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Sample records for inappropriate drug prescribing

  1. Inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug events in older people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, Hilary J

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate prescribing (IP) in older patients is highly prevalent and is associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs), morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Consequently, IP is a major safety concern and with changing population demographics, it is likely to become even more prevalent in the future. IP can be detected using explicit or implicit prescribing indicators. Theoretically, the routine clinical application of these IP criteria could represent an inexpensive and time efficient method to optimise prescribing practice. However, IP criteria must be sensitive, specific, have good inter-rater reliability and incorporate those medications most commonly associated with ADEs in older people. To be clinically relevant, use of prescribing appropriateness tools must translate into positive patient outcomes, such as reduced rates of ADEs. To accurately measure these outcomes, a reliable method of assessing the relationship between the administration of a drug and an adverse clinical event is required. The Naranjo criteria are the most widely used tool for assessing ADE causality, however, they are often difficult to interpret in the context of older patients. ADE causality criteria that allow for the multiple co-morbidities and prescribed medications in older people are required. Ultimately, the current high prevalence of IP and ADEs is unacceptable. IP screening criteria need to be tested as an intervention to assess their impact on the incidence of ADEs in vulnerable older patients. There is a role for IP screening tools in everyday clinical practice. These should enhance, not replace good clinical judgement, which in turn should be based on sound pharmacogeriatric training.

  2. Inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug events in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher Paul F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inappropriate prescribing (IP in older patients is highly prevalent and is associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs, morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Consequently, IP is a major safety concern and with changing population demographics, it is likely to become even more prevalent in the future. IP can be detected using explicit or implicit prescribing indicators. Theoretically, the routine clinical application of these IP criteria could represent an inexpensive and time efficient method to optimise prescribing practice. However, IP criteria must be sensitive, specific, have good inter-rater reliability and incorporate those medications most commonly associated with ADEs in older people. To be clinically relevant, use of prescribing appropriateness tools must translate into positive patient outcomes, such as reduced rates of ADEs. To accurately measure these outcomes, a reliable method of assessing the relationship between the administration of a drug and an adverse clinical event is required. The Naranjo criteria are the most widely used tool for assessing ADE causality, however, they are often difficult to interpret in the context of older patients. ADE causality criteria that allow for the multiple co-morbidities and prescribed medications in older people are required. Ultimately, the current high prevalence of IP and ADEs is unacceptable. IP screening criteria need to be tested as an intervention to assess their impact on the incidence of ADEs in vulnerable older patients. There is a role for IP screening tools in everyday clinical practice. These should enhance, not replace good clinical judgement, which in turn should be based on sound pharmacogeriatric training.

  3. Inappropriate prescribing in the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, P

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Drug therapy is necessary to treat acute illness, maintain current health and prevent further decline. However, optimizing drug therapy for older patients is challenging and sometimes, drug therapy can do more harm than good. Drug utilization review tools can highlight instances of potentially inappropriate prescribing to those involved in elderly pharmacotherapy, i.e. doctors, nurses and pharmacists. We aim to provide a review of the literature on potentially inappropriate prescribing in the elderly and also to review the explicit criteria that have been designed to detect potentially inappropriate prescribing in the elderly. METHODS: We performed an electronic search of the PUBMED database for articles published between 1991 and 2006 and a manual search through major journals for articles referenced in those located through PUBMED. Search terms were elderly, inappropriate prescribing, prescriptions, prevalence, Beers criteria, health outcomes and Europe. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Prescription of potentially inappropriate medications to older people is highly prevalent in the United States and Europe, ranging from 12% in community-dwelling elderly to 40% in nursing home residents. Inappropriate prescribing is associated with adverse drug events. Limited data exists on health outcomes from use of inappropriate medications. There are no prospective randomized controlled studies that test the tangible clinical benefit to patients of using drug utilization review tools. Existing drug utilization review tools have been designed on the basis of North American and Canadian drug formularies and may not be appropriate for use in European countries because of the differences in national drug formularies and prescribing attitudes. CONCLUSION: Given the high prevalence of inappropriate prescribing despite the widespread use of drug-utilization review tools, prospective randomized controlled trials are necessary to identify useful interventions. Drug

  4. Inappropriate prescribing: criteria, detection and prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Marie N

    2012-06-01

    Inappropriate prescribing is highly prevalent in older people and is a major healthcare concern because of its association with negative healthcare outcomes including adverse drug events, related morbidity and hospitalization. With changing population demographics resulting in increasing proportions of older people worldwide, improving the quality and safety of prescribing in older people poses a global challenge. To date a number of different strategies have been used to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing in older people. Over the last two decades, a number of criteria have been published to assist prescribers in detecting inappropriate prescribing, the majority of which have been explicit sets of criteria, though some are implicit. The majority of these prescribing indicators pertain to overprescribing and misprescribing, with only a minority focussing on the underprescribing of indicated medicines. Additional interventions to optimize prescribing in older people include comprehensive geriatric assessment, clinical pharmacist review, and education of prescribers as well as computerized prescribing with clinical decision support systems. In this review, we describe the inappropriate prescribing detection tools or criteria most frequently cited in the literature and examine their role in preventing inappropriate prescribing and other related healthcare outcomes. We also discuss other measures commonly used in the detection and prevention of inappropriate prescribing in older people and the evidence supporting their use and their application in everyday clinical practice.

  5. Inappropriate prescribing in geriatric patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Patrick J

    2012-02-03

    Inappropriate prescribing in older people is a common condition associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and financial costs. Medication use increases with age, and this, in conjunction with an increasing disease burden, is associated with adverse drug reactions. This review outlines why older people are more likely to develop adverse drug reactions and how common the problem is. The use of different tools to identify and measure the problem is reviewed. Common syndromes seen in older adults (eg, falling, cognitive impairment, sleep disturbance) are considered, and recent evidence in relation to medication use for these conditions is reviewed. Finally, we present a brief summary of significant developments in the recent literature for those caring for older people.

  6. Potentially inappropriate prescribing and the risk of adverse drug reactions in critically ill older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galli TB

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM use in the elderly is associated with increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs, but there is limited information regarding PIM use in the intensive care unit (ICU setting. Objective: The aim of the study is to describe the prevalence and factors associated with the use of PIM and the occurrence of PIM-related adverse reactions in the critically ill elderly. Methods: This study enrolled all critically ill older adults (60 years or more admitted to medical or cardiovascular ICUs between January and December 2013, in a large tertiary teaching hospital. For all patients, clinical pharmacists listed the medications given during the ICU stay and data on drugs were analyzed using 2012 Beers Criteria, to identify the prevalence of PIM. For each identified PIM the medical records were analyzed to evaluate factors associated with its use. The frequency of ADRs and, the causal relationship between PIM and the ADRs identified were also evaluated through review of medical records. Results: According to 2012 Beers Criteria, 98.2% of elderly patients used at least one PIM (n=599, of which 24.8% were newly started in the ICUs. In 29.6% of PIMs, there was a clinical circumstance that justified their prescription. The number of PIMs was associated with ICU length of stay and total number of medications. There was at least one ADR identified in 17.8% of patients; more than 40% were attributed to PIM, but there was no statistical association. Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of PIM used in acutely ill older people, but they do not seem to be the major cause of adverse drug reactions in this population. Although many PIMs had a clinical circumstance that led to their prescription during the course of ICU hospitalization, many were still present upon hospital discharge. Therefore, prescription of PIMs should be minimized to improve the safety of elderly patients.

  7. Prevalence of inappropriate prescribing in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnhøj, Lisbeth; Thirstrup, Steffen; Kristensen, Mogens Brandt

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of inappropriate prescribing in primary care in Copenhagen County, according to the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI) and to identify the therapeutic areas most commonly involved. SETTING: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 212 elderly ( >65 years...... most commonly involved in inappropriate prescribing were medications for treatment of peptic ulcer, cardiovascular medications, anti-inflammatory medications, antidepressants, hypnotics and anti-asthmatics. CONCLUSION: The overall prescribing quality in primary care in Copenhagen County, Denmark...

  8. Inappropriate prescribing in the older population: need for new criteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Mahony, Denis

    2012-02-03

    Inappropriate prescribing (IP) is a common and serious global healthcare problem in elderly people, leading to increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), polypharmacy being the main risk factor for both IP and ADRs. IP in older people is highly prevalent but preventable; hence screening tools for IP have been devised, principally Beers\\' Criteria and the Inappropriate Prescribing in the Elderly Tool (IPET). Although Beers\\' Criteria have become the most widely cited IP criteria in the literature, nevertheless, they have serious deficiencies, including several drugs that are rarely prescribed nowadays, a lack of structure in the presentation of the criteria and omission of several important and common IP instances. New, more up-to-date, systems-based and easily applicable criteria are needed that can be applied in the routine clinical setting.

  9. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in a population of frail elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Récoché, Isabelle; Lebaudy, Cécile; Cool, Charlène; Sourdet, Sandrine; Piau, Antoine; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Vellas, Bruno; Cestac, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Background Frailty is a clinical syndrome highly predictive of functional decline after a stress or a medical event, such as adverse drug events. Objective To describe the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing in a population of frail elderly patients. Setting Geriatric day hospital for assessment of frailty and prevention of disability, Toulouse, France. Method A cross-sectional study performed from January to April 2014. Two pharmacists retrospectively analyzed the prescriptions of elderly patients who were sent to the day hospital to assess their frailty and to be given a personalized plan of care and prevention. Potentially inappropriate prescribing was defined by combining explicit criteria: Laroche list, screening tool of older people's prescriptions, and screening tool to alert to right treatment with an implicit method (drug utilization review for each medication). Prescriptions' optimizations were then suggested to the geriatricians of the day hospital and classified according to criteria defined by the French Society of Clinical Pharmacy. Main outcome measure Prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing. Results Among the 229 patients included, 71.2% had potentially inappropriate prescribing. 76 patients (33.2%) had at least one drug without any valid indication. 51 (22.3%) had at least one drug with an unfavorable benefit-to-risk ratio according to their clinical and biological data, 42 (18.3%) according to the Laroche list and 38 (16.6%) had at least one drug with questionable efficacy. Conclusion Our work shows that the incidence of PIP is high in the frail elderly and that, in most cases, it could be avoided with an adequate and regular reassessment of the prescriptions. In future, prescription optimization will be integrated into the personalized medical care plan to further prevent drug-related disability.

  10. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in an Irish elderly population in primary care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Cristín

    2009-12-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT: * Potentially inappropriate prescribing in older people is a well-documented problem and has been associated with adverse drug reactions and hospitalization. * Beers\\' criteria, Screening Tool of Older Persons\\' potentially inappropriate Prescriptions (STOPP) and Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (START) are screening tools that have been formulated to help physicians and pharmacists identify potentially inappropriate prescribing and potential prescribing omissions. * The prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing and prescribing omissions in the elderly population presenting to hospital with acute illness is high according to STOPP and START criteria.

  11. Psychotropic drugs: another survey of prescribing patterns.

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    Morgan, R; Gopalaswamy, A K

    1984-03-01

    We surveyed the psychotropic drug treatment of our hospital's 220 patients, and compared our findings with those of the only previous hospital survey in this country which showed much allegedly inappropriate prescribing. Using simple classifications of the patients' diagnoses and of the drugs prescribed, 30 per cent of our prescriptions appeared inappropriate in the absence of knowledge of the patients' symptoms. With such knowledge we show that only 2 of our 460 prescriptions were inappropriate.

  12. Potentially inappropriate prescribing and cost outcomes for older people: a national population study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahir, Caitriona

    2010-05-01

    Optimization of drug prescribing in older populations is a priority due to the significant clinical and economic costs of drug-related illness. This study aimed to: (i) estimate the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in a national Irish older population using European specific explicit prescribing criteria; (ii) investigate the association between PIP, number of drug classes, gender and age and; (iii) establish the total cost of PIP.

  13. Pediatricians who prescribe clotrimazole-betamethasone diproprionate (Lotrisone) often utilize it in inappropriate settings regardless of their knowledge of the drug's potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Railan, Divya; Wilson, Jill K; Feldman, Steven R; Fleischer, Alan B

    2002-10-01

    Clotrimazole-betamethasone diproprionate (C-BMV) is a fluorinated, high potency topical steroid that has been formulated with clotrimazole in the brand-named product, Lotrisone. The product is frequently used inappropriately in intertriginous areas, particularly in children. The following evaluates the use of this combination based upon a survey of 106 US-based pediatricians with at least two years post-residency, who attended the 1999 American Academy of Pediatrics. Of pediatricians who prescribe C-BMV, 23% prescribe it for diaper dermatitis. 11% of C-BMV prescriptions exceed the recommended duration of therapy. Only 18% of prescribing pediatricians correctly identify "Lotrisone" as a high potency steroid. There is no significant association between knowledge of C-BMV potency and frequency of use (p>.1). These self-reported data confirm and complement the findings of previous studies that used representative national data to assess the use of C-BMV. Pediatricians continue to utilize C-BMV in inappropriate settings, such as diaper dermatitis, regardless of their knowledge of the agent's potency. Our advice is to refrain from using high-potency steroids, such as C-BMV, in pediatric cases as there are more appropriate, safer alternatives with many fewer side effects.

  14. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in older primary care patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Vezmar Kovačević

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to determine the rate of Potentially Inappropriate Medicines (PIM and Potential Prescription Omissions (PPO according to Screening Tool of Older Person's potentially inappropriate Prescriptions/Screening Tool to Alert doctors to the Right Treatment (STOPP/START criteria. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey in community pharmacy. METHOD: A prospective cross-sectional study was performed, during March-May 2012, in five community pharmacies. Patients aged ≥65 years, who collected one or more prescribed medications, were asked to participate in the study, and an interview was scheduled. Patients were asked to provide their complete medical and biochemical record from their general practitioner. RESULTS: 509 patients, mean age 74.8±6.5 years, 57.4% female, participated in the study. 164 PIM were identified in 139 patients (27.3%. The most common were: long-term use of long-acting benzodiazepines (20.7%, use of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID in patients with moderate-severe hypertension (20.1%, use of theophylline as monotherapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, 15.9% and use of aspirin without appropriate indication (15.2%. Patients with more than four prescpritions had a higher risk for PIM (OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.97-4.14, p<0.001. There were 439 PPO, identified in 257, (50.5% patients. Predictors for PPO were older age, presence of diabetes, myocardial infarction, osteoporosis, stroke, COPD and/or angina pectoris. CONCLUSION: STOPP/START criteria may be useful in identifying inappropriate prescribing and improving the current prescribing practices. Pharmacists should focus more on patients with more than four medications and/or patients with gout or pain accompanied with arterial hypertension because those patient may be at higher risk of PIM. Additionlly, patients older than 74 years with diabetes, osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, angina pectoris and/or COPD may have an

  15. Appropriate prescribing in the elderly: an investigation of two screening tools, Beers criteria considering diagnosis and independent of diagnosis and improved prescribing in the elderly tool to identify inappropriate use of medicines in the elderly in primary care in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, C

    2009-08-01

    Elderly patients are particularly vulnerable to inappropriate prescribing, with increased risk of adverse drug reactions and consequently higher rates of morbidity and mortality. A large proportion of inappropriate prescribing is preventable by adherence to prescribing guidelines, suitable monitoring and regular medication review. As a result, screening tools have been developed to help clinicians improve their prescribing.

  16. [Potentially inappropriate prescribing in hospitalized patients with comparative study between prescription by internist and geriatricians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Cabello, A J; Bermudo-Conde, S; Manzano-Gamero, V

    2014-01-01

    To analyze potentially inappropriate prescribing in hospitalized patients and compare the prescription by internists and geriatricians. Cross-sectional study in hospitalized patients older than 65 years. We recorded prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescriptions according to the criteria of "Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions". We included 95 hospitalized patients over 65 years with a median age of 79 years (interquartile range: 73-82 years) and 50.5% female. One hundred eighty-three potentially inappropriate prescriptions were detected in 81 patients (85.2% of patients). The most frequent potentially inappropriate prescription were the prolonged use of inhibitors of proton pump high dose (32.6% of patients), the use of benzodiazepines in patients prone to falling (23.2% of patients), the prolonged use of long-acting benzodiazepines (21.1% of patients) and prolonged use of neuroleptic as hypnotics (21.1% of patients). In comparative study between medical specialties, significant differences were found in mean number of drugs (P = 0.0001) and in prolonged use of neuroleptics as hypnotics (P = 0.015). A high percentage of hospitalized patients older than 65 years receive potentially inappropriate prescribing. Prolonged use of inhibitors of the proton pump at high doses was the most frequent potentially inappropriate prescribing criterion.

  17. Inappropriate prescribing in the hospitalized elderly patient: Defining the problem, evaluation tools, and possible solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Page II

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Robert L Page II1, Sunny A Linnebur2, Lucinda L Bryant3, J Mark Ruscin41Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy and Physical Medicine, Clinical Specialist, Division of Cardiology and Heart Transplantation, 2Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, Clinical Specialist, Center on the Aging, Schools of Pharmacy and Medicine, 3Assistant Professor of Community and Behavioral Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA; 4Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Pharmacy, Edwardsville, IL, USAAbstract: Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM prescribing in older adults is quite prevalent and is associated with an increased risk for adverse drug events, morbidity, and utilization of health care resources. In the acute care setting, PIM prescribing can be even more problematic due to multiple physicians and specialists who may be prescribing for a single patient as well as difficulty with medication reconciliation at transitions and limitations imposed by hospital formularies. This article highlights critical issues surrounding PIM prescribing in the acute care setting such as risk factors, screening tools, and potential strategies to minimize this significant public health problem.Keywords: inappropriate prescribing, aged, elderly, adverse drug events, adverse drug reactions, Beers’ criteria, screening

  18. Inappropriate prescribing in the elderly: a comparison of the Beers criteria and the improved prescribing in the elderly tool (IPET) in acutely ill elderly hospitalized patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, P J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: In appropriate prescribing is a significant and persistent problem in elderly people, both in hospital and the community and has been described in several countries in Europe and also the USA. The problem of inappropriate prescribing has not been quantified in the Republic of Ireland. The most commonly used criteria for the identification of inappropriate prescribing are the Beers\\' criteria [both independent of diagnosis (ID) and considering diagnosis (CD) - 2003 version]. The Beers\\' criteria ID includes 48 different categories of either single medications or multiple medications of a similar class identified as inappropriate prescriptions and the Beers\\' criteria CD contains 19 different categories containing possible drug-disease interactions. A second tool, the improved prescribing in the elderly tool (IPET) has also been validated and used in hospital and community studies and has 14 categories of either explicitly contraindicated medications or possible drug-disease interactions. OBJECTIVES: The primary aim of the study is to measure the incidence of inappropriate prescribing among older community-dwelling individuals presenting to an acute hospital in the Republic of Ireland. A secondary aim of this study was also therefore to compare the efficacy of the above two tools in identifying inappropriate prescribing. METHODS: A prospective, consecutive observational cohort study was carried out over a 4-month period. The setting was an urban-based university hospital acute geriatric medicine assessment unit. Subjects in this study (n = 350) were consecutively screened on admission to hospital (mean age = 80.3 +\\/- 6.1 years) and all patients had both Beers\\' criteria ID and CD and IPET applied to their list of prescription drugs on admission, cross-referenced with their list of current active medical diagnosis. RESULTS: The results of the study identified a high rate of inappropriate prescribing among this population of community

  19. Defining inappropriate practices in prescribing for elderly people: a national consensus panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, P J; Huang, A R; Tamblyn, R M; Gayton, D C

    1997-02-01

    To develop a consensus-based list of inappropriate practices in prescribing for elderly people. Mail survey of a 32-member national panel. Academic medical centres across Canada. Thirty-two specialists selected arbitrarily, including 7 clinical pharmacologists, 9 geriatricians, 8 family practitioners and 8 pharmacists. Consensus that the practice would introduce a substantial and significant increase in the risk of serious adverse effect and is common enough that its curtailment would decrease morbidity among elderly people, ranking of clinical importance of the risk, and availability of equally or more effective and less risky alternative therapy. The 32-member national panel developed a list of 71 practices in prescribing for elderly people and rated the clinical significance of each on a scale of 1 (not significant) to 4 (highly significant). The practices in prescribing identified fell into 3 categories: drugs generally contraindicated for elderly people, drug-disease interactions and drug-drug interactions. The mean significance rating was greater than 3 for 39 practices. For each practice, alternative therapies were recommended. There was surprising congruence among the specialists on the significance rating and the suggested alternative therapies. The authors have developed a valid, relevant list of inappropriate practices in prescribing for elderly people, to be used in a practice-based intervention study.

  20. Association of potentially inappropriate medication use with patient and prescriber characteristics in Medicare Part D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Holly M; Luo, Ruili; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Baillargeon, Jacques; Goodwin, James S

    2013-07-01

    The use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in older people is associated with increased risk of adverse drug events and hospitalization. This study aimed to determine the contribution of primary prescribers to variation in PIM use. This was a retrospective cohort study using 2008 Medicare Part D event files and claims data for a 100% sample of Texas beneficiaries. PIM use was defined as receiving any of 48 medications on the Beers 2003 list of PIMs. Patient characteristics associated with PIM use were determined using a multivariable model. A multilevel model for the odds of PIM use was constructed to evaluate the amount of variation in PIM use at the level of primary care prescriber, controlling for patient characteristics. Of 677,580 patients receiving prescriptions through Part D in 2008, 31.9% received a PIM. Sex, ethnicity, low-income subsidy eligibility, and hospitalization in 2007 were associated with PIM use. The strongest associations with higher PIM use were increasing number of prescribers and increasing number of medications. The odds ratio for PIM use was 1.50 (95%CI 1.47-1.53) for ≥4 prescribers versus only 1 prescriber. In the multilevel model, the adjusted average percent of patients prescribed a PIM ranged from 17.5% for the lowest decile to 28.9% for the highest decile of prescribers. PIM use was prevalent in Part D beneficiaries and varied among individual primary care prescribers. The association of PIM use with increasing numbers of prescribers suggests the need to reduce fragmentation of care to reduce inappropriate prescribing. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Combined intervention programme reduces inappropriate prescribing in elderly patients exposed to polypharmacy in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnhøj, L; Thirstrup, S; Kristensen, M B

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of a combined or a single educational intervention on the prescribing behaviour of general practitioners (GPs). The primary endpoint was effect on inappropriate prescribing according to the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI)....

  2. Inappropriate prescribing in an acutely ill population of elderly patients as determined by Beers' Criteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Paul F

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Adverse drug events (ADEs) are associated with inappropriate prescribing (IP) and result in increased morbidity, mortality and resource utilisation. We used Beers\\' Criteria to determine the three-month prevalence of IP in a non-selected community-dwelling population of acutely ill older people requiring hospitalisation. METHODS: A prospective, observational study of 597 consecutive acute admissions was performed. Diagnoses and concurrent medications were recorded before hospital physician intervention, and Beers\\' Criteria applied. RESULTS: Mean patient age (SD) was 77 (7) years. Median number of medications was 5, range 0-13. IP occurred in 32% of patients (n = 191), with 24%, 6% and 2% taking 1, 2 and 3 inappropriate medications respectively. Patients taking >5 medications were 3.3 times more likely to receive an inappropriate medication than those taking < or =5 medications (OR 3.34: 95%, CI 2.37-4.79; P<0.001). Forty-nine per cent of patients with inappropriate prescriptions were admitted with adverse effects of the inappropriate medications. Sixteen per cent of all admissions were associated with such adverse effects. CONCLUSION: IP is highly prevalent in acutely ill older patients and is associated with polypharmacy and hospitalisation. However, Beers\\' Criteria cannot be used as a gold standard as they do not comprehensively address all aspects of IP in older people.

  3. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in institutionalised older patients in Spain: the STOPP-START criteria compared with the Beers criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonet M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aims of this study were to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing using the Beers and STOPP criteria. The START criteria were applied to detect prescription omission in the geriatric population. We compared the utility of these criteria in institutionalised older people.Methods: Descriptive study reviewing the medication and clinical records of 81 residents (aged 65 years and more by pharmacists in a nursing home in the Lleida region (Spain.Results: The mean patients’ age was 84 (SD=8 years, with an average of 5 drugs per resident (total prescriptions: 416 medicines. The Beers criteria identified potentially inappropriate medication use in 25% of patients and 48% of patients used at least 1 inappropriate medication according to STOPP criteria. The most frequent potentially inappropriate medications for both criteria were long-acting benzodiazepines and NSAIDs. START detected 58 potential prescribing omissions in 44% of patients. Calcium-vitamin D supplementation in osteoporosis was the most frequent rule (15%, but omissions corresponding to the cardiovascular system implied 23% of patients.Conclusion: The STOPP-START criteria reveal that potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP is a highly prevalent problem among Spanish nursing home residents, and a statistically significant positive correlation was found between the number of medicines prescribed and the number of PIP detected in this study. The STOPP criteria detect a larger number of PI medications in this geriatric population than the Beers criteria. The prescribing omissions detected by the START criteria are relevant and require intervention. Pharmacists’ review of medications may help identify potentially inappropriate prescribing and, through an interdisciplinary approach, working with physicians may improve prescribing practices among geriatric residents of nursing homes.

  4. Potentially inappropriate prescribing of primarily renally cleared medications for older veterans affairs nursing home patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Joseph T; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Handler, Steven M; Weisbord, Steven; Pugh, Mary Jo; Semla, Todd; Stone, Roslyn A; Aspinall, Sherrie L

    2011-06-01

    Inappropriate prescribing of primarily renally cleared medications in older patients with kidney disease can lead to adverse outcomes. To estimate the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing of 21 primarily renally cleared medications based on 2 separate estimates of renal function and to identify factors associated with this form of suboptimal prescribing in older VA nursing home (NH) patients. Longitudinal study Participants were 1304 patients, aged 65 years or older, admitted between January 1, 2004, and June 30, 2005, for 90 days or more to 1 of 133 VA NHs. Potentially inappropriate prescribing of primarily renally cleared medications determined by estimating creatinine clearance using the Cockcroft Gault (CG) and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equations and applying explicit guidelines for contraindicated medications and dosing. The median estimated creatinine clearance via CG was 67 mL/min, whereas it was 80 mL/min/1.73m(2) with the MDRD. Overall, 11.89% patients via CG and only 5.98% via MDRD had evidence of potentially inappropriate prescribing of at least 1 renally cleared medication. The most commonly involved medications were ranitidine, glyburide, gabapentin, and nitrofurantoin. Factors associated with potentially inappropriate prescribing as per the CG were age older than 85 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.42-7.43), obesity (AOR 0.26, 95% CI 0.14-0.50) and having multiple comorbidities (AOR 1.09 for each unit increase in the Charlson comorbidity index, 95% CI 1.01-1.19). Potentially inappropriate prescribing of renally cleared medications is common in older VA NH patients. Intervention studies to improve the prescribing of primarily renally cleared medications in nursing homes are needed. Copyright © 2011 American Medical Directors Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Potentially inappropriate prescribing in older Spanish population according to STOPP/START criteria (STARTREC study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Esteve, Inés; Marsal-Mora, Josep Ramón; Galindo-Ortego, Gisela; Galván-Santiago, Leonardo; Serrano-Godoy, Marcos; Ribes-Murillo, Esther; Real-Gatius, Jordi

    2017-03-01

    Rational prescribing in older people is a priority for health care organizations. The STOPP/START screening tool has been developed to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in individuals. In a primary care setting, STOPP/START can estimate PIP prevalence and related factors at population level. The aim of this study is to measure the prevalence rates of PPI in elderly population using clinical and prescription claim databases. Cross-sectional population study. Primary Care, Lleida Health Region, Spain. 45.408 patients 70 years old and over, attended in the primary health care centers at least once the last year. 43 STOPP and 12 START criteria are applied to their 2012 clinical and prescription records. Logistic regression models are adjusted to determine PIP association with several factors. 45,408 patients are included. The mean age is 79.7 years, 58% being female. The overall prevalence of PPI is 58.1%. According to STOPP, the most common drugs identified are benzodiazepines, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors; according to START, osteoporosis treatments, antiplatelet agents, statins, metformin and beta blockers. PIP increases with age and polypharmacy and it is higher in long-term care facilities residents and patients receiving home health care. In our Health Region, at least 50% of the population aged 70 or older has one or more PIP, according to STOPP/START criteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Beers Criteria as a Proxy for Inappropriate Prescribing of Other Medications Among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Brian C; Steinman, Michael A; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A; Kaboli, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Beers criteria are a compilation of medications deemed potentially inappropriate for older adults, and widely used a prescribing quality indicator. OBJECTIVE To determine whether Beers criteria serve as a proxy measure for other forms of inappropriate prescribing, as measured by comprehensive implicit review. METHODS Data for patients 65 years and older were obtained from the VA Enhanced Pharmacy Outpatient Clinic (EPOC) and the Iowa Medicaid Pharmaceutical Case Management (PCM) studies. Comprehensive measurement of prescribing quality was conducted using expert clinician review of medical records according to the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI). MAI scores attributable to non-Beers medications (non-Beers MAI) were contrasted between patients who did and did not receive a Beers criteria medication. RESULTS Beers criteria medications accounted for 12.9% and 14.0% of total MAI scores in the two studies. Importantly, non-Beers MAI scores were significantly higher in patients receiving a Beers criteria medication in both studies (EPOC: 15.1 vs. 12.4, p = 0.02; PCM: 11.1 vs. 8.7, p = 0.04), after adjusting for important confounding factors. CONCLUSIONS Beers criteria utility extended beyond direct measurement of a limited set of inappropriate prescribing practices by serving as a clinically meaningful proxy for other inappropriate practices. Using prescribing quality indicators to guide interventions should thus identify patients for comprehensive medication review, rather than identifying specific targets for discontinuation. Future research should explore both the quality measurement and the intervention targeting applications of the Beers criteria, particularly when integrated with other indicators. PMID:21972251

  7. Reducing inappropriate antibiotics prescribing: The role of online commentary on physical examination findings

    OpenAIRE

    Heritage, J; Elliott, M; Stivers, T.; Richardson, A.; Mangione-Smith, R

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study investigates the relationship of ‘online commentary’(contemporaneous physician comments about physical examination [PE] findings) with (i) parent questioning of the treatment recommendation and (ii) inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. Methods: A nested cross-sectional study of 522 encounters motivated by upper respiratory symptoms in 27 California pediatric practices (38 pediatricians). Physicians completed a post-visit survey regarding physical examination findings, d...

  8. Defining inappropriate practices in prescribing for elderly people: a national consensus panel

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, P. J.; Huang, A R; Tamblyn, R M; Gayton, D. C.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a consensus-based list of inappropriate practices in prescribing for elderly people. DESIGN: Mail survey of a 32-member national panel. SETTING: Academic medical centres across Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-two specialists selected arbitrarily, including 7 clinical pharmacologists, 9 geriatricians, 8 family practitioners and 8 pharmacists. OUTCOME MEASURES: Consensus that the practice would introduce a substantial and significant increase in the risk of serious adverse ef...

  9. Prevention of potentially inappropriate prescribing for elderly patients: a randomized controlled trial using STOPP/START criteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, P F

    2011-06-01

    Inappropriate prescribing is particularly common in older patients and is associated with adverse drug events (ADEs), hospitalization, and wasteful utilization of resources. We randomized 400 hospitalized patients aged ≥ 65 years to receive either the usual pharmaceutical care (control) or screening with STOPP\\/START criteria followed up with recommendations to their attending physicians (intervention). The Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI) and Assessment of Underutilization (AOU) index were used to assess prescribing appropriateness, both at the time of discharge and for 6 months after discharge. Unnecessary polypharmacy, the use of drugs at incorrect doses, and potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions were significantly lower in the intervention group at discharge (absolute risk reduction 35.7%, number needed to screen to yield improvement in MAI = 2.8 (95% confidence interval 2.2-3.8)). Underutilization of clinically indicated medications was also reduced (absolute risk reduction 21.2%, number needed to screen to yield reduction in AOU = 4.7 (95% confidence interval 3.4-7.5)). Significant improvements in prescribing appropriateness were sustained for 6 months after discharge.

  10. Magnitude of potentially inappropriate prescribing in Germany among older patients with generalized anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Ariel; Mychaskiw, Marko; Dukes, Ellen; Edelsberg, John; Oster, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Background Several medications commonly used to treat generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) have been designated "potentially inappropriate" for use in patients aged ≥65 years because their risks may outweigh their potential benefits. The actual extent of use of these agents in clinical practice is unknown, however. Methods Using a database with information from encounters with general practitioners (GP) in Germany, we identified all patients, aged ≥65 years, with any GP office visits or dispensed prescriptions with a diagnosis of GAD (ICD-10 diagnosis code F41.1) between 10/1/2003 and 9/30/2004 ("GAD patients"). Among GAD-related medications (including benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants [TCAs], selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, venlafaxine, hydroxyzine, buspirone, pregabalin, and trifluoperazine), long-acting benzodiazepines, selected short-acting benzodiazepines at relatively high dosages, selected TCAs, and hydroxyzine were designated "potentially inappropriate" for use in patients aged ≥ 65 years, based on published criteria. Results A total of 975 elderly patients with GAD were identified. Mean age was 75 years, and 72% were women; 29% had diagnoses of comorbid depression. Forty percent of study subjects received potentially inappropriate agents – most commonly, bromazepam (10% of all subjects), diazepam (9%), doxepin (7%), amitriptyline (5%), and lorazepam (5%). Twenty-three percent of study subjects received long-acting benzodiazepines, 10% received short-acting benzodiazepines at relatively high doses, and 12% received TCAs designated as potentially inappropriate. Conclusion GPs in Germany often prescribe medications that have been designated as potentially inappropriate to their elderly patients with GAD – especially those with comorbid depressive disorders. Further research is needed to ascertain whether there are specific subgoups of elderly patients with GAD for whom the benefits of these medications outweigh their risks. PMID

  11. Magnitude of potentially inappropriate prescribing in Germany among older patients with generalized anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dukes Ellen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several medications commonly used to treat generalized anxiety disorder (GAD have been designated "potentially inappropriate" for use in patients aged ≥65 years because their risks may outweigh their potential benefits. The actual extent of use of these agents in clinical practice is unknown, however. Methods Using a database with information from encounters with general practitioners (GP in Germany, we identified all patients, aged ≥65 years, with any GP office visits or dispensed prescriptions with a diagnosis of GAD (ICD-10 diagnosis code F41.1 between 10/1/2003 and 9/30/2004 ("GAD patients". Among GAD-related medications (including benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants [TCAs], selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, venlafaxine, hydroxyzine, buspirone, pregabalin, and trifluoperazine, long-acting benzodiazepines, selected short-acting benzodiazepines at relatively high dosages, selected TCAs, and hydroxyzine were designated "potentially inappropriate" for use in patients aged ≥ 65 years, based on published criteria. Results A total of 975 elderly patients with GAD were identified. Mean age was 75 years, and 72% were women; 29% had diagnoses of comorbid depression. Forty percent of study subjects received potentially inappropriate agents – most commonly, bromazepam (10% of all subjects, diazepam (9%, doxepin (7%, amitriptyline (5%, and lorazepam (5%. Twenty-three percent of study subjects received long-acting benzodiazepines, 10% received short-acting benzodiazepines at relatively high doses, and 12% received TCAs designated as potentially inappropriate. Conclusion GPs in Germany often prescribe medications that have been designated as potentially inappropriate to their elderly patients with GAD – especially those with comorbid depressive disorders. Further research is needed to ascertain whether there are specific subgoups of elderly patients with GAD for whom the benefits of these medications outweigh

  12. Reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in the residential care setting: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ching Jou; Kong, David C M; Stuart, Rhonda L

    2014-01-01

    Residential aged care facilities are increasingly identified as having a high burden of infection, resulting in subsequent antibiotic use, compounded by the complexity of patient demographics and medical care. Of particular concern is the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms among this vulnerable population. Accordingly, antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs have started to be introduced into the residential aged care facilities setting to promote judicious antimicrobial use. However, to successfully implement AMS programs, there are unique challenges pertaining to this resource-limited setting that need to be addressed. In this review, we summarize the epidemiology of infections in this population and review studies that explore antibiotic use and prescribing patterns. Specific attention is paid to issues relating to inappropriate or suboptimal antibiotic prescribing to guide future AMS interventions.

  13. Impact of educational intervention on prescribing inappropriate medication to elderly nursing homes residents

    OpenAIRE

    Ilić Darko; Bukumirić Zoran; Janković Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Problems with polypharmacy, adverse drug reactions and non-adherence are especially frequent among elderly nursing home residents. Objective. The aim of our study was to evaluate effectiveness of a specific form of staff education on appropriateness of prescribing in a cluster of nursing homes for the elderly. Methods. The study was designed as before-and-after trial of educational intervention on appropriateness of prescribing in nursing home...

  14. [Potentially inappropriate prescribing in patients over 65 years-old in a primary care health centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi López, Naldy; Villán Villán, Yuri Fabiola; Granados Menéndez, María Isabel; Royuela, Ana

    2014-01-01

    To identify potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PPI) and prescribing omissions (OP) by means of the STOPP/START criteria, as well as associated factors in ≥65year old patients in a Primary Care setting in Spain. A cross-sectional, descriptive study. Centro de Salud Monóvar, Primary Health Care. 6months. 247patients. ≥65years patients who attended an urban Primary Care clinic 2 or more times were studied. Terminally ill and nursing home residents were excluded. Data were collected from electronic clinical records. STOPP and START criteria were evaluated in each clinical record, including age, sex, co-morbidity, number of chronic prescriptions. PPI and OP identified by STOPP and START criteria, respectively. A total of 81 patients (32.8%) had PPI, with the most common being the long-term use of long-acting benzodiazepines in 17 (6.9%). OP was found in 73 (29.6%) patients, with the most common being the omission of statins in patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus and/or one or more major cardiovascular risk factors in 21 (8.5%). After adjustment by gender and age, correlations were found between PPI and multiple medication (OR: 2.02; 95%CI: 1.15-3.53; P=.014), and OP and polypharmacy (OR: 2.37; 95%CI: 1.32-4.24; P=0.004). Inappropriate prescribing in older people is frequent, and is mainly associated with long-acting benzodiazepines. There are diabetic patients who do not have statins prescribed. Multiple medication is associated with PPI and OP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. “If it’s a broad spectrum, it can shoot better”: inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in Cambodia

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    Chhorvoin Om

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cambodia is affected by antibiotic resistance but interventions to reduce the level of resistance require knowledge of the phenomena that lead to inappropriate prescribing. We interviewed physicians working in public hospitals to explore the drivers of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. Methods Hospitals participating in a knowledge, attitudes and practices survey prior to this study were purposively selected and physicians were randomly recruited to participate in focus group discussions. Nvivo version 10 was used to inductively code the qualitative transcripts and manage thematic data analysis. Results Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing was a common practice and driven by seven factors: prescribing habit, limited diagnostic capacity, lack of microbiology evidence, non-evidence-based clinical guidelines, perceived patient demand, poor hygiene and infection control, and perceived bacterial resistance to narrow spectrum antibiotics. “Every day, doctors are not performing appropriately. We have made lots of mistakes with our antibiotic prescribing.” When a patient’s clinical condition was not responsive to empiric treatment, physicians changed to a broader spectrum antibiotic and microbiology services were sought only after failure of a treatment with a broad-spectrum antibiotic. This habitual empirical prescribing was a common practice regardless of microbiology service accessibility. Poor hygiene and infection control practices were commonly described as reasons for ‘preventive’ prescribing with full course of antibiotics while perception of bacterial resistance to narrow-spectrum antibiotics due to unrestricted access in the community resulted in unnecessary prescribing of broad spectrum antibiotics in private practices. Conclusions The practice of prescribing antibiotics by Cambodian physicians is inappropriate and based on prescribing habit rather than microbiology evidence. Improvement in prescribing

  16. Reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in the residential care setting: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim CJ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ching Jou Lim,1 David CM Kong,1 Rhonda L Stuart2,31Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, Monash University, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 2Monash Infectious Diseases, Monash Health, Clayton, VIC, Australia; 3Department of Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, AustraliaAbstract: Residential aged care facilities are increasingly identified as having a high burden of infection, resulting in subsequent antibiotic use, compounded by the complexity of patient demographics and medical care. Of particular concern is the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms among this vulnerable population. Accordingly, antimicrobial stewardship (AMS programs have started to be introduced into the residential aged care facilities setting to promote judicious antimicrobial use. However, to successfully implement AMS programs, there are unique challenges pertaining to this resource-limited setting that need to be addressed. In this review, we summarize the epidemiology of infections in this population and review studies that explore antibiotic use and prescribing patterns. Specific attention is paid to issues relating to inappropriate or suboptimal antibiotic prescribing to guide future AMS interventions.Keywords: residential aged care, health care-associated infection, surveillance, multidrug-resistant, antibiotic prescribing, antimicrobial stewardship

  17. pASELINE SURVEY ON DRUG PRESCRIBING

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Baseline Survey On Drug Prescribing Indicators Wubeante K. 147 rr. RIGINAL ... Specialized Hospital where measured values could be used later as baseline data for further follow up of ..... drug management systems in hospital. Moreover the ...

  18. Inappropriate prescribing among older persons in primary care: protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cia Sin; Liew, Tau Ming

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Inappropriate prescribing has a significant impact on older persons in primary care. Previous reviews on inappropriate prescribing included a heterogeneous range of populations and may not be generalisable to primary care. In this study we aim to conduct a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of the prevalence, risk factors and adverse outcome associated with inappropriate prescribing, specifically among older persons in primary care. Methods and analysis We will search PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, Scopus, PsycINFO and references of other review articles for observational studies related to the keywords ‘older persons’, ‘primary care’ and ‘inappropriate prescribing’. Two reviewers will independently select the eligible articles. For each included article, the two reviewers will independently extract the data and assess the risk of bias using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale. If appropriate, meta-analyses will be performed to pool the data across all the studies. In the presence of heterogeneity, meta-regression and subgroup analyses will also be performed. The quality of the evidence will be assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Ethics and dissemination The results will be disseminated through conference presentations and peer-reviewed publications. They will provide consolidated evidence to support informed actions by policymakers to address inappropriate prescribing in primary care, thus reducing preventable and iatrogenic risk to older persons in primary care. Trial registration number CRD42016048874. PMID:28237963

  19. Prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing in an acutely ill population of older patients admitted to six European hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescribing is common in older people presenting to hospital with acute illness in Ireland. The aim of this study was to determine if this phenomenon is unique to Ireland or whether it is a more widespread problem in hospitals across Europe.

  20. Reducing Inappropriate Antibiotic Prescribing for Adults With Acute Bronchitis in an Urgent Care Setting: A Quality Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Tamara L; Townsend, Mary L; Leung, Eugene; Kommu, Sekhar; Vega, Rhonda Y; Hendrix, Cristina C

    Acute bronchitis is a predominantly viral illness and, according to clinical practice guidelines, should not be treated with antibiotics. Despite clear guidelines, acute bronchitis continues to be the most common acute respiratory illness for which antibiotics are incorrectly prescribed. Although the national benchmark for antibiotic prescribing for adults with acute bronchitis is 0%, a preliminary record review before implementing the intervention at the project setting showed that 96% (N = 30) of adults with acute bronchitis in this setting were prescribed an antibiotic. This quality improvement project utilized a single-group, pre-post design. The setting for this project was a large urgent care network with numerous locations in central North Carolina. The purpose was to determine whether nurse practitioners and physician assistants, after participating in a multifaceted provider education session, would reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for healthy adults with acute uncomplicated bronchitis. Twenty providers attended 1 of 4 training sessions offered in October and November 2015. The face-to-face interactive training sessions focused on factors associated with inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, current clinical practice guidelines, and patient communication skills. Retrospective medical record review of 217 pretraining and 335 posttraining encounters for acute bronchitis by 19 eligible participating providers demonstrated a 61.9% reduction in immediate antibiotic prescribing from 91.7% to 29.8%. Delayed prescribing, which accounted for a small percentage of the total prescriptions given, had a small but significant increase of 9.3% after training. Overall, this multifaceted, interactive provider training resulted in significant reductions in inappropriate prescriptions.

  1. Rates of inappropriate antiretroviral prescription among injection drug users

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    Bonner Simon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the survival benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART for the treatment of HIV infection are well established, the clinical management of HIV disease continues to present major challenges. There are particular concerns regarding access to appropriate HIV treatment among HIV-infected injection drug users (IDU. Methods In a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected IDU in Vancouver, Canada, we examined initial ART regimens vis-à-vis the provincial government's therapeutic guidelines at the time ART was initiated. Briefly, there have been four sets of guidelines: Era 1 (1992 to November 1995; double-drug (dual NRTIs ART for patients with a CD4 cell count of 350 or less; Era 2 (December 1995 to May 1996; double-drug therapy for patients with a CD4+ cell count of 500 or less; Era 3 (June 1996 to June 1997; triple-drug therapy (dual NRTIs with a PI or NNRTI for patients who had a plasma viral load of > 100,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL; dual therapy with two NRTIs for those with a plasma viral load of 5,000 to 100,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL; Era 4 (since July 1997; universal use of triple drug therapy as first-line treatment. Results Between May 1996 and May 2003, 431 HIV-infected individuals were enrolled into the cohort. By May 31, 2003, 291 (67.5% individuals had initiated ART. We noted instances of inappropriate antiretroviral prescription in each guideline era, with 9 (53% in Era 1, 3 (12% in Era 2, 22 (28% in Era 3, and 23 (15% in Era 4. Of the 57 subjects who received an inappropriate ART regimen initially, 14 never received the appropriate therapy; among the remaining 43, the median time to the initiation of a guideline-appropriate ART regimen was 12 months (inter-quartile range 5 – 20. Conclusion The present study identified measurable rates of guideline-inappropriate ART prescription for patients who were injection drug users. Rates were highest in the era of dual therapy, although high rates persisted into the triple

  2. Prescribing psychotropic drugs: whose responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R S; Wiedeman, G H; Linn, L

    1980-01-01

    Through the use of a questionnaire it has been ascertained that a significant number of second-year graduate school social work students at the Columbia University School of Social Work are called upon to monitor and dispense psychotrophic drugs in various placements where they receive their practical clinical training. In some instances they may even fill out prescription blanks that are signed by psychiatrists who do not have the time to see the patients personally. This situation not only represents the abdication of medical responsibility, frequently leaving non-medical personnel with functions beyond their training and professional competence, but also raises important ethical and legal problems. Non-medical professionals in mental health settings should receive appropriate instruction in the essentials of psychopharmacology. Such training should not be left to chance as apparently is the case now. Non-medically trained members of the mental health team, if properly instructed, could cooperate more effectively with the psychiatrists who must in any event retain primary responsibility for pharmacotherapy.

  3. Is new drug prescribing in primary care specialist induced?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentinus, S.R.; Heerdink, R.; Dijk, L. van; Griens, F.A.M.G.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Leufkens, H.G.M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Medical specialists are often seen as the first prescribers of new drugs. However, the extent to which specialists influence new drug prescribing in primary care is largely unknown. Methods: This study estimates the influence of medical specialists on new drug prescribing in primary care

  4. Is new drug prescribing in primary care specialist induced?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentinus, S.R.; Heerdink, E.R.; Dijk, L. van; Griens, F.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Leufkens, H.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medical specialists are often seen as the first prescribers of new drugs. However, the extent to which specialists influence new drug prescribing in primary care is largely unknown. METHODS: This study estimates the influence of medical specialists on new drug prescribing in primary care

  5. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in two populations with differing socio-economic profiles: a cross-sectional database study using the PROMPT criteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooper, Janine A

    2016-01-28

    The purpose of this study is to establish the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in middle-aged adults (45-64 years) in two populations with differing socio-economic profiles, and to investigate factors associated with PIP, using the PROMPT (PRescribing Optimally in Middle-aged People\\'s Treatments) criteria.

  6. Assessment of disease profiles and drug prescribing patterns of health care facilities in Edo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehijie F.O. Enato

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have systematically characterized drug-prescribing patterns, particularly at the primary care level in Nigeria, a country disproportionately burdened with disease. The aim of this study was to assess the disease profiles and drug-prescribing pattern in two health care facilities in Edo State, Nigeria. The medical records of 495 patients who attended a primary or secondary health care facility in Owan-East Local Government Area of Edo State, Nigeria, between June and November 2009 were reviewed. Disease profiles and drug prescribing patterns were assessed. Data were analyzed based on the World Health Organization Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical classification system, and core drug prescribing indicators. Five hundred and twelve clinical conditions were identified. Infectious disease was most prevalent (38.3%, followed by disorder of the alimentary tract (16.4%. Malaria was responsible for 55.6% of the infectious diseases seen, and 21.3% (109/512 of the total clinical conditions managed at the two health facilities during the study period. Consequently, anti-infective medications were the most frequently prescribed medicines (21.5%, followed by vitamins (18.2%. Use of artesunate monotherapy at both facilities (15.7%, and chloroquine at the primary health facility (24.9% were common. Paracetamol (41.8% and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (24.9% were the most frequently used analgesic/antipyretic. At the primary health care facility, dipyrone was used in 21.6% of cases. The core drug prescribing use indicators showed inappropriate prescribing, indicating poly-pharmacy, overuse of antibiotics and injectio. Inappropriate drug use patterns were identified at both health care facilities, especially with regard to the use of ineffective antimalarial drugs and the use of dipyrone.

  7. Drug prescribing pattern among pregnant mothers attending obstetrics and gynecology department in Hiwot Fana Specialized Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Million Negasa

    2014-01-01

    Category D and X drugs which were considered to be risky to both pregnant women and fetus were prescribed for 42 (13.08% pregnant women. From the study participant, 169 (42.8% had drug therapy problem. One hundred eleven (28.1% had need of additional drug therapy while 52 (13.2% had unnecessary drug therapy and 11(2.8%, 24 (6.1% had high and low dosage respectively. Conclusion: Antibiotics were commonly prescribed along vitamins and minerals while there were (13.08% category D and category X drugs prescribed inappropriately to some of the patients. Such inappropriate prescription of drugs should not be underestimated because it definitely affects the life of both the mother and the fetus.

  8. Top 200 Prescribed Drugs Mostly Prescribed by the Physician in Pharmacies at Medan City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanjung, H. R.; Nasution, E. S.

    2017-03-01

    The drug information literatures usually contains thousands of drugs, which much of them were rare or never prescribed by the physicians. It caused pharmacy students must learn thousands of drugs that will depleted resources and the study result was not effective. The aim of the study was to identify 200 items of drugs that mostly prescribed by the physicians in the pharmacies at Medan City. The study was a descriptive study that used a cross sectional survey methodology. The 200 items of drugs that mostly prescribed by the physician obtained from the pharmacies selected regarding to random sampling method. The study was conducted from August to September 2016. The 200 items of drugs that mostly prescribed by the physician resulted from 21.962 prescribed drugs item of 16.352 prescriptions of 100 pharmacies. The list revealed that the most prescribed drugs was amoxicilline (5.55 %), followed by dexamethasone (4.44%), mefenamic acid (3.73%), cetirizine (3.16%), and ciprofloxacine (2.97%). It shows that the antibiotic drug was the most prescribed drug by the physician in pharmacies at Medan City. Further studies are required to develop the study card from the list.

  9. Inappropriate drugs in elderly patients with severe cognitive impairment: results from the shelter study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Colloca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been estimated that Nursing Home (NH residents with impaired cognitive status receive an average of seven to eight drugs daily. The aim of this study was to determine prevalence and factors associated with use of inappropriate drugs in elderly patients with severe cognitive impairment living in NH in Europe. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from a sample of 1449 NH residents with severe cognitive impairment, participating in the Services and Health for Elderly in Long TERm care (SHELTER study were analysed. Inappropriate drug use was defined as the use of drugs classified as rarely or never appropriate in patients with severe cognitive impairment based on the Holmes criteria published in 2008. RESULTS: Mean age of participating residents was 84.2±8.9 years, 1087 (75.0% were women. Inappropriate drug use was observed in 643 (44.9% residents. Most commonly used inappropriate drugs were lipid-lowering agents (9.9%, antiplatelet agents (excluding Acetylsalicylic Acid - ASA - (9.9%, acetylcholinesterase, inhibitors (7.2% and antispasmodics (6.9%. Inappropriate drug use was directly associated with specific diseases including diabetes (OR 1.64; 95% CI 1.21-2.24, heart failure (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.04-2.09, stroke (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.06-1.93, and recent hospitalization (OR 1.69; 95% CI 1.20-2.39. An inverse relation was shown between inappropriate drug use and presence of a geriatrician in the facility (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.39-0.77. CONCLUSION: Use of inappropriate drugs is common among older EU NH residents. Determinants of inappropriate drug use include comorbidities and recent hospitalization. Presence of a geriatrician in the facility staff is associated with a reduced rate of use of these medications.

  10. Trends and interaction of polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate prescribing in primary care over 15 years in Ireland: a repeated cross-sectional study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moriarty, Frank

    2015-03-01

    To examine: (1) changes in polypharmacy in 1997, 2002, 2007 and 2012 and; (2) changes in potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) prevalence and the relationship between PIP and polypharmacy in individuals aged ≥65 years over this period in Ireland.

  11. Inappropriate prescribing of antithrombotic therapy in Ethiopian elderly population using updated 2015 STOPP/START criteria: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getachew H

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Henok Getachew, Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula, Tamrat Befekadu Abebe, Sewunet Admasu Belachew Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Background: Inappropriate use of antiplatelets and anticoagulants among elderly patients increases the risk of adverse outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of inappropriate prescribing of antithrombotic therapy in hospitalized elderly patients. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional, single-center study was conducted at the Gondar University Hospital. A total of 156 hospitalized elderly patients fulfilling the inclusion/­exclusion criteria were included in the study. The Screening Tool for Older Person’s Prescription/Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment criteria version 2 were applied to patients’ data to identify the total number of inappropriate prescribing (IPs including potentially inappropriate medications and potential prescribing omissions. Results: A total of 70 IPs were identified in 156 patients who met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 36 (51.4% were identified as potentially inappropriate medications by the Screening Tool for Older Person’s Prescription criteria. The prevalence of IP per patient indicated that 58 of the 156 (37.2% patients were exposed to at least one IP. Of these, 32 (55.2% had at least one potentially inappropriate medication and 33 (56.9% had at least one potential prescribing omission. Patients hospitalized due to venous thromboembolism (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =29.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26–708.6, stroke (AOR =7.74, 95% CI, 1.27–47.29, or acute coronary syndrome (AOR =13.48, 95% CI, 1.4–129.1 were less likely to be exposed to an IP. An increase in Charlson comorbidity index score was associated with increased IP exposure (AOR =0.60, 95% CI, 0.39–0.945. IPs were about six times more likely to absent in patients prescribed

  12. Prescribing Patterns and Cost of Antihypertensive Drugs in Private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nx 6110

    Among the combination therapy drugs were angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor+diuretic ... Key words: Hypertension, prescribing patterns, private hospitals, cost-analysis. INTRODUCTION ... non fatal myocardial infarction. The drug was.

  13. Is new drug prescribing in primary care specialist induced?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical specialists are often seen as the first prescribers of new drugs. However, the extent to which specialists influence new drug prescribing in primary care is largely unknown. Methods This study estimates the influence of medical specialists on new drug prescribing in primary care shortly after market introduction. The influence of medical specialists on prescribing of five new drugs was measured in a cohort of 103 GPs, working in 59 practices, over the period 1999 until 2003. The influence of medical specialists on new drug prescribing in primary care was assessed using three outcome measures. Firstly, the proportion of patients receiving their first prescription for a new or reference drug from a specialist. Secondly, the proportion of GPs prescribing new drugs before any specialist prescribes to their patients. Thirdly, we compared the time until the GP's first own prescribing between GPs who waited for prescriptions from specialists and those who did not. Results The influence of specialists showed considerable differences among the new drugs studied. The proportion of patients receiving their first prescription from a specialist was greatest for the combination salmeterol/fluticasone (60.2%, and lowest for rofecoxib (23.0%. The proportion of GPs prescribing new drugs before waiting for prescriptions from medical specialists ranged from 21.1% in the case of esomeprazole to 32.9% for rofecoxib. Prescribing new drugs by specialists did not shorten the GP's own time to prescribing. Conclusion This study shows that the influence of medical specialists is clearly visible for all new drugs and often greater than for the existing older drugs, but the rapid uptake of new drugs in primary care does not seem specialist induced in all cases. GPs are responsible for a substantial amount of all early prescriptions for new drugs and for a subpopulation specialist endorsement is not a requisite to initiate in new drug prescribing

  14. Effect of interventions to reduce potentially inappropriate use of drugs in nursing homes: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

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    Gjerberg Elisabeth

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that residents in nursing homes often are exposed to inappropriate medication. Particular concern has been raised about the consumption of psychoactive drugs, which are commonly prescribed for nursing home residents suffering from dementia. This review is an update of a Norwegian systematic review commissioned by the Norwegian Directorate of Health. The purpose of the review was to identify and summarise the effect of interventions aimed at reducing potentially inappropriate use or prescribing of drugs in nursing homes. Methods We searched for systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, DARE and HTA, with the last update in April 2010. Two of the authors independently screened titles and abstracts for inclusion or exclusion. Data on interventions, participants, comparison intervention, and outcomes were extracted from the included studies. Risk of bias and quality of evidence were assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Table and GRADE, respectively. Outcomes assessed were use of or prescribing of drugs (primary and the health-related outcomes falls, physical limitation, hospitalisation and mortality (secondary. Results Due to heterogeneity in interventions and outcomes, we employed a narrative approach. Twenty randomised controlled trials were included from 1631 evaluated references. Ten studies tested different kinds of educational interventions while seven studies tested medication reviews by pharmacists. Only one study was found for each of the interventions geriatric care teams, early psychiatric intervening or activities for the residents combined with education of health care personnel. Several reviews were identified, but these either concerned elderly in general or did not satisfy all the requirements for systematic reviews. Conclusions Interventions using educational outreach, on-site education given alone or as part of an

  15. Drug Prescribing Pattern in Two Hospitals in Mwanza, Northwest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Kongola

    1Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Catholic University of Health and ... Key words: Prescribing pattern, generic and brand drugs, antibiotics, injections ... pharmacy store at Sekou Toure hospital and 188 .... therapeutic duplication errors.

  16. Quality of drug prescribing in elderly people in nursing homes and special care units for dementia: a cross-sectional computerized pharmacy register analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Jonny; Bergman, Asa; Carlsten, Anders; Oké, Thimothy; Bernsten, Cecilia; Schmidt, Ingrid K; Fastbom, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Drug prescribing to the elderly is extensive and often inappropriate. Furthermore, the number of drugs used is the most important risk factor for adverse drug reactions. Despite this, drug prescribing in the elderly in Sweden is high and increasing. In 2003 the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare launched a set of indicators to evaluate the quality of drug therapy in the elderly. Use of this tool in combination with the Swedish computerized national register covering all persons receiving multi-dose drug dispensing (drugs dispensed in one dose unit bag for each dose occasion) would enable detection of inappropriate drug prescribing and could help reduce the risk of drug-related problems among the elderly. To assess the extent and quality of drug prescribing in younger and older elderly residents receiving multi-dose drug dispensing in ordinary nursing homes (NHs) and special care units for dementia (NHDs), and to evaluate the relationship between the quality of prescribing and the number of prescribers per resident, in a Swedish county. The computerized national pharmacy drug register provided the database and a cross-sectional design was used. Selected drug-specific quality indicators proposed by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare in 2003 were used to assess the quality of drug prescribing. This study included 3705 residents. Their mean age was 85 years and 72% were women. The mean number of prescribed drugs was 10.3 per resident. The proportion of residents with prescriptions for psychotropic drugs was 80% in NHs and 85% in NHDs. The prevalence of each drug-specific quality indicator was as follows: long-acting benzodiazepines 16.4% (NHs) versus 11.7% (NHDs), anticholinergic drugs 20.7% versus 18.5%, drug duplication 14.6% versus 13.6%, three or more psychotropic drugs 25.6% versus 35.3%, class C interactions (drug combinations that may require dose adjustment) 41.9% versus 38.7% and class D interactions (drug combinations that should be

  17. Application of the STOPP/START criteria: a systematic review of the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing in older adults, and evidence of clinical, humanistic and economic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Taylor, B; Sketris, I; Hayden, J; Byrne, S; O'Sullivan, D; Christie, R

    2013-10-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) has significant clinical, humanistic and economic impacts. Identifying PIP in older adults may reduce their burden of adverse drug events. Tools with explicit criteria are being developed to screen for PIP in this population. These tools vary in their ability to identify PIP in specific care settings and jurisdictions due to such factors as local prescribing practices and formularies. One promising set of screening tools are the STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Person's potentially inappropriate Prescriptions) and START (Screening Tool of Alert doctors to the Right Treatment) criteria. We conducted a systematic review of research studies that describe the application of the STOPP/START criteria and examined the evidence of the impact of STOPP/START on clinical, humanistic and economic outcomes in older adults. We performed a systematic review of studies from relevant biomedical databases and grey literature sources published from January 2007 to January 2012. We searched citation and reference lists and contacted content experts to identify additional studies. Two authors independently selected studies using a predefined protocol. We did not restrict selection to particular study designs; however, non-English studies were excluded during the selection process. Independent extraction of articles by two authors used predefined data fields. For randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing STOPP/START to other explicit criteria, we assessed risk of bias using an adapted tool. We included 13 studies: a single randomized controlled trial and 12 observational studies. We performed a descriptive analysis as heterogeneity of study populations, interventions and study design precluded meta-analysis. All observational studies reported the prevalence of PIP; however, the application of the criteria was not consistent across all studies. Seven of the observational studies compared STOPP/START with other explicit

  18. Evaluation of prescribing quality in nursing homes based on drug-specific indicators: The Bergen district nursing home (BEDNURS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Ruths

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available To examine prescribing quality among nursing home patients. Methods: A cross sectional study in 23 nursing homes, based on drug charts. The evaluation of prescribing quality was based on selected drug-specific indicators established by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between prescribing indicators and predictors related to patient (age, gender, drug number and institution (nurse and physician staff time characteristics. Results: A total of 1513 nursing home patients (76% women, mean age 85 years were included in the study. On average, the patients used 5.1 (SD 2.5 standing medications. Laxatives were most commonly used (58%, followed by loop-diuretics (35%, antidepressants (31%, and anti-thrombotic agents (27%. Altogether 850 (56% patients used at least one potentially inappropriate prescription (PIP, including long-term use of contact laxatives without proper indication (25%, long-acting benzodiazepines (17%, and anticholinergic drugs (16%. The number of drugs used was the most important determinant for any PIP as well as for all individual indicators (p<0.001. Relatively younger patients were more likely to receive any PIP, and in particular anticholinergic drugs, multiple psychotropic drugs, and interacting drugs (p<0.05. Conclusion: Prescribing quality assessment by use of drug-specific indicators revealed great potentials for improving drug therapy in Norwegian nursing homes.

  19. A review on prescribing patterns of antihypertensive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarari, Noah; Rao, Narasinga; Peela, Jagannadha Rao; Ellafi, Khaled A; Shakila, Srikumar; Said, Abdul R; Nelapalli, Nagaraja Kumari; Min, Yupa; Tun, Kin Darli; Jamallulail, Syed Ibrahim; Rawal, Avinash Kousik; Ramanujam, Ranjani; Yedla, Ramesh Naidu; Kandregula, Dhilip Kumar; Argi, Anuradha; Peela, Laxmi Teja

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension continues to be an important public health concern because of its associated morbidity, mortality and economic impact on the society. It is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal complications. It has been estimated that by 2025, 1.56 billion individuals will have hypertension. The increasing prevalence of hypertension and the continually increasing expense of its treatment influence the prescribing patterns among physicians and compliance to the treatment by the patients. A number of national and international guidelines for the management of hypertension have been published. Since many years ago, diuretics were considered as the first-line drugs for treatment of hypertension therapy; however, the recent guidelines by the Joint National Commission (JNC8 guidelines) recommend both calcium channel blockers as well as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors as first-line drugs, in addition to diuretics. Antihypertensive drug combinations are generally used for effective long-term management and to treat comorbid conditions. This review focuses on the antihypertensive medication utilization, their cost factors, adherence to treatment by patients, and physicians' adherence to guidelines in prescribing medications in different settings including Indian scenario. The antihypertensive medication prescribing pattern studies help in monitoring, evaluation and necessary modifications to the prescribing habits to achieve rational and cost-effective treatment. Additionally, periodic updating of recommended guidelines and innovative drug formulations, and prescription monitoring studies help in rational use of antihypertensive drugs, which can be tailored to suit the patients' requirements, including those in the developing countries.

