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Sample records for inappropriate empirical antibiotic

  1. Effects of inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy on mortality in patients with healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a propensity-matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young Kyung; Park, Dae Won; Sohn, Jang Wook; Kim, Hyo Youl; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Lee, Chang-Seop; Lee, Mi Suk; Ryu, Seong-Yeol; Jang, Hee-Chang; Choi, Young Ju; Kang, Cheol-In; Choi, Hee Jung; Lee, Seung Soon; Kim, Shin Woo; Kim, Sang Il; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Jeong Yeon; Yang, Kyung Sook; Peck, Kyong Ran; Kim, Min Ja

    2016-07-15

    The purported value of empirical therapy to cover methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been debated for decades. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy on clinical outcomes in patients with healthcare-associated MRSA bacteremia (HA-MRSAB). A prospective, multicenter, observational study was conducted in 15 teaching hospitals in the Republic of Korea from February 2010 to July 2011. The study subjects included adult patients with HA-MRSAB. Covariate adjustment using the propensity score was performed to control for bias in treatment assignment. The predictors of in-hospital mortality were determined by multivariate logistic regression analyses. In total, 345 patients with HA-MRSAB were analyzed. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 33.0 %. Appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy was given to 154 (44.6 %) patients. The vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations of the MRSA isolates ranged from 0.5 to 2 mg/L by E-test. There was no significant difference in mortality between propensity-matched patient pairs receiving inappropriate or appropriate empirical antibiotics (odds ratio [OR] = 1.20; 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 0.71-2.03). Among patients with severe sepsis or septic shock, there was no significant difference in mortality between the treatment groups. In multivariate analyses, severe sepsis or septic shock (OR = 5.45; 95 % CI = 2.14-13.87), Charlson's comorbidity index (per 1-point increment; OR = 1.52; 95 % CI = 1.27-1.83), and prior receipt of glycopeptides (OR = 3.24; 95 % CI = 1.08-9.67) were independent risk factors for mortality. Inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy was not associated with clinical outcome in patients with HA-MRSAB. Prudent use of empirical glycopeptide therapy should be justified even in hospitals with high MRSA prevalence.

  2. Inappropriate antibiotic prescription for respiratory tract indications : most prominent in adult patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Anne R. J.; Verheij, Theo J. M.; van der Velden, Alike W.

    Background. Numerous studies suggest overprescribing of antibiotics for respiratory tract indications (RTIs), without really authenticating inappropriate prescription; the strict criteria of guideline recommendations were not taken into account as information on specific diagnoses, patient

  3. Factors associated with suitability of empiric antibiotic therapy in hospitalized patients with bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Chagai; Keller, Nathan; Bornstein, Gil; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Koren-Morag, Nira; Rahav, Galia

    2017-06-01

    Bacteremia is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Initiation of inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy is associated with a worse outcome. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence and the factors associated with inappropriate empiric antibiotic therapy in patients hospitalized with bacteremia. A cross-sectional study was conducted during January 2010-December 2011 at the medical wards of the Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Israel. The records of all patients with bacteremia were reviewed. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, bacteremic pathogens and antimicrobial agents were retrieved from the medical records. Factors associated with appropriateness of empiric antibiotic therapy were assessed. A total of 681 eligible adults were included in the study. Antibiotic therapy was found to be inappropriate in 138 (20.2%) patients (95% C.I. 17.2-23.2). The rate of appropriateness was not related to the type of antibiotic regimen and the type of bacteria. Patients with healthcare-associated infections were more likely to be administrated inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Patients with primary bloodstream infections were also more likely to be administrated inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Empiric combination therapy was more likely to be appropriate than monotherapy, except for an aminoglycosides-based combination. Combination empiric antibiotic therapy should be considered in patients with healthcare-associated infections and in those with primary bloodstream infections.

  4. Community Intervention Model to Reduce Inappropriate Antibiotic Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, Stephen; Wuthrich, Amy; Haddadin, Bassam; Donnelly, Sharon; Hannah, Elizabeth Lyon; Stoddard, Greg; Benuzillo, Jose; Bateman, Kim; Samore, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Background: The Inter-Mountain Project on Antibiotic Resistance and Therapy (IMPART) is an intervention that addresses emerging antimicrobial resistance and the reduction of unnecessary antimicrobial use. Purpose: This study assesses the design and implementation of the community intervention component of IMPART. Methods: The study was conducted…

  5. [Reasons for inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics in a high-complexity pediatric hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvinsky, Silvina; Mónaco, Andrea; Pérez, Guadalupe; Taicz, Moira; Inda, Laura; Kijko, Ivana; Constanzo, Patricia; Bologna, Rosa

    2011-12-01

    Determine the reasons for inappropriate prescription of antibiotics and identify opportunities to improve prescription of these drugs in pediatric patients hospitalized in intermediate and intensive care units. A prospective, descriptive longitudinal study was conducted of pediatric patients in intermediate and intensive care units who received parenteral administration of antibiotics, with the exception of newborns, burn unit patients, and surgical prophylaxis patients. A univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression were performed. A total of 376 patients with a median of age of 50 months were studied (interquartile range [IQR] 14.5-127 months). Out of the total patients studied, 75% had one or more underlying conditions. A total of 40.6% of these patients had an oncologic pathology and 33.5% had neurological conditions. The remaining 25.9% had other underlying conditions. Antibiotic treatment was inappropriate in 35.6% of the patients studied (N = 134). In 73 (54.4%) of the 134 cases, inappropriate use was due to the type of antibiotic prescribed, the dose administered, or the treatment period. The 61 (45.5%) remaining cases did not require antibiotic treatment. In the multivariate analysis, the risk factors for inappropriate use of antibiotics were: administration of ceftriaxone OR 2 (95% CI, 1.3-3.7; P = 0.02); acute lower respiratory tract infection OR 1.8 (95% CI, 1.1-3.3; P < 0.04); onset of fever of unknown origin in hospital inpatients OR 5.55 (95% CI, 2.5-12; P < 0.0001); and febrile neutropenia OR 0.3 (95% CI, 0.1-0.7; P = 0.009). Inappropriate use of antibiotics was less common in the clinical conditions that were well-characterized. Prescribing practices that could be improved were identified through the preparation and circulation of guidelines for antibiotic use in hospital inpatients.

  6. Cardiac surgery antibiotic prophylaxis and calculated empiric antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Armin; Hamouda, Khaled; Özkur, Mehmet; Leistner, Markus; Sommer, Sebastian-Patrick; Leyh, Rainer; Schimmer, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    Ongoing debate exists concerning the optimal choice and duration of antibiotic prophylaxis as well as the reasonable calculated empiric antibiotic therapy for hospital-acquired infections in critically ill cardiac surgery patients. A nationwide questionnaire was distributed to all German heart surgery centers concerning antibiotic prophylaxis and the calculated empiric antibiotic therapy. The response to the questionnaire was 87.3%. All clinics that responded use antibiotic prophylaxis, 79% perform it not longer than 24 h (single-shot: 23%; 2 doses: 29%; 3 doses: 27%; 4 doses: 13%; and >5 doses: 8%). Cephalosporin was used in 89% of clinics (46% second-generation, 43% first-generation cephalosporin). If sepsis is suspected, the following diagnostics are performed routinely: wound inspection 100%; white blood cell count 100%; radiography 99%; C-reactive protein 97%; microbiological testing of urine 91%, blood 81%, and bronchial secretion 81%; procalcitonin 74%; and echocardiography 75%. The calculated empiric antibiotic therapy (depending on the suspected focus) consists of a multidrug combination with broad-spectrum agents. This survey shows that existing national guidelines and recommendations concerning perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis and calculated empiric antibiotic therapy are well applied in almost all German heart centers. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. Empiric antibiotic prescription among febrile under-five Children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    limiting viral infection and therefore, would not require antibiotics. Over prescription of antibiotics increases antibiotics exposure and development of resistance among patients. There is need to evaluate empiric antibiotic prescription in order to limit ...

  8. Empiric Antibiotic Therapy of Nosocomial Bacterial Infections.

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    Reddy, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotics are commonly used by physicians to treat various infections. The source of infection and causative organisms are not always apparent during the initial evaluation of the patient, and antibiotics are often given empirically to patients with suspected sepsis. Fear of attempting cephalosporins and carbapenems in penicillin-allergic septic patients may result in significant decrease in the spectrum of antimicrobial coverage. Empiric antibiotic therapy should sufficiently cover all the suspected pathogens, guided by the bacteriologic susceptibilities of the medical center. It is important to understand the major pharmacokinetic properties of antibacterial agents for proper use and to minimize the development of resistance. In several septic patients, negative cultures do not exclude active infection and positive cultures may not represent the actual infection. This article will review the important differences in the spectrum of commonly used antibiotics for nosocomial bacterial infections with a particular emphasis on culture-negative sepsis and colonization.

  9. Inappropriate antibiotic prescription for respiratory tract indications: most prominent in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Anne R J; Verheij, Theo J M; van der Velden, Alike W

    2015-08-01

    Numerous studies suggest overprescribing of antibiotics for respiratory tract indications (RTIs), without really authenticating inappropriate prescription; the strict criteria of guideline recommendations were not taken into account as information on specific diagnoses, patient characteristics and disease severity was not available. The aim of this study is to quantify and qualify inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for RTIs. This is an observational study of the (antibiotic) management of patients with RTIs, using a detailed registration of RTI consultations by general practitioners (GPs). Consultations of which all necessary information was available were benchmarked to the prescribing guidelines for acute otitis media (AOM), acute sore throat, rhinosinusitis or acute cough. Levels of overprescribing for these indications and factors associated with overprescribing were determined. The overall antibiotic prescribing rate was 38%. Of these prescriptions, 46% were not indicated by the guidelines. Relative overprescribing was highest for throat (including tonsillitis) and lowest for ear consultations (including AOM). Absolute overprescribing was highest for lower RTIs (including bronchitis). Overprescribing was highest for patients between 18 and 65 years of age, when GPs felt patients' pressure for an antibiotic treatment, for patients presenting with fever and with complaints longer than 1 week. Underprescribing was observed in overprescribing can help in the development of targeted strategies to improve GPs' prescribing routines for RTIs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Decreasing Inappropriate Use of Antibiotics in Primary Care in Four Countries in South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbiztondo, Inés; Bjerrum, Lars; Caballero, Lidia

    2017-01-01

    High antibiotic prescribing and antimicrobial resistance in patients attending primary care have been reported in South America. Very few interventions targeting general practitioners (GPs) to decrease inappropriate antibiotic prescribing have been investigated in this region. This study assessed...... limited effect. A cluster randomized two-arm control trial was implemented. Healthcare centres from Bolivia, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay participating in the quality improvement program HAPPY AUDIT were randomly allocated to either intervention or control group. During ten consecutive weeks, GPs...... in the intervention group received evidence-based online feedback on the management of suspected RTIs. In patients with acute bronchitis, the intervention reduced the antibiotic prescribing rate from 71.6% to 56% (control group from 61.2% to 52%). In patients with acute otitis media, the intervention reduced...

  11. An audit of empiric antibiotic choice in the inpatient management of community-acquired pneumonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delaney, F

    2017-04-01

    Adherence to antimicrobial guidelines for empiric antibiotic prescribing in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been reported to be worryingly low. We conducted a review of empiric antibiotic prescribing for sixty consecutive adult patients admitted to the Mercy University Hospital with a diagnosis of CAP. When analysed against local antimicrobial guidelines, guideline concordant empiric antibiotics were given in only 48% of cases, lower than the average rate in comparable studies. Concordance was 100% in cases where the CURB-65 pneumonia severity assessment score, on which the guidelines are based, was documented in the medical notes. The use of excessively broad spectrum and inappropriate antibiotics is a notable problem. This study supports the theory that lack of knowledge regarding pneumonia severity assessment tools and unfamiliarity with therapeutic guidelines are key barriers to guideline adherence, which remains a significant problem despite increased focus on antimicrobial stewardship programs in Ireland

  12. Inappropriate use of antibiotics in hospitals: the complex relationship between antibiotic use and antimicrobial resistance.

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    Cantón, Rafael; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Oliver, Antonio; Garbajosa, Patricia Ruiz; Vila, Jordi

    2013-09-01

    Hospitals are considered an excellent compartment for the selection of resistant and multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria. The overuse and misuse of antimicrobial agents are considered key points fuelling this situation. Antimicrobial stewardship programs have been designed for better use of these compounds to prevent the emergence of resistant microorganisms and to diminish the upward trend in resistance. Nevertheless, the relationship between antibiotic use and antimicrobial resistance is complex, and the desired objectives are difficult to reach. Various factors affecting this relationship have been advocated including, among others, antibiotic exposure and mutant selection windows, antimicrobial pharmacodynamics, the nature of the resistance (natural or acquired, including mutational and that associated with horizontal gene transfer) and the definition of resistance. Moreover, antimicrobial policies to promote better use of these drugs should be implemented not only in the hospital setting coupled with infection control programs, but also in the community, which should also include animal and environmental compartments. Within hospitals, the restriction of antimicrobials, cycling and mixing strategies and the use of combination therapies have been used to avoid resistance. Nevertheless, the results have not always been favorable and resistant bacteria have persisted despite the theoretical benefits of these strategies. Mathematical models as well as microbiological knowledge can explain this failure, which is mainly related to the current scenario involving MDR bacteria and overcoming the fitness associated with resistance. New antimicrobials, rapid diagnostic and antimicrobial susceptibility testing and biomarkers will be useful for future antimicrobial stewardship interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Carbapenem resistance, inappropriate empiric treatment and outcomes among patients hospitalized with Enterobacteriaceae urinary tract infection, pneumonia and sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberberg, Marya D; Nathanson, Brian H; Sulham, Kate; Fan, Weihong; Shorr, Andrew F

    2017-04-17

    Drug resistance among gram-negative pathogens is a risk factor for inappropriate empiric treatment (IET), which in turn increases the risk for mortality. We explored the impact of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) on the risk of IET and of IET on outcomes in patients with Enterobacteriaceae infections. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in Premier Perspective database (2009-2013) of 175 US hospitals. We included all adult patients with community-onset culture-positive urinary tract infection (UTI), pneumonia, or sepsis as a principal diagnosis, or as a secondary diagnosis in the setting of respiratory failure, treated with antibiotics within 2 days of admission. We employed regression modeling to compute adjusted association of presence of CRE with risk of receiving IET, and of IET on hospital mortality, length of stay (LOS) and costs. Among 40,137 patients presenting to the hospital with an Enterobacteriaceae UTI, pneumonia or sepsis, 1227 (3.1%) were CRE. In both groups, the majority of the cases were UTI (51.4% CRE and 54.3% non-CRE). Those with CRE were younger (66.6+/-15.3 vs. 69.1+/-15.9 years, p pneumonia or sepsis was comparable to other national estimates. Infection with CRE was associated with a four-fold increased risk of receiving IET, which in turn increased mortality, LOS and costs.

  14. National cultural dimensions as drivers of inappropriate ambulatory care consumption of antibiotics in Europe and their relevance to awareness campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Michael A

    2012-03-01

    European countries exhibit significant geographical differences in antibiotic consumption per capita within ambulatory care, especially inappropriate use for colds/flu/sore throat (CFSt). One potential explanation could be national cultural differences resulting in varying perceptions and, therefore, influences. Publicly available data on the proportions of respondents in the 2009 Eurobarometer survey who had taken antibiotics for CFSt were tested for association against country scores derived from the Hofstede cultural dimension model. They were also correlated with knowledge of respondents about various key antibiotic facts. The Eurobarometer dataset incorporated 26,259 responses from all European Union (EU) countries except Cyprus. Using multiple regression, uncertainty avoidance and masculinity were identified as the two national cultural dimensions significantly associated with the use of antibiotics for CFSt (R-adjusted = 0.45; PCFSt was found to be inversely correlated with respondents' knowledge that antibiotics are ineffective against viruses (r=-0.724; P<0.001) and that misuse will render them ineffective in the longer term (r=-0.775; P<0.001). National cultural dimensions, especially uncertainty avoidance and masculinity, appear to have a very significant impact on inappropriate antibiotic use within European countries. Nevertheless, their influence can be reduced by making EU citizens more knowledgeable about antibiotics through appropriate messages and targeted campaigns.

  15. Children with meningeal signs: predicting who needs empiric antibiotic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Oostenbrink (Rianne); K.G.M. Moons (Karel); M.J. Twijnstra; D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Since delayed diagnosis and treatment of bacterial meningitis worsens patient prognosis, clinicians have a low threshold to perform a lumbar puncture or to start empiric antibiotic treatment in patients suspected of having meningitis. OBJECTIVE: To develop a

  16. Epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection and empirical antibiotic therapy for MRSA infection: multicenter investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li-jing; Wu, Xiao-dong; Kang, Yan; Xu, Yuan; Zhou, Jian-xin; Wang, Di-fen; Chen, De-chang

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) maybe changed by strict infection control measures, and the impact of empirical antibiotic therapy on the outcomes of MRSA infection was not clear. We aimed to investigate the present epidemiological status of MRSA infection and empirical antibiotic therapy for MRSA infection in university teaching hospitals in mainland China. The present study was a multicenter prospective observational study conducted in five university teaching hospitals. Patients who were consecutively admitted to the intensive care unit and signed a consent form from March 3, 2011 to May 31, 2011 were included. Patients with age antibiotics during a stay. Primary outcomes and prognostic indicators included length of hospital stay and 28-day and 90-day mortality. The differences between the patients with appropriate empirical therapy and patients with inappropriate therapy were analyzed to detect the influences of antibiotic therapy on the prognosis of MRSA infection. A total of 682 cases were enrolled. Thirty (66.2%) of 88 MRSA cases were treated with effective antibiotics for MRSA infection; only 20% received appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment. The empirical therapy group compared with the target therapy group had a shorter length of stay, but there were no significant differences in mortality rates. There were no significant differences in the length of hospital stay, length of stay, and 28-day and 90-day mortality between MRSA-infected patients who received or not received effective antibiotics. Two hundred and eighteen cases received sensitive antibiotics for MRSA. The MRSA infection rates are at relatively low levels in university teaching hospitals in China. The empirical use of sensitive antibiotics for MRSA infection was at relatively high rate, and there is a tendency of overusing in patients without MRSA infection. On the other hand, the rate of appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy for patients with

  17. How to avoid the inappropriate use of antibiotics in upper respiratory tract infections? A position statement from an expert panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltcher, Otávio Bejzman; Kosugi, Eduardo Macoto; Sakano, Eulalia; Mion, Olavo; Testa, José Ricardo Gurgel; Romano, Fabrizio Ricci; Santos, Marco Cesar Jorge; Di Francesco, Renata Cantisani; Mitre, Edson Ibrahim; Bezerra, Thiago Freire Pinto; Roithmann, Renato; Padua, Francini Greco; Valera, Fabiana Cardoso Pereira; Lubianca Neto, José Faibes; Sá, Leonardo Conrado Barbosa; Pignatari, Shirley Shizue Nagata; Avelino, Melissa Ameloti Gomes; Caixeta, Juliana Alves de Souza; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma Terezinha; Tamashiro, Edwin

    2018-02-25

    Bacterial resistance burden has increased in the past years, mainly due to inappropriate antibiotic use. Recently it has become an urgent public health concern due to its impact on the prolongation of hospitalization, an increase of total cost of treatment and mortality associated with infectious disease. Almost half of the antimicrobial prescriptions in outpatient care visits are prescribed for acute upper respiratory infections, especially rhinosinusitis, otitis media, and pharyngotonsillitis. In this context, otorhinolaryngologists play an important role in orienting patients and non-specialists in the utilization of antibiotics rationally and properly in these infections. To review the most recent recommendations and guidelines for the use of antibiotics in acute otitis media, acute rhinosinusitis, and pharyngotonsillitis, adapted to our national reality. A literature review on PubMed database including the medical management in acute otitis media, acute rhinosinusitis, and pharyngotonsillitis, followed by a discussion with a panel of specialists. Antibiotics must be judiciously prescribed in uncomplicated acute upper respiratory tract infections. The severity of clinical presentation and the potential risks for evolution to suppurative and non-suppurative complications must be taken into 'consideration'. Periodic revisions on guidelines and recommendations for treatment of the main acute infections are necessary to orient rationale and appropriate use of antibiotics. 'Continuous medical education and changes in physicians' and patients' behavior are required to modify the paradigm that all upper respiratory infection needs antibiotic therapy, minimizing the consequences of its inadequate and inappropriate use. Copyright © 2018 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Inadequate Empirical Antibiotic Therapy in Hospital Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, S; Rijal, B P; Yogi, K N; Sherchand, J B; Parajuli, K; Parajuli, N; Pokhrel, B M

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy for HAP is a common phenomena and one of the indicators of the poor stewardship. This study intended to analyze the efficacy of empirical antibiotics in the light of microbiological data in HAP cases. Suspected cases of HAP were followed for clinico-bacterial evidence, antimicrobial resistance and pre and post culture antibiotic use. The study was taken from February,2014 to July 2014 in department of Microbiology and department of Respiratory medicine prospectively. Data was analyzed by Microsoft Office Excel 2007. Out of 758 cases investigated, 77(10 %) cases were HAP, 65(84%) of them were culture positive and 48(74 %) were late in onset. In early onset cases, isolates were Acinetobacter 10(42%), Escherichia coli 5(21%), S.aureus 4(17%), Klebsiella 1(4%) and Pseudomonas 1(4%). From the late onset cases Acinetobacter 15(28%), Klebsiella 17(32%) and Pseudomonas 13(24%) were isolated. All Acinetobacter, 78% Klebsiella and 36% Pseudomonas isolates were multi drug resistant. Empirical therapies were inadequate in 12(70%) of early onset cases and 44(92%) of late onset type. Cephalosporins were used in 7(41%) of early onset infections but found to be adequate only in 2(12%) cases. Polymyxins were avoided empirically but after cultures were used in 9(19%) cases. Empirical antibiotics were vastly inadequate, more frequently so in late onset infections. Use of cephalosporins empirically in early onset infections and avoiding empirical use of polymyxin antibiotics in late onset infections contributed largely to the findings. Inadequate empirical regimen is a real time feedback for a practitioner to update his knowledge on the local microbiological trends.

  19. Empiric systemic antibiotics for hospitalized patients with severe odontogenic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirk, Matthias; Buller, Johannes; Goeddertz, Peter; Rothamel, Daniel; Dreiseidler, Timo; Zöller, Joachim E; Kreppel, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Odontogenic infections may lead to severe head and neck infections with potentially great health risk. Age, location of purulent affected sites and beta-lactam allergy are some mentionable factors regarding patients' in-hospital stay and course of disease. Are there new challenges regarding bacteria' antibiotic resistance for empiric treatment and what influences do they have on patients' clinical course? We analyzed in a 4-year retrospective study the medical records of 294 in-hospital patients with severe odontogenic infections. On a routine base bacteria were identified and susceptibility testing was performed. Length of stay in-hospital was evaluated regarding patients' age, beta-lactam allergy profile, affected sites and bacteria susceptibility to empiric antibiotics. Length of stay in-hospital was detected to be associated with affected space and penicillin allergy as well (p odontogenic neck infections. Cephalosporins seem to be a considerable option as well. If beta-lactam allergy is diagnosed co-trimoxazol and moxifloxacin represent relevant alternatives. Age, allergic profile and bacteria' resistance patterns for empiric antibiotics have an influence on patients in-hospital stay. Ampicillin/sulbactam proves itself to be good for empiric antibiosis in severe odontogenic infections. Furthermore cephalosporins could be considered as another option in treatment. However moxifloxacin and co-trimoxazol deserves further investigation as empiric antibiosis in odontogenic infections if beta-lactam allergy is diagnosed. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gram-negative bacteraemia; a multi-centre prospective evaluation of empiric antibiotic therapy and outcome in English acute hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, J M; Biswas, J S; Edgeworth, J D; Islam, J; Jenkins, N; Judge, R; Lavery, A J; Melzer, M; Morris-Jones, S; Nsutebu, E F; Peters, J; Pillay, D G; Pink, F; Price, J R; Scarborough, M; Thwaites, G E; Tilley, R; Walker, A S; Llewelyn, M J

    2016-03-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance makes choosing antibiotics for suspected Gram-negative infection challenging. This study set out to identify key determinants of mortality among patients with Gram-negative bacteraemia, focusing particularly on the importance of appropriate empiric antibiotic treatment. We conducted a prospective observational study of 679 unselected adults with Gram-negative bacteraemia at ten acute english hospitals between October 2013 and March 2014. Appropriate empiric antibiotic treatment was defined as intravenous treatment on the day of blood culture collection with an antibiotic to which the cultured organism was sensitive in vitro. Mortality analyses were adjusted for patient demographics, co-morbidities and illness severity. The majority of bacteraemias were community-onset (70%); most were caused by Escherichia coli (65%), Klebsiella spp. (15%) or Pseudomonas spp. (7%). Main foci of infection were urinary tract (51%), abdomen/biliary tract (20%) and lower respiratory tract (14%). The main antibiotics used were co-amoxiclav (32%) and piperacillin-tazobactam (30%) with 34% receiving combination therapy (predominantly aminoglycosides). Empiric treatment was inappropriate in 34%. All-cause mortality was 8% at 7 days and 15% at 30 days. Independent predictors of mortality (p antibiotic therapy was not associated with mortality at either time-point (adjusted OR 0.82; 95% CI 0.35-1.94 and adjusted OR 0.92; 95% CI 0.50-1.66, respectively). Although our study does not exclude an impact of empiric antibiotic choice on survival in Gram-negative bacteraemia, outcome is determined primarily by patient and disease factors. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of a multi-faceted quality improvement intervention on inappropriate antibiotic use in children with non-bloody diarrhoea admitted to district hospitals in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opondo Charles

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few reports of interventions to reduce the common but irrational use of antibiotics for acute non-bloody diarrhoea amongst hospitalised children in low-income settings. We undertook a secondary analysis of data from an intervention comprising training of health workers, facilitation, supervision and face-to-face feedback, to assess whether it reduced inappropriate use of antibiotics in children with non-bloody diarrhoea and no co-morbidities requiring antibiotics, compared to a partial intervention comprising didactic training and written feedback only. This outcome was not a pre-specified end-point of the main trial. Methods Repeated cross-sectional survey data from a cluster-randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve management of common childhood illnesses in Kenya were used to describe the prevalence of inappropriate antibiotic use in a 7-day period in children aged 2-59 months with acute non-bloody diarrhoea. Logistic regression models with random effects for hospital were then used to identify patient and clinician level factors associated with inappropriate antibiotic use and to assess the effect of the intervention. Results 9, 459 admission records of children were reviewed for this outcome. Of these, 4, 232 (44.7% were diagnosed with diarrhoea, with 130 of these being bloody (dysentery therefore requiring antibiotics. 1, 160 children had non-bloody diarrhoea and no co-morbidities requiring antibiotics-these were the focus of the analysis. 750 (64.7% of them received antibiotics inappropriately, 313 of these being in the intervention hospitals vs. 437 in the controls. The adjusted logistic regression model showed the baseline-adjusted odds of inappropriate antibiotic prescription to children admitted to the intervention hospitals was 0.30 times that in the control hospitals (95%CI 0.09-1.02. Conclusion We found some evidence that the multi-faceted, sustained intervention described in this

  2. A Multicenter Evaluation of Prolonged Empiric Antibiotic Therapy in Adult ICUs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Zachariah; Bandali, Farooq; Sankaranarayanan, Jayashri; Reardon, Tom; Olsen, Keith M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the rate of prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy in adult ICUs in the United States. Our secondary objective is to examine the relationship between the prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy rate and certain ICU characteristics. Multicenter, prospective, observational, 72-hour snapshot study. Sixty-seven ICUs from 32 hospitals in the United States. Nine hundred ninety-eight patients admitted to the ICU between midnight on June 20, 2011, and June 21, 2011, were included in the study. None. Antibiotic orders were categorized as prophylactic, definitive, empiric, or prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy. Prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy was defined as empiric antibiotics that continued for at least 72 hours in the absence of adjudicated infection. Standard definitions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were used to determine infection. Prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy rate was determined as the ratio of the total number of empiric antibiotics continued for at least 72 hours divided by the total number of empiric antibiotics. Univariate analysis of factors associated with the ICU prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy rate was conducted using Student t test. A total of 660 unique antibiotics were prescribed as empiric therapy to 364 patients. Of the empiric antibiotics, 333 of 660 (50%) were continued for at least 72 hours in instances where Centers for Disease Control and Prevention infection criteria were not met. Suspected pneumonia accounted for approximately 60% of empiric antibiotic use. The most frequently prescribed empiric antibiotics were vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam. ICUs that utilized invasive techniques for the diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia had lower rates of prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy than those that did not, 45.1% versus 59.5% (p = 0.03). No other institutional factor was significantly associated with prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy rate. Half of all

  3. Secular trends in the appropriateness of empirical antibiotic treatment in patients with bacteremia: a comparison between three prospective cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daitch, Vered; Akayzen, Yulia; Abu-Ghanem, Yasmin; Eliakim-Raz, Noa; Paul, Mical; Leibovici, Leonard; Yahav, Dafna

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether the percentage of inappropriate empirical antibiotic treatment in patients with bacteremia changed over time and to understand the factors that brought on the change. Three prospective cohorts of patients with bacteremia in three different periods (January 1st, 1988 to December 31st, 1989; May 1st, 2004 to November 30, 2004; May 1st, 2010 to April 30, 2011) were compared. Analysis was performed on a total of 811 patients. In 2010-2011, 55.9% (76/136) of patients with bacteremia received inappropriate empirical treatment, compared with 34.5% (170/493) and 33.5% (55/164) in the first and second periods, respectively, in a significant upward trend (p = 0.001). Resistance to antibiotics increased significantly during the study period. The following variables were included in the multivariate analysis assessing risk factors for inappropriate empirical treatment: study period (third period) [odds ratio, OR = 2.766 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.655-4.625)], gender (male) [OR = 1.511 (1.014-2.253)], pathogen carrying extended-spectrum beta-lactamases [OR = 10.426 (4.688-23.187)], multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii [OR = 5.428 (2.181-13.513)], and skin/soft infections [OR = 3.23 (1.148-9.084)]. A model excluding microbiological data included: gender (male) [OR = 1.648 (1.216-2.234)], study period (third period) [OR = 2.446 (1.653-3.620)], hospital-acquired infection [OR = 1.551 (1.060-2.270)], previous use of antibiotics [OR = 1.815 (1.247-2.642)], bedridden patient [OR = 2.019 (1.114-3.658)], and diabetes mellitus [OR = 1.620 (1.154-2.274)]. We have observed a worrisome increase in the rate of inappropriate empirical treatment of bacteremia. We need tools that will allow us better prediction of the pathogen and its susceptibilities during the first hours of managing a patient suspected of a severe bacterial infection.

  4. Tigecycline Therapy for Nosocomial Pneumonia due to Carbapenem-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria in Critically Ill Patients Who Received Inappropriate Initial Antibiotic Treatment: A Retrospective Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaomai; Zhu, Yefei; Chen, Qiuying; Gong, Liuyang; Lin, Jian; Lv, Dongqing; Feng, Jiaxi

    2016-01-01

    Background . Nosocomial pneumonia due to carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (CRGNB) is a growing concern because treatment options are limited and the mortality rate is high. The effect of tigecycline (TGC) on nosocomial pneumonia due to CRGNB in patients who have received inappropriate initial empiric antibiotic treatment (IIAT) is unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the effect of TGC on nosocomial pneumonia due to CRGNB in critically ill patients who had received IIAT. Methods . A retrospective study was conducted in an adult respiratory intensive care unit. Data were obtained and analyzed for all patients who were treated with TGC ≥ 3 days for microbiologically confirmed nosocomial pneumonia due to CRGNB and had experienced initial antibiotic failure. Clinical and microbiological outcomes were investigated. Results . Thirty-one patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia or ventilator-associated pneumonia were included in the study. The majority of the responsible organisms were carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (67.7%), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (16.1%) and Escherichia coli (9.7%). Twenty patients were treated with high-dose TGC therapy (100 mg every 12 h after a 200 mg loading dose), and the others received a standard-dose therapy (50 mg every 12 h after a 100 mg loading dose). The duration of TGC therapy was 14.3 ± 2.8 days. The global clinical cure rate and the microbiological eradication rate were 48.4% and 61.3%, respectively. The overall ICU mortality rate was 45.2%. A higher score on the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and a longer duration of IIAT were associated with clinical failure. High-dose TGC therapy had a higher clinical success rate [65.0% (13/20) versus 18.2% (2/11), P = 0.023] and a lower ICU mortality rate [30.0% (6/20) versus 72.7% (8/11), P = 0.031] than the standard-dose therapy. Conclusions . TGC, especially a high-dose regimen, might be a justifiable option for

  5. Different recommendations for empiric first-choice antibiotic treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQuiston Haslund, Josephine; Rosborg Dinesen, Marianne; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Uncomplicated urinary tract infection (uUTI) is a common reason for antibiotic treatment in primary health care. Due to the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant uropathogens it is crucial to use the most appropriate antibiotics for first-choice empiric treatment of u...

  6. The Comparison of Procalcitonin Guidance Administer Antibiotics with Empiric Antibiotic Therapy in Critically Ill Patients Admitted in Intensive Care Unit

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    Atabak Najafi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The empiric antibiotic therapy can result in antibiotic overuse, development of bacterial resistance and increasing costs in critically ill patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of procalcitonin (PCT guide treatment on antibiotic use and clinical outcomes of patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS.  A total of 60 patients were enrolled in this study and randomly divided into two groups, cases that underwent antibiotic treatment based on serum level of PCT as PCT group (n=30 and patients who undergoing antibiotic empiric therapy as control group (n=30. Our primary endpoint was the use of antibiotic treatment. Additional endpoints were changed in clinical status and early mortality. Antibiotics use was lower in PCT group compared to control group (P=0.03. Current data showed that difference in SOFA score from the first day to the second day after admitting patients in ICU did not significantly differ (P=0.88. Patients in PCT group had a significantly shorter median ICU stay, four days versus six days (P=0.01. However, hospital stay was not statistically significant different between two groups, 20 days versus 22 days (P=0.23.  Early mortality was similar between two groups. PCT guidance administers antibiotics reduce antibiotics exposure and length of ICU stay, and we found no differences in clinical outcomes and early mortality rates between the two studied groups.

  7. Inappropriate empiric antifungal therapy for candidemia in the ICU and hospital resource utilization: a retrospective cohort study

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    Micek Scott T

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida represents the most common cause of invasive fungal disease, and candidal blood stream infections (CBSI are prevalent in the ICU. Inappropriate antifungal therapy (IAT is known to increase a patient's risk for death. We hypothesized that in an ICU cohort it would also adversely affect resource utilization. Methods We retrospectively identified all patients with candidemia on or before hospital day 14 and requiring an ICU stay at Barnes-Jewish Hospital between 2004 and 2007. Hospital length of stay following culture-proven onset of CBSI (post-CBSI HLOS was primary and hospital costs secondary endpoints. IAT was defined as treatment delay of ≥24 hours from candidemia onset or inadequate dose of antifungal agent active against the pathogen. We developed generalized linear models (GLM to assess independent impact of inappropriate therapy on LOS and costs. Results Ninety patients met inclusion criteria. IAT was frequent (88.9%. In the IAT group antifungal delay ≥24 hours occurred in 95.0% and inappropriate dosage in 26.3%. Unadjusted hospital mortality was greater among IAT (28.8% than non-IAT (0% patients, p = 0.059. Both crude post-CBSI HLOS (18.4 ± 17.0 vs. 10.7 ± 9.4, p = 0.062 and total costs ($66,584 ± $49,120 vs. $33,526 ± $27,244, p = 0.006 were higher in IAT than in non-IAT. In GLMs adjusting for confounders IAT-attributable excess post-CBSI HLOS was 7.7 days (95% CI 0.6-13.5 and attributable total costs were $13,398 (95% CI $1,060-$26,736. Conclusions IAT of CBSI, such as delays and incorrect dosing, occurs commonly. In addition to its adverse impact on clinical outcomes, IAT results in substantial prolongation of hospital LOS and increase in hospital costs. Efforts to enhance rates of appropriate therapy for candidemia may improve resource use.

  8. Bacterial clonal diagnostics as a tool for evidence-based empiric antibiotic selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Tchesnokova

    Full Text Available Despite the known clonal distribution of antibiotic resistance in many bacteria, empiric (pre-culture antibiotic selection still relies heavily on species-level cumulative antibiograms, resulting in overuse of broad-spectrum agents and excessive antibiotic/pathogen mismatch. Urinary tract infections (UTIs, which account for a large share of antibiotic use, are caused predominantly by Escherichia coli, a highly clonal pathogen. In an observational clinical cohort study of urgent care patients with suspected UTI, we assessed the potential for E. coli clonal-level antibiograms to improve empiric antibiotic selection. A novel PCR-based clonotyping assay was applied to fresh urine samples to rapidly detect E. coli and the urine strain's clonotype. Based on a database of clonotype-specific antibiograms, the acceptability of various antibiotics for empiric therapy was inferred using a 20%, 10%, and 30% allowed resistance threshold. The test's performance characteristics and possible effects on prescribing were assessed. The rapid test identified E. coli clonotypes directly in patients' urine within 25-35 minutes, with high specificity and sensitivity compared to culture. Antibiotic selection based on a clonotype-specific antibiogram could reduce the relative likelihood of antibiotic/pathogen mismatch by ≥ 60%. Compared to observed prescribing patterns, clonal diagnostics-guided antibiotic selection could safely double the use of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and minimize fluoroquinolone use. In summary, a rapid clonotyping test showed promise for improving empiric antibiotic prescribing for E. coli UTI, including reversing preferential use of fluoroquinolones over trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The clonal diagnostics approach merges epidemiologic surveillance, antimicrobial stewardship, and molecular diagnostics to bring evidence-based medicine directly to the point of care.

  9. Bacterial clonal diagnostics as a tool for evidence-based empiric antibiotic selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchesnokova, Veronika; Avagyan, Hovhannes; Rechkina, Elena; Chan, Diana; Muradova, Mariya; Haile, Helen Ghirmai; Radey, Matthew; Weissman, Scott; Riddell, Kim; Scholes, Delia; Johnson, James R; Sokurenko, Evgeni V

    2017-01-01

    Despite the known clonal distribution of antibiotic resistance in many bacteria, empiric (pre-culture) antibiotic selection still relies heavily on species-level cumulative antibiograms, resulting in overuse of broad-spectrum agents and excessive antibiotic/pathogen mismatch. Urinary tract infections (UTIs), which account for a large share of antibiotic use, are caused predominantly by Escherichia coli, a highly clonal pathogen. In an observational clinical cohort study of urgent care patients with suspected UTI, we assessed the potential for E. coli clonal-level antibiograms to improve empiric antibiotic selection. A novel PCR-based clonotyping assay was applied to fresh urine samples to rapidly detect E. coli and the urine strain's clonotype. Based on a database of clonotype-specific antibiograms, the acceptability of various antibiotics for empiric therapy was inferred using a 20%, 10%, and 30% allowed resistance threshold. The test's performance characteristics and possible effects on prescribing were assessed. The rapid test identified E. coli clonotypes directly in patients' urine within 25-35 minutes, with high specificity and sensitivity compared to culture. Antibiotic selection based on a clonotype-specific antibiogram could reduce the relative likelihood of antibiotic/pathogen mismatch by ≥ 60%. Compared to observed prescribing patterns, clonal diagnostics-guided antibiotic selection could safely double the use of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and minimize fluoroquinolone use. In summary, a rapid clonotyping test showed promise for improving empiric antibiotic prescribing for E. coli UTI, including reversing preferential use of fluoroquinolones over trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The clonal diagnostics approach merges epidemiologic surveillance, antimicrobial stewardship, and molecular diagnostics to bring evidence-based medicine directly to the point of care.

  10. Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and demand for antibiotics in patients with upper respiratory tract infections is hardly different in female versus male patients as seen in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Kathrine; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Siersma, Volkert

    2015-01-01

    of a cross-sectional study including 15 022 patients with URTI (acute rhinitis, acute otitis media, acute sinusitis, acute pharyngotonsillitis) from Argentina, Denmark, Lithuania, Russia, Spain and Sweden (HAPPY AUDIT Project). The association between gender and unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions...

  11. Efficiency of Empirically Administered Antibiotics in Patients with Cervical Infections of Odontogenic Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncar, Mihai; OniȘor-Gligor, Florin; Bran, Simion; Juncar, Raluca-Iulia; BăciuȚ, Mihaela-Felicia; DumitraȘcu, Dinu-Iuliu; BăciuȚ, Grigore; Moldovan, Iuliu

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic infections are among the main types of disorders located in the cephalic extremity. The aim of this study was to determine the efficiency of empirically administered antibiotics on the bacterial strains identified at the infection sites. The study included 10 randomly selected patients with odontogenic cervical soft tissue infections, who received antibiotic treatment prescribed by the family doctor or the dentist. The bacterial flora involved in the development of the septic process, the type of antibiotic administered to the patient and the sensitivity of the identified bacterial flora to the administered antibiotic were determined. In the 10 selected patients, 14 bacterial strains were detected; 7 patients had a single bacterial strain, and 3 patients had two or three types of bacteria. Of the administered antibiotics, amoxicillin was the most widely used (33.3% of the cases), followed by amoxicillin with beta-lactamase inhibitors (25% of the cases). In half of the patients, there was no sensitivity of the bacteria detected in the septic focus to the empirically administered antibiotic, and in 10% of the cases, partial sensitivity was evidenced. Empirical administration of antibiotics without the association of surgery did not prove to be effective in the treatment of cervical infections of odontogenic origin.

  12. Antibiotic susceptibilities of bacteria isolated within the oral flora of Florida blacktip sharks: guidance for empiric antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Nathan R; Ritter, Erich; Borrego, Robert; Goodman, Jay; Osiyemi, Olayemi O

    2014-01-01

    Sharks possess a variety of pathogenic bacteria in their oral cavity that may potentially be transferred into humans during a bite. The aim of the presented study focused on the identification of the bacteria present in the mouths of live blacktip sharks, Carcharhinus limbatus, and the extent that these bacteria possess multi-drug resistance. Swabs were taken from the oral cavity of nineteen live blacktip sharks, which were subsequently released. The average fork length was 146 cm (±11), suggesting the blacktip sharks were mature adults at least 8 years old. All swabs underwent standard microbiological work-up with identification of organisms and reporting of antibiotic susceptibilities using an automated microbiology system. The oral samples revealed an average of 2.72 (±1.4) bacterial isolates per shark. Gram-negative bacteria, making up 61% of all bacterial isolates, were significantly (pbacteria (39%). The most common organisms were Vibrio spp. (28%), various coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. (16%), and Pasteurella spp. (12%). The overall resistance rate was 12% for all antibiotics tested with nearly 43% of bacteria resistant to at least one antibiotic. Multi-drug resistance was seen in 4% of bacteria. No association between shark gender or fork length with bacterial density or antibiotic resistance was observed. Antibiotics with the highest overall susceptibility rates included fluoroquinolones, 3rd generation cephalosporins and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Recommended empiric antimicrobial therapy for adult blacktip shark bites should encompass either a fluoroquinolone or combination of a 3rd generation cephalosporin plus doxycycline.

  13. Impact of appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment on recurrence and mortality in patients with bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, Kim O; Jensen, Ulrich S; Schønheyder, Henrik C

    2017-01-01

    Background: Data on the impact of empirical antibiotic treatment (EAT) on patient outcome in a population-based setting are sparse. We assessed the association between EAT and the risk of recurrence within one year, short-term- (2-30 days) and long-term (31-365 days) mortality in a Danish cohort...

  14. The spread of multi drug resistant infections is leading to an increase in the empirical antibiotic treatment failure in cirrhosis: a prospective survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Manuela; Lucidi, Cristina; Di Gregorio, Vincenza; Falcone, Marco; Giannelli, Valerio; Lattanzi, Barbara; Giusto, Michela; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; Farcomeni, Alessio; Riggio, Oliviero; Venditti, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The spread of multi-resistant infections represents a continuously growing problem in cirrhosis, particularly in patients in contact with the healthcare environment. Our prospective study aimed to analyze epidemiology, prevalence and risk factors of multi-resistant infections, as well as the rate of failure of empirical antibiotic therapy in cirrhotic patients. All consecutive cirrhotic patients hospitalized between 2008 and 2013 with a microbiologically-documented infection (MDI) were enrolled. Infections were classified as Community-Acquired (CA), Hospital-Acquired (HA) and Healthcare-Associated (HCA). Bacteria were classified as Multidrug-Resistant (MDR) if resistant to at least three antimicrobial classes, Extensively-Drug-Resistant (XDR) if only sensitive to one/two classes and Pandrug-Resistant (PDR) if resistant to all classes. One-hundred-twenty-four infections (15% CA, 52% HA, 33% HCA) were observed in 111 patients. Urinary tract infections, pneumonia and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis were the more frequent. Forty-seven percent of infections were caused by Gram-negative bacteria. Fifty-one percent of the isolates were multi-resistant to antibiotic therapy (76% MDR, 21% XDR, 3% PDR): the use of antibiotic prophylaxis (OR = 8.4; 95%CI = 1.03-76; P = 0,05) and current/recent contact with the healthcare-system (OR = 3.7; 95%CI = 1.05-13; P = 0.04) were selected as independent predictors. The failure of the empirical antibiotic therapy was progressively more frequent according to the degree of resistance. The therapy was inappropriate in the majority of HA and HCA infections. Multi-resistant infections are increasing in hospitalized cirrhotic patients. A better knowledge of the epidemiological characteristics is important to improve the efficacy of empirical antibiotic therapy. The use of preventive measures aimed at reducing the spread of multi-resistant bacteria is also essential.

  15. Sepsis calculator implementation reduces empiric antibiotics for suspected early-onset sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achten, Niek B; Dorigo-Zetsma, J Wendelien; van der Linden, Paul D; van Brakel, Monique; Plötz, Frans B

    2018-02-18

    Significant overtreatment with antibiotics for suspected early onset sepsis (EOS) constitutes a persisting clinical problem, generating unnecessary risks, harms, and costs for many newborns. We aimed to study feasibility and impact of a sepsis calculator to help guide antibiotic for suspected EOS in a European setting. In this single-center study, the sepsis calculator was implemented as an addition to and in accordance with existing protocols. One thousand eight hundred seventy-seven newborns ≥ 35 weeks of gestational age were prospectively evaluated; an analogous retrospective control group (n = 2076) was used for impact analysis. We found that empirical treatment with intravenous antibiotics for suspected EOS was reduced from 4.8 to 2.7% after sepsis calculator implementation (relative risk reduction 44% (95% confidence interval 21.4-59.5%)). No evidence for changes in time to treatment start, treatment duration, or proven sepsis rates was found. Adherence to sepsis calculator recommendation was 91%. Pragmatic and feasible implementation of the sepsis calculator yields a 44% reduction of empirical use of antibiotics for EOS, without signs of delay or prolongation of treatment. These findings warrant a multicenter, nation-wide, randomized study evaluating systematic use of the sepsis calculator prediction model and its effects in clinical practice outside of the USA. What is known: • Significant overtreatment with antibiotics for suspected early-onset sepsis results in unnecessary costs, risks, and harms. • Implementation of the sepsis calculator in the USA has resulted in a significant decrease in empirical antibiotic treatment, without apparent adverse events. What is new: • Implementation of the sepsis calculator in daily clinical decision-making in a Dutch teaching hospital is feasible in conjunction with existing protocols, with high adherence. • Antibiotic therapy for suspected early-onset sepsis was reduced by 44% following implementation

  16. Clinical efficacy of cycling empirical antibiotic therapy for febrile neutropenia in pediatric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teranishi, Hideto; Koga, Yuhki; Nishio, Hisanori; Kato, Wakako; Ono, Hiroaki; Kanno, Shunsuke; Nakashima, Kentaro; Takada, Hidetoshi

    2017-07-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) is the main treatment-related cause of mortality among children with cancer, as the prolonged use of broad-spectrum antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance in these patients. Antibiotic cycling has been reported to limit the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria among adult patients. However, no studies have evaluated pediatric patients with FN. Between September 2011 and February 2014, 126 pediatric cancer patients were admitted to our center for chemotherapy and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and were included in this study. Retrospective and prospective data collection were performed before and after antibiotic cycling, respectively. Between September 2011 and November 2012 (before antibiotic cycling was implemented), intravenous cefpirome was used as the empirical therapy for FN. Between December 2012 and February 2014 (after antibiotic cycling was implemented), the monthly antibiotic cycling involved intravenous piperacillin-tazobactam (PIPC/TAZ), intravenous meropenem or ciprofloxacin (CPFX), and intravenous cefepime in that order. For children aged ≥13 years, the monthly cycling involved intravenous PIPC/TAZ, and CPFX was administered. The detection rates for extended-spectrum β-lactamase producers in blood and stool culture samples decreased significantly after the implementation of antibiotic cycling (0.33/1000 patient-days vs 0/1000 patient-days, p = 0.03; 1.00/1000 patient-days vs 0/1000 patient-days, p Antibiotic cycling was associated with a decreased emergence of multidrug-resistant microbes. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Empirical mode decomposition and k-nearest embedding vectors for timely analyses of antibiotic resistance trends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Teodoro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibiotic resistance is a major worldwide public health concern. In clinical settings, timely antibiotic resistance information is key for care providers as it allows appropriate targeted treatment or improved empirical treatment when the specific results of the patient are not yet available. OBJECTIVE: To improve antibiotic resistance trend analysis algorithms by building a novel, fully data-driven forecasting method from the combination of trend extraction and machine learning models for enhanced biosurveillance systems. METHODS: We investigate a robust model for extraction and forecasting of antibiotic resistance trends using a decade of microbiology data. Our method consists of breaking down the resistance time series into independent oscillatory components via the empirical mode decomposition technique. The resulting waveforms describing intrinsic resistance trends serve as the input for the forecasting algorithm. The algorithm applies the delay coordinate embedding theorem together with the k-nearest neighbor framework to project mappings from past events into the future dimension and estimate the resistance levels. RESULTS: The algorithms that decompose the resistance time series and filter out high frequency components showed statistically significant performance improvements in comparison with a benchmark random walk model. We present further qualitative use-cases of antibiotic resistance trend extraction, where empirical mode decomposition was applied to highlight the specificities of the resistance trends. CONCLUSION: The decomposition of the raw signal was found not only to yield valuable insight into the resistance evolution, but also to produce novel models of resistance forecasters with boosted prediction performance, which could be utilized as a complementary method in the analysis of antibiotic resistance trends.

  18. Mortality in enterococcal bloodstream infections increases with inappropriate antimicrobial therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, M.; Aabenhus, R.; Harboe, Z.B.

    2010-01-01

    Enterococcus species are common in nosocomial bloodstream infections and their incidence is rising. Although well recognized in several serious bacterial infections, the influence of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in enterococcal bacteraemia has not been fully settled. The aim of the study.......7-10), thrombocytopenia (3.9, 1.6-9.3), chronic liver failure (3.3, 1.1-10) and age >/=60 years (2.2, 0.99-5.0). Antibiotics not appropriately covering enterococci are frequently administered empirically in suspected bloodstream infections. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy was an independent risk factor for mortality...

  19. Empiric Antibiotic Prescribing Decisions Among Medical Residents: The Role of the Antibiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallman, Gregory B; Vilches-Tran, Rowena A; Elman, Miriam R; Bearden, David T; Taylor, Jerusha E; Gorman, Paul N; McGregor, Jessina C

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess general medical residents' familiarity with antibiograms using a self-administered survey DESIGN Cross-sectional, single-center survey PARTICIPANTS Residents in internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics at an academic medical center METHODS Participants were administered an anonymous survey at our institution during regularly scheduled educational conferences between January and May 2012. Questions collected data regarding demographics, professional training; further open-ended questions assessed knowledge and use of antibiograms regarding possible pathogens, antibiotic regimens, and prescribing resources for 2 clinical vignettes; a series of directed, closed-ended questions followed. Bivariate analyses to compare responses between residency programs were performed. RESULTS Of 122 surveys distributed, 106 residents (87%) responded; internal medicine residents accounted for 69% of responses. More than 20% of residents could not accurately identify pathogens to target with empiric therapy or select therapy with an appropriate spectrum of activity in response to the clinical vignettes; correct identification of potential pathogens was not associated with selecting appropriate therapy. Only 12% of respondents identified antibiograms as a resource when prescribing empiric antibiotic therapy for scenarios in the vignettes, with most selecting the UpToDate online clinical decision support resource or The Sanford Guide. When directly questioned, 89% reported awareness of institutional antibiograms, but only 70% felt comfortable using them and only 44% knew how to access them. CONCLUSIONS When selecting empiric antibiotics, many residents are not comfortable using antibiograms as part of treatment decisions. Efforts to improve antibiotic use may benefit from residents being given additional education on both infectious diseases pharmacotherapy and antibiogram utilization. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;1-6.

  20. Empiric antibiotic coverage of atypical pathogens for community acquired pneumonia in hospitalized adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robenshtok, E; Shefet, D; Gafter-Gvili, A; Paul, M; Vidal, L; Leibovici, L

    2008-01-23

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is caused by various pathogens, traditionally divided to 'typical' and 'atypical'. Initial antibiotic treatment of CAP is usually empirical, customarily covering both typical and atypical pathogens. To date, no sufficient evidence exists to support this broad coverage, while limiting coverage is bound to reduce toxicity, resistance and expense. To assess the efficacy and need of adding antibiotic coverage for atypical pathogens in hospitalized patients with CAP, in terms of mortality and successful treatment. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 1) which includes the Acute Respiratory Infection Group's specialized register; MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2007); and EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2007). Randomized trials of adult patients hospitalized due to CAP, comparing antibiotic regimens with atypical antibiotic coverage to a regimen without atypical antibiotic coverage. Two review authors independently appraised the quality of each trial and extracted the data from included trials. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated, assuming an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis for the outcome measures. Twenty five trials were included, encompassing 5244 randomized patients. There was no difference in mortality between the atypical arm and the non-atypical arm (RR 1.15; 95% CI 0.85 to 1.56). The atypical arm showed an insignificant trend toward clinical success and a significant advantage to bacteriological eradication, which disappeared when evaluating methodologically high-quality studies alone. Clinical success for the atypical arm was significantly higher for Legionella pneumophilae (L. pneumophilae) and non-significantly lower for pneumococcal pneumonia. There was no significant difference between the groups in the frequency of (total) adverse events, or those requiring discontinuation of treatment. However, gastrointestinal events

  1. Time to Guideline-Based Empiric Antibiotic Therapy in the Treatment of Pneumonia in a Community Hospital: A Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Beth L; Kyle, Jeffrey A; Allen, Leland N

    2016-08-01

    The 2005 American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America (ATS/IDSA) guidelines for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP) stress the importance of initiating prompt appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy. This study's purpose was to determine the percentage of patients with HAP, VAP, and HCAP who received guideline-based empiric antibiotic therapy and to determine the average time to receipt of an appropriate empiric regimen. A retrospective chart review of adults with HAP, VAP, or HCAP was conducted at a community hospital in suburban Birmingham, Alabama. The hospital's electronic medical record system utilized International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes to identify patients diagnosed with pneumonia. The percentage of patients who received guideline-based empiric antibiotic therapy was calculated. The mean time from suspected diagnosis of pneumonia to initial administration of the final antibiotic within the empiric regimen was calculated for patients who received guideline-based therapy. Ninety-three patients met the inclusion criteria. The overall guideline adherence rate for empiric antibiotic therapy was 31.2%. The mean time to guideline-based therapy in hours:minutes was 7:47 for HAP and 28:16 for HCAP. For HAP and HCAP combined, the mean time to appropriate therapy was 21:55. Guideline adherence rates were lower and time to appropriate empiric therapy was greater for patients with HCAP compared to patients with HAP. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Empiric antibiotic coverage of atypical pathogens for community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliakim-Raz, Noa; Robenshtok, Eyal; Shefet, Daphna; Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Vidal, Liat; Paul, Mical; Leibovici, Leonard

    2012-09-12

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is caused by various pathogens, traditionally divided into 'typical' and 'atypical'. Initial antibiotic treatment of CAP is usually empirical, customarily covering both typical and atypical pathogens. To date, no sufficient evidence exists to support this broad coverage, while limiting coverage is bound to reduce toxicity, resistance and expense. The main objective was to estimate the mortality and proportion with treatment failure using regimens containing atypical antibiotic coverage compared to those that had typical coverage only. Secondary objectives included the assessment of adverse events. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Issue 3, 2012 which includes the Acute Respiratory Infection Group's Specialized Register, MEDLINE (January 1966 to April week 1, 2012) and EMBASE (January 1980 to April 2012). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adult patients hospitalized due to CAP, comparing antibiotic regimens with atypical coverage (quinolones, macrolides, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, streptogramins or ketolides) to a regimen without atypical antibiotic coverage. Two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from included trials. We estimated risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We assessed heterogeneity using a Chi(2) test. We included 28 trials, encompassing 5939 randomized patients. The atypical antibiotic was administered as monotherapy in all but three studies. Only one study assessed a beta-lactam combined with a macrolide compared to the same beta-lactam. There was no difference in mortality between the atypical arm and the non-atypical arm (RR 1.14; 95% CI 0.84 to 1.55), RR atypical arm. The atypical arm showed an insignificant trend toward clinical success and a significant advantage to bacteriological eradication, which disappeared when evaluating methodologically high quality studies alone. Clinical success for the atypical arm

  3. Qualitative evaluation of antibiotic usage in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hindra Irawan Satari

    2011-12-01

    Methods We performed a descriptive, retrospective study of matient medical records of those admitted to the pediatric ward from January 1 – June 30, 2009. Records were screened for patient antibiotic use, followed by qualitative evaluation using Gyssens algorithm on data from patient who received antibiotic treatment. Results We found 49.2% of subject were prescribed antibiotics. The majority of patients given antibiotics were aged 1 month - 1 year (39.3%. Antibiotic use was categorized by therapy type : empirical, prophylactic, or definitive. We found empirical therapy in 73% of cases, prophylactic in 8%, and definitive in 15%. Cefotaxime was the most common antibiotic used (25.1%, followed by ceftazidime (14% and cotrimoxazole (1%. 39.6% of subjects were given antibiotics appropriately, while 48.3% were given inappropriately. In 3.3% of patients, antibiotics were given without indication and in 8.8% there was insufficient data. Conclusions Of hospitalized patients receiving antibiotic treatment at the Departement of Child Health, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, 39.6% were given antibiotic appropriately, while 48.3% were given antibiotics inappropriately. Cefotaxime was the most commonly used, as well as most inappropriately given antibiotic.

