode polarisations are diagnosed simultaneous in absolute terms for several harmonics with two Martin-Puplett interferometers. From the second harmonic range in X-mode polarisation, the electron temperature profile can be deduced for the outboard side (low magnetic field strength) of JET but only for some parts of the inboard side (high magnetic field strength). This spatial restriction can be bypassed, if a cutoff is not present inside the plasma for O-mode waves in the first harmonic range. Then, from this spectral domain, the profile on the entire inboard side is accessible. The profile determination relies on the new absolute and independent calibration for both interferometers. During the calibration procedure, the antenna pattern was investigated as well, and, potentially, an increase in the diagnostic responsivity of about 5% was found for the domain 100-300 GHz. This increase and other uncertainty sources are taken into account in the thorough revision of the uncertainty for the diagnostic absolute calibration. The uncertainty deduced and the convolution inherent for Fourier spectroscopy diagnostics have implications for the temperature profile inferred. Having probed the electron cyclotron emission spectra in orthogonal polarisation directions for the first harmonic range, a condition is derived for the reflection and polarisation-scrambling coefficients of the first wall on the outboard side of JET.

  2. Normal-Force and Hinge-Moment Characteristics at Transonic Speeds of Flap-Type Ailerons at Three Spanwise Locations on a 4-Percent-Thick Sweptback-Wing-Body Model and Pressure-Distribution Measurements on an Inboard Aileron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runckel, Jack F.; Hieser, Gerald

    1961-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted at the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel to determine the loading characteristics of flap-type ailerons located at inboard, midspan, and outboard positions on a 45 deg. sweptback-wing-body combination. Aileron normal-force and hinge-moment data have been obtained at Mach numbers from 0.80 t o 1.03, at angles of attack up to about 27 deg., and at aileron deflections between approximately -15 deg. and 15 deg. Results of the investigation indicate that the loading over the ailerons was established by the wing-flow characteristics, and the loading shapes were irregular in the transonic speed range. The spanwise location of the aileron had little effect on the values of the slope of the curves of hinge-moment coefficient against aileron deflection, but the inboard aileron had the greatest value of the slope of the curves of hinge-moment coefficient against angle of attack and the outboard aileron had the least. Hinge-moment and aileron normal-force data taken with strain-gage instrumentation are compared with data obtained with pressure measurements.

  3. Characterization and biocompatibility studies of lead free X-ray shielding polymer composite for healthcare application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Bhupesh; Tyagi, Ajay Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Lead based X-ray shielding systems are widely being used in healthcare and radiation processing centers to protect technicians, operators and patients from unwanted exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the use of lead is avoided mainly due to its toxic effects on human health and environment, and also discomfort due to heavier in weight. Hence, production of non-toxic, environment friendly, lead-free X-ray shielding system with less weight and good radiation shielding efficiency compared to conventional lead-based shielding systems is a challenging issue and need of the day. The objectives of present study are to develop, characterize and establish synergy of the materials making radiation shielding composition and their biocompatibility without compromising on radiation shielding efficiency and physico-mechanical attributes vis-à-vis lead based systems.

  4. LOW-FREQUENCY MAGNETIC FIELD SHIELDING BY A CIRCULAR PASSIVE LOOP AND CLOSED SHELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Grinchenko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyze the shielding factors for a circular passive loop and conductive closed shells placed in a homogeneous low-frequency magnetic field. Methodology. We have obtained simplified expressions for the shielding factors for a circular passive loop and a thin spherical shell. In addition, we have developed the numerical model of a thin cubical shell in a magnetic field, which allows exploring its shielding characteristics. Results. We have obtained dependences of the shielding factors for passive loops and shells on the frequency of the external field. Analytically determined frequency of the external magnetic field, below which field shielding of a passive loop is expedient to use, above which it is advisable to use a shielding shell.

  5. Survivor shielding. Part A. Nagasaki factory worker shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Robert T.; Barnes, John M.; Azmy, Yousry Y.; Kerr, George D.; Egbert, Stephen D.; Cullings, Harry M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent investigations based on conventional chromosome aberration data by the RERF suggest that the DS86 doses received by many Nagasaki factory workers may have been overestimated by as much as 40% relative to those for other survivors in Japanese-type houses and other shielding configurations (Kodama et al. 2001). Since the factory workers represent about 25% of the Nagasaki survivors with DS86 doses in excess of 0.5 Gy (50 rad), systematic errors in their dose estimates can have a major impact on the risk coefficients from RERF studies. The factory worker doses may have been overestimated for a number of reasons. The calculation techniques, including the factory building modeling, weapon source spectra and cross-section data used in the DS86 shielding calculations were not detailed enough to replicate actual conditions. The models used did not take into account local shielding provided by machinery, tools, and the internal structure in the buildings. In addition, changes in the disposition of shielding following collapse of the building by the blast wave were not considered. The location of large factory complexes may be uncertain, causing large numbers of factory survivors, correctly located relative to each other, to be uniformly too close to the hypocenter. Any or all of these reasons are sufficient to result in an overestimate of the factory worker doses. During the DS02 studies, factory worker doses have been reassessed by more carefully modeling the factory buildings, incorporating improved radiation transport methods and cross-section data and using the most recent bomb leakage spectra (Chapter 2). Two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations were carried out initially to estimate the effects of workbenches and tools on worker doses to determine if the inclusion of these components would, in fact, reduce the dose by amounts consistent with the RERF observations (Kodama et al. 2001). (author)

  6. Photochromic ultraviolet protective shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudjil, Kamal

    2000-10-01

    Damage to the eye can result from unexpectedly low levels of light, particularly at the shorter wavelengths. UV emitting lasers such as Excimer (248 nm, 308 nm, 351 nm) and HeCd lasers (325 nm, 354 nm) are increasingly used in various applications including: medical, research (spectroscopy), stereolithography and semiconductor industries. Therefore, protection against harmful UV light is needed, but more importantly, development of a material that will react to detect the presence of UV light while completely protecting the wearer, is of great interest. Such materials have been developed with the use of lightweight clear plastics such as acrylics by incorporation of UV reactive photochromic compounds into a polymeric matrix.

  7. Neutron beam-line shield design for the protein crystallography instrument at the Lujan Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Muhrer, G.; Ferguson, P.D.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a very useful methodology for calculating absolute total (neutron plus gamma-ray) dose equivalent rates for use in the design of neutron beam line shields at a spallation neutron source. We have applied this technique to the design of beam line shields for several new materials science instruments being built at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. These instruments have a variety of collimation systems and different beam line shielding issues. We show here some specific beam line shield designs for the Protein Crystallography Instrument. (author)

  8. Numerical simulation of a reinforced concrete shield around a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahama, Mumuni Salifu

    1996-02-01

    Ghana currently operates a Research Reactor and other nuclear facilities including a Gamma Irradiation Facility, a Radiographic Non-Destructive Testing laboratory and would be operating in the nearest future a Radiotherapy Centre. Each of these has a concrete radiation shield as a major safety device. In carrying out its functions, a concrete radiation shield may be subjected to thermal and mechanical stresses. A facility for analysing these stresses is desirable. Two computer codes have been developed under this programme for radiation shielding computation and stress analysis of cylindrical reactor shields. (au)

  9. Novel shielding materials for space and air travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vana, N; Hajek, M; Berger, T; Fugger, M; Hofmann, P

    2006-01-01

    The reduction of dose onboard spacecraft and aircraft by appropriate shielding measures plays an essential role in the future development of space exploration and air travel. The design of novel shielding strategies and materials may involve hydrogenous composites, as it is well known that liquid hydrogen is most effective in attenuating charged particle radiation. As precursor for a later flight experiment, the shielding properties of newly developed hydrogen-rich polymers and rare earth-doped high-density rubber were tested in various ground-based neutron and heavy ion fields and compared with aluminium and polyethylene as reference materials. Absorbed dose, average linear energy transfer and gamma-equivalent neutron absorbed dose were determined by means of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosemeters and CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. First results for samples of equal aerial density indicate that selected hydrogen-rich plastics and rare-earth-doped rubber may be more effective in attenuating cosmic rays by up to 10% compared with conventional aluminium shielding. The appropriate adaptation of shielding thicknesses may thus allow reducing the biologically relevant dose. Owing to the lower density of the plastic composites, mass savings shall result in a significant reduction of launch costs. The experiment was flown as part of the European Space Agency's Biopan-5 mission in May 2005.

  10. Neutronic design of MYRRHA reactor hall shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celik Yurdunaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The lateral shielding of a 600 MeV proton linear accelerator beam line in the MYRRHA reactor hall has been assessed using neutronic calculations by the MCNPX code complemented with analytical predictions. Continuous beam losses were considered to define the required shielding thickness that meets the requirements for the dose rate limits. Required shielding thicknesses were investigated from the viewpoint of accidental full beam loss as well as beam loss on collimator. The results confirm that the required shielding thicknesses are highly sensitive to the spatial shape of the beam and strongly divergent beam losses. Therefore shielding barrier should be designed according to the more conservative assumptions.

  11. Magnetic leakage shield of septum magnet for SPring-8 synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Aoki, Tsuyoshi; Fukami, Kenji

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes magnetic field measurements of the prototype septum magnet and countermeasure for reducing the leakage magnetic fields in the incidence and the extraction parts of the SPring-8 synchrotron. We studied and developed 'leakage magnetic shield' on the basis of the tests data got in these measurements. Consequentially, it succeeded in reducing effects of the leakage field to about 50% by installing the shield board in the magnet main body. Then, it was possible to manufacture the magnet which sufficiently held the effect of the leakage field for the electron and positron beam. In this examination, we confirmed the reproduction with the magnetic field distribution of the magnet measured in the manufacturer. We developed and produced of the septum magnets which were carried out determination of the shapes of the magnetic shielding. (author)

  12. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  13. Radiation shield vest and skirt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maine, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    A two-piece garment is described which provides shielding for female workers exposed to radiation. The upper part is a vest, overlapping and secured in the front by adjustable closures. The bottom part is a wraparound skirt, also secured by adjustable closures. The two parts overlap, thus providing continuous protection from shoulder to knee and ensuring that the back part of the body is protected as well as the front

  14. Handbook of radiation shielding data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, J.C.

    1976-07-01

    This handbook is a compilation of data on units, conversion factors, geometric considerations, sources of radiation, and the attenuation of photons, neutrons, and charged particles. It also includes related topics in health physics. Data are presented in tabular and graphical form with sufficient narrative for a least first-approximation solutions to a variety of problems in nuclear radiation protection. Members of the radiation shielding community contributed the information in this document from unclassified and uncopyrighted sources, as referenced

  15. Shielding Idiosyncrasy from Isomorphic Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, José Luis; Mazza, Carmelo; Strandgaard Pedersen, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    with legitimacyin the field. Our theory of creative actionfor optimal distinctiveness suggests thatfilm directors increase their control bypersonally consolidating artistic andproduction roles, by forming closepartnership with committed producer, andby establishing own production company.Ironically, to escape......Abstract. This paper advances a microtheory of creative action by examining howdistinctive artists shield their idiosyncraticstyles from the isomorphic pressures of afield. It draws on the cases of threeinternationally recognized, distinctiveEuropean film directors - Pedro Almodóvar(Spain), Nanni...

  16. Calculation of shielding parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya Z, J.

    1994-01-01

    With the propose of reduce the hazard to radiation, exist three basic factors: a) time, the time to exposition to working person inside to area, from exist determined speed the doses, is proportional of the time permanence; b) distance, the reduce to doses is inverse square of the distance to exposition point; c) building, consist to interpose between source and exposition point to material. The main aspect development to the analysis of parameters distance and building. The analysis consist to development of the mathematical implicit, in the model of source radioactive, beginning with the geometry to source, distance to exposition source, and configuration building. In the final part was realize one comparative studied to calculus of parameters to blinding, employs two codes CPBGAM and MICROSHIELD, the first made as part to work thesis. The point source its a good approximation to any one real source, but in the majority of the time to propose analysis the spatial distribution of the source must realized in explicit way. The buildings calculus in volumetry's source can be approximate begin's of plan as source adaptations. It's important to have present that not only the building exist the exposition to the radiation, and the parameters time and distance plays an important paper too. (Author)

  17. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) Shielding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    Photonic Bandgap (PBG) shielding technology is a new approach to designing electromagnetic shielding materials for mitigating Electromagnetic Interference (EM!) with small, light-weight shielding materials. It focuses on ground planes of printed wiring boards (PWBs), rather than on components. Modem PSG materials also are emerging based on planar materials, in place of earlier, bulkier, 3-dimensional PBG structures. Planar PBG designs especially show great promise in mitigating and suppressing EMI and crosstalk for aerospace designs, such as needed for NASA's Constellation Program, for returning humans to the moon and for use by our first human visitors traveling to and from Mars. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) materials are also known as artificial dielectrics, meta-materials, and photonic crystals. General PBG materials are fundamentally periodic slow-wave structures in I, 2, or 3 dimensions. By adjusting the choice of structure periodicities in terms of size and recurring structure spacings, multiple scatterings of surface waves can be created that act as a forbidden energy gap (i.e., a range of frequencies) over which nominally-conductive metallic conductors cease to be a conductor and become dielectrics. Equivalently, PBG materials can be regarded as giving rise to forbidden energy gaps in metals without chemical doping, analogous to electron bandgap properties that previously gave rise to the modem semiconductor industry 60 years ago. Electromagnetic waves cannot propagate over bandgap regions that are created with PBG materials, that is, over frequencies for which a bandgap is artificially created through introducing periodic defects

  18. Shielding wall for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Takaho.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns shielding walls opposing to plasmas of a thermonuclear device and it is an object thereof to conduct reactor operation with no troubles even if a portion of shielding wall tiles should be damaged. That is, the shielding wall tiles are constituted as a dual layer structure in which the lower base tiles are connected by means of bolts to first walls. Further, the upper surface tiles are bolt-connected to the layer base tiles. In this structure, the plasma thermal loads are directly received by the surface layer tiles and heat is conducted by means of conduction and radiation to the underlying base tiles and the first walls. Even upon occurrence of destruction accidents to the surface layer tiles caused by incident heat or electromagnetic force upon elimination of plasmas, since the underlying base tiles remain as they are, the first walls constituted with stainless steels, etc. are not directly exposed to the plasmas. Accordingly, the integrity of the first walls having cooling channels can be maintained and sputtering intrusion of atoms of high atom number into the plasmas can be prevented. (I.S.)

  19. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  20. Calculation, planning, and production technology of the radiation shielding means of nuclear power plants in spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremin, A.G.; Korobkov, L.S.; Dubinin, A.A.; Pyshko, A.P.; Tkach, K.G.; Bochvar, A.A.

    1993-01-01

    The development of reliable nuclear power plants for spacecraft is an iterative process in which all elements are jointly optimized. In the present development stage, there is a division into quasi-independent problems one of which is the development of radiation shielding means. The solution to this problem is a complicated multistage process involving greatly dissimilar tasks, namely the calculation, the planning, the production, and the quality control of the shielding means. In the initial stage of planning, the research work is concerned with the selection of the optimal rearrangement of the spacecraft and the associated shielding composition. The arrangement selected is thereafter entered into detailed calculations which are to define in greater detail the parameters of the radiation shielding means and the parameters of the radiation fields in the circuitry and the components of the spacecraft. The calculations proceed in parallel with further developments of the design of the shield, which implies determination of optimal design and method meeting the requirements

  1. Evaluation of the usefulness of bismuth shields in PET/CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hoon Hee; Lyu, Kwang Yeul; Lee, Ju Young; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Kung, Sik Nam; Lee, Tae Soo

    2014-01-01

    Recently with CT developed, various studies for reduction of exposure dose is underway. Study of bismuth shields in these studies is actively underway, and has already been applied in the clinical. However, the application of the PET/CT examination was not activated. Therefore, through this study, depending on the application of bismuth shields in the PET/CT examination, we identify the quality of the image and the impact on the Standard Uptake Value (SUV). In this study, to apply to the shielding of the breast, by using the bismuth shields that contains 0.06 mm Pb ingredients, was applied to the PET/CT GEMINI TF 64 (Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, USA). Phantom experiments using the NEMA IEC Body Phantom, images were acquired according to the presence or absence of bismuth shields apply. Also, When applying, images were obtained by varying the spacing 0, 1, 2 cm each image set to the interest range in the depth of the phantom by using EBW-NM ver.1.0. When image of the PET Emission acquires, the SUV was in increased depending on the use of bismuth shields, difference in the depth to the surface from deep in the phantom increasingly SUV increased (P<0.005). Also, when using shields, as the more gab decreased, SUV is more increased (P<0.005). Through this study, PET/CT examination by using of bismuth shields which is used as purpose of reduction dose. When using shields, the difference of SUV resulting from the application of bismuth shields exist and that difference when gab is decrease and surface is wider. Therefore, setting spacing of shield should be considered, if considering the reduction of the variation of SUV and image quality, disease of deep organs should be a priority rather than superficial organ disease. Use of bismuth shielding factor considering the standard clinical examination, decrease unnecessary exposure can be expected to be considered

  2. Oxidative shielding and the cost of reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Jonathan D; Vitikainen, Emma I K; Stott, Iain; Cant, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Life-history theory assumes that reproduction and lifespan are constrained by trade-offs which prevent their simultaneous increase. Recently, there has been considerable interest in the possibility that this cost of reproduction is mediated by oxidative stress. However, empirical tests of this theory have yielded equivocal support. We carried out a meta-analysis to examine associations between reproduction and oxidative damage across markers and tissues. We show that oxidative damage is positively associated with reproductive effort across females of various species. Yet paradoxically, categorical comparisons of breeders versus non-breeders reveal that transition to the reproductive state is associated with a step-change reduction in oxidative damage in certain tissues and markers. Developing offspring may be particularly sensitive to harm caused by oxidative damage in mothers. Therefore, such reductions could potentially function to shield reproducing mothers, gametes and developing offspring from oxidative insults that inevitably increase as a consequence of reproductive effort. According to this perspective, we hypothesise that the cost of reproduction is mediated by dual impacts of maternally-derived oxidative damage on mothers and offspring, and that mothers may be selected to diminish such damage. Such oxidative shielding may explain why many existing studies have concluded that reproduction has little or no oxidative cost. Future advance in life-history theory therefore needs to take account of potential transgenerational impacts of the mechanisms underlying life-history trade-offs. © 2015 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  3. MicroShield/ISOCS gamma modeling comparison.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansone, Kenneth R

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative radiological analysis attempts to determine the quantity of activity or concentration of specific radionuclide(s) in a sample. Based upon the certified standards that are used to calibrate gamma spectral detectors, geometric similarities between sample shape and the calibration standards determine if the analysis results developed are qualitative or quantitative. A sample analyzed that does not mimic a calibrated sample geometry must be reported as a non-standard geometry and thus the results are considered qualitative and not quantitative. MicroShieldR or ISOCSR calibration software can be used to model non-standard geometric sample shapes in an effort to obtain a quantitative analytical result. MicroShieldR and Canberras ISOCSR software contain several geometry templates that can provide accurate quantitative modeling for a variety of sample configurations. Included in the software are computational algorithms that are used to develop and calculate energy efficiency values for the modeled sample geometry which can then be used with conventional analysis methodology to calculate the result. The response of the analytical method and the sensitivity of the mechanical and electronic equipment to the radionuclide of interest must be calibrated, or standardized, using a calibrated radiological source that contains a known and certified amount of activity.

  4. Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, David I.; Ade, Brian J.; Sadasivan, Pratap; Leichliter, Katrina J.; Dixon, David D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates potential shielding options for surface power fission reactors. The majority of work is focused on a lunar shield that uses a combination of water in stainless-steel cans and lunar regolith. The major advantage of a water-based shield is that development, testing, and deployment should be relatively inexpensive. This shielding approach is used for three surface reactor concepts: (1) a moderated spectrum, NaK cooled, Hastalloy/UZrH reactor, (2) a fast-spectrum, NaK-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor, and (3) a fast-spectrum, K-heat-pipe-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor. For this study, each of these reactors is coupled to a 25-kWt Stirling power system, designed for 5 year life. The shields are designed to limit the dose both to the Stirling alternators and potential astronauts on the surface. The general configuration used is to bury the reactor, but several other options exist as well. Dose calculations are presented as a function of distance from reactor, depth of buried hole, water boron concentration (if any), and regolith repacked density.

  5. Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, David I.; Sadasivan, Pratap; Dixon, David D.; Ade, Brian J.; Leichliter, Katrina J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates potential shielding options for surface power fission reactors. The majority of work is focused on a lunar shield that uses a combination of water in stainless-steel cans and lunar regolith. The major advantage of a water-based shield is that development, testing, and deployment should be relatively inexpensive. This shielding approach is used for three surface reactor concepts: (1) a moderated spectrum, NaK cooled, Hastalloy/UZrH reactor, (2) a fast-spectrum, NaK-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor, and (3) a fast-spectrum, K-heat-pipe-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor. For this study, each of these reactors is coupled to a 25-kWt Stirling power system, designed for 5 year life. The shields are designed to limit the dose both to the Stirling alternators and potential astronauts on the surface. The general configuration used is to bury the reactor, but several other options exist as well. Dose calculations are presented as a function of distance from reactor, depth of buried hole, water boron concentration (if any), and regolith repacked density

  6. Modelling and Optimization of Four-Segment Shielding Coils of Current Transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yucheng; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Qing; Qu, Kaifeng; Li, He; Shao, Haiming; Huang, Songling

    2017-05-26

    Applying shielding coils is a practical way to protect current transformers (CTs) for large-capacity generators from the intensive magnetic interference produced by adjacent bus-bars. The aim of this study is to build a simple analytical model for the shielding coils, from which the optimization of the shielding coils can be calculated effectively. Based on an existing stray flux model, a new analytical model for the leakage flux of partial coils is presented, and finite element method-based simulations are carried out to develop empirical equations for the core-pickup factors of the models. Using the flux models, a model of the common four-segment shielding coils is derived. Furthermore, a theoretical analysis is carried out on the optimal performance of the four-segment shielding coils in a typical six-bus-bars scenario. It turns out that the "all parallel" shielding coils with a 45° starting position have the best shielding performance, whereas the "separated loop" shielding coils with a 0° starting position feature the lowest heating value. Physical experiments were performed, which verified all the models and the conclusions proposed in the paper. In addition, for shielding coils with other than the four-segment configuration, the analysis process will generally be the same.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-16

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  8. The Modified Socket Shield Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chang-Hun; Park, Kwang-Bum; Mangano, Francesco Guido

    2018-03-20

    In the anterior regions, the resorption of the buccal bone after tooth extraction leads to a contraction of the overlying soft tissues, resulting in an esthetic problem, particularly with immediate implant placement. In the socket shield technique, the buccal root section of the tooth is maintained, to preserve the buccal bone for immediate implant placement. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the survival, stability, and complication rates of implants placed using a "modified" socket shield technique. Over a 2-year period, all patients referred to a dental clinic for treatment with oral implants were considered for inclusion in this study. Inclusion criteria were healthy adult patients who presented nonrestorable single teeth with intact buccal periodontal tissues in the anterior regions of both jaws. Exclusion criteria were teeth with present/past periodontal disease, vertical root fractures on the buccal aspect, horizontal fractures below bone level, and external/internal resorptions. The buccal portion of the root was retained to prevent the resorption of the buccal bone; the shield was 1.5 mm thick with the most coronal portion at the bone crest level. All patients then underwent immediate implants. In the patient with a gap between the implant and shield, no graft material was placed. All implants were immediately restored with single crowns and followed for 1 year. The main outcomes were implant survival, stability, and complications. Thirty patients (15 males, 15 females; mean age was 48.2 ± 15.0 years) were enrolled in the study and installed with 40 immediate implants. After 1 year, all implants were functioning, for a survival rate of 100%; excellent implant stability was reported (mean implant stability quotient at placement: 72.9 ± 5.9; after 1 year: 74.6 ± 2.7). No biologic complications were reported, and the incidence of prosthetic complications was low (2.5%). The "modified" socket shield technique seems to be a

  9. Modelling the electrical properties of concrete for shielding effectiveness prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrolini, L; Reggiani, U; Ogunsola, A

    2007-01-01

    Concrete is a porous, heterogeneous material whose abundant use in numerous applications demands a detailed understanding of its electrical properties. Besides experimental measurements, material theoretical models can be useful to investigate its behaviour with respect to frequency, moisture content or other factors. These models can be used in electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) to predict the shielding effectiveness of a concrete structure against external electromagnetic waves. This paper presents the development of a dispersive material model for concrete out of experimental measurement data to take account of the frequency dependence of concrete's electrical properties. The model is implemented into a numerical simulator and compared with the classical transmission-line approach in shielding effectiveness calculations of simple concrete walls of different moisture content. The comparative results show good agreement in all cases; a possible relation between shielding effectiveness and the electrical properties of concrete and the limits of the proposed model are discussed

  10. Modelling the electrical properties of concrete for shielding effectiveness prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrolini, L.; Reggiani, U.; Ogunsola, A.

    2007-09-01

    Concrete is a porous, heterogeneous material whose abundant use in numerous applications demands a detailed understanding of its electrical properties. Besides experimental measurements, material theoretical models can be useful to investigate its behaviour with respect to frequency, moisture content or other factors. These models can be used in electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) to predict the shielding effectiveness of a concrete structure against external electromagnetic waves. This paper presents the development of a dispersive material model for concrete out of experimental measurement data to take account of the frequency dependence of concrete's electrical properties. The model is implemented into a numerical simulator and compared with the classical transmission-line approach in shielding effectiveness calculations of simple concrete walls of different moisture content. The comparative results show good agreement in all cases; a possible relation between shielding effectiveness and the electrical properties of concrete and the limits of the proposed model are discussed.

  11. Investigating Radiation Shielding Properties of Different Mineral Origin Heavyweight Concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyigit, Celalettin; Uysal, Volkan; Kilinçarslan, Şemsettin; Mavi, Betül; Günoǧlu, Kadir; Akkurt, Iskender; Akkaş, Ayşe

    2011-12-01

    The radiation although has hazardous effects for human health, developing technologies bring lots of usage fields to radiation like in medicine and nuclear power station buildings. In this case protecting from undesirable radiation is a necessity for human health. Heavyweight concrete is one of the most important materials used in where radiation should be shielded, like those areas. In this study, used heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin (Limonite, Siderite), in order to prepare different series in concrete mixtures and investigated radiation shielding properties. The experimental results on measuring the radiation shielding, the heavyweight concrete prepared with heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin show that, are useful radiation absorbents when they used in concrete mixtures.

  12. Investigating Radiation Shielding Properties of Different Mineral Origin Heavyweight Concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basyigit, Celalettin; Uysal, Volkan; Kilincarslan, Semsettin; Akkas, Ayse; Mavi, Betuel; Guenoglu, Kadir; Akkurt, Iskender

    2011-01-01

    The radiation although has hazardous effects for human health, developing technologies bring lots of usage fields to radiation like in medicine and nuclear power station buildings. In this case protecting from undesirable radiation is a necessity for human health. Heavyweight concrete is one of the most important materials used in where radiation should be shielded, like those areas. In this study, used heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin (Limonite, Siderite), in order to prepare different series in concrete mixtures and investigated radiation shielding properties. The experimental results on measuring the radiation shielding, the heavyweight concrete prepared with heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin show that, are useful radiation absorbents when they used in concrete mixtures.