  20. New drugs in general practice: prescribing patterns and external influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentinus, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis several studies are presented with the objective to detect and elucidate the patterns by which new drugs are prescribed by general practitioners (GPs). Furthermore, we studied the influences of medical specialists and community pharmacists as important factors on the GP's decision to

  1. ETHICAL PRACTICES IN DRUG PRESCRIBING. A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN DOCTORS’ AND PHARMACISTS’ OPINION ABOUT DRUG PRESCRIBING IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LASZLO-ZOLTAN SZTANKOVSZKY

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The prescription of drugs is influenced by a number of factors with a great impact upon the health of the main beneficiaries of health services. The purpose of the study is to identify the perception of doctors and pharmacists on drug prescription practices adopted by doctors. Material and Methods: a number of 349 subjects (149 pharmacists and 200 doctors answered a survey about the perception of drug dispensing in Romania. Variables like age, work environment (urban, rural, length of employment were taken into account. Results: When prescribing a treatment, 93% of doctors follow the standard treatment protocol for the given diagnosis and 93,5% of them are declaring that personal resources are the main source for training while the percent appreciated by pharmacists is evaluated to 65,78%. A total of 50% of doctors are considering other criteria than the treatment when prescribing a drug (financial contribution for the patient or National Health Insurance House. A total of 59% of doctors are recommending overthe-counter products while pharmacists consider that is happening in more than 70% of the cases. Conclusions: There are differences of opinion between doctors and pharmacists regarding doctor’s practices of prescribing drugs to their patients, like: kinds of sponsorship for the continuing education, the relationship with the pharmaceutical representative or the frequency of prescribing over-the-counter products or supplements when they are recommending a certain treatment.

  2. Testing for diabetes in hospitalised patients prescribed antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David; Young, Corina; Esop, Raadiyya; Paton, Carol; Walwyn, Rebecca

    2004-08-01

    Studies using computer databases suggest that atypical antipsychotic agents are more likely to be associated with diabetes than are conventional drugs. To discover the extent of testing for diabetes mellitus in hospital in-patients prescribed antipsychotics. Prescription charts were screened to identify patients prescribed antipsychotics. Case notes were then searched for evidence of testing for diabetes. In all, 606 patients were prescribed antipsychotics, of whom 250 (41.3%) had evidence of prior testing for diabetes. Patients prescribed atypicals were 40% more likely to have been tested than those prescribed conventional drugs (RR =1.4,95% CI1.1-1.9). Adjusted odds ratios v. conventional antipsychotics for conventional antipsychotics for testing were significantly higher for clozapine (OR=4.64,95% CI 2.42-8.90), olanzapine (OR=1.85,95% CI1.04-3.30) and antipsychotic polypharmacy (OR=2.96,95% CI1.59-5.52). Testing for diabetes was undertaken in less than half of the patients studied. Testing was more common in those receiving atypical antipsychotics. Apparent differences in claimed causal association of the use of some antipsychotics with diabetes may in part reflect different rates of testing.

  3. Potentially inappropriate medications defined by STOPP criteria and the risk of adverse drug events in older hospitalized patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, Hilary

    2011-06-13

    Previous studies have not demonstrated a consistent association between potentially inappropriate medicines (PIMs) in older patients as defined by Beers criteria and avoidable adverse drug events (ADEs). This study aimed to assess whether PIMs defined by new STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Persons\\' potentially inappropriate Prescriptions) criteria are significantly associated with ADEs in older people with acute illness.

  4. [Prescribing drugs to patients receiving out-patient care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garjón Parra, F J

    2009-01-01

    Drug prescription has evolved to deal mainly with chronic diseases. Nowadays, repeating prescriptions using computers results in problems if this is not done with adequate control. Steps proposed for appropriate prescription are: defining the problem; specifying the objective; selecting the drug; initiating therapy with appropriate details; giving information; regular evaluation; considering cost; and using tools to reduce errors. Published recommendations for prescription, which have focused on elderly patients, include: avoiding polypharmacy; carrying out a regular medication review; stopping any current drugs that are not indicated and prescribing new drugs that have a clear indication; avoiding drugs that have deleterious effects; using dosages that are suitable for the age and renal function; using simple drug regimes and appropriate administration systems; considering non-pharmacological treatments; limiting the number of practitioners prescribing for each patient; and avoiding treating adverse drug reactions with further drugs. Examples of compliance with those recommendations in the Navarre Health Service, extracted from the prescription information system, are provided. The measures for improving prescription are: education, auditing, collaboration between health professionals and use of electronic tools.

  5. Drug Dosing in Patients with Renal Insufficiency in a Hospital Setting using Electronic Prescribing and Automated Reporting of Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anita L.; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Marinakis, Christianna;

    2014-01-01

    . We conclude that despite implementation of electronic prescribing and automated reporting of eGFR, patients with renal insufficiency may still be exposed to inappropriate drug use, with potential increased risk of adverse effects. Initiatives to reduce medication errors such as the use of electronic......GFR in the range of 10-49 ml/min/1.73m(2) were included. We identified 436 episodes with administration of renal risk drugs (prescribed to 183 patients): 410 drugs required dose adjustment according to the eGFR and 26 should be avoided. In total, the use or dosing of 66 (15%) of the 436 renal risk drugs...

  6. Polypharmacy in chronic diseases-Reduction of Inappropriate Medication and Adverse drug events in older populations by electronic Decision Support (PRIMA-eDS): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönnichsen, Andreas; Trampisch, Ulrike S; Rieckert, Anja; Piccoliori, Giuliano; Vögele, Anna; Flamm, Maria; Johansson, Tim; Esmail, Aneez; Reeves, David; Löffler, Christin; Höck, Jennifer; Klaassen-Mielke, Renate; Trampisch, Hans Joachim; Kunnamo, Ilkka

    2016-01-29

    Multimorbidity is increasing in aging populations with a corresponding increase in polypharmacy as well as inappropriate prescribing. Depending on definitions, 25-50 % of patients aged 75 years or older are exposed to at least five drugs. Evidence is increasing that polypharmacy, even when guidelines advise the prescribing of each drug individually, can potentially cause more harm than benefit to older patients, due to factors such as drug-drug and drug-disease interactions. Several approaches reducing polypharmacy and inappropriate prescribing have been proposed, but evidence showing a benefit of these measures regarding clinically relevant endpoints is scarce. There is an urgent need to implement more effective strategies. We therefore set out to develop an evidence-based electronic decision support (eDS) tool to aid physicians in reducing inappropriate prescribing and test its effectiveness in a large-scale cluster-randomized controlled trial. The "Polypharmacy in chronic diseases-Reduction of Inappropriate Medication and Adverse drug events in older populations" (PRIMA)-eDS tool is a tool comprising an indication check and recommendations for the reduction of polypharmacy and inappropriate prescribing based on systematic reviews and guidelines, the European list of inappropriate medications for older people, the SFINX-database of interactions, the PHARAO-database on adverse effects, and the RENBASE-database on renal dosing. The tool will be evaluated in a cluster-randomized controlled trial involving 325 general practitioners (GPs) and around 3500 patients across five study centres in the United Kingdom, Germany, Austria and Italy. GP practices will be asked to recruit 11 patients aged 75 years or older who are taking at least eight medications and will be cluster-randomized after completion of patient recruitment. Intervention GPs will have access to the PRIMA-eDS tool, while control GPs will treat their patients according to current guidelines (usual care

  7. Drug Use Evaluation of Three Widely Prescribed Antibiotics in a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mohammadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug utilization studies are helpful in understanding the current practice. We have conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the relevant use of a group of most commonly prescribed antibiotics in a teaching hospital in Iran.  The results of this study may be of help for clinicians to improve the patient care.Methods: Patients who received parenteral ceftazidim, vancomycin and amikacin from December2010 to May 2011 were enrolled in this study. Patient’s data including demographic, length of Hospital stay, drug allergy, first and final diagnosis were recorded in a predesigned data collection form. American Hospital Formulary Services (AHFS book were used as a reference for evaluation of study drug indication and dosing according to diagnosis and microbiological culture. Defined Daily Dose (DDD of each drug extracted from Anatomic and Therapeutic Chemical classification system (ATC/DDD and drug usage data evaluated by calculating the ratio of prescribed drug to its DDD.Results: The ratio of prescribed daily dose to DDD was 0.78, 0.95 and 0.86 for amikacin, ceftazidime and vancomycin respectively. Between amikacin group, 43 patients (86% received drug empirically, the number of empiric treatments for ceftazidim and vancomycin were 45(90% and 44 patients (88%. The renal function tests (Blood Urea Nitrogen, Serum Creatinin were evaluated in 56% of amikacin group, 64% in ceftazidime group and 78% in vancomycin group.Conclusion: The results of this study indicate the need to establish continuing medical education (CME courses for physicians to familiarize them with standards required to use and monitor these agents.

  8. Sources of drug information and their influence on the prescribing behaviour of doctors in a teaching hospital in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikoya, Kazeem Adeola; Oreagba, Ibrahim; Adeyemi, Olayinka

    2011-01-01

    Pharmaceutical drug promotion is a means of informing health professionals about new drugs. The approach is often times unethical and inappropriate and may promote irrational prescribing. Dearth of information on impact of pharmaceutical drug promotion on prescribing behaviour of doctors in developing African countries has necessitated this study. We therefore aimed to determine the sources of drug information for doctors working in a teaching hospital in Nigeria and to assess the self-reported impact of the sources on their prescribing behaviour. A total of 163 doctors working at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan in Nigeria were evaluated with a questionnaire for their demographics and sources of drug information. For doctors who relied on drug promotion, they were asked to self-report and self-rate their opinion on extent of interactions with pharmaceutical companies as well as how such interactions had impacted on their prescribing behaviour. Apart from the demographics, each question was evaluated with a typical five-level Likert item. Data analyses were with simple descriptive statistics. Of the 400 doctors working at UCH, only 40.8% participated in the study. Drug information was sourced from colleagues (161, 98.8%), reference books (158, 96.9%), pharmaceutical sales representatives-PSRs (152, 93.2%), promotion materials (151, 92.6%), scientific papers/journals/internet (149, 91.4%), and drug promotion forum/product launches (144, 88.3%). Each source was highly utilized but there was no wide variation in their pattern of use. According to the self-report of over a half of the respondents, PSRs was an accurate and reliable drug information resource; PSRs increased their awareness of the promoted drugs; and their prescribing behaviours were influenced by information from PSRs. Respondents tend to rely on a broad range of drug information resources which include potentially inappropriate resources such as PSRs. Since this study was based on self

  9. Trends and interaction of polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate prescribing in primary care over 15 years in Ireland: a repeated cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Frank; Hardy, Colin; Bennett, Kathleen; Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine: (1) changes in polypharmacy in 1997, 2002, 2007 and 2012 and; (2) changes in potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) prevalence and the relationship between PIP and polypharmacy in individuals aged ≥65 years over this period in Ireland. Methods This repeated cross-sectional study using pharmacy claims data included all individuals eligible for the General Medical Services scheme in the former Eastern Health Board region of Ireland in 1997, 2002, 2007 and 2012 (range 338 025–539 752 individuals). Outcomes evaluated were prevalence of polypharmacy (being prescribed ≥5 regular medicines) and excessive polypharmacy (≥10 regular medicines) in all individuals and PIP prevalence in those aged ≥65 years determined by 30 criteria from the Screening Tool for Older Persons’ Prescriptions. Results The prevalence of polypharmacy increased from 1997 to 2012, particularly among older individuals (from 17.8% to 60.4% in those aged ≥65 years). The adjusted incident rate ratio for polypharmacy in 2012 compared to 1997 was 4.16 (95% CI 3.23 to 5.36), and for excessive polypharmacy it was 10.53 (8.58 to 12.91). Prevalence of PIP rose from 32.6% in 1997 to 37.3% in 2012. High-dose aspirin and digoxin prescribing decreased over time, but long-term proton pump inhibitors at maximal dose increased substantially (from 0.8% to 23.8%). The odds of having any PIP in 2012 were lower compared to 1997 after controlling for gender and level of polypharmacy, OR 0.39 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.4). Conclusions Accounting for the marked increase in polypharmacy, prescribing quality appears to have improved with a reduction in the odds of having PIP from 1997 to 2012. With growing numbers of people taking multiple regular medicines, strategies to address the related challenges of polypharmacy and PIP are needed. PMID:26384726

  10. Trends and interaction of polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate prescribing in primary care over 15 years in Ireland: a repeated cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Frank; Hardy, Colin; Bennett, Kathleen; Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom

    2015-09-18

    To examine: (1) changes in polypharmacy in 1997, 2002, 2007 and 2012 and; (2) changes in potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) prevalence and the relationship between PIP and polypharmacy in individuals aged ≥65 years over this period in Ireland. This repeated cross-sectional study using pharmacy claims data included all individuals eligible for the General Medical Services scheme in the former Eastern Health Board region of Ireland in 1997, 2002, 2007 and 2012 (range 338,025-539,752 individuals). Outcomes evaluated were prevalence of polypharmacy (being prescribed ≥5 regular medicines) and excessive polypharmacy (≥10 regular medicines) in all individuals and PIP prevalence in those aged ≥65 years determined by 30 criteria from the Screening Tool for Older Persons' Prescriptions. The prevalence of polypharmacy increased from 1997 to 2012, particularly among older individuals (from 17.8% to 60.4% in those aged ≥65 years). The adjusted incident rate ratio for polypharmacy in 2012 compared to 1997 was 4.16 (95% CI 3.23 to 5.36), and for excessive polypharmacy it was 10.53 (8.58 to 12.91). Prevalence of PIP rose from 32.6% in 1997 to 37.3% in 2012. High-dose aspirin and digoxin prescribing decreased over time, but long-term proton pump inhibitors at maximal dose increased substantially (from 0.8% to 23.8%). The odds of having any PIP in 2012 were lower compared to 1997 after controlling for gender and level of polypharmacy, OR 0.39 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.4). Accounting for the marked increase in polypharmacy, prescribing quality appears to have improved with a reduction in the odds of having PIP from 1997 to 2012. With growing numbers of people taking multiple regular medicines, strategies to address the related challenges of polypharmacy and PIP are needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Monitoring of Patients Aged 0–2 Years Drug Prescribing Pattern Used Indicator from WHO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Priyadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate drug used by patients 0–2 years old using five World Health Organization guideline for prescribing indicators, which include average number of drugs per encounter, percentage of drugs prescribed by generic name, percentage of encounters with an antibiotics, injection prescribed, and drugs prescribed from essential drugs list or formulary. Outpatient prescription of patients 0–2 years old period Januari–Desember 2012 were collected retrospectively in one of health facility in Bandung. Average number of drugs per encounter was gained by dividing 6350 drugs with 2741 prescriptions. Percentage of using generic drugs was 9,19 %, antibiotics were 67,53 % and no injections per encounters, whereas percentage of drugs prescribed from essential drugs list was 45,02 %. The result showed that usage of generic drugs and essential drugs were low while the usage of antibiotics is relatively higher than World Health Organization recommendation.

  12. Prescribing pattern and appropriateness of drug treatment of diarrhoea in hospitalised children at a tertiary care hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigar R Panchal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To analyze the prescribing pattern and appropriateness of drug treatment of diarrhoea in hospitalized children. The economic burden of the disease and adverse drug reactions (ADRs occurring during the course of treatment was also studied. Materials and Methods: It was a prospective, observational, single center study undertaken in pediatric inpatients of diarrhea, aged one month to twelve years over a period of eighteen months at a tertiary care teaching hospital in western India. Modified Kunin's criteria along with the guidelines set by the Indian Academy of Pediatrics (IAP and WHO were followed for assessing the appropriateness of the antimicrobials prescribed. The adverse drug reactions occurring during course of the treatment were noted and the economic burden of the disease was calculated as direct and indirect costs. Results: A total of 103 patients were enrolled, of whom 45% were in the age group of one month to one year. Diarrhoea with some dehydration was diagnosed in 50.5% patients followed by severe dehydration (34.9% and no dehydration (14.6%. The number of drugs and antimicrobials prescribed per patient were 7.53±1.87 and 1.92±0.67, respectively. Rehydration fluids (31.6% and antimicrobials (25.5% were the commonest drug groups prescribed. Among the antimicrobials, cefotaxime, cotrimoxazole and amoxicillin with clavulanic acid were frequently prescribed. Appropriate antibacterial therapy was given in only 13% of the cases. Only one ADR due to cotrimoxazole was observed. The economic burden of the disease was calculated to be Rs. 3164.81 per patient. Conclusion: Inappropriate use of antimicrobials was seen in the study. Emphasis on proper diagnosis and treatment, education and availability of locally effective guidelines may help in a better and judicious use of drugs in children.

  13. Structured Pharmaceutical Analysis of the Systematic Tool to Reduce Inappropriate Prescribing Is an Effective Method for Final-Year Medical Students to Improve Polypharmacy Skills : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, Carolina J. P. W.; van Doorn, Adriaan B. D.; van Kalles, Anouk; de Wildt, Dick J.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; Van de Kamp, Henrieke J.; Jansen, Paul A. F.

    Medical students may not be adequately trained to prescribe appropriately to older adults with polypharmacy. This study addressed how to teach students to minimize inappropriate polypharmacy. Final-year medical students (N = 106) from two Dutch schools of medicine participated in this randomized

  14. Structured pharmaceutical analysis of the Systematic Tool to Reduce Inappropriate Prescribing is an effective method for final-year medical students to improve polypharmacy skills : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, Carolina J P W; van Doorn, Adriaan B D; van Kalles, Anouk; de Wildt, Dick J; Brouwers, Jacobus R B J; van de Kamp, Henrieke J; Jansen, Paul A F

    Medical students may not be adequately trained to prescribe appropriately to older adults with polypharmacy. This study addressed how to teach students to minimize inappropriate polypharmacy. Final-year medical students (N = 106) from two Dutch schools of medicine participated in this randomized

  15. Putting Pediatric Off Label Prescribing on the Map: A Study to Understand which Children, Medications and Physicians are Involved in Prescribing Drugs for Unapproved Uses

    OpenAIRE

    Bazzano, Alicia Theresa Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prescribing medications for an indication or age outside of the terms of U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval is called off label prescribing. In children, off label prescribing has resulted in drug disasters and increased adverse events and has been the subject of recent legislation promoting medication study. Off label prescribing appears to be a very common pediatric practice; nonetheless, the pharmacoepidemiology of off label prescribing has not been systematically...

  16. An educational intervention on drug use in nursing homes improves health outcomes resource utilization and reduces inappropriate drug prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gollarte, Fermín; Baleriola-Júlvez, José; Ferrero-López, Isabel; Cuenllas-Díaz, Álvaro; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2014-12-01

    Inappropriate drug prescription is a common problem in people living in nursing homes and is linked to adverse health outcomes. This study assessed the effect of an educational intervention directed to nursing home physicians in reducing inappropriate prescription and improving health outcomes and resource utilization. Prospective, randomized, multicenter study. A private organization of nursing homes in Spain. Sixty nursing home physicians caring for approximately 3900 nursing home residents in 37 centers were randomized to receive an educational intervention (30) or as a control group (30). 10 hours educational program, followed by on demand support by phone. Outcomes were assessed in 1018 randomly selected nursing home residents. Appropriateness of drug use [measured by the Screening Tool of Older Persons Prescriptions (STOPP) and Screening Tool to Alert Doctors to Right Treatment (START) criteria], incidence of selected geriatric syndromes (falls, delirium) and health resource utilization (visits to physicians and nursing homes, visits to the emergency room, days of hospitalization) were recorded for 3 months before the intervention started and 3 months after the intervention finished. O total of 716 residents finished the study (344 cared for by the intervention group physicians, 372 cared for by control physicians). Mean age was 84.4 ± 12.7 years; 73% were women. The mean number of inappropriate drugs (STOPP criteria) was higher at the end of the study in the control than in the intervention group (1.29 ± 1.56 vs 0.81 ± 1.13), as was the number of residents on 6 or more drugs (76.5% vs.67.0%), using antipsychotics (9.1% vs 3.2%) or duplicate medications (32.5% vs 9.2%). The number of fallers increased in the control group (from 19.3% to 28%) and did not significantly change in the intervention group (from 25.3% to 23.9%); the number of residents with delirium increased in the control group (from 3.8% to 9.1%) and decreased in the intervention group (from 6

  17. PHYSICIAN PRESCRIBING PRACTICES AND ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS: A Proposal for Further FDA Regulation of Prescription Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Corrigan, Kerry A.

    1995-01-01

    In 1938 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) adopted regulations which created a category of prescription drugs to be distributed only by order of a physician or other licensed medical personnel. This categorization, along with the extensive regulation of the approval, labelling and marketing of human drugs, has substantially reduced the risks which accompanied self-medication. However, the current regulatory regime does not place any limits on physician prescribing. This shortfall in regul...

  18. New drug prescribing by hospital doctors: the nature and meaning of knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Helen; Walley, Tom

    2006-04-01

    In the UK the high cost of new drugs is partly accountable for the growth in spending on prescription drugs. Most prescribing takes place in general practice and the influence of secondary care prescribing on primary care prescribing is well recognized; yet the factors that influence hospital prescribing have been little researched. Drawing on accounts of actual prescribing events from hospital doctors from a range of specialties, we investigated the processes by which new drugs come into practice, from hospital doctors' awareness of new drugs to the assimilation and interpretation of evidential sources. The determinants of new drug prescribing were interconnected within four forms of knowledge: scientific knowledge, social knowledge, patient knowledge and experiential knowledge. Furthermore, the nature of knowledge could only be understood within its situated context. The revelation of multiple and contingent forms of knowledge highlights the problematic nature of knowledge construction within the approaches of evidence-based medicine.

  19. Metabolic drug interactions - the impact of prescribed drug regimens on the medication safety.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fialova, D.; Vrbensky, K.; Topinkova, E.; Vlcek, J.; Soerbye, L.W.; Wagner, C.; Bernabei, R.

    2005-01-01

    Background and objective: Risk/benefit profile of prescribed drug regimens is unkown. Over 60% of commonly used medications interact on metabolic pathways (cytochrom P450 (CYP450), uridyl-glucuronyl tranferasis (UGT I, II) and P-glycoprotein (PGP) transport). Using an up-to-date knowledge on metabo

  20. Antiepileptic drug prescribing before, during and after pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlton, Rachel; Garne, Ester; Wang, Hao;

    2015-01-01

    and after pregnancy were identified in each of the databases. AED prescribing patterns were analysed, and the choice of AEDs and co-prescribing of folic acid were evaluated. Results In total, 978 957 women with 1 248 713 deliveries were identified. In all regions, AED prescribing declined during pregnancy...... co-prescribed with high-dose folic acid: ranging from 1.0% (CI950.3–1.8%) in Emilia Romagna to 33.5% (CI9528.7–38.4%) in Wales. Conclusion The country's differences in prescribing patterns may suggest different use, knowledge or interpretation of the scientific evidence base. The low co......-prescribing of folic acid indicates that more needs to be done to better inform clinicians and women of childbearing age taking AEDs about the need to offer and receive complete preconception care....

  1. Pharmacokinetic interactions between herbal medicines and prescribed drugs: focus on drug metabolic enzymes and transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qiang; Liu, Kexin

    2014-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been widely used for thousands of years, and now are gaining continued popularity worldwide as a complementary or alternative treatment for a variety of diseases, rehabilitation and health care. Since herbal medicines contain more than one pharmacologically active ingredient and are commonly used with many prescribed drugs, there are potential herb-drug interactions. A variety of reported herb-drug interactions are of pharmacokinetic origin, arising from the effects of herbal medicines on metabolic enzymes and/or transporters. Such an alteration in metabolism or transport can result in changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (e.g., induction or inhibition of metabolic enzymes, and modulation of uptake and efflux transporters), leading to changed pharmacokinetics of the concomitantly prescribed drugs. Pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions have more clinical significance as pharmacokinetic parameters such as the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) or the elimination half-life (t1/2) of the concomitant drug alter. This review summarizes the mechanism underlying herb-drug interactions and the approaches to identify the interactions, and discusses pharmacokinetic interactions of eight widely used herbal medicines (Ginkgo biloba, ginseng, garlic, black cohosh, Echinacea, milk thistle, kava, and St. John's wort) with conventional drugs, using various in vitro, animal in vivo, and clinical studies. The increasing understanding of pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions will make health care professionals and patients pay more attention to the potential interactions.

  2. An audit of prescribing practices for benzodiazepines and Z-drugs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cadogan, C

    2015-03-01

    Concerns persist over the use of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs in Ireland. A prospective prescription audit was conducted in 81 community pharmacies across Ireland over a four week period. The study sought to assess the level of prescription compliance with key components of benzodiazepine and Z-drug prescribing guidelines. 28% of audit booklets issued were returned, yielding data on 4,418 prescriptions. The findings suggest that little progress has been made in improving the prescribing of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs in Ireland in the decade since publication of the Benzodiazepine Committee\\'s report. Fewer than one fifth of prescriptions (18.8%) were fully compliant with the assessment criteria and the majority (53.7%) had multiple discrepancies. This study highlights the importance of monitoring and auditing benzodiazepine and Z-drug prescribing practices. Interventions involving patients, prescribers and pharmacists are required to improve the prescribing and use of these medications in Ireland.

  3. Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and demand for antibiotics in patients with upper respiratory tract infections is hardly different in female versus male patients as seen in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Kathrine; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Siersma, Volkert

    2015-01-01

    Background: Unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics is a major public health concern. General practitioners (GPs) prescribe most antibiotics, often for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), and have in general been shown to prescribe antibiotics more often to women. No studies have examined...... of a cross-sectional study including 15 022 patients with URTI (acute rhinitis, acute otitis media, acute sinusitis, acute pharyngotonsillitis) from Argentina, Denmark, Lithuania, Russia, Spain and Sweden (HAPPY AUDIT Project). The association between gender and unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions...

  4. Replacing hormone therapy-is the decline in prescribing sustained, and are nonhormonal drugs substituted?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, Stefan; Kolling, Pieternel; Toben, Marjolijn; Visser, Sipke T.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: After two cautioning landmark studies in 2002 and 2003, a dramatic decrease in hormonal therapy (HT) prescribing for menopausal symptoms was seen. Our objectives were to (1) determine whether this decline in HT prescribing sustained until 2007 and (2) investigate nonhormonal drug prescri

  5. Prescribing patterns of gastrointestinal drugs in private clinics in Benghazi-Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouh M. H. Aljarari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prescription analysis can pinpoint areas of improvement in encounters issued by prescribing physicians. The present study was carried out to analyze prescribing trends for outpatients among consultants in the city of Benghazi-Libya. Methods: A total of 4000 prescriptions were collected from private pharmacies around the city of Benghazi, Libya. Indicators addressed included the patient's name, age, sex, and address, and the physician's name, address, and signature. The percentage of prescriptions lacking this information was calculated. Drugs prescribed by dosage, duration of treatment were also considered. The study focused on the commonly prescribed classes of gastrointestinal drugs and the most frequently prescribed drug of each common class. No attempt was made to evaluate the incidence of various gastrointestinal disorders. Results are expressed as frequency and percentage of prescribed medicines. Results: Information present in prescriptions and pertaining to the patient were name (2972, 74.3%, age (468, 11.7%, date of visit (107, 2.7% while those for prescriber were name (1902, 47.6% and signature (3612, 90.3%. None of the prescriptions contained sex of patient, his/her address, or registration number of the prescriber. All prescribed drugs were in brand names. Polypharmacy was not evident as all prescriptions contained 1-2 drugs. The number of prescriptions with a gastrointestinal drug(s counted to 421 (10.5% out of the total 4000 prescriptions. The most commonly prescribed classes of gastrointestinal drugs include in order, anti-hyperacidity, anti-emetics, anti-spasmodic, laxatives and anti-diarrheal with the most frequently prescribed drug of each therapeutic class being omeprazole (67, 48.9%, metoclopramide (57, 57%, hyoscine-N-butyl bromide (42, 55.3%, bisacodyl (44, 59.5% and loperamide (30, 88.3% respectively. Conclusions: The results of the present study indicate the need to improve prescribing among physicians, a task

  6. Physicians' Non-Uniform Approach to Prescribing Drugs to Older Patients - A Qualitative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Due; Petersen, Janne; Andersen, Ove

    2017-01-01

    Multi-morbidity and polypharmacy are common in older patients and increase their susceptibility to adverse drug events and hospitalizations. Rational drug prescription is critical, however, little is known about physicians' perspectives on how to prescribe drugs for older patients. The aim...

  7. Prescribing trends of statins in Scotland: A drug utilization study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadul M. Helali

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Statins are highly effective in managing hypercholesterolaemia in patients with or without chronic heart disease due to extensive evidence for safety, efficacy and cost effectiveness. Observational cross sectional retrospective cohort study was done in approximately 200 primary care practices in Scotland. Frequency, rates and time trends for statin prescriptions together with demographic data and the prescribing patterns for high dose simvastatin and newer statins in its place was measured. 63%, 27%, 5%, 4% and 1% patients were prescribed simvastatin, atorvastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin and fluvastatin respectively (n=1,91370. Prevalence for individual statin as well as for all statin prescriptions, significantly increased (p<0.05. Except rosuvastatin the incidence of other statins prescription significantly decreased (p<0.05. The highest number of patients, 884 (24% switched to atorvastatin from high dose simvastatin. Increase in prevalent use and decrease in incident use of statins, implies the diminished cardiovascular disease related mortality and subsequent increased life expectancy of patients with cardiovascular disease.

  8. Evaluation of trends of drug-prescribing patterns based on WHO prescribing indicators at outpatient departments of four hospitals in southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summoro TS

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Temesgen Sidamo Summoro,1 Kassa Daka Gidebo,2 Zewde Zemma Kanche,1 Eskinder Wolka Woticha2 1School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences and Medicine, Wolaita Sodo University, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia; 2School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences and Medicine, Wolaita Sodo University, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia Background: Rational prescribing is a primary step to ensure rational drug use. Often, half of the medicines are prescribed irrationally and half of these are even used incorrectly as the patients fail to take their medicines appropriately. The aim of this research was to evaluate drug-prescribing patterns of four hospitals in southern Ethiopia.Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted between May 15 and June 25, 2014, to evaluate the drug-prescribing patterns based on the World health Organization (WHO prescribing indicators. The prescription papers, kept for the last 1 year in the outpatient departments of the four hospitals, were analyzed according to WHO guidelines. Also, prescriptions in the hospitals were analyzed to determine the most frequently prescribed drugs. All the statistical calculations were performed using SPSS® version 20.0 software.Results and discussion: The average number of drugs per prescription ranges from 1.82±0.90 to 2.28±0.90, whereas the percentage of use of antibiotics and injections ranged from 46.7 to 85 and 15 to 61.7, respectively. The average percentages of drugs prescribed by generic name and from the essential drugs list were 95.8 and 94.1, respectively. Anti-infective and analgesic drugs are found to be the most frequently prescribed medicines. In terms of polypharmacy, there was a slight deviation in prescribing patterns from what is acceptable according to the WHO criteria. Prescribing by generic name and from essential drug list was almost optimal. There was a significant deviation in the use of injectables in two of the four hospitals (50%, whereas their use in the other

  9. Patterns of drug prescribing in a hospital in dubai, United arab emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Si; Al-Shaqra, M; Hajjar, H; Shamout, A; Wess, L

    2008-03-01

    To determine the pattern of drug prescription by consultants in a private hospital in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 1190 prescriptions were collected from the hospital's pharmacy over 30 days. In total, 2659 drugs were prescribed. The mean number of drugs per encounter was 2.2. Only 4.4% of all drugs prescribed were generic. Polypharmacy was observed in only 7.5% of all encounters. Information about the prescribing physician and the patient was invariably deficient. Name of patient, age, and gender were absent in 2.9%, 9.7%, and 12% of prescriptions, respectively. In addition, none of the prescriptions mentioned address, diagnosis, or allergy of the patient. Name of physician, signature, speciality and license or registration number were omitted in 12.2%, 10.3%, 20.3%, and 54.9% of prescriptions. The most commonly prescribed therapeutic classes of drugs (and principal drug in each class) were as follows: 23.4% non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, Diclofenac sodium being 51.6%), 21.4% antibiotics (amoxicillin-clavulanate 13.5%), and 11.5% gastrointestinal drugs (GI, Hyoscine-N-butylbromide 28.1%). Other therapeutic classes included endocrine drugs (6.1%), vitamin supplements (5.9%), nasal decongestants (4%), antihistaminics (3.8%) and cardiovascular drugs (2.6%). Antibiotic injections accounted for 7.4% of all antibiotics prescribed, which was equivalent to 1.6% of all prescriptions. Other agents prescribed in small proportions of encounters collectively amounted to 21.3%. This study reveals the prescription trends, and indicates possible areas of improvement in prescription practice.

  10. Exploring chronic myeloid leukemia patients' reasons for not adhering to the oral anticancer drug imatinib as prescribed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Lina; Clifford, Sarah; Barber, Nick; Marin, David

    2011-05-01

    Nonadherence has been shown to be frequent amongst chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients prescribed imatinib, which results in reduced clinical response and increased healthcare costs. However, little is known about the reasons why CML patients frequently do not take their imatinib as prescribed. The current study explored CML patients' experience of taking, or not taking, imatinib therapy through in-depth interviews with twenty-one patients. Their adherence had been previously measured using a medication events monitoring device. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed in accordance with established techniques. Patients revealed a variety of reasons for their nonadherence. Major themes that emerged from the data were the intentional and unintentional reasons for nonadherence. Furthermore, as a result of information received from health care professionals, several patients felt inappropriately reassured that their nonadherence would not have a detrimental effect on their clinical response. Factors that seemed to favour adherence were finding ways to deal with side effects and using prompts as reminders to take the medicine. This study forms a basis on which to build future adherence research and may help to develop interventions designed to ensure that patients with CML and other cancers adhere optimally to their oral drugs treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Determinants of the range of drugs prescribed in general practice: a cross-sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dijk Liset

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current health policies assume that prescribing is more efficient and rational when general practitioners (GPs work with a formulary or restricted drugs lists and thus with a limited range of drugs. Therefore we studied determinants of the range of drugs prescribed by general practitioners, distinguishing general GP-characteristics, characteristics of the practice setting, characteristics of the patient population and information sources used by GPs. Methods Secondary analysis was carried out on data from the Second Dutch Survey in General Practice. Data were available for 138 GPs working in 93 practices. ATC-coded prescription data from electronic medical records, census data and data from GP/practice questionnaires were analyzed with multilevel techniques. Results The average GP writes prescriptions for 233 different drugs, i.e. 30% of the available drugs on the market within one year. There is considerable variation between ATC main groups and subgroups and between GPs. GPs with larger patient lists, GPs with higher prescribing volumes and GPs who frequently receive representatives from the pharmaceutical industry have a broader range when controlled for other variables. Conclusion The range of drugs prescribed is a useful instrument for analysing GPs' prescribing behaviour. It shows both variation between GPs and between therapeutic groups. Statistically significant relationships found were in line with the hypotheses formulated, like the one concerning the influence of the industry. Further research should be done into the relationship between the range and quality of prescribing and the reasons why some GPs prescribe a greater number of different drugs than others.

  12. [Prescribed and dispensed in the third trimester of pregnancy drugs: What practices and risks?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, G; Mottet, N; Mairot, P; Baudier, F; Carel, D; Goguey, M; Riethmuller, D; Limat, S

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the prescribing of drugs to pregnant women during the third trimester of pregnancy. The retrospective analysis is interested by pregnant women from August 2009 to April 2011, living in Franche-Comté. The used data are recorded in the database of the French Health Insurance Service. Drugs prescribing were analyzed and classified according to three categories: drugs that are contraindicated, not recommended drugs and drugs that are used. This classification is based on two databases: the Summaries of Product Characteristics of Vidal 2010 and data from the National Security Agency of Medicines. The potential exposure of patients was pointed out. On 15,027 patients, 80% had a prescription. Six percent of prescriptions containing drugs not recommended and 1% drugs that contraindicated. Therapeutic classes identified are analgesics, anti-infective drugs and medicines supplementing with vitamins and minerals. Contraindicated drugs (10%) are NSAIDs, rubella vaccine, cyclins and ACE inhibitors and ARBs. Approximately 2.7% of women were potentially exposed to these drugs. Despite the recommendations of the ANSM, some drugs that are contraindicated are prescribed for pregnant women in their third trimester of pregnancy. In the absence of studies, the decision must be made on a case by case basis by assessing the risk-benefit ratio. Particular care is to bring about the drugs taken in self-medication. Information and advice are key steps to avoid incidents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Bioequivalence studies of drugs prescribed mainly for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilveray, Iain J

    2011-01-01

    The basic components of pharmacokinetics are absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. During pregnancy there may be changes in one or many of these components. Early drug studies did not include a representative proportion of women, however, researchers as well as regulators agree that studies on the sex differences in the disposition of drugs are important, but at what stage in the clinical trial process? Except for drugs used only in women, such as those for estrogen-dependent breast cancer, caution prevails and the differences are usually studied at phase 3. Studies in pregnant women are much rarer but some do get done, e.g., with antivirals and antimalarials, where the positive risk-benefit of these agents is the likelihood that fetal transfer of these drugs might help protect the fetus. Women are being included in pharmacokinetic studies for new drug applications in accordance with the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH), U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and Health Canada (HC) guidances. A new look at bioequivalence studies, to compare results in men and women, would help determine if interactions of formulation and gender are a problem.

  14. Prescribing patterns of antihypertensive drugs in geriatric population in tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renoy Philip

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the major chronic diseases with high mortality and morbidity in the today’s world. Present study was to assess the prescribing pattern of antihypertensive medications in geriatric population suffering mainly from hypertension with or without co morbidities like Diabetes Mellitus (DM. A prospective observational study was carried out for a period of six months in an in-patient general medicine department. Elderly patients who have been diagnosed with pure hypertension as per JNC 7 guidelines and hypertension with co- morbid condition like diabetes mellitus and patients receiving or prescribed with antihypertensive drugs were included. A total of 150 prescriptions were analyzed. The present study revealed that there were 93 patients with pure Hypertension and 57 patients with co morbid conditions like Diabetes Mellitus (DM. Among antihypertensive drugs in pure hypertensive cases, 53.76% of cases were prescribed with monotherapy, followed by 46.23% by combination therapy. The commonly prescribed antihypertensive monotherapy is calcium channel blockers. The most commonly prescribed combination therapy in severe cases was angiotensin receptor blockers with diuretics. This prescribing pattern of antihypertensives was as per Joint National Committee-7report on hypertension. In case of geriatric patients suffering from hypertension with Type 2 diabetes mellitus, most commonly prescribed antihypertensive as monotherapy was found to be amlodipine and combination therapy was telmisartan + hydrochlorothiazide.

  15. Patterns of drug prescribing in a hospital in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wess L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the pattern of drug prescription by consultants in a private hospital in Dubai, UnitedArab Emirates, 1190 prescriptions were collected from the hospital’s pharmacy over 30 days. In total,2659 drugs were prescribed. The mean number of drugs per encounter was 2.2. Only 4.4% of alldrugs prescribed were generic. Polypharmacy was observed in only 7.5% of all encounters.Information about the prescribing physician and the patient was invariably deficient. Name of patient,age, and gender were absent in 2.9%, 9.7%, and 12% of prescriptions, respectively. In addition, noneof the prescriptions mentioned address, diagnosis, or allergy of the patient. Name of physician,signature, speciality and license or registration number were omitted in 12.2%, 10.3%, 20.3%, and54.9% of prescriptions. The most commonly prescribed therapeutic classes of drugs (and principaldrug in each class were as follows: 23.4% non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, Diclofenacsodium being 51.6%, 21.4% antibiotics (amoxicillin-clavulanate 13.5%, and 11.5% gastrointestinaldrugs (GI, Hyoscine-N-butylbromide 28.1%. Other therapeutic classes included endocrine drugs(6.1%, vitamin supplements (5.9%, nasal decongestants (4%, antihistaminics (3.8% andcardiovascular drugs (2.6%. Antibiotic injections accounted for 7.4% of all antibiotics prescribed,which was equivalent to 1.6% of all prescriptions. Other agents prescribed in small proportions ofencounters collectively amounted to 21.3%. This study reveals the prescription trends, and indicatespossible areas of improvement in prescription practice.

  16. Proper use of drugs and relation between purchasing power and cost of treatment prescribed in Casamance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankhoba Dramé, Y

    2016-08-01

    In Senegal, health insurance is available only to employees in the private and public sector and to the elderly (through the Sesame program). The rest of the population, especially different categories of vulnerable people, has no health insurance. Their access to healthcare and to medications is thus limited. In this study, we sought to analyze the relation between purchasing power and costs of treatment prescribed in one city. We questioned the customers leaving pharmacies in Ziguinchor, the administrative center of the lower Casamance, in southern Senegal, and analyzed their prescriptions and over-the-counter purchases. In all, we examined 255 prescriptions/purchases including 643 drugs; 29.4% were written by prescribers in the public health sector. The customers with these prescriptions were less educated, had lower incomes, used taxis more often, and consulted nurses more often than customers with prescriptions from the private health sector. Injectables and INN (international nonproprietary names) were dispensed most often to customers with prescriptions. Dispensing was usually better when the drug was prescribed, and when it was prescribed by a doctor. Nurses appeared to be inadequately trained in the proper use of medications. The percentage of drugs purchased did not depend on the patients' financial means or educational level. Those who most often acquired all of the drugs prescribed were those who had consulted a doctor rather than another type of healthcare provider.

  17. Antibacterial Drugs Prescribed for Dogs and Cats in Sweden and Norway 1990–1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greko C

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The usage of veterinary antibacterial drugs in dogs and cats in Sweden and Norway for the period 1990–1998 was investigated by use of drug wholesalers' statistics. Additionally, usage of human antibacterial drugs in these species in Sweden was investigated by use of prescription data for the period 1996–1998. On average, more than 50% of the prescribed veterinary antibacterials in Sweden were beta-lactam antibiotics. In Norway, about 75% of the preparations prescribed for dogs and cats contained sulfonamides and trimethoprim. Furthermore, the prescription data from Sweden showed a reduced usage of human antibacterials prescribed for dogs and cats since the beginning of the 1980s. Approximately 20% of the prescribed packages for dogs in the years 1996–1998 were human approved drugs. The corresponding figure for cats was 13%. The differences between the countries in the choice of antibacterial drugs can be explained by differences in the availability of approved preparations during the study period. The consumption of veterinary antibacterials in dogs and cats in Sweden during the period was in the range of 3% to 8% of the total use of veterinary antibacterials. The corresponding figures in Norway were in the range of 3% to 7%. It is of vital importance to study usage patterns of antibacterial drugs in dogs and cats in surveillance and control of bacterial resistance, but also in discussions of therapeutic appropriateness. Therefore, further research is needed in this area.

  18. Antiepileptic drugs prescribed in pregnancy and prevalence of major congenital malformations: comparative prevalence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Irene; Collings, Shuk-Li; McCrea, Rachel L; Nazareth, Irwin; Osborn, David P; Cowen, Phil J; Sammon, Cormac J

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of major congenital malformations associated with antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment in pregnancy. Patients and methods Using data from The Health Improvement Network, we identified women who have given live birth and their offspring. Four subgroups were selected based on the AED treatment in early pregnancy, valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and women not receiving AED treatment. We compared the prevalence of major congenital malformations within children of these four groups and estimated prevalence ratios (PRs) using Poisson regression adjusted for maternal age, sex of child, quintiles of Townsend deprivation score and indication for treatment. Results In total, 240,071 women were included in the study. A total of 229 women were prescribed valproate in pregnancy, 357 were prescribed lamotrigine and 334 were prescribed carbamazepine and 239,151 women were not prescribed AEDs. Fifteen out of 229 (6.6%) women prescribed valproate gave birth to a child with a major congenital malformation. The figures for lamotrigine, carbamazepine and women not prescribed AEDs were 2.7%, 3.3% and 2.2%, respectively. The prevalence of major congenital malformation was similar for women prescribed lamotrigine or carbamazepine compared to women with no AED treatment in pregnancy. For women prescribed valproate in polytherapy, the prevalence was fourfold higher. After adjustments, the effect of estimates attenuated, but the prevalence remained two- to threefold higher in women prescribed valproate. Conclusion The results of our study suggest that lamotrigine and carbamazepine are safer treatment options than valproate in pregnancy and should be considered as alternative treatment options for women of childbearing potential and in pregnancy. PMID:28243149

  19. Paying Physicians to Prescribe Generic Drugs and Follow-On Biologics in the United States: e1001802

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ameet Sarpatwari; Niteesh K Choudhry; Jerry Avorn; Aaron S Kesselheim

    2015-01-01

    .... * Strategies to promote greater prescribing of generic drugs and follow-on biologics include traditional information-supplying programs such as formulary decision support and academic detailing...

  20. Drug prescribing pattern in ulcerative colitis in a tertiary care hospital: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukunda Narayanareddy

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Ulcerative colitis was more common in males. Aminosalicylates were the commonly prescribed drugs and a combination of aminosalicylate and steroid was frequently used regimen in our study. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(5.000: 1862-1865

  1. Paediatric drug prescribing. A comparison of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, E J; Bergman, U; Dahlström, M

    1989-01-01

    The prescribing of medicines for ambulant children below 14 years of age has been compared between Tenerife (Spain) and Sweden. Data obtained from a random sample of 1327 children in a prospective study in Tenerife were compared with data from 3901 children in a Swedish survey linking diagnosis and therapy. Upper respiratory tract infection was the main diagnosis in both countries and antibiotics was the most frequently prescribed drug group (28.2% in Tenerife and 28.8% in Sweden). Half of the children in Sweden did not receive any medication, but only 10% of those in Tenerife did not receive a prescription. Children who received a prescription on average got 1.4 drugs in Sweden and 2.3 in Spain. Amongst the ten most commonly prescribed products in Sweden there were 11 active pharmacological principles as compared to 25 in Spain. These most frequently used preparations accounted for two thirds of all the prescriptions for children in Sweden and one third in Tenerife. In conclusion, drugs were significantly more often used to treat paediatric outpatients in Tenerife than in Sweden. The prescribing physician in Spain also chose a wider variety of drugs and more commonly used fixed combination products.

  2. 42 CFR 441.25 - Prohibition on FFP for certain prescribed drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... by FDA, made under its efficacy review program (see 21 CFR 310.6 for an explanation of this program... similar, as defined in 21 CFR 310.6, to a drug product that meets the conditions of paragraph (a) of this... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prohibition on FFP for certain prescribed...

  3. PRESENTING CLINICAL-PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS - A PROBLEM-BASED APPROACH FOR CHOOSING AND PRESCRIBING DRUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEVRIES, TPGM

    1993-01-01

    As a guide to the rational choice and prescribing of drugs a normative (ideal) problem-solving model has been developed. This model combines medical problem solving and decision analysis, practical medical aspects, and pharmacological facts and basic principles. It consists of a set of actions or st

  4. Should Physicians be Encouraged to use Generic Names and to Prescribe Generic Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Haris; Krasuski, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    While using the brand names seems like a trivial issue at the outset, using these names is inherently problematic. Cardiovascular drugs remain the most commonly prescribed drugs by the physicians. The junior doctors are likely to introject practices of their seniors and consequently to reciprocate from the experiences learnt from their preceptors. Using the generic names may be one way to facilitate prescription of the generic drugs who have a better cost profile and similar efficacy than the more expensive branded drugs. In this editorial, we have outlined several arguments to suggest the importance of using the generic names in academic discussions and clinical documentation.

  5. Pharmacy students teaching prescribers strategies to lower prescription drug costs for underserved patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Marilyn R; Frear, Meghan E; Cutler, Timothy W; Lightwood, James M; Fingado, Amanda R; Lai, Cindy J; Lipton, Helene Levens

    2013-09-01

    The rising costs of health care and, in particular, prescription drugs remains a challenge. Health professionals' ability to promote cost-effective prescription drug use is critical, yet this subject is not included consistently in the curriculum of most health professional schools. As experts in prescription drug selection, use, and cost, pharmacists are in a unique position to help manage prescription drug regimens for the best therapeutic outcome, while also helping to keep patients' out-of-pocket (OOP) prescription drug costs low. In addition to promoting interprofessional collaboration, pharmacy student-led lectures may provide an effective means to teach prescription drug cost-savings strategies to other health professional students and current prescribers. To describe and evaluate the impact of a 60- to 90-minute standardized, case-based lecture on prescribers' attitudes and knowledge about drug cost-containment strategies. Four trained pharmacy students delivered a lecture that focused on strategies to help underserved patients with their OOP prescription drug costs. This lecture was given to health professional students and prescribers across disciplines. For purposes of this study, underserved patients included those with no drug insurance, those with limited financial resources who were unable to pay for their prescription drugs, and those whose drug insurance had significant gaps in coverage (e.g., Medicare Part D patients). Lectures targeted future and current prescribers and were delivered in multiple settings (e.g., residents' seminars, medical grand rounds, required health policy courses for medical and nursing students). Pretest/posttest surveys were administered to assess the impact of the lecture on learners' (a) knowledge of strategies to improve underserved patients' access to needed prescription drugs; (b) willingness to address and discuss cost issues with patients; (c) likelihood of collaborating with other health care professionals; and (d

  6. Inappropriate benzodiazepine use in older adults and the risk of fracture

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: The Beers criteria for prescribing in elderly are well known and used for many drug utilization studies. We investigated the clinical value of the Beers criteria for benzodiazepine use, notably the association between inappropriate use and risk of fracture. METHODS: We performed a nested case-control study within the Rotterdam Study, a population-based cohort study in 7983 elderly. The proportion of 'inappropriate' benzodiazepine use according to the Beers criteria was compa...

  7. Do advertisements for antihypertensive drugs in Australia promote quality prescribing? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Brett D; Mansfield, Peter R; Spurling, Geoffrey K; Ward, Alison M

    2008-05-20

    Antihypertensive medications are widely prescribed by doctors and heavily promoted by the pharmaceutical industry. Despite strong evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of thiazide diuretics, trends in both promotion and prescription of antihypertensive drugs favour newer, less cost-effective agents. Observational evidence shows correlations between exposure to pharmaceutical promotion and less ideal prescribing. Our study therefore aimed to determine whether print advertisements for antihypertensive medications promote quality prescribing in hypertension. We performed a cross-sectional study of 113 advertisements for antihypertensive drugs from 4 general practice-oriented Australian medical publications in 2004. Advertisements were evaluated using a quality checklist based on a review of hypertension management guidelines. Main outcome measures included: frequency with which antihypertensive classes were advertised, promotion of thiazide class drugs as first line agents, use of statistical claims in advertisements, mention of harms and prices in the advertisements, promotion of assessment and treatment of cardiovascular risk, promotion of lifestyle modification, and targeting of particular patient subgroups. Thiazides were the most frequently advertised drug class (48.7% of advertisements), but were largely promoted in combination preparations. The only thiazide advertised as a single agent was the most expensive, indapamide. No advertisement specifically promoted any thiazide as a better first-line drug. Statistics in the advertisements tended to be expressed in relative rather than absolute terms. Drug costs were often reported, but without cost comparisons between drugs. Adverse effects were usually reported but largely confined to the advertisements' small print. Other than mentioning drug interactions with alcohol and salt, no advertisements promoted lifestyle modification. Few advertisements (2.7%) promoted the assessment of cardiovascular risk

  8. Do advertisements for antihypertensive drugs in Australia promote quality prescribing? A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spurling Geoffrey K

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antihypertensive medications are widely prescribed by doctors and heavily promoted by the pharmaceutical industry. Despite strong evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of thiazide diuretics, trends in both promotion and prescription of antihypertensive drugs favour newer, less cost-effective agents. Observational evidence shows correlations between exposure to pharmaceutical promotion and less ideal prescribing. Our study therefore aimed to determine whether print advertisements for antihypertensive medications promote quality prescribing in hypertension. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 113 advertisements for antihypertensive drugs from 4 general practice-oriented Australian medical publications in 2004. Advertisements were evaluated using a quality checklist based on a review of hypertension management guidelines. Main outcome measures included: frequency with which antihypertensive classes were advertised, promotion of thiazide class drugs as first line agents, use of statistical claims in advertisements, mention of harms and prices in the advertisements, promotion of assessment and treatment of cardiovascular risk, promotion of lifestyle modification, and targeting of particular patient subgroups. Results Thiazides were the most frequently advertised drug class (48.7% of advertisements, but were largely promoted in combination preparations. The only thiazide advertised as a single agent was the most expensive, indapamide. No advertisement specifically promoted any thiazide as a better first-line drug. Statistics in the advertisements tended to be expressed in relative rather than absolute terms. Drug costs were often reported, but without cost comparisons between drugs. Adverse effects were usually reported but largely confined to the advertisements' small print. Other than mentioning drug interactions with alcohol and salt, no advertisements promoted lifestyle modification. Few

  9. Antiepileptic drugs prescribed in pregnancy and prevalence of major congenital malformations: comparative prevalence studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen I

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Irene Petersen,1,2 Shuk-Li Collings,1,3 Rachel L McCrea,1 Irwin Nazareth,1 David P Osborn,4 Phil J Cowen,5 Cormac J Sammon1 1Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, London, UK; 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus N, Denmark; 3OXON Epidemiology, London, UK; 4Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, UK; 5University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of major congenital malformations associated with antiepileptic drug (AED treatment in pregnancy.Patients and methods: Using data from The Health Improvement Network, we identified women who have given live birth and their offspring. Four subgroups were selected based on the AED treatment in early pregnancy, valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and women not receiving AED treatment. We compared the prevalence of major congenital malformations within children of these four groups and estimated prevalence ratios (PRs using Poisson regression adjusted for maternal age, sex of child, quintiles of Townsend deprivation score and indication for treatment.Results: In total, 240,071 women were included in the study. A total of 229 women were prescribed valproate in pregnancy, 357 were prescribed lamotrigine and 334 were prescribed carbamazepine and 239,151 women were not prescribed AEDs. Fifteen out of 229 (6.6% women prescribed valproate gave birth to a child with a major congenital malformation. The figures for lamotrigine, carbamazepine and women not prescribed AEDs were 2.7%, 3.3% and 2.2%, respectively. The prevalence of major congenital malformation was similar for women prescribed lamotrigine or carbamazepine compared to women with no AED treatment in pregnancy. For women prescribed valproate in polytherapy, the prevalence was fourfold higher. After adjustments, the effect of estimates attenuated, but the prevalence remained two- to

  10. Potentially inappropriate prescriptions for older patients in long-term care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurin Danielle

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inappropriate medication use is a major healthcare issue for the elderly population. This study explored the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PIPs in long-term care in metropolitan Quebec. Methods A cross sectional chart review of 2,633 long-term care older patients of the Quebec City area was performed. An explicit criteria list for PIPs was developed based on the literature and validated by a modified Delphi method. Medication orders were reviewed to describe prescribing patterns and to determine the prevalence of PIPs. A multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of PIPs. Results Almost all residents (94.0% were receiving one or more prescribed medication; on average patients had 4.8 prescribed medications. A majority (54.7% of treated patients had a potentially inappropriate prescription (PIP. Most common PIPs were drug interactions (33.9% of treated patients, followed by potentially inappropriate duration (23.6%, potentially inappropriate medication (14.7% and potentially inappropriate dosage (9.6%. PIPs were most frequent for medications of the central nervous system (10.8% of prescribed medication. The likelihood of PIP increased significantly as the number of drugs prescribed increased (odds ratio [OR]: 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33 – 1.43 and with the length of stay (OR: 1.78, CI: 1.43 – 2.20. On the other hand, the risk of receiving a PIP decreased with age. Conclusion Potentially inappropriate prescribing is a serious problem in the highly medicated long-term care population in metropolitan Quebec. Use of explicit criteria lists may help identify the most critical issues and prioritize interventions to improve quality of care and patient safety.

  11. [Inappropriate prescription in older patients: the STOPP/START criteria].

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delgado Silveira, Eva

    2009-09-01

    Older people are a heterogeneous group of patients, often with multiple comorbidities for which they are prescribed a large number of drugs, leading to an increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADR) and drug interactions. This risk is compounded by physiological age-related changes in physiology, changes in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as by disease-related, functional and social issues. Inappropriate prescription of drugs is common in the older individuals and contributes to the increased risk of ADR. Several tools have been developed to detect potentially inappropriate prescription, the most frequently used in Spain being Beers\\' criteria. However, the value of these criteria is limited, especially as they were developed in a different healthcare system. In this article, the Spanish version of a new tool to detect potentially inappropriate prescriptions-STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Person\\'s Prescriptions) and START (Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right i.e. appropriate, indicated Treatment) criteria-is presented. The creation, development, reliability, and use of these criteria in routine practice is described and discussed. These criteria have shown better sensitivity than Beers\\' criteria in detecting prescription problems and have the added value of being able to detect not only inappropriate prescription of some drugs, but also the omission of well indicated drugs. The STOPP\\/START criteria could become a useful screening tool to improve prescription in older people.

  12. Change in antihypertensive drug prescribing after guideline implementation: a controlled before and after study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Antihypertensive drug choices and treatment levels are not in accordance with the existing guidelines. We aimed to assess the impact of a guideline implementation intervention on antihypertensive drug prescribing. Methods In this controlled before and after study, the effects of a multifaceted (education, audit and feedback, local care pathway) quality programme was evaluated. The intervention was carried out in a health centre between 2002 and 2003. From each health care unit (n = 31), a doctor-nurse pair was trained to act as peer facilitators in the intervention. All antihypertensive drugs prescribed by 25 facilitator general practitioners (intervention GPs) and 53 control GPs were retrieved from the nationwide Prescription Register for three-month periods in 2001 and 2003. The proportions of patients receiving specific antihypertensive drugs and multiple antihypertensive drugs were measured before and after the intervention for three subgroups of hypertension patients: hypertension only, with coronary heart disease, and with diabetes. Results In all subgroups, the use of multiple concurrent medications increased. For intervention patients with hypertension only, the odds ratio (OR) was 1.12 (95% CI 0.99, 1.25; p = 0.06) and for controls 1.13 (1.05, 1.21; p = 0.002). We observed no statistically significant differences in the change in the prescribing of specific antihypertensive agents between the intervention and control groups. The use of agents acting on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system increased in all subgroups (hypertension only intervention patients OR 1.19 (1.06, 1.34; p = 0.004) and controls OR 1.24 (1.15, 1.34; p < 0.0001). Conclusions A multifaceted guideline implementation intervention does not necessarily lead to significant changes in prescribing performance. Rigorous planning of the interventions and quality projects and their evaluation are essential. PMID:21849037

  13. Change in antihypertensive drug prescribing after guideline implementation: a controlled before and after study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helin-Salmivaara Arja

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antihypertensive drug choices and treatment levels are not in accordance with the existing guidelines. We aimed to assess the impact of a guideline implementation intervention on antihypertensive drug prescribing. Methods In this controlled before and after study, the effects of a multifaceted (education, audit and feedback, local care pathway quality programme was evaluated. The intervention was carried out in a health centre between 2002 and 2003. From each health care unit (n = 31, a doctor-nurse pair was trained to act as peer facilitators in the intervention. All antihypertensive drugs prescribed by 25 facilitator general practitioners (intervention GPs and 53 control GPs were retrieved from the nationwide Prescription Register for three-month periods in 2001 and 2003. The proportions of patients receiving specific antihypertensive drugs and multiple antihypertensive drugs were measured before and after the intervention for three subgroups of hypertension patients: hypertension only, with coronary heart disease, and with diabetes. Results In all subgroups, the use of multiple concurrent medications increased. For intervention patients with hypertension only, the odds ratio (OR was 1.12 (95% CI 0.99, 1.25; p = 0.06 and for controls 1.13 (1.05, 1.21; p = 0.002. We observed no statistically significant differences in the change in the prescribing of specific antihypertensive agents between the intervention and control groups. The use of agents acting on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system increased in all subgroups (hypertension only intervention patients OR 1.19 (1.06, 1.34; p = 0.004 and controls OR 1.24 (1.15, 1.34; p Conclusions A multifaceted guideline implementation intervention does not necessarily lead to significant changes in prescribing performance. Rigorous planning of the interventions and quality projects and their evaluation are essential.

  14. Economic impact of prescribing error prevention with computerized physician order entry of injectable antineoplastic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerich, V; Borg, C; Villanueva, C; Thiery-Vuillemin, A; Helias, P; Rohrlich, P-S; Demarchi, M; Pivot, X; Limat, S

    2013-03-01

    A cost-benefit analysis was carried out to determine the potential economic costs and benefits of pharmaceutical analysis in preventing prescribing errors for full standardized injectable antineoplastic drugs computerized physician order entry, in a pharmaceutical unit (University teaching hospital), compared with theoretical setting with no pharmaceutical analysis. The viewpoint is that of the payer or the French national Public Health Insurance system, and is limited to hospital cost (only direct medical costs related to net cost and net benefit. A decision analysis model was performed to compare two strategies: with pharmaceutical analysis (± pharmacy intervention) and without pharmaceutical analysis. are expressed in terms of benefit-to-cost ratio and total benefit. The robustness of the results was assessed through a series of one-way sensitivity analyses. Over 1 year, prescribing error incidence was estimated at 1.5% [1.3-1.7], i.e. 218 avoided prescribing errors. Potential avoidance of hospital stay was estimated at 419 days or 1.9 ± 0.3 days per prescribing error. Cost-benefit analysis could estimate a net benefit-to-cost ratio of 33.3 (€17.34/€0.52) and a total benefit at €16.82 per pharmaceutical analysis or €249,844 per year. The sensitivity analysis showed robustness of results. Our study shows a substantial economic benefit of pharmaceutical analysis and intervention in the prevention of prescribing errors. The clinical pharmacist adds both value and economic benefit, making it possible to avoid additional use of expensive antineoplastic drugs and hospitalization. Computerized physician order entry of antineoplastic drugs improves the relevance of clinical pharmacist interventions, expanding pharmaceutical analysis and also the role of the pharmacist.

  15. Teaching of medical pharmacology: the need to nurture the early development of desired attitudes for safe and rational drug prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwee, Matthew C E

    2009-09-01

    Pharmacology, as a basic medical science discipline, provides the scientific basis of therapeutics, i.e. the scientific foundation for safe and rational prescribing of drugs. The public, lay media, and the medical profession have raised serious concerns over the high incidence of errors of drug prescribing which compromise patient safety, including death of some patients, attributed mainly to inadequate teaching of medical pharmacology and, consequently, to medical graduates lacking skills in safe and effective drug prescribing. There is also overwhelming evidence that the pervasive and prevalent doctor-drug industry relationships have a strong influence over the prescribing habits and drug education of doctors. The British Pharmacological Society and American Association of Medical Colleges have crafted some insightful guidelines, including the learning of desired attitudes, for designing a medical pharmacology curriculum aimed at enhancing patient safety. This article will critically review the major issues relating to errors of drug prescribing, including the need to nurture the early development of desired attitudes which foster safe and rational drug prescribing. A simple educational approach, using a task analysis of drug prescribing, is applied to identify desired attitudes which should be incorporated into a basic pharmacology course for medical students in the twenty-first century.

  16. Using spatial analysis to demonstrate the heterogeneity of the cardiovascular drug-prescribing pattern in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Tzu-Ming; Chen Yi-Chi; Cheng Ching-Lan; Kao Yang Yea-Huei

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Geographic Information Systems (GIS) combined with spatial analytical methods could be helpful in examining patterns of drug use. Little attention has been paid to geographic variation of cardiovascular prescription use in Taiwan. The main objective was to use local spatial association statistics to test whether or not the cardiovascular medication-prescribing pattern is homogenous across 352 townships in Taiwan. Methods The statistical methods used were the global measure...