  4. Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  5. Cycling empirical antibiotic therapy in hospitals: meta-analysis and models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Abel zur Wiesch

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The rise of resistance together with the shortage of new broad-spectrum antibiotics underlines the urgency of optimizing the use of available drugs to minimize disease burden. Theoretical studies suggest that coordinating empirical usage of antibiotics in a hospital ward can contain the spread of resistance. However, theoretical and clinical studies came to different conclusions regarding the usefulness of rotating first-line therapy (cycling. Here, we performed a quantitative pathogen-specific meta-analysis of clinical studies comparing cycling to standard practice. We searched PubMed and Google Scholar and identified 46 clinical studies addressing the effect of cycling on nosocomial infections, of which 11 met our selection criteria. We employed a method for multivariate meta-analysis using incidence rates as endpoints and find that cycling reduced the incidence rate/1000 patient days of both total infections by 4.95 [9.43-0.48] and resistant infections by 7.2 [14.00-0.44]. This positive effect was observed in most pathogens despite a large variance between individual species. Our findings remain robust in uni- and multivariate metaregressions. We used theoretical models that reflect various infections and hospital settings to compare cycling to random assignment to different drugs (mixing. We make the realistic assumption that therapy is changed when first line treatment is ineffective, which we call "adjustable cycling/mixing". In concordance with earlier theoretical studies, we find that in strict regimens, cycling is detrimental. However, in adjustable regimens single resistance is suppressed and cycling is successful in most settings. Both a meta-regression and our theoretical model indicate that "adjustable cycling" is especially useful to suppress emergence of multiple resistance. While our model predicts that cycling periods of one month perform well, we expect that too long cycling periods are detrimental. Our results suggest that

  6. Diagnostic Accuracy of Cerebrospinal Fluid Procalcitonin in Bacterial Meningitis Patients with Empiric Antibiotic Pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Sun, Xiaolong; Yuan, Fang; Gao, Qiong; Ma, Yue; Jiang, Yongli; Yang, Xiai; Yang, Fang; Ma, Lei; Jiang, Wen

    2017-04-01

    Accurate diagnosis of bacterial meningitis (BM) relies on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Gram staining and bacterial culture, which often present high false-negative rates because of antibiotic abuse. Thus, a novel and reliable diagnostic biomarker is required. Procalcitonin (PCT) has been well demonstrated to be specifically produced from peripheral tissues by bacterial infection, which makes it a potential diagnostic biomarker candidate. Here, we performed a prospective clinical study comprising a total of 143 patients to investigate the diagnostic value of CSF PCT, serum PCT, and other conventional biomarkers for BM. Patients were assigned to the BM ( n = 49), tuberculous meningitis (TBM) ( n = 25), viral meningitis/encephalitis (VM/E) ( n = 34), autoimmune encephalitis (AIE) ( n = 15), or noninflammatory nervous system diseases (NINSD) group ( n = 20). Empirical antibiotic pretreatment was not an exclusion criterion. Our results show that the CSF PCT level was significantly ( P < 0.01) higher in patients with BM (median, 0.22 ng/ml; range, 0.13 to 0.54 ng/ml) than in those with TBM (median, 0.12 ng/ml; range, 0.07 to 0.16 ng/ml), VM/E (median, 0.09 ng/ml; range, 0.07 to 0.11 ng/ml), AIE (median, 0.06 ng/ml; range, 0.05 to 0.10 ng/ml), or NINSD (median, 0.07 ng/ml; range, 0.06 to 0.08 ng/ml). Among the assessed biomarkers, CSF PCT exhibited the largest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.881; 95% confidence interval, 0.810 to 0.932; cutoff value, 0.15 ng/ml; sensitivity, 69.39%; specificity, 91.49%). Our study sheds light upon the diagnostic dilemma of BM due to antibiotic abuse. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT02278016.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Motivos de la prescripción inadecuada de antibióticos en un hospital pediátrico de alta complejidad Reasons for inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics in a high-complexity pediatric hospital

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    Silvina Ruvinsky

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar los motivos de la prescripción inadecuada de antibióticos y detectar oportunidades de mejorar la prescripción de dichos medicamentos en el caso de pacientes pediátricos hospitalizados en unidades de cuidados intermedios e intensivos. MÉTODOS: Estudio prospectivo, descriptivo y longitudinal de pacientes pediátricos internados en unidades de cuidados intermedios e intensivos que recibían antibióticos por vía parenteral, con excepción de los recién nacidos, pacientes de la unidad de quemados y pacientes en profilaxis quirúrgica. Se realizó un análisis univariado y regresión logística múltiple. RESULTADOS: Se estudió a 376 pacientes, con una mediana de edad de 50 meses (rango intercuartilo [RIC] 14,5-127 meses. Del total de pacientes estudiados, 75,0% tenía una enfermedad de base o más. De esos últimos, 40,6% tenía una patología oncológica y 33,5%, neurológica; el restante 25,9% presentaba otras enfermedades de base. El tratamiento antibiótico fue inadecuado en 35,6% de los pacientes estudiados (n = 134. En 73 (54,4% de los 134 casos, el uso inadecuado se debió al tipo de antibiótico recetado, la dosis administrada o la duración del tratamiento. Los 61 (45,5% casos restantes no tenían indicación de tratamiento antibiótico. En el análisis multivariado, los factores de riesgo de uso inadecuado de antibióticos fueron: la administración de ceftriaxona: OR 2 (IC 95% 1,3-3,7; P = 0,02; infección agudade vías respiratorias inferiores: OR 1,8 (IC 95%1, 1-3,3; P OBJECTIVE: Determine the reasons for inappropriate prescription of antibiotics and identify opportunities to improve prescription of these drugs in pediatric patients hospitalized in intermediate and intensive care units. METHODS: A prospective, descriptive longitudinal study was conducted of pediatric patients in intermediate and intensive care units who received parenteral administration of antibiotics, with the exception of newborns, burn

  8. Antibiotic resistance pattern and empirical therapy for urinary tract infections in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Harthi, Abdulla A.; Al-Fifi, Suliman H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to study the type of bacterial pathogen causing urinary tract infection in children at Aseer Central Hospital, southwestern Saudi Arabia and their antimicrobial resistance patterns. A retrospective study of all the urine cultures carried out on the children in the period from January 2003 to December 2006, for a total of 4 years were reviewed at the bacteriology laboratory, Aseer Central Hospital, southwestern region of Saudi Arabia. Their antimicrobial resistances as well as sensitivities were also analyzed. A total of 464 urine cultures were identified. Escherichia coli constitutes the most common pathogen isolated 37.3%, followed by Klebsiella 16.4% and Pseudomonas species 15.7%. In general, there was a significant increase in the resistance rates of different bacterial pathogens to different antibiotics. In spite of an increase in the resistance rates of bacterial pathogens causing UTI, ceftriaxone, imipenem and to some extent Azactam are appropriate for initial empirical intravenous therapy in UTI. In patients with uncomplicated UTI not requiring hospitalization, Nalidixic acid and Nitrofurantoin can be used as oral treatment. (author)

  9. Point-of-care C-reactive protein testing to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics for non-severe acute respiratory infections in Vietnamese primary health care: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Nga T T; Ta, Ngan T D; Tran, Ninh T H; Than, Hung M; Vu, Bich T N; Hoang, Long B; van Doorn, H Rogier; Vu, Dung T V; Cals, Jochen W L; Chandna, Arjun; Lubell, Yoel; Nadjm, Behzad; Thwaites, Guy; Wolbers, Marcel; Nguyen, Kinh V; Wertheim, Heiman F L

    2016-09-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic use for acute respiratory tract infections is common in primary health care, but distinguishing serious from self-limiting infections is difficult, particularly in low-resource settings. We assessed whether C-reactive protein point-of-care testing can safely reduce antibiotic use in patients with non-severe acute respiratory tract infections in Vietnam. We did a multicentre open-label randomised controlled trial in ten primary health-care centres in northern Vietnam. Patients aged 1-65 years with at least one focal and one systemic symptom of acute respiratory tract infection were assigned 1:1 to receive either C-reactive protein point-of-care testing or routine care, following which antibiotic prescribing decisions were made. Patients with severe acute respiratory tract infection were excluded. Enrolled patients were reassessed on day 3, 4, or 5, and on day 14 a structured telephone interview was done blind to the intervention. Randomised assignments were concealed from prescribers and patients but not masked as the test result was used to assist treatment decisions. The primary outcome was antibiotic use within 14 days of follow-up. All analyses were prespecified in the protocol and the statistical analysis plan. All analyses were done on the intention-to-treat population and the analysis of the primary endpoint was repeated in the per-protocol population. This trial is registered under number NCT01918579. Between March 17, 2014, and July 3, 2015, 2037 patients (1028 children and 1009 adults) were enrolled and randomised. One adult patient withdrew immediately after randomisation. 1017 patients were assigned to receive C-reactive protein point-of-care testing, and 1019 patients were assigned to receive routine care. 115 patients in the C-reactive protein point-of-care group and 72 patients in the routine care group were excluded in the intention-to-treat analysis due to missing primary endpoint. The number of patients who used antibiotics

  10. Empiric antibiotics for an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level: a randomised, prospective, controlled multi-institutional trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggener, Scott E; Large, Michael C; Gerber, Glenn S; Pettus, Joseph; Yossepowitch, Ofer; Smith, Norm D; Kundu, Shilajit; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh; Zorn, Kevin; Raman, Jay D

    2013-11-01

    To determine the impact of empiric antibiotics on men with an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Men of any age with a PSA level of >2.5 ng/mL and normal digital rectal examination undergoing their first prostate biopsy were recruited from five medical centres. Patients with previous biopsy, prostate cancer, urinary tract infection (UTI) or prostatitis within the prior year, antibiotic use within 1 month, 5α-reductase inhibitor use, allergy to fluoroquinolones or clinical suspicion of UTI were excluded. Men were randomised to 2 weeks of ciprofloxacin or no antibiotic. A PSA measurement was obtained 21-45 days after randomisation immediately before prostate biopsy. The primary endpoint was the change in PSA level between baseline and immediately before biopsy. Complete data were available for 77 men with a mean (interquartile range) age of 60.6 (53-66) years. In the control group of men not receiving antibiotic (39 men), the mean baseline and pre-biopsy PSA levels were 6.5 and 6.9 ng/mL, respectively (P = 0.8). In men receiving ciprofloxacin (38 men), the mean baseline PSA level was 7.6 ng/mL and after 2 weeks of ciprofloxacin was 8.5 ng/mL (P = 0.7). Compared with controls not receiving antibiotic, use of ciprofloxacin was not associated with a statistically significant change in PSA level (P = 0.33). Prostate cancer was detected in 36 (47%) men, 23 (59%) in the control group and 13 (34%) in the antibiotic group (P = 0.04). Detection rates were not significantly associated with the change in PSA level between baseline and biopsy. The primary limitation of the study is early stoppage due to an interim futility analysis and poor accrual. Despite not meeting the target accrual goal, empiric use of antibiotics for asymptomatic men with an elevated PSA level does not appear to be of clinical benefit. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  11. Febrile neutropenia in paediatric peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, in vitro sensitivity data and clinical response to empirical antibiotic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, S.H.; Nasim, S.; Ahmed, A.; Irfan, M.; Ishaque, A.; Farzana, T.; Panjwani, V.K.; Taj, M.; Shamsi, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    To find the in-vitro sensitivity data and clinical response in order to determine the changes required in empiric antibiotic therapy for management of febrile neutropenia in paediatric patients undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. All patients were treated according to institutional protocol for febrile neutropenia. Empirical antibiotics include Ceftriaxone and Amikacin. In non-responders, changes made included Imipenem and Amikacin, Piperacillin Tazobactum/Tiecoplanin or Vancomycin/Cloxacilin/Ceftazidime. In non-responders, amphotaracin was added until recovery. Out of 52 patients, 5 did not develop any fever; in the remaining 47 patients there were 57 episodes of febrile neutropenia. The mean days of febrile episodes were 4.71 (range 3-8). Fever of unknown origin (FUO) occurred in 31 (54.3%) episodes. Microbiologically documented infection (MDI) occurred in 17 (29.8%) episodes of fever. Clinically documented infection (CDI) occurred in 9 (15.7%) episodes. Gram-negative organisms were isolated in 10 while gram-positive organisms in 7. Klebseilla, S. aureus were the most common isolates. Empirical therapy was effective in 12 of the 33 (36%) episodes. Out of 28, 26 (92%) responded to Imipenem/Amikacin as second line therapy while those who received any other second line combination, only 11 out of 22 (50%) showed response. Systemic Amphotericin was used in 4 patients, 2 responded. Infection related mortality rate was 4%. (author)

  12. Use of metronidazole as part of an empirical antibiotic regimen after incision and drainage of infections of the odontogenic spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Rishi; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani

    2015-01-01

    The combination of amoxicillin/clavulanate and metronidazole is a widely-accepted empirical regimen for infections of the odontogenic spaces. Once adequate drainage has been established micro-organisms are less likely to grow and multiply, particularly anaerobes. This may obviate the need for anaerobic coverage after drainage in healthy hosts. We studied 60 patients in this randomised prospective study, the objective of which was to evaluate metronidazole as part of an empirical antibiotic regimen after drainage of infections of the odontogenic spaces. Samples of pus were sent for culture and testing for sensitivity. Amoxicillin/clavulanate and metronidazole were given to all patients. After incision and drainage the patients were randomly allocated to two groups. In the first group both antibiotics were continued, and in the second metronidazole was withdrawn. The groups were compared both clinically and microbiologically. There were no significant differences between the groups in the resolution of infection. Thirteen patients (n=6 in the 2-antimicrobial group, and n=7 in the amoxicillin/clavulanate group) showed no improvement during the 48 h postoperatively. Overall there was need to substitute another antibiotic for amoxicillin/clavulanate in only 6 cases. Six patients in the amoxicillin/clavulanate group required the addition of metronidazole after drainage. We conclude that in healthy subjects metronidazole is not necessary in the period after drainage, but its prescription should be based on assessment of clinical and laboratory markers of infection. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of Outpatient Antibiotic Use in Beijing General Hospitals in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Antibiotic use in Beijing general hospitals is generally low; however, inappropriate antibiotic use still exists. Inappropriately used antibiotics should be subject to rigorous control and management, and public policy initiatives are required to promote the judicious use of antibiotics.

  14. Recommendations for empiric parenteral initial antibiotic therapy of bacterial diseases in adults: Update 2010

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    Bodmann, Klaus-Friedrich

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Under the auspices of the “Paul-Ehrlich Gesellschaft”, an expert panel of German infectious disease specialists and microbiologists compiled updated evidence-based treatment recommendations for parenteral antibiotic therapy in adult patients. Subject-specific expert teams reviewed the available evidence from published data. Evidence levels and grades of recommendations were assigned using a standardized protocol. The following indication areas were covered: respiratory, ENT, oral/maxillary, intra-abdominal, urinary tract, skin/soft tissue, bone/joint and eye infections, sepsis, endocarditis, meningitis, infections in the elderly and perioperative prophylaxis. In addition, the recommendations cover relevant issues regarding the use of parenteral antibiotics: characteristics of drug classes, susceptibility testing, spread of resistance, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug monitoring, interactions, safety and pharmacoeconomics.

  15. Effects of Prolonged Empirical Antibiotic Administration on Post-Surgical Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Local Dogs Undergoing Non-Laparoscopic Gastrectomy

    OpenAIRE

    J.F. Akinrinmade; Gladys O. Melekwe; Adenike A.O. Ogunshe

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged post-surgical antibiotic administration may be of less advantage in prevention of post-surgical infections. This study therefore, aimed at investigating the prolonged effect of empiric administration of three most-prescribed antibiotics (amoxicillin, cefotaxime and oxytetracycline) by veterinary practices in Southwest Nigeria on intestinal bacterial population of dogs undergoing partial, non-laparoscopic gastrectomy. Using conventional quantitative and qualitative microbial culture ...

  16. Community-acquired pneumonia: impact of empirical antibiotic therapy without respiratory fluoroquinolones nor third-generation cephalosporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradelli, J; Risso, K; de Salvador, F G; Cua, E; Ruimy, R; Roger, P-M

    2015-03-01

    Guidelines for inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) propose to use respiratory fluoroquinolone (RFQ) and/or third-generation cephalosporins (Ceph-3). However, broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy is associated with the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria. We established a guideline in which RFQ and Ceph-3 were excluded as a first course. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of our therapeutic choices for CAP on the length of hospital stay (LOS) and patient outcome. This was a cohort study of patients with CAP from July 2005 to June 2014. We compared patients benefiting from our guideline established in 2008 to those receiving non-consensual antibiotics. Disease severity was evaluated through the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). The empirical treatment for PSI III to V was a combination therapy of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMX-C) + roxithromycin (RX) or AMX + ofloxacin. Adherence to guidelines was defined by the prescription of one of these antibiotic agents. Requirement for intensive care or death defined unfavorable outcome. Among 1,370 patients, 847 were treated according to our guideline (61.8 %, group 1) and 523 without concordant therapy (38.2 %, group 2). The mean PSI was similar: 82 vs. 83, p > 0.5. The mean LOS was lower in group 1: 7.6 days vs. 9.1 days, p < 0.001. An unfavorable outcome was less frequent in group 1: 5.4 % vs. 9.9 %, p = 0.001. In logistic regression models, concordant therapy was associated with a favorable outcome: adjusted odds ratio (AOR) [95 % confidence interval (CI)] 1.85 [1.20-2.88], p = 0.005. CAP therapy without RFQ and Ceph-3 use was associated with a shorter LOS and fewer unfavorable outcomes.

  17. Analysis of Acinetobacter baumannii resistance patterns in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in terms of choice of effective empiric antibiotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Grochowalska

    2017-06-01

    In the performed study, the infections caused by multi-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, were observed in COPD, which should be taken into consideration in choosing empirical antibiotic therapy. Simultaneously, the local resistance patterns of multi-drug-resistant (MDR Gram-negative strains co-infecting COPD should be considered in empirical treatment. Moreover, both additional clinical complication and co-infections contribute to a more severe course of diseases. In this study, the mortality percent exceeded 29%.

  18. Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariprasad, Seenu M; Mieler, William F

    2016-01-01

    The Endophthalmitis Vitrectomy Study (EVS) provided ophthalmologists with evidence-based management strategies to deal with endophthalmitis for the first time. However, since the completion of the EVS, numerous unresolved issues remain. The use of oral antibiotics has important implications for the ophthalmologist, particularly in the prophylaxis and/or management of postoperative, posttraumatic, or bleb-associated bacterial endophthalmitis. One can reasonably conclude that significant intraocular penetration of an antibiotic after oral administration may be a property unique to the newer-generation fluoroquinolones. Prophylactic use of mupirocin nasal ointment resulted in significant reduction of conjunctival flora with or without preoperative topical 5% povidone-iodine preparation. Ocular fungal infections have traditionally been very difficult to treat due to limited therapeutic options both systemically and intravitreally. Because of its broad spectrum of coverage, low MIC90 levels for the organisms of concern, good tolerability, and excellent bioavailability, voriconazole through various routes of administration may be useful to the ophthalmologist in the primary treatment of or as an adjunct to the current management of ocular fungal infections. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Association of Pattern of Bacteria Sensitivity During the Empirical Antibiotics Use to the Achievement of Clinical Outcome in Pediatric Patients with Pneumonia

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    Vesara A. Gatera

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is one of infectious diseases that require a comprehensive and effective effort in its treatment, including in the use of empirical antibiotics. The use of empirical antibiotics should be based on patterns of sensitivity toward bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of antibiotics based on the sensitivity patterns by clinical outcomes as the goal of treatment. This study was conducted in Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung in October–December 2013 using a retrospective cross-sectional study design. Secondary data were obtained from medical records during January 2011–December 2012. This study consisted of 24 patients with positive culture test and received antibiotic prescription. The results showed the percentage of the use of cefotaxime-ampicillin (37.5%, cefotaxime (33.3%, ceftriaxone (20.8%, and Ampicillin (8.4%. The most influential antibiotics for achieving clinical outcome using 95% confidence level is combination of cefotaxime-ampiciline (P=0.044 with 77.7% sensitivity level. This study suggested that the pattern of antibiotic sensitivity affected the clinical outcomes of pediatric patients with pneumonia.

  20. Empirical mono- versus combination antibiotic therapy in adult intensive care patients with severe sepsis - A systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjövall, Fredrik; Perner, Anders; Hylander Møller, Morten

    2017-04-01

    To assess benefits and harms of empirical mono- vs. combination antibiotic therapy in adult patients with severe sepsis in the intensive care unit (ICU). We performed a systematic review according to the Cochrane Collaboration methodology, including meta-analysis, risk of bias assessment and trial sequential analysis (TSA). We included randomised clinical trials (RCT) assessing empirical mono-antibiotic therapy versus a combination of two or more antibiotics in adult ICU patients with severe sepsis. We exclusively assessed patient-important outcomes, including mortality. Two reviewers independently evaluated studies for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated and the risk of random errors was assessed by TSA. Thirteen RCTs (n = 2633) were included; all were judged as having high risk of bias. Carbapenems were the most frequently used mono-antibiotic (8 of 13 trials). There was no difference in mortality (RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.95-1.29; p = 0.19) or in any other patient-important outcomes between mono- vs. combination therapy. In TSA of mortality, the Z-curve reached the futility area, indicating that a 20% relative risk difference in mortality may be excluded between the two groups. For the other outcomes, TSA indicated lack of data and high risk of random errors. This systematic review of RCTs with meta-analysis and TSA demonstrated no differences in mortality or other patient-important outcomes between empirical mono- vs. combination antibiotic therapy in adult ICU patients with severe sepsis. The quantity and quality of data was low without firm evidence for benefit or harm of combination therapy. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. High antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori and its effect on tailored and empiric eradication of the organism in Lower Silesia, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenc, Stanisław; Gnus, Jan; Kościelna, Magdalena; Kinda, Małgorzata; Yarka, Andriy; Stewart, Luke; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2017-04-01

    At present, the resistance to antibiotics is considered the most important reason for Helicobacter pylori (HP) eradication failure. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance of HP strains and to evaluate tailored and empiric therapeutic regimens in patients with peptic ulcer disease associated with infection of this microorganism. Between May 2011 and February 2013, 185 consecutive Polish patients with at least one positive Helicobacter pylori test (urease test, histopathologic examination, and/or culture) underwent eradication therapy. Those with positive culture were prescribed a tailored triple regimen, whereas those with no culture available received an empiric quadruple concomitant regimen or levofloxacin-containing triple therapy. There were no HP strains resistant to amoxicillin; however, 56.7% were resistant to metronidazole, 55.2% to clarithromycin, and 5.9% to levofloxacin. Dual resistance was detected in 32.8% of individuals. Tailored and empiric therapies achieve cure rates, respectively, 95.5% and 86.6% by intention-to-treat and 95.5% and 91.3% by per-protocol analysis (P > 0.05). Antibiotic resistance is notably high in Poland currently, but both tailored and empiric therapies can achieve acceptable cure rates equal to or higher than 90%. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Predictive Value of Prior Colonization and Antibiotic Use for Third-Generation Cephalosporin-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Bacteremia in Patients With Sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rottier, Wouter C.; Bamberg, Yara R. P.; Dorigo-Zetsma, J. Wendelien; van der Linden, Paul D.; Ammerlaan, Heidi S. M.; Bonten, Marc J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. To prevent inappropriate empiric antibiotic treatment in patients with bacteremia caused by third-generation cephalosporin (3GC)-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (3GC-R EB), Dutch guidelines recommend beta-lactam and aminoglycoside combination therapy or carbapenem monotherapy in patients

  3. A cost analysis of a broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy in the empirical treatment of health care-associated infections in cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucidi C

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Lucidi,1 Vincenza Di Gregorio,1 Giancarlo Ceccarelli,2 Mario Venditti,2 Oliviero Riggio,1 Manuela Merli1 1Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy Background: Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of infections in cirrhosis are crucial. As new guidelines in this context, particularly for health care-associated (HCA infections, would be needed, we performed a trial documenting whether an empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy is more effective than the standard one for these infections. Because of the higher daily cost of broad-spectrum than standard antibiotics, we performed a cost analysis to compare: 1 total drug costs, 2 profitability of hospital admissions. Methods: This retrospective observational analysis was performed on patients enrolled in the trial NCT01820026, in which consecutive cirrhotic patients with HCA infections were randomly assigned to a standard vs a broad-spectrum treatment. Antibiotic daily doses, days of treatment, length of hospital stay, and DRG (diagnosis-related group were recorded from the clinical trial medical records. The profitability of hospitalizations was calculated considering DRG tariffs divided by length of hospital stay.Results: We considered 84 patients (42 for each group. The standard therapy allowed to obtain a first-line treatment cost lower than in the broad-spectrum therapy. Anyway, the latter, being related to a lower failure rate (19% vs 57.1%, resulted in cost saving in terms of cumulative antibiotic costs (first- and second-line treatments. The mean cost saving per patient for the broad-spectrum arm was €44.18 (–37.6%, with a total cost saving of about €2,000. Compared to standard group, we observed a statistically significant reduction in hospital stay from 17.8 to 11.8 days (p<0.002 for patients treated with broad

  4. Toward a bioethical framework for antibiotic use, antimicrobial resistance and for empirically designing ethically robust strategies to protect human health: a research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Marrero, Pablo; Martins Pereira, Sandra; de Sá Brandão, Patrícia Joana; Araújo, Joana; Carvalho, Ana Sofia

    2017-12-01

    Introduction Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a challenging global and public health issue, raising bioethical challenges, considerations and strategies. Objectives This research protocol presents a conceptual model leading to formulating an empirically based bioethics framework for antibiotic use, AMR and designing ethically robust strategies to protect human health. Methods Mixed methods research will be used and operationalized into five substudies. The bioethical framework will encompass and integrate two theoretical models: global bioethics and ethical decision-making. Results Being a study protocol, this article reports on planned and ongoing research. Conclusions Based on data collection, future findings and using a comprehensive, integrative, evidence-based approach, a step-by-step bioethical framework will be developed for (i) responsible use of antibiotics in healthcare and (ii) design of strategies to decrease AMR. This will entail the analysis and interpretation of approaches from several bioethical theories, including deontological and consequentialist approaches, and the implications of uncertainty to these approaches.

  5. Inappropriate prescribing in the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, P

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Drug therapy is necessary to treat acute illness, maintain current health and prevent further decline. However, optimizing drug therapy for older patients is challenging and sometimes, drug therapy can do more harm than good. Drug utilization review tools can highlight instances of potentially inappropriate prescribing to those involved in elderly pharmacotherapy, i.e. doctors, nurses and pharmacists. We aim to provide a review of the literature on potentially inappropriate prescribing in the elderly and also to review the explicit criteria that have been designed to detect potentially inappropriate prescribing in the elderly. METHODS: We performed an electronic search of the PUBMED database for articles published between 1991 and 2006 and a manual search through major journals for articles referenced in those located through PUBMED. Search terms were elderly, inappropriate prescribing, prescriptions, prevalence, Beers criteria, health outcomes and Europe. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Prescription of potentially inappropriate medications to older people is highly prevalent in the United States and Europe, ranging from 12% in community-dwelling elderly to 40% in nursing home residents. Inappropriate prescribing is associated with adverse drug events. Limited data exists on health outcomes from use of inappropriate medications. There are no prospective randomized controlled studies that test the tangible clinical benefit to patients of using drug utilization review tools. Existing drug utilization review tools have been designed on the basis of North American and Canadian drug formularies and may not be appropriate for use in European countries because of the differences in national drug formularies and prescribing attitudes. CONCLUSION: Given the high prevalence of inappropriate prescribing despite the widespread use of drug-utilization review tools, prospective randomized controlled trials are necessary to identify useful interventions. Drug

  6. Antibiotic Utilization and Opportunities for Stewardship Among Hospitalized Patients With Influenza Respiratory Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi, Islam M; Nicolau, David P; Nailor, Michael D; Aslanzadeh, Jaber; Ross, Jack W; Kuti, Joseph L

    2016-05-01

    Hospitalized influenza patients are often treated with antibiotics empirically while awaiting final diagnosis. The goal of this study was to describe the inappropriate continuation of antibiotics for influenza respiratory tract infections (RTIs). We retrospectively studied adults admitted to our institution over 2 respiratory flu seasons with positive influenza RTIs. Inappropriate antibiotic duration (IAD) was defined as antibiotic use for >24 hours after a positive influenza test in patients presenting with <72 hours of RTI symptoms and with no other indications of bacterial infection. During the study period, 322 patients included in this study were admitted for influenza RTI. Respiratory cultures were ordered for 50 of these patients (15.5%) and 71 patients (22%) had a positive chest x-ray, but antibiotics were prescribed to 211 patients (65.5%) on admission. Antibiotics were inappropriately continued in 73 patients (34.5%). Patients receiving IAD had a longer length of stay (LOS) (median, 6 days; range, 4-9 days) compared with those whose antibiotics were discontinued appropriately (median, 5 days; range, 3-8 days) and those who were not treated with antibiotics (median, 4 days; range, 3-6 days; P<.001). However, mortality was similar among these 3 groups: 3 patients (4.1%) from the IAD cohort died; 6 patients (4.3%) from the group with an appropriate antibiotic duration died; and 2 patients [1.8%] from the group given no antibiotics died (P=.510). The 30-day readmission rates were similar as well: 9 patients (12.3%) from the IAD group were readmitted within 30 days; 21 patients (15.2%) from the group with appropriate antibiotic duration were readmitted; and 11 patients (9.9%) from the group given no antibiotics were readmitted (P=.455). Total hospital costs were greater in patients treated with IAD ($10,645; range, $6,485-$18,035) compared with the group treated with appropriate antibiotic duration ($7,479; range, $4,866-$12,922) and the group given no

  7. What Attitudes Could Influence Antibiotic Dispensing without Prescription?

    OpenAIRE

    Roque, Fátima; Soares, Sara; Breitenfeld, Luiza; Figueiras, Adolfo; Herdeiro, Maria Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics, are attributed to inadequate prescription and self-medication with antibiotics obtained from leftovers from previous courses or self-medication with antibiotics dispensed in pharmacies without prescription.

  8. Changing Trend of Empirical Antibiotic Regimen: Experience of Two Studies at Different Periods in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Marzban

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBacterial sepsis is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity in neonates. It has been recognized a gradual change in spectrum of organisms responsible for neonatal sepsis. In this study we have evaluated changing trend of incidence and antibiotic susceptibility in neonatal late - onset sepsis (LOS in 2-periods. This study is based on results of blood culture in neonatal late-onset sepsis, in 2--periods study throughout 12 - years. Neonatal LOS was defined as clinical signs suggestive of infection with a positive blood culture (B/C after 72 hrs of birth. During first study (period: 1990-1992, the most common bacteremia in LOS was staphylococcus aureus (staph aureus (34%. Overall gram- negative bacteria (GNB were the predominant organism (66%. It was shown that 60% of GNB were resisted to gentamicin and 3% to amikacin, while in case of gram-positive bacteria (GPB; about 95% were resisted to ampicillin and 28% to cephalothin. In the second study (period: 2004-2007, the vast majority (56.6% of septic cases were caused by GNB. The most common cause of late- onset sepsis was klebsiela p. (31%. The GPB were resistant to cephalothin (90%. There has been a dramatic increase resistance to cephalothin and aminoglycosides and 3rd -generation cephalosporins. The combination of cephalothin plus amikacin in suspected LOS was no longer the effective therapeutic regimen in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. Now, it seems the best choice for empiric antibiotic regimen in suspected LOS is the combination vancomycin plus amikacin. Constant surveillance is important to guide empirical antibiotic therapy and changes in trends.

  9. Changing trend of empirical antibiotic regimen: experience of two studies at different periods in a neonatal intensive care unit in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzban, Asghar; Samaee, Hadi; Mosavinasab, Noredien

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity in neonates. It has been recognized a gradual change in spectrum of organisms responsible for neonatal sepsis. In this study we have evaluated changing trend of incidence and antibiotic susceptibility in neonatal late - onset sepsis (LOS) in 2-periods. This study is based on results of blood culture in neonatal late-onset sepsis, in 2--periods study throughout 12 - years. Neonatal LOS was defined as clinical signs suggestive of infection with a positive blood culture (B/C) after 72 hrs of birth. During first study (period: 1990-1992), the most common bacteremia in LOS was staphylococcus aureus (staph aureus) (34%). Overall gram- negative bacteria (GNB) were the predominant organism (66%). It was shown that 60% of GNB were resisted to gentamicin and 3% to amikacin, while in case of gram-positive bacteria (GPB); about 95% were resisted to ampicillin and 28% to cephalothin. In the second study (period: 2004-2007), the vast majority (56.6%) of septic cases were caused by GNB. The most common cause of late- onset sepsis was klebsiela p. (31%). The GPB were resistant to cephalothin (90%). There has been a dramatic increase resistance to cephalothin and aminoglycosides and 3rd -generation cephalosporins. The combination of cephalothin plus amikacin in suspected LOS was no longer the effective therapeutic regimen in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Now, it seems the best choice for empiric antibiotic regimen in suspected LOS is the combination vancomycin plus amikacin. Constant surveillance is important to guide empirical antibiotic therapy and changes in trends.

  10. Changing Trend of Empirical Antibiotic Regimen: Experience of Two Studies at Different Periods in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Marzban

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial sepsis is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity in neonates. It has been recognized a gradual change in spectrum of organisms responsible for neonatal sepsis. In this study we have evaluated changing trend of incidence and antibiotic susceptibility in neonatal late - onset sepsis (LOS in 2-periods. This study is based on results of blood culture in neonatal late-onset sepsis, in 2--periods study throughout 12 - years. Neonatal LOS was defined as clinical signs suggestive of infection with a positive blood culture (B/C after 72 hrs of birth. During first study (period: 1990-1992, the most common bacteremia in LOS was staphylococcus aureus (staph aureus (34%. Overall gram- negative bacteria (GNB were the predominant organism (66%. It was shown that 60% of GNB were resisted to gentamicin and 3% to amikacin, while in case of gram-positive bacteria (GPB; about 95% were resisted to ampicillin and 28% to cephalothin. In the second study (period: 2004-2007, the vast majority (56.6% of septic cases were caused by GNB. The most common cause of late- onset sepsis was klebsiela p. (31%. The GPB were resistant to cephalothin (90%. There has been a dramatic increase resistance to cephalothin and aminoglycosides and 3rd -generation cephalosporins. The combination of cephalothin plus amikacin in suspected LOS was no longer the effective therapeutic regimen in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. Now, it seems the best choice for empiric antibiotic regimen in suspected LOS is the combination vancomycin plus amikacin. Constant surveillance is important to guide empirical antibiotic therapy and changes in trends.

  11. Improvement in clinical and economic outcomes with empiric antibiotic therapy covering atypical pathogens for community-acquired pneumonia patients: a multicenter cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiangru; Ma, Jian; Hu, Bijie; Gao, Xiaodong; He, Lixian; Shen, Wei; Weng, Lei; Cai, Liming; Huang, Yonggang; Hu, Zheng; Xu, Jianpu; Zhao, Lan; Huang, Meijiang; Cui, Xuefan; Tu, Chunling

    2015-11-01

    To determine the effectiveness of empiric antibiotic regimens covering atypical pathogens with respect to detailed clinical and economic outcomes in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A population-based, multicenter, retrospective cohort study was conducted from June 2010 to May 2011. Patients with a diagnosis of CAP were enrolled and categorized into two groups according to the initial antibiotic strategy used - covering or not covering atypical pathogens. Regression analysis was performed to assess their clinical outcomes (all-cause mortality, clinical improvement rate after 72 h of antimicrobial therapy, and clinical cure rate) and economic outcomes (length of stay, hospitalization costs, and antibiotic expenditure). A total of 827 patients met the criteria for CAP; 561 (67.8%) received antibiotics with atypical pathogen coverage (APC group), while 266 (32.2%) did not (non-APC group). Regression analysis revealed that the all-cause mortality was much lower in the APC group than in the non-APC group (0.9% vs. 4.9%, respectively), with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.18 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.06-0.49). Clinical improvement at 72 h (87.7% vs. 85.0%, p=0.274) and the clinical cure rate (91.1% vs. 88.3%, p=0.213) were more favorable in the APC group, but with no significant difference compared to the non-APC group. Moreover, the APC group had a shorter mean length of stay (APC 10.2 days vs. non-APC 11.6 days, patypical pathogens for hospitalized CAP patients is associated with reduced mortality and economic burden. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. The Comparison Of The Efficacy Of Cefriaxon Monotherapy With Ceftazidim Plus Amikacin As Initial Empiric Antibiotic Therapy In Febrile Neutropenic Patients Emam Hospital (2000-2001

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    Mohammadi S M

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Neutropenic state with fever is exactly regarded as a medical emergency, with high mortality and morbidity rate, unless treated urgently and correctly. Every attempt should be made to find and establish the offending organism, but postponing treatment until obtaining culture results is not advised. Controversy exist on which antibiotic regimen to be used while waiting for culture results. Many antibiotic regiments both monotherapy or combination treatments have been used with varying result. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of cefriaxon monothenapy with ceftazidim. Plus Amikacin as initial empiric antibiotic therapy in febrile neutropenic patients."nMaterials and Methods: We performed a randomized, single blind clinical trial in 57 adult (age>12 years, neutropenic (PMN<1000 patients with fever (Temperature, oral >38.5c in Hematology ward, Imam khomeini hospital. After careful physical exam and obtaining blood & urine samples for culture, the patients were randomized to each of the two arms: Cefriaxon 2 grams daily, intravenously (arm A and; Ceftazidim 2g thrice daily plus amikacin 500 mg twice daily (arm B. Patients with shock, organ failure or previous antibiotic intake (during 48 hour before fever were excluded. If needed, dose adjustment of drugs were allowed. Effervescence in 3 days following initiation of treatment, lasting 48 hours or more, were regarded as effective (positive result."nResults: During a twelve months period of study, a total of 57 patients (17female, 40male were included. They were randomly selected to each arm of empirical treatment. Of 28 pts in arm A, 19 (67 percent, the treatment was effective, compared to 15 of 29 (51.7 percent in groups B. The duration of fever after initiation of treatment was 37.9 ± 17 hours in arm A and 40. 1 ± 20 h in arm B. Blood and / or urine culture was equally positive in two arms (25 percent in arm A and 27.6 percent in arm B."nConclusion: Cefriaxon monotherapy is at

  13. Analysis of Acinetobacter baumannii resistance patterns in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in terms of choice of effective empiric antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochowalska, Aneta; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Sobieszczańska, Anna

    2017-06-12

    Introduction. Multi-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from patients has become one of the most hazardous pathogens in health care settings. The aim of the study was to analyze pneumonia caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in patients hospitalized because of exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD), who were admitted to the Pulmonology Ward of the Masovian Specialistic Hospital in Radom (MSS). The incidence and drug sensitivity of these non-fermenting rods were evaluated, and compliance with antimicrobial procedure with the algorithm of the guidelines in applicable recommendations, was estimated. This should result in determining the local patterns of resistance and verifying therapeutic procedures in accordance with the assumptions of hospital antibiotic policy. In addition, the study examined the effectiveness of empiric and targeted therapy according to the clinical condition of the patient, and the eradication of A. baumannii, in comparison with the aggravating factors of the patient. Materials and Method. The retrospective study included 90 patients with exacerbation of COPD whose etiological factor of infection was A. baumannii, hospitalized in the Department of Pulmonology (MSS) in 2012-2016. Results. Studies were conducted on 90 patients with COPD exacerbation from which A. baumannii was isolated. Co-infections with other bacterial species among 41 patients were additionally noted. The majority of A. baumannii strains showed a high resistance (90%) to fluoroquinolones, ceftazidime, piperacillin/tazobactam. For strains causing a co-infection, drug resistance was successively 44-56%, 44%, 44%. All of patients received empirical therapy. The most commonly used drug was amoxicillin with a clavulanic acid, often combined with fluoroquinolone. This type of therapy was effective among 10% of patients. The mortality in this group was determined at 29%. Among 79% of patients with COPD, a targeted therapy was performed which proved to be

  14. Trends in antimicrobial resistance and empiric antibiotic therapy of bloodstream infections at a general hospital in Mid-Norway: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Arne; Åsvold, Bjørn Olav; Kümmel, Angela; Lydersen, Stian; Paulsen, Julie; Haugan, Ingvild; Solligård, Erik; Damås, Jan Kristian; Harthug, Stig; Edna, Tom-Harald

    2017-02-02

    The occurrence of bloodstream infection (BSI) and antimicrobial resistance have been increasing in many countries. We studied trends in antimicrobial resistance and empiric antibiotic therapy at a medium-sized general hospital in Mid-Norway. Between 2002 and 2013, 1995 prospectively recorded episodes of BSI in 1719 patients aged 16-99 years were included. We analyzed the antimicrobial non-susceptibility according to place of acquisition, site of infection, microbe group, and time period. There were 934 community-acquired (CA), 787 health care-associated (HCA) and 274 hospital-acquired (HA) BSIs. The urinary tract was the most common site of infection. Escherichia coli was the most frequently isolated infective agent in all three places of acquisition. Second in frequency was Streptococcus pneumoniae in CA and Staphylococcus aureus in both HCA and HA. Of the BSI microbes, 3.5% were non-susceptible to the antimicrobial regimen recommended by the National Professional Guidelines for Use of Antibiotics in Hospitals, consisting of penicillin, gentamicin, and metronidazole (PGM). In contrast, 17.8% of the BSI microbes were non-susceptible to cefotaxime and 27.8% were non-susceptible to ceftazidime. Antimicrobial non-susceptibility differed by place of acquisition. For the PGM regimen, the proportions of non-susceptibility were 1.4% in CA, 4.8% in HCA, and 6.9% in HA-BSI (p antibiotic therapy could be achieved to a larger extent by replacing second- and third-generation cephalosporins with penicillin-gentamicin or piperacillin-tazobactam.

  15. Cleaning, resistant bacteria, and antibiotic prescribing in residential aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Raquel U; Kishan, Divya; Walton, Aaron L; Sneath, Emmy; Cheah, Thomas; Butwilowsky, Judith; Friedman, N Deborah

    2016-03-01

    Residents of residential aged care facilities (RACFs) are at risk of colonization and infection with multidrug-resistant bacteria, and antibiotic prescribing is often inappropriate and not based on culture-proven infection. We describe low levels of resident colonization and environmental contamination with resistant gram-negative bacteria in RACFs, but high levels of empirical antibiotic use not guided by microbiologic culture. This research highlights the importance of antimicrobial stewardship and environmental cleaning in aged care facilities. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of prospective verification of intravenous antibiotics in an ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Allyson; Nakajima, Steven; Hall Zimmerman, Lisa; Patel, Manav

    2016-12-01

    Delay in appropriate antibiotic therapy is associated with an increase in mortality and prolonged length of stay. Automatic dispensing machines decrease the delivery time of intravenous (IV) antibiotics to patients in the emergency department (ED). However, when IV antibiotics are not reviewed by pharmacists before being administered, patients are at risk for receiving inappropriate antibiotic therapy. The objective of this study was to determine if a difference exists in the time to administration of appropriate antibiotic therapy before and after implementation of prospective verification of antibiotics in the ED. This retrospective, institutional review board-approved preimplementation vs postimplementation study evaluated patients 18years or older who were started on IV antibiotics in the ED. Patients were excluded if pregnant, if the patient is a prisoner, if no cultures were drawn, or if the patient was transferred from an outside facility. Appropriate antibiotic therapy was based on empiric source-specific evidence-based guidelines, appropriate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, and microbiologic data. The primary end point was the time from ED arrival to administration of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Of the 1628 evaluated, 128 patients met the inclusion criteria (64 pre vs 64 post). Patients were aged 65.2±17.0years, with most of infections being pneumonia (44%) and urinary tract infections (18%) and most patients being noncritically ill. Time to appropriate antibiotic therapy was reduced in the postgroup vs pregroup (8.1±8.6 vs 15.2±22.8hours, respectively, P=.03). In addition, appropriate empiric antibiotics were initiated more frequently after the implementation (92% post vs 66% pre; P=.0001). There was no difference in mortality or length of stay between the 2 groups. Prompt administration of the appropriate antibiotics is imperative in patients with infections presenting to the ED. The impact of prospective verification of

  17. Selection of empirical antibiotics for health care-associated pneumonia via integration of pneumonia severity index and risk factors of drug-resistant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping-Huai; Wang, Hao-Chien; Cheng, Shih-Lung; Chang, Hou-Tai; Laio, Chun-Hsing

    2016-05-01

    The pneumonia severity index (PSI) both contains some risk factors of drug-resistant pathogens (DRPs) and represents the severity of health care-associated pneumonia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the PSI could be used to predict DRPs and whether there were risk factors beyond the PSI. A retrospective observational study enrolled 530 patients with health care-associated pneumonia who were admitted from January 2005 to December 2010 in a tertiary care hospital. A total of 206 patients (38.9%) had DRPs, of which the most common was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (24.3%). The incidence of DRPs increased with increasing PSI classes (6.7%, 25.5%, 36.9%, and 44.6% in PSI II, III, IV, and V, respectively). An analysis of the risk factors for DRPs by PSI classes revealed that wound care was associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in PSI V (p = 0.045). Nasogastric tube feeding (odds ratio, 3.88; 95% confidence interval, 1.75-8.60; p = 0.006), and bronchiectasis (odds ratio, 3.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-14.69; p = 0.007) were risk factors for DRPs in PSI III and IV. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve progressed from 0.578 to 0.651 while integrating these risk factors with PSI classes. The findings suggested that PSI plus risk factors predicted the risk of DRPs. PSI II had a low risk of DRPs and could be treated as community-acquired pneumonia. Antibiotics of PSI III and IV with risk factors could be targeted DRPs. PSI V with wound care had a higher risk of MRSA, and empirical anti-MRSA antibiotics could be added. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Prospective open-label randomized comparative, non-inferiority study of two initial antibiotic strategies for patients with nursing- and healthcare-associated pneumonia: Guideline-concordant therapy versus empiric therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Shuichi; Ogasawara, Takashi; Sugimoto, Shunsuke; Kato, Shinpei; Umezawa, Hiroki; Yano, Toshiaki; Kasamatsu, Norio

    2016-06-01

    The nursing- and healthcare-associated pneumonia guideline, proposed by the Japan Respiratory Society, recommends that patients at risk of exposure to drug-resistant pathogens, classified as treatment category C, be treated with antipseudomonal antibiotics. This study aimed to prove the non-inferiority of empirical therapy in our hospital compared with guideline-concordant therapy. This was a randomized controlled trial conducted from December 2011 to December 2012. Patients were randomized to the Guideline group receiving guideline-concordant therapy, and the Empiric group treated with sulbactam/ampicillin or ceftriaxone. The primary endpoint was in-hospital relapse of pneumonia and mortality within 30 days, with a predefined non-inferiority margin of 10%. The secondary endpoints included duration, adverse effects, and cost of antibiotic therapy. One hundred and eleven patients were assigned to the Guideline group (n = 55) and the Empiric group (n = 56; 3 of which were excluded). The incidence of relapse and death within 30 days was similar in the Guideline and the Empiric groups (31% vs. 26%, risk difference -4.5%, 95% CI -21.5% to 12.5%). While the duration of antibiotic therapy was slightly shorter in the Guideline group than in the Empiric group (7 vs. 8 days), there were no significant differences in adverse effects or cost. The efficacy of empiric therapy was comparable to guideline-concordant therapy, although non-inferiority was not proven. The administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics to patients at risk of exposure to drug-resistant pathogens may not necessarily improve the prognosis. UMIN000006792. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs Resources for You Information for Consumers (Drugs) Buying & Using Medicine Safely Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotics ... Antibiotic Resistance and Protect Public Health The White House Blog FDA’s Take on the Executive Order and ...

  20. Inappropriate prescribing in geriatric patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Patrick J

    2012-02-03

    Inappropriate prescribing in older people is a common condition associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and financial costs. Medication use increases with age, and this, in conjunction with an increasing disease burden, is associated with adverse drug reactions. This review outlines why older people are more likely to develop adverse drug reactions and how common the problem is. The use of different tools to identify and measure the problem is reviewed. Common syndromes seen in older adults (eg, falling, cognitive impairment, sleep disturbance) are considered, and recent evidence in relation to medication use for these conditions is reviewed. Finally, we present a brief summary of significant developments in the recent literature for those caring for older people.

  1. Optimising the duration of antibiotic therapy for ventilator-associated pneumonia

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    J. Chastre

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP has traditionally been treated with a 14–21-day course of antibiotics. However, prolonged antibiotic therapy is associated with the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains, as well as higher toxicity and costs. In a large, randomised, controlled trial in patients with microbiologically confirmed VAP who received appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy, an 8-day antibiotic regimen was not associated with excess mortality or more episodes of recurrent pulmonary infection compared with a 15-day regimen. Amongst patients who developed recurrent infection, multidrug-resistant pathogens emerged less frequently in the group receiving 8 days of antibiotic therapy. The 8-day regimen was also not associated with excess mortality in the subgroup with VAP caused by nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli, mostly Pseudomonas aeruginosa, although recurrent infections occurred more often. Pending confirmatory studies, an 8-day course of antibiotic therapy may be appropriate for many patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia, providing that initial antibiotic therapy is appropriate, the clinical course is favourable and extreme vigilance is maintained after stopping antibiotics. Patients whose initial treatment regimen was inappropriate, those infected with difficult-to-treat pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and immunocompromised patients and others at high risk for relapse are likely to require a longer duration of antibiotic therapy.

  2. [Inappropriate test methods in allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine-Tebbe, J; Herold, D A

    2010-11-01

    Inappropriate test methods are increasingly utilized to diagnose allergy. They fall into two categories: I. Tests with obscure theoretical basis, missing validity and lacking reproducibility, such as bioresonance, electroacupuncture, applied kinesiology and the ALCAT-test. These methods lack both the technical and clinical validation needed to justify their use. II. Tests with real data, but misleading interpretation: Detection of IgG or IgG4-antibodies or lymphocyte proliferation tests to foods do not allow to separate healthy from diseased subjects, neither in case of food intolerance, allergy or other diagnoses. The absence of diagnostic specificity induces many false positive findings in healthy subjects. As a result unjustified diets might limit quality of life and lead to malnutrition. Proliferation of lymphocytes in response to foods can show elevated rates in patients with allergies. These values do not allow individual diagnosis of hypersensitivity due to their broad variation. Successful internet marketing, infiltration of academic programs and superficial reporting by the media promote the popularity of unqualified diagnostic tests; also in allergy. Therefore, critical observation and quick analysis of and clear comments to unqualified methods by the scientific medical societies are more important than ever.

  3. Epidemiology, antibiotic therapy and outcomes of bacteremia caused by drug-resistant ESKAPE pathogens in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodro, Marta; Gudiol, Carlota; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Tubau, Fe; Contra, Anna; Boix, Lucía; Domingo-Domenech, Eva; Calvo, Mariona; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-03-01

    Infection due to the six ESKAPE pathogens has recently been identified as a serious emerging problem. However, there is still a lack of information on bacteremia caused by these organisms in cancer patients. We aimed to assess the epidemiology, antibiotic therapy and outcomes of bacteremia due to drug-resistant ESKAPE pathogens (rESKAPE) in patients with cancer. All episodes of bacteremia prospectively documented in hospitalized adults with cancer from 2006 to 2011 were analyzed. Of 1,148 episodes of bacteremia, 392 (34 %) were caused by ESKAPE pathogens. Fifty-four episodes (4.7 %) were due to rESKAPE strains (vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium 0, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) 13, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESLB)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae 7, carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii 4, carbapenem- and quinolone-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa 18 and derepression chromosomic ß-lactam and ESBL-producing Enterobacter species 12. Risk factors independently associated with rESKAPE bacteremia were comorbidities, prior antibiotic therapy, urinary catheter and urinary tract source. Inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy was more frequent in patients with rESKAPE bacteremia than in the other cases (55.6 % vs. 21.5 %, p antibiotic therapy and have a urinary tract source. These patients often receive inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy and have a poor outcome.

  4. Knowledge and Attitude of Physicians toward Prescribing Antibiotics and the Risk of Resistance in Two Reference Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Alothman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Antibiotics are essential and abundantly prescribed in hospitals because of their effectiveness and lifesaving benefits. However, the unnecessary use of antibiotics has been observed in earlier studies, and it has persisted through recent years as a major issue since it is one of the leading causes of antibiotic resistance. The increase in antibiotic resistance nowadays is one of the most critical concerns in global public health around the world. The objective of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and perceptions related to antibiotic prescription among physicians at our medical centers. Method A cross-sectional survey of non-infectious diseases specialized physicians. The study was conducted during 2015 at two tertiary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Result Of the 107 returned questionnaires, 93 were complete and valuable. Most respondents (82% perceived antibiotic resistance to be a critical problem globally, and 78% also think that it is a very important national problem. These attitudes did not differ across specialty or level of training. Widespread antibiotic use and inappropriate empirical choices were believed by 81% of the participants to be important general causes of resistance. Only half of respondents thought that antibiotic restriction is a useful intervention to decrease the antibiotic resistance. The physicians believed educational interventions are the most useful and effective way to improve prescription patterns and decrease antibiotic resistance. Complications due to infection with resistant organisms were acknowledged by almost all of the participants, with some differences in their estimations of how often it will occur. Conclusion Antimicrobial resistance, globally and nationally, is considered as a serious threat, and physicians in this survey acknowledged that. Among the most significant factors is antimicrobial misuse, either by overprescribing or providing inappropriate drugs with some

  5. Three Cases With Inappropriate TSH Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Sebila Dökmetaş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH syndrome or central hyperthyroidism is a rare disorder characterized by inappropriately normal or elevated levels of TSH and elevated levels of T3 and T4. The syndrome is associated with TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma (TSHoma or thyroid hormone resistance (THR. Thyroid-releasing hormone stimulation test and T3 suppression test can be useful for the differential diagnosis of central hyperthyroidism. In the present study, we report three cases of inappropriate TSH syndrome diagnosed after TRH stimulation and T3 suppression tests. Turk Jem 2012; 16: 105-8

  6. Primary Sjogren's syndrome associated with inappropriate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A patient in whom primary Sjogren's syndrome and inappropriate antiduretic hormone secretion were associated is reported. This is the first report of such an association. The possible pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed and vasculitis proposed as the underlying pathogenetic mechanism.

  7. Cost analysis of inappropriate treatments for suspected dermatomycoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Fiammenghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Superficial mycoses are estimated to affect more than 20-25% of the world’s population with a consistent increase over the years. Most patients referred to our clinic for suspected dermatomycoses have already been treated with pharmacotherapy, without a previous mycological examination and many show changes in the clinical manifestations. Indeed, some medications, such as steroids, antiviral, antibiotics and antihistamines are not able to erase a fungal infection, but also they can cause atypical clinical manifestations. The consequences of inappropriate treatment include delayed diagnosis, prolonged healing time, and additional costs. The aims of this study were (1 to evaluate the incidence of increased costs attributable to inappropriate therapy sustained by the National Health Service and patients and (2 to highlight the importance of mycological evaluation before starting treatment, in order to improve diagnostic accuracy. An observational retrospective and prospective study was performed from September 2013 to February 2014, in 765 patients referred to our center (University Hospital “ Federico II” in Naples, Italy, for suspected mycological infection. The following treatments (alone or in combination were defined as inappropriate: (1 cortisone in a patient with at least one positive site; (2 antifungals in (a patients with all negative sites or (b ineffective antifungal treatment (in terms of drug chosen, dose or duration in those with all positive sites; or (3 antibiotics; (4 antivirals or (5 antihistamines, in patients with ≥ 1 positive site. Five hundred and fifty patients were using medications before the assessment visit. The total amount of avoidable costs related to inappropriate previous treatments was € 121,417, representing 74% of the total treatment costs. 253/550 patients received drugs also after the visit. For these patients, the cost of treatment prescribed after mycological testing was € 42,952, with a decrease

  8. Inappropriate prescribing: criteria, detection and prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Marie N

    2012-06-01

    Inappropriate prescribing is highly prevalent in older people and is a major healthcare concern because of its association with negative healthcare outcomes including adverse drug events, related morbidity and hospitalization. With changing population demographics resulting in increasing proportions of older people worldwide, improving the quality and safety of prescribing in older people poses a global challenge. To date a number of different strategies have been used to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing in older people. Over the last two decades, a number of criteria have been published to assist prescribers in detecting inappropriate prescribing, the majority of which have been explicit sets of criteria, though some are implicit. The majority of these prescribing indicators pertain to overprescribing and misprescribing, with only a minority focussing on the underprescribing of indicated medicines. Additional interventions to optimize prescribing in older people include comprehensive geriatric assessment, clinical pharmacist review, and education of prescribers as well as computerized prescribing with clinical decision support systems. In this review, we describe the inappropriate prescribing detection tools or criteria most frequently cited in the literature and examine their role in preventing inappropriate prescribing and other related healthcare outcomes. We also discuss other measures commonly used in the detection and prevention of inappropriate prescribing in older people and the evidence supporting their use and their application in everyday clinical practice.

  9. Drug Utilization and Inappropriate Prescribing in Centenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Nisha C; Dregan, Alex; Jackson, Stephen; Gulliford, Martin C

    2016-05-01

    To use primary care electronic health records (EHRs) to evaluate prescriptions and inappropriate prescribing in men and women at age 100. Population-based cohort study. Primary care database in the United Kingdom, 1990 to 2013. Individuals reaching the age of 100 between 1990 and 2013 (N = 11,084; n = 8,982 women, n = 2,102 men). Main drug classes prescribed and potentially inappropriate prescribing according to the 2012 American Geriatrics Society Beers Criteria. At the age of 100, 73% of individuals (79% of women, 54% of men) had received one or more prescription drugs, with a median of 7 (interquartile range 0-12) prescription items. The most frequently prescribed drug classes were cardiovascular (53%), central nervous system (CNS) (53%), and gastrointestinal (47%). Overall, 32% of participants (28% of men, 32% of women) who received drug prescriptions may have received one or more potentially inappropriate prescriptions, with temazepam and amitriptyline being the most frequent. CNS prescriptions were potentially inappropriate in 23% of individuals, and anticholinergic prescriptions were potentially inappropriate in 18% of individuals. The majority of centenarians are prescribed one or more drug therapies, and the prescription may be inappropriate for up to one-third of these individuals. Research using EHRs offers opportunities to understand prescribing trends and improve pharmacological care of the oldest adults. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Inappropriate shocks in the subcutaneous ICD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R A; Brouwer, Tom F; Barr, Craig

    2015-01-01

    shocks have been reported. METHODS: We analyzed the incidence, predictors and management of inappropriate shocks in the EFFORTLESS S-ICD Registry, which collects S-ICD implantation information and follow-up data from clinical centers in Europe and New Zealand. RESULTS: During a follow-up of 21 ± 13...... months, 48 out of 581 S-ICD patients (71% male, age 49 ± 18 years) experienced 101 inappropriate shocks (8.3%). The most common cause was cardiac signal oversensing (73%), such as T-wave oversensing. Eighteen shocks (18%) were due to supraventricular tachycardias (SVT), of which 15 occurred in the shock......-only zone. Cox-proportional hazard modeling using time-dependent covariates demonstrated that patients with a history of atrial fibrillation (HR 2.4) and patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HR 4.6) had an increased risk for inappropriate shocks, while programming the primary vector for sensing (from...

  11. Qualitative evaluation of antibiotic usage in pediatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hindra Irawan Satari; Agus Firmansyah; Theresia Theresia

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drug for pediatric patients. Inappropriate use of antibiotics can increase morbidity, mortality, patient cost and bacterial antibiotic resistence. Antibiotic uses can be evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. Objective To qualitatively evaluate antibiotic use in patients using Gyssens algorithm. Methods We performed a descriptive, retrospective study of matient medical records of those admitted to the pediatric ward fro...

  12. Pattern of prescription of antibiotics among dental practitioners in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Inappropriate use of antibiotics by clinicians leads to antibiotic resistance, and is a serious global health concern. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine antibiotic prescription practices of dental practitioners and their adherence to professional guidelines while treating oral health problems among children.

  13. Outpatient antibiotic prescriptions from 1992 to 2001 in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuyvenhoven, MM; van Balen, FAM; Verheij, TJM

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Although Dutch outpatient antibiotic prescription rates are low compared with other European countries, continuing to scrutinize trends in outpatient antibiotic use is important in order to identify possible increases in antibiotic use or inappropriate increases in the use of particular

  14. Inappropriate Intensive Care Unit admissions: Nigerian doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... Conclusion: Inappropriate ICU admissions were perceived as a common event and were mainly attributed to pressure from seniors, referring clinicians, and hospital management. Further work is ..... Financial support and sponsorship. Nil. Conflicts of interest. There are no conflicts of interest. References. 1.

  15. Prevalence and Predictors of Inappropriate Medications Prescribing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data analysis involved use of World Health Organization (WHO) prescribing indicators, Updated 2002 Beer's criteria and DRUG-REAX® system software package of MICROMEDEX (R) Healthcare Series to assess the prescribing pattern, identify potentially inappropriate medications and potential drug-drug interactions, ...

  16. Bullying and Inappropriate Behaviour among Faculty Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriläinen, Matti; Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Puhakka, Helena; Käyhkö, Katinka

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the degree, nature and consequences of bullying or inappropriate behaviour among faculty personnel (n = 303) in a Finnish university. A total of 114 (38%) faculty members answered the email questionnaire. According to the results, 15% of the respondents had experienced bullying; in addition, 45% had experienced inappropriate…

  17. Prevalence of inappropriate prescribing in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnhøj, Lisbeth; Thirstrup, Steffen; Kristensen, Mogens Brandt

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of inappropriate prescribing in primary care in Copenhagen County, according to the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI) and to identify the therapeutic areas most commonly involved. SETTING: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 212 elderly ( >65 years...

  18. Missed opportunities and inappropriately given vaccines reduce ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coverage would have increased by 10% for diphtheria pertusistetanus (DPT) doses DPTI and DPT2, and 7% for DPT3. Measles immunisation coverage would have increased by 19% had missed immunisation opportunities and inappropriately administered vaccinations been avoided. The overall missed opportunities rate ...

  19. Empirical mono- versus combination antibiotic therapy in adult intensive care patients with severe sepsis – A systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Karl Fredrik Lennart; Perner, Anders; Hylander Møller, Morten

    2017-01-01

    of bias. Carbapenems were the most frequently used mono-antibiotic (8 of 13 trials). There was no difference in mortality (RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.95–1.29; p = 0.19) or in any other patient-important outcomes between mono- vs. combination therapy. In TSA of mortality, the Z-curve reached the futility area...

  20. The use of antibiotic drugs in everyday dental practice

    OpenAIRE

    Terzieva, Olivera; Petrovski, Mihajlo; Maksimov, Zlatko; Markoska, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    produce a severe illness or even become fatal. Antibiotics are antimicrobial agents useful in numerous bacterial infections. Increasingly we're seeing the inappropriate use of antibiotics. The purpose of this our study was to determine which are the most commonly used antibiotics and who are the most frequently antibiotic treated diseases. Materials and methods: For the realization of our purpose in our study were included 20 dental clinics. We registered the total number...

  1. Empiric antibiotic treatment of erythema migrans-like skin lesions as a function of geography: a clinical and cost effectiveness modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantos, Paul M; Brinkerhoff, R Jory; Wormser, Gary P; Clemen, Robert

    2013-12-01

    The skin lesion of early Lyme disease, erythema migrans (EM), is so characteristic that routine practice is to treat all such patients with antibiotics. Because other skin lesions may resemble EM, it is not known whether presumptive treatment of EM is appropriate in regions where Lyme disease is rare. We constructed a decision model to compare the cost and clinical effectiveness of three strategies for the management of EM: Treat All, Observe, and Serology as a function of the probability that an EM-like lesion is Lyme disease. Treat All was found to be the preferred strategy in regions that are endemic for Lyme disease. Where Lyme disease is rare, Observe is the preferred strategy, as presumptive treatment would be expected to produce excessive harm and increased costs. Where Lyme disease is rare, clinicians and public health officials should consider observing patients with EM-like lesions who lack travel to Lyme disease-endemic areas.

  2. Empirical antibiotic therapy (ABT) of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in the elderly: application of artificial neural network (ANN). Preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueli, Nicolò; Martinez, Andrea; Verrusio, Walter; Linguanti, Adele; Passador, Paola; Martinelli, Valentina; Longo, Giovanni; Marigliano, Benedetta; Cacciafesta, Flaminia; Cacciafesta, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    LRTI are among the most common diseases in developed countries, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), one of the most frequent conditions. Their treatment in general practice is often unsuccessful and this increases hospital admissions. We know, bacterial infections in the elderly show a higher morbidity and mortality, either for more severe symptoms, than in younger adults, or because the causing agent often remains unknown. The need for a quick initiation of ABT often requires to chose on empirical grounds. To date there are no official guidelines for empirical ABT of COPD exacerbations, but only heterogeneous and often conflicting recommendations exist. The aim of our study was to identify a tool to guide the choice of the most effective empirical ABT when symptoms are acute and bacteriological tests cannot be performed. We used an ANN to study 117 patients aged between 55 and 97 years (mean 81.5 ± 8.7 years) (± S.D.), admitted with a diagnosis of pneumonia, COPD exacerbation or pneumonia with respiratory failure. We registered symptoms at onset and some individual variables such as age, sex, risk factors, comorbidity, current drug therapies. Then the ANN was applied to choose ABT in 20 patients versus 20 subjects whose therapy was chosen by the physicians, comparing these groups for therapy's efficacy, mean durations of therapy and hospitalization (H). In the learning phase, the ANN could predict the resolution index 99.05% of the time (i.e., 104 times) with a ± S.D. = 0.23. After the training, during the test phase, the network predicted the resolution index 91.67% of the time (i.e., 11 times) with a ± S.D. = 0.54, thus proving the validity of the relations identified during the learning phase. Preliminary results of the application of our tool, show the ANN allowed us to greatly reduce the duration of the ABT and subsequently of the H. Based on preliminary results, we assume that the use of ANN can make a valuable contribution in the

  3. Third generation cephalosporin use in a tertiary hospital in Port of Spain, Trinidad: need for an antibiotic policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto Pereira, Lexley M; Phillips, Marjorie; Ramlal, Hema; Teemul, Karen; Prabhakar, P

    2004-01-01

    Background Tertiary care hospitals are a potential source for development and spread of bacterial resistance being in the loop to receive outpatients and referrals from community nursing homes and hospitals. The liberal use of third-generation cephalosporins (3GCs) in these hospitals has been associated with the emergence of extended-spectrum beta- lactamases (ESBLs) presenting concerns for bacterial resistance in therapeutics. We studied the 3GC utilization in a tertiary care teaching hospital, in warded patients (medical, surgical, gynaecology, orthopedic) prescribed these drugs. Methods Clinical data of patients (≥ 13 years) admitted to the General Hospital, Port of Spain (POSGH) from January to June 2000, and who had received 3GCs based on the Pharmacy records were studied. The Sanford Antibiotic Guide 2000, was used to determine appropriateness of therapy. The agency which procures drugs for the Ministry of Health supplied the cost of drugs. Results The prevalence rate of use of 3GCs was 9.5 per 1000 admissions and was higher in surgical and gynecological admissions (21/1000) compared with medical and orthopedic (8 /1000) services (p < 0.05). Ceftriaxone was the most frequently used 3GC. Sixty-nine (36%) patients without clinical evidence of infection received 3Gcs and prescribing was based on therapeutic recommendations in 4% of patients. At least 62% of all prescriptions were inappropriate with significant associations for patients from gynaecology (p < 0.003), empirical prescribing (p < 0.48), patients with undetermined infection sites (p < 0.007), and for single drug use compared with multiple antibiotics (p < 0.001). Treatment was twice as costly when prescribing was inappropriate Conclusions There is extensive inappropriate 3GC utilization in tertiary care in Trinidad. We recommend hospital laboratories undertake continuous surveillance of antibiotic resistance patterns so that appropriate changes in prescribing guidelines can be developed and

  4. POPI (Pediatrics: Omission of Prescriptions and Inappropriate prescriptions: development of a tool to identify inappropriate prescribing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Prot-Labarthe

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rational prescribing for children is an issue for all countries and has been inadequately studied. Inappropriate prescriptions, including drug omissions, are one of the main causes of medication errors in this population. Our aim is to develop a screening tool to identify omissions and inappropriate prescriptions in pediatrics based on French and international guidelines. METHODS: A selection of diseases was included in the tool using data from social security and hospital statistics. A literature review was done to obtain criteria which could be included in the tool called POPI. A 2-round-Delphi consensus technique was used to establish the content validity of POPI; panelists were asked to rate their level of agreement with each proposition on a 9-point Likert scale and add suggestions if necessary. RESULTS: 108 explicit criteria (80 inappropriate prescriptions and 28 omissions were obtained and submitted to a 16-member expert panel (8 pharmacists, 8 pediatricians hospital-based -50%- or working in community -50%-. Criteria were categorized according to the main physiological systems (gastroenterology, respiratory infections, pain, neurology, dermatology and miscellaneous. Each criterion was accompanied by a concise explanation as to why the practice is potentially inappropriate in pediatrics (including references. Two round of Delphi process were completed via an online questionnaire. 104 out of the 108 criteria submitted to experts were selected after 2 Delphi rounds (79 inappropriate prescriptions and 25 omissions. DISCUSSION CONCLUSION: POPI is the first screening-tool develop to detect inappropriate prescriptions and omissions in pediatrics based on explicit criteria. Inter-user reliability study is necessary before using the tool, and prospective study to assess the effectiveness of POPI is also necessary.