  13. Shielded Heavy-Ion Environment Linear Detector (SHIELD): an experiment for the Radiation and Technology Demonstration (RTD) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, M. R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Wilson, J. W.; Singleterry, R. C. Jr

    2001-01-01

    Radiological assessment of the many cosmic ion species of widely distributed energies requires the use of theoretical transport models to accurately describe diverse physical processes related to nuclear reactions in spacecraft structures, planetary atmospheres and surfaces, and tissues. Heavy-ion transport models that were designed to characterize shielded radiation fields have been validated through comparison with data from thick-target irradiation experiments at particle accelerators. With the RTD Mission comes a unique opportunity to validate existing radiation transport models and guide the development of tools for shield design. For the first time, transport properties will be measured in free-space to characterize the shielding effectiveness of materials that are likely to be aboard interplanetary space missions. Target materials composed of aluminum, advanced composite spacecraft structure and other shielding materials, helium (a propellant) and tissue equivalent matrices will be evaluated. Large solid state detectors will provide kinetic energy and charge identification for incident heavy-ions and for secondary ions created in the target material. Transport calculations using the HZETRN model suggest that 8 g cm -2 thick targets would be adequate to evaluate the shielding effectiveness during solar minimum activity conditions for a period of 30 days or more.

  14. Enhanced radiation shielding with galena concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadad Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new concrete, containing galena mineral, with enhanced shielding properties for gamma sources is developed. To achieve optimized shielding properties, ten types of galena concrete containing different mixing ratios and a reference normal concrete of 2300 kg/m3 density are studied experimentally and numerically using Monte Carlo and XCOM codes. For building galena concrete, in addition to the main composition, micro-silica and water, galena mineral (containing lead were used. The built samples have high density of 4470 kg/m3 to 5623 kg/m3 and compressive strength of 628 kg/m2 to 685 kg/m2. The half and tenth value layers (half value layer and tenth value layers for the galena concrete, when irradiated with 137Cs gamma source, were found to be 1.45 cm and 4.94 cm, respectively. When irradiated with 60Co gamma source, half value layer was measured to be 2.42 cm. The computation modeling by FLUKA and XCOM shows a good agreement between experimental and computational results.

  15. A superconducting shield to protect astronauts

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Superconductors team in the Technology department is involved in the European Space Radiation Superconducting Shield (SR2S) project, which aims to demonstrate the feasibility of using superconducting magnetic shielding technology to protect astronauts from cosmic radiation in the space environment. The material that will be used in the superconductor coils on which the project is working is magnesium diboride (MgB2), the same type of conductor developed in the form of wire for CERN for the LHC High Luminosity Cold Powering project.   Image: K. Anthony/CERN. Back in April 2014, the CERN Superconductors team announced a world-record current in an electrical transmission line using cables made of the MgB2 superconductor. This result proved that the technology could be used in the form of wire and could be a viable solution for both electrical transmission for accelerator technology and long-distance power transportation. Now, the MgB2 superconductor has found another application: it wi...

  16. Systems for neutronic, thermohydraulic and shielding calculation in personal computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarino, E.A.; Abbate, P.; Lovotti, O.; Santini, M.

    1990-01-01

    The MTR-PC (Materials Testing Reactors-Personal Computers) system has been developed by the Nuclear Engineering Division of INVAP S.E. with the aim of providing working conditions integrated with personal computers for design and neutronic, thermohydraulic and shielding analysis for reactors employing plate type fuel. (Author) [es

  17. Effect of sunlight shielding on leaf structure and amino acids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this case, the chloroplasts showed partially lysed, with few thylakoids. The leaf albinism was reverted when the leaf was shielded from direct illumination of strong sunlight. It is considered that the blocked development of chloroplast and photosynthetic pigments in the albinism leaf inhibited the biosynthesis of leaf proteins, ...

  18. RADIO SHIELDING PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE BASED ON SHUNGITE NANOMATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BELOUSOVA Elena Sergeevna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of shielding construction materials based on Portland cement with the addition of powder nanomaterial shungite were developed. Attenuation and re­flection of electromagnetic radiation for obtained materials were studied. Recommen­dations for using are given.

  19. Evaluation of electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of multi-axial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Textile Technology, Serik G.S. Süral Vocational School of Higher Education, Akdeniz University, 07500. Antalya, Turkey. MS received 18 June 2015; accepted 21 January 2016 ... tinue in information technology and electronic equipments. [5]. Therefore, suitable shielding materials are needed to be developed ...

  20. Radiation shielding activities at IDOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordóñez, César Hueso; Gurpegui, Unai Cano; Valiente, Yelko Chento; Poveda, Imanol Zamora

    2017-01-01

    When human activities have to be performed under ionising radiation environments the safety of the workers must be guaranteed. Usually three principles are used to accomplish with ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) requirements: the more distance between the source term and the worker, the better; the less time spent to arrange any task, the better; and, once the previous principles are optimized should the exposure of the workers continues being above the regulatory limits, shielding has to be implemented. Through this paper some different examples of IDOM's shielding design activities are presented. Beginning with the gamma collimators for the Jules Horowitz Reactor, nuclear fuel's behaviour researching facility, where the beam path crosses the reactor's containment walls and is steered up to a gamma detector where the fuel spectrum is analysed and where the beam has to be attenuated several orders of magnitude in a short distance. Later it is shown IDOM’s approach for the shielding of the Emergency Control Management Center of Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs-II NPPs, a bunker designed to withstand severe accident conditions and to support the involved staff during 30 days, considering the outside radioactive cloud and the inside source term that filtering units become as they filter the incoming air. And finally, a general approach to this kind of problems is presented, since the study of the source term considering all the possible contributions, passing through the material selection and the thicknesses calculation until the optimization of the materials. (author)

  1. Shielded room measurements, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanton, J.S.

    1949-02-22

    The attenuation of electro-statically and electro-magnetically shielded rooms in the ``E,`` ``R,`` ``I,`` and ``T`` Buildings was measured so that corrective measure could be taken if the attenuation was found to be low. If remedial measures could not be taken, the shortcomings of the rooms would be known. Also, the men making the measurements should oversee construction and correct errors at the time. The work was performed by measuring the attenuation at spot frequencies over the range of from 150 kilocycles to 1280 megacycles with suitable equipment mounted in small rubber-tried trucks. The attenuation was determined by ``before and after`` shielding and/or ``door open and door closed`` measurements after installation of copper shielding. In general, attenuation in the frequency range of approximately 10 to 150 mc. was good and was of the order expected. At frequencies in the range of 150 mc. to 1280 mc., the attenuation curve was more erratic; that is, at certain frequencies a severe loss of attenuation was noted, while at others, the attenuation was very good. This was mainly due to poor or faulty seals around doors and pass windows. These poor seals existed in the ``T,`` ``E,`` and ``I`` Buildings because the doors were fitted improperly and somewhat inferior material was used. By experience from these difficulties, both causes were corrected in the ``R`` Building, which resulted in the improvement of the very high frequency (v.h.f.) range in this building. In some specific cases, however, the results were about the same. For the range of frequencies below approximately 10 mc., the attenuation, in almost all cases, gradually decreased as the frequency decreased and reached a minimum at .3 to 1.0 mc. This loss of attenuation was attributed to multiple grounding caused by moisture in the insulating timbers and will gradually decrease as the wood dries out.

  2. Radiation shielding activities at IDOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordóñez, César Hueso; Gurpegui, Unai Cano; Valiente, Yelko Chento; Poveda, Imanol Zamora, E-mail: cesar.hueso@idom.com [IDOM, Consulting, Engineering and Architecture, S.A.U, Vizcaya (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    When human activities have to be performed under ionising radiation environments the safety of the workers must be guaranteed. Usually three principles are used to accomplish with ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) requirements: the more distance between the source term and the worker, the better; the less time spent to arrange any task, the better; and, once the previous principles are optimized should the exposure of the workers continues being above the regulatory limits, shielding has to be implemented. Through this paper some different examples of IDOM's shielding design activities are presented. Beginning with the gamma collimators for the Jules Horowitz Reactor, nuclear fuel's behaviour researching facility, where the beam path crosses the reactor's containment walls and is steered up to a gamma detector where the fuel spectrum is analysed and where the beam has to be attenuated several orders of magnitude in a short distance. Later it is shown IDOM’s approach for the shielding of the Emergency Control Management Center of Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs-II NPPs, a bunker designed to withstand severe accident conditions and to support the involved staff during 30 days, considering the outside radioactive cloud and the inside source term that filtering units become as they filter the incoming air. And finally, a general approach to this kind of problems is presented, since the study of the source term considering all the possible contributions, passing through the material selection and the thicknesses calculation until the optimization of the materials. (author)

  3. Magnetic shielding of a limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevnov, N.N.; Stepanov, S.B.; Khimchenko, L.N.; Matthews, G.F.; Goodal, D.H.J.

    1991-01-01

    Localization of plasma interaction with material surfaces in a separate chamber, from where the escape of impurities is hardly realized, i.e. application of magnetic divertors or pump limiters, is the main technique for reduction of the impurity content in a plasma. In this case, the production of a divertor configuration requires a considerable power consumption and results in a less effective utilization of the magnetic field volume. Utilization of a pump limiter, for example the ICL-type, under tokamak-reactor conditions would result in the extremely high and forbidden local heat loadings onto the limiter surface. Moreover, the magnetically-shielded pump limiter (MSL) was proposed to combine positive properties of the divertor and the pump limiter. The idea of magnetic shielding is to locate the winding with current inside the limiter head so that the field lines of the resultant magnetic field do not intercept the limiter surface. In this case the plasma flows around the limiter leading edges and penetrates into the space under the limiter. The shielding magnetic field can be directed either counter the toroidal field or counter the poloidal one of a tokamak, dependent on the concrete diagram of the device. Such a limiter has a number of advantages: -opportunity to control over the particle and impurity recycling without practical influence upon the plasma column geometry, - perturbation of a plasma column magnetic configuration from the side of such a limiter is less than that from the side of the divertor coils. The main deficiency is the necessity to locate active windings inside the discharge chamber. (author) 5 refs., 3 figs

  4. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang, Wenjun [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  5. Irrigoscopy - irrigography method, dosimetry and radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubanov, Z.; Kolarevic, G.

    1999-01-01

    Use of patient's radiation shielding during radiology diagnostic procedures in our country is insufficiently represent, so patients needlessly receive very high entrance skin doses in body areas which are not in direct x-ray beam. During irrigoscopy, patient's radiation shielding is very complex problem, because of the organs position. In the future that problem must be solved. We hope that some of our suggestions about patient's radiation shielding during irrigoscopy, can be a small step in that way. (author)

  6. Thermal, Radiation and Impact Protective Shields (TRIPS) for Robotic and Human Space Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, M. P.; Arnold, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    New concepts for protective shields for NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicles (CEVs) and planetary probes offer improved mission safety and affordability. Hazards include radiation from cosmic rays and solar particle events, hypervelocity impacts from orbital debris/ micrometeorites, and the extreme heating environment experienced during entry into planetary atmospheres. The traditional approach for the design of protection systems for these hazards has been to create single-function shields, i.e. ablative and blanket-based heat shields for thermal protection systems (TPS), polymer or other low-molecular-weight materials for radiation shields, and multilayer, Whipple-type shields for protection from hypervelocity impacts. This paper introduces an approach for the development of a single, multifunctional protective shield, employing nanotechnology- based materials, to serve simultaneously as a TPS, an impact shield and as the first line of defense against radiation. The approach is first to choose low molecular weight ablative TPS materials, (existing and planned for development) and add functionalized carbon nanotubes. Together they provide both thermal and radiation (TR) shielding. Next, impact protection (IP) is furnished through a tough skin, consisting of hard, ceramic outer layers (to fracture the impactor) and sublayers of tough, nanostructured fabrics to contain the debris cloud from the impactor before it can penetrate the spacecraft s interior.

  7. Isotopic age of enderbites of Ukrainian shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartnitskij, E.N.; Bojko, V.L.; Levkovskaya, N.Yu.; Lesnaya, I.M.; Siroshtan, R.I.; Sharkin, O.P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of determining U-Pb isotopic age of accessory zircons from enderbites of Azov, Dniestrovo-Bug and Ingulo-Ingultsk regions of the Ukrainian shield are presented. The isotopic age values obtained make up from 3400 millions of years for enderbites of Novo-Pavlovsk complex of the Ukrainian shield up to 2100 millions of years for enderbites and charnockites of Berdichev complex. So, enderbites of both Archean and Proterozoic age are found in the Ukrainian shield area which points out to diversification of granulites metamorphism manifestation in various blocks of the Ukrainian shield

  8. Problems of the power plant shield optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abagyan, A.A.; Dubinin, A.A.; Zhuravlev, V.I.; Kurachenko, Yu.A.; Petrov, Eh.E.

    1981-01-01

    General approaches to the solution of problems on the nuclear power plant radiation shield optimization are considered. The requirements to the shield parameters are formulated in a form of restrictions on a number of functionals, determined by the solution of γ quantum and neutron transport equations or dimensional and weight characteristics of shield components. Functional determined by weight-dimensional parameters (shield cost, mass and thickness) and functionals, determined by radiation fields (equivalent dose rate, produced by neutrons and γ quanta, activation functional, radiation functional, heat flux, integral heat flux in a particular part of the shield volume, total energy flux through a particular shield surface are considered. The following methods of numerical solution of simplified optimization problems are discussed: semiempirical methods using radiation transport physical leaks, numerical solution of approximate transport equations, numerical solution of transport equations for the simplest configurations making possible to decrease essentially a number of variables in the problem. The conclusion is drawn that the attained level of investigations on the problem of nuclear power plant shield optimization gives the possibility to pass on at present to the solution of problems with a more detailed account of the real shield operating conditions (shield temperature field account, its strength and other characteristics) [ru

  9. Optimization of the CMS forward shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Huhtinen, Mika

    2000-01-01

    A first realistic version of the CMS forward shielding was presented in the 1999 Engineering Design Review. It was discovered that the background increased by a factor of 2 with respect to the TDR where an idealized shielding had been assumed. This note describes the optimizations implemented in the realistic shielding with the aim to recover the TDR performance. An optimization of the shielding geometry, the beam pipe and a filling of major cracks has allowed to achieve the goal. Although the differences to the TDR are very minor, these new calculations should be understood as an update to those presented in the TDR.

  10. Analytic Shielding Optimization to Reduce Crew Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Inside Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaza, Razvan; Cooper, Tim P.; Hanzo, Arthur; Hussein, Hesham; Jarvis, Kandy S.; Kimble, Ryan; Lee, Kerry T.; Patel, Chirag; Reddell, Brandon D.; Stoffle, Nicholas; hide

    2009-01-01

    A sustainable lunar architecture provides capabilities for leveraging out-of-service components for alternate uses. Discarded architecture elements may be used to provide ionizing radiation shielding to the crew habitat in case of a Solar Particle Event. The specific location relative to the vehicle where the additional shielding mass is placed, as corroborated with particularities of the vehicle design, has a large influence on protection gain. This effect is caused by the exponential- like decrease of radiation exposure with shielding mass thickness, which in turn determines that the most benefit from a given amount of shielding mass is obtained by placing it so that it preferentially augments protection in under-shielded areas of the vehicle exposed to the radiation environment. A novel analytic technique to derive an optimal shielding configuration was developed by Lockheed Martin during Design Analysis Cycle 3 (DAC-3) of the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). [1] Based on a detailed Computer Aided Design (CAD) model of the vehicle including a specific crew positioning scenario, a set of under-shielded vehicle regions can be identified as candidates for placement of additional shielding. Analytic tools are available to allow capturing an idealized supplemental shielding distribution in the CAD environment, which in turn is used as a reference for deriving a realistic shielding configuration from available vehicle components. While the analysis referenced in this communication applies particularly to the Orion vehicle, the general method can be applied to a large range of space exploration vehicles, including but not limited to lunar and Mars architecture components. In addition, the method can be immediately applied for optimization of radiation shielding provided to sensitive electronic components.

  11. Development of improved low-strain creep strength in Cabot alloy R-41 sheet. [nickel base sheet alloy for reentry shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of improving the low-strain creep properties of a thin gauge nickel base sheet alloy through modified heat treatment or through development of a preferred crystal-lographic texture was investigated. The basic approach taken to improve the creep strength of the material by heat treatment was to increase grain size by raising the solution treatment temperature for the alloy to the range of 1420 K to 1475 K (2100 F to 2200 F). The key technical issue involved was maintenance of adequate tensile ductility following the solutioning of M6C primary carbides during the higher temperature solution treatment. The approach to improve creep properties by developing a sheet texture involved varying both annealing temperatures and the amount of prior cold work. Results identified a heat treatment for alloy R-14 sheet which yields a substantial creep-life advantage at temperatures above 1090 K (1500 F) when compared with material given the standard heat treatment. At the same time, this treatment provides reasonable tensile ductility over the entire temperature range of interest. The mechanical properties of the material given the new heat treatment are compared with those for material given the standard heat treatment. Attempts to improve creep strength by developing a sheet texture were unsuccessful.

  12. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    .6, 12.9, 7.2, 3.7, and 1.7 Gy{sub 10}, respectively. P-RSBT HR-CTV D{sub 90}-values were insensitive to the paddle size for paddles angled at less than 60°. Increasing the paddle angle from 5° to 60° resulted in only a 0.6 Gy{sub 10} decrease in HR-CTV D{sub 90} on average for five cases when the delivery times were set to 15 min/fx. The HR-CTV D{sub 90} decreased to 2.5 and 11.9 Gy{sub 10} with paddle angles of 90° and 120°, respectively. Conclusions: P-RSBT produces treatment plans that are dosimetrically and temporally superior to those of S-RSBT and D-RSBT, although P-RSBT systems may be more mechanically challenging to develop than S-RSBT or D-RSBT. A P-RSBT implementation with 4–6 shield paddles would be sufficient to outperform S-RSBT and D-RSBT if delivery times are constrained to less than 15 min/fx.

  13. Use of a radio frequency shield during 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: experimental evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favazza CP

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher P Favazza, Deirdre M King, Heidi A Edmonson, Joel P Felmlee, Phillip J Rossman, Nicholas J Hangiandreou, Robert E Watson, Krzysztof R Gorny Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Radiofrequency (RF shields have been recently developed for the purpose of shielding portions of the patient's body during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examinations. We present an experimental evaluation of a commercially available RF shield in the MRI environment. All tests were performed on 1.5 T and 3.0 T clinical MRI scanners. The tests were repeated with and without the RF shield present in the bore, for comparison. Effects of the shield, placed within the scanner bore, on the RF fields generated by the scanner were measured directly using tuned pick-up coils. Attenuation, by as much as 35 dB, of RF field power was found inside the RF shield. These results were supported by temperature measurements of metallic leads placed inside the shield, in which no measurable RF heating was found. In addition, there was a small, simultaneous detectable increase (~1 dB of RF power just outside the edges of the shield. For these particular scanners, the autocalibrated RF power levels were reduced for scan locations prescribed just outside the edges of the shield, which corresponded with estimations based on the pick-up coil measurements. Additionally, no significant heating during MRI scanning was observed on the shield surface. The impact of the RF shield on the RF fields inside the magnet bore is likely to be dependent on the particular model of the RF shield or the MRI scanner. These results suggest that the RF shield could be a valuable tool for clinical MRI practices. Keywords: radiofrequency shield, magnetic resonance imaging, radiofrequency attenuation

  14. TPX remote maintenance and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennich, M.J.; Nelson, B.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment machine design incorporates comprehensive planning for efficient and safe component maintenance. Three programmatic decisions have been made to insure the successful implementation of this objective. First, the tokamak incorporates radiation shielding to reduce activation of components and limit the dose rate to personnel working on the outside of the machine. This allows most of the ex-vessel equipment to be maintained through conventional ''hands-on'' procedures. Second, to the maximum extent possible, low activation materials will be used inside the shielding volume. This resulted in the selection of Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) for the vacuum vessel and PFC structures. The third decision stipulated that the primary in-vessel components will be replaced or repaired via remote maintenance tools specifically provided for the task. The component designers have been given the responsibility of incorporating maintenance design and for proving the maintainability of the design concepts in full-scale mockup tests prior to the initiation of final fabrication. Remote maintenance of the TPX machine is facilitated by general purpose tools provided by a special purpose design team. Major tools will include an in-vessel transporter, a vessel transfer system and a large component transfer container. In addition, tools such as manipulators and remotely operable impact wrenches will be made available to the component designers by this group. Maintenance systems will also provide the necessary controls for this equipment

  15. Isotope effects on nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    This review concentrates upon empirical trends and practical uses of mostly secondary isotope effects, both of the intrinsic and equilibrium types. The text and the tables are arranged in the following fashion. The most 'popular' isotope effect is treated first, deuterium isotope effects on 13 C nuclear shielding, followed by deuterium on 1 H nuclear shieldings, etc. Focus is thus on the isotopes producing the effect rather than on the nuclei suffering the effect. After a brief treatment of each type of isotope effect, general trends are dealt with. Basic trends of intrinsic isotope effects such as additivity, solvent effects, temperature effects, steric effects, substituent effects and hyperconjugation are discussed. Uses of isotope effects for assignment purposes, in stereochemical studies, in hydrogen bonding and in isotopic tracer studies are dealt with. Kinetic studies, especially of phosphates, are frequently performed by utilizing isotope effects. In addition, equilibrium isotope effects are treated in great detail as these are felt to be new and very important and may lead to new uses of isotope effects. Techniques used to obtain isotope effects are briefly surveyed at the end of the chapter. (author)

  16. Continuous electrodeionization through electrostatic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermentzis, Konstantinos

    2008-01-01

    We report a new continuous electrodeionization cell with electrostatically shielded concentrate compartments or electrochemical Faraday cages formed by porous electronically and ionically conductive media, instead of permselective ion exchange membranes. Due to local elimination of the applied electric field within the compartments, they electrostatically retain the incoming ions and act as 'electrostatic ion pumps' or 'ion traps' and therefore concentrate compartments. The porous media are chemically and thermally stable. Electrodeionization or electrodialysis cells containing such concentrate compartments in place of ion exchange membranes can be used to regenerate ion exchange resins and produce deionized water, to purify industrial effluents and desalinate brackish or seawater. The cells can work by polarity reversal without any negative impact to the deionization process. Because the electronically and ionically active media constituting the electrostatically shielded concentrate compartments are not permselective and coions are not repelled but can be swept by the migrating counterions, the cells are not affected by the known membrane associated limitations, such as concentration polarization or scaling and show an increased current efficiency

  17. Analysis of ferromagnetic shielding of the ITER NBI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roccella, M.; Lucca, F.; Roccella, R.; Cocilovo, V.; Ramogida, G.; Portone, A.; Tanga, A.; Formisano, A.; Martone, R.

    2006-01-01

    In ITER two heating and one diagnostic Neutral Beam Injectors (NBIs) are foreseen [P. L. Mondino et al., ''ITER neutral beam system '', Nucl. Fus., vol. 40, p. 501 (2000)]. Inside these components there are very stringent limits on the magnetic field (the flux density must be below some Gauss (G) along the ion path and below 20 G in the neutralizing region). To achieve these performances in an environment with high stray field due to the plasma and the poloidal field coils, both passive and active shielding systems are foreseen. The present design of the Magnetic Field Reduction System (MFRS) is made of seven active coils and of a box surrounding the NBI region, consisting of ferromagnetic plates 15 cm thick. The electromagnetic analysis of the effectiveness of these shields has been performed by a full 3D FEM model using the ANSYS code. To perform the FEM modeling of the component special care has been used to face the particular geometrical features of the component (a box of about 15 x 5 x 5 m vs. a ferromagnetic layer of only 15 cm thick). To insert an adequate number of FEM elements (at least 5) in the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer, without a prohibitive increase in the total FEM elements number, a particular modeling approach (a sort of '' Chinese boxes '' technique) has been developed. Due to this technique the FEM model enclosing the ferromagnetic box results completely independent on the fine FEM structure inside the shielding layer. It has been even possible, using this technique, introducing a thin (below 1 cm thick) slot all through the shielding plates, without perturbing the rest of the model. This slot has been used to analyze the effects of possible manufacturing lacks on the residual magnetic field inside the component. This technique has allowed the use of only structured meshes made by brick elements, much more accurate than the tetra elements, needed in the usual free meshing techniques. To have the possibility of changing the shielding

  18. Evaluation of an alternative shielding materials for F-127 transport package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gual, Maritza R.; Mesquita, Amir Z.; Pereira, Cláubia

    2018-03-01

    Lead is used as radiation shielding material for the Nordion's F-127 source shipping container is used for transport and storage of the GammaBeam -127's cobalt-60 source of the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) located in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. As an alternative, Th, Tl and WC have been evaluated as radiation shielding material. The goal is to check their behavior regarding shielding and dosing. Monte Carlo MCNPX code is used for the simulations. In the MCNPX calculation was used one cylinder as exclusion surface instead one sphere. Validation of MCNPX gamma doses calculations was carried out through comparison with experimental measurements. The results show that tungsten carbide WC is better shielding material for γ-ray than lead shielding.

  19. Shield design for next-generation, low-neutron-fluence, superconducting tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A shield design using stainless steel (SST), water, boron carbide, lead, and concrete materials was developed for the next-generation tokamak device with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and low neutron fluence. A device such as the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) is representative of the tokamak design which could use this shield design. The unique feature of this reference design is that a majority of the bulk steel in the shield is in the form of spherical balls with two small, flat spots. The balls are purchased from ball-bearing manufacturers and are added as bulk shielding to the void areas of builtup, structural steel shells which form the torus cavity of the plasma chamber. This paper describes the design configuration of the shielding components

  20. Progress in Research on Lightweight Graphene-based EMI Shielding Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Chan-yuan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With rapid progresses on the advanced electronic science and technology, electromagnetic irradiations have led to considerable issues, including electromagnetic pollutions, electromagnetic interference and security concerns, in electronics, aeronautics, astronautics, information technology, communication systems and etc. Based on the fundamentals of the electromagnetic interference shielding and general methods for preparing graphene nanosheets, this review involves the recent advances in the electromagnetic interference shielding materials of various applications in four morphologies, which include bulk, lightweight foams, flexible films and those for operation at high temperature. Meanwhile, the major strategical methods and general concept for designing and fabricating graphene-based electromagnetic interference shielding materials have been overviewed, and fundamental issues of electromagnetic interference technology have been further discussed. The perspectives for fabricating novel electromagnetic interference shielding materials, including ultrathin and transparent configuration, and future development have been proposed based on the practical applications, which suggest significant conception for designing next generation lightweight EMI shielding materials.

  1. Effects of Aperture Size on Q factor and Shielding Effectiveness of a Cubic Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Stefan; Chromy, Stephan; Dickmann, Stefan; Schaarschmidt, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The EMC properties of a cubic metallic shield are highly affected by its resonances. At the resonant frequencies, the shielding effectiveness (SE) collapses, which results in high field strengths inside the cavity. This can cause failure or even breakdown of electronic devices inside the shield. The resonant behaviour is mainly determined by the quality or Q factor of the shield. In this paper, the effects of the aperture size on the Q factor and the SE of an electrically large, cubic shield are analysed. At first, a method is developed in order to determine the Q factor based on the resonance behaviour of the shield in time domain. Only the first resonance of the shield is considered therefore. The results are evaluated for different aperture diameters and compared with theory for the Q factor. The dominant coupling mechanism of electromagnetic energy into the shield is thus identified. Then the effect of aperture size on the SE is analysed. The excitation of resonances is very probable if the interfering signal is an ultrawideband (UWB) pulse, which constitutes a typical intentional electromagnetic interference (IEMI) scenario. Therefore, the relation between aperture size and SE is analysed using the theory of the transient SE for a broadband signal with a constant spectral density distribution. The results show, that a worst case aperture size exists, where the SE has its minimum.