  17. Did FDA Decisionmaking Affect Anti-Psychotic Drug Prescribing in Children?: A Time-Trend Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    Full Text Available Following Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval, many drugs are prescribed for non-FDA-approved ("off-label" uses. If substantial evidence supports the efficacy and safety of off-label indications, manufacturers can pursue formal FDA approval through supplemental new drug applications (sNDAs. We evaluated the effect of FDA determinations on pediatric sNDAs for antipsychotic drugs on prescribing of these products in children.Retrospective, segmented time-series analysis using new prescription claims during 2003-2012 for three atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone. FDA approved the sNDAs for pediatric use of olanzapine and quetiapine in December 2009, but did not approve the sNDA for pediatric use of ziprasidone.During the months before FDA approval of its pediatric sNDA, new prescriptions of olanzapine decreased for both children and adults. After FDA approval, the increase in prescribing trends was similar for both age groups (P = 0.47 for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder; P = 0.37 for other indications. Comparable decreases in use of quetiapine were observed between pediatrics and adults following FDA approval of its pediatric sNDA (P = 0.88; P = 0.63. Prescribing of ziprasidone decreased similarly for pediatric and adult patients after FDA non-approval of its pediatric sNDA (P = 0.61; P = 0.79.The FDA's sNDA determinations relating to use of antipsychotics in children did not result in changes in use that favored the approved sNDAs and disfavored the unapproved sNDA. Improved communication may help translate the agency's expert judgments to clinical practice.

  18. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF PRESCRIBING PATTERN OF ANTIHYPERTENSIVE DRUGS IN TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL, BANGALORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand R

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Hypertension is the most common cardiovascular disease . Sustained arterial hypertension damages blood vessel s in kidney , heart , brain and leads to an increased incidence of renal failure , coronary disease , heart failure and stroke. Effective pharmacologic lowering of blood pressure has been shown to prevent damage to blood vessel and so substantially reduce morbidity and mortality rates. AIM : This drug utilization study wa s intended to find out the preferred drug group prescribed either alone o r in combinations and their adherence to the JNC7 guidelines. Furthermore the prescription variations as regards to t he age and concomitant illness we re also analyzed . METHODS AND MATERIAL : Drug utilization data were analyzed after getting the patient ’ s pa rticulars regarding age , sex , drugs , concomitant illness etc. in the proforma . RESULTS : After analysis , it was found that most frequently prescribed antihypertensive drugs were ARBs ( 58 %, CCBs ( 50 %, Beta blockers(15 % , Diuretics ( 14 %. 68 % received monotherapy while remaining 32 % received combination therapy . CONCLUSION : The prescription pattern was found to be partly in accordance with JNC VII guidelines . KEY WORDS : Antihypertensives , Drug utilization , ARBs

  19. Clinical pharmacist evaluation of medication inappropriateness in the emergency department of a teaching hospital in Malta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    West LM

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate prescribing remains an important priority in all medical areas of practice. Objective: The objective of this study was to apply a Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI to identify issues of inappropriate prescribing amongst patients admitted from the Emergency Department (ED.Method: This study was carried out at Malta’s general hospital on 125 patients following a two-week pilot period on 10 patients. Patients aged 18 years and over and on medication therapy were included. Medication treatment for inappropriateness was assessed by using the MAI. Under-prescribing was also screened for. Results: Treatment charts of 125 patients, including 697 medications, were assessed using a MAI. Overall, 115 (92% patients had one or more medications with one or more MAI criteria rated as inappropriate, giving a total of 384 (55.1% medications prescribed inappropriately. The mean SD MAI score per drug was 1.78 (SD=2.19. The most common medication classes with appropriateness problems were supplements (20.1%, antibiotics (20.0% and steroids (19.8%. The most common problems involved incorrect directions (26% and incorrect dosages (18.5%. There were 36 omitted medications with untreated indications. Conclusion: There is considerable inappropriate prescribing which could have significant negative effects regarding patient care.

  20. [High prevalence of off-label and unlicensed drug prescribing in a Brazilian intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lilian de Abreu; Ibiapina, Cássio da Cunha; Machado, Márcia Gomes Penido; Fagundes, Eleonora Druve Tavares

    2012-01-01

    To describe the use and determine the prevalence of off-label and unlicensed drug use prescribing in a pediatric intensive care unit in a Southeastern Brazilian hospital Cross-sectional study of inpatients in a pediatric intensive care unit from May 2008 through January 2009. The classification according to the Brazilian regulatory agency (Agência de Vigilância Sanitária - Anvisa) approval criteria was based on the Anvisa electronic package insert list, Pharmaceuticals Dictionary, and the analysis was conducted through R software. We analysed 1,054 prescription items for 73 patients. Females predominated (52%), and the patients' age ranged from 0 to 16 years. Among the prescribed items, 23.4% were off-label, 12.6% were unlicensed, 1.4% were both off-label and unlicensed, 86% had at least one item off-label, and 67% had at least one unlicensed drug. The most frequently prescribed therapeutic groups were systemic anti-bacterial, analgesic, psycholeptic, and antiasmathic agents. The current study results confirm the high prevalence of unlicensed and off-label drug use in a pediatric intensive care unit.

  1. Specialist prescribing of psychotropic drugs to older persons in Sweden - a register-based study of 188 024 older persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinsson Gunilla

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The situation for older persons with mental disorders other than dementia disorders has scarcely been studied. The older population is increasing worldwide and along with this increase the prevalence of mental disorders will also rise. The treatment of older persons with mental disorders entails complex challenges, with drugs constituting the major medical treatment. Knowledge of geriatric psychiatry is essential for providing older persons with appropriate treatment and care. This study aimed to evaluate the prescription of drugs for mental disorders to older persons (≥65 in Sweden, focused on the medical specialties of the prescribing physicians. Methods Data concerning drug treatment for older persons from 2006 to 2008 was gathered from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Mental disorders, defined as affective, psychotic and anxiety disorders (ICD-10 F20-42 were evaluated in order to identify associated drugs. Included was a total of 188 024 older individuals, who collectively filled 2 013 079 prescriptions for the treatment of mental disorders. Descriptive analyses were performed, including frequency distribution and 95% CI. The competence of the prescribers was analyzed by subdividing them into five groups: geriatricians, psychiatrists, general practitioners (GPs, other specialists, and physicians without specialist education. Results GPs represented the main prescribers, whereas geriatricians and psychiatrists rarely prescribed drugs to older persons. Benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants were the most commonly prescribed drugs. Women were prescribed drugs from geriatricians and psychiatrists to a greater extent than men. Conclusions This study examined the prescription of psychotropic drugs to older persons. Physicians specialized in older persons’ disorders and mental health were rarely the prescribers of these drugs. Contrary to clinical guidelines, benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants were

  2. Inappropriate benzodiazepine use in older adults and the risk of fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.S. van der Hooft (Cornelis); M.W.C.J. Schoofs (Marlette); G. Ziere; A. Hofman (Albert); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: The Beers criteria for prescribing in elderly are well known and used for many drug utilization studies. We investigated the clinical value of the Beers criteria for benzodiazepine use, notably the association between inappropriate use and risk of fracture. METHODS: We performed a

  3. The influence of hospital drug formulary policies on the prescribing patterns of proton pump inhibitors in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Due; Schou, Mette; Kristiansen, Anja Sparre

    2014-01-01

    AIM: This study had two aims: Firstly, to describe how prescriptions for proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in primary care were influenced by a change of the hospital drug policy, and secondly, to describe if a large discount on an expensive PPI (esomeprazole) to a hospital would influence prescribing...... policy on prescribings in primary care was measured by the likelihood of having a high-cost PPI prescribed before and after change of drug policy. RESULTS: In total, 9,341 hospital stays in 2009 and 2010 were included. The probability of a patient to be prescribed an expensive PPI after discharge...... for the recommended PPIs pantoprazole and lansoprazole to 14.6 and 26.1 %, respectively. The effect of a large discount on expensive PPI to hospital was 14.7 %, and this decreased to 2.6 % when coordinating drug policy in hospital and primary care. CONCLUSION: The likelihood of having an expensive PPI prescribed...

  4. [Appropriate medication prescribing in older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, H; Rambourg, P; Le Quellec, A; Ayach, L; Biboulet, P; Bismuth, M; Blain, A; Boulenger, J-P; Celton, B; Combe, B; Dauvilliers, Y; Davy, J-M; Geny, C; Hemmi, P; Hillaire-Buys, D; Jalabert, A; Jung, B; Leclercq, F; Léglise, M-S; Morel, J; Mourad, G; Ponrouch, M-P; Puisieux, F; Quantin, X; Quéré, I; Renard, E; Ribstein, J; Roch-Torreilles, I; Rolland, Y; Rosant, D; Terminet, A; Thuret, R; Villiet, M; Deshormières, N; Bourret, R; Bousquet, J; Jonquet, O; Millat, B

    2015-10-01

    Drug-induced adverse effects are one of the main avoidable causes of hospitalization in older people. Numerous lists of potentially inappropriate medications for older people have been published, as national and international guidelines for appropriate prescribing in numerous diseases and for different age categories. The present review describes the general rules for an appropriate prescribing in older people and summarizes, for the main conditions encountered in older people, medications that are too often under-prescribed, the precautions of use of the main drugs that induce adverse effects, and drugs for which the benefit to risk ratio is unfavourable in older people. All these data are assembled in educational tables designed to be printed in a practical pocket format and used in daily practice by prescribers, whether physicians, surgeons or pharmacists.

  5. Identification and prevalence of adverse drug events caused by potentially inappropriate medication in homebound elderly patients: a retrospective study using a nationwide survey in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A nationwide large-scale survey was conducted to identify the prevalence and causal medications of adverse drug events (ADEs) that are caused by potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) given to homebound elderly patients, factors associated with ADEs, and measures taken by pharmacists to manage ADEs and their effects on ADEs. Settings A questionnaire was mailed to 3321 pharmacies nationwide. It asked about the details of PIMs and ADEs of up to 5 patients for whom home visits w...

  6. Antiepileptic drug prescribing patterns in Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Natalie N; Baca, Christine B; Van Cott, Anne C; Parko, Karen L; Amuan, Megan E; Pugh, Mary Jo

    2015-05-01

    We examined patterns of antiepileptic drug (AED) use in a cohort of Iraq/Afghanistan war veterans (IAVs) who were previously identified as having epilepsy. We hypothesized that clinicians would be more likely to prescribe newer AEDs and would select specific AEDs to treat seizures based on patient characteristics including gender and comorbidities. From the cohort of IAVs previously identified with epilepsy between fiscal years 2009 and 2010, we selected those who received AEDs from the Veterans Health Administration in FY2010. Regimens were classified as monotherapy or polytherapy, and specific AED use was examine overall and by gender. Multivariable logistic regression examined associations of age; gender; race/ethnicity; medical, psychiatric, and neurological comorbidities; and receipt of neurology specialty care associated with the six most commonly used AEDs. Among 256,284 IAVs, 2123 met inclusion criteria (mean age: 33years; 89% men). Seventy-two percent (n=1526) received monotherapy, most commonly valproate (N=425) and levetiracetam (n=347). Sixty-one percent of those on monotherapy received a newer AED (levetiracetam, topiramate, lamotrigine, zonisamide, oxcarbazepine). Although fewer women than men received valproate, nearly 90% (N=45) were of reproductive age (≤45years). Antiepileptic drug prescribing patterns were associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder, cerebrovascular disease, dementia/cognitive impairment, headache, and receipt of neurological specialty care (all p<0.01). In this cohort of veterans with epilepsy, most received AED monotherapy and newer AEDs. Prescribing patterns were different for men and women. The patterns observed between AEDs and neurological/psychiatric comorbidities suggest that clinicians are practicing rational prescribing. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Governmental oversight of prescribing medications: history of the US Food and Drug Administration and prescriptive authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Linda S

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of drug regulation and awarding of prescriptive authority is a complex and sometimes convoluted process that can be confusing for health care providers. A review of the history of how drugs have been manufactured and dispensed helps explain why this process has been so laborious and complicated. Because the federal and state governments have the responsibility for protecting the public, most regulations have been passed with the intentions of ensuring consumer safety. The current system of laws and regulations is the result of many years of using the legal system to correct drug marketing that had adverse health consequences. Government oversight will continue as prescribing medications transitions to an electronic form and as health care professionals in addition to physicians seek to gain prescriptive authority.

  8. Using spatial analysis to demonstrate the heterogeneity of the cardiovascular drug-prescribing pattern in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Lan; Chen, Yi-Chi; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao

    2011-05-24

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) combined with spatial analytical methods could be helpful in examining patterns of drug use. Little attention has been paid to geographic variation of cardiovascular prescription use in Taiwan. The main objective was to use local spatial association statistics to test whether or not the cardiovascular medication-prescribing pattern is homogenous across 352 townships in Taiwan. The statistical methods used were the global measures of Moran's I and Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA). While Moran's I provides information on the overall spatial distribution of the data, LISA provides information on types of spatial association at the local level. LISA statistics can also be used to identify influential locations in spatial association analysis. The major classes of prescription cardiovascular drugs were taken from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), which has a coverage rate of over 97%. The dosage of each prescription was converted into defined daily doses to measure the consumption of each class of drugs. Data were analyzed with ArcGIS and GeoDa at the township level. The LISA statistics showed an unusual use of cardiovascular medications in the southern townships with high local variation. Patterns of drug use also showed more low-low spatial clusters (cold spots) than high-high spatial clusters (hot spots), and those low-low associations were clustered in the rural areas. The cardiovascular drug prescribing patterns were heterogeneous across Taiwan. In particular, a clear pattern of north-south disparity exists. Such spatial clustering helps prioritize the target areas that require better education concerning drug use.

  9. Using spatial analysis to demonstrate the heterogeneity of the cardiovascular drug-prescribing pattern in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Tzu-Ming

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographic Information Systems (GIS combined with spatial analytical methods could be helpful in examining patterns of drug use. Little attention has been paid to geographic variation of cardiovascular prescription use in Taiwan. The main objective was to use local spatial association statistics to test whether or not the cardiovascular medication-prescribing pattern is homogenous across 352 townships in Taiwan. Methods The statistical methods used were the global measures of Moran's I and Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA. While Moran's I provides information on the overall spatial distribution of the data, LISA provides information on types of spatial association at the local level. LISA statistics can also be used to identify influential locations in spatial association analysis. The major classes of prescription cardiovascular drugs were taken from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD, which has a coverage rate of over 97%. The dosage of each prescription was converted into defined daily doses to measure the consumption of each class of drugs. Data were analyzed with ArcGIS and GeoDa at the township level. Results The LISA statistics showed an unusual use of cardiovascular medications in the southern townships with high local variation. Patterns of drug use also showed more low-low spatial clusters (cold spots than high-high spatial clusters (hot spots, and those low-low associations were clustered in the rural areas. Conclusions The cardiovascular drug prescribing patterns were heterogeneous across Taiwan. In particular, a clear pattern of north-south disparity exists. Such spatial clustering helps prioritize the target areas that require better education concerning drug use.

  10. What Should Junior Doctors Know about the Drugs they Frequently Prescribe? A Delphi Study among Physicians in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, David; Disselhorst, Guus; Jansen, Bernard; Tichelaar, Jelle; van Agtmael, Michiel; de Vries, Theo; Richir, Milan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the information about commonly prescribed drugs that junior doctors should know in order to prescribe rationally in daily practice, defined as essential drug knowledge (EDK). A two-round Internet Delphi study was carried out involving general practitioners from one practice cluster, and registrars and consultants from two Dutch academic and eight teaching hospitals. A preliminary list of 377 potential EDK items for three commonly prescribed drugs was assessed on a dichotomous scale; an item was considered EDK if at least 80% consensus was reached. The consensus list of EDK items was discussed by the research team to identify similarities between the three drugs, with a view to forming a list of general EDK items applicable to other commonly prescribed drugs. Sixty experts considered 93 of the 377 items (25%) as EDK. These items were then used to form a list of 10 general EDK items. The list of EDK items identified by primary and secondary care doctors could be used in medical curricula and training programmes and for assessing the prescribing competence of future junior doctors. Further research is needed to evaluate the generalizability of this list for other commonly prescribed drugs.

  11. Pharmacoeconomics of antihypertensive drugs prescribed in a multispecialty hospital in South India

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    P S Dhivya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to evaluate the most cost-effective therapy among the different group of antihypertensive prescribed in a multispecialty hospital. According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, 104 hypertensive patients were selected. Participants were interviewed at about the demographic data. Initial clinical assessment of blood pressure (BP and pulse rate were done. They were prescribed monotherapy either with angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB (n = 7 or beta blocker (BB (n = 23 or calcium channel blocker (CCB (n = 9. Angiotensin converting enzyme with BB (n = 27, ARB with CCB (n = 17 and ARB with BB (n = 21 were prescribed in combination therapy. The cost of antihypertensive drugs was calculated using incremental cost for "per mmHg" reduction and cost for "per patient" reaching target BP. The data are analyzed using suitable statistical methods. ARB with BB shows significant reduction in BP. To maintain the targeted BP, BB is found to be cost-effective in both systolic BP (SBP and diastolic BP (DBP as well as in the reduction of "per mmHg" of DBP. In case of reduction of "per mmHg" of SBP ARB is cost-effective. Treatment of hypertension with BBs is cost-effective.

  12. Development and validation of a survey instrument for assessing prescribers' perception of computerized drug-drug interaction alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Fear, Kathleen; Chaffee, Bruce W; Zimmerman, Christopher R; Karls, Edward M; Gatwood, Justin D; Stevenson, James G; Pearlman, Mark D

    2011-12-01

    To develop a theoretically informed and empirically validated survey instrument for assessing prescribers' perception of computerized drug-drug interaction (DDI) alerts. The survey is grounded in the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology and an adapted accident causation model. Development of the instrument was also informed by a review of the extant literature on prescribers' attitude toward computerized medication safety alerts and common prescriber-provided reasons for overriding. To refine and validate the survey, we conducted a two-stage empirical validation study consisting of a pretest with a panel of domain experts followed by a field test among all eligible prescribers at our institution. The resulting survey instrument contains 28 questionnaire items assessing six theoretical dimensions: performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, perceived fatigue, and perceived use behavior. Satisfactory results were obtained from the field validation; however, a few potential issues were also identified. We analyzed these issues accordingly and the results led to the final survey instrument as well as usage recommendations. High override rates of computerized medication safety alerts have been a prevalent problem. They are usually caused by, or manifested in, issues of poor end user acceptance. However, standardized research tools for assessing and understanding end users' perception are currently lacking, which inhibits knowledge accumulation and consequently forgoes improvement opportunities. The survey instrument presented in this paper may help fill this methodological gap. We developed and empirically validated a survey instrument that may be useful for future research on DDI alerts and other types of computerized medication safety alerts more generally.

  13. [A pop-up menu linked to a computerized drug prescribing system. Prescribing pattern's feedback via a simple and quick method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovhed, I; Berglund, J; Oistämö, S; Lenhoff, K; Odeberg, H

    2001-12-12

    It takes time for a GP to acquire sufficient experience of a new drug to be able to prescribe competently. This article describes a project studying the use of computerized records to afford a group of GP's swift feedback on recently introduced drugs of special interest. In the south-east of Sweden a network of primary health care centers has been created in two neighboring counties. The pharmacies of the region are also taking part. When new drugs of particular interest are introduced, each participating GP will automatically see a pop-up menu, asking questions pertaining to each computer-assisted prescription. In the pharmacies, patients are given a questionnaire regarding their expectations with respect to the drug. In this way it will be possible to provide the individual GP swift feedback from a large number of colleagues and patients concerning the drug's effectiveness in clinical practice. We have now been studying the COX-2 inhibitors rofecoxib (Vioxx) and celecoxib (Celebrex). Results show that a pop-up menu used in this way provides the general practitioner quick feed-back on prescribing behavior as well as drug effectiveness in clinical practice.

  14. Drug-prescribing patterns during pregnancy in the tertiary care hospitals of Pakistan: a cross sectional study

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    Shaikh Abdul M

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rationale for use of drugs during pregnancy requires a careful assessment as in addition to the mother, the health and life of her unborn child is also at stake. Information on the use of drugs during pregnancy is not available in Pakistan. The aim of this study was to evaluate the patterns of drug prescriptions to pregnant women in tertiary care hospitals of Pakistan. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted at five tertiary care hospitals of Pakistan. Copies of outpatient medicinal prescriptions given to pregnant patients attending the antenatal clinics were collected. The drugs were classified according to the pharmacological class and their teratogenic potential. Results All the pregnant women attending the antenatal clinics received a prescription containing at least one drug. A total of 3769 distinct prescriptions given to different women were collected. Majority of the women who received the prescriptions belonged to third trimester (55.4% followed by second (33.6% and first trimester (11.0%. On an average, each prescription contained 1.66 ± 0.14 drugs. The obstetricians at Civil Hospital, Karachi and Chandka Medical College Hospital, Larkana showed a tendency of prescribing lesser number of drugs compared to those in other hospitals. Anti-anemic drugs including iron preparations and vitamin and mineral supplements (79.4% were the most frequently prescribed drugs followed by analgesics (6.2% and anti-bacterials (2.2%. 739 women (19.6% received prescriptions containing drugs other than vitamin or mineral supplements. Only 1275 (21.6% of all the prescribed drugs (n = 6100 were outside this vitamin/mineral supplement class. Out of these 1275 drugs, 29 (2.3% drugs were prescribed which are considered to be teratogenic. Misoprostol was the most frequently prescribed (n = 6 among the teratogenic drugs followed by carbimazole (n = 5 and methotrexate (n = 5. Twenty nine pregnant women (0.8% of all the women

  15. Use of potentially inappropriate medicines in elderly: A prospective study in medicine out-patient department of a tertiary care teaching hospital

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    Zaveri H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was undertaken with the aim to detect extent of drug use in elderly at medicine outpatient department at tertiary care hospital and to evaluate inappropriate prescribing with the help of Beers′ criteria 2002. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out at medicine out patient department of our hospital. 407 geriatric patients were included during the study period of three and half months. The data was collected in a proforma which included the patients′ details and the prescriptions. Results: The results reveal that 7.42% of total drugs were prescribed in an inappropriate manner and 23.59% of total patients received at least one inappropriate drug prescription. Administration of a drug which is avoided in elderly forms a common category of inappropriate drug use. Antihistamines, anticholinergic, sedatives and hypnotics and cardiac glycosides are the most common drug groups prescribed in inappropriate manner. Conclusion: To conclude, this study shows high prevalence of inappropriate use of drugs in geriatric practice suggesting urgent need for sincere efforts to improve the situation.

  16. An evaluation of the appropriateness and safety of nurse and midwife prescribing in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naughton, Corina

    2012-09-19

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical appropriateness and safety of nurse and midwife prescribing practice. BACKGROUND: The number of countries introducing nurse and midwife prescribing is increasing; however, concerns over patient safety remain. DESIGN: A multi-site documentation evaluation was conducted using purposeful and random sampling. The sample included 142 patients\\' records and 208 medications prescribed by 25 Registered Nurse Prescribers. METHODS: Data were extracted from patient and prescription records between March-May 2009. Two expert reviewers applied the modified Medication Appropriate Index tool (8 criteria) to each drug. The percentage of appropriate or inappropriate responses for each criterion was reported. Reviewer concordance was measured using the Cohen\\'s kappa statistic (inter-rater reliability). RESULTS: Nurse or midwife prescribers from eight hospitals working in seventeen different areas of practice were included. The reviewers judged that 95-96% of medicines prescribed were indicated and effective for the diagnosed condition. Criteria relating to dosage, directions, drug-drugs or disease-condition interaction, and duplication of therapy were judged appropriate in 87-92% of prescriptions. Duration of therapy received the lowest value at 76%. Overall, reviewers indicated that between 69 (reviewer 2)-80% (reviewer 1) of prescribing decisions met all eight criteria. CONCLUSION: The majority of nurse and midwife prescribing decisions were deemed safe and clinically appropriate. However, risk of inappropriate prescribing with the potential for drug errors was detected. Continuing education and evaluation of prescribing practice, especially related to drug and condition interactions, is required to maximize appropriate and safe prescribing.

  17. [Effectiveness of interventions for improving drug prescribing in Primary Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-González, Marco Antonio; Cabrera-Pivaral, Carlos Enrique; Orozco-Valerio, María de Jesús; Ramos-Herrera, Igor Martín

    2017-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of interventions for improving drug prescribing in Primary Health Care units. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Searches were made in MedLine(©), ScienceDirect(©), Springer(©), SciELO(©), Dialnet(©), RedALyC(©) and Imbiomed(©), in Spanish, English and Portuguese, using keywords "drug prescribing", "intervention studies" and "primary health care", indexed in each data base up to August 2014. Experimental and quasi-experimental studies were included that had a CASP-score>5 and that evaluated effect of any type intervention on the quality of drug prescription in Primary Health Care. A total of 522 articles were found, and an analysis was performed on 12 that reported 17 interventions: 64.7% educational, 23.5% incorporating pharmacists into the health team, and 11.8% on the use of computer applications. The strong "intervention/improvement" associations were educational interventions OR=2.47 (95% CI; 2.28 - 2.69), incorporation of pharmacists OR=3.28 (95% CI; 2.58 4.18), and use of computer applications OR=10.16 (95% CI; 8.81 -11.71). The use of interventions with computer applications showed to be more effective than educational interventions and incorporation pharmacists into the health team. Future studies are required that include economic variables such as, implementation costs, drug costs and other expenses associated with health care and treatment of diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Japanese Patients Prescribed Antithrombotic Drugs: Differences in Trends over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Tsuruoka, Nanae; Shimoda, Ryo; Higuchi, Toru; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Iwakiri, Ryuichi

    2014-06-01

    We studied the features of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients taking antithrombotic drugs. The records of 430 patients taking antithrombotic drugs who underwent emergency endoscopy for UGIB in Saga Medical School Hospital between 2002 and 2011 were studied. We also compared the characteristics of our cohort of 11,919 patients prescribed antithrombotic drugs in our hospital between 2002 and 2011. UBGI patients of variceal bleeding were not included in this study. 186 patients presented with UGIB in the first period (2002-2006) and 244 in the second period (2007-2011). The proportion of patients infected with Helicobacter pylori was lower in the second period, while the proportion taking antithrombotic drugs rose significantly. Peptic ulcer disease was responsible for the majority of bleeding episodes; however, bleeding from other sources is increasing. In the whole cohort, the risk of UGIB was 1.08%; however, of the 31.8% who also took an acid-secretion inhibitor only 18 (0.28%) developed bleeding. In contrast, 102 (1.87%) of those not taking an acid-secretion inhibitor developed UGIB, a statistically significant difference. Risk of UGIB in Japanese patients taking antithrombotics was 1.01% and the incidence is increasing. Acid-secretion inhibitors reduced the risk of antithrombotic drug-related UGIB.

  19. Utilization of potentially inappropriate medications in elderly patients in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India

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    Binit N Jhaveri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the use of potentially inappropriate medicines in elderly inpatients in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed for cases of elderly patients admitted between January 2010 and December 2010. Data on age, gender, diagnosis, duration of hospital stay, treatment, and outcome were collected. Prescriptions were assessed for the use of potentially inappropriate medications in geriatric patients by using American Geriatric Society Beer′s criteria (2012 and PRISCUS list (2010. Results: A total of 676 geriatric patients (52.12% females were admitted in the medicine ward. The average age of geriatric patients was 72.69 years. According to Beer′s criteria, at least one inappropriate medicine was prescribed in 590 (87.3% patients. Metoclopramide (54.3%, alprazolam (9%, diazepam (8%, digoxin > 0.125 mg/day (5%, and diclofenac (3.7% were the commonly used inappropriate medications. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in heart and renal failure patients was the commonly identified drug-disease interaction. According to PRISCUS list, at least one inappropriate medication was prescribed in 210 (31.06% patients. Conclusion: Use of inappropriate medicines is highly prevalent in elderly patients.

  20. Which Medication Is the Patient Taking at Admission to the Emergency Ward? Still Unclear Despite the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Engqvist

    Full Text Available Correct information on patients' medication is crucial for diagnosis and treatment in the Emergency Department. The aim of this study was to investigate the concordance between the admission chart and two other records of the patient's medication.This cohort study includes data on 168 patients over 18 years admitted to the Emergency Ward between September 1 and 30, 2008. The record kept by the general practitioner and the patient record of dispensed drugs in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register were compared to the admission chart record.Drug record discrepancies of potential clinical significance between the admission chart record and the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register or general practitioner record were present in 79 and 82 percent, respectively. For 63 percent of the studied patients the admission chart record did not include all drugs registered in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. For 62 percent the admission chart record did not include all drugs registered in the general practitioner record. In addition, for 32 percent of the patients the admission chart record included drugs not registered in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and for 52 percent the admission chart record included drugs not found in the general practitioner record. The most discordant drug classes were cardiovascular and CNS-active drugs. Clinically significant drug record discrepancies were more frequent in older patients with multiple medication and caregivers.The apparent absence of an accurate record of the patient's drugs at admission to the Emergency Ward constitutes a potential patient safety hazard. The available sources in Sweden, containing information on the drugs a particular patient is taking, do not seem to be up to date. These results highlight the importance of an accurate list of currently used drugs that follows the patient and can be accessed upon acute admission to the hospital.

  1. Potentially inappropriate medication use among institutionalized elderly individuals in southeastern Brazil

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    Mauro Cunha Xavier Pinto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the elderly population in Brazil has grown rapidly, as has concern for the health of this population. Institutionalization in nursing homes has appeared as an alternative form of health care for frail elderly that live alone. The present study evaluated the pharmacotherapy and inappropriate drug prescriptions for institutionalized elderly patients living in long-term institutions in southeastern Brazil. This research was conducted at five institutions with a total sample of 151 individuals aged at least 60 years. Databases were used to identify drug interactions, defined daily dose and inappropriate prescriptions. The prevalence of drug intake among the elderly was 95.36%, and there were an average of 3.31 ± 1.80 drug prescriptions per individual. Based on Beers criteria, the prevalence of inappropriate prescriptions was 25.83%. In addition, 70.2% of prescriptions were prescribed at a higher dosage than the defined daily dose (ATC/WHO. Potential drug interactions were identified for 54.11% of prescriptions; 81.42% of these were of moderate severity. The main inappropriate drugs were prescribed for cardiovascular and nervous system problems. Institutionalized elderly individuals presented a high consumption and misuse of medications, requiring professional intervention to monitor prescriptions and improve the quality of service for this population.

  2. [Potentially inappropriate medications in geriatrics: Which tools to detect them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnoyer, Aude; Guignard, Bertrand; Lang, Pierre-Olivier; Desmeules, Jules; Vogt-Ferrier, Nicole; Bonnabry, Pascal

    2016-11-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescriptions include over-prescription, which refers to prescription of more drugs than clinically needed, mis-prescription which refers to incorrect prescription of a drug that is needed (as per drug, dose, drug interactions, duration of therapy, duplication, follow-up, etc.) and under-prescription which stands for failure to prescribe drugs that are needed. They are associated with adverse drug events, increased use of health-care services, morbimortality and health-care costs, and poorer quality of life. Due to polymorbidity and polypharmacy, potentially inappropriate prescription is common among the elderly. In the last 2 decades, explicit indicators to detect inappropriate prescriptions were developed in geriatrics. The aim of this review is to summarize, compare and critically review existing explicit criteria. We conducted a systematic literature search in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar, from January 1991 to November 2015. The following keywords were used: "("inappropriate prescribing" [MeSH Terms] OR "medication errors" [MeSH Terms] AND "potentially inappropriate medications" [MeSH Terms] AND "elderly" [MeSH All field] AND "explicit criteria" [MeSH Terms])". Articles describing the development of new list of explicit indicators dedicated to geriatrics, in English and in French, were included in this review. Their characteristics, organization, content, and assessments of their validity and of the optimal tool for geriatrics are presented. Fourteen lists of explicit indicators were included in the review. An organization based on physiological systems and pathologies, as observed in ACOVE, 5th version of Beers criteria and STOPP/START enables quick application in general practice. A low overlap among criteria was observed between tools. This may be due to a lack of completeness for some tools. Mimica, ACOVE, PIEA, and STOPP/START are the most exhaustive ones, only the last three addressing the under

  3. DRUG UTILIZATION STUDY OF PSYCHOTROPIC DRUGS PRESCRIBED IN PSYCHIATRY OPD OF L. N. MEDICAL COLLEGE ASSOCIATED J. K. HOSPITAL, BHOPAL DISTRICT, MADHYA PRADESH

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    Richa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Utilization pattern of drugs varies from place to place and is influenced by differing patient characteristics, type of disease prevalent, cultural and environmental influences, socioeconomic states, availability of newer drugs and prescribing habit of physicians. Psychiatric disorders are one of the major causes of morbidity. Development of newer drugs like SSRIs and atypical antipsychotics has altered the treatment paradigms. Various factors like cost of drugs, local paradigms, etc. play a role in the selection of drug therapy and hence affect the outcome. Keeping this in mind, we conducted a study to delineate the various drugs used in psychiatric disorders. Psychotropic drugs have had a remarkable impact in psychiatric practice. However, their utilization in actual clinical practice, effectiveness and safety in real life situation needs continuous studies. So our aim to study the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity and analyse drug prescribing pattern in various psychiatric illnesses. METHODOLOGY A prospective cross sectional study was carried out for 6 months (Dec. 2014 - May. 2015 in psychiatry OPD of L. N. Medical College, Bhopal. Patients of all ages and both sexes were included in the study and 600 prescriptions were randomly selected. RESULT Antipsychotic drugs (75.33% were most frequently prescribed psychotropic drugs in various psychiatric disorders followed by Anti-Depressants (48.33% and Anxiolytics (26%. CONCLUSION This study shows that antipsychotics are the most common antipsychotic drugs prescribed in patients with psychotic illness. Depression is the most common disease. Prescription rate was higher in men between 21-40 yrs. age

  4. Practice characteristics and prescribing of cardiovascular drugs in areas with higher risk of CHD in Scotland: cross-sectional study

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    McLean Gary

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examine whether practices in areas with higher risks of CHD prescribe different levels of cardiovascular drugs and describe how they differ in GP and practice characteristics. Methods Propensity score matching was used to identify two groups of practices in Scotland. The cases were in areas with 5% or more of the population in South Asian ethnic groups. The controls were in areas with less than 1% of the population in South Asian ethnic groups and were matched for other population characteristics. Results The 39 case practices have lower prescribing rates than the matched controls for all heart disease drugs Significant different are found for six drugs (statins, ace Inhibitors, clopidogrel, thiazides, warfarin and digoxin. The differences range from 12.8% less for amlodipine to 43.9% for clopidogrel. The case practices also have lower prescribing costs than the unmatched group with the exception of ace inhibitors and aspirin. The highest prescribing costs for all drugs are found in the matched control group. The case practices are smaller than the controls, and have fewer GPs per 1,000 patients. Case practices have fewer quality markers and receive less in total resources, but have higher sums reimbursed to cover their employed staff costs. Conclusion Patients with higher risk of CHD tend to live in areas served by practices with lower prescribing rates and poorer structural characteristics. The scale of the differences in prescribing suggests that health care system factors rather than individual treatment decisions cause inequity in care. Identifying whether South Asian individuals are less likely to receive heart disease drugs than non South Asians requires individual-level prescribing data, which is currently not available in the UK.

  5. Drug prescribing data used in the assessment of general practitioners’ treatment of asthma and urinary tract infection – Experience from the European Drug Education Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Lagerløv

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available  ABSTRACTDescribing drug treatment given by general practitioners, and quantifying changes in their prescribingbehaviour due to educational intervention, were important parts of the method developed and appliedby the European Drug Education Project. Based on the physicians’ prescription data, individual patientswere defined as having either asthma or urinary tract infections. Prescribing indicators were establishedfor assessing the quality (acceptable or unacceptable of the drug treatment. The diagnose definitionsand prescribing indicators are discussed in more detail in relation to feeding back individual prescribingdata to educational groups of physicians to improve the quality of their drug therapy.

  6. Postmarketing review of intravenous acetaminophen dosing based on Food and Drug Administration prescribing guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dela Cruz Ubaldo, Catherine; Hall, Natalie Semaan; Le, Brenden

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the appropriateness of intravenous acetaminophen dosing-prescribed dose, frequency, duration, and indication-based on United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved prescribing guidelines and to evaluate the adverse effect profile of intravenous acetaminophen. Retrospective chart review. United States Navy medical center. Three hundred patients who received intravenous acetaminophen from August 1, 2011, to August 1, 2012. The indications, dose, frequency, and duration of intravenous acetaminophen were recorded for each patient. Adverse effects of intravenous acetaminophen were analyzed by thoroughly reviewing any adverse effects documented, including nausea, vomiting, headache, or any symptom specifically attributed to the drug. Baseline liver function tests, including aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels, and elevations 3 times the upper limit of normal during intravenous acetaminophen therapy were recorded. The average patient weight was 78±21 kg, with 12 patients (4%) weighing less than 50 kg and 288 (96%) patients weighing 50 kg or greater. Two hundred forty-one patients (80%) were appropriately dosed, whereas 59 (20%) patients were not appropriately dosed based on the FDA-approved dosing. No patients exceeded the FDA-approved maximum daily dosing recommendations for intravenous acetaminophen (4 g). Sixty-five patients (22%) received intravenous acetaminophen for longer than 24 hours. Intravenous acetaminophen was well tolerated, without any reported adverse effects, including the commonly reported adverse effects of nausea, vomiting, headache, and insomnia. Ten patients (3%) had a documented history of liver disease and did not experience any adverse effects or increases in liver function tests after the administration of intravenous acetaminophen. Intravenous acetaminophen appeared to be a safe and effective analgesic and antipyretic agent. Dosing for patients weighing less than 50 kg needs to be appropriately

  7. Retrospective drug utilization review: impact of pharmacist interventions on physician prescribing

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    Angalakuditi M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mallik Angalakuditi1, Joseph Gomes21Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Baxter Health Care, Deerfield, IL, USAObjectives: To evaluate the impact of retrospective drug utilization review (RDUR, pharmacist’s interventions on physician prescribing, and the level of spillover effect on future prescriptions following the intervention.Methods: A retrospective case–control study was conducted at a pharmacy benefits management company using the available prescription data from April 2004 to August 2005. RDUR conflicts evaluated and intervened by a clinical pharmacist served as a case group, whereas conflicts that were not evaluated and intervened by a clinical pharmacist served as a control group.Results: A total of 40,284 conflicts in cases and 13,044 in controls were identified. For cases, 32,780 interventions were considered nonrepetitive, and 529 were repetitive. There were 22,870 physicians in cases that received intervention letters and 2348 physicians in the control group that would have received intervention letters during the study period. Each physician received on average 1.4 interventions for cases vs 3.0 for controls. Among the case physicians who were intervened during the study period, 2.2% (505 were involved in a repeated intervention vs 18.2% (428 in controls (P < 0.001, which is an eight-fold difference. The most common conflict intervened on in cases was therapeutic appropriateness (8277, 25.3%, and for controls it was drug–drug interactions (1796, 25.4%. The overall interventional spillover effect in cases was 98.4% vs 89.4% in controls (P = 0.01.Conclusion: RDUR is an effective interventional program which results in decreased numbers of interventions per physician and provides a significant impact on future prescribing habits.Keywords: pharmacy management, spillover effect, RDUR, DUR

  8. Register-based indicators for potentially inappropriate medication in high-cost patients with excessive polypharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saastamoinen, Leena K; Verho, Jouko

    2015-06-01

    Excessive polypharmacy is often associated with inappropriate drug use. Because drug expenditures are heavily skewed and a considerable share of patients in the top 5% of the cost distribution have excessive polypharmacy, the appropriateness of their drug use should be reviewed. The aim of this study was to review the quality of drug use in patients with extremely high costs and excessive polypharmacy and to compare them with all drug users. This is a nationwide register study. The subjects of this study were all drug users in Finland over 15 years of age, n = 3,303,813. The measures used were annual total costs, average costs, and number of patients. The background characteristics used included gender, age, morbidity, number of prescribers, active substances, and indicators of potentially inappropriate drug use, for example, Beers criteria. The patients with high costs and excessive polypharmacy accounted for 22% of the total pharmaceutical expenditures but only 3% of drug users. One-third of them were elderly, compared with 11.3% of all drug users (p polypharmacy patients used more potentially inappropriate (28.0% vs 19.9%, p polypharmacy with inappropriate medication use should be prevented using all the methods. The patients with excessive polypharmacy and high-drug costs provide a most interesting group for containing pharmaceutical costs via medication reviews. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Commonly prescribed drugs associate with cognitive function: a cross-sectional study in UK Biobank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevado-Holgado, Alejo J; Winchester, Laura; Gallacher, John; Lovestone, Simon

    2016-01-01

    0.09 (0.03 to 0.14), breaction time 5 (3 to 6)). Conclusions In this large volunteer study, some commonly prescribed medications were associated with poor cognitive performance. Some associations may reflect underlying diseases for which the medications were prescribed, although the analysis controlled for the possible effect of diagnosis. Other drugs, whose association cannot be linked to the effect of any disease, may need vigilance for their implications in clinical practice. PMID:27903560

  10. Rationalising prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadmann, Sarah; Bang, Lia Evi

    2015-01-01

    with chronic care management in Denmark. We demonstrate how attempts to rationalise prescribing by informing GPs about drug effects, adverse effects and price do not satisfy GPs' knowledge needs. We argue that, for GPs, 'rational' prescribing cannot be understood in separation from the processes that enable...... of GPs as a need for practice-relevant knowledge and argue that industry sales representatives are granted opportunity to access general practice because they understand this need of GPs....

  11. Prevalence of inappropriate medication using Beers criteria in Japanese long-term care facilities

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    Yamada Yukari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence and risk factors of potentially inappropriate medication use among the elderly patients have been studied in various countries, but because of the difficulty of obtaining data on patient characteristics and medications they have not been studied in Japan. Methods We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study in 17 Japanese long-term care (LTC facilities by collecting data from the comprehensive MDS assessment forms for 1669 patients aged 65 years and over who were assessed between January and July of 2002. Potentially inappropriate medications were identified on the basis of the 2003 Beers criteria. Results The patients in the sample were similar in terms of demographic characteristics to those in the national survey. Our study revealed that 356 (21.1% of the patients were treated with potentially inappropriate medication independent of disease or condition. The most commonly inappropriately prescribed medication was ticlopidine, which had been prescribed for 107 patients (6.3%. There were 300 (18.0% patients treated with at least 1 inappropriate medication dependent on the disease or condition. The highest prevalence of inappropriate medication use dependent on the disease or condition was found in patients with chronic constipation. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed psychotropic drug use (OR = 1.511, medication cost of per day (OR = 1.173, number of medications (OR = 1.140, and age (OR = 0.981 as factors related to inappropriate medication use independent of disease or condition. Neither patient characteristics nor facility characteristics emerged as predictors of inappropriate prescription. Conclusion The prevalence and predictors of inappropriate medication use in Japanese LTC facilities were similar to those in other countries.

  12. Randomized trial of switching from prescribed non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to prescribed celecoxib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macdonald, Thomas M; Hawkey, Chris J; Ford, Ian;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and conventional non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular (CV) effects. We compared the CV safety of switching to celecoxib vs. continuing nsNSAID therapy in a European setting...... primary events per 1000 patient-years exposure. There were only 15 adjudicated secondary upper gastrointestinal complication endpoints (0.078/100 patient-years on celecoxib vs. 0.053 on nsNSAIDs OT, 0.078 vs. 0.053 ITT). More gastrointestinal serious adverse reactions and haematological adverse reactions...

  13. Effect of drug utilization reviews on the quality of in-hospital prescribing: a quasi-experimental study

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    Chabot Isabelle

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug utilization review (DUR programs are being conducted in Canadian hospitals with the aim of improving the appropriateness of prescriptions. However, there is little evidence of their effectiveness. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of both a retrospective and a concurrent DUR programs on the quality of in-hospital prescribing. Methods We conducted an interrupted time series quasi-experimental study. Using explicit criteria for quality of prescribing, the natural history of cisapride prescription was established retrospectively in three university-affiliated hospitals. A retrospective DUR was implemented in one of the hospitals, a concurrent DUR in another, whereas the third hospital served as a control. An archivist abstracted records of all patients who were prescribed cisapride during the observation period. The effect of DURs relative to the control hospital was determined by comparing estimated regression coefficients from the time series models and by testing the statistical significance using a 2-tailed Student's t test. Results The concurrent DUR program significantly improved the appropriateness of prescriptions for the indication for use whereas the retrospective DUR brought about no significant effect on the quality of prescribing. Conclusion Results suggest a retrospective DUR approach may not be sufficient to improve the quality of prescribing. However, a concurrent DUR strategy, with direct feedback to prescribers seems effective and should be tested in other settings with other drugs.

  14. Assessment of drug prescribing pattern using WHO indicators in hospitalized patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital in rural area of India

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    Asha Pathak

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The prescribing pattern of antibiotics was according to WHO recommendations while the average number of drugs per prescription was found high. There were small differences in the values of drugs prescribed by generic names, injectable and drugs from NLEM from the recommended values. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 651-655

  15. The effect of federal and state off-label marketing investigations on drug prescribing: The case of olanzapine.

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    Wang, Bo; Studdert, David M; Sarpatwari, Ameet; Franklin, Jessica M; Landon, Joan; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade, the federal government has frequently investigated and prosecuted pharmaceutical manufacturers for illegal promotion of drugs for indications not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ("off-label" uses). State governments can choose to coordinate with the federal investigation, or pursue their own independent state investigations. One of the largest-ever off-label prosecutions relates to the atypical antipsychotic drug olanzapine (Zyprexa). In a series of settlements between 2008 and 2010, Eli Lilly paid $1.4 billion to the federal government and over $290 million to state governments. We examined the effect of these settlements on off-label prescribing of this medication, taking advantage of geographical differences in states' involvement in the investigations and the timing of the settlements. However, we did not find a reduction in off-label prescribing; rather, there were no prescribing changes among states that joined the federal investigation, those that pursued independent state investigations, and states that pursued no investigations at all. Since the settlements of state investigations of off-label prescribing do not appear to significantly impact prescribing rates, policymakers should consider alternate ways of reducing the prevalence of non-evidence-based off-label use to complement their ongoing investigations.

  16. Correlation between prescribed daily dose, seizure freedom and defined daily dose in antiepileptic drug treatment.

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    Horváth, László; Fekete, Klára; Márton, Sándor; Fekete, István

    2017-04-01

    Background Although defined daily doses (DDD) for antiepileptic drugs (AED) have been assigned only in combination therapy, based on the literature, most patients take them in monotherapy. Furthermore, discrepancies between DDD and prescribed daily dose (PDD) were observed. Objective First, to determine PDDs of AEDs and to reveal PDD/DDD ratio among seizure free versus not seizure free patients in everyday clinical practice. Second, to test the applicability of 75% cut-off of DDD to achieve seizure freedom. Furthermore, to find out what factors might influence PDD. Setting Outpatient data files at a Hungarian university hospital were studied. Methods A retrospective, 20-year cross-sectional database was compiled from 1282 epileptic outpatients' files. Main outcome measure Seizure freedom and PDD were used as outcome measures. Results The mean DDD% of all prescribed AEDs increased steadily from monotherapy, through bitherapy towards polytherapy (p seizure free patients took AEDs in doses in the range of ≤75% of DDDs in monotherapy and bitherapy. Older AEDs (carbamazepine and valproate) were given in a significantly higher mean dose in bitherapy in the seizure free group. Among the newer types, only levetiracetam and lamotrigine had a significantly higher DDD% in mono-, bi-, and polytherapy. Confirmed by logistic regression analysis, gender, age, type of epilepsy, and number of AEDs had a significant impact on the value of 75% DDD. Conclusion No significant unfavourable impact of the lower ratio of PDD/DDD on the outcome of achieving seizure freedom has been confirmed. As a measure of seizure freedom, 75% of DDD may be used, although individual therapy must be emphasised. Precisely quantified DDD would provide a more accurate calculation of other derived values.

  17. Prescription pattern and prevalence of potentially inappropriate medications among elderly patients in a Nigerian rural tertiary hospital

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    Fadare JO

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Joseph O Fadare,1 Segun Matthew Agboola,2 Olumide Augustine Opeke,3 Rachel A Alabi41Department of Medical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria; 2Department of Family Medicine, 3Department of Internal Medicine, 4Pharmacy Department, Federal Medical Centre, Ido-Ekiti, NigeriaIntroduction: Polypharmacy and inappropriate prescriptions are prominent prescribing issues with elderly patients. Beers criteria and other guidelines have been developed to assist in the reduction of potentially inappropriate medications prescribed to elderly patients. The objectives of this study were to assess the prescribing pattern for elderly Nigerian outpatients and estimate the prevalence of potentially inappropriate medications among them using the Beers criteria.Methodology: This was a prospective cross-sectional study of elderly patients (65 years and above who were attending the general outpatients clinic of a rural Nigerian hospital. For the drug utilization aspect of the study, drug-use indicators were assessed using established World Health Organization guidelines, while the Beers criteria was used to screen for potentially inappropriate medications.Result: The medical records of 220 patients aged 65 years and above were utilized for the study. A total of 837 drugs were prescribed for the patients, giving an average of 3.8 ± 1.3 drugs per person. Antihypertensive drugs accounted for 30.6% of the prescriptions, followed by multivitamins/food supplements (11.5% and analgesics (10.8%. A review of the prescribed medications using the 2012 Updated Beers Criteria by the American Geriatric Society identified 56 patients with at least one potentially inappropriate medication prescribed giving a rate of 25.5%. The drug groups identified were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antihistamines, and amitriptyline.Conclusion: Polypharmacy and prescription of potentially inappropriate medications are major therapeutic issues in

  18. A study on drug prescribing pattern in upper respiratory tract infections among children aged 1-12 years

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    Sushil Sharma

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: The study reflects the current drug prescribing patterns in patients of URTI among patients aged 1-12 yrs. Regular studies such as this are the need of the hour to study drug prescribing practices so that appropriate feedback and awareness is generated among the health care providers on the various aspects of Rational drug therapy. This will not only help the patients by reducing polypharmacy, reduction in antibiotic resistance and reduction of adverse drug reactions but also help the society at large in ensuring the optimum utilisation of the limited health sources esp in a developing country like India. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(2.000: 406-410

  19. DRUG PRESCRIBED TO DIABETIC PATIENTS AND EFFECTIVENESS OF COMBINATION AND MONOTHERAPY

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    Safila Naveed

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To study the pattern of drug prescribed to diabetic patients & the effectiveness of combination & mono therapy. Method: We took a survey of primary & tertiary care hospitals to gather the data for this study randomized diabetic patients of type 1 & type 2 diabetes of different age, gender & conditions. Results: We included 110 patients for this study to check the effectiveness of combination & mono therapy in diabetic patients. Out of 110 patients we found 37 patients on mono therapy of metformin & the % effectiveness was 32%, 30 patients on insulin monotherapy, 13 patients taking combination therapy of insulin plus metformin & the % effectiveness was 54%, combination therapy of metformin plus sulphonyl urea were taken by 22 patients among which only 3 patients were on effective therapy & % effectiveness was found to be 14%. The result shows that combination of insulin plus metformin is more effective than the combination of metformin plus sulphonyl lurea & mono therapy of insulin & metformin. Conclusion: Combined therapy with insulin plus oral agents is widely used and has been shown to be effective in improving glycemic control in many short-term studies. When oral therapy is continued during insulin therapy, enhancing effectiveness of endogenous insulin control with similar hypoglycemic risk, or equal glycemic control with less hypoglycemia.

  20. Interaction between pharmaceutical companies and physicians who prescribe antiretroviral drugs for treating AIDS

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    Mario Cesar Scheffer

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Given that Brazil has a universal public policy for supplying medications to treat HIV and AIDS, the aim here was to describe the forms of relationship between physicians and the pharmaceutical companies that produce antiretrovirals (ARVs. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional epidemiological study conducted in the state of São Paulo. METHODS : Secondary database linkage was used, with structured interviews conducted by telephone among a sample group of 300 physicians representing 2,361 professionals who care for patients with HIV and AIDS. RESULTS : Around two thirds (64% of the physicians prescribing ARVs for HIV and AIDS treatment in the state of São Paulo who were interviewed declared that they had some form of relationship with pharmaceutical companies, of which the most frequent were receipt of publications (54%, visits by sales promoters (51% and receipt of small-value objects (47%. CONCLUSIONS: Two forms of relationship between the pharmaceutical industry and physicians who deal with HIV and AIDS can be highlighted: facilitation of professionals' access to continuing education; and antiretroviral drug brand name promotion.

  1. Methods to reduce prescribing errors in elderly patients with multimorbidity

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    Lavan AH

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Amanda H Lavan, Paul F Gallagher, Denis O’Mahony Department of Geriatric Medicine, Cork University Hospital, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland Abstract: The global population of multimorbid older people is growing steadily. Multimorbidity is the principal cause of complex polypharmacy, which in turn is the prime risk factor for inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug reactions and events. Those who prescribe for older frailer multimorbid people are particularly prone to committing prescribing errors of various kinds. The causes of prescribing errors in this patient population are multifaceted and complex, including prescribers’ lack of knowledge of aging physiology, geriatric medicine, and geriatric pharmacotherapy, overprescribing that frequently leads to major polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing, and inappropriate drug omission. This review examines the various ways of minimizing prescribing errors in multimorbid older people. The role of education in physician prescribers and clinical pharmacists, the use of implicit and explicit prescribing criteria designed to improve medication appropriateness in older people, and the application of information and communication-technology systems to minimize errors are discussed in detail. Although evidence to support any single intervention to prevent prescribing errors in multimorbid elderly people is inconclusive or lacking, published data support focused prescriber education in geriatric pharmacotherapy, routine application of STOPP/START (screening tool of older people’s prescriptions/screening tool to alert to right treatment criteria for potentially inappropriate prescribing, electronic prescribing, and close liaison between clinical pharmacists and physicians in relation to structured medication review and reconciliation. Carrying out a structured medication review aimed at optimizing pharmacotherapy in this vulnerable patient population presents a major challenge. Another

  2. Disciplinary proceedings for inappropriate prescription of opioid medications by medical practitioners in Australia (2010-2014).

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    Mendelson, Danuta

    2014-12-01

    An analysis of 32 cases reported between July 2010 and September 2014 by professional disciplinary tribunals in New South Wales and Victoria against medical practitioners found guilty of inappropriately prescribing Sch 8 medications (mainly opioids) and Sch 4 drugs (mainly benzodiazepines) demonstrated, among others, a lengthy delay between the occurrence of the miscreant conduct and the conclusion of disciplinary proceedings. The study also raised questions about the appropriateness of utilising common criminal law theories of punishment and deterrence by non-judicial tribunals.

  3. Recurrence of adverse drug reactions following inappropriate re-prescription: better documentation, availability of information and monitoring are needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Carolien M J; Jansen, Paul A F; van Marum, Rob J; Grouls, René J E; Korsten, Erik H M; Egberts, Antoine C G

    2010-07-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a common, and often preventable, cause of hospital admission, especially in the elderly, and can occur during hospitalization. In this current opinion article, we present three cases of recurrence of a serious ADR due to re-prescription of a withdrawn medication that highlight the need for a system to prevent the undesirable re-prescription of medications withdrawn because of an ADR. In addition, we describe an electronic system that could help prevent undesirable re-prescription following an ADR. Such a system should document ADRs systematically at the patient level, make this information available to relevant healthcare providers and the patient, and flag re-prescription of the offending drug. The effectiveness and cost effectiveness of such a system would need to be determined.

  4. An evaluation of knowledge, attitude, and practice of adverse drug reaction reporting among prescribers at a tertiary care hospital

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    Chetna K Desai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Spontaneous reporting is an important tool in pharmacovigilance. However, its success depends on cooperative and motivated prescribers. Under-reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs by prescribers is a common problem. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP regarding ADR reporting among prescribers at the Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, to get an insight into the causes of under-reporting of ADRs. Materials and Methods: A pretested KAP questionnaire comprising of 15 questions (knowledge 6, attitude 5, and practice 4 was administered to 436 prescribers. The questionnaires were assessed for their completeness (maximum score 20 and the type of responses regarding ADR reporting. Microsoft Excel worksheet (Microsoft Office 2007 and Chi-Square test were used for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 260 (61% prescribers completed the questionnaire (mean score of completion 18.04. The response rate of resident doctors (70.7% was better than consultants (34.5% (P < 0.001. ADR reporting was considered important by 97.3% of the respondents; primarily for improving patient safety (28.8% and identifying new ADRs (24.6%. A majority of the respondents opined that they would like to report serious ADRs (56%. However, only 15% of the prescribers had reported ADRs previously. The reasons cited for this were lack of information on where (70% and how (68% to report and the lack of access to reporting forms (49.2%. Preferred methods for reporting were e-mail (56% and personal communication (42%. Conclusion: The prescribers are aware of the ADRs and the importance of their reporting. However, under reporting and lack of knowledge about the reporting system are clearly evident. Creating awareness about ADR reporting and devising means to make it easy and convenient may aid in improving spontaneous reporting.

  5. Pharmacodynamic profiling of commonly prescribed antimicrobial drugs against Escherichia coli isolates from urinary tract

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    Gabriel Trova Cuba

    Full Text Available Since antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens against current first line agents has affected the management of severe urinary tract infection, we determined the likelihood that antibiotic regimens achieve bactericidal pharmacodynamic exposures using Monte Carlo simulation for five antimicrobials (ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, piperacillin/tazobactam, ertapenem, and meropenem commonly prescribed as initial empirical treatment of inpatients with severe community acquired urinary tract infections. Minimum inhibitory concentration determination by Etest was performed for 205 Brazilian community urinary tract infection Escherichia coli strains from 2008 to 2012 and 74 E. coli bloodstream strains recovered from a surveillance study. Pharmacodynamic exposure was modeled via a 5000 subject Monte Carlo simulation. All isolates were susceptible to ertapenem and meropenem. Piperacillin/tazobactam, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin showed 100%, 97.5% and 83.3% susceptibility among outpatient isolates and 98.6%, 75.7% and 64.3% among inpatient isolates, respectively. Against outpatient isolates, all drugs except ciprofloxacin (82.7% in aggressive and 77.6% in conservative scenarios achieved high cumulative fraction of response: car-bapenems and piperacillin/tazobactam cumulative fraction of responses were close to 100%, and ceftriaxone cumulative fraction of response was 97.5%. Similar results were observed against inpatients isolates for carbapenems (100% and piperacillin/tazobactam (98.4%, whereas ceftriaxone achieved only 76.9% bactericidal cumulative fraction of response and ciprofloxacin 61.9% (aggressive scenario and 56.7% (conservative scenario respectively. Based on this model, standard doses of beta-lactams were predicted to deliver sufficient pharmacodynamic exposure for outpatients. However, ceftriaxone should be avoided for inpatients and ciprofloxacin empirical prescription should be avoided in both inpatients and outpatients with complicated

  6. Pharmacodynamic profiling of commonly prescribed antimicrobial drugs against Escherichia coli isolates from urinary tract.

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    Cuba, Gabriel Trova; Pignatari, Antonio Carlos Campos; Patekoski, Katya Silva; Luchesi, Lucimila Jorge; Kiffer, Carlos Roberto Veiga

    2014-01-01

    Since antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens against current first line agents has affected the management of severe urinary tract infection, we determined the likelihood that antibiotic regimens achieve bactericidal pharmacodynamic exposures using Monte Carlo simulation for five antimicrobials (ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, piperacillin/tazobactam, ertapenem, and meropenem) commonly prescribed as initial empirical treatment of inpatients with severe community acquired urinary tract infections. Minimum inhibitory concentration determination by Etest was performed for 205 Brazilian community urinary tract infection Escherichia coli strains from 2008 to 2012 and 74 E. coli bloodstream strains recovered from a surveillance study. Pharmacodynamic exposure was modeled via a 5000 subject Monte Carlo simulation. All isolates were susceptible to ertapenem and meropenem. Piperacillin/tazobactam, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin showed 100%, 97.5% and 83.3% susceptibility among outpatient isolates and 98.6%, 75.7% and 64.3% among inpatient isolates, respectively. Against outpatient isolates, all drugs except ciprofloxacin (82.7% in aggressive and 77.6% in conservative scenarios) achieved high cumulative fraction of response: carbapenems and piperacillin/tazobactam cumulative fraction of responses were close to 100%, and ceftriaxone cumulative fraction of response was 97.5%. Similar results were observed against inpatients isolates for carbapenems (100%) and piperacillin/tazobactam (98.4%), whereas ceftriaxone achieved only 76.9% bactericidal cumulative fraction of response and ciprofloxacin 61.9% (aggressive scenario) and 56.7% (conservative scenario) respectively. Based on this model, standard doses of beta-lactams were predicted to deliver sufficient pharmacodynamic exposure for outpatients. However, ceftriaxone should be avoided for inpatients and ciprofloxacin empirical prescription should be avoided in both inpatients and outpatients with complicated urinary tract

  7. Inappropriate sexual behavior.

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    Philo, S W; Richie, M F; Kaas, M J

    1996-11-01

    Inappropriate sexual behavior, or sexually aggressive behavior, is a term which encompasses a variety of behaviors, including obscene gesturing, touching or hugging another person, exposing body parts or disrobing, and masturbating in public. Inappropriate sexual behavior often elicits feelings of anxiety, embarrassment, or unease in the caregiver and the result is often disruption in continuity of care for the patient. The cause of inappropriate sexual behavior varies among individuals and careful assessment of the etiology of the behavior is the first essential step in intervening. Nursing interventions focus upon providing opportunities for expression of appropriate sexual behavior while attempting to extinguish inappropriate sexual behavior.