  5. Inappropriate prescribing in outpatient healthcare: an evaluation of respiratory infection visits among veterans in teaching versus non-teaching primary care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M. Parente

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent study led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC revealed at least 30% of antibiotic prescriptions in the outpatient setting were inappropriate. In this study of all ages, among adult patients, results were similar to the overall population, with the majority of inappropriate prescribing relating to respiratory infections. We applied the same methodology to investigate rates of antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections in outpatient primary care clinics at the Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The results of our evaluation reflected comparable rates of inappropriate prescribing, but when stratified by teaching versus non-teaching primary care clinics, inappropriate prescribing was significantly higher in non-teaching clinics (17.6% vs 44.0%, p < .0001. Respiratory infection visits in non-teaching outpatient clinics may be a pragmatic target for antimicrobial stewardship programs.

  6. Antibiotic policy

    OpenAIRE

    Gyssens, Inge

    2011-01-01

    There is a clear association between antibiotic use and resistance both on individual and population levels. In the European Union, countries with large antibiotic consumption have higher resistance rates. Antibiotic resistance leads to failed treatments, prolonged hospitalisations, increased costs and deaths. With few new antibiotics in the Research & Development pipeline, prudent antibiotic use is the only option to delay the development of resistance. Antibiotic policy consists of prescrib...

  7. Prescriber and Patient Responsibilities in Treatment of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections — Essential for Conservation of Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Pignatari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate antibiotic use in normally self-limiting acute respiratory tract infections (RTIs, such as sore throat and the common cold, is a global problem and an important factor for increasing levels of antibiotic resistance. A new group of international experts—the Global Respiratory Infection Partnership (GRIP—is committed to addressing this issue, with the interface between primary care practitioners and their patients as their core focus. To combat the overuse of antibiotics in the community, and facilitate a change from prescribing empiric antibiotic treatment towards cautious deferment combined with symptomatic relief, there is a need to introduce and enhance evidence-based dialogue between primary care practitioners and their patients. Communication with patients should focus on the de-medicalisation of self-limiting viral infections, which can be achieved via a coherent globally endorsed framework outlining the rationale for appropriate antibiotic use in acute RTIs in the context of antibiotic stewardship and conservancy. The planned framework is intended to be adaptable at a country level to reflect local behaviours, cultures and healthcare systems, and has the potential to serve as a model for change in other therapeutic areas.

  8. Growth in nurse prescribing of antibiotics: the Scottish experience 2007-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Valerie; Malcolm, William; McGivern, Guy; Reilly, Jacqui

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively analyse patterns of primary care antibiotic prescribing by nurse prescribers in Scotland. Data on dispensed antibiotic prescriptions written by nurse prescribers in 2007-13 were obtained from the Prescribing Information System, a database of all NHS prescriptions dispensed in Scotland. Since 2007, there has been a steady increase in the volume of antibiotic prescribing in primary care undertaken by nurse prescribers. There was considerable variability in the frequency of antibiotic prescribing among nurses and across NHS regions. Since 2007, an increasing proportion of antibiotics prescribed by nurses are those recommended for first-line empirical treatment of infection, with a reduction in the proportion of broader-spectrum agents. Other measures of prescribing quality (duration of treatment of adult females with urinary tract infection and use of recommended doses) have improved since 2007. This paper is the first, to our knowledge, to present an analysis of data on antibiotic prescribing in primary care by nurse prescribers. Inappropriate prescribing is a problem and, given the impact that antibiotic prescribing has on antimicrobial resistance, it is important that the prescribing behaviour of nurses is explored. This is especially significant as this is a growing body of prescribers who predominately work in the community, where the majority of antibiotics are prescribed. This analysis showed that practice varies across NHS regions and between prescribers and although more information is needed to establish whether nurse prescribers are prescribing appropriately, some quality indicators may suggest that they are following best practice. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Diabetic foot infections: Current treatment and delaying the 'post-antibiotic era'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for diabetic foot infections requires properly diagnosing infection, obtaining an appropriate specimen for culture, assessing for any needed surgical procedures and selecting an empiric antibiotic regimen. Therapy will often need to be modified based on results of culture and sensitivity testing. Because of excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics for treating diabetic foot infections, resistance to the usually employed bacteria has been increasing to alarming levels. This article reviews recommendations from evidence-based guidelines, informed by results of systematic reviews, on treating diabetic foot infections. Data from the pre-antibiotic era reported rates of mortality of about 9% and of high-level leg amputations of about 70%. Outcomes have greatly improved with appropriate antibiotic therapy. While there are now many oral and parenteral antibiotic agents that have demonstrated efficacy in treating diabetic foot infections, the rate of infection with multidrug-resistant pathogens is growing. This problem requires a multi-focal approach, including providing education to both clinicians and patients, developing robust antimicrobial stewardship programmes and using new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies. Recently, new methods have been developed to find novel antibiotic agents and to resurrect old treatments, like bacteriophages, for treating these difficult infections. Medical and political leaders have recognized the serious global threat posed by the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. By a multipronged approach that includes exerting administrative pressure on clinicians to do the right thing, investing in new technologies and encouraging the profitable development of new antimicrobials, we may be able to stave off the coming 'post-antibiotic era'. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. [The effectiveness of empirical antibiotic therapy of pyelonephritis in patients with type 2 diabetes and without depending on the availability of plasmid-mediated resistance genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chub, O I; Bilchenko, A V

    2015-02-01

    Multi-drug resistance has been increasing in the treatment of urinary tract infections, especially complicated. The prevalence of plasmid-mediated resistance genes among urinary pathogens has nether been studied in Ukraine. So, the aim of our study was to identify the plasmid-mediated resistance genes and to determine their impact on the efficacy of the treatment. A total of 105 adult patients with chronic pyelonephritis were included in the study. Among them, 32 patients were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis of pyelonephritis was verified according to the criteria EAU, 2013. Plasmid-mediated resistance genes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The prevalence of plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms among patients with pyelonephritis were 44,4%. ESBLs was the most common isolated genes. Favorable clinical response was seen in 11/31 (35,5%) infected with ESBL-producing organisms compared with 59/74 (79,7%) patients with non-ESBL-producing organisms (p<0,05). In 16% of patients with resistance organisms antimicrobial agent was changed. Antibiotic efficiency was reduced in patients with complicated pyelonephritis due to presence of plasmid-mediated resistance genes. Therefore, prоpеr mаnagеment fоr prescriptiоn of аntibiоtics and also idеntificаtiоn of ESBL-prоducing bаcteria in cоmmunitiеs arе impоrtant fоr prevеntion.

  11. Antibiotics prescription in Nigerian dental healthcare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodo, C C; Ojehanon, P I

    2014-09-01

    Inappropriate antibiotics prescription in dental healthcare delivery that may result in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, is a worldwide concern. The objective of the study was to determine the antibiotics knowledge and prescription patterns among dentists in Nigeria. A total of 160 questionnaires were distributed to dentists attending continuing education courses organized by two organizations in Southern and Northern parts of Nigeria. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0. A total of 146 questionnaires were returned, properly filled, out of 160 questionnaires, giving an overall response rate 91.3%. The clinical factors predominantly influenced the choice of therapeutic antibiotics among the respondents. In this study, the most commonly prescribed antibiotics among the respondents was a combination of amoxicillin and metronidazole. Of the respondents, 136 (93.2%) of them considered antibiotic resistance as a major problem in Nigeria and 102 (69.9%) have experienced antibiotics resistance in dental practice. The major reported conditions for prophylactic antibiotics among the respondents were diabetic mellitus, HIV/AIDS, history of rheumatic fever, other heart anomalies presenting with heart murmur and presence of prosthetic hip. The knowledge of adverse effects of antibiotics was greatest for tooth discoloration which is related to tetracycline. Data from this study revealed the most commonly prescribed antibiotics as a combination of amoxicillin and metronidazole. There existed gaps in prophylactic antibiotic prescription, consideration in the choice of therapeutic antibiotics and knowledge of adverse effects of antibiotics among the studied dentists.

  12. Inappropriate colonoscopic surveillance of hyperplastic polyps.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keane, R A

    2011-11-15

    Colonoscopic surveillance of hyperplastic polyps alone is controversial and may be inappropriate. The colonoscopy surveillance register at a university teaching hospital was audited to determine the extent of such hyperplastic polyp surveillance. The surveillance endoscopy records were reviewed, those patients with hyperplastic polyps were identified, their clinical records were examined and contact was made with each patient. Of the 483 patients undergoing surveillance for colonic polyps 113 (23%) had hyperplastic polyps alone on last colonoscopy. 104 patients remained after exclusion of those under appropriate surveillance. 87 of the 104 patients (84%) were successfully contacted. 37 patients (8%) were under appropriate colonoscopic surveillance for a significant family history of colorectal carcinoma. 50 (10%) patients with hyperplastic polyps alone and no other clinical indication for colonoscopic surveillance were booked for follow up colonoscopy. This represents not only a budgetary but more importantly a clinical opportunity cost the removal of which could liberate valuable colonoscopy time for more appropriate indications.

  13. Cost-analysis of PCR-guided pre-emptive antibiotic treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections: an analytic decision model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, C; Hübner, N-O; Kramer, A; Fleßa, S

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to examine whether rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based screening is a cost-efficient tool to optimize pre-emptive antibiotic therapy of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and MSSA, respectively) infections. A decision analytic cost model was developed, based on data from the peer-reviewed literature. Sensitivity analyses were undertaken to investigate the impact of variation in the MRSA rate, cost ratio of the cost of inappropriate antibiotic therapy to the cost of appropriate antibiotic therapy, PCR test cost, and total hospital costs per case. At a current MRSA rate of 24.5 % in Germany, PCR-guided treatment regimens are cost-efficient compared to empirical strategies. The costs of alternative treatment strategies differ, on average, up to 1,780 per case. An empirical MRSA treatment strategy is least costly when the cost ratio is less than 1.06. When the total hospital cost per MRSA case is increased, pre-emptive MSSA treatment with PCR tests achieves the lowest average cost. Early verification and adaptation of an initial pre-emptive antibiotic treatment of S. aureus infections using PCR-based tests are advantageous in Germany and other European countries. PCR tests, accordingly, should be considered as elements in antimicrobial stewardship programs.

  14. Antibiotic resistance in community-acquired urinary tract infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the treatment of other infections would inevitably lead to the development of resistance. S Afr Med J 1994; 84: 600-602. Antibiotic resistance is a major problem in developing countries.' There are many reasons for this, including antibiotic use in animal feeds, inappropriate prescribing and poor sanitation. Resistance rates in ...

  15. Antibiotic prescribing practice in management of cough and/or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The increase in resistance of many pathogens to currently available antibiotics has been recognized as life-threatening problem. The development of drug resistance is promoted by irrational prescribing behavior. Inappropriate use of antibiotics is attributed by overprescription, inadequate dosage and use for ...

  16. Evaluation of antibiotic self-medication among outpatients of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Haiti, where all drugs are available over the counter, self-medication with antibiotics appears as a common practice. Inappropriate use of betalactams and macrolides is likely to contribute to the development of antimicrobial resistance. This study aimed to (i) assess the extent of selfmedication with antibiotics, (ii) explore ...

  17. Appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurðardóttir, Nanna Rún; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Munck, Anders

    2015-01-01

    antibiotics (Iceland = 75.8% vs. Denmark = 59.3%), but Danish GPs had a higher percentage of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for sinusitis, and Icelandic GPs for pharyngotonsillitis. No differences were found for acute otitis media (AOM). The different antibiotic prescribing patterns between Denmark...... and Iceland could not fully be explained by different symptoms and signs among patients. Conclusion: Icelandic GPs have a higher antibiotic prescribing rate compared with Danish GPs, but the percentage of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing is highest in Denmark for sinusitis, and in Iceland...

  18. Combination antibiotic therapy for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tängdén, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Combination antibiotic therapy for Gram-negative sepsis is controversial. The present review provides a brief summary of the existing knowledge on combination therapy for severe infections with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas spp., Acinetobacter spp., and Enterobacteriaceae. Empirical combination antibiotic therapy is recommended for severe sepsis and septic shock to reduce mortality related to inappropriate antibiotic treatment. Because definitive combination therapy has not been proven superior to monotherapy in meta-analyses, it is generally advised to de-escalate antibiotic therapy when the antibiotic susceptibility profile is known, although it cannot be excluded that some subgroups of patients might still benefit from continued combination therapy. Definitive combination therapy is recommended for carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and should also be considered for severe infections with Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter spp. when beta-lactams cannot be used. Because resistance to broad-spectrum beta-lactams is increasing in Gram-negative bacteria and because no new antibiotics are expected to become available in the near future, the antibacterial potential of combination therapy should be further explored. In vitro data suggest that combinations can be effective even if the bacteria are resistant to the individual antibiotics, although existing evidence is insufficient to support the choice of combinations and explain the synergistic effects observed. In vitro models can be used to screen for effective combinations that can later be validated in animal or clinical studies. Further, in the absence of clinical evidence, in vitro data might be useful in supporting therapeutic decisions for severe infections with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

  19. [Patients with hyperlipidemia: inappropriate nutritional intake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecerf, Jean-Michel; Hottin, Delphine Mastin

    2004-10-23

    Gather knowledge on nutritional supplementation in patients with hyperlipidemia. In an observational study on patients with hyperlipidemia, nutritional intake was assessed using a 7-day dietary questionnaire, provided on the first visit to a lipid clinic. 291 patients (201 men and 90 women) were studied. Calorie intake and proportion of energetic nutrients revealed low carbohydrate intake, low intake of dietary fibres, and excessive lipid and saturated fatty acid intakes. Patients with isolated hypercholesterolemia had nutritional intake very similar to the daily allowances recommended in France. Men with type III hyperlipidemia had the highest calorie intake and those with type IV dyslipidemia had the highest alcohol intake. Triglycerides increased with total energy intake and with fat intake (%). Body mass index was inversely correlated to carbohydrate intake. The duration of dyslipidemia was related to low vitamin C and B9 intake. The existence of risk factors (type 2 diabetes, hypertension, smoking or inactivity) was associated with less well-balanced diet and low protective micronutrient status. In the case of atherosclerosis, vitamin B9, C, E and beta-carotene intake was insufficient. Interactions existed between nutrient intake with correlations between fibres, vitamin B9, C and beta-carotene, suggesting that nutritional education should favour foodstuffs that provide them simultaneously. Nutritional intake in patients with hyperlipidemia is often far from that recommended and does not greatly differ from that in large non-selected populations. It can be considered as inappropriate because of the metabolic and cardiovascular risks in these patients. Adapted nutritional management is crucial.

  20. Accommodating Presuppositions Is Inappropriate in Implausible Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raj; Fedorenko, Evelina; Mahowald, Kyle; Gibson, Edward

    2016-04-01

    According to one view of linguistic information (Karttunen, 1974; Stalnaker, 1974), a speaker can convey contextually new information in one of two ways: (a) by asserting the content as new information; or (b) by presupposing the content as given information which would then have to be accommodated. This distinction predicts that it is conversationally more appropriate to assert implausible information rather than presuppose it (e.g., von Fintel, 2008; Heim, 1992; Stalnaker, 2002). A second view rejects the assumption that presuppositions are accommodated; instead, presuppositions are assimilated into asserted content and both are correspondingly open to challenge (e.g., Gazdar, 1979; van der Sandt, 1992). Under this view, we should not expect to find a difference in conversational appropriateness between asserting implausible information and presupposing it. To distinguish between these two views of linguistic information, we performed two self-paced reading experiments with an on-line stops-making-sense judgment. The results of the two experiments-using the presupposition triggers the and too-show that accommodation is inappropriate (makes less sense) relative to non-presuppositional controls when the presupposed information is implausible but not when it is plausible. These results provide support for the first view of linguistic information: the contrast in implausible contexts can only be explained if there is a presupposition-assertion distinction and accommodation is a mechanism dedicated to reasoning about presuppositions. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  1. Vancomycin intoxication in a patient with inappropriate antidiuretic hormone syndrome and diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Hidalgo-Collazos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vancomycin is an antibiotic used for infections by gram-positive bacteria with a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model. Its monitoring has an established therapeutic range (10-20 mg/L to prevent nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity due to supratherapeutic levels, and inefficiency and development of resistance by subtherapeutic levels. Nephrotoxicity for vancomycin monotherapy at standard doses according to pathogen and typical regimens (usual dose: 15-20 mg/kg/12 h is rare and usually reversible. Moreover, monitoring plasma concentrations allows to achieve concentrations within therapeutic range to allow safe and effective drug use. The renal hypoperfusion can cause pre-renal damage, resulting in elevated levels of serum creatinine, resulting in decreased antibiotic elimination and nephrotoxicity. We report a case of unexpected vancomycin nephrotoxicity in a patient with syndrome Inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion associated paraneoplastic

  2. Antibiotic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Superbugs and Drugs" Home | Contact Us General Background: Antibiotic Agents What is an antibacterial and how are ... with the growth and reproduction of bacteria. While antibiotics and antibacterials both attack bacteria, these terms have ...

  3. Inappropriate treatments for patients with cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles Bayón, A; Gude Sampedro, F

    2014-01-01

    Some treatments are inappropriate for patients with cognitive decline. We analyse their use in 500 patients and present a literature review. Benzodiazepines produce dependence, and reduce attention, memory, and motor ability. They can cause disinhibition or aggressive behaviour, facilitate the appearance of delirium, and increase accident and mortality rates in people older than 60. In subjects over 65, low systolic blood pressure is associated with cognitive decline. Maintaining this figure between 130 and 140 mm Hg (145 in patients older than 80) is recommended. Hypocholesterolaemia < 160 mg/dl is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, aggressiveness, and suicide; HDL-cholesterol<40 mg/dl is associated with memory loss and increased vascular and mortality risks. Old age is a predisposing factor for developing cognitive disorders or delirium when taking opioids. The risks of prescribing anticholinesterases and memantine to patients with non-Alzheimer dementia that is not associated with Parkinson disease, mild cognitive impairment, or psychiatric disorders probably outweigh the benefits. Anticholinergic drugs acting preferentially on the peripheral system can also induce cognitive side effects. Practitioners should be aware of steroid-induced dementia and steroid-induced psychosis, and know that risk of delirium increases with polypharmacy. Of 500 patients with cognitive impairment, 70.4% were on multiple medications and 42% were taking benzodiazepines. Both conditions were present in 74.3% of all suspected iatrogenic cases. Polypharmacy should be avoided, if it is not essential, especially in elderly patients and those with cognitive impairment. Benzodiazepines, opioids and anticholinergics often elicit cognitive and behavioural disorders. Moreover, systolic blood pressure must be kept above 130 mm Hg, total cholesterol levels over 160 mg/dl, and HDL-cholesterol over 40 mg/dl in this population. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurolog

  4. Functional Analysis and Treatment of Multiply Controlled Inappropriate Mealtime Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmeyer, Melanie H.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Fredrick, Laura D.; Reed, Gregory K.; Rivas, Kristi D.; Kadey, Heather J.

    2009-01-01

    Functional analyses identified children whose inappropriate mealtime behavior was maintained by escape and adult attention. Function-based extinction procedures were tested individually and in combination. Attention extinction alone did not result in decreases in inappropriate mealtime behavior or a significant increase in acceptance. By contrast,…

  5. Prescribing Patterns and Inappropriate Use of Medications in Elderly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescribing Patterns and Inappropriate Use of Medications in Elderly Outpatients in a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Purpose: To determine the prescribing patterns and occurrence of potentially inappropriate medications (PIM) among elderly outpatients visiting a tertiary ...

  6. Study of patterns of prescribing antibiotics in geriatric patients admitted to the medical wards in a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Ankita Bist; Gajanan P. Kulkarni; Kashinath M. Gumma

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence indicates high prevalence of inappropriate prescribing of medicines especially in the elderly. This can cause increased incidence of adverse drug reactions, morbidity, mortality and cost of treatment. Also inappropriate use of antibiotics promotes emergence of antimicrobial resistance. This study aims to study the prescribing patterns of antibiotics administered in geriatric patients, disease conditions for which the antibiotics were prescribed and adherence of these anti...

  7. Australian consumer perspectives, attitudes and behaviours on antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance: a qualitative study with implications for public health policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Elaine P M; Page, Katie; Nissen, Lisa; Doust, Jenny; Graves, Nicholas

    2017-10-10

    Consumers receive over 27 million antibiotic prescriptions annually in Australian primary healthcare. Hence, consumers are a key group to engage in the fight against antibiotic resistance. There is a paucity of research pertaining to consumers in the Australian healthcare environment. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives, attitudes and behaviours of Australian consumers on antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance, to inform national programs for reducing inappropriate antibiotic consumption. Semi-structured interviews with 32 consumers recruited via convenience and snowball sampling from a university population in South East Queensland. Interview transcripts were deductively and inductively coded. Main themes were identified using iterative thematic analysis. Three themes emerged from the analysis, to elucidate factors affecting antibiotic use: (a) prescription type; (b) consumer attitudes, behaviours, skills and knowledge; and (c) consumer engagement with antibiotic resistance. Consumers held mixed views regarding the use of delayed antibiotic prescriptions, and were often not made aware of the use of repeat antibiotic prescriptions. Consumers with regular general practitioners were more likely to have shared expectations regarding minimising the use of antibiotics. Even so, advice or information mediated by general practitioners was influential with all consumers; and helped to prevent inappropriate antibiotic use behaviours. Consumers were not aware of the free Return of Unwanted Medicines service offered by pharmacies and disposed of leftover antibiotics through household waste. To engage with mitigating antibiotic resistance, consumers required specific information. Previous public health campaigns raising awareness of antibiotics were largely not seen by this sample of consumers. Australian consumers have specific information needs regarding prescribed antibiotics to enable appropriate antibiotic use behaviours. Consumers also have expectations

  8. Australian consumer perspectives, attitudes and behaviours on antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance: a qualitative study with implications for public health policy and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine P. M. Lum

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consumers receive over 27 million antibiotic prescriptions annually in Australian primary healthcare. Hence, consumers are a key group to engage in the fight against antibiotic resistance. There is a paucity of research pertaining to consumers in the Australian healthcare environment. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives, attitudes and behaviours of Australian consumers on antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance, to inform national programs for reducing inappropriate antibiotic consumption. Method Semi-structured interviews with 32 consumers recruited via convenience and snowball sampling from a university population in South East Queensland. Interview transcripts were deductively and inductively coded. Main themes were identified using iterative thematic analysis. Results Three themes emerged from the analysis, to elucidate factors affecting antibiotic use: (a prescription type; (b consumer attitudes, behaviours, skills and knowledge; and (c consumer engagement with antibiotic resistance. Consumers held mixed views regarding the use of delayed antibiotic prescriptions, and were often not made aware of the use of repeat antibiotic prescriptions. Consumers with regular general practitioners were more likely to have shared expectations regarding minimising the use of antibiotics. Even so, advice or information mediated by general practitioners was influential with all consumers; and helped to prevent inappropriate antibiotic use behaviours. Consumers were not aware of the free Return of Unwanted Medicines service offered by pharmacies and disposed of leftover antibiotics through household waste. To engage with mitigating antibiotic resistance, consumers required specific information. Previous public health campaigns raising awareness of antibiotics were largely not seen by this sample of consumers. Conclusions Australian consumers have specific information needs regarding prescribed antibiotics to enable

  9. Predictive value of prior colonization and antibiotic use for third-generation cephalosporin-resistant enterobacteriaceae bacteremia in patients with sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottier, Wouter C; Bamberg, Yara R P; Dorigo-Zetsma, J Wendelien; van der Linden, Paul D; Ammerlaan, Heidi S M; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-06-01

    To prevent inappropriate empiric antibiotic treatment in patients with bacteremia caused by third-generation cephalosporin (3GC)-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (3GC-R EB), Dutch guidelines recommend β-lactam and aminoglycoside combination therapy or carbapenem monotherapy in patients with prior 3GC-R EB colonization and/or recent cephalosporin or fluoroquinolone usage. Positive predictive values (PPVs) of these determinants are unknown. We retrospectively studied patients with a clinical infection in whom blood cultures were obtained and empiric therapy with broad-spectrum β-lactams and/or aminoglycosides and/or fluoroquinolones was started. We determined the PPVs of prior colonization and antibiotic use for 3GC-R EB bacteremia, and the consequences of guideline adherence on appropriateness of empiric treatment. Of 9422 episodes, 773 (8.2%) were EB bacteremias and 64 (0.7%) were caused by 3GC-R EB. For bacteremia caused by 3GC-R EB, PPVs of prior colonization with 3GC-R EB (90-day window) and prior usage of cephalosporins or fluoroquinolones (30-day window) were 7.4% and 1.3%, respectively, and PPV was 1.8% for the presence of any of these predictors. Adherence to Dutch sepsis guideline recommendations was 27%. Of bacteremia episodes caused by 3GC-R and 3GC-sensitive EB, 56% and 94%, respectively, were initially treated with appropriate antibiotics. Full adherence to guideline recommendations would hardly augment proportions of appropriate therapy, but could considerably increase carbapenem use. In patients receiving empiric treatment for sepsis, prior colonization with 3GC-R EB and prior antibiotic use have low PPV for infections caused by 3GC-R EB. Strict guideline adherence would unnecessarily stimulate broad-spectrum antibiotic use. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Newly approved antibiotics and antibiotics reserved for resistant infections: Implications for emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer-Amirshahi, Maryann; Pourmand, Ali; May, Larissa

    2017-01-01

    Millions of patients are evaluated every year in the emergency department (ED) for bacterial infections. Emergency physicians often diagnose and prescribe initial antibiotic therapy for a variety of bacterial infections, ranging from simple urinary tract infections to severe sepsis. In life-threatening infections, inappropriate choice of initial antibiotic has been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. As such, initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy on the part of the emergency physician is critical. Increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, drug allergies, and antibiotic shortages further complicates the choice of antibiotics. Patients may have a history of prior resistant infections or culture data indicating that common first-line antibiotics used in the ED may be ineffective. In recent years, there have been several new antibiotic approvals as well as renewed interest in second and third line antibiotics because of the aforementioned concerns. In addition, several newly approved antibiotics have the advantage of being administered once weekly or even as a single infusion, which has the potential to decrease hospitalizations and healthcare costs. This article reviews newly approved antibiotics and antibiotics used to treat resistant infections with a focus on implications for emergency medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of Outpatient Antibiotic Use in Beijing General Hospitals in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan; Cai, Wen-Qiang; Zhou, Zi-Jun

    2017-02-05

    Medical misuse of antibiotics is associated with the acquisition and spread of antibiotic resistance, resulting in a lack of effective drugs and increased health-care cost. Nevertheless, inappropriate antibiotic use in China remains common and the situation requires urgent improvement. Here, we analyzed the prescriptions of antibiotics and evaluated the rationality of antibiotic use among outpatients in Beijing general hospitals during 2015. We collected basic medical insurance claim data from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015 in 507 general hospitals of Beijing. A descriptive analysis of outpatient antibiotic prescribing was performed. The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification/defined daily doses system was used to evaluate the rationality of antibiotic use. Over the study, an estimated 721,930, 613,520, and 822,480 antibiotics were dispensed in primary, secondary, and tertiary general hospitals corresponding to 5.09%, 5.06%, and 2.53% of all prescriptions, respectively. Antibiotic combinations represented 2.95%, 7.74%, and 10.18% of the total antibiotic prescriptions, respectively. Expenditure for the top twenty antibiotics in primary, secondary, and tertiary general hospitals was RMB 42.92, 65.89, and 83.26 million Yuan, respectively. Cephalosporins were the most frequently prescribed class of antibiotic in clinical practice. The antibiotics used inappropriately included azithromycin enteric-coated capsules, compound cefaclor tablets and nifuratel nysfungin vaginal soft capsules in primary hospitals, amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium dispersible tablets (7:1) and cefonicid sodium for injection in secondary hospitals, cefminox sodium for injection and amoxicillin sodium and sulbactam sodium for injection in tertiary hospitals. Antibiotic use in Beijing general hospitals is generally low; however, inappropriate antibiotic use still exists. Inappropriately used antibiotics should be subject to rigorous control and management, and public policy

  12. Inappropriate urinary catheter reinsertion in hospitalized older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fang-Wen; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Chen, Ching-Huey; Chang, Chia-Ming

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the incidence and rationale for inappropriate reinsertion of urinary catheters and elucidated whether reinsertion is an independent predictor of adverse outcomes. A longitudinal study was adopted. Patients aged ≥65 years with urinary catheters placed within 24 hours of hospitalization were enrolled. Data collection, including demographic variables and health conditions, was conducted within 48 hours after admission. Patients with catheters in place were followed-up every day. If the patient had catheter reinsertion, the reinsertion information was reviewed from medical records. Adverse outcomes were collected at discharge. A total of 321 patients were enrolled. Urinary catheters were reinserted in 66 patients (20.6%), with 95 reinsertions; 49.5% of catheter reinsertions were found to be inappropriate. "No evident reason for urinary catheter use" was the most common rationale for inappropriate reinsertion. Inappropriate reinsertion was found to be a significant predictor for prolonged length of hospital stay, development of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and catheter-related complications, and decline in activities of daily living. This study indicates a considerable percentage of inappropriate urinary catheter reinsertions in hospitalized older patients. Inappropriate reinsertion was significantly associated with worsening outcomes. Efforts to improve appropriateness of reinsertion and setting clinical policies for catheterization are necessary to reduce the high rate of inappropriate reinsertion. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterisation of antibiotic prescriptions for acute respiratory tract infections in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Saust, Laura Trolle

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics is contributing to the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance. Several Danish guidelines on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in general practice have been issued to promote rational prescribing of antibiotics, however it is uncle......-line agents like macrolides and amoxicillin with or without clavulanic acid are overused. Strategies to improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing especially for pneumonia, acute otitis media and acute rhinosinusitis are warranted.......Inappropriate use of antibiotics is contributing to the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance. Several Danish guidelines on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in general practice have been issued to promote rational prescribing of antibiotics, however it is unclear...... if these recommendations are followed. We aimed to characterise the pattern of antibiotic prescriptions for patients diagnosed with acute respiratory tract infections, by means of electronic prescriptions, labeled with clinical indications, from Danish general practice. Acute respiratory tract infections accounted for 456...

  14. Adverse consequences of neonatal antibiotic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotten, Charles M

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics have not only saved lives and improved outcomes, but they also influence the evolving microbiome. This review summarizes reports on neonatal infections and variation in antibiotic utilization, discusses the emergence of resistant organisms, and presents data from human neonates and animal models demonstrating the impact of antibiotics on the microbiome, and how microbiome alterations impact health. The importance of antibiotic stewardship is also discussed. Infections increase neonatal morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the clinical presentation of infections can be subtle, prompting clinicians to empirically start antibiotics when infection is a possibility. Antibiotic-resistant infections are a growing problem. Cohort studies have identified extensive center variations in antibiotic usage and associations between antibiotic exposures and outcomes. Studies of antibiotic-induced microbiome alterations and downstream effects on the developing immune system have increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the associations between antibiotics and adverse outcomes. The emergence of resistant microorganisms and recent evidence linking antibiotic practice variations with health outcomes has led to the initiation of antibiotic stewardship programs. The review encourages practitioners to assess local antibiotic use with regard to local microbiology, and to adopt steps to reduce infections and use antibiotics wisely.

  15. Development of effective hospital-based antibiotic stewardship program. The role of infectious disease specialist

    OpenAIRE

    Georgios Chrysos

    2017-01-01

    Excessive antibiotic consumption and misuse is one of the main factors responsible for the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and has been associated with increased health care costs. Active intervention is necessary in changing antimicrobial prescribing practices. The Infection Control Committee and the administration of our hospital decided to implement an antibiotic stewardship program beginning in January 2016 in order to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use and to combat antibi...

  16. A Point Prevalence Survey of Antibiotic Use in 18 Hospitals in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Talaat, Maha; Saied, Tamer; Kandeel, Amr; Abo El-Ata, Gehad A.; El-Kholy, Amani; Hafez, Soad; Osman, Ashraf; Abdel Razik, Mohamed; Ismail, Ghada; El-Masry, Sherine; Galal, Rami; Yehia, Mohamad; Amer, Amira; Calfee, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic use leads to increased risk of antibiotic resistance and other adverse outcomes. The objectives of the study were to determine the prevalence and characteristics of antibiotic use in Egyptian hospitals to identify opportunities for quality improvement. A point prevalence survey was conducted in 18 hospitals in March 2011. A total of 3408 patients were included and 59% received at least one antibiotic, with the most significant use among persons <12 years and inten...

  17. Antibiotic use: how to improve it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulscher, Marlies E J L; van der Meer, Jos W M; Grol, Richard P T M

    2010-08-01

    Antibiotics are an extremely important weapon in the fight against infections. However, antimicrobial resistance is a growing problem. That is why the appropriate use of antibiotics is of great importance. A proper analysis of factors influencing appropriate antibiotic use is at the heart of an effective improvement programme, as interventions can only result in improved medical behaviour if they are well attuned to the problems, the target group, and the setting in which the change is to take place. Determinants of appropriate and inappropriate prescribing are not only found in patient knowledge and behaviour, in the way medical professionals think and act, and in the way in which patient care is organised, but also in the wider, socio-cultural environment of doctors and their patients. We present several relevant factors at each of these 4 levels and various possible measures that could be an effective response to them. The reasons why antibiotic use is inappropriate are complex. This means that any programme to rationalise antibiotic use - if it is to be effective - will have to include activities at all 4 levels discussed above. A national programme for 'appropriate antibiotic use' could be considered, including patient, professional and organisational-oriented activities. In addition, close international cooperation is required involving international guidelines, agreements, monitoring and feedback of information, and implementation programmes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Prescribing Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Jepsen, Kim Sune

    2018-01-01

    The medical professions will lose an indispensable tool in clinical practice if even simple infections cannot be cured because antibiotics have lost effectiveness. This article presents results from an exploratory enquiry into “good doctoring” in the case of antibiotic prescribing at a time when...

  19. Forgotten antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulcini, Céline; Bush, Karen; Craig, William A

    2012-01-01

    In view of the alarming spread of antimicrobial resistance in the absence of new antibiotics, this study aimed at assessing the availability of potentially useful older antibiotics. A survey was performed in 38 countries among experts including hospital pharmacists, microbiologists, and infectious...

  20. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Hoffmann, Tammy C; McCullough, Amanda R

    2015-01-01

    Numerous opportunities are available in primary care for alleviating the crisis of increasing antibiotic resistance. Preventing patients from developing an acute respiratory infection (ARI) will obviate any need for antibiotic use downstream. Hygiene measures such as physical barriers and hand...... will greatly improve the use of antibiotics for ARIs. However, used in concert, combinations are likely to enable clinicians and health care systems to implement the strategies that will reduce antimicrobial resistance in the future....... antibiotic prescribing are a major factor in the prescribing for ARIs. Professional interventions with educational components are effective, although they have modest effects, and are expensive. GPs' perceptions - that mistakenly assume as a default that patients want antibiotics for their ARIs - are often...

  1. Discontinuing Inappropriate Medication Use in Nursing Home Residents : A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Hans; Scheper, Jessica; Koning, Hedi; Brouwer, Chris; Twisk, Jos W.; van der Meer, Helene; Boersma, Froukje; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Taxis, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Background: Inappropriate prescribing is a well-known clinical problem in nursing home residents, but few interventions have focused on reducing inappropriate medication use. Objective: To examine successful discontinuation of inappropriate medication use and to improve prescribing in nursing home

  2. Discontinuing Inappropriate Medication in Nursing Home Residents (DIM-NHR study): A cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, H.; Scheper, J.; Koning, H.; Brouwer, C.; Twisk, J.; Van Der Meer, H.; Boersma, F.; Zuidema, S.; Taxis, K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Inappropriate prescribing is a prevalent problem in nursing home residents that is associated with cognitive and physical impairment. Few interventions have been shown to reduce inappropriate prescribing. The aim was therefore to examine successful discontinuation of inappropriate

  3. Inappropriate oophorectomy at time of benign premenopausal hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahal, Amandeep S; Rhoads, Kim F; Elliott, Christopher S; Sokol, Eric R

    2017-08-01

    We assessed rates of oophorectomy during benign hysterectomy around the release of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 2008 practice bulletin on prophylactic oophorectomy, and evaluated predictors of inappropriate premenopausal oophorectomy. A cross-sectional administrative database analysis was performed utilizing the California Office of Statewide Health Planning Development Patient Discharge Database for years 2005 to 2011. After identifying all premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions, International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 diagnosis codes were reviewed to create a master list of indications for oophorectomy. We defined appropriate oophorectomy as cases with concomitant coding for ovarian cyst, breast cancer susceptibility gene carrier status, and other diagnoses. Using patient demographics and hospital characteristics to predict inappropriate oophorectomy, a logistic regression model was created. We identified 57,776 benign premenopausal hysterectomies with oophorectomies during the period studied. Of the premenopausal oophorectomies, 37.7% (21,783) were deemed "inappropriate" with no documented reason for removal. The total number of premenopausal inpatient hysterectomies with oophorectomy decreased yearly (12,227/y in 2005 to 5,930/y in 2011). However, the percentage of inappropriate oophorectomies remained stable. In multivariate analysis, Hispanic and African American ethnicity/race associated with increased odds of inappropriate oophorectomy (P Urban and at low Medi-Cal utilization hospitals showed increased odds of inappropriate oophorectomy. In premenopausal women undergoing benign hysterectomy, over one-third undergo oophorectomy without an appropriate indication documented. The rate of inappropriate oophorectomy in California has not changed since the 2008 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists guidelines. Whereas the absolute number of inpatient hysterectomies for benign

  4. Do physician outcome judgments and judgment biases contribute to inappropriate use of treatments? Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lott Alison

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are many examples of physicians using treatments inappropriately, despite clear evidence about the circumstances under which the benefits of such treatments outweigh their harms. When such over- or under- use of treatments occurs for common diseases, the burden to the healthcare system and risks to patients can be substantial. We propose that a major contributor to inappropriate treatment may be how clinicians judge the likelihood of important treatment outcomes, and how these judgments influence their treatment decisions. The current study will examine the role of judged outcome probabilities and other cognitive factors in the context of two clinical treatment decisions: 1 prescription of antibiotics for sore throat, where we hypothesize overestimation of benefit and underestimation of harm leads to over-prescription of antibiotics; and 2 initiation of anticoagulation for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF, where we hypothesize that underestimation of benefit and overestimation of harm leads to under-prescription of warfarin. Methods For each of the two conditions, we will administer surveys of two types (Type 1 and Type 2 to different samples of Canadian physicians. The primary goal of the Type 1 survey is to assess physicians' perceived outcome probabilities (both good and bad outcomes for the target treatment. Type 1 surveys will assess judged outcome probabilities in the context of a representative patient, and include questions about how physicians currently treat such cases, the recollection of rare or vivid outcomes, as well as practice and demographic details. The primary goal of the Type 2 surveys is to measure the specific factors that drive individual clinical judgments and treatment decisions, using a 'clinical judgment analysis' or 'lens modeling' approach. This survey will manipulate eight clinical variables across a series of sixteen realistic case vignettes. Based on the survey responses, we will be

  5. Inglorious Empire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khair, Tabish

    2017-01-01

    Review of 'Inglorious Empire: What the British did to India' by Shashi Tharoor, London, Hurst Publishers, 2017, 296 pp., £20.00......Review of 'Inglorious Empire: What the British did to India' by Shashi Tharoor, London, Hurst Publishers, 2017, 296 pp., £20.00...

  6. Prevalence and correlates of inappropriate use of benzodiazepines in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, Zejdush; Kellici, Suela; Mone, Iris; Shabani, Driton; Qazimi, Musa; Burazeri, Genc

    2017-08-01

    In post-war Kosovo, the magnitude of inappropriate use of benzodiazepines is unknown to date. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and correlates of continuation of intake of benzodiazepines beyond prescription (referred to as "inappropriate use") in the adult population of Gjilan region in Kosovo. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Gjilan region in 2015 including a representative sample of 780 individuals attending different pharmacies and reporting use of benzodiazepines (385 men and 395 women; age range 18-87 years; response rate: 90%). A structured questionnaire was administered to all participants inquiring about the use of benzodiazepines and socio-demographic characteristics. Overall, the prevalence of inappropriate use of benzodiazepines was 58%. In multivariable-adjusted models, inappropriate use of benzodiazepines was significantly associated with older age (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.7), middle education (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2-2.7), daily use (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-2.0) and addiction awareness (OR 2.7, 95% CI 2.0-3.8). Furthermore, there was evidence of a borderline relationship with rural residence (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.9-1.7). Our study provides novel evidence about the prevalence and selected correlates of inappropriate use of benzodiazepines in Gjilan region of Kosovo. Health professionals and policymakers in Kosovo should be aware of the magnitude and determinants of drug misuse in this transitional society.

  7. [Antibiotic use in Mexico: review of problems and policies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreser, Anahí; Wirtz, Veronika J; Corbett, Kitty K; Echániz, Gabriela

    2008-01-01

    The inappropriate use of antibiotics signifies a risk for individual health and a waste of health resources. It triggers the development of antibiotic resistance, which increases expenditures and mortality related to infectious disease, and is hence considered a serious public health problem. The World Health Organization has thus recommended a series of strategies to be included within national pharmaceutical policies. In Mexico, diverse factors related to the inappropriate use of antibiotics have been documented. While the response has been mainly in the form of educational and managerial interventions directed toward physicians in public health services, as well as epidemiological surveillance, there is a paucity of research and interventions focused on consumers, pharmacies, and the private sector. Fundamentally, a comprehensive national strategy for antibiotics is not incorporated into health and pharmaceutical policies.

  8. An assessment of antibiotics prescribed at the secondary health-care level in the Kyrgyz Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baktygul, Kambaralieva; Marat, Bozgunchiev; Ashirali, Zurdinov; Harun-Or-rashid, Md; Sakamoto, Junichi

    2011-08-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the pattern of antibiotic prescriptions in a secondary health care setting in Kyrgyzstan. A retrospective analysis was performed of antibiotic prescriptions in 251 inpatient records of patients admitted to the Sokuluk Territorial Hospital. A total of 19 different antibiotics were prescribed. Penicillin G (24.9%), gentamicin (16.1%), metronidazole (15.6%) and cefazolin (14.5%) were those most frequently prescribed. The major indications for antibiotics were diseases of the respiratory system (28.0%), injury, poisoning and certain other consequences from external causes (25.5%), and diseases of the digestive system (14.3%). Almost three-quarters of the antibiotics were used parenterally, 252 of which (58.9%) were administered intramuscularly and 70 (16.4%) intravenously. Forty-five percent of the patients received two antibiotics, and 12.0% received three antibiotics during their stay at the hospital. Antibiotic therapy proved inappropriate for 184 patients (73.3%). The most common reason given for inappropriateness was the unjustified (not indicated) use of antibiotics in 143 (48.6%) cases. There was a significantly higher inappropriate choice of antibiotics in gynecology (OR = 2.70, 95% CI = 1.02-7.69) when compared with that in other wards. Although antibiotics were prescribed in all cases post-operatively, none of those patients were given pre-operative prophylactic antibiotics when indicated. We concluded that antibiotic prescriptions were seriously inappropriate in the Kyrgyz Republic with prescribing patterns failing to strictly adhere to the national guidelines. Adoption of an international standard and locally conformable guidelines of antibiotic use can help correct such problems.

  9. Antibiotic Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Antibiotics www.healthsci.tufts.edu Georgia-Pacific Health Smart Institute www.gphealthsmart.com Special thanks to Rhonda ... effectiveness of other medications such as birth control pills? 7. Are there any possible adverse reactions if ...

  10. Repairing the broken market for antibiotic innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outterson, Kevin; Powers, John H; Daniel, Gregory W; McClellan, Mark B

    2015-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial diseases pose serious and growing threats to human health. While innovation is important to all areas of health research, it is uniquely important in antibiotics. Resistance destroys the fruit of prior research, making it necessary to constantly innovate to avoid falling back into a pre-antibiotic era. But investment is declining in antibiotics, driven by competition from older antibiotics, the cost and uncertainty of the development process, and limited reimbursement incentives. Good public health practices curb inappropriate antibiotic use, making return on investment challenging in payment systems based on sales volume. We assess the impact of recent initiatives to improve antibiotic innovation, reflecting experience with all sixty-seven new molecular entity antibiotics approved by the Food and Drug Administration since 1980. Our analysis incorporates data and insights derived from several multistakeholder initiatives under way involving governments and the private sector on both sides of the Atlantic. We propose three specific reforms that could revitalize innovations that protect public health, while promoting long-term sustainability: increased incentives for antibiotic research and development, surveillance, and stewardship; greater targeting of incentives to high-priority public health needs, including reimbursement that is delinked from volume of drug use; and enhanced global collaboration, including a global treaty. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  11. Antibiotic use and misuse in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Nidhi; Cotten, C Michael; Smith, P Brian

    2012-03-01

    Neonatal sepsis causes significant morbidity and mortality, especially in preterm infants. Clinicians are compelled to treat with empiric antibiotics at the first signs of suspected sepsis. Broad-spectrum antibiotics and prolonged treatment with empiric antibiotics are associated with adverse outcomes. Most common neonatal pathogens are susceptible to narrow-spectrum antibiotics. The choice of antibiotic and duration of empiric treatment are strongly associated with center-based risk factors. Clinicians should treat with short courses of narrow-spectrum antibiotics whenever possible, choosing the antibiotics and treatment duration to balance the risks of potentially untreated sepsis against the adverse effects of treatment in infants with sterile cultures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antibiotic prescription: An oral physician's point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Patait, Mahendra; Urvashi, N.; Rajderkar, M.; Kedar, S.; Shah, Kinjal; Patait, Reeta

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibiotics are important in the management and prophylaxis of infections in patients at a risk of experiencing microbial disease. Uses of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited since management of acute dental conditions is primarily based upon extraction of teeth or extirpation of the pulp. However, the literature provides evidence of inappropriate prescribing practices by practitioners, due to a number of factors from inadequate knowledge to social factors. Aim: The aim ...

  13. Dispensing of antibiotics without prescription in Greece, 2008: another link in the antibiotic resistance chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachouras, D; Kavatha, D; Antoniadou, A; Giannitsioti, E; Poulakou, G; Kanellakopoulou, K; Giamarellou, H

    2010-02-18

    Antibiotic resistance has been associated with the use of antibiotics. The dispensing of antimicrobials without prescription is a potential source of inappropriate antibiotic use. In our study, antibiotics were requested without prescription from pharmacies in the metropolitan area of Athens in Greece in 2008. Twenty-one collaborators visited 174 pharmacies and asked for either amoxicillin/clavulanate acid or ciprofloxacin without providing a prescription or any other justification for the request. In Greece additional restrictions for fluoroquinolone prescriptions were implemented in 2003 after which a separate specific prescription form needs to be filled in by the prescriber, justifying the choice of any fluoroquinolone. Amoxicillin/clavulanate acid was dispensed in all cases. Furthermore, despite the regulation restricting the prescription of ciprofloxacin, this drug was dispensed by 53% of the pharmacies. It appears that the implementation of measures to restrict the use of certain antibiotics (e.g. ciprofloxacin that was studied in our case) was effective in reducing, although not eliminating, inappropriate dispensing. Overall, dispensing of antimicrobials without prescription is a widespread practice in the studied area and is contributing to the overuse of antibiotics.

  14. Is self-medication with antibiotics in Europe driven by prescribed use?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoryan, Larissa; Burgerhof, Johannes G. M.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Degener, John E.; Deschepper, Reginald; Monnet, Dominique L.; Di Matteo, Antonella; Scicluna, Elizabeth A.; Bara, Ana-Claudia; Lundborg, Cecilia Stalsby; Birkin, Joan

    Background: Self-medication with antibiotics may increase the risk of inappropriate use and the selection of resistant bacteria. One of the triggers for using self-medication may be past experience with antibiotics prescribed by health professionals. We examined the association between prescribed

  15. Treatment practices of households and antibiotic dispensing in medicine outlets in developing countries: The case of Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tersbøl, Britt Pinkowski

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Antibiotic resistance, associated with inappropriate drug use, is a global public health threat. The pharmaceutical sectors in developing countries are poorly regulated leading to antibiotic sales and use without a prescription. The study documents the treatment of acute illnesses...... households. Most (65%) medicine-use events involved self-treatment with pharmaceuticals; 40% of medicineuse events involved antibiotics, often without a prescription. Although the number of antibiotic transactions without prescription in rural medicine outlets (n=139, 27.4%) was statistically significantly...... of antibiotics, community knowledge and use of antibiotics in ways inconsistent with biomedical recommendations, poverty and perceived barriers to formal healthcare were factors that influenced the inappropriate use of antibiotics. Conclusion: Self-medication, including antibiotic self-prescription, constitutes...

  16. A new strategy for healthcare-associated pneumonia: a 2-year prospective multicenter cohort study using risk factors for multidrug-resistant pathogens to select initial empiric therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Takaya; Fujisawa, Takao; Okuno, Masataka; Toyoshima, Hirokazu; Tsutsui, Kiyoyuki; Maeda, Hikaru; Yuda, Hisamichi; Yoshida, Masamichi; Kobayashi, Hiroyasu; Taguchi, Osamu; Gabazza, Esteban C; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Ihara, Toshiaki; Brito, Veronica; Niederman, Michael S

    2013-11-01

    Optimal empiric therapy for hospitalized patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is uncertain. We prospectively applied a therapeutic algorithm, based on the presence of risk factors for multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens in a multicenter cohort study of 445 pneumonia patients, including both community-acquired pneumonia (CAP; n = 124) and HCAP (n = 321). MDR pathogens were more common (15.3% vs 0.8%, P risk factors, one of which was severity of illness (n = 170), vs HCAP patients with 0-1 risk factor (n = 151) had a significantly higher frequency of MDR pathogens (27.1% vs 2%, P risk factor, mortality was lower than with ≥2 MDR risk factors (8.6% vs 18.2%, P = .012). In multivariate analysis, initial treatment failure, but not inappropriate empiric antibiotic therapy, was a mortality risk factor (odds ratio, 72.0). Basing empiric HCAP therapy on its severity and the presence of risk factors for MDR pathogens is a potentially useful approach that achieves good outcomes without excessive use of broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Japan Medical Association Center for Clinical Trials, JMA-IIA00054.

  17. Duration of antibiotic therapy in the intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilahi, Gabor; McMahon, Mary Aisling; Povoa, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    There are certain well defined clinical situations where prolonged therapy is beneficial, but prolonged duration of antibiotic therapy is associated with increased resistance, medicalising effects, high costs and adverse drug reactions. The best way to decrease antibiotic duration is both to stop antibiotics when not needed (sterile invasive cultures with clinical improvement), not to start antibiotics when not indicated (treating colonization) and keep the antibiotic course as short as possible. The optimal duration of antimicrobial treatment for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is unknown, however, there is a growing evidence that reduction in the length of antibiotic courses to 7–8 days can minimize the consequences of antibiotic overuse in critical care, including antibiotic resistance, adverse effects, collateral damage and costs. Biomarkers like C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) do have a valuable role in helping guide antibiotic duration but should be interpreted cautiously in the context of the clinical situation. On the other hand, microbiological criteria alone are not reliable and should not be used to justify a prolonged antibiotic course, as clinical cure does not equate to microbiological eradication. We do not recommend a ‘one size fits all’ approach and in some clinical situations, including infection with non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli (NF-GNB) clinical evaluation is needed but shortening the antibiotic course is an effective and safe way to decrease inappropriate antibiotic exposure. PMID:28149576

  18. Hypercalcemia, inappropriate calcitriol levels, and tuberculosis on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Pobes, A; Díaz-Corte, C; Gago, E

    2000-08-01

    We describe a female patient undergoing hemodialysis who developed tuberculosis, hypercalcemia, and inappropriately elevated calcitriol levels. These findings suggest ectopic production of calcitriol by tuberculous granulomas. Successful treatment of tuberculosis led to a substantial decrease in the levels of calcium and calcitriol.

  19. Inappropriate prescribing of proton pump inhibitors among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    updating physicians on the practice guidelines, participation of a clinical pharmacist in making therapeutic decisions and modifying hospital ... inappropriate overuse of PPIs include physician type, practice setting, formulary status and ... Well-trained assistants, using a structured questionnaire, recruited the study sample.

  20. [Inappropriate prescription in older patients: the STOPP/START criteria].

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delgado Silveira, Eva

    2009-09-01

    Older people are a heterogeneous group of patients, often with multiple comorbidities for which they are prescribed a large number of drugs, leading to an increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADR) and drug interactions. This risk is compounded by physiological age-related changes in physiology, changes in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as by disease-related, functional and social issues. Inappropriate prescription of drugs is common in the older individuals and contributes to the increased risk of ADR. Several tools have been developed to detect potentially inappropriate prescription, the most frequently used in Spain being Beers\\' criteria. However, the value of these criteria is limited, especially as they were developed in a different healthcare system. In this article, the Spanish version of a new tool to detect potentially inappropriate prescriptions-STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Person\\'s Prescriptions) and START (Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right i.e. appropriate, indicated Treatment) criteria-is presented. The creation, development, reliability, and use of these criteria in routine practice is described and discussed. These criteria have shown better sensitivity than Beers\\' criteria in detecting prescription problems and have the added value of being able to detect not only inappropriate prescription of some drugs, but also the omission of well indicated drugs. The STOPP\\/START criteria could become a useful screening tool to improve prescription in older people.

  1. Inappropriate Practices in Fitness Testing and Reporting: Alternative Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xihe; Davis, Summer; Kirk, T. Nicole; Haegele, Justin A.; Knott, Stephen E.

    2018-01-01

    Fitness education is becoming an integrated component for many physical education programs. As such, many physical educators conduct health-related fitness tests on a regular basis. Some states even mandate certain types of physical fitness tests to be administered and reported annually or by semester. Yet, inappropriate practices have been…

  2. Impact of an antimicrobial resistance control program: pre- and post-training antibiotic use in children with typhoid fever

    OpenAIRE

    Elfrida A. Rachmah; Maftuchah Rochmanti; Dwiyanti Puspitasari

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics may lead to antimicrobial resistance. In 2012, Dr. Soetomo Hospital conducted training for pediatric residents on the proper use of antibiotics to limit antimicrobial resistance. Objective To evaluate the impact of a rational, antibiotic-use training program for pediatric residents on their antibiotic prescriptions for patients with typhoid fever. Methods A cross-sectional, analytic study was conducted. We collected data from children with typhoid fe...

  3. Antibiotic allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caimmi, S; Caimmi, D; Lombardi, E; Crisafulli, G; Franceschini, F; Ricci, G; Marseglia, G L

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics are commonly injected during the perioperative period and are responsible of 15 percent of the anaphylactic reactions. Anaphylaxis triggered by antibiotics primarily involves penicillin and cephalosporin. The management of patients with histories of allergic reactions to antibiotics is a common situation in clinical practice. The confirmation or invalidation of the allergic nature of the reported reaction is not based on in vitro tests, but on a rigorous allergological work-up based on detailed analysis of clinical history, skin tests and drug provocation test. Considering a possible cross-reactivity between penicillins, once an immediate penicillin allergy has been diagnosed, skin testing with the alternative molecule (cephalosporin, carbapenem, aztreonam) is mandatory and, if negative, the relevant drug should be given in an appropriate setting at increasing doses.

  4. Empirical likelihood

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Art B

    2001-01-01

    Empirical likelihood provides inferences whose validity does not depend on specifying a parametric model for the data. Because it uses a likelihood, the method has certain inherent advantages over resampling methods: it uses the data to determine the shape of the confidence regions, and it makes it easy to combined data from multiple sources. It also facilitates incorporating side information, and it simplifies accounting for censored, truncated, or biased sampling.One of the first books published on the subject, Empirical Likelihood offers an in-depth treatment of this method for constructing confidence regions and testing hypotheses. The author applies empirical likelihood to a range of problems, from those as simple as setting a confidence region for a univariate mean under IID sampling, to problems defined through smooth functions of means, regression models, generalized linear models, estimating equations, or kernel smooths, and to sampling with non-identically distributed data. Abundant figures offer vi...

  5. Prescribing antibiotics to pediatric dengue: increasing risk of bacterial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanunjaya Sandopa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Use of antibiotics to treat self-limiting viral infections like dengue fever (DF without any co-morbid conditions in pediatric patients is common practice in India, and a major contribution of the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the country. Objective To provide an analysis of diagnosis, grading, and prescribing of antibiotics in pediatric inpatients with DF in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India. Methods Data from case sheets of all pediatric inpatients (n=370 diagnosed with DF without co-morbid conditions were collected with regards to diagnosis, grading, presence, and appropriateness of antibiotic usage according to the 2009 WHO Guidelines, the National Vector Borne Disease Control Program (NVBDCP of India Guidelines, and the Hospital Infection Society (HIS Guidelines. Results Platelet count determination (50% of the cases was the major diagnostic method for dengue. Inappropriate grading of DF was seen in 20% of patients. Almost 75% of the 370 dengue cases were prescribed antibiotics for the expressed purpose of avoiding hospital-acquired infections. A single antibiotic was given in 225 cases (60.81%, 2 antibiotics in 33 (8.91 % cases, and 3 antibiotics in 9 (2.43% cases. Conclusions From the results it is clear that antibiotics were prescribed to treat DF where the antibiotics do not have any role. DF is a self-limiting viral infection that can be treated with proper management of hemodynamic status with IV fluids. To avoid the usage of antibiotics in the treatment of dengue, awareness has to be created in healthcare professionals regarding the treatment guidelines for dengue and appropriate use of antibiotics to avoid hospital acquired infections.

  6. Country-specific antibiotic use practices impact the human gut resistome

    OpenAIRE

    Forslund, K.; Sunagawa, S.; Kultima, J. R.; Mende, D. R.; Arumugam, M.; Typas, A.; Bork, P.

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasing concerns over inappropriate use of antibiotics in medicine and food production, population-level resistance transfer into the human gut microbiota has not been demonstrated beyond individual case studies. To determine the “antibiotic resistance potential” for entire microbial communities, we employ metagenomic data and quantify the totality of known resistance genes in each community (its resistome) for 68 classes and subclasses of antibiotics. In 252 fecal metagenomes from...

  7. Hydrid Antibiotics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Běhal, Vladislav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2003), s. 17-25 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/01/1004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : hydrid * antibiotics Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.857, year: 2003

  8. Antibiotic Resistance in Sepsis Patients: Evaluation and Recommendation of Antibiotic Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradipta, Ivan Surya; Sodik, Dian Chairunnisa; Lestari, Keri; Parwati, Ida; Halimah, Eli; Diantini, Ajeng; Abdulah, Rizky

    2013-01-01

    Background: The appropriate selection of empirical antibiotics based on the pattern of local antibiotic resistance can reduce the mortality rate and increase the rational use of antibiotics. Aims: We analyze the pattern of antibiotic use and the sensitivity patterns of antibiotics to support the rational use of antibiotics in patients with sepsis. Materials and Methods: A retrospective observational study was conducted in adult sepsis patient at one of Indonesian hospital during January-December 2011. Data were collected from the hospital medical record department. Descriptive analysis was used in the processing and interpretation of data. Results: A total of 76 patients were included as research subjects. Lung infection was the highest source of infection. In the 66.3% of clinical specimens that were culture positive for microbes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus hominis were detected with the highest frequency. The six most frequently used antibiotics, levofloxacin, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and erythromycin, showed an average resistance above 50%. Conclusions: The high use of antibiotic with a high level resistance requires a policy to support its rational use. Local microbial pattern based on site infection and pattern of antibiotics sensitivity test can be used as supporting data to optimize appropriateness of empirical antibiotics therapy in sepsis patients. PMID:23923107

  9. Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Farm Animals FDA: Cutting-Edge Technology Sheds Light on Antibiotic Resistance For More Information Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Antimicrobial Resistance Information for Consumers and Health Professionals CDC: Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work More in Consumer Updates ...

  10. Trends in antibiotic use among outpatients in New Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holloway Kathleen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The overall volume of antibiotic consumption in the community is one of the foremost causes of antimicrobial resistance. There is much ad-hoc information about the inappropriate consumption of antibiotics, over-the-counter availability, and inadequate dosage but there is very little actual evidence of community practices. Methods This study surveyed antibiotic use in the community (December 2007-November 2008 using the established methodology of patient exit interviews at three types of facilities: 20 private retail pharmacies, 10 public sector facilities, and 20 private clinics to obtain a complete picture of community antibiotic use over a year. The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC classification and the Defined Daily Dose (DDD measurement units were assigned to the data. Antibiotic use was measured as DDD/1000 patients visiting the facility and also as percent of patients receiving an antibiotic. Results During the data collection period, 17995, 9205, and 5922 patients visiting private retail pharmacies, public facilities and private clinics, respectively, were included in our study. 39% of the patients attending private retail pharmacies and public facilities and 43% of patients visiting private clinics were prescribed at least one antibiotic. Consumption patterns of antibiotics were similar at private retail pharmacies and private clinics where fluoroquinolones, cephalosporins, and extended spectrum penicillins were the three most commonly prescribed groups of antibiotics. At public facilities, there was a more even use of all the major antibiotic groups including penicillins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, cephalosporins, tetracyclines, and cotrimoxazole. Newer members from each class of antibiotics were prescribed. Not much seasonal variation was seen although slightly higher consumption of some antibiotics in winter and slightly higher consumption of fluoroquinolones during the rainy season were observed

  11. Evaluation of the general public's knowledge, views and practices relating to appropriate antibiotic use in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moienzadeh, Atefeh; Massoud, Tasnim; Black, Emily

    2017-04-01

    Studies completed internationally have demonstrated an alarming number of patients believed antibiotics are indicated in the treatment of viral infections and other self-limited illnesses. Evaluation of patient practices relating to antibiotics have also demonstrated inappropriate use. Antibiotic misuse by patients and practitioners has been identified as a factor in the development of resistance. Current knowledge, views and practices relating to antibiotic use in Qatar is unknown. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the general population's current antimicrobial knowledge, views and practices in Qatar. This study was designed as a self-administered cross-sectional survey. Eligible participants were residents of Qatar who were over the age of 18 and spoke English or Arabic. The questionnaire was developed based on previously published literature and objectives of this study. Data were collected at community pharmacies in Doha, Qatar. The majority of participants (95.8%) had taken antibiotics in the past. The median knowledge score of the study population was 4/8. Misconceptions relating to use of antibiotics for treatment of viral infections were common. Inappropriate use as evident by hoarding of antibiotics for future use and sharing antibiotics with family or friends was also identified in this study population. Community pharmacists in Qatar have an opportunity to improve knowledge of the general population regarding appropriate indications of antibiotics and risk of resistance with inappropriate use. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  12. Inappropriate prescribing in the older population: need for new criteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Mahony, Denis

    2012-02-03

    Inappropriate prescribing (IP) is a common and serious global healthcare problem in elderly people, leading to increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), polypharmacy being the main risk factor for both IP and ADRs. IP in older people is highly prevalent but preventable; hence screening tools for IP have been devised, principally Beers\\' Criteria and the Inappropriate Prescribing in the Elderly Tool (IPET). Although Beers\\' Criteria have become the most widely cited IP criteria in the literature, nevertheless, they have serious deficiencies, including several drugs that are rarely prescribed nowadays, a lack of structure in the presentation of the criteria and omission of several important and common IP instances. New, more up-to-date, systems-based and easily applicable criteria are needed that can be applied in the routine clinical setting.