  2. Design and analysis of magnetic shield for 650 MHz SCRF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Vanshree; Jain, Vikas; Das, S.; Shinde, R.S.; Joshi, S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Five-cell, 650 MHz Superconducting RF (SCRF) cavity is being developed at RRCAT for the Injector Linac of proposed ISNS project. The SCRF cavity needs to be shielded effectively from earth magnetic field. The external magnetic field can cause magnetic field trapping that limits the performance of SCRF cavity. The allowable limit of earth magnetic field in the cavity surface is < 10 mG. The magnetic shielding analysis carried out for 650 MHz dressed SCRF cavity is presented in this paper. For axial magnetic field shielding analysis, 2-D code PANDIRA has been used. A 2-D axisymmetric geometry (cylinder of Cryoperm10 sheet with 460 mm diameter of various thickness and 1100 mm length) has been modelled and analyzed in the presence of 240 mG external axial magnetic field. The influence of partial opening of 120 mm diameter at both ends of the cylinder on magnetic field pattern inside the shielded region has been evaluated. The transverse magnetic shielding analysis in the presence of 500 mG transverse external field has been carried out using OPERA 3D code. The flux leakage through the major openings for cavity supports, ports on the shield is investigated and accordingly the openings are designed to minimize the leakage. Inference of material thickness on the magnetic shielding for reducing magnetic field below specified limit has been investigated. Details of design and analysis of magnetic shield for SCRF cavity will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  3. Effects of Aperture Size on Q factor and Shielding Effectiveness of a Cubic Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Parr

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The EMC properties of a cubic metallic shield are highly affected by its resonances. At the resonant frequencies, the shielding effectiveness (SE collapses, which results in high field strengths inside the cavity. This can cause failure or even breakdown of electronic devices inside the shield. The resonant behaviour is mainly determined by the quality or Q factor of the shield. In this paper, the effects of the aperture size on the Q factor and the SE of an electrically large, cubic shield are analysed. At first, a method is developed in order to determine the Q factor based on the resonance behaviour of the shield in time domain. Only the first resonance of the shield is considered therefore. The results are evaluated for different aperture diameters and compared with theory for the Q factor. The dominant coupling mechanism of electromagnetic energy into the shield is thus identified. Then the effect of aperture size on the SE is analysed. The excitation of resonances is very probable if the interfering signal is an ultrawideband (UWB pulse, which constitutes a typical intentional electromagnetic interference (IEMI scenario. Therefore, the relation between aperture size and SE is analysed using the theory of the transient SE for a broadband signal with a constant spectral density distribution. The results show, that a worst case aperture size exists, where the SE has its minimum.

  4. Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL; Grove, Robert E [ORNL; Kodeli, I. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Sartori, Enrico [ORNL; Gulliford, J. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    2011-01-01

    The Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD) collection of benchmarks was initiated in the early 1990 s. SINBAD is an international collaboration between the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development s Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (OECD/NEADB) and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SINBAD is a major attempt to compile experiments and corresponding computational models with the goal of preserving institutional knowledge and expertise that need to be handed down to future scientists. SINBAD is also a learning tool for university students and scientists who need to design experiments or gain expertise in modeling and simulation. The SINBAD database is currently divided into three categories fission, fusion, and accelerator benchmarks. Where possible, each experiment is described and analyzed using deterministic or probabilistic (Monte Carlo) radiation transport software.

  5. Shielding integral benchmark archive and database (SINBAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, B.L.; Grove, R.E. [Radiation Safety Information Computational Center RSICC, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6171 (United States); Kodeli, I. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gulliford, J.; Sartori, E. [OECD NEA Data Bank, Bd des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2011-07-01

    The shielding integral benchmark archive and database (SINBAD) collection of experiments descriptions was initiated in the early 1990s. SINBAD is an international collaboration between the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (OECD/NEADB) and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SINBAD was designed to compile experiments and corresponding computational models with the goal of preserving institutional knowledge and expertise that need to be handed down to future scientists. SINBAD can serve as a learning tool for university students and scientists who need to design experiments or gain expertise in modeling and simulation. The SINBAD database is currently divided into three categories - fission, fusion, and accelerator experiments. Many experiments are described and analyzed using deterministic or stochastic (Monte Carlo) radiation transport software. The nuclear cross sections also play an important role as they are necessary in performing computational analysis. (authors)

  6. A practical neutron shielding design based on data-base interpolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, S.H.; Sheu, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron shielding design is an important part of the construction of nuclear reactors and high-energy accelerators. Neutron shielding design is also indispensable in the packaging and storage of isotopic neutron sources. Most efforts in the development of neutron shielding design have been concentrated on nuclear reactor shielding because of its huge mass and strict requirement of accuracy. Sophisticated computational tools, such as transport and Monte Carlo codes and detailed data libraries have been developed. In principle, now, neutron shielding, in spite of its complexity, can be designed in any detail and with fine accuracy. However, in most practical cases, neutron shielding design is accomplished with simplified methods. Unlike practical gamma-ray shielding design, where exponential attenuation coupled with buildup factors has been applied effectively and accurately, simplified neutron shielding design, either by using removal cross sections or by applying charts or tables of transmission factors such as the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 38 (Ref. 1) for general neutron protection or to NCRP 51 (Ref. 2) for accelerator neutron shielding, is still very primitive and not well established. The available data are limited in energy range, materials, and thicknesses, and the estimated results are only roughly accurate. It is the purpose of this work to establish a simple, convenient, and user-friendly general-purpose computational tool for practical preliminary neutron shielding design that is reasonably accurate. A wide-range (energy, material, and thickness) data base of dose transmission factors has been generated by applying one-dimensional transport calculations in slab geometry

  7. Fabrication of prototype mockups of ITER shielding blanket with separable first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaku, Yasuo; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Enoeda, Mikio; Hatano, Toshihisa; Sato, Satoshi; Akiba, Masato

    2002-07-01

    Design of shielding blanket for ITER-FEAT applies the first wall which has the separable structure from the shield block for the purpose of radio-active waste reduction in the maintenance work and cost reduction in fabrication process. Also, it is required to have various types of slots in both of the first wall and the shield block, to reduce the eddy current for reduction of electro-magnetic force in disruption events. This report summarizes the demonstrative fabrication of the ITER shielding blanket with separable first wall performed for the shielding blanket fabrication technology development, under the task agreement of G 16 TT 108 FJ (T420-2) in ITER Engineering Design Activity Extension Period. The objectives of the demonstrative fabrication are: to demonstrate the comprehensive fabrication technique in a large scale component (e.g the joining techniques for the beryllium armor/copper alloy and copper alloy/SS, and the slotting method of the FW and shield block); to develop an improved fabrication method for the shielding blanket based on the ITER-FEAT updated design. In this work, the fabrication technique of full scale separable first wall shield blanket was confirmed by fabricating full width Be armored first wall panel, full scale of 1/2 shield block with poloidal cooling channels. As the R and D for updated cooling channel configuration, the fabrication technique of the radial channel shield block was also demonstrated. Concluding to the all R and D results, it was demonstrated successfully that the fabrication technique and optimized conditions in the results obtained under the task agreement of G 16 TT 95 FJ (T420-1) was applicable to the prototype of the separable first wall blanket module. Additionally, basic echo data of ultra-sonic test method (UT) was obtained to show the applicability of UT method for in tube access detection of defect on the Cu alloy/SS tube interface. (author)

  8. Heavy concrete shieldings made of recycled radio-active steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.; Quade, U.; Sappok, M.; Heim, H.

    1998-01-01

    Maintenance and decommissioning of nuclear installations will generate increasing quantities of radioactively contaminated metallic residues. For many years, Siempelkamp has been melting low-level radioactive scrap in order to re-use it for containers of nuclear industry. Another new recycling path has recently been developed by producing steel granules from the melt. These granules are used as replacement for hematite (iron ore) in the production of heavy concrete shieldings. In the CARLA plant (central plant for the recycling of low-level radioactive waste) of Siempelkamp Nuklear- und Umwelttechnik GmbH and Co., the scrap is melted in a medium frequency induction furnace. The liquid iron is poured into a cooling basin through a water jet, which splits the iron into granules. The shape of these granules is determined by various factors, such as water jet speed, pouring rate of the liquid iron and different additives to the melt. In this process, massive spheres with diameters ranging from 1 to 8 mm can be produced which add to the density of heavy concrete elements for optimum shielding. In close cooperation with Boschert, which indeed is an expert for the production of concrete shieldings, a new technology for manufacturing heavy concrete shieldings, containing low-level radioactive steel granules, has been developed. The portion of steel granules in the concrete is approx. 50 weight-%. A concrete density between 2.4 kg/dm 3 and 4.0 kg/dm 3 is available. The compressive strength for the concrete reaches values up to 65 MPa. Different types of Granulate Shielding Casks (GSC) are offered by Siempelkamp. The most famous one is the GSC 200 for 200 1 drums, which has already been qualified for final storage of radioactive wastes at the German Morsleben final repository (ERAM). This newly developed recycling process further increases the quantities of low-level radioactive metallic wastes available for recycling. Expensive storage area can thus be saved respectively

  9. Optically-transparent radiation-shielding composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolles, T.F.; Fleming, P.B.

    1976-01-01

    An optically transparent, essentially colorless radiation shielding material for high energy radiation contains a combination of lead or thallium salts of C 1 to C 5 organic acids and may contain lead or thallium salts of mineral acids. Shields of complex shapes are easily constructed

  10. Improvements in or relating to nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, R.J.; Riley, K.; Powell, C.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear radiation shield comprises two pieces of steel held together edge to edge by a weld, the depth of which is less than the thickness of either of the edges. As the radiaion shielding effect of the weld will be less than the steel, an insert is bolted or welded over the weld. (U.K.)

  11. Several problems in accelerator shielding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Hirayama, Hideo; Ban, Shuichi.

    1980-01-01

    Recently, the utilization of accelerators has increased rapidly, and the increase of accelerating energy and beam intensity is also remarkable. The studies on accelerator shielding have become important, because the amount of radiation emitted from accelerators increased, the regulation of the dose of environmental radiation was tightened, and the cost of constructing shielding rose. As the plans of constructing large accelerators have been made successively, the survey on the present state and the problems of the studies on accelerator shielding was carried out. Accelerators are classified into electron accelerators and proton accelerators in view of the studies on shielding. In order to start the studies on accelerator shielding, first, the preparation of the cross section data is indispensable. The cross sections for generating Bremsstrahlung, photonuclear reactions generating neutrons, generation of neutrons by hadrons, nuclear reaction of neutrons and generation of gamma-ray by hadrons are described. The generation of neutrons and gamma-ray as the problems of thick targets is explained. The shielding problems are complex and diversified, but in this paper, the studies on the shielding, by which basic data are obtainable, are taken up, such as beam damping and side wall shielding. As for residual radioactivity, main nuclides and the difference of residual radioactivity according to substances have been studied. (J.P.N.)

  12. Actively shielded low level gamma - spectrometric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrdja, D.; Bikit, I.; Forkapic, S.; Slivka, J.; Veskovic, M.

    2005-01-01

    The results of the adjusting and testing of the actively shielded low level gamma-spectrometry system are presented. The veto action of the shield reduces the background in the energy region of 50 keV to the 2800 keV for about 3 times. (author) [sr

  13. Fundamental Parameters of the SHIELD II Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, John

    2014-10-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs" ("SHIELD") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in 12 low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered in early Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey data products. Cycle 19 HST observations of the 12 SHIELD galaxies have allowed us to determine their TRGB distances, thus anchoring the physical scales on which our ongoing analysis is based. Since the inception of SHIELD, the ALFALFA survey has completed data acquisition, thereby populating the faint end of the HI mass function with dozens of SHIELD analogs. In this proposal we request ACS imaging of 18 of these "SHIELD II" galaxies that have already been imaged in the HI spectral line with the WSRT. These data will enable a holistic HST imaging study of the fundamental parameters and characteristics of a statistically robust sample of 30 extremely low-mass galaxies (including 12 SHIELD and 18 SHIELD II systems). The primary science goal is the derivation of TRGB distances; the distance dependence of many fundamental parameters makes HST observations critical for the success of SHIELD II. Additional science goals include an accurate census of the dark matter contents of these galaxies, a spatial and temporal study of star formation within them, and a characterization of the fundamental parameters that change as galaxy masses range from "mini-halo" to star-forming dwarf.

  14. Shielding effectiveness of superconductive particles in plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pienkowski, T.; Kincaid, J.; Lanagan, M.T.; Poeppel, R.B.; Dusek, J.T.; Shi, D.; Goretta, K.C.

    1988-09-01

    The ability to cool superconductors with liquid nitrogen instead of liquid helium has opened the door to a wide range of research. The well known Meissner effect, which states superconductors are perfectly diamagnetic, suggests shielding applications. One of the drawbacks to the new ceramic superconductors is the brittleness of the finished material. Because of this drawback, any application which required flexibility (e.g., wire and cable) would be impractical. Therefore, this paper presents the results of a preliminary investigation into the shielding effectiveness of YBa 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-x/ both as a composite and as a monolithic material. Shielding effectiveness was measured using two separate test methods. One tested the magnetic (near field) shielding, and the other tested the electromagnetic (far field) shielding. No shielding was seen in the near field measurements on the composite samples, and only one heavily loaded sample showed some shielding in the far field. The monolithic samples showed a large amount of magnetic shielding. 5 refs., 5 figs

  15. Infrared shield facilitates optical pyrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbrenner, F. F.; Illg, W.

    1965-01-01

    Water-cooled shield facilitates optical pyrometer high temperature measurements of small sheet metal specimens subjected to tensile stress in fatigue tests. The shield excludes direct or reflected radiation from one face of the specimen and permits viewing of the infrared radiation only.

  16. Metallogeny of gold in the Fennoscandian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaál, G.; Sundblad, K.

    1990-12-01

    Gold occurs in a number of different ore types in the Fennoscandian Shield ranging in age from Late Archean to Late Proterozoic. Until recently, the metal was exploited primarily as a byproduct in volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits but during the 1980s more gold mines have been opened than during any other episode in the mining history of northern Europe. The occurrence of gold in the Fennoscandian Shield is reviewed in the context of the major tectonostratigraphic units: 1. In the Karelian Province, gold is hosted by greenstone belts of the Archean basement complex e.g. at Ilomantsi, eastern Finland. Greenstone belts of the Nordkalott Province, which are interpreted as part of an Early Proterozoic cover sequence, contain gold deposits associated with copper (Bidjovagge, Saattopora and Pahtohavare). Gold is also associated with cobalt in the metasomatically altered Early Proterozoic cover in north-eastern Finland (Meurastuksenaho and Juomasuo). 2. In the Svecofennian Domain, the major gold deposits were generated during the emplacement of 1.92 1.87 Ga old accretional magmatism. These deposits occur in the northeastern part of the Svecofennian Domain, close to the Archean-Proterozoic boundary. They comprise two major types: (a) the porphyry-type and shear-zone gold hosted by tonalite at Tallberg, Laivakangas, Kopsa and Osikonmäki; (b) as a component of volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits (e.g. Holmtjärn, Boliden and Pyhäsalmi). Other types are: (c) gold-bearing quartz-alumina alteration zones formed during the 1.92 1.87 Ga magmatic period (Enåsen); (d) gold in massive sulphide and iron ore deposits in Bergslagen. 3. Gold associated with 1.84 1.54 Ga granites has been reported from several sites in the Shield, including quartz veins and contact-metasomatic deposits. In addition, shear-zone-related gold deposits post-dating these granites have been identified in southeastern Sweden (Ädelfors). 4. In the Sveconorwegian Domain, the gold deposits at Bleka

  17. GFR Sub-Assembly Shielding Design Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. R. Parry

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the methodology and results for a preliminary study for Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) subassembly fast neutron shielding configurations. The purpose of the shielding in the subassembly is to protect reactor components from fast (E>0.1 MeV) neutrons. The subassembly is modeled in MCNP version 5 release 1.30. Parametric studies were performed varying the thickness of the shielding and calculating the fast neutron flux at the vessel head and the core grid plate. This data was used to determine the minimum thickness needed to protect the vessel head and the core grid plate. These thicknesses were used to analyze different shielding configurations incorporating coolant passages and also to estimate the neutron and photon energy deposition in the shielding material.

  18. Practical radiation shielding for biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.C.; Reginatto, M.; Party, E.; Gershey, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on calculations which exist for estimating shielding required for radioactivity; however, they are often not applicable for the radionuclides and activities common in biomedical research. A variety of commercially available Lucite shields are being marketed to the biomedical community. Their advertisements may lead laboratory workers to expect better radiation protection than these shields can provide or to assume erroneously that very weak beta emitters require extensive shielding. The authors have conducted a series of shielding experiments designed to simulate exposures from the amounts of 32 P, 51 Cr and 125 I typically used in biomedical laboratories. For most routine work, ≥0.64 cm of Lucite covered with various thicknesses of lead will reduce whole-body occupational exposure rates of < 1mR/hr at the point of contact

  19. Radiation Shielding Systems Using Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin (Inventor); McKay, Christoper P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system for shielding personnel and/or equipment from radiation particles. In one embodiment, a first substrate is connected to a first array or perpendicularly oriented metal-like fingers, and a second, electrically conducting substrate has an array of carbon nanostructure (CNS) fingers, coated with an electro-active polymer extending toward, but spaced apart from, the first substrate fingers. An electric current and electric charge discharge and dissipation system, connected to the second substrate, receives a current and/or voltage pulse initially generated when the first substrate receives incident radiation. In another embodiment, an array of CNSs is immersed in a first layer of hydrogen-rich polymers and in a second layer of metal-like material. In another embodiment, a one- or two-dimensional assembly of fibers containing CNSs embedded in a metal-like matrix serves as a radiation-protective fabric or body covering.

  20. Neutron shielding heat insulation material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Susumu; Asaumi, Hiroshi; Take, Shigeo; Miyakoshi, Jun-ichi; Takemoto, Hiroshi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve decceleration and absorption of neutrons by incorporating neutron moderators and neutron absorbers in asbestos to thereby increase hydrogen concentration. Constitution: A mixture consisting of crysotile asbestos, surface active agent and water is well stirred and compounded to open the crysotile asbestos filaments and prepare a high viscosity slurry. After adding hydroxides such as magnesium hydroxide, hydrated salts such as magnesium borate hydrate or water containing minerals such as alumina cement hydrate, or boron compound to the slurry, the slurry is charged in a predetermined die, and dried and compressed to prepare shielding heat insulation products. The crysotile asbestos has 18 - 15 wt.% of water of crystallinity in the structure and contains a considerably high hydrogen concentration that acts as neutron moderators. (Kawakami, Y.)

  1. The Light - Electric Power Services experience in the lifetime extension of 15 kV shielded manoeuvre and control device sets through the development and utilization of retrofit circuit breakers; Experiencia da Light na extensao de vida util de conjuntos de manobra e controle blindados de 15 kV atraves do desenvolvimento e utilizacao de disjuntores retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Geraldo Magella Pereira da; Carneiro, Jose Manuel Alves [Light - Servicos de Eletricidade S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    The paper presents the Light experience in the extension of lifetime of the 15 kV shield sets by replacing the circuit breakers by a retrofit vacuum or S F6 modern technologies, with total utilization of the lockers which are in good conditions. The following topics will be approached: development of the retrofit circuit breakers, problems and respective solutions, comparative costs, circuit breaker replacing program and reduction of the failure indexes with consequent increasing of the system reliability.

  2. The use of nipple shields: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina Chow

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A nipple shield is a breastfeeding aid with a nipple-shaped shield that is positioned over the nipple and areola prior to nursing. Nipple shields are usually recommended to mothers with flat nipples or in cases in which there is a failure of the baby to effectively latch onto the breast within the first two days postpartum. The use of nipple shields is a controversial topic in the field of lactation. Its use has been an issue in the clinical literature since some older studies discovered reduced breast milk transfer when using nipple shields, while more recent studies reported successful breastfeeding outcomes. The purpose of this review was to examine the evidence and outcomes with nipple shield use. Methods: A literature search was conducted in Ovid MEDLINE, OLDMEDLINE, EMBASE Classic, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and CINAHL. The primary endpoint was any breastfeeding outcome following nipple shield use. Secondary endpoints included the reasons for nipple shield use and the average/median length of use. For the analysis, we examined the effect of nipple shield use on physiological responses, premature infants, mothers’ experiences, and health professionals’ experiences. Results: The literature search yielded 261 articles, 14 of which were included in this review. Of these 14 articles, three reported on physiological responses, two reported on premature infants, eight reported on mothers’ experiences, and one reported on health professionals’ experiences. Conclusion: Through examining the use of nipple shields, further insight is provided on the advantages and disadvantages of this practice, thus allowing clinicians and researchers to address improvements on areas that will benefit mothers and infants the most.

  3. Radiological shielding of low power compact reactor: calculation and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, Raul

    2004-01-01

    The development of compact reactors becoming a technology that offers great projection and innumerable use possibilities, both in electricity generation and in propulsion.One of the requirements for the operation of this type of reactor is that it must include a radiological shield that will allow for different types of configurations and that, may be moved with the reactor if it needs to be transported.The nucleus of a reactor emits radiation, mainly neutrons and gamma rays in the heat of power, and gamma radiation during the radioactive decay of fission products.This radiation must be restrained in both conditions of operation to avoid it affecting workers or the public.The combination of different materials and properties in layers results in better performance in the form of a decrease in radiation, hence causing the dosage outside the reactor, whether in operation or shut down, to fall within the allowed limits.The calculations and design of radiological shields is therefore of paramount importance in reactor design.The choice of material and the design of the shield have a strong impact on the cost and the load capacity, the latter being one of the characteristics to optimize.The imposed condition of design is that the reactor can be transported together with the decay shield in a standard container of 40 foot [es

  4. A Shielding Concept for the MedAustron Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jägerhofer L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available MedAustron is a synchrotron based accelerator facility for cancer therapy and research in Wiener Neustadt, 50 km south of Vienna. The facility will provide protons up to kinetic energies of 250 MeV and carbon ions up to 400 MeV/n for ion beam therapy. Additionally, protons up to 800 MeV kinetic energy will be used in a dedicated room for non-clinical research. In order to obtain a shielding concept for this facility a detailed geometry of the accelerator facility was implemented into the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA and shielding simulations were performed. In the course of these simulations the contributions of different particle types to the mixed fields around the accelerator and behind shielding were analysed. In an iterative process with the architect the final design of the shielding concept was developed until it was capable of reducing the effect of secondary radiation on humans and the environment below Austrian legal limits.

  5. Conversion Factors for Predicting Unshielded Dose Rates in Shielded Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapham, M.; Seamans Jr, J.V.; Arbon, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    This document describes the methodology developed and used by the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project for determining the activity content and the unshielded surface dose rate for lead lined containers contaminated with transuranic waste. Several methods were investigated: - Direct measurement of the dose rate after removing the shielding. - Use of a MicroShield R derived dose conversion factor, (mRem/hr unshielded )/(mRem/hr shielded ), applied to the measured surface dose rate to estimate the unshielded surface dose rate. - Use of a MicroShield R derived activity conversion factor, mRem/hr unshielded /Ci, applied to the measured activity to estimate the unshielded dose rate. - Use of an empirically derived activity conversion factor, mRem/hr unshielded /Ci, applied to the measured activity to estimate the unshielded dose rate. The last approach proved to be the most efficacious by using a combination of nondestructive assay and empirically defined dose rate conversion factors. Empirically derived conversion factors were found to be highly dependent upon the matrix of the waste. Use of conversion factors relied on activity values corrected to address the presence of a lead liner. (authors)

  6. Modeling geomagnetic shielding of solar energetic particles and cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, B. T.

    2009-12-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are a space weather hazard posing risks to manned and robotic space flight missions. At low- to mid-latitudes the Earth's magnetic field usually shields the upper atmosphere and spacecraft in low Earth orbit from SEPs. During severe geomagnetic storms distortion of the Earth's field suppresses geomagnetic shielding giving SEPs access to Earth at the mid-latitudes. Significant variations in geomagnetic shielding can occur on timescales of an hour or less in response to changes in the solar wind dynamic pressure and IMF. Geomagnetic shielding of energetic ions is quantified in terms of cutoff rigidity, and a dynamic geomagnetic cutoff model can be used for predicting SEP and cosmic ray fluxes in geospace. Two advancements in recent years that have made a real-time geomagnetic cutoff rigidity model a possibility are (1) increased computer power, and (2) the development of accurate dynamic geomagnetic field models that respond to changes in Dst, solar wind dynamic pressure and IMF. A numerical model capable of a real time cutoff prediction will be presented. Issues and techniques related to modeling SEP and cosmic ray fluxes in the magnetosphere will be discussed.

  7. Accelerator shield design of KIPT neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the design development of a neutron source facility at KIPT utilizing an electron-accelerator-driven subcritical assembly. Electron beam power is 100 kW, using 100 MeV electrons. The facility is designed to perform basic and applied nuclear research, produce medical isotopes, and train young nuclear specialists. The biological shield of the accelerator building is designed to reduce the biological dose to less than 0.5-mrem/hr during operation. The main source of the biological dose is the photons and the neutrons generated by interactions of leaked electrons from the electron gun and accelerator sections with the surrounding concrete and accelerator materials. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX serves as the calculation tool for the shield design, due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons coupled problems. The direct photon dose can be tallied by MCNPX calculation, starting with the leaked electrons. However, it is difficult to accurately tally the neutron dose directly from the leaked electrons. The neutron yield per electron from the interactions with the surrounding components is less than 0.01 neutron per electron. This causes difficulties for Monte Carlo analyses and consumes tremendous computation time for tallying with acceptable statistics the neutron dose outside the shield boundary. To avoid these difficulties, the SOURCE and TALLYX user subroutines of MCNPX were developed for the study. The generated neutrons are banked, together with all related parameters, for a subsequent MCNPX calculation to obtain the neutron and secondary photon doses. The weight windows variance reduction technique is utilized for both neutron and photon dose calculations. Two shielding materials, i.e., heavy concrete and ordinary concrete, were considered for the shield design. The main goal is to maintain the total

  8. Foam-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Radiation Shields Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New and innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are needed to protect humans in future manned exploration vehicles. Radiation shielding materials are...

  9. Foam-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Radiation Shields, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New and innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are needed to protect humans in future manned exploration vehicles. Radiation shielding materials are...

  10. Shielding study of a fusion machine. Elaboration of a global shielding calculation scheme for the Tokamak tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diop, C.M'B.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis presents a global shielding calculation scheme for neutron and gamma rays arising from the Tokamak TORE SUPRA fusion device, in which a deuterium plasma is used. To study the shield parameters we have elabored a important chaining of neutron and gamma transport codes, TRIPOLI, ANISN, MERCURE 4, allowing to evaluate the radial and skyshine components of the dose rate behind the concrete shield. The study of thermonuclear neutron activation is fundamental to define a tokamak exploitation strategy. For this, two formalisme have been developed. They are based on a modelization of the activation reaction rates according to TRIPOLI, ANISN, and MERCURE 4 codes capabilities. The first one calculates, in one dimensional geometry, the desactivation gamma dose rate inside the vacuum chamber. The second one is a tridimensional model which determines the spatial variation of the gamma dose rate in the machine room. The problem of the existence of runaway electrons and associated secondaries radiations, bremsstrahlung gamma rays particularly, is approched. The results which are presented have contributed to define the parameters of the concrete shield and a strategy for TORE SUPRA Tokamak exploitation [fr

  11. Multifunctional Shielding and Self-Healing HybridSil Smart Composites for Space, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic has recently developed multifunctional shielding and self-healing HybridSil (HS) smart composites via the inclusion of innovative nanoshell inclusions....

  12. Space Station Validation of Advanced Radiation-Shielding Polymeric Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Subtopic X11.01, NASA has identified the need to develop advanced radiation-shielding materials and systems to protect humans from the hazards of space radiation...

  13. Space Station Validation of Advanced Radiation-Shielding Polymeric Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Subtopic X11.01, NASA has identified the need to develop advanced radiation-shielding materials and systems to protect humans from the hazards of space radiation...

  14. Multifunctional Shielding and Self-Healing HybridSil Smart Composites for Space, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic has developed revolutionary multifunctional, super lightweight, self-healing and radiation shielding carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites as a...