  8. Exploring the equity of GP practice prescribing rates for selected coronary heart disease drugs: a multiple regression analysis with proxies of healthcare need

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    St Leger Antony S

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a small, but growing body of literature highlighting inequities in GP practice prescribing rates for many drug therapies. The aim of this paper is to further explore the equity of prescribing for five major CHD drug groups and to explain the amount of variation in GP practice prescribing rates that can be explained by a range of healthcare needs indicators (HCNIs. Methods The study involved a cross-sectional secondary analysis in four primary care trusts (PCTs 1–4 in the North West of England, including 132 GP practices. Prescribing rates (average daily quantities per registered patient aged over 35 years and HCNIs were developed for all GP practices. Analysis was undertaken using multiple linear regression. Results Between 22–25% of the variation in prescribing rates for statins, beta-blockers and bendrofluazide was explained in the multiple regression models. Slightly more variation was explained for ACE inhibitors (31.6% and considerably more for aspirin (51.2%. Prescribing rates were positively associated with CHD hospital diagnoses and procedures for all drug groups other than ACE inhibitors. The proportion of patients aged 55–74 years was positively related to all prescribing rates other than aspirin, where they were positively related to the proportion of patients aged >75 years. However, prescribing rates for statins and ACE inhibitors were negatively associated with the proportion of patients aged >75 years in addition to the proportion of patients from minority ethnic groups. Prescribing rates for aspirin, bendrofluazide and all CHD drugs combined were negatively associated with deprivation. Conclusion Although around 25–50% of the variation in prescribing rates was explained by HCNIs, this varied markedly between PCTs and drug groups. Prescribing rates were generally characterised by both positive and negative associations with HCNIs, suggesting possible inequities in prescribing rates on the basis

  9. Individualizing Pharmacotherapy: Genetic factors and co-prescribed drugs affecting pharmacotherapy

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    M.L. Becker (Matthijs)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractDrug therapies may result in adverse drug reactions or in ineffective therapy. A better prediction which patients will not respond to drug therapy or will develop adverse drug reactions may avoid these events. In this thesis we studied the effect of drug-drug interactions and genetic

  10. An in-depth study of drugs prescribing pattern in the Surgery Department of a Tertiary Care Teaching Institute in Northern India

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    Raj Kumar

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: There is a high tendency and frequency to prescribe four and more than four drugs to post-operative patients. Most drugs prescribed were AMAs, GIT related, NSAIDs and Multivitamins and trace elements. There is an urgent need to develop proper prescription writing skills in budding doctors regarding the use of EML/drugs list and generic medicines to reduce the cost of treatment. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(4.000: 681-686

  11. Appropriate prescribing for older people

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    Drenth - van Maanen, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate prescribing is the result of pharmacotherapeutic decision-making to maximise the net health benefit of treatment, given the resources available. Several risk factors for inappropriate prescribing in older people have been identified, such as polypharmacy, impaired renal function, and

  12. Antibiotics prescribed before, during and after pregnancy in the Netherlands : a drug utilization study

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    de Jonge, Linda; Bos, H Jens; van Langen, Irene M; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T W; Bakker, Marian K

    2014-01-01

    PurposeTo describe the prescription of antibiotics before, during and after pregnancy, and the trends over a 16-year period in the Netherlands, and to determine whether they were prescribed according to national guidelines. MethodsThe IADB (http://iadb.nl) contains prescriptions dispensed by communi

  13. Comparison of anti-diabetic drug prescribing in children and adolescents in seven European countries

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    Neubert, Antje; Hsia, Yingfen; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Janhsen, Katrin; Glaeske, Gerd; Furu, Kari; Kieler, Helle; Norgaard, Mette; Clavenna, Antonio; Wong, Ian C. K.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of diabetes in children across seven European countries, when using prescribing of anti-diabetics as a proxy for diabetes. A secondary aim was to assess the potential for collaboration between countries using different databases in diabetes re

  14. Prescribing pattern of antipsychotic drugs in the outpatient department of psychiatry in Silchar Medical College and Hospital, Assam

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    Pinaki Chakravarty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the prescribing pattern of antipsychotic drugs in the outpatient department of psychiatry in Silchar Medical College and Hospital (SMCH of Assam. Methods: It is a prospective cross-sectional study which was carried out for three months from August to November 2015 in the outpatient department of psychiatry. All patients irrespective of their ages and sexes were included in this study. Inpatients, referred patients, patients not willing to give consent, patients of epilepsy as well as those cases where diagnoses were not certain were excluded from the study. The prescription patterns of antipsychotic drugs and the occurrences of various psychiatric diseases on both the sexes were studied after taking permission from the Institutional Ethical Committee (SMCH. Results: A total of 112 prescriptions were analysed. The most common disease was found to be schizophrenia. Total drugs prescribed were 265 and average number of drugs per prescription was 2.36. It was seen that out of the 112 prescriptions, monotherapy was practiced in 19.64% (22 compared to polytherapy in 80.35% (90. Out of 265 prescribed drugs atypical antipsychotics were 112 (42.26%, typical antipsychotics 12 (4.52%, antiepileptics 57 (21.50%, antidepressants 29 (10.94%, antiparkinsonian 29 (10.94%, and others 26 (9.81%. Antipsychotics given orally were 122 of which olanzapine was 54 (44.26%, risperidone 40 (32.78%, chlorpromazine ten (8.19%, quetiapine eight (6.55%, aripiprazole five (4.09%, amisulpiride five (4.09% were seen. Injectable antipsychotics were two, of which only haloperidol two (100%. Antipsychotics in combination prescription with same groups were 14 (12.5%, with antidepressants, antipileptics, antiparkinsonian were 88 (78.57% and other agents were ten (8.92%, which included pantoprazole, multivitamins, and benfotiamine. Conclusion: This study shows that atypical antipsychotics are the most common drugs prescribed in patients with psychotic illness and

  15. Comparative assessment of the pattern of anti-hypertensive drugs prescribed in medicine and cardiology outpatient department

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    Bhargav Gaikwad

    2016-10-01

    Results :The present study which was conducted for a period of 6 months in the medicine and cardiology OPD showed unequal distribution of the patients in the medicine and cardiology OPD, with 223 patients attended medicine OPD while 434 patients attended cardiology OPD. Amongst the patients attending medicine OPD, majority of the patients (61.88% were stage 1 hypertensive (>140/90mmHg according to JNC VII classification whereas majority (69.38% of those attending cardiology OPD were stage II hypertensive (>160/100. calcium channel blockers (CCB were the most commonly prescribed drug in medicine OPD followed by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI whereas beta blockers (BB were most commonly prescribed in cardiology OPD followed by ACEI. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(5.000: 1958-1965

  16. Mental illness, challenging behaviour, and psychotropic drug prescribing in people with intellectual disability: UK population based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Rory; Hassiotis, Angela; Walters, Kate; Osborn, David; Strydom, André; Horsfall, Laura

    2015-09-01

    To describe the incidence of recorded mental illness and challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability in UK primary care and to explore the prescription of psychotropic drugs in this group. Cohort study. 571 general practices contributing data to The Health Improvement Network clinical database. 33,016 adults (58% male) with intellectual disability who contributed 211,793 person years' data. Existing and new records of mental illness, challenging behaviour, and psychotropic drug prescription. 21% (7065) of the cohort had a record of mental illness at study entry, 25% (8300) had a record of challenging behaviour, and 49% (16,242) had a record of prescription of psychotropic drugs. During follow-up, the rate of new cases of mental illness in people without a history at cohort entry was 262 (95% confidence interval 254 to 271) per 10,000 person years and the rate of challenging behaviour was 239 (231 to 247) per 10,000 person years. The rate of new psychotropic drug prescription in those without a previous history of psychotropic drug treatment was 518 (503 to 533) per 10,000 person years. Rates of new recording of severe mental illness declined by 5% (95% confidence interval 3% to 7%) per year (Pdisability who have been treated with psychotropic drugs far exceeds the proportion with recorded mental illness. Antipsychotics are often prescribed to people without recorded severe mental illness but who have a record of challenging behaviour. The findings suggest that changes are needed in the prescribing of psychotropics for people with intellectual disability. More evidence is needed of the efficacy and safety of psychotropic drugs in this group, particularly when they are used for challenging behaviour. © Sheehan et al 2015.

  17. Antibiotic prescribing policy of the Republic health insurance fund of Montenegro in the period 2000-2004: Effects of drug utilization reform strategy

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    Duborija-Kovačević Nataša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Monitoring of antibiotic prescribing promotes rational use of these drugs, reduces costs and slows down the progress of resistance. The objective of present study was to analyze the effects of drug utilization reform strategy realized by the Republic Health Insurance Fund of Montenegro, during the period 2000-2004. Material and methods. This before-after comparative pharmacoepidemiological study comprised a sample of 100% prescription only antibiotics available in public pharmacies during the period 2000-2004. The drug use was calculated using A TC/DDD methodology and Wilcoxon's test for matched pairs was used in order to calculate the statistical significance of difference. Results. Antibiotic prescribing was aproximately lower by 12% in 2004 in regard to 2000 (12.80 vs. 14.57 DDDs, p>0.05. The participation of this pharmacotherapeutic group in the total drug dispensing has remained almost equal (aproximately 8%. The highest increase in prescribing was established for macrolides (1.05 vs. 1.64 DDDs, 59%; penicillins were also prescribed more frequently (6.41 vs. 6.56 DDDs, 2%. but other subgroups were prescribed less frequently: cephalosporins - (23% (3.11 vs. 2.43 DDDs and quinolones - (63% f 1.10 vs. 0.47 DDDs. Conclusion The drug utilization reform strategy showed mostly positive effects on antibiotic prescribing during the period 2000-2004. Further educational activities are necessary in order to establish more rational approach to prescribing and utilization of antibiotics. .

  18. Prescripción de medicamentos a pacientes ambulatorios Prescribing drugs to patients receiving out-patient care

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    F. J. Garjón

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available La prescripción de medicamentos ha evolucionado para tratar principalmente patologías crónicas. Actualmente se prescribe de forma repetida usando medios informáticos, lo que acarrea problemas si no se hace con un control apropiado. Los pasos que se han propuesto para una prescripción adecuada son: definir el problema, especificar el objetivo, seleccionar el medicamento, iniciar el tratamiento cumplimentando los datos apropiados, proporcionar información, evaluar regularmente, considerar el coste y usar herramientas para reducir los errores. Las recomendaciones para la prescripción publicadas se han centrado en pacientes ancianos e incluyen: evitar la polimedicación, revisar regularmente el tratamiento, suspender cualquier fármaco no indicado y prescribir los que el paciente precise, evitar fármacos con efectos deletéreos, usar dosis adecuadas para la edad y función renal, usar regímenes sencillos y sistemas de administración adecuados, considerar los tratamientos no farmacológicos, limitar el número de profesionales que prescriben a un paciente y evitar tratar el efecto adverso de un medicamento con otro. Se proporcionan ejemplos, extraídos del sistema de información de recetas, sobre el cumplimiento de tales recomendaciones en el Servicio Navarro de Salud-Osasunbidea. Los medios para mejorar la prescripción son: formación, auditorías, colaboración entre profesionales sanitarios y uso de herramientas informáticas.Drug prescription has evolved to deal mainly with chronic diseases. Nowadays, repeating prescriptions using computers results in problems if this is not done with adequate control. Steps proposed for appropriate prescription are: defining the problem; specifying the objective; selecting the drug; initiating therapy with appropriate details; giving information; regular evaluation; considering cost; and using tools to reduce errors. Published recommendations for prescription, which have focused on elderly patients

  19. Less is more: a project to reduce the number of PIMs (potentially inappropriate medications) on an elderly care ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Tin Htun; Judith Beck, Adèle; Siese, Thomas; Berrisford, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescribing in healthcare of the elderly (HCE) is associated with avoidable adverse drug events (ADEs).1,2 A recent set of prescribing criteria has been designed and validated, called “Screening Tool of Older Persons' Prescriptions” (STOPP), to rationalise prescribing in hospitalised patients on HCE wards.1,3 The aim of this quality improvement project was to identify how many potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) were prescribed on these wards, and remove them. This was executed by implementing a ward round checklist, which incorporated STOPP criteria, for the twice weekly, consultant led ward rounds. This quality improvement project was carried out over four months. In a pilot study, we identified eight inappropriate medical prescriptions among 148 medications (5.4% ) prescribed on one ward. After applying a checklist for a structured ward round, we reviewed the medications prescribed on that ward, and found 10 PIMs out of 192 (5.2% ). Utilising the increasingly recognised “plan, do, study, act” (PDSA) cycle,4 we implemented departmental teaching and meetings with other members of the multidisciplinary team, which raised awareness of PIMs among junior doctors, as well as involving our pharmacists in drug chart screening. During this process we continued with a further six cycles on a bi-weekly basis, and saw a gradual decrease in PIM to 1.5%. In conclusion, a structured ward round, facilitated by a checklist that included review of drug charts based on STOPP criteria, demonstrated a considerable reduction of PIMs. It would be interesting to apply this quality improvement project to non-HCE wards, including general surgical wards or adult psychiatry wards, as a means of not only reducing the effects of ADEs, but also the expenditure associated with unnecessary drug prescriptions, and the costs associated with additional care arising from associated ADEs. PMID:27096089

  20. Inconsistencies and misleading information in officially approved prescribing information from three major drug markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfistermeister, B; Saß, A; Criegee-Rieck, M; Bürkle, T; Fromm, M F; Maas, R

    2014-11-01

    The summary of product characteristics (SPC) should provide information for the safe prescription and use of a drug. We evaluated the consistency of critical interaction warnings, the quality of presentation of undesirable effects as well as concordance of critical information of representative drugs marketed in the United States, the UK, and Germany. Reciprocal warnings regarding drug-drug interactions that constitute contraindications were frequently missing in the SPCs of the drugs concerned (all countries >40%). Most SPCs did not explicitly exclude adverse reactions considered not reasonably attributable to the use of the drug. Comparing SPCs of different generic brands of the same drug, only 60, 10, and 20% of the US, UK, and German SPCs, respectively, provided identical contraindications. Current SPCs contain inconsistencies and misleading data that are not compatible with the purpose of SPCs, which is to provide a basis for the safe prescription and use of drugs.

  1. Clinically significant interactions between antiretroviral and co-prescribed drugs for HIV-infected children: profiling and comparison of two drug databases

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    Oshikoya KA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kazeem A Oshikoya,1 Ibrahim A Oreagba,2 Olayinka O Ogunleye,1 Saheed Lawal,2 Idowu O Senbanjo3 1Department of Pharmacology, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria; 2Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 3Department of Paediatric and Child Health, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria Background: Drug–drug interactions are an important therapeutic challenge among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Early recognition of drug–drug interactions is important, but conflicts do exist among drug compendia on drug interaction information. We aimed to evaluate the consistencies of two drug information resources with regards to the severity rating and categorization of the potential interactions between antiretroviral and co-prescribed drugs. Methods: We reviewed the case files of human immunodeficiency virus-infected children who were receiving treatment at the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi Araba, between January 2005 and December 2010. All of the co-prescribed and antiretroviral drug pairs were screened for potential interactions using the Medscape Drug Interaction Checker and the Monthly Index of Medical Specialties Interaction Checker. Drug–drug interaction (DDI severity and categorization were rated on a scale of A (no known interaction; B (minor/no action needed; C (moderate/monitor therapy; D (major/therapy modification; and X (contraindicated/avoid combination. Results: A total of 280 patients were at risk of 596 potential DDIs. The databases showed discrepancies, with Medscape database identifying 504 (84.6% and USA MIMS database identifying 302 (50.7% potential DDIs. Simultaneous identification of DDIs by both databases occurred for only 275 (46.1% listed interactions. Both databases have a weak correlation on the severity rating (rs = 0.45; P < 0.001. The

  2. The irrational fixed dose combinations in the Indian drug market: an evaluation of prescribing pattern using WHO guidelines

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    Somesh P. Rayasam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evaluation of the pattern of fixed dose combinations (FDCs prescribing amongst the practitioners in a tertiary care hospital in Central India. Methods: Nine hundred and ninety four prescriptions, containing 639 FDCs were scrutinized in the tertiary care hospital. After excluding the total and the interdepartmental repetitions, the numbers of FDCs were 278, which were considered for final analysis. Inclusion criteria were FDCs from the major out-patient department (OPD of the tertiary care hospital from January 2011 to December 2011. FDCs from the wards, casualty, infectious disease unit, intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU, tuberculosis and chest and HIV unit were excluded from the study. FDCs were analysed for the different pattern of prescribing and rationalism. Results were expressed as percentages. Results: Out of 639 FDCs, the most commonly prescribed FDCs were B complex (12.20%, pantoprazole plus domperidone (9.55% and amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid (7.35%. Seventy percent of the FDCs were prescribed to the age group of 21-60 years. The FDCs were maximum from the department of medicine (25.59%, followed by surgery (15.47% and ENT 13.69%. Out of 278 FDCs, only 5.4% were rational, and rest of the FDCs were irrational. Ninety five percent of all FDCs were brand names. The physicians were unaware of the active pharmacological ingredients (APIs of 20.86% FDCs. Ninety two percent FDCs were available as over the counter (OTCs. Forty eight percent FDCs were costing from Rs. 0-50. There were 2.87% FDCs whose price was above Rs. 500. Conclusions: Irrational FDCs are prescribed by all the departments. Physicians were ignorant about the essential drugs and FDCs. Patients didn’t have access to rational medicines. Therefore, physicians and regulators should be alerted in time. Regulatory actions or government laws should be made mandatory. Availability and access to 348 essential medicines for basic health care should be the priority of the

  3. Health Alliance for Prudent Prescribing, Yield and Use of Antimicrobial Drugs in the Treatment of Respiratory Tract Infections (HAPPY AUDIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Munck, Anders; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Jarboel, Dorte; Llor, Carl; Cots, Josep Maria; Hernández, Silvia; López-Valcárcel, Beatriz González; Pérez, Antoñia; Caballero, Lidia; von der Heyde, Walter; Radzeviviene, Ruta; Jurgutis, Arnoldas; Reutskiy, Anatoliy; Egorova, Elena; Strandberg, Eva Lena; Ovhed, Ingvar; Molstad, Sigvard; vander Stichele, Robert; Benko, Ria; Vlahovic-Palcevski, Vera; Lionis, Christos; Rønning, Marit

    2010-04-23

    Excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics is considered to be the most important reason for development of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. As antibiotic resistance may spread across borders, high prevalence countries may serve as a source of bacterial resistance for countries with a low prevalence. Therefore, bacterial resistance is an important issue with a potential serious impact on all countries. The majority of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are treated in general practice. Most infections are caused by virus and antibiotics are therefore unlikely to have any clinical benefit. Several intervention initiatives have been taken to reduce the inappropriate use of antibiotics in primary health care, but the effectiveness of these interventions is only modest. Only few studies have been designed to determine the effectiveness of multifaceted strategies in countries with different practice setting. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a multifaceted intervention targeting general practitioners (GPs) and patients in six countries with different prevalence of antibiotic resistance: Two Nordic countries (Denmark and Sweden), two Baltic Countries (Lithuania and Kaliningrad-Russia) and two Hispano-American countries (Spain and Argentina). HAPPY AUDIT was initiated in 2008 and the project is still ongoing. The project includes 15 partners from 9 countries. GPs participating in HAPPY AUDIT will be audited by the Audit Project Odense (APO) method. The APO method will be used at a multinational level involving GPs from six countries with different cultural background and different organisation of primary health care. Research on the effect of the intervention will be performed by analysing audit registrations carried out before and after the intervention. The intervention includes training courses on management of RTIs, dissemination of clinical guidelines with recommendations for diagnosis and treatment, posters for the waiting room, brochures to

  4. Health Alliance for Prudent Prescribing, Yield and Use of Antimicrobial Drugs in the Treatment of Respiratory Tract Infections (HAPPY AUDIT

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    Reutskiy Anatoliy

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics is considered to be the most important reason for development of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. As antibiotic resistance may spread across borders, high prevalence countries may serve as a source of bacterial resistance for countries with a low prevalence. Therefore, bacterial resistance is an important issue with a potential serious impact on all countries. The majority of respiratory tract infections (RTIs are treated in general practice. Most infections are caused by virus and antibiotics are therefore unlikely to have any clinical benefit. Several intervention initiatives have been taken to reduce the inappropriate use of antibiotics in primary health care, but the effectiveness of these interventions is only modest. Only few studies have been designed to determine the effectiveness of multifaceted strategies in countries with different practice setting. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a multifaceted intervention targeting general practitioners (GPs and patients in six countries with different prevalence of antibiotic resistance: Two Nordic countries (Denmark and Sweden, two Baltic Countries (Lithuania and Kaliningrad-Russia and two Hispano-American countries (Spain and Argentina. Methods/Design HAPPY AUDIT was initiated in 2008 and the project is still ongoing. The project includes 15 partners from 9 countries. GPs participating in HAPPY AUDIT will be audited by the Audit Project Odense (APO method. The APO method will be used at a multinational level involving GPs from six countries with different cultural background and different organisation of primary health care. Research on the effect of the intervention will be performed by analysing audit registrations carried out before and after the intervention. The intervention includes training courses on management of RTIs, dissemination of clinical guidelines with recommendations for diagnosis and

  5. Uso indicado e uso referido de medicamentos durante a gravidez Prescribed and reported drug use during pregnancy

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    Claudia Garcia Serpa Osorio-de-Castro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Poucos estudos descrevem a utilização de medicamentos na gravidez com detalhamento de práticas prescritivas. A pesquisa integra grande inquérito sobre atenção perinatal em hospitais do Município do Rio de Janeiro. A natureza do hospital - se pública, contratada/conveniada ao SUS ou privada - determinou estratificação de 10.072 puérperas internadas. A coleta de dados se deu por entrevista e por consulta a prontuários, cobrindo medicamentos utilizados durante a gravidez e prescritos durante a internação hospitalar quando do parto. Medicamentos foram classificados pela ATC e outro sistema para casos especiais de uso referido. Houve média de 2,08 medicamentos prescritos no parto e 2,3 usados durante a gestação, sendo os mais prescritos anestésicos, antibióticos, ocitocina e analgésicos, com diferenças significativas entre estratos, e os mais referidos sulfato ferroso, vitaminas, escopolamina e paracetamol. Para interromper a gravidez, 49,7% relatam o uso de chás e 9,2% de misoprostol. O perfil de utilização é corroborado pela literatura. A pesquisa oferece oportunidade de conhecimento de padrões de prescrição ao parto e de uso referido durante a gestação nos setores público e privado.Few studies describe drug utilization in pregnancy focusing on prescribing practices. This study is part of a larger survey on perinatal care in the City of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The type of hospital (public, contracted out by the Unified National Health System, or private determined the stratification of 10,072 hospitalized post-partum women, who were asked about medication used during pregnancy. Hospital records supplied information on drugs prescribed during labor. Drugs were classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC system. Another system was used for specific cases of referred use. A mean of 2.08 drugs was prescribed during labor, and a mean of 2.3 was reported during pregnancy. Anesthetics, antibiotics

  6. Potential to enhance the prescribing of generic drugs in patients with mental health problems in Austria; implications for the future

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    Brian eGodman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scrutiny over pharmaceutical expenditure is increasing leading to multiple reforms. This includes Austria with measures to lower generic prices and enhance their utilisation. However the situation for newer antidepressants and atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPs is different to PPIs, statins and renin-angiotensin drugs with greater tailoring of therapy and no wish to switch products in stable patients. Authorities welcome generics though given high costs particularly of patented AAPs. Objective: Assess (a changes in utilisation of venlafaxine versus other newer anti-depressants before and after availability of generics, (b utilisation of generic versus originator venlafaxine, (c price reductions of venlafaxine over time and influence on total expenditure, (d utilisation of risperidone versus other AAPs, (e suggest potential additional reforms that could be introduced if pertinent. Methodology: A quasi-experimental study design with a segmented time series and an observational study. Utilisation measured in defined daily doses (DDDs and total expenditure per DDD and over time. Results: No appreciable changes in the utilization patterns of venlafaxine and risperidone after generics. The reduction in expenditure/ DDD for venlafaxine decreased overall expenditure on antidepressants by 5% by the end of the study versus just before generics despite a 37% increase in utilization. Expenditure will further decrease if there was reduced prescribing of duloxetine. Conclusion: Depression, schizophrenia and bipolar diseases are complex diseases. As a result, specific measures are needed to encourage prescribing of generic risperidone and venlafaxine when multiple choices are appropriate, and authorities cannot rely on a ´Hawthorne´ effect between classes to enhance use of generics first line. Measures may include prescribing restrictions for duloxetine. No specific measures planned for AAPs with more generics becoming available.

  7. Patient factors influencing the prescribing of lipid lowering drugs for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in UK general practice: a national retrospective cohort study.

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    Jianhua Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guidelines indicate eligibility for lipid lowering drugs, but it is not known to what extent GPs' follow guidelines in routine clinical practice or whether additional clinical factors systematically influence their prescribing decisions. METHODS: A retrospective cohort analysis was undertaken using electronic primary care records from 421 UK general practices. At baseline (May 2008 patients were aged 30 to 74 years, free from cardiovascular disease and not taking lipid lowering drugs. The outcome was prescription of a lipid lowering drug within the next two years. The proportions of eligible and ineligible patients prescribed lipid lowering drugs were reported and multivariable logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors and prescribing. RESULTS: Of 365,718 patients with complete data, 13.8% (50,558 were prescribed lipid lowering drugs: 28.5% (21,101/74,137 of those eligible and 10.1% (29,457/291,581 of those ineligible. Only 41.7% (21,101/50,558 of those prescribed lipid lowering drugs were eligible. In multivariable analysis prescribing was most strongly associated with increasing age (OR for age ≥ 65 years 4.21; 95% CI 4.05-4.39; diabetes (OR 4.49; 95% CI 4.35-4.64; total cholesterol level ≥ 7 mmol/L (OR 2.20; 95% CI 2.12-2.29; and ≥ 4 blood pressure measurements in the past year (OR 4.24; 95% CI 4.06-4.42. The predictors were similar in eligible and ineligible patients. CONCLUSIONS: Most lipid lowering drugs for primary prevention are prescribed to ineligible patients. There is underuse of lipid lowering drugs in eligible patients.

  8. Pattern of anti-diabetic drugs prescribed in a tertiary care hospital of Bangladesh

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    Zuhayer Ahmed

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: The findings can serve as a guide to choose the formulation and combination of anti-diabetic drugs in this part of the world before developing and marketing any new drug. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(1.000: 6-12

  9. Potency of Drugs Interaction among Geriatric Patients Prescribing: Retrospective Study in Pharmacies in Bandung

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    Nurul Annisa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Geriatric age is an age group that vulnerable to the problems which associated with drug use, one of them is the incidence of drug-drug interactions. This research, conducted to determine potential drug-drug interactions. Data processed through www.drugs.comdatabase. This evaluation explain the prevalence and classify types of potential interactions based on the level of interactions and medical specialities. Based on the total of 29.839 prescriptions from seven pharmacies in the Bandung city obtained 334 prescription sheet of geriatrics (1.12% and from that geriatric prescriptions, there are 4 prescriptions sheets (1.20 % that contain 1 R/, which means that in this prescriptions is do not have any potential for interaction. The number of R/ on prescription sheets which contain more than 1 R / is 1.136 with an average number of R/ on each sheet prescriptions is 3.40. Total of 131 (39.22% sheets of prescriptions contain potential drug-drug interaction. Total potential interactions that occur are 210 interactions. The moderate interaction potential is 187 (89.05%, while severe as much as 23 (10.95%. The incidence of moderate and severe potential interaction in the group of medical specialities are 85.50% interactions in general practitioners, 8.40% in internist, 2.30% in cardiologist, 2.30% in ENT, 0.76% in neurologists and 0.76% in dentist.

  10. Adequacy of representation of the National Drug File Reference Terminology Physiologic Effects reference hierarchy for commonly prescribed medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, S. Trent; Awad, Joseph; Speroff, Ted; Elkin, Peter L.; Rothman, Russell; Spickard, Anderson; Peterson, Josh; Bauer, Brent A; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L.; Lee, Mark; Gregg, William; Johnson, Kevin B.; Jirjis, Jim; Erlbaum, Mark S.; Carter, John S.; Lincoln, Michael J.; Brown, Steven H.

    2003-01-01

    The National Drug File Reference Terminology contains a novel reference hierarchy to describe physiologic effects (PE) of drugs. The PE reference hierarchy contains 1697 concepts arranged into two broad categories; organ specific and generalized systemic effects. This investigation evaluated the appropriateness of the PE concepts for classifying a random selection of commonly prescribed medications. Ten physician reviewers classified the physiologic effects of ten drugs and rated the accuracy of the selected term. Inter reviewer agreement, overall confidence, and concept frequencies were assessed and were correlated with the complexity of the drug’s known physiologic effects. In general, agreement between reviewers was fair to moderate (kappa range 0.08–0.49). The physiologic effects modeled became more disperse with drugs having and inducing multiple physiologic processes. Complete modeling of all physiologic effects was limited by reviewers focusing on different physiologic processes. The reviewers were generally comfortable with the accuracy of the concepts selected. Overall, the PE reference hierarchy was useful for physician reviewers classifying the physiologic effects of drugs. Ongoing evolution of the PE reference hierarchy as it evolves should take into account the experiences of our reviewers. PMID:14728237

  11. Psychopharmacoteratophobia: Excessive fear of malformation associated with prescribing psychotropic drugs during pregnancy: An Indian perspective

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    Dushad Ram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available "Psychopharmacoteratophobia is the fear or avoidance of prescribing psychotropic medicine to a pregnant woman on a given indication in anticipation of fetal malformation." It is rooted in the tragedy associated with thalidomide use and is increasing due to the inability to predict accurately, strict legal provision of consumer protection, ethical and legal issues involved, and pitfalls in the available evidence of teratogenicity. In the Indian setting, the physicians face more challenges as the majority of the patients may ask them to decide, what is the best for their health. Most guidelines emphasize more on what not to do than what to do, and the locus of decision is left to the doctor and the patient. In this review, we have focused on relevant issues related to psychopharmacoteraophobia that may be helpful to understand this phenomenon and help to address the deprivation of a mentally ill woman from the required treatment.

  12. Developing and evaluating interventions to reduce inappropriate prescribing by general practitioners of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections: A randomised controlled trial to compare paper-based and web-based modelling experiments

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    Sullivan Frank

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much implementation research is focused on full-scale trials with little evidence of preceding modelling work. The Medical Research Council Framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions has argued for more and better theoretical and exploratory work prior to a trial as a means of improving intervention development. Intervention modelling experiments (IMEs are a way of exploring and refining an intervention before moving to a full-scale trial. They do this by delivering key elements of the intervention in a simulation that approximates clinical practice by, for example, presenting general practitioners (GPs with a clinical scenario about making a treatment decision. Methods The current proposal will run a full, web-based IME involving 250 GPs that will advance the methodology of IMEs by directly comparing results with an earlier paper-based IME. Moreover, the web-based IME will evaluate an intervention that can be put into a full-scale trial that aims to reduce antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in primary care. The study will also include a trial of email versus postal invitations to participate. Discussion More effective behaviour change interventions are needed and this study will develop one such intervention and a system to model and test future interventions. This system will be applicable to any situation in the National Health Service where behaviour needs to be modified, including interventions aimed directly at the public. Trial registration ClinicalTrials (NCT: NCT01206738

  13. Effects of L'Aquila earthquake on the prescribing pattern of antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifirò, Gianluca; Italiano, Domenico; Alibrandi, Angela; Sini, Giovanna; Ferrajolo, Carmen; Capuano, Annalisa; Spina, Edoardo; Rossi, Alessandro; L'Aquila group

    2013-12-01

    Natural disasters provoke an increase in mental and medical disorders in survivors. Monitoring drug prescription changes after natural disasters can provide an indirect evaluation of trauma impact in the population. Moreover, it could be useful to both identify risk categories that require special assistance and assess possible drug abuse or misuse. To assess the effects of earthquake that occurred on April 6, 2009 on the use of antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs in the province of L'Aquila. General population of L'Aquila and Caserta provinces from Southern Italy. In a retrospective, drug utilization study we identified all the persons who received at least one dispensing of antidepressant and/or antipsychotic drugs during the period April 1st, 2008-March 31st, 2010. The monthly prevalence of use of these drugs, 1 year prior and after the date of earthquake in L'Aquila was compared between the two provinces, L'Aquila and Caserta. All the analyses were stratified by age groups, gender and drug classes. We observed an increase in the use of antipsychotic drugs and, to lesser extent, of antidepressant agents (mostly typicals and tryciclics, respectively) in the first 2 months after the earthquake in L'Aquila but not in Caserta. This increase was almost two-fold higher in women older than 75 years. After the first 2 months from the earthquake, the use of antidepressants and antipsychotics was stabilized at the pre-earthquake levels in L'Aquila. The earthquake determined a short-term increase in the use of antipsychotics (mostly haloperidol and promazine) and, to lesser extent, of antidepressants (i.e. tryciclics), especially in older women of L'Aquila.

  14. Spanish Compliance With Guidelines for Prescribing Four Drugs in the Intensive Phase of Standard Tuberculosis Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, José-María; Rodrigo, Teresa; Casals, Martí; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Pascual-Pascual, Teresa; Caylà, Joan A

    2016-05-01

    International and Spanish guidelines recommend a 4-drug regimen in the intensive treatment of tuberculosis (TB). The aim of our study was to determine if these recommendations are followed in Spain, and the factors associated with the use of 3 drugs (standard regimen without ethambutol). Observational, multicenter, retrospective analysis of data from patients diagnosed with TB in practically all Spanish Autonomous Communities between 2007 and 2102. Factors associated with the use of 3 drugs were analyzed using logistic regression, and odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. A total of 3,189 patients were included, 1,413 (44.3%) of whom received 3 drugs. The percentage of 3-drug users among patients with positive sputum smear was 41.2%; among patients with resistance to at least 1 drug, 36.1%; among HIV-infected patients, 31.4%; and among immigrants, 24.8%. Factors associated with the use of 3 drugs were: female sex (OR=1.18; CI: 1.00-1.39); native Spanish (OR=3.09; CI: 2.58-3.70); retired (OR=1.42; CI: 1.14-1.77); homeless (OR=3.10; CI: 1.52-6.43); living alone (OR=1.62; CI: 1.11-2.36); living in a family (OR=1.97; CI: 1.48-2.65); seen by specialists in the region (OR=1.37; CI: 1.10;1.70); no HIV infection (OR=1.63; CI: 1.09-2.48); and negative sputum smear with positive culture (OR=1.59; CI: 1.25-2.02). A large proportion of TB patients receive intensive treatment with 3 drugs. TB treatment recommendations should be followed, both in routine clinical practice and by the National Plan for Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis in Spain. Copyright © 2015 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Unsolicited Reporting to Prescribers of Opioid Analgesics by a State Prescription Drug Monitoring Program: An Observational Study with Matched Comparison Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Leonard D; Kreiner, Peter W; Panas, Lee

    2017-04-04

     State prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) can help detect individuals with multiple provider episodes (MPEs; also referred to as doctor/pharmacy shopping), an indicator of prescription drug abuse and/or diversion. Although unsolicited reporting by PDMPs to prescribers of opioid analgesics is thought to be an important practice in reducing MPEs and the potential harm associated with them, evidence of its effectiveness is mixed. This exploratory research evaluates the impact of unsolicited reports sent by Massachusetts' PDMP to the prescribers of persons with MPEs.  Individuals with MPEs were identified from PDMP records between January 2010 and July 2011 as individuals having Schedule II prescriptions (at least one prescription being an opioid) from four or more distinct prescribers and four or more distinct pharmacies within six months. Based on available MA-PDMP resources, an unsolicited report containing the patient's 12-month prescription history was sent to prescribers of a subset of patients who met the MPE threshold; a comparison group closely matched on demographics and baseline prescription history, whose prescribers were not sent a report, was generated using propensity score matching. The prescription history of each group was examined for 12 months before and after the intervention.  There were eighty-four patients (intervention group) whose prescribers received an unsolicited report and 504 matched patients (comparison group) whose prescribers were not sent a report. Regression analyses indicated significantly greater decreases in the number of Schedule II opioid prescriptions ( P  opioid analgesics from multiple providers.

  16. Utilization of psychotropic drugs prescribed to persons with and without HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, L D; Obel, D; Kronborg, G;

    2014-01-01

    .76 for anxiolytics, 4.42 for hypnotics and sedatives, and 2.28 for antidepressants. Antidepressants were confined primarily to men who have sex with men (MSM). Older age, more recent calendar time, and increased time after HIV diagnosis were associated with increased drug utilization. However, no association...... with exposure to HAART or efavirenz was found. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-infected individuals had a higher utilization of psychotropic drugs than the background population, which was not confined to individuals with a history of IDU or HCV infection. This emphasizes the need to focus on diagnosis of, and appropriate......OBJECTIVES: The objective was to estimate the utilization of psychotropic drugs in HIV-infected individuals compared with that in the background population. METHODS: Using data obtained from the Danish HIV Cohort Study and the Danish National Prescription Registry, we analysed aggregated data...

  17. Prescribing pattern of antihypertensive drugs in diabetic patients of Southern Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

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    Sirajudeen Shaik Alavudeen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension is extremely prevalent in patients with diabetes. Limited data exist on utilization patterns of antihypertensive in this population are consistent with evidence-based practice guidelines. Objective: To evaluate utilization patterns of antihypertensive agents among diabetic patients with hypertension. Design: Retrospective descriptive cross sectional. Patients / Participants: 149 patients with diabetes and hypertension from outpatient department at Family Medicine Hospital, Ahaderfieda. Khamis Mushait, K.S.A. Results: Over 43% of patients were receiving calcium channel blockers (CCB, 36.2 % of received angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI, followed by angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs (34.9%, diuretics (34.2% and β -blockers (16.2%. Patients on monotherapy were mostly receiving CCB (34.3% and ACEI (29.9%. The majority (55.03% of treated patients were on multidrug regimens. In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, a diuretic with ACEI (25% and calcium channel blocker with angiotensin receptor blocker (25% was most commonly prescribed. Conclusions: Patterns of antihypertensive therapy were generally consistent with international guidelines. Areas of improvement include increasing ACEI/ARB and diuretic use, decreasing the number of untreated patients, and increasing the proportion of patients with controlled BP in this population.

  18. Variation in prescribing patterns and therapeutic drug monitoring of intravenous busulfan in pediatric hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Jeannine S; Baker, K Scott; Blough, David K; Gamis, Alan; Bemer, Meagan J; Kelton-Rehkopf, Megan C; Winter, Laura; Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2013-03-01

    Personalizing intravenous (IV) busulfan doses in children using therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is an integral component of hematopoietic cell transplant. The authors sought to characterize initial dosing and TDM of IV busulfan, along with factors associated with busulfan clearance, in 729 children who underwent busulfan TDM from December 2005 to December 2008. The initial IV busulfan dose in children weighing ≤12 kg ranged 4.8-fold, with only 19% prescribed the package insert dose of 1.1 mg/kg. In those children weighing >12 kg, the initial dose ranged 5.4-fold, and 79% were prescribed the package insert dose. The initial busulfan dose achieved the target exposure in only 24.3% of children. A wide range of busulfan exposures were targeted for children with the same disease (eg, 39 target busulfan exposures for the 264 children diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia). Considerable heterogeneity exists regarding when TDM is conducted and the number of pharmacokinetic samples obtained. Busulfan clearance varied by age and dosing frequency but not by underlying disease. The authors- group is currently evaluating how using population pharmacokinetics to optimize initial busulfan dose and TDM (eg, limited sampling schedule in conjunction with maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation) may affect clinical outcomes in children.

  19. A STUDY OF PRESCRIBING PATTERN OF NON STEROIDAL ANTI INFLAMMATORY DRUGS IN ORTHOPEDIC OUT PATIENT DEPARTMENT AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Latha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the pattern of NON STEROIDAL ANTI INFLAMMATORY DRUGS prescribing for arthritic and non - arthritic conditions in orthopedic outpatient department . METHODOLOGY: 100 prescription duplicate collected and analyzed prospectively for the pattern of NSAID prescription for arthritic and non - arthritic conditions; the drug formulation , route , frequency, duration of adm issio n and concomitant medications results. NSAID were prescribed for non - traumatic musculo skeletal 35% pain, 25% post traumatic pain, 20% osteoarthritis, 10% post - operative pain, 3% ankylosing spondylitis, 6% degenerativ e disease of spine, 1% neuralgia. The NSAIDs commonly prescribed were Aceclofenac 45%, Etodolac 20%, Diclofenac 24%, and Ibuprofen 11%. Fixed dose combination of NSAIDs with adjuvante was prescribed in. The adjuvants, included are paracetamol 55.6%, serrat opeptidase 32.8%, chlorzoxazone 9.1%, Thiocolchichoside 2.5%. oral formulations of NSAIDs were prescribed in all patients, supplemented by Topical formulations as gel/cream in 15% of subjects. The dosing frequency was BID (65%, OD (25%, TID (2%, SOS (8% . Duration of administration ranged from 5 - 15 days . other classes of drugs used concomitantly were proton pump inhibitors , calcium supplements, Multivitamins, Anti microbials, Immuno suppressants, and Glucosamine. CONCLUSION: NSAIDs were prescribed empiric all y for various arthritic and Non - arthritic conditions, frequently as fixed dose combinations [FDC]s with various adjuvants as per the standard guide lines. However patient information was inadequate in most of the prescriptions. Proper patient Assessment deemed necessary for individualizing NSAIDs.

  20. A retrospective study of drug prescribing pattern in burns patients in a tertiary care rural hospital

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    Palak Agrawal

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Females are more vulnerable to burn injuries. Polypharmacy was observed in prescriptions. Systemic antibiotic should be used with caution to prevent emergence of resistant microorganisms. Results of the present study indicate that some aspects of drug treatment need to be rationalized in order to achieve better patient care. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(6.000: 1446-1452

  1. Struggles in prescribing : determinants of psychotropic drug use in multiple clinical settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of this thesis were to establish the prevalence of psychotropic drug use as well as possible determinants associated with its use in multiple clinical settings: psychiatric admission wards, an intensive care unit and two settings for the intellectually disabled. In this

  2. Struggles in prescribing : determinants of psychotropic drug use in multiple clinical settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of this thesis were to establish the prevalence of psychotropic drug use as well as possible determinants associated with its use in multiple clinical settings: psychiatric admission wards, an intensive care unit and two settings for the intellectually disabled. In this thesis,

  3. The effect of pharmacotherapy audit meetings on early new drug prescribing by general practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentinus, S.R.; Hulten, R. van; Kloth, M.E.M.; Heerdink, E.R.; Griens, A.M.G.F.; Leufkens, H.G.M.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: New drugs are cornerstones of clinical practice. However, when included in practice in an erratic fashion, there is valid concern about uncertain risk-benefit for patients and increased healthcare expenditures. In several countries, general practitioners (GPs) and pharmacists work closel

  4. Changing Australian prescribing patterns for antiepileptic drugs in pregnancy and their possible consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vajda, F. J. E.; Lander, C. M.; Hitchcock, A.; Graham, J.; Solinas, C.; O'Brien, T.; Eadie, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    We report progress in the accumulation of data by the Australian Pregnancy Register over 64 months, confirming the rise in enrolment and the predominantly epileptic indication for taking antiepileptic drugs. Eighty percent of the enrolment was prospective. The focus of the current report is the obse

  5. Effects of prescribed antihypertensives and other cardiovascular drugs on mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation and hypertension: a cohort study from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Axel C; Wändell, Per; Sundquist, Kristina; Johansson, Sven-Erik; Sundquist, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Although antihypertensive drugs are known to reduce mortality in individuals with hypertension, the effects of different cardiovascular pharmacotherapies on mortality among patients with hypertension and atrial fibrillation (AF) have been less thoroughly explored. To study mortality rates in men and women separately with hypertension and AF prescribed different cardiovascular pharmacotherapies. A cohort of men (n=2809) and women (n=2793) aged >45 years diagnosed with hypertension and AF were selected using patient records. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox regression, with all-cause mortality as the outcome. Analysis was performed on the whole population and after stratification by age and sex. Independent factors were prescribed pharmacotherapies. Adjustments were made for a propensity score comprising age, comorbidities, education and marital status. The higher the number of antihypertensive drugs prescribed, the lower the mortality rate (P-value for trend 0.005). Individuals prescribed 4-5 antihypertensive drugs had a lower risk of mortality than those prescribed 0-1 drugs (HR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.45-0.86). The HRs for the following drug classes were: loop diuretics 1.39 (95% CI: 1.08-1.78), non-selective β-blockers 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53-0.88), angiotensin receptor blockers 0.75 (95% CI: 0.56-0.99) and statins 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53-0.88). AF patients with hypertension prescribed statins, non-selective β-blockers and angiotensin receptor blockers had low relative mortality risks, suggesting that these prescribed pharmacotherapies were beneficial. This needs to be further explored in other clinical settings.

  6. Colleague interactions and new drug prescribing behavior: the case of the initial prescription of antidepressants in Taiwanese medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Jou; Jan, Kuan-An; Kao, Jen-Tse

    2011-10-01

    This research explores the social factors influencing hospital physicians' initial adoption of duloxetine hydrochloride, with a focus on colleague interactions. The study analyzes archival data compiled by the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan to examine how the prescribing decisions made by psychiatrists' colleagues influence the likelihood of the psychiatrists' initial prescription. The results show that the adoption ratio of a physician's colleagues in a medical center is positively associated with the likelihood of a physician's adoption of the new drug. Specifically, colleague groups with similar and longer tenure as well as similar and older age have significantly positive effects. Colleague groups with the same and different gender also have positive effects. In summary, tenure and age, rather than gender, are vital sources of heterogeneous colleague interactions.

  7. Drug utilization according to reason for prescribing: a pharmacoepidemiologic method based on an indication hierarchy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Hendriksen, Carsten; Morten, Andersen

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To develop a pharmacoepidemiologic method for drug utilization analysis according to indication, gender, and age by means of register-based information. Statin utilization in 2005 was applied as an example. Methods Following the recommendations for statin therapy, we constructed...... an indication hierarchy with eight mutually exclusive levels of register markers of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Danish residents, as of January 1, 1996, were followed at the individual level in nationwide registers with respect to dispensed prescriptions of cardiovascular drugs and antidiabetics (1996...... with no register marker or primary hypertension accounted for almost 50% of all incident female users; among men, the figure was 35%. The proportion of incident users with ischemic heart disease or myocardial infarction increased with age. Conclusion The proposed indication hierarchy provided new insight...

  8. Prospective, non-interventional, uncontrolled, open-chart, pharmacoepidemiologic study of prescribing patterns for anti-diabetic drugs at tertiary care hospital in Erode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine current prescribing patterns for anti-diabetic drugs adopted by physicians in Erode. The prospective, non interventional, uncontrolled, open-chart, pharmacoepidemiological study was conducted from January -2007 to April -2007 at a diabetic care centre having 350 diabetic patients. The pattern of prescribing anti-diabetic drugs was recorded along with glycosylated haemoglobin levels, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, very low-density lipoprotein and triglycerides in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients and the values were observed. The prescribing pattern of the oral anti-diabetic drugs shows that out of the various oral anti-diabetic drugs′ available, drugs from only two groups were prescribed. Sulphonylureas, biguanides and combination therapy accounts for 31.43%, 20.28% and 33.71% of prescriptions, respectively, while insulin alone and with OAD′s accounts for 6.28% and 8.29% prescriptions, respectively. Overall, prescribing trend is away from monotherapy with insulin and sulphonylureas and towards combination therapies.

  9. Cost analysis of inappropriate treatments for suspected dermatomycoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Fiammenghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Superficial mycoses are estimated to affect more than 20-25% of the world’s population with a consistent increase over the years. Most patients referred to our clinic for suspected dermatomycoses have already been treated with pharmacotherapy, without a previous mycological examination and many show changes in the clinical manifestations. Indeed, some medications, such as steroids, antiviral, antibiotics and antihistamines are not able to erase a fungal infection, but also they can cause atypical clinical manifestations. The consequences of inappropriate treatment include delayed diagnosis, prolonged healing time, and additional costs. The aims of this study were (1 to evaluate the incidence of increased costs attributable to inappropriate therapy sustained by the National Health Service and patients and (2 to highlight the importance of mycological evaluation before starting treatment, in order to improve diagnostic accuracy. An observational retrospective and prospective study was performed from September 2013 to February 2014, in 765 patients referred to our center (University Hospital “ Federico II” in Naples, Italy, for suspected mycological infection. The following treatments (alone or in combination were defined as inappropriate: (1 cortisone in a patient with at least one positive site; (2 antifungals in (a patients with all negative sites or (b ineffective antifungal treatment (in terms of drug chosen, dose or duration in those with all positive sites; or (3 antibiotics; (4 antivirals or (5 antihistamines, in patients with ≥ 1 positive site. Five hundred and fifty patients were using medications before the assessment visit. The total amount of avoidable costs related to inappropriate previous treatments was € 121,417, representing 74% of the total treatment costs. 253/550 patients received drugs also after the visit. For these patients, the cost of treatment prescribed after mycological testing was € 42,952, with a decrease

  10. Re-prescribing of causative drugs in persons discharged after serious drug-induced upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, M; Christensen, René dePont; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B

    2012-01-01

    Several drug classes are known to be associated with serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), among others NSAID, low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), vitamin K antagonists (VKA), clopidogrel and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). There are few data on how and to what extent...

  11. Associations between statewide prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) requirement and physician patterns of prescribing opioid analgesics for patients with non-cancer chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsien-Chang; Wang, Zhi; Boyd, Carol; Simoni-Wastila, Linda; Buu, Anne

    2018-01-01

    State-level prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) have been implemented in most states. PDMPs enable registered prescribers to obtain real-time information on patients' prescription history to reduce non-medical use of controlled drugs. This study examined whether PDMP implementation and different levels of PDMP requirements were associated with physicians' patterns of prescribing opioid analgesics for patients with non-cancer chronic pain. This is a secondary analysis study using cross-sectional national data. Patients with non-cancer chronic pain from the 2012 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were included (weighted N=81,018,131; unweighted N=3295). Heckman two-step selection procedure employing two logistic regressions was used to explore the associations between PDMP requirements and physicians' prescribing behaviors, controlling for physician characteristics, patient characteristics, physician-healthcare system interaction, and physician-patient relationship, guided by the Eisenberg's model of physician decision making. State PDMP implementation status and requirement levels were not associated with physician opioid prescribing for non-cancer chronic pain treatment (p's ranged 0.30-0.32). Patients with Medicare coverage were more likely to be prescribed opioid analgesics than those with private health insurance (OR=1.55, prequirements and enforcement for prescribers and related stakeholders. Future studies also are needed to identify characteristics contributing to PDMP effectiveness in reducing non-medical use of prescription opioids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A drug utilization and pharmacoeconomic study of anti-diabetic drugs prescribed to type 2 diabetes mellitus patients visiting the medicine out-patient department of a tertiary care hospital of north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Singh

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Metformin was the most common OAD agent and insulin aspart was the most common injectable anti-diabetic drug prescribed in patients with T2DM. The newer anti-diabetic drugs sitagliptin and newer insulin analogues were also prescribed to a great extent. Overall, the prescribing trend was rational to a great extent and had improved since the earlier study in the same institute. The most cost-effective anti-diabetic therapy was combination therapy of glipizide and metformin. The cost of diabetes management is high, especially for insulin therapy. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(4.000: 1220-1227

  13. [Prescribing and dispensing generic drugs in the Mambéré-Kadéï health district of the Central African Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouala, C; Abeye, J; Somse, P; Maritoux, J; Goumba, A

    2008-04-01

    Good drug prescription and distribution practices are pre-requisites for rational use of essential generic medications. However few studies have been conducted on this topic in sub-Saharan Africa especially in rural areas. The purpose of this study in the Mambéré-Kadei health district of the Central African Republic was to evaluate drug use patterns with special attention to prescribing and dispensing, as a basis for assisting policy makers in planning and identifying intervention strategies. The transverse descriptive survey was undertaken in 14 public health facilities in the Mambéré-Kadéï health district. Data were collected by interviewing care providers and patients immediately after consultation and at the exit of the dispensary. The indicators recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for investigating drug use patterns in Communities were used for data collection. A total of 512 prescriptions were analysed. The average number of drugs prescribed per consultation was 3.5. Most drugs (68.6%) were prescribed by generic name. Antibiotic use (31.4% of consultations) was frequent and 29% of patients received injections. 82.1% of the drugs were compliant with the national essential drug list. The distribution survey showed that 79.46% of prescriptions were completely filled. No serious distribution errors occurred but 21.5% of the dispensed drugs were inadequately labelled. Patients understood the modalities of use for 69.6% of prescribed drugs. The average consultation and distribution times were 8.3 and 5 minutes respectively. Excessive use of antibiotics and injections and blunderbuss therapy is still observed in Mambéré-Kadei. Many drugs not included on the essential drug list and non-generics are prescribed. Other prescription and distribution problems identified in this survey include poor information on drug use, inadequate labelling of dispensed drugs, and lack of access to standard drug use tools such as a locally adapted essential drug

  14. The First Decade with the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register - A Systematic Review of the Output in the Scientific Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstedt, Susanna M; Wettermark, Björn; Hoffmann, Mikael

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify and characterize the scientific output from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register (SPDR) the first decade after its establishment. A systematic literature search was performed in Medline, EMBASE and PubMed (2005-2014). Additional publications were identified by personal knowledge, reference lists, contact with active authors and a citation search in Web of Sciences. Publications using SPDR data were included in the analysis and characterized regarding study type, presence of patient-level record linkage, target population and topic. A total of 719 publications were identified in the literature search and an additional 148 by other strategies. Three hundred and thirty-eight studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The majority were analytic (n = 166; 49.1%) or descriptive (n = 100; 29.5%). The remaining studies focused on validation (n = 20; 5.9%), health economics (n = 16; 4.7%) or miscellaneous (n = 36; 10.7%). The analytic studies investigating effects of drug exposure focused mainly on safety (n = 46) and/or effectiveness (n = 24). The first publications appeared in 2007 (n = 6), and in 2014, 90 articles using SPDR were published. Over the years, linkage with other registers using the personal identity number increased (0-88.9% of the publications). The population was often selected by age (49.7%), condition (45.0%) and/or drug (22.8%) and concerned predominantly psychiatric (29.0%) and cardiovascular (20.4%) diseases. In conclusion, this study illustrates that the establishment of a nationwide individual-based register on dispensed prescription drugs facilitates an encouraging development of pharmacoepidemiological research, both regarding the number of publications and the scientific level of the analyses.

  15. [Prescribers' awareness about the pharmacology of the non-steroidal drugs in the capital town of Antananarivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fara, R; Rasoloherimampiononiaina, M R; Rajaonarivony, T; Randriamiarana, J M

    2008-01-01

    In order to assess prescribers' level of knowledge about the pharmacology of the non steroidian anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), we led a prospective study without randomization among the caregivers of three university teaching hospitals and three private hospitals centres of Antananarivo, capital town of Malagasy Republic. The answers to the questionnaire were coded as known or unknown. Statistical analysis (by SPSS 10.0 software for Windows) displayed Fisher's exact test and p value less than 0.05 was set as cut-off for significance. The response rate was 71% (43 over 60), mainly from physicians (62.8%). The correct posology, the non-digestive adverse effects and the adequate follow-up were the main ignored items. Analysis by logistic regression demonstrated association between medical professionals and ignorance of adequate follow-up (p=0.030), female gender and ignorance of the non-digestive adverse effects (p=0.041). In conclusion, routine prescription hides ignorance about the safe use of the drug and periodical recycling of health professionals is helpful.

  16. In silico analysis to compare the effectiveness of assorted drugs prescribed for swine flu in diverse medicine systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Raja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome of the virus H1N1 2009 consists of eight segments but maximum number of mutations occurs at segments 1 and 4, coding for PB2 subunit of hemagglutinin. Comparatively less number of mutations occur at segment 6, coding for neuraminidase. Two antiviral drugs, oseltamivir and zanamivir are commonly prescribed for treating H1N1 infection. Alternate medical systems do compete equally; andrographolide in Siddha and gelsemine in Homeopathy. Recent studies confirm the efficacy of eugenol from Tulsi and vitamins C and E against H1N1. As the protein structures are unavailable, we modeled them using Modeller by identifying suitable templates, 1RUY and 3BEQ, for hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, respectively. Prior to docking simulations using AutoDock, the drug likeness properties of the ligands were screened using in silico techniques. Docking results showed interaction between the proteins individually into selected ligands, except for gelsemine and vitamin E no interactions were shown. The best docking simulation was reported by vitamin C interacting through six hydrogen bonds into proteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase with binding energies -4.28 and -4.56 kcal/mol, respectively. Furthermore, vitamin C showed hydrophobic interactions with both proteins, two bonds with Arg119, Glu120 of HA, and one bond with Arg74 of NA. In silico docking studies thus recommend vitamin C to be more effective against H1N1.

  17. Reforms and initiatives in Scotland in recent years to encourage the prescribing of generic drugs, their influence and implications for other countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godman, Brian; Bishop, Iain; Finlayson, Alexander E; Campbell, Stephen; Kwon, Hye-Young; Bennie, Marion

    2013-08-01

    Scotland has introduced a number of initiatives to enhance the prescribing of low-cost generic drugs versus originators and patent products in a class where these are seen as similar. The objective of this review is to appraise the influence of the various measures on subsequent utilization patterns and expenditure in high-volume classes to provide guidance. This review is principally a narrative review of published studies. The authors' found supply-side measures resulted in generic prices as low as 3% of pre-patent loss prices. Multiple demand-side measures resulted in high international non-proprietary name prescribing, and a considerable increase in prescribing efficiency for the proton pump inhibitors, statins, renin-angiotensin inhibitor drugs and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. There were no specific activities encouraging the prescription of losartan versus other angiotensin receptor blockers or risperidone versus other atypical antipsychotic drugs following generics and no change in their utilization patterns post generics. The authors can conclude multiple measures are needed to change physician prescribing habits. Authorities cannot rely on any 'spillover' effects to affect future prescribing, even in closely related classes.

  18. Physicians' preferences for prescribing oral and intravenous anticancer drugs: a Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Laure; Cotté, François-Emery; Philippe, Caroline; Mercier, Florence; Bachelot, Thomas; Vidal-Trécan, Gwenaëlle

    2012-04-01

    Although efficacy and tolerability are classical criteria for treatment choice, patient adherence and tariff issues related to novel oral anticancer drugs may also influence therapeutic decisions. We estimated the relative influence of efficacy, tolerability, expected adherence and route of administration of a chemotherapy treatment on 203 French physicians' preferences who participated in a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE), a quantitative method used to elicit preferences. From a questionnaire with six scenarii, respondents had to choose between two treatments which differed with respect to these four attributes. Scenarii were first presented in a curative setting then in a palliative setting. Efficacy, tolerability and expected adherence had two modalities (good versus moderate) and route of administration had three modalities (intravenous (€286-379/session), oral with the current tariff (€28/consultation), oral with a hypothetical tariff (€114)). Efficacy was the reference criterion in choosing a treatment whatever the therapeutic goal (β: 2.114, padherence (β: 1.223, p=0.0001) were influent in curative setting while the route of administration was still predominant in palliative setting (β: 0.431, p<0.0001). Results suggest that economic considerations as well as therapeutic efficacy play a significant role in choosing a treatment. Preference for oral chemotherapy with a hypothetical tariff for a patient support programme should be considered for the development of therapeutic education and healthcare coordination, currently not taken into account in the tariff of oral chemotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. American parents' willingness to prescribe psychoactive drugs to children: a test of cultural mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, David; Dillon, Frank R; Gladwin, Hugh; De La Rosa, Mario

    2013-12-01

    In the USA, white children receive psychoactive drugs more often than black or Hispanic children. This study investigates whether cultural attitudes statistically mediate differences between American parents' self-identified racial-ethnic group membership and their willingness to medicate children for behavioral problems. Using data from telephone interviews with 1,145 parents in two Florida counties, structural models tested associations between each group compared with the other, in willingness to medicate children exhibiting different problematic behaviors and hypothesized cultural (familism, fatalism, attitude toward corporal punishment, religiosity, concern about treatment stigma, birth abroad, language of interview) and other mediators (views about medications and causes of children's problems). Respondent gender, age, socioeconomic status, parent-type household, taking psychoactive medication, and having a child with behavioral problems were used as covariates. Race-ethnicity was strongly associated with specific cultural attitudes and views about medications and problems, but only Hispanics distinguished themselves significantly from whites in willingness to medicate children. Across groups, parents who viewed medication favorably and endorsed biomedical causes for problems were more willing to medicate. In Hispanic-white and Hispanic-black comparisons, being interviewed in Spanish was the sole but modest cultural mediator of willingness, and in black-white comparisons, only concern about treatment stigma weakly mediated differences in willingness. These findings provide faint support for a parent-centered cultural explanation of reported prescription differences among youths of different racial-ethnic groups in the USA. However, structural and professional components of a broader cultural hypothesis for such differences, within the USA and between different countries, still require evaluation.

  20. Electronic Prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Do you prescribe electronically?” For more information about electronic prescribing, call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633- ... TTY users should call 1-877-486-2048 . Electronic eRx Prescribing I went to the pharmacy, and ...

  1. American Geriatrics Society Updated Beers Criteria for Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) continue to be prescribed and used as first-line treatment for the most vulnerable of older adults, despite evidence of poor outcomes from the use of PIMs in older adults. PIMs now form an integral part of policy and practice and are incorporated into several quality measures. The specific aim of this project was to update the previous Beers Criteria using a comprehensive, systematic review and grading of the evidence on drug-related problems and adverse drug events (ADEs) in older adults. This was accomplished through the support of The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and the work of an interdisciplinary panel of 11 experts in geriatric care and pharmacotherapy who applied a modified Delphi method to the systematic review and grading to reach consensus on the updated 2012 AGS Beers Criteria. Fifty-three medications or medication classes encompass the final updated Criteria, which are divided into three categories: potentially inappropriate medications and classes to avoid in older adults, potentially inappropriate medications and classes to avoid in older adults with certain diseases and syndromes that the drugs listed can exacerbate, and finally medications to be used with caution in older adults. This update has much strength, including the use of an evidence-based approach using the Institute of Medicine standards and the development of a partnership to regularly update the Criteria. Thoughtful application of the Criteria will allow for (a) closer monitoring of drug use, (b) application of real-time e-prescribing and interventions to decrease ADEs in older adults, and (c) better patient outcomes. PMID:22376048

  2. American Geriatrics Society updated Beers Criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) continue to be prescribed and used as first-line treatment for the most vulnerable of older adults, despite evidence of poor outcomes from the use of PIMs in older adults. PIMs now form an integral part of policy and practice and are incorporated into several quality measures. The specific aim of this project was to update the previous Beers Criteria using a comprehensive, systematic review and grading of the evidence on drug-related problems and adverse drug events (ADEs) in older adults. This was accomplished through the support of The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and the work of an interdisciplinary panel of 11 experts in geriatric care and pharmacotherapy who applied a modified Delphi method to the systematic review and grading to reach consensus on the updated 2012 AGS Beers Criteria. Fifty-three medications or medication classes encompass the final updated Criteria, which are divided into three categories: potentially inappropriate medications and classes to avoid in older adults, potentially inappropriate medications and classes to avoid in older adults with certain diseases and syndromes that the drugs listed can exacerbate, and finally medications to be used with caution in older adults. This update has much strength, including the use of an evidence-based approach using the Institute of Medicine standards and the development of a partnership to regularly update the Criteria. Thoughtful application of the Criteria will allow for (a) closer monitoring of drug use, (b) application of real-time e-prescribing and interventions to decrease ADEs in older adults, and (c) better patient outcomes.

  3. The Impact of WHO Essential Medicines Policies on Inappropriate Use of Antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Anne Holloway

    Full Text Available Inappropriate overuse of antibiotics contributes to antimicrobial resistance (AMR, yet policy implementation to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use is poor in low and middle-income countries.To determine whether public sector inappropriate antibiotic use is lower in countries reporting implementation of selected essential medicines policies.Results from independently conducted antibiotic use surveys in countries that did, and did not report implementation of policies to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, were compared. Survey data on four validated indicators of inappropriate antibiotic use and 16 self-reported policy implementation variables from WHO databases were extracted. The average difference for indicators between countries reporting versus not reporting implementation of specific policies was calculated. For 16 selected policies we regressed the four antibiotic use variables on the numbers of policies the countries reported implementing.Data were available for 55 countries. Of 16 policies studied, four (having a national Ministry of Health unit on promoting rational use of medicines, a national drug information centre and provincial and hospital drugs and therapeutics committees were associated with statistically significant reductions in antibiotic use of ≥20% in upper respiratory infection (URTI. A national strategy to contain antibiotic resistance was associated with a 30% reduction in use of antibiotics in acute diarrheal illness. Policies seemed to be associated with greater effects in antibiotic use for URTI and diarrhea compared with antibiotic use in all patients. There were negative correlations between the numbers of policies reported implemented and the percentage of acute diarrhoea cases treated with antibiotics (r = -0.484, p = 0.007 and the percentage of URTI cases treated with antibiotics (r = -0.472, p = 0.005. Major study limitations were the reliance on self-reported policy implementation data and

  4. [Inappropriate prescribing in older adults with chronic-degenerative disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Medina, María Aideé; Peralta-Pedrero, María Luisa; Pineda-Aquino, Victoria; Durán-Fernández, Yubia Coral; Avalos-Mejía, Annia; Aguirre-García, María Del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: la prescripción potencialmente inapropiada incluye el uso de medicamentos que representan mayor riesgo que benefi cio para el paciente. El objetivo fue evaluar la utilidad del instrumento STOPP-START para su detección. Métodos: se realizó un estudio transversal descriptivo, con selección aleatoria de expedientes de adultos mayores con al menos una enfermedad crónica degenerativa, cuya última consulta tuviera máximo dos meses y que hubiesen cumplido con su cita mensual cuando menos cuatro veces en el últimos semestre. Resultados: de los 285 expedientes revisados, 60 % de los pacientes fueron mujeres; la edad promedio fue de 74 ± 6 años. Se revisaron 1749 prescripciones de 126 medicamentos diferentes. La prescripción inapropiada tuvo una prevalencia de 55 % (IC 95 % = 49-61) y la polifarmacia de 87 % (IC 95 % = 83-91). En los padecimientos cardiovasculares, endocrinos y musculoesqueléticos se registró el mayor número de prescripciones y de prescripción potencialmente inapropiada. Se detectó la omisión de uno o más medicamentos indicados en 72 % de 75 circunstancias clínicas específi cas. Conclusiones: el STOPP-START es útil para detectar prescripción potencialmente inapropiada. Es frecuente la omisión de tratamientos preventivos indicados para el adulto mayor con enfermedades crónicas degenerativas.