  13. Factors associated with inappropriate utilisation of emergency department services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selasawati, H G; Naing, L; Wan Aasim, W A; Winn, T; Rusli, B N

    2007-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the associated factors and the reasons for inappropriate utilisation of Emergency Department (ED) services at Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital. A case-control study was conducted with 170 cases from ED and 170 controls from the Outpatient Department (OPD). A self-administered questionnaire was designed and used to obtain sociodemographic data, knowledge on the functions of ED and OPD, health seeking attitude and behaviour, and reasons for seeking treatment at ED. The study found that gender, marital status, family size, shift work, perceived illness, and knowledge on the role and functions of ED and OPD were significant associated factors. The three most common reasons for inappropriate utilisation of ED were as follows: "due to severity of illness" (85%), "can't go to OPD during office hours" (42%), and "ED near my house" (27%).

  14. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone: prevalence, causes and consequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2010-06-01

    Hyponatraemia is the commonest electrolyte abnormality found in hospital inpatients, and is associated with a greatly increased morbidity and mortality. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) is the most frequent cause of hyponatraemia in hospital inpatients. SIADH is the clinical and biochemical manifestation of a wide range of disease processes, and every case warrants investigation of the underlying cause. In this review, we will examine the prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical characteristics and clinical consequences of hyponatraemia due to SIADH.

  15. Requests for "inappropriate" treatment based on religious beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, R D; Genesen, L B

    1997-06-01

    Requests by patients or their families for treatment which the patient's physician considers to be "inappropriate" are becoming more frequent than refusals of treatment which the physician considers appropriate. Such requests are often based on the patient's religious beliefs about the attributes of God (sovereignty, omnipotence), the attributes of persons (sanctity of life), or the individual's personal relationship with God (communication, commands, etc). We present four such cases and discuss some of the basic religious tenets of the three Abrahamic faith traditions as they relate to such requests. We suggest that religious reasons for requesting "inappropriate" treatment are "special" and deserve serious consideration. We offer guidance to assist clinicians and clinical ethicists as they attempt to resolve these conflicts, emphasising the importance of understanding the religious beliefs of the patient/surrogate and suggesting the assistance of a religious interpreter. We suggest open discussion with patients and families of both the clinical situation and the theological basis for these requests. We also suggest that clinicians use additional religious doctrines or principles from patients' own traditions to balance the reasons behind the requests. We conclude that most persistent requests for "inappropriate" treatment should be honoured.

  16. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian

    of antimicrobial resistance: (1) adaptive mutations and (2) horizontal acquisition of resistance genes from antibiotic gene reservoirs. By studying the geno- and phenotypic changes of E. coli in response to single and drug-pair exposures, I uncover the evolutionary trajectories leading to adaptive resistance. I......Bacteria can avoid extinction during antimicrobial exposure by becoming resistant. They achieve this either via adaptive mutations or horizontally acquired resistance genes. If resistance emerges in clinical relevant species, it can lead to treatment failure and ultimately result in increasing...... morbidity and mortality as well as an increase in the cost of treatment. Understanding how bacteria respond to antibiotic exposure gives the foundations for a rational approach to counteract antimicrobial resistance. In the work presented in this thesis, I explore the two fundamental sources...

  17. Empirical Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.; Talman, R.

    1987-01-01

    As proton accelerators get larger, and include more magnets, the conventional tracking programs which simulate them run slower. The purpose of this paper is to describe a method, still under development, in which element-by-element tracking around one turn is replaced by a single man, which can be processed far faster. It is assumed for this method that a conventional program exists which can perform faithful tracking in the lattice under study for some hundreds of turns, with all lattice parameters held constant. An empirical map is then generated by comparison with the tracking program. A procedure has been outlined for determining an empirical Hamiltonian, which can represent motion through many nonlinear kicks, by taking data from a conventional tracking program. Though derived by an approximate method this Hamiltonian is analytic in form and can be subjected to further analysis of varying degrees of mathematical rigor. Even though the empirical procedure has only been described in one transverse dimension, there is good reason to hope that it can be extended to include two transverse dimensions, so that it can become a more practical tool in realistic cases

  18. Potentially inappropriate medications among older adults in Pelotas, Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Bárbara Heather; Miranda, Vanessa Irribarem Avena; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso

    2017-06-22

    To assess the use of potentially inappropriate medications among older adults. This is a population-based cross-sectional study with 1,451 older individuals aged 60 years or more in the city of Pelotas, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, in 2014. We have investigated the use of medications in the last 15 days. Using the Beers criteria (2012), we have verified the use of potentially inappropriate medications and their relationship with socioeconomic and demographic variables, polypharmacy, self-medication, and burden of disease. Among the 5,700 medications used, 5,651 could be assessed as to being inappropriate. Of these, 937 were potentially inappropriate for the older adults according to the 2012 Beers criteria (16.6%). Approximately 42.4% of the older adults studied used at least one medication considered as potentially inappropriate. The group of medications for the nervous system accounted for 48.9% of the total of the potentially inappropriate medications. In the adjusted analysis, the variables female, advanced age, white race, low educational level, polypharmacy, self-medication, and burden of disease were associated with the use of potentially inappropriate medications. It is important to known the possible consequences of the use of medication among older adults. Special attention should be given to the older adults who use polypharmacy. Specific lists should be created with more appropriate medications for the older population in the National Essential Medicine List. Avaliar o uso de medicamentos potencialmente inadequados entre idosos. Estudo transversal de base populacional com 1.451 idosos com 60 anos ou mais em Pelotas, RS, em 2014. Investigou-se o uso de medicamentos nos últimos 15 dias. Utilizando os critérios de Beers (2012), verificou-se a potencial inadequação dos medicamentos e sua relação com variáveis socioeconômicas e demográficas, polifarmácia, automedicação e carga de doença. Dentre os 5.700 medicamentos utilizados, 5

  19. Use of antibiotics without medical prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalton Espíndola Volpato

    Full Text Available The inappropriate use of antibiotics for the treatment of infections is a worldwide problem that has implications for the cost of treatment and the development of resistant strains of bacteria. The use of antibiotics should follow specific criteria; they are on top of the list of self-medication drugs in countries that do not control their commercialization. OBJECTIVES: To determine the percentage of pharmacies that attend the public and sell antibiotics without medical prescription in a medium-sized city in Brazil, and analyze the variables involved in this procedure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 107 of the 136 pharmacies registered in our city were evaluated. These pharmacies were visited by actresses who simulated having a sister with symptoms of a non-complicated rhino-sinusitis, so that they could obtain antibiotics without a medical prescription. Each pharmacy was visited only once; the only variable in the simulated clinical setting was the report of fever temperature, which was randomly assigned between 38.5 and 40 degrees Celsius. RESULTS: Antibiotics were offered in 58% of the pharmacies, and this offer was increased to 74% after the actresses insisted on having them. In 65.4% of the pharmacies, the actresses were attended by a pharmacist, and 84.2% of them said they would sell antibiotics. When the request for antibiotics was denied (26%, only 7.5% was due to absence of prescription. The most frequent reason for refusal to sell antibiotics, was because the attendant deemed it unnecessary (46.6% CONCLUSION: Antibiotics can be easily bought in the great majority of the pharmacies in our town without a medical prescription and a clear indication. Fever temperature did not modify the attendant's indication of the drug.

  20. Community factors in the development of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    The global impact of antibiotic resistance is potentially devastating, threatening to set back progress against certain infectious diseases to the pre-antibiotic era. Although most antibiotic-resistant bacteria originally emerged in hospitals, drug-resistant strains are becoming more common in the community. Factors that facilitate the development of resistance within the community can be categorized as behavioral or environmental/policy. Behavioral factors include inappropriate use of antibiotics and ineffective infection control and hygiene practices. Environmental/policy factors include the continued use of antibiotics in agriculture and the lack of new drug development. A multifaceted approach that includes behavioral strategies in the community and the political will to make difficult regulatory decisions will help to minimize the problem of antimicrobial resistance globally.

  1. Clinicians’ Views and Experiences of Interventions to Enhance the Quality of Antibiotic Prescribing for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anthierens, Sibyl; Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Cals, Jochen W.; Coenen, Samuel; Yardley, Lucy; Brookes-Howell, Lucy; Fernandez-Vandellos, Patricia; Krawczyk, Jaroslaw; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Llor, Carl; Butler, Christopher C.; Verheij, Theo; Goossens, Herman; Little, Paul; Francis, Nick A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence shows a high rate of unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions in primary care in Europe and the United States. Given the costs of widespread use and associated antibiotic resistance, reducing inappropriate use is a public health priority. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to explore clinicians’

  2. Medically Inappropriate or Futile Treatment: Deliberation and Justification 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misak, Cheryl J.; White, Douglas B.; Truog, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reframes the futility debate, moving away from the question “Who decides when to end what is considered to be a medically inappropriate or futile treatment?” and toward the question “How can society make policy that will best account for the multitude of values and conflicts involved in such decision-making?” It offers a pragmatist moral epistemology that provides us with (1) a clear justification of why it is important to take best standards, norms, and physician judgment seriously and (2) a clear justification of why ample opportunity must be made for patients, families, and society to challenge those standards and norms. PMID:26681796

  3. Quetiapine-Induced Syndrome of Inappropriate Secretion of Antidiuretic Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theocharis Koufakis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH can be induced by various conditions, including malignant neoplasms, infections, central nervous system disorders, and numerous drugs. We here report a case of a 65-year-old female patient, treated with quetiapine for schizophrenia, who presented with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and was finally diagnosed with quetiapine-induced SIADH. Quetiapine-associated hyponatremia is extremely uncommon and only a few, relevant reports can be found in the literature. This case underlines the fact that patients on antipsychotic medication and more specifically on quetiapine should be closely monitored and routinely tested for electrolyte disorders.

  4. Diagnosis of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Ellen Astrid; Bie, Peter; Ottesen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyponatremia is a frequent condition in elderly patients. In diagnostic workup, a 24-hour urine sample is used to measure urinary osmolality and urinary sodium concentration necessary to confirm the diagnosis of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH...... peptide (P = 0.007), elevated mean arterial blood pressure (P = 0.03), and lower plasma levels of creatinine (P = 0.002) compared to the controls. CONCLUSION: A spot urine sample seems to be sufficient to confirm the diagnosis of SIADH....

  5. Childhood urinary tract infection caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria: Risk factors and empiric therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyar Aksu, Nihal; Ekinci, Zelal; Dündar, Devrim; Baydemir, Canan

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated risk factors of childhood urinary tract infection (UTI) associated with extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria (ESBL-positive UTI) and evaluated antimicrobial resistance as well as empiric treatment of childhood UTI. The records of children with positive urine culture between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2012 were evaluated. Patients with positive urine culture for ESBL-producing bacteria were defined as the ESBL-positive group, whereas patients of the same gender and similar age with positive urine culture for non-ESBL-producing bacteria were defined as the ESBL-negative group. Each ESBL-positive patient was matched with two ESBL-negative patients. The ESBL-positive and negative groups consisted of 154 and 308 patients, respectively. Potential risk factors for ESBL-positive UTI were identified as presence of underlying disease, clean intermittent catheterization (CIC), hospitalization, use of any antibiotic and history of infection in the last 3 months (P infection in the last 3 months were identified as independent risk factors. In the present study, 324 of 462 patients had empiric therapy. Empiric therapy was inappropriate in 90.3% of the ESBL-positive group and in 4.5% of the ESBL-negative group. Resistance to nitrofurantoin was similar between groups (5.1% vs 1.2%, P = 0.072); resistance to amikacin was low in the ESBL-positive group (2.6%) and there was no resistance in the ESBL-negative group. Clean intermittent catheterization, hospitalization and history of infection in the last 3 months should be considered as risk factors for ESBL-positive UTI. The combination of ampicillin plus amikacin should be taken into consideration for empiric therapy in patients with acute pyelonephritis who have the risk factors for ESBL-positive UTI. Nitrofurantoin seems to be a logical choice for the empiric therapy of cystitis. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  6. Real-Time Clinical Decision Support Decreases Inappropriate Plasma Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neil; Baker, Steven A; Spain, David; Shieh, Lisa; Shepard, John; Hadhazy, Eric; Maggio, Paul; Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2017-08-01

    To curtail inappropriate plasma transfusions, we instituted clinical decision support as an alert upon order entry if the patient's recent international normalized ratio (INR) was 1.7 or less. The alert was suppressed for massive transfusion and within operative or apheresis settings. The plasma order was automatically removed upon alert acceptance while clinical exception reasons allowed for continued transfusion. Alert impact was studied comparing a 7-month control period with a 4-month intervention period. Monthly plasma utilization decreased 17.4%, from a mean ± SD of 3.40 ± 0.48 to 2.82 ± 0.6 plasma units per hundred patient days (95% confidence interval [CI] of difference, -0.1 to 1.3). Plasma transfused below an INR of 1.7 or less decreased from 47.6% to 41.6% (P = .0002; odds ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.69-0.89). The alert recommendation was accepted 33% of the time while clinical exceptions were chosen in the remaining cases (active bleeding, 31%; other clinical indication, 33%; and apheresis, 2%). Alert acceptance rate varied significantly among different provider specialties. Clinical decision support can help curtail inappropriate plasma use but needs to be part of a comprehensive strategy including audit and feedback for comprehensive, long-term changes. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. [Prevalence of potentially inappropriate drug prescription in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajreldines, A; Insua, J; Schnitzler, E

    2016-01-01

    One of the causes of preventable adverse drug events (ADES) in older patients constitutes inappropriate prescription of drugs (PIM). The PIM is where risks exceed the clinical benefit. Several instruments can be use to measure this problem, the most used are: a) Beers criteria; b) Screening tool to Older People Potentially inappropriate Prescription (STOPP); c) Screening tool to Alert Doctors to Right Appropriate indicated Treatments (START); d) The Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI). This study aims to assess the prevalence of PIM, in a population of older adults in three clinical scopes of university hospital. cross sectional study of 300 cases from a random sample of fields: hospitalization (n=100), ambulatory (n=100) and emergency (n=100), all patients over 65 years old or more who where treated at our hospital. 1355 prescription drugs were analized, finding patients hospitalized (PIM) of 57.7%, 55%, 26%, and 80% according to Beers, in ambulatory 36%, 36.5%, 5% and 52% with the same tools and in emergency 35%, 35%, 6% y 52% with the same tools. Was found significant association the PIM with polipharmacy with Beers, STOPP and MAI. results can be compare to world literature (26-80% vs 11-73.1%). The STOPP-START used in an integrated manner would be best estimating the problem of PIM. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Empire Redux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercau, Ezequiel

    from the legacies of empire. Taking decolonization as a starting point, this thesis demonstrates how the idea of a ‘British world’ gained a new lease of life vis-à-vis the Falklands, as the Islanders adopted the rhetorical mantle of ‘abandoned Britons’. Yet this new momentum was partial and fractured......The Falklands War was shrouded in symbolism and permeated with imperial rhetoric, imagery and memories, bringing to the fore divergent conceptions of Britishness, kinship and belonging. The current dispute, moreover, is frequently framed in terms of national identity, and accusations of imperialism......, as evinced by the developments triggered by the Argentine invasion in 1982. Despite the apparent firmness of the British government’s commitment to the Islands, cracks and fissures over the meaning of Britishness were simultaneously magnified. The perceived temporal dislocation of defending loyal Britons...

  9. 'Repeat' prescriptions and antibiotic resistance: findings from Australian community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, Ian; Hollingworth, Samantha; Pudmenzky, Alex; Rossato, Laurence; Kairuz, Therése

    2017-02-01

    Australians are among the highest users of antibiotics in the developed world. The primary aim was to determine the 'age' of antibiotic prescriptions at the time of dispensing as a possible contributor to antibiotic misuse and ultimately, resistance. The secondary aim was to test customised software to permit extraction and de-identification of dispensing records for analysis. Data were extracted and de-identified from computerised dispensing systems in three community pharmacies in Brisbane, Australia, according to a strict ethical protocol. All prescription records dispensed between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2012 were merged to form a complete dataset of 1 158 871 de-identified dispensing records which were analysed using Microsoft Excel ® . A retrospective drug utilisation study was conducted on a subset of 100 573 antibiotic records. In a substudy conducted at a single pharmacy site, all antibiotic records dispensed over a 4-month (winter) period were examined to determine the age of prescriptions. Nearly one in ten antibiotics (9.0%) was dispensed from prescriptions that were more than a month old, and over one in five (22.1%) were dispensed from a repeat prescription. Health system factors may contribute to inappropriate antibiotic use in Australia, including availability and validity of repeat antibiotic prescriptions. Government health departments, prescribers, pharmacists, other health professionals and consumers have to share the responsibility of ensuring that antibiotics are used appropriately. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Treating Wisely: The Surgeon's Role in Antibiotic Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeds, Ira L; Fabrizio, Anne; Cosgrove, Sara E; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2017-05-01

    : Antibiotic resistance continues to receive national attention as a leading public health threat. In 2015, President Barack Obama proposed a National Action Plan to Combat Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria to curb the rise of "superbugs," bacteria resistant to antibiotics of last resort. Whereas many antibiotics are prescribed appropriately to treat infections, there continue to be a large number of inappropriately prescribed antibiotics. Although much of the national attention with regards to stewardship has focused on primary care providers, there is a significant opportunity for surgeons to embrace this national imperative and improve our practices. Local quality improvement efforts suggest that antibiotic misuse for surgical disease is common. Opportunities exist as part of day-to-day surgical care as well as through surgeons' interactions with nonsurgeon colleagues and policy experts. This article discusses the scope of the antibiotic misuse in surgery for surgical patients, and provides immediate practice improvements and also advocacy efforts surgeons can take to address the threat. We believe that surgical antibiotic prescribing patterns frequently do not adhere to evidence-based practices; surgeons are in a position to mitigate their ill effects; and antibiotic stewardship should be a part of every surgeons' practice.

  11. Antibiotic resistance: are we all doomed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, P

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing and worrying problem associated with increased deaths and suffering for people. Overall, there are only two factors that drive antimicrobial resistance, and both can be controlled. These factors are the volumes of antimicrobials used and the spread of resistant micro-organisms and/or the genes encoding for resistance. The One Health concept is important if we want to understand better and control antimicrobial resistance. There are many things we can do to better control antimicrobial resistance. We need to prevent infections. We need to have better surveillance with good data on usage patterns and resistance patterns available across all sectors, both human and agriculture, locally and internationally. We need to act on these results when we see either inappropriate usage or resistance levels rising in bacteria that are of concern for people. We need to ensure that food and water sources do not spread multi-resistant micro-organisms or resistance genes. We need better approaches to restrict successfully what and how antibiotics are used in people. We need to restrict the use of 'critically important' antibiotics in food animals and the entry of these drugs into the environment. We need to ensure that 'One Health' concept is not just a buzz word but implemented. We need to look at all sectors and control not only antibiotic use but also the spread and development of antibiotic resistant bacteria - both locally and internationally. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  12. Appropriate antibiotic therapy in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Pieralli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Severe sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients in and outside Intensive Care Units. Early hemodynamic and respiratory support, along with prompt appropriate antimicrobial therapy and source control of the infectious process are cornerstone management strategies to improve survival. Antimicrobial therapy should be as much appropriate as possible, since inappropriate initial antimicrobial therapy is associated with poorer outcome in different clinical settings. When prescribing antibiotic therapy, drug’s characteristics, along with dosing, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic properties related to the drug and to the clinical scenario should be well kept in mind in order to achieve maximal success.

  13. Development of effective hospital-based antibiotic stewardship program. The role of infectious disease specialist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Chrysos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive antibiotic consumption and misuse is one of the main factors responsible for the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and has been associated with increased health care costs. Active intervention is necessary in changing antimicrobial prescribing practices. The Infection Control Committee and the administration of our hospital decided to implement an antibiotic stewardship program beginning in January 2016 in order to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use and to combat antibiotic resistance through improved prescribing practices. The antimicrobial stewardship team includes an ID specialist, physicians, infection control nurses, a microbiologist and a pharmacist who are responsible for the implementation of the program. Preauthorization by an ID specialist and prospective review is necessary for all pharmacy orders of antibiotics under restriction. Pre-intervention, we collected Pharmacy and hospital data regarding antibiotic consumption and numbers of patient-days for the years 2013-2015. We calculated antibiotic use in Defined Daily Doses (DDDs/100 patient-days. After one year, the antibiotic stewardship program was effective in reducing consumption of most antibiotics. The result of the implementation of the program in our hospital was a reduction about 17% of antibiotic DDDs/100 patient-days and about 21% of the antibiotic cost/100 patient-days. Education is an essential element of our program in order to influence prescribing behavior. Lectures and brochures are used to supplement strategies. Antibiotic stewardship programs have been shown from many studies to improve patient outcomes, reduce antibiotic resistance and save money.

  14. Antibiotic sales in rural and urban pharmacies in northern Vietnam: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The irrational overuse of antibiotics should be minimized as it drives the development of antibiotic resistance, but changing these practices is challenging. A better understanding is needed of practices and economic incentives for antibiotic dispensing in order to design effective interventions to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use. Here we report on both quantitative and qualitative aspects of antibiotic sales in private pharmacies in northern Vietnam. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted in which all drug sales were observed and recorded for three consecutive days at thirty private pharmacies, 15 urban and 15 rural, in the Hanoi region in 2010. The proportion of antibiotics to total drug sales was assessed and the revenue was calculated for rural and urban settings. Pharmacists and drug sellers were interviewed by a semi-structured questionnaire and in-depth interviews to understand the incentive structure of antibiotic dispensing. Results In total 2953 drug sale transactions (2083 urban and 870 rural) were observed. Antibiotics contributed 24% and 18% to the total revenue of pharmacies in urban and rural, respectively. Most antibiotics were sold without a prescription: 88% in urban and 91% in rural pharmacies. The most frequent reported reason for buying antibiotics was cough in the urban setting (32%) and fever in the rural area (22%). Consumers commonly requested antibiotics without having a prescription: 50% in urban and 28% in rural area. The qualitative data revealed that drug sellers and customer’s knowledge of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance were low, particularly in rural area. Conclusion Over the counter sales of antibiotic without a prescription remains a major problem in Vietnam. Suggested areas of improvement are enforcement of regulations and pricing policies and educational programs to increase the knowledge of drug sellers as well as to increase community awareness to reduce demand-side pressure for drug sellers to

  15. Making Antibiotic Choices: Formula Derivation and Usage in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop mathematical formulae to aid the selection of antibiotics most appropriate in the empirical treatment of infections. Methods: Formulae quantifying the characteristics of antibiotics with regard to their cost and activity against associated bacterial isolates of given infections were derived from probability laws ...

  16. Prevalence of septicaemia and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bloodstream infections are important causes of mortality and morbidity. Rapid empiric antibiotic therapy is often needed. Knowledge of epidemiological data of common pathogens and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern is needed for rapid therapy. This study was aimed at determining the common causes of septicaemia and ...

  17. Use and prescription of antibiotics in primary health care settings in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Wang, Pan; Wang, Xinghe; Zheng, Yingdong; Xiao, Yonghong

    2014-12-01

    Appropriate antibiotic use is a key strategy to control antibacterial resistance. The first step in achieving this is to identify the major problems in antibiotic prescription in health care facilities, especially in primary health care settings, which is where most patients receive medical care. To identify current patterns of antibiotic use and explore the reasons for inappropriate prescription in primary health care settings in China. A total of 48 primary health care facilities in China were randomly selected from 6 provinces at various levels of economic development. Data for the years 2009 through 2011 from 39 qualifying facilities (23 city and 16 rural primary health care centers) were analyzed retrospectively. The study sample consisted of prescription records for 7311 outpatient visits and 2888 inpatient hospitalizations. General health center information, drug usage, disease diagnoses, and antibiotic use by outpatients and inpatients were surveyed. Cases of inappropriate antibiotic prescription were identified. Most staff in the primary health care facilities had less than a college degree, and the medical staff consisted primarily of physician assistants, assistant pharmacists, nurses, and nursing assistants. The median (range) governmental contribution to each facility was 34.0% (3.6%-92.5%) of total revenue. The facilities prescribed a median (range) of 28 (8-111) types of antibiotics, including 34 (10-115) individual agents. Antibiotics were included in 52.9% of the outpatient visit prescription records: of these, only 39.4% were prescribed properly. Of the inpatients, 77.5% received antibiotic therapy: of these, only 24.6% were prescribed properly. Antibiotics were prescribed for 78.0% of colds and 93.5% of cases of acute bronchitis. Of the antibiotic prescriptions, 28.0% contained cephalosporins and 15.7% fluoroquinolones. A total of 55.0% of the antibiotic prescriptions were for antibiotic combination therapy with 2 or more agents. In nonsurgical

  18. Antibiotic Adjuvants: Rescuing Antibiotics from Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gerard D

    2016-11-01

    Rooted in the mechanism of action of antibiotics and subject to bacterial evolution, antibiotic resistance is difficult and perhaps impossible to overcome. Nevertheless, strategies can be used to minimize the emergence and impact of resistance. Antibiotic adjuvants offer one such approach. These are compounds that have little or no antibiotic activity themselves but act to block resistance or otherwise enhance antibiotic action. Antibiotic adjuvants are therefore delivered in combination with antibiotics and can be divided into two groups: Class I agents that act on the pathogen, and Class II agents that act on the host. Adjuvants offer a means to both suppress the emergence of resistance and rescue the activity of existing drugs, offering an orthogonal strategy complimentary to new antibiotic discovery VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Rates of inappropriate antiretroviral prescription among injection drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonner Simon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the survival benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART for the treatment of HIV infection are well established, the clinical management of HIV disease continues to present major challenges. There are particular concerns regarding access to appropriate HIV treatment among HIV-infected injection drug users (IDU. Methods In a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected IDU in Vancouver, Canada, we examined initial ART regimens vis-à-vis the provincial government's therapeutic guidelines at the time ART was initiated. Briefly, there have been four sets of guidelines: Era 1 (1992 to November 1995; double-drug (dual NRTIs ART for patients with a CD4 cell count of 350 or less; Era 2 (December 1995 to May 1996; double-drug therapy for patients with a CD4+ cell count of 500 or less; Era 3 (June 1996 to June 1997; triple-drug therapy (dual NRTIs with a PI or NNRTI for patients who had a plasma viral load of > 100,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL; dual therapy with two NRTIs for those with a plasma viral load of 5,000 to 100,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL; Era 4 (since July 1997; universal use of triple drug therapy as first-line treatment. Results Between May 1996 and May 2003, 431 HIV-infected individuals were enrolled into the cohort. By May 31, 2003, 291 (67.5% individuals had initiated ART. We noted instances of inappropriate antiretroviral prescription in each guideline era, with 9 (53% in Era 1, 3 (12% in Era 2, 22 (28% in Era 3, and 23 (15% in Era 4. Of the 57 subjects who received an inappropriate ART regimen initially, 14 never received the appropriate therapy; among the remaining 43, the median time to the initiation of a guideline-appropriate ART regimen was 12 months (inter-quartile range 5 – 20. Conclusion The present study identified measurable rates of guideline-inappropriate ART prescription for patients who were injection drug users. Rates were highest in the era of dual therapy, although high rates persisted into the triple

  20. Different patterns of inappropriate antimicrobial use in surgical and medical units at a tertiary care hospital in Switzerland: a prevalence survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusini, Alexia; Rampini, Silvana K; Bansal, Vineeta; Ledergerber, Bruno; Kuster, Stefan P; Ruef, Christian; Weber, Rainer

    2010-11-16

    Unnecessary or inappropriate use of antimicrobials is associated with the emergence of antimicrobial resistance, drug toxicity, increased morbidity and health care costs. Antimicrobial use has been reported to be incorrect or not indicated in 9-64% of inpatients. We studied the quality of antimicrobial therapy and prophylaxis in hospitalized patients at a tertiary care hospital to plan interventions to improve the quality of antimicrobial prescription. Experienced infectious diseases (ID) fellows performed audits of antimicrobial use at regular intervals among all patients--with or without antimicrobials--hospitalized in predefined surgical, medical, haemato-oncological, or intensive care units. Data were collected from medical and nursing patient charts with a standardized questionnaire. Appropriateness of antimicrobial use was evaluated using a modified algorithm developed by Gyssens et al.; the assessment was double-checked by a senior ID specialist. We evaluated 1577 patients of whom 700 (44.4%) had antimicrobials, receiving a total of 1270 prescriptions. 958 (75.4%) prescriptions were for therapy and 312 (24.6%) for prophylaxis. 37.0% of therapeutic and 16.6% of prophylactic prescriptions were found to be inappropriate. Most frequent characteristics of inappropriate treatments included: No indication (17.5%); incorrect choice of antimicrobials (7.6%); incorrect application of drugs (9.3%); and divergence from institutional guidelines (8%). Characteristics of inappropriate prophylaxes were: No indication (9%); incorrect choice of antimicrobials (1%); duration too long or other inappropriate use (6.7%). Patterns of inappropriate antimicrobial varied widely in the different hospital units; empirical prescriptions were more frequently incorrect than prescriptions based on available microbiological results. Audits of individual patient care provide important data to identify local problems in antimicrobial prescription practice. In our study, antimicrobial

  1. Different patterns of inappropriate antimicrobial use in surgical and medical units at a tertiary care hospital in Switzerland: a prevalence survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia Cusini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Unnecessary or inappropriate use of antimicrobials is associated with the emergence of antimicrobial resistance, drug toxicity, increased morbidity and health care costs. Antimicrobial use has been reported to be incorrect or not indicated in 9-64% of inpatients. We studied the quality of antimicrobial therapy and prophylaxis in hospitalized patients at a tertiary care hospital to plan interventions to improve the quality of antimicrobial prescription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Experienced infectious diseases (ID fellows performed audits of antimicrobial use at regular intervals among all patients--with or without antimicrobials--hospitalized in predefined surgical, medical, haemato-oncological, or intensive care units. Data were collected from medical and nursing patient charts with a standardized questionnaire. Appropriateness of antimicrobial use was evaluated using a modified algorithm developed by Gyssens et al.; the assessment was double-checked by a senior ID specialist. We evaluated 1577 patients of whom 700 (44.4% had antimicrobials, receiving a total of 1270 prescriptions. 958 (75.4% prescriptions were for therapy and 312 (24.6% for prophylaxis. 37.0% of therapeutic and 16.6% of prophylactic prescriptions were found to be inappropriate. Most frequent characteristics of inappropriate treatments included: No indication (17.5%; incorrect choice of antimicrobials (7.6%; incorrect application of drugs (9.3%; and divergence from institutional guidelines (8%. Characteristics of inappropriate prophylaxes were: No indication (9%; incorrect choice of antimicrobials (1%; duration too long or other inappropriate use (6.7%. Patterns of inappropriate antimicrobial varied widely in the different hospital units; empirical prescriptions were more frequently incorrect than prescriptions based on available microbiological results. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Audits of individual patient care provide important data to identify local

  2. Potentially inappropriate prescriptions in patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soerensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt

    2016-01-01

    Background Very little is known about the general appropriateness of prescribing for psychiatric patients. Aims To identify prevalence and types of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) of psychotropic and somatic medications, to assess the severity of potential clinical consequences...... and to identify possible predictive factors of PIP in a sample of adult psychiatric in-patients. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional design using medication reviews by clinical pharmacologists to identify PIP during a 3-month period. The setting was in-patient units in a psychiatric department of a Danish...... the most frequent PIP. Predictive factors for PIP were polypharmacy (>5 prescriptions) and having one or more somatic diagnoses. Conclusion PIP is common in psychiatric patients and potentially fatal. Particularly polypharmacy (>5 prescriptions) and concomitant somatic illness were associated...

  3. Prevalence of nasopharyngeal antibiotic-Resistant pneumococcal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Pneumococcal resistance was significant in this group of children with easy access to paediatric services and antibiotic use. The implication of such high resistance for the treatment of pneumococcal diseases is that high-dose amoxicillin is the preferred empirical oral therapy for treatment of otitis media.

  4. Inappropriate sexual behaviour experienced by speech-language therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T H; de Seriere, J; Boddington, L

    1999-01-01

    Inappropriate sexual behaviour by clients or patients of health professionals has been noted as a considerable problem in a number of professions. Similarly, sexual harassment by colleagues or employers has been identified as causing stress and harm. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the experience of speech-language therapists in New Zealand of inappropriate sexual behaviour (ISB) by colleagues, clients, and care givers of clients. A questionnaire developed by McComas and colleagues to investigate ISB directed by patients at physical therapists in Canada was adapted to meet the broader requirements of this study. This questionnaire was sent to all members of the New Zealand Speech-Language Therapists' Association and to current third- and fourth-year students in the Bachelor of Speech and Language Therapy degree programme in 1994. The overall return rate was 70%. A large number of respondents (81%) reported experiencing some level of ISB. The number of incidents of ISB from clients and colleagues was identified with equal frequency; care givers less frequently. Fewer students than qualified therapists reported ISB as sexual harassment. ISB affects work performance (e.g. absenteeism) and causes psychological reactions (e.g. stress). A majority of respondents reported being satisfied with how they handled ISB but considered there would be value in having training for both qualified and student therapists in managing such behaviour. Conclusions drawn from the study are that colleagues as well as clients are a serious source of ISB for qualified and student speech-language therapists; that negative effects in this group are similar to those in other professions; that speech-language therapists experience less ISB from clients than some other professions; and that, despite legal steps to curb sexual harassment, it continues to be an issue that requires local administrative and educative attention.

  5. Syndrome of inappropriately low-pressure acute hydrocephalus (SILPAH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Mark G; Price, Angel V

    2012-01-01

    Most patients with acute hydrocephalus have ventriculomegaly and high intracranial pressure (ICP). However, there is a subset of patients who are symptomatic with acute ventriculomegaly and inappropriately low ICP. Two patient groups were defined. Each patient presented with clinical deterioration that included a significant decrease in level of consciousness with new and significant ventriculomegaly. Patients in group 1 (n = 10) were managed without endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV). Group 2 was a series of patients (n = 10) managed with ETV. Treatment for both groups involved insertion of an external ventricular drain (EVD) with ICP <5 cmH(2)O. Further treatment consisted of either neck wrapping with a tensor bandage and/or lowering the EVD to negative levels to facilitate drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which resulted in clinical improvement and resolution of ventriculomegaly. All 20 patients had anatomical obstruction to CSF flow into the subarachnoid space (SAS) confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with cine MRI studies. Group 1 patients were treated until shunt revision/insertion was possible (n = 7), ICP normalized, and the EVD could be removed (n = 2), or death (n = 1) occurred. Patients in group 2 all underwent ETV, and ICP patterns normalized in all. Group 2 patients were managed with an EVD until shunt revision/insertion was required (n = 2), ICP normalized and the EVD could be removed (n = 7), or death (n = 1) occurred. The syndrome of inappropriately low-pressure acute hydrocephalus (SILPAH) is an important entity in both children and adults. A possible hypothesis invokes loss of an effective SAS. ETV reestablishes communication between the SAS and ventricles, producing a rapid return of normal ICP dynamics and a significant decrease in the number of shunt-dependent patients.

  6. Appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in general practice: Comparison between Denmark and Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rún Sigurðardóttir, Nanna; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Munck, Anders; Bjerrum, Lars

    2015-01-01

    To compare the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) in two countries with different prevalence of antimicrobial resistance: Denmark and Iceland. A cross-sectional study. General practitioners (GPs) in Denmark (n = 78) and Iceland (n = 21) registered all patients with URTI according to the Audit Project Odense (APO) method during a three-week period in the winter months of 2008 and 2009. Appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing in patients with URTI in Denmark and Iceland. A total of 1428 patients were registered (Denmark: n = 1208; Iceland: n = 220). A majority of patients in both countries were prescribed antibiotics, and only a minority of the prescriptions could be classified as appropriate prescribing. In general, Icelandic GPs more often prescribed antibiotics (Iceland = 75.8% vs. Denmark = 59.3%), but Danish GPs had a higher percentage of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for sinusitis, and Icelandic GPs for pharyngotonsillitis. No differences were found for acute otitis media (AOM). The different antibiotic prescribing patterns between Denmark and Iceland could not fully be explained by different symptoms and signs among patients. Icelandic GPs have a higher antibiotic prescribing rate compared with Danish GPs, but the percentage of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing is highest in Denmark for sinusitis, and in Iceland for pharyngotonsillitis. Key points Within the Nordic countries there are marked differences in antimicrobial resistance and antibiotic use. Iceland differs from Denmark by a higher antibiotic prescribing rate and a higher prevalence of antimicrobial resistance. The majority of antibiotics are prescribed in primary care and most often for upper respiratory infections (URTIs). Only a minor amount of antibiotic prescriptions for URTIs can be classified as appropriate; inappropriate antibiotic prescribing is higher in Denmark than in Iceland for sinusitis and the opposite for

  7. Evaluation of new antimicrobials for the hospital formulary. Policies restricting antibiotic use in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Miquel; Delgado, Olga; Puigventós, Francesc; Corzo, Juan E; Cercenado, Emilia; Martínez, José Antonio

    2013-09-01

    In Spain, the inclusion of new antibiotics in hospital formularies is performed by the Infection Policy Committee or the Pharmacy and Therapeutic Committee, although now the decision is moving to a regional level. Criteria for the evaluation of new drugs include efficacy, safety and cost. For antimicrobial drugs evaluation it is necessary to consider local sensibility and impact in bacterial resistance to determinate the therapeutic positioning. There is compelling evidence that the use of antibiotics is associated with increasing bacterial resistance, and a great number of antibiotics are used incorrectly. In order to decrease the inappropriate use of antibiotics, several approaches have been proposed. Limiting the use of antimicrobials through formulary restrictions, often aimed at drugs with a specific resistance profile, shows benefits in improving antimicrobial susceptibilities and decreasing colonization by drug-resistant organisms. However, the restriction of one agent may result in the increased utilization of other agents. By using antibiotic cycling, the amount of antibiotics is maintained below the threshold where bacterial resistance develops, thus preserving highly efficient antibiotics. Unfortunately, cumulative evidence to date suggests that antibiotic cycling has limited efficacy in preventing antibiotic resistance. Finally, although there is still little clinical evidence available on antibiotic heterogeneity, the use of most of the existing antimicrobial classes could limit the emergence of resistance. This review summarizes information regarding antibiotic evaluation and available restrictive strategies to limit the use of antibiotics at hospitals with the aim of curtailing increasing antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Enteral Antibiotics are Non-inferior to Intravenous Antibiotics After Complicated Appendicitis in Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleif, Jakob; Rasmussen, Louise; Fonnes, Siv

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prolonging post-operative antibiotic treatment beyond 3 days does not seem to reduce the incidence of post-operative abscess formation or wound infection after surgery for complicated appendicitis. The route of administration seems to be based on an empirical basis. Using enteral...... antibiotics could reduce length of stay and reduce overall costs. We aimed to examine whether treatment with enteral antibiotics during the first three post-operative days is non-inferior to intravenous antibiotics regarding intra-abdominal abscess formation or wound infection after surgery for complicated...... of surgery. Route of antibiotic administration for the first three post-operative days was registered for all patients. RESULTS: A total of 1141 patients were included in the study. The overall risk of developing an intra-abdominal abscess was 6.7% (95% CI 5.2%; 8.1%), and the risk of wound infection was 1...

  9. Self-medication with antibiotics in Jordanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Al-Husein, Belal A; Alzoubi, Firas; Masadeh, Majed M; Al-Horani, Mohammad Ali S

    2007-01-01

    A survey was conducted to estimate the prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics in Jordan and evaluate the factors associated with antibiotic misuse. Validated questionnaire was used to collect data from a sample of 1943 households (9281 persons) selected from among different cities in Jordan. 842 (39.5%) of 2133 antibiotic users identified via the survey had used antibiotics without a prescription within a one-month study period. Self-medication with antibiotics was found to be significantly associated with age, income, and level of education. The main reason for self-medication as reported by the participants was their previous experience on the efficacy of treatment. The main sources of antibiotics were the previously prescribed pharmaceuticals stored in the household and those purchased in pharmacies. The prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics in Jordan is alarmingly high. Given the growing global resistance to antibiotics and the documented health problems related to their inappropriate use, our findings may have major public health policy implications in Jordan.

  10. Perception of acceptable antibiotic stewardship strategies in outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauffrey, V; Kivits, J; Pulcini, C; Boivin, J M

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are still often inappropriately prescribed in France despite specific measures being taken for over 10years. The 25% decrease in antibiotic prescription advocated in the 2011-2016 National Antibiotic Plan seems difficult to achieve. One of the strategies currently considered in France is the use of a specific prescription form dedicated to antibiotics, with an educational message for patients. We aimed to evaluate the acceptability - by primary care prescribers - of this measure and to evaluate their perception of other antibiotic stewardship strategies. Qualitative study conducted among family physicians, pediatricians, dermatologists, dentists, and ENT specialists using semi-structured interviews. A thematic and framework analysis was then performed. Thirty prescribing physicians practicing in a specific region of France were included in the study. The dedicated prescription form for antibiotics was deemed excessive and questionable. Other measures, not directly targeting prescribers, were rather well perceived: the unit sales of antibiotics, the restricted reporting of susceptibility tests, or the limitation of the number of molecules available in outpatient settings. The results of this exploratory study may guide the national antibiotic stewardship policy in France. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  11. [Change in attitude towards antibiotic prescriptions among Icelandic general practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthíasdóttir, Anna Mjöll; Guðnason, Thórólfur; Halldórsson, Matthías; Haraldsson, Ásgeir; Kristinsson, Karl G

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic use is a leading cause of antibiotic resistance and it is therefore important to reduce unnecessary prescribing in Iceland where antibiotic use is relatively high. The purpose of this study was to explore antibiotic prescribing practices among Icelandic physicians and compare the results with results of comparable studies from 1991 and 1995 conducted by the Directorate of Health, Iceland. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among all general practitioners registered in Iceland in 1991 and 1995 and all physicians registered in March 2014. Data was collected with questionnaires regarding diagnosis and treatment of simple urinary tract infection, acute otitis media and pharyngitis. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed and level of significance p≤0.05. Response rates were 85% and 93% in 1991 and 1995 but 31% in 2014. Proportion of physicians who consider themselves prescribing antibiotics more than 10 times per week was 36% in 1991, 32% in 1995 and 21% in 2014. Proportion of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole as first choice for simple urinary tract infection reduced from 43% and 45% to 8% in 2014. In 2014, general practitioners considered themselves 87% less likely to prescribe an antibiotic for acute otitis media than in 1991 (pAntibiotic prescribing practices have changed significantly in the past two decades in Iceland becoming more in line with clinical guidelines. Improvements are still needed to further reduce inappropriate antibiotic use.

  12. Antibiotic prescribing in public and private practice: a cross-sectional study in primary care clinics in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Rahman, Norazida; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Sivasampu, Sheamini

    2016-05-17

    Antibiotic overuse is driving the emergence of antibiotic resistance worldwide. Good data on prescribing behaviours of healthcare providers are needed to support antimicrobial stewardship initiatives. This study examined the differences in antibiotic prescribing rates of public and private primary care clinics in Malaysia. We used data from the National Medical Care Survey (NMCS), a nationwide cluster sample of Malaysian public and private primary care clinics in 2014. NMCS contained demographic, diagnoses and prescribing from 129 public clinics and 416 private clinics. We identified all encounters who were prescribed antibiotic and analyse the prescribing rate, types of antibiotics, and diagnoses that resulted in antibiotic. Five thousand eight hundred ten encounters were prescribed antibiotics; antibiotic prescribing rate was 21.1 % (public clinics 6.8 %, private clinics 30.8 %). Antibiotic prescribing was higher in private clinics where they contributed almost 87 % of antibiotics prescribed in primary care. Upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) was the most frequent diagnosis in patients receiving antibiotic therapy and accounted for 49.2 % of prescriptions. Of the patients diagnosed with URTI, 46.2 % received antibiotic treatment (public 16.8 %, private 57.7 %). Penicillins, cephalosporins and macrolides were the most commonly prescribed antibiotics and accounted for 30.7, 23.6 and 16.0 % of all antibiotics, respectively. More recently available broad-spectrum antibiotics such as azithromycin and quinolones were more frequently prescribed in private clinics. Antibiotic prescribing rates are high in both public and private primary care settings in Malaysia, especially in the latter. This study provides evidence of excessive and inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for self-limiting conditions. These data highlights the needs for more concerted interventions targeting both prescribers and public. Improvement strategies should focus on reducing

  13. Antibiotic Treatment Strategies for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Douwe F.; Van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.; Van Elden, Leontine J R; Thijsen, Steven F T; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Boersma, Wim G.; Compaijen, Clara J.; Van Der Wall, Eva; Prins, Jan M.; Oosterheert, Jan J.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The choice of empirical antibiotic treatment for patients with clinically suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) who are admitted to non-intensive care unit (ICU) hospital wards is complicated by the limited availability of evidence. We compared strategies of empirical treatment

  14. Antibiotic Resistance in Children with Recurrent or Complicated Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidal S Younish

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric urine culture isolates are becoming increasingly resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Empirical treatment with Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX or Cephalexin as the initial drug is ineffective. Nitrofurantoin and Nalidixic acid can be considered as the first line antibiotics for prophylaxis and or treatment of patients with recurrent UTI, while Meropenam and Ciprofloxacin can be used empirically in treating patients with complicated UTI. Key words: Antibiotic resistance, Complicated, Recurrent, Urinary tract infection

  15. Potentially inappropriate medication use in a city of Southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Cunha Xavier Pinto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Potentially inappropriate medication use by the Diamantina (Minas Gerais State population was investigated by analyzing medicine consumption, self-medication, polypharmacy and drug interactions of medicines prescribed among those interviewed. Level of knowledge about rational drug use and its relationship to socio-economic variables was also evaluated using a semi-structured questionnaire. This survey was based on stratified sampling of 423 individuals selected randomly. The prevalence of prescription drug consumption was 42.32% (n=179 and cardiovascular drugs were the most prescribed. Drug interactions were found in 45.81% (n=82 of prescriptions and 92.68% (n=76 of these interactions were moderate, with co-administration of cardiovascular drugs occurring in more than half of the cases. The inappropriate use of medication, according to Beers criteria, occurred in 44.73% of prescriptions to the elderly. The prevalence of self-medication was 63.34% (n=268 while 21.99% (n=91 of individuals administered medications to their children without formal prescriptions, where this practice was associated to analgesic/antipyretic consumption. The population showed a high prevalence of inappropriate use of drugs across all strata of society, representing an issue requiring effective actions to promote rational use of medicines.O consumo inapropriado de medicamentos pela população de Diamantina-MG foi investigado através da análise do consumo de medicamentos, automedicação, polifarmácia e interações medicamentosas prescritas aos entrevistados. Também foi avaliado o nível de conhecimento sobre uso racional de medicamentos e sua relação com variáveis sócio-econômicas através de um questionário semi-estruturado. Este estudo transversal foi baseado em amostragem estratificada e contou com a participação de 423 indivíduos selecionados aleatoriamente. A prevalência do consumo de medicamentos prescritos foi de 42,32% (n=179, sendo os

  16. Appropriateness of antibiotic prescription for targeted therapy of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria: assessment of the most common improper uses in a tertiary hospital in southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viceconte, Giulio; Maraolo, Alberto Enrico; Iula, Vita Dora; Catania, Maria Rosaria; Tosone, Grazia; Orlando, Raffaele

    2017-09-01

    A huge proportion of antibiotic therapies for infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR) are inappropriate. In this study, we described the most common causes of inappropriateness of definitive antibiotic regimes in a large university hospital in southern Italy and we evaluated the impact on microbial eradication, length of stay, 30-day readmission and mortality. We retrospectively assessed 45 patients who received a definitive antibiotic therapy after isolation of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. strains between 2014 and 2015. From the literature, we set a series of criteria to retrospectively determine the appropriateness of the therapy. In all, 61% of the prescribed antibiotic regimes were found to be inappropriate, especially due to incorrect drug dosage. It emerged that meropenem was the antibiotic most frequently inappropriately used. In 46% of infections caused by MDR but not extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenems were inappropriately administered. Microbial eradication was achieved in 87% of the appropriate therapy group compared to 31% of the inappropriate therapy group (chi-square=6.750, p<0.027). No statistically significant association was found between inappropriate therapy and the length of stay (chi-square=3.084, p=0.101) and 30-day readmission (p=0.103). Definitive antibiotic therapy in infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria in a large university hospital is often inappropriate, especially due to the drug dosing regimen, particularly in the case of meropenem and colistin. This inappropriateness has a significant impact on post-treatment microbial eradication in specimens collected after antibiotic therapy.

  17. Working Together to Define Antibiotic Appropriateness: Point Prevalence Survey in 47 Intensive Care Units from 12 US Hospitals, Partnership for Quality Care, March 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Kavita K; Ostrowsky, Belinda; Abbo, Lilian M; Srinivasan, Arjun; Bartash, Rachel; Cassera, Fred; Fleisher, Jorge; Kubiak, David W; Letourneau, Alyssa R; Nori, Priya; Parodi, Stephen; Aragon, Laura; Dollard, Eliza; Gagliardo, Christina; Ghitan, Monica; Giles, Amber; Mayer, Suri; Quevedo, Jennifer; Rieg, Gunter; Shteyman, Galina; Vargas, Jaclyn; Kelley, Shannon; Silver, Phyllis

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background A national assessment of antibiotic appropriateness in intensive care units (ICUs) with benchmarking was performed to assist antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs) identify improvement opportunities. Methods A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tool was adapted by an expert panel from the Partnership for Quality Care (PQC), a coalition dedicated to high quality care in US hospitals, to validate appropriate antibiotic use measurement via a point prevalence survey on a single day. Data were collected by ASP personnel at each hospital, de-identified and submitted in aggregate to PQC for benchmarking. Hospitals identified reasons for inappropriate antibiotic use by category and antibiotics misused. Results Forty-seven ICUs from 12 PQC hospitals participated: California (2), Florida (2), Massachusetts (3), Minnesota (1), and New York (4). Most hospitals identified as teaching (83%) with 252-1550 bed size (median: 563) and 20–270 licensed ICU beds (median: 70). All hospitals reported a formal ASP. On March 1, 2017, 362 (54%) of 667 patients in participating ICUs were on antibiotics (range: 8-81 patients); 1 patient was not assessed. Of the remaining 361 antibiotic regimens, 112 (31%) were identified as inappropriate from among all 12 hospitals (range: 9-82%) (figure). The table displays inappropriate antibiotic use by ICU type. Reasons for inappropriate use included unnecessarily broad spectrum of activity (29%), duration longer than necessary (21%), and treatment of a non-infectious syndrome (19%). The antibiotic most commonly misused was vancomycin in 7 (58%) hospitals. Conclusion Up to 80% of antibiotic use in some ICUs is inappropriate, underscoring the need for ASP interventions, standardized assessment tools and benchmarking. Strategies should focus on de-escalation of broad-spectrum antibiotics and reducing duration of therapy. Disclosures D. W. Kubiak, Shionogi: Consultant, Consulting fee. Astellas Pharma: Consultant, Consulting

  18. Cross-border comparison of antibiotic prescriptions among children and adolescents between the north of the Netherlands and the north-west of Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dik, Jan-Willem H.; Sinha, Bhanu; Friedrich, Alex W.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; Hendrix, Ron; Koeck, Robin; Bijker, Bert; Postma, Maarten J.; Freitag, Michael H.; Glaeske, Gerd; Hoffmann, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide problem and inappropriate prescriptions are a cause. Especially among children, prescriptions tend to be high. It is unclear how they differ in bordering regions. This study therefore examined the antibiotic prescription prevalence among children in

  19. Cross border comparison of antibiotic prescriptions among children and adolescents between the north of the Netherlands and the north-west of Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dik, J.W.; Hoffmann, F.; Lo Ten Foe, JR; Bijker, B.; Saß, David; Postma, MJ; Hendrix, R.; Sinha, B.; Glaeske, G; Friedrich, AW

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Antimicrobial resistance is becoming a growing threat to public health worldwide. Inappropriate prescriptions and use of antibiotics are known to contribute to the problem. Within Europe there are wide variations in antibiotic use. Especially with paediatric patients, prevalence is known

  20. Inappropriate self-medication among adolescents and its association with lower medication literacy and substance use

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chun-Hsien; Chang, Fong-Ching; Hsu, Sheng-Der; Chi, Hsueh-Yun; Huang, Li-Jung; Yeh, Ming-Kung

    2017-01-01

    Background While self-medication is common, inappropriate self-medication has potential risks. This study assesses inappropriate self-medication among adolescents and examines the relationships among medication literacy, substance use, and inappropriate self-medication. Method In 2016, a national representative sample of 6,226 students from 99 primary, middle, and high schools completed an online self-administered questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine factor...

  1. Biofilm processes in treating mariculture wastewater may be a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Zhang, Shenghua; Ye, Chengsong; Lin, Wenfang; Zhang, Menglu; Chen, Lihua; Li, Jinmei; Yu, Xin

    2017-05-15

    Antibiotics are heavily used in Chinese mariculture, but only a small portion of the added antibiotics are absorbed by living creatures. Biofilm processes are universally used in mariculture wastewater treatment. In this study, removal of antibiotics (norfloxacin, rifampicin, and oxytetracycline) from wastewater by moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) and the influence of antibiotics on reactor biofilm were investigated. The results demonstrated that there was no significant effect of sub-μg/L-sub-mg/L concentrations of antibiotics on TOC removal. Moreover, the relative abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and antibiotic resistance bacteria (ARB) in MBBR biofilm increased because of selective pressure of antibiotics. In addition, antibiotics decreased the diversity of the biofilm bacterial community and altered bacterial community structure. These findings provide an empirical basis for the development of appropriate practices for mariculture, and suggest that disinfection and advanced oxidation should be applied to eliminate antibiotics, ARGs, and ARB from mariculture wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in an Irish elderly population in primary care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Cristín

    2009-12-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT: * Potentially inappropriate prescribing in older people is a well-documented problem and has been associated with adverse drug reactions and hospitalization. * Beers\\' criteria, Screening Tool of Older Persons\\' potentially inappropriate Prescriptions (STOPP) and Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (START) are screening tools that have been formulated to help physicians and pharmacists identify potentially inappropriate prescribing and potential prescribing omissions. * The prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing and prescribing omissions in the elderly population presenting to hospital with acute illness is high according to STOPP and START criteria.

  3. Between two beds: inappropriately delayed discharges from hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmås, Tor Helge; Islam, Mohammad Kamrul; Kjerstad, Egil

    2013-12-01

    Acknowledging the necessity of a division of labour between hospitals and social care services regarding treatment and care of patients with chronic and complex conditions, is to acknowledge the potential conflict of interests between health care providers. A potentially important conflict is that hospitals prefer comparatively short length of stay (LOS) at hospital, while social care services prefer longer LOS all else equal. Furthermore, inappropriately delayed discharges from hospital, i.e. bed blocking, is costly for society. Our aim is to discuss which factors that may influence bed blocking and to quantify bed blocking costs using individual Norwegian patient data, merged with social care and hospital data. The data allow us to divide hospital LOS into length of appropriate stay (LAS) and length of delay (LOD), the bed blocking period. We find that additional resources allocated to social care services contribute to shorten LOD indicating that social care services may exploit hospital resources as a buffer for insufficient capacity. LAS increases as medical complexity increases indicating hospitals incentives to reduce LOS are softened by considerations related to patients’ medical needs. Bed blocking costs constitute a relatively large share of the total costs of inpatient care.

  4. An inappropriate tool: criminal law and HIV in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csete, Joanne; Dube, Siddharth

    2010-09-01

    Asian countries have applied criminal sanctions widely in areas directly relevant to national HIV programmes and policies, including criminalization of HIV transmission, sex work, homosexuality and drug injection. This criminalization may impede universal access to HIV prevention and treatment services in Asia and undermine vulnerable people's ability to be part of the HIV response. To review the status of application of criminal law in key HIV-related areas in Asia and analyze its impact. Review of literature and application of human rights norms to analysis of criminal law measures. Criminal laws in the areas considered here and their enforcement, while intended to reduce HIV transmission, are inappropriate and counterproductive with respect to health and human rights. Governments should remove punitive laws that impede the HIV response and should ensure meaningful participation of people living with HIV, people who use illicit drugs, sex workers and men who have sex with men in combating stigma and discrimination and developing rights-centered approaches to HIV.

  5. Inappropriate eating behavior: a longitudinal study with female adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo de Sousa Fortes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the inappropriate eating behaviors (IEB of female adolescents over a one-year period. Methods: 290 adolescents aged between 11 and 14 years old participated in the three research stages (T1: first four months, T2: second four months and T3: third four months. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26 was applied to assess the IEB. Weight and height were measured to calculate body mass index (BMI in the three study periods. Analysis of variance for repeated measures was used to analyze the data, adjusted for the scores of the Body Shape Questionnaire and the Brazil Economic Classification Criteria. Results: Girls at T1 showed a higher frequency of IEB compared to T2 (p=0.001 and T3 (p=0.001. The findings also indicated higher values for BMI in T3 in relation to T1 (p=0.04. The other comparisons did not show statistically significant differences. Conclusions: IEB scores of female adolescents declined over one year.

  6. Antibiotic policies and control of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Ian M

    2002-08-01

    The current worldwide pandemic of antibiotic resistance shows no signs of abating. It is clear that it is driven mainly by heavy and often inappropriate antibiotic use. Although control measures are widely practised, it is important that we assess their efficacy critically in order to concentrate expensive control efforts where they will be most effective. The past year has seen much activity in this area, with evidence-based assessments of the literature according to strict guidelines, as well as progress in basic science studies of mechanisms of resistance, and their causes and relations to pathogenicity and adaptability. The present review summarizes current developments in the causes of antibiotic resistance, the classification of antibiotic stewardship and control measures, the evidence base for their efficacy, current problems in hospital practice, the adaptability of bacteria, the content of antibiotic policies and anticipated activities. The conclusions from the published literature are that much of it that pertains to changing prescribing practices does not stand up to modern evidence-based analysis concepts. Nevertheless, we can learn from experience in changing other areas of medical practice. We must be pragmatic and must not expect to change the world, but rather take it step by step, recognizing barriers and measuring outcomes and quality indicators. Studies into the molecular basis of resistance confirm the superb genetic adaptability of micro-organisms. They will always be several steps ahead of us. Nevertheless, we are learning how to modify our prescribing habits to minimize resistance, not only by using antibiotics less frequently but also by altering dosing schedules in various ways.

  7. Outpatient use of antibiotics in children in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Čižman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antibiotics are among the most common drugs prescribed in outpatient settings. It is estimated that up to 50 % are prescribed unnecessarily or inappropriately. To plan the actions for optimizing the use of antibiotics, we conducted a national antibiotic consumption study in children aged 0–18 years in the period between 2003 and 2015.Methods: In this national retrospective research we analyzed outpatient antibiotic consumption using ATC/DDD classification. The use of antibiotics was recorded in relation to the pattern of prescription, age, gender and health region.Results: The total consumption of antibiotics decreased by 35 % from 979 to 636 prescriptions per 1000 children/year (PTY during the whole study period. Te use of all antibiotic classes decreased (except for quinolones and nitrofuran derivatives by 12.5 %–81 %. In all those years we recorded the highest consumption in children aged 1 to 4 years (2184–1160 PTY. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic in children aged 0 to 4 years, penicillin V among 5 to 14 years and co-amoxiclav among adolescents aged 15 to 19 years. In health regions in the northeastern part of Slovenia much more antibiotics were prescribed than in other regions. In 2015, 65 % of prescriptions were prescribed by pediatricians and school medicine specialists, 16 % by physicians without specialization, 14 % by GPs/family doctors and 5 % by other specialists.Conclusions: Despite the decrease in outpatient antibiotic use in children and adolescents in Slovenia, the overall and especially broad-spectrum antibiotic consumption (amoxicillin with clavulanic acid, azithromycin and second/third generation cephalosporins is still too high. It is necessary to strengthen activities to reduce prescribing, particularly for acute (upper respiratory tract infections.

  8. A Survey of Anti-biotic Usage and its Effects in Port Harcourt City in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    inappropriate use of antibacterial drugs can lead to the development of resistance. Drug use is the end of therapeutic consultation. ... of drug resistance which often leads to failure in therapy. Surveys on antibiotic use in .... from the research findings, it was discovered that the counseling done by the pharmacists were ...

  9. Polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use in patients with dementia: an underresearched problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Multimorbidity and polypharmacy are increasingly prevalent across healthcare systems and settings as global demographic trends shift towards increased proportions of older people in populations. Numerous studies have demonstrated an association between polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP), and have reported high prevalence of PIP across settings of care in Europe and North America and, as a consequence, increased risk of adverse drug reactions, healthcare utilization, morbidity and mortality. These studies have not focused specifically on people with dementia, despite the high risk of adverse drug reactions and PIP in this patient cohort. This narrative review considers the evidence currently available in the area, including studies examining prevalence of PIP in older people with dementia, how appropriateness of prescribing is assessed, the medications most commonly implicated, the clinical consequences, and research priorities to optimize prescribing for this vulnerable patient group. Although there has been a considerable research effort to develop criteria to assess medication appropriateness in older people in recent years, the majority of tools do not focus on people with dementia. Of the limited number of tools available, most focus on the advanced stages of dementia in which life expectancy is limited. The development of tools to assess medication appropriateness in people with mild to moderate dementia or across the full spectrum of disease severity represents an important gap in the research literature and is beginning to attract research interest, with recent studies considering the medication regimen as a whole, or misprescribing, overprescribing or underprescribing of certain medications/medication classes, including anticholinergics, psychotropics, antibiotics and analgesics. Further work is required in development and validation of criteria to assess prescribing appropriateness in this vulnerable patient population, to

  10. Can pay-for-performance to primary care providers stimulate appropriate use of antibiotics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrichson, Jens; Maria Ellegård, Lina; Anell, Anders

    2018-01-01

    , which act on fewer bacteria types, when possible. Inappropriate use of antibiotics is nonetheless widespread, not least for respiratory tract infections (RTI), a common reason for antibiotics prescriptions. We examine if pay-for-performance (P4P) presents a way to influence primary care physicians......' choice of antibiotics. During 2006-2013, eight Swedish health care authorities adopted P4P to make physicians select narrow-spectrum antibiotics more often in the treatment of children with RTI. Exploiting register data on all purchases of RTI antibiotics in a difference-in-differences analysis, wefind...... that P4P significantly increased the share of narrow-spectrum antibiotics. There are no signs that physicians gamed the system by issuing more prescriptions overall....

  11. Variability in Antibiotic Use Across PICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, Thomas V; Thurm, Cary; Hersh, Adam L; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Smith, Michael J; Shah, Samir S; Courter, Joshua D; Patel, Sameer J; Parker, Sarah K; Kronman, Matthew P; Lee, Brian R; Newland, Jason G

    2018-03-10

    by all 41 PICUs. The wide variation in antibiotic use observed across children's hospital PICUs suggests inappropriate antibiotic use.

  12. Evaluation of the appropriate perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Napolitano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The appropriate use of antibiotics prophylaxis in the prevention and reduction in the incidence of surgical site infection is widespread. This study evaluates the appropriateness of the prescription of antibiotics prophylaxis prior to surgery amongst hospitalized patients in the geographic area of Avellino, Caserta, and Naples (Italy and the factors associated with a poor adherence. METHODS: A sample of 382 patients admitted to 23 surgical wards and undergoing surgery in five hospitals were randomly selected. RESULTS: Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was appropriate in 18.1% of cases. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that patients with hypoalbuminemia, with a clinical infection, with a wound clean were more likely to receive an appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis. Compared with patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA score ≥4, those with a score of 2 were correlated with a 64% reduction in the odds of having an appropriate prophylaxis. The appropriateness of the timing of prophylactic antibiotic administration was observed in 53.4% of the procedures. Multivariate logistic regression model showed that such appropriateness was more frequent in older patients, in those admitted in general surgery wards, in those not having been underwent an endoscopic surgery, in those with a higher length of surgery, and in patients with ASA score 1 when a score ≥4 was chosen as the reference category. The most common antibiotics used inappropriately were ceftazidime, sultamicillin, levofloxacin, and teicoplanin. CONCLUSIONS: Educational interventions are needed to improve perioperative appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis.