  15. Space Station Validation of Advanced Radiation-Shielding Polymeric Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Subtopic X11-01, NASA has identified the need to develop advanced radiation-shielding materials and systems to protect humans from the hazards of space radiation...

  16. Shielding concerns at a spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Robinson, H.; Legate, G.L.; Woods, R.

    1989-01-01

    Neutrons produced by 800-MeV proton reactions at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center spallation neutron source cause a variety of challenging shielding problems. We identify several characteristics distinctly different from reactor shielding and compute the dose attenuation through an infinite slab/shield composed of iron (100 cm) and borated polyethylene (15 cm). Our calculations show that (for an incident spallation spectrum characteristic of neutrons leaking from a tungsten target at 90/degree/) the dose through the shield is a complex mixture of neutrons and gamma rays. High-energy (> 20 MeV) neutron production from the target is ≅5% of the total, yet causes ≅68% of the dose at the shield surface. Primary low-energy (< 20 MeV) neutrons from the target contribute negligibly (≅0.5%) to the dose at the shield surface yet cause gamma rays, which contribute ≅31% to the total dose at the shield surface. Low-energy neutrons from spallation reactions behave similarly to neutrons with a fission spectrum distribution. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  17. Integrated Solar Concentrator and Shielded Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David Larry

    2010-01-01

    A shielded radiator is integrated within a solar concentrator for applications that require protection from high ambient temperatures with little convective heat transfer. This innovation uses a reflective surface to deflect ambient thermal radiation, shielding the radiator. The interior of the shield is also reflective to provide a view factor to deep space. A key feature of the shield is the parabolic shape that focuses incoming solar radiation to a line above the radiator along the length of the trough. This keeps the solar energy from adding to the radiator load. By placing solar cells along this focal line, the concentration of solar energy reduces the number and mass of required cells. By shielding the radiator, the effective reject temperature is much lower, allowing lower radiator temperatures. This is particularly important for lower-temperature processes, like habitat heat rejection and fuel cell operations where a high radiator temperature is not feasible. Adding the solar cells in the focal line uses the concentrating effect of the shield to advantage to accomplish two processes with a single device. This shield can be a deployable, lightweight Mylar structure for compact transport.

  18. Dimmuborgir: a rootless shield complex in northern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Alasdair; Sturkell, Erik; Jakobsson, Martin; Einarsson, Draupnir; Tollefsen, Elin; Orr, Tim R.

    2016-01-01

    The origin of Dimmuborgir, a shield-like volcanic structure within the Younger Laxá lava flow field near Lake Mývatn, in northern Iceland, has long been questioned. New airborne laser mapping (light detection and ranging (LiDAR)), combined with ground-penetrating radar results and a detailed field study, suggests that Dimmuborgir is a complex of at least two overlapping rootless shields fed by lava erupting from the nearby Lúdentarborgir crater row. This model builds upon previous explanations for the formation of Dimmuborgir and is consistent with observations of rootless shield development at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii. The larger rootless shields at Dimmuborgir, 1–1.5 km in diameter, elliptical in plan view, ∼30 m in height, and each with a 500-m-wide summit depression, were capable of storing as much as 2–3 × 106 m3 of lava. They were fed by lava which descended 30–60 m in lava tubes along a distance of 3 km from the crater row. The height difference generated pressure sufficient to build rootless shields at Dimmuborgir in a timescale of weeks. The main summit depressions, inferred to be drained lava ponds, could have emptied via a 30-m-wide × 5-m-deep channel, with estimated effusion rates of 0.7–7 m3 s−1 and minimum flow durations of 5–50 days. We argue that the pillars for which Dimmuborgir is famed are remnants of lava pond rims, at various stages of disintegration that formed during pond drainage.

  19. Seismic proof test of shielding block walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohte, Yukio; Watanabe, Takahide; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Kazuhide

    1989-01-01

    Most of the shielding block walls used for building nuclear facilities are built by dry process. When a nuclear facility is designed, seismic waves specific at each site are set as input seismic motions and they are adopted in the design. Therefore, it is necessary to assure safety of the shielding block walls for earthquake by performing anti-seismic experiments under the conditions at each site. In order to establish the normal form that can be applied to various seismic conditions in various areas, Shimizu Corp. made an actual-size test samples for the shielding block wall and confirmed the safety for earthquake and validity of normalization. (author)

  20. Radiation protection/shield design: a need for a systems approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation protection/shielding design of a nuclear facility requires a coordinated effort of many engineering disciplines to meet the requirements imposed by regulations. The system approach to Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) radiation protection is described, and the program developed to implement this approach is defined. In addition, the principal shielding design problems for LMFBR nuclear reactor systems are discussed in relation to LWR nuclear reactor system shielding designs. The methodology used to analyze these problems in the U.S. LMFBR program, the resultant design solutions, and the experimental verification of these designs and/or methods are discussed

  1. REPOSITORY RADIATION SHIELDING DESIGN GUIDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Haas; E.M. Fortsch

    1997-01-01

    The scope of this document includes radiation safety considerations used in the design of facilities for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The purpose of the Repository Radiation Shielding Design Guide is to document the approach used in the radiological design of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) surface and subsurface facilities for the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. This document is intended to ensure that a common methodology is used by all groups that may be involved with Radiological Design. This document will also assist in ensuring the long term survivability of the information basis used for radiological safety design and will assist in satisfying the documentation requirements of the licensing body, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This design guide provides referenceable information that is current and maintained under the YMP Quality Assurance (QA) Program. Furthermore, this approach is consistent with maintaining continuity in spite of a changing design environment. This approach also serves to ensure common inter-disciplinary interpretation and application of data

  2. REPOSITORY RADIATION SHIELDING DESIGN GUIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Haas; E.M. Fortsch

    1997-09-12

    The scope of this document includes radiation safety considerations used in the design of facilities for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The purpose of the Repository Radiation Shielding Design Guide is to document the approach used in the radiological design of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) surface and subsurface facilities for the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. This document is intended to ensure that a common methodology is used by all groups that may be involved with Radiological Design. This document will also assist in ensuring the long term survivability of the information basis used for radiological safety design and will assist in satisfying the documentation requirements of the licensing body, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This design guide provides referenceable information that is current and maintained under the YMP Quality Assurance (QA) Program. Furthermore, this approach is consistent with maintaining continuity in spite of a changing design environment. This approach also serves to ensure common inter-disciplinary interpretation and application of data.

  3. Shielding Calculations for PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP) Fuel Transfer Cask with Micro shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurhayati Ramli; Ahmad Nabil Abdul Rahim; Ariff Shah Ismail

    2011-01-01

    The shielding calculations for RTP fuel transfer cask was performed by using computer code Micro shield 7.02. Micro shield is a computer code designed to provide a model to be used for shielding calculations. The results of the calculations can be obtained fast but the code is not suitable for complex geometries with a shielding composed of more than one material. Nevertheless, the program is sufficient for As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) optimization calculations. In this calculation, a geometry based on the conceptual design of RTP fuel transfer cask was modeled. Shielding material used in the calculations were lead (Pb) and stainless steel 304 (SS304). The results obtained from these calculations are discussed in this paper. (author)

  4. Research on Primary Shielding Calculation Source Generation Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Mei, Qiliang; Li, Hui; Shangguan, Danhua; Zhang, Guangchun

    2017-09-01

    Primary Shielding Calculation (PSC) plays an important role in reactor shielding design and analysis. In order to facilitate PSC, a source generation code is developed to generate cumulative distribution functions (CDF) for the source particle sample code of the J Monte Carlo Transport (JMCT) code, and a source particle sample code is deveoped to sample source particle directions, types, coordinates, energy and weights from the CDFs. A source generation code is developed to transform three dimensional (3D) power distributions in xyz geometry to source distributions in r θ z geometry for the J Discrete Ordinate Transport (JSNT) code. Validation on PSC model of Qinshan No.1 nuclear power plant (NPP), CAP1400 and CAP1700 reactors are performed. Numerical results show that the theoretical model and the codes are both correct.

  5. Method for calculating required shielding in medical x-ray rooms; Roentgentutkimushuoneen saeteilysuojauksen laskeminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karppinen, J

    1997-10-01

    The new annual radiation dose limits - 20 mSv (previously 50 mSv) for radiation workers and 1 mSv (previously 5 mSv) for other persons - implies that the adequacy of existing radiation shielding must be re-evaluated. In principle, one could assume that the thicknesses of old radiation shields should be increased by about one or two half-value layers in order to comply with the new dose limits. However, the assumptions made in the earlier shielding calculations are highly conservative; the required shielding was often determined by applying the maximum high-voltage of the x-ray tube for the whole workload. A more realistic calculation shows that increased shielding is typically not necessary if more practical x-ray tube voltages are used in the evaluation. We have developed a PC-based calculation method for calculating the x-ray shielding which is more realistic than the highly conservative method formerly used. The method may be used to evaluate an existing shield for compliance with new regulations. As examples of these calculations, typical x-ray rooms are considered. The lead and concrete thickness requirements as a function of x-ray tube voltage and workload are also given in tables. (author) 18 refs.

  6. A large scale high-Tc superconducting shield and its cryostat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shintomi, K.; Yahara, A.; Irisawa, D.; Imai, K.; Matsuba, H. [Yokohama R& D Labs., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    The authors have developed a cryostat for a large scale high-T{sub c} superconducting shield enclosing a human body to measure biomagnetism. The cryostat has an interior space of {phi} 0.8 m x L2.8 m and cools a high-T{sub c} superconducting shield {phi} 0.87 m x L2.4 m. The cryostat is made of non-magnetic materials to avoid internal magnetic noise. It also includes other provisions to achieve a very low magnetic noise environment. The authors investigated the optimal design of the radiation shields for the cryostats using liquid nitrogen and concluded that one radiation shield has sufficient performance for the thermal insulation. They designed the liquid nitrogen reservoir to keep the superconductor at 77.3 K until the reservoir is nearly emptied. A magnetic shielding capacity of the superconducting shield for an external magnetic fields reaching 1.8 mT was found. This sufficed for biomagnetic measurements. The critical current density distribution of the superconductor was evaluated using a magnetic field source formed by a pair of small opposing coils placed near the wall of the cryostat. The mean critical current density of the superconductor was about 450 A/cm{sup 2}. External noise was attenuated by 160 dB within the shielded space. This kept the external noises below the internal noise of the SQUID magnetometer.

  7. Conservative method for determination of material thickness used in shielding of veterinary facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lava, Deise D.; Borges, Diogo da S.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de L.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.

    2014-01-01

    For determination of an effective method for shielding of veterinary rooms, was provided shielding methods generally used in rooms which works with X-ray production and radiotherapy. Every calculation procedure is based in traditional variables used to transmission calculation. The thickness of the materials used for primary and secondary shieldings are obtained to respect the limits set by the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). This work presents the development of a computer code in order to serve as a practical tool for determining rapid and effective materials and their thicknesses to shield veterinary facilities. The code determines transmission values of the shieldings and compares them with data from transmission 'maps' provided by NCRP-148 report. These 'maps' were added to the algorithm through interpolation techniques of curves of materials used for shielding. Each interpolation generates about 1,000,000 points that are used to generate a new curve. The new curve is subjected to regression techniques, which makes possible to obtain nine degree polynomial, and exponential equations. These equations whose variables consist of transmission of values, enable trace all the points of this curve with high precision. The data obtained from the algorithm were satisfactory with official data presented by the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and can contribute as a practical tool for verification of shielding of veterinary facilities that require using Radiotherapy techniques and X-ray production

  8. Shielding design for the target room of the proton accelerator research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Y. S.; Lee, C. W.; Mun, K. J.; Nam, J.; Kim, J. Y.

    2010-01-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) has been developing a 100-MeV proton linear accelerator. Also, PEFP has been designing the Proton Accelerator Research Center (PARC). In the Accelerator Tunnel and Beam Experiment Hall in PARC, 10 target rooms for the 20- and 100-MeV beamline facilities exist in the Beam Experiment Hall. For the 100-MeV target rooms during 100-MeV proton beam extraction, a number of high energy neutrons, ranging up to 100-MeV, are produced. Because of the high beam current and space limitations of each target room, the shielding design of each target room should be considered seriously. For the shielding design of the 100-MeV target rooms of the PEFP, a permanent and removable local shield structure was adopted. To optimize shielding performance, we evaluated four different shield materials (concrete, HDPE, lead, iron). From the shielding calculation results, we confirmed that the proposed shielding design made it possible to keep the dose rate below the 'as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)' objective.

  9. Numerical Analyses of a Shield Building Subjected to a Large Commercial Aircraft Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The missile-target interaction method is used to perform simulations of the impact of a commercial B767 aircraft on a shield building made of steel-concrete-steel sandwich panels to study impact damage characteristics. Refined finite element models of a shield building and two large commercial B767 aircraft are developed. The aircraft impact force is given and assessed with the Riera function to verify the B767 aircraft model, and a simulation analysis of tests is performed to verify the concrete model. The peak impact forces of the fuselage, engine, wing, and entire aircraft are approximately linearly proportional to the square of each impact velocity. The shield building subjected to the aircraft impact exhibits no perforation, and the damage range of the shield building expands with increasing impact velocity. The influences of impact velocity, aircraft mass, impact angle, and tie bar diameter on the deformation of the shield building are significant. The thickness of the steel plate plays an important part in the deformation of the shield building, whereas the compressive strength of concrete and the water in circular tank have only a slight effect on the deformation of the shield building.

  10. Shielding properties of fibre cement wallboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, D L; Godwin, G A; Coakley, K S

    1998-09-01

    Transmission data for a fibre cement wallboard (villaboard) are determined for use in diagnostic shielding designs. Villaboard is found to be more attenuating than plasterboard e.g. 9 mm of villaboard is equivalent to 16 mm of plasterboard.

  11. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1990-03-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing, These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environmental prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase showed that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  12. Multifunctional BHL Radiation Shield, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advances in radiation shielding technology remain an important challenge for NASA in order to protect their astronauts, particularly as NASA grows closer to manned...

  13. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing. These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale section of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environment prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase show that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  14. Radiation shielding method for pipes, etc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Shuichi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To constitute shielding walls of a dense structure around pipes and enable to reduce the wall thickness thereof upon periodical inspection, etc. for nuclear power plants. Constitution: For those portions of pipes requring shieldings, cylindrical vessels surrounding the portions are disposed and connected to a mercury supply system, a mercury discharge system and a freezing system for solidifying mercury. After charging mercury in a tank by way of a supply hose to the cylindrical vessels, the temperature of the mercury is lowered below the freezing point thereof to solidify the mercury while circulating cooling medium, to thereby form dense cylindrical radioactive-ray shielding walls. The specific gravity of mercury is greater than that of lead and, accordingly, the thickness of the shielding walls can be reduced as compared with the conventional wall thickness of the entire laminates. (Takahashi, M.)

  15. Shielding design for better plant availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, G.G.

    1975-01-01

    Design methods are described for providing a shield system for nuclear power plants that will facilitate maintenance and inspection, increase overall plant availability, and ensure that man-rem exposures are as low as practicable

  16. Radiation shielding structure for concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Crack inducing members for inducing cracks in a predetermined manner are buried in a concrete structure. Namely, a crack-inducing member comprises integrally a shielding plate and extended plates situated at the center of a wall and inducing plates vertically disposed to the boundary portion between them with the inducing plates being disposed each in a direction perforating the wall. There are disposed integrally a pair of the inducing plate spaced at a predetermined horizontal distance on both sides of the shielding plate so as to form a substantially crank-shaped cross section and extended plates formed in the extending direction of the shielding plate, and the inducing plates are disposed each in a direction perforating the wall. Then, cracks generated when stresses are exerted can be controlled, and generation of cracks passing through the concrete structure can be prevented reliably. The reliability of a radiation shielding effect can be enhanced remarkably. (N.H.)

  17. Technical specifications for the bulk shielding reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    This report provides information concerning the technical specifications for the Bulk Shielding Reactor. Areas covered include: safety limits and limiting safety settings; limiting conditions for operation; surveillance requirements; design features; administrative controls; and monitoring of airborne effluents. 10 refs

  18. Shielding simulation of the CDTN cyclotron bunker using MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalle, Hugo M.; Campolina, Daniel de A.M., E-mail: dallehm@cdtn.b, E-mail: campolina@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Div. de Reatores e Radiacoes

    2011-07-01

    The Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN/CNEN) has contracted services from General Electric in order to install a cyclotron for radioisotopes production and PET radiopharmaceutical synthesis. The Monte Carlo code MCNP5 was used to determine the TVL (tenth value layer) of the concrete and verify shielding calculations performed by GE. The simulations results show values of equivalent dose rates in agreement with those calculated using the methodology adopted by GE, the NCRP-144 and the NCRP-51. (author)

  19. Method to produce a neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    The neutron shielding for armoured vehicles consists of preshaped plastic plates which are coated on the armoured vehicle walls by conversion of the thermoplast. Suitable plastics or thermoplasts are PVC, PVC acetate, or mixtures of these, into which more than 50% B, B 4 C, or BN is embedded. The colour of the shielding may be determined by the choice of the neutron absorber, e.g. a white colour for BN. The plates are produced using an extruder or calender. (DG) [de

  20. Shield structure for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, C.A.; Simnad, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shield structure is described for use where there are significant amounts of fast neutron flux above an energy level of approximately 70 keV. The shield includes structural supports and neutron moderator and absorber systems. A portion at least of the neutron moderator material is magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron. (U.K.)

  1. ANALISIS KESELAMATAN TERMOHIDROLIK BULK SHIELDING REAKTOR KARTINI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizul Khakim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK ANALISIS KESELAMATAN TERMOHIDROLIK BULK SHIELDING REAKTOR KARTINI. Bulk shielding merupakan fasilitas yang terintegrasi dengan reaktor Kartini yang berfungsi sebagai penyimpanan sementara bahan bakar bekas. Fasilitas ini merupakan fasilitas yang termasuk dalam struktur, sistem dan komponen (SSK yang penting bagi keselamatan. Salah satu fungsi keselamatan dari sistem penanganan dan penyimpanan bahan bakar adalah mencegah kecelakaan kekritisan yang tak terkendali dan membatasi naiknya temperatur bahan bakar. Analisis keselamatan paling kurang harus mencakup analisis keselamatan dari sisi neutronik dan termo hidrolik Bulk shielding. Analisis termo hidrolik ditujukan untuk memastikan perpindahan panas dan proses pendinginan bahan bakar bekas berjalan baik dan tidak terjadi akumulasi panas yang mengancam integritas bahan bakar. Code tervalidasi PARET/ANL digunakan untuk analisis pendinginan dengan mode konveksi alam. Hasil perhitungan menunjukkan bahwa mode pendinginan konvekasi alam cukup memadai dalam mendinginkan panas sisa tanpa mengakibatkan kenaikan temperatur bahan bakar yang signifikan. Kata kunci: Bulk shielding, bahan bakar bekas, konveksi alam, PARET.   ABSTRACT THERMAL HYDRAULIC SAFETY ANALYSIS OF BULK SHIELDING KARTINI REACTOR. Bulk shielding is an integrated facility to Kartini reactor which is used for temporary spent fuels storage. The facility is one of the structures, systems and components (SSCs important to safety. Among the safety functions of fuel handling and storage are to prevent any uncontrolable criticality accidents and to limit the fuel temperature increase. Safety analyses should, at least, cover neutronic and thermal hydraulic calculations of the bulk shielding. Thermal hydraulic analyses were intended to ensure that heat removal and the process of the spent fuels cooling takes place adequately and no heat accumulation that challenges the fuel integrity. Validated code, PARET/ANL was used for analysing the

  2. Radiation shielding of the main injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, C.M.; Martin, P.S.

    1995-05-01

    The radiation shielding in the Fermilab Main Injector (FMI) complex has been carried out by adopting a number of prescribed stringent guidelines established by a previous safety analysis. Determination of the required amount of radiation shielding at various locations of the FMI has been done using Monte Carlo computations. A three dimensional ray tracing code as well as a code based upon empirical observations have been employed in certain cases

  3. The Absolute Shielding Constants of Heavy Nuclei: Resolving the Enigma of the (119)Sn Absolute Shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, Elena; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth

    2013-02-07

    We demonstrate that the apparent disagreement between experimental determinations and four-component relativistic calculations of the absolute shielding constants of heavy nuclei is due to the breakdown of the commonly assumed relation between the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the NMR shielding constants. We demonstrate that this breakdown has significant consequences for the absolute shielding constant of (119)Sn, leading to errors of about 1000 ppm. As a consequence, we expect that many absolute shielding constants of heavy nuclei will be in need of revision.

  4. Shielding requirements for particle bed propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruneisen, S. J.

    1991-06-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion systems present unique challenges in reliability and safety. Due to the radiation incident upon all components of the propulsion system, shielding must be used to keep nuclear heating in the materials within limits; in addition, electronic control systems must be protected. This report analyzes the nuclear heating due to the radiation and the shielding required to meet the established criteria while also minimizing the shield mass. Heating rates were determined in a 2000 MWt Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) system for all materials in the interstage region, between the reactor vessel and the propellant tank, with special emphasis on meeting the silicon dose criteria. Using a Lithium Hydride/Tungsten shield, the optimum shield design was found to be: 50 cm LiH/2 cm W on the axial reflector in the reactor vessel and 50 cm LiH/2 cm W in a collar extension of the inside shield outside of the pressure vessel. Within these parameters, the radiation doses in all of the components in the interstage and lower tank regions would be within acceptable limits for mission requirements.

  5. Uranium self-shielding in fast reactor blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadiroglu, O.K.; Driscoll, M.J.

    1976-03-01

    The effects of heterogeneity on resonance self-shielding are examined with particular emphasis on the blanket region of the fast breeder reactor and on its dominant reaction--capture in /sup 238/U. The results, however, apply equally well to scattering resonances, to other isotopes (fertile, fissile and structural species) and to other environments, so long as the underlying assumptions of narrow resonance theory apply. The heterogeneous resonance integral is first cast into a modified homogeneous form involving the ratio of coolant-to-fuel fluxes. A generalized correlation (useful in its own right in many other applications) is developed for this ratio, using both integral transport and collision probability theory to infer the form of correlation, and then relying upon Monte Carlo calculations to establish absolute values of the correlation coefficients. It is shown that a simple linear prescription can be developed for the flux ratio as a function of only fuel optical thickness and the fraction of the slowing-down source generated by the coolant. This in turn permitted derivation of a new equivalence theorem relating the heterogeneous self-shielding factor to the homogeneous self-shielding factor at a modified value of the background scattering cross section per absorber nucleus. A simple version of this relation is developed and used to show that heterogeneity has a negligible effect on the calculated blanket breeding ratio in fast reactors.

  6. CHESS upgrade 1995: Improved radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, K.

    1996-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) stores electrons and positrons at 5.3 GeV for the production and study of B mesons, and, in addition, it supplies synchrotron radiation for CHESS. The machine has been upgraded for 300 mA operation. It is planned that each beam will be injected in about 5 minutes and that particle beam lifetimes will be several hours. In a cooperative effort, staff members at CHESS and LNS have studied sources in CESR that produce radiation in the user areas. The group has been responsible for the development and realization of new tunnel shielding walls that provide a level of radiation protection from 20 to approx-gt 100 times what was previously available. Our experience has indicated that a major contribution to the environmental radiation is not from photons, but results from neutrons that are generated by particle beam loss in the ring. Neutrons are stopped by inelastic scattering and absorption in thick materials such as heavy concrete. The design for the upgraded walls, the development of a mix for our heavy concrete, and all the concrete casting was done by CHESS and LNS personnel. The concrete incorporates a new material for this application, one that has yielded a significant cost saving in the production of over 200 tons of new wall sections. The material is an artificially enriched iron oxide pellet manufactured in vast quantities from hematite ore for the steel-making industry. Its material and chemical properties (iron and impurity content, strength, size and uniformity) make it an excellent substitute for high grade Brazilian ore, which is commonly used as heavy aggregate in radiation shielding. Its cost is about a third that of the natural ore. The concrete has excellent workability, a 28 day compressive strength exceeding 6000 psi and a density of 220 lbs/cu.ft (3.5 gr/cc). The density is limited by an interesting property of the pellets that is motivated by efficiency in the steel-making application. (Abstract Truncated)

  7. INFORMATION-MEASURING SYSTEM FOR EVALUATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION POWER LEVELS INFLUENCE TO ITS WEAKENED BY PROTECTIVE SHIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Boiprav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An information-measuring system and realized on the basis of its methodology used for evaluation of electromagnetic radiation power levels passing via the protective shielding construction are described. It’s proposed to use the developed methodology for the testing of electromagnetic radiation shields for anechoic chambers

  8. Malaria on the Guiana Shield: a review of the situation in French Guiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musset, Lise; Pelleau, Stéphane; Girod, Romain; Ardillon, Vanessa; Carvalho, Luisiane; Dusfour, Isabelle; Gomes, Margarete SM; Djossou, Félix; Legrand, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In a climate of growing concern that Plasmodium falciparum may be developing a drug resistance to artemisinin derivatives in the Guiana Shield, this review details our current knowledge of malaria and control strategy in one part of the Shield, French Guiana. Local epidemiology, test-treat-track strategy, the state of parasite drug resistance and vector control measures are summarised. Current issues in terms of mobile populations and legislative limitations are also discussed. PMID:25184998

  9. Study on Load-displacement Test of Rubber Pads of Coal Mine Roadway Constructed by Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Chen, Xiaoguo; Yang, Liyun

    2017-12-01

    Shield method construction of coal mine roadway is the future trend of the development of deep coal mining. The main shaft supporting is the segment. There is rubber pads between segment and segment. The performance of compression deformation of rubber pad is essential for the overall stability of lining. Through load test, displacement of the rubber pad under load, the thrust force law of the rubber pad deformation, and provide a theoretical basis for the stability analysis of coal mine tunnel shield construction.

  10. Numerical Models for the Study of Electromagnetic Shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPA Monica

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents 2D and 3D models for the study of electromagnetic shielding of a coil. The magnetic fields are computed for defining the shielding effectiveness. Parametrized numerical studies were performed in order to established the influence of shield thickness and height on magnetic field in certain points located in the exterior of coil – shield setup and on induced power within the shield.

  11. Special concrete shield selection using the analytic hierarchy process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abulfaraj, W.H.