  5. Inappropriate prescribing of proton pump inhibitors among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    such as duodenal and gastric ulcers, severe reflux oesophagitis .... Mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours. 3. History of GI ulceration or bleeding with the past year. 4. Traumatic brain injury, traumatic spinal cord injury, or burn injury ( >.

  6. Health care professionals' knowledge and attitudes of drug benefits and risks in africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berhe, Derbew F.; Taxis, Katja; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Mol, Peter G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inappropriate drug use is a major global challenge. In Africa, it may be even more widespread for a number of reasons, especially limited resources. Drugs may be prescribed by health care professionals (HCPs) who have received little training on drug benefits, but especially risks. Objec

  7. Health care professionals' knowledge and attitudes of drug benefits and risks in africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berhe, Derbew F.; Taxis, Katja; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Mol, Peter G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inappropriate drug use is a major global challenge. In Africa, it may be even more widespread for a number of reasons, especially limited resources. Drugs may be prescribed by health care professionals (HCPs) who have received little training on drug benefits, but especially risks.

  8. Assessment of prescribing, dispensing, and patient use pattern of antihypertensive drugs for patients attending outpatient department of Hiwot Fana Specialized University Hospital, Harar, Eastern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukrala F

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fedila Shukrala,1 Tesfaye Gabriel2 1Dil Chora Referral Hospital, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Social Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Background: Hypertension is a global concern and is one of the key preventable risk factors for cardiovascular events, resulting in unnecessary morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the prescribing, dispensing and patient use pattern of antihypertensive drugs among patients attending Hiwot Fana Specialized University Hospital outpatient department.Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Hiwot Fana Specialized University Hospital on assessment of the prescribing, dispensing, and patient use pattern of antihypertensive drugs among patients who were above the age of 18 years and attending outpatient department from April 1–May 31, 2013. Data collection was conducted by reviewing the record of patients and direct observation of the dispensing process of randomly selected patients to measure average dispensing time, and direct interview with the patients. Results: A total of 400 patients met the inclusion criteria; out of the 400 patients studied, 63.5% were females. Most of the patients had Stage 1 hypertension (69%, followed by Stage 2 hypertension (31%. Out of the total number of patients, 264 were with different comorbid conditions: diabetes mellitus (64.3%, followed by congestive heart failure (15.1% and ischemic heart disease (2.3%. The most frequently prescribed class of antihypertensive drugs was diuretics, of which hydrochlorothiazide was the most frequently prescribed drug, both in single (55%, followed by enalapril (22.3%, methyl dopa (11.2%, atenolol (6.9%, and nifedipine (4.6%, and in combination with other antihypertensive drugs. The average dispensing time was 1.2 minutes, and 75% of the patients left the counter with inadequate information about the dosage

  9. Rational Prescribing in Primary care (RaPP: process evaluation of an intervention to improve prescribing of antihypertensive and cholesterol-lowering drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxman Andrew D

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A randomised trial of a multifaceted intervention for improving adherence to clinical practice guidelines for the pharmacological management of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia increased prescribing of thiazides, butdetected no impact onthe use of cardiovascular risk assessment toolsor achievement of treatment targets. We carried out a predominantly quantitative process evaluation to help explain and interpret the trial-findings. Methods Several data-sources were used including: questionnaires completed by pharmacists immediately after educational outreach visits, semi-structured interviews with physicians subjected to the intervention, and data extracted from their electronic medical records. Multivariate regression analyses were conducted to explore the association between possible explanatory variables and the observed variation across practices for the three main outcomes. Results The attendance rate during the educational sessions in each practice was high; few problems were reported, and the physicians were perceived as being largely supportive of the recommendations we promoted, except for some scepticism regarding the use of thiazides as first-line antihypertensive medication. Multivariate regression models could explain only a small part of the observed variation across practices and across trial-outcomes, and key factors that might explain the observed variation in adherence to the recommendations across practices were not identified. Conclusion This study did not provide compelling explanations for the trial results. Possible reasons for this include a lack of statistical power and failure to include potential explanatory variables in our analyses, particularly organisational factors. More use of qualitative research methods in the course of the trial could have improved our understanding.

  10. Potentially inappropriate medication use in a city of Southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Cunha Xavier Pinto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Potentially inappropriate medication use by the Diamantina (Minas Gerais State population was investigated by analyzing medicine consumption, self-medication, polypharmacy and drug interactions of medicines prescribed among those interviewed. Level of knowledge about rational drug use and its relationship to socio-economic variables was also evaluated using a semi-structured questionnaire. This survey was based on stratified sampling of 423 individuals selected randomly. The prevalence of prescription drug consumption was 42.32% (n=179 and cardiovascular drugs were the most prescribed. Drug interactions were found in 45.81% (n=82 of prescriptions and 92.68% (n=76 of these interactions were moderate, with co-administration of cardiovascular drugs occurring in more than half of the cases. The inappropriate use of medication, according to Beers criteria, occurred in 44.73% of prescriptions to the elderly. The prevalence of self-medication was 63.34% (n=268 while 21.99% (n=91 of individuals administered medications to their children without formal prescriptions, where this practice was associated to analgesic/antipyretic consumption. The population showed a high prevalence of inappropriate use of drugs across all strata of society, representing an issue requiring effective actions to promote rational use of medicines.O consumo inapropriado de medicamentos pela população de Diamantina-MG foi investigado através da análise do consumo de medicamentos, automedicação, polifarmácia e interações medicamentosas prescritas aos entrevistados. Também foi avaliado o nível de conhecimento sobre uso racional de medicamentos e sua relação com variáveis sócio-econômicas através de um questionário semi-estruturado. Este estudo transversal foi baseado em amostragem estratificada e contou com a participação de 423 indivíduos selecionados aleatoriamente. A prevalência do consumo de medicamentos prescritos foi de 42,32% (n=179, sendo os

  11. ADDRESSING RATIONAL PRESCRIBERS THROUGH THE PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS COURSE WORK OF MBBS SYLLABUS IN BANGLADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdus Salam

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacology is most rapidly expanding science in medical discipline which leads to the development of many important drugs to treat many medical conditions that was previously untreatable. This paper focuses on the necessity of integration of pharmacology in the medical curriculum in all clinical phases and ethical aspects of medicine in terms of irrational prescribing. Irrational prescribing of drugs is a major global health problem in medical practice. Currently Pharmacology is taught at phase-II, a 2 year period in a 5 years undergraduate medical Programme in Bangladesh under the name ‘Pharmacology and Therapeutics’. Indiscriminate use of clinically inappropriate and ineffective medicines are a serious problem. Medicines in Bangladesh are inappropriately prescribed, again all kinds of drugs including controlled products are dispensed and sold out frequently without prescription. Henceforth there are regular violation of medical ethics and professionalism. As only pharmacology and therapeutics deals with the correct selection of drugs, the subject should be continued to teach up to phase-III. In addition, therapeutic discussion should be incorporated with proper logbook during internship in order to make safe and efficient prescribers. Supreme priority should be given to legal and ethical aspects of medicine. Medical professionals must uphold social order by ensuring ethical practices of medicine and appropriate role modelling especially by the faculty.

  12. Doctors' perspectives on the barriers to appropriate prescribing in older hospitalized patients: A qualitative study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullinan, S

    2014-11-18

    Older patients commonly suffer from multimorbidites and take multiple medications. As a result, these patients are more vulnerable to potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP). PIP in older patients may result in adverse drug events and hospitalisations. However, little has been done to identify why PIP occurs. The objectives of this study were; (1) to identify hospital doctors\\' perceptions as to why PIP occurs, (2) to identify the barriers to addressing the issues identified, and (3) to determine which intervention types would be best suited to improving prescribing.

  13. Antimalarial drug prescribing practice in private and public health facilities in South-east Nigeria: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okebe Joseph

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nigeria's national standard has recently moved to artemisinin combination treatments for malaria. As clinicians in the private sector are responsible for attending a large proportion of the population ill with malaria, this study compared prescribing in the private and public sector in one State in Nigeria prior to promoting ACTs. Objective To assess prescribing for uncomplicated malaria in government and private health facilities in Cross River State. Method Audit of 665 patient records at six private and seven government health facilities in 2003. Results Clinicians in the private sector were less likely to record history or physical examination than those in public facilities, but otherwise practice and prescribing were similar. Overall, 45% of patients had a diagnostic blood slides; 77% were prescribed monotherapy, either chloroquine (30.2%, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (22.7% or artemisinin derivatives alone (15.8%. Some 20.8% were prescribed combination therapy; the commonest was chloroquine with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. A few patients (3.5% were prescribed sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine-mefloquine in the private sector, and only 3.0% patients were prescribed artemisinin combination treatments. Conclusion Malaria treatments were varied, but there were not large differences between the public and private sector. Very few are following current WHO guidelines. Monotherapy with artemisinin derivatives is relatively common.

  14. Changing physician prescribing behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, J

    2006-01-01

    Didactic approaches to educating physicians and/or other health professionals do not produce changes in learner behaviour. Similarly, printed materials and practice guidelines have not been shown to change prescribing behaviour. Evidence-based educational approaches that do have an impact on provider behaviour include: teaching aimed at identified learning needs; interactive educational activities; sequenced and multifaceted interventions; enabling tools such as patient education programs, flow charts, and reminders; educational outreach or academic detailing; and audit and feedback to prescribers. Dr. Jean Gray reflects over the past 25 years on how there has been a transformation in the types of activities employed to improve prescribing practices in Nova Scotia. The evolution of Continuing Medical Education (CME) has resulted in the creation of the Drug Evaluation Alliance of Nova Scotia (DEANS) program, which is one exemplar of an evidence-based educational approach to improving physician prescribing in that province. Key words: Evidence-based, education, prescribing.

  15. A pilot study evaluating the prescribing of ceftriaxone in hospitals in Ghana: findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afriyie, Daniel Kwame; Amponsah, Seth Kwabena; Dogbey, Justice; Agyekum, Kwabena; Kesse, Samuel; Truter, Ilse; Meyer, Johanna C; Godman, Brian

    2017-10-01

    Widespread empiric use of antibiotics exists especially in developing countries. This is a concern since inappropriate use of antibiotics, including their extended inappropriate use, will increase resistance rates. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate antibiotic utilisation across healthcare sectors to improve future use. This includes ceftriaxone, widely used among hospitals including those in Ghana. A cross-sectional study to evaluate the appropriateness of ceftriaxone prescribing in a leading hospital in Ghana. Ceftriaxone prescribing in patient-record cards was assessed using a modified WHO drug-utilization evaluation criteria as well as referencing the national standard treatment guidelines in Ghana and the ceftriaxone package insert. A total of 251 patients were assessed. Ceftriaxone was most commonly prescribed for comorbid malaria with bacterial infections, urinary tract infections, sepsis and gastroenteritis. The appropriateness of the indication was 86% (n = 218). The doses most prescribed were 1g (41%) and 2g (39%). Stat dose and once-daily dosage regimen constituted 51.4% and 84.5%, respectively. The most common duration of treatment was 1 (51.4%) and 2 days (35.1%). The overall appropriateness of prescribing was 93% against a pre-set threshold of 97%. The appropriateness of ceftriaxone prescribing was high in this leading hospital in Ghana; however, there is room for improvement with targeted education initiatives, with further research planned.

  16. Systematic evaluation of "compliance" to prescribed treatment medications and "abstinence" from psychoactive drug abuse in chemical dependence programs: data from the comprehensive analysis of reported drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Blum

    Full Text Available This is the first quantitative analysis of data from urine drug tests for compliance to treatment medications and abstinence from drug abuse across "levels of care" in six eastern states of America. Comprehensive Analysis of Reported Drugs (CARD data was used in this post-hoc retrospective observational study from 10,570 patients, filtered to include a total of 2,919 patients prescribed at least one treatment medication during 2010 and 2011. The first and last urine samples (5,838 specimens were analyzed; compliance to treatment medications and abstinence from drugs of abuse supported treatment effectiveness for many. Compared to non-compliant patients, compliant patients were marginally less likely to abuse opioids, cannabinoids, and ethanol during treatment although more likely to abuse benzodiazepines. Almost 17% of the non-abstinent patients used benzodiazepines, 15% used opiates, and 10% used cocaine during treatment. Compliance was significantly higher in residential than in the non-residential treatment facilities. Independent of level of care, 67.2% of the patients (n = 1963; P<.001 had every treatment medication found in both first and last urine specimens (compliance. In addition, 39.2% of the patients (n = 1143; P<.001 had no substance of abuse detected in either the first or last urine samples (abstinence. Moreover, in 2010, 16.9% of the patients (n = 57 were abstinent at first but not at last urine (deteriorating abstinence, the percentage dropped to 13.3% (n = 174 in 2011; this improvement over years was statistically significant. A longitudinal analysis for abstinence and compliance was studied in a randomized subset from 2011, (n = 511 representing 17.5% of the total cohort. A statistically significant upward trend (p = 2.353×10-8 of abstinence rates as well as a similar but stronger trend for compliance ((p = 2.200×10-16 was found. Being cognizant of the trend toward drug urine testing being linked

  17. Systematic evaluation of "compliance" to prescribed treatment medications and "abstinence" from psychoactive drug abuse in chemical dependence programs: data from the comprehensive analysis of reported drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Han, David; Femino, John; Smith, David E; Saunders, Scott; Simpatico, Thomas; Schoenthaler, Stephen J; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Gold, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    This is the first quantitative analysis of data from urine drug tests for compliance to treatment medications and abstinence from drug abuse across "levels of care" in six eastern states of America. Comprehensive Analysis of Reported Drugs (CARD) data was used in this post-hoc retrospective observational study from 10,570 patients, filtered to include a total of 2,919 patients prescribed at least one treatment medication during 2010 and 2011. The first and last urine samples (5,838 specimens) were analyzed; compliance to treatment medications and abstinence from drugs of abuse supported treatment effectiveness for many. Compared to non-compliant patients, compliant patients were marginally less likely to abuse opioids, cannabinoids, and ethanol during treatment although more likely to abuse benzodiazepines. Almost 17% of the non-abstinent patients used benzodiazepines, 15% used opiates, and 10% used cocaine during treatment. Compliance was significantly higher in residential than in the non-residential treatment facilities. Independent of level of care, 67.2% of the patients (n = 1963; P<.001) had every treatment medication found in both first and last urine specimens (compliance). In addition, 39.2% of the patients (n = 1143; P<.001) had no substance of abuse detected in either the first or last urine samples (abstinence). Moreover, in 2010, 16.9% of the patients (n = 57) were abstinent at first but not at last urine (deteriorating abstinence), the percentage dropped to 13.3% (n = 174) in 2011; this improvement over years was statistically significant. A longitudinal analysis for abstinence and compliance was studied in a randomized subset from 2011, (n = 511) representing 17.5% of the total cohort. A statistically significant upward trend (p = 2.353×10-8) of abstinence rates as well as a similar but stronger trend for compliance ((p = 2.200×10-16) was found. Being cognizant of the trend toward drug urine testing being linked to

  18. Prescribing patterns of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in chronic kidney disease patients in the South African private sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwesen, Willem P; du Plessis, Jesslee M; Burger, Johanita R; Lubbe, Martie S; Cockeran, Marike

    2016-08-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most commonly used pharmaceutical agents worldwide. NSAIDs are considered nephrotoxic and should therefore be used with caution or be avoided completely in high risk patients, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Objective This study aimed to investigate the prescribing of NSAIDs in CKD patients in order to generate awareness and improve the outcome of these patients. Setting The study was conducted using medicine claims data in the private health sector of South Africa. Method A descriptive, quantitative study was performed, using retrospective data obtained from a Pharmaceutical Benefit Management company. Data from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2013 were analysed. The study population consisted of all patients with an ICD-10 code for a CKD (N18), in association with a paid claim for an NSAID. Main outcome measure The stratification of NSAID prescribing volume among the CKD population in terms of gender, age, NSAID type, dosage and prescriber type. Results The prescribing of NSAIDs in CKD patients varied between 26 and 40 % over the 5 year study period. No association between gender and CKD patients who received NSAIDs versus those who did not was found, with p > 0.05 and Cramer's V < 0.1 for each year of the study. The association between age groups and CKD patients who received NSAIDs versus those who did not was statistically significant, but practically weak (p < 0.05; Cramer's V ≥ 0.1). Most NSAID prescriptions (52-63 %) were for patients aged 35-64 years. Diclofenac (34.25 %) was the single most frequently prescribed NSAID, but the COX-2-inhibitors (celecoxib, meloxicam and etoricoxib) were the preferred NSAID class to be prescribed. The majority (61.6 %) of the NSAIDs were prescribed by general medical practitioners in dosages meeting and even exceeding the recommended daily dosage of patients with normal kidney function. Conclusions Even though NSAIDs are

  19. Incidence of oral thrush in patients with COPD prescribed inhaled corticosteroids: Effect of drug, dose, and device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Batsiou, M.; Bjermer, L.; Bosnic-Anticevich, S.; Chrystyn, H.; Papi, A.; Rodriguez-Roisin, R.; Fletcher, M.; Wood, L.; Cifra, A.; Soriano, J.B.; Price, D.B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Little information is available on real-life occurrence of oral thrush in COPD patients treated with ICS. We investigated oral thrush incidence in COPD patients prescribed FDC ICS/LABA therapies and assessed whether it is modulated by the ICS type, dose, and delivery device. MET

  20. Association between prescribing patterns of anti-asthmatic drugs and clinically uncontrolled asthma: a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jesper Rømhild; Hallas, Jesper; Søndergaard, Jens;

    2011-01-01

    Studies based on prescription data have shown that many asthmatics tend to use large quantities of inhaled beta-2-agonists, suggesting poorly controlled disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between clinically uncontrolled asthma and prescribing patterns of anti...

  1. Renal Drug Dosing. Effectiveness of Outpatient Pharmacist-Based vs. Prescriber-Based Clinical Decision Support Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Erin A; Billups, Sarah J; Herner, Sheryl J; Delate, Thomas

    2016-07-27

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of an outpatient renal dose adjustment alert via a computerized provider order entry (CPOE) clinical decision support system (CDSS) versus a CDSS with alerts made to dispensing pharmacists. This was a retrospective analysis of patients with renal impairment and 30 medications that are contraindicated or require dose-adjustment in such patients. The primary outcome was the rate of renal dosing errors for study medications that were dispensed between August and December 2013, when a pharmacist-based CDSS was in place, versus August through December 2014, when a prescriber-based CDSS was in place. A dosing error was defined as a prescription for one of the study medications dispensed to a patient where the medication was contraindicated or improperly dosed based on the patient's renal function. The denominator was all prescriptions for the study medications dispensed during each respective study period. During the pharmacist- and prescriber-based CDSS study periods, 49,054 and 50,678 prescriptions, respectively, were dispensed for one of the included medications. Of these, 878 (1.8%) and 758 (1.5%) prescriptions were dispensed to patients with renal impairment in the respective study periods. Patients in each group were similar with respect to age, sex, and renal function stage. Overall, the five-month error rate was 0.38%. Error rates were similar between the two groups: 0.36% and 0.40% in the pharmacist- and prescriber-based CDSS, respectively (p=0.523). The medication with the highest error rate was dofetilide (0.51% overall) while the medications with the lowest error rate were dabigatran, fondaparinux, and spironolactone (0.00% overall). Prescriber- and pharmacist-based CDSS provided comparable, low rates of potential medication errors. Future studies should be undertaken to examine patient benefits of the prescriber-based CDSS.

  2. How can we improve antibiotic prescribing in primary care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyar, Oliver J.; Beović, Bojana; Vlahović-Palčevski, Vera; Verheij, Theo; Pulcini, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic stewardship is a necessity given the worldwide antimicrobial resistance crisis. Outpatient antibiotic use represents around 90% of total antibiotic use, with more than half of these prescriptions being either unnecessary or inappropriate. Efforts to improve antibiotic prescribing need to

  3. How can we improve antibiotic prescribing in primary care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyar, Oliver J.; Beović, Bojana; Vlahović-Palčevski, Vera; Verheij, Theo; Pulcini, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic stewardship is a necessity given the worldwide antimicrobial resistance crisis. Outpatient antibiotic use represents around 90% of total antibiotic use, with more than half of these prescriptions being either unnecessary or inappropriate. Efforts to improve antibiotic prescribing need to

  4. Off-label or out of bounds? Prescriber and marketer liability for unapproved uses of FDA-approved drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, James; Dalal, Amy

    2003-01-01

    Professor O'Reilly's study of recent drug review legislation applies a historical and holistic view of promotion practices for unapproved uses of prescription drugs. He faults Congress for moving public health protections away from a strictly protective mode and toward assistance to drug marketers. He argues that the adverse health consequences of "off-label" promotion of drugs are not well understood, and that the 1997 amendments deserved the public health interest while expanding pharmaceutical company profits.

  5. AB013. Inappropriate asthma therapy: a tale of two countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibber, Anjan; Belhassen, Manon; Van Ganse, Eric; Ryan, Dermot; Langlois, Carole; Appiagyei, Francis; Skinner, Derek; Laforest, Laurent; Soriano, Joan B.; Price, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Inappropriate prescribing and misuse of asthma medication, have been identified as potentially preventable factors linked to asthma exacerbations and deaths. A recent report by the National Review of Asthma Deaths drew attention to the excessive prescribing of reliever medication, and under-prescribing of controlled medication in the United-Kingdom (UK). The inappropriate prescribing of long-acting beta agonist (LABA) bronchodilator inhalers, as either a monotherapy or without inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) has been highlighted as a major preventable factor of asthma exacerbations and deaths. To determine whether the prevalence of inappropriate LABA therapy use in asthma in the UK and in France has changed over time. Methods Two interval, parallel, population-based cohorts (2007 and 2013), were developed in each country, utilising the UK Optimum Patient Care Research Database and the French Permanent Beneficiaries Sample database. Following inclusion, patients aged 6–40 years were studied over a 12-month period. The use of LABAs without ICS, and ≥2-fold higher use of LABA compared with ICS were investigated. Analyses were stratified by age groups: children (6–13 years) and adults (14–40 years). Results Overall, 39,743 UK and 4,910 French patients were included in 2007 and 14,036 and 5,657 in 2013. In 2013, LABA use without ICS occurred in 0.1% and 1.5% of UK and French adults respectively. This was a marked reduction from 2007 UK and French figures of 0.4% and 2.6% respectively (P<0.05 for both). Excessive use of LABA relative to ICS occurred in 0.2% of UK adults and in 0.7% of French adults in 2013. These percentages represented a decrease from the 2007 figures of 0.6% and 1.4% for UK (P=0.29) and France (P=0.003), respectively. In 2007, LABA inappropriate use was more frequent in French than UK asthmatic children (P<0.0001), but showed a downward trend by time in both countries (0.1% in 2013 in both countries). Conclusions Our study suggests

  6. START (screening tool to alert doctors to the right treatment)--an evidence-based screening tool to detect prescribing omissions in elderly patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, P J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Inappropriate prescribing encompasses acts of commission i.e. giving drugs that are contraindicated or unsuitable, and acts of omission i.e. failure to prescribe drugs when indicated due to ignorance of evidence base or other irrational basis e.g. ageism. There are considerable published data on the prevalence of inappropriate prescribing; however, there are no recent published data on the prevalence of acts of omission. The aim of this study was to calculate the prevalence of acts of prescribing omission in a population of consecutively hospitalised elderly people. METHODS: A screening tool (screening tool to alert doctors to the right treatment acronym, START), devised from evidence-based prescribing indicators and arranged according to physiological systems was prepared and validated for identifying prescribing omissions in older adults. Data on active medical problems and prescribed medicines were collected in 600 consecutive elderly patients admitted from the community with acute illness to a teaching hospital. On identification of an omitted medication, the patient\\'s medical records were studied to look for a valid reason for the prescribing omission. RESULTS: Using the START list, we found one or more prescribing omissions in 57.9% of patients. In order of prevalence, the most common prescribing omissions were: statins in atherosclerotic disease (26%), warfarin in chronic atrial fibrillation (9.5%), anti-platelet therapy in arterial disease (7.3%) and calcium\\/vitamin D supplementation in symptomatic osteoporosis (6%). CONCLUSION: Failure to prescribe appropriate medicines is a highly prevalent problem among older people presenting to hospital with acute illness. A validated screening tool (START) is one method of systematically identifying appropriate omitted medicines in clinical practice.

  7. Health Alliance for Prudent Prescribing, Yield and Use of Antimicrobial Drugs in the Treatment of Respiratory Tract Infections (HAPPY AUDIT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Munck, Anders; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    2010-01-01

    benefit. Several intervention initiatives have been taken to reduce the inappropriate use of antibiotics in primary health care, but the effectiveness of these interventions is only modest. Only few studies have been designed to determine the effectiveness of multifaceted strategies in countries...... and Kaliningrad-Russia) and two Hispano-American countries (Spain and Argentina). METHODS/DESIGN: HAPPY AUDIT was initiated in 2008 and the project is still ongoing. The project includes 15 partners from 9 countries. GPs participating in HAPPY AUDIT will be audited by the Audit Project Odense (APO) method....... The APO method will be used at a multinational level involving GPs from six countries with different cultural background and different organisation of primary health care. Research on the effect of the intervention will be performed by analysing audit registrations carried out before and after...

  8. Results of anti-mortem screening methodology to predict prescribed drug withholding periods for flunixin and ceftiofur in heifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: A simple, cow-side test for the presence of drug residues in live animals would be useful for drug residue avoidance programs. Simple inhibition tests used at slaughter do not detect some drug tolerance concentrations such as those for flunixin and ceftiofur-metabolites. This experim...

  9. Antiepileptic drugs patterns in elderly inpatients in a Brazilian tertiary center, Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Rocha de Assis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is very prevalent among elderly inpatients and treatment is far from ideal. Objective To analyze prescribing patterns of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs for hospitalized elderly with epilepsy, their relations with comorbidities and comedications. Method We assessed prescription regimen of elderly patients that were under AED use for treatment of epileptic seizures, during hospitalization. One hundred and nine patients were enrolled. AED regimen was categorized into two groups: Group 1 defined as appropriate (carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, valproic acid, gabapentin, clobazan and lamotrigine and Group 2 as inappropriate (phenytoin and phenobarbital. Results We found 73.4% of patients used inappropriate AEDs (p<0.001. Monotherapy was prescribed for 71.6% of patients. The most common comorbidity was hypertension. Potentially proconvulsant drugs as comedications were used for nearly half of patients. Conclusion Inappropriate AED therapy was commonly prescribed regimen for elderly inpatients. Some recommendations are discussed for a better care of elderly inpatients with epilepsy.

  10. Guidance to manage inappropriate polypharmacy in older people: systematic review and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Derek; Mair, Alpana; Wilson, Martin; Kardas, Przemyslaw; Lewek, Pawel; Alonso, Albert; McIntosh, Jennifer; MacLure, Katie

    2017-02-01

    Single disease state led evidence-based guidelines do not provide sufficient coverage of issues of multimorbidities, with the cumulative impact of recommendations often resulting in overwhelming medicines burden. Inappropriate polypharmacy increases the likelihood of adverse drug events, drug interactions and non-adherence. Areas covered: A detailed description of a pan-European initiative, 'Stimulating Innovation Management of Polypharmacy and Adherence in the Elderly, SIMPATHY', which is a project funded by the European Commission to support innovation across the European Union. This includes a systematic review of the literature aiming to summarize and review critically current policies and guidelines on polypharmacy management in older people. The policy driven, evidence-based approach to managing inappropriate polypharmacy in Scotland is described, with consideration of a change management strategy based on Kotter's eight step process for leading sustainable change. Expert opinion: The challenges around promoting appropriate polypharmacy are on many levels, primarily clinical, organisational and political, all of which any workable solution will need to address. To be effective, safe and efficient, any programme that attempts to deal with the complexities of prescribing in this population must be patient-centred, clinically robust, multidisciplinary and designed to fit into the healthcare system in which it is delivered.

  11. The discomfort caused by patient pressure on the prescribing decisions of hospital prescribers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Penny J; Tully, Mary P

    2011-03-01

    The influence of patient expectations and demands on the decisions of prescribers in general practice has been associated with irrational prescribing and lack of evidence-based practice. However, to our knowledge, no one has investigated patient pressure to prescribe in secondary care. To investigate the influences on hospital prescribers' decisions by exploring what they found uncomfortable when prescribing. Qualitative interviews with 48 prescribers of varying seniority from 4 hospitals were conducted. Interviews were based on the critical incident technique, and prescribers were asked, before an interview, to remember any uncomfortable prescribing decisions that they had made; these were then discussed in detail during an interview. This approach allowed the interviewer to explore the more general influences on the decision to prescribe. Interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. A grounded theory approach to data analysis was taken. Prescribers discussed various factors that could provoke feelings of discomfort when prescribing. Pressure on the prescribing decision from patients, relatives, or carers was a major theme, and more than half of interviewees discussed discomfort caused by such perceived pressure on the prescribing decision. How prescribers dealt with this pressure varied with seniority and the type of relationship that they had fostered with the patient. Nearly half of all incidents of patient pressure resulted in the patient being prescribed the medication they requested. Yet, many of these requests were deemed inappropriate by the prescriber. Their reasons for capitulation varied but included maintaining a good prescriber-patient relationship and avoiding conflict in the wider health care team. Pressure from patients, relatives, or carers was an uncomfortable influence on these hospital prescribers' prescribing decisions. Increasingly consumer-driven health care will intensify these issues in the future. We advocate further research

  12. Medicare Provider Data - Part D Prescriber

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Part D Prescriber Public Use File (PUF) provides information on prescription drugs prescribed by individual physicians and other health care providers and paid...

  13. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis in doxylamine overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, Miguel F; Caviedes, José-Ramón Salcines; Lucena, M Isabel; Cuadrado-Lavín, Antonio

    2012-11-19

    Doxylamine succinate, an H(1)-antihistamine drug, is commonly used as sleep-inducing agent as well as therapy for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. At usual doses, it may cause impairment of cognitive and psychomotor performance, anticholinergic effects, agitation and postural hypotension. Besides, since this drug is frequently involved in either accidental or intentional overdoses, it seems relevant to bear in mind other possible toxic effects. We report a case of acute severe hyponatremia in the setting of a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD), an apparent new adverse effect linked to doxylamine overdose. The Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a probable relationship between doxylamine intake and SIAD development. SIAD may be considered as a potential, serious adverse reaction of doxylamine overdose. Clinicians should consider this aetiological possibility when attending patients suffering from hyponatremia.

  14. Analytical detection of explosives and illicit, prescribed and designer drugs using proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Bishu; Petersson, Fredrik; Juerschik, Simone [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Sulzer, Philipp; Jordan, Alfons [IONICON Analytik GmbH, Eduard-Bodem-Gasse 3, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Maerk, Tilmann D. [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); IONICON Analytik GmbH, Eduard-Bodem-Gasse 3, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Watts, Peter; Mayhew, Chris A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 4TT (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    This work demonstrates the extremely favorable features of Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) for the detection and identification of solid explosives, chemical warfare agent simulants and illicit, prescribed and designer drugs in real time. Here, we report the use of PTR-TOF, for the detection of explosives (e.g., trinitrotoluene, trinitrobenzene) and illicit, prescribed and designer drugs (e.g., ecstasy, morphine, heroin, ethcathinone, 2C-D). For all substances, the protonated parent ion (as we used H{sub 3}O{sup +} as a reagent ion) could be detected, providing a high level of confidence in their identification since the high mass resolution allows compounds having the same nominal mass to be separated. We varied the E/N from 90 to 220 T{sub d} (1 T{sub d}=10{sup -17} Vcm{sup -1}). This allowed us to study fragmentation pathways as a function of E/N (reduced electric field). For a few compounds rather unusual E/N dependencies were also discovered.

  15. Addressing the Issue of Chronic, Inappropriate Benzodiazepine Use: How Can Pharmacists Play a Role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen C. Gallagher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prescribing guidelines do not recommend the long-term use of benzodiazepines since their effectiveness with chronic use is out-weighed by risks including dependence, memory and cognitive impairment, hip fractures and traffic accidents. Despite these guidelines, historical data points to an increasing proportion of inappropriate, repeat prescribing of benzodiazepines in Ireland and elsewhere, with up to 33% of patients who use these drugs doing so long-term. The typical long-term benzodiazepine user is an older, socio-economically disadvantaged patient who has been prescribed these medicines by their general practitioner (GP and dispensed them by their community pharmacist. Misuse of benzodiazepines in nursing homes and psychiatric institutions is also of concern, with one Irish study indicating that almost half of all admissions to a psychiatric hospital were prescribed these drugs, usually despite a lack of clear clinical need. Discontinuation of benzodiazepines has proven to be of benefit, as it is followed by improvements in cognitive and psychomotor function, particularly in elderly patients. It is obvious that an inter-professional effort, focusing on the primary care setting, is required to address benzodiazepine misuse and to ensure appropriate pharmaceutical care. Pharmacists must be an integral part of this inter-professional effort, not least because they are uniquely positioned as the health professional with most frequent patient contact. There is already some supporting evidence that pharmacists’ involvement in interventions to reduce benzodiazepine use can have positive effects on patient outcomes. Here, this evidence is reviewed and the potential for pharmacists to play an expanded role in ensuring the appropriate use of benzodiazepines is discussed.

  16. Antimicrobial stewardship: Improving antibiotic prescribing practice in a respiratory ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jing Ming

    2016-01-01

    International efforts have mandated guidelines on antibiotic use and prescribing, therefore the focus is now on encouraging positive behavioral changes in antibiotic prescribing practice. Documentation of indication and intended duration of antibiotic use in drug charts is an evidence-based method of reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. It is also a standard detailed in our local antimicrobial guidelines. We collected baseline data on compliance with documentation of indication and duration in drug charts in a respiratory ward which revealed compliance rates of 24% and 39% respectively. We introduced interventions to improve accessibility to the guideline and to increase awareness by distributing antibiotic guardian pocket cards with a three-point checklist and strategically-placed mini-posters. We also aim to increase team motivation by obtaining their feedback in multidisciplinary team meetings and by introducing certificates for their involvement in the quality improvement process. The results of the second cycle post-intervention showed an increase in compliance rates for documentation of indication and duration of 97% and 69% respectively. After a further awareness and discussion session at the multidisciplinary team meeting with the local antimicrobial management team audit nurses, a third cycle showed compliance rates of 94% and 71% for indication and duration respectively. This project has highlighted the importance of improving accessibility and of encouraging interventions that would bring about a change in personal value and subsequently in behavior and individual practice.

  17. Nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levtchenko, E.N.; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2010-01-01

    The nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD) is a rare, recently recognized disorder in water balance affecting not only infants but also adults. A new molecular mechanism responsible for NSIAD has recently been identified: a gain of function of the arginine vasopressin (AVP) recep

  18. Evaluation of standardized tasks for primary care physicians using the MOXXI electronic prescribing and integrated drug management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, G; Tamblyn, R; Huang, A; Kawasumi, Y; Petrella, L; Dufour, E

    2003-01-01

    The Medical Office for the Twenty First Century (MOXXI) is a research project testing the potential benefits of an electronic prescription and drug management system for primary care physicians. This system includes a dynamic electronic pad for prescription entry with fields for treatment indications; a drug profiler with a graphic representation of the list of prescription medications purchased in the last year; a refill compliance calculator; dates of emergency room visits and hospital admissions; cost of drugs dispensed; and an alert system that detects interactions among drugs, treatment duplications, and contraindications with certain allergies or specific diseases. One concern expressed by physicians that could influence uptake and acceptability is the increased time that may be required to use the system. User abilities are a factor in this process, as well as user interface, user training and system speed.

  19. Drugs prescribed by general practitioners according to age, gender and socioeconomic status after adjustment for multimorbidity level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skoog, Jessica; Midlöv, Patrik; Beckman, Anders

    2014-01-01

    of prescription drugs among patients, issued in primary health care, according to age, gender and socioeconomic status after adjustment for multimorbidity level.MethodData were collected on all individuals above 20 years of age in Östergötland county with about 400 000 inhabitants in year 2006. The John Hopkins......BackgroundAge, gender and socioeconomic status have been shown to be associated with the use of prescription drugs, even after adjustment for multimorbidity. General practitioners have a holistic and patient-centred perspective and our hypothesis is that this may reflect on the prescription...... ACG Case-mix was used as a proxy for multimorbidity level. Odds ratio (OR) of having prescription drugs issued in primary health care in the population and rates of prescription drug use among patients in primary health care, stated as incidence rate ratio (IRR), according to age, gender...

  20. The quality of outpatient antimicrobial prescribing: A comparison between two areas of northern and southern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; Bjerrum, Lars; Feja, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Institute for Health Data and Disease Control in Denmark, and from the Aragon Information System of Drug Consumption. The number of Defined Daily Doses (DDD) of the different substances were calculated, and the quality of the antimicrobial prescription was analysed using the 'Drug Utilization 90 %' method...... and the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC) quality indicators for outpatient antimicrobial use. RESULTS: The majority of the prescriptions (90 % of total DDD) were comprised of 14 (of 39) different antimicrobials in Denmark, based mainly on narrow spectrum penicillin, and 11 (of 59......PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to analyse and compare the quality of outpatient antimicrobial prescribing in Denmark and Aragon (in northeastern Spain), with the objective of assessing inappropriate prescribing. METHODS: Outpatient antimicrobial prescription data were obtained from the National...

  1. Nephrogenic Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, D.; Tenenbaum, J.; Ranchin, B.; Durroux, T.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor gene are responsible for two human tubular disorders: X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, due to a loss of function of the mutant V2 receptor, and the nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis, due to a constitutive activation of the mutant V2 receptor. This latter recently described disease may be diagnosed from infancy to adulthood, as some carriers remain asymptomatic for many years. Symptomatic children, however, typically present with clinical and biological features suggesting inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion with severe hyponatremia and high urine osmolality, but a low plasma arginine vasopressin level. To date, only two missense mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor gene have been found in the reported patients. The pathophysiology of the disease requires fuller elucidation as the phenotypic variability observed in patients bearing the same mutations remains unexplained. The treatment is mainly preventive with fluid restriction, but urea may also be proposed. PMID:22518188

  2. Nephrogenic Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Morin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor gene are responsible for two human tubular disorders: X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, due to a loss of function of the mutant V2 receptor, and the nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis, due to a constitutive activation of the mutant V2 receptor. This latter recently described disease may be diagnosed from infancy to adulthood, as some carriers remain asymptomatic for many years. Symptomatic children, however, typically present with clinical and biological features suggesting inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion with severe hyponatremia and high urine osmolality, but a low plasma arginine vasopressin level. To date, only two missense mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor gene have been found in the reported patients. The pathophysiology of the disease requires fuller elucidation as the phenotypic variability observed in patients bearing the same mutations remains unexplained. The treatment is mainly preventive with fluid restriction, but urea may also be proposed.

  3. Does organisational culture influence prescribing in care homes for older people? A new direction for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Carmel M; Lapane, Kate; Watson, Margaret C; Davies, Huw T O

    2007-01-01

    Prescribing in care homes for older people has been the focus of much research and debate because of inappropriate drug choice and poor monitoring practices. In the US, this has led to the implementation of punitive and adversarial regulation that has sought to improve the quality of prescribing in this healthcare setting. This approach is unique to the US and has not been replicated elsewhere. The literature has revealed that there are limitations as to how much can be achieved with regulation that is externally imposed (an 'external factor'). Other influences, which may be categorised as 'internal factors' operating within the care home (e.g. patient, physician and care-home characteristics), also affect prescribing. However, these internal and external factors do not appear to affect prescribing uniformly, and poor prescribing practices in care homes continue to be observed. One intangible factor that has received little attention in this area of healthcare is that of organisational culture. This factor has been linked to quality and performance within other health organisations. Consideration of organisational culture within care-home settings may help to understand what drives prescribing decisions in this particularly vulnerable patient group and thus provide new directions for future strategies to promote quality care.

  4. Attitudes and Behaviours to Antimicrobial Prescribing following Introduction of a Smartphone App.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, Preet; Jones, Alisdair; Aldous, Alicia; Kranzer, Katharina; Halpin, Eamus; Fifer, Helen; Macrae, Bruce; Curtis, Carmel; Pollara, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Our hospital replaced the format for delivering portable antimicrobial prescribing guidance from a paper-based pocket guide to a smartphone application (app). We used this opportunity to assess the relationship between its use and the attitudes and behaviours of antimicrobial prescribers. We used 2 structured cross-sectional questionnaires issued just prior to and 3 months following the launch of the smartphone app. Ordinal Likert scale responses to both frequencies of use and agreement statements permitted quantitative assessment of the relationship between variables. The smartphone app was used more frequently than the pocket guide it replaced (p app was useful, easy to navigate and its content relevant. Users who used the app more frequently were more likely to agree that the app encouraged them to challenge inappropriate prescribing by their colleagues (p = 0.001) and were more aware of the importance of antimicrobial stewardship (p = 0.005). Reduced use of the app was associated with agreement that senior physicians' preferences for antimicrobial prescribing would irrespectively overrule guideline recommendations (p = 0.0002). Smartphone apps are an effective and acceptable format to deliver guidance on antimicrobial prescribing. Our findings suggest that they may empower users to challenge incorrect prescribing, breaking well-established behaviours, and thus supporting vital stewardship efforts in an era of increased antimicrobial resistance. Future work will need to focus on the direct impact on drug prescriptions as well as identifying barriers to implementing smartphone apps in other clinical settings.

  5. Computerized clinical decision support systems for drug prescribing and management: a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemens, Brian J; Holbrook, Anne; Tonkin, Marita; Mackay, Jean A; Weise-Kelly, Lorraine; Navarro, Tamara; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Haynes, R Brian

    2011-08-03

    Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs) for drug therapy management are designed to promote safe and effective medication use. Evidence documenting the effectiveness of CCDSSs for improving drug therapy is necessary for informed adoption decisions. The objective of this review was to systematically review randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of CCDSSs for drug therapy management on process of care and patient outcomes. We also sought to identify system and study characteristics that predicted benefit. We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We updated our earlier reviews (1998, 2005) by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBM Reviews, Inspec, and other databases, and consulting reference lists through January 2010. Authors of 82% of included studies confirmed or supplemented extracted data. We included only randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effect on process of care or patient outcomes of a CCDSS for drug therapy management compared to care provided without a CCDSS. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement) if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. Sixty-five studies met our inclusion criteria, including 41 new studies since our previous review. Methodological quality was generally high and unchanged with time. CCDSSs improved process of care performance in 37 of the 59 studies assessing this type of outcome (64%, 57% of all studies). Twenty-nine trials assessed patient outcomes, of which six trials (21%, 9% of all trials) reported improvements. CCDSSs inconsistently improved process of care measures and seldomly improved patient outcomes. Lack of clear patient benefit and lack of data on harms and costs preclude a recommendation to adopt CCDSSs for drug therapy management.

  6. Potentially inappropriate medication use: the Beers' Criteria used among older adults with depressive symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee D

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The ageing population means prescribing for chronic illnesses in older people is expected to rise. Comorbidities and compromised organ function may complicate prescribing and increase medication-related risks. Comorbid depression in older people is highly prevalent and complicates medication prescribing decisions. AIM: To determine the prevalence of potentially inappropriate medication use in a community-dwelling population of older adults with depressive symptoms. METHODS: The medications of 191 community-dwelling older people selected because of depressive symptoms for a randomised trial were reviewed and assessed using the modified version of the Beers' Criteria. The association between inappropriate medication use and various population characteristics was assessed using Chi-square statistics and logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: The mean age was 81 (±4.3 years and 59% were women. The median number of medications used was 6 (range 1-21 medications. The most commonly prescribed potentially inappropriate medications were amitriptyline, dextropropoxyphene, quinine and benzodiazepines. Almost half (49% of the participants were prescribed at least one potentially inappropriate medication; 29% were considered to suffer significant depressive symptoms (Geriatric Depression Scale ≥5 and no differences were found in the number of inappropriate medications used between those with and without significant depressive symptoms (Chi-square 0.005 p=0.54. DISCUSSION: Potentially inappropriate medication use, as per the modified Beers' Criteria, is very common among community-dwelling older people with depressive symptoms. However, the utility of the Beers' Criteria is lessened by lack of clinical correlation. Ongoing research to examine outcomes related to apparent inappropriate medication use is needed.

  7. Educational Outreach to Opioid Prescribers: The Case for Academic Detailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter Davis, Margot; Bateman, Brian; Avorn, Jerry

    2017-02-01

    Nonmedical use of opioid medications constitutes a serious health threat as the rates of addiction, overdoses, and deaths have risen in recent years. Increasingly, inappropriate and excessively liberal prescribing of opioids by physicians is understood to be a central part of the crisis. Public health officials, hospital systems, and legislators are developing programs and regulations to address the problem in sustained and systematic ways that both insures effective treatment of pain and appropriate limits on the availability of opioids. Three approaches have obtained prominence as means of avoiding excessive and inappropriate prescribing, including: providing financial incentives to physicians to change their clinical decision through pay-for-performance contracts, monitoring patient medications through Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, and educational outreach to physicians. A promising approach to educational outreach to physicians is an intervention known as "academic detailing." It was developed in the 1980s to provide one-on-one educational outreach to physicians using similar methods as the pharmaceutical industry that sends "detailers" to market their products to physician practices. Core to academic detailing, however, is the idea that medical decisions should be based on evidence-based information, including managing conditions with updated assessment measures, behavioral, and nonpharmacological interventions. With the pharmaceutical industry spending billions of dollars to advertise their products, individual practitioners can have difficulty gathering unbiased information, especially as the number of approved medications grows each year. Academic detailing has successfully affected the management of health conditions, such as atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and recently, has targeted physicians who prescribe opioids. This article discusses the approach as a potentially effective preventative intervention to address the

  8. Tailored antihypertensive drug therapy prescribed to older women attenuates circulating levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toledo JO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Juliana O Toledo,1 Clayton F Moraes,2,3 Vinícius C Souza,2 Audrey C Tonet-Furioso,2 Luís CC Afonso,4 Cláudio Córdova,3 Otávio T Nóbrega1,2 1Graduate Program in Health Sciences, 2Graduate Program in Medical Sciences, University of Brasília, Brasília, 3Graduate Program in Gerontology, Catholic University of Brasília, Brasília, 4Research Center in Biological Sciences, Federal University of Ouro Preto, Ouro Preto, Brazil Objective: To test the hypothesis that antihypertensive drug therapy produces anti-inflammatory effects in clinical practice, this study investigated circulating levels of selected proinflammatory mediators (interleukin-6 [IL-6], tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α], and interferon-γ [INF-γ] in response to multivariate drug directions for blood pressure (BP control.Methods: Prospective study involving 110 hypertensive, community-dwelling older women with different metabolic disorders. A short-term BP-lowering drug therapy was conducted according to current Brazilian guidelines on hypertension, and basal cytokine levels were measured before and after intervention.Results: Interventions were found to represent current hypertension-management practices in Brazil and corresponded to a significant reduction in systolic and diastolic BP levels in a whole-group analysis, as well as when users and nonusers of the most common therapeutic classes were considered separately. Considering all patients, mean IL-6 and TNF-α levels showed a significant decrease in circulating concentrations (P<0.01 at the endpoint compared with baseline, whereas the mean INF-γ level was not significantly different from baseline values. In separate analyses, only users of antagonists of the renin–angiotensin system and users of diuretics exhibited the same significant treatment-induced reduction in serum IL-6 and TNF-α observed in the whole group.Conclusion: Our data demonstrates that a clinically guided antihypertensive treatment is effective in

  9. In vitro screening of 50 highly prescribed drugs for thiol adduct formation--comparison of potential for drug-induced toxicity and extent of adduct formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinping; Ruan, Qian; He, Bing; Zhu, Mingshe; Shyu, Wen C; Humphreys, W Griffith

    2009-04-01

    Reactive metabolite formation has been associated with drug-induced liver, skin, and hematopoietic toxicity of many drugs that has resulted in serious clinical toxicity, leading to clinical development failure, black box warnings, or, in some cases, withdrawal from the market. In vitro and in vivo screening for reactive metabolite formation has been proposed and widely adopted in the pharmaceutical industry with the aim of minimizing the property and thus the risk of drug-induced toxicity (DIT). One of the most common screening methods is in vitro thiol trapping of reactive metabolites. Although it is well-documented that many hepatotoxins form thiol adducts, there is no literature describing the adduct formation potential of safer drugs that are widely used. The objective of this study was to quantitatively assess the thiol adduct formation potential of 50 drugs (10 associated with DIT and 40 not associated) and document apparent differences in adduct formation between toxic and safer drugs. Dansyl glutathione was used as a trapping agent to aid the quantitation of adducts following in vitro incubation of drugs with human liver microsomes in the presence and absence of NADPH. Metabolic turnover of these drugs was also monitored by LC/UV. Overall, 15 out of the 50 drugs screened formed detectable levels of thiol adducts. There were general trends toward more positive findings in the DIT group vs the non-DIT group. These trends became more marked when the relative amount of thiol adducts was taken into account and improved further when dose and total daily reactive metabolite burdens were considered. In conclusion, there appears to be a general trend between the extent of thiol adduct formation and the potential for DIT, which would support the preclinical measurement and minimization of the property through screening of thiol adduct formation as part of an overall discovery optimization paradigm.

  10. Plasma quetiapine in relation to prescribed dose and other factors: data from a therapeutic drug monitoring service, 2000–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowskill, Sally V.J.; Patel, Maxine X.; Flanagan, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Suggested predose plasma quetiapine target ranges for effective therapy in schizophrenia lie between 50 and 500 µg/l. We aimed to examine data from a quetiapine therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) service to assess the plasma quetiapine concentrations attained at specified doses in clinical practice. Method: We studied TDM data from patients given immediate-release quetiapine in the period 2000–2011. Results: There were 946 samples from 487 patients (257 males, age at time of first sample, median [range] 34 [14–87] years, and 230 females, age at time of first sample, median [range] 38 [10–92] years). The plasma quetiapine concentration was <50 and <100 µg/l in 30% and 50% of samples, respectively (no quetiapine detected in 9% of samples). The relationship between dose and plasma quetiapine was poor. The mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) quetiapine dose was higher (t = 3.6, df = 446, p <0.01) in males versus females (641 [600–1240] and 548 [600–943] mg/day, respectively), although there was no difference in median dose (600 mg/day) or in the mean (95% CI) plasma quetiapine concentrations attained. Smoking habit had no discernible effect on plasma quetiapine concentration. Conclusions: There was a poor relationship between dose and plasma quetiapine concentration in this study, as found by others. This is probably because of the short plasma half-life of the drug, at least in part. Nevertheless, quetiapine TDM can help assess adherence and measurement of quetiapine metabolites, notably N-desalkylquetiapine, as well as quetiapine itself may enhance the value of quetiapine TDM in future. PMID:24167685

  11. Potentially Inappropriate Medication in Community-Dwelling Primary Care Patients who were Screened Positive for Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wucherer, Diana; Eichler, Tilly; Hertel, Johannes; Kilimann, Ingo; Richter, Steffen; Michalowsky, Bernhard; Thyrian, Jochen René; Teipel, Stefan; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) in older people is a risk factor for adverse drug effects. This risk is even higher in older people with dementia (PWD). Objective: Our study aimed to determine (1) the prevalence of PIM among primary care patients who were screened positive for dementia and (2) the sociodemographic and clinical variables associated with the use of PIM. Methods: DelpHi-MV (Dementia: life- and person-centered help in Mecklenburg–Western Pomerania) is a general practitioner-based, cluster-randomized, controlled intervention study to implement and evaluate an innovative concept of collaborative dementia care management in Germany. The comprehensive baseline assessment includes a home medication review. The present analyses are based on the data from 448 study participants (age 70+, DemTect benzodiazepines, and analgetics. The most frequently prescribed PIMs were amitriptyline, etoricoxib, and doxazosin. (2) Use of a PIM was significantly associated with a diagnosis of a mental or behavioral disorder. Conclusions: The prescription rate of PIMs for community-dwelling PWD was comparable with the rates found for the general population of older people in Germany (20–29%). Antidepressants with anticholinergic properties and long-acting benzodiazepines were the most prescribed PIMs, despite having an unfavorable benefit-risk ratio. This high prevalence of PIM prescriptions in a vulnerable population of PWD indicates that standard care for dementia should include careful medication review and management. PMID:27716668

  12. Utilização de medicamentos por indivíduos HIV positivos: abordagem qualitativa Utilization of prescribed drugs by HIV infected individuals: qualitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A. Acurcio

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar, em sua dimensão qualitativa, a utilização de medicamentos por indivíduos infectados pelo HIV, durante o processo de procura e atendimento em serviços de saúde. MÉTODOS: Foram realizadas 52 entrevistas semi-estruturadas com pacientes, trabalhadores da saúde e voluntários de organizações não-governamentais, e revistos 1.079 prontuários médicos para obtenção de informações sobre a utilização de medicamentos por portadores do HIV, cuja primeira visita a um dos serviços públicos de referência estudados ocorreu entre janeiro de 1989 e dezembro de 1992. RESULTADOS: Os problemas relacionados à utilização de anti-retrovirais foram: recusa ao uso, dificuldade de obtenção e de cumprimento da prescrição. Outros problemas foram a auto-medicação, dificuldade de obter medicamentos para patologias associadas e de cumprimento da prescrição de sulfas. CONCLUSÕES: Os resultados permitiram compreender melhor os principais obstáculos e dificuldades vivenciados pelo usuário dos serviços, desde o ato da prescrição até a continuidade do tratamento.OBJECTIVE: The assessment, in its qualitative dimension, of the utilization - by HIV infected individuals - of selected prescribed drugs during the process of the search for and the obtaining of care in public health services in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. METHOD: Fifty two semi-structured interviews with patients, health care workers and non- governamental organizations volunteers were carried out and 1,079 medical records were reviewed. Data were obtained on the utilization of prescribed drugs by HIV infected individuals, whose first visit to one of the public services studied occurred between January 1989 and December 1992. Problems related to the use of anti-retroviral and/or opportunistic infection medication were identified and a qualitative description of their possible causes and consequences was commented on. RESULTS: Refusal to use, difficulty in obtaining and

  13. Low risk of development of substance dependence for barbiturates and clobazam prescribed as antiepileptic drugs: results from a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Carmen; Fröscher, Walter

    2009-01-01

    There is no systematical research about the topic of dependence on antiepileptic drugs (AED) for patients with epilepsy, despite the fact that barbiturates and benzodiazepines comprise a potential risk of dependence. We hypothesize that there is no psychological substance dependence for patients with epilepsy, possibly because of their outcome expectations. The aim of the study was to examine these patients in terms of substance dependence. One hundred inpatients at the Lake Constance Epilepsy Center were asked about their experiences with AED in terms of dependence in a structured interview. We registered general statements about dependence of AED, markers for substance dependence, and outcome expectations. About 50% of the patients reported withdrawal symptoms and the development of tolerance, but less than 10% noticed loss of control and craving. Withdrawal symptoms and development of tolerance were significantly lower in a group of patients without barbiturates or clobazam versus patients with barbiturates or/and clobazam. There was no significant difference between these two groups in psychological criteria of dependence, that is, loss of control and craving. Outcome expectations of AED were clearly related to the efficacy against seizures, and only to a small amount to psychotropic effects. The study demonstrates that physiological variables of dependence are present more in patients with epilepsy with a permanent intake of barbiturates or clobazam, but psychological variables of dependence are rarely present in epileptic patients, with or without an intake of barbiturates and clobazam. These results confirm our hypothesis that substance dependence is not a major problem in benzodiazepines and barbiturates in patients with epilepsy. Outcome expectations seem to be related mainly to the anticonvulsant and not the psychotropic effect. This might be the reason for the absence of dependence.

  14. An Observational Study to Evaluate the Prevalence of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) and Prescribing Pattern of Drugs in Patients with ED Visiting an Andrology Specialty Clinic, Mumbai: 2012-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Vijay R.; Bhagat, Sagar B.; Beldar, Amit S.; Patel, Sadiq B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common occurrence and its incidence is expected to increase significantly along with the increase in various lifestyle diseases. The drug utilization for ED is very low. Also, studies describing the prescription pattern in ED are lacking. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional observational study, including a drug utilization analysis, of 606 prescriptions as per the standard guidelines (WHO and STROBE). Results: Out of 606, 249 (41%) were from the age group of 30-39 years. Addictions were present in 388 (64%). Out of 606, 186 had urological, 154 had cardiovascular and 102 had psychological co-morbid disorders. Out of 348, 201 were prescribed Tadalafil (low dose) on a once daily basis. Out of 172, 121 were prescribed Sildenafil (high dose) on an ‘as and when required’ basis. Nutritional/ herbal supplements were prescribed in 126/606. The ratio of ‘Prescribed Daily Dose’ to ‘Defined Daily Dose’ of Tadalafil, Sildenafil, and Dapoxetine were 1.1, 1.3 and 1.5 respectively. Conclusion: Measures for de-addiction play an important role in the overall management of ED. The most common co-morbid disorders were urological, like BPH, LUTS, etc, followed by cardiovascular, psychological and diabetes. Overall, rational pharmacotherapy was observed. Tadalafil was the most commonly prescribed drug for ED. The main factor in the selection of a particular PDE5 inhibitor was its pharmacokinetics and cost. Udenafil, being the costliest, was the least prescribed. Dapoxetine was used in a significant number of individuals primarily for PE with ED. The combination of Papaverine, Chlorpromazine ± Alprostadil was used as intracavernosal injection in patients not responding to oral drugs. PMID:26393163

  15. Prevalence and correlates of inappropriate use of benzodiazepines in Kosovo.

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    Tahiri, Zejdush; Kellici, Suela; Mone, Iris; Shabani, Driton; Qazimi, Musa; Burazeri, Genc

    2017-08-01

    In post-war Kosovo, the magnitude of inappropriate use of benzodiazepines is unknown to date. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and correlates of continuation of intake of benzodiazepines beyond prescription (referred to as "inappropriate use") in the adult population of Gjilan region in Kosovo. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Gjilan region in 2015 including a representative sample of 780 individuals attending different pharmacies and reporting use of benzodiazepines (385 men and 395 women; age range 18-87 years; response rate: 90%). A structured questionnaire was administered to all participants inquiring about the use of benzodiazepines and socio-demographic characteristics. Overall, the prevalence of inappropriate use of benzodiazepines was 58%. In multivariable-adjusted models, inappropriate use of benzodiazepines was significantly associated with older age (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.7), middle education (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2-2.7), daily use (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-2.0) and addiction awareness (OR 2.7, 95% CI 2.0-3.8). Furthermore, there was evidence of a borderline relationship with rural residence (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.9-1.7). Our study provides novel evidence about the prevalence and selected correlates of inappropriate use of benzodiazepines in Gjilan region of Kosovo. Health professionals and policymakers in Kosovo should be aware of the magnitude and determinants of drug misuse in this transitional society.

  16. Study of potential drug interactions between prescribed drugs in geriatric patients attending outpatient department in a government tertiary care hospital in Maharashtra

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    Tushar Bhimrao Nishandar

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: In the present study, PDIs were studied in geriatric population. Knowledge of the prevalence and predictors of clinically important PDIs will help physicians and pharmacists identify patients at higher risk of adverse drug interactions requiring more cautious pharmacotherapy. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(4.000: 1569-1573

  17. Questionable prescribing for elderly patients in Quebec.

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    Tamblyn, R M; McLeod, P J; Abrahamowicz, M; Monette, J; Gayton, D C; Berkson, L; Dauphinee, W D; Grad, R M; Huang, A R; Isaac, L M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of questionable and rational high-risk prescribing among elderly people of the three drug groups most commonly implicated in drug-related illness: cardiovascular drugs, psychotropic drugs and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). DESIGN: Retrospective prevalence study; all prescription and billing records for the period Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1990, for the study sample were retrieved from the relevant provincial databases of the Régie de l'assurance-maladie du Québec. SETTING: Quebec. PARTICIPANTS: Regionally stratified random sample of 63,268 elderly medicare registrants who made at least one visit to physician in 1990 and were not living in a health care institution for the entire year. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Prescription information was examined for three types of high-risk prescribing: rational and questionable drug combinations, excessive treatment duration and drugs relatively contraindicated for use in elderly people. RESULTS: Overall, 52.6% of the patients experienced one or more events of high-risk prescribing, and 45.6% experienced at least one that was questionable. High-risk prescribing was most prevalent for psychotropic drugs, and questionable prescribing was more frequent than rational prescribing in this drug group. An estimated 30.8% of the total elderly population in Quebec received benzodiazepines for more than 30 consecutive days, 12.9% received a long-acting benzodiazepine, and 13.0% received a questionable high-risk psychotropic drug combination. The prevalence of high-risk prescribing was higher among the women than among the men and increased with age until 75 to 84 years. There were significant unexplained differences between regions in the regional prevalence of high-risk prescribing, particularly of psychotropic drugs. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of questionable high-risk prescribing, especially of psychotropic drugs, is substantial among elderly people. This may be a potentially important and

  18. Physician behaviour for antimicrobial prescribing for paediatric upper respiratory tract infections: a survey in general practice in Trinidad, West Indies

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    Ramdhanie Joseph

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs are among the most frequent reasons for physician office visits in paediatrics. Despite their predominant viral aetiology, URTIs continue to be treated with antimicrobials. We explored general practitioners' (GPs prescribing behaviour for antimicrobials in children (≤ 16 years with URTIs in Trinidad, using the guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC as a reference. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 92 consenting GPs from the 109 contacted in Central and East Trinidad, between January to June 2003. Using a pilot-tested questionnaire, GPs identified the 5 most frequent URTIs they see in office and reported on their antimicrobial prescribing practices for these URTIs to trained research students. Results The 5 most frequent URTIs presenting in children in general practice, are the common cold, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, sinusitis and acute otitis media (AOM in rank order. GPs prescribe at least 25 different antibiotics for these URTIs with significant associations for amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, cefaclor, cefuroxime, erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin (p 30 years were more likely to prescribe antibiotics for the common cold (p = 0.014. Severity (95.7% and duration of illness (82.5% influenced doctors' prescribing and over prescribing in general practice was attributed to parent demands (75% and concern for secondary bacterial infections (70%. Physicians do not request laboratory investigations primarily because they are unnecessary (86% and the waiting time for results is too long (51%. Conclusions Antibiotics are over prescribed for paediatric URTIs in Trinidad and amoxicillin with co-amoxiclav were preferentially prescribed. Except for AOM, GPs' prescribing varied from the CDC guidelines for drug and duration. Physicians recognise antibiotics are overused and consider parents expecting antibiotics and a concern for secondary

  19. Polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate medications: a cross-sectional analysis among 451 nursing homes in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Marie; Grondin, Helene; Sanchez, Stéphane; Armaingaud, Didier; Blochet, Caroline; Vial, Antoine; Denormandie, Philippe; Ankri, Joël

    2017-05-01

    The quality of drug therapy is an important issue for nursing homes. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in a large sample of nursing home residents by using the data recorded during the preparation of pill dispensers. This is a cross-sectional study that included 451 nursing homes across France. Information about the medications received by the 30,702 residents (73.8% women) living in these nursing homes was extracted from the system that assists in the preparation of pill dispensers in pharmacies. The anonymized database included age, sex, and medications prescribed to residents, as well as nursing home characteristics (capacity, legal status). Factors associated with excessive polypharmacy (≥10 different drugs) and PIMs according to the Laroche list were studied using multilevel regression models. The average number of drugs prescribed was 6.9 ± 3.3, and excessive polypharmacy concerned 21.1% of the residents (n = 6468). According to the Laroche list, 47.4% of residents (n = 14,547) received at least one PIM. Benzodiazepines (excessive doses, long-acting benzodiazepines, and combination of benzodiazepines) and anticholinergic medications (hydroxyzine, cyamemazine, alimemazine) accounted for a large part of PIMs. Individual characteristics (age, gender) influenced the risk of receiving PIMs whereas nursing home characteristics (capacity, legal status) influenced the risk of excessive polypharmacy. This study shows that polypharmacy and PIMs remain highly prevalent among nursing home residents. Main PIMs concerned psychotropic and anticholinergic medications.