  13. Antibiotic prescription: An oral physician′s point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Patait

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antibiotics are important in the management and prophylaxis of infections in patients at a risk of experiencing microbial disease. Uses of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited since management of acute dental conditions is primarily based upon extraction of teeth or extirpation of the pulp. However, the literature provides evidence of inappropriate prescribing practices by practitioners, due to a number of factors from inadequate knowledge to social factors. Aim: The aim was to assess the therapeutic prescription of antibiotics in the dental office. Materials and Methods: In the current study, 42 faculty members of two dental colleges in the same vicinity were included. A questionnaire was drafted and sent to the dentists to collect data pertaining to the conditions in which antibiotics were prescribed and most commonly prescribed antibiotic. Results: During the study period, 42 faculty members from various departments in the institutes were surveyed, of which 41 questionnaires were completely filled. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic followed by other amoxicillin combinations; Metronidazole was most widely prescribed antibiotic for anaerobic infections. Conclusion: We have entered an era where cures may be few due to increasing microbial resistance. The biggest force for change will be if all practicing dentists looked at their prescribing and made it more rational.

  14. Inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug events in older people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, Hilary J

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate prescribing (IP) in older patients is highly prevalent and is associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs), morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Consequently, IP is a major safety concern and with changing population demographics, it is likely to become even more prevalent in the future. IP can be detected using explicit or implicit prescribing indicators. Theoretically, the routine clinical application of these IP criteria could represent an inexpensive and time efficient method to optimise prescribing practice. However, IP criteria must be sensitive, specific, have good inter-rater reliability and incorporate those medications most commonly associated with ADEs in older people. To be clinically relevant, use of prescribing appropriateness tools must translate into positive patient outcomes, such as reduced rates of ADEs. To accurately measure these outcomes, a reliable method of assessing the relationship between the administration of a drug and an adverse clinical event is required. The Naranjo criteria are the most widely used tool for assessing ADE causality, however, they are often difficult to interpret in the context of older patients. ADE causality criteria that allow for the multiple co-morbidities and prescribed medications in older people are required. Ultimately, the current high prevalence of IP and ADEs is unacceptable. IP screening criteria need to be tested as an intervention to assess their impact on the incidence of ADEs in vulnerable older patients. There is a role for IP screening tools in everyday clinical practice. These should enhance, not replace good clinical judgement, which in turn should be based on sound pharmacogeriatric training.

  15. Inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug events in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher Paul F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inappropriate prescribing (IP in older patients is highly prevalent and is associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs, morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Consequently, IP is a major safety concern and with changing population demographics, it is likely to become even more prevalent in the future. IP can be detected using explicit or implicit prescribing indicators. Theoretically, the routine clinical application of these IP criteria could represent an inexpensive and time efficient method to optimise prescribing practice. However, IP criteria must be sensitive, specific, have good inter-rater reliability and incorporate those medications most commonly associated with ADEs in older people. To be clinically relevant, use of prescribing appropriateness tools must translate into positive patient outcomes, such as reduced rates of ADEs. To accurately measure these outcomes, a reliable method of assessing the relationship between the administration of a drug and an adverse clinical event is required. The Naranjo criteria are the most widely used tool for assessing ADE causality, however, they are often difficult to interpret in the context of older patients. ADE causality criteria that allow for the multiple co-morbidities and prescribed medications in older people are required. Ultimately, the current high prevalence of IP and ADEs is unacceptable. IP screening criteria need to be tested as an intervention to assess their impact on the incidence of ADEs in vulnerable older patients. There is a role for IP screening tools in everyday clinical practice. These should enhance, not replace good clinical judgement, which in turn should be based on sound pharmacogeriatric training.

  16. The Inappropriate Symmetries of Multivariate Statistical Analysis in Geometric Morphometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookstein, Fred L

    In today's geometric morphometrics the commonest multivariate statistical procedures, such as principal component analysis or regressions of Procrustes shape coordinates on Centroid Size, embody a tacit roster of symmetries -axioms concerning the homogeneity of the multiple spatial domains or descriptor vectors involved-that do not correspond to actual biological fact. These techniques are hence inappropriate for any application regarding which we have a-priori biological knowledge to the contrary (e.g., genetic/morphogenetic processes common to multiple landmarks, the range of normal in anatomy atlases, the consequences of growth or function for form). But nearly every morphometric investigation is motivated by prior insights of this sort. We therefore need new tools that explicitly incorporate these elements of knowledge, should they be quantitative, to break the symmetries of the classic morphometric approaches. Some of these are already available in our literature but deserve to be known more widely: deflated (spatially adaptive) reference distributions of Procrustes coordinates, Sewall Wright's century-old variant of factor analysis, the geometric algebra of importing explicit biomechanical formulas into Procrustes space. Other methods, not yet fully formulated, might involve parameterized models for strain in idealized forms under load, principled approaches to the separation of functional from Brownian aspects of shape variation over time, and, in general, a better understanding of how the formalism of landmarks interacts with the many other approaches to quantification of anatomy. To more powerfully organize inferences from the high-dimensional measurements that characterize so much of today's organismal biology, tomorrow's toolkit must rely neither on principal component analysis nor on the Procrustes distance formula, but instead on sound prior biological knowledge as expressed in formulas whose coefficients are not all the same. I describe the problems

  17. Inappropriate shock: a failure of SVT discriminators in a dual chamber ICD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahmad, Amin; Tsiperfal, Angela; Hsia, Henry H; Wang, Paul J

    2006-12-01

    Inappropriate shock remains a major issue in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators. We examine an inappropriate shock delivered in a patient with atrial tachycardia that conducted 1:1. We reconstruct the device algorithms that led to therapy delivery and discuss programming changes that could be considered.

  18. Functional Analysis of Inappropriate Social Interactions in Students with Asperger's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roantree, Christina F.; Kennedy, Craig H.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the inappropriate social interactions of 3 students with Asperger's syndrome whose behavior was maintained by social positive reinforcement. We tested whether inappropriate social behavior was sensitive to social positive reinforcement contingencies and whether such contingencies could be reversed to increase the probability of…

  19. [Management of inappropriate shocks/T-wave-oversensing in S-ICD®-patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbig, Robert; Bettin, Markus; Motloch, Lukas J; Fischer, Alicia; Bode, Niklas; Frommeyer, Gerrit; Reinke, Florian; Loeher, Andreas; Eckardt, Lars; Köbe, Julia

    2018-02-12

    Inappropriate shocks are a feared complication after implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation and have a tremendous impact on quality of life. Inappropriate shocks in patients with subcutaneous ICD (S-ICD®, Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA) have various underlying causes. This review summarizes the current literature on this topic and lists possible treatment options.

  20. What is inappropriate hospital use for elderly people near the end of life?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardona-Morrell, Magnolia; Kim, James C H; Brabrand, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    independently by two authors. RESULTS: The definition of 'Inappropriate admissions' near the end of life incorporated system factors, social and family factors. The prevalence of inappropriate admissions ranged widely depending largely on non-clinical reasons: poor availability of alternative sites of care...

  1. Concurrent acute illness and comorbid conditions poorly predict antibiotic use in upper respiratory tract infections: a cross-sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perencevich Eli N

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inappropriate antibiotic use promotes resistance. Antibiotics are generally not indicated for upper respiratory infections (URIs. Our objectives were to describe patterns of URI treatment and to identify patient and provider factors associated with antibiotic use for URIs. Methods This study was a cross-sectional analysis of medical and pharmacy claims data from the Pennsylvania Medicaid fee-for-service program database. We identified Pennsylvania Medicaid recipients with a URI office visit over a one-year period. Our outcome variable was antibiotic use within seven days after the URI visit. Study variables included URI type and presence of concurrent acute illnesses and chronic conditions. We considered the associations of each study variable with antibiotic use in a logistic regression model, stratifying by age group and adjusting for confounders. Results Among 69,936 recipients with URI, 35,786 (51.2% received an antibiotic. In all age groups, acute sinusitis, chronic sinusitis, otitis, URI type and season were associated with antibiotic use. Except for the oldest group, physician specialty and streptococcal pharyngitis were associated with antibiotic use. History of chronic conditions was not associated with antibiotic use in any age group. In all age groups, concurrent acute illnesses and history of chronic conditions had only had fair to poor ability to distinguish patients who received an antibiotic from patients who did not. Conclusion Antibiotic prevalence for URIs was high, indicating that potentially inappropriate antibiotic utilization is occurring. Our data suggest that demographic and clinical factors are associated with antibiotic use, but additional reasons remain unexplained. Insight regarding reasons for antibiotic prescribing is needed to develop interventions to address the growing problem of antibiotic resistance.

  2. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Threat Gonorrhea has progressively developed resistance to the antibiotic drugs prescribed to treat it. Following the spread ...

  3. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Work Contact Us ABOUT THE ISSUE What is Antibiotic Resistance? General Background Science of Resistance Glossary References ... for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance Project (ROAR) INTERNATIONAL CHAPTERS APUA Chapter Network ...

  4. [Sensitivity to antibiotics uropathogens bacteria in Nouakchott - Mauritania].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailaji, N S M; Ould Salem, M L; Ghaber, S M

    2016-05-01

    . coli and Klebsiella spp, respectively produced a ESBL. The distribution of germs in our study is comparable to the literature, however, antibiotic resistance is higher in our study, which is probably a result of the inappropriate use of these drugs in our country, therefore it is important for us to create a good strategy to supply and distribute these drugs, as well as the review of the empirical treatment of UTI in our country. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Empirical antimicrobial therapy of acute dentoalveolar abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matijević Stevo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The most common cause of acute dental infections are oral streptococci and anaerobe bacteria. Acute dentoalveolar infections are usually treated surgically in combination with antibiotics. Empirical therapy in such infections usually requires the use of penicillin-based antibiotics. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical efficiency of amoxicillin and cefalexin in the empirical treatment of acute odontogenic abscess and to assess the antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolated bacteria in early phases of its development. Methods. This study included 90 patients with acute odontogenic abscess who received surgical treatment (extraction of a teeth and/or abscess incision and were divided into three groups: two surgicalantibiotic groups (amoxicillin, cefalexin and the surgical group. In order to evaluate the effects of the applied therapy following clinical symptoms were monitored: inflammatory swelling, trismus, regional lymphadentytis and febrility. In all the patients before the beginning of antibiotic treatment suppuration was suched out of the abscess and antibiotic susceptibility of isolated bacteria was tested by using the disk diffusion method. Results. The infection signs and symptoms lasted on the average 4.47 days, 4.67 days, and 6.17 days in the amoxicillin, cefalexin, and surgically only treated group, respectively. A total of 111 bacterial strains were isolated from 90 patients. Mostly, the bacteria were Gram-positive facultative anaerobs (81.1%. The most common bacteria isolated were Viridans streptococci (68/111. Antibiotic susceptibility of isolated bacteria to amoxicillin was 76.6% and cefalexin 89.2%. Conclusion. Empirical, peroral use of amoxicillin or cefalexin after surgical treatment in early phase of development of dentoalveolar abscess significantly reduced the time of clinical symptoms duration in the acute odontogenic infections in comparison to surgical treatment only. Bacterial strains

  6. A Survey and Analysis of the American Public's Perceptions and Knowledge About Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Rebecca R; Sun, Jiayang; Jump, Robin L P

    2016-09-01

    Background.  Little is known about the American public's perceptions or knowledge about antibiotic-resistant bacteria or antibiotic misuse. We hypothesized that although many people recognize antibiotic resistance as a problem, they may not understand the relationship between antibiotic consumption and selection of resistant bacteria. Methods.  We developed and tested a survey asking respondents about their perceptions and knowledge regarding appropriate antibiotic use. Respondents were recruited with the Amazon Mechanical Turk crowdsourcing platform. The survey, carefully designed to assess a crowd-sourced population, asked respondents to explain "antibiotic resistance" in their own words. Subsequent questions were multiple choice. Results.  Of 215 respondents, the vast majority agreed that inappropriate antibiotic use contributes to antibiotic resistance (92%), whereas a notable proportion (70%) responded neutrally or disagreed with the statement that antibiotic resistance is a problem. Over 40% of respondents indicated that antibiotics were the best choice to treat a fever or a runny nose and sore throat. Major themes from the free-text responses included that antibiotic resistance develops by bacteria, or by the infection, or the body (ie, an immune response). Minor themes included antibiotic overuse and antibiotic resistance caused by bacterial adaptation or an immune response. Conclusions.  Our findings indicate that the public is aware that antibiotic misuse contributes to antibiotic resistance, but many do not consider it to be an important problem. The free-text responses suggest specific educational targets, including the difference between an immune response and bacterial adaptation, to increase awareness and understanding of antibiotic resistance.

  7. Efficacy and feasibility of a collaborative multidisciplinary program for antibiotic prophylaxis in clean wound surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyu; Chen, Hong; Zhu, Shenyin; Liu, Yu; Yang, Jiadan; Yuan, Zhe; Yao, Gaoqun; Qiu, Feng

    2018-02-01

    Background Despite national and international guidelines and recommendations, inappropriate prophylactic antibiotic use for clean wound surgery remains a common phenomenon in many Chinese hospitals, causing higher medical costs and bacterial resistance. Objective To improve the prescribing behavior for antibiotic prophylaxis and decrease antibiotic abuse and/or misuse in clean wound surgery. Setting The teaching hospital of a medical university in Southwest China. Methods A collaborative multidisciplinary program involving educational, technical, and administrative strategies was undertaken. It was characterized by a monthly evaluation by clinical pharmacists for randomly selected cases of clean wound surgery, as well as a group discussion attended by correlative personnel, consisting of the administrative staff, experts from the Rational Drug Use Committee, clinical pharmacists and surgeons. Main outcome measure The overall incidence of antibiotic prophylaxis, appropriate antibiotics selection, appropriate initial dosage timing, proper drug combination and the duration of antibiotic prophylaxis were measured. Results from 2009 to 2014, the rate of antibiotic prophylaxis for clean wound surgery declined from nearly 100% to 20-30%. Improvements were also observed in drug selection, timing of the first dose, and dosage and duration for antibiotic prophylaxis. Broad-spectrum antibiotics and enzyme inhibitors have seldom been used after 2011. The medical cost for antibiotics also decreased. Conclusion A collaborative multidisciplinary program, together with a group discussion, is efficient for improving rational antibiotic prophylaxis for clean wound surgery. This study indicates that clinical pharmacists can play a pivotal role in providing the professional evaluation of medical cases, education, and intervention.

  8. Use of antibiotics in nursing homes--surveillance with different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Hanne-Merete; Sæther, Anja Ramberg; Viktil, Kirsten K; Andberg, Lene; Munkerud, Marianne Winther; Willoch, Karin; Blix, Hege Salvesen

    2013-10-15

    Residents in nursing homes have a heightened risk of developing infections that should be treated with antibiotics. Inappropriate use of antibiotics may generate drug-related problems and increase resistance. In this study, we describe the use of antibiotics in nursing homes on the basis of prevalence surveys and drug sales statistics. Five nursing homes in Oslo participated in two one-day surveys in 2009. All use of systemic antibiotics was registered. The data collection was undertaken according to a protocol developed by the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC) Network and was part of a European study. The nursing homes' drug sales statistics for systemic antibiotics during 2009, distributed by the number of bed days for each nursing home, were estimated. Information on indications for each antibiotic from the prevalence surveys was collated with sales data to achieve an estimate of how the purchased antibiotics were used. The prevalence surveys showed that more than 8% of the residents received antibiotics. Prophylactic treatment accounted for 33% of the prescriptions. A prevalence of antibiotic use of 10% was estimated from the drug sales statistics. Urinary tract infection was the most frequently registered indication. Pivmecillinam and methenamine were most frequently prescribed and most frequently purchased. Most courses of treatment were prescribed in accordance with the national guidelines for antibiotic use. The results from the drug sales statistics concurred well with the prevalence surveys, and the methods can thus be relevant for purposes of monitoring the use of antibiotics.

  9. Know When Antibiotics Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-15

    This podcast provides a brief background about antibiotics and quick tips to help prevent antibiotic resistance.  Created: 4/15/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  10. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antibiotic-associated colitis, which can occur after the antibiotic therapy upsets the balance of good and bad bacteria in your intestinal tract. Besides loose stools, C. difficile infection can ... and symptoms of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. These signs and symptoms are common ...

  11. Rational Use of Antibiotics in the Treatment of Functional Bowel Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Michele; Fasulo, Roberta; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal symptoms such us bloating, fullness, flatulence, diarrhea, and constipation due to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were recently attributed to small bowel bacterial overgrowth, a condition depending on the presence of an increased number of bacteria in the small bowel. However, the methodology used to describe this association may be harshly criticized, since it has already been shown to be quite inaccurate. As a result an inappropriate use of antibiotics was consequently generated. In fact, antibiotics could be effective in the treatment of functional complaints, but only in a limited subgroup of patients, characterized by an increase of fermentation at colonic level. In this review, we have examined the papers suggesting a pathophysiological link between IBS and small bowel bacterial overgrowth, underlining its inappropriateness, and put forth our personal view on the rationale for antibiotic use in IBS. PMID:27713358

  12. Rational Use of Antibiotics in the Treatment of Functional Bowel Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Fasulo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional gastrointestinal symptoms such us bloating, fullness, flatulence, diarrhea, and constipation due to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS were recently attributed to small bowel bacterial overgrowth, a condition depending on the presence of an increased number of bacteria in the small bowel. However, the methodology used to describe this association may be harshly criticized, since it has already been shown to be quite inaccurate. As a result an inappropriate use of antibiotics was consequently generated. In fact, antibiotics could be effective in the treatment of functional complaints, but only in a limited subgroup of patients, characterized by an increase of fermentation at colonic level. In this review, we have examined the papers suggesting a pathophysiological link between IBS and small bowel bacterial overgrowth, underlining its inappropriateness, and put forth our personal view on the rationale for antibiotic use in IBS.

  13. Pediatric antibiotic stewardship: successful interventions to reduce broad-spectrum antibiotic use on general pediatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitmeyr, Katharina; von Both, Ulrich; Pecar, Alenka; Borde, Johannes P; Mikolajczyk, Rafael; Huebner, Johannes

    2017-08-01

    Antibiotic stewardship programs (ASP) optimize antibiotic usage and combat antibiotic resistance of bacteria. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of specific ASP interventions on antibiotic consumption in general pediatric wards. We conducted a prospective study to compare a pre-intervention (Sept.-Dec. 2014) and post-intervention (Sept.-Dec. 2015) period. An ASP bundle was established including (1) infectious diseases (ID) ward rounds (prospective-audit-with-feedback), (2) ID consultation service, (3) internal guidelines on empiric antibiotic therapy. Medical records on four general pediatric wards were reviewed daily to analyze: (1) antibiotic consumption, (2) antibiotic dosage ranges according to local guidelines, and (3) guideline adherence for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Antibiotic prescribing for 273 patients (pre-intervention) was compared to 263 patients (post-intervention). Antibiotic prescription rate did not change (30.6 vs. 30.5%). However, overall days-of-therapy and length-of-therapy decreased by 10.5 and 7.7%, respectively. Use of cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones decreased by 35.5 and 59.9%, whereas the use of penicillins increased by 15.0%. An increase in dosage accuracy was noted (78.8 vs. 97.6%) and guideline adherence for CAP improved from 39.5 to 93.5%. Between the two study periods, no adverse effects regarding length of hospital stay and in-hospital mortality were observed. Our data demonstrate that implementation of an ASP was associated with a profound improvement of rational antibiotic use and, therefore, patient safety. Considering the relatively short observation period, the long-term effects of our ASP bundle need to be further investigated.

  14. Arbitration seen as inappropriate in denial-of-care claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-11

    Dr. Peter G. Mozsary, charged with denying service to a patient with AIDS, has failed in his attempt to change the venue from Federal District Court to an arbitration panel. The California dentist was sued for violating the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Dr. Mozsary argued that the matter involved malpractice and should be settled by arbitration, as stated in an agreement on malpractice claims signed by the patient. But the judge determined that the patient's claim that he was denied care involves civil rights, not malpractice. The plaintiff, known in court records as John Doe, alleged Mozsary refused to treat him upon learning he is HIV-positive, and referred him to a hospital for antibiotic therapy and observation. Dr. Mozsary claims he usually treats people with AIDS, but Doe was suffering from a severe respiratory infection and the nonemergency removal of three decayed teeth could be handled better in a hospital setting. Doe is seeking a jury trial and compensatory and punitive damages.

  15. The Association between Inappropriate Weight Control Behaviors and Suicide Ideation and Attempt among Korean Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ah; Jang, Suk Yong; Shin, Jaeyong; Ju, Yeong Jun; Nam, Jin Young; Park, Eun Cheol

    2016-10-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents globally, and body weight is also a recognized reason for adolescent suicide. Therefore, we investigated the association between weight control behaviors (WCB) and suicide ideation and attempt, focusing on inappropriate weight control measures. We used data from the 2014 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, representing a total of 35,224 boys and 34,361 girls aged 12 to 18 years. Adolescents were classified into groups based on WCB: appropriate WCB, inappropriate WCB, and no WCB. We performed logistic regression models to examine associations between WCB and suicide ideation and attempt, controlling for covariates. Both boys and girls with inappropriate WCB were more likely to report suicide ideation and attempt. Underweight and normal weight boys with inappropriate WCB were more likely to think or attempt suicide, and underweight girls with inappropriate WCB were also more likely to attempt suicide. Among five common WCB combinations, the combination of "regular exercise, fasting, eating less" was highly associated with suicide ideation and attempt. We confirmed that inappropriate WCB is associated with suicide ideation and attempt among Korean adolescents. Given the high incidence rate of suicide among adolescents and the adverse effect of inappropriate WCB, encouraging adolescents to control their weight in healthy ways is imperative.

  16. Inappropriate self-medication among adolescents and its association with lower medication literacy and substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Hsien; Chang, Fong-Ching; Hsu, Sheng-Der; Chi, Hsueh-Yun; Huang, Li-Jung; Yeh, Ming-Kung

    2017-01-01

    While self-medication is common, inappropriate self-medication has potential risks. This study assesses inappropriate self-medication among adolescents and examines the relationships among medication literacy, substance use, and inappropriate self-medication. In 2016, a national representative sample of 6,226 students from 99 primary, middle, and high schools completed an online self-administered questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine factors related to inappropriate self-medication. The prevalence of self-medication in the past year among the adolescents surveyed was 45.8%, and the most frequently reported drugs for self-medication included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or pain relievers (prevalence = 31.1%), cold or cough medicines (prevalence = 21.6%), analgesics (prevalence = 19.3%), and antacids (prevalence = 17.3%). Of the participants who practiced self-medication, the prevalence of inappropriate self-medication behaviors included not reading drug labels or instructions (10.1%), using excessive dosages (21.6%), and using prescription and nonprescription medicine simultaneously without advice from a health provider (polypharmacy) (30.3%). The results of multiple logistic regression analysis showed that after controlling for school level, gender, and chronic diseases, the participants with lower medication knowledge, lower self-efficacy, lower medication literacy, and who consumed tobacco or alcohol were more likely to engage in inappropriate self-medication. Lower medication literacy and substance use were associated with inappropriate self-medication among adolescents.

  17. Inappropriate self-medication among adolescents and its association with lower medication literacy and substance use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hsien Lee

    Full Text Available While self-medication is common, inappropriate self-medication has potential risks. This study assesses inappropriate self-medication among adolescents and examines the relationships among medication literacy, substance use, and inappropriate self-medication.In 2016, a national representative sample of 6,226 students from 99 primary, middle, and high schools completed an online self-administered questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine factors related to inappropriate self-medication.The prevalence of self-medication in the past year among the adolescents surveyed was 45.8%, and the most frequently reported drugs for self-medication included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or pain relievers (prevalence = 31.1%, cold or cough medicines (prevalence = 21.6%, analgesics (prevalence = 19.3%, and antacids (prevalence = 17.3%. Of the participants who practiced self-medication, the prevalence of inappropriate self-medication behaviors included not reading drug labels or instructions (10.1%, using excessive dosages (21.6%, and using prescription and nonprescription medicine simultaneously without advice from a health provider (polypharmacy (30.3%. The results of multiple logistic regression analysis showed that after controlling for school level, gender, and chronic diseases, the participants with lower medication knowledge, lower self-efficacy, lower medication literacy, and who consumed tobacco or alcohol were more likely to engage in inappropriate self-medication.Lower medication literacy and substance use were associated with inappropriate self-medication among adolescents.

  18. Prevalence of inappropriate medication using Beers criteria in Japanese long-term care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada Yukari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence and risk factors of potentially inappropriate medication use among the elderly patients have been studied in various countries, but because of the difficulty of obtaining data on patient characteristics and medications they have not been studied in Japan. Methods We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study in 17 Japanese long-term care (LTC facilities by collecting data from the comprehensive MDS assessment forms for 1669 patients aged 65 years and over who were assessed between January and July of 2002. Potentially inappropriate medications were identified on the basis of the 2003 Beers criteria. Results The patients in the sample were similar in terms of demographic characteristics to those in the national survey. Our study revealed that 356 (21.1% of the patients were treated with potentially inappropriate medication independent of disease or condition. The most commonly inappropriately prescribed medication was ticlopidine, which had been prescribed for 107 patients (6.3%. There were 300 (18.0% patients treated with at least 1 inappropriate medication dependent on the disease or condition. The highest prevalence of inappropriate medication use dependent on the disease or condition was found in patients with chronic constipation. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed psychotropic drug use (OR = 1.511, medication cost of per day (OR = 1.173, number of medications (OR = 1.140, and age (OR = 0.981 as factors related to inappropriate medication use independent of disease or condition. Neither patient characteristics nor facility characteristics emerged as predictors of inappropriate prescription. Conclusion The prevalence and predictors of inappropriate medication use in Japanese LTC facilities were similar to those in other countries.

  19. Impact of a warning CPOE system on the inappropriate pill splitting of prescribed medications in outpatients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chen Hsu

    Full Text Available Prescribing inappropriate pill splitting is not rare in clinical practice. To reduce inappropriate pill splitting, we developed an automatic warning system linked to a computerized physician order entry (CPOE system for special oral formulation drugs in outpatient settings. We examined the impact of the warning system on inappropriate prescribing of pill splitting and assess prescribers' responses to the warnings.Drugs with extended-release or enteric-coated formulations that were not originally intended to be split were recognized as "special oral formulations". A hard-stop system which could examine non-integer doses of drugs with special oral formulations, provide warnings to interrupt inappropriate prescriptions was integrated in CPOE in a medical center since June 2010. We designed an intervention study to compare the inappropriate splitting before and after the implementation of the warning system (baseline period 2010 January to May vs. intervention period 2010 June to 2011 August. During the intervention period, prescription changes in response to a warning were logged and analyzed.A total of 470,611 prescribed drug items with 34 different drugs with special oral formulations were prescribed in the study period. During the 15-month intervention period, 909 warnings for 26 different drugs were triggered among 354,523 prescribed drug items with special oral formulations. The warning rate of inappropriate splitting in the late intervention period was lower than those in baseline period (0.16% vs. 0.61%, incidence rate ratio 0.27, 95% CI 0.23-0.31, P<0.001. In respond to warnings, physicians had to make adjustments, of which the majority was changing to an unsplit pill (72.9%.The interruptive warning system could avoid the prescriptions with inappropriate pill splitting. Accordingly, physicians changed their behavior of prescribing special oral formulations regarding inappropriate pill splitting. We suggest the establishment of such system

  20. Individual and hospital-related determinants of potentially inappropriate admissions emerging from administrative records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Marco; Buja, Alessandra; Piergentili, Paolo; Golfetto, Maria Teresa; Serafin, Gianni; Gallo, Silvia; Dalla Barba, Livio; Baldo, Vincenzo

    2016-11-01

    The appropriate use of health care is an important issue in developed countries. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the extent of potentially inappropriate hospital admissions and their individual, clinical and hospital-related determinants. Medical records were analyzed for the year 2014 held by the Local Heath Unit n. 13 in the Veneto Region of north-east Italy (19,000 records). The outcomes calculated were: admissions for conditions amenable to day hospital care; brief medical admissions; outlier lengths of stay for elderly patients' medical admissions; and medical admissions to surgical wards. Univariate analyses and logistic regression models were used to test associations with demographic, clinical and hospital ward covariates, including organizational indicators. Inappropriate reliance on acute care beds ranged from 6% to 28%, depending on the type of quality indicator analyzed. Some individual features, and wards' specific characteristics were associated with at least one of the phenomena of inappropriate hospital resource usage. In particular, male gender, younger age and transferals seemed to affect inappropriate admissions to surgical wards. Potentially avoidable admissions featuring inpatients amenable to day hospital care were associated with subjects with fewer comorbidities and lower case-mix wards, while inappropriately short medical stays were influenced by patients' higher functional status and local residency and by lower bed occupancy rates. In conclusion, inappropriately long hospital stays for elderly cases were associated with patients with multiple pathologies in wards with a low bed-occupancy. Education level and citizenship did not seem to influence inappropriate admissions. Some individual, clinical ad structural characteristics of patients and wards emerging from administrative records could be associated with inappropriate reliance on acute hospital beds. Analyzing the indicators considered in this study could generate

  1. Understanding Factors Contributing to Inappropriate Critical Care: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of Medical Record Documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Thanh H; Tarn, Derjung M; Yamamoto, Myrtle; Garber, Bryan J; Wenger, Neil S

    2017-11-01

    Factors leading to inappropriate critical care, that is treatment that should not be provided because it does not offer the patient meaningful benefit, have not been rigorously characterized. We explored medical record documentation about patients who received inappropriate critical care and those who received appropriate critical care to examine factors associated with the provision of inappropriate treatment. Medical records were abstracted from 123 patients who were assessed as receiving inappropriate treatment and 66 patients who were assessed as receiving appropriate treatment but died within six months of intensive care unit (ICU) admission. We used mixed methods combining qualitative analysis of medical record documentation with multivariable analysis to examine the relationship between patient and communication factors and the receipt of inappropriate treatment, and present these within a conceptual model. One academic health system. Medical records revealed 21 themes pertaining to prognosis and factors influencing treatment aggressiveness. Four themes were independently associated with patients receiving inappropriate treatment according to physicians. When decision making was not guided by physicians (odds ratio [OR] 3.76, confidence interval [95% CI] 1.21-11.70) or was delayed by patient/family (OR 4.52, 95% CI 1.69-12.04), patients were more likely to receive inappropriate treatment. Documented communication about goals of care (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.10-0.84) and patient's preferences driving decision making (OR 0.02, 95% CI 0.00-0.27) were associated with lower odds of receiving inappropriate treatment. Medical record documentation suggests that inappropriate treatment occurs in the setting of communication and decision-making patterns that may be amenable to intervention.

  2. Knudsen-Like Scaling May Be Inappropriate for Gas Shales

    KAUST Repository

    Patzek, Tadeusz

    2017-10-02

    Summary We assert that a classification of gas flow regimes in shales that is widely accepted in the petroleum industry, may be inconsistent with the physics of high-pressure gas flow in capillaries. This classification follows from the 1946 work by Brown et al. (1946) that deals with the flow of gases in large industrial metal pipes, elbows and orifices under vacuum, with gas pressures of the order of 1 mm Hg or less. In another pioneering paper that year, Tsien (1946) analyzed the hypersonic flight of rockets in the thermosphere (above 50 miles of altitude), and established the widely accepted Knudsen flow regimes for the high-Reynolds, high-Mach flow of rarified gases. We show why both these papers are not quite applicable to flow of compressed gas in the hot, high-pressure shale pores with rough surfaces. In addition, it may be inappropriate to use the capillary tube metaphor to describe shale micropores or microcracks, simply because each is fed with gas by dozens or hundreds of intricately connected nanopores, which themselves may be slits rather than circular cylinders, and are charged with the dense, liquid-like gas. In the small-scale, low-velocity flows of gases, failure of the standard Navier-Stokes description (the standard Darcy law in petroleum engineering) can be quantified by the Knudsen number, ratio of the mean free path, λ, of gas molecules at the reservoir pressure and temperature to the characteristic pore radius, R. We carefully enumerate the multiple restrictive conditions that must hold for the slip-flow boundary condition to emerge. We also describe the dependence of the slip correction factor on the gas pressure and temperature, as well as the median pore size and rock roughness. In the derivation, we revisit the original approaches of Helmholtz and von Piotrowski (1860) and Maxwell, Niven (1890), which were somehow lost in the multiple translations from physics to petroleum engineering. For example, in Barnett mudrocks, naturally

  3. Antibiotic overusage and resistance: A cross-sectional survey among pediatric dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna Konde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Most human orofacial infections originate from odontogenic infections and prescribing antibiotics has become a ubiquitous phenomenon. The World Health Organization (WHO has recognized the inappropriate, indiscriminate, and irrational use of antibiotics leading to antibiotic resistance as a global problem. Objective: The objective of this survey is to compare the antibiotic prescription pattern and the awareness of antibiotic resistance among Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS practitioners and pediatric dentists. Materials and methods: A hundred BDS practitioners and 100 pediatric dentists included in the study were given a questionnaire containing both open-ended and closed-ended questions. The questionnaire comprised information pertaining to antibiotic prescription for most common oral conditions, commonly prescribed antibiotics, their dosage, etc. Results: The majority of the practitioners prescribed antibiotics for managing oral diseases. On comparing the prescription patterns between the BDS practitioners and pediatric dentists, there was an overprescription in the BDS group for many conditions, which was statistically significant. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed drug in both the groups. In the presence of an anaerobic infection, the most preferred drug was a combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid with metronidazole. With regard to the duration of antibiotic prescription, 74% BDS practitioners prescribed antibiotics as a 3-day course and 60% pediatric dentists resorted to a 5-day course, which was statistically significant. The awareness regarding antibiotic prophylaxis and antibiotic resistance was found to be adequate in both the groups. However, there was a general lack of awareness with regard to the guidelines for antibiotic prescribing in both the groups. Conclusion: Practitioners should prescribe antibiotics in accordance with the guidelines to curb antibiotic resistance, an emerging public health

  4. Knowledge, attitudes and practices concerning self-medication with antibiotics among university students in western China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bing; Zhou, Zhongliang; Xu, Guiping; Yang, Dingkun; Wu, Lina; Shen, Qian; Jiang, Minghuan; Wang, Xiao; Zhao, Guilan; Yang, Shimin; Fang, Yu

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the knowledge, attitude and behaviours of university students on the use of antibiotics. A knowledge-attitude-practice questionnaire was developed and distributed to undergraduate students of Xi'an Jiaotong University, comprising 18 schools/colleges in Shaanxi Province, western China. Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were applied to identify risk factors associated with self-medication with antibiotics. Of the 731 respondents (response rate = 73.1%), 294 (40.2%) had self-medicated with antibiotics in the past 6 months. Most of the antibiotics (59.2%) for self-medication were purchased without prescription in retail pharmacies. The median score of students' knowledge about antibiotics was 4 (IQR: 3-6) of a maximum possible score of 10. Students had moderately accurate beliefs towards antibiotics. More than half of the students (56.5%) were storing antibiotics frequently. During self-medication, 16.7% of students claimed to have experienced adverse reactions, and 30.6% had used antibiotics to prevent common colds. The majority preferred to use broad-spectrum antibiotics, and nearly half preferred intravenous antibiotics. Over 44% of students had changed antibiotic dosage, and 36.5% had switched to another antibiotic during the treatment course. Logistic regression analysis identified college and home town as independent risk factors for self-medication with antibiotics (P < 0.01). Undergraduate students had inadequate knowledge, moderately accurate beliefs and inappropriate practices concerning antibiotics, and a high rate of self-medication. This highlights the need for focused educational intervention and stricter governmental regulation concerning antibiotic use and sale in retail pharmacies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Prophylaxis for infective endocarditis: antibiotic sensitivity of dental plaque.

    OpenAIRE

    MacFarlane, T W; McGowan, D A; Hunter, K; MacKenzie, D

    1983-01-01

    The antibiotic sensitivity pattern of bacteria isolated from bacteraemia after dental extraction was compared with that of bacteria isolated from dental plaque samples from the same patient. The results supported the current practice of using penicillin and erythromycin empirically for prophylaxis. The prediction of the most appropriate antibiotic for prophylaxis using dental plaque samples was most accurate when the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of plaque isolates were used. It appe...

  6. Bacterial Etiology and Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in a Cameroonian City

    OpenAIRE

    Nzalie, Rolf Nyah-tuku; Gonsu, Hortense Kamga; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are usually treated empirically. Geographical variations in etiologic agents and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns are common. Knowledge of antibiotic resistance trends is important for improving evidence-based recommendations for empirical treatment of UTIs. Our aim was to determine the major bacterial etiologies of CAUTIs and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a cosmopolitan area of Cameroon for comparison with pres...

  7. Antibiotic knowledge and self-medication practices in a developing country: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamhour, Antoun; El-Kheir, Ammar; Salameh, Pascale; Hanna, Pierre Abi; Mansour, Hanine

    2017-04-01

    Self-medication is identified by the World Health Organization as a major factor leading to antibiotics overuse, misuse and resistance. This study's objectives were to evaluate the knowledge and self-medication with antibiotics in a sample of the population of Lebanon. This study surveyed a sample of adults (over 18 years of age) residing in 2 major cities in Lebanon about their knowledge and self-medication with antibiotics. Health care professionals were excluded from the study. Four hundred questionnaires were completed. Of the responders, 72% were between 18 and 45 years of age with an overall 86% having completed at least high school. For their knowledge about antibiotics, 61% thought that antibiotics should be taken for common cold and 83% knew that misuse of antibiotics could result in microbial resistance. Self-medication significantly correlated with a lower educational level (P = .036). Those with lower knowledge about antibiotics stopped antibiotics at the inappropriate time (P = .002). Socioeconomic status, gender and age did not correlate with self-medication. Self-medication was associated with a person's educational level and knowledge of antibiotics. Awareness campaigns and enforcing medication dispensing laws are needed in to avoid self-medication with antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibiotic use and knowledge in the community of Yemen, Saudi Arabia, and Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Tatyana; Al Warafi, Abdullah; Hussein Eltom, Elhassan; Tadjieva, Nigora; Kubena, Ales; Vlcek, Jiri

    2014-04-15

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics has resulted in a dramatic increase of antimicrobial resistance in developing countries. We examined knowledge, attitudes, and practices of antibiotic use in three Asian countries. A nationwide cross-sectional study of teachers in large cities of Yemen, Saudi Arabia, and Uzbekistan was conducted. A random sample of 1,200 teachers was selected in each country. Data were collected through a questionnaire-based survey and then analyzed using descriptive and multivariate statistical methods. The prevalence of non-prescription antibiotic use ranged from 48% in Saudi Arabia to 78% in Yemen and Uzbekistan. Pharmacies were the main source of non-prescribed antibiotics. The most common reasons for antibiotic use were cough (40%) and influenza (34%). Forty-nine percent of respondents discontinued antibiotics when they felt better. Although awareness of the dangers of antibiotic use correlated inversely with self-medication, understanding of the appropriate use of antibiotics was limited. The prevalence of antibiotic self-medication in the educated adult population in the studied countries was found to be alarmingly high. Effective strategies involving regulatory enforcement prohibiting sales of antibiotics without prescription should be implemented along with educational interventions for health professionals and the public.

  9. Country-specific antibiotic use practices impact the human gut resistome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslund, Kristoffer; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Kultima, Jens Roat

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasing concerns over inappropriate use of antibiotics in medicine and food production, population-level resistance transfer into the human gut microbiota has not been demonstrated beyond individual case studies. To determine the "antibiotic resistance potential" for entire microbial...... in animals and for antibiotics that have been available longer. Resistance genes are also more abundant in samples from Spain, Italy, and France than from Denmark, the United States, or Japan. Where comparable country-level data on antibiotic use in both humans and animals are available, differences...... in these statistics match the observed resistance potential differences. The results are robust over time as the antibiotic resistance determinants of individuals persist in the human gut flora for at least a year....

  10. Inappropriate use of urinary catheters in patients admitted to medical wards in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Calvo, Beatriz; Vara, Rebeca; Villar, Rocío N; Aguado, José María

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence and predisposing factors were determined for inappropriate urinary catheterization (UC) among inpatients in medical wards. A cross-sectional study was conducted including all patients aged ≥ 18 years admitted to medical wards in a 1300-bed tertiary-care centre, and who had a urinary catheter in place on the day of the survey. Of 380 patients observed, 46 (12.1%) had a urinary catheter in place. Twelve of them (26.1%) were inappropriately catheterized. The most common indication for inappropriate UC was urine output monitoring in a cooperative, non-critically ill patient. Inappropriateness was associated with increased age, poor functional status, urinary incontinence, dementia, and admission from a long-term care facility. Further educational efforts should be focused on improving catheterization prescribing practices by physicians. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Personality on Social Network Disclosure: Do Emotionally Intelligent Individuals Post Inappropriate Content?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chockalingam Viswesvaran

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of individuals using social networking sites to stay connected has increased considerably in only a few years and the information posted is now being used by organizations for employee selection. The purpose of the current study was to investigating how differences on the Big Five Personality traits, honesty-integrity, and emotional intelligence influence whether individuals post inappropriate social network content. Participants were 506 college students from a large metropolitan state university in the Southeastern United States. Results suggest individuals scoring high on emotional intelligence and honesty/integrity disclosed less inappropriate social network content. Emotional intelligence was not, however, predictive of inappropriate disclosure above and beyond the Big Five Personality traits. Honest and emotionally intelligent individuals seem to understand the negative implications of disclosing inappropriate social network content. Future research should examine how social network information is being used in employee selection and the predictive validity of this method.

  12. The frequency of agitation due to inappropriate use of naltrexone in addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Siadat

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of agitation in the poisoning emergency department due to inappropriate use of naltrexone, more accurate planning for administration of naltrexone in addicts seems necessary.

  13. Correlates of (inappropriate) benzodiazepine use : the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manthey, Leonie; van Veen, Tineke; Giltay, Erik J.; Stoop, Jose E.; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Zitman, Frans G.

    AIM Results on determinants of benzodiazepine (BZD) use in general and inappropriate use were inconsistent and mostly univariate. The relative importance of sociodemographic, psychological and physical determinants has never been investigated in a comprehensive, multivariate model. METHODS We

  14. Correlates of (inappropriate) benzodiazepine use: the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manthey, L.; van Veen, T.; Giltay, E.J.; Stoop, J.E.; Neven, A.K.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Zitman, F.G.

    2011-01-01

    AIM Results on determinants of benzodiazepine (BZD) use in general and inappropriate use were inconsistent and mostly univariate. The relative importance of sociodemographic, psychological and physical determinants has never been investigated in a comprehensive, multivariate model.METHODS We

  15. Antibiotic resistance rates and physician antibiotic prescription patterns of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in southern Chinese primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Carmen Ka Man; Kung, Kenny; Au-Doung, Philip Lung Wai; Ip, Margaret; Lee, Nelson; Fung, Alice; Wong, Samuel Yeung Shan

    2017-01-01

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI) are common in primary care. Whilst primary care physicians are called to be antimicrobial stewards, there is limited primary care antibiotic resistance surveillance and physician antibiotic prescription data available in southern Chinese primary care. The study aimed to investigate the antibiotic resistance rate and antibiotic prescription patterns in female patients with uncomplicated UTI. Factors associated with antibiotic resistance and prescription was explored. A prospective cohort study was conducted in 12 primary care group clinics in Hong Kong of patients presenting with symptoms of uncomplicated UTI from January 2012 to December 2013. Patients' characteristics such as age, comorbidity, presenting symptoms and prior antibiotic use were recorded by physicians, as well as any empirical antibiotic prescription given at presentation. Urine samples were collected to test for antibiotic resistance of uropathogens. Univariate analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with antibiotic resistance and prescription. A total of 298 patients were included in the study. E. coli was detected in 107 (76%) out of the 141 positive urine samples. Antibiotic resistance rates of E. coli isolates for ampicillin, co-trimoxazole, ciprofloxacin, amoxicillin and nitrofurantoin were 59.8%, 31.8%, 23.4%, 1.9% and 0.9% respectively. E. coli isolates were sensitive to nitrofurantoin (98.1%) followed by amoxicillin (78.5%). The overall physician antibiotic prescription rate was 82.2%. Amoxicillin (39.6%) and nitrofurantoin (28.6%) were the most common prescribed antibiotics. Meanwhile, whilst physicians in public primary care prescribed more amoxicillin (OR: 2.84, 95% CI: 1.67 to 4.85, Pantibiotic resistance and physician antibiotic prescription is recommended.

  16. Antibiotics and Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Gauthier, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    During the breastfeeding period, bacterial infections can occur in the nursing mother, requiring the use of antibiotics. A lack of accurate information may lead health care professionals and mothers to suspend breastfeeding, which may be unnecessary. This article provides information on the main antibiotics that are appropriate for clinical use and the interference of these antibiotics with the infant to support medical decisions regarding the discontinuation of breastfeeding. We aim to provide information on the pharmacokinetic factors that interfere with the passage of antibiotics into breast milk and the toxicological implications of absorption by the infant. Publications related to the 20 most frequently employed antibiotics and their transfer into breast milk were evaluated. The results demonstrate that most antibiotics in clinical use are considered suitable during breastfeeding; however, the pharmacokinetic profile of each drug must be observed to ensure the resolution of the maternal infection and the safety of the infant. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Impact of carvedilol and metoprolol on inappropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin H; Abu-Zeitone, Abeer; Jons, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of carvedilol and metoprolol on the endpoint of inappropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy in the MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy) study.......The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of carvedilol and metoprolol on the endpoint of inappropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy in the MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy) study....

  18. Inappropriate Detection of a Supraventricular Tachycardia as Dual Tachycardia by the PR Logic™ Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Thachil, MD, DM, CCDS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tachycardia detection and therapy algorithms in Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators (ICD reduce, but do not eliminate inappropriate ICD shocks. Awareness of the pros and cons of a particular algorithm helps to predict its utility in specific situations. We report a case where PR logic™, an algorithm commonly used in currently implanted ICDs to differentiate supraventricular tachycardia (SVT from ventricular tachycardia resulted in inappropriate detection and shock for an SVT, and discuss several solutions to the problem.

  19. Correlation analysis between team communication characteristics and frequency of inappropriate communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ar Ryum; Lee, Seung Woo; Park, Jinkyun; Kang, Hyun Gook; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We proposed a method to evaluate team communication characteristics based on social network analysis. • We compare team communication characteristics with the frequency of inappropriate communications. • Frequency of inappropriate communications were decreased when more operators perform the same types of role as others. • Frequency of inappropriate communications were decreased for teams who provide more number of acknowledgment. - Abstract: The characteristics of team communications are important since large process systems such as nuclear power plants, airline, and railways are operated by operating teams. In such situation, inappropriate communications can cause a lack of situational information and lead to serious consequences for the systems. As a result, the communication characteristics of operating teams should be understood in order to extract meaningful insights to address the nature of inappropriate communications. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to evaluate the characteristics of team communications based on social network analysis and compare them with the frequency of inappropriate communications. In order to perform the analysis, verbal protocol data, which were audio-visual recorded under training sessions by operating teams, were used and interfacing system loss of coolant accident scenarios were selected. As a result of the study, it was found that the frequency of inappropriate communications decreased when more operators perform the same types of role as other operators, since they can easily and effectively back up each other. Also, the frequency of inappropriate communication is decreased for teams which provide a relatively large communication content that acknowledge or confirm another communication content

  20. Reduction in inappropriate hospital use based on analysis of the causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soria-Aledo Víctor

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To reduce inappropriate admissions and stays with the application of an improvement cycle in patients admitted to a University Hospital. The secondary objective is to analyze the hospital cost saved by reducing inadequacy after the implementation of measures proposed by the group for improvement. Methods Pre- and post-analysis of a sample of clinical histories studied retrospectively, in which the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP was applied to a representative hospital sample of 1350 clinical histories in two phases. In the first phase the AEP was applied retrospectively to 725 admissions and 1350 stays. The factors associated with inappropriateness were analysed together with the causes, and specific measures were implemented in a bid to reduce inappropriateness. In the second phase the AEP was reapplied to a similar group of clinical histories and the results of the two groups were compared. The cost of inappropriate stays was calculated by cost accounting. Setting: General University Hospital with 426 beds serving a population of 320,000 inhabitants in the centre of Murcia, a city in south-eastern Spain. Results Inappropriate admissions were reduced significantly: 7.4% in the control group and 3.2% in the intervention group. Likewise, inappropriate stays decreased significantly from 24.6% to 10.4%. The cost of inappropriateness in the study sample fell from 147,044 euros to 66,642 euros. The causes of inappropriateness for which corrective measures were adopted were those that showed the most significant decrease. Conclusions It is possible to reduce inadequacy by applying measures based on prior analysis of the situation in each hospital.

  1. Inappropriate drugs in elderly patients with severe cognitive impairment: results from the shelter study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Colloca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been estimated that Nursing Home (NH residents with impaired cognitive status receive an average of seven to eight drugs daily. The aim of this study was to determine prevalence and factors associated with use of inappropriate drugs in elderly patients with severe cognitive impairment living in NH in Europe. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from a sample of 1449 NH residents with severe cognitive impairment, participating in the Services and Health for Elderly in Long TERm care (SHELTER study were analysed. Inappropriate drug use was defined as the use of drugs classified as rarely or never appropriate in patients with severe cognitive impairment based on the Holmes criteria published in 2008. RESULTS: Mean age of participating residents was 84.2±8.9 years, 1087 (75.0% were women. Inappropriate drug use was observed in 643 (44.9% residents. Most commonly used inappropriate drugs were lipid-lowering agents (9.9%, antiplatelet agents (excluding Acetylsalicylic Acid - ASA - (9.9%, acetylcholinesterase, inhibitors (7.2% and antispasmodics (6.9%. Inappropriate drug use was directly associated with specific diseases including diabetes (OR 1.64; 95% CI 1.21-2.24, heart failure (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.04-2.09, stroke (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.06-1.93, and recent hospitalization (OR 1.69; 95% CI 1.20-2.39. An inverse relation was shown between inappropriate drug use and presence of a geriatrician in the facility (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.39-0.77. CONCLUSION: Use of inappropriate drugs is common among older EU NH residents. Determinants of inappropriate drug use include comorbidities and recent hospitalization. Presence of a geriatrician in the facility staff is associated with a reduced rate of use of these medications.

  2. Utilization of potentially inappropriate medications in elderly patients in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binit N Jhaveri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the use of potentially inappropriate medicines in elderly inpatients in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed for cases of elderly patients admitted between January 2010 and December 2010. Data on age, gender, diagnosis, duration of hospital stay, treatment, and outcome were collected. Prescriptions were assessed for the use of potentially inappropriate medications in geriatric patients by using American Geriatric Society Beer′s criteria (2012 and PRISCUS list (2010. Results: A total of 676 geriatric patients (52.12% females were admitted in the medicine ward. The average age of geriatric patients was 72.69 years. According to Beer′s criteria, at least one inappropriate medicine was prescribed in 590 (87.3% patients. Metoclopramide (54.3%, alprazolam (9%, diazepam (8%, digoxin > 0.125 mg/day (5%, and diclofenac (3.7% were the commonly used inappropriate medications. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in heart and renal failure patients was the commonly identified drug-disease interaction. According to PRISCUS list, at least one inappropriate medication was prescribed in 210 (31.06% patients. Conclusion: Use of inappropriate medicines is highly prevalent in elderly patients.

  3. Heart failure severity, inappropriate ICD therapy, and novel ICD programming: a MADIT-RIT substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimee, Usama A; Vermilye, Katherine; Rosero, Spencer; Schuger, Claudio D; Daubert, James P; Zareba, Wojciech; McNitt, Scott; Polonsky, Bronislava; Moss, Arthur J; Kutyifa, Valentina

    2017-12-01

    The effects of heart failure (HF) severity on risk of inappropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy have not been thoroughly investigated. We aimed to study the association between HF severity and inappropriate ICD therapy in MADIT-RIT. MADIT-RIT randomized 1,500 patients to three ICD programming arms: conventional (Arm A), high-rate cut-off (Arm B: ≥200 beats/min), and delayed therapy (Arm C: 60-second delay for ≥170 beats/min). We evaluated the association between New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III (n = 256) versus class I-II (n = 251) and inappropriate ICD therapy in Arm A patients with ICD-only and cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D). We additionally assessed benefit of novel ICD programming in Arms B and C versus Arm A by NYHA classification. In Arm A, the risk of inappropriate therapy was significantly higher in those with NYHA III versus NYHA I-II for both ICD (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.55, confidence interval [CI]: 1.51-4.30, P programming significantly reduced inappropriate therapy in patients with both NYHA III (Arm B vs Arm A: HR = 0.08, P programming with high-rate cut-off or delayed detection reduces inappropriate ICD therapies in both mild and moderate HF. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Variations in Antibiotic and Azithromycin Prescribing for Children by Geography and Specialty-United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming-Dutra, Katherine E; Demirjian, Alicia; Bartoces, Monina; Roberts, Rebecca M; Taylor, Thomas H; Hicks, Lauri A

    2018-01-01

    Using antibiotics appropriately is critical to slow spread of antibiotic resistance, a major public health problem. Children, especially young children, receive more antibiotics than other age groups. Our objective was to describe antibiotic use in children in the United States and use of azithromycin, which is recommended infrequently for pediatric conditions. We used QuintilesIMS Xponent 2013 data to calculate the number and rate of oral antibiotic prescriptions for children by age (0-2, 3-9 and 10-19 years) and agent. We used log-binomial regression to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals to determine if specialty and patient age were associated with azithromycin selection when an antibiotic was prescribed. In 2013, 66.8 million antibiotics were prescribed to US children ≤19 years of age (813 antibiotic prescriptions per 1000 children). Amoxicillin and azithromycin were the 2 most commonly prescribed agents (23.1 million courses, 35% of all antibiotics; 12.2 million, 18%, respectively). Most antibiotics for children were prescribed by pediatricians (39%) and family practitioners (15%). Family practitioners were more likely to select azithromycin when an antibiotic was prescribed in all age groups than pediatricians (for children 0-2 years of age: prevalence ratio: 1.79, 95% confidence interval: 1.78-1.80; 3-9 years: 1.40, 1.40-1.40 and 10-19 years: 1.18, 1.18-1.18). Despite infrequent pediatric recommendations, variations in pediatric azithromycin use may suggest inappropriate antibiotic selection. Public health interventions focused on improving antibiotic selection in children as well as reducing antibiotic overuse are needed.

  5. Demographics of antibiotic persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerova, Silvia; Jouvet, Lionel; Steiner, Ulrich

    Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch...... cultures, rather than the individual level. Here, we used individual level bacteria data to confirm previous studies in how fast cells switch into a persistence stage, but our results challenge the fundamental idea that persistence comes with major costs of reduced growth (cell elongation) and division due...... even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed....

  6. Structure of polysaccharide antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matutano, L.

    1966-01-01

    Study of the structure of antibiotics having two or several sugars in their molecule. One may distinguish: the polysaccharide antibiotics themselves, made up of two or several sugars either with or without nitrogen, such as streptomycin, neomycins, paromomycine, kanamycin, chalcomycin; the hetero-polysaccharide antibiotics made up of one saccharide part linked to an aglycone of various type through a glucoside: macrolide, pigment, pyrimidine purine. Amongst these latter are: erythromycin, magnamycin, spiramycin, oleandomycin, cinerubin and amicetin. The sugars can either play a direct role in biochemical reactions or act as a dissolving agent, as far as the anti-microbe power of these antibiotics is concerned. (author) [fr

  7. [Antibiotic treatments in urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussade, H; Sunder, S; Bernard, L; Coloby, P; Guy, L; Karsenty, G; Bastide, C; Bruyère, F

    2013-11-01

    To define prescription modalities for the use of antibiotics in urology. A bibliographic research was performed using the MEDLINE database concerning all the antibiotics usable in urology. Treatments were classified by families; modes of action, indications in urology and adverse events have been detailed. Administrative files for commercial use have been consulted and associated with literature analysis. About 8 classes of antibiotics are usable in urology in a routine use. How they work, indications in urology and adverse events are discussed. Knowing that bacterial resistance to quinilones is increasing dramatically, it seems imperative to control the use of 8 classes of antibiotics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibiotics: Miracle Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-16

    The overuse of antibiotics has led to the development of resistance among bacteria, making antibiotics ineffective in treating certain conditions. This podcast discusses the importance of talking to your healthcare professional about whether or not antibiotics will be beneficial if you’ve been diagnosed with an infectious disease.  Created: 4/16/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  9. A computerized education module improves patient knowledge and attitudes about appropriate antibiotic use for acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Erika Leemann; Mackenzie, Thomas D; Metlay, Joshua P; Camargo, Carlos A; Gonzales, Ralph

    2011-12-01

    Over-use of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) increases antimicrobial resistance, treatment costs, and side effects. Patient desire for antibiotics contributes to over-use. To explore whether a point-of-care interactive computerized education module increases patient knowledge and decreases desire for antibiotics. Bilingual (English/Spanish) interactive kiosks were available in 8 emergency departments as part of a multidimensional intervention to reduce antibiotic prescribing for ARIs. The symptom-tailored module included assessment of symptoms, knowledge about ARIs (3 items), and desire for antibiotics on a 10-point visual analog scale. Multivariable analysis assessed predictors of change in desire for antibiotics. Of 686 adults with ARI symptoms, 63% initially thought antibiotics might help. The proportion of patients with low (1-3 on the scale) desire for antibiotics increased from 22% pre-module to 49% post-module (pknowledge about antibiotics and ARIs. Learning correlated with changes in personal desire for antibiotics. By reducing desire for antibiotics, point-of-care interactive educational computer technology may help decrease inappropriate use for antibiotics for ARIs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of the Appropriateness of Antibiotic Prescriptions in Lesotho Public Hospitals: A Novel Methodology Based on Principles of Antibiotic Prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorka, Matthias; Mitonga, Honoré Kabwebwe; Lubbe, Martie; Serfontein, Jan; Allen, Kirk

    2014-02-04

    The study primarily aimed at assessing the appropriateness of antibiotic prescriptions in a section of public health institutions in Lesotho using an assessment tool formulated from principles of antibiotic prescribing. Relevant data on procedures of infection diagnosis and prescribed antibiotics were collected from both inpatient and outpatient case reports for a one-month period in five public hospitals in Lesotho. These were analyzed for the appropriateness of the prescribed antibiotics. Prescription appropriateness assessment was based on conformities of prescribed antibiotics to criteria developed from pertinent principles of antibiotic prescribing. Assessed prescriptions, 307 inpatient and 865 outpatient prescriptions in total, were classified into categories of appropriateness based on extents to which they satisfied conditions defined by combinations of criteria in the assessment tool. Antibiotic prescriptions from inpatient and outpatient departments of study site hospitals were categorized into groups of different degrees of appropriateness. A total of 32.2% inpatient prescriptions and 78.4% outpatient prescriptions assessed were appropriately written for the empiric treatment of infections for which bacterial pathogens were considered absolute or possible etiologies. The use of prescription assessment tools based on principles of antibiotic prescribing is a feasible option of assessing the appropriateness of antibiotic prescriptions, particularly in low-income countries where expert panels cannot be formed.

  11. Community perceptions of infectious diseases, antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance in context of environmental changes: a study in Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Krushna Chandra; Tamhankar, Ashok J; Johansson, Eva; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2014-10-01

    The public health impact of environmental changes and the faceless threat of antibiotic resistance are currently among the top global health challenges. Community understanding of health, diseases and medicines in relation to the changing environment is necessary to mitigate the impact of these changes on health and for prudent use of antibiotics. The objective is to explore community perceptions of infectious diseases, antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance in the context of environmental changes. A qualitative study was conducted among community members with various backgrounds in education, gender, age and occupation of two districts of Odisha, India. Eight focus groups discussions and ten individual interviews were conducted. Data were analysed using content analysis. Two themes emerged: 'Interpretation of infectious diseases and health hazards in the context of environmental changes', and 'Understanding of antibiotic use and its consequences for resistance development and the environment'. The participants perceived that nowadays there is irregularity in the occurrence of seasons, particularly an increase in average temperature, which is influencing health. Participants' perceptions of infectious diseases, antibiotic use and resistance varied according to their social environment. Furthermore, they perceived that improved sanitation, choice of alternative medicine and awareness and education on prudent use of antibiotics are probably some ways to prevent antibiotic resistance. The participants perceived that climate variability is increasing and that this has health consequences for the community. They also hypothesized an interrelationship between the environment, infectious diseases and medicine use, particularly antibiotics. This is helpful for further empirical studies. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Preserving the 'commons': addressing the sustainable use of antibiotics through an economic lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, C M; Edwards, S E; Harbarth, S

    2017-10-01

    As the growth of antibiotic resistance has resulted in large part from widespread use of antibiotics, every effort must be made to ensure their sustainable use. This narrative review aims to assess the potential contribution of health economic analyses to sustainable use efforts. The work draws on existing literature and experience with health economic tools. The study examines some of the weaknesses in the health, regulatory, and industry arenas that could contribute to inappropriate or suboptimal prescribing of antibiotics and describes how economic analysis could be used to improve current practice by comparing both costs and health outcomes to maximize societal wellbeing over the longer-term. It finds that economic considerations underpinning current antibiotic prescribing strategies are incomplete and short-termist, with the result that they may foster suboptimal use. It also stresses that perverse incentives that drive antibiotic sales and inappropriate prescribing practices must be dis-entangled for sustainable use policies to gain traction. Finally, payment structures can be used to re-align incentives and promote optimal prescribing and sustainable use more generally. In particular, eliminating or altering reimbursement differentials could help steer clinical practice more deliberately towards the minimization of selection pressure and the resulting levels of antibiotic resistance. This work highlights the need for appropriately designed cost-effectiveness analyses, incentives analysis, and novel remuneration systems to underpin sustainable use policies both within and beyond the health sector. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-medication with antibiotics among undergraduate nursing students of a government medical college in Eastern India

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    suvadip biswas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics serve very useful therapeutic purpose in eradicating pathogens. Unfortunately excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics results in antibiotic resistance. The consequences of inappropriate self-medication with antibiotics among healthcare professionals have severe implications which might be legal issues, ethical issues, negative impacts on patient and poor quality of health care delivery. The present study was conducted on self-medication by undergraduate nursing students in a government medical college of West Bengal, India. A pre designed questionnaire was used to collect the relevant information pertaining to the study variables. Among the participants 54.2% had self-medicated in the last six months. The antibiotics most commonly used being metronidazole (67.4%, azithromycin (32.6% and norfloxacin (16.8%. Regarding the source of the antibiotics used for self-medication 41.6% participants went for leftover medicines at home, 34.8% participants obtained the drug from community pharmacies or drug stores. Hospital pharmacies and medicine samples were the source of the drugs for 19.2% and 4.4% participants respectively for this purpose. This study has shown that self-medication with antibiotics is common among undergraduate nursing students. There is a need for a rigorous mass enlightenment campaign to educate the population, including the health care professional about the disadvantages and possible complications of antibiotic self-medication. 