    1994-01-01

    Special types of concrete radiation shields that depend on locally available materials and have improved properties for both neutron and gamma-ray attenuation were developed by using plastic materials and heavy ores. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is implemented to evaluate these types for selecting the best biological radiation shield for nuclear reactors. Factors affecting the selection decision are degree of protection against neutrons, degree of protection against gamma rays, suitability of the concrete as building material, and economic considerations. The seven concrete alternatives are barite-polyethylene concrete, barite-polyvinyl chloride (PVC) concrete, barite-portland cement concrete, pyrite-polyethylene concrete, pyrite-PVC concrete, pyrite-portland cement concrete, and ordinary concrete. The AHP analysis shows the superiority of pyrite-polyethylene concrete over the others

  12. Shielding aspects of accelerators, targets and irradiation facilities - SATIF 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Over the last 50 years particle accelerators have evolved from simple devices to powerful machines, and will continue to have an important impact on research, technology and lifestyle. Today, they cover a wide range of applications, from television and computer displays in households to investigating the origin and structure of matter. It has become common practice to use particle accelerators for material science and medical applications. In recent years, requirements from new technological and research applications have emerged, giving rise to new radiation shielding aspects and problems. These workshop proceedings review recent progress in radiation shielding of accelerator facilities, evaluating advancements and discussing further developments needed with respect to international co-operation in this field. (author)

  13. CAD-based radiation protection and shielding in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleby, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    In the not-too-distant future, astronauts will begin living and working on space station Freedom (SSF), eventually establishing a permanent presence in space. Beyond Freedom, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has set its sights on returning to and eventually establishing outposts on the moon and Mars. Without appropriate methods of identifying protection deficiencies, spacecraft designers often overestimate or defer shielding solutions in both cases burdening the program. To avoid possible penalties such as increased mass, complexity, and cost, radiation analysis should be conducted as part of the preliminary design process. An innovative radiation assessment system combining computer-aided design (CAD) capabilities with established NASA transport codes has been developed permitting fast, accurate analysis of spacecraft. The use of this automated analytical tool the Boeing Radiation Exposure Model (Brem) is discussed in this paper, relative to spacecraft design and the optimization of radiation shielding. Results obtained from recently completed radiation analysis of space station Freedom are also discussed

  14. Adaptation of radiation shielding code to space environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Koichi; Hara, Akihisa

    1992-01-01

    Recently, the trend to the development of space has heightened. To the development of space, many problems are related, and as one of them, there is the protection from cosmic ray. The cosmic ray is the radiation having ultrahigh energy, and there was not the radiation shielding design code that copes with cosmic ray so far. Therefore, the high energy radiation shielding design code for accelerators was improved so as to cope with the peculiarity that cosmic ray possesses. Moreover, the calculation of the radiation dose equivalent rate in the moon base to which the countermeasures against cosmic ray were taken was simulated by using the improved code. As the important countermeasures for the safety protection from radiation, the covering with regolith is carried out, and the effect of regolith was confirmed by using the improved code. Galactic cosmic ray, solar flare particles, radiation belt, the adaptation of the radiation shielding code HERMES to space environment, the improvement of the three-dimensional hadron cascade code HETCKFA-2 and the electromagnetic cascade code EGS 4-KFA, and the cosmic ray simulation are reported. (K.I.)

  15. The influence of shielding gas in hybrid LASER MIG welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Giovanni; Campana, Giampaolo; Fortunato, Alessandro; Ascari, Alessandro

    2007-07-01

    Hybrid LASER-GMAW welding technique has been recently studied and developed in order to meet the needs of modern welding industries. The two sources involved in this process play, in fact, a complementary role: fast welding speed, deep bead penetration and high energy concentration can be achieved through the LASER beam, while gap bridgeability and cost-effectiveness are typical of the GMAW process. Particularly interesting, in this context, is the CO 2 LASER-MIG welding which differs from the Nd:YAG LASER-MIG technique for the high powers that can be exploited and for the good power/cost ratio of the process. This paper is a part of a wide study on the hybrid CO 2 LASER-MIG welding and investigates the influence of the shielding gas both on the stability of the process and on the dimensional characteristics of the weld bead. Two different parameters have been taken into consideration in order to develop this analysis: the shielding gas composition and the shielding gas flow. The experiment, performed on AISI 304 stainless steel plates, has been planned exploiting design of experiment techniques. The results have been analyzed through a statistical approach in order to determine the real influence of each parameter on the overall process.

  16. New Improvements in Mixture Self-Shielding Treatment with APOLLO2 Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coste-Delclaux, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of the presentation follows: APOLLO2 is a modular multigroup transport code developed at the CEA in Saclay (France). Previously, the self-shielding module could only treat one resonant isotope mixed with moderator isotopes. Consequently, the resonant mixture self-shielding treatment was an iterative one. Each resonant isotope of the mixture was treated separately, the other resonant isotopes of the mixture being then considered as moderator isotopes, that is to say non-resonant isotopes. This treatment could be iterated. Recently, we have developed a new method that consists in treating the resonant mixture as a unique entity. A main feature of APOLLO2 self-shielding module is that some implemented models are very general and therefore very powerful and versatile. We can give, as examples, the use of probability tables in order to describe the microscopic cross-section fluctuations or the TR slowing-down model that can deal with any resonance shape. The self-shielding treatment of a resonant mixture was developed essentially thanks to these two models. The goal of this paper is to describe the improvements on the self-shielding treatment of a resonant mixture and to present, as an application, the calculation of the ATRIUM-10 BWR benchmark. We will conclude by some prospects on remaining work in the self-shielding domain. (author)

  17. Shielding design for positron emission tomography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, I.I.

    2007-01-01

    With the recent advent of readily available tracer isotopes, there has been marked increase in the number of hospital-based and free-standing positron emission tomography (PET) clinics. PET facilities employ relatively large activities of high-energy photon emitting isotopes, which can be dangerous to the health of humans and animals. This coupled with the current dose limits for radiation worker and members of the public can result in shielding requirements. This research contributes to the calculation of the appropriate shielding to keep the level of radiation within an acceptable recommended limit. Two different methods were used including measurements made at selected points of an operating PET facility and computer simulations by using Monte Carlo Transport Code. The measurements mainly concerned the radiation exposure at different points around facility using the survey meter detectors and Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLD). Then the set of manual calculation procedures were used to estimate the shielding requirements for a newly built PEF facility. The results from the measurement and the computer simulation were compared to the results obtained from the set manual calculation procedure. In general, the estimated weekly dose at the points of interest is lower than the regulatory limits for the little company of Mary Hospital. Furthermore, the density and the HVL for normal strength concrete and clay bricks are almost similar. In conclusion, PET facilities present somewhat different design requirements and are more likely to require additional radiation shielding. Therefore, existing shields at the little Company of Mary Hospital are in general found to be adequate and satisfactory and additional shielding was found necessary at the new PET facility in the department of Nuclear Medicine of the Dr. George Mukhari Hospital. By use of appropriate design, by implying specific shielding requirements and by maintaining good operating practices, radiation doses to

  18. Frequency dependence of magnetic shielding performance of HTS plates in mixed states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamitani, Atsushi; Yokono, Takafumi [Yamagata Univ., Yonezawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yokono, Takafumi [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Information Sciences and Electronics

    2000-06-01

    The magnetic shielding performance of the high-Tc superconducting (HTS) plate is investigated numerically. The behavior of the shielding current density in the HTS plate is expressed as the integral-differential equation with a normal component of the current vector potential as a dependent variable. The numerical code for solving the equation has been developed by using the combination of the Newton-Raphson method and the successive substitution method and, by use of the code, damping coefficients and shielding factors are evaluated for the various values of the frequency {omega}. The results of computations show that the HTS plate has a possibility of shielding the high-frequency magnetic field with {omega} > or approx. 1 kHz. (author)

  19. Orion Heat Shield Manufacturing Producibility Improvements for the EM-1 Flight Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, William J.; Stewart, Michael; Harris, Richard F.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes how the ORION program is incorporating improvements in the heat shield design and manufacturing processes reducing programmatic risk and ensuring crew safety in support of NASA's Exploration missions. The approach for the EFT-1 heat shield utilized a low risk Apollo heritage design and manufacturing process using an Avcoat TPS ablator with a honeycomb substrate to provide a one piece heat shield to meet the mission re-entry heating environments. The EM-1 mission will have additional flight systems installed to fly to the moon and return to Earth. Heat shield design and producibility improvements have been incorporated in the EM-1 vehicle to meet deep space mission requirements. The design continues to use the Avcoat material, but in a block configuration to enable improvements in consistant and repeatable application processes using tile bonding experience developed on the Space Shuttle Transportation System Program.

  20. A polyethylene-B4C based concrete for enhanced neutron shielding at neutron research facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Perrey, H.; Fissum, K.; Rofors, E.; Scherzinger, J.; Bentley, P. M.

    2017-07-01

    We present the development of a specialized concrete for neutron shielding at neutron research facilities, based on the addition of hydrogen atoms in the form of polyethylene and also B4C for enhancing the neutron capture properties of the concrete. We show information on the mechanical properties of the concrete and the neutronics, in particular its relevance to modern spallation neutron sources, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS), currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. The new concrete exhibits a 15% lower mass density, a compressible strength of 50% relative to a standard concrete and a significant increase in performance of shielding against MeV neutrons and lower energies. The concrete could find application at the ESS in for example common shielding components, individual beamline shielding and instrument caves. Initial neutronic tests of the concrete, carried out at Lund University, have also verified the performance in the MeV neutron energy range and the results are presented.

  1. Pollution prevention benefits of non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves - 11000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dodge, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-11

    Radiation shielding is commonly used to protect the glovebox worker from unintentional direct and secondary radiation exposure, while working with plutonium-238 and plutonium-239. Shielding glovebox gloves are traditionally composed of lead-based materials, i.e., hazardous waste. This has prompted the development of new, non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves. No studies, however, have investigated the pollution prevention benefits of these new glovebox gloves. We examined both leaded and non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves. The nonhazardous substitutes are higher in cost, but this is offset by eliminating the costs associated with onsite waste handling of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) items. In the end, replacing lead with non-hazardous substitutes eliminates waste generation and future liability.

  2. Recycling radioactive scrap metal by producing concrete shielding with steel granules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sappok, M.

    1996-01-01

    Siempelkamp foundry at Krefeld, Germany, developed a method for recycling radioactively contaminated steel from nuclear installations. The material is melted and used for producing shielding plates, containers, etc., on a cast-iron basis. Because the percentage of stainless steel has recently increased significantly, problems in the production of high-quality cast iron components have also grown. The metallurgy, the contents of nickel and chromium especially, does not allow for the recycling of stainless steel in a percentage to make this process economical. In Germany, the state of the art is to use shielded concrete containers for the transport of low active waste; this concrete is produced by using hematite as an additive for increasing shielding efficiency. The plan was to produce steel granules from radioactive scrap metal as a substitute for hematite in shielding concrete

  3. Structural and Shielding Safety of a Transport Package for Radioisotope Sealed Source Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kiseog; Cho, Ilje; Kim, Donghak

    2006-01-01

    As some kinds of radioisotope (RI) sealed source are produced by HANARO research reactor, a demand of RI transport package is increasing gradually. Foreign countries, which produce the various RIs, have the intrinsic model of the RI transport package. It is necessary to develop a RI and its transport package simultaneously. It is difficult to design a shielding part for this transport package because the passage for this source assembly should be provided from the center of shielding part to the outside of the package. In order to endure the accident conditions such as a 9 m drop and puncture, this transport package consists of the guide tubes, a gamma shield and a shock absorber. This paper describe that a shielding and structural safety of RI sealed source transport package are evaluated under the accident conditions

  4. Frequency dependence of magnetic shielding performance of HTS plates in mixed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitani, Atsushi; Yokono, Takafumi; Yokono, Takafumi

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic shielding performance of the high-Tc superconducting (HTS) plate is investigated numerically. The behavior of the shielding current density in the HTS plate is expressed as the integral-differential equation with a normal component of the current vector potential as a dependent variable. The numerical code for solving the equation has been developed by using the combination of the Newton-Raphson method and the successive substitution method and, by use of the code, damping coefficients and shielding factors are evaluated for the various values of the frequency ω. The results of computations show that the HTS plate has a possibility of shielding the high-frequency magnetic field with ω > or approx. 1 kHz. (author)

  5. Application of ceramics for neutron shielding. Proposal of multi-functional shielding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senda, Tetsuya; Akiyama, Shigeru; Matsuoka, Kazuyoshi; Ueki, Kohtaro; Ohashi, Atsuto [Ship Research Inst., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Amada, Shigeyasu [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Radiation shielding is one of the fundamental technologies to ensure the safety of the nuclear plants. Particularly for the nuclear systems as the power plants of ships and undersea vehicles, radiation shielding should be achieved within limited space and weight. Ceramics are of great interest as shielding components, because they can be composed with a wide variation of elements that have different shielding specifications. They are also known as good structural materials at high temperatures. Therefore, ceramics may be promising as 'multi-functional' shielding materials. In the present study, neutron shielding effects are first investigated by a series of the experiments using a {sup 252}Cf neutron source and simulated by using Monte Carlo Code MCNP 4A. The role of each ceramics is discussed particularly in terms of the 'enhancement effect' by medium-heavy elements, such as chromium and titanium. As an advanced technique to evaluate the thermal shock resistance of the materials, a laser irradiation method is proposed and applied to those ceramics that are expected to be neutron shielding components. Detailed discussion is made on the effects of porosity and multiple irradiation resulting in a fatigue-like behavior. Based on the results of these experiments and simulations, a three-layered arrangement, consisting of chromium carbide, titanium boride and boron nitride, is proposed as a multi-functional shielding material that minimizes the dose-equivalent rate and also exhibits good thermal shock resistance. (author)

  6. Nutrient shielding in clusters of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Koschwanez, John H.; Nelson, David R.

    2013-06-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells' spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness ℓ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter ν that characterizes the absorption strength of each cell. The parameter ν can vary over many orders of magnitude among different cell types, ranging from bacteria and yeast to human tissue. The thickness ℓ decreases with increasing ν, increasing cell volume fraction ϕ, and decreasing ambient nutrient concentration ψ∞. The theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations and experiments. In the latter studies, colonies of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are grown on glucose media and imaged under a confocal microscope. We measure the growth inside the colonies via a fluorescent protein reporter and compare the experimental and theoretical results for the thickness ℓ.

  7. Nutrient Shielding in Clusters of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Koschwanez, John H.; Nelson, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells’ spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness ℓ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter ν that characterizes the absorption strength of each cell. The parameter ν can vary over many orders of magnitude between different cell types, ranging from bacteria and yeast to human tissue. The thickness ℓ decreases with increasing ν, increasing cell volume fraction ϕ, and decreasing ambient nutrient concentration ψ∞. The theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations and experiments. In the latter studies, colonies of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are grown on glucose media and imaged under a confocal microscope. We measure the growth inside the colonies via a fluorescent protein reporter and compare the experimental and theoretical results for the thickness ℓ. PMID:23848711

  8. Fusion reactor blanket/shield design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Clemmer, R.G.; Harkness, S.D.

    1979-07-01

    A joint study of tokamak reactor first-wall/blanket/shield technology was conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC). The objectives of this program were the identification of key technological limitations for various tritium-breeding-blanket design concepts, establishment of a basis for assessment and comparison of the design features of each concept, and development of optimized blanket designs. The approach used involved a review of previously proposed blanket designs, analysis of critical technological problems and design features associated with each of the blanket concepts, and a detailed evaluation of the most tractable design concepts. Tritium-breeding-blanket concepts were evaluated according to the proposed coolant. The ANL effort concentrated on evaluation of lithium- and water-cooled blanket designs while the MDAC effort focused on helium- and molten salt-cooled designs. A joint effort was undertaken to provide a consistent set of materials property data used for analysis of all blanket concepts. Generalized nuclear analysis of the tritium breeding performance, an analysis of tritium breeding requirements, and a first-wall stress analysis were conducted as part of the study. The impact of coolant selection on the mechanical design of a tokamak reactor was evaluated. Reference blanket designs utilizing the four candidate coolants are presented

  9. Fusion reactor blanket/shield design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Clemmer, R.G.; Harkness, S.D.

    1979-07-01

    A joint study of tokamak reactor first-wall/blanket/shield technology was conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC). The objectives of this program were the identification of key technological limitations for various tritium-breeding-blanket design concepts, establishment of a basis for assessment and comparison of the design features of each concept, and development of optimized blanket designs. The approach used involved a review of previously proposed blanket designs, analysis of critical technological problems and design features associated with each of the blanket concepts, and a detailed evaluation of the most tractable design concepts. Tritium-breeding-blanket concepts were evaluated according to the proposed coolant. The ANL effort concentrated on evaluation of lithium- and water-cooled blanket designs while the MDAC effort focused on helium- and molten salt-cooled designs. A joint effort was undertaken to provide a consistent set of materials property data used for analysis of all blanket concepts. Generalized nuclear analysis of the tritium breeding performance, an analysis of tritium breeding requirements, and a first-wall stress analysis were conducted as part of the study. The impact of coolant selection on the mechanical design of a tokamak reactor was evaluated. Reference blanket designs utilizing the four candidate coolants are presented.

  10. Comparison of eye shields in radiotherapeutic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, B.E.; Wellington Hospital, Wellington; Johnson, A.D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Both MeV electrons and kV photons are used in the treatment of superficial cancers. The advantages and disadvantages for each of these modalities have been widely reported in the literature (See for example [1-2]). Of particular note in the literature is the use of lead and tungsten eye shields to protect ocular structures during radiotherapy. An investigation addressing issues raised in the literature that are relevant to the Wellington Cancer Centre method of treatment of lesions near the eye shall be summarised. Various small sized fields were irradiated to determine depth dose and profile curves in a water phantom shielded by various commercially available eye shields. Transmission factors relevant to critical ocular structures and particle distribution theories are used to further elucidate the comparison between the use of MeV electrons and kV photons in the treatment of superficial cancers. Superficial X-rays from a Pantak Therapax unit SXT 150 model of HVL 4.90mm Al were used for the lead eye shield measurements and electrons from a Varian Clinac 2100C nominal energies 6MeV and 9MeV (R p 3.00cm and 4.34cm respectively) were used for the tungsten eye shield measurements. For the photon measurements circular applicators of 3cm, 4cm and 5cm diameter were used and for the electrons standard 6x6cm and 10x 10cm applicators were used, with no custom inserts. A Scanditronix RFA-300 water phantom and Scanditronix RFAplus version 5.3 software application were used to collect and collate all data. The eye shields were the Radiation Products Design Inc. medium lead eye shield (item 934-014) and the MED-TEC tungsten eye shields MT-T-45 M and MT-T-45 S. It is demonstrated that electron fields have appreciably greater scatter into the area directly under the eye shields than the photon fields. Similarly at the region of d max for the electron fields the relative dose is appreciably greater than the photon fields at similar depth. The relative merits for

  11. Radiation shielding fiber and its manufacturing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Koji; Ono, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To manufacture radiation shielding fibers of excellent shielding effects. Method: Fibers containing more than 1 mmol/g of carboxyl groups are bonded with heavy metals, or they are impregnated with an aqueous solution containing water-soluble heavy metal salts dissolved therein. Fibers as the substrate may be any of forms such as short fibers, long fibers, fiber tows, webs, threads, knitting or woven products, non-woven fabrics, etc. It is however necessary that fibers contain more than 1 mmol/g, preferably, from 2 to 7 mmol/g of carboxylic groups. Since heavy metals having radiation shielding performance are bonded to the outer layer of the fibers and the inherent performance of the fibers per se is possessed, excellent radiation shielding performance can be obtained, as well as they can be applied with spinning, knitting or weaving, stitching, etc. thus can be used for secondary fiber products such as clothings, caps, masks, curtains, carpets, cloths, etc. for use in radiation shieldings. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

    2011-09-08

    This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earth’s surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earth’s surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

  13. Correlated Uncertainties in Radiation Shielding Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneth, Charles M.; Maung, Khin Maung; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    2013-01-01

    The space radiation environment is composed of energetic particles which can deliver harmful doses of radiation that may lead to acute radiation sickness, cancer, and even death for insufficiently shielded crew members. Spacecraft shielding must provide structural integrity and minimize the risk associated with radiation exposure. The risk of radiation exposure induced death (REID) is a measure of the risk of dying from cancer induced by radiation exposure. Uncertainties in the risk projection model, quality factor, and spectral fluence are folded into the calculation of the REID by sampling from probability distribution functions. Consequently, determining optimal shielding materials that reduce the REID in a statistically significant manner has been found to be difficult. In this work, the difference of the REID distributions for different materials is used to study the effect of composition on shielding effectiveness. It is shown that the use of correlated uncertainties allows for the determination of statistically significant differences between materials despite the large uncertainties in the quality factor. This is in contrast to previous methods where uncertainties have been generally treated as uncorrelated. It is concluded that the use of correlated quality factor uncertainties greatly reduces the uncertainty in the assessment of shielding effectiveness for the mitigation of radiation exposure.

  14. High ionization radiation field remote visualization device - shielding requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Antonio P. Rodrigues; Omi, Nelson M.; Silveira, Carlos Gaia da; Calvo, Wilson A. Pajero

    2011-01-01

    The high activity sources manipulation hot-cells use special and very thick leaded glass windows. This window provides a single sight of what is being manipulated inside the hot-cell. The use of surveillance cameras would replace the leaded glass window, provide other sights and show more details of the manipulated pieces, using the zoom capacity. Online distant manipulation may be implemented, too. The limitation is their low ionizing radiation resistance. This low resistance also limited the useful time of robots made to explore or even fix problematic nuclear reactor core, industrial gamma irradiators and high radioactive leaks. This work is a part of the development of a high gamma field remote visualization device using commercial surveillance cameras. These cameras are cheap enough to be discarded after the use for some hours of use in an emergency application, some days or some months in routine applications. A radiation shield can be used but it cannot block the camera sight which is the shield weakness. Estimates of the camera and its electronics resistance may be made knowing each component behavior. This knowledge is also used to determine the optical sensor type and the lens material, too. A better approach will be obtained with the commercial cameras working inside a high gamma field, like the one inside of the IPEN Multipurpose Irradiator. The goal of this work is to establish the radiation shielding needed to extend the camera's useful time to hours, days or months, depending on the application needs. (author)

  15. Shielding considerations and design concepts for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of shielding considerations and design concepts that have been under investigation at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Lewis Research Center for the application of space reactor power systems to a wide range of future NASA missions. The missions are based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) and Mission from Plant Earth programs currently under study. They include both instrument and human-rated applications in cislunar and outer space as well as planet surface locations. The SRPS configurations under consideration are based on advanced reactor and power-generation technologies being developed jointly by the US Department of Energy/NASA/US Department of Defense SP-100 space reactor power system program and the NASA Civil Space Technology Initiative programs. The SP-100 reactor technology employs a UN-fueled, niobium-alloy-clad, pin-type core with high-temperature lithium coolant. Electrical power generation technologies include both direct or static and dynamic thermal-to-electrical conversion techniques, with selection dependent on mission power-level requirements. Shield designs are also highly mission dependent and can range from shadow-shield configurations employing tungsten and lithium hydride (LiH) materials manufactured and assembled on Earth, to the use of indigenous planet surface materials that could be utilized on the moon and Mars

  16. Evaluation of a permanent reactor vessel head shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.S.; Johnson, T.G.; Tipswork, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports that Virginia Power recently completed installing permanent reactor vessel head shields at all four of its nuclear units-Surry 1 and 2 (781-MWe Westinghouse PWRs) and North Anna 1 and 2 (893-MWe Westinghouse PWRs). Permanent shields were chosen over the use of temporary shielding based on a cost/benefit analysis. Factors that were taken into account in the analysis included the cost of the shields, the one-time dose commitment for installation of permanent shields, dose and manpower commitments for installation and removal of temporary shielding during each outage, decontamination and storage of temporary shielding between outages, and projected dose savings for both types of shields. Basically, permanent shields were found to be more cot-effective because each required only a one-time dose commitment for installation

  17. Passive magnetic shielding in MRI-Linac systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Brendan; Kolling, Stefan; Oborn, Brad M.; Keall, Paul

    2018-04-01

    Passive magnetic shielding refers to the use of ferromagnetic materials to redirect magnetic field lines away from vulnerable regions. An application of particular interest to the medical physics community is shielding in MRI systems, especially integrated MRI-linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) systems. In these systems, the goal is not only to minimize the magnetic field in some volume, but also to minimize the impact of the shield on the magnetic fields within the imaging volume of the MRI scanner. In this work, finite element modelling was used to assess the shielding of a side coupled 6 MV linac and resultant heterogeneity induced within the 30 cm diameter of spherical volume (DSV) of a novel 1 Tesla split bore MRI magnet. A number of different shield parameters were investigated; distance between shield and magnet, shield shape, shield thickness, shield length, openings in the shield, number of concentric layers, spacing between each layer, and shield material. Both the in-line and perpendicular MRI-Linac configurations were studied. By modifying the shield shape around the linac from the starting design of an open ended cylinder, the shielding effect was boosted by approximately 70% whilst the impact on the magnet was simultaneously reduced by approximately 10%. Openings in the shield for the RF port and beam exit were substantial sources of field leakage; however it was demonstrated that shielding could be added around these openings to compensate for this leakage. Layering multiple concentric shield shells was highly effective in the perpendicular configuration, but less so for the in-line configuration. Cautious use of high permeability materials such as Mu-metal can greatly increase the shielding performance in some scenarios. In the perpendicular configuration, magnetic shielding was more effective and the impact on the magnet lower compared with the in-line configuration.

  18. Calculated shielding factors for selected European houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.

    1984-12-01

    Shielding factors for gamma radiation from activity deposited on structures and ground surfaces have been calculated with the computer model DEPSHIELD for single-family and multi-storey buildings in France, United Kingdom and Denmark. For all three countries it was found that the shielding factors for single-family houses are approximately a factor of 2 - 10 higher that those for buildings with five or more storeys. Away from doors and windows the shielding factors for French, British, and Danish single-family houses are in the range 0.03 - 0.1, 0.06 - 0.4, and 0.07 - 0.3, respectively. The uncertainties of the calculations are discussed and DEPSHIELD-results are compared with other methods as well as with experimental results. (author)

  19. Radiation safety shield for a syringe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    Safety apparatus for use in administering radioactive serums by a syringe, without endangering the health and safety of the medical operators is described. The apparatus consists of a sheath and a shield which can be retracted into the sheath to assay the radioactive serum in an assay well. The shield can be moved from the retracted position into an extended position when the serum is to be injected into the patient. To protect the operator, the shield can be constructed of tantalum or any like high density substance to attenuate the radiation, emanating from the radioactive serums contained in the syringe, from passing to the atmosphere. A lead glass window is provided so that the operator can determine the exact quantity of the radioactive serum which is contained in the syringe

  20. Slipforming of reinforced concrete shield building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, M.C.; King, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The unique design and construction features of slipforming the heavily reinforced concrete cylindrical shield walls at the Satsop nuclear plant in Washington, D.C. site are presented. The shield walls were designed in compliance with seismic requirements which resulted in the need for reinforcing steel averaging 326 kg/m/sup 3/. A 7.6 m high, three-deck moving platform was designed to permit easy installation of the reinforcing steel, embedments, and blockouts, and to facilitate concrete placement and finishing. Two circular box trusses, one on each side of the shield wall, were used in combination with a spider truss to meet both the tolerance and strength requirements for the slipform assembly

  1. Final design of ITER thermal shield manifold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-Kyu [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 52811 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Chang Hyun, E-mail: chnoh@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun-Kyu; Park, Sungwoo [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 52811 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Kwanwoo [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Wooho [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 52811 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dongkwon; Kang, Kyung-O. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungmun [SFA Engineering Corporation, Hwaseong-si 10060 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jing Do [Korea Marine Equipment Research Institute, Busan 49111 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Engineering design of thermal shield manifold is finalized. • Pipe routing, support design and flow balance are verified by analysis. • Mock-ups are fabricated to verify the design. - Abstract: The ITER thermal shield is actively cooled by 80 K pressurized helium gas. The helium coolant flows from the cold valve box to the cooling tubes on the TS panels via manifold piping. This paper describes the final design of thermal shield manifold. Pipe design to accommodate the thermal contraction considering interface with adjacent components and detailed design of support structure are presented. R&D for the pipe branch connection is carried out to find a feasible manufacturing method. Global structural behavior and structural integrity of the manifold including pipe supports are investigated by a finite element analysis based on ASME B31.3 code. Flow analyses are performed to check the flow distribution.

  2. Electromagnetic Shielding Efficiency Measurement of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dřínovský, J.; Kejík, Z.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the theoretical and practical aspects of the shielding efficiency measurements of construction composite materials. This contribution describes an alternative test method of these measurements by using the measurement circular flange. The measured results and parameters of coaxial test flange are also discussed. The measurement circular flange is described by measured scattering parameters in the frequency range from 9 kHz up to 1 GHz. The accuracy of the used shielding efficiency measurement method was checked by brass calibration ring. The suitability of the coaxial test setup was also checked by measurements on the EMC test chamber. This data was compared with the measured data on the real EMC chamber. The whole measurement of shielding efficiency was controlled by the program which runs on a personal computer. This program was created in the VEE Pro environment produced by © Agilent Technology.