  20. Prescribing pattern of anti-epileptic drugs in an Italian setting of elderly outpatients: a population-based study during 2004–07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteri, Alessandro; Trifirò, Gianluca; Gagliostro, Maria Silvia; Tari, Daniele Ugo; Moretti, Salvatore; Bramanti, Placido; Spina, Edoardo; Caputi, Achille Patrizio; Arcoraci, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The aims of the study were to assess the trend of older and newer anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in the elderly population and to analyze the effects of a health-policy intervention with regard to AED use in general practice in a setting in Southern Italy. METHODS Data were extracted from the ‘Caserta-1’ Local-Health-Unit Arianna database in the years 2004–07. Patients aged over 65 years, receiving at least one AED prescription and registered in the lists of 88 general practitioners, were selected. The use of older and newer AEDs was calculated as 1 year prevalence and incidence of use and defined daily dose (DDD) per 1000 inhabitants day−1. Sub-analyses by gender, age and indication of use were performed. RESULTS Most of AED users were treated because of neuropathic pain (64.8%). However, the main indication of use for older AEDs (57.8%) was epilepsy, whereas newer AEDs (79.5%) were used for neuropathic pain. Prevalence and incidence of newer AED use increased until 2006, followed by a reduction in 2007. Newer AEDs, particularly gabapentin and pregabalin, were used in the treatment of more patients than older AEDs. However phenobarbital, accounting for more than 50% of total AED volume, was the most prescribed medication during the entire study period. CONCLUSIONS An increasing use of AEDs has been observed during 2004–07, mostly due to the prescription of newer compounds for neuropathic pain. The fall in the use of newer AEDs during 2007 coincides with revised re-imbursement criteria for gabapentin and pregabalin. The large use of phenobarbital in the elderly should be considered in the light of a risk of adverse drug reactions. PMID:20840443

  1. Polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate prescriptions identified by Beers and STOPP criteria in co-morbid older patients at hospital discharge.

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    Hudhra, Klejda; García-Caballos, Marta; Casado-Fernandez, Eloisa; Jucja, Besnik; Shabani, Driton; Bueno-Cavanillas, Aurora

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PIP) and the association with polypharmacy (more than six drugs prescribed) in co-morbid older patients in a critical moment of care transition such as hospital discharge by means of two explicit criteria (Beers 2012 and STOPP 2008). Cross-sectional study carried out in an older patients' population (≥65 years old) discharged from a university hospital in Spain. We recorded patients' information regarding demographics, diagnosis, drugs prescribed and associated pathological conditions and calculated the Charlson co-morbidity index. Data were obtained from the electronic medical records of hospital discharge. Beers (2012) and STOPP criteria (2008) were applied for PIP detection. The strength of association between polypharmacy and the presence of PIP was assessed by calculating the crude and adjusted odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval. From 1004 patients of a 15% random sample, just 624 that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included in the study. The number of prescribed drugs was a risk factor for PIP according to both criteria, even after adjusting for confounding variables. PIP frequency was higher in patients who received more than 12 medications (Beers: 34.8%, STOPP: 54.4%). Each additional medication increased the risk of PIP by 14 or 15% (Beers or STOPP). Our results suggest that the strategies used for PIP reduction in co-morbid older patients should focus on the management of polypharmacy. Medication review at hospital discharge is highly recommended for patients taking more than six drugs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Social inappropriateness, executive control, and aging.

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    Henry, Julie D; von Hippel, William; Baynes, Kate

    2009-03-01

    Age-related deficits in executive control might lead to socially inappropriate behavior if they compromise the ability to withhold inappropriate responses. Consistent with this possibility, older adults in the current study showed greater social inappropriateness than younger adults--as rated by their peers--and this effect was mediated by deficits in executive control as well as deficits in general cognitive ability. Older adults also responded with greater social inappropriateness to a provocative event in the laboratory, but this effect was unrelated to executive functioning or general cognitive ability. These findings suggest that changes in both social and cognitive factors are important in understanding age-related changes in social behavior.

  3. Inappropriate use of urinary catheters in patients admitted to medical wards in a university hospital.

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    Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Calvo, Beatriz; Vara, Rebeca; Villar, Rocío N; Aguado, José María

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence and predisposing factors were determined for inappropriate urinary catheterization (UC) among inpatients in medical wards. A cross-sectional study was conducted including all patients aged ≥ 18 years admitted to medical wards in a 1300-bed tertiary-care centre, and who had a urinary catheter in place on the day of the survey. Of 380 patients observed, 46 (12.1%) had a urinary catheter in place. Twelve of them (26.1%) were inappropriately catheterized. The most common indication for inappropriate UC was urine output monitoring in a cooperative, non-critically ill patient. Inappropriateness was associated with increased age, poor functional status, urinary incontinence, dementia, and admission from a long-term care facility. Further educational efforts should be focused on improving catheterization prescribing practices by physicians. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Drug prescription in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Fuentes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aging process changes the way in which common drugs act in the elderly. Changes in both the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics make prescribing drugs in geriatrics a process very different from that of the young adult. The aim of this article is to review the physiologic changes that occur with aging and that must be considered when indicating drugs in this age group. For this purpose we conducted a literature review of articles from various journals and textbooks devoted to geriatric medicine in order to extract recommendations for appropriate prescribing in the elderly, represented in easy to use listings of potentially inappropriate medications, according to the quality of evidence and rationale for their avoidance in advanced age.

  5. [Inappropriate test methods in allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine-Tebbe, J; Herold, D A

    2010-11-01

    Inappropriate test methods are increasingly utilized to diagnose allergy. They fall into two categories: I. Tests with obscure theoretical basis, missing validity and lacking reproducibility, such as bioresonance, electroacupuncture, applied kinesiology and the ALCAT-test. These methods lack both the technical and clinical validation needed to justify their use. II. Tests with real data, but misleading interpretation: Detection of IgG or IgG4-antibodies or lymphocyte proliferation tests to foods do not allow to separate healthy from diseased subjects, neither in case of food intolerance, allergy or other diagnoses. The absence of diagnostic specificity induces many false positive findings in healthy subjects. As a result unjustified diets might limit quality of life and lead to malnutrition. Proliferation of lymphocytes in response to foods can show elevated rates in patients with allergies. These values do not allow individual diagnosis of hypersensitivity due to their broad variation. Successful internet marketing, infiltration of academic programs and superficial reporting by the media promote the popularity of unqualified diagnostic tests; also in allergy. Therefore, critical observation and quick analysis of and clear comments to unqualified methods by the scientific medical societies are more important than ever.

  6. District nurses prescribing as nurse independent prescribers.

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    Downer, Frances; Shepherd, Chew Kim

    2010-07-01

    Nurse prescribing has been established in the UK since 1994, however, limited focus has been placed on the experiences of district nurses adopting this additional role. This phenomenological study explores the experiences of district nurses prescribing as nurse independent prescribers across the West of Scotland. A qualitative Heideggarian approach examined the every-day experiences of independent prescribing among district nurses. A purposive sample was used and data collected using audio taped one-to-one informal interviews. The data was analysed thematically using Colaizzi's seven procedural steps. Overall these nurses reported that nurse prescribing was a predominantly positive experience. Participants identified improvements in patient care, job satisfaction, level of autonomy and role development. However, some of the participants indicated that issues such as support, record keeping, confidence and ongoing education are all major influences on prescribing practices.

  7. Prescriber preferences for behavioural economics interventions to improve treatment of acute respiratory infections: a discrete choice experiment

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    Gong, Cynthia L; Hay, Joel W; Meeker, Daniella; Doctor, Jason N

    2016-01-01

    Objective To elicit prescribers' preferences for behavioural economics interventions designed to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, and compare these to actual behaviour. Design Discrete choice experiment (DCE). Setting 47 primary care centres in Boston and Los Angeles. Participants 234 primary care providers, with an average 20 years of practice. Main outcomes and measures Results of a behavioural economic intervention trial were compared to prescribers' stated preferences for the same interventions relative to monetary and time rewards for improved prescribing outcomes. In the randomised controlled trial (RCT) component, the 3 computerised prescription order entry-triggered interventions studied included: Suggested Alternatives (SA), an alert that populated non-antibiotic treatment options if an inappropriate antibiotic was prescribed; Accountable Justifications (JA), which prompted the prescriber to enter a justification for an inappropriately prescribed antibiotic that would then be documented in the patient's chart; and Peer Comparison (PC), an email periodically sent to each prescriber comparing his/her antibiotic prescribing rate with those who had the lowest rates of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. A DCE study component was administered to determine whether prescribers felt SA, JA, PC, pay-for-performance or additional clinic time would most effectively reduce their inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. Willingness-to-pay (WTP) was calculated for each intervention. Results In the RCT, PC and JA were found to be the most effective interventions to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, whereas SA was not significantly different from controls. In the DCE however, regardless of treatment intervention received during the RCT, prescribers overwhelmingly preferred SA, followed by PC, then JA. WTP estimates indicated that each intervention would be significantly cheaper to implement than pay-for-performance incentives of $200/month

  8. Treatment of Inappropriate Sexual Behavior in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giorgi, Riccardo; Series, Hugh

    2016-09-01

    Inappropriate sexual behavior (ISB) is a relatively common and potentially disruptive form of behavior in people with dementia. It can cause considerable distress and put placements and people at risk. Yet it is poorly researched and understood. In addition to non-pharmacological approaches to management, a wide range of classes of medication has been used in ISB, and the results have been reported as single cases or short series, though none has been the subject of a randomized clinical trial, in part because of the lack of a well-defined method of observing and measuring ISB, as well as the significant ethical considerations. Pharmacological treatments for which there is low-level evidence of efficacy in the literature include antidepressants, antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, cholinesterase inhibitors, hormonal agents, and beta-blockers. None of the drugs discussed here is licensed for use in ISB, and elderly people, particularly those with dementia, are at high risk of adverse effects. Caution is advised before using medication in this group of people. It is important to consider alternative non-pharmacological treatments, as well as discussing issues of ethics and consent with those involved, before initiating treatment. It is helpful to identify and monitor target symptoms. Pharmacological treatments should be started at low dose and titrated up slowly and carefully. Nevertheless, in some situations, medication may provide a useful part of a management plan for ISB.

  9. Renal Drug Dosage Adjustment According to Estimated Creatinine Clearance in Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunbas, Gokhan; Yazc, Mehmet; Solak, Yalcin; Gul, Enes E; Kayrak, Mehmet; Kaya, Zeynettin; Akilli, Hakan; Aribas, Alpay; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Yazc, Raziye; Ozdemir, Kurtulus

    2016-01-01

    It is of clinical importance to determine creatinine clearance and adjust doses of prescribed drugs accordingly in patients with heart failure to prevent untoward effects. There is a scarcity of studies in the literature investigating this issue particularly in patients with heart failure, in whom many have impaired kidney function. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of awareness of medication prescription as to creatinine clearance in patients hospitalized with heart failure. Patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of heart failure were retrospectively evaluated. Among screened charts, patients with left ventricular ejection fraction renal dose adjustment were determined and evaluated for appropriate dosing according to eGFR. A total of 388 patients with concomitant heart failure and renal dysfunction were included in the study. The total number of prescribed medications was 2808 and 48.3% (1357 medications) required renal dose adjustment. Of the 1357 medications, 12.6% (171 medications) were found to be inappropriately prescribed according to eGFR. The most common inappropriately prescribed medications were famotidine, metformin, perindopril, and ramipril. A significant portion of medications used in heart failure requires dose adjustment. Our results showed that in a typical cohort of patients with heart failure, many drugs are prescribed at inappropriately high doses according to creatinine clearance. Awareness should be increased among physicians caring for patients with heart failure to prevent adverse events related to medications.

  10. Three Cases With Inappropriate TSH Syndrome

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    Hatice Sebila Dökmetaş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH syndrome or central hyperthyroidism is a rare disorder characterized by inappropriately normal or elevated levels of TSH and elevated levels of T3 and T4. The syndrome is associated with TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma (TSHoma or thyroid hormone resistance (THR. Thyroid-releasing hormone stimulation test and T3 suppression test can be useful for the differential diagnosis of central hyperthyroidism. In the present study, we report three cases of inappropriate TSH syndrome diagnosed after TRH stimulation and T3 suppression tests. Turk Jem 2012; 16: 105-8

  11. Prevalence of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions after the great east Japan earthquake, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Kentaro; Fukuchi, Takahiko; Hirai, Midori; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Kanatani, Yasuhiro

    2017-04-01

    Few studies have investigated the appropriateness of antibiotic use in postdisaster settings. We retrospectively evaluated clinical databases on health care delivered at clinics near shelters set up after the Great East Japan Earthquake, 2011. We defined appropriate, acceptable, and inappropriate antibiotic use for each diagnostic category, by applying and adopting precedent studies and clinical guidelines. From March to July, 2011, a total of 23,704 clinic visits occurred at 98 shelters with 7934 residents. Oral antibiotics were prescribed a total of 2253 times. The median age of the patients was 48.5 years old (range 0-97), and 43.7% were male. Of 2253 antibiotic prescriptions, 1944 were judged to be inappropriate (86.3% 95% CI 84.8%-87.7%). The most prescribed antibiotic was clarithromycin (646 times, 28.7%), followed by cefcapene pivoxil (644 times, 28.6%), levofloxacin (380, 16.9%), cefdinir (194, 8.6%), and cefditren pivoxil (98, 4.4%). The most frequent diagnosis for which antibiotics were prescribed was upper respiratory infection (URI, 1040 visits, 46.2%), followed by acute bronchitis (369, 16.4%), pharyngitis (298, 13.2%), traumatic injuries (194, 8.6%), acute gastroenteritis (136, 6.0%), urinary tract infections (UTIs, 123, 5.5%), and allergic rhinitis (5.1%). The majority of antibiotics prescribed at clinics after the Great East Japan Earthquake was inappropriate. Significant improvement of the use of antibiotics in postdisaster settings should be sought immediately in Japan.

  12. The prescribing pattern of outpatient polyclinic doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K H; Yap, K B

    1999-06-01

    This study aims to analyse the prescribing pattern of doctors working in a government outpatient polyclinic in Singapore. Retrospective study of 1 week of prescription scripts in 1996. Number, types and duration of drugs prescribed; combination of drugs; age distribution; bad handwriting. Two thousand six hundred and seventy-nine scripts were analysed. The age of patients ranged from 1 to 93 years with a mean of 43.8 years. There were 44.0% males and 56.0% females. The overall mean of 'total number of drugs prescribed' was 2.8 items. The means of 'number of drug items prescribed for more than 1 week' by age-group were: 60 years = 2.4. One way analysis of variance showed significant difference between the means of each age-group. Post hoc analysis revealed that the oldest age group accounted for most of this significant result. The top 10 drugs prescribed in descending order were: antihistamines, paracetamol, throat medications (eg. lozenges, gargles, etc), nifedipine, beta-blockers, antacids, mist benadryl expectorant, Procodin cough syrup (containing codeine and promethazine), amoxycillin and vitamin B. Nifedipine and beta-blockers were the most commonly prescribed anti-hypertensives. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were usually prescribed with antacids. One hundred and twenty (4.5%) scripts were illegible. This study provides a baseline data for monitoring future prescribing trends. There may be a need to re-evaluate the appropriateness of nifedipine as the first line anti-hypertensive drug and the usefulness of NSAID-antacid and amoxycillin-cloxacillin combinations. The prevalence of illegible handwriting was high.

  13. Educating nonmedical prescribers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Derek; MacLure, Katie; George, Johnson

    2012-10-01

    The last decade has seen developments in nonmedical prescribing, with the introduction of prescribing rights for healthcare professionals. In this article, we focus on the education, training and practice of nonmedical prescribers in the UK. There are around 20,000 nurse independent prescribers, 2400 pharmacist supplementary/independent prescribers, several hundred allied health professional supplementary prescribers and almost 100 optometrist supplementary/independent prescribers. Many are active prescribers, managing chronic conditions or acute episodes of infections and minor ailments. Key aims of nonmedical prescribing are as follows: to improve patient care; to increase patient choice in accessing medicines; and to make better use of the skills of health professionals. Education and training are provided by higher education institutions accredited by UK professional bodies/regulators,namely, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, General Pharmaceutical Council, Health Professions Council and General Optical Council. The programme comprises two main components: a university component equivalent to 26 days full-time education and a period of learning in practice of 12 days minimum under the supervision of a designated medical practitioner. Course content focuses on the following factors: consultation, decision making, assessment and review; psychology of prescribing; prescribing in team context; applied therapeutics; evidence-based practice and clinical governance; legal, policy, professional and ethical aspects; and prescribing in the public health context. Nonmedical prescribers must practise within their competence, demonstrating continuing professional development to maintain the quality engendered during training. Despite the substantial progress, there are several issues of strategy, capacity, sustainability and a research evidence base which require attention to fully integrate nonmedical prescribing within healthcare. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of

  14. Should we prescribe heroin? A current Scottish debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J; McKeganey, N

    2007-11-01

    There have been recent calls from within both Scotland and England for the wider prescription of heroin to heroin addicts as a way of coping with our burgeoning drug problem and as a route to reducing drug related criminality. But how feasible is heroin prescribing in this context? This paper considers some of the existing research evidence relating to heroin prescribing and looks also at the ethics and practicalities of prescribing heroin to heroin addicts in Scotland. We conclude that whilst the evidence on the benefits of heroin prescribing is far from clear cut there is a case for mounting a Scottish trial of heroin prescribing. Such a trial would need to be tightly controlled and rigorously evaluated. It would need to show that heroin prescribing was associated not only with a comparable level of harm reduction, as methadone prescribing, but that it was also an effective route towards drug users' eventual recovery and drug cessation.

  15. Psychiatric Prescribers' Experiences With Doctor Shoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Johnson, Mary; Karnik, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Doctor shopping is a primary method of prescription medication diversion. After opioids, benzodiazepines and stimulants are the next most common prescription medications used nonmedically. Studies have shown that patients who engage in doctor shopping find it fun, exciting, and easy to do. There is a lack of research on the prescriber's perspective on the phenomenon of doctor shopping. This study investigates the experiences of prescribers in psychiatry with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Fifteen prescribers including psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners working in outpatient psychiatry were interviewed to elicit detailed information about their experiences with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Themes found throughout the interview were that psychiatric prescribers' experience with patients who engage in doctor shopping includes (a) detecting red flags, (b) negative emotional responding, (c) addressing the patient and the problem, and (d) inconsistently implementing precautions. When red flags were detected when prescribing controlled drugs, prescribers in psychiatry experienced both their own negative emotional responses such as disappointment and resentment as well as the negative emotions of the patients such as anger and other extreme emotional responses. Psychiatric prescribers responded to patient's doctor shopping in a variety of ways such as changing their practice, discharging the patients or taking steps to not accept certain patients identified as being at risk for doctor shopping, as well as by talking to the patient and trying to offer them help. Despite experiencing doctor shopping, the prescribers inconsistently implemented precautionary measures such as checking prescription drug monitoring programs.

  16. Prescribing for unlabeled conditions: patient benefit or therapeutic roulette?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serradell, J; Rucker, T D

    1990-01-01

    There is ample evidence that prescribed medications are employed for uses far broader than the approved label indications in the U.S. An enormous research agenda thus exists that should be addressed in the not-too-distant future. In fact, it seems essential that operation of the Medicare Catastrophic Drug Benefit program be designed with the best available knowledge in this area. Perhaps it might be appropriate for several universities, the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention, and/or the FDA to establish a center to study this question. This model has been applied with clinical/surgical registries, with adverse reaction reporting, and with device failures. We need a rational, science-compatible, and uniform policy free of political and emotional arguments to address the issue of handling, monitoring, and regulating the use of drugs for unlabeled conditions. Comprehensive data should be provided for policy makers, regulators, payers, and clinicians in their evaluating the use of different drug products. Even a brief glance at any page from the National Disease and Therapeutic Index shows intended use that would cause most experts to react in disbelief. Further, there seem to be relatively few instances in which the use of a given pharmaceutical for an unlabeled indication would qualify as a drug of choice in the first place. The therapeutic and economic consequences of the use of legend drugs for unlabeled indications are difficult to document. We do know that a significant proportion of hospital admissions and days can be traced to the inappropriate use of pharmaceutical products but the net impact of our subject on institution cost has not been established.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Factor analysis improves the selection of prescribing indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hanne Marie Skyggedal; Søndergaard, Jens; Sokolowski, Ineta

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test a method for improving the selection of indicators of general practitioners' prescribing. METHODS: We conducted a prescription database study including all 180 general practices in the County of Funen, Denmark, approximately 472,000 inhabitants. Principal factor analysis was used...... indicators directly quantifying choice of coxibs, indicators measuring expenditure per Defined Daily Dose, and indicators taking risk aspects into account, (2) "Frequent NSAID prescribing", comprising indicators quantifying prevalence or amount of NSAID prescribing, and (3) "Diverse NSAID choice", comprising...... appropriate and inappropriate prescribing, as revealed by the correlation of the indicators in the first factor. CONCLUSION: Correlation and factor analysis is a feasible method that assists the selection of indicators and gives better insight into prescribing patterns....

  18. Assessment of prescribing, dispensing, and patient use pattern of antihypertensive drugs for patients attending outpatient department of Hiwot Fana Specialized University Hospital, Harar, Eastern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Shukrala F; Gabriel T

    2015-01-01

    Fedila Shukrala,1 Tesfaye Gabriel2 1Dil Chora Referral Hospital, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Social Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Background: Hypertension is a global concern and is one of the key preventable risk factors for cardiovascular events, resulting in unnecessary morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the prescribing, dispensing and patient use pattern of antih...

  19. Auditing GPs' prescribing habits : Cardiovascular prescribing frequently continues medication initiated by specialists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, C.S; van Diepen, N.M; de Jong-van den Berg, L T W

    Objective: To determine to what extent general practitioners' (GPs) prescribing behaviour is a result of repeat prescribing of medication which has been initiated by specialists. Method: During a 4-week period, pharmacists identified GPs' prescriptions for a large group of cardiovascular drugs.

  20. Auditing GPs' prescribing habits : Cardiovascular prescribing frequently continues medication initiated by specialists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deVries, CS; vanDiepen, NM; Tromp, TFJ; deJongvandenBerg, LTW

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To determine to what extent general practitioners' (GPs) prescribing behaviour is a result of repeat prescribing of medication which has been initiated by specialists. Method: During a 4-week period, pharmacists identified GPs' prescriptions for a large group of cardiovascular drugs. Next

  1. Prescription of potentially inappropriate medication in older persons in Switzerland: does the dispensing channel make a difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blozik E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Eva Blozik,1,2 Roland Rapold,1 Oliver Reich1 1Department of Health Sciences, Helsana Group, Zürich, Switzerland; 2Department of Medicine, Division of General Practice, University Medical Centre Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany Background: Drugs can be supplied either directly from the prescribing physician (physician dispensing [PD] or via a pharmacy. It is unclear whether the dispensing channel is associated with quality problems. Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM is associated with adverse outcomes in older persons and can be considered a marker for quality deficits in prescribing. We investigated whether prevalence of PIM differs across dispensing channels. Patients and methods: We analyzed basic health insurance claims of 50,747 person quarter years with PIM use of residents of the Swiss cantons Aargau and Lucerne of the years 2012 and 2013. PIM was identified using the Beers 2012 criteria and the PRISCUS list. We calculated PIM prevalence stratified by supply channel. Adjusted mixed effects logistic regression analysis was done to estimate the effect of obtaining medications through the dispensing physician as compared to the pharmacy channel on receipt of PIM. The most frequent PIMs were identified. Results: There is a small but detectable difference in total PIM prevalence: 30.7% of the population supplied by a dispensing physician as opposed to 29.3% individuals who received medication in a pharmacy. According to adjusted logistic regression individuals who obtained the majority of their medications from their prescribing physician had a 15% higher chance to receive a PIM (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.08–1.22; P<0.001. Conclusion: Physician dispensing seems to affect quality and safety of drug prescriptions. Quality issues should not be neglected in the political discussion about the regulations on PD. Future studies should explore whether PD is related to other indicators of inefficiency or quality flaws. The present

  2. Potentially inappropriate home medications among older patients with cardiovascular disease admitted to a cardiology service in USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh-Taha, Marwan; Dimassi, Hani

    2017-07-17

    The use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) may pose more risks than benefits to patients and is a major factor contributing to the likelihood of serious adverse drug reactions and negative health outcomes among older patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted in a tertiary care center in USA where home medications of the older patients were reviewed and analyzed upon hospital admission over three months, from March till May 2016. Inclusion criteria were age of 65 years and above, history of cardiovascular disease, and admission to the cardiology service. The aim of our study was to determine the frequency and factors associated with PIMs, by applying the updated Beers 2015 criteria. A total of 404 patients were included in the study and were taking a total of 4669 medications at home, an average of 11.6 ± 4.5 medications per patient. The proportion of PIMS was 20% of all medications reported, with an average of 2.4 PIM per patient, and 87.4% of patients were receiving at least one PIM. Significant association was found between use of PIMs and number of home medications, female gender, and number and types of comorbidities. Comorbidities associated with more PIMs were heart failure, atrial fibrillation/flutter, history of falls/fractures, cerebrovascular accident, and depression. The most commonly prescribed PIMs were: drugs that may exacerbate or cause syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion or hyponatremia (29.7%), scheduled use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) > 8 weeks in non-high-risk patients (11.3%), and benzodiazepines (8.1%). A high prevalence of PIMs in older patients with cardiovascular disease was observed. Provider education and detailed assessment of medication lists upon hospital admission by multidisciplinary teams can help in preventing the use of PIMs.

  3. Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone due to desvenlafaxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gary tin-ho; Leung, Jess lam-ming

    2013-01-01

    Hyponatremia secondary to the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) is not uncommon in patients receiving treatment of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or venlafaxine. This is a case report of a 47-year-old man with depression, who developed hyponatremia after commencing treatment with desvenlafaxine. To our knowledge, this is the first case in which desvenlafaxine-associated SIADH was reported since the introduction of the drug. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of desvenlafaxine-associated hyponatremia in patients under age of 65. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inappropriate shocks in the subcutaneous ICD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R A; Brouwer, Tom F; Barr, Craig

    2015-01-01

    shocks have been reported. METHODS: We analyzed the incidence, predictors and management of inappropriate shocks in the EFFORTLESS S-ICD Registry, which collects S-ICD implantation information and follow-up data from clinical centers in Europe and New Zealand. RESULTS: During a follow-up of 21 ± 13......BACKGROUND: The entirely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) eliminates the need for transvenous leads, and therefore has the potential to improve lead-longevity and reduce lead-related complications. The S-ICD has a morphology-based sensing algorithm of which inappropriate...

  5. Inappropriate hospital admissions: patient participation in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasby, J; Littlechild, R

    Although political interest in reducing the number of inappropriate hospital admissions is mounting, methods for researching the rate of inappropriate admissions have several major limitations. Whereas traditional studies have tended to be predominantly subjective, more recent studies using clinical review instruments also have a number of limitations. Chief among these is the failure to consider the potential input of the individual patient. To illustrate some of the possible benefits of patient participation, this article cites findings from a study in Birmingham, which sought to involve individual older people in a research study into emergency hospital admissions.

  6. Changing doctor prescribing behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.S.; Mäkelä, M.; Vermeulen, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane Collabora......The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane...

  7. NSAID prescribing precautions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Amanda; Donovan, Deirdre; Heintzman, John; Page, Tanya

    2009-12-15

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used, but have risks associated with their use, including significant upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding. Older persons, persons taking anticoagulants, and persons with a history of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding associated with NSAIDs are at especially high risk. Although aspirin is cardioprotective, other NSAIDs can worsen congestive heart failure, can increase blood pressure, and are related to adverse cardiovascular events, such as myocardial infarction and ischemia. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors have been associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction; however, the only cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor still available in the United States, celecoxib, seems to be safer in this regard. Hepatic damage from NSAIDs is rare, but these medications should not be used in persons with cirrhotic liver diseases because bleeding problems and renal failure are more likely. Care should be used when prescribing NSAIDs in persons taking anticoagulants and in those with platelet dysfunction, as well as immediately before surgery. Potential central nervous system effects include aseptic meningitis, psychosis, and tinnitus. Asthma may be induced or exacerbated by NSAIDs. Although most NSAIDs are likely safe in pregnancy, they should be avoided in the last six to eight weeks of pregnancy to prevent prolonged gestation from inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, premature closure of the ductus arteriosus, and maternal and fetal complications from antiplatelet activity. Ibuprofen, indomethacin, and naproxen are safe in breastfeeding women. Care should be taken to prevent accidental NSAID overdose in children by educating parents about correct dosing and storage in childproof containers.

  8. Capitation combined with pay-for-performance improves antibiotic prescribing practices in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Winnie; Powell-Jackson, Timothy; Chen, Wen; Hu, Min; Fe, Eduardo; Hu, Mu; Jian, Weiyan; Lu, Ming; Han, Wei; Hsiao, William C

    2014-03-01

    Pay-for-performance in health care holds promise as a policy lever to improve the quality and efficiency of care. Although the approach has become increasingly popular in developing countries in recent years, most policy designs do not permit the rigorous evaluation of its impact. Thus, evidence of its effect is limited. In collaboration with the government of Ningxia Province, a predominantly rural area in northwest China, we conducted a matched-pair cluster-randomized experiment between 2009 and 2012 to evaluate the effects of capitation with pay-for-performance on primary care providers' antibiotic prescribing practices, health spending, outpatient visit volume, and patient satisfaction. We found that the intervention led to a reduction of approximately 15 percent in antibiotic prescriptions and a small reduction in total spending per visit to village posts-essentially, community health clinics. We found no effect on other outcomes. Our results suggest that capitation with pay-for-performance can improve drug prescribing practices by reducing overprescribing and inappropriate prescribing. Our study also shows that rigorous evaluations of health system interventions are feasible when conducted in close collaboration with the government.

  9. Children's Context Inappropriate Anger and Salivary Cortisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Robin L.; Davidson, Richard J.; Kalin, Ned H.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2009-01-01

    Some children show emotion that is not consistent with normative appraisal of the context and can therefore be defined as context inappropriate (CI). The authors used individual growth curve modeling and hierarchical multiple regression analyses to examine whether CI anger predicts differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, as…

  10. Bullying and Inappropriate Behaviour among Faculty Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriläinen, Matti; Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Puhakka, Helena; Käyhkö, Katinka

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the degree, nature and consequences of bullying or inappropriate behaviour among faculty personnel (n = 303) in a Finnish university. A total of 114 (38%) faculty members answered the email questionnaire. According to the results, 15% of the respondents had experienced bullying; in addition, 45% had experienced inappropriate…

  11. Prescribing restrictions – a necessary strategy among some European countries to enhance future prescribing efficiency?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Godman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unsustainable growth in pharmaceutical expenditure has resulted in multiple initiatives across Europe to lower prices of generics and enhance their utilisation. These include prescribing restrictions. However, there have been concerns with their impact on subsequent quality of care as well as their influence in reality. OBJECTIVES: (a Review the influence of prescribing restrictions and whether there are any differences depending on their nature and drug classes; (b Ascertain whether prescribing restrictions can be added to existing demand-side measures to further enhance prescribing efficiency; (c Whether they compromise subsequent quality of care. RESULTS: Prescribing restrictions have a variable impact on subsequent utilisation of patented protected products versus generics in a class, with their influence depending on the nature and follow-up of the restrictions rather than the class of drug. This is seen among the proton pump inhibitors, statins, and renin-angiotensin drugs. Prescribing restrictions can be successfully added to existing measures to further enhance prescribing efficiency, and do not appear to compromise subsequent quality of care. CONCLUSIONS: Prescribing restrictions can be a successful strategy as countries strive to maintain the European ideals for healthcare. However, care is needed when planning these programmes: else health authorities could be disappointed with their outcome.

  12. Prescribing pattern and WHO core prescribing indicators in post-operative patients of Gynaecology department of a tertiary care teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu P. Kolasani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prescription pattern analysis is an essential tool to provide an insight regarding the existing drug usage and to ensure rational drug therapy. Even though drugs used for gynecological disorders are one of the commonly used, they are least studied in terms of prescribing patterns. Hence the present study was planned to analyze the prescribing pattern and WHO core prescribing indicators among post-operative patients of Gynaecology department in our institute. Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted in 76 post-operative patients of Gynaecology department for a period of six months. Each prescription was analyzed for demographic data, total number and various categories of drugs prescribed, the percentage of individual drugs prescribed in each category, the dosage forms and the percentage of drugs prescribed by generic name, and from essential drug list were also analyzed. Results: A total of 990 medications were prescribed among which anti-microbial agents (32.52% were the most commonly prescribed category followed by analgesics (19.60% and Intravenous fluids (13.53%. Metronidazole (27.02% was the most commonly prescribed antimicrobial, Diclofenac (68.04% was the commonly prescribed analgesics and Ringer lactate (38.81% was the commonly prescribed Intravenous fluid. Most commonly prescribed antiulcer drug was ranitidine (75.0%, antiemetic was Ondansetron (76.39%. Majority of drugs (72.54% were prescribed by generic name. Average number of drugs per prescription was 13.03. Percentages of encounters with antibiotics were 32.52%. The percentage of drugs prescribed from the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM was 82.16%. Injection (57.78% was the most common drug formulation. Conclusions: Antimicrobial agents and analgesics were the most commonly prescribed drugs. Prescription by generic name was high, usage of antibiotics and injections were also high and Poly-pharmacy was common, especially among antimicrobial

  13. Essential competencies in prescribing: A first european cross-sectional study among 895 final-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, D J; Tichelaar, J; Schutte, T; Benemei, S; Böttiger, Y; Chamontin, B; Christiaens, T; Likic, R; Maˇiulaitis, R; Marandi, T; Monteiro, E C; Papaioannidou, P; Pers, Y M; Pontes, C; Raskovic, A; Regenthal, R; Sanz, E J; Tamba, B I; Wilson, K; Vries, Tp de; Richir, M C; Agtmael, Ma van

    2017-02-01

    European medical students should have acquired adequate prescribing competencies before graduation, but it is not known whether this is the case. In this international multicenter study, we evaluated the essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics (CPT) of final-year medical students across Europe. In a cross-sectional design, 26 medical schools from 17 European countries were asked to administer a standardized assessment and questionnaire to 50 final-year students. Although there were differences between schools, our results show an overall lack of essential prescribing competencies among final-year students in Europe. Students had a poor knowledge of drug interactions and contraindications, and chose inappropriate therapies for common diseases or made prescribing errors. Our results suggest that undergraduate teaching in CPT is inadequate in many European schools, leading to incompetent prescribers and potentially unsafe patient care. A European core curriculum with clear learning outcomes and assessments should be urgently developed. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  14. Antibiotic prescribing in primary care, adherence to guidelines and unnecessary prescribing - an Irish perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Marion

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information about antibiotic prescribing practice in primary care is not available for Ireland, unlike other European countries. The study aimed to ascertain the types of antibiotics and the corresponding conditions seen in primary care and whether general practitioners (GPs felt that an antibiotic was necessary at the time of consultation. This information will be vital to inform future initiatives in prudent antibiotic prescribing in primary care. Methods Participating GPs gathered data on all antibiotics prescribed by them in 100 consecutive patients’ consultations as well as data on the conditions being treated and whether they felt the antibiotic was necessary. Results 171 GPs collected data on 16,899 consultations. An antibiotic was prescribed at 20.16% of these consultations. The majority were prescribed for symptoms or diagnoses associated with the respiratory system; the highest rate of prescribing in these consultations were for patients aged 15–64 years (62.23%. There is a high rate of 2nd and 3rd line agents being used for common ailments such as otitis media and tonsillitis. Amoxicillin, which is recommended as 1st line in most common infections, was twice as likely to be prescribed if the prescription was for deferred used or deemed unnecessary by the GP. Conclusion The study demonstrates that potentially inappropriate prescribing is occurring in the adult population and the high rate of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents is a major concern. This study also indicates that amoxicillin may be being used for its placebo effect rather than specifically for treatment of a definite bacterial infection.

  15. The impact of non-pharmacological treatments for diseases of the locomotor system on the prescribed drug use and lifestyles of the patients in the sanatoria in Busko-Zdroj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korczak Milena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is the result of research on the impact of non-pharmacological therapies for diseases of the locomotor system on the prescribed drug use and lifestyles of the patients of the sanatoria in Busko-Zdroj. The reported research uses primary and secondary measures. The former includes the assessment of the impact of non-pharmacological sanatorium treatments for locomotor system diseases on the use of prescribed drug regimes, while the latter is aimed at assessing the patients’ quality of life. The research was conducted on adult patients of both genders in the sanatoria in Busko-Zdroj. The subjects were patients suffering from disorders of the musculoskeletal system such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis and discopathies. The research included two visits, the first at the start of the research and the second at the end of the research. The patients were examined for a period of three consecutive weeks. The study involved 170 patients, 50% of them were women and 50% men.

  16. Reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in the residential care setting: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Lim CJ; Kong DCM; Stuart RL

    2014-01-01

    Ching Jou Lim,1 David CM Kong,1 Rhonda L Stuart2,31Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, Monash University, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 2Monash Infectious Diseases, Monash Health, Clayton, VIC, Australia; 3Department of Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, AustraliaAbstract: Residential aged care facilities are increasingly identified as having a high burden of infection, resulting in subsequent antibiotic use, compounded by the complexity of patient demographics and medical care. Of parti...

  17. Prescriber adoption of newly approved selective COX-2 inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Layton, Deborah; Souverein, Patrick C.; Heerdink, Eibert R.; Shakir, Saad A. W.; Egberts, A. G. C.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction There is no consistent definition of prescribers who adopt new drug treatments early. This study examines if COX-2 inhibitors (coxibs) were prescribed by subsets of practitioners and describes GP adoption patterns of coxibs and existing NSAIDs over time. Methods A population-based drug

  18. Appropriateness of medications prescribed to elderly patients with advanced heart failure and limited life expectancy who died during hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceló, Montserrat; Torres, Olga; Ruiz, Domingo; Casademont, Jordi

    2014-07-01

    Drug therapy in patients with advanced heart failure and limited life expectancy may be of no benefit or even inappropriate. The aim of this study was to analyze the appropriateness of medication prescribed to patients with advanced heart failure and limited life expectancy, considering as such an expected median survival of less than 6 months. We retrospectively reviewed data on all patients with advanced heart failure who met criteria for limited life expectancy and who died in the geriatric ward of a tertiary hospital over a four-and-a-half-year period. We analyzed treatments prescribed before admission, especially drugs used for prophylaxis or to prolong life. A total of 72 patients were included. The mean age was 85.4 years, and 52.3 % were women. Mean Charlson index was 3.2. Prophylactic medications taken by patients at admission were antiplatelets in 40 patients (55.6 %), oral anticoagulants in 17 (23.6 %), statins in 14 (19.4 %), and osteoporosis medication in nine (12.5 %). Medications taken to prolong survival were angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor antagonists in 29 patients (40.3 %). Other medications were iron supplements in 19 patients (26.4 %), vitamins in two (2.8 %), and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in two (2.8 %). Our results show that patients with advanced heart failure and limited life expectancy were receiving an excessive number of prophylactic medications, drugs to prolong life, and other inappropriate treatments. These findings emphasize the need to review drug therapy in an individualized manner in elderly patients with advanced stages of heart disease and a poor prognosis.

  19. When Medication Is Prescribed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression When Medication Is Prescribed Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... you have about the medicine. —NIMH Types of Medications There are several types of medications used to ...

  20. Clinical perspectives on the influence of drug formulation on patient tolerability and use of commonly prescribed antidepressants in major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Fuller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to summarize the formulation options for currently available antidepressants, and discuss examples of the influence that formulation may have on the pharmacologic and clinical profiles of the medications. A review of current literature suggests that differences in drug-delivery technologies can lead to variations in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of generic and branded drugs, despite generic drugs being required to meet bioequivalence standards compared with their branded counterparts. These differences may influence the effectiveness and tolerability of treatment. Recent reports have highlighted the need for individualized treatment regimens and careful assessment of tolerability and efficacy when switching patients from brand to generic formulations. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that differences in formulation can substantially impact drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, which in turn, can affect drug effects. The clinical impact of these differences remains unclear. Further research is needed to clarify the influence of antidepressant formulations on treatment adherence, patient preference, and quality of life, and how this impacts clinical practice with regard to brand versus generic treatment selection.

  1. Study of drug use in outdoor pediatric patients of upper respiratory tract infections in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Joshi

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: The study revealed that the majority of children were below 5 years of age. The most common class of drugs prescribed was antihistaminics and expectorant combinations followed by analgesics and antipyretics. Although the majority of the patients received antibiotics, 40.55% of patients received symptomatic treatment. This is a welcome step as inappropriate use of the antibiotics can potentiate to the increasing trend of antimicrobial resistance. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(5.000: 1004-1008

  2. Physician prescribing behavior and its impact on patient-level outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Geoffrey F; Carrera, Mariana P; Goldman, Dana P; Sood, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    Concerns over rising drug costs, pharmaceutical advertising, and potential conflicts of interest have focused attention on physician prescribing behavior. We examine how broadly physicians prescribe within the 10 most prevalent therapeutic classes, the factors affecting their choices, and the impact of their prescribing behavior on patient-level outcomes. Retrospective study from 2005 to 2007 examining prescribers with at least 5 initial prescriptions within a class from 2005 to 2007. Medical and pharmacy claims are linked to prescriber information from 146 different health plans, reflecting 1975 to 8923 unique providers per drug class. Primary outcomes are the number of distinct drugs in a class initially prescribed by a physician over 1- and 3-year periods, medication possession ratio, and out-of-pocket costs. In 8 of 10 therapeutic classes, the median physician prescribes at least 3 different drugs and fewer than 1 in 6 physicians prescribe only brand drugs. Physicians prescribing only 1 or 2 drugs in a class are more likely to prescribe the most advertised drug. Physicians who prescribe fewer drugs are less likely to see patients with other comorbid conditions and varied formulary designs. Prescribing fewer drugs is associated with lower rates of medication adherence and higher out-ofpocket costs for drugs, but the effects are small and inconsistent across classes. Physicians prescribe more broadly than commonly perceived. Though narrow prescribers are more likely to prescribe highly advertised drugs, few physicians prescribe these drugs exclusively. Narrow prescribing has modest effects on medication adherence and out-of-pocket costs in some classes.

  3. Unexplained abdominal pain as a driver for inappropriate therapeutics: an audit on the use of intravenous proton pump inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Siew Mei Lai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs are currently the most effective agents for acid-related disorders. However, studies show that 25–75% of patients receiving intravenous PPIs had no appropriate justification, indicating high rates of inappropriate prescribing.Objective. To examine the appropriate use of intravenous PPIs in accordance with guidelines and the efficacy of a prescribing awareness intervention at an Asian teaching institution.Setting. Prospective audit in a tertiary hospital in Malaysia.Method. Every 4th intravenous PPI prescription received in the pharmacy was screened against hospital guidelines. Interventions for incorrect indication/dose/duration were performed. Patients’ demographic data, medical history and the use of intravenous PPI were collected. Included were all adult inpatients prescribed intravenous PPI.Main Outcome Measure. Proportion of appropriate IV PPI prescriptions.Results. Data for 106 patients were collected. Most patients were male [65(61.3%], Chinese [50(47.2%], with mean age ± SD = 60.3 ± 18.0 years. Most intravenous PPI prescriptions were initiated by junior doctors from the surgical [47(44.3%] and medical [42(39.6%] departments. Only 50/106(47.2% patients had upper gastrointestinal endoscopy/surgery performed to verify the source of bleeding. Unexplained abdominal pain [81(76.4%] was the main driver for prescribing intravenous PPIs empirically, out of which 73(68.9% were for suspected upper gastrointestinal bleed. Overall, intravenous PPI was found to be inappropriately prescribed in 56(52.8% patients for indication, dose or duration. Interventions on the use of intravenous PPI were most effective when performed by senior doctors (100%, followed by clinical pharmacists (50%, and inpatient pharmacists (37.5%, p = 0.027.Conclusion. Inappropriate intravenous PPI usage is still prevalent despite the enforcement of hospital guidelines. The promotion of prescribing awareness and evidence

  4. [Recomendations for the prevention of adverse drug reactions in older adults with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pavón, Javier; González García, Paloma; Francés Román, Inés; Vidán Astiz, Maite; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, José; Jiménez Díaz, Gregorio; Montero Fernández, Nuria Pilar; Alvarez Fernández, Baldomero; Jiménez Páez, José María

    2010-01-01

    The elderly are one of the groups at greatest risk for adverse drugs reactions (ADR). The mean prevalence of these reactions in this population is 30%. Dementia is not an independent risk factor of ADR, but is the main condition that increases all risk factors (polypharmacy, comorbidity, inappropriate prescribing, drug-drug interactions, advanced age, and treatment adherence). The present article discusses revised and consensual recommendations for the prevention of ADR in the elderly, as well as recommendations specifically for dementia patients in relation to the management of comorbidity and cognitive, behavioral and psychological symptoms. Copyright 2009 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Medical-legal aspects of the fungal infection drug therapy in neonatology: evidence-based medicine and off-label prescribing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Ciuffi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to focus on the well-known issue of the clinical use of off-label drug therapy in neonatology with respect to evidence-based medicine, with particular reference to antifungal products, in comparison with the wider use in pediatric and adult population. Then we considered the new regulatory approaches carried out in the past decade by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration and the EMA (European Medicine Agency, aimed to improve newborn and children population inclusion into scientific trials and to promote drug labeling with respect to pediatric indications, and the goals nowadays achieved through the American Pediatric Research Equity Act / Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act and the European Pediatric Investigation Plans. Finally we pointed out, on the basis of the Italian regulatory framework, the Italian medical-legal liability profiles related to the use of off-label therapies in neonatology. Further efforts are required in the international context to carry forward the process started while in the particular Italian scenario it is to be hoped that a general change of mind towards the off-label drug use in neonatology clinical practice may take place.

  6. [Hyponatremia and syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Alessandro; Parenti, Gabriele; Giuliani, Anna; Scrivano, Jacopo; Pettorini, Laura; Festuccia, Francescaromana; Pirozzi, Nicola; Mene', Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), also termed ''syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD)'', is an often unrecognized cause of hypotonic hyponatremia, arising from ectopic release of ADH in lung cancer or as a side effect of various drugs. In SIADH, hyponatremia results from selectively impaired water excretion by the kidney, whereas the external Na+ balance is normally regulated. Despite the increase in total body water, only a slight reduction of urine output and modest edema are usually seen. Renal function and acid-base balance are generally preserved, while subclinical neurological impairment may occasionally become life-threatening, when hyponatremia has an abrupt onset. The major clinical variants of SIADH are reviewed here, with particular emphasis on causes, iatrogenic complications and hospital-acquired hyponatremia. Effective treatment of SIADH is based on water restriction, hypertonic saline plus loop diuretics, or aquaretics. Worsening of hyponatremia may result from parenteral isotonic fluid administration, emphasizing the importance of an early diagnosis and careful follow-up of these patients.

  7. Chemotherapy e-prescribing: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsaid KA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Khaled A Elsaid,1,2 Steven Garguilo,1 Christine M Collins2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, MCPHS University, Boston, MA, 2Pharmacy Services, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USA Abstract: Chemotherapy drugs are characterized by low therapeutic indices and significant toxicities at clinically prescribed doses, raising serious issues of drug safety. The safety of the chemotherapy medication use process is further challenged by regimen complexity and need to tailor treatment to patient status. Errors that occur during chemotherapy prescribing are associated with serious and life-threatening outcomes. Computerized provider order entry (CPOE systems were shown to reduce overall medication errors in ambulatory and inpatient settings. The adoption of chemotherapy CPOE is lagging due to financial cost and cultural and technological challenges. Institutions that adopted infusional or oral chemotherapy electronic prescribing modified existing CPOE systems to allow chemotherapy prescribing, implemented chemotherapy-specific CPOE systems, or developed home-grown chemotherapy electronic prescribing programs. Implementation of chemotherapy electronic prescribing was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of prescribing errors, most significantly dose calculation and adjustment errors. In certain cases, implementation of chemotherapy CPOE was shown to improve the chemotherapy use process. The implementation of chemotherapy CPOE may increase the risk of new types of errors, especially if processes are not redesigned and adapted to CPOE. Organizations aiming to implement chemotherapy CPOE should pursue a multidisciplinary approach engaging all stakeholders to guide system selection and implementation. Following implementation, organizations should develop and use a risk assessment process to identify and evaluate unanticipated consequences and CPOE-generated errors. The results of these analyses should serve to

  8. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS AND TREATMENT OF MULTIPLY CONTROLLED INAPPROPRIATE MEALTIME BEHAVIOR

    OpenAIRE

    Bachmeyer, Melanie H; Piazza, Cathleen C; Fredrick, Laura D; Reed, Gregory K; Rivas, Kristi D; Kadey, Heather J

    2009-01-01

    Functional analyses identified children whose inappropriate mealtime behavior was maintained by escape and adult attention. Function-based extinction procedures were tested individually and in combination. Attention extinction alone did not result in decreases in inappropriate mealtime behavior or a significant increase in acceptance. By contrast, escape extinction alone resulted in a decrease in inappropriate mealtime behavior and an increase in acceptance. However, inappropriate mealtime be...

  9. Drug utilization of clarithromycin for gastrointestinal disease treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan Zhou; Ling-Ling Zhu; Xiao-Feng Yan; Wen-Sheng Pan; Su Zeng

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the patterns of use of clarithromycin for gastrointestinal disease treatment and promote its rational use.METHODS: Using a structured pro forma, we conducted a two-month survey of the electronic prescriptions containing immediate-release (IR) or sustained-release (SR) product of clarithromycin for outpatients with gastrointestinal diseases in a 2200-bed general hospital. Suitability of the prescription was audited retrospectively.RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-four prescriptions of SR product and 110 prescriptions of IR product were prescribed for gastrointestinal disease treatment. Among prescriptions for anti-Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) therapy, triple therapy take the dominant position (91.8%), followed by quadruple therapy (4.3%) and dual therapy (3.9%). Amoxicillin was the most frequently co-prescribed antibiotic. Furazolidone and levofloxacin are used more widely than metronidazole or tinidazole. Clarithromycin SR was administered at inappropriate time points in all prescriptions. Fifty percent of all prescriptions of clarithromycin SR, and 6.4% of prescriptions of clarithromycin IR, were prescribed at inappropriate dosing intervals. Surprisingly, disconcordance between diagnoses and indications was observed in all prescriptions of clarithromycin SR which has not been approved for treating Hpylori infection although off-label use for this purpose was reported in literature. On the contrary, only one prescription (0.9%) of clarithromycin IR was prescribed for unapproved indication (i.e. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease). 1.4% of prescriptions for chronic gastritis or peptic ulcer treatment were irrational in that clarithromycin was not co-prescribed with gastric acid inhibitors. Clinical significant CYP3A based drug interactions with clarithromycin were identified.CONCLUSION: There is a great scope to improve the quality of clarithromycin prescribing in patients with gastrointestinal disease, especially with regard to administration

  10. Nurse practitioner prescribing: an international perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Fong,1,2 Thomas Buckley,2 Andrew Cashin3 1St George Hospital, Kogarah, 2Sydney Nursing School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 3School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, Australia Background: Internationally, the delivery of care provided by nurses and midwives has undergone a significant change due to a variety of interrelated factors, including economic circumstances, a diminishing number of medical providers, the unavailability of adequate health care services in underserved and rural areas, and growing specialization among the professions. One solution to the challenges of care delivery has been the introduction of nurse practitioners (NPs and the authorization of NPs to prescribe medicines. Aim: The aim of this paper was to review the current international literature related to NP prescribing and compare the findings to the Australian context. The review focuses on literature from the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Methods: Databases were searched from January 2000 to January 2015. The following keywords: “nurse practitioner”, “advanced nurse”, “advanced practice nurse”, “prescri*”, “Australia”, “United States America”, “UK”, “New Zealand”, “Canada”, “Europe”, “drug prescri*”, “prescri* authority”, and “prescri* legislation” were used. Findings: NPs tend to prescribe in differing contexts of practice to provide care in underserved populations and require good systems literacy to practice across complex systems. The key themes identified internationally related to NP prescribing relate to barriers to prescribing, confidence in prescribing, and the unique role of NPs in prescribing medicines, eg, the high prevalence of prescribing pain medicines in several countries, including Australia. Conclusion: Across all countries reviewed, there appears a need for further research into the organizational and

  11. Antidepressant prescribing in five European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbing-Karahagopian, V; Huerta, C; Souverein, P C

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Drug utilization studies have applied different methods to various data types to describe medication use, which hampers comparisons across populations. The aim of this study was to describe the time trends in antidepressant prescribing in the last decade and the variation in the prevalen...

  12. Optimization of electronic prescribing in pediatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, B.

    2014-01-01

    Improving pediatric patient safety by preventing medication errors that may result in adverse drug events and consequent healthcare expenditure,is a worldwide challenge to healthcare. In pediatrics, reported medication error rates in general, and prescribing error rates in particular, vary between s

  13. Appropriateness of Prescribing among Elderly Patients in a Dutch Residential Home Observational Study of Outcomes after a Pharmacist-Led Medication Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuijt, Clementine C. M.; Franssen, Eric J. F.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.; Hudson, Steve A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Clinically significant pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes occurring with age make older patients more prone to the consequences of inappropriate prescribing. The combination of higher use of medicines resulting from a higher disease burden with suboptimal treatment monitoring re

  14. Appropriateness of Prescribing among Elderly Patients in a Dutch Residential Home Observational Study of Outcomes after a Pharmacist-Led Medication Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuijt, Clementine C. M.; Franssen, Eric J. F.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.; Hudson, Steve A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Clinically significant pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes occurring with age make older patients more prone to the consequences of inappropriate prescribing. The combination of higher use of medicines resulting from a higher disease burden with suboptimal treatment monitoring

  15. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  16. Opioid Prescribing PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-06

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.  Created: 7/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/6/2017.

  17. Perceptions and Attitudes of Medical Sales Representatives (MSRs) and Prescribers Regarding Pharmaceutical Sales Promotion and Prescribing Practices in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Nabeel; Naqvi, Atta; Ahmad, Rizwan; Ahmed, Farrukh; McGarry, Kenneth; Fazlani, Raafia; Ahsan, Mahrukh

    2016-01-01

    Pakistan is the 6th most populous country in the world and has an enormous potential for an ever increasing drug market. The health care system is highly prone to unethical drug prescribing practices. In addition, there is a huge tendency of pharmaceutical firms to indulge in unethical drug promotional practices by means of inducements and other benefits through their medical sales representatives (MSRs). On the other hand, the prescribers are also reported to be demanding inducements from th...

  18. Medication safety and chronic kidney disease in older adults prescribed metformin: a cross-sectional analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Deborah L.; Abrass, Itamar B; Young, Bessie A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication safety in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing concern. This is particularly relevant in older adults due to underlying CKD. Metformin use is contraindicated in patients with abnormal kidney function; however, many patients are potentially prescribed metformin inappropriately. We evaluated the prevalence of CKD among older adults prescribed metformin for type 2 diabetes mellitus using available equations to estimate kidney function and examined demogra...

  19. Methadone dosage and its relationship to quality of life, satisfaction, psychopathology, cognitive performance and additional consumption of non-prescribed drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrero-Pérez, Eduardo J; MethaQoL, Grupo

    2016-06-14

    The effectiveness of methadone maintenance treatment is beyond any doubt, but there remains some incertitude about the appropriate and effective dosage and the objectives that should be achieved by this therapy. Some authors maintain that only doses higher than 50-60 mg/day ought to be considered effective, since only these block all the opioid receptors. But others propose the use of doses adjusted to the needs of the patient, based on their recovery process. Quality of life, satisfaction with treatment, psychopathological symptoms, cognitive performance and additional intake of illegal and unprescribed drugs were evaluated in a representative sample of all patients treated with opioid agonists in the Addiction Institute of Madrid (N = 1898, n = 450) and the Junta de Extremadura (N = 100, n = 65). The results revealed a negative relationship between dose and quality of life, psychopathological symptoms and cognitive performance. Satisfaction with treatment, based on doses negotiated together by doctor and patient, was very high, regardless of the dose. To establish hypothetical causal dependencies among the studied variables structural equation modelling was performed. The results reject the need for high dosage if not required by the patient, and highlight the benefits of other psychosocial interventions that lead to recovery, despite the chronification that could imply the use of high doses. Whereas high dosage programmes provide better indicators of social control, the patient's quality of life must be one of the main indicators of a successful treatment, as in any other health problem.

  20. Inappropriate colonoscopic surveillance of hyperplastic polyps.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keane, R A

    2011-11-15

    Colonoscopic surveillance of hyperplastic polyps alone is controversial and may be inappropriate. The colonoscopy surveillance register at a university teaching hospital was audited to determine the extent of such hyperplastic polyp surveillance. The surveillance endoscopy records were reviewed, those patients with hyperplastic polyps were identified, their clinical records were examined and contact was made with each patient. Of the 483 patients undergoing surveillance for colonic polyps 113 (23%) had hyperplastic polyps alone on last colonoscopy. 104 patients remained after exclusion of those under appropriate surveillance. 87 of the 104 patients (84%) were successfully contacted. 37 patients (8%) were under appropriate colonoscopic surveillance for a significant family history of colorectal carcinoma. 50 (10%) patients with hyperplastic polyps alone and no other clinical indication for colonoscopic surveillance were booked for follow up colonoscopy. This represents not only a budgetary but more importantly a clinical opportunity cost the removal of which could liberate valuable colonoscopy time for more appropriate indications.

  1. Proton pump inhibitors: potential cost reductions by applying prescribing guidelines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahir, Caitriona

    2012-01-01

    There are concerns that proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are being over prescribed in both primary and secondary care. This study aims to establish potential cost savings in a community drug scheme for a one year period according to published clinical and cost-effective guidelines for PPI prescribing.

  2. Should we prescribe blood pressure lowering drugs to every patient with advanced chronic kidney disease? A comment on two recent meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Peter; Schirutschke, Holger; Barnett, Kerstin

    2009-10-01

    Antihypertensive treatment is an essential, life-prolonging measure in primary hypertension. It prevents apoplexy, myocardial infarction, and hypertensive kidney failure. Chronic kidney failure is associated with hypertension and an accelerated form of arteriosclerosis. Demise from cardiovascular affliction is a leading cause of death in renal patients (chronic renal failure stages II-IV, renal failure requiring dialysis, renal transplantation). What, then, is the role of antihypertensive treatment in such patients, and, specifically, what is achieved by renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAA) system modifying agents? Two meta-analyses have recently investigated these issues. An article in The Lancet evaluated eight studies on dialysis patients (n = 1679). It concluded that antihypertensives are beneficial in reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, we criticize these conclusions and show that the data are not convincingly in favor of antihypertensive treatment. A meta-analysis in the American Heart Journal assessed the role of antihypertensive agents and RAA system modifying drugs in 45,758 patients (from 25 studies), who were in stages I-III of renal failure, i.e., not (yet) requiring dialysis. The authors claim that angiotensin- -converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEI/ARB) significantly reduced cardiovascular outcomes. However, our analysis of the data is not consistent with their conclusions. It showed that the results were quite mixed, that the authors may have overemphasized the positive results, and that considering all the results, it should be concluded that antihypertensive treatments, including those with ACEI/ARB, may not be superior to placebo (sic!) in renal patients. Rather than doing meta-analyses, larger primary studies are needed to reveal the real role of antihypertensive treatments in renal patients.

  3. Hospital physicians' influence on gastrointestinal protection during treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetylsalicylic acid and the impact on prescribing in primary care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Due Larsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to describe the use of gastrointestinal (GI protection before, during and after hospitalisation for elderly patients using NSAID or low-dose ASA. METHODS: This study included all elderly patients (75+ admitted to hospital in the period of 1(st April 2010 to 31(st March 2011 at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, who were regular users of NSAID or low-dose ASA before hospital admission, or had one of these drugs initiated during hospital stay. By using pharmacy dispensing data and a hospital-based pharmacoepidemiological database, the treatment strategy for the individual patients was followed across hospital stay. RESULTS: In total, 3,587 patients were included. Before hospital admission, 93 of 245 NSAID users (38.0% and 597 of 1994 user of low-dose ASA (29.9% had used GI protection. During hospital stay, use of GI protection increased to 75% and 33.9%, respectively. When hospital physicians initiated new treatment with NSAID or with low-dose ASA, 305 of 555 (55.0% and 647 of 961 (67.3% were initiated without concomitant use of GI protection. When hospital physicians initiated GI protection, 26.8-51.0% were continued in primary care after discharge. CONCLUSIONS: During hospital stay, the use of GI protection increases, but when new treatment with NSAIDs or low-dose ASA is initiated in hospital, the use of gastrointestinal protection is low. The low use of GI protection is carried on in primary care after discharge.

  4. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Soares Rodrigues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI and adverse drug reactions (ADR in older adults polymedicated. Methods: an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. Results: forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years were analyzed: 24 (51.1% concerning ADR, 14 (29.8% DDI, and 9 studies (19.1% investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. Conclusions: DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps.

  5. More than a prescriber: gerontological nurse practitioners' perspectives on prescribing and pharmaceutical marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Diane Feeney; Ladd, Elissa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain understanding about nurse practitioners' (NPs') prescriptive decision making for geriatric patients with attention to pharmaceutical marketing influences. Prior research has focused on physician prescribers and identified suboptimal practices. Because the majority of medications are prescribed to older adults, NPs in geriatric practice were targeted as an information-rich group to interview about prescribing issues. Given the exploratory nature of this research, qualitative focus group methods were employed using content analysis. Fifteen NPs were recruited at an annual national geriatric NP conference. They worked in all regions of the United States, had an average of 9 years prescribing experience, and participated in 1 of the 2 focus groups. The key theme that emerged was that they were more than a prescriber. Findings revealed overwhelming consistency among the NP participants that their nursing background instilled a holistic approach that encompassed both nondrug and therapeutic drug options and skepticism about drug marketing, as well as offered a positive difference by tailoring to their patients' biophysical, psychological, and economic needs with an involvement in the interplay of geriatric care issues not typically addressed by physicians. The participants' reported approaches were in alignment with geriatric prescribing recommendations.

  6. Intended and unintended consequences of China's zero markup drug policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hongmei; Miller, Grant; Zhang, Linxiu; Li, Shaoping; Rozelle, Scott

    2015-08-01

    Since economic liberalization in the late 1970s, China's health care providers have grown heavily reliant on revenue from drugs, which they both prescribe and sell. To curb abuse and to promote the availability, safety, and appropriate use of essential drugs, China introduced its national essential drug list in 2009 and implemented a zero markup policy designed to decouple provider compensation from drug prescription and sales. We collected and analyzed representative data from China's township health centers and their catchment-area populations both before and after the reform. We found large reductions in drug revenue, as intended by policy makers. However, we also found a doubling of inpatient care that appeared to be driven by supply, instead of demand. Thus, the reform had an important unintended consequence: China's health care providers have sought new, potentially inappropriate, forms of revenue. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  7. Pharmaceutical marketing research and the prescribing physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jeremy A

    2007-05-15

    Surveillance of physicians' prescribing patterns and the accumulation and sale of these data for pharmaceutical marketing are currently the subjects of legislation in several states and action by state and national medical associations. Contrary to common perception, the growth of the health care information organization industry has not been limited to the past decade but has been building slowly over the past 50 years, beginning in the 1940s when growth in the prescription drug market fueled industry interest in understanding and influencing prescribing patterns. The development of this surveillance system was not simply imposed on the medical profession by the pharmaceutical industry but was developed through the interactions of pharmaceutical salesmen, pharmaceutical marketers, academic researchers, individual physicians, and physician organizations. Examination of the role of physicians and physician organizations in the development of prescriber profiling is directly relevant to the contemporary policy debate surrounding this issue.