  14. Handling Time-dependent Variables : Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Price, L. Silvia; Frencken, Jos F.; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods,

  15. Inappropriate and cloned clinical histories on radiology request forms for sick children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Chetan Chandulal; Linam, Leann; Greenberg, S Bruce

    2013-10-01

    An appropriate clinical history improves the perception and interpretation of radiographic examinations in children and adults. However, clinical history provided on radiology request has not been studied for its appropriateness and frequency of cloned clinical history. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of inappropriate histories and cloned histories at a tertiary-care children's hospital. We analyzed radiology request forms of 388 outpatient and inpatient radiographic examinations obtained on 3 days during the same month at a tertiary-care children's hospital. Appropriateness of the clinical history was judged by its relevance to the examination ordered and appropriate associated billable ICD-9 code. Cloning was defined as identical clinical histories appearing on the radiology request on three consecutive days. Cloned histories were further subdivided as being appropriate or inappropriate. A total of 18% (70/388) of the requests for clinical history were either inappropriate, cloned or both. Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) referrals constituted the majority (82%, 9/11) of combined inappropriate history and cloning. NICU referrals accounted for 52% (28/54) of all inappropriate clinical histories, a significantly higher percentage than other inpatient locations (P = 0.006). The cardiovascular intensive care unit (CVICU) was the second most common patient location for inappropriate clinical histories (11%, 6/54). About one-third of the radiographic requests from the NICU had inappropriate histories (35%, 28/79). Among the outpatient referrals, 50% (4/8) of the inappropriate histories were from the emergency department. The most common cloned histories included "hypoplastic left heart syndrome" (15%, 4/27), "endotracheal tube placement" (11%, 3/27) and "evaluate lung fields and bowel" (11%, 3/27). The most commonly cloned clinical history was seen on referrals from the NICU at 63% (17/27), a significantly higher percentage than other

  16. Caregivers' practices, knowledge and beliefs of antibiotics in paediatric upper respiratorytract infections in Trinidad and Tobago: a cross-sectional study

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    Pereira Lexley

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic overuse and misuse for upper respiratory tract infections in children is widespread and fuelled by public attitudes and expectations. This study assessed knowledge, beliefs, and practices regarding antibiotic use for these paediatric infections among children's caregivers' in Trinidad and Tobago in the English speaking Caribbean. Methods In a cross-sectional observational study, by random survey children's adult caregivers gave a telephone interview from November 1998 to January 1999. On a pilot-tested evaluation instrument, respondents provided information about their knowledge and beliefs of antibiotics, and their use of these agents to treat recent episodes ( Results Of the 417 caregivers, 70% were female and between 18–40 years, 77% were educated to high school and beyond and 43% lived in urban areas. Two hundred and forty nine (60% respondents scored high (≥ 12 on antibiotic knowledge and 149 (34% had used antibiotics in the preceding year. More caregivers with a high knowledge score had private health insurance (33%, (p Conclusions In Trinidad and Tobago, caregivers scoring low on antibiotic knowledge have erroneous beliefs and use antibiotics inappropriately. Children in their care receive antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections without visiting a health clinic or a physician. Educational interventions in the community on the consequences of inappropriate antibiotic use in children are recommended. Our findings emphasise the need to address information, training, legislation and education at all levels of the drug delivery system towards discouraging self-medication with antibiotics in children.

  17. Factors Influencing Patterns of Antibiotic Prescribing in Primary Health Care Centers in the Savodjbolaq District During 2012-13: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Karimi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics is one of the main reasons for antibiotic resistance in the world which has an increasing pressure and cost on health system and also household economy. The present study aimed to determine the pattern of antibiotic prescribing and related it,s factors in health centers. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional design, 1068 random prescriptions of General Physicians (GPs who work in Savodjbolaq Health Centers were studied. Variables included age, gender of patients and physicians, frequency of antibiotic prescribing, rate of combination therapy, methods of prescribing, type of patient’s insurance booklet and seasons. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS version 18 software. Results: More than half of prescriptions (56.8% included at least one antibiotics. One in every four prescriptions had some sort of antibiotic combination therapy. According to the scientific criteria, 57.1% of antibiotics were prescribed inappropriately. among these criteria, the highest error belongs to doses per day with 67.72%. Frequency of antibiotic prescribing based on age, gender, type of patient’s insurance booklet, physicians experience, different seasons was significantly different (p<0.05. Conclusions: Combination therapy and unscientific prescribing of antibiotics for youths are concern for public health and household economy. Review of protocols and methods of supervision, Changes in purchasing medical services, Design and implementation of operational and targeted educational interventions, Training physicians emphasizing on logical aspects of antibiotic prescription and prescribing skills, are recommended.  

  18. Bactericidal Antibiotics Promote Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Inflammation in Human Sinonasal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohanski, Michael A; Tharakan, Anuj; Lane, Andrew P.; Ramanathan, Murugappan

    2015-01-01

    Background Bactericidal antibiotics have been shown to stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in mammalian cells through mitochondrial dysfunction. This results in oxidative tissue damage that may have negative consequences for long-term antibiotic use. Antibiotics are widely and heavily used in the treatment of acute and chronic sinusitis, however the relationship between antibiotics and ROS formation in sinonasal epithelial cells (SNECs) has not yet been demonstrated. Methods Human SNECs were collected from patients during endoscopic sinus surgery and grown in culture at the air-liquid interface. Differentiated SNECs were stimulated with the bactericidal antibiotics amoxicillin and levofloxacin and the bacteriostatic antibiotic clarithromycin for 24-hours. Reactive oxygen species were quantified via fluorescence. Cell death was quantified by LDH secretion. Expression of inflammatory markers such as TNF-α and Nrf2 mediated antioxidant genes were measured by RT-PCR. Results Cultured SNECs treated with the bactericidal antibiotics amoxicillin and levofloxacin resulted in a significant increase in production of ROS (pbactericidal antibiotics leads to formation of ROS with an associated increase in inflammatory and antioxidant gene expression and cell death. This suggests that long term or inappropriate antibiotic use in the treatment of sinusitis, may result in oxidative tissue damage to the sinonasal epithelium. Future studies will explore the clinical implications of such damage to the sinonasal epithelium. PMID:26624249

  19. The future of antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to spread even as society is experiencing a market failure of new antibiotic research and development (R&D). Scientific, economic, and regulatory barriers all contribute to the antibiotic market failure. Scientific solutions to rekindle R&D include finding new screening strategies to identify novel antibiotic scaffolds and transforming the way we think about treating infections, such that the goal is to disarm the pathogen without killing it or modulate the host response to the organism without targeting the organism for destruction. Future economic strategies are likely to focus on ‘push’ incentives offered by public-private partnerships as well as increasing pricing by focusing development on areas of high unmet need. Such strategies can also help protect new antibiotics from overuse after marketing. Regulatory reform is needed to re-establish feasible and meaningful traditional antibiotic pathways, to create novel limited-use pathways that focus on highly resistant infections, and to harmonize regulatory standards across nations. We need new antibiotics with which to treat our patients. But we also need to protect those new antibiotics from misuse when they become available. If we want to break the cycle of resistance and change the current landscape, disruptive approaches that challenge long-standing dogma will be needed. PMID:25043962

  20. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  1. Potentially inappropriate medication use: the Beers' Criteria used among older adults with depressive symptoms

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    Lee D

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The ageing population means prescribing for chronic illnesses in older people is expected to rise. Comorbidities and compromised organ function may complicate prescribing and increase medication-related risks. Comorbid depression in older people is highly prevalent and complicates medication prescribing decisions. AIM: To determine the prevalence of potentially inappropriate medication use in a community-dwelling population of older adults with depressive symptoms. METHODS: The medications of 191 community-dwelling older people selected because of depressive symptoms for a randomised trial were reviewed and assessed using the modified version of the Beers' Criteria. The association between inappropriate medication use and various population characteristics was assessed using Chi-square statistics and logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: The mean age was 81 (±4.3 years and 59% were women. The median number of medications used was 6 (range 1-21 medications. The most commonly prescribed potentially inappropriate medications were amitriptyline, dextropropoxyphene, quinine and benzodiazepines. Almost half (49% of the participants were prescribed at least one potentially inappropriate medication; 29% were considered to suffer significant depressive symptoms (Geriatric Depression Scale ≥5 and no differences were found in the number of inappropriate medications used between those with and without significant depressive symptoms (Chi-square 0.005 p=0.54. DISCUSSION: Potentially inappropriate medication use, as per the modified Beers' Criteria, is very common among community-dwelling older people with depressive symptoms. However, the utility of the Beers' Criteria is lessened by lack of clinical correlation. Ongoing research to examine outcomes related to apparent inappropriate medication use is needed.

  2. Using a social story intervention to decrease inappropriate behavior of preschool children with autism

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    Angkhana Khantreejitranon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This research investigated the inappropriate behavior of preschool children with autism in a classroom and examined the effectiveness of the use of social stories to decrease inappropriate autistic behavior. An A-B-A-B single subject design was used across the five participants selected for the study. Investigating the problematic social skills and developing a social story intervention for the preschool autistic children was completed, followed by an examination of the effectiveness of the social story intervention. Ten common problematic social skills among the autistic children in preschool were identified—walking around, making loud noises, not sharing their toys with others, showing frustration when feeling unsatisfied, having no patience, not putting toys away when finished, taking other people's belongings without permission, not knowing how to greet others, destroying things when feeling frustrated, and giving a hug to other people at inappropriate times. It was found that the social story intervention helped to decrease inappropriate behavior in children with autism. The social story intervention consisted of five social story books and five e-books (one story per child using a single subject design with an A-B-A-B pattern. The autistic children preferred social stories from the hardcopy books compared with stories from the e-books. A fourth stage time trial was used over 6 weeks, five times per week, for a total of 30 times. The findings suggested that the use of properly constructed social stories can be effective in decreasing the inappropriate behavior of children with autism. However, each story intervention should be applied with caution because of individual differences between children. The social story intervention should be designed only for autistic children who exhibit specific inappropriate social behavior. Keywords: autistic child, inappropriate behavior, social skills, social story

  3. Potentially inappropriate prescriptions for older patients in long-term care

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    Laurin Danielle

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inappropriate medication use is a major healthcare issue for the elderly population. This study explored the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PIPs in long-term care in metropolitan Quebec. Methods A cross sectional chart review of 2,633 long-term care older patients of the Quebec City area was performed. An explicit criteria list for PIPs was developed based on the literature and validated by a modified Delphi method. Medication orders were reviewed to describe prescribing patterns and to determine the prevalence of PIPs. A multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of PIPs. Results Almost all residents (94.0% were receiving one or more prescribed medication; on average patients had 4.8 prescribed medications. A majority (54.7% of treated patients had a potentially inappropriate prescription (PIP. Most common PIPs were drug interactions (33.9% of treated patients, followed by potentially inappropriate duration (23.6%, potentially inappropriate medication (14.7% and potentially inappropriate dosage (9.6%. PIPs were most frequent for medications of the central nervous system (10.8% of prescribed medication. The likelihood of PIP increased significantly as the number of drugs prescribed increased (odds ratio [OR]: 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33 – 1.43 and with the length of stay (OR: 1.78, CI: 1.43 – 2.20. On the other hand, the risk of receiving a PIP decreased with age. Conclusion Potentially inappropriate prescribing is a serious problem in the highly medicated long-term care population in metropolitan Quebec. Use of explicit criteria lists may help identify the most critical issues and prioritize interventions to improve quality of care and patient safety.

  4. Inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks-incidence, effect, and implications for driver licensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Eiichi; Okajima, Katsunori; Shimane, Akira; Ozawa, Tomoya; Manaka, Tetsuyuki; Morishima, Itsuro; Asai, Toru; Takagi, Masahiko; Honda, Toshihiro; Kasai, Atsunobu; Fujii, Eitaro; Yamashiro, Kohei; Kohno, Ritsuko; Abe, Haruhiko; Noda, Takashi; Kurita, Takashi; Watanabe, Shigeyuki; Ohmori, Hiroya; Nitta, Takashi; Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Kiyono, Ken; Okumura, Ken

    2017-09-01

    Patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) have an ongoing risk of sudden incapacitation that may cause traffic accidents. However, there are limited data on the magnitude of this risk after inappropriate ICD therapies. We studied the rate of syncope associated with inappropriate ICD therapies to provide a scientific basis for formulating driving restrictions. Inappropriate ICD therapy event data between 1997 and 2014 from 50 Japanese institutions were analyzed retrospectively. The annual risk of harm (RH) to others posed by a driver with an ICD was calculated for private driving habits. We used a commonly employed annual RH to others of 5 in 100,000 (0.005%) as an acceptable risk threshold. Of the 4089 patients, 772 inappropriate ICD therapies occurred in 417 patients (age 61 ± 15 years, 74% male, and 65% secondary prevention). Patients experiencing inappropriate therapies had a mean number of 1.8 ± 1.5 therapy episodes during a median follow-up period of 3.9 years. No significant differences were found in the age, sex, or number of inappropriate therapies between patients receiving ICDs for primary or secondary prevention. Only three patients (0.7%) experienced syncope associated with inappropriate therapies. The maximum annual RH to others after the first therapy in primary and secondary prevention patients was calculated to be 0.11 in 100,000 and 0.12 in 100,000, respectively. We found that the annual RH from driving was far below the commonly cited acceptable risk threshold. Our data provide useful information to supplement current recommendations on driving restrictions in ICD patients with private driving habits.

  5. The outcome of non-carbapenem-based empirical antibacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, non-carbapenem-based empirical therapy provides benefit in regard to cost-effectiveness and antimicrobial stewardship when local antibiotic resistance patterns of gram-negative bacteria are considered. Patients who are colonized with VRE are more likely to develop bacteremia with VRE strains as a result of ...

  6. Empiric treatment based on Helicobacter Pylori serology cannont ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Evidence that chronic gastric Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is an aetiological factor in dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma and lymphoma has led to the suggestion that all serologically positive dyspeptic patients should be treated empirically with antibiotics to eradicate the infection, without ...

  7. The outcome of non-carbapenem-based empirical antibacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    contain an anti-pseudomonal antimicrobial agent which must be chosen according to cumulative local antimicrobial resistance data. Although carbapenems are recommended as empirical antibiotic therapy options in febrile patients with neutropenia, they should be used with care due to the increasing rates of carbapenem ...

  8. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea (ARG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Basic Information Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea: An Overview Antibiotic resistance is the ...

  9. History of Antibiotics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Kathrin I

    2016-01-01

    For thousands of years people were delivered helplessly to various kinds of infections, which often reached epidemic proportions and have cost the lives of millions of people. This is precisely the age since mankind has been thinking of infectious diseases and the question of their causes. However, due to a lack of knowledge, the search for strategies to fight, heal, and prevent the spread of communicable diseases was unsuccessful for a long time. It was not until the discovery of the healing effects of (antibiotic producing) molds, the first microscopic observations of microorganisms in the seventeenth century, the refutation of the abiogenesis theory, and the dissolution of the question "What is the nature of infectious diseases?" that the first milestones within the history of antibiotics research were set. Then new discoveries accelerated rapidly: Bacteria could be isolated and cultured and were identified as possible agents of diseases as well as producers of bioactive metabolites. At the same time the first synthetic antibiotics were developed and shortly thereafter, thousands of synthetic substances as well as millions of soil borne bacteria and fungi were screened for bioactivity within numerous microbial laboratories of pharmaceutical companies. New antibiotic classes with different targets were discovered as on assembly line production. With the beginning of the twentieth century, many of the diseases which reached epidemic proportions at the time-e.g., cholera, syphilis, plague, tuberculosis, or typhoid fever, just to name a few, could be combatted with new discovered antibiotics. It should be considered that hundred years ago the market launch of new antibiotics was significantly faster and less complicated than today (where it takes 10-12 years in average between the discovery of a new antibiotic until the launch). After the first euphoria it was quickly realized that bacteria are able to develop, acquire, and spread numerous resistance mechanisms

  10. Appropriate Antibiotic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Michael G; Heil, Emily L; Hayes, Bryan D

    2017-02-01

    Prescribing antibiotics is an essential component of initial therapy in sepsis. Early antibiotics are an important component of therapy, but speed of administration should not overshadow the patient-specific characteristics that determine the optimal breadth of antimicrobial therapy. Cultures should be drawn before antibiotic therapy if it does not significantly delay administration. Combination antibiotic therapy against gram-negative infections is not routinely required, and combination therapy involving vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam is associated with an increase in acute kidney injury. Emergency practitioners should be aware of special considerations in the administration and dosing of antibiotics in order to deliver optimal care to septic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Knowledge, awareness, and attitudes toward antibiotic use and antimicrobial resistance among Saudi population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Belkina, Tatiana; Bahashwan, Saleh A; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E; Tebbens, Jurjen Duintjer; Abdel-Salam, Hassan A; Khalil, Adel I; Daghriry, Safaa I; Gahtani, Mona A; Madkhaly, Fatimah M; Nohi, Nahed I; Khodari, Rafaa H; Sharahili, Reem M; Dagreery, Khlood A; Khormi, Mayisah; Habibah, Sarah Abuo; Medrba, Bayan A; Gahtani, Amal A; Hifthi, Rasha Y; Zaid, Jameelah M; Amshan, Arwa W; Alneami, Alqasim A; Noreddin, Ayman; Vlček, Jiří

    2016-10-01

    Background Inappropriate use of antibiotics is a public health problem of great concern. Objective To evaluate knowledge of antibiotics, race, gender and age as independent risk factors for self-medication. Setting Residents and population from different regions of Saudi Arabia. Methods We conducted a cross sectional survey study among residents. Data were collected between June 2014 to May, 2015 from 1310 participants and data were recorded anonymously. The questionnaire was randomly distributed by interview of participants and included sociodemographic characteristics, antibiotics knowledge, attitudes and behavior with respect to antibiotics usage. Main outcome measure Population aggregate scores on questions and data were analyzed using univariate logistic regression to evaluate the influence of variables on self-prescription of antibiotics. Results The response rate was 87.7 %. A cumulative 63.6 % of participants reported to have purchased antibiotics without a prescription from pharmacies; 71.1 % reported that they did not finish the antibiotic course as they felt better. The availability of antibiotics without prescription was found to be positively associated with self-medication (OR 0.238, 95 % CI 0.17-0.33). Of those who used prescribed or non-prescribed antibiotics, 44.7 % reported that they kept left-over antibiotics from the incomplete course of treatment for future need. Interestingly, 62 % of respondents who used drugs without prescription agreed with the statement that antibiotics should be access-controlled prescribed by a physician. We also found significant association between storage, knowledge/attitudes and education. Conclusions The overall level of awareness on antibiotics use among residents in Saudi Arabia is low. This mandates public health awareness intervention programs to be implemented on the use of antibiotics.

  12. Antibiotic use among older adults on an acute care general surgery service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, André S.; Bailey, Jon G.; Davis, Philip J.B.; Johnson, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Antibiotics play an important role in the treatment of many surgical diseases that affect older adults, and the potential for inappropriate use of these drugs is high. Our objective was to describe antibiotic use among older adults admitted to an acute care surgery service at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Methods Detailed data regarding diagnosis, comorbidities, surgery and antibiotic use were retrospectively collected for patients 70 years and older admitted to an acute care surgery service. We evaluated antibiotic use (perioperative prophylaxis and treatment) for appropriateness based on published guidelines. Results During the study period 453 patients were admitted to the acute care surgery service, and 229 underwent surgery. The most common diagnoses were small bowel obstruction (27.2%) and acute cholecystitis (11.0%). In total 251 nonelective abdominal operations were performed, and perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was appropriate in 49.5% of cases. The most common prophylaxis errors were incorrect timing (15.5%) and incorrect dose (12.4%). Overall 206 patients received treatment with antibiotics for their underlying disease process, and 44.2% received appropriate first-line drug therapy. The most common therapeutic errors were administration of second- or third-line antibiotics without indication (37.9%) and use of antibiotics when not indicated (12.1%). There was considerable variation in the duration of treatment for patients with the same diagnoses. Conclusion Inappropriate antibiotic use was common among older patients admitted to an acute care surgery service. Quality improvement initiatives are needed to ensure patients receive optimal care in this complex hospital environment. PMID:28930045

  13. Antibiotic use among older adults on an acute care general surgery service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, André S; Bailey, Jon G; Davis, Philip J B; Johnson, Paul M

    2017-12-01

    Antibiotics play an important role in the treatment of many surgical diseases that affect older adults, and the potential for inappropriate use of these drugs is high. Our objective was to describe antibiotic use among older adults admitted to an acute care surgery service at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Detailed data regarding diagnosis, comorbidities, surgery and antibiotic use were retrospectively collected for patients 70 years and older admitted to an acute care surgery service. We evaluated antibiotic use (perioperative prophylaxis and treatment) for appropriateness based on published guidelines. During the study period 453 patients were admitted to the acute care surgery service, and 229 underwent surgery. The most common diagnoses were small bowel obstruction (27.2%) and acute cholecystitis (11.0%). In total 251 nonelective abdominal operations were performed, and perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was appropriate in 49.5% of cases. The most common prophylaxis errors were incorrect timing (15.5%) and incorrect dose (12.4%). Overall 206 patients received treatment with antibiotics for their underlying disease process, and 44.2% received appropriate first-line drug therapy. The most common therapeutic errors were administration of second- or third-line antibiotics without indication (37.9%) and use of antibiotics when not indicated (12.1%). There was considerable variation in the duration of treatment for patients with the same diagnoses. Inappropriate antibiotic use was common among older patients admitted to an acute care surgery service. Quality improvement initiatives are needed to ensure patients receive optimal care in this complex hospital environment.

  14. Frequent Home Monitoring of ICD Is Effective to Prevent Inappropriate Defibrillator Shock Delivery

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    Paolo Bifulco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, in the context of telemedicine, telemonitoring services are gaining attention. They are offered, for example, to patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs. A major problem associated with ICD therapy is the occurrence of inappropriate shocks which impair patients’ quality of life and may also be arrhythmogenic. The telemonitoring can provide a valid support to intensify followup visits, in order to improve the prevention of inappropriate defibrillator shock, thus enhancing patient safety. Inappropriate shock generally depends on atrial fibrillation, supraventricular tachycardia, and abnormal sensing (such as those caused by electromagnetic interferences. As a practical example, an unusual case of an ICD patient who risked an inappropriate shock while taking a shower is reported. Continuous remote telemonitoring was able to timely warn cardiologist via GSM-SMS, who were able to detect improper sensing examining the intracardiac electrogram via Web. Patient was promptly contacted and warned to not further come in contact with the hydraulic system and any electrical appliance to prevent an inappropriate defibrillator shock. This demonstrates the effectiveness and usefulness of continuous remote telemonitoring in supporting ICD patients.

  15. Healthcare providers attitudes and perceptions of 'inappropriate attendance' in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Bernadette M; McCann, Margaret

    2013-07-01

    Emergency Departments (EDs) worldwide are facing a crisis from overcrowding and a common perception exists that inappropriate use of the ED is a major contributing factor. Patients, who attend the ED with non-urgent problems, could be dealt with by a General Practitioner; such patients use time and resources that would otherwise be used for patients with more appropriate needs. To explore attitudes and perceptions of healthcare providers regarding 'inappropriate attendance' in the ED. Using a survey questionnaire, this descriptive quantitative study included ED nurses, doctors and paramedics from three regional hospitals in the Republic of Ireland. A total of 163 surveys were returned (59% response rate). There was an overwhelming agreement among respondents that inappropriate attendance in Irish ED exists and poses a considerable challenge for healthcare providers. Results suggest differences of opinion on what represents inappropriate ED use. Potential solutions to address the issue of inappropriate ED attendance include General Practitioners and Advanced Nurse Practitioners practicing within the ED setting; education and greater public awareness and faster access to a specialist opinion in the Out Patient Department. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inappropriate sexual behaviour in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder: what education is recommended and why.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddows, Nicola; Brooks, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder impairing social skills and communication. Adolescents with ASD have sexual needs, but may not understand their physical and emotional development resulting in inappropriate sexual behaviour. The aim of this review is to describe the type of inappropriate behaviour that presents in these adolescents, explain why such behaviours occur, suggest what education is suitable and identify current gaps in research. The databases EMBASE, OVID MEDLINE and PSYCINFO were searched for relevant articles. In total, 5241 articles were found, with an additional 15 sources found via soft searches, of which 42 met inclusion criteria and were subsequently reviewed. Sexual behaviours that occur in these adolescents with ASD include hypermasturbation, public masturbation, inappropriate romantic gestures, inappropriate arousal and exhibitionism. Such behaviours are thought to be caused via a lack of understanding of normal puberty, the absence of appropriate sex education, the severity of their ASD and other associated problems. It is suggested that individualized, repetitive education should be started from an early age in an accessible form. Social skills development is also important before more technical aspects of sex education are taught. Despite being such a common problem for schools, institutions and families to manage, it is surprising how sparse literature is particularly regarding why inappropriate behaviour occurs and what education is effective. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Inappropriate gestational weight gain among teenage pregnancies: prevalence and pregnancy outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivatkusol Y

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Yada Vivatkusol, Thaovalai Thavaramara, Chadakarn Phaloprakarn Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Vajira Hospital, Navamindradhiraj University, Bangkok, Thailand Objective: To study the prevalence and pregnancy outcomes of inappropriate gestational weight gain (GWG among teenage pregnant women.Methods: A retrospective descriptive study was conducted on 2,165 teenage pregnant women who attended our antenatal clinic between January 2007 and August 2015. Adverse pregnancy outcomes, including maternal and neonatal outcomes of women with inappropriate GWG, including underweight and overweight, were studied and compared with those of women with appropriate GWG.Results: Complete data of 1,943 women were obtained. Among these women, the mean age was 17.4±1.4 years and mean body mass index at first visit was 19.1±3.0 kg/m2. The prevalence of inappropriate GWG was 61.7%. Underweight women were more likely to experience anemia and preterm delivery, whereas overweight women required more cesarean sections because of cephalopelvic disproportion and preeclampsia, compared to women with appropriate weight gain (all P<0.001. The rates of gestational diabetes mellitus among women who were underweight, overweight, or appropriate weight were not significantly different.Conclusion: More than 60% of teenage pregnancies showed inappropriate GWG. GWG had a significant impact on pregnancy outcomes. Keywords: prevalence, pregnancy outcome, inappropriate gestational weight gain, teenage pregnancy

  18. Inappropriate prescribing in an acutely ill population of elderly patients as determined by Beers' Criteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Paul F

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Adverse drug events (ADEs) are associated with inappropriate prescribing (IP) and result in increased morbidity, mortality and resource utilisation. We used Beers\\' Criteria to determine the three-month prevalence of IP in a non-selected community-dwelling population of acutely ill older people requiring hospitalisation. METHODS: A prospective, observational study of 597 consecutive acute admissions was performed. Diagnoses and concurrent medications were recorded before hospital physician intervention, and Beers\\' Criteria applied. RESULTS: Mean patient age (SD) was 77 (7) years. Median number of medications was 5, range 0-13. IP occurred in 32% of patients (n = 191), with 24%, 6% and 2% taking 1, 2 and 3 inappropriate medications respectively. Patients taking >5 medications were 3.3 times more likely to receive an inappropriate medication than those taking < or =5 medications (OR 3.34: 95%, CI 2.37-4.79; P<0.001). Forty-nine per cent of patients with inappropriate prescriptions were admitted with adverse effects of the inappropriate medications. Sixteen per cent of all admissions were associated with such adverse effects. CONCLUSION: IP is highly prevalent in acutely ill older patients and is associated with polypharmacy and hospitalisation. However, Beers\\' Criteria cannot be used as a gold standard as they do not comprehensively address all aspects of IP in older people.

  19. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in elderly population: A study in medicine out-patient department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Kumar Sah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Older individuals often suffer from multiple systemic diseases and are particularly more vulnerable to potentially inappropriate medicine prescribing. Inappropriate medication can cause serious medical problem for the elderly. The study was conducted with objectives to determine the prevalence of potentially inappropriate medicine (PIM prescribing in older Nepalese patients in a medicine outpatient department.Materials & Methods: A prospective observational analysis of drugs prescribed in medicine out-patient department (OPD of a tertiary hospital of central Nepal was conducted during November 2012 to October 2013 among 869 older adults aged 65 years and above. The use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIM in elderly patients was analysed using Beer’s Criteria updated to 2013. Results: In the 869 patients included, the average number of drugs prescribed per prescription was 5.56. The most commonly used drugs were atenolol (24.3%, amlodipine (23.16%, paracetamol (17.6%, salbutamol (15.72% and vitamin B complex (13.26%. The total number of medications prescribed was 4833. At least one instance of PIM was experienced by approximately 26.3% of patients when evaluated using the Beers criteria. Conclusion: Potentially inappropriate medications are highly prevalent among older patients attending medical OPD and are associated with number of medications prescribed. Further research is warranted to study the impact of PIMs towards health related outcomes in these elderly.

  20. Development of botanicals to combat antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja D. Gupta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of antibiotics in the previous century lead to reduction in mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases but their inappropriate and irrational use has resulted in emergence of resistant microbial populations. Alteration of target sites, active efflux of drugs and enzymatic degradations are the strategies employed by the pathogenic bacteria to develop intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. This has led to an increased interest in medicinal plants since 25–50% of current pharmaceuticals are plant derived. Crude extracts of medicinal plants could serve as an alternate source of resistance modifying agents owing to the wide variety of secondary metabolites. These metabolites (alkaloids, tannins, polyphenols etc. could act as potentials for antimicrobials and resistance modifiers. Plant extracts have the ability to bind to protein domains leading to modification or inhibition protein–protein interactions. This enables the herbals to also present themselves as effective modulators of host related cellular processes viz immune response, mitosis, apoptosis and signal transduction. Thus they may exert their activity not only by killing the microorganism but by affecting key events in the pathogenic process, thereby, the bacteria, fungi and viruses may have a reduced ability to develop resistance to botanicals. The article is meant to stimulate research wherein the cidal activity of the extract is not the only parameter considered but other mechanism of action by which plants can combat drug resistant microbes are investigated. The present article emphasizes on mechanisms involved in countering multi drug resistance.

  1. Antibiotic distribution channels in Thailand: results of key-informant interviews, reviews of drug regulations and database searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommanustweechai, Angkana; Chanvatik, Sunicha; Sermsinsiri, Varavoot; Sivilaikul, Somsajee; Patcharanarumol, Walaiporn; Yeung, Shunmay; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2018-02-01

    To analyse how antibiotics are imported, manufactured, distributed and regulated in Thailand. We gathered information, on antibiotic distribution in Thailand, in in-depth interviews - with 43 key informants from farms, health facilities, pharmaceutical and animal feed industries, private pharmacies and regulators- and in database and literature searches. In 2016-2017, licensed antibiotic distribution in Thailand involves over 700 importers and about 24 000 distributors - e.g. retail pharmacies and wholesalers. Thailand imports antibiotics and active pharmaceutical ingredients. There is no system for monitoring the distribution of active ingredients, some of which are used directly on farms, without being processed. Most antibiotics can be bought from pharmacies, for home or farm use, without a prescription. Although the 1987 Drug Act classified most antibiotics as "dangerous drugs", it only classified a few of them as prescription-only medicines and placed no restrictions on the quantities of antibiotics that could be sold to any individual. Pharmacists working in pharmacies are covered by some of the Act's regulations, but the quality of their dispensing and prescribing appears to be largely reliant on their competences. In Thailand, most antibiotics are easily and widely available from retail pharmacies, without a prescription. If the inappropriate use of active pharmaceutical ingredients and antibiotics is to be reduced, we need to reclassify and restrict access to certain antibiotics and to develop systems to audit the dispensing of antibiotics in the retail sector and track the movements of active ingredients.

  2. Empirical Test Case Specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

    This document includes the empirical specification on the IEA task of evaluation building energy simulation computer programs for the Double Skin Facades (DSF) constructions. There are two approaches involved into this procedure, one is the comparative approach and another is the empirical one. I....... In the comparative approach the outcomes of different software tools are compared, while in the empirical approach the modelling results are compared with the results of experimental test cases....

  3. Antibiotic Therapy in Pyogenic Meningitis in Paediatric Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajdin, F.; Rasheed, M.A.; Ashraf, M.; Khan, G.J.; Rasheed, H.; Ejaz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To isolate and identify the causative pathogen, antibiotic sensitivity testing and success rate of empirical antibiotic therapy in pyogenic meningitis. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: The Children's Hospital and Institute of Child Health, Lahore, Pakistan, from March to July 2012. Methodology: The study was performed on 72 culture positive meningitis cases in children less than 15 years of age. This therapy was evaluated by monitoring the patient's clinical picture for 14 - 21 days. The collected data was analyzed by Chi-square test. Results: Seventeen different bacteria were isolated. The most commonly occurring bacteria were coagulase negative Staphylococci (25%), E. coli (12.5%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.3%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (8.3%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.3%). All the bacteria were sensitive to vancomycin (96.7%), meropenem (76.7%), amikacin (75%), ciprofloxacin (65.3%), chloramphenicol (46.5%), ceftazidime (44.2%), cefepime (41.9%), co-amoxiclav (38.0%), oxacillin (34.8%), cefotaxime (21.4%), penicillin (20.7%), ceftriaxone (18.6%), cefuroxime (14%) and ampicillin (6.9%). The combination of sulbactam and cefoperazone showed antimicrobial sensitivity of 81.4%. The success rate of empirical antibiotic therapy was 91.7%. Conclusion: It was found that Gram negative bacteria were the major cause of pyogenic meningitis. Mostly there were resistant strains against all commonly used antibiotics except vancomycin. All empirical antibiotic therapies were found to be most successful. (author)

  4. Profiles of antibiotic susceptibilities of bacterial isolates and physico ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Venda region of South Africa is predominantly rural and residents rely on untreated water sources for daily water needs. The physico-chemical quality of these water sources including antibiotic susceptibilities of enteric bacterial isolates which would guide clinicians in the empiric management of diarrhoea have ...

  5. Solving the Antibiotic Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gerard D

    2015-02-13

    Antibiotics are essential for both treating and preventing infectious diseases. Paradoxically, despite their importance as pillars of modern medicine, we are in danger of losing antibiotics because of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms throughout all pathogenic microbes. This fact, coupled with an inability to bring new drugs to market at a pace that matches resistance, has resulted in a crisis of global proportion. Solving this crisis requires the actions of many stakeholders, but chemists, chemical biologists, and microbiologists must drive the scientific innovation that is required to maintain our antibiotic arsenal. This innovation requires (1) a deep understanding of the evolution and reservoirs of resistance; (2) full knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic action and resistance; (3) the discovery of chemical and genetic probes of antibiotic action and resistance; (4) the integration of systems biology into antibiotic discovery; and (5) the discovery of new antimicrobial chemical matter. Addressing these pressing scientific gaps will ensure that we can meet the antibiotic crisis with creativity and purpose.

  6. [Level of knowledge of antibiotics prescribed in outpatients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabé Muñoz, Elena; Flores Dorado, Macarena; Martínez Martínez, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    The lack of patient knowledge about their medication is considered to be one of the main reasons for an inappropriate use. This study the level of knowledge in patients about their prescribed antibiotic, and describes some of the factors related to this. A cross-sectional, descriptive and observational study with an analytical component. SITE: A community pharmacy in Murcia. The study form was offered to all customers who arrived to obtain antibiotics while the study was taking place. A validated form was used to determined the level of knowledge was a validated form. A total of 126 patients, most of them women, with an average age of 44.6 years were included. Half of the study population had no knowledge which could ensure the correct use of the antibiotic they were taking. The «process of use» of the medication was the best known dimension by the study population, followed by the «therapeutic aim». The dimension related to the «safety» of the medication was the one with the lowest values. After a logistic regression, a link between the knowledge of the antibiotic and the «know the name of the antibiotic» (p=.05; r=2.15) and the «number of antibiotic the patient takes» (p=.02; r=0.30) variables. The results show that there is a certain lack of information on the use of antibiotics by the study sample. Thes results could help to show the way to follow in future studies, targeted to meet the need of information. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Statin therapy reduces inappropriate shock in non-ischemic patients with mild heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Anne-Christine H.; Zareba, Wojciech; Jons, Christian

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between diabetes mellitus and risk of inappropriate or appropriate therapy in patients receiving an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) and resynchronization therapy has not been investigated thoroughly. The effect of innovative ICD programming on therapy...... tachycardia zone of 170 to 199 bpm (arm A), high-rate cutoff with a ventricular tachycardia zone ≥200 bpm (arm B), or 60-second-delayed therapy (arm C). The end points of inappropriate therapy, appropriate therapy, and death were assessed among 485 patients with and 998 without diabetes mellitus. Innovative...... (hazard ratio, 4.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-11.40; P=0.005) and appropriate therapy (hazard ratio, 2.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-5.87; P=0.037) compared with those who did not. CONCLUSIONS: Innovative high-rate cutoff or delayed ICD programming was associated with a reduction in inappropriate...

  8. The Effect of ICD Programming on Inappropriate and Appropriate ICD Therapies in Ischemic and Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedláček, Kamil; Ruwald, Anne-Christine; Kutyifa, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The MADIT-RIT trial demonstrated reduction of inappropriate and appropriate ICD therapies and mortality by high-rate cut-off and 60-second-delayed VT therapy ICD programming in patients with a primary prophylactic ICD indication. The aim of this analysis was to study effects of MADIT......-RIT ICD programming in patients with ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy. METHODS AND RESULTS: First and total occurrences of both inappropriate and appropriate ICD therapies were analyzed by multivariate Cox models in 791 (53%) patients with ischemic and 707 (47%) patients with nonischemic......-rate cut-off (arm B) and delayed VT therapy ICD programming (arm C) compared with conventional (arm A) ICD programming were associated with a significant risk reduction of first inappropriate and appropriate ICD therapy in patients with ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy (HR range 0.11-0.34, P

  9. Prevalence of inappropriate medication using Beers criteria in Japanese long-term care facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niwata, Satoko; Yamada, Yukari; Ikegami, Naoki

    2006-01-01

    Background The prevalence and risk factors of potentially inappropriate medication use among the elderly patients have been studied in various countries, but because of the difficulty of obtaining data on patient characteristics and medications they have not been studied in Japan. Methods We...... conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study in 17 Japanese long-term care (LTC) facilities by collecting data from the comprehensive MDS assessment forms for 1669 patients aged 65 years and over who were assessed between January and July of 2002. Potentially inappropriate medications were identified...... on the basis of the 2003 Beers criteria. Results The patients in the sample were similar in terms of demographic characteristics to those in the national survey. Our study revealed that 356 (21.1%) of the patients were treated with potentially inappropriate medication independent of disease or condition...

  10. Dementia and inappropriate sexual behavior (ISB: What we know and what we need to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Fabà

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, there has been no place for sexuality in older age. However, research has shown that sexuality plays an important role in older people’s life, even in situations such as dementia. The goal of the article is to review the scientific literature regarding the inappropriate sexual behavior that these kind of patients might present. In order to do so, we will firstly address the definition of inappropriate sexual behavior or, more precisely, its multiple definitions. After that, we will deal with other issues such as its prevalence, factors that can cause its appearance, its consequences and some of the available therapeutic options. Finally, in the last section some recommendations for future research will be provided, such as the need to clarify the concept of inappropriate sexual behavior, to find more efficient ways to address this problem, and the desirability of considering sexuality as a human dimension with a high adaptive potential in old age.

  11. Dementia and inappropriate sexual behavior: What we know and what we need to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Fabà

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, there has been no place for sexuality in older age. However, research has shown that sexuality plays an important role in older people’s life, even in situations such as dementia. The goal of the article is to review the scientific literature regarding the inappropriate sexual behavior that these kind of patients might present. In order to do so, we will firstly address the definition of inappropriate sexual behavior or, more precisely, its multiple definitions. After that, we will deal with other issues such as its prevalence, factors that can cause its appearance, its consequences and some of the available therapeutic options. Finally, in the last section some recommendations for future research will be provided, such as the need to clarify the concept of inappropriate sexual behavior, to find more efficient ways to address this problem, and the desirability of considering sexuality as a human dimension with a high potential for adaptation in old age.

  12. Inappropriate shock for myopotential over-sensing in a patient with subcutaneous ICD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Corzani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate ICD shocks are common adverse events; they are mainly due to supraventricular arrhythmias and secondly are related to noise, undersensing, oversensing, device malfunctions. We present a case of inappropriate device therapy due to myopotential oversensing in a patient with a subcutaneous ICD (s-ICD. A 58 years old male with an s-ICD during the device interrogation showed a previous episode of suspected sustained ventricular tachycardia at 210 bpm, which was effectively treated with ICD shock. The patient experienced the electrical shock while holding a big gas-cylinder in his arms. The EGM analysis revealed many irregular ventricular signals of low amplitude lasting for 24 s and interrupted by the shock. The device showed no malfunctions. This is the first case report of inappropriate S-ICD shock related to myopotential over-sensing. By recording intracardiac EGM, we demonstrated that the noise was created by the activity of the pectorals muscles.

  13. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This

  14. Elevator talk: observational study of inappropriate comments in a public space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubel, P A; Zell, M M; Miller, D J; Fischer, G S; Peters-Stefani, D; Arnold, R M

    1995-08-01

    We conducted a study to determine the type and frequency of inappropriate comments made by hospital employees while riding hospital elevators. Four observers rode in elevators at five hospitals, listening for any comments made by hospital employees that might be deemed inappropriate. All potentially inappropriate comments were reviewed by the research team and were classified as inappropriate if they met at least one of the following criteria: violated patient confidentiality, raised concerns about the speaker's ability or desire to provide high-quality patient care, raised concerns about poor quality of care in the hospital (by persons other than the speaker), or contained derogatory remarks about patients or their families. We observed 259 one-way elevator trips offering opportunity for conversation. We overheard a total of 39 inappropriate comments, which took place on 36 rides (13.9% of the trips). The most frequent comments (18) were violations of patients confidentiality. Next most frequent (10 comments) were unprofessional remarks in which clinicians talked about themselves in ways that raised questions about their ability or desire to provide high-quality patient care. Other comments included derogatory statements about the general quality of hospital care (8) and derogatory remarks about patients (5). Physicians were involved in 15 of the comments, nurses in 10, and other hospital employees in the remainder. Inappropriate comments took place with disturbing frequency in the elevator rides we sampled. These comments did not exclusively involve violations of patient confidentiality, but encompassed a range of discussions that health care employees must be careful to avoid.

  15. The inappropriate use of lumbar magnetic resonance imaging in a health service area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Recio, F. J.; Sanz, J. C.; Vera, S.; Peiro, S.

    1999-01-01

    To identify the percentage of inappropriate lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging in the Soria Health Service, to quantify the costs and the possible association between inadequate use, the characteristics of the patient and the services requested. A descriptive study of the inappropriate use of MRI of the lumbar spine, taken from the retrospective examination, carried out by a radiologist, of the 233 MRI's requested between 1995 and 1998. For the valuation, the criteria of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Basque Agency for the Evaluation of Technologies (OSTEBA) were used. All the MRI's were carried out at an approved centre, the costs were calculated taken form the expenses paid by the Insalud, including the transport costs, calculated at prices applicable for the year in question. 11.7% of the studies were values as inappropriate, 2.1% debatable and the remainder adequate according to the ACR criteria, concentrating the inadequacy on studies for lumbago, that reached 80% of the inappropriate requests. The ACR and OSTEBA criteria coincided to a high degree (kappa statistics: 0.87). The expense related to the unnecessary studies was a litter higher than a million pesetas. No differences were found in the proportion of inappropriate studies according to the characteristics of the patient or the service requested, except the one already mentioned for the supposition diagnosis. Although the results of the study cannot be generalised to other environments, they suggest the possibility of a significant proportion of inappropriate use of lumbar spine MRI that could have an important repercussion on health care expenses. (Author) 11 refs

  16. Correlates of (inappropriate) benzodiazepine use: the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthey, Leonie; van Veen, Tineke; Giltay, Erik J; Stoop, José E; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Zitman, Frans G

    2011-02-01

    Results on determinants of benzodiazepine (BZD) use in general and inappropriate use were inconsistent and mostly univariate. The relative importance of sociodemographic, psychological and physical determinants has never been investigated in a comprehensive, multivariate model. We included 429 BZD users and 2423 non-users from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) in order to investigate sociodemographic, psychological and physical determinants of BZD use and inappropriate use by logistic and linear regression analyses. BZDs were used by a considerable proportion of the 2852 NESDA participants (15.0%). BZD use was independently associated with older age, singleness, unemployment, treatment in secondary care, higher medical consumption (more severe) anxiety, depression (OR [95% CI]=1.95 [1.29, 2.93]), comorbidity, insomnia, SSRI (OR [95% CI]=2.05 [1.55, 2.70]), TCA and other antidepressant (OR [95% CI]=2.44 [1.64, 3.62]) use. Overall, BZD use was rarely in accordance with all guidelines, mainly because most users (82.5%) exceeded the recommended duration of safe use. Inappropriate use was independently associated with older age (β=0.130) and chronic illnesses (β=0.120). Higher scores on agreeableness were associated with less inappropriate use. Mentally or physically vulnerable subjects were most likely to use BZDs. The most vulnerable (i.e. the old and physically ill) BZD users were at highest risk of inappropriate BZD use. Without further evidence of the effectiveness of BZDs in long-term use, caution in initiating BZD prescriptions is recommended, particularly when patients are chronically ill and old, as those are most likely to display inappropriate use. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Validation of the parental knowledge and attitude towards antibiotic usage and resistance among children in Tetovo, the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alili-Idrizi E

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study sought to explore the knowledge and attitudes of parents on the use of antibiotics among children that could serve as baseline data and provide further insight in planning and developing strategies for local health education purposes. Methods: A cross-sectional survey involving 500 parents who attended community pharmacies in Tetovo, Republic of Macedonia, was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire from October 2013 to January 2014. The questionnaire included demographics, knowledge and attitude statements of parents towards antibiotics. The data collected were analyzed using SPSS program, version 19.0. Descriptive statistics was used to summarize the data. In all statistical analyses, a p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Nearly 40% of the parents demonstrated a moderate level of knowledge. The highest correct response in the knowledge part was the awareness of parents in using antibiotics to treat a bacterial infection (61.2%. However, most of the parents did not know that antibiotics cannot cure viral infections (59.6%. About 48.2% of the parents were aware of the antibiotic resistance as s result of the overuse. Concerning attitudes, 60.8% reported keeping any leftover antibiotics, 77.0% agreed that taking antibiotics when having cold symptoms could help their children recover faster, while, 74.6% wrongly agreed with the statement of appropriate use of antibiotics for prophylaxis’ measure. Conclusions: This study has documented the main areas that merit attention when parental knowledge on antibiotic use for their children is the concern, reflecting in some inappropriate attitudes as well. The findings highlight the need to devise effective interventions to decrease misconceptions regarding antibiotic use and to increase parents’ awareness for the risks of inappropriate use of antibiotics in children specifically and in the community at large.

  18. Challenges and Future Prospects of Antibiotic Therapy: From Peptides to Phages Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi M. Mandal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are raising serious concern across the globe. The effectiveness of conventional antibiotics is decreasing due to global emergence of multi-drug-resistant (MDR bacterial pathogens. This process seems to be primarily caused by an indiscriminate and inappropriate use of antibiotics in non-infected patients and in the food industry. New classes of antibiotics with different actions against MDR pathogens need to be developed urgently. In this context, this review focuses on several ways and future directions to search for the next generation of safe and effective antibiotics compounds including antimicrobial peptides, phage therapy, phytochemicals, metalloantibiotics, LPS and efflux pump inhibitors to control the infections caused by MDR pathogens.

  19. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  20. Reducing inappropriate testing in the diagnosis of the menopause and peri-menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jac; Currie, Heather; Foster, Adele; Anderson, Julia

    2016-09-01

    The menopause should be diagnosed based on age, menstrual history and clinical symptoms, and as such, follicle stimulating hormone testing may be considered inappropriate when diagnosing the menopause or peri-menopause in women aged 45 and over. As part of a demand optimisation programme, the number of follicle stimulating hormone tests requested to diagnose the menopause in this age group was quantified and educational interventions were implemented to reduce inappropriate testing. The number of follicle stimulating hormone tests requested to diagnose the menopause in women aged 45 and over was successfully and sustainably reduced. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Prevalence of inappropriate medication using Beers criteria in Japanese long-term care facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niwata, Satoko; Yamada, Yukari; Ikegami, Naoki

    2006-01-01

    Background The prevalence and risk factors of potentially inappropriate medication use among the elderly patients have been studied in various countries, but because of the difficulty of obtaining data on patient characteristics and medications they have not been studied in Japan. Methods We...... dependent on the disease or condition was found in patients with chronic constipation. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed psychotropic drug use (OR = 1.511), medication cost of per day (OR = 1.173), number of medications (OR = 1.140), and age (OR = 0.981) as factors related to inappropriate...

  2. Impact of Rapid Susceptibility Testing and Antibiotic Selection Strategy on the Emergence and Spread of Antibiotic Resistance in Gonorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuite, Ashleigh R; Gift, Thomas L; Chesson, Harrell W; Hsu, Katherine; Salomon, Joshua A; Grad, Yonatan H

    2017-11-27

    Increasing antibiotic resistance limits treatment options for gonorrhea. We examined the impact of a hypothetical point-of-care (POC) test reporting antibiotic susceptibility profiles on slowing resistance spread. A mathematical model describing gonorrhea transmission incorporated resistance emergence probabilities and fitness costs associated with resistance based on characteristics of ciprofloxacin (A), azithromycin (B), and ceftriaxone (C). We evaluated time to 1% and 5% prevalence of resistant strains among all isolates with the following: (1) empiric treatment (B and C), and treatment guided by POC tests determining susceptibility to (2) A only and (3) all 3 antibiotics. Continued empiric treatment without POC testing was projected to result in >5% of isolates being resistant to both B and C within 15 years. Use of either POC test in 10% of identified cases delayed this by 5 years. The 3 antibiotic POC test delayed the time to reach 1% prevalence of triply-resistant strains by 6 years, whereas the A-only test resulted in no delay. Results were less sensitive to assumptions about fitness costs and test characteristics with increasing test uptake. Rapid diagnostics reporting antibiotic susceptibility may extend the usefulness of existing antibiotics for gonorrhea treatment, but ongoing monitoring of resistance patterns will be critical. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  3. Misuse of antibiotics reserved for hospital settings in outpatients: a prospective clinical audit in a university hospital in Southern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Manon; Bornet, Charléric; Monges, Philippe; Stein, Andreas; Gensollen, Sophie; Seng, Piseth

    2016-07-01

    Some antibiotics are reserved essentially for hospital settings owing to cost effectiveness and in order to fight the emerging antibiotic resistance crisis. In some cases, antibiotics reserved exclusively for use in hospitals may be prescribed in outpatients for serious infections or in the absence of a therapeutic alternative. A 30-day prospective audit of outpatient prescriptions of antibiotics reserved exclusively for use in hospitals was performed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relevance of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions by measuring appropriateness according to guidelines. During the study period, 53 prescriptions were included, only 40% of which were appropriate. Among the 32 inappropriate prescriptions, 4 cases lacked microbial arguments, 1 case was not adequate for the infection type, 1 case involved an incorrect antibiotic dosage, 1 case involved an incorrect interval of dose administration, 3 cases had a therapeutic alternative and 22 cases were not recommended. Of the 53 prescriptions, 66% were started in hospital and 34% in outpatients. Only 25% of cases were prescribed with infectious diseases specialist (IDS) advice, 64% were based on microbiological documentation and 13% had a negative bacterial culture. Inappropriate prescriptions were usually observed in antibiotic lock therapy, skin infections, Clostridium difficile colitis, intra-abdominal infections and intravascular catheter-related infections. Outpatient prescriptions of antimicrobial drugs reserved exclusively for use in hospitals are frequently inappropriate. We recommend a real-time analysis algorithm with the involvement of an IDS for monitoring prescriptions to improve the quality of these prescriptions and possibly to prevent antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of prophylactic antibiotic administration in general surgery division of a teaching hospital in north of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paniz Yousefi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections are one of the most important post-surgery complications. Antimicrobial prophylaxis has been used routinely in surgeries to reduce infection incidence. However, inappropriate selection of antimicrobial agents or dosing can develop antimicrobial resistance, serious adverse reactions and prolong hospitalization. Current study aimed to examine prophylactic antibiotic prescription in surgeries in a teaching hospital in Sari, Mazandaran and evaluate level of adherence to the international guidelines. Between January 2015 to May 2015, 104 patients in general surgery ward were selected and enrolled in the study. The prophylactic antibiotics, dosage, timing and duration of administration were collected by reviewing patients’ records and compared to the existing guidelines. Prophylactic antibiotic was given to 85.5% of patients. Prescribed antibiotics were cefazolin (46.1%, metronidazole (24%, ceftriaxone (12.5%, ciprofloxacin (1.9% and vancomycin (0.96%. Most of the patients (62.9% received an inappropriate and delayed timing. Proper antibiotic dosage was seen in 45.2% of patients. All patients received post-operative prophylactic antibiotic. Main antibiotics include cefazolin (41.3%, metronidazole (33.7%, ceftriaxone (31.7% and clindamycin (20.2%. Only 10 (21.9% patients received cefazolin or vancomycin for a total duration of 48 hours or less. Surgical wound infection occurred in 17 (16.3% patients during hospital stay. Adherence to antimicrobial prophylaxis guidelines was completely achieved in 14.4% of cases. Results of this study signified that adherence to existing guidelines was poor and the most common mistakes were over usage, inappropriate dosage and choosing of antibiotics.

  5. An audit and feedback intervention study increased adherence to antibiotic prescribing guidelines at a Norwegian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgli, June Utnes; Garcia, Beate Hennie; Skjold, Frode; Skogen, Vegard; Småbrekke, Lars

    2016-02-27

    Appropriate antibiotic prescribing is associated with favourable levels of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and clinical outcomes. Most intervention studies on antibiotic prescribing originate from settings with high level of AMR. In a Norwegian hospital setting with low level of AMR, the literature on interventions for promoting guideline-recommended antibiotic prescribing in hospital is scarce and requested. Preliminary studies have shown improvement potentials regarding antibiotic prescribing according to guidelines. We aimed to promote appropriate antibiotic prescribing in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) at a respiratory medicine department in a Norwegian University hospital. Our specific objectives were to increase prescribing of appropriate empirical antibiotics, reduce high-dose benzylpenicillin and reduce total treatment duration. We performed an audit and feedback intervention study, combined with distribution of a recently published pocket version of the national clinical practice guideline. We included patients discharged with CAP or AECOPD and prescribed antibiotics during hospital stay, and excluded those presenting with aspiration, nosocomial infection and co-infections. The pre- and post-intervention period was 9 and 6 months, respectively. Feedback was provided orally to the department physicians at an internal-educational meeting. To explore the effect of the intervention on appropriate empirical antibiotics and mean total treatment duration we applied before-after analysis (Student's t-test) and interrupted time series (ITS). We used Pearson's χ2 to compare dose changes. In the pre-and post-intervention period we included 253 and 155 patients, respectively. Following the intervention, overall mean prescribing of appropriate empirical antibiotics increased from 61.7 to 83.8 % (P antibiotic prescribing had increased and sustained, while the effect on treatment

  6. Antibiotics for uncomplicated diverticulitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel M; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    Diverticulitis is an inflammatory complication to the very common condition diverticulosis. Uncomplicated diverticulitis has traditionally been treated with antibiotics with reference to the microbiology, extrapolation from trials on complicated intra-abdominal infections and clinical experience....

  7. High Antibiotic Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; José Rabanaque, María; Feja, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    as their exposure to antibiotics. Data on outpatient prescribing of antimicrobials (ATC J01) in 2010 were obtained from a prescription database covering Aragón (northeastern Spain). The antimicrobial consumption at the individual level was analysed both according to the volume of DDD and the number of packages...... purchased per year. Heavy antibiotic users were identified according to Lorenz curves and characterized by age, gender, and their antimicrobial prescription profile. Lorenz curves demonstrated substantial differences in the individual use of antimicrobials. Heavy antibiotic users (5% of individuals...... with highest consumption) were responsible for 21% of the total DDD consumed and received ≥6 packages per year. Elderly adults (≥60 years) and small children (0-9 years) were those exposed to the highest volume of antibiotics and with the most frequent exposure, respectively. Heavy users received a high...

  8. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really ...

  9. A Point Prevalence Survey of Antibiotic Use in 18 Hospitals in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Talaat

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate antibiotic use leads to increased risk of antibiotic resistance and other adverse outcomes. The objectives of the study were to determine the prevalence and characteristics of antibiotic use in Egyptian hospitals to identify opportunities for quality improvement. A point prevalence survey was conducted in 18 hospitals in March 2011. A total of 3408 patients were included and 59% received at least one antibiotic, with the most significant use among persons <12 years and intensive care unit patients (p < 0.05. Third generation cephalosporin were the most commonly prescribed antibiotics (28.7% of prescriptions. Reasons for antibiotic use included treatment of community—(27% and healthcare-associated infections (11% and surgical (39% and medical (23% prophylaxis. Among surgical prophylaxis recipients, only 28% of evaluable cases received the first dose within two hours before incision and only 25% of cases received surgical prophylaxis for <24 h. The prevalence of antibiotic use in Egyptian hospitals was high with obvious targets for antimicrobial stewardship activities including provision of antibiotic prescription guidelines and optimization of surgical and medical prophylaxis practices.

  10. Physicians' responsibility for antibiotic use in infants from periurban Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Lucie; Olarte, Liset; Vilchez, Gustavo; Ochoa, Theresa J; Amemiya, Isabel; Gil, Ana I; Lanata, Claudio F

    2011-12-01

    To describe the use of antibiotics in Peruvian children under 1 year in a setting where they are available without a prescription. Data were analyzed from a cohort study between September 2006 and December 2007 of 1 023 children child per year (range 0-12). Higher rates of antibiotic use were found in children 3-6 months old (37.2%). Antibiotics were given to children for 8.2% of common colds, 58.6% of all pharyngitis, 66.0% of bronchitis, 40.7% of diarrheas, 22.8% of dermatitis, and 12.0% of bronchial obstructions. A physician's prescription was the most common reason for antibiotic use (90.8%). Medication use without a prescription was found in 6.9% of children, and in 63.9% of them it was preceded by a physician's prescription. Infants are often exposed to antibiotics in this setting. Overuse of antibiotics is common for diagnoses such as pharyngitis, bronchitis, bronchial obstruction, and diarrhea but is typically inappropriate (83.1% of courses) based on the most common etiologies for this age group. Interventions to improve the use of antibiotics should focus on physicians, since a physician's prescription was the most common reason for antibiotic use.

  11. Surveys of public knowledge and attitudes with regard to antibiotics in Poland: Did the European Antibiotic Awareness Day campaigns change attitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazińska, Beata; Strużycka, Izabela; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2017-01-01

    The survey generated information about the knowledge, attitude, and behavior regarding antibiotics among the general population of Poland. Inappropriate antibiotic use is still highly prevalent in Poland, although a positive trend in behavioral change was observed after the educational campaigns. Additional didactic and systematic education campaigns regarding appropriate antibiotic use are needed and the use of the Internet as an education tool should be enhanced. PMID:28212400

  12. Surveys of public knowledge and attitudes with regard to antibiotics in Poland: Did the European Antibiotic Awareness Day campaigns change attitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazińska, Beata; Strużycka, Izabela; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2017-01-01

    knowledge, attitude, and behavior regarding antibiotics among the general population of Poland. Inappropriate antibiotic use is still highly prevalent in Poland, although a positive trend in behavioral change was observed after the educational campaigns. Additional didactic and systematic education campaigns regarding appropriate antibiotic use are needed and the use of the Internet as an education tool should be enhanced.

  13. Surveys of public knowledge and attitudes with regard to antibiotics in Poland: Did the European Antibiotic Awareness Day campaigns change attitudes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Mazińska

    the knowledge, attitude, and behavior regarding antibiotics among the general population of Poland. Inappropriate antibiotic use is still highly prevalent in Poland, although a positive trend in behavioral change was observed after the educational campaigns. Additional didactic and systematic education campaigns regarding appropriate antibiotic use are needed and the use of the Internet as an education tool should be enhanced.

  14. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hee Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST, clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care, the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing. The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  15. Susceptibility testing and reporting of new antibiotics with a focus on tedizolid: an international working group report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Mark H; Dmitrieva, Natalia; Gales, Ana Cristina; Petukhova, Irina; Al-Obeid, Suleiman; Rossi, Flavia; M Blondeau, Joseph

    2017-12-01

    Inappropriate use and overuse of antibiotics are among the most important factors in resistance development, and effective antibiotic stewardship measures are needed to optimize outcomes. Selection of appropriate antimicrobials relies on accurate and timely antimicrobial susceptibility testing. However, the availability of clinical breakpoints and in vitro susceptibility testing often lags behind regulatory approval by several years for new antimicrobials. A Working Group of clinical/medical microbiologists from Brazil, Canada, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Russia and the UK recently examined issues surrounding antimicrobial susceptibility testing for novel antibiotics. While commercially available tests are being developed, potential surrogate antibiotics may be used as marker of susceptibility. Using tedizolid as an example of a new antibiotic, this special report makes recommendations to optimize routine susceptibility reporting.

  16. Antibiotic treatment and mortality in patients with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis or bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thønnings, S; Knudsen, J D; Schønheyder, H C

    2016-01-01

    . monocytogenes infections including the efficacy of empiric and definitive antibiotic therapies. Demographic, clinical and biochemical findings, antibiotic treatment and 30-day mortality for all episodes of L. monocytogenes bacteraemia and/or meningitis were collected by retrospective medical record review...... both. Significant risk factors for 30-day mortality were septic shock (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.4-6.4), altered mental state (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.7-7.6) and inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.8-8.1). Cephalosporins accounted for 90% of inadequately treated cases. Adequate definitive...... mortality in an adjusted analysis compared with meropenem (OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-0.8). In conclusion, inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy and definitive therapy with meropenem were both associated with significantly higher 30-day mortality....

  17. Development of new taxonomy of inappropriate communication and its application to operating teams in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ar Ryum; Lee, Seung Woo; Jang, In Seok; Kang, Hyun Gook; Seong, Poong Hyun; Park, Jin Kyun

    2012-01-01

    Inappropriate communications can cause a lack of necessary information exchange between operators and lead to serious consequences in large process systems such as nuclear power plants (NPPs). In this regard, various kinds of taxonomies of inappropriate communications have been developed to prevent inappropriate communications. However, there seems to be difficult to identify inappropriate communications from verbal protocol data between operators. Because the existing taxonomies were developed for use in report analysis, there is a problem of 'uncertainty'. In consequence, this paper proposes a new taxonomy of inappropriate communications and provides some insights to prevent inappropriate communications. In order to develop the taxonomy, existing taxonomies for four industries from 1980 to 2010 were collected and a new taxonomy is developed based on the simplified one-way communication model. In addition, the ratio of inappropriate communications from 8 samples of audio-visual format verbal protocol data recorded during emergency training sessions by operating teams is compared with performance scores calculated based on the task analysis. As a result, inappropriate communications can be easily identified from the verbal protocol data using the suggested taxonomy, and teams with a higher ratio of inappropriate communications tend to have a lower performance score.

  18. Using an Electronic Highlighter to Eliminate the Negative Effects of Pre-Existing, Inappropriate Highlighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gier, Vicki; Kreiner, David; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Herring, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether using an active learning technique, electronic highlighting, can eliminate the negative effects of pre-existing, poor highlighting on reading comprehension. Participants read passages containing no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, or inappropriate highlighting. We hypothesized…

  19. [Characteristics of potentially inappropriate prescribing of drugs in elderly polypathological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Cobas, Paula Carlota; Ramírez-Duque, Nieves; Gómez Hernández, Mercedes; García, Juana; Agustí, Antonia; Vidal, Xavier; Formiga, Francesc; López-Soto, Alfonso; Torres, Olga H; San-José, Antonio

    To analyse potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in elderly polypathological patients (PP). Multicentre observational, prospective study of 672 patients aged 75 years and older hospitalised in Internal Medicine between April 2011 and March 2012. The Beers, STOPP-START and ACOVE criteria were used to detect potentially inappropriate prescribing and the results of PP and non-PP patients were compared. Of the 672 patients included, 419 (62%) were polypathological, of which 89.3% met PIP criteria versus 79.4% of non-polypathological patients (p <0.01). 40.3% of polypathological patients met at least one Beers criteria, 62.8% at least one STOPP criteria, 62.3% at least one START criteria and 65.6% at least one ACOVE criteria. The rate of potentially inappropriate prescribing was higher in polypathological patients regardless of the tool used. Given the high rate of potentially inappropriate prescribing in polypathological patients, strategies to improve prescribing adequacy must be developed. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Inappropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks in Brugada syndrome: Pattern in primary and secondary prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimé Bonny

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Inappropriate shock is common in Brugada syndrome during the early periods after an ICD implantation, and seems to be more likely in asymptomatic patients. This finding may warrant a review of the indications for ICD implantation, especially in the young and apparently healthy population of patients with Brugada syndrome.