  3. Radiation shielding performance of some concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkurt, I.; Akyildirim, H.; Mavi, B.; Kilincarslan, S.; Basyigit, C.

    2007-01-01

    The energy consumption is increasing with the increased population of the world and thus new energy sources were discovered such as nuclear energy. Besides using nuclear energy, nuclear techniques are being used in a variety of fields such as medical hospital, industry, agriculture or military issue, the radiation protection becomes one of the important research fields. In radiation protection, the main rules are time, distance and shielding. The most effective radiation shields are materials which have a high density and high atomic number such as lead, tungsten which are expensive. Alternatively the concrete which produced using different aggregate can be used. The effectiveness of radiation shielding is frequently described in terms of the half value layer (HVL) or the tenth value layer (TVL). These are the thicknesses of an absorber that will reduce the radiation to half, and one tenth of its intensity respectively. In this study the radiation protection properties of different types of concrete will be discussed

  4. Accelerator shielding experts meet at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Fifteen years after its first CERN edition, the Shielding Aspects of Accelerator, Targets and Irradiation Facility (SATIF) conference was held again here from 2-4 June. Now at its 10th edition, SATIF10 brought together experts from all over the world to discuss issues related to the shielding techniques. They set out the scene for an improved collaboration and discussed novel shielding solutions.   This was the most attended meeting of the series with more than 65 participants from 34 institutions and 14 countries. “We welcomed experts from many different laboratories around the world. We come from different contexts but we face similar problems. In this year’s session, among other things, we discussed ways for improving the effectiveness of calculations versus real data, as well as experimental solutions to investigate the damage that radiation produces on various materials and the electronics”, says Marco Silari, Chair of the conference and member of the DGS/RP gro...

  5. Heating profiles on ICRF antenna Faraday shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hahs, C.L.; Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, P.M.; Williamson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual design for an uncooled Faraday shield for the BPX ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna, which should withstand the proposed long-pulse operation, has been completed. A high-heat-flux, uncooled Faraday shield has also been designed for the fast-wave current drive (FWCD) antenna on D3-D. For both components, the improved understanding of the heating profiles made it possible to design for heat fluxes that would otherwise have been too close to mechanically established limits. The analytical effort is described in detail, with emphasis on the design work for the BPX ICRH antenna conceptual design and for the replacement Faraday shield for the D3-D FWCD antenna. Results of analyses are shown, and configuration issues involved in component modeling are discussed. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Self-Shielding Of Transmission Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christodoulou, Christos [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The use of shielding to contend with noise or harmful EMI/EMR energy is not a new concept. An inevitable trade that must be made for shielding is physical space and weight. Space was often not as much of a painful design trade in older larger systems as they are in today’s smaller systems. Today we are packing in an exponentially growing number of functionality within the same or smaller volumes. As systems become smaller and space within systems become more restricted, the implementation of shielding becomes more problematic. Often, space that was used to design a more mechanically robust component must be used for shielding. As the system gets smaller and space is at more of a premium, the trades starts to result in defects, designs with inadequate margin in other performance areas, and designs that are sensitive to manufacturing variability. With these challenges in mind, it would be ideal to maximize attenuation of harmful fields as they inevitably couple onto transmission lines without the use of traditional shielding. Dr. Tom Van Doren proposed a design concept for transmission lines to a class of engineers while visiting New Mexico. This design concept works by maximizing Electric field (E) and Magnetic Field (H) field containment between operating transmission lines to achieve what he called “Self-Shielding”. By making the geometric centroid of the outgoing current coincident with the return current, maximum field containment is achieved. The reciprocal should be true as well, resulting in greater attenuation of incident fields. Figure’s 1(a)-1(b) are examples of designs where the current centroids are coincident. Coax cables are good examples of transmission lines with co-located centroids but they demonstrate excellent field attenuation for other reasons and can’t be used to test this design concept. Figure 1(b) is a flex circuit design that demonstrate the implementation of self-shielding vs a standard conductor layout.

  7. A study on the shielding element using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jae Goo [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this research, we simulated the elementary star shielding ability using Monte Carlo simulation to apply medical radiation shielding sheet which can replace existing lead. In the selection of elements, mainly elements and metal elements having a large atomic number, which are known to have high shielding performance, recently, various composite materials have improved shielding performance, so that weight reduction, processability, In consideration of activity etc., 21 elements were selected. The simulation tools were utilized Monte Carlo method. As a result of simulating the shielding performance by each element, it was estimated that the shielding ratio is the highest at 98.82% and 98.44% for tungsten and gold.

  8. Shutdown dose rate analysis of European test blanket modules shields in ITER Equatorial Port #16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juárez, Rafael, E-mail: rjuarez@ind.uned.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, ETSII-UNED, Calle Juan del Rosal 12, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Sauvan, Patrick; Perez, Lucia [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, ETSII-UNED, Calle Juan del Rosal 12, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Panayotov, Dobromir; Vallory, Joelle; Zmitko, Milan; Poitevin, Yves [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla 2, Barcelona 08019 (Spain); Sanz, Javier [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, ETSII-UNED, Calle Juan del Rosal 12, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Nuclear analysis for European TBMs and shields, in ITER Equatorial Port #16, has been conducted in support of the ‘Concept Design Review’ from ITER. • The objective of the work is the characterization of the Shutdown Dose Rates at Equatorial Port #16 interspace. • The role played by the TBM and TBM shields, the equatorial port gaps and the vacuum vessel permeation, in terms of neutron flux transmission is assessed. • The role played by the TBM, TBM shields, Port Plug Frame, Pipe Forest and the machine in terms of activation is also investigated. - Abstract: ‘Fusion for Energy’ (F4E) is designing, developing, and implementing the European Helium-Cooled Lead-Lithium (HCLL) and Helium-Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) for ITER (Nuclear Facility INB-174). An essential element of the Conceptual Design Review (CDR) of these TBSs is the demonstration of capability of Test Blanket Modules (TBM) and their shields to fulfil their function and comply with the design requirements. One of the TBM shields highly relevant design aspects is the project target for shutdown dose rates (SDDR) in the interspace. We investigated two functions of the TBMs and TBM shields—the neutron flux attenuation along the shields, and the reduction of the activation of the components contributing to SDDR. It is shown that TBMs and TBM shields reduce significantly the neutron flux in the port plug (PP). In terms of neutron flux attenuation, the TBM shield provides sufficient neutron flux reduction, being responsible for 5 × 10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2} s at port interspace, while the EPP gaps and BSM gaps are responsible for 5 × 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} s each. When considering closed upper, lower and lateral neighbour equatorial ports (thus, excluding the cross-talk between ports), a SDDR of 121 μSv/h averaged near the port closure flange was obtained, out of which, only 4 μSv/h are due to the activation of TBMs and TBM shields. Maximum SDDR in the range

  9. Experimental Evaluation of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Reid, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the Vision for Space Exploration the end of the next decade will bring man back to the surface of the moon. One of the most critical issues for the establishment of human presence on the moon will be the availability of compact power sources. The establishment of man on the moon will require power from greater than 10's of kWt's in follow on years. Nuclear reactors are extremely we11 suited to meet the needs for power generation on the lunar or Martian surface. reactor system. Several competing concepts exist for lightweight, safe, robust shielding systems such as a water shield, lithium hydride (LiH), Boron Carbide, and others. Water offers several potential advantages, including reduced cost, reduced technical risk, and reduced mass. Water has not typically been considered for space reactor applications because of the need for gravity to remove the potential for radiation streaming paths. The water shield concept relies on predictions of passive circulation of the shield water by natural convection to adequately cool the shield. This prediction needs to be experimentally evaluated, especially for shields with complex geometries. MSFC has developed the experience and fac necessary to do this evaluation in the Early Flight Fission - Test Facility (EFF-TF).

  10. Prediction of melanoma metastasis by the Shields index based on lymphatic vessel density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metcalfe Chris

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma usually presents as an initial skin lesion without evidence of metastasis. A significant proportion of patients develop subsequent local, regional or distant metastasis, sometimes many years after the initial lesion was removed. The current most effective staging method to identify early regional metastasis is sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB, which is invasive, not without morbidity and, while improving staging, may not improve overall survival. Lymphatic density, Breslow's thickness and the presence or absence of lymphatic invasion combined has been proposed to be a prognostic index of metastasis, by Shields et al in a patient group. Methods Here we undertook a retrospective analysis of 102 malignant melanomas from patients with more than five years follow-up to evaluate the Shields' index and compare with existing indicators. Results The Shields' index accurately predicted outcome in 90% of patients with metastases and 84% without metastases. For these, the Shields index was more predictive than thickness or lymphatic density. Alternate lymphatic measurement (hot spot analysis was also effective when combined into the Shields index in a cohort of 24 patients. Conclusions These results show the Shields index, a non-invasive analysis based on immunohistochemistry of lymphatics surrounding primary lesions that can accurately predict outcome, is a simple, useful prognostic tool in malignant melanoma.

  11. FLUKA shielding calculations for the FAIR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehrenbacher, Georg; Kozlova, Ekaterina; Radon, Torsten; Sokolov, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    FAIR is an international accelerator project being in construction at GSI Helmholtz center for heavy ion research in Darmstadt. The Monte Carlo program FLUKA is used to study radiation protection problems. The contribution deals with general application possibilities of FLUKA and for FAIR with respect the radiation protection planning. The necessity to simulate the radiation transport through shielding of several meters thickness and to determine the equivalent doses outside the shielding with sufficient accuracy is demonstrated using two examples under consideration of the variance reduction. Results of simulation calculations for activation estimation in accelerator facilities are presented.

  12. Thermophysical Properties of Heat Resistant Shielding Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    This project was aimed at determining thermal conductivity, specific heat and thermal expansion of a heat resistant shielding material for neutron absorption applications. These data are critical in predicting the structural integrity of the shielding under thermal cycling and mechanical load. The measurements of thermal conductivity and specific heat were conducted in air at five different temperatures (-31 F, 73.4 F, 140 F, 212 F and 302 F). The transient plane source (TPS) method was used in the tests. Thermal expansion tests were conducted using push rod dilatometry over the continuous range from -40 F (-40 C) to 302 F (150 C)

  13. [Electromagnetic Shielding Alters Behaviour of Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temuryants, N A; Kostyuk, A S; Tumanyants, K N

    2015-01-01

    It has been found that long-term electromagnetic shielding (19 hours per day for 10 days) leads to an increase in the duration of passive swimming time in male rats, decrease the duration of active swimming in the "forced swim" test as well as decrease of libido. On the other hand animals kept under the "open field" conditions do not show significant deviations from their normal behavior. Therefore, one could conclude that moderate electromagnetic shielding causes a depression-like state in rats.

  14. Radiation shielding issues on the FMIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.J.; Davis, A.A.; Huang, S.; Morford, R.J.

    1981-05-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) is being built to study neutron radiation effects in candidate fusion reactor materials. The FMIT will yield high fluence data in a fusion-like neutron radiation environment produced by the interaction of a 0.1A, 35 MeV deuteron beam with a flowing lithium target. The design of the facility as a whole is driven by a high availability requirement. The variety of radiation environments in the facility requires the use of diverse and extensive shielding. Shielding design throughout the FMIT must accommodate the need for maintenance and operations access while providing adequate personnel and equipment protection

  15. WASTE HANDLING BUILDING SHIELD WALL ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Padula

    2000-01-13

    The scope of this analysis is to estimate the shielding wall, ceiling or equivalent door thicknesses that will be required in the Waste Handling Building to maintain the radiation doses to personnel within acceptable limits. The shielding thickness calculated is the minimum required to meet administrative limits, and not necessarily what will be recommended for the final design. The preliminary evaluations will identify the areas which have the greatest impact on mechanical and facility design concepts. The objective is to provide the design teams with the necessary information to assure an efficient and effective design.

  16. LOFT shield tank steady state temperatures with addition of gamma and neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyllingstad, G.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of introducing a neutron and gamma shield into the annulus between the reactor vessel and the shield tank is analyzed. This addition has been proposed in order to intercept neutron streaming up the annulus during nuclear operations. Its installation will require removal of approximately 20- 1 / 2 inches of stainless steel foil insulation at the top of the annulus. The resulting conduction path is believed to result in increased water temperatures within the shield tank, possibly beyond the 150 0 F limit, and/or cooling of the reactor vessel nozzles such that adverse thermal stresses would be generated. A two dimensional thermal analysis using the finite element code COUPLE/MOD2 was done for the shield tank system illustrated in the figure (1). The reactor was assumed to be at full power, 55 MW (th), with a loop flow rate of 2.15 x 10 6 lbm/hr (268.4 kg/s) at 2250 psi (15.51 MPa). Calculations indicate a steady state shield tank water temperature of 140 0 F (60 0 C). This is below the 150 0 F (65.56 0 C) limit. Also, no significant changes in thermal gradients within the nozzle or reactor vessel wall are generated. A spacer between the gamma shield and the shield tank is recommended, however, in order to ensure free air circulation through the annulus

  17. Gamma and X-ray shielding compositions utilizing bauxite - Red Mud regional research laboratory (CSIR), Bhopal, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anshul, Avneesh; Amritphale, Sudhir Sitaram; Chandra, Navin; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The application spectrum of X-ray and Gamma radiation is increasing exponentially in the area of diagnostic, nuclear medicine, food preservation, nuclear power plants and strategic utilities. To prevent the harmful effects of these radiations, shielding materials based on lead metal and its compounds are being used historically, which are toxic in nature. To protect environment it has become necessary to develop non-toxic lead free shielding materials. The use of titanium metal and its compounds as synthetic rock i.e. SYNROC are reported to be very effective non-toxic shielding materials for various applications. Red mud waste generated in aluminum producing industries possesses a unique mineralogical compositions containing fairly high quantity of titanium oxide and iron oxide useful for making non toxic shielding compositions and therefore red mud has been utilized for the first time in the world for making radiation shielding materials. The red mud based compositions developed have been characterized for their various physico-mechanical properties namely compressive strength, impact strength, density and X-ray and gamma radiation shielding capacity in terms of shielding thickness i.e. HVT. Based on the characterization results it is found that the red mud based materials can be used for the construction of X-ray diagnostic and CT-Scanner room and as a substitute shielding material for concrete in the nuclear reactors and other radiation based applications. Studies on the identification of shielding phases and their morphology present, in the red mud based shielding compositions has been carried out using X-ray diffraction and SEM technique. The results of these studies are presented in this paper. (authors)

  18. WAPDEG Analysis of Waste Package and Drip shield Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Mon

    2004-01-01

    As directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), an analysis of the degradation of the engineered barrier system (EBS) drip shields and waste packages at the Yucca Mountain repository is developed. The purpose of this activity is to provide the TSPA with inputs and methodologies used to evaluate waste package and drip shield degradation as a function of exposure time under exposure conditions anticipated in the repository. This analysis provides information useful to satisfy ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) requirements. Several features, events, and processes (FEPs) are also discussed (Section 6.2, Table 15). The previous revision of this report was prepared as a model report in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, Models. Due to changes in the role of this report since the site recommendation, it no longer contains model development. This revision is prepared as a scientific analysis in accordance with AP-SIII.9Q, ''Scientific Analyses'' and uses models previously validated in (1) ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]); (2) ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169984]); and (3) ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169845]). The integrated waste package degradation (IWPD) analysis presented in this report treats several implementation-related issues, such as defining the number and size of patches per waste package that undergo stress corrosion cracking; recasting the weld flaw analysis in a form as implemented in the Closure Weld Defects (CWD) software; and, general corrosion rate manipulations (e.g., change of scale in Section 6.3.4). The weld flaw portion of this report takes input from an engineering calculation (BSC 2004

  19. Specification of the Surface Charging Environment with SHIELDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, V.; Delzanno, G. L.; Henderson, M. G.; Godinez, H. C.; Jeffery, C. A.; Lawrence, E. C.; Meierbachtol, C.; Moulton, J. D.; Vernon, L.; Woodroffe, J. R.; Brito, T.; Toth, G.; Welling, D. T.; Yu, Y.; Albert, J.; Birn, J.; Borovsky, J.; Denton, M.; Horne, R. B.; Lemon, C.; Markidis, S.; Thomsen, M. F.; Young, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    Predicting variations in the near-Earth space environment that can lead to spacecraft damage and failure, i.e. "space weather", remains a big space physics challenge. A recently funded project through the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program aims at developing a new capability to understand, model, and predict Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large Dynamic Storms, the SHIELDS framework. The project goals are to understand the dynamics of the surface charging environment (SCE), the hot (keV) electrons representing the source and seed populations for the radiation belts, on both macro- and microscale. Important physics questions related to rapid particle injection and acceleration associated with magnetospheric storms and substorms as well as plasma waves are investigated. These challenging problems are addressed using a team of world-class experts in the fields of space science and computational plasma physics, and state-of-the-art models and computational facilities. In addition to physics-based models (like RAM-SCB, BATS-R-US, and iPIC3D), new data assimilation techniques employing data from LANL instruments on the Van Allen Probes and geosynchronous satellites are developed. Simulations with the SHIELDS framework of the near-Earth space environment where operational satellites reside are presented. Further model development and the organization of a "Spacecraft Charging Environment Challenge" by the SHIELDS project at LANL in collaboration with the NSF Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) Workshop and the multi-agency Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) to assess the accuracy of SCE predictions are discussed.

  20. Self-Healing Inflatable Extraterrestrial Shield (SHIELD), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The team of Astro Terra Corp, Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), and Virginia Tech (VT) propose the development of a composite polymer over Phase-I and Phase-II...

  1. SU-C-BRB-06: Utilizing 3D Scanner and Printer for Dummy Eye-Shield: Artifact-Free CT Images of Tungsten Eye-Shield for Accurate Dose Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J; Lee, J; Kim, H; Kim, I; Ye, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a tungsten eye-shield on the dose distribution of a patient. Methods: A 3D scanner was used to extract the dimension and shape of a tungsten eye-shield in the STL format. Scanned data was transferred into a 3D printer. A dummy eye shield was then produced using bio-resin (3D systems, VisiJet M3 Proplast). For a patient with mucinous carcinoma, the planning CT was obtained with the dummy eye-shield placed on the patient’s right eye. Field shaping of 6 MeV was performed using a patient-specific cerrobend block on the 15 x 15 cm 2 applicator. The gantry angle was 330° to cover the planning target volume near by the lens. EGS4/BEAMnrc was commissioned from our measurement data from a Varian 21EX. For the CT-based dose calculation using EGS4/DOSXYZnrc, the CT images were converted to a phantom file through the ctcreate program. The phantom file had the same resolution as the planning CT images. By assigning the CT numbers of the dummy eye-shield region to 17000, the real dose distributions below the tungsten eye-shield were calculated in EGS4/DOSXYZnrc. In the TPS, the CT number of the dummy eye-shield region was assigned to the maximum allowable CT number (3000). Results: As compared to the maximum dose, the MC dose on the right lens or below the eye shield area was less than 2%, while the corresponding RTP calculated dose was an unrealistic value of approximately 50%. Conclusion: Utilizing a 3D scanner and a 3D printer, a dummy eye-shield for electron treatment can be easily produced. The artifact-free CT images were successfully incorporated into the CT-based Monte Carlo simulations. The developed method was useful in predicting the realistic dose distributions around the lens blocked with the tungsten shield

  2. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Stephens

    2006-01-13

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL & Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project.

  3. A new ceramic material for shielding pulsed neutron scattering instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celli, M.; Grazzi, F.; Zoppi, M.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new ceramic composite, based on boron carbide, to use as a shielding material for pulsed neutron scattering instrumentation. The measured transmission data show characteristics equivalent to crispy mix, a common shielding material used at ISIS (UK)

  4. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analyses , for information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Stephens

    2006-01-01

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL and Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project

  5. Software Tools for Measuring and Calculating Electromagnetic Shielding Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tesny, Neal

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation and the analysis of high-altitude electromagnetic pulse response of shielded enclosures require the availability of software tools able to acquire data and calculate shielding effectiveness...

  6. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-05-07

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

  7. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports

  8. 40 CFR 72.51 - Permit shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Contents § 72.51 Permit shield. Each affected unit operated in accordance with the Acid Rain permit that governs the unit and that was issued in compliance with title IV of the Act, as provided in this part and parts 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, and 78 of this chapter shall be deemed to be...

  9. In-beam background suppression shield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santoro, V.; Cai, Xiao Xiao; DiJulio, D. D.

    2015-01-01

    , which do not use a bender to help mitigate the fast neutron background, are the most challenging. For these beam lines we propose the innovative shielding of placing blocks of material directly into the guide system, which allow a minimum attenuation of the cold and thermal fluxes relative...

  10. Internally shielded beam transport and support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schildkamp, W.; Brewer, H.

    1996-01-01

    Due to environmental concerns, the Advanced Photon Source has a policy that disallows any exposed lead within the facility. This creates a real problem for the beam transport system, not so much for the pipe but for the flexible coupling (bellows) sections. A complete internally shielded x-ray transport system, consisting of long transport lines joined by flexible coupling sections, has been designed for CARS sector 14 to operate either at high vacuum or as a helium flight tube. It can effectively shield against air scattering of wiggler or undulator white beam with proper placement of apertures, collimators, and masks for direct beam control. The system makes use of male- and female-style fittings that create a labyrinth allowing for continuous shielding through the flexible coupling sections. These parts are precision machined from a ternary hypereutectic lead alloy (cast under 15 inches of head pressure to assure a pinhole-free casting) then pressed into either end (rotatable vacuum flanges) of the bellows assembly. The transport pipe itself consists of a four part construction using a stepped transition ring (Z-ring) to connect an inner tube to the vacuum flange and also to a protective and supportive outer tube. The inner tube is wrapped with 1/16 double-prime pure lead sheet to a predetermined thickness following the shape of the stepped transition ring for continuous shielding. This design has been prototyped and radiation tested. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. Shielding Effectiveness Measurements using a Reverberation Chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes; Bergsma, J.G.; Bergsma, Hans; van Etten, Wim

    2006-01-01

    Shielding effectiveness measurements have been performed using a reverberation chamber. The reverberation chamber methodology as we1l as the measurement setup is described and some results are given. Samples include glass reinforced plastic panels, aluminum panels with many holes, wire mesh, among

  12. AP1000 shield building: a constructability challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Bonanno, Domenico

    2010-01-01

    The AP1000 Shield Building, an enhanced structure which surrounds the containment vessel, consists of standard Reinforced Concrete (RC) and composite Steel and Concrete (SC) construction. In the SC module the surface steel plates, (with attached shear studs and angles) filled with concrete, act as the steel reinforcement in concrete. This is a relatively new design technology that required the appropriate use of structural codes, supplemented with information from applicable tests on similar composite steel and concrete construction. Being a newer design concept, existing codes do not provide explicit guidance on SC construction so a review of literature and test data on composite structures similar to AP1000 shield building was done in order to confirm the technical basis for the design. The SC walls, air inlet structure and roof of the Shield Building will be constructed using modular construction practices and then transported to site and lifted into place. These modules, working also as permanent form-work, will be filled with high strength Self- Consolidating Concrete. (SCC) This paper provides a focused and integrated presentation of the enhanced shield building design methodology, testing, constructability and inspection. (authors)

  13. [Participation of melatonin in change of nociception of snails and mice under influence of long-term electromagnetic shielding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temur'iants, N A; Kostiuk, A S; Tumaniants, K N

    2013-11-01

    Long-term electromagnetic shielding causes three-phase changes in nociception of snails and mice: an initial phase of the antinociceptive effect ofhyperalgesia is replaced with a further normalization of the parameters of nociception. These changes in snails develop slowly and phase of hyperalgesia expressed more vividly than in mice. Daily injections of melatonin in animals eliminate shielding-induced hyperalgesia causes an earlier and more pronounced antinociceptive effect. Such changes are due, apparently, with the initial depression ofmelatonin secretion under the influence of the electromagnetic shielding, which leads to the development ofhyperalgesia. In the future, the secretion of melatonin increases, that is shown in the growth of antinociceptive effect.

  14. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  15. Proceedings of a meeting on radiation shielding and related topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This is a proceedings of a meeting on radiation shielding and related topics held on Feb. 22 and 23 in 1978 at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory of University of Tokyo. The reports includes the following items (1) studies on neutronics with accelerators (2) radiation damage (3) shielding design (4) radiation streaming (5) shielding experiments from a point of view of radiation measurements (6) shielding benchmark experiments (7) prospects on the study of neutronics. All items are written in Japanese. (auth.)

  16. Shielding consideration for the SSCL experimental halls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, J.; Coyne, J.; Mokhov, N.; Stapleton, G.

    1994-03-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider which is being designed and built in Waxahachie, Texas consists Of series of proton accelerators, culminating in a 20 Te proton on proton collider. The collider will be in a tunnel which will be 87 km in circumference and. on average about 30 meters underground. The present design calls for two large interaction halls on the east side of the ring. The shielding for these halls is being designed for an interaction rate of 10 9 Hz or 10 16 interactions per year, based on 10 7 seconds per operational year. SSC guidelines require that the shielding be designed to meet the criterion of 1mSv per year for open areas off site 2mSv per year for open areas on site, and 2mSv per year for controlled areas. Only radiation workers will be routinely allowed to work in controlled areas. It should be pointed that there is a potential for an accidental full beam loss in either of the experimental halls, and this event would consist of the loss of the full circulating beam up to 4 x 10 14 protons. With the present design. the calculated dose equivalent for this event is about 10% of the annual dose equivalent for the normal p-p interactions, so that die accident condition does not control the shielding. If, for instance, local shielding within the experimental hall is introduced into the calculations, this could change. The shielding requirements presented here are controlled by the normal p-p interactions. Three important questions were addressed in the present calculations. They are (1) the thickness of the roof over the experimental halls, (2) the configuration of the shafts and adits which give access to the halls, and (3) the problem of ground water and air activation

  17. Flux trapping and shielding in irreversible superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, D.J.

    1978-05-01

    Flux trappings and shielding experiments were carried out on Pb, Nb, Pb-Bi, Nb-Sn, and Nb-Ti samples of various shapes. Movable Hall probes were used to measure fields near or inside the samples as a function of position and of applied field. The trapping of transverse multipole magnetic fields in tubular samples was accomplished by cooling the samples in an applied field and then smoothly reducing the applied field to zero. Transverse quadrupole and sextupole fields with gradients of over 2000 G/cm were trapped with typical fidelity to the original impressed field of a few percent. Transverse dipole fields of up to 17 kG were also trapped with similar fidelity. Shielding experiments were carried out by cooling the samples in zero field and then gradually applying an external field. Flux trapping and shielding abilities were found to be limited by two factors, the pinning strength of the material, and the susceptibility of a sample to flux jumping. The trapping and shielding behavior of flat disk samples in axial fields and thin-walled tubular samples in transverse fields was modeled. The models, which were based on the concept of the critical state, allowed a connection to be made between the pinning strength and critical current level, and the flux trapping and shielding abilities. Adiabatic and dynamic stability theories are discussed and applied to the materials tested. Good qualitative, but limited quantitative agreement was obtained between the predictions of the theoretical stability criteria and the observed flux jumping behavior

  18. Radiation shielding calculations for the vista spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Suemer; Sahin, Haci Mehmet; Acir, Adem

    2005-01-01

    The VISTA spacecraft design concept has been proposed for manned or heavy cargo deep space missions beyond earth orbit with inertial fusion energy propulsion. Rocket propulsion is provided by fusion power deposited in the inertial confined fuel pellet debris and with the help of a magnetic nozzle. The calculations for the radiation shielding have been revised under the fact that the highest jet efficiency of the vehicle could be attained only if the propelling plasma would have a narrow temperature distribution. The shield mass could be reduced from 600 tons in the original design to 62 tons. Natural and enriched lithium were the principle shielding materials. The allowable nuclear heating in the superconducting magnet coils (up to 5 mW/cm 3 ) is taken as the crucial criterion for dimensioning the radiation shielding structure of the spacecraft. The space craft mass is 6000 tons. Total peak nuclear power density in the coils is calculated as ∼5.0 mW/cm 3 for a fusion power output of 17 500 MW. The peak neutron heating density is ∼2.0 mW/cm 3 , and the peak γ-ray heating density is ∼3.0 mW/cm 3 (on different points) using natural lithium in the shielding. However, the volume averaged heat generation in the coils is much lower, namely 0.21, 0.71 and 0.92 mW/cm 3 for the neutron, γ-ray and total nuclear heating, respectively. The coil heating will be slightly lower if highly enriched 6 Li (90%) is used instead of natural lithium. Peak values are then calculated as 2.05, 2.15 and 4.2 mW/cm 3 for the neutron, γ-ray and total nuclear heating, respectively. The corresponding volume averaged heat generation in the coils became 0.19, 0.58 and 0.77 mW/cm 3

  19. Neutronics and shielding issues of ADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrahim, H. A.; Aoust, T.; Haeck, W.; Malambu, E.; Van den Eynde, G.; Gonzalez, E.; Vicente, C.; Martinez-Val, J. M.; Romanets, Y.; Vaz, P.