  8. Potential misuse and inappropriate prescription practices involving opioid analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Logan, Joseph E; Paulozzi, Leonard J; Zhang, Kun; Jones, Christopher M

    2013-08-01

    Opioid misuse and abuse are growing concerns among the medical and public health communities. To examine the prevalence of indicators for potential opioid misuse in a large, commercially insured adult population. We adapted existing indicators developed by expert panels to include having overlapping opioid prescriptions, overlapping opioid and benzodiazepine prescriptions, long-acting/ extended release (LA/ER) opioids for acute pain,and high daily doses of opioids (>100 morphine milligram equivalents). These indicators were assessed among continuously enrolled individuals aged 18-64 years from the 2009 Truven Health MarketScan databases. Analyses were stratified by sex. We identified 3,391,599 eligible enrollees who received at least 1 opioid prescription. On average, enrollees obtained 3.3 opioid prescriptions, and the average annual days of supply was 47 days. Twice as many enrollees received opioid prescriptions for acute pain as for chronic pain. About a quarter of the enrollees had at least 1 indicator of either potential misuse by patients or inappropriate prescription practices by providers. About 15% of enrollees had high daily doses;7.8% had opioid overlap; and 7.9% had opioid and benzodiazepine overlap. Among those prescribed LA/ER opioids, 24.3% were treated for acute pain. Overlap indicators were more common among women. Our findings underscore the critical need to develop programs aimed at promoting appropriate use of opioids. Retrospective opioid utilization reviews similar to our analyses can potentially help managed care organizations and healthcare providers improve patient care and reduce the risk of adverse outcomes related to these medications.

  9. 69-74 A Retrospective Analysis of Prescribing Prac

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    development of resistance to antibiotics, adverse effects and .... Table 1: Some WHO prescribing indicators of drug use in four public hospitals in West Ethiopia in the period January .... the knowledge of clinical pharmacists in outpatient ...

  10. U.S. Hospitals Still Prescribe Too Many Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 166633.html U.S. Hospitals Still Prescribe Too Many Antibiotics: Study 1 in 5 patients experiences side effects ... 20 percent of U.S. hospital patients who receive antibiotics experience side effects from the drugs, researchers report. ...

  11. Trends in Antibiotic Prescribing in Adults in Dutch General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B. Haeseker (Michiel); N.H.T.M. Dukers-Muijrers (Nicole); C.J.P.A. Hoebe (Christian); C.A. Bruggeman (Cathrien); J.W.L. Cals (Jochen); A. Verbon (Annelies)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Antibiotic consumption is associated with adverse drug events (ADE) and increasing antibiotic resistance. Detailed information of antibiotic prescribing in different age categories is scarce, but necessary to develop strategies for prudent antibiotic use. The aim of this

  12. Errors associated with outpatient computerized prescribing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Salzberg, Claudia; Keohane, Carol A; Zigmont, Katherine; Devita, Jim; Gandhi, Tejal K; Dalal, Anuj K; Bates, David W; Poon, Eric G

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the frequency, types, and causes of errors associated with outpatient computer-generated prescriptions, and to develop a framework to classify these errors to determine which strategies have greatest potential for preventing them. Materials and methods This is a retrospective cohort study of 3850 computer-generated prescriptions received by a commercial outpatient pharmacy chain across three states over 4 weeks in 2008. A clinician panel reviewed the prescriptions using a previously described method to identify and classify medication errors. Primary outcomes were the incidence of medication errors; potential adverse drug events, defined as errors with potential for harm; and rate of prescribing errors by error type and by prescribing system. Results Of 3850 prescriptions, 452 (11.7%) contained 466 total errors, of which 163 (35.0%) were considered potential adverse drug events. Error rates varied by computerized prescribing system, from 5.1% to 37.5%. The most common error was omitted information (60.7% of all errors). Discussion About one in 10 computer-generated prescriptions included at least one error, of which a third had potential for harm. This is consistent with the literature on manual handwritten prescription error rates. The number, type, and severity of errors varied by computerized prescribing system, suggesting that some systems may be better at preventing errors than others. Conclusions Implementing a computerized prescribing system without comprehensive functionality and processes in place to ensure meaningful system use does not decrease medication errors. The authors offer targeted recommendations on improving computerized prescribing systems to prevent errors. PMID:21715428

  13. Prescribing practices of topical corticosteroids in the outpatient dermatology department of a rural tertiary care teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Suvarna S; Motghare, Vijay M; Deshmukh, Vinod S; Deshpande, Rushikesh P; Bhamare, Chetanraj G; Patil, Jyoti R

    2013-09-01

    Inappropriate or excessive use of topical corticosteroids can lead to cutaneous and systemic adverse effects which occur more commonly with the use of very potent steroids. Monitoring and analysis of the prescription practices of topical steroids can help to achieve rational prescription of these drugs. The present study was carried out to study and analyze the pattern of prescribing topical corticosteroids among outpatients attending the dermatology clinic in a rural tertiary care and teaching hospital, Ambajogai, Maharashtra. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted for a duration of two months from August 2011 to September 2011, and 500 prescriptions were randomly collected from the dermatology pharmacy and analyzed. About 66% of the prescriptions contained four to five drugs per prescription. Topical steroids were given in 28.4% of all the prescriptions. In almost all the prescriptions, strength, quantity of the steroid to be used, frequency, site, and duration of application was not mentioned. The chief complaints and diagnoses were not mentioned in about 85% of the prescriptions for topical corticosteroids. About 94.36% of the prescriptions contained very potent steroids. Inadequate prescribing information is a clear characteristic of the dermatological prescriptions containing topical corticosteroids. Doctors should be educated about the importance of giving patients sufficient information regarding the use of steroids. There is a need to revise hospital formulary where low-potency steroids can also be included along with potent ones so that the latter can be avoided in conditions where they are unnecessary.

  14. [CyberKnife can cause inappropriate shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Nazmiye; Yılmaz, Hale; Sayar, Nurten; Erer, Betül

    2012-12-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) have been increasingly used to treat life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Although they have life-saving capabilities, they are very sensitive to electromagnetic energy sources. It has been reported that many problems associated with the detection of tachyarrhythmias and termination of the mechanism of the ICDs occur due to electromagnetic interference (EMI). In spite of the fact that EMI has been decreasingly observed with the latest generation ICDs, problems may still occur during radiotherapy. The CyberKnife is the latest stereotactic radio-surgery technology in the field of radiotherapy, and is currently being used for the treatment of malign neoplasm in the body. It is especially preferred for the treatment of advanced stage and metastatic tumors. Five ICD shocks were detected in a patient during a routine follow-up visit. When the patient was evaluated, it was determined that he underwent radiotherapy with CyberKnife technology because of lung metastasis and rectal adenocarcinoma. He received the ICD shocks while he was on radiotherapy. When the stored intracardiac electrograms in the memory of the ICD were investigated, it was established that the shocks were inappropriate shocks due to oversensing because of the exposure to EMI.

  15. Inappropriate sexual behavior in a geriatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardell, Andrea; Lau, Timothy; Fedoroff, J Paul

    2011-09-01

    Inappropriate sexual behavior (ISB) is an important topic in geriatrics; etiologies remain unclear and evidence for the efficacy of treatment strategies is limited. The aims of this study were to provide a description of the phenomenology of ISB in the geriatric population, to identify potential contributing factors, and to review the efficacy of interventions aimed at reducing ISB. A retrospective chart review was conducted of ten patients admitted to an academic inpatient geriatric psychiatry ward because of their ISB (study group) and ten patients matched in age and gender (control group). A comprehensive chart review inventory was done to determine variables that may contribute to ISB. For the study group, effectiveness, adverse effects, and discontinuation due to adverse effects of interventions aimed at reducing ISB were reviewed. A significant finding was the association of a history of right frontal lobe stroke with ISB (Fisher's Exact Probability Test p < 0.05). Also significant was performance on cognitive testing and the presence of dementia (Fisher's Exact Probability Test p < 0.05) in the study group. Citalopram was well tolerated but with minimal reduction of ISB. Atypical antipsychotics olanzapine and risperidone were effective in some cases but also had adverse effects. Medroxyprogesterone acetate was well tolerated and effective in all cases in which it was utilized (n = 5). This study suggests that ISB in the geriatric population is associated with a history of right frontal lobe stroke and with severity of dementia. Case examples of pharmacologic interventions are reviewed.

  16. The Risks of Inappropriateness in Cardiac Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Picano

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The immense clinical and scientific benefits of cardiovascular imaging are well-established, but are also true that 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Marketing messages, high patient demand and defensive medicine, lead to the vicious circle of the so-called Ulysses syndrome. Mr. Ulysses, a typical middle-aged “worried-well” asymptomatic subject with an A-type coronary personality, a heavy (opium smoker, leading a stressful life, would be advised to have a cardiological check-up after 10 years of war. After a long journey across imaging laboratories, he will have stress echo, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, PET-CT, 64-slice CT, and adenosine-MRI performed, with a cumulative cost of >100 times a simple exercise-electrocardiography test and a cumulative radiation dose of >4,000 chest x-rays, with a cancer risk of 1 in 100. Ulysses is tired of useless examinations, exorbitant costs. unaffordable even by the richest society, and unacceptable risks.

  17. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...... description of this momentum flow. The Prescribed Velocity Method is a practical method for the description of an Air Terminal Device which will save grid points close to the opening and ensure the right level of the momentum flow....

  18. Prescribing patterns of celecoxib and prescribers' perceptions among three general hospitals in Northern Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chan, Huan-Keat; Bakri, Ema; Tan, Sing-Yi; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Saleem, Fahad; Khan, Tahir Mehmood

    2014-01-01

    ... expenditure on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in 2012. To date, no reviews were found in the literature of its prescribing patterns in Malaysia. Since celecoxib was marketed, it has been consistently proven to have similar efficacy to the nonselective NSAIDs in OA and RA. [4] A subsequent trial had confirmed that both dosages of c...

  19. Potentially inappropriate medication related to weakness in older acute medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Line Due; Andersen, Ove; Hallin, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) is common in the older population. Inappropriate medications as well as polypharmacy expose older people to a greater risk of adverse drug reactions and may result in hospitalizations. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of PIMs......, handgrip strength, health-related quality of life, visual acuity, days of hospitalization, and comorbidities, and was prospectively collected. Polypharmacy was defined as regular use of 5 or more drugs. The Charlson Comorbidity Index was used to categorize comorbidities. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE...... exposed to polypharmacy. PIMs were used by 85 % of patients, and PIMs were associated with low functional status (p = 0.032), low handgrip strength (p = 0.006), and reduced health-related quality of life (p = 0.005), but not comorbidities (p = 0.63), age (p = 0.60), sex (p = 0.53), education (p = 0...

  20. [How should drugs for anxiety be prescribed?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylé, F J

    1998-01-01

    Difficulties in anxiety treatment is emphasized by benzodiazepine use and misuse. Pathological anxiety threshold can be understood in a dimensional perspective or by large in philosophical considerations. Therapeutic guidelines can be defined on the length of disease or by a categorical and nosological approach. Actually, this one appears more efficient. Numerous studies lead to better selection of psychotropics for each disorders (panic disorder; general anxiety disorder; social phobia; obsessive-compulsive disorder; post-traumatic stress disorder). Therapeutic choice is under others conditions such as length of prescription, severity of the disorders; comorbidity; individual feature to patient. Improvement in therapeutic efficacy needs further studies. Some directions could be: better definition of disorders and their link with personality, appreciation of intensity and chronicity, biological parameters.

  1. Prescribing pattern and indicators for performance in a psychiatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sangeeta; Chadda, Rk; Rishi, Rk; Gulati, Raj K; Bapna, Js

    2003-01-01

    AIMS To assess the prescribing pattern and to measure some specific aspects of the behaviour of the prescribers (psychiatrists) before and after educational interventions using core drug use indicators. METHODS In the present randomized retrospective controlled pre-post intervention prescription survey of schizophrenia and depression, 100 prescriptions each for schizophrenia and depression were obtained before and after each intervention. The prescriptions were analyzed for the following prescriber-specific indicators: number of drugs prescribed, prescribing by generic names, prescriptions for essential drugs, antiparkinsonian and benzodiazepines, nature of drugs and number of combinations prescribed. Based on the results of pre-intervention data, two interactional workshops were conducted 1 and 6 months after pre-intervention data collection. The first workshop focused on the results of the prescription audit feedback and reasons thereof. The second workshop focused, in addition, on appropriate management of schizophrenia and depression using consensus treatment guidelines with the aim of evolving a consensus on the treatment in a given hospital setting. RESULTS Before intervention, the essential drugs accounted for 80.95 and 96.91% of the total number of drugs prescribed in depression and schizophrenia, respectively. Prescription for essential drugs improved further significantly in the post intervention period to 95.26% (Pprescriptions for essential drugs declined to 80.95%. The average number of drugs prescribed per encounter marginally declined in both schizophrenia (2.46±0.94 to 2.34±0.65) and depression (2.09±0.79 to 2.00±0.65) after the second intervention. The patients receiving two or more drugs from the same group together declined from 12 to 9% in schizophrenia, but increased from 5 to 10% in depression after intervention. Trihexyphenidyl, an antiparkinsonian drug, was co-prescribed (90%) with antipsychotic agents (98%) in schizophrenia; however

  2. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis in doxylamine overdose

    OpenAIRE

    Carrascosa, Miguel F; Caviedes, José-Ramón Salcines; Lucena, M. Isabel; Cuadrado-Lavín, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Doxylamine succinate, an H1-antihistamine drug, is commonly used as sleep-inducing agent as well as therapy for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. At usual doses, it may cause impairment of cognitive and psychomotor performance, anticholinergic effects, agitation and postural hypotension. Besides, since this drug is frequently involved in either accidental or intentional overdoses, it seems relevant to bear in mind other possible toxic effects. We report a case of acute severe hyponatremia in ...

  3. Functional Analysis and Treatment of Multiply Controlled Inappropriate Mealtime Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmeyer, Melanie H.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Fredrick, Laura D.; Reed, Gregory K.; Rivas, Kristi D.; Kadey, Heather J.

    2009-01-01

    Functional analyses identified children whose inappropriate mealtime behavior was maintained by escape and adult attention. Function-based extinction procedures were tested individually and in combination. Attention extinction alone did not result in decreases in inappropriate mealtime behavior or a significant increase in acceptance. By contrast,…

  4. Assessing Students' Perceptions of Inappropriate and Appropriate Teacher Humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frymier, Ann Bainbridge; Wanzer, Melissa Bekelja; Wojtaszczyk, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    This study replicated and extended a preliminary typology of appropriate and inappropriate teacher humor and advanced three explanations for differences in interpretations of teacher humor. Students were more likely to view teacher humor as inappropriate when it was perceived as offensive and when it demeaned students as a group or individually.…

  5. Sexually Inappropriate Behaviors in Seriously Mentally Ill Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Julie; And Others

    This study examined the prevalence and clinical correlates of sexually inappropriate behaviors in all youth treated at a tertiary care public sector psychiatric hospital over a 5-year period. A retrospective chart review was completed on 499 subjects. Subjects were grouped in four mutually exclusive categories: no inappropriate sexual behaviors…

  6. [Law 6/84: "an inappropriate law"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroco, L E

    1994-01-01

    The intervention of Dr. Luis Elmano Barroco was evaluated at a meeting on March 19, 1994, on the topic of the state of abortion after 10 years of the new abortion law. Some aspects of the law of 1984 are characterized as inappropriate and inadequate because of the experience of the maternity ward of Dr. Alfredo da Costa. It was expected that in the wake of the publication of the law, official health care institutions would provide services for termination of pregnancy in accordance with legal indications. However, a survey carried out by the Association for Family Planning in July 1993 revealed that more than 50% of hospitals did not perform abortions because of the inexistence of specialized services or lack of resources or on grounds of conscientious objection. Even a revision of the abortion law does not take into consideration the fact that before 12 weeks of gestation it is difficult to precisely confirm grave lesions or the physical and psychological state of health of the pregnant woman which could be potentially life threatening. It was not taken into account either that it is impossible to diagnose definitively chromosomal aberrations, severe diseases, and fetal malformation before the 16th week. The law did not contemplate the prevailing socioeconomical conditions either that lead to clandestine abortion with high morbidity and mortality from cervical lesions, uterine perforation, infections, sepsis, and salpingitis. Prenatal diagnosis for eugenic abortion can be carried out by cytogenetic analysis of the amniotic fluid and ecography, but such diagnosis probably amounts to only 30-40% of risk cases in the whole country. A recent study by the Johns Hopkins University indicated that the chance of survival of a child born before 24 weeks is nil, therefore the limit of induced abortion should be extended to the 24th week to facilitate diagnosis of possible genetic abnormalities.

  7. Reconsidering "The inappropriateness of conventional cephalometrics".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookstein, Fred L

    2016-06-01

    Of all the articles on cephalometrics this journal has published over the last half-century, the one most cited across the scientific literature is the 1979 lecture "The inappropriateness of conventional cephalometrics" by Robert Moyers and me. But the durable salience of this article is perplexing, as its critique was misdirected (it should have been aimed at the craniometrics of the early twentieth century, not merely the roentgenographic extension used in the orthodontic clinic) and its proposed remedies have all failed to establish themselves as methods of any broad utility. When problems highlighted by Moyers and me have been resolved at all, the innovations that resolved them owe to tools very different from those suggested in our article and imported from fields quite a bit farther from biometrics than we expected back in 1979. One of these tools was the creation de novo of a new abstract mathematical construction, statistical shape space, in the 1980s and 1990s; another was a flexible and intuitive new graphic, the thin-plate spline, for meaningfully and suggestively visualizing a wide variety of biological findings in these spaces. On the other hand, many of the complaints Moyers and I enunciated back in 1979, especially those stemming from the disarticulation of morphometrics from the explanatory styles and purposes of clinical medicine, remain unanswered even today. The present essay, a retrospective historical meditation, reviews the context of the 1979 publication, its major themes, and its relevance today. This essay is dedicated to the memory of Robert E. Moyers on the 100th anniversary of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics.

  8. Evaluation of prescribing pattern of the private practitioners by the undergraduate medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaida Rahman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To sensitize the fourth year undergraduate medical students about rational prescribing, 600 prescriptions of private practitioners were collected by them and analyzed using WHO/INRUD indicators. There were average 3.81 drugs per prescriptions. Drugs were prescribed in generic name only in 5 prescriptions. About 50% drugs were prescribed from the Essential Drug List; only 17.5% of prescriptions were complete in respect to patient medical information. Antibiotics were prescribed in 72.5% of the prescriptions; injections were prescribed in about 12.1% of the prescriptions. Although the exercise revealed few elementary aspects of the prescribing, the medical students participated in the exercise enthusiastically and perhaps understood the issues related to rational prescribing effectively.

  9. Análise da adequação das propagandas de medicamentos dirigidas à categoria médica distribuídas no Sul do Brasil Adequacy of drug advertisements distributed to prescribers in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Dal Pizzol

    1998-01-01

    difficult to read. Most of the advertisements declared the product dosage in more properly-sized print. The main advertising claims were efficacy, safety, faster action, and high tolerability. In conclusion, the analysis demonstrated that most advertisements fail to comply with either the Brazilian legislation on medicinal products and/or the WHO ethical criteria for medicinal drug promotion. To improve this situation it thus seems necessary to develop more effective instruments to monitor quality of information provided to prescribers by the drug advertisers.

  10. Prescribing practices amid the OxyContin crisis: examining the effect of print media coverage on opioid prescribing among physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borwein, Alexandra; Kephart, George; Whelan, Emma; Asbridge, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The pain medication OxyContin (hereafter referred to as oxycodone extended release) has been the subject of sustained, and largely negative, media attention in recent years. We sought to determine whether media coverage of oxycodone extended release in North American newspapers has led to changes in prescribing of the drug in Nova Scotia, Canada. An interrupted time-series design examined the effect of media attention on physicians' monthly prescribing of opioids. The outcome measures were, for each physician, the monthly proportions of all opioids prescribed and the proportion of strong opioids prescribed that were for oxycodone extended release. The exposure of interest was media attention defined as the number of articles published each month in 27 North American newspapers. Variations in media effects by provider characteristics (specialty, prescribing volume, and region) were assessed. Within-provider changes in the prescribing of oxycodone extended release in Nova Scotia were observed, and they followed changes in media coverage. Oxycodone extended release prescribing rose steadily prior to receiving media attention. Following peak media attention in the United States, the prescribing of oxycodone extended release slowed. Likewise, following peak coverage in Canadian newspapers, the prescribing of oxycodone extended release declined. These patterns were observed across prescriber specialties and by prescriber volume, though the magnitude of change in prescribing varied. This study demonstrates that print media reporting of oxycodone extended release in North American newspapers, and its continued portrayal as a social problem, coincided with reductions in the prescribing of oxycodone extended release by physicians in Nova Scotia. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Substantial reduction of inappropriate tablet splitting with computerised decision support: a prospective intervention study assessing potential benefit and harm

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    Quinzler Renate

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently ambulatory patients break one in four tablets before ingestion. Roughly 10% of them are not suitable for splitting because they lack score lines or because enteric or modified release coating is destroyed impairing safety and effectiveness of the medication. We assessed impact and safety of computerised decision support on the inappropriate prescription of split tablets. Methods We performed a prospective intervention study in a 1680-bed university hospital. Over a 15-week period we evaluated all electronically composed medication regimens and determined the fraction of tablets and capsules that demanded inappropriate splitting. In a subsequent intervention phase of 15 weeks duration for 10553 oral drugs divisibility characteristics were indicated in the system. In addition, an alert was generated and displayed during the prescription process whenever the entered dosage regimen demanded inappropriate splitting (splitting of capsules, unscored tablets, or scored tablets unsuitable for the intended fragmentation. Results During the baseline period 12.5% of all drugs required splitting and 2.7% of all drugs (257/9545 required inappropriate splitting. During the intervention period the frequency of inappropriate splitting was significantly reduced (1.4% of all drugs (146/10486; p = 0.0008. In response to half of the alerts (69/136 physicians adjusted the medication regimen. In the other half (67/136 no corrections were made although a switch to more suitable drugs (scored tablets, tablets with lower strength, liquid formulation was possible in 82% (55/67. Conclusion This study revealed that computerised decision support can immediately reduce the frequency of inappropriate splitting without introducing new safety hazards.

  12. A cluster randomised stepped wedge trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a multifaceted information technology-based intervention in reducing high-risk prescribing of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antiplatelets in primary medical care: The DQIP study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreischulte Tobias

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-risk prescribing of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and antiplatelet agents accounts for a significant proportion of hospital admissions due to preventable adverse drug events. The recently completed PINCER trial has demonstrated that a one-off pharmacist-led information technology (IT-based intervention can significantly reduce high-risk prescribing in primary care, but there is evidence that effects decrease over time and employing additional pharmacists to facilitate change may not be sustainable. Methods/design We will conduct a cluster randomised controlled with a stepped wedge design in 40 volunteer general practices in two Scottish health boards. Eligible practices are those that are using the INPS Vision clinical IT system, and have agreed to have relevant medication-related data to be automatically extracted from their electronic medical records. All practices (clusters that agree to take part will receive the data-driven quality improvement in primary care (DQIP intervention, but will be randomised to one of 10 start dates. The DQIP intervention has three components: a web-based informatics tool that provides weekly updated feedback of targeted prescribing at practice level, prompts the review of individual patients affected, and summarises each patient's relevant risk factors and prescribing; an outreach visit providing education on targeted prescribing and training in the use of the informatics tool; and a fixed payment of 350 GBP (560 USD; 403 EUR up front and a small payment of 15 GBP (24 USD; 17 EUR for each patient reviewed in the 12 months of the intervention. We hypothesise that the DQIP intervention will reduce a composite of nine previously validated measures of high-risk prescribing. Due to the nature of the intervention, it is not possible to blind practices, the core research team, or the data analyst. However, outcome assessment is entirely objective and automated. There will

  13. Do consumers really trust their doctors’ suggestions and drugs they prescribe? : the relationship between perceived risk and trust in consumer buying decisions on prescription drugs, and how pharmaceutical companies can improve consumer’s trust through marketing activities in China

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Meina

    2016-01-01

    This thesis examines how perceived risk and trust affect consumer’s buying decisions during the process of buying and consuming prescription drugs, and investigates how pharmaceutical companies can improve consumer’s trust by strategically designing and performing their marketing activities in the Chinese pharmaceutical market. Previous literature has generally introduced the overview of consumer buying process and the two important factors that may influence the buying decisions: percei...

  14. Inappropriateness of medication prescriptions about chronic kidney disease patients without dialysis therapy in a Chinese tertiary teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ping Yang, Na Chen, Rong-Rong Wang, Lu Li, Sai-Ping Jiang Department of Pharmacy, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: With the increasing incidence rate of chronic kidney disease (CKD, inappropriate use of medicine in CKD patients is an important issue, as it may cause adverse effects in patients and progression to chronic renal failure.Objective: The aim of this study is to assess the frequency of inappropriate medicine use among CKD patients.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 1 to December 1, 2014 in a Chinese teaching tertiary hospital. All medication prescriptions for CKD patients with serum creatinine level above normal value were enrolled. The prescriptions, including unreasonable dosage, contraindicated, and cautiously used medicines in CKD patients, were evaluated and the related medications were also analyzed and classified.Results: Two hundred and two patients were included, and a total of 1,733 lines of medication prescriptions were evaluated. The prevalence of inappropriate medication prescriptions in CKD patients was 15.18%, of which, unreasonable dosage (n=56, contraindicated (n=46, and cautiously used medicines (n=161 accounted for 3.23%, 2.65%, and 9.29%, respectively. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient implied that there was a significant correlation between the severity of renal insufficiency and frequency of inappropriate medication prescriptions (P=0.02, r=0.056. Among the inappropriate medication prescriptions, nutraceutical and electrolytes (n=65, 24.71%, cardiovascular drugs (n=61, 23.19%, and antimicrobial drugs (n=55, 20.91% represented the top three medicine categories in CKD patients.Conclusion: The study confirmed that inappropriate medication prescriptions were prevalent in CKD patients. Improving the quality of medication prescriptions in CKD patients is necessary. Keywords: inappropriateness of

  15. Prescribing patterns of antibiotics and sensitivity patterns of common microorganisms in the Internal Medicine ward of a teaching hospital in Western Nepal: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Easow Joshy

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information about antibiotic use and resistance patterns of common microorganisms are lacking in hospitals in Western Nepal. Excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics contributes to the development of bacterial resistance. The parameter: Defined daily dose/100 bed-days, provides an estimate of consumption of drugs among hospital in-patients. This study was carried out to collect relevant demographic information, antibiotic prescribing patterns and the common organisms isolated including their antibiotic sensitivity patterns. Methods The study was carried out over a 3-month period (01.04.2002 to 30.06.2002 at the Manipal Teaching Hospital, Western Nepal. The median number of days of hospitalization and mean ± SD cost of antibiotics prescribed during hospital stay were calculated. The use of antibiotics was classified for prophylaxis, bacteriologically proven infection or non-bacteriologically proven infection. Sensitivity patterns of the common organisms were determined. Defined daily dose/100 bed-days of the ten most commonly prescribed antibiotics were calculated. Results 203 patients were prescribed antibiotics; 112 were male. Median duration of hospitalization was 5 days. 347 antibiotics were prescribed. The most common were ampicillin, amoxicillin, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and benzylpenicillin. Mean ± SD cost of antibiotics was 16.5 ± 13.4 US$. Culture and sensitivity testing was carried out in 141 patients. The common organisms isolated were H. influenzae, E. coli, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus. Conclusions Antibiotic resistance is becoming a problem in the Internal Medicine ward. Formulation of a policy for hospital antibiotic use and an educational programme especially for junior doctors is required.

  16. Primary care clinicians' perceptions about antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Patrick P; Businger, Alexandra C; Whaley, Lauren E; Gagne, Joshua J; Linder, Jeffrey A

    2014-12-12

    Clinicians prescribe antibiotics to over 65% of adults with acute bronchitis despite guidelines stating that antibiotics are not indicated. To identify and understand primary care clinician perceptions about antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 13 primary care clinicians in Boston, Massachusetts and used thematic content analysis. All the participants agreed with guidelines that antibiotics are not indicated for acute bronchitis and felt that clinicians other than themselves were responsible for overprescribing. Barriers to guideline adherence included 6 themes: (1) perceived patient demand, which was the main barrier, although some clinicians perceived a recent decrease; (2) lack of accountability for antibiotic prescribing; (3) saving time and money; (4) other clinicians' misconceptions about acute bronchitis; (5) diagnostic uncertainty; and (6) clinician dissatisfaction in failing to meet patient expectations. Strategies to decrease inappropriate antibiotic prescribing included 5 themes: (1) patient educational materials; (2) quality reporting; (3) clinical decision support; (4) use of an over-the-counter prescription pad; and (5) pre-visit triage and education by nurses to prevent visits. Clinicians continued to cite patient demand as the main reason for antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis, though some clinicians perceived a recent decrease. Clinicians felt that other clinicians were responsible for inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and that better pre-visit triage by nurses could prevent visits and change patients' expectations.

  17. Inappropriate sexual behaviors in cognitively impaired older individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, David R P

    2008-12-01

    Agitated and aggressive behaviors are common in older patients with dementia (33% of the community-dwelling and 80% of the institutionalized populations). Although inappropriate verbal and physical sexual behaviors are among the least common of these actions, they can be profoundly disruptive to caregivers (spouse, institutional staff, or both) and other individuals in the immediate surroundings. Substantial mental and physical harm can occur secondary to these behaviors. The common perception is that such behavior cannot be treated. This review summarizes the epidemiology, etiology, and biology of abnormal sexual behaviors in cognitively impaired older individuals and highlights potentially useful drug therapies. Primary research and review articles in the English language were identified through a search of MEDLINE/PubMed (1966-September 2008). Search terms included aged, hypersexuality, sexual disorders, paraphilia, sexual behaviors, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, medroxyprogesterone acetate, cyproterone acetate, estrogens, LHRH agonists, leuprolide, and triptorelin. The bibliographies of all articles obtained were also reviewed for relevant citations. All articles involving abnormal sexual behaviors in older humans were reviewed. Use of pharmacotherapy in managing inappropriate sexual behaviors in cognitively impaired older individuals has been detailed in only 23 case reports and case series (N = 55 subjects). Additional supportive data from case reports and case series are available in nonsexual agitation/aggression in elderly patients with dementia (N = 16 subjects) and abnormal sexual behaviors in cognitively intact elderly (N = 2 subjects). One comparative trial in nonsexual agitation/aggression in elderly patients with dementia also exists (N = 27 subjects). There are no practice guidelines available for the treatment of abnormal sexual behaviors in the cognitively impaired elderly population. Recommendations must be

  18. Management of inappropriate sexual behaviors in dementia: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Inese

    2010-08-01

    This paper reviews published literature on the pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of inappropriate sexual behavior in dementia. A literature search of Psychinfo and Cochrane databases was performed and data from case reports and case series were analyzed. No randomized controlled trials exist for any treatment of sexual disinhibition in dementia and there are no trials comparing different pharmacological agents. Case reports and case series report a wide range of pharmacotherapies as efficacious in the treatment of inappropriate sexual behaviors in dementia. There is only one case report of non-pharmacological strategies to manage inappropriate sexual behavior. Inappropriate sexual behaviors in dementia can be difficult to treat. Frequently, multiple psychoactive medications are used and many pharmacotherapies are trialed prior to finding an effective agent. More research is needed to clarify the usefulness of these medications and to identify non-pharmacological strategies to prevent unnecessary use of medications.

  19. Patients Aged 80 Years or Older are Encountered More Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Mo

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The finding from this study revealed that inpatients aged 80 years or older encountered more PIM use than those aged 65-79 years. Anticholinergic properties, megestrol, antipsychotics, theophylline, and aspirin are medications that often prescribed to inpatients aged 80 years or older. Doctors should carefully choose drugs for the elderly, especially the elderly aged 80 years or older.

  20. Collecting duct renal cell carcinoma with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis: An autopsy case report

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    Emi Yasuda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year-old Japanese man visited our hospital with a moist cough. Chest radiographic imaging showed a left hilar shadow. Adenocarcinoma cells were found on cytologic screening of fresh sputum. Although multiple metastases including brain were detected, no tumor was observed in the kidneys. The patient underwent whole-brain irradiation and chemotherapy for advanced-stage lung cancer. One month before his death, carcinomatous meningitis was detected. Hyponatremia, hypo-osmolality, and hypertonic urine suggested the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis. Restricting water intake improved the hyponatremia; however, he developed fever and hematuria. Despite systemic administration of an antibacterial drug, he died. Primary tumor in the lung was absent, but adenocarcinoma of the right kidney was evident on autopsy. Lectin histochemical analysis of the carcinoma revealed its distal nephron origin, confirming collecting duct carcinoma. Severe carcinomatous meningitis, which is possibly caused the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis, was observed, with no cancer involvement of the pituitary gland and hypothalamus.

  1. Initiatives to improve appropriate antibiotic prescribing in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Diane J

    2013-11-01

    Influencing clinicians' prescribing behaviour is important because inappropriate use and overuse of antibiotics are major drivers of antibiotic resistance. A systematic review of interventions for promoting prudent prescribing of antibiotics by general practitioners suggests that multifaceted interventions will maximize acceptability. This article reports how this type of approach has been used successfully in Derbyshire, UK over the last 4 years. The range of interventions that have been used includes educational meetings (both open group events and others targeted at higher prescribers in the surgery) using a supportive and guiding ethos; the provision of support materials aimed at empowering avoidance or delayed antibiotic prescribing, where appropriate, and improving patients' knowledge and confidence in self-management; and the production of different treatment guidelines incorporating key messages with evidence, indicating where antibiotics are unlikely to be of benefit. Education on antibiotics in schools was a novel approach, which was developed in North Derbyshire to increase public awareness of the appropriate treatment for common illnesses without using antibiotics.

  2. Prescribing antibiotics in general practice:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    Objectives The majority of antibiotics are prescribed from general practice. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. In spite of guidelines aiming to minimize the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics we see an increase...... in the use of these agents. The overall aim of the project is to explore factors influencing the decision process and the prescribing behaviour of the GPs when prescribing antibiotics. We will study the impact of microbiological testing on the choice of antibiotic. Furthermore the project will explore how...... the GPs’ prescribing behaviour is influenced by selected factors. Method The study consists of a register-based study and a questionnaire study. The register-based study is based on data from the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics (prescribed antibiotics), Statistics Denmark (socio-demographic data...

  3. [Over-consumption of drugs by elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paille, François

    2004-01-01

    Aging is a major factor in the over-consumption of drugs: although individuals aged >65 years account for approximately 15% of the population, almost one-third of all prescriptions are made out for this age group. This over-consumption is responsible for a number of potential hazards, such as iatrogenic pathology, poor compliance and drug interactions; it is also an economic burden. Most studies report an average of five drugs prescribed per individual, regardless of outpatient or inpatient status. Cardiovascular and psychotropic drugs are the most widely prescribed classes. Analgesic and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are also very common. These are also the classes responsible for the highest number of adverse events in the elderly. There are numerous reasons for this over-consumption; in some cases, it is attributable to the patient himself (multiple diseases, deterioration of bodily functions, poor compliance, misuse, etc.), while in others, the prescribing physician, family or professional caregivers are at fault. The development of new drugs and the information made available regarding them can also be implicated. Studies comparing actual prescriptions with reference indications have shown that some are inappropriate: one meta-analysis showed that for 21.3% of patients in institutions and 40% of patients in convalescent homes, at least one prescription was inadequate; and in another analysis, the same applied to 12.5% of patients living at home. The potential seriousness of this over-consumption by elderly patients, even more so than in adults, calls for a detailed analysis of the situation and rational, regularly reviewed, realistic prescribing.

  4. Shift in antibiotic prescribing patterns in relation to antibiotic expenditure in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimpen, JLL; van Houten, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    In paediatrics, antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs. Because of an overall rise in health care costs, lack of uniformity in drug prescribing and the emergence of antibiotic resistance, monitoring and control of antibiotic use is of growing concern and strict antibiotic policies

  5. Shift in antibiotic prescribing patterns in relation to antibiotic expenditure in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimpen, JLL; van Houten, M.A.

    In paediatrics, antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs. Because of an overall rise in health care costs, lack of uniformity in drug prescribing and the emergence of antibiotic resistance, monitoring and control of antibiotic use is of growing concern and strict antibiotic policies

  6. Shift in antibiotic prescribing patterns in relation to antibiotic expenditure in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimpen, JLL; van Houten, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    In paediatrics, antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs. Because of an overall rise in health care costs, lack of uniformity in drug prescribing and the emergence of antibiotic resistance, monitoring and control of antibiotic use is of growing concern and strict antibiotic policies

  7. WHO core prescribing indicators in patients with allergic contact dermatitis in a coastal town of South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyashanthi C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prescribing pattern analysis utilizing WHO core drug prescribing indicators can be helpful for the assessing the beneficial and adverse impacts of the prescribed drugs. Even though many drugs are commonly used in treatment of Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD they are least studied in terms of prescribing patterns. Hence the present study was planned to analyze the prescribing pattern and study the WHO core prescribing indicators in patients with ACD in our institute. Methods: A prospective observational study was carried out with prescriptions of 81 outpatients who attended the dermatology OPD with the diagnosis of ACD over a period of six months. Details such as basic demographics, specific drugs prescribed with their dose and dosage forms were recorded and WHO core prescription indicators analysed. Results: Overall, corticosteroids both topical and systemic were the most commonly prescribed drugs (45.54% followed by antihistamines (30.69% and antimicrobials (13.86%. The most commonly prescribed topical corticosteroid was desonide (58.82%, systemic corticosteroid was prednisolone (47.61%, antihistamine was cetirizine (54, 83% and antimicrobials were cephalosporins (42.86%. Average drugs per prescription for patients of ACD were 6.8. Percentage of drugs prescribed by generic name was 22.77%. Percentage of encounters with antibiotic prescribed was 13.86% whereas injection prescribed was 9.90%. Percentage of drugs prescribed from National list of essential medicines (NLEM was 53.57%. Conclusions: Corticosteroids remain the mainstay of treatment in ACD. The percentage of encounters with an injection and the use of systemic steroids were low and were according to the guidelines. But drugs prescribed by generic name and those prescribed from NELM were found to be satisfactory but can further be improved.

  8. The influence of user fees and patient demand on prescribers in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Kathleen A; Gautam, Bharat R; Harpham, Trudy; Taket, Ann

    2002-03-01

    Irrational prescribing and over-prescription is a world-wide problem. Prescribers often cite patient demand as one of the main reasons why they over-prescribe, but the degree to which this is so is unknown. This article describes a study to test the hypothesis that patient demand causes over-prescription. The study occurred within the context of different kinds of nominal user fee for drugs in Nepal, where it was assumed that charging per drug item would deter patient demand, and hence over-prescription, as compared to charging per prescription. Focus group discussions with patients attending rural health facilities explored patient attitudes towards drugs. Patients and health workers were interviewed to gather quantitative data on (1) patient demand, and (2) health worker views of patient demand and their own prescribing habits, and comparing these with the drugs actually prescribed and dispensed to patients. Patients felt they needed more drugs than they were prescribed or dispensed, but stated that they would be happy to accept advice from prescribers for fewer drugs. In all areas of whatever fee type, there was no association between the number of drug items patients felt they needed pre-consultation and the number of drug items that they actually received as observed postconsultation. However, there was a significant association between the average number of drug items per patient that prescribers stated they usually prescribed and the actual number that were prescribed. It was concluded that patient demand was not affected by different kinds of user fee and did not directly influence prescribing behaviour.

  9. Drug Dose Adjustment in Dialysis Patients Admitted in Clinics Other Than Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Yalcin; Biyik, Zeynep; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Kayrak, Mehmet; Ciray, Hilal; Cizmecioglu, Ahmet; Tonbul, Halil Zeki; Turk, Suleyman

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs that are administered during hospitalization are metabolized or excreted through kidneys, consequently require dosage adjustment. We aimed to investigate inappropriate prescription of drugs requiring renal dose adjustment (RDA) in various surgical and medical inpatient clinics. We retrospectively determined dialysis patients hospitalized between January 2007 and December 2010. Inpatient clinics, including cardiology, pulmonary medicine, neurology, infectious diseases (medical clinics) and cardiovascular surgery, orthopedics, general surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, and neurosurgery (surgical clinics), were screened via electronic database. Total and RDA medications were determined. RDA drugs correctly adjusted to creatinine clearance were labeled as RDA-A (appropriate), otherwise as RDA-I (inappropriate). Renal doses of RDA medications were based on the "American College of Physicians Drug Prescribing in Renal Failure, fifth Edition." Two hundred seventeen hospitalization records of 172 dialysis patients (92 men and 80 women) were included in the analysis. Mean age of patients was 59.4 ± 14.6 years, and the mean hospitalization duration was 8.5 ± 7.8 days. In total, 247 (84.3%, percentage in drugs requiring dose adjustment) and 175 (46.2%) drugs have been inadequately dosed in surgical and medical clinics, respectively. The percentage of patients to whom at least 1 RDA-I drug was ordered was 92% and 91.4% for surgical and medical clinics, respectively (P > 0.05). Nephrology consultation numbers were 8 (7.1%) in surgical and 32 (30.4%) in medical clinics. The most common RDA-I drugs were aspirin and famotidine. A significant portion of RDA drugs was ordered inappropriately both in surgical and medical clinics. Nephrology consultation rate was very low. Measures to increase physician awareness are required to improve results.

  10. Appropriate and inappropriate referrals to a unit of conservative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J; Goodall, C A; Hayes, F

    1999-10-01

    Inappropriate referrals to secondary care are an unnecessary cost, notwithstanding the effect on waiting lists. It is essential therefore that only those patients whose referrals are appropriate are actually referred for secondary care. This project aimed to determine whether referrals to a unit of conservative dentistry are appropriate. The records of 120 consecutive new patient referrals who had been examined by one consultant in the unit of conservative dentistry at Glasgow Dental Hospital and School were obtained. A pro forma was designed on which synopses of the relevant clinical findings were written. These synopses were examined by four general dental practitioners (GDPs). A referral was considered appropriate if three or four of the GDPs considered it to be so, a referral was considered inappropriate if three or four of the GDPs concurred. Of the 120 cases examined, a majority of the GDP assessors agreed that 54 warranted referral, with 23 of these being referrals for toothwear. Agreement was not reached in 35 cases, while 31 referrals were considered inappropriate. Of the 31 cases which were considered inappropriate, 27 were thought to be within the scope of general practitioners. In conclusion, the results suggest that around one quarter of referrals to a unit of conservative dentistry are inappropriate. It would appear that a number of GDPs are unable or unwilling to treat a variety of simple conditions in practice and it may be that the development of referral guidelines is necessary to ensure that only those patients who merit a specialist opinion are referred for this service.

  11. Comparisons of anti-diabetic prescriptions of private practitioners and hospital prescribers: A survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Mandal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monotherapy as well as effective and safe combination therapy for diabetes is practiced widely by both private and government hospital prescribers. This study attempted to compare the prescriptions of government and private practitioners to obtain a fair idea of the trends of diabetes management in either group. Prescriptions for diabetic patients from both private practitioners and government medical college prescribers were collected. These were analyzed for parameters such as number and type of drugs, cost, and generic prescription. Private prescribers were not significantly different from hospital prescribers in terms of number of drugs per prescription, cost of therapy, and treatment regimens. However, there was a dearth of generic prescriptions from private consultants (33% vs. 9%. Metformin and Glimepiride were the most prescribed drugs in both groups. However, private practitioners preferred Gliclazide, Glipizide, and Glibenclamide more than hospital prescribers.

  12. Rational use of medicines: prescribing indicators at different levels of health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Beatriz Cardoso Ferreira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This multicenter study aimed to investigate prescribing patterns of drugs at different levels of health care delivery in university-affiliated outpatient clinics located in eight cities in the South and Midwest of Brazil. All prescriptions collected were analyzed for various items, including WHO prescribing indicators. A total of 2,411 prescriptions were analyzed, and 469 drugs were identified. The number of drugs prescribed per encounter, the frequency of polypharmacy, and the percentage of encounters with at least one injection or antibiotic prescribed were higher in centers providing primary health care services, compared to those where this type of care is not provided. Most drugs (86.1% were prescribed by generic name. In centers with primary health care services, drug availability was higher, drugs included in the National and Municipal Lists of Essential Medicines were more frequently prescribed, and patients were given more instructions. However, warnings and non-pharmacological measures were less frequently recommended. This study reveals trends in drug prescribing at different levels of health care delivery in university-affiliated outpatient clinics and indicates possible areas for improvement in prescribing practices.

  13. [Formal criteria for good prescribing in the hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langebrake, Claudia; Melzer, Simone; Baehr, Michael

    2014-06-01

    The provision of drugs to hospitalised patients is a complex process with the involvement of different healthcare professionals. As pharmacotherapy is (1) one of the most common medical interventions, (2) a high-risk procedure, and (3) affects the majority of hospitalised patients, medication errors have sustainable impact on patient safety. Although medication errors can occur at different stages of drug use (prescribing, dispensing, administration), they are most likely within the prescribing process. According to the Reason's model of accident causation, these errors can be divided into active failures, error-provoking conditions, and latent conditions. Commonly, the complex interaction between lacking knowledge and/or experience, rule-based mistakes, skill-based slips and memory lapses, inadequate working environment (exessive work load, fatigue) as well as poor communication and safety culture is causative for prescribing errors. Therefore, good prescribing should include the following items: Adherence to formal criteria (e. g. avoidance of abbreviations), performance of medication reconciliation, implementation of an electronic prescribing system (computerised physician order entry, CPOE) - preferably combined with a clinical decision support system (CDSS), education and training as well as the establishment of a positive error management culture. The implementation of recommendations to reduce prescribing errors is described on the basis of established processes in hospitals.

  14. The cost-effectiveness of direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherly, Adam; Rubin, Paul H

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we use published information to analyze the economic value of Direct to Consumer Advertising (DTCA). The reviewed research finds that DTCA leads to increased demand for the advertised drug and that the effect of the drug tends to be class-wide rather than product specific. There is weak evidence that DTCA may increase compliance and improve clinical outcomes. However, there is little research on the effect of DTCA on inappropriate prescribing or on the characteristics of patients who respond to treatment. On net, if the advertised drugs are cost effective on average and the patients using the drugs in response to the advertisement are similar to other users, DTCA is likely cost effective. Overall, the literature to date is consistent with the idea that DTCA is beneficial, but further research is needed before definitive conclusions can be drawn.

  15. Medicamentos potencialmente inapropriados para idosos Potentially inappropriate medications in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Luiz Gorzoni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar PRISCUS com Beers-Fick na detecção de medicamentos potencialmente inapropriados (MPI para idosos à primeira consulta ambulatorial geriátrica. MÉTODOS: Análise retrospectiva de prontuários por PRISCUS e Beers-Fick adaptados à farmacopeia brasileira, comparando-se o encontro de MPI à primeira consulta ambulatorial geriátrica pelos dois critérios. RESULTADOS: Idade média de 77,4 ± 7,7 anos, 64 mulheres e 36 homens, consumo médio de 3,9 ± 2,5 fármacos. Este estudo encontrou significância estatística no número de mulheres em uso de benzodiazepínicos e de homens quanto a salicilatos. Média de 0,5 ± 0,7 MPI/paciente por Beers-Fick e 0,7 ± 0,8 MPI/paciente pela PRISCUS. Medicamentos de Beers-Fick mais referidos: benzodiazepínicos, metildopa e derivados do ergot. Medicamentos de PRISCUS mais referidos: benzodiazepínicos, anti-hipertensivos e antidepressivos tricíclicos. Não houve significância estatística comparando-se o número de idosos com MPI pelos dois critérios. Constatou-se significância estatística (PRISCUS versus Beers-Fick no consumo de benzodiazepínicos de longa ação e laxantes. Ambos não incluem fármacos como vitaminas, fitoterápicos e colírios, relatados por percentual da casuística. CONCLUSÃO: Os dois critérios são úteis para a prevenção de MPI em idosos, sendo PRISCUS mais atualizada e abrangente, mas não são completos para a realidade ambulatorial brasileira.OBJECTIVE: To compare PRISCUS with Beers-Fick in detecting potentially inappropriate medication (PIMs in elderly at their first outpatient geriatric visit. METHODS: Retrospective medical record analysis by PRISCUS and Beers-Fick adapted to Brazilian pharmacopoeia, comparing the finding of PIMs at the first outpatient geriatric visit by both criteria. RESULTS: Cases had mean age of 77.4 ± 7.7 years (64 females and 36 males, and mean consumption of 3.9 ± 2.5 drugs. This study found statistical significance for the

  16. Specialist pediatric palliative care prescribing practices: A large 5-year retrospective audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuja Damani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a gradual increasing trend in childhood cancers in India and pediatric palliative care in India is an emerging specialty. Prescribing pain and symptom control drugs in children with cancer requires knowledge of palliative care formulary, dosing schedules, and prescription guidelines. This study is a retrospective audit of prescribing practices of a specialist palliative care service situated in a tertiary cancer center. Methods: A total of 1135 medication records of children receiving specialist pediatric palliative care services were audited for 5 years (2010-2014 to evaluate prescribing practices in children with advanced cancer. Results: A total of 51 types of drugs were prescribed with an average of 4.2 drugs per prescription. 66.9% of the prescriptions had paracetamol, and 33.9% of the prescriptions had morphine. Most common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prescribed was ibuprofen (23.9%, and more than 50% of the prescriptions had aperients. The most commonly prescribed aperient was a combination of liquid paraffin and sodium-picosulfate. Dexamethasone was prescribed in 51.9% of patients and in most cases this was part of oral chemotherapy regimen. Generic names in prescription were used only in 33% of cases, and adverse effects of the drugs were documented in only 9% of cases. In 25% of cases, noncompliance to the WHO prescription guidelines was seen, and patient compliance to prescription was seen in 40% of cases. Conclusions: Audit of the prescribing practices in specialist pediatric palliative care service shows that knowledge of pediatric palliative care formulary, rational drug use, dosing, and prescribing guidelines is essential for symptom control in children with advanced life-limiting illness. Noncompliance to WHO prescribing guidelines in one fourth of cases and using nongeneric names in two-thirds of prescription indicates poor prescribing practices and warrants prescriber education. Prescription

  17. Prescribing practices of topical corticosteroids in the outpatient dermatology department of a rural tertiary care teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvarna S Rathod

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inappropriate or excessive use of topical corticosteroids can lead to cutaneous and systemic adverse effects which occur more commonly with the use of very potent steroids. Monitoring and analysis of the prescription practices of topical steroids can help to achieve rational prescription of these drugs. Aim: The present study was carried out to study and analyze the pattern of prescribing topical corticosteroids among outpatients attending the dermatology clinic in a rural tertiary care and teaching hospital, Ambajogai, Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted for a duration of two months from August 2011 to September 2011, and 500 prescriptions were randomly collected from the dermatology pharmacy and analyzed. Results: About 66% of the prescriptions contained four to five drugs per prescription. Topical steroids were given in 28.4% of all the prescriptions. In almost all the prescriptions, strength, quantity of the steroid to be used, frequency, site, and duration of application was not mentioned. The chief complaints and diagnoses were not mentioned in about 85% of the prescriptions for topical corticosteroids. About 94.36% of the prescriptions contained very potent steroids. Conclusion: Inadequate prescribing information is a clear characteristic of the dermatological prescriptions containing topical corticosteroids. Doctors should be educated about the importance of giving patients sufficient information regarding the use of steroids. There is a need to revise hospital formulary where low-potency steroids can also be included along with potent ones so that the latter can be avoided in conditions where they are unnecessary.

  18. Diurnal variation of prescribing pattern of primary care doctors in Bahrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damanhori, Awatif H H; Al Khaja, Khalid A J; Sequeira, Reginald P; Al-Ansari, Thuraya M

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the variation in prescribing by primary care doctors during the morning and the evening clinics and to determine whether these prescribing patterns are influenced by doctors' training background. A retrospective prescription-based study was carried out in 17 out of 20 primary care health centres in Bahrain distributed across the Kingdom. A total of 4472 prescriptions containing 10 588 drug-items covering the prescribing practice of approximately 90% primary care doctors were analysed. Paracetamol was the most commonly prescribed drug in both clinics. Drugs such as diclofenac sodium, amoxycillin, ibuprofen, chlorpheniramine, hyoscine butylbromide, Actifed, Benylin and xylometazoline were the most commonly prescribed drugs to patients attending morning and evening clinics with a considerable variation in ordinal ranking of proportions. As regards morning clinic, chlorpheniramine and Fefol were prescribed by the family doctors (FDs) more often than by the general practitioners (GPs) (Pprescription was 2.41+/-1.3. Prescriptions containing three or more drugs comprised 41.7% of all prescriptions. The GPs had a greater tendency to practice polypharmacy than the FDs. A significant diurnal variation in prescribing, and polypharmacy practice were related to the training background of the doctors. This quantitative study provides the baseline data for monitoring primary care prescribing practices in Bahrain. To further evaluate the underlying factors that influence drug use indicators, a qualitative study is needed.

  19. Noninsulin Antidiabetic Drugs for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Are We Respecting Their Contraindications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Ruiz-Tamayo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess prescribing practices of noninsulin antidiabetic drugs (NIADs in T2DM with several major contraindications according to prescribing information or clinical guidelines: renal failure, heart failure, liver dysfunction, or history of bladder cancer. Methods. Cross-sectional, descriptive, multicenter study. Electronic medical records were retrieved from all T2DM subjects who attended primary care centers pertaining to the Catalan Health Institute in Catalonia in 2013 and were pharmacologically treated with any NIAD alone or in combination. Results. Records were retrieved from a total of 255,499 pharmacologically treated patients. 78% of patients with some degree of renal impairment (glomerular filtration rate (GFR < 60 mL/min were treated with metformin and 31.2% with sulfonylureas. Even in the event of severe renal failure (GFR < 30 mL/min, 35.3% and 22.5% of patients were on metformin or sulfonylureas, respectively. Moreover, metformin was prescribed to more than 60% of patients with moderate or severe heart failure. Conclusion. Some NIADs, and in particular metformin, were frequently used in patients at high risk of complications when they were contraindicated. There is a need to increase awareness of potential inappropriate prescribing and to monitor the quality of prescribing patterns in order to help physicians and policymakers to yield better clinical outcomes in T2DM.

  20. Functional Analysis and Treatment of Inappropriate Sexual Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyffe, Christie E.; Kahng, SungWoo; Fittro, Ellen; Russell, David

    2004-01-01

    The results of a functional analysis showed that inappropriate sexual behaviors exhibited by a 9-year-old boy who had been diagnosed with traumatic brain injury were maintained by positive reinforcement in the form of social attention. An intervention consisting of functional communication training and extinction resulted in reduced levels of…

  1. Hypercalcemia, inappropriate calcitriol levels, and tuberculosis on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Pobes, A; Díaz-Corte, C; Gago, E

    2000-08-01

    We describe a female patient undergoing hemodialysis who developed tuberculosis, hypercalcemia, and inappropriately elevated calcitriol levels. These findings suggest ectopic production of calcitriol by tuberculous granulomas. Successful treatment of tuberculosis led to a substantial decrease in the levels of calcium and calcitriol.

  2. Diagnosis of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Ellen Astrid; Bie, Peter; Ottesen, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyponatremia is a frequent condition in elderly patients. In diagnostic workup, a 24-hour urine sample is used to measure urinary osmolality and urinary sodium concentration necessary to confirm the diagnosis of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH...

  3. Reducing inappropriate antibiotic use among children with influenza infection

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Bat-Chen; Schwabe-Warf, Derek; Goldman, Ran

    2011-01-01

    Question With the influenza season reaching a peak, I see numerous children in my clinic with fever and influenza-like illnesses. Parents are concerned and at times ask for antibiotic treatment in hopes that the treatment will shorten the duration of illness. What strategies can I use in order to minimize inappropriate prescription of antibiotics during the influenza season?

  4. ELECTORAL PRESCRIBERS. WHO ARE THEY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin SASU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The decision to vote and choosing among the candidates is an extremely important one with repercussions on everyday life by determining, in global mode, its quality for the whole society. Therefore the whole process by which the voter decides becomes a central concern. Prescribers, supposed to have a big influence on the electoral market, are a component of the microenvironment political organizations. These are people who occupy important positions that can influence the behavior of others. In the political environment, prescribers are known under the name of "opinion formers", "opinion leaders", "mediators" (Beciu, 2009 or "influencers" (Keller and Berry, 2003 Weimann, 1994. This paper aims to review the central opinions on what is the influence prescribers, opinion makers on voting behavior, voting and decisions on whether and how they act?

  5. Prescribed fire as an alternative measure in European grassland conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkó, Orsolya; Deák, Balázs; Török, Péter; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2015-04-01

    There are contrasting opinions on the perspectives of prescribed burning management in European grasslands. One hand, prescribed burning can be effectively used with relatively low implementation costs for the management of open landscapes, the reduction of accumulated litter or for decreasing the chance of wildfires. On the other hand burning can also have serious detrimental impacts on grassland ecosystems by promoting the dominance of some problem species (e.g. some competitors or invasive species) and by threatening endangered plant and animal species, especially invertebrates, thus, inappropriate burning can result in a loss of biodiversity in the long run. Our goal was to review the publications on the application of prescribed burning in European grasslands considering general (e.g. timing, frequency and duration) and specific (e.g. types of grasslands, effects on endangered species) circumstances. Even prescribed burning forms an integral part of the North-American grassland management practice, it is rarely applied in Europe, despite the fact that uncontrolled burning occurs frequently in some regions. According to the North-American experiences prescribed burning can be a viable solution for biodiversity conservation and can be a feasible solution for several nature conservation problems. We reviewed prescribed burning studies from Europe and North-America to identify findings which might be adapted to the European grassland conservation strategy. We found that not only the application of fire management is scarce in Europe but there is also a lack of published studies on this topic. European studies - contrary to the North-American practice - usually used yearly dormant-season burning, and concluded that this burning type solely is not feasible to preserve and maintain species-rich grasslands. In North-American grasslands, application of burning has a stronger historical, practical and scientific background; it is fine-tuned in terms of timing, frequency

  6. 'Doing the right thing': factors influencing GP prescribing of antidepressants and prescribed doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris F; Williams, Brian; MacGillivray, Stephen A; Dougall, Nadine J; Maxwell, Margaret

    2017-06-17

    prescribing (e.g. fear of depression recurrence), few perceived continuation problems (e.g. lack of safety concerns) and lack of proactive medication review (e.g. patients only present in crisis), all combine to further drive antidepressant prescribing growth over time. GPs strive to 'do the right thing' to help people. Antidepressants are only a single facet of depression treatment. However, increased awareness of drug limitations and regular proactive reviews may help optimise care.

  7. Assessment of prescribing practices among urban and rural general practitioners in Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekharan Gopalakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studying drug use pattern among medical practitioners is of vital importance in the present scenario where irrational drug use and development of drug resistance is becoming rampant. Objective: To assess, the pattern of prescribing practices among the general practitioners in a defined rural and urban area of Tamil Nadu. Materials and Methods: A community based descriptive study was conducted to collect 600 prescriptions from the catchment areas of rural and urban health training centers of a medical college using prescribing indicators as per the WHO "How to investigate drug use in health facilities" tool. Results: This prescription study revealed that multivitamins (19.5%, antibiotics (19.3%, drugs for gastro-intestinal tract (GIT (18%, analgesic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs/ (NSAID′s (15.1%, and antihistaminic (12.5% were prescribed frequently. Among the antibiotics, amoxicillin (49.2% was the most commonly prescribed followed by gentamicin (31.7%. Percentage of prescriptions with an antibiotic was 55% and nearly 62% of the practitioners prescribed drugs by their generic names. As a practice of poly-pharmacy, it was observed that the average number of drugs prescribed in urban and rural area was nearly 5 and 4, respectively. Nearly 80% of the urban and rural practitioners were prescribing at least one injection. Study of the quality of prescriptions revealed that there was poor legibility, high usage of abbreviations, inadequate details of the drugs, and absence of signature by practitioners in the prescriptions. Conclusion: This study clearly highlights the practice of poly-pharmacy, low usage of generic drugs, injudicious usage of antibiotics and injections and low usage of drugs prescribed from essential drugs list.

  8. Vital Signs: Changes in Opioid Prescribing in the United States, 2006-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Gery P; Zhang, Kun; Bohm, Michele K; Losby, Jan; Lewis, Brian; Young, Randall; Murphy, Louise B; Dowell, Deborah

    2017-07-07

    Prescription opioid-related overdose deaths increased sharply during 1999-2010 in the United States in parallel with increased opioid prescribing. CDC assessed changes in national-level and county-level opioid prescribing during 2006-2015. CDC analyzed retail prescription data from QuintilesIMS to assess opioid prescribing in the United States from 2006 to 2015, including rates, amounts, dosages, and durations prescribed. CDC examined county-level prescribing patterns in 2010 and 2015. The amount of opioids prescribed in the United States peaked at 782 morphine milligram equivalents (MME) per capita in 2010 and then decreased to 640 MME per capita in 2015. Despite significant decreases, the amount of opioids prescribed in 2015 remained approximately three times as high as in 1999 and varied substantially across the country. County-level factors associated with higher amounts of prescribed opioids include a larger percentage of non-Hispanic whites; a higher prevalence of diabetes and arthritis; micropolitan status (i.e., town/city; nonmetro); and higher unemployment and Medicaid enrollment. Despite reductions in opioid prescribing in some parts of the country, the amount of opioids prescribed remains high relative to 1999 levels and varies substantially at the county-level. Given associations between opioid prescribing, opioid use disorder, and overdose rates, health care providers should carefully weigh the benefits and risks when prescribing opioids outside of end-of-life care, follow evidence-based guidelines, such as CDC's Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain, and consider nonopioid therapy for chronic pain treatment. State and local jurisdictions can use these findings combined with Prescription Drug Monitoring Program data to identify areas with prescribing patterns that place patients at risk for opioid use disorder and overdose and to target interventions with prescribers based on opioid prescribing guidelines.

  9. Identification of Associations Between Prescribed Medications and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Friis, Søren; Christensen, René dePont;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: We present a systematic screening for identifying associations between prescribed drugs and cancer risk using the high quality Danish nationwide health registries. METHODS: We identified all patients (cases) with incident cancer in Denmark during 2000-2012 (n=278,485) and matched each ca...

  10. Does comorbidity explain trends in prescribing of newer antihypertensive agents?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greving, JP; Denig, P; van der Veen, WJ; Beltman, FW; Sturkenboom, MCJM; de Zeeuw, D; Haaijer-Ruskamp, FM

    2004-01-01

    Objective Concerns exist about heavily prescribing of new drugs when the evidence on hard outcomes is still limited. This has been the case for the newer classes of anti hypertensives, especially in hypertensive patients without additional comorbidity. The association between comorbidity and trends

  11. Trends in Antibiotic Prescribing in Adults in Dutch General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B. Haeseker (Michiel); N.H.T.M. Dukers-Muijrers (Nicole); C.J.P.A. Hoebe (Christian); C.A. Bruggeman (Cathrien); J.W.L. Cals (Jochen); A. Verbon (Annelies)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Antibiotic consumption is associated with adverse drug events (ADE) and increasing antibiotic resistance. Detailed information of antibiotic prescribing in different age categories is scarce, but necessary to develop strategies for prudent antibiotic use. The aim of this stud

  12. Improving prescribing practices with rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burchett, Helen E D; Leurent, Baptiste; Baiden, Frank

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The overuse of antimalarial drugs is widespread. Effective methods to improve prescribing practice remain unclear. We evaluated the impact of 10 interventions that introduced rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (mRDTs) on the use of tests and adherence to results in different contexts....