  1. Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use Among Elderly Home Care Patients in Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fialová, D.; Topinková, E.; Gambassi, G.; Finne-Soveri, H.; Jónsson, P.; Carpenter, I.; Schroll, M.; Onder, G.; Sorbye, L.W.; Wagner, C.; Reissigová, Jindra; Bernabei, R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 293, č. 11 (2005), s. 1348-1358 ISSN 0098-7484 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : potentially inappropriate medication * prevalence * independent correlates Subject RIV: FQ - Public Health Care, Social Medicine Impact factor: 23.332, year: 2005 http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/293/11/1348

  2. Unveiling common responses of Medicago truncatula to appropriate and inappropriate rust species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carlota eVaz Patto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the nature of effective defense mechanisms in legumes to pathogens of remotely related plant species. Some rust species are among pathogens with broad host range causing dramatic losses in various crop plants. To understand and compare the different host and nonhost resistance responses of legume species against rusts, we characterized the reaction of the model legume Medicago truncatula to one appropriate (Uromyces striatus and two inappropriate (U. viciae-fabae and U. lupinicolus rusts. We found that similar pre and post-haustorial mechanisms of resistance appear to be operative in M. truncatula against appropriate and inappropriate rust fungus. The appropriate U. striatus germinated better on M. truncatula accessions then the inappropriate U. viciae-fabae and U. lupinicolus, but once germinated, germ tubes of the three rusts had a similar level of success in finding stomata and forming an appressoria over a stoma. However responses to different inappropriate rust species also showed some specificity, suggesting a combination of non specific and specific responses underlying this legume nonhost resistance to rust fungi. Further genetic and expression analysis studies will contribute to the development of the necessary molecular tools to use the present information on host and nonhost resistance mechanisms to breed for broad-spectrum resistance to rust in legume species.

  3. Inappropriate use of urinary catheters and its common complications in different hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parivash Davoodian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate use of indwelling urinary catheters (IUCs and their related complications is one of the most important problems in hospital wards. The aim of this study was to evaluate inappropriate use of IUCs and their complications among patients in Tehran, Iran. Two hundred and six consecutive patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU as well as medical and surgical wards at the Shahid Mohammadi Hospital in Bandarabbas from September 1 to 30, 2005 and in whom IUCs were used, were studied. Data collected included age of the patients, diagnoses, reason for use of IUC and the complications related to it. Overall, 164 patients (79.6% had IUCs used appropriately while 42 of them (20.6% were catheterized unjustifiably. Inappropriate use of IUCs in the ICU, medical and surgical wards was reported in 12 (18.5%, 16 (19.0% and 14 patients (24.6%, respectively. The most common complication of IUCs was urinary tract infection, which occurred in 91 patients (44.2% and hematuria, which was seen in 3.9% of the patients. Our study suggests that inappropriate use of IUCs is prevalent, particularly in the surgical wards, and the most common complication observed was catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

  4. Potentially inappropriate medication use among institutionalized elderly individuals in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Cunha Xavier Pinto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the elderly population in Brazil has grown rapidly, as has concern for the health of this population. Institutionalization in nursing homes has appeared as an alternative form of health care for frail elderly that live alone. The present study evaluated the pharmacotherapy and inappropriate drug prescriptions for institutionalized elderly patients living in long-term institutions in southeastern Brazil. This research was conducted at five institutions with a total sample of 151 individuals aged at least 60 years. Databases were used to identify drug interactions, defined daily dose and inappropriate prescriptions. The prevalence of drug intake among the elderly was 95.36%, and there were an average of 3.31 ± 1.80 drug prescriptions per individual. Based on Beers criteria, the prevalence of inappropriate prescriptions was 25.83%. In addition, 70.2% of prescriptions were prescribed at a higher dosage than the defined daily dose (ATC/WHO. Potential drug interactions were identified for 54.11% of prescriptions; 81.42% of these were of moderate severity. The main inappropriate drugs were prescribed for cardiovascular and nervous system problems. Institutionalized elderly individuals presented a high consumption and misuse of medications, requiring professional intervention to monitor prescriptions and improve the quality of service for this population.

  5. College Student Perceptions of the (In)Appropriateness and Functions of Teacher Disclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosek, Angela M.; Presley, Rachel

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated college student perceptions of the (in)appropriateness of instructor disclosures and perceived functions of instructor disclosures. An interpretive analysis of 35 college students identified that family relationships, life experiences and background, and everyday talk and activities were forms of appropriate disclosures;…

  6. Inappropriate Care in European ICUs Confronting Views From Nurses and Junior and Senior Physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, Ruth D.; Azoulay, Elie; Ricou, Bara; Ganz, Freda DeKeyser; Max, Adeline; Michalsen, Andrej; Maia, Paulo Azevedo; Owczuk, Radoslaw; Rubulotta, Francesca; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Reyners, Anna K.; Decruyenaere, Johan; Benoit, Dominique D.

    BACKGROUND: ICU care providers oft en feel that the care given to a patient may be inconsistent with their professional knowledge or beliefs. This study aimed to assess differences in, and reasons for, perceived inappropriate care (PIC) across ICU care providers with varying levels of

  7. Electromagnetic Interference from Swimming Pool Generator Current Causing Inappropriate ICD Discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Samuel Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic interference (EMI includes any electromagnetic field signal that can be detected by device circuitry, with potentially serious consequences: incorrect sensing, pacing, device mode switching, and defibrillation. This is a unique case of extracardiac EMI by alternating current leakage from a submerged motor used to recycle chlorinated water, resulting in false rhythm detection and inappropriate ICD discharge. A 31-year-old female with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and Medtronic dual-chamber ICD placement presented after several inappropriate ICD shocks at the public swimming pool. Patient had never received prior shocks and device was appropriate at all regular follow-ups. Intracardiac electrograms revealed unique, high-frequency signals at exactly 120 msec suggestive of EMI from a strong external source of alternating current. Electrical artifact was incorrectly sensed as a ventricular arrhythmia which resulted in discharge. ICD parameters including sensing, pacing thresholds, and impedance were all normal suggesting against device malfunction. With device failure and intracardiac sources excluded, EMI was therefore strongly suspected. Avoidance of EMI source brought complete resolution with no further inappropriate shocks. After exclusion of intracardiac interference, device malfunction, and abnormal settings, extracardiac etiologies such as EMI must be thoughtfully considered and excluded. Elimination of inappropriate shocks is to “first, do no harm.”

  8. Improving Inappropriate Social Behavior of Autistic Students Using the LISTEN Intervention Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shammari, Zaid; Daniel, Cathy; Faulkner, Paula; Yawkey, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    A case study was conducted on the development of the LISTEN intervention strategy for use with autistic students to improve inappropriate social behaviors. The study was conducted in a special education classroom in an autism school in Kuwait. Examination of LISTEN Intervention Strategy applications included: duration of targeted behavior; methods…

  9. Inappropriate gestational weight gain among teenage pregnancies: prevalence and pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivatkusol, Yada; Thavaramara, Thaovalai; Phaloprakarn, Chadakarn

    2017-01-01

    To study the prevalence and pregnancy outcomes of inappropriate gestational weight gain (GWG) among teenage pregnant women. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted on 2,165 teenage pregnant women who attended our antenatal clinic between January 2007 and August 2015. Adverse pregnancy outcomes, including maternal and neonatal outcomes of women with inappropriate GWG, including underweight and overweight, were studied and compared with those of women with appropriate GWG. Complete data of 1,943 women were obtained. Among these women, the mean age was 17.4±1.4 years and mean body mass index at first visit was 19.1±3.0 kg/m 2 . The prevalence of inappropriate GWG was 61.7%. Underweight women were more likely to experience anemia and preterm delivery, whereas overweight women required more cesarean sections because of cephalopelvic disproportion and preeclampsia, compared to women with appropriate weight gain (all P teenage pregnancies showed inappropriate GWG. GWG had a significant impact on pregnancy outcomes.

  10. Age-Related Differences in Judgments of Inappropriate Behavior are Related to Humor Style Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jennifer Tehan; Lohani, Monika; Isaacowitz, Derek M.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying social gaffes is important for maintaining relationships. Older adults are less able than young to discriminate between socially appropriate and inappropriate behavior in video clips. One open question is how these social appropriateness ratings relate to potential age differences in the perception of what is actually funny or not. In the present study, young, middle-aged, and older adults were equally able to discriminate between appropriate and inappropriate social behavior in a diverse set of clips relevant to both age groups. However, young and middle-aged adults rated the gaffe clips as funnier than control clips and young adults smiled more during the inappropriate clips than the control clips. Older adults did not show this pattern, suggesting that they did not find the inappropriate clips funny. Additionally, young adults endorsed a more aggressive humor style than middle-aged and older adults and aggressive humor style endorsement mediated age differences in social appropriateness ratings. Results are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms such as cohort differences in humor and developmental prioritization of certain humor styles, as well as the importance of investigating age differences in both abilities and preferences. PMID:25244473

  11. Performance Costs when Emotion Tunes Inappropriate Cognitive Abilities: Implications for Mental Resources and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storbeck, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Emotion tunes cognition, such that approach-motivated positive states promote verbal cognition, whereas withdrawal-motivated negative states promote spatial cognition (Gray, 2001). The current research examined whether self-control resources become depleted and influence subsequent behavior when emotion tunes an inappropriate cognitive tendency.…

  12. Inappropriate behaviors and hypersexuality in individuals with dementia: An overview of a neglected issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Michele; Cacciola, Alberto; Marra, Angela; De Luca, Rosaria; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2017-06-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia are very common in patients affected by dementia, and are associated with high rates of institutionalization. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia consist of aggressive behavior, delusions, hallucinations, depression, apathy, wandering, stereotyped and inappropriate sexual behavior. Interestingly, the latter has been reported to be relatively uncommon, but causing immense distress to patients and their caregivers. The genesis of inappropriate behavior is considered a combination of neurological, psychological and social factors. Although assessment is mainly carried out by clinical observation and interviews with caregivers, the most appropriate management of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including hypersexuality, is a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions, according to specific symptoms, degree of cognitive dysfunction and subtype of dementia. The present narrative review will mainly focus on aggressiveness, disinhibition, aberrant motor, and sexually inappropriate behavior diagnostic work-up and treatment, in an attempt to provide both the patients and their caregivers with useful information to better manage these symptoms and improve their quality of life. Space is particularly dedicated to inappropriate sexual behavior, which is still considered a neglected issue. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 865-874. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. Empirical Philosophy of Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansnerus, Erika; Wagenknecht, Susann

    2015-01-01

    The book examines the emerging approach of using qualitative methods, such as interviews and field observations, in the philosophy of science. Qualitative methods are gaining popularity among philosophers of science as more and more scholars are resorting to empirical work in their study...... of scientific practices. At the same time, the results produced through empirical work are quite different from those gained through the kind of introspective conceptual analysis more typical of philosophy. This volume explores the benefits and challenges of an empirical philosophy of science and addresses...

  14. Theological reflections on empire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan A. Boesak

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the meeting of the World Alliance of Reformed Churches in Accra, Ghana (2004, and the adoption of the Accra Declaration, a debate has been raging in the churches about globalisation, socio-economic justice, ecological responsibility, political and cultural domination and globalised war. Central to this debate is the concept of empire and the way the United States is increasingly becoming its embodiment. Is the United States a global empire? This article argues that the United States has indeed become the expression of a modern empire and that this reality has considerable consequences, not just for global economics and politics but for theological refl ection as well.

  15. Empires, Nations, and Revolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    This essay examines the ways in which the age of revolutions expanded the repertoire of political ideas and identities available to new and old political subjects. It questions the traditional narrative that replaces a model of old regimes and empires with a new one of imagined unitary nation-states. Instead, it argues that the nature of the political crisis of the Iberian empires gave rise to a reinvention of familiar categories, like monarchy and empire, and sired a wider range of new ones that did not fit the national mold.

  16. Healthcare Utilization and Expenditures Associated With Appropriate and Inappropriate Implantable Defibrillator Shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turakhia, Mintu P; Zweibel, Steven; Swain, Andrea L; Mollenkopf, Sarah A; Reynolds, Matthew R

    2017-02-01

    In patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, healthcare utilization (HCU) and expenditures related to shocks have not been quantified. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators identified from commercial and Medicare supplemental claims databases linked to adjudicated shock events from remote monitoring data. A shock event was defined as ≥1 spontaneous shocks delivered by an implanted device. Shock-related HCU was ascertained from inpatient and outpatient claims within 7 days following a shock event. Shock events were adjudicated and classified as inappropriate or appropriate, and HCU and expenditures, stratified by shock type, were quantified. Of 10 266 linked patients, 963 (9.4%) patients (61.3±13.6 years; 81% male) had 1885 shock events (56% appropriate, 38% inappropriate, and 6% indeterminate). Of these events, 867 (46%) had shock-related HCU (14% inpatient and 32% outpatient). After shocks, inpatient cardiovascular procedures were common, including echocardiography (59%), electrophysiology study or ablation (34%), stress testing (16%), and lead revision (11%). Cardiac catheterization was common (71% and 51%), but percutaneous coronary intervention was low (6.5% and 5.0%) after appropriate and inappropriate shocks. Expenditures related to appropriate and inappropriate shocks were not significantly different. After implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shock, related HCU was common, with 1 in 3 shock events followed by outpatient HCU and 1 in 7 followed by hospitalization. Use of invasive cardiovascular procedures was substantial, even after inappropriate shocks, which comprised 38% of all shocks. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks seem to trigger a cascade of health care. Strategies to reduce shocks could result in cost savings. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Potentially Inappropriate Antihypertensive Prescriptions to Elderly Patients: Results of a Prospective, Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Paola H Ponte; Torres, Olga H; San-José, Anonio; Vidal, Xavier; Agustí, Antonia; Formiga, Francesc; López-Soto, Alfonso; Ramírez-Duque, Nieves; Fernández-Moyano, Antonio; Garcia-Moreno, Juana; Arroyo, Juan A; Ruiz, Domingo

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies of antihypertensive treatment of older patients have focused on blood pressure control, cardiovascular risk or adherence, whereas data on inappropriate antihypertensive prescriptions to older patients are scarce. The aim of the study was to assess inappropriate antihypertensive prescriptions to older patients. An observational, prospective multicentric study was conducted to assess potentially inappropriate prescription of antihypertensive drugs, in patients aged 75 years and older with arterial hypertension (HTN), in the month prior to hospital admission, using four instruments: Beers, Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions (STOPP), Screening Tool to Alert Doctors to the Right Treatment (START) and Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders 3 (ACOVE-3). Primary care and hospital electronic records were reviewed for HTN diagnoses, antihypertensive treatment and blood pressure readings. Of 672 patients, 532 (median age 85 years, 56% female) had HTN. 21.6% received antihypertensive monotherapy, 4.7% received no hypertensive treatment, and the remainder received a combination of antihypertensive therapies. The most frequently prescribed antihypertensive drugs were diuretics (53.5%), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) (41%), calcium antagonists (32.2%), angiotensin receptor blockers (29.7%) and beta-blockers (29.7%). Potentially inappropriate prescription was observed in 51.3% of patients (27.8% overprescription and 35% underprescription). The most frequent inappropriately prescribed drugs were calcium antagonists (overprescribed), ACEIs and beta-blockers (underprescribed). ACEI and beta-blocker underprescriptions were independently associated with heart failure admissions [beta-blockers odds ratio (OR) 0.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39-0.71, p treatment. Underprescription was more frequent than overprescription. ACEIs and beta-blockers were frequently underprescribed and were associated with heart failure admissions.

  18. Echocardiographic assessment of inappropriate left ventricular mass and left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with diastolic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Shemirani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: early diagnosis of left ventricular mass (LVM inappropriateness and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH can result in preventing diastolic left ventricular dysfunction and its related morbidity and mortality. This study was performed to determine if diastolic dysfunction is associated with LVH and inappropriate LVM. Materials and Methods: one hundred and twenty five uncomplicated hypertension from Isfahan Healthy Heart Program underwent two-dimensional echocardiography. Inappropriate LVM was defined as an LVM index greater than 88 g/m2 of body-surface area in women and greater than 102 g/m2 in men. LVH-defined septal and posterior wall thickness greater than 0/9 cm in women and greater than 1 cm in men, respectively. Echocardiographic parameters, including early diastolic peak velocity (E/late diastolic peak velocity (A, deceleration time (DT, and E/early mitral annulus velocity (E′ were measured. Results: the mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure at the patients′ admission day were 142.87 ± 18.12 and 88.45 ± 9.18 mmHg, respectively. Totally, 21.7% of subjects had inappropriate LV mass that moderate and severe abnormal LV mass was revealed in 5.6% and 5.6%, respectively. The mean of age and BMI was significantly higher in patients with moderate left ventricular hypertrophy (P 0.05. Spearman′s Rank test was used to test the correlation between diastolic dysfunction and LV mass (P = 0.025. Conclusion: LVH is correlated with the severity of diastolic dysfunction manifested by the E/A value and deceleration time, but inappropriate LVM can slightly predict diastolic dysfunction severity in uncomplicated hypertension.

  19. Life Writing After Empire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    in order to understand how individual life writing reflects broader societal changes. From far-flung corners of the former British Empire, people have turned to life writing to manage painful or nostalgic memories, as well as to think about the past and future of the nation anew through the personal......A watershed moment of the twentieth century, the end of empire saw upheavals to global power structures and national identities. However, decolonisation profoundly affected individual subjectivities too. Life Writing After Empire examines how people around the globe have made sense of the post...... experience. In a range of innovative and insightful contributions, some of the foremost scholars of the field challenge the way we think about narrative, memory and identity after empire. This book was originally published as a special issue of Life Writing....

  20. Ceftaroline fosamil: just another intravenous antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Various antibiotics, especially cephalosporins, are used for empirical treatment of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalisation and intravenous treatment, and for serious infections of the skin and soft tissues. When the infection is caused by bacteria that are resistant to common antibiotics, some antibiotics such as vancomycin are available. Ceftaroline (Zinforo, AstraZeneca) is a new cephalosporin intended for intravenous administration (as ceftaroline fosamil). It is authorised for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and for serious infections of the skin and soft tissues. In two double-blind, randomised trials of ceftaroline versus ceftriaxone (a cephalosporin), ceftaroline showed no advantage in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Note that the results of these trials are undermined by the use of a suboptimal dose of ceftriaxone. Ceftaroline has not been evaluated versus a first-line treatment for serious skin infections. It has been compared with second-line antibiotics in patients with serious skin infections in four randomised trials. None of these trials showed that ceftaroline has superior efficacy. The known adverse effect profile of ceftaroline is similar to that of all cephalosporins, and comprises hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis) and gastrointestinal disorders (including rare cases of pseudomembranous colitis). A possible excess of haematological and renal adverse effects has also been raised. Given the absence of relevant data, it is best to avoid using ceftaroline during pregnancy. In practice, there is no proof that ceftaroline represents a therapeutic advance for patients with community-acquired pneumonia warranting hospitalisation or with serious skin or soft-tissue infections. It is best to stick with better-known antibiotics.

  1. Protocol to disseminate a hospital-site controlled intervention using audit and feedback to implement guidelines concerning inappropriate treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautner, Barbara W; Prasad, Pooja; Grigoryan, Larissa; Hysong, Sylvia J; Kramer, Jennifer R; Rajan, Suja; Petersen, Nancy J; Rosen, Tracey; Drekonja, Dimitri M; Graber, Christopher; Patel, Payal; Lichtenberger, Paola; Gauthier, Timothy P; Wiseman, Steve; Jones, Makoto; Sales, Anne; Krein, Sarah; Naik, Aanand Dinkar

    2018-01-19

    Antimicrobial stewardship to combat the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has become a national priority. This project focuses on reducing inappropriate use of antimicrobials for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), a very common condition that leads to antimicrobial overuse in acute and long-term care. We previously conducted a successful intervention, entitled "Kicking Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI): the No Knee-Jerk Antibiotics Campaign," to decrease guideline-discordant ordering of urine cultures and antibiotics for ASB. The current objective is to facilitate implementation of a scalable version of the Kicking CAUTI campaign across four geographically diverse Veterans Health Administration facilities while assessing what aspects of an antimicrobial stewardship intervention are essential to success and sustainability. This project uses an interrupted time series design with four control sites. The two main intervention tools are (1) an evidence-based algorithm that distills the guidelines into a streamlined clinical pathway and (2) case-based audit and feedback to train clinicians to use the algorithm. Our conceptual framework for the development and implementation of this intervention draws on May's General Theory of Implementation. The intervention is directed at providers in acute and long-term care, and the goal is to reduce inappropriate screening for and treatment of ASB in all patients and residents, not just those with urinary catheters. The start-up for each facility consists of centrally-led phone calls with local site champions and baseline surveys. Case-based audit and feedback will begin at a given site after the start-up period and continue for 12 months, followed by a sustainability assessment. In addition to the clinical outcomes, we will explore the relationship between the dose of the intervention and clinical outcomes. This project moves from a proof-of-concept effectiveness study to implementation involving

  2. Bacterial infections in Lilongwe, Malawi: aetiology and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makoka, Mwai H; Miller, William C; Hoffman, Irving F; Cholera, Rushina; Gilligan, Peter H; Kamwendo, Debbie; Malunga, Gabriel; Joaki, George; Martinson, Francis; Hosseinipour, Mina C

    2012-03-21

    Life-threatening infections present major challenges for health systems in Malawi and the developing world because routine microbiologic culture and sensitivity testing are not performed due to lack of capacity. Use of empirical antimicrobial therapy without regular microbiologic surveillance is unable to provide adequate treatment in the face of emerging antimicrobial resistance. This study was conducted to determine antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in order to inform treatment choices and generate hospital-wide baseline data. Culture and susceptibility testing was performed on various specimens from patients presenting with possible infectious diseases at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi. Between July 2006 and December 2007 3104 specimens from 2458 patients were evaluated, with 60.1% from the adult medical service. Common presentations were sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia and abscess. An etiologic agent was detected in 13% of patients. The most common organisms detected from blood cultures were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella species and Streptococcus pneumoniae, whereas Streptococcus pneumoniae and Cryptococcus neoformans were most frequently detected from cerebrospinal fluid. Haemophilus influenzae was rarely isolated. Resistance to commonly used antibiotics was observed in up to 80% of the isolates while antibiotics that were not commonly in use maintained susceptibility. There is widespread resistance to almost all of the antibiotics that are empirically used in Malawi. Antibiotics that have not been widely introduced in Malawi show better laboratory performance. Choices for empirical therapy in Malawi should be revised accordingly. A microbiologic surveillance system should be established and prudent use of antimicrobials promoted to improve patient care.

  3. [Systemic therapy with anti-infective agents. Principles of rational use of systemic antibiotics in dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderkötter, C; Brehler, R; Becker, K

    2014-02-01

    Antibiotics are frequently prescribed and extremely valuable drugs, because they are curative. However, their often incorrect use is the main reason for the increase of multiresistant pathogens. Inappropriate prescription of broad spectrum antibiotics for skin and soft tissue infections favors the selection and spread of multiresistant bacteria not only in the skin, but also in remote visceral organs (e.g. in the intestines), due to their systemic distribution and effects in the body (so-called collateral damage). For this reason basic knowledge and special prudence when using antibiotics are just as desirable as an awareness of responsibility for the public welfare. This article intends to convey basic knowledge on the indications and selection of suitable antibiotics as well as on the development of bacterial resistance and it gives recommendations for allergological procedures when patients report alleged drug reactions to antibiotics. Systemic antibiotics for soft tissue infections are indicated when the infection spreads within the tissue so that it is no longer accessible for local antiseptics. In addition to the clinical symptoms, important parameters are high blood sedimentation rates (BSR) and high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), leukocytosis with neutrophilia and fever (not always present in elderly or immunosuppressed patients). Certain constellations, such as the presence of severe underlying diseases, perfusion disorders or a particular localization (e.g. infection of the face) may necessitate early or parenteral administration. There is no need for systemic administration of antibiotics for uncomplicated wounds without soft tissue infections. Due to their curative effects, the decisive criterion for the use of antibiotics is their sufficient antimicrobial efficacy at the site of infection. An inappropriate administration increases both the selection pressure and costs of treatment and can have fatal consequences in serious situations. In

  4. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswati eSengupta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic-resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic-resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in subinhibitory concentrations acting as signalling molecules supporting quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host-parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell and so on. The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behaviour of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and genes that confer resistance to antibiotics in

  5. Resistance Elasticity of Antibiotic Demand in Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heister, Thomas; Hagist, Christian; Kaier, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    The emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is still an unresolved problem worldwide. In intensive care units (ICUs), first-line antibiotic therapy is highly standardized and widely empiric while treatment failure because of AMR often has severe consequences. Simultaneously, there is a limited number of reserve antibiotics, whose prices and/or side effects are substantially higher than first-line therapy. This paper explores the implications of resistance-induced substitution effects in ICUs. The extent of such substitution effects is shown in a dynamic fixed effect regression analysis using a panel of 66 German ICUs with monthly antibiotic use and resistance data between 2001 and 2012. Our findings support the hypothesis that demand for reserve antibiotics substantially increases when resistance towards first-line agents rises. For some analyses the lagged effect of resistance is also significant, supporting the conjecture that part of the substitution effect is caused by physicians changing antibiotic choices in empiric treatment by adapting their resistance expectation to new information on resistance prevalence. The available information about resistance rates allows physicians to efficiently balance the trade-off between exacerbating resistance and ensuring treatment success. However, resistance-induced substitution effects are not free of charge. These effects should be considered an indirect burden of AMR. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  7. Why do paediatricians prescribe antibiotics? Results of an Italian regional project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Maria Luisa; Marchi, Massimiliano; Gagliotti, Carlo; Di Mario, Simona; Resi, Davide

    2009-01-01

    Background To investigate determinants of antibiotic prescription in paediatric care, as a first step of a multilevel intervention to improve prescribing for common respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in a northern Italian region with high antibiotic prescription rate. Methods A two-step survey was performed: in phase I, knowledge, and attitudes were explored involving all family and hospital paediatricians of Emilia-Romagna and a sample of parents. In phase II, patient care practices were explored in a stratified random sample of visits, both in hospitals and family physician's clinics; parent expectations were investigated in a sub-sample of these visits. Results Out of overall 4352 visits for suspected RTIs, in 38% of children an antibiotic was prescribed. Diagnostic uncertainty was perceived by paediatricians as the most frequent cause of inappropriate prescription (56% of 633 interviewed paediatricians); but, rapid antigen detecting tests was used in case of pharyngitis/pharyngotonsillitis by 36% and 21% of family and hospital paediatricians only. More than 50% of paediatricians affirmed to not adopt a "wait and see strategy" in acute otitis. The perceived parental expectation of antibiotics was not indicated by paediatricians as a crucial determinant of prescription, but this perception was the second factor most strongly associated to prescription (OR = 12.8; 95% CI 10.4 - 15.8), the first being the presence of othorrea. Regarding parents, the most important identified factors, potentially associated to overprescribing, were the lack of knowledge of RTIs and antibiotics (41% of 1029 parents indicated bacteria as a possible cause of common cold), and the propensity to seek medical care for trivial infections (48% of 4352 children accessing ambulatory practice presented only symptoms of common cold). Conclusion A wide gap between perceived and real determinants of antibiotic prescription exists. This can promote antibiotic overuse. Inadequate parental

  8. Potentially inappropriate medication use in nursing homes: an observational study using the NORGEP-NH criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyborg, Gunhild; Brekke, Mette; Straand, Jørund; Gjelstad, Svein; Romøren, Maria

    2017-09-19

    Frail residents in the nursing home sector call for extra care in prescribing. The Norwegian General Practice Nursing Home (NORGEP-NH) list of 34 explicit criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in nursing homes was developed explicitly for this population. The aim of this study was to employ the NORGEP-NH Criteria to study the extent of potentially inappropriate medication use among nursing home residents and explore possible associated factors. Cross-sectional observational pharmacoepidemiological study from residents in nursing homes in the county of Vestfold, Norway. Data collected 2009-11 included residents' demographic and clinical status and all medications, regular and on demand. 881 patients from 30 institutions (mean 85.9 years, 68.6% female), were included. According to NORGEP-NH, 43.8% were prescribed at least one potentially inappropriate regular medication, and 9.9% regularly received three or more potentially inappropriate medications. When also including a) the NORGEP-NH Deprescribing Criteria and b) including drugs prescribed for use as needed, 92.7% of all residents received medication that needs particular surveillance according to the NORGEP-NH. 69.7% of the nursing home residents used at least one psychotropic drug regularly. Female residents received more often than males at least one potentially inappropriate regular medication (OR 1.60, p=0.007). Regarding the prescription of three or more concomitant psychotropic medications, odds ratio for females was 1.79 (p=0.03) compared to males. Residents with the best performance in activities of daily living, and residents residing in long-term wards, had higher risk of using three or more psychotropic drugs. Use of multiple psychoactive drugs increased the risk of falls in the course of an acute episode of infection or dehydration (odds ratio 1.70, p=0.009). Prevalence of potentially inappropriate medications in nursing homes according to the NORGEP-NH was extensive, and especially

  9. The Robustness and Effectiveness of the Triage System at Times of Overcrowding and the Extra Costs due to Inappropriate Use of Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonesi, Paolo; di Bella, Enrico; Montefiori, Marcello; Persico, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Overcrowding is one of the most harmful problems for Emergency Department (ED) management and the correct estimation of time resource absorption by each type of patient plays a strategic role in dealing with overcrowding and correctly programming ED activity. We aimed to investigate how overcrowding may affect urgent patients' waiting times (i.e., the robustness of the triage patient priority system) and to evaluate the extra costs due to inappropriate use of EDs. Data referring to 54,254 patients who accessed the ED of a major Italian hospital in 2011 were analyzed to study patient flows and overcrowding. To define an average per-patient cost, according to the severity of his or her health condition, the 2010 profit and loss account of the aforementioned hospital was studied and the time devoted by physicians to each type of patient was estimated by means of a self-reported survey. Empirical findings confirm a positive correlation between overcrowding and the time a patient has to wait before receiving treatment. This effect is relevant only for non-urgent patients who are responsible for the overcrowding itself. However, urgent patients' waiting times do not increase in the presence of overcrowding, confirming that the triage priority system is robust against the overcrowding situation. The analysis estimates, using 2010 data, that the actual per patient cost incurred by the hospital when treating white-coded patients is, on average, 36.54 euros; a green code costs 93.17, yellow 170.62, and red 227.62. It emerges that 4% of all the personnel costs are attributable to white color-code assistance, 67% to green codes, 23% to yellow codes, and the remaining 6% to red codes. The implementation of effective policies intended to improve both efficiency and quality in providing emergency health services has to deal with the systemic problem of inappropriate use of EDs. Policy-makers should be aware of the fact that there is a considerable portion of ED demand for

  10. PROBLEM OF ANTIBIOTIC USE AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN INDONESIA: ARE WE REALLY MAKING PROGRESS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Hadi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Based on the results Antimicrobial Resistance in Indonesia: prevalence and prevention-study (AMRIN-study, the Ministry of Health of Indonesia in 2005 began a program antibiotic resistance control (PPRA in some government hospitals, and is currently developing to all government teaching hospitals in Indonesia. Aim: The core activities of the PPRA are to implement standardized surveillance emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, and the surveillance of antibiotic use in terms of quantity and quality. Method: Our research in the years 2003 showed the proportion of antibiotic use 84% of patients in a hospital. The use of inappropriate antibiotics was very high, 42% no indication. Result: In 2012 the results ofsurveillance showed decline ofinappropriate use of antibiotic, but prevalence extended-spectrum b-lactamase (ESBL-producing K.pneumoniae (58%, and E.coli (52% and methicillin-resistant S.aures (MRSA (24% were increasing. Conclusion: It was needed to implement the most appropriate programs to prevent the growth and development ofbacteria resistant to antibiotics.

  11. Potentially inappropriate medications defined by STOPP criteria and the risk of adverse drug events in older hospitalized patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, Hilary

    2011-06-13

    Previous studies have not demonstrated a consistent association between potentially inappropriate medicines (PIMs) in older patients as defined by Beers criteria and avoidable adverse drug events (ADEs). This study aimed to assess whether PIMs defined by new STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Persons\\' potentially inappropriate Prescriptions) criteria are significantly associated with ADEs in older people with acute illness.

  12. Assessing the Impact of a School Intervention to Promote Students’ Knowledge and Practices on Correct Antibiotic Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Baltazar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The clinical efficacy of antibiotics depends on their correct use. Widespread ignorance and inappropriate attitudes to antibiotic use have been identified among consumers. In order to improve the knowledge of middle-school students on antibiotics and their correct use, 82 ninth-grade students were enrolled in a teaching activity. The teaching activity consisted of a slide show presentation followed by discussion in a regular class. To evaluate the impact of the teaching activity the students were asked to answer a questionnaire before and after the activity. This study aimed: (1 to evaluate knowledge on the use of antibiotics in students of two schools in the north of Portugal and (2 to evaluate the efficacy of the school intervention in improving students’ knowledge on correct antibiotic use. We found lack of knowledge among students regarding antibiotic spectra and indications and incorrect attitudes in the pre-test. Significant increases in knowledge were observed after implementation of the teaching activity. Knowledge of the correct use of antibiotics for bacterial diseases rather than viral diseases rose from 43% to 76% in the post-test (p < 0.01. Knowledge of the risk of bacterial resistance to antibiotics from their incorrect use rose from 48% to 74% in the post-test (p < 0.05. We believe that it is important to reinforce the teaching activities on microbiology and antibiotic use at the middle school level.

  13. Antibiotic prescribing in medical intensive care units--a comparison between two private sector hospitals in Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Megha; Damlin, Anna L; Sharma, Ashish; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2015-05-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, common in India, contributes to increased risk for development of bacterial resistance. Patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) are often prescribed antibiotics. Paucity of local data on antibiotic prescribing hinders development of appropriate interventions. The aim of the study was to describe and compare antibiotic prescribing in medical ICUs (MICUs) at two private sector hospitals, one teaching (TH) and one non-teaching (NTH) in Ujjain, India. The study was conducted prospectively for 3 years at MICUs of both hospitals. Patients were compared for demographic variables and diagnosis, prescribed antibiotics, generic name prescribing, and route of administration. Adherence to the World Health Organization list of essential medicines (WHOLEM) and the National List of Essential Medicines of India (NLEMI) was analyzed. In total, 4843 of 6141 patients admitted to the MICUs stayed at least one night. More than 70% were prescribed antibiotics. Generic name prescribing was more common at the TH than at the NTH. Prescriptions at the TH had higher compliance to WHOLEM and NLEMI compared with that at the NTH (p Antibiotic prescribing was common at both hospitals. The antibiotic prescriptions at the TH had higher compliance to WHOLEM and NLEMI. However, there is a need to develop appropriate interventions to improve antibiotic prescribing at both hospitals.

  14. Multi-bacteria multi-antibiotic testing using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for urinary tract infection (UTI) diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Kastanos, Evdokia; Pitris, Costas

    2013-06-01

    The inappropriate use of antibiotics leads to antibiotic resistance, which is a major health care problem. The current method for determination of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics requires overnight cultures. However most of the infections cannot wait for the results to receive treatment, so physicians administer general spectrum antibiotics. This results in ineffective treatments and aggravates the rising problem of antibiotic resistance. In this work, a rapid method for diagnosis and antibiogram for a bacterial infection was developed using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) with silver nanoparticles. The advantages of this novel method include its rapidness and efficiency which will potentially allow doctors to prescribe the most appropriate antibiotic for an infection. SERS spectra of three species of gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, Proteus spp., and Klebsiella spp. were obtained after 0 and 4 hour exposure to the seven different antibiotics. Bacterial strains were diluted in order to reach the concentration of (2x105 cfu/ml), cells/ml which is equivalent to the minimum concentration found in urine samples from UTIs. Even though the concentration of bacteria was low, species classification was achieved with 94% accuracy using spectra obtained at 0 hours. Sensitivity or resistance to antibiotics was predicted with 81%-100% accuracy from spectra obtained after 4 hours of exposure to the different antibiotics. This technique can be applied directly to urine samples, and with the enhancement provided by SERS, this method has the potential to be developed into a rapid method for same day UTI diagnosis and antibiogram.

  15. Improving antibiotic use in daily hospital practice : The antibiotic checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daalen, F.V.

    2018-01-01

    Better use of current antibiotic agents is necessary to help control antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs) are introduced to coordinate activities to measure and improve appropriate antibiotic use in daily hospital practice. This thesis shows how the introduction of

  16. Clinical analysis of asthenopia caused by wearing inappropriate glasses in college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To proposed control measures by exploring visual fatigue caused by college students wearing inappropriate glasses.METHODS: A total of 124 cases of asthenopia patients underwent optometry students audition, checked the original spectacles; TOPCON-CL100 computer center was used to checked the original mirror glasses(glasses, the distance between the optical center; with near vision as the standard examination table nearly with vergence and regulation near point, and checked the visual function. RESULTS: All 124 cases(248 eyeshad refractive errors, 77% were spherical mirror and 69% column mirror with error ≥±0.50D, and the pupil center distance from the lens had significant difference(U=5.27, PCONCLUSION: Students wearing inappropriate spectacle asthenopia is caused by one of the main scientific wearing glasses can effectively control asthenopia.

  17. Collecting duct renal cell carcinoma with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis: An autopsy case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Yasuda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year-old Japanese man visited our hospital with a moist cough. Chest radiographic imaging showed a left hilar shadow. Adenocarcinoma cells were found on cytologic screening of fresh sputum. Although multiple metastases including brain were detected, no tumor was observed in the kidneys. The patient underwent whole-brain irradiation and chemotherapy for advanced-stage lung cancer. One month before his death, carcinomatous meningitis was detected. Hyponatremia, hypo-osmolality, and hypertonic urine suggested the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis. Restricting water intake improved the hyponatremia; however, he developed fever and hematuria. Despite systemic administration of an antibacterial drug, he died. Primary tumor in the lung was absent, but adenocarcinoma of the right kidney was evident on autopsy. Lectin histochemical analysis of the carcinoma revealed its distal nephron origin, confirming collecting duct carcinoma. Severe carcinomatous meningitis, which is possibly caused the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis, was observed, with no cancer involvement of the pituitary gland and hypothalamus.

  18. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  19. Community perceptions of infectious diseases, antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance in context of environmental changes: a study in Odisha, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Krushna Chandra; Tamhankar, Ashok J.; Johansson, Eva; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  The public health impact of environmental changes and the faceless threat of antibiotic resistance are currently among the top global health challenges. Community understanding of health, diseases and medicines in relation to the changing environment is necessary to mitigate the impact of these changes on health and for prudent use of antibiotics. Objective  The objective is to explore community perceptions of infectious diseases, antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance in the context of environmental changes. Methods  A qualitative study was conducted among community members with various backgrounds in education, gender, age and occupation of two districts of Odisha, India. Eight focus groups discussions and ten individual interviews were conducted. Data were analysed using content analysis. Results  Two themes emerged: ‘Interpretation of infectious diseases and health hazards in the context of environmental changes’, and ‘Understanding of antibiotic use and its consequences for resistance development and the environment’. The participants perceived that nowadays there is irregularity in the occurrence of seasons, particularly an increase in average temperature, which is influencing health. Participants’ perceptions of infectious diseases, antibiotic use and resistance varied according to their social environment. Furthermore, they perceived that improved sanitation, choice of alternative medicine and awareness and education on prudent use of antibiotics are probably some ways to prevent antibiotic resistance. Conclusions  The participants perceived that climate variability is increasing and that this has health consequences for the community. They also hypothesized an interrelationship between the environment, infectious diseases and medicine use, particularly antibiotics. This is helpful for further empirical studies. PMID:22583645

  20. Empirical philosophy of science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenknecht, Susann; Nersessian, Nancy J.; Andersen, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of philosophers of science make use of qualitative empirical data, a development that may reconfigure the relations between philosophy and sociology of science and that is reminiscent of efforts to integrate history and philosophy of science. Therefore, the first part...... of this introduction to the volume Empirical Philosophy of Science outlines the history of relations between philosophy and sociology of science on the one hand, and philosophy and history of science on the other. The second part of this introduction offers an overview of the papers in the volume, each of which...... is giving its own answer to questions such as: Why does the use of qualitative empirical methods benefit philosophical accounts of science? And how should these methods be used by the philosopher?...

  1. The effectiveness of computerised decision support on antibiotic use in hospitals: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Inappropriate antimicrobial use has been shown to be an important determinant of the emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Health information technology (HIT) in the form of Computerised Decision Support (CDS) represents an option for improving antimicrobial prescribing and containing AMR. Objectives To evaluate the evidence for CDS in improving quantitative and qualitative measures of antibiotic prescribing in inpatient hospital settings. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted of articles published from inception to 20th December 2014 using eight electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PUBMED, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, HMIC and PsychINFo. An updated systematic literature search was conducted from January 1st 2015 to October 1st 2016 using PUBMED. The search strategy used combinations of the following terms: (electronic prescribing) OR (clinical decision support) AND (antibiotic or antibacterial or antimicrobial) AND (hospital or secondary care or inpatient). Studies were evaluated for quality using a 10-point rating scale. Results Eighty-one studies were identified matching the inclusion criteria. Seven outcome measures were evaluated: adequacy of antibiotic coverage, mortality, volume of antibiotic usage, length of stay, antibiotic cost, compliance with guidelines, antimicrobial resistance, and CDS implementation and uptake. Meta-analysis of pooled outcomes showed CDS significantly improved the adequacy of antibiotic coverage (n = 13; odds ratio [OR], 2.11 [95% CI, 1.67 to 2.66, p ≤ 0.00001]). Also, CDS was associated with marginally lowered mortality (n = 20; OR, 0.85 [CI, 0.75 to 0.96, p = 0.01]). CDS was associated with lower antibiotic utilisation, increased compliance with antibiotic guidelines and reductions in antimicrobial resistance. Conflicting effects of CDS on length of stay, antibiotic costs and system uptake were also noted. Conclusions CDS has the potential to improve the adequacy of antibiotic

  2. Surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescription in Singaporean hospitals: a 5-year longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Xin Liew

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inappropriate prescription of antibiotics may contribute towards higher levels antimicrobial resistance. A key intervention for improving appropriate antibiotic prescription is surveillance of prescription. This paper presents the results of a longitudinal surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescription in 5 public-sector hospitals in Singapore from 2006 to 2010. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Quarterly antibiotic prescription data were obtained and converted to defined daily doses (DDDs per 1,000 inpatient-days. The presence of significant trends in antibiotic prescription over time for both individual and combined hospitals was tested by regression analysis and corrected for autocorrelation between time-points. Excluding fluoroquinolones, there was a significant increase in prescription of all monitored antibiotics from an average of 233.12 defined daily doses (DDD/1,000 inpatient-days in 2006 to 254.38 DDD/1,000 inpatient-days in 2010 (Coefficient = 1.13, 95%CI: 0.16-2.09, p = 0.025. Increasing utilization of carbapenems, piperacillin/tazobactam, and Gram-positive agents were seen in the majority of the hospitals, while cephalosporins were less prescribed over time. The combined expenditure for 5 hospitals increased from USD9.9 million in 2006 to USD16.7 million in 2010. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The rate of prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics in Singaporean hospitals is much higher compared to those of European hospitals. This may be due to high rates of antimicrobial resistance. The increase in expenditure on monitored antibiotics over the past 5 years outstripped the actual increase in DDD/1,000 inpatient-days of antibiotics prescribed. Longitudinal surveillance of antibiotic prescription on a hospital and countrywide level is important for detecting trends for formulating interventions or policies. Further research is needed to understand the causes for the various prescription trends and to act on these where

  3. Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens is recognized as a major public health threat affecting humans worldwide. Multidrug-resistant organisms have emerged not only in the hospital environment but are now often identified in community settings, suggesting that reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present outside the hospital. The bacterial response to the antibiotic “attack” is the prime example of bacterial adaptation and the pinnacle of evolution. “Survival of the fittest” is a consequence of an immense genetic plasticity of bacterial pathogens that trigger specific responses that result in mutational adaptations, acquisition of genetic material or alteration of gene expression producing resistance to virtually all antibiotics currently available in clinical practice. Therefore, understanding the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance is of paramount importance to design strategies to curtail the emergence and spread of resistance and devise innovative therapeutic approaches against multidrug-resistant organisms. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the major mechanisms of antibiotic resistance encountered in clinical practice providing specific examples in relevant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27227291

  4. Antibiotic resistance in Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vo, A.T.T.

    2007-01-01

    Immediately after their introduction in the beginning of the fourties of the previous century, the agents used to combat infectious diseases caused by bacteria were regarded with suspicion, but not long thereafter antibiotics had the status of miracle drugs. For decades mankind has lived under the

  5. Antibiotic resistance reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    One of the major threats to human health in the 21st century is the emergence of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, thereby limiting treatment options. An important route through which pathogens become resistant is via acquisition of resistance genes from environmental

  6. Antibiotics in laboratory medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lorian, Victor

    2005-01-01

    ... in critical articles and reviews. Materials appearing in this book prepared by individuals as part of their official duties as U.S. government employees are not covered by the above-mentioned copyright. Printed in the USA Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Antibiotics in laboratory medicine / [edited by] Victor Lorian. - 5th ed...

  7. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibiotic therapy of cholera*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbaum, John; Greenough, William B.; Islam, M. R.

    1967-01-01

    Recent clinical trials having established the value of tetracycline as an adjunct to fluid and electrolyte replacement in cholera treatment, a controlled trial of antibiotic therapy was conducted in Dacca on 318 adults hospitalized for cholera. The effects of 4 antibiotics orally administered in varying dosage schedules were studied. Cholera therapy with tetracycline or chloramphenicol caused a highly significant reduction in the duration of diarrhoea and of positive culture, in stool volume, and in intravenous fluid requirement as compared with the results in controls who received intravenous fluid therapy only. Streptomycin was also effective, but to a lesser degree; paromomycin was of little value. The severity of dehydration on admission was significantly related to subsequent duration of diarrhoea regardless of whether antibiotics were given. Increasing age was associated with more prolonged purging in patients receiving antibiotics. Increasing the dose of tetracycline to 2 to 3 times that usually administered, or prolonging treatment from 2 to 4 days, did not enhance the therapeutic results. The effect of tetracycline was apparent within a few hours of administration. Bacteriological relapses were seen after discontinuation of therapy in all treatment groups, but were not due to the development of resistant bacteria. PMID:4865453

  9. Antibiotic resistance reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    One of the major threats to human health in the 21st century is the emergence of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, thereby limiting treatment options. An important route through which pathogens become resistant is via acquisition of resistance genes from

  10. Impact of oncology-related direct-to-consumer advertising: association with appropriate and inappropriate prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Gregory A; Chen, Kun; Taback, Nathan; Hassett, Michael J; Schrag, Deborah; Weeks, Jane C

    2013-03-01

    Little is known about the impact of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) on appropriate versus inappropriate prescribing. Aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy for breast cancer provides an ideal paradigm for studying this issue, because AIs have been the focus of substantial DTCA, and because they should only be used in postmenopausal women, age can serve as a simple surrogate marker of appropriateness. Data regarding national DTCA spending for the AIs were obtained from TNS Multimedia; hormonal therapy prescription data were obtained from IMS Health. Time series analyses were performed to characterize the association between monthly changes in DTCA spending for the AIs and monthly changes in the proportion of all new hormonal therapy prescriptions represented by the AIs from October 2005 to September 2007. Analyses were stratified by age, considering prescriptions for women ≤ 40 (likely premenopausal) to be inappropriate and those for women > 60 (likely postmenopausal) to be appropriate. Monthly dollars spent on AI-associated DTCA varied considerably ($118,600 to $22,019,660). Time series analysis revealed that for every million dollars spent on DTCA for the AIs, there was an associated increase 3 months later in the new AI prescription proportion of 0.15% for all ages (P 60 years (P < .0001), but no significant change for those ≤ 40 at any time from 0 to 6 months. DTCA for the AIs was associated with increases in appropriate prescriptions with no significant effect on inappropriate prescriptions, suggesting that DTCA may not foster inappropriate medication use for certain drug classes. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  11. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  12. A case of appropriate inappropriate device therapy: Hyperkalemia-induced ventricular oversensing

    OpenAIRE

    Oudit, Gavin Y; Cameron, Doug; Harris, Louise

    2008-01-01

    The present case describes a patient who received inappropriate, but potentially life-saving, therapy from her implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in the setting of acute hyperkalemia (plasma potassium concentration = 8 mM). Hyperkalemia was associated with the development of a slow sinusoidal ventricular tachycardia, at a rate of 100 beats/min to 125 beats/min (610 ms to 480 ms) in a patient who is pacemaker-dependent. There was associated fractionation of the ICD electrogram and T ...

  13. Potentially inappropriate prescribing and cost outcomes for older people: a national population study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahir, Caitriona

    2010-05-01

    Optimization of drug prescribing in older populations is a priority due to the significant clinical and economic costs of drug-related illness. This study aimed to: (i) estimate the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in a national Irish older population using European specific explicit prescribing criteria; (ii) investigate the association between PIP, number of drug classes, gender and age and; (iii) establish the total cost of PIP.

  14. An automated technique to identify potential inappropriate traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsuan-Chia; Iqbal, Usman; Nguyen, Phung Anh; Lin, Shen-Hsien; Huang, Chih-Wei; Jian, Wen-Shan; Li, Yu-Chuan

    2016-04-01

    Medication errors such as potential inappropriate prescriptions would induce serious adverse drug events to patients. Information technology has the ability to prevent medication errors; however, the pharmacology of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is not as clear as in western medicine. The aim of this study was to apply the appropriateness of prescription (AOP) model to identify potential inappropriate TCM prescriptions. We used the association rule of mining techniques to analyze 14.5 million prescriptions from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The disease and TCM (DTCM) and traditional Chinese medicine-traditional Chinese medicine (TCMM) associations are computed by their co-occurrence, and the associations' strength was measured as Q-values, which often referred to as interestingness or life values. By considering the number of Q-values, the AOP model was applied to identify the inappropriate prescriptions. Afterwards, three traditional Chinese physicians evaluated 1920 prescriptions and validated the detected outcomes from the AOP model. Out of 1920 prescriptions, 97.1% of positive predictive value and 19.5% of negative predictive value were shown by the system as compared with those by experts. The sensitivity analysis indicated that the negative predictive value could improve up to 27.5% when the model's threshold changed to 0.4. We successfully applied the AOP model to automatically identify potential inappropriate TCM prescriptions. This model could be a potential TCM clinical decision support system in order to improve drug safety and quality of care. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Beers Criteria as a Proxy for Inappropriate Prescribing of Other Medications Among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Brian C; Steinman, Michael A; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A; Kaboli, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Beers criteria are a compilation of medications deemed potentially inappropriate for older adults, and widely used a prescribing quality indicator. OBJECTIVE To determine whether Beers criteria serve as a proxy measure for other forms of inappropriate prescribing, as measured by comprehensive implicit review. METHODS Data for patients 65 years and older were obtained from the VA Enhanced Pharmacy Outpatient Clinic (EPOC) and the Iowa Medicaid Pharmaceutical Case Management (PCM) studies. Comprehensive measurement of prescribing quality was conducted using expert clinician review of medical records according to the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI). MAI scores attributable to non-Beers medications (non-Beers MAI) were contrasted between patients who did and did not receive a Beers criteria medication. RESULTS Beers criteria medications accounted for 12.9% and 14.0% of total MAI scores in the two studies. Importantly, non-Beers MAI scores were significantly higher in patients receiving a Beers criteria medication in both studies (EPOC: 15.1 vs. 12.4, p = 0.02; PCM: 11.1 vs. 8.7, p = 0.04), after adjusting for important confounding factors. CONCLUSIONS Beers criteria utility extended beyond direct measurement of a limited set of inappropriate prescribing practices by serving as a clinically meaningful proxy for other inappropriate practices. Using prescribing quality indicators to guide interventions should thus identify patients for comprehensive medication review, rather than identifying specific targets for discontinuation. Future research should explore both the quality measurement and the intervention targeting applications of the Beers criteria, particularly when integrated with other indicators. PMID:21972251

  16. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone caused by continuous lumbar spinal fluid drainage after transphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlela, S; Azmi, K N; Khalid, B A K

    2006-01-01

    A 53-year-old acromegalic woman had cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea following transphenoidal surgery for a pituitary microadenoma. A continuous lumbar spinal fluid drainage catheter was inserted and on the sixth postoperative day, she developed hyponatremia with features of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) requiring hypertonic saline administration. Over-drainage is potentially hazardous and close biochemical monitoring is required. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of SIADH caused by continuous lumbar drainage in an adult.

  17. Inappropriate gestational weight gain among teenage pregnancies: prevalence and pregnancy outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Vivatkusol, Yada; Thavaramara, Thaovalai; Phaloprakarn, Chadakarn

    2017-01-01

    Yada Vivatkusol, Thaovalai Thavaramara, Chadakarn Phaloprakarn Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Vajira Hospital, Navamindradhiraj University, Bangkok, Thailand Objective: To study the prevalence and pregnancy outcomes of inappropriate gestational weight gain (GWG) among teenage pregnant women.Methods: A retrospective descriptive study was conducted on 2,165 teenage pregnant women who attended our antenatal clinic between January 2007 and August 2015. Adverse preg...

  18. Short notes and reviews Simplifying hydrozoan classification: inappropriateness of the group Hydroidomedusae in a phylogenetic context

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, Antonio C.

    2001-01-01

    The systematics of Hydrozoa is considered from the viewpoint of logical consistency between phylogeny and classification. The validity of the nominal taxon Hydroidomedusae (including all groups of Hydrozoa except the Siphonophorae) is discussed with regard to its distinctness and inclusive relationships. In general, phylogenetic systematic evidence suggest that the use of the term Hydroidomedusae is inappropriate given our current level of understanding. It is concluded that no new, or resurr...

  19. Evaluation of potentially inappropriate medications among older residents of Malaysian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li Li; Tangiisuran, Balamurugan; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2012-08-01

    There is an increasing evidence of medicines related issues such as inappropriate prescribing among older people. Inappropriate prescribing is an important risk factor for adverse drug reactions and hospitalizations in the older people. To assess and characterize the prevalence of Potentially Inappropriate Medications (PIMs) in nursing home care in Malaysia as defined by Screening Tool of Older Peoples Prescriptions (STOPP) and Beers criteria. Four Nursing Homes situated in Penang, Malaysia. A multicenter and cross-sectional study was conducted over 2 months period at four large non-governmental organizations nursing homes in Penang, Malaysia. The study population included older residents (≥65 years old) taking at least one medication. Residents who had been diagnosed with dementia or taking anti dementia drugs, delirium, too frail or refused to give consent were excluded. Demographic, clinical data and concurrent medications were collected through direct interview and also by reviewing medical records. STOPP and Beers criteria were applied in the medical review to screen for PIMs. Potentially Inappropriate Medication using STOPP and Beers criteria. Two hundred eleven residents were included in the study with the median age of 77 (inter quartile range (IQR) 72-82) years. Median number of prescription medicines was 4 (IQR 1-14). STOPP identified less residents (50 residents, 23.7 %) being prescribed on PIMs compared with Beers criteria (69 residents, 32.7 %) (p older residents living in the nursing homes and are associated with number of medications and longer nursing home stay. Further research is warranted to study the impact of PIMs towards health related outcomes in these elderly.

  20. Reduction of the inappropriate ICD therapies by implementing a new fuzzy logic-based diagnostic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Michał; Przybylski, Andrzej; Kuźmicz, Wiesław; Szwed, Hanna

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the value of a completely new fuzzy logic-based detection algorithm (FA) in comparison with arrhythmia classification algorithms used in existing ICDs in order to demonstrate whether the rate of inappropriate therapies can be reduced. On the basis of the RR intervals database containing arrhythmia events and controls recordings from the ICD memory a diagnostic algorithm was developed and tested by a computer program. This algorithm uses the same input signals as existing ICDs: RR interval as the primary input variable and two variables derived from it, onset and stability. However, it uses 15 fuzzy rules instead of fixed thresholds used in existing devices. The algorithm considers 6 diagnostic categories: (1) VF (ventricular fibrillation), (2) VT (ventricular tachycardia), (3) ST (sinus tachycardia), (4) DAI (artifacts and heart rhythm irregularities including extrasystoles and T-wave oversensing-TWOS), (5) ATF (atrial and supraventricular tachycardia or fibrillation), and 96) NT (sinus rhythm). This algorithm was tested on 172 RR recordings from different ICDs in the follow-up of 135 patients. All diagnostic categories of the algorithm were present in the analyzed recordings: VF (n = 35), VT (n = 48), ST (n = 14), DAI (n = 32), ATF (n = 18), NT (n = 25). Thirty-eight patients (31.4%) in the studied group received inappropriate ICD therapies. In all these cases the final diagnosis of the algorithm was correct (19 cases of artifacts, 11 of atrial fibrillation and 8 of ST) and fuzzy rules algorithm implementation would have withheld unnecessary therapies. Incidence of inappropriate therapies: 3 vs. 38 (the proposed algorithm vs. ICD diagnosis, respectively) differed significantly (p fuzzy logic based algorithm seems to be promising and its implementation could diminish ICDs inappropriate therapies. We found FA usefulness in correct diagnosis of sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation and artifacts in comparison with tested ICDs.

  1. Antibiotic Resistance in Foodborne Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Ciara; Duffy, Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    Wide-spread antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens is now a serious public health issue and multi-antibiotic resistance has been reported in many foodborne pathogens including Salmonella and E. coli. A study to determine antibiotic resistance profiles of a range of Salmonella and Verocytotoxigenic E.coli (VTEC) isolated from Irish foods revealed significant levels of antibiotic resistance in the strains. S. typhimurium DT104 were multiantibiotic resistant with 97% resistant to 7 anti...

  2. Congenital short QT syndrome and implantable cardioverter defibrillator treatment: inherent risk for inappropriate shock delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpf, Rainer; Wolpert, Christian; Bianchi, Francesca; Giustetto, Carla; Gaita, Florenzo; Bauersfeld, Urs; Borggrefe, Martin

    2003-12-01

    A congenital short QT interval constitutes a new primary electrical abnormality associated with syncope and/or sudden cardiac death. We report on the initial use of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy in patients with inherited short QT interval and discuss sensing abnormalities and detection issues. In five consecutive patients from two unrelated European families who had structurally normal hearts, excessively shortened QT intervals, and a strong positive family history of sudden cardiac death, ICDs were placed for primary and secondary prevention. Mean QT intervals were 252 +/- 13 ms (QTc 287 +/- 13 ms). Despite normal sensing behavior during intraoperative and postoperative device testing, 3 of 5 patients experienced inappropriate shock therapies for T wave oversensing 30 +/- 26 days after implantation. Programming lower sensitivities and decay delays prevented further inappropriate discharges. The congenital short QT syndrome constitutes a new clinical entity with an increased risk for sudden cardiac death. Currently, ICD treatment is the only therapeutic option. In patients with short QT interval and implanted ICD, increased risk for inappropriate therapy is inherent due to the detection of short-coupled and prominent T waves. Careful testing of ICD function and adaptation of sensing levels and decay delays without sacrificing correct arrhythmia detection are essential.

  3. Inappropriate Dexamethasone Use by a Trekker in Nepal: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Nicholas R; Garth, Rachel; Kelly, Nicola

    2017-12-01

    We present a case of inappropriate dexamethasone use in a trekker in the Everest region of Nepal. We aim to increase awareness among health professionals of the possible use of this medication by trekkers and promote knowledge of potential complications. In this case, a previously altitude-naive trekker was prescribed prophylactic dexamethasone by physicians in a Western travel clinic before high-altitude trekking in Nepal. There were no indications for prophylactic medication nor for the use of dexamethasone. The trekker reported that no discussion regarding risks and benefits, alternatives, side effects, contraindications, or dose tapering on completion of the course had occurred before travel. Side effects were temporary, but serious complications may have ensued if it not for timely interventions by doctors at the International Porter Protection Group rescue post. The events leading to inappropriate dexamethasone use in this case cannot be known for certain. However, it is clear that the trekker lacked the knowledge to use the medication safely. Although the efficacy of dexamethasone in the prevention of acute mountain sickness is undisputed, associated side effects and other limitations make acetazolamide the prophylactic drug of choice. Inappropriate use of dexamethasone can lead to severe complications, and such a case has been reported from Mount Everest. Clinicians prescribing dexamethasone must understand the indications and risks, and health professionals at altitude should be aware of its use by trekkers and the potential complications. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Phantom movements from physiologically inappropriate muscles: A case study with a high transhumeral amputee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Julie; Hugosdottir, Rosa; Kamavuako, Ernest N

    2015-08-01

    Individuals with high-level amputation have a great need for functional prostheses because of their vast functional deficits. Conventional techniques are considered inappropriate for high-level amputees due to the lack of physiologically appropriate muscles. This study investigates how accurate phantom movements (PMs) can be classified from physiologically inappropriate muscles. The study involves a case study of a 42-year-old transhumeral amputee. Suitable PMs and best electrode configuration were identified using the sequential forward selection method and brute-force technique. Using linear discriminant analysis, the best PMs (elbow extension/flexion, wrist supination/pronation) and rest were classified with error ranging from 3% to 0.18% when using 3 to 8 EMG channels respectively. A completion rate of 93 % was obtained during a targeted achievement control test in a virtual reality environment. This case indicates that a proximal transhumeral amputee can generate muscle activation patterns related to distinct PMs; and these PMs can be decoded from physiologically inappropriate muscles.

  5. Amusia results in abnormal brain activity following inappropriate intonation during speech comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cunmei; Hamm, Jeff P; Lim, Vanessa K; Kirk, Ian J; Chen, Xuhai; Yang, Yufang

    2012-01-01

    Pitch processing is a critical ability on which humans' tonal musical experience depends, and which is also of paramount importance for decoding prosody in speech. Congenital amusia refers to deficits in the ability to properly process musical pitch, and recent evidence has suggested that this musical pitch disorder may impact upon the processing of speech sounds. Here we present the first electrophysiological evidence demonstrating that individuals with amusia who speak Mandarin Chinese are impaired in classifying prosody as appropriate or inappropriate during a speech comprehension task. When presented with inappropriate prosody stimuli, control participants elicited a larger P600 and smaller N100 relative to the appropriate condition. In contrast, amusics did not show significant differences between the appropriate and inappropriate conditions in either the N100 or the P600 component. This provides further evidence that the pitch perception deficits associated with amusia may also affect intonation processing during speech comprehension in those who speak a tonal language such as Mandarin, and suggests music and language share some cognitive and neural resources.

  6. Amusia results in abnormal brain activity following inappropriate intonation during speech comprehension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunmei Jiang

    Full Text Available Pitch processing is a critical ability on which humans' tonal musical experience depends, and which is also of paramount importance for decoding prosody in speech. Congenital amusia refers to deficits in the ability to properly process musical pitch, and recent evidence has suggested that this musical pitch disorder may impact upon the processing of speech sounds. Here we present the first electrophysiological evidence demonstrating that individuals with amusia who speak Mandarin Chinese are impaired in classifying prosody as appropriate or inappropriate during a speech comprehension task. When presented with inappropriate prosody stimuli, control participants elicited a larger P600 and smaller N100 relative to the appropriate condition. In contrast, amusics did not show significant differences between the appropriate and inappropriate conditions in either the N100 or the P600 component. This provides further evidence that the pitch perception deficits associated with amusia may also affect intonation processing during speech comprehension in those who speak a tonal language such as Mandarin, and suggests music and language share some cognitive and neural resources.