    2007-01-01

    Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are hybrid systems consisting of a high-intensity proton accelerator with beam energy in the hundreds of MeV range impinging in a target of a heavy element and coupled to a sub-critical core. The intense (of the order of 10 1 5 n/cm 2 /s) and fast neutron fluxes produced by the spallation reactions triggered by the impinging protons in the target can be used to induce fission reactions in the actinides and capture reactions in the longlived fission products in the fuel assemblies in the core of the system. ADS have been considered during the last fifteen years as one of the promising technological solutions for the transmutation of nuclear waste, reducing the radiotoxicity of the high-level nuclear waste and reducing the burden to the geological repositories. The European Commission's Green Paper entitled 'Towards a European Strategy for the Security of Energy Supply' clearly pointed out the importance of nuclear energy in Europe. With 145 operating reactors producing a total power of 125 GWe, the resulting energy generation of 850 TWh per year provides 35% of the electricity consumption of the European Union. The Green Paper also points out that the nuclear industry has mastered the entire nuclear fuel cycle with the exception of waste management and for this reason, 'focusing on waste management has to be continued'. Amongst the several solutions being studied in recent years, MYRRHA (concept developed at SCK-CEN, Belgium), XADS (design studies co-funded by the European Union in the framework of the 5th Framework Programme) and XT-ADS and EFIT (acronyms standing for an experimental machine and for the long term transmuter to be deployed on an industrial scale, both in the EUROTRANS project of the 6th Framework Programme) have deserved the attention of different communities of specialists in the field of Nuclear Technology and Radioactive Waste Management. Although these machines have been designed with different parameters, their

  20. Investigation of Shielding Properties of Yarns, Twisted with Metal Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra VARNAITĖ-ŽURAVLIOVA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The development level of the modern techniques and information technologies creates diverse nature electromagnetic fields and electric field accumulations in the human environment. Electrically conductive textiles that protect against electromagnetic waves and electric charge accumulations can be usable as protective covers for work in computer equipment rooms, measuring stands, air and gas filters and so on. One of the methods used in increase of electrical conductivity in textiles is the development of their specific structures (including the development of threads with the metal component. In this paper, unlike the currently used in the world conductive material production method, where different metal fibres are used as an additives to the main fibre composition in order to create a variety of fibres and yarns, a spun yarn with metal wire was prototyped as samples for this research and the parameters of protective properties of these samples were investigated (such as surface resistivity, vertical resistance, etc.. The protective and shielding properties of woven network with prototyped twisted electro conductive thread with a wire (metal wire diameter of 15 microns were investigated. During the investigation the influence of the following factors, such as conductive fibre composition, electrically conductive thread distribution frequency of the longitudinal and transverse direction, on the protective shielding properties of conductive network were analyzed. The research enabled the assessment of influence of electrically conductive fibre yarn composition and its distribution in the woven mesh on protective shielding properties. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.1.2492

  1. 30 CFR 56.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 56.14213... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14213 Ventilation and shielding for welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous to...

  2. Advanced materials and design for electromagnetic interference shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Xingcun Colin

    2008-01-01

    Exploring the role of EMI shielding in EMC design, this book introduces the design guidelines, materials selection, characterization methodology, manufacturing technology, and future potential of EMI shielding. It covers an array of issues in advanced shielding materials and design solutions, including enclosures and composites.

  3. PRORA - program for calculating neutron flux in reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindilaru, G.; Cuculeanu, V.

    1978-06-01

    In order to perform the reactor shielding calculations for the reactor design, it is necessary a fast, accurate method which should take into account the proper shielding geometry. Thus, the PRORA program calculates space-energy neutron distribution in the reactor shielding using age-diffusion approximation and the multigroup formalism. (author)

  4. System for detecting and processing abnormality in electromagnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Nakamura, M.; Yabana, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Nagata, K.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for detecting and processing an abnormality in electromagnetic shielding of an intelligent building which is constructed using an electromagnetic shielding material for the skeleton and openings such as windows and doorways so that the whole of the building is formed into an electromagnetic shielding structure. (author). 4 figs

  5. Cost Assessment for Shielding of C3 Type. Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    Oersted (2) 3.2.2 Corner Effects For a box-like shielded enclosure, the shielding effectiveness is commonly said to be "degraded" at the edges and...Young in which a limiting nonlinear theory predicts a lower bound on shielding ef- fectiveness. The procedure adopted here is as follows. As shown

  6. Determination of the shielding factors for gamma-ray spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korun, M.; Vodenik, B.; Zorko, B.

    2014-01-01

    A method for determining the shielding factors for gamma-ray spectrometers is described. The shielding factors are expressed by decomposing the peaked background of the spectrometer into contributions of the detector, spectrometer shield and ambient radiation to the spectrometer background. The dimensions of the sample and its mass-attenuation coefficient are taken into account using a simple model. For six spectrometers, with contributions to the background quantified, the shielding factors were determined for the background based on the thorium decay series and the radon daughters. For a water sample with a diameter of 9 cm and a thickness of 4 cm and the nuclides of the thorium decay series that are in the spectrometer shields, the values of the shielding factors lie in the interval 0.95–1.00. For a spectrometer exhibiting the diffusion of radon into the shielding material, the values of the shielding factors for the same sample for gamma-rays from the radon daughters lie in the interval 0.88–1.00. - Highlights: • A model is described to assess shielding factors for gamma-ray spectrometers. • The background due to the detector, shield and ambient radiation must be known. • The sample attenuation, its dimensions and distance from the crystal are considered. • Shielding factors for gamma-rays from the 232 Th and 226 Ra decay chains are assessed. • For a water sample with a mass of 0.25 kg, shielding factors above 0.88 are obtained

  7. On New Limits of the Coefficient of Gravitation Shielding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... New limits of the shielding coefficients in the supposed phenomenon of gravitation shielding have recently become available. The new values are briefly reviewed and discussed in order to update the state of art since some new limits for gravitation shielding are not necessarily the lowest ones which, ...

  8. Simulation of a Shielded Thermocouple | Berntsson | Rwanda Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A shielded thermocouple is a measurement device used for monitoring the temperature in chemically, or mechanically, hostile environments. The sensitive parts of the thermocouple are protected by a shielding layer. In this work we use numerical methods to study the accuracy and dynamic properties of a shielded ...

  9. The shielding calculation for the CN guide shielding assembly in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. S.; Lee, B. C.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, H.

    2006-01-01

    The cold neutron research facility in HANARO is under construction. The area including neutron guides and rotary shutter in the reactor hall should be shielded by the guide shielding assembly which is constructed of heavy concrete blocks and structure. The guide shielding assembly is divided into 2 parts, A and B. Part A is about 6.4 meters apart from the reactor biological shield and it is constructed of heavy concrete blocks whose density is above 4.0g/cm 3 . And part B is a fixed heavy concrete structure whose density is above 3.5g/cm 3 . The rotary shutter is also made with heavy concrete whose density is above 4.0g/cm 3 and includes 5 neutron guides inside. It can block the neutron beam by rotating when CNS is not operating. The dose criterion outside the guide shielding assembly is established as 12.5 μSv/hr which is also applied to reactor shielding in HANARO

  10. Recent Improvements in the SHIELD-HIT Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Lühr, Armin Christian; Herrmann, Rochus

    2012-01-01

    concentrating on three objectives, namely: Enhanced functionality, improved efficiency, and a modification of employed physical models. Methodological developments: SHIELD-HIT (currently at version ‘10A’) is now equipped with an independent detector geometry, ripple filter implementations, and it is capable...... of using accelerator control files as a basis for the primaries. Furthermore, the code has been parallelized and efficiency is improved. The physical description of inelastic ion collisions has been modified. Results: The simulation of an experimental depth-dose distribution including a ripple filter...

  11. ARTEMIS: a 3D transport code for shielding calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varin, E.; Samba, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Bruyeres-Le-Chatels (France); Roy, R. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    In radiation transport problems, as shielding applications, the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation is usually obtained by the discrete ordinates deterministic method. An alternative methodology has been developed in three dimensions into the code ARTEMIS. A Spherical Harmonics expansion of the angular flux has been chosen to guaranty solutions free of ray-effects. A least squares approach is applied over the linear transport equation; this approach leads to well-defined symmetric positive definite systems which allows the use of finite element spatial discretization. This paper presents the basic derivation of the discrete equations and provides examples on the use of this technique to solve different transport problems. (author)

  12. Analysis, design, and constrution of a sacrificial shield wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialkow; Shah, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    The sacrificial shield wall, a cylindrical enclosure around the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), is a major component of nuclear power plants of the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) type. A method developed for the analysis and design of such walls is described which eliminates shortcomings in methods used in current practice. The method treats the wall as a space frame of ring beams and columns and includes the skin plates as finite elements. Design loadings, load combinations, and acceptance criteria are presented. Results by this method are furnished and compared with results by an alternate method. Significant design features are described and a narrative of construction procedures is included. (Author)

  13. Compression Pad Cavity Heating Augmentation on Orion Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle heat shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  14. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MMOD toughened, smart thermal blankets. The project was successful over the past two years in developing and demonstrating by test (hypervelocity impact and thermal...

  15. Novel Approach In Fabrication Of Shielding Composite Materials By Emerging Field Assisted Sintering Technique (FAST), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of this work is to develop a radiation shielding material system that is sufficiently strong to serve as a load bearing structure. Such a...

  16. Numerical and Analytical Model of an Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Solar Panels on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, C. I.; Linell, B.; Chen, A.; Meyer, J.; Clements, S.; Mazumder, M. K.

    2006-01-01

    Masuda and collaborators at the University of Tokyo developed a method to confine and transport particles called the electric curtain in which a series of parallel electrodes connected to an AC source generates a traveling wave that acts as a contactless conveyor. The curtain electrodes can be excited by a single-phase or a multi-phase AC voltage. A multi-phase curtain produces a non-uniform traveling wave that provides controlled transport of those particles [1-6]. Multi-phase electric curtains from two to six phases have been developed and studied by several research groups [7-9]. We have developed an Electrodynamic Dust Shield prototype using threephase AC voltage electrodes to remove dust from surfaces. The purpose of the modeling work presented here is to research and to better understand the physics governing the electrodynamic shield, as well as to advance and to support the experimental dust shield research.

  17. Shielding of the Hip Prosthesis During Radiation Therapy for Heterotopic Ossification is Associated with Increased Failure of Prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balboni, Tracy A.; Gaccione, Peter; Gobezie, Reuben; Mamon, Harvey J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently administered to prevent heterotopic ossification (HO) after total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an increased risk of HO after RT prophylaxis with shielding of the THA components. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of THA patients undergoing RT prophylaxis of HO at Brigham and Women's Hospital between June 1994 and February 2004. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to assess the relationships of all variables to failure of RT prophylaxis. Results: A total of 137 patients were identified and 84 were eligible for analysis (61%). The median RT dose was 750 cGy in one fraction, and the median follow-up was 24 months. Eight of 40 unshielded patients (20%) developed any progression of HO compared with 21 of 44 shielded patients (48%) (p = 0.009). Brooker Grade III-IV HO developed in 5% of unshielded and 18% of shielded patients (p 0.08). Multivariate analysis revealed shielding (p = 0.02) and THA for prosthesis infection (p = 0.03) to be significant predictors of RT failure, with a trend toward an increasing risk of HO progression with age (p = 0.07). There was no significant difference in the prosthesis failure rates between shielded and unshielded patients. Conclusions: A significantly increased risk of failure of RT prophylaxis for HO was noted in those receiving shielding of the hip prosthesis. Shielding did not appear to reduce the risk of prosthesis failure

  18. Determination of shielding factors for typical buildings in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, Isabel Cristina Poquet

    2006-10-01

    This study presents a methodology for the determination of the air kerma inside buildings due to contamination on the external surfaces and the shielding factors for the construction material to be used on emergency assessment systems for urban areas. The commonly used construction materials were simulated with the MCNP computer code. A special methodology to simulate the bricks with holes were developed, mixing all different regions into a single one, making the simulation easier and faster. The effective density and the attenuation coefficients for the 50-3000 keV energy range were determined. The effective protection for the bricks with no cement cover decreases by 40-50% for energies greater then 300 keV when compared to bricks covered on both sides. With the data made available it was possible to evaluate the influence of the construction materials densities and thickness on the exposure due to external surfaces contamination and to estimate the error on the dose when the shielding factor applied on the calculation differs from the more realistic ones. The shielding factors for three types of walls were determined for a five rooms house. Special protection procedures should be applied for houses built with bricks with no cement cover, because they are due to the double of the dose when compared to houses built with bricks two-sided cement covered. The influence of windows and doors were evaluated too. This work was developed at the IRD in order to provide information on the construction material commonly uses on building in Brazil. (author)

  19. Design of the magnetized muon shield for the prompt-neutrino facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltay, C.; Bosek, N.; Couch, J.

    1982-01-01

    The main technical challenge in the design of the prompt neutrino beam is the magnetized muon shield. Two satisfactory alternate designs have been developed for such a shield during this past year and the background muon fluxes have been calculated by three independent programs at Columbia, Fermilab, and MIT. The background muon fluxes have been calculated to be satisfactory in all of the detectors that might use the beam. In Section III of this report we describe in detail the three Monte Carlo programs used in these calculations. In Section IV we give the details of the flux calculations for the E-613 shield and the comparisons with the observed fluxes with various configurations of that shield. In Section V we describe the designs that have been developed for the neutrino area shield. In Section VI we discuss the problem of proton beam transport losses and the associated muon fluxes. Finally, in Section VII a comparison of the two solutions is made which covers cost, effectiveness, schedule and responsiveness to future unknowns. We conclude that there are not overwhelming reasons for the choice of one design over the other. However, for a variety of secondary reasons the superconducting design offers advantages. We therefore propose the construction of the prompt neutrino facility with the superconducting magnet design

  20. Closed-cycle cryocooled SQUID system with superconductive shield for biomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kwon Kyu; Lee, Yong Ho; Lee, Seong Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Hwang, Seong min; Kim, Jin Mok; Kwon, Hyuckchan; Kim, Kiwoong

    2014-10-01

    We developed a cryocooled SQUID system with which human magnetocardiogram (MCG) and possibly magnetoenceparogram (MEG) can be measured. To reduce cyclic magnetic noises originating from the regenerator of the cold heads of the cryocooler, a superconductive shield (99.5% Pb) was used to protect the SQUID sensors, and a ferromagnetic shield (78% Ni alloy) was used to screen the cold head. In addition, the SQUID sensors’ chamber was placed at a distance of 1.8 m from the cold head chamber to install the cold-head chamber outside the magnetically shielded room (MSR) for future development. The loss in cooling power due to the increased distance was compensated by increasing the number of thermal rods, and thus the SQUID sensor and superconductive shield could be refrigerated to 4.8 K and 5 K, respectively. The superconductive shield successfully rejected thermal noise emitted from metallic blocks used to improve thermal conduction. The noise of the SQUID system was 3 fT/Hz1/2, and the cyclic magnetic noise could be reduced to 1.7 pT. We could obtain a clear MCG signal while the entire cryogenics was in operation without any special digital processing.

  1. Enhanced Sentinel Lymphoscintigraphic Mapping in Breast Tumor Using the Graded Shield Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wen Chen

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The graded shield technique was developed to increase the sentinel node detection rate by improving lymphoscintigraphic image contrast. In a 6-month period, 50 women with clinical suspicion of early stage breast cancer (T1 and T2 tumors were enrolled in this study. The patients had a mean age of 47.2 ± 10.3 years. A composite graded shield was constructed using three concentric layers of leaded plastic measuring 3 cm, 5 cm, and 7 cm each in diameter. The graded shield was designed with a movable Velcro backing for accurate positioning over the injection site. Images were acquired with a vertical angle dual-head gamma camera using an established injection procedure developed at our institution. The rate of detection of sentinel lymph nodes using lymphoscintigraphic mapping improved from 74% (37/50 patients to 96% (48/50 using the graded shield (p < 0.05. In addition to the increased detection rate, our technique also increased the number of nodes detected and improved visualization of the adjacent lymphatic basin. By enhancing nodal contrast, we have demonstrated that the graded shield technique is an effective method for improving the rate of sentinel node detection.

  2. Design optimization of radiation shielding structure for lead slowing-down spectrometer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Dong; Ahn, Sang Joon; Lee, Yong Deok; Park, Chang Je

    2015-01-01

    A lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS) system is a promising nondestructive assay technique that enables a quantitative measurement of the isotopic contents of major fissile isotopes in spent nuclear fuel and its pyroprocessing counterparts, such as 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu, and, potentially, minor actinides. The LSDS system currently under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Daejeon, Korea) is planned to utilize a high-flux (>101 2n /cm 2 ·s) neutron source comprised of a high-energy (30 MeV)/high-current (∼2 A) electron beam and a heavy metal target, which results in a very intense and complex radiation field for the facility, thus demanding structural shielding to guarantee the safety. Optimization of the structural shielding design was conducted using MCNPX for neutron dose rate evaluation of several representative hypothetical designs. In order to satisfy the construction cost and neutron attenuation capability of the facility, while simultaneously achieving the aimed dose rate limit (<0.06 μSv/h), a few shielding materials [high-density polyethylene (HDPE)–Borax, B 4 C, and Li 2 CO 3 ] were considered for the main neutron absorber layer, which is encapsulated within the double-sided concrete wall. The MCNP simulation indicated that HDPE-Borax is the most efficient among the aforementioned candidate materials, and the combined thickness of the shielding layers should exceed 100 cm to satisfy the dose limit on the outside surface of the shielding wall of the facility when limiting the thickness of the HDPE-Borax intermediate layer to below 5 cm. However, the shielding wall must include the instrumentation and installation holes for the LSDS system. The radiation leakage through the holes was substantially mitigated by adopting a zigzag-shape with concrete covers on both sides. The suggested optimized design of the shielding structure satisfies the dose rate limit and can be used for the construction of a facility in the near future.

  3. Shielding of Electronic Systems against Transient Electromagnetic Interferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Herlemann

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to protect electronic systems against the effects of transient electromagnetic interferences, shields made of electrically conductive material can be used. The subject of this paper is an electrically conductive textile. When applying the shield, a reliable measure is needed in order to determine the effectiveness of the shield to protect against electromagnetic pulses. For this purpose, a time domain measurement technique is presented using double exponential pulses. With these pulses, the susceptibility of an operating electronic device with and without the shield is determined. As a criterion of quality of a shield, the breakdown failure rate found in both cases is compared.

  4. Regolith Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In Situ Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    This NIAC project investigated an innovative approach to provide heat shield protection to spacecraft after launch and prior to each EDL thus potentially realizing significant launch mass savings. Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Regolith has extremely good insulating properties and the silicates it contains can be used in the fabrication and molding of thermal-protection materials. Such in situ developed heat shields have been suggested before by Lewis. Prior research efforts have shown that regolith properties can be compatible with very-high temperature resistance. Our project team is highly experienced in regolith processing and thermal protection systems (TPS). Routine access to space and return from any planetary surface requires dealing with heat loads experienced by the spacecraft during reentry. Our team addresses some of the key issues with the EDL of human-scale missions through a highly innovative investigation of heat shields that can be fabricated in space by using local resources on asteroids and moons. Most space missions are one-way trips, dedicated to placing an asset in space for economical or scientific gain. However, for human missions, a very-reliable heat-shield system is necessary to protect the crew from the intense heat experienced at very high entry velocities of approximately 11 km/s at approximately Mach 33 (Apollo). For a human mission to Mars, the return problem is even more difficult, with predicted velocities of up to 14 km/s, at approximately Mach 42 at the Earth-atmosphere entry. In addition to human return, it is very likely that future space-travel architecture will include returning cargo to the Earth, either for scientific purposes or for commercial reasons

  5. Comprehensive analysis of shielding effectiveness for HDPE, BPE and concrete as candidate materials for neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhang, Prosenjit; Verma, Rishi; Shyam, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    In the compact accelerator based DD neutron generator, the deuterium ions generated by the ion source are accelerated after the extraction and bombarded to a deuterated titanium target. The emitted neutrons have typical energy of ∼2.45MeV. Utilization of these compact accelerator based neutron generators of yield up to 10 9 neutron/second (DD) is under active consideration in many research laboratories for conducting active neutron interrogation experiments. Requirement of an adequately shielded laboratory is mandatory for the effective and safe utilization of these generators for intended applications. In this reference, we report the comprehensive analysis of shielding effectiveness for High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Borated Polyethylene (BPE) and Concrete as candidate materials for neutron shielding. In shielding calculations, neutron induced scattering and absorption gamma dose has also been considered along with neutron dose. Contemporarily any material with higher hydrogenous concentration is best suited for neutron shielding. Choice of shielding material is also dominated by practical issues like economic viability and availability of space. Our computational analysis results reveal that utilization of BPE sheets results in minimum wall thickness requirement for attaining similar range of attenuation in neutron and gamma dose. The added advantage of using borated polyethylene is that it reduces the effect of both neutron and gamma dose by absorbing neutron and producing lithium and alpha particle. It has also been realized that for deciding upon optimum thickness determination of any shielding material, three important factors to be necessarily considered are: use factor, occupancy factor and work load factor. (author)

  6. Radiation shielding activities at the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, Enrico; Vaz, Pedro

    2000-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has devoted considerable effort over the years to radiation shielding issues. The issues are addressed through international working groups. These activities are carried out in close co-ordination and co-operation with the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). The areas of work include: basic nuclear data activities in support of radiation shielding, computer codes, shipping cask shielding applications, reactor pressure vessel dosimetry, shielding experiments database. The method of work includes organising international code comparison exercises and benchmark studies. Training courses on radiation shielding computer codes are organised regularly including hands-on experience in modelling skills. The scope of the activity covers mainly reactor shields and spent fuel transportation packages, but also fusion neutronics and in particular shielding of accelerators and irradiation facilities. (author)

  7. Radiation shielding for medical compact cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futatsukawa, Syoji; Hatakeyama, Satoru; Saito, Yoshihiro; Sera, Kouichiro; Hatano, Kentaro; Sasaki, Toshiaki.

    1993-01-01

    We are using a medical compact cyclotron for PET (positron emission tomography) and PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) analysis in Nishina Memorial Cyclotron Center. The cyclotron vault is covered by concrete wall of 1.5 m thickness. However, a big penetrating window of 1.8 m square was needed at the concrete wall between the cyclotron vault and the PIXE room for beam transport equipment. This window was closed by packing materials of iron shots, small grained polyethylenes mixed with boron and lead grains for shielding of neutrons and γ-rays. Several measurement data have showed that this method is useful for shielding of radiations from the compact cyclotron. (author)

  8. Radiation shielding aspects of compact medical cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.; Ruth, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    Hospital-based compact medical cyclotrons are commonly used to produce large activities of short-lived PET radioisotopes such as fluorine-18 (HL110 min) and oxygen-18 (HL= 20 min), by bombarding suitably enriched gas or liquid targets with 11-15 MeV protons. High energy prompt neutron/gamma radiation fields are generated as the nuclear reaction product. The compact medical cyclotrons are installed either inside or in the close proximity of the nuclear medicine clinic. Therefore the adequacy of the radiation shielding is vitally important for the radiological safety of the patients and members of the public. The present paper highlights the important radiation shielding aspects of some compact medical cyclotrons presently available in the international market. 2 tabs., 4 figs

  9. Radiation shielding design considerations for Doublet III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engholm, B.A.

    1980-06-01

    Calculations and measurements were made of the bremsstrahlung (x-ray) doses resulting from runaway electron shots at Doublet III. The analysis considered direct, wall-scattered, and skyshine contributions. Reasonably good agreement was obtained between calculations and measurements. The x-ray dose in the control room was about 1 mR per runaway shot, while that at the north boundary was undetectable, with a calculated value of 0.05 mR per shot. These low doses attest to the adequacy of the 2 ft concrete shadow shield surrounding the Doublet III room. Exploratory shielding analyses were performed for possible neutron generation if Doublet III were operated with neutral beam injection in an aggressive D-D mode

  10. EMC Test Report Electrodynamic Dust Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Lynne M.; Boyette, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the Electromagnetic Interference E M I evaluation performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) which is part of the MISSE-X System under the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center. Measurements are performed to document the emissions environment associated with the EDS units. The purpose of this report is to collect all information needed to reproduce the testing performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield units, document data gathered during testing, and present the results. This document presents information unique to the measurements performed on the Bioculture Express Rack payload; using test methods prepared to meet SSP 30238 requirements. It includes the information necessary to satisfy the needs of the customer per work order number 1037104. The information presented herein should only be used to meet the requirements for which it was prepared.

  11. Future directions in shielding methods and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, H.

    1987-01-01

    Over the nearly half century history of shielding against reactor radiation, there has been a see-saw battle between theory and measurement. During that period the capability and accuracy of calculational methods have been enormously improved. The microscopic cross sections needed as input to the theoretical computations are now also known to adequate accuracy (with certain exceptions). Nonetheless, there remain substantial classes of shielding problems not yet accessible to satisfactory computational methods, particularly where three-dimensional geometries are involved. This paper discusses promising avenues to approach such problems, especially in the light of recent and expected advances in supercomputers. In particular, it seems that Monte Carlo methods should be much more advantageous in the new computer environment than they have been in the past

  12. Grounding and shielding circuits and interference

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Applies basic field behavior in circuit design and demonstrates how it relates to grounding and shielding requirements and techniques in circuit design This book connects the fundamentals of electromagnetic theory to the problems of interference in all types of electronic design. The text covers power distribution in facilities, mixing of analog and digital circuitry, circuit board layout at high clock rates, and meeting radiation and susceptibility standards. The author examines the grounding and shielding requirements and techniques in circuit design and applies basic physics to circuit behavior. The sixth edition of this book has been updated with new material added throughout the chapters where appropriate. The presentation of the book has also been rearranged in order to reflect the current trends in the field.

  13. Operating manual for the Tower Shielding Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-12-01

    This manual provides information necessary to operate and perform maintenance on the reactor systems and all equipment or systems which can affect their operation or the safety of personnel at the Tower Shielding Facility. The first four chapters consist of introductory and descriptive material of benefit to personnel in training, the qualifications required for training, the responsibilities of the personnel in the organization, and the procedures for reviewing proposed experiments. Chapter 8, Emergency Procedures, is also a necessary part of the indoctrination of personnel. The procedures for operation of the Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR-II), its water cooling system, and the main tower hoists are outlined in Chapters 5, 6, and 7. The Technical Specification surveillance requirements for the TSR-II are summarized in Chapter 9. The maintenance and calibration schedule is spelled out in Chapter 10. The procedures for assembly and disassembly of the TSR-II are outlined in Chapter 11.