  13. Trends in Antibiotic Prescribing in Adults in Dutch General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B. Haeseker (Michiel); N.H.T.M. Dukers-Muijrers (Nicole); C.J.P.A. Hoebe (Christian); C.A. Bruggeman (Cathrien); J.W.L. Cals (Jochen); A. Verbon (Annelies)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Antibiotic consumption is associated with adverse drug events (ADE) and increasing antibiotic resistance. Detailed information of antibiotic prescribing in different age categories is scarce, but necessary to develop strategies for prudent antibiotic use. The aim of this stud

  14. Serial pharmacological prescribing practices for tic management in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mena; Stern, Jeremy S; Simmons, Helen; Robertson, Mary M

    2015-11-01

    Pharmacological treatments for Tourette syndrome (TS) vary in efficacy between different patients. The evidence base is limited as even high quality controlled studies tend to be of relatively short duration which may lose relevance in clinical usage. Patients are frequently treated with serial agents in the search for efficacy and tolerability. The success of this strategy has not been previously documented. We examined 400 consecutive TS patients seen over a 10-year period, some with a longer prior history in other clinics; 255/400 (64%) were prescribed medication. We present this heterogeneous cohort in terms of the number of drugs they had tried, and as a proxy measure of some benefit of the last drug used, whether it had been prescribed under our supervision for ≥ 5 months. The most commonly prescribed medications were aripiprazole (64%), clonidine (40%), risperidone (30%) and sulpiride (29%) with changes in prescribing practises over the period examined. The number of different drugs tried were one (n = 155), two (n = 69), three (n = 36), four (n = 14), five (n = 15), six (n = 5), seven (n = 2) and eight (n = 1). The data illustrate the difficulty in drug treatment of tics and suggest that even after trials of several agents there is potential benefit in trying further options.

  15. 社区失能老年人居家排药服务的探索与评价%Establishment and evaluation of integration and arrangement of the prescribed drugs for the incapacitating elderly people at their home in the community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安美娟; 黄煊

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine the effect of the model of integration and arrangement of the prescribed drugs at patients’ home through evaluation of the satisfaction of the patients and their family members, the rate of drug leakage and other indicators. Methods:The general practitioners visited the patients’ home and integrated and arranged the prescribed drugs for them regularly. After tracing the practice for 1~2 years, the questionnaires survey was conducted and the leakage rate and patients’ satisfaction were analyzed for the feasibility of this service. Results:After carrying out the mode, the drug leakage rate of the patients dropped from 86.7%to 4.0%, and 97.3%of the patients and their families were satisifed with this service. Conclusion:Integration and arrangement of the prescribed drugs for the incapacitating elderly at their home reduces the leakage rate of drugs, which raises their quality of life, improves their awareness of medication, delays complication, and reduces the burden on their families. It’s a good solution to the problem of the elderly medication.%目的:通过评价患者及家属对居家排药服务的满意度和药物漏服率等指标判断排药模式的效果。方法:开展全科医生对患者的用药方案整合及定期上门排药服务,经过1~2年的排药服务跟踪后,进行问卷调查,针对上门排药前后的漏服率和满意度等进行统计,分析此项服务的可行性。结果:医生定期上门排药后,患者的漏服率由86.7%下降为4.0%,97.3%的患者及家属对此项服务表示满意。结论:对失能老人提供上门排药服药能有效的降低药物漏服率,使老年患者的生活质量及按时服药的认知度得到改善,延缓并发症,减轻家属负担,很好的解决了老年人的服药问题。

  16. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug prescriptions in hospital inpatients: are we assessing the risks?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kitchen, J

    2012-02-01

    AIM: To determine non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) prescribing practices in a tertiary referral hospital. METHODS: A single time-point audit of drug kardexes and clinical notes of n = 388 patients on 2 July 2008 was carried out assessing demographics, gastrointestinal and coronary heart disease risk factors, renal function and co-prescribed medications. RESULTS: Fifty-seven of 388 (14.7%) hospital patients were on NSAIDs. Forty-nine were prescribed NSAID after admission. Nineteen (32.2%) were on regular NSAID (11\\/19 on PPI) and 38 patients were on PRN NSAID (12\\/38 on PPI). Seventeen of 49 patients were on other medications associated with gastrointestinal bleeding (10\\/17 were on PPI). Nineteen patients (33.3%) were >60 years. Eight patients had three or four risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding; six were on PPI. Thirteen patients had two risks; 7 were on PPI. Six of 19 patients with one risk factor were on PPI. 40.3% had stage 2\\/3 chronic kidney disease. 35.1% had ischaemic heart disease. CONCLUSIONS: NSAIDs and PPIs are often prescribed inappropriately.

  17. Existing FDA pathways have potential to ensure early access to, and appropriate use of, specialty drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Tan, Yongtian Tina; Darrow, Jonathan J; Avorn, Jerry

    2014-10-01

    Specialty drugs are notable among prescription drugs in that they offer the possibility of substantial clinical improvement, come with important risks of adverse events and mortality, can be complex to manufacture or administer, and are usually extremely costly. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) plays a critical role in ensuring that patients who could benefit from specialty drugs have access to them in a timely fashion. In this article we review the different strategies that the FDA can use to approve and influence the post-approval prescribing of specialty drugs. When specialty drugs show promise in early clinical trials, the FDA can expedite the drugs' availability to patients through expanded access programs and expedited approval pathways that speed regulatory authorization. After approval, to ensure that specialty drugs are directed to the patients who are most likely to benefit from them, the FDA can limit the scope of the drugs' indications, encourage the development of companion diagnostic tests to indicate which patients should receive the drugs, or require that manufacturers subject them to Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies to ensure that their use is appropriately limited to a restricted population that is aware of the drugs' risks and benefits. Implementing these existing regulatory approaches can promote timely patient access to specialty drugs while preventing expensive and potentially inappropriate overuse.

  18. Nurse prescribing: radicalism or tokenism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, W; Tyrer, S; Brazier, M; Prayle, D

    1999-02-01

    The creation of The Medical Products (Prescription by Nurses, etc.) Act 1992 has been generally welcomed by the nursing profession. This article seeks to introduce a note of scepticism about the assumed motivations for its introduction through an analysis of various legal, ethical, economic and political dimensions. In reviewing the position of nursing vis-à-vis medicine it is argued that one of the ways that nursing has sought to improve its professional position is to take on work previously done by doctors, and nurse prescribing can be seen in the context of the concurrent de-regulation of medicines, allowing greater access to medicines and therefore greater consumer choice. This de-regulation stems from the liberation ideology of the previous Conservative government. Viewed in this way nurse prescribing, particularly with reference to the limited nature of the nursing formulary, can be seen to be anomalous. In the light of this analysis, the reasons generally put forward (notably in the Crown Report 1989) for the introduction of nurse prescribing could be seen to be peripheral to its real purpose. It is argued that the most convincing reasons for its introduction relate to the medical profession as a social institution. It is proposed that the three primary aims behind the introduction of nurse prescribing are: the saving of money; the transfer of routine medical work to nursing; and a challenge to the professional monolith of medicine.

  19. Analgesic prescribing in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Emma; Hanchanale, Sarika; Hurlow, Adam

    2014-12-01

    Pain management requires a multimodal approach involving pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies. It is important to take a detailed history and examine the patient before prescribing any analgesia. This article focuses on assessment and management of pain in palliative care patients.

  20. Clinical nurse specialist prescriber characteristics and challenges in Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess role characteristics of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) with prescriptive authority in Oregon 10 years after passage of Senate Bill 460. Factors examined included role preparation and mentorship, use and maintenance of authority, prescribing benefits and barriers, and types of drugs/nondrugs prescribed. This study was a descriptive survey using both quantitative and qualitative analysis. The sample was obtained from a list provided on June 13, 2014, by the Oregon State Board of Nursing of all CNSs in Oregon who had ever been granted prescriptive authority (n = 40). Twenty-nine with active authority, 7 with expired authority, and 4 with inactive status were sampled. E-mail distribution with Qualtrics software was released on June 27, 2014. Reminder e-mails were sent at 1 and 2 weeks. Of the 38 e-mails successfully delivered, 23 responses were received for a total response rate of 60%. Clinical nurse specialists successfully maintained their authority in Oregon and felt well prepared for their role. Their prescribing mentorship included nurse and nonnurse prescribers. They were most likely to have ever prescribed psychiatric, noncontrolled analgesics and durable medical equipment. They most frequently prescribed nutrition/electrolytes/fluids, durable medical equipment, and controlled analgesics. Lapse in authority was attributed to constraints regarding certification or credentialing in the role. Clinical nurse specialists uniformly expressed benefits from prescriptive authority. There were no differences in perceptions of preparation based on type of mentorship or educational modality for completion of prescribing requirements. There were systems barriers including lack of employer and colleague support to use of authority. Durable medical equipment authority is important to the CNS role. Clinical nurse specialists valued and maintained their prescriptive authority despite barriers. Further research is recommended to support

  1. Opioid Prescribing Education in Surgical Residencies: A Program Director Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorkgitis, Brian K; Bryant, Elizabeth; Raygor, Desiree; Brat, Gabriel; Smink, Douglas S; Crandall, Marie

    2017-09-04

    Opioid abuse and misuse is a public health crisis. A national effort to reduce this phenomenon is ongoing. Residents represent a large pool of opioid prescribers but, are often not the target for opioid prescribing education (OPE). We developed a survey to assess current opioid prescribing practices and education among surgical residents. An Institutional Review Board and Association of Program Directors in Surgery approved survey was electronically mailed to surgical program directors (PDs). The survey included questions regarding residency type, location, number of graduates per year, perceived value of OPE, residency policy on prescribing outpatients controlled substances, presence of OPE, and preferred method of OPE. A total of 248 PDs were e-mailed the survey with 110 complete responses (44.4%). Of all 104 (94.5%) allow residents to prescribe outpatient opioids with 24 (23.1%) limiting the opioid class prescribed. A total of 29 (27.9%) programs require residents to obtain their own Drug Enforcement Administration registration. Only 22 (20.0%) programs had in place mandatory OPE, 7 (6.4%) PDs were unsure if OPE was a mandatory educational requirement. Furthermore, 70 (79.5%) of programs currently without OPE are considering adding it. Didactic lecture (18, 81.8%) is the most common modality for OPE. The mode time dedicated to OPE was 1 hour. When PDs were asked about which method would be best to deliver OPE, the most common response was case-based scenarios (39, 35.5%). Bivariate statistics were performed and no association was found between OPE and program characteristics'. Most surgical residency programs allow residents to prescribe outpatient opioids, very few require OPE. The most common method of OPE was didactic lectures. To enhance a resident's knowledge in prescribing opioids, programs should incorporate OPE into their curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prescription Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug abuse. It could be Taking a medicine that ... purpose, such as getting high Abusing some prescription drugs can lead to addiction. These include opioids, sedatives, ...

  3. To what extent does the indicator “concurrent use of three or more psychotropic drugs” capture use of potentially inappropriate psychotropics among the elderly?

    OpenAIRE

    Lesén, Eva; Petzold, Max; Andersson, Karolina; Carlsten, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Purpose The indicator ?concurrent use of three or more psychotropic drugs? has been used as a measure of quality in drug use among the elderly. The aim of our study was to assess to what extent the indicator captures the use of specific psychotropics associated with an increased risk of adverse events among the elderly, i.e., potentially inappropriate psychotropic drugs (PIP). Methods All individu...

  4. Inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone treated with frusemide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaux, G; Waterlot, Y; Genette, F; Hallemans, R; Demanet, J C

    1982-07-10

    Seven out of nine patients with chronic inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone were successfully treated with 40 mg frusemide daily. One patient needed 80 mg, and the remaining patient achieved only a small increase in diuresis after 40 mg frusemide; this was probably related to his low creatinine clearance. In order to maintain a salt intake high enough to compensate for the loss of urine electrolytes 3 to 6 g sodium chloride was added as tablets to the sodium-free diet in six patients. Hypokalaemia occurred in five patients but was easily corrected with either supplements of potassium chloride or a potassium-sparing diuretic. These findings add further weight to evidence that Frusemide is a good alternative for the treatment of patients with inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone who cannot tolerate water restriction.

  5. Mortality in enterococcal bloodstream infections increases with inappropriate antimicrobial therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, M.; Aabenhus, R.; Harboe, Z.B.

    2010-01-01

    .7-10), thrombocytopenia (3.9, 1.6-9.3), chronic liver failure (3.3, 1.1-10) and age >/=60 years (2.2, 0.99-5.0). Antibiotics not appropriately covering enterococci are frequently administered empirically in suspected bloodstream infections. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy was an independent risk factor for mortality...... was to determine whether administration of inappropriate antibiotics in enterococcal bacteraemia is an independent risk factor for mortality, among other known and suspected risk factors. We conducted a cohort study of E. faecalis/faecium bacteraemia during a 3-year period at a single tertiary care hospital...... as any therapy with documented clinical effect, in vitro activity and a minimum treatment length of 6 days. Multivariate regression models were built to determine the independent risk factors for mortality. We included 196 patients with enterococcal bacteraemia. Appropriate antibiotics for at least 6...

  6. Drug policy: making effective drugs available without bankrupting the healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laupacis, Andreas; Anderson, Geoffrey; O'Brien, Bernie

    2002-01-01

    To the extent possible, drug policy should be based upon good quality evidence. This must extend beyond the traditional focus on efficacy and safety in carefully selected patients, to evidence about real-world effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of drugs. This paper will consider methods of improving the quality of the evidence currently available, and the implications of requiring that evidence. Historically, there has been a direct link between research evidence and policy at the level of licensing - drugs are only made available after they have been shown to be safe and efficacious in well-designed and independently assessed research studies. We propose that this reliance on evidence be logically extended to cover the formulary inclusion and post-marketing surveillance aspects of modern prescription drug policy. More specifically we propose that the decision to initially list a drug on a benefit formulary be based on evidence from relevant head-to-head comparisons and well-designed cost-effectiveness analyses. This evidence would be produced by industry in cooperation with independent peer-reviewed funding agencies. Drugs could only be added to a formulary if they met specific predetermined criteria, and drugs could be removed as superior alternatives became available. The provincial governments are monopsony buyers of medicines, and they wield the power to determine public payer "market access'for medicines. This power (within and across provinces) could be used more effectively to negotiate price in the context of reimbursement. The effect of different methods of influencing prescribing (e.g., 'limited access?) upon drug utilization and patient outcomes should be rigorously assessed, including the randomization of groups of patients or communities to different strategies. We also propose that all drugs on the formulary would be subject to a well-designed post-marketing surveillance program. This program would build on the existing passive reporting of

  7. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone: prevalence, causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, M J; Thompson, C J

    2010-06-01

    Hyponatraemia is the commonest electrolyte abnormality found in hospital inpatients, and is associated with a greatly increased morbidity and mortality. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) is the most frequent cause of hyponatraemia in hospital inpatients. SIADH is the clinical and biochemical manifestation of a wide range of disease processes, and every case warrants investigation of the underlying cause. In this review, we will examine the prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical characteristics and clinical consequences of hyponatraemia due to SIADH.

  8. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone: prevalence, causes and consequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2010-06-01

    Hyponatraemia is the commonest electrolyte abnormality found in hospital inpatients, and is associated with a greatly increased morbidity and mortality. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) is the most frequent cause of hyponatraemia in hospital inpatients. SIADH is the clinical and biochemical manifestation of a wide range of disease processes, and every case warrants investigation of the underlying cause. In this review, we will examine the prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical characteristics and clinical consequences of hyponatraemia due to SIADH.

  9. Syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH) associated with citalopram use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpekar, Vivek C.; Joshi, Prashant P.

    2005-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can cause the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). SIADH is associated with hyponatraemia without oedema. We report the case of a patient who developed acute-onset hyponatraemia that progressed rapidly to serious neurological dysfunction shortly after the introduction of citalopram. All SSRIs including citalopram should be used with care in the elderly. The water and electrolyte balance should be monitored carefully during SSRI therapy. PMID:20711296

  10. Is the prescribing behavior of Chinese physicians driven by financial incentives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun; Dong, Weizhen; Shen, Jay J; Cochran, Christopher; Wang, Ying; Hao, Mo

    2014-11-01

    The prescribing behavior to prescribe high-priced drugs has been hypothesized to be related to the increasing drug expenditures in China, but little empirical evidence exists. The purpose of this study was to examine whether Chinese physicians, driven by financial incentives, tend to prescribe high-priced drugs. The 2000-2008 drug data in the Yangtze River Basin Hospitals' Drug Use Analysis System were analyzed to examine the prescription patterns of penicillins and cephalosporins in Shanghai. Among the top-100 drugs (by volume), cephalosporins cost as 1.1- 2.3 times as penicillins and their volume was 1.7-18.2 times. Revenues generated from prescribing cephalosporins were 3.4-24.2 times as those from prescribing penicillins. The tendency of prescribing relatively high-priced drugs was observed given the same chemical name, dosage, and specification but different trade names. Furthermore, high-priced drugs remained on the top-100 list with increasing volumes, while some lower-priced drugs exited from the list due to decreases in volumes. Facing the policy dilemmas, the Chinese government needs to implement a new financially rewarding system in which hospitals and physicians are able to achieve financial gains in a cost-effective way including prescribing similar drugs with lower prices. Reforming hospitals' payment methods is necessary and feasible to reshape financial incentives of healthcare providers. The combination of the global budget policy and financial incentive measures would be likely to change providers' prescribing behaviors towards a cost-effective direction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Urinary Tract Infection: Analysis of Prescribing Pattern of Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHADEVAMMA L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are one of most common drugs prescribed in hospital today. It has been estimated that up to onethird of all patients receive at least one antibiotics during hospitalization`. The cost involved is therefore correspondingly high and up to 40% of a hospital’s drug expenditure may be devoted to the purchase of antibiotics1. The objective of this study was to analyze the prescribing pattern of antibiotics in Urinary Tract Infection (UTI. A prospective cross sectional and observational study was conducted on patients diagnosed with UTI. The study was carried out in the OBG and Urology departments of both in-patients and out-patients, for a period of 5 months (Aug 2011 to Dec 2011. Patients diagnosed with UTI and who were above age group of 15-years were included in the study. A suitable data collection form was prepared to collect the required data. Among 162 patents, 54 were in-patients and 108 were out-patients. Most of the in-patients were prescribed with Ciprofloxacin 13(22.8%, and Ceftriaxone 19(33.3%. In out-patients, Ciprofloxacin 25(23.8%, Norfloxacin 15(14.3% and Ceftriaxone 14(13.3% were prescribed frequently. The study found that gram negative organisms like E. coli and Klebsills was the most predominant organisms associated with infection. It was also found that Cephalosporin's were most commonly used and Quinolones were the second most commonly used drugs for the treatment of UTI.

  12. Off-label and unlicensed prescribing of psychotropics in children in Dutch general practice .

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, A.; Dijk, L. van

    2006-01-01

    Background: Unsafe drug use is a point of concern in children with psychotropics. Methylfenidate is licensed to prescribe above the age of 6 years, but most of the antidepressants and benzodiazepines are not approved in children. We studied the off-label and unlicensed prescribing of psychotropics i

  13. Prescribing Skills of First and Second Year MBBS Students of A Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapagain, K; Paranjape, B D; Lama, G

    2016-01-01

    To ensure safe, effective and rational prescribing by tomorrow's doctors it is important to assess the prescribing skills of today's medical students. The aim of this study was to assess the prescribing skills of MBBS preclinical students of a Teaching Hospital. First and second year medical students were given different sets of common clinical scenarios and asked to write a prescription for these. The physician and drug related components were analyzed following the WHO guidelines. The data were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test for 99% and 99.99% Confidence Intervals. P values first year student scored 123 (82%) and 94 (62.66%) in physician and drug related component respectively. MBBS second year students scored 139 (92.66%) and 111 (73.33%) in physician and drug related components respectively. Results obtained from the element prescriber's address and telephone number, date of prescription and patient's address on the prescription of first year and second year medical students were highly significant (pfirst and second year MBBS students is not satisfactory. Prescribing deficiencies were found on both the physician and drug related components which emphasizes the need of adequate prescribing knowledge in order to minimize the prescription errors and irrational prescribing. Based on this study, we suggest all the undergraduate medical students should be regularly trained and evaluated to further help minimize the prescribing errors.

  14. Prescribing patterns in premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Paul W

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over 300 therapies have been proposed for premenstrual syndrome. To date there has been only one survey conducted in the UK of PMS treatments prescribed by GPs, a questionnaire-based study by the National Association of Premenstrual Syndrome in 1989. Since then, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors have been licensed for severe PMS/PMDD, and governmental recommendations to reduce the dosage of vitamin B6 (the first choice over-the-counter treatment for many women with PMS have been made. This study investigates the annual rates of diagnoses and prescribing patterns for premenstrual syndrome (1993–1998 within a computerised general practitioner database. Methods Retrospective survey of prescribing data for premenstrual syndrome between 1993–1998 using the General Practice Research Database for the West Midlands Region which contains information on 282,600 female patients Results Overall the proportion of women with a prescription-linked diagnosis of premenstrual syndrome has halved over the five years. Progestogens including progesterone were the most commonly recorded treatment for premenstrual syndrome during the whole study period accounting for over 40% of all prescriptions. Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors accounted for only 2% of the prescriptions in 1993 but rose to over 16% by 1998, becoming the second most commonly recorded treatment. Vitamin B6 accounted for 22% of the prescriptions in 1993 but dropped markedly between 1997 and 1998 to 11%. Conclusions This study shows a yearly decrease in the number of prescriptions linked to diagnoses for premenstrual syndrome. Progestogens including progesterone, is the most widely prescribed treatment for premenstrual syndrome despite the lack of evidence demonstrating their efficacy.

  15. Reducing general practice trainees' antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: an evaluation of a combined face-to-face workshop and online educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Parker J; Morgan, Simon; Tapley, Amanda; Davis, Joshua S; McArthur, Lawrie; Henderson, Kim M; Mulquiney, Katie J; Dallas, Anthea; Davey, Andrew R; Scott, John; van Driel, Mieke L

    2016-03-01

    Over-prescription of antibiotics for non-pneumonia respiratory tract infections (RTIs) is a major concern in general practice. Australian general practice registrars (trainees) have inappropriately high rates of prescription of antibiotics for RTIs. The 'apprenticeship' educational model and the trainee-trainer relationship are drivers of this inappropriate prescribing. We aimed to reduce registrars' non-pneumonia RTI antibiotic prescribing via an educational intervention (a 90-min face-to-face workshop supported by online modules), complemented by delivery of the same intervention, separately, to their trainers. We conducted a pre- and post-intervention comparison of the registrars' intention to prescribe antibiotics for common RTIs using McNemar's test. We similarly tested changes in supervisors' intended prescribing. Prescribing intentions were elicited by responses to six written clinical vignettes (upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, sore throat and three acute bronchitis vignettes). We found that, for registrars, there were statistically significant reductions in antibiotic prescribing for the sore throat (24.0% absolute reduction), otitis media (17.5% absolute reduction) and two of the three acute bronchitis (12.0% and 18.0% absolute reduction) vignettes. There were significant reductions in supervisors' antibiotic prescribing intentions for the same four vignettes. We conclude that our intervention produced a significant change in registrars' intention to prescribe antibiotics for non-pneumonia RTIs.

  16. Potentially inappropriate medications among older adults in Pelotas, Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Bárbara Heather; Miranda, Vanessa Irribarem Avena; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso

    2017-06-22

    To assess the use of potentially inappropriate medications among older adults. This is a population-based cross-sectional study with 1,451 older individuals aged 60 years or more in the city of Pelotas, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, in 2014. We have investigated the use of medications in the last 15 days. Using the Beers criteria (2012), we have verified the use of potentially inappropriate medications and their relationship with socioeconomic and demographic variables, polypharmacy, self-medication, and burden of disease. Among the 5,700 medications used, 5,651 could be assessed as to being inappropriate. Of these, 937 were potentially inappropriate for the older adults according to the 2012 Beers criteria (16.6%). Approximately 42.4% of the older adults studied used at least one medication considered as potentially inappropriate. The group of medications for the nervous system accounted for 48.9% of the total of the potentially inappropriate medications. In the adjusted analysis, the variables female, advanced age, white race, low educational level, polypharmacy, self-medication, and burden of disease were associated with the use of potentially inappropriate medications. It is important to known the possible consequences of the use of medication among older adults. Special attention should be given to the older adults who use polypharmacy. Specific lists should be created with more appropriate medications for the older population in the National Essential Medicine List. Avaliar o uso de medicamentos potencialmente inadequados entre idosos. Estudo transversal de base populacional com 1.451 idosos com 60 anos ou mais em Pelotas, RS, em 2014. Investigou-se o uso de medicamentos nos últimos 15 dias. Utilizando os critérios de Beers (2012), verificou-se a potencial inadequação dos medicamentos e sua relação com variáveis socioeconômicas e demográficas, polifarmácia, automedicação e carga de doença. Dentre os 5.700 medicamentos utilizados, 5

  17. Drug utilization in clinical conditions: an update on its essentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Drug utilization studies may be defined as studies of the marketing, distribution, prescription and use of drugs in a society, with special emphasis on the resulting medical, social and economic consequences. Drug utilization studies can provide highly valuable information, at a reasonable price, on the costs and effects (harmful and beneficial of drugs. Such studies make available much useful information including indirect data on morbidity, the pharmaceutical component of the treatment cost of an illness, therapeutic compliance, the incidence of adverse reactions, the effectiveness of drug consumption and the choice of comparators. This information can be of great use in the subsequent elaboration of pharmacoeconomy studies, or in the selection of problematic areas in which these studies may be applied. Pharmacoeconomy studies, in turn, can be used to discover the economic repercussions of inappropriate prescribing and to quantify the cost effectiveness of various therapeutic interventions. The use of drug utilization studies in conjunction with pharmacoeconornic analysis can result in more cost effective utilization of medicines and a better utilization of pharmacoeconomy methods, both of which contribute to a more rational use of drugs. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(4.000: 320-325

  18. An audit of generic prescribing in a general surgical department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, M

    2013-01-17

    BACKGROUND: The Health Service Executive introduced a generic prescription policy to reduce costs. Despite this, generic prescription rates remain low. AIM: To audit in-patient prescription practice in a single surgical department and identify potential savings which could be realised by adherence to the generic prescribing policy. METHODS: Surgical in-patient charts were obtained at the point of discharge and their drug prescription information was recorded. RESULTS: 51 % of prescriptions involved a trade-name prescription where an appropriate generic equivalent existed. The cost implications for hospital and community patients were found to be greatly affected by substitution policies that exist at hospital pharmacy level. CONCLUSION: There is a need to promote greater adherence to generic prescribing amongst hospital doctors in line with international best practice. It can have a positive impact in terms of safe prescribing and can have cost implications at both hospital and community level.

  19. South African medical students’ perceptions and knowledge about antibiotic resistance and appropriate prescribing: Are we providing adequate training to future prescribers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Wasserman,

    2017-05-01

    questionnaire, with significant differences between institutions. Students who used antibiotic prescribing guidelines and found their education more useful scored higher on knowledge questionnaires. Conclusion. There are low levels of confidence with regard to antibiotic prescribing among final-year medical students in SA, and most students would like more education in this area. Perceptions that ABR is less of a problem in their local setting may contribute to inappropriate prescribing behaviours. Differences exist between medical schools in knowledge about antibiotic use, with suboptimal scores across institutions. The introduction and use of antibiotic prescribing guidelines and greater contact with specialists in antibiotic prescribing may improve prescribing behaviours.

  20. A survey of prescribing practices for monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balon, R; Mufti, R; Arfken, C L

    1999-07-01

    A survey examined prescribing practices for monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and explored reasons for the widely noted decline in their use. A one-page questionnaire was sent in 1997 to 1,129 members of the Michigan Psychiatric Association. A total of 717 responses were received, for a response rate of 64 percent. Only data from the 573 psychiatrists who were currently practicing were used. Twelve percent of the respondents never prescribed MAOIs, 27 percent had not prescribed them for at least three years, and 17 percent had prescribed them from one to three years ago. Thirty percent of the respondents had prescribed an MAOI within the past three months, and 14 percent between three and 12 months ago. The most frequent reasons for not prescribing the drugs were side effects and interactions with other medications (46 percent), preference for other medications (30 percent), and dietary restrictions necessary for patients taking MAOIs (19 percent). Ninety-two percent of respondents believed that MAOIs were useful for atypical depression, 64 percent for major depression, 54 percent for melancholic depression, 56 percent for panic disorder, 44 percent for social phobia, 27 percent for dysthymia, 12 percent for obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 19 percent for posttraumatic stress disorder. However, only 2 percent said they would use MAOIs as their first-line treatment in atypical depression, and only 3 percent would use them a first-line treatment in social phobia. The results document the commonly held view that practicing psychiatrists believe MAOIs are efficacious but use them infrequently, primarily due to concerns about side effects and drug interactions.

  1. Prescribing of FDA-approved and compounded hormone therapy differs by specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantine, Ginger D; Archer, David F; Graham, Shelli; Bernick, Brian A; Mirkin, Sebastian

    2016-10-01

    To determine the prescribing patterns of general practitioners (GPs), obstetrician/gynecologists (OB/GYNs), and wellness physicians (WPs) of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) for both compounded (CHT) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved products, using a survey of US physicians. Nine thousand one US physicians were invited to participate in a survey to report on their HT-prescribing patterns. Physicians were eligible if they prescribed HT for at least six patients per month. The survey was completed by 440 eligible physicians (893 responded of 9,001 invited) including 171 GPs, 170 OB/GYNs, and 84 WPs. Physicians prescribed HT for 15% to 30% of their female patients, with WPs numerically most likely to prescribe HT. Menopausal symptoms were the leading reason for HT prescriptions among all specialties. WPs seemed more likely to prescribe HT for general/cardiovascular health (28%), and for shorter durations, than other specialties. WPs prescribed proportionally more compounded (vs FDA-approved) estrogens/progestogens than GPs or OB/GYNs, but OB/GYNs seemed to prescribe more compounded dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone (prescribed alone) than did others. OB/GYNs seemed least likely to consider CHT being more safe or effective than FDA-approved HT. Symptom relief was the main determinant of efficacy for all specialties; WPs also used blood (61%) or saliva testing (25%) for dose adjustment. Although all physician specialties surveyed prescribed HT, differences in prescribing CHT versus FDA-approved formulations by medical specialty/practice seemed to exist. Of those surveyed, OB/GYNs and GPs prescribed proportionally more FDA-approved HT, whereas WPs, similarly, prescribed more CHT. More discussion is needed concerning physicians' decisions to prescribe CHT versus FDA-approved formulations.

  2. 27 CFR 20.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Administrative Provisions Authorities § 20.21 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate TTB officer is authorized to prescribe all...

  3. Prescribed Fire Plan Union Slough NWR 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document outlines a prescribed burn schedule for Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge. The Prescribed Fire Plan provides the following information; names of...

  4. Why Does My Dentist Prescribe Medication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your desktop! more... Why Does My Dentist Prescribe Medication? Article Chapters Why Does My Dentist Prescribe Medication? ... dentist or pharmacist. Reviewed: January 2012 Related Articles: Medication Epilepsy, Seizure Meds Have Oral Health Implications How ...

  5. The effect of pharmacist-led interventions in optimising prescribing in older adults in primary care: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O Riordan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate studies of pharmacist-led interventions on potentially inappropriate prescribing among community-dwelling older adults receiving primary care to identify the components of a successful intervention. Data sources: An electronic search of the literature was conducted using the following databases from inception to December 2015: PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE (through Ovid, Trip, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISI Web of Science, ScienceDirect, ClinicalTrials.gov, metaRegister of Controlled Trials, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database (Theses in Great Britain, Ireland and North America. Review methods: Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised studies involving a pharmacist-led intervention compared to usual/routine care which aimed to reduce potentially inappropriate prescribing in older adults in primary care. Methodological quality of the included studies was independently assessed. Results: A comprehensive literature search was conducted which identified 2193 studies following removal of duplicates. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Four studies involved a pharmacist conducting a medication review and providing feedback to patients or their family physician. One randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of a computerised tool that alerted pharmacists when elderly patients were newly prescribed potentially inappropriate medications. Four studies were associated with an improvement in prescribing appropriateness. Conclusion: Overall, this review demonstrates that pharmacist-led interventions may improve prescribing appropriateness in community-dwelling older adults. However, the quality of evidence is low. The role of a pharmacist working as part of a multidisciplinary primary care team requires further investigation to optimise prescribing in this group of

  6. The effect of pharmacist-led interventions in optimising prescribing in older adults in primary care: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, David O; Walsh, Kieran A; Galvin, Rose; Sinnott, Carol; Kearney, Patricia M; Byrne, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate studies of pharmacist-led interventions on potentially inappropriate prescribing among community-dwelling older adults receiving primary care to identify the components of a successful intervention. Data sources: An electronic search of the literature was conducted using the following databases from inception to December 2015: PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE (through Ovid), Trip, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISI Web of Science, ScienceDirect, ClinicalTrials.gov, metaRegister of Controlled Trials, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database (Theses in Great Britain, Ireland and North America). Review methods: Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised studies involving a pharmacist-led intervention compared to usual/routine care which aimed to reduce potentially inappropriate prescribing in older adults in primary care. Methodological quality of the included studies was independently assessed. Results: A comprehensive literature search was conducted which identified 2193 studies following removal of duplicates. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Four studies involved a pharmacist conducting a medication review and providing feedback to patients or their family physician. One randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of a computerised tool that alerted pharmacists when elderly patients were newly prescribed potentially inappropriate medications. Four studies were associated with an improvement in prescribing appropriateness. Conclusion: Overall, this review demonstrates that pharmacist-led interventions may improve prescribing appropriateness in community-dwelling older adults. However, the quality of evidence is low. The role of a pharmacist working as part of a multidisciplinary primary care team requires further investigation to optimise prescribing in this group of patients. PMID

  7. Anaerobic Bacteremia: Impact of Inappropriate Therapy on Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yangsoon; Park, Yongjung; Kim, Myungsook; Choi, Jun Yong; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Investigation on incidence and mortality of anaerobic bacteremia (AB) is clinically relevant in spite of its infrequent occurrence and not often explored, which report varies according to period and institutions. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the incidence and risk factors related to mortality and assess clinical outcomes of AB in current aspect. Materials and Methods Characteristics of AB patients and anaerobic bacteria from blood culture at a university hospital in 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The correlation between risk factors and 28-day patient mortality was analyzed. Results A total of 70 non-duplicated anaerobic bacteria were isolated from blood of 70 bacteremia patients in 2012. The history of cardiovascular disease as host's risk factor was statistically significant (P = 0.0344) in univariate and multivariate analysis. Although the inappropriate therapy was not statistically significant in univariate and multivariate analysis, the survival rate of bacteremia was significantly worse in patients who had inappropriate therapy compared with those underwent appropriate therapy (hazard ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.7–6.9; P = 0.004). The most frequently isolated organism was Bacteroides fragilis (32 isolates, 46%), followed by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (10, 14%), and non-perfringens Clostridium (7, 10%). Conclusion The incidence of AB in 2012 was 2.3% (number of AB patients per 100 positive blood culture patients) and the mortality rate in patients with clinically significant AB was 21.4%. In addition, AB was frequently noted in patients having malignancy and the survival rate of AB was significantly worse in patients who received inappropriate therapy compared with those underwent appropriate therapy. PMID:27433379

  8. The Impact of Healthcare Providers’ Knowledge on Appropriate Prescribing of Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Adorka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In-depth knowledge of antibiotic principles is widely considered a necessary condition for appropriate prescribing of antibiotics. The study aimed at determining the impact of healthcare providers’ level of knowledge in bacteriology and principles of antibiotic prescribing on their abilities to prescribe antibiotics appropriately.Methods: A structured questionnaire survey targeting all doctors, nurses and healthcare providers within Health Service Areas abounding and including five selected public hospitals in Lesotho was carried out. The questionnaire tested respondents’ knowledge in bacteriology of infections and principles of antibiotic prescribing. Relevant data on antibiotic prescriptions were also collected concurrently with the survey. Data were analysed to establish respondents’ level of knowledge and the influence of same on their abilities to prescribe antibiotics appropriately.Results: In inpatient and outpatient departments, 53.3% and 62.5% of respondents demonstrated inadequate levels of knowledge in the bacteriology and treatment of infections, respectively. Of the prescriptions analysed, 57.0% in the inpatient department and 19.1% in the outpatient department were  classified  as  inappropriate.  Appropriateness  of  antibiotic  prescriptions  was  positively associated with healthcare providers’ level of knowledge in inpatient but not outpatient settings.Conclusion: A majority of healthcare providers appear to lack sufficient knowledge in bacteriology of infections and principles of antibiotic prescribing. In respect to antibiotic prescribing among inpatients but not outpatients the study demonstrated a positive correlation between healthcare providers’ knowledge and their abilities to prescribe antibiotics appropriately.

  9. Inappropriate mode switching clarified by using a chest radiograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Brian; Jaiswal, Abhishek; Goldbarg, Seth

    2015-08-01

    An 80-year-old woman with a history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and atrioventricular node disease status post-dual chamber pacemaker placement was noted to have abnormal pacing episodes during a percutaneous coronary intervention. Pacemaker interrogation revealed a high number of short duration mode switching episodes. Representative electrograms demonstrated high frequency nonphysiologic recordings predominantly in the atrial lead. Intrinsic pacemaker malfunction was excluded. A chest radiograph showed excess atrial and ventricular lead slack in the right ventricular inflow. It was suspected that lead-lead interaction resulted in artifacts and oversensing, causing frequent short episodes of inappropriate mode switching.

  10. Hypersexuality and dementia: dealing with inappropriate sexual expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Agnes; Barker, Philip; Begley, Cecily M

    Sexuality is always a difficult and challenging issue for nurses to address with older patients. This is particularly the case in relation to responding to incidents of hypersexuality or inappropriate sexual expression as a result of dementia. Although research suggests that hypersexuality is a rare occurrence, when it happens it has the potential to jeopardize the quality of life of all concerned. The focus of this article is on exploring the literature on hypersexuality in people with dementia in the residential care setting. Information and principles of care are offered that may help nurses respond in a sensitive manner that protects the rights, dignity and autonomy of all concerned.

  11. A factorial analysis experimentation of inappropriate waste disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Oke, K. O. Awofeso

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a statistical approach to estimating the effects of psychological factors on humans due to inappropriate waste disposal in the environment. Factorial experimental analysis is combined with the concepts of transition matrix and steady state conditions. An adequate understanding into the statistical quantification of the waste disposal concept would aid policy makers in effective decision making and the proper control of environment. The feasibility of developing statistical parameters for assessing the waste disposal concept is confirmed. The work shows the novelty of the approach.

  12. American Geriatrics Society 2015 Updated Beers Criteria for Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The 2015 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Beers Criteria are presented. Like the 2012 AGS Beers Criteria, they include lists of potentially inappropriate medications to be avoided in older adults. New to the criteria are lists of select drugs that should be avoided or have their dose adjusted based on the individual's kidney function and select drug-drug interactions documented to be associated with harms in older adults. The specific aim was to have a 13-member interdisciplinary panel of experts in geriatric care and pharmacotherapy update the 2012 AGS Beers Criteria using a modified Delphi method to systematically review and grade the evidence and reach a consensus on each existing and new criterion. The process followed an evidence-based approach using Institute of Medicine standards. The 2015 AGS Beers Criteria are applicable to all older adults with the exclusion of those in palliative and hospice care. Careful application of the criteria by health professionals, consumers, payors, and health systems should lead to closer monitoring of drug use in older adults. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Vancomycin intoxication in a patient with inappropriate antidiuretic hormone syndrome and diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Hidalgo-Collazos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vancomycin is an antibiotic used for infections by gram-positive bacteria with a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model. Its monitoring has an established therapeutic range (10-20 mg/L to prevent nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity due to supratherapeutic levels, and inefficiency and development of resistance by subtherapeutic levels. Nephrotoxicity for vancomycin monotherapy at standard doses according to pathogen and typical regimens (usual dose: 15-20 mg/kg/12 h is rare and usually reversible. Moreover, monitoring plasma concentrations allows to achieve concentrations within therapeutic range to allow safe and effective drug use. The renal hypoperfusion can cause pre-renal damage, resulting in elevated levels of serum creatinine, resulting in decreased antibiotic elimination and nephrotoxicity. We report a case of unexpected vancomycin nephrotoxicity in a patient with syndrome Inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion associated paraneoplastic

  14. Polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate medication use as the precipitating factor in readmissions to the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Sehgal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Readmission to the hospital within 30 days of discharge from the hospital is a common occurrence. Congestive heart failure is the most common cause of readmissions in the hospital. We hypothesized that irrespective of the admission diagnosis polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate use of medications (PIM leads to readmissions within 30 days of discharge from the hospital. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out by reviewing the hospital records of 414 patients who were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of discharge from the hospital between January 2008 and December 2009. The data was stratified to see which patients were on polypharmacy and/or on PIM. Polypharmacy was defined as use of more than 5 medications. PIM was defined as per the modified Beers criteria. Day 0 was defined as the day of discharge and day1 was defined as the day-after Admission to the hospital. Statistical analysis was carried out using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA on the data to see if polypharmacy and/or PIM was related to readmission within 30 days of discharge irrespective of admission diagnosis. Results: Polypharmacy was related to hospital readmission at day 1 and day 0, however inappropriate drug use was found to be not related at any day. Polypharmacy and PIM combined had a positive correlation to readmission only on days 1 and 0 and it was statistically significant. The use of minimal and appropriate use of drugs was statistically significant compared to polypharmacy and PIM use. Conclusions: Polypharmacy and PIM are under recognized cause of readmissions to the hospital.

  15. [Appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing in a primary care area: a cross-sectional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Urrusuno, Rocío; Flores-Dorado, Macarena; Vilches-Arenas, Angel; Serrano-Martino, Carmen; Corral-Baena, Susana; Montero-Balosa, M Carmen

    2014-05-01

    To assess the profile of patients receiving antibiotics and the appropriateness of these prescriptions for the clinical conditions. Cross-sectional study of prescription-indication. A primary health care area in Andalusia. Patients assigned to primary care centres. Patients with antibiotic prescriptions during 2009 were selected by simple random sampling (confidence level: 95%, accuracy: 5%). Primary endpoint: appropriateness of antibiotics prescribing to recommendations included in local guidelines. Data were obtained through the billing computerised prescriptions system and medical histories. Twenty-five per cent of the population area received antibiotics during 2009. The 1,266 patient samples showed the following characteristics: 57.9% were women, with a mean age of 41 (±1) years. There were 39.3% pensioners. The percentage of appropriate antibiotic prescriptions was 19.9%, with no difference due to gender. Statistically significant differences were related to age, being those over 65 years the group of patients with the highest percentage of inappropriateness. The main reasons for inappropriateness were: no recording of the infectious process (44.5%), a wrong treatment duration (15.5%), and the use of an inadequate antibiotic (11.5%). There is a high level of inappropriateness in antibiotic prescribing in primary care. The high level of under-recording of diagnoses, mainly in elderly patients, followed by the use of wrong schedules, and the wrong type of antibiotics were the main reasons of inappropriateness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. drug use evaluation on cotrimoxazole preventive therapy for people ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    care hospitals' drug expenditure and they are prescribed ... 3 Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Medical School, Faculty of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 378, Jimma .... Patient monitoring .... on the drug prescribing pattern and use of.

  17. An evaluation of the Essential Medicines List, Standard Treatment Guidelines and prescribing restrictions, as an integrated strategy to enhance quality, efficacy and safety of and improve access to essential medicines in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua, Isaac B; Passmore, Phillip R; Sunderland, Bruce V

    2016-05-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has advocated the development and use of country specific Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs) and Essential Medicines Lists (EML) as strategies to promote the rational use of medicines. When implemented effectively STGs offer many health advantages. Papua New Guinea (PNG) has official STGs and a Medical and Dental Catalogue (MDC) which serves as a national EML for use at different levels of health facilities. This study evaluated consistency between the PNG Adult STGs (2003 and 2012) and those for children (2005 and 2011) with respect to the MDCs (2002, 2012) for six chronic and/or acute diseases: asthma, arthritis, diabetes, hypertension, pneumonia and psychosis. Additionally, the potential impact of prescriber level restrictions on rational medicines use for patient's living in rural areas, where no medical officer is present, was evaluated. Almost all drugs included in the STGs for each disease state evaluated were listed in the MDCs. However, significant discrepancies occurred between the recommended treatments in the STGs with the range of related medicines listed in the MDCs. Many medicines recommended in the STGs for chronic diseases had prescriber level restrictions hindering access for most of the PNG population who live in rural and remote areas. In addition many more medicines were listed in the MDCs which are commonly used to treat arthritis, high blood pressure and psychosis than were recommended in the STGs contributing to inappropriate prescribing. We recommend the public health and rational use of medicines deficiencies associated with these findings are addressed requiring: reviewing prescriber level restrictions; updating the STGs; aligning the MDC to reflect recommendations in the STGs; establishing the process where the MDC would automatically be updated based on any changes made to the STGs; and developing STGs for higher levels of care.

  18. How is leflunomide prescribed and used in Australia? Analysis of prescribing and adverse effect reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vivien; Tett, Susan E

    2006-07-01

    To evaluate the use of leflunomide in the Australian community since introduction in 2000. Trends in adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting were also studied. Annual Australian prescription and dispensing statistics were analysed. Drug utilisation was estimated as defined daily doses (DDD)/1000 inhabitants/day. ADR data from the Therapeutic Goods Administration's Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee (ADRAC) national monitoring system were compared with the World Health Organisation (WHO) Vigibase records. Leflunomide use in Australia (dispensing data) increased from 0.2 in 2000 to 0.4 DDD/1000 inhabitants/day in 2002. The same overall pattern was observed in the 'authority to prescribe' data. From 2000-2002, prescribing of the starter pack (3 x 100 mg loading dose plus 30 x 20 mg tablets) declined (down 74%); likewise for the 20 mg (30 tablets) pack. Gradual increases were noted for the 10 mg (30 tablets) pack (up 40%). Approximately 135 reports, detailing about 370 individual ADR, were generated annually. Gastro-intestinal disorders predominated, accounting for 24% of reactions reported to ADRAC. Skin and appendages disorders constituted 14% of reported reactions. Deaths in leflunomide users were attributed to a combination of haematological and gastro-intestinal complications, but it was not possible to ascertain other medication usage or contributing factors. Trends observed with the ADRAC reports were consistent with the WHO database. Leflunomide was the first registered DMARD in Australia in over a decade and its use has increased within the community. The ADR reports might have contributed to Australian rheumatologists gradually abandoning loading patients with high doses of leflunomide in favour of starting therapy at lower doses. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Analysis for commonly prescribed non-sedating antihistamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. El-Kommos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive review with 185 references for the analysis of commonly prescribed members of an important class of drugs, non-sedating antihistamines (NSAs, is presented. The review covers most of the methods described for the analysis of cetirizine (CTZ, ebastine (EBS, fexofenadine (FXD, ketotifen (KET and loratadine (LOR in pure forms, in different pharmaceutical dosage forms and in biological fluids. The review covers the period from 1991 till now.

  20. STUDY OF PRESCRIBING PATTERNS OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS IN THE PAEDIATRIC WARDS AT TERTIARY TEACHING CARE HOSPITAL, GUJARAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Prajapati* and J.D. Bhatt

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prescription of drugs, which needs to be continuously assessed and refined according to disease progression. It not only reflects the physician’s knowledge about drugs but also his/her skill in diagnose and attitude towards selecting the most appropriate cost-effective treatment. Antimicrobials are among the most commonly prescribed drugs in hospital. As per literature, they account for over 50% of total value of drugs sold in our country. Such studies have been sparse from Gujarat and hence, this study was undertaken.Methods: Retrospective study was carried out by collecting 350 prescriptions containing antimicrobial agents in paediatric department at Sir Sayajirao General (SSG Hospital, Vadodara to assess the prescribing patterns of antimicrobial agents. All information about the drugs details recorded in pre-tested Proforma that was finalized by our Pharmacology department. Results: Total 350 prescriptions containing 690 antimicrobial drugs were prescribed in patients during study. Of them aminoglycosides (233; 33.77% was frequently prescribed followed by β-lactam group (191; 27.68 and cephalosporins (176; 25.5%. Average numbers of antimicrobials per prescription was 1.97.Out of 690 antimicrobial prescribed, 576(83.48% were prescribed by generic name, while 114(16.52% were prescribed by trade name. Total numbers of antimicrobial prescribed by parenteral route were 599 (86.81%, while only 91(13.18% antimicrobial agents were prescribed by oral route. Out of 350 prescriptions two or more than two antimicrobial agents were prescribed in 249(71.14% prescriptions, while 101(28.85% prescriptions constitute one antimicrobial agent. Conclusion: Results indicates need for improving the prescribing pattern of drugs and minimizing the use of antimicrobial agents. It is suggested that further detail analysis to judge the rationality of the therapy is necessary.

  1. International rigid contact lens prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efron, Nathan; Morgan, Philip B; Helland, Magne; Itoi, Motozumi; Jones, Deborah; Nichols, Jason J; van der Worp, Eef; Woods, Craig A

    2010-06-01

    Rigid lenses have been fitted less since the introduction of soft lenses nearly 40 years ago. Data that we have gathered from annual contact lens fitting surveys conducted in Australia, Canada, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, the UK and the USA between 2000 and 2008 facilitate an accurate characterization of the pattern of the decline of rigid lens fitting during the first decade of this century. There is a trend for rigid lenses to be utilized primarily for refitting those patients who are already successful rigid lens wearers-most typically older females being refit with higher Dk materials. Rigid lenses are generally fitted on a full-time basis (four or more days of wear per week) without a planned replacement schedule. Orthokeratology is especially popular in the Netherlands, but is seldom prescribed in the other countries surveyed.

  2. Quantum measurements with prescribed symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzda, Wojciech; Goyeneche, Dardo; Życzkowski, Karol

    2017-08-01

    We introduce a method to determine whether a given generalized quantum measurement is isolated or if it belongs to a family of measurements having the same prescribed symmetry. The technique proposed reduces to solving a linear system of equations in some relevant cases. As a consequence, we provide a simple derivation of the maximal family of symmetric informationally complete positive operator-valued measure SIC-POVM in dimension 3. Furthermore, we show that the following remarkable geometrical structures are isolated, so that free parameters cannot be introduced: (a) maximal sets of mutually unbiased bases in prime power dimensions from 4 to 16, (b) SIC-POVM in dimensions from 4 to 16, and (c) contextual Kochen-Specker sets in dimension 3, 4, and 6, composed of 13, 18, and 21 vectors, respectively.

  3. Association of Industry Payments to Physicians With the Prescribing of Brand-name Statins in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, James S; Franklin, Jessica M; Avorn, Jerry; Landon, Joan; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2016-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industry payments to physicians may affect prescribing practices and increase costs if more expensive medications are prescribed. Determine the association between industry payments to physicians and the prescribing of brand-name as compared with generic statins for lowering cholesterol. Cross-sectional linkage of the Part D Medicare prescriptions claims data with the Massachusetts physicians payment database including all licensed Massachusetts physicians who wrote prescriptions for statins paid for under the Medicare drug benefit in 2011. The exposure variable was a physician's industry payments as listed in the Massachusetts database. The outcome was the physician's rate of prescribing brand-name statins. We used linear regression to analyze the association between the intensity of physicians' industry relationships (as measured by total payments) and their prescribing practices, as well as the effects of specific types of payments. Among the 2444 Massachusetts physicians in the Medicare prescribing database in 2011, 899 (36.8%) received industry payments. The most frequent payment was for company-sponsored meals (n = 639 [71.1%]). Statins accounted for 1 559 003 prescription claims; 356 807 (22.8%) were for brand-name drugs. For physicians with no industry payments listed, the median brand-name statin prescribing rate was 17.8% (95% CI, 17.2%-18.4%). For every $1000 in total payments received, the brand-name statin prescribing rate increased by 0.1% (95% CI, 0.06%-0.13%; P associated with a 4.8% increase in the rate of brand-name prescribing (P = .004); other forms of payments were not. Industry payments to physicians are associated with higher rates of prescribing brand-name statins. As the United States seeks to rein in the costs of prescription drugs and make them less expensive for patients, our findings are concerning.

  4. Different patterns of inappropriate antimicrobial use in surgical and medical units at a tertiary care hospital in Switzerland: a prevalence survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia Cusini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Unnecessary or inappropriate use of antimicrobials is associated with the emergence of antimicrobial resistance, drug toxicity, increased morbidity and health care costs. Antimicrobial use has been reported to be incorrect or not indicated in 9-64% of inpatients. We studied the quality of antimicrobial therapy and prophylaxis in hospitalized patients at a tertiary care hospital to plan interventions to improve the quality of antimicrobial prescription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Experienced infectious diseases (ID fellows performed audits of antimicrobial use at regular intervals among all patients--with or without antimicrobials--hospitalized in predefined surgical, medical, haemato-oncological, or intensive care units. Data were collected from medical and nursing patient charts with a standardized questionnaire. Appropriateness of antimicrobial use was evaluated using a modified algorithm developed by Gyssens et al.; the assessment was double-checked by a senior ID specialist. We evaluated 1577 patients of whom 700 (44.4% had antimicrobials, receiving a total of 1270 prescriptions. 958 (75.4% prescriptions were for therapy and 312 (24.6% for prophylaxis. 37.0% of therapeutic and 16.6% of prophylactic prescriptions were found to be inappropriate. Most frequent characteristics of inappropriate treatments included: No indication (17.5%; incorrect choice of antimicrobials (7.6%; incorrect application of drugs (9.3%; and divergence from institutional guidelines (8%. Characteristics of inappropriate prophylaxes were: No indication (9%; incorrect choice of antimicrobials (1%; duration too long or other inappropriate use (6.7%. Patterns of inappropriate antimicrobial varied widely in the different hospital units; empirical prescriptions were more frequently incorrect than prescriptions based on available microbiological results. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Audits of individual patient care provide important data to identify local

  5. Benzodiazepine prescribing behaviour and attitudes: a survey among general practitioners practicing in northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Critchley Julia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over-prescribing of benzodiazepines appears common in many countries, a better understanding of prescribing practices and attitudes may help develop strategies to reduce prescribing. This study aimed to evaluate benzodiazepine prescribing behaviour and attitudes in general practitioners practising in Chiang Mai and Lampoon, Thailand. Methods Questionnaire survey of general practitioners in community hospitals, to estimate: i use of benzodiazepines for anxiety/insomnia, panic disorder, depression, essential hypertension, and uncomplicated low back pain and ii views on the optimal duration of benzodiazepine use. Results Fifty-five of 100 general practitioners returned the completed questionnaires. They reported use of benzodiazepines for anxiety/insomnia (n = 51, 93%, panic disorder (n = 43, 78%, depression (n = 26, 43%, essential hypertension (n = 15, 27 % and uncomplicated low back pain (n = 10, 18%. Twenty-eight general practitioners would prescribe benzodiazepines for non-psychiatric conditions, 17 for use as muscle relaxants. Seventy-five per cent, 62% and 29% of the general practitioners agreed or totally agreed with the use of benzodiazepines for insomnia, anxiety and depression, respectively. Practitioners agreed that prescribing should be less than one week (80%; or from 1 week to 1 month (47%; or 1 to 4 months (16%; or 4 to 6 months (5% or more than 6 months (2%. Twenty-five general practitioners (45% accepted that they used benzodiazepines excessively in the past year. Conclusion A considerable proportion of general practitioners in Chiang Mai and Lampoon, Thailand inappropriately use benzodiazepines for physical illnesses, especially essential hypertension and uncomplicated low back pain. However, almost half of them thought that they overused benzodiazepines. General practitioner's lack of time, knowledge and skills should be taken into account in improving prescribing behaviour and attitudes.

  6. Knowledge of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic prescription practices among prescribers in the Brong Ahafo Region of Ghana; a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asante, Kwaku Poku; Boamah, Ellen Abrafi; Abdulai, Martha Ali; Buabeng, Kwame Ohene; Mahama, Emmanuel; Dzabeng, Francis; Gavor, Edith; Annan, Edith Andrews; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Gyansa-Lutterodt, Martha

    2017-06-20

    Antibiotic resistance (ABR) has become a major public health challenge in most parts of the world including Ghana and is a major threat to gain in bacterial disease control. The role of prescribers in the control of antibiotics is identified as crucial in developing interventions to control ABR. To guide policy recommendations on ABR, a study was carried out among prescribers to identify gaps in their knowledge of ABR and to document their prescription practices. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among prescribers from both public and private facilities in the Brong Ahafo Region of Ghana using both quantitative and qualitative methods in 2014. Three hundred and seventy nine prescribers participated in the quantitative study and a subset of 33 participated in in-depth interviews. Majority (50.0%) of the prescribers interviewed were nurses. Most (51.0%) of the prescribers were located in hospitals. Knowledge of ABR was high among all the prescribers. About 80.0% percent of all prescribers agreed that the antibiotics that are currently used could lose its efficacy in future. There is no singular formal source of information on antibiotic resistance. The prescribers held a strong perception that antibiotic resistance is imminent though their knowledge on various resistant bacterial strains was limited. Prescribers attributed ABR burden to factors such as poor prescription practices and limited ABR control measures. The prescription practices of the prescribers vary but were mostly inappropriate among the lower cadre. The knowledge of ABR is high among prescribers. There is however a gap in the knowledge and perception of optimal antibiotic prescription practices among prescribers. There is the need for a formal source of information on ABR to support prescriber's antibiotic prescription practices.

  7. Sources of information used when prescribing for children, a survey of hospital based pediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukattash, Tareq L; Nuseir, Khawla Q; Jarab, Anan S; Alzoubi, Karem H; Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Shara, Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of properly tested medicines for children, there is little available information with regards to indications and dosing of medications in children. To collect data on sources where hospital based pediatricians obtain prescribing information when treating children and the extent of collaboration with the hospital pharmacist. Two hundred and fifty pediatricians in different hospitals within different cities in Jordan were asked to fill in a structured questionnaire regarding information sources used when prescribing for children. Questionnaires were collected from 162 (64.8%) hospital based pediatricians, who have completed the questionnaire by the designated date. Most (75.5%) reported that the Lexi Comp's Drug Information Handbook was the source that they most frequently used for drug information when prescribing for in children. The BNF and the BNFc (British National Formulary for children) were found to be the most sources that contain sufficient information that aids pediatricians when prescribing for children. A minority (22%) claimed to consult with the hospital pharmacist when they face difficulties when prescribing for children. Pediatricians rely on different information sources when they prescribe for children. Those sources vary in their reliability in aiding pediatrician when prescribing. Further work should be done in the provision of useful information on pediatric drug therapy to pediatricians. More steps should be taking place to activate collaboration and interaction between pediatricians and pharmacists as well.

  8. BAP Position Statement: Off-label prescribing of psychotropic medication to children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aditya N; Arango, Celso; Coghill, David; Gringras, Paul; Nutt, David J; Pratt, Peter; Young, Allan H; Hollis, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The off-label use of medicines for children and adolescents remains a common and important issue for prescribing practice across child and adolescent psychiatry, paediatrics and primary care. This editorial focusses on psychotropic drug treatment, which plays an essential part in the comprehensive management of a range of child and adolescent psychiatric disorders. Despite a growing evidence base for drug treatment in child and adolescent psychiatric disorders, much psychotropic medication continues to be prescribed off-label (i.e. outside the limits of the marketing authorisation or product license). The reasons for and implications of off-label prescribing, including the potential clinical benefits/risks and medico-legal implications, are often poorly understood by both patients and prescribers. An important unintended consequence of the uncertainties and confusion surrounding the status of off-label prescribing for children and adolescents may be that effective drug treatments are being withheld or underused. This BAP Position Statement aims to clarify these issues, challenge some of the myths surrounding off-label prescribing for children and adolescents and offer practical guidance for prescribers.

  9. Incidences of new prescribing by British child and adolescent psychiatrists: a prospective study over 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew F

    2004-03-01

    Little is known about the epidemiology of pharmacotherapy in the treatment of child psychiatric disorder. This study reports on the systematic prospective collection of instances of new prescribing by child and adolescent mental health services serving a population of approximately four million people in North West England. Diagnostic and demographic information regarding new prescribing by child and adolescent mental health services within Greater Manchester and Lancashire was systematically collected prospectively over two 6-month periods between 2000 and 2002. Within the 12 months studied, there were 845 instances of a drug being newly prescribed to a child or adolescent in the treatment of a psychiatric disorder. In total, 48 different drugs were prescribed for 25 different diagnoses. The eight most commonly prescribed drugs were methylphenidate, methylphenidate/placebo trial, paroxetine, fluoxetine, risperidone, imipramine, dexamphetamine and melatonin, accounting for 73% of all prescribing. There was marked variation between services in the amount of prescribing with significant correlation between prescription of stimulants and prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants. Prescription of medications in the treatment of child psychiatric disorder has become a significant part of child and adolescent mental health practice. However, the evidence base underpinning this usage remains limited, and further high quality therapeutic clinical trials are urgently needed.

  10. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion associated with desvenlafaxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Ellise D; Alderman, Christopher P

    2014-04-01

    To report a case of syndrome of inappropriate anti-diuretic hormone (SIADH) secretion associated with desvenlafaxine. A 57-year old female with hyponatraemia. Her medications included desvenlafaxine, and symptoms included nausea, anxiety and confusion. The serum sodium at this time was 120 mmol/L, serum osmolality was 263 mosmol/kg, urine osmolality 410 mosmol/kg and urine sodium 63 mmol/L, consistent with a diagnosis of SIADH. Desvenlafaxine was ceased and fluid restriction implemented. After 4 days the sodium increased to 128 mmol/L and fluid restriction was relaxed. During her further 3 weeks inpatient admission the serum sodium ranged from 134 to 137 mmol/L during treatment with mirtazapine. SIADH has been widely reported with a range of antidepressants. This case report suggests that desvenlafaxine might cause clinically significant hyponatremia. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for antidepressants to cause hyponatremia,and take appropriate corrective action where necessary.

  11. Inappropriate sexual behaviour and dementia: an exploration of staff experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Laura E; Robertson, Noelle; Knight, Caroline

    2013-07-01

    Research assessing the impact of inappropriate sexual behaviour (ISB) on staff working in dementia care is circumscribed, yet studies from comparable settings indicate that ISB appears uniquely challenging, particularly to personal and cultural values. This study explored staff experiences of ISB exhibited by older adults with a dementia. Fourteen staff working within an in-patient setting were interviewed. Participants' experiences of ISB appeared underpinned by complex social and psychological processes. Shock, embarrassment and incomprehension were prominent when ISB was initially encountered. Knowledge of dementia, familiarity with patients and social norms were important in contextualising ISB and staff often minimised its impact by construing a lack of capacity. Feelings about ISB appeared equivocal and findings suggest that the effect of ISB should be routinely considered in preparing staff who work within dementia care.

  12. Hepatitis B viral breakthrough associated with inappropriate preservation of entecavir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabay, Oguz; Tuna, Nazan; Yahyaoglu, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    If virologic breakthrough is observed during chronic hepatitis B treatment, drug resistance or compliance problem should be considered. But in some cases, breakthrough depends on drug preservation conditions. We report the case of a 30-years-old man, who experienced viral breakthrough due to wrong preservation conditions of the drug. PMID:22345891

  13. Hepatitis B viral breakthrough associated with inappropriate preservation of entecavir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguz Karabay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available If virologic breakthrough is observed during chronic hepatitis B treatment, drug resistance or compliance problem should be considered. But in some cases, breakthrough depends on drug preservation conditions. We report the case of a 30-y