  7. The Impact of a Computerized Clinical Decision Support Tool on Inappropriate Clostridium difficile Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Duncan R; Hamilton, Keith W; Pegues, David A; Hanish, Asaf; Umscheid, Craig A

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized clinical decision support intervention aimed at reducing inappropriate Clostridium difficile testing DESIGN Retrospective cohort study SETTING University of Pennsylvania Health System, comprised of 3 large tertiary-care hospitals PATIENTS All adult patients admitted over a 2-year period INTERVENTION Providers were required to use an order set integrated into a commercial electronic health record to order C. difficile toxin testing. The order set identified patients who had received laxatives within the previous 36 hours and displayed a message asking providers to consider stopping laxatives and reassessing in 24 hours prior to ordering C. difficile testing. Providers had the option to continue or discontinue laxatives and to proceed with or forgo testing. The primary endpoint was the change in inappropriate C. difficile testing, as measured by the number of patients who had C. difficile testing ordered while receiving laxatives. RESULTS Compared to the 1-year baseline period, the intervention resulted in a decrease in the proportion of inappropriate C. difficile testing (29.6% vs 27.3%; P=.02). The intervention was associated with an increase in the number of patients who had laxatives discontinued and did not undergo C. difficile testing (5.8% vs 46.4%; Ptesting (5.4% vs 35.2%; Ptesting and improving the timely discontinuation of laxatives. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:1204-1208.

  8. Empirical philosophy of science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenknecht, Susann; Nersessian, Nancy J.; Andersen, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of philosophers of science make use of qualitative empirical data, a development that may reconfigure the relations between philosophy and sociology of science and that is reminiscent of efforts to integrate history and philosophy of science. Therefore, the first part...... of this introduction to the volume Empirical Philosophy of Science outlines the history of relations between philosophy and sociology of science on the one hand, and philosophy and history of science on the other. The second part of this introduction offers an overview of the papers in the volume, each of which...

  9. Empirical comparison of theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opp, K.D.; Wippler, R.

    1990-01-01

    The book represents the first, comprehensive attempt to take an empirical approach for comparative assessment of theories in sociology. The aims, problems, and advantages of the empirical approach are discussed in detail, and the three theories selected for the purpose of this work are explained. Their comparative assessment is performed within the framework of several research projects, which among other subjects also investigate the social aspects of the protest against nuclear power plants. The theories analysed in this context are the theory of mental incongruities and that of the benefit, and their efficiency in explaining protest behaviour is compared. (orig./HSCH) [de

  10. When and How to Take Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us General Background: When & How to take Antibiotics When should you take antibiotics? What is the proper dosage? How safe are antibiotics? How does a physician decide which antibiotic to ...

  11. Topical and systemic antibiotics in the management of periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombelli, Andrea; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2004-02-01

    Both systemic and topical antibiotics are increasingly used in the management of periodontal infections. Whilst these drugs are used mostly on an empirical basis, some contend that rational use of antibiotics should be the norm due to their wide abuse and consequential global emergence of antibiotic resistance organisms. Here we review the rationale and principles of antimicrobial therapy, treatment goals, drug delivery routes and various antibiotics that are used in the management of periodontal diseases. The pros and cons of systemic and local antibiotic therapy are described together with practical guidelines for their delivery. The available data indicate, in general, that mechanical periodontal treatment alone is adequate to ameliorate or resolve the clinical condition in most cases, but adjunctive antimicrobial agents, delivered either locally or systemically, can enhance the effect of therapy in specific situations. This is particularly true for aggressive (early onset) periodontitis, in patients with generalised systemic disease that may affect host resistance and in case of poor response to conventional mechanical therapy. Locally delivered antibiotics together with mechanical debridement are indicated for non-responding sites of focal infection or in localised recurrent disease. After resolution of the periodontal infection, the patient should be placed on an individually tailored maintenance care programme. Optimal plaque control by the patient is of paramount importance for a favourable clinical and microbiological response to any form of periodontal therapy.

  12. Antibiotics for leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett-Major, David M; Coldren, Rodney

    2012-02-15

    Leptospirosis has a wide-ranging clinical and public health impact. Leptospira are globally distributed. Case attack rates are as high as 1:4 to 2:5 persons in exposed populations. In some settings mortality has exceeded 10% of infected people. The benefit of antibiotic therapy in the disease has been unclear. We sought to characterise the risks and benefits associated with use of antibiotic therapy in the management of leptospirosis. We searched the The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded regardless of study language. This was augmented by a manual search. The last date of search was November, 2011. To be included in assessment of benefits, trials had to specifically assess the use of antibiotics in a randomised clinical trial. A broad range of study types were incorporated to seek potential harms. Included trials were systematically abstracted, as were excluded studies for the purposes of assessing harms. Analyses were conducted in accordance with The Cochrane Handbook and practices of The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group. Seven randomised trials were included.  Four trials with 403 patients compared an antibiotic with placebo or no intervention. Three trials compared at least one antibiotic regimen with another antibiotic regimen. The trials all had high risk of bias. The trials varied in the severity of leptospirosis among trial patients. The ability to group data for meta-analysis was limited. While all four trials that compared antibiotics with placebo reported mortality and used parenteral penicillin, there were no deaths in two of them. Since odds ratio calculations cannot employ zero-event trials, only two trials contributed to this estimate. The number of deaths were 16/200 (8.0%) in the antibiotic arm versus 11/203 (5.4%) in the placebo arm giving a fixed-effect OR 1.56 (95% CI 0.70 to 3.46). The

  13. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre-, and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm, and virulence), and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment.

  14. Antibiotic Alternatives: The Substitution of Antibiotics in Animal Husbandry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyue eCheng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could relly replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre- and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm and virulence, and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment.

  15. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandegren, Linus

    2014-05-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are found in sewage water, soils, and many water environments due to natural production and contamination from human activities. Selection of resistance at non-lethal antibiotic concentrations (below the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration) occurs due to differences in growth rate at the particular antibiotic concentration between cells with different tolerance levels to the antibiotic. The minimum selective concentration for a particular antibiotic is reached when its reducing effect on growth of the susceptible strain balances the reducing effect (fitness cost) of the resistance determinant in the resistant strain. Recent studies have shown that resistant bacteria can be selected at concentrations several hundred-fold below the lethal concentrations for susceptible cells. Resistant mutants selected at low antibiotic concentrations are generally more fit than those selected at high concentrations but can still be highly resistant. The characteristics of selection at low antibiotic concentrations, the potential clinical problems of this mode of selection, and potential solutions will be discussed.

  16. Environmental pollution by antibiotics and by antibiotic resistance determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Jose Luis

    2009-01-01

    Antibiotics are among the most successful drugs used for human therapy. However, since they can challenge microbial populations, they must be considered as important pollutants as well. Besides being used for human therapy, antibiotics are extensively used for animal farming and for agricultural purposes. Residues from human environments and from farms may contain antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes that can contaminate natural environments. The clearest consequence of antibiotic release in natural environments is the selection of resistant bacteria. The same resistance genes found at clinical settings are currently disseminated among pristine ecosystems without any record of antibiotic contamination. Nevertheless, the effect of antibiotics on the biosphere is wider than this and can impact the structure and activity of environmental microbiota. Along the article, we review the impact that pollution by antibiotics or by antibiotic resistance genes may have for both human health and for the evolution of environmental microbial populations. - The article reviews the current knowledge on the effects that pollution by antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes may have for the microbiosphere.

  17. Environmental pollution by antibiotics and by antibiotic resistance determinants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jose Luis, E-mail: jlmtnez@cnb.csic.e [Departamento de Biotecnologia Microbiana, Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Darwin 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, and CIBERESP (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    Antibiotics are among the most successful drugs used for human therapy. However, since they can challenge microbial populations, they must be considered as important pollutants as well. Besides being used for human therapy, antibiotics are extensively used for animal farming and for agricultural purposes. Residues from human environments and from farms may contain antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes that can contaminate natural environments. The clearest consequence of antibiotic release in natural environments is the selection of resistant bacteria. The same resistance genes found at clinical settings are currently disseminated among pristine ecosystems without any record of antibiotic contamination. Nevertheless, the effect of antibiotics on the biosphere is wider than this and can impact the structure and activity of environmental microbiota. Along the article, we review the impact that pollution by antibiotics or by antibiotic resistance genes may have for both human health and for the evolution of environmental microbial populations. - The article reviews the current knowledge on the effects that pollution by antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes may have for the microbiosphere.

  18. Three years of antibiotic consumption evaluation in French nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, A; Thibaut, S; LePabic, E; Huon, J F; Ballereau, F

    2015-08-01

    We had for aim to assess antibiotic consumption and to better understand their use in nursing homes so as to target messages on relevant practice procedures sent to prescribers. The MedQual network asked nursing homes with in-house pharmacies to participate in a retrospective collection of yearly antibiotic consumption data with an Excel(®) spread sheet according to the Health Ministry recommendations. Fifty-two nursing homes participated in 2011, 2012, and 74 in 2013, accounting for 10% of the Pays de la Loire region's nursing homes and 15% of beds. The medians of total antibiotic consumption in daily-defined dose for 1000 patient-days were respectively 39 (32.4-49.0), 39.3 (34.4-52.9), and 44.8 (33.6-55.4). There was no significant difference between 2011 and 2013. Penicillins (J01C) were the most commonly used class with a median of 25.7 [IQ 18.8; 33.8] in 2011 and 30.4 [IQ 23.6; 41.3] in 2013. Quinolones (J01M) were the second most commonly used class with a median of 4.6 [IQ 2.9; 5.9] in 2011 and 3.8 [IQ 2.3; 6.5] in 2013, followed by the other beta-lactams (J01D) with a median of 2.5 [IQ 1.7; 4.5] in 2011 and 2,8 [IQ 1.7; 3.8] in 2013. The monitoring of antibiotic consumption in nursing homes in the Pays de la Loire Region since 2011 has allowed identifying inappropriate use and helped improve practices. No increase of overall consumption was observed in nursing homes but the distribution according to antibiotic class changed. The current objective is to extend this monitoring and to send personalized messages to prescribers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The Empire Strikes Back

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micklitz, Hans-W.; Pałka, Przemysław; Panagis, Yannis

    2017-01-01

    The authors argue that it is possible to partly automate the process of abstract control of fairness of clauses in online consumer contracts. The authors present a theoretical and empirical argument for this claim, including a brief presentation of the software they have designed. This type...

  20. Auditory Imagery: Empirical Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    The empirical literature on auditory imagery is reviewed. Data on (a) imagery for auditory features (pitch, timbre, loudness), (b) imagery for complex nonverbal auditory stimuli (musical contour, melody, harmony, tempo, notational audiation, environmental sounds), (c) imagery for verbal stimuli (speech, text, in dreams, interior monologue), (d)…

  1. Essays in empirical microeconomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Péter, A.N.

    2016-01-01

    The empirical studies in this thesis investigate various factors that could affect individuals' labor market, family formation and educational outcomes. Chapter 2 focuses on scheduling as a potential determinant of individuals' productivity. Chapter 3 looks at the role of a family factor on

  2. Empirically sampling Universal Dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schluter, Natalie; Agic, Zeljko

    2017-01-01

    Universal Dependencies incur a high cost in computation for unbiased system development. We propose a 100% empirically chosen small subset of UD languages for efficient parsing system development. The technique used is based on measurements of model capacity globally. We show that the diversity o...

  3. Empirical Music Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    musical performance and reception is inspired by traditional approaches within aesthetics, but it also challenges some of the presuppositions inherent in them. As an example of such work I present a research project in empirical music aesthetics begun last year and of which I am a team member....

  4. Empirical research and logotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulenberg, Stefan E

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this paper was to outline suggestions for future logotherapy applications and research. Empirical studies are available on logotherapy constructs, but additional research is sorely needed. The psychometrics of logotherapy measures need to be expanded. Carefully conducted experimental studies may aid in refining long-standing logotherapy concepts and supporting or refuting new ones.

  5. Antibiotic use during the intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags into fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of antibiotics, in particular, the use of a single dose of antibiotics during electronic tag implantation is of unproven value, and carries with it the potential for the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria and the alteration of the immune response of the fish. Antibiotic use during electronic tag implantation must conform to relevant drug laws and regulations in the country where work is being done, including the requirements for withdrawal times before human consumption is a possibility. Currently, the choice of antibiotics (most often tetracycline or oxytetracycline) and the use of a single dose of the drug are decisions made without knowledge of the basic need for antibiotic usage and of the bacteria involved in infections that occur following electronic tag implantation. Correct perioperative use of an antibiotic is to apply the drug to the animal before surgery begins, to assure serum and tissue levels of the drug are adequate before the incision is made. However, the most common perioperative application of antibiotics during implantation of an electronic tag is to delay the administration of the drug, injecting it into the coelom after the electronic tag is inserted, just prior to closure of the incision. There is little empirical evidence that the present application of antibiotics in fish being implanted with electronic tags is of value. Improvements should first be made to surgical techniques, especially the use of aseptic techniques and sterilized instruments and electronic tags, before resorting to antibiotics. ?? 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.(outside the USA).

  6. Impact of de-escalation of beta-lactam antibiotics on the emergence of antibiotic resistance in ICU patients: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bus, Liesbet; Denys, Wouter; Catteeuw, Julie; Gadeyne, Bram; Vermeulen, Karel; Boelens, Jerina; Claeys, Geert; De Waele, Jan J; Decruyenaere, Johan; Depuydt, Pieter O

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic de-escalation is promoted to limit prolonged exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics, but proof that it prevents the emergence of resistance is lacking. We evaluated determinants of antibiotic de-escalation in an attempt to assess whether the latter is associated with a lower emergence of antimicrobial resistance. Antibiotic treatments, starting with empirical beta-lactam prescriptions, were prospectively documented during 2013 and 2014 in a tertiary intensive care unit (ICU) and categorized as continuation, de-escalation or escalation of the empirical antimicrobial treatment. Determinants of the de-escalation or escalation treatments were identified by multivariate logistic regression; the continuation category was used as the reference group. Using systematically collected diagnostic and surveillance cultures, we estimated the cumulative incidence of antimicrobial resistance following de-escalation or continuation of therapy, with adjustment for ICU discharge and death as competing risks. Of 478 anti-pseudomonal antibiotic prescriptions, 42 (9 %) were classified as escalation of the antimicrobial treatment and 121 (25 %) were classified as de-escalation, mainly through replacement of the originally prescribed antibiotics with those having a narrower spectrum. In multivariate analysis, de-escalation was associated with the identification of etiologic pathogens (p antibiotic course in the ICU in de-escalated versus continued prescriptions was 8 (range 6-10) versus 5 (range 4-7) days, respectively (p resistance to the initial beta-lactam antibiotic on day 14 were 30.6 and 23.5 % for de-escalation and continuation, respectively (p = 0.22). For the selection of multi-drug resistant pathogens, these values were 23.5 (de-escalation) and 18.6 % (continuation) respectively (p = 0.35). The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria after exposure to anti-pseudomonal beta-lactam antibiotics was not lower following de-escalation.

  7. Antibiotic use and microbiome function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Manuel; Méndez-García, Celia; Rojo, David; Barbas, Coral; Moya, Andrés

    2017-06-15

    Our microbiome should be understood as one of the most complex components of the human body. The use of β-lactam antibiotics is one of the microbiome covariates that influence its composition. The extent to which our microbiota changes after an antibiotic intervention depends not only on the chemical nature of the antibiotic or cocktail of antibiotics used to treat specific infections, but also on the type of administration, duration and dose, as well as the level of resistance that each microbiota develops. We have begun to appreciate that not all bacteria within our microbiota are vulnerable or reactive to different antibiotic interventions, and that their influence on both microbial composition and metabolism may differ. Antibiotics are being used worldwide on a huge scale and the prescription of antibiotics is continuing to rise; however, their effects on our microbiota have been reported for only a limited number of them. This article presents a critical review of the antibiotics or antibiotic cocktails whose use in humans has been linked to changes in the composition of our microbial communities, with a particular focus on the gut, oral, respiratory, skin and vaginal microbiota, and on their molecular agents (genes, proteins and metabolites). We review the state of the art as of June 2016, and cover a total of circa 68 different antibiotics. The data herein are the first to compile information about the bacteria, fungi, archaea and viruses most influenced by the main antibiotic treatments prescribed nowadays. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Comprehensive Antibiotic Resistance Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Andrew G.; Waglechner, Nicholas; Nizam, Fazmin; Yan, Austin; Azad, Marisa A.; Baylay, Alison J.; Bhullar, Kirandeep; Canova, Marc J.; De Pascale, Gianfranco; Ejim, Linda; Kalan, Lindsay; King, Andrew M.; Koteva, Kalinka; Morar, Mariya; Mulvey, Michael R.; O'Brien, Jonathan S.; Pawlowski, Andrew C.; Piddock, Laura J. V.; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Sutherland, Arlene D.; Tang, Irene; Taylor, Patricia L.; Thaker, Maulik; Wang, Wenliang; Yan, Marie; Yu, Tennison

    2013-01-01

    The field of antibiotic drug discovery and the monitoring of new antibiotic resistance elements have yet to fully exploit the power of the genome revolution. Despite the fact that the first genomes sequenced of free living organisms were those of bacteria, there have been few specialized bioinformatic tools developed to mine the growing amount of genomic data associated with pathogens. In particular, there are few tools to study the genetics and genomics of antibiotic resistance and how it impacts bacterial populations, ecology, and the clinic. We have initiated development of such tools in the form of the Comprehensive Antibiotic Research Database (CARD; http://arpcard.mcmaster.ca). The CARD integrates disparate molecular and sequence data, provides a unique organizing principle in the form of the Antibiotic Resistance Ontology (ARO), and can quickly identify putative antibiotic resistance genes in new unannotated genome sequences. This unique platform provides an informatic tool that bridges antibiotic resistance concerns in health care, agriculture, and the environment. PMID:23650175

  9. Prescribing antibiotics in general practice:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    Objectives The majority of antibiotics are prescribed from general practice. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. In spite of guidelines aiming to minimize the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics we see an increase...... in the use of these agents. The overall aim of the project is to explore factors influencing the decision process and the prescribing behaviour of the GPs when prescribing antibiotics. We will study the impact of microbiological testing on the choice of antibiotic. Furthermore the project will explore how......) and the Danish Microbiology Database (performed microbiological testing). We will assess and quantify the use of microbiological testing prior to antibiotic prescription. Furthermore we will investigate associations between GP characteristics, use of microbiological investigations and description patterns...

  10. Antibiotic prescribing practice for acute, uncomplicated respiratory tract infections in primary care settings in New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwani, Anita; Holloway, Kathleen

    2014-07-01

    To obtain information on prescribing rates and choice of antibiotics for acute, uncomplicated respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in the community. Antibiotic use in acute, uncomplicated RTIs consisting of common cold/sore throat/cough for not more than five days was surveyed in the community (December 2007-November 2008) using patient exit interviews at public and private facilities from four localities in New Delhi. Data were collected from 10 public sector facilities and 20 private clinics over one year. The percentage of acute, uncomplicated RTIs patients receiving antibiotics in general and using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification and the Defined Daily Dose (ATS/DDD) were analysed. At public and private facilities, 45% (746/1646) and 57% (259/457) of acute, uncomplicated RTI patients were prescribed at least one antibiotic, respectively. The main antibiotic class calculated as percentage of total antibiotics DDDs/1000 prescribed to acute, uncomplicated RTI patients at private clinics was cephalosporins, J01DA (39%), followed by fluoroquinolones, J01MA (24%), penicillins, J01C (19%) and macrolides, J01FA (15%). Newer members from each class were prescribed; older antibiotics such as co-trimoxazole or tetracyclines were rarely prescribed. At public facilities, the main class of antibiotic prescribed was penicillins (31%), followed by macrolides (25%), fluoroquinolones (20%) and cephalosporins (10%). Study clearly shows overuse and inappropriate choice of antibiotics for the treatment of acute, uncomplicated RTIs which are mainly due to virus and do not require antibiotic treatment. Results of the study warrant interventional strategies to promote rational use of antibiotics to decrease the overgrowing threat of antibiotic resistance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS ON ESTOMATOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Alfaro, Miguel; Responsable de la cátedra de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Burga Sánchez, Jonny; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Chumpitaz Cerrate, Víctor; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Varas Hilario, Roberto; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Guerra Sanguinetti, Jaime; Cirujano Dentista de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; López Bellido, Roger; Bachiller de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Zegarra Cuya, Juan; Interno de la Facultad de OdontoIogia UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical antibiotic prophylaxis consists in the use of an antimicrobial drug in a preventive way, that must be active against microorganisms that in high frequency causes posterior infections of our surgical wounds and maintain effective tissue concentrations along the surgery procedure and the posterior time when appears the bacteremia. To reach a successful treatment is necessary to have the knowledge of the resident bactemial flora and the pathogenous flora that infects our surgical wounds...

  12. Influence of diabetes mellitus on inappropriate and appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy and mortality in the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-Reduce Inappropriate Therapy (MADIT-RIT) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin H.; Zareba, Wojciech; Jons, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between diabetes mellitus and risk of inappropriate or appropriate therapy in patients receiving an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) and resynchronization therapy has not been investigated thoroughly. The effect of innovative ICD programming on therapy delivery...

  13. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alan P.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance involves the collection and analysis of data for the detection and monitoring of threats to public health. Surveillance should also inform as to the epidemiology of the threat and its burden in the population. A further key component of surveillance is the timely feedback of data to stakeholders with a view to generating action aimed at reducing or preventing the public health threat being monitored. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance involves the collection of antibiotic susceptibility test results undertaken by microbiology laboratories on bacteria isolated from clinical samples sent for investigation. Correlation of these data with demographic and clinical data for the patient populations from whom the pathogens were isolated gives insight into the underlying epidemiology and facilitates the formulation of rational interventions aimed at reducing the burden of resistance. This article describes a range of surveillance activities that have been undertaken in the UK over a number of years, together with current interventions being implemented. These activities are not only of national importance but form part of the international response to the global threat posed by antibiotic resistance. PMID:25918439

  14. Self-medication with antibiotics by the community of Abu Dhabi Emirate, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abasaeed, Abobakr; Vlcek, Jiri; Abuelkhair, Mohammed; Kubena, Ales

    2009-08-30

    Self-medication with antibiotics may increase the risk of inappropriate use and the selection of resistant bacteria. The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics in Abu Dhabi. A validated, self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, and the chi-square test when applicable. One thousand subjects were invited to participate in the study. Eight hundred sixty questionnaires were completed, with a respondent rate of 86%, consisting of 66% males and 34% females. Among the 860 participants, 485 (56%) reported the use of antibiotics within the last year. Amoxicillin was the antibiotic most commonly used (46.3%). The survey showed a significant association between antibiotics used and age group (p self-medication without a medical consultation, a behavior that is significantly affected by educational levels (ppharmacies without prescriptions (pself-medication is a relatively frequent problem in Abu Dhabi. Interventions are required in order to reduce the frequency of antibiotic misuse.

  15. Antibiotics Dispensed to Privately Insured Pregnant Women with Urinary Tract Infections - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailes, Elizabeth C; Summers, April D; Tran, Emmy L; Gilboa, Suzanne M; Arnold, Kathryn E; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2018-01-12

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) occur in about 8% of pregnant women, and untreated UTIs can have serious consequences, including pyelonephritis, preterm labor, low birth weight, and sepsis (1). Pregnant women are typically screened for UTIs during early pregnancy, and those with bacteriuria are treated with antibiotics (1,2). Antibiotic stewardship is critical to improving patient safety and to combating antibiotic resistance. Because of the potential risk for birth defects, including anencephaly, heart defects, and orofacial clefts, associated with use of sulfonamides and nitrofurantoin during pregnancy (3), a 2011 committee opinion from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommended that sulfonamides and nitrofurantoin may be prescribed in the first trimester of pregnancy only when other antimicrobial therapies are deemed clinically inappropriate (4). To assess the effects of these recommendations, CDC analyzed the Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Database* to examine antibiotic prescriptions filled by pregnant women with UTIs. Among 482,917 pregnancies in 2014, 7.2% of women had an outpatient UTI diagnosis during the 90 days before the date of last menstrual period (LMP) or during pregnancy. Among pregnant women with UTIs, the most frequently prescribed antibiotics during the first trimester were nitrofurantoin, ciprofloxacin, cephalexin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Given the potential risks associated with use of some of these antibiotics in early pregnancy and the potential for unrecognized pregnancy, women's health care providers should be familiar with the ACOG recommendations and consider the possibility of early pregnancy when treating women of reproductive age.

  16. Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of French medical students about antibiotic prescribing and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyar, O J; Howard, P; Nathwani, D; Pulcini, C

    2013-10-01

    We had for aim to learn about medical students' knowledge and perspectives on antibiotic prescribing and bacterial resistance. Penultimate and final year students at a French medical school were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey in summer 2012. The response rate was 20% (60/297). Penultimate and final year students gave similar answers. Students felt more confident in diagnosing an infection, and less confident in choosing the correct dose and interval of antibiotic administration. Seventy-nine percent of students wanted more training on antibiotic treatments. Sixty-nine percent of students knew that antibiotic prescriptions were inappropriate or unnecessary in 21-60% of the cases, and 95% believed that these prescriptions were unethical. Only 27% knew that more than 80% of antibiotic prescriptions were made in community practice. Students believed that the most important causes of resistance were that too many prescriptions were made and broad-spectrum antibiotic use; 27% believed poor hand hygiene was "not at all important". Ninety-four percent believed resistance was a national problem, and 69% mentioned it as a problem in their hospital. Sixty-three percent thought that the antibiotics they would prescribe would contribute to resistance, and 96% thought resistance would be a greater problem in the future. Twenty-two percent knew MRSA bacteremia rates had decreased over the past decade in France. Medical students are aware that antibiotic resistance is a current and growing problem. They would like more training on antibiotic selection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. From Visiting a Physician to Expecting Antibiotics: Korean Perspectives and Practices toward Respiratory Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidoony, Leila; Kim, Chun Bae; Haghani, Hamid; Park, Myung Bae; Chang, Sei Jin; Kim, Sang Ha; Koh, Sang Baek

    2017-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance is steadily rising worldwide. Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are common indications, mostly imprudent, for antibiotic prescriptions in outpatient setting. In Korea, antibiotic prescription rate for RTIs is still high. As physician visit and antibiotic prescribing are influenced by patient's perceptions and beliefs, we aimed to explore the general public's perspectives and practices toward RTIs and to develop the 'RTI clinical iceberg.' A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Wonju Severance Christian Hospital (WSCH) among 550 adults attending outpatient departments during January 2016. Differences in distributions between groups were examined using two-tailed Pearson χ² test. Using the Andersen's behavioral model as a conceptual framework, we constructed logistic regression models to assess factors associated with physician visit. Of 547 participants with complete questionnaires, 62.9% reported having experienced an RTI in the previous six months; 59.3% visited a physician for the illness, most commonly because the symptoms were severe or prolonged, and approximately 16% of them expected an antibiotic prescription from the visit. Perceptions of symptoms severity, the need factor, most strongly influenced physician visit. Predisposing and enabling factors such as inappropriate expectations for antibiotic for a sore throat or having national health insurance also influenced physician visit. Almost all participants who reported asking for an antibiotic were prescribed one, with a 37.1% non-adherence rate. Conclusively, public education on self-care for RTI symptoms that addresses their main concerns may reduce physician visits. Improving physician-patient relationship and informing patients about the lack of antibiotic benefit for most RTIs may also reduce antibiotic prescriptions.

  18. Complementary or alternative? The use of homeopathic products and antibiotics amongst pre-school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishop Jackie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Any intervention to reduce the inappropriate use of antibiotics for infections in children has the potential to reduce the selective pressure on antimicrobial resistance and minimise the medicalisation of self-limiting illness. Little is known about whether homeopathic products might be used by some families as an alternative to antibiotics or the characteristics of such families. We used the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC observational dataset to explore the hypothesis that the use of homeopathic products is associated with reduced antibiotic use in pre-school children and to identify characteristics of the families of pre-school children given homeopathic products. Methods Questionnaires data were completed by the parents of 9723 children while aged between 3–4.5 years in Bristol UK. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to explore the relationships between antibiotic and homeopathic product use. Results Six percent of children had received one or more homeopathic products and 62% one or more antibiotics between the ages of 3 and 4.5 years. After adjustment for factors associated with antibiotic use, there was no association between homeopathic product and antibiotic use (adjusted OR = 1.02, 95% CI 0.84, 1.24. Factors independently associated with child homeopathic product use were: higher maternal education, maternal use of homeopathic products, maternal lack of confidence in doctors, mothers reporting that they were less likely to see doctor when the child was ill, children being given vitamins, watching less television and suffering from wheeze and food allergies. Conclusion In this observational study, the use of homeopathic products was not associated with decreased antibiotic consumption, suggesting the use of homeopathic product complements rather than competes with the use of antibiotics in pre-school children. The characteristics of mothers giving homeopathic products to their

  19. Effect of Prophylactic Antibiotic Use in the Development of Antibiotic Resistance in Children with Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karacı

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Although prophylactic antibiotic treatment is still debatable, it is currently in use in recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs. In the present study, we aimed to observe if prophylactic antibiotic use had any effect on the development of antibiotic resistance in patients with recurrent UTIs who we followed up in our clinic. Methods: The present study was performed on patients aged between one month and 16 years, who had recurrent UTIs, and were followed up by the Department of Pediatrics at Bülent Ecevit University Medical School. Patient files were retrospectively reviewed, and 50 patients who received antibiotic prophylaxis and 100 patients without prophylaxis were enrolled in the study. Urinary tests, subsequent urinary culture results, and antibiotic resistances were compared between the groups. Results: The mean age was 42.7±44.2 months. The most frequently cultured isolated bacterium was Escherichia coli (E. coli (58.4%. No difference was determined in bacteria in cultures between prophylaxis receivers and non-receivers. Isolation rate of E. coli was higher in urinary cultures in females than in males (p<0.001. When antibiotic resistance of all urinary culture-isolated bacteria was compared between the two groups, there was no statistically significant difference. However, an increased resistance against amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftriaxone, and piperacillin was determined in prophylaxis group in whom E. coli was grown. In this study, general antibiotic resistance was most frequently observed against ampicillin (71.9%. Conclusion: In the present study, we observed that prophylaxis did not contribute so much to resistance other than E. coli. We recommend not preferring antibiotics which have increased resistance in our institution especially in children receiving prophylaxis for empirical treatment.

  20. Inappropriate pharmacological treatment in older adults affected by cardiovascular disease and other chronic comorbidities: a systematic literature review to identify potentially inappropriate prescription indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucenteforte E

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ersilia Lucenteforte,1 Niccolò Lombardi,1,* Davide Liborio Vetrano,2,* Domenico La Carpia,2,* Zuzana Mitrova,3 Ursula Kirchmayer,3 Giovanni Corrao,4 Francesco Lapi,5 Alessandro Mugelli,1 Alfredo Vannacci1 On behalf of the Italian Group for Appropriate Drug prescription in the Elderly (I-GrADE 1Department of Neurosciences, Psychology, Drug Research and Child Health (NEUROFARBA, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Geriatrics Catholic University, Rome, Italy; 3Department of Epidemiology, ASL 1 Rome, Italy; 4Department of Statistics and Quantitative Methods, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy; 5Epidemiology Unit, ARS Toscana, Florence, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Avoiding medications in which the risks outweigh the benefits in the elderly patient is a challenge for physicians, and different criteria to identify inappropriate prescription (IP exist to aid prescribers. Definition of IP indicators in the Italian geriatric population affected by cardiovascular disease and chronic comorbidities could be extremely useful for prescribers and could offer advantages from a public health perspective. The purpose of the present study was to identify IP indicators by means of a systematic literature review coupled with consensus criteria. A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases was conducted, with the search structured around four themes and combining each with the Boolean operator “and”. The first regarded “prescriptions”, the second “adverse events”, the third “cardiovascular conditions”, and the last was planned to identify studies on “older people”. Two investigators independently reviewed titles, abstracts, full texts, and selected articles addressing IP in the elderly affected by cardiovascular condition using the following inclusion criteria: studies on people aged ≥65 years; studies on patients with no restriction on age but with data on subjects

  1. Gazprom: the new empire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillemoles, A.; Lazareva, A.

    2008-01-01

    Gazprom is conquering the world. The Russian industrial giant owns the hugest gas reserves and enjoys the privilege of a considerable power. Gazprom edits journals, owns hospitals, airplanes and has even built cities where most of the habitants work for him. With 400000 workers, Gazprom represents 8% of Russia's GDP. This inquiry describes the history and operation of this empire and show how its has become a masterpiece of the government's strategy of russian influence reconquest at the world scale. Is it going to be a winning game? Are the corruption affairs and the expected depletion of resources going to weaken the empire? The authors shade light on the political and diplomatic strategies that are played around the crucial dossier of the energy supply. (J.S.)

  2. Empires, Modernisation and Modernities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Ballantyne

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In examining four recent books, this essay explores some key facets of contemporary scholarship on empire and the making of the modern world. Drawing on Dipesh Chakrabarty’s arguments about the often contingent relationship between modernisation as a set of material and institutional transformations and modernity as a cultural sensibility, it argues that the unfolding of the modern was messy, uneven, and remained in process until the age of decolonisation. The essay suggests that the range of modern formations that emerged out of empire-building were profoundly imprinted by local socio-political patterns and the weight of precolonial cultural traditions, meaning that modernisation never played out as an entirely homogenising force.

  3. Essays in empirical microeconomics

    OpenAIRE

    Péter, A.N.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three papers using empirical methods to study issues in public and social economics. My first paper, co-authored with Julian Betts, analyzes the performance of San Diego's charter schools using fixed-effect methods on panel student data. We find that charter school performance in San Diego varies by subject matter, grades served, school type and years of operation. In many cases, we find that charter school performance is indistinguishable from that of tradit...

  4. Trade and Empire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Peter Fibiger

    2007-01-01

    This articles seeks to establish a new set of organizing concepts for the analysis of the Roman imperial economy from Republic to late antiquity: tributary empire, port-folio capitalism and protection costs. Together these concepts explain better economic developments in the Roman world than the ...... much used notion of an imperial market economy.  Roman imperial government was to weak to provide the institutional supports needed by a well functioning laissez-faire economy....

  5. Stemming the Tide of Antibiotic Resistance (STAR: A protocol for a trial of a complex intervention addressing the 'why' and 'how' of appropriate antibiotic prescribing in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hare Monika

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After some years of a downward trend, antibiotic prescribing rates in the community have tended to level out in many countries. There is also wide variation in antibiotic prescribing between general practices, and between countries. There are still considerable further gains that could be made in reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, but complex interventions are required. Studies to date have generally evaluated the effect of interventions on antibiotic prescribing in a single consultation and pragmatic evaluations that assess maintenance of new skills are rare. This paper describes the protocol for a pragmatic, randomized evaluation of a complex intervention aimed at reducing antibiotic prescribing by primary care clinicians. Methods and design We developed a Social Learning Theory based, blended learning program (on-line learning, a practice based seminar, and context bound learning called the STAR Educational Program. The 'why of change' is addressed by providing clinicians in general practice with information on antibiotic resistance in urine samples submitted by their practice and their antibiotic prescribing data, and facilitating a practice-based seminar on the implications of this data. The 'how of change' is addressed through context-bound communication skills training and information on antibiotic indication and choice. This intervention will be evaluated in a trial involving 60 general practices, with general practice as the unit of randomization (clinicians from each practice to either receive the STAR Educational Program or not and analysis. The primary outcome will be the number of antibiotic items dispensed over one year. An economic and process evaluation will also be conducted. Discussion This trial will be the first to evaluate the effectiveness of this type of theory-based, blended learning intervention aimed at reducing antibiotic prescribing by primary care clinicians. Novel aspects include

  6. Advancing empirical resilience research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Raffael; Müller, Marianne B; Tüscher, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We are delighted by the broad, intense, and fruitful discussion in reaction to our target article. A major point we take from the many comments is a prevailing feeling in the research community that we need significantly and urgently to advance resilience research, both by sharpening concepts and theories and by conducting empirical studies at a much larger scale and with a much more extended and sophisticated methodological arsenal than is the case currently. This advancement can be achieved only in a concerted international collaborative effort. In our response, we try to argue that an explicitly atheoretical, purely observational definition of resilience and a transdiagnostic, quantitative study framework can provide a suitable basis for empirically testing different competing resilience theories (sects. R1, R2, R6, R7). We are confident that it should be possible to unite resilience researchers from different schools, including from sociology and social psychology, behind such a pragmatic and theoretically neutral research strategy. In sections R3 to R5, we further specify and explain the positive appraisal style theory of resilience (PASTOR). We defend PASTOR as a comparatively parsimonious and translational theory that makes sufficiently concrete predictions to be evaluated empirically.

  7. Charlson Comorbidity Index, inappropriate medication use and cognitive impairment : Bermuda Triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silay, Kamile; Yalcin, Ahmet; Akinci, Sema; Gursoy, Fatma Gul; Sener Dede, Didem

    2017-11-01

    The aim is to evaluate the association between the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), polypharmacy, inappropriate medication use and cognitive impairment in long-term care facility patients. A cross-sectional study including 105 long-term care facility residents was performed. The Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) was used. Inappropriate drug use (IDU) was defined according to the STOPP (Screening Tool of Older People's Prescriptions) criteria. Univariate analysis to identify variables associated with patient outcome related with cognitive impairment was investigated with χ 2 , Pearson correlation, Fisher exact, and Mann-Whitney U test where appropriate. For the multivariate analysis, the possible factors identified with univariate analysis were further entered into logistic regression analysis. A significant difference was found between gender, CCI and cognitive impairment (p = 0.038, p = 0.01). While every one point increment in the CCI increases the risk of cognitive impairment 3.1 fold (95% CI = 1.8-5.4, p < 0.001), hypertension increases the risk 12 fold (95% CI = 2.5-67.8, p = 0.002). While the correlation between Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) score and polypharmacy is significant (p = 0.015), the correlation between MMSE and IDU was insignificant (p = 0.739). The association of urogenital system drugs and dementia was significant (p = 0.044). Comorbidities, especially hypertension and old age, are risk factors for cognitive impairment. Polypharmacy correlates with MMSE and is considered a risk factor for cognitive impairment. Inappropriate medication use is high among long-term care facility residents. More studies on large cohorts are needed regarding optimal drug prescription and detection of specific drugs that may have an impact on cognitive performance.

  8. Failed Attempts to Reduce Inappropriate Laboratory Utilization in an Emergency Department Setting in Cyprus: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Panagiotis

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory test ordering is a significant part of the diagnosis definition and disease treatment monitoring process. Inappropriate laboratory test ordering wastes scarce resources, places unnecessary burden on the health care delivery system, and exposes patients to unnecessary discomfort. Inappropriate ordering is caused by many factors, such as lack of guidelines, defensive medicine, thoughtless ordering, and lack of awareness of costs incurred to the system. The purpose of this study is to assess two successive measures, which were introduced in a Cyprus emergency department (ED) for the purpose of synergistically reducing inappropriate laboratory ordering: the introduction of a copayment fee to reduce nonemergent visits, and the development of a Web-based protocol defining the tests emergency physicians could order. An autoregressive integrated moving average model for interrupted time series analysis was constructed. Data include number and type of tests ordered, along with number of visits for a period of 4 years from an ED in Cyprus. Copayment fee and introduction of a revised Web-based protocol for a test ordering form did not reduce the number of ordered tests in the ED unit. Copayment fee alone resulted in a statistically significant reduction in ED visits. The implementation of two consecutive measures resulted in an increase of ordered tests per patient. Laboratory ordering is a multidimensional process that is primarily supplier induced, therefore, all underlying possible causes must be scrutinized by health authorities. These include lack of guidelines, defensive medicine and thoughtless prescribing. To attain significant gains, an integrated approach must be implemented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reducing inappropriate accident and emergency department attendances: a systematic review of primary care service interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Sharif A; Gibbons, Daniel C; Gnani, Shamini

    2013-12-01

    Inappropriate attendances may account for up to 40% of presentations at accident and emergency (A&E) departments. There is considerable interest from health practitioners and policymakers in interventions to reduce this burden. To review the evidence on primary care service interventions to reduce inappropriate A&E attendances. Systematic review of UK and international primary care interventions. Studies published in English between 1 January 1986 and 23 August 2011 were identified from PubMed, the NHS Economic Evaluation Database, the Cochrane Collaboration, and Health Technology Assessment databases. The outcome measures were A&E attendances, patient satisfaction, clinical outcome, and intervention cost. Two authors reviewed titles and abstracts of retrieved results, with adjudication of disagreements conducted by the third. Studies were quality assessed using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network checklist system where applicable. In total, 9916 manuscripts were identified, of which 34 were reviewed. Telephone triage was the single best-evaluated intervention. This resulted in negligible impact on A&E attendance, but exhibited acceptable patient satisfaction and clinical safety; cost effectiveness was uncertain. The limited available evidence suggests that emergency nurse practitioners in community settings and community health centres may reduce A&E attendance. For all other interventions considered in this review (walk-in centres, minor injuries units, and out-of-hours general practice), the effects on A&E attendance, patient outcomes, and cost were inconclusive. Studies showed a negligible effect on A&E attendance for all interventions; data on patient outcomes and cost-effectiveness are limited. There is an urgent need to examine all aspects of primary care service interventions that aim to reduce inappropriate A&E attendance.

  10. A qualitative examination of inappropriate hospital admissions and lengths of stay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammond Christina L

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research has shown that a number of patients, with a variety of diagnoses, are admitted to hospital when it is not essential and can remain in hospital unnecessarily. To date, research in this area has been primarily quantitative. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceived causes of inappropriate or prolonged lengths of stay and focuses on a specific population (i.e., patients with long term neurological conditions. We also wanted to identify interventions which might avoid admission or expedite discharge as periods of hospitalisation pose particular risks for this group. Methods Two focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of eight primary and secondary care clinicians working in the Derbyshire area. Data were analysed using a thematic content approach. Results The participants identified a number of key causes of inappropriate admissions and lengths of stay, including: the limited capacity of health and social care resources; poor communication between primary and secondary care clinicians and the cautiousness of clinicians who manage patients in community settings. The participants also suggested a number of strategies that may prevent inappropriate admissions or reduce length of stay (LoS, including: the introduction of new sub-acute care facilities; the introduction of auxiliary nurses to support specialist nursing staff and patient held summaries of specialist consultations. Conclusion Clinicians in both the secondary and primary care sectors acknowledged that some admissions were unnecessary and some patients remain in hospital for a prolonged period. These events were attributed to problems with the current capacity or structuring of services. It was noted, for example, that there is a shortage of appropriate therapeutic services and that the distribution of beds between community and sub-acute care should be reviewed.

  11. Effect of the Tool to Reduce Inappropriate Medications on Medication Communication and Deprescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Terri R; Niehoff, Kristina M; Street, Richard L; Charpentier, Peter A; Rajeevan, Nallakkandi; Miller, Perry L; Goldstein, Mary K; O'Leary, John R; Fenton, Brenda T

    2017-10-01

    To examine the effect of the Tool to Reduce Inappropriate Medications (TRIM), a web tool linking an electronic health record (EHR) to a clinical decision support system, on medication communication and prescribing. Randomized clinical trial. Primary care clinics at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Veterans aged 65 and older prescribed seven or more medications randomized to receipt of TRIM or usual care (N = 128). TRIM extracts information on medications and chronic conditions from the EHR and contains data entry screens for information obtained from brief chart review and telephonic patient assessment. These data serve as input for automated algorithms identifying medication reconciliation discrepancies, potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs), and potentially inappropriate regimens. Clinician feedback reports summarize discrepancies and provide recommendations for deprescribing. Patient feedback reports summarize discrepancies and self-reported medication problems. Primary: subscales of the Patient Assessment of Care for Chronic Conditions (PACIC) related to shared decision-making; clinician and patient communication. Secondary: changes in medications. 29.7% of TRIM participants and 15.6% of control participants provided the highest PACIC ratings; this difference was not significant. Adjusting for covariates and clustering of patients within clinicians, TRIM was associated with significantly more-active patient communication and facilitative clinician communication and with more medication-related communication among patients and clinicians. TRIM was significantly associated with correction of medication discrepancies but had no effect on number of medications or reduction in PIMs. TRIM improved communication about medications and accuracy of documentation. Although there was no association with prescribing, the small sample size provided limited power to examine medication-related outcomes. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The

  12. Effect of nurse practitioner and pharmacist counseling on inappropriate medication use in family practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, John; Hogg, William; Farrell, Barbara; Woodend, Kirsten; Dahrouge, Simone; Lemelin, Jacques; Dalziel, William

    2012-08-01

    To measure the effect of nurse practitioner and pharmacist consultations on the appropriate use of medications by patients. We studied patients in the intervention arm of a randomized controlled trial. The main trial intervention was provision of multidisciplinary team care and the main outcome was quality and processes of care for chronic disease management. Patients were recruited from a single publicly funded family health network practice of 8 family physicians and associated staff serving 10 000 patients in a rural area near Ottawa, Ont. A total of 120 patients 50 years of age or older who were on the practice roster and who were considered by their family physicians to be at risk of experiencing adverse health outcomes. A pharmacist and 1 of 3 nurse practitioners visited each patient at his or her home, conducted a comprehensive medication review, and developed a tailored plan to optimize medication use. The plan was developed in consultation with the patient and the patient's doctor. We assessed medication appropriateness at the study baseline and again 12 to 18 months later. We used the medication appropriateness index to assess medication use. We examined associations between personal characteristics and inappropriate use at baseline and with improvements in medication use at the follow-up assessment. We recorded all drug problems encountered during the trial. At baseline, 27.2% of medications were inappropriate in some way and 77.7% of patients were receiving at least 1 medication that was inappropriate in some way. At the follow-up assessments these percentages had dropped to 8.9% and 38.6%, respectively (P trial. This might provide a mechanism to explain some of the reductions in mortality and morbidity observed in other trials of counseling and advice provided by pharmacists and nurses. NCT00238836 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

  13. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies....... This omission creates a skewed view, which emphasizes short-term efficacy and ignores the long-term consequences to the patient and other people. We offer a framework for addressing antibiotic resistance in systematic reviews. We suggest that the data on background resistance in the original trials should...... be reported and taken into account when interpreting results. Data on emergence of resistance (whether in the body reservoirs or in the bacteria causing infection) are important outcomes. Emergence of resistance should be taken into account when interpreting the evidence on antibiotic treatment in randomized...

  14. Quetiapine effective in treatment of inappropriate sexual behavior of lewy body disease with predominant frontal lobe signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ravi; Pathak, Amit; Munda, Sanjay; Bagati, Dhruv

    2009-01-01

    Dementia of Lewy body disease is the second most common degenerative cause of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, among all the dementias. The core features are a progressive dementia, fluctuations in cognitive functions, visual hallucinations, and spontaneous parkinsonism. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, severe neuroleptic sensitivity, and low dopamine transporter uptake in basal ganglia are other suggestive features. Behavioral abnormalities are commonly present in the form of aggressive behavior, irritability, and uninhibited behaviors. These are mostly seen in the advanced stages of dementia. However, inappropriate sexual behavior is uncommonly seen in such cases. Three types of inappropriate sexual behaviors commonly found in cases of dementia are sex talks, sexual acts, and implied sexual acts. Such inappropriate sexual behaviors have not been described adequately in dementia of Lewy body disease. We report inappropriate sexual behaviors in a case of dementia of Lewy body disease, which improved rapidly after treatment with quetiapine.

  15. Appeal of inappropriate technologies: self-inflicted wages, ethnic pride and corruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winston, G.C.

    1979-08-01

    A survey of manufacturing firms in Nigeria produced a set of useful clues to why firms in poor countries so often choose inappropriate production technologies. Some of their explanations do and some do not fit neatly in the neoclassical modelling of production by which economists have judged technological appropriateness. Much of what the firms described affect their real costs and do so in ways that escape economists' notice; technology is appropriate to the managers' view of costs. Often they were responding to more complicated goals than simple profit maximization for the firm; defense of ethnic identity or the goal of increasing their own incomes by stealing from the firm.

  16. Urea for management of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Solà-Morales, Oriol; Riera, Maribel

    2014-11-01

    Urea has been recently proposed for the management of hyponatremia linked to the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH (SIADH). The objective of the study was to review the levels of evidence for treatment of hyponatremia associated with SIADH with urea. We performed a: systematic review of experimental trials and grading according to SIGN. No clinical trials were found. The 6 studies analysed had methodological limitations and were prone to biases. In conclusion, there is no evidence to support the efficacy of urea for the treatment of hyponatremia following SIADH. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Adrenal insufficiency secondary to inappropriate oral administration of topical exogenous steroids presenting with hypercalcaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Rahila Sarwar; Flynn, Michael D

    2012-06-21

    A 59-year-old Caucasian gentleman presented with malaise, fatigue and proximal muscle weakness. He had history of long-standing roseate psoriasis treated with topical clobetasol propionate (dermovate). On admission, he had significant postural hypotension, and hypercalcaemia. Endocrinological investigation revealed hypercalcaemia, a serum cortisol of <30 nmol/l, a flat short synacthen test and undetectable adrenocorticotropic hormone. He was treated with hydrocortisone. The abrupt withdrawal of the topical steroids by the patient precipitated the addisonian crisis. Further enquiry documented inappropriate oral administration of clobetasol for more than 10 years in addition to prescribed topical usage.

  18. Inappropriate emergency laboratory test ordering: defensive or peer evidence shared based medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Descovich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The laboratory overuse is widely prevalent in hospital practice, mostly in the emergency care. Reasons for excessive and inappropriate test-ordering include defensive behaviour and fear or uncertainty, lack of experience, the misuse of protocols and guidelines, “routine” and local attitudes, inadequate educational feedback and clinician’s unawareness about the cost of examinations and their related implications. AIM OF THE STUDY AND METHODS The primary target of our working group was to reduce inappropriate ordering on a urgent basis test, implementing further examinations not yet previewed in the hospital panel of the available urgencies, according to the evidence based diagnosis concept. The secondary goal was to indicate strategies of re-engineering of the processes, improving turnaround time in the laboratory management of emergencies. After evaluating, as first intervention, the more reliable sources for practice guidelines, systematic reviews and RCTs, the committee further discussed main topics with in-hospital stakeholders, selected from Emergency, Internal Medicine and Surgery Depts. The working group, in many subsequent audits, tried to obtain a systematic feed back with all involved professionals. RESULTS After reviewing literature’s evidence, the board constrained testing options by defining the basic emergency laboratory panel tests (blood type, hemogram, blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, glucose, sodium, potassium, chloride, osmolarity, CRP, bicarbonate, CPK, creatine phosphokinase-MB, myoglobin, troponin, BNP and NT-proBNP, PT-INR, PTT, D-dimer, beta- HCG, biochemical urinalysis etc.. As final result, the proposed tests reduced the overall number of inappropriate investigations and increased, with newer and updated tests, the available panel for critical patients. DISCUSSION A collegiate review of data reporting, in-hospital deepening of problems and the inter- professional discussion of the evidences

  19. Cost savings associated with improving appropriate and reducing inappropriate preventive care: cost-consequences analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baskerville Neill

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outreach facilitation has been proven successful in improving the adoption of clinical preventive care guidelines in primary care practice. The net costs and savings of delivering such an intensive intervention need to be understood. We wanted to estimate the proportion of a facilitation intervention cost that is offset and the potential for savings by reducing inappropriate screening tests and increasing appropriate screening tests in 22 intervention primary care practices affecting a population of 90,283 patients. Methods A cost-consequences analysis of one successful outreach facilitation intervention was done, taking into account the estimated cost savings to the health system of reducing five inappropriate tests and increasing seven appropriate tests. Multiple data sources were used to calculate costs and cost savings to the government. The cost of the intervention and costs of performing appropriate testing were calculated. Costs averted were calculated by multiplying the number of tests not performed as a result of the intervention. Further downstream cost savings were determined by calculating the direct costs associated with the number of false positive test follow-ups avoided. Treatment costs averted as a result of increasing appropriate testing were similarly calculated. Results The total cost of the intervention over 12 months was $238,388 and the cost of increasing the delivery of appropriate care was $192,912 for a total cost of $431,300. The savings from reduction in inappropriate testing were $148,568 and from avoiding treatment costs as a result of appropriate testing were $455,464 for a total savings of $604,032. On a yearly basis the net cost saving to the government is $191,733 per year (2003 $Can equating to $3,687 per physician or $63,911 per facilitator, an estimated return on intervention investment and delivery of appropriate preventive care of 40%. Conclusion Outreach facilitation is more expensive

  20. Dual AV Nodal Nonreentrant Tachycardia Resulting in Inappropriate ICD Therapy in a Patient with Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur A. Karnik, MD

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dual atrioventricular nodal nonreentrant tachycardia (DAVNNT occurs due to concurrent antegrade conduction over fast and slow atrioventricular nodal pathways and is treated by slow pathway modification. We describe a unique case of a patient with cardiac sarcoidosis who received inappropriate ICD shocks for DAVNNT. Atrial and ventricular device electrograms satisfied both rate and V>A criteria for ventricular tachycardia. We postulate that alterations in refractoriness and conduction as is seen in cardiac sarcoidosis (CS may have contributed to occurrence of DAVNNT.

  1. Suppression of antibiotic resistance acquisition by combined use of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shingo; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Furusawa, Chikara

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the effect of combinatorial use of antibiotics with a trade-off relationship of resistance, i.e., resistance acquisition to one drug causes susceptibility to the other drug, and vice versa, on the evolution of antibiotic resistance. We demonstrated that this combinatorial use of antibiotics significantly suppressed the acquisition of resistance. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Rationalizing antibiotic use to limit antibiotic resistance in India+

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance, a global concern, is particularly pressing in developing nations, including India, where the burden of infectious disease is high and healthcare spending is low. The Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership (GARP) was established to develop actionable policy recommendations specifically relevant to low- and middle-income countries where suboptimal access to antibiotics - not a major concern in high-income countries - is possibly as severe a problem as is the spread of resistant organisms. This report summarizes the situation as it is known regarding antibiotic use and growing resistance in India and recommends short and long term actions. Recommendations aim at (i) reducing the need for antibiotics; (ii) lowering resistance-enhancing drug pressure through improved antibiotic targeting, and (iii) eliminating antibiotic use for growth promotion in agriculture. The highest priority needs to be given to (i) national surveillance of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic use - better information to underpin decisions on standard treatment guidelines, education and other actions, as well as to monitor changes over time; (ii) increasing the use of diagnostic tests, which necessitates behavioural changes and improvements in microbiology laboratory capacity; (iii) setting up and/or strengthening infection control committees in hospitals; and (iv) restricting the use of antibiotics for non-therapeutic uses in agriculture. These interventions should help to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance, improve public health directly, benefit the populace and reduce pressure on the healthcare system. Finally, increasing the types and coverage of childhood vaccines offered by the government would reduce the disease burden enormously and spare antibiotics. PMID:21985810

  3. Metrics of quality care in veterans: correlation between primary-care performance measures and inappropriate myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, David E; Kitchen, Andrew; Brandt, John C; Dusaj, Raman S; Virani, Salim S; Bradley, Steven M; Shaw, Leslee J; Beyth, Rebecca J

    2015-04-01

    Approximately 10% to 20% of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) tests are inappropriate based on professional-society recommendations. The correlation between inappropriate MPI and quality care metrics is not known. Inappropriate MPI will be associated with low achievement of quality care metrics. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional investigation at a single Veterans Affairs medical center. Myocardial perfusion imaging tests ordered by primary-care clinicians between December 2010 and July 2011 were assessed for appropriateness (by 2009 criteria). Using documentation of the clinical encounter where MPI was ordered, we determined how often quality care metrics were achieved. Among 516 MPI patients, 52 (10.1%) were inappropriate and 464 (89.9%) were not inappropriate (either appropriate or uncertain). Hypertension (82.2%), diabetes mellitus (41.3%), and coronary artery disease (41.1%) were common. Glycated hemoglobin levels were lower in the inappropriate MPI cohort (6.6% vs 7.5%; P = 0.04). No difference was observed in the proportion with goal hemoglobin (62.5% vs 46.3% for appropriate/uncertain; P = 0.258). Systolic blood pressure was not different (132 mm Hg vs 135 mm Hg; P = 0.34). Achievement of several other categorical quality metrics was low in both cohorts and no differences were observed. More than 90% of clinicians documented a plan to achieve most metrics. Inappropriate MPI is not associated with performance on metrics of quality care. If an association exists, it may be between inappropriate MPI and overly aggressive care. Most clinicians document a plan of care to address failure of quality metrics, suggesting awareness of the problem. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes from antibiotic producers to pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinglin; Ellabaan, Mostafa M Hashim; Charusanti, Pep

    2017-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that some antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) found in pathogenic bacteria derive from antibiotic-producing actinobacteria. Here we provide bioinformatic and experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis. We identify genes in proteobacteria, including some pathogens......, that appear to be closely related to actinobacterial ARGs known to confer resistance against clinically important antibiotics. Furthermore, we identify two potential examples of recent horizontal transfer of actinobacterial ARGs to proteobacterial pathogens. Based on this bioinformatic evidence, we propose...... results support the existence of ancient and, possibly, recent transfers of ARGs from antibiotic-producing actinobacteria to proteobacteria, and provide evidence for a defined mechanism....

  5. Antibiotics in late clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Martens, Evan

    2017-06-01

    Most pharmaceutical companies have stopped or have severely limited investments to discover and develop new antibiotics to treat the increasing prevalence of infections caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, because the return on investment has been mostly negative for antibiotics that received marketing approved in the last few decades. In contrast, a few small companies have taken on this challenge and are developing new antibiotics. This review describes those antibiotics in late-stage clinical development. Most of them belong to existing antibiotic classes and a few with a narrow spectrum of activity are novel compounds directed against novel targets. The reasons for some of the past failures to find new molecules and a path forward to help attract investments to fund discovery of new antibiotics are described. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prospective study of the efficacy of antibiotics versus antitussive drugs for the management of URTI-related acute cough in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanasi, Alessandro; Lanata, Luigi; Saibene, Federico; Fontana, Giovanni; Dicpinigaitis, Peter V; Venier, Valentina; De Blasio, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Acute cough is one of the most frequent symptoms prompting a visit to a health care provider, usually following a viral upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). The disproportionate use of antibiotics in children with URTIs, recently highlighted in the medical literature, could lead to associated side effects, without any beneficial effect. Although an early, albeit inappropriate, antibiotic prescription increases parental satisfaction, URTIs are predominantly viral infections and are generally self-limiting. Therefore the aim of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of antibiotics compared to symptomatic drugs (central and peripheral antitussives) on URTI-related cough in a pediatric population. This is a prospective observational study of 330 children who required pediatric consultation for acute cough. Severity, frequency and type of cough were assessed at baseline and after 6 days of treatment (antitussives n = 123, antibiotics n = 89 or combination of them n = 38) or no treatment (n = 80). The outcome of cough management after 6 days was analyzed in terms of resolution, improvement, no change or worsening of symptoms. Study assessments were performed using a standardized questionnaire administered to parents. Between children treated with antitussives or antibiotics, there was a statistically significant difference in the resolution of cough. Moreover, if considering peripheral antitussives, the resolution of cough was significantly higher with antitussives than with antibiotics (p < 0.01). There was no difference in cough resolution between children treated with antitussives and those receiving a combination of antibiotics and antitussives, either central and peripheral antitussives. Antibiotics are generally not useful nor appropriate in treating acute cough due to the common cold. Furthermore, inappropriate antibiotic use introduces the possibility of adverse side effects as well as promotion of antibiotic resistance. The

  7. The effects of antibiotic cycling and mixing on antibiotic resistance in intensive care units: a cluster-randomised crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Pleun Joppe; Verbrugghe, Walter; Jorens, Philippe Germaine; Spöhr, Fabian; Schedler, Dirk; Deja, Maria; Rothbart, Andreas; Annane, Djillali; Lawrence, Christine; Nguyen Van, Jean-Claude; Misset, Benoit; Jereb, Matjaz; Seme, Katja; Šifrer, Franc; Tomiç, Viktorija; Estevez, Francisco; Carneiro, Jandira; Harbarth, Stephan; Eijkemans, Marinus Johannes Cornelis; Bonten, Marc

    2018-04-01

    Whether antibiotic rotation strategies reduce prevalence of antibiotic-resistant, Gram-negative bacteria in intensive care units (ICUs) has not been accurately established. We aimed to assess whether cycling of antibiotics compared with a mixing strategy (changing antibiotic to an alternative class for each consecutive patient) would reduce the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant, Gram-negative bacteria in European intensive care units (ICUs). In a cluster-randomised crossover study, we randomly assigned ICUs to use one of three antibiotic groups (third-generation or fourth-generation cephalosporins, piperacillin-tazobactam, and carbapenems) as preferred empirical treatment during 6-week periods (cycling) or to change preference after every consecutively treated patient (mixing). Computer-based randomisation of intervention and rotated antibiotic sequence was done centrally. Cycling or mixing was applied for 9 months; then, following a washout period, the alternative strategy was implemented. We defined antibiotic-resistant, Gram-negative bacteria as Enterobacteriaceae with extended-spectrum β-lactamase production or piperacillin-tazobactam resistance, and Acinetobacter spp and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with piperacillin-tazobactam or carbapenem resistance. Data were collected for all admissions during the study. The primary endpoint was average, unit-wide, monthly point prevalence of antibiotic-resistant, Gram-negative bacteria in respiratory and perineal swabs with adjustment for potential confounders. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01293071. Eight ICUs (from Belgium, France, Germany, Portugal, and Slovenia) were randomly assigned and patients enrolled from June 27, 2011, to Feb 16, 2014. 4069 patients were admitted during the cycling periods in total and 4707 were admitted during the mixing periods. Of these, 745 patients during cycling and 853 patients during mixing were present during the monthly point-prevalence surveys, and were

  8. Retrospective Assessment of Antibiotics Prescribing at Public Primary Healthcare Facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikru Worku

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Antibiotic overprescribing is the major driving force for the emergence of antibiotics resistance. The aim of this study was to assess antibiotics prescribing at primary healthcare facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. The study was conducted in six public health centers found in Addis Ababa City. Data was collected retrospectively from a total of 900 prescriptions and selected medical charts of patients in the health centers in 2016. Data was entered and analyzed using EPI Info 7 and SPSS 20, respectively. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Results. One or more antibiotics were prescribed in 56.0% of the prescriptions. Antibiotics accounted for 46.0% of the total cost of medicines prescribed. Amoxicillin was the most frequently (44.8% prescribed antibiotic and upper respiratory tract infection was the most common (24.5% diagnosis for prescribing antibiotics. Laboratory investigation was done for only about 27% of the cases for which antibiotics were prescribed. Conclusion. There was a high rate of antibiotics prescribing in the health centers often empirically which might exacerbate the antimicrobial resistance situation in the country. Large-scale study should be conducted to fully understand the prescribing pattern and identify the associated factors thereby design and implement appropriate interventions.

  9. The macrolide antibiotic renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinos, George P

    2017-09-01

    Macrolides represent a large family of protein synthesis inhibitors of great clinical interest due to their applicability to human medicine. Macrolides are composed of a macrocyclic lactone of different ring sizes, to which one or more deoxy-sugar or amino sugar residues are attached. Macrolides act as antibiotics by binding to bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit and interfering with protein synthesis. The high affinity of macrolides for bacterial ribosomes, together with the highly conserved structure of ribosomes across virtually all of the bacterial species, is consistent with their broad-spectrum activity. Since the discovery of the progenitor macrolide, erythromycin, in 1950, many derivatives have been synthesised, leading to compounds with better bioavailability and acid stability and improved pharmacokinetics. These efforts led to the second generation of macrolides, including well-known members such as azithromycin and clarithromycin. Subsequently, in order to address increasing antibiotic resistance, a third generation of macrolides displaying improved activity against many macrolide resistant strains was developed. However, these improvements were accompanied with serious side effects, leading to disappointment and causing many researchers to stop working on macrolide derivatives, assuming that this procedure had reached the end. In contrast, a recent published breakthrough int