  14. Operating manual for the Tower Shielding Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    This manual provides information necessary to operate and perform maintenance on the reactor systems and all equipment or systems which can affect their operation or the safety of personnel at the Tower Shielding Facility. The first four chapters consist of introductory and descriptive material of benefit to personnel in training, the qualifications required for training, the responsibilities of the personnel in the organization, and the procedures for reviewing proposed experiments. Chapter 8, Emergency Procedures, is also a necessary part of the indoctrination of personnel. The procedures for operation of the Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR-II), its water cooling system, and the main tower hoists are outlined in Chapters 5, 6, and 7. The Technical Specification surveillance requirements for the TSR-II are summarized in Chapter 9. The maintenance and calibration schedule is spelled out in Chapter 10. The procedures for assembly and disassembly of the TSR-II are outlined in Chapter 11

  15. Methodology of shielding calculation for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, J.R.; Mendonca, A.G.; Otto, A.C.; Yamaguchi, Mitsuo

    1982-01-01

    A methodology of calculation that coupling a serie of computer codes in a net that make the possibility to calculate the radiation, neutron and gamma transport, is described, for deep penetration problems, typical of nuclear reactor shielding. This net of calculation begining with the generation of constant multigroups, for neutrons and gamma, by the AMPX system, coupled to ENDF/B-IV data library, the transport calculation of these radiations by ANISN, DOT 3.5 and Morse computer codes, up to the calculation of absorbed doses and/or equivalents buy SPACETRAN code. As examples of the calculation method, results from benchmark n 0 6 of Shielding Benchmark Problems - ORNL - RSIC - 25, namely Neutron and Secondary Gamma Ray fluence transmitted through a Slab of Borated Polyethylene, are presented. (Author) [pt

  16. Shielding design of disposal container for disused sealed radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suk Hoon; Kim, Ju Youl

    2017-01-01

    Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources (DSRSs), which are stored temporally in the centralized storage facility of Korea Radioactive Waste Agency (KORAD), will be disposed of in the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal facility located in Wolsong. Accordingly, the future plan on DSRS disposal should be established as soon as possible in connection with the construction and operation plan of disposal facility. In this study, as part of developing the systematic management plan, the radiation shielding analysis for three types of disposal container was performed for all kinds of radionuclides (excluding mixed sources) contained in DSRSs generated from domestic area using MicroShield and MCNP5 codes in consideration of the preliminary post-closure safety assessment result for disposal options, source-specific characteristics, and etc. In accordance with the analysis result, thickness of inner container for general disposal container and dimensions (i.e. diameter and height) of inner capsule for two types of special disposal container were determined as 3 mm, OD40×H120 mm (for type 1), and OD100× H240 mm (for type 2), respectively. These values were reflected in the conceptual design of DSRS disposal container, and the structural integrity of each container was confrmed through the structural analysis carried out separately from this study. Given the shielding and structural analysis results, the conceptual design derived from this study sufficiently fulfills the technical standards in force and the design performance level. And consequently, it is judged that the safe management for DSRSs to be disposed of is achieved by utilizing the disposal container with the conceptual design devised

  17. Shielding design of disposal container for disused sealed radioactive source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk Hoon; Kim, Ju Youl [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources (DSRSs), which are stored temporally in the centralized storage facility of Korea Radioactive Waste Agency (KORAD), will be disposed of in the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal facility located in Wolsong. Accordingly, the future plan on DSRS disposal should be established as soon as possible in connection with the construction and operation plan of disposal facility. In this study, as part of developing the systematic management plan, the radiation shielding analysis for three types of disposal container was performed for all kinds of radionuclides (excluding mixed sources) contained in DSRSs generated from domestic area using MicroShield and MCNP5 codes in consideration of the preliminary post-closure safety assessment result for disposal options, source-specific characteristics, and etc. In accordance with the analysis result, thickness of inner container for general disposal container and dimensions (i.e. diameter and height) of inner capsule for two types of special disposal container were determined as 3 mm, OD40×H120 mm (for type 1), and OD100× H240 mm (for type 2), respectively. These values were reflected in the conceptual design of DSRS disposal container, and the structural integrity of each container was confrmed through the structural analysis carried out separately from this study. Given the shielding and structural analysis results, the conceptual design derived from this study sufficiently fulfills the technical standards in force and the design performance level. And consequently, it is judged that the safe management for DSRSs to be disposed of is achieved by utilizing the disposal container with the conceptual design devised.

  18. Bench evaluation: three face-shield CPR barrier devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, M; Deao, D; Moon, L; Peters, K; Cavanaugh, S

    1995-06-01

    Due to the fear of disease transmission, the practice of mouth-to-mouth (M-M) rescue breathing is rarely performed; to address this concern, many types of CPR barrier devices have been developed. These include bag-valve-mask devices, mouth-to-mask devices, and face shields (FS). The purpose of this study was to measure the volumes delivered during mouth-to-face shield (M-FS) breathing, to measure the back pressure and calculate the resistance to flow through their 1-way valves, and to test for backward leak of gas through the valves. Three FS brands were evaluated: Kiss of Life (KOL), MicroSHIELD (Micro) and Res-Cue Key (RCK). Volume delivered during M-M and M-FS breathing was evaluated by 10 rescuers who used the devices while performing rescue breathing on a CPR mannequin. Back pressure was measured and resistance calculated by directing airflow through the 1-way valves. Backward leak was evaluated by measuring the O2 concentration at the rescuer side of the valve while 100% O2 was directed toward the patient side of the valve. Differences among the brands were evaluated using analysis of variance. The mean (SD) values for volumes in L were: M-M 1.00 (0.25), Micro 0.77 (0.20), RCK 0.64 (0.10), and KOL 0.24 (0.11). Mean values for back pressure in cm H2O at 50 L/min were Micro 16.7 (1.29), KOL 7.22 (0.13), and RCK 2.15 (0.16). Significant backward leak only occurred with RCK. Not one of the FSs tested met all of the requirements suggested by the American Heart Association and by the International Standards Organization.

  19. A database-informed approach to new plant shielding design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: To facilitate the definition and description of radiation dose rates in the numerous rooms and areas of a new nuclear power plant, a database approach was developed. This approach offers a number of benefits over more manual methods. A key benefit is that the selection of an appropriate shielding method to use in each area of the plant is greatly facilitated by virtue of the team's improved ability to grasp the significance of each of the individual sources that are candidates for making a significant contribution to the dose rate in each area. By understanding the level of relevant contribution - if any - of each of these candidate sources, an analyst is able to select a method that will define the contribution without becoming enmired in a model representing inappropriately high degrees of accuracy and modeling time. This database method, by allowing for an evolving understanding of dose rates and sources in the neighboring rooms for each portion of the plant, leads to substantial reductions in the effort of characterizing a plant's radiation environment. As an additional benefit, the database serves as a tool for documenting the shielding calculations themselves, automatically generating formatted sections including drawing and source term references, shielding calculation types, key dimensions, and results; these sections can form the starting point of a full calculation package. The approach offers a final project management benefit: estimating, tracking, and predicting the effort associated with the many calculations involved in such a project are greatly systematized, leading to more reliable manpower estimates. (authors)

  20. Shielding analyses: the rabbit vs the turtle?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper compares solutions using Monte Carlo and discrete- ordinates methods applied to two actual shielding situations in order to make some general observations concerning the efficiency and advantages/disadvantages of the two approaches. The discrete- ordinates solutions are performed using two-dimensional geometries, while the Monte Carlo approaches utilize three-dimensional geometries with both multigroup and point cross-section data

  1. Radiation shielded movable work station apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuschke, R.E.; Andrews, H.N.; Massaro, A.A. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A movable work station includes travelling hoist-supported tools and a radiation-shielded enclosure or gondola that may be moved vertically or rotated. The enclosure is divided and accommodates four upright workers in facing pairs at opposite sides of a clearanceway observable and accessible from the gondola interior via lead glass windows and hand holes. The work station is particularly suitable for personnel involved in tube bundle replacement tasks performed within the shell of a nuclear power plant steam generator

  2. Grounding and shielding in the accelerator environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, Q.

    1991-01-01

    Everyday features of the accelerator environment include long cable runs, high power and low level equipment sharing building space, stray electromagnetic fields and ground voltage differences between the sending and receiving ends of an installation. This paper pictures some Fermilab installations chosen to highlight significant features and presents practices, test methods and equipment that have been helpful in achieving successful shielding. Throughout the report are numbered statements aimed at summarizing good practices and avoiding pitfalls

  3. The TPC shielding of the CAST experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruz, J; Luzon, G; Beltran, B; Carmona, J M; Cebrian, S; Gomez, H; Irastorza, I G; Morales, J; Ortiz de Solorzano, A; RodrIguez, A; Villar, J A

    2006-01-01

    Sunset solar axions traversing the intense magnetic field of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment may be detected in a TPC detector, placed at one side of the magnet, as point-like X-rays signals. This signal could be masked, however, by the inhomogeneous radioactive background of materials and experimental site. Here we present the shielding built to reduce and homogenize the radioactive background levels of the TPC detector

  4. The TPC shielding of the CAST experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruz, J [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Luzon, G [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Beltran, B [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Carmona, J M [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Cebrian, S [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Gomez, H [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Irastorza, I G [DAPNIA, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (CEA-Saclay), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Morales, J [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Ortiz de Solorzano, A [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); RodrIguez, A [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Villar, J A [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2006-05-15

    Sunset solar axions traversing the intense magnetic field of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment may be detected in a TPC detector, placed at one side of the magnet, as point-like X-rays signals. This signal could be masked, however, by the inhomogeneous radioactive background of materials and experimental site. Here we present the shielding built to reduce and homogenize the radioactive background levels of the TPC detector.

  5. The effect of some organic and non-organic additions on the shielding and mechanical properties of radiation shielding concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Yousef, S.; Al-Nassar, M.

    2011-04-01

    Few studies on the effect of some additives on the shielding properties of concrete have been carried out in this research. These studies included the effect of carbon powder, boron compounds, and waste polyethylene. The effect of water to cement ratio has been studied too. The research results showed that carbon powder and some boron compounds could be used to improve shielding concrete properties, and the possibility to add waste polyethylene in shielding concrete without effects on shielding properties. No significant effect for water to cement ratio on shielding properties of concrete. (author)

  6. An attenuation Layer for Electromagnetic Shielding in X- Band Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vida Zaroushani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled exposure to X-band frequency leads to health damage. One of the principles of radiation protection is shielding. But, conventional shielding materials have disadvantages. Therefore, studies of novel materials, as an alternative to conventional shielding materials, are required to obtain new electromagnetic shielding material. Therefore, this study investigated the electromagnetic shielding of two component epoxy thermosetting resin for the X - band frequency with workplace approach. Two components of epoxy resin mixed according to manufacturing instruction with the weight ratio that was 100:10 .Epoxy plates fabricated in three different thicknesses (2, 4 and 6mm and shielding effectiveness measured by Vector Network Analyzer. Then, shielding effectiveness measured by the scattering parameters.The results showed that 6mm thickness of epoxy had the highest and 2mm had the lowest average of shielding effectiveness in X-band frequency that is 4.48 and 1.9 dB, respectively. Also, shielding effectiveness increased by increasing the thickness. But this increasing is useful up to 4mm. Percentage shielding effectiveness of attenuation for 6, 4 and 2mm thicknesses is 64.35%, 63.31% and 35.40%. Also, attenuation values for 4mm and 6mm thicknesses at 8.53 GHz and 8.52 GHz frequency are 77.15% and 82.95%, respectively, and can be used as favourite shields for the above frequency. 4mm-Epoxy is a suitable candidate for shielding application in X-band frequency range but, in the lower section, 6mm thickness is recommended. Finely, the shielding matrix can be used for selecting the proper thickness for electromagnetic shielding in X- Band frequency.

  7. SHIELD: Neutral Gas Kinematics and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichols, Andrew T.; Teich, Yaron G.; Nims, Elise; Cannon, John M.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Bernstein-Cooper, Elijah Z.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Józsa, Gyula I. G.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Salzer, John J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Warren, Steven R.; Dolphin, Andrew; Elson, E. C.; Haurberg, Nathalie; Ott, Jürgen; Saintonge, Amelie; Cave, Ian; Hagen, Cedric; Huang, Shan; Janowiecki, Steven; Marshall, Melissa V.; Thomann, Clara M.; Van Sistine, Angela

    2016-11-01

    We present kinematic analyses of the 12 galaxies in the “Survey of H I in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs” (SHIELD). We use multi-configuration interferometric observations of the H I 21 cm emission line from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA)22 to produce image cubes at a variety of spatial and spectral resolutions. Both two- and three-dimensional fitting techniques are employed in an attempt to derive inclination-corrected rotation curves for each galaxy. In most cases, the comparable magnitudes of velocity dispersion and projected rotation result in degeneracies that prohibit unambiguous circular velocity solutions. We thus make spatially resolved position-velocity cuts, corrected for inclination using the stellar components, to estimate the circular rotation velocities. We find {v}{circ} ≤slant 30 km s-1 for the entire survey population. Baryonic masses are calculated using single-dish H I fluxes from Arecibo and stellar masses derived from HST and Spitzer imaging. Comparison is made with total dynamical masses estimated from the position-velocity analysis. The SHIELD galaxies are then placed on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation. There exists an empirical threshold rotational velocity, V {}{rot} < 15 km s-1, below which current observations cannot differentiate coherent rotation from pressure support. The SHIELD galaxies are representative of an important population of galaxies whose properties cannot be described by current models of rotationally dominated galaxy dynamics.

  8. Active Muon Shield - Preliminary Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Bayliss, Victoria; Rawlings, T

    2015-01-01

    This report summarises the initial design study which was carried out for the SHiP magnetic muon shield – which is proposed to consist of a 40m beamline of seven magnets generating a 1.8T By field over defined cross-section. This is intended to sweep unwanted muons off the beamline to prevent them reaching the detector. The magnetic shield is an alternative to a passive tungsten shield. This work was carried out in three sections. Initially the magnets were considered in isolation to establish whether they were theoretically feasible to build and the impact of the iron yoke shape and material was considered. Next the beamline was considered as a whole; this included issues such as the impact of neighbouring magnets and the hadrons stopper, and also building a model of the complete beamline whose magnetic fields could be exported for use in particle modelling. Finally, some consideration was given to the manufacture and operational issues, including costs.

  9. 54th meeting on cryogenics and superconductivity. Shield and permanent current switch (PCS); Dai 54 kai 1995 nendo teion kogaku chodendo gakkai koenshu. Shield oyobi PCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, H. [Dowa Mining Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Mizuochi, G. [Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Nakade, M. [Tokyo Electric Power Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Waki, M. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba (Japan); Sato, M. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Sadakata, N. [Fujikura Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-11-03

    This paper describes reports related to shields and PCS presented at the Meeting on Cryogenics and Superconductivity in fiscal 1995. In developing a magnet shielding body for measuring biomagnetism, a superconduction magnetic shielding body was fabricated by forming a Bi-system 2223 phase superconductor film on the inner side of a heat-resistant metal cylinder. In increasing the capacity of a magnetic shielding system by superconduction junction, a possibility was suggested in increasing the capacity by superimposing small superconductor test pieces. In measuring the heat penetration amount in an alternating current high-temperature conductor current lead, the heat penetration amount was shown to increase by increasing the number of leads and reducing the length of the leads. In evaluating a surface treatment on superconduction cavities by using the magnetization measurement, a method was developed that observes and evaluates defects in an Nb material surface as magnetization hysteresis. With regard to the on-off characteristics of a current transformer type permanent current switch, tests were carried out on connecting actions of a 1-KA permanent current switch to a system stabilizing SMES equipment. The paper also reports the demonstration test on a 1-KA magnetic field type permanent current switch. 8 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Lightweight engine containment. [Kevlar shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, A. T.

    1977-01-01

    Kevlar fabric styles and weaves were studied, as well as methods of application for advanced gas turbine engines. The Kevlar material was subjected to high speed impacts by simple projectiles fired from a rifle, as well as more complex shapes such as fan blades released from gas turbine rotors in a spin pit. Just contained data was developed for a variety of weave and/or application techniques, and a comparative containment weight efficiency was established for Kevlar containment applications. The data generated during these tests is being incorporated into an analytical design system so that blade containment trade-off studies between Kevlar and metal case engine structures can be made. Laboratory tests and engine environment tests were performed to determine the survivability of Kevlar in a gas turbine environment.

  11. Under Water Thermal Cutting of the Moderator Vessel and Thermal Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeb, A.; Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Eisenmann, B.; Prechtl, E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the segmentation of the in 8 meter depth of water and for cutting through super alloyed moderator vessel and of the thermal shield of the MZFR stainless steel up to 130 mm wall thickness. Depending on the research reactor by means of under water plasma and contact arc metal cutting. The moderator vessel and the thermal shield are the most essential parts of the MZFR reactor vessel internals. These components have been segmented in 2005 by means of remotely controlled under water cutting utilizing a special manipulator system, a plasma torch and CAMC (Contact Arc Metal Cutting) as cutting tools. The engineered equipment used is a highly advanced design developed in a two years R and D program. It was qualified to cut through steel walls of more than 100 mm thickness in 8 meters water depth. Both the moderator vessel and the thermal shield had to be cut into such size that the segments could afterwards be packed into shielded waste containers each with a volume of roughly 1 m 3 . Segmentation of the moderator vessel and of the thermal shield was performed within 15 months. (author)

  12. Experimental results of neutron fluence outside an iron shield in the forward direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M.M.C.; Elwyn, A.J.; Fein, D.; James, E.; Johns, K.; Davis, W.; Ciampa, D.P.; Mierkiewicz, E.

    1996-09-01

    Analyses of both lateral shielding measurements and Monte Carlo calculations for beam stop geometry for incident hadrons at energies between 10 GeV and 10 TeV suggests that the dose equivalent can be represented by the expression H = H 0 (E)e -r/λ /r 2 where H, is the source term, r is the radial distance to the point of interest in the shield, and λ is the effective interaction length, or absorption mean free path. However, unlike the lateral shielding case, there is no similarly simple analytical expression that can be used to describe the on-axis longitudinal cascade development. In this study the results from the measurement in the forward direction of neutron fluence spectra (and the derived quantity dose equivalent) for 25 to 150 GeV pions incident on an iron beam stop as a function of thickness of iron are presented. The observed dependence of both fluence and dose equivalent on shield thickness and hadron energy was then quantified in terms of an expression in which a build up factor as well as an attenuation term was included. On the basis of this analysis the conversion factor from fluence to dose equivalent was also determined for these forward going neutrons. This work represents the first systematic study at an high energy accelerator of the depth dependence of neutron fluence in longitudinal shielding

  13. Determination of boron in Jabroc wood used as a shielding material in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamble, Granthali S.; Manisha, V.; Venkatesh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Jabroc are non-impregnated, densified wood laminates developed commercially for a wide range of industrial applications. Jabroc can be used with other neutron shielding materials such as Lead to form complex shielding structures. Its relative light weight and cleanliness in handling are additional features that make it a suitable candidate for the standard design of neutron shielding equipment. Jabroc can also be impregnated with Boron up to a maximum of 4% to be used in areas where Gamma radiation produced on Neutron capture reaches unacceptable dose rates. Boron impregnated Jabroc wood finds application in TAPS 3 and 4 as a shielding material for the Ion Chambers and the Horizontal Flux Units (HFU). The shielding property of this material is optimized by incorporating requisite amount of boron in wood. Boron content in this material has to be determined accurately prior to its use in the nuclear reactors. In this work a method was standardized to determine boron in Jabroc wood samples to check for conformance to specifications. The wood sample flakes were wetted with saturated barium hydroxide solution and dries under IR. The sample was ashed in a muffle furnace at 600℃ for 2 h

  14. Design and Fabrication of a Tank-Applied Broad Area Cooling Shield Coupon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. J.; Middlemas, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    The small-scale broad area cooling (BAC) shield test panel represents a section of the cryogenic propellant storage and transfer ground test article, a flight-like cryogenic propellant storage tank. The test panel design includes an aluminum tank shell, primer, spray-on foam insulation, multilayer insulation (MLI), and BAC shield hardware. This assembly was sized to accurately represent the character of the MLI/BAC shield system, be quickly and inexpensively assembled, and be tested in the Marshall Space Flight Center Acoustic Test Facility. Investigating the BAC shield response to a worst-case launch dynamic load was the key purpose for developing the test article and performing the test. A preliminary method for structurally supporting the BAC shield using low-conductivity standoffs was designed, manufactured, and evaluated as part of the test. The BAC tube-standoff interface and unsupported BAC tube lengths were key parameters for evaluation. No noticeable damage to any system hardware element was observed after acoustic testing.

  15. Combined measurement system for double shield tunnel boring machine guidance based on optical and visual methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiarui; Gao, Kai; Gao, Yang; Wang, Zheng

    2017-10-01

    In order to detect the position of the cutting shield at the head of a double shield tunnel boring machine (TBM) during the excavation, this paper develops a combined measurement system which is mainly composed of several optical feature points, a monocular vision sensor, a laser target sensor, and a total station. The different elements of the combined system are mounted on the TBM in suitable sequence, and the position of the cutting shield in the reference total station frame is determined by coordinate transformations. Subsequently, the structure of the feature points and matching technique for them are expounded, the position measurement method based on monocular vision is presented, and the calibration methods for the unknown relationships among different parts of the system are proposed. Finally, a set of experimental platforms to simulate the double shield TBM is established, and accuracy verification experiments are conducted. Experimental results show that the mean deviation of the system is 6.8 mm, which satisfies the requirements of double shield TBM guidance.

  16. Self Shielding in Nuclear Fissile Assay Using LSDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Deok; Park, Chang Je; Park, Geun Il; Song, Kee Chan

    2012-01-01

    The new technology for isotopic fissile material contents assay is under development at KAERI using lead slowing down spectrometer(LSDS). LSDS is very sensitive to distinguish fission signals from each fissile isotope in spent and recycled fuel. The accumulation of spent fuel is current big issue. The amount of spent fuels will reach the maximum storage capacity of the pools soon. Therefore, an interim storage must be searched and it should be optimized in design by applying accurate fissile content. When the storage has taken effect, all the nuclear materials must be also specified and verified for safety, economics and management. Generally, the spent fuel from PWR has unburned ∼1 % U235, produced ∼0.5 % plutonium from decay chain, ∼3 % fission products, ∼ 0.1 % minor actinides (MA) and uranium remainder. About 1.5 % fissile materials still exist in the spent fuel. Therefore, for reutilization of fissile materials in spent fuel at SFR, resource material is produced through pyro process. Fissile material contents in resource material must be analyzed before fabricating SFR fuel for reactor safety and economics. In assay of fissile content of spent fuel and recycled fuel, intense radiation background gives limitation on the direct analysis of fissile materials. However, LSDS is not influenced by such a radiation background in fissile assay. Based on the decided geometry setup, self shielding parameter was calculated at the fuel assay zone by introducing spent fuel or pyro produced nuclear material. When nuclear material is inserted into the assay area, the spent fuel assembly or pyro recycled fuel material perturbs the spatial distribution of the slowing down neutrons in lead and the prompt fast fission neutrons produced by fissile materials are also perturbed. The self shielding factor is interpreted as that how much of absorption is created inside the fuel area when it is in the lead. Self shielding effect provides a non-linear property in the isotopic

  17. Brachytherapy structural shielding calculations using Monte Carlo generated, monoenergetic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zourari, K.; Peppa, V.; Papagiannis, P., E-mail: ppapagi@phys.uoa.gr [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 11527 Athens (Greece); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Siebert, Frank-André [Clinic of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel 24105 (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide a method for calculating the transmission of any broad photon beam with a known energy spectrum in the range of 20–1090 keV, through concrete and lead, based on the superposition of corresponding monoenergetic data obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: MCNP5 was used to calculate broad photon beam transmission data through varying thickness of lead and concrete, for monoenergetic point sources of energy in the range pertinent to brachytherapy (20–1090 keV, in 10 keV intervals). The three parameter empirical model introduced byArcher et al. [“Diagnostic x-ray shielding design based on an empirical model of photon attenuation,” Health Phys. 44, 507–517 (1983)] was used to describe the transmission curve for each of the 216 energy-material combinations. These three parameters, and hence the transmission curve, for any polyenergetic spectrum can then be obtained by superposition along the lines of Kharrati et al. [“Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities,” Med. Phys. 34, 1398–1404 (2007)]. A simple program, incorporating a graphical user interface, was developed to facilitate the superposition of monoenergetic data, the graphical and tabular display of broad photon beam transmission curves, and the calculation of material thickness required for a given transmission from these curves. Results: Polyenergetic broad photon beam transmission curves of this work, calculated from the superposition of monoenergetic data, are compared to corresponding results in the literature. A good agreement is observed with results in the literature obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for the photon spectra emitted from bare point sources of various radionuclides. Differences are observed with corresponding results in the literature for x-ray spectra at various tube potentials, mainly due to the different broad beam conditions or x-ray spectra assumed. Conclusions

  18. Validity of the Aluminum Equivalent Approximation in Space Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Adams, Daniel O.; Wilson, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The origin of the aluminum equivalent shield approximation in space radiation analysis can be traced back to its roots in the early years of the NASA space programs (Mercury, Gemini and Apollo) wherein the primary radiobiological concern was the intense sources of ionizing radiation causing short term effects which was thought to jeopardize the safety of the crew and hence the mission. Herein, it is shown that the aluminum equivalent shield approximation, although reasonably well suited for that time period and to the application for which it was developed, is of questionable usefulness to the radiobiological concerns of routine space operations of the 21 st century which will include long stays onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and perhaps the moon. This is especially true for a risk based protection system, as appears imminent for deep space exploration where the long-term effects of Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) exposure is of primary concern. The present analysis demonstrates that sufficiently large errors in the interior particle environment of a spacecraft result from the use of the aluminum equivalent approximation, and such approximations should be avoided in future astronaut risk estimates. In this study, the aluminum equivalent approximation is evaluated as a means for estimating the particle environment within a spacecraft structure induced by the GCR radiation field. For comparison, the two extremes of the GCR environment, the 1977 solar minimum and the 2001 solar maximum, are considered. These environments are coupled to the Langley Research Center (LaRC) deterministic ionized particle transport code High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN), which propagates the GCR spectra for elements with charges (Z) in the range I aluminum equivalent approximation for a good polymeric shield material such as genetic polyethylene (PE). The shield thickness is represented by a 25 g/cm spherical shell. Although one could imagine the progression to greater

  19. pH-Triggered Sheddable Shielding System for Polycationic Gene Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialiang Xia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For improving the therapeutic efficiency of tumors and decreasing undesirable side effects, ternary complexes were developed by coating pH-sensitive PEG-b-PLL-g-succinylsulfathiazole (hereafter abbreviated as PPSD with DNA/PEI polyplexes via electrostatic interaction. PPSD can efficiently shield the surface charge of DNA/PEI. The gene transfection efficiency of ternary complexes was lower than that of DNA/PEI at pH 7.4; however, it recovered to the same level as that of DNA/PEI at pH 6.0, attributed to the pH-triggered release of DNA/PEI from ternary complexes. Cell uptake results also exhibited the same trend as transfection at different pH values. The suitable ability for pH-triggered shielding/deshielding estimated that PPSD demonstrates potential as a shielding system for use in in vivo gene delivery.

  20. Electron, electron-bremsstrahlung and proton depth-dose data for space-shielding applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    A data set has been developed, consisting of depth-dose distributions for omni-directional electron and proton fluxes incident on aluminum shields. The principal new feature of this work is the accurate treatment, based on detailed Monte Carlo calculations, of the electron-produced bremsstrahlung component. Results covering the energy region of interest in space-shielding calculations have been obtained for the absorbed dose (a) as a function of depth in a semi-infinite medium, (b) at the edge of slab shields, and (c) at the center of a solid sphere. The dose to a thin tissue-equivalent detector was obtained as well as that in aluminum. Various results and comparisons with other work are